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Sample records for neurochemical profile quantification

  1. 1H NMR spectroscopy of rat brain in vivo at 14.1 Tesla: Improvements in quantification of the neurochemical profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynárik, Vladimír; Cudalbu, Cristina; Xin, Lijing; Gruetter, Rolf

    2008-10-01

    Ultra-short echo-time proton single voxel spectra of rat brain were obtained on a 14.1 T 26 cm horizontal bore system. At this field, the fitted linewidth in the brain tissue of adult rats was about 11 Hz. New, separated resonances ascribed to phosphocholine, glycerophosphocholine and N-acetylaspartate were detected for the first time in vivo in the spectral range of 4.2-4.4 ppm. Moreover, improved separation of the resonances of lactate, alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, glutamate and glutathione was observed. Metabolite concentrations were estimated by fitting in vivo spectra to a linear combination of simulated spectra of individual metabolites and a measured spectrum of macromolecules (LCModel). The calculated concentrations of metabolites were generally in excellent agreement with those obtained at 9.4 T. These initial results further indicated that increasing magnetic field strength to 14.1 T enhanced spectral resolution in 1H NMR spectroscopy. This implies that the quantification of the neurochemical profile in rodent brain can be achieved with improved accuracy and precision.

  2. Reproducibility of Neurochemical Profile Quantification in Pregenual Cingulate, Anterior Midcingulate, and Bilateral Posterior Insular Subdivisions Measured at 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    de Matos, Nuno M. P.; Meier, Lukas; Wyss, Michael; Meier, Dieter; Gutzeit, Andreas; Ettlin, Dominik A.; Brügger, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The current report assessed measurement reproducibility of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 Tesla in the left and right posterior insular, pregenual anterior cingulate, and anterior midcingulate cortices. Ten healthy male volunteers aged 21–30 years were tested at four different days, of which nine were included in the data analysis. Intra- and inter-subject variability of myo-inositol, creatine, glutamate, total-choline, total-N-acetylaspartate, and combined glutamine–glutamate were calculated considering the influence of movement parameters, age, daytime of measurements, and tissue composition. Overall mean intra-/inter-subject variability for all neurochemicals combined revealed small mean coefficients of variation across the four regions: 5.3/9.05% in anterior midcingulate, 6.6/8.84% in pregenual anterior cingulate, 7.3/10.00% in left posterior and 8.2/10.55% in right posterior insula. Head movement, tissue composition and day time revealed no significant explanatory variance contribution suggesting a negligible influence on the data. A strong correlation between Cramer–Rao Lower Bounds (a measure of fitting errors) and the mean intra-subject coefficients of variation (r = 0.799, p < 0.001) outlined the importance of low fitting errors in order to obtain robust and finally meaningful measurements. The present findings confirm proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a reliable tool to measure brain neurochemistry in small subregions of the human brain. PMID:27445745

  3. Reproducibility of Neurochemical Profile Quantification in Pregenual Cingulate, Anterior Midcingulate, and Bilateral Posterior Insular Subdivisions Measured at 3 Tesla.

    PubMed

    de Matos, Nuno M P; Meier, Lukas; Wyss, Michael; Meier, Dieter; Gutzeit, Andreas; Ettlin, Dominik A; Brügger, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The current report assessed measurement reproducibility of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 3 Tesla in the left and right posterior insular, pregenual anterior cingulate, and anterior midcingulate cortices. Ten healthy male volunteers aged 21-30 years were tested at four different days, of which nine were included in the data analysis. Intra- and inter-subject variability of myo-inositol, creatine, glutamate, total-choline, total-N-acetylaspartate, and combined glutamine-glutamate were calculated considering the influence of movement parameters, age, daytime of measurements, and tissue composition. Overall mean intra-/inter-subject variability for all neurochemicals combined revealed small mean coefficients of variation across the four regions: 5.3/9.05% in anterior midcingulate, 6.6/8.84% in pregenual anterior cingulate, 7.3/10.00% in left posterior and 8.2/10.55% in right posterior insula. Head movement, tissue composition and day time revealed no significant explanatory variance contribution suggesting a negligible influence on the data. A strong correlation between Cramer-Rao Lower Bounds (a measure of fitting errors) and the mean intra-subject coefficients of variation (r = 0.799, p < 0.001) outlined the importance of low fitting errors in order to obtain robust and finally meaningful measurements. The present findings confirm proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a reliable tool to measure brain neurochemistry in small subregions of the human brain. PMID:27445745

  4. Toward an in Vivo Neurochemical Profile: Quantification of 18 Metabolites in Short-Echo-Time 1H NMR Spectra of the Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeuffer, Josef; Tkáč , Ivan; Provencher, Stephen W.; Gruetter, Rolf

    1999-11-01

    Localized in vivo1H NMR spectroscopy was performed with 2-ms echo time in the rat brain at 9.4 T. Frequency domain analysis with LCModel showed that the in vivo spectra can be explained by 18 metabolite model solution spectra and a highly structured background, which was attributed to resonances with fivefold shorter in vivo T1 than metabolites. The high spectral resolution (full width at half maximum approximately 0.025 ppm) and sensitivity (signal-to-noise ratio approximately 45 from a 63-μL volume, 512 scans) was used for the simultaneous measurement of the concentrations of metabolites previously difficult to quantify in 1H spectra. The strongly represented signals of N-acetylaspartate, glutamate, taurine, myo-inositol, creatine, phosphocreatine, glutamine, and lactate were quantified with Cramér-Rao lower bounds below 4%. Choline groups, phosphorylethanolamine, glucose, glutathione, γ-aminobutyric acid, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, and alanine were below 13%, whereas aspartate and scyllo-inositol were below 22%. Intra-assay variation was assessed from a time series of 3-min spectra, and the coefficient of variation was similar to the calculated Cramér-Rao lower bounds. Interassay variation was determined from 31 pooled spectra, and the coefficient of variation for total creatine was 7%. Tissue concentrations were found to be in very good agreement with neurochemical data from the literature.

  5. Light-Induced Alterations in Striatal Neurochemical Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Much of our present knowledge regarding circadian rhythms and biological activity during space flight has been derived from those missions orbiting the Earth. During space missions, astronauts can become exposed to bright/dark cycles that vary considerably from those that entrain the mammalian biological timing system to the 24-hour cycle found on Earth. As a spacecraft orbits the Earth, the duration of the light/dark period experienced becomes a function of the time it takes to circumnavigate the planet which in turn depends upon the altitude of the craft. Orbiting the Earth at an altitude of 200-800 km provides a light/dark cycle lasting between 80 and 140 minutes, whereas a voyage to the moon or even another planet would provide a light condition of constant light. Currently, little is known regarding the effects of altered light/dark cycles on neurochemical levels within the central nervous system (CNS). Many biochemical, physiological and behavioral phenomena are under circadian control, governed primarily by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. As such, these phenomena are subject to influence by the environmental light/dark cycle. Circadian variations in locomotor and behavioral activities have been correlated to both the environmental light/dark cycle and to dopamine (DA) levels within the CNS. It has been postulated by Martin-Iverson et al. that DA's role in the control of motor activity is subject to modulation by circadian rhythms (CR), environmental lighting and excitatory amino acids (EAAs). In addition, DA and EAA receptor regulated pathways are involved in both the photic entrainment of CR and the control of motor activity. The cellular mechanisms by which DA and EAA-receptor ligands execute these functions, is still unclear. In order to help elucidate these mechanisms, we set out to determine the effects of altered environmental light/dark cycles on CNS neurotransmitter levels. In this study, we focused on the striatum, a region of the brain

  6. Multi-center reproducibility of neurochemical profiles in the human brain at 7 T.

    PubMed

    van de Bank, B L; Emir, U E; Boer, V O; van Asten, J J A; Maas, M C; Wijnen, J P; Kan, H E; Oz, G; Klomp, D W J; Scheenen, T W J

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to harmonize data acquisition and post-processing of single voxel proton MRS ((1) H-MRS) at 7 T, and to determine metabolite concentrations and the accuracy and reproducibility of metabolite levels in the adult human brain. This study was performed in compliance with local institutional human ethics committees. The same seven subjects were each examined twice using four different 7 T MR systems from two different vendors using an identical semi-localization by adiabatic selective refocusing spectroscopy sequence. Neurochemical profiles were obtained from the posterior cingulate cortex (gray matter, GM) and the corona radiata (white matter, WM). Spectra were analyzed with LCModel, and sources of variation in concentrations ('subject', 'institute' and 'random') were identified with a variance component analysis. Concentrations of 10-11 metabolites, which were corrected for T1 , T2 , magnetization transfer effects and partial volume effects, were obtained with mean Cramér-Rao lower bounds below 20%. Data variances and mean concentrations in GM and WM were comparable for all institutions. The primary source of variance for glutamate, myo-inositol, scyllo-inositol, total creatine and total choline was between subjects. Variance sources for all other metabolites were associated with within-subject and system noise, except for total N-acetylaspartate, glutamine and glutathione, which were related to differences in signal-to-noise ratio and in shimming performance between vendors. After multi-center harmonization of acquisition and post-processing protocols, metabolite concentrations and the sizes and sources of their variations were established for neurochemical profiles in the healthy brain at 7 T, which can be used as guidance in future studies quantifying metabolite and neurotransmitter concentrations with (1) H-MRS at ultra-high magnetic field. PMID:25581510

  7. Neurochemical profile of the human cervical spinal cord determined by MRS.

    PubMed

    Hock, Andreas; Wilm, Bertram; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Franckenberg, Sabine; Zoelch, Niklaus; Wyss, Patrik Oliver; De Zanche, Nicola; Nordmeyer-Maßner, Jurek; Kraemer, Thomas; Thali, Michael; Ernst, Matthias; Kollias, Spyros; Henning, Anke

    2016-10-01

    MRS enables insight into the chemical composition of central nervous system tissue. However, technical challenges degrade the data quality when applied to the human spinal cord. Therefore, to date detection of only the most prominent metabolite resonances has been reported in the healthy human spinal cord. The aim of this investigation is to provide an extended metabolic profile including neurotransmitters and antioxidants in addition to metabolites involved in the energy and membrane metabolism of the human cervical spinal cord in vivo. To achieve this, data quality was improved by using a custom-made, cervical detector array together with constructive averaging of a high number of echo signals, which is enabled by the metabolite cycling technique at 3T. In addition, the improved spinal cord spectra were extensively cross-validated, in vivo, post-mortem in situ and ex vivo. Reliable identification of up to nine metabolites was achieved in group analyses for the first time. Distinct features of the spinal cord neurochemical profile, in comparison with the brain neurotransmission system, include decreased concentrations of the sum of glutamate and glutamate and increased concentrations of aspartate, γ-amino-butyric acid, scyllo-inositol and the sum of myo-inositol and glycine. PMID:27580498

  8. Single-voxel (1)H spectroscopy in the human hippocampus at 3 T using the LASER sequence: characterization of neurochemical profile and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Allaïli, Najib; Valabrègue, Romain; Auerbach, Edward J; Guillemot, Vincent; Yahia-Cherif, Lydia; Bardinet, Eric; Jabourian, Maritza; Fossati, Philippe; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Marjańska, Małgorzata

    2015-10-01

    The hippocampus is crucial for long-term episodic memory and learning. It undergoes structural change in aging and is sensitive to neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. MRS studies have seldom been performed in the hippocampus due to technical challenges. The reproducibility of MRS in the hippocampus has not been evaluated at 3 T. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the concentration of metabolites in a small voxel placed in the hippocampus and evaluate the reproducibility of the quantification. Spectra were measured in a 2.4 mL voxel placed in the left hippocampus covering the body and most of the tail of the structure in 10 healthy subjects across three different sessions and quantified using LCModel. High-quality spectra were obtained, which allowed a reliable quantification of 10 metabolites including glutamate and glutamine. Reproducibility of MRS was evaluated with coefficient of variation, standard errors of measurement, and intraclass correlation coefficients. All of these measures showed improvement with increased number of averages. Changes of less than 5% in concentration of N-acetylaspartate, choline-containing compounds, and total creatine and of less than 10% in concentration of myo-inositol and the sum of glutamate and glutamine can be confidently detected between two measurements in a group of 20 subjects. A reliable and reproducible neurochemical profile of the human hippocampus was obtained using MRS at 3 T in a small hippocampal volume. PMID:26282328

  9. Pharmacological, neurochemical, and behavioral profile of JB-788, a new 5-HT1A agonist.

    PubMed

    Picard, M; Morisset, S; Cloix, J F; Bizot, J C; Guerin, M; Beneteau, V; Guillaumet, G; Hevor, T K

    2010-09-01

    A novel pyridine derivative, 8-{4-[(6-methoxy-2,3-dihydro-[1,4]dioxino[2,3-b]pyridine-3-ylmethyl)-amino]-butyl}-8-aza-spiro[4.5]decane-7,9-dione hydrochloride, termed JB-788, was designed to selectively target 5-HT(1A) receptors. In the present study, the pharmacological profile of JB-788 was characterized in vitro using radioligands binding tests and in vivo using neurochemical and behavioural experiments. JB-788 bound tightly to human 5-HT(1A) receptor expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells with a K(i) value of 0.8 nM. Its binding affinity is in the same range as that observed for the (+/-)8-OH-DPAT, a reference 5HT(1A) agonist compound. Notably, JB-788 only bound weakly to 5-HT(1B) or 5-HT(2A) receptors and moreover the drug displayed only weak or indetectable binding to muscarinic, alpha(2), beta(1) and beta(2) adrenergic receptors, or dopaminergic D(1) receptors. JB-788 was found to display substantial binding affinity for dopaminergic D(2) receptors and, to a lesser extend to alpha(1) adrenoreceptors. JB-788 dose-dependently decreased forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation in HEK cells expressing human 5-HT(1A), thus acting as a potent 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist (E(max.) 75%, EC(50) 3.5 nM). JB-788 did not exhibit any D(2) receptor agonism but progressively inhibited the effects of quinpirole, a D(2) receptor agonist, in the cAMP accumulation test with a K(i) value of 250 nM. JB-788 induced a weak change in cAMP levels in mouse brain but, like some antipsychotics, transiently increased glycogen contents in various brain regions. Behavioral effects were investigated in mice using the elevated plus-maze. JB-788 was found to increase the time duration spent by animals in anxiogenic situations. Locomotor hyperactivity induced by methamphetamine in mouse, a model of antipsychotic activity, was dose-dependently inhibited by JB-788. Altogether, these results suggest that JB-788 displays pharmacological properties, which could be of interest in the area

  10. Behavioral and neurochemical profile of m-CPP following exposure to single restraint stress in rat.

    PubMed

    Samad, Noreen; Haleem, Darakhshan J

    2009-03-01

    The present study was designed to monitor the responsiveness of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin)-2C receptors following the exposure to restraint stress in rats. Rats were restrained for 2 hours. 24-h after the termination of the restraint period, 1-(m-Chlorophenyl)piperazine (m-CPP; a 5-HT-2C agonist) at the doses of 1.5 mg/kg or 3.0 mg/kg and saline (1 ml/kg), was injected to unrestrained and restrained animals. Hypolocomotive effects (home cage activity, open field activity and motor coordination) and anxiogenic-like effects (light-dark activity and plus maze activity) were successively monitored in each animal after the drug or saline administration. Rats were decapitated 1-h post-injection to collect brain samples for neurochemical estimation by HPLC-EC. Our results show that differences in the hypolocomotive and anxiogenic-like effects of m-CPP between restrained and unrestrained animals could not be demonstrated in the present experimental paradigm. This was due to the fact that the behavioral effects were already marked after restraint leaving little room for an additional m-CPP effect. The effects of m-CPP on increasing 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) and decreasing dihydroxy phenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) levels were more pronounced (p < 0.01) in restrained than unrestrained animals. The results suggest that behavioral responses to m-CPP and stress are similar The attenuation of m-CPP changes in 5-HIAA and DOPAC levels may be due to a decreased responsiveness of 5-HT-2C receptors in restrained animals. PMID:19402569

  11. Escalating dose methamphetamine pretreatment alters the behavioral and neurochemical profiles associated with exposure to a high-dose methamphetamine binge.

    PubMed

    Segal, David S; Kuczenski, Ronald; O'Neil, Meghan L; Melega, William P; Cho, Arthur K

    2003-10-01

    The neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine (METH) have been characterized primarily from the study of high-dose binge regimens in rodents. However, this drug administration paradigm does not include a potentially important feature of stimulant abuse in humans, that is, the gradual escalation of stimulant doses that frequently occurs prior to high-dose exposure. We have argued that pretreatment with escalating doses (EDs) might significantly alter the neurotoxic profile produced by a single high-dose binge. In the present study, we tested this hypothesis by pretreating rats with saline or gradually increasing doses of METH (0.1-4.0 mg/kg over 14 days), prior to an acute METH binge (4 x 6 mg/kg at 2 h intervals). These animals, whose behavior was continuously monitored throughout drug treatment, were then killed 3 days later for determination of caudate-putamen dopamine (DA) content, levels of [(3)H]WIN 35,428 binding to the DA transporter, and levels of [(3)H]dihydrotetrabenazine ([(3)H]DTBZ) binding to the vesicular monoamine transporter. ED pretreatment markedly attenuated the stereotypy response, as well as the hyperthermia and indices of sympathetic activation associated with the acute binge. In addition, ED pretreatment prevented the decline in [(3)H]WIN 35,428 binding, and significantly diminished the decrease in DA levels, but did not affect the decrease in [(3)H]DTBZ binding associated with the acute binge. We suggest that further study of the effects produced by a regimen which includes a gradual escalation of doses prior to high-dose METH binge exposure could more accurately identify the neurochemical and behavioral changes relevant to those that occur as a consequence of high-dose METH abuse in humans.

  12. Estrous cycle affects the neurochemical and neurobehavioral profile of carvacrol-treated female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Trabace, L.; Zotti, M.; Morgese, M.G.; Tucci, P.; Colaianna, M.; Schiavone, S.; Avato, P.; Cuomo, V.

    2011-09-01

    Carvacrol is the major constituent of essential oils from aromatic plants. It showed antimicrobial, anticancer and antioxidant properties. Although it was approved for food use and included in the chemical flavorings list, no indication on its safety has been estimated. Since the use of plant extracts is relatively high among women, aim of this study was to evaluate carvacrol effects on female physiology and endocrine profiles by using female rats in proestrus and diestrus phases. Serotonin and metabolite tissue content in prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens, after carvacrol administration (0.15 and 0.45 g/kg p.o.), was measured. Drug effects in behavioral tests for alterations in motor activity, depression, anxiety-related behaviors and endocrine alterations were also investigated. While in proestrus carvacrol reduced serotonin and metabolite levels in both brain areas, no effects were observed in diestrus phase. Only in proestrus phase, carvacrol induced a depressive-like behavior in forced swimming test, without accompanying changes in ambulation. The improvement of performance in FST after subchronic treatment with fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) suggested a specific involvement of serotonergic system. No differences were found across the groups with regard to self-grooming behavior. Moreover, in proestrus phase, carvacrol reduced only estradiol levels without binding hypothalamic estradiol receptors. Our study showed an estrous-stage specific effect of carvacrol on depressive behaviors and endocrine parameters, involving serotonergic system. Given the wide carvacrol use not only as feed additive, but also as cosmetic essence and herbal remedy, our results suggest that an accurate investigation on the effects of its chronic exposure is warranted. - Highlights: > Carvacrol induced a depressive-like phenotype in rats, depending on ovarian cyclicity. > Carvacrol selectively reduced serotonin content in female rats in proestrus phase. > Carvacrol reduced serotonin levels

  13. Changes in endocrine and neurochemical profiles in neonatal pigs prenatally exposed to increased maternal cortisol.

    PubMed

    Kanitz, Ellen; Otten, Winfried; Tuchscherer, Margret

    2006-10-01

    Early life environmental factors are able to influence prenatal development and may cause structural and functional effects on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and neurotransmitter systems in the offspring. These effects seem to be species specific and may depend on the period of gestation when the factors are effective. Elevated maternal cortisol levels are assumed to play a crucial role as a programming factor during prenatal development. Thus, the present study was performed in order to examine the effects of increased maternal cortisol levels during mid- and late gestation on central and peripheral alterations of the HPA axis and brain neurotransmitter profiles in piglets. Endogenous cortisol release was induced by i.m. administration of ACTH to sows every second day either during mid- (day 49 until 75) or late gestation (day 85 until 107). Controls received injections of saline. ACTH treatment of sows during mid- and late gestation had no effects on the gestation length, the number of total born and the frequency of stillborn piglets. However, ACTH treatment during late gestation caused an increase of birth weight (P < 0.04) and affected the organ:body weight ratios (brain and adrenal) in the offspring. There was an impact of increased maternal cortisol on the HPA axis and on central neurotransmitter systems in the offspring. ACTH treatment during mid gestation caused a significant decrease of plasma corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG; P < 0.03) and an increase of the noradrenergic activity in the locus coeruleus (LC) region (P < 0.02). Elevated maternal cortisol during late gestation also produced a significant decrease of plasma CBG (P < 0.05), but significantly increased the plasma noradrenaline (NA) concentration (P < 0.02) and decreased the serotonergic activity in the LC at both postnatal day 1 (P < 0.016) and day 28 (P < 0.003). Furthermore, there were sex-specific effects of ACTH treatment on plasma CBG, NA and brain monoamine turnover, with

  14. Gene expression profiling of neurochemically-defined regions of the human brain by in situ hybridization-guided laser capture microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, René; Kerman, Ilan A.; Meng, Fan; Evans, Simon J.; Amrein, Irmgard; Jones, Edward G.; Bunney, William E.; Akil, Huda; Watson, Stanley J.; Thompson, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) permits isolation of specific cell types and cell groups based upon morphology, anatomical landmarks and histochemical properties. This powerful technique can be used for region-specific dissection if the target structure is clearly delineated. However, it is difficult to visualize anatomical boundaries in an unstained specimen, while histological staining can complicate the microdissection process and compromise downstream processing and analysis. We now introduce a novel method in which in situ hybridization (ISH) signal is used to guide LCM on adjacent unstained sections to collect tissue from neurochemically-defined regions of the human postmortem brain to minimize sample manipulation prior to analysis. This approach was validated in nuclei that provide monoaminergic inputs to the forebrain, and likely contribute to the pathophysiology of mood disorders. This method was used successfully to carry out gene expression profiling and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) confirmation from the dissected material. When compared to traditional micropunch dissections, our ISH-guided LCM method provided enhanced signal intensity for mRNAs of specific monoaminergic marker genes as measured by genome-wide gene expression microarrays. Enriched expression of specific monoaminergic genes (as determined by microarrays and qPCR) was detected within appropriate anatomical locations validating the accuracy of microdissection. Together these results support the conclusion that ISH-guided LCM permits acquisition of enriched nucleus-specific RNA that can be successfully used for downstream gene expression investigations. Future studies will utilize this approach for gene expression profiling of neurochemically-defined regions of postmortem brains collected from mood disorder patients. PMID:19070632

  15. Neurochemical Profile of Dementia Pugilistica

    PubMed Central

    Kokjohn, Tyler A.; Maarouf, Chera L.; Daugs, Ian D.; Hunter, Jesse M.; Whiteside, Charisse M.; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Rodriguez, Emma; Kalback, Walter; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Dementia pugilistica (DP), a suite of neuropathological and cognitive function declines after chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI), is present in approximately 20% of retired boxers. Epidemiological studies indicate TBI is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD). Some biochemical alterations observed in AD and PD may be recapitulated in DP and other TBI persons. In this report, we investigate long-term biochemical changes in the brains of former boxers with neuropathologically confirmed DP. Our experiments revealed biochemical and cellular alterations in DP that are complementary to and extend information already provided by histological methods. ELISA and one-dimensional and two dimensional Western blot techniques revealed differential expression of select molecules between three patients with DP and three age-matched non-demented control (NDC) persons without a history of TBI. Structural changes such as disturbances in the expression and processing of glial fibrillary acidic protein, tau, and α-synuclein were evident. The levels of the Aβ–degrading enzyme neprilysin were reduced in the patients with DP. Amyloid-β levels were elevated in the DP participant with the concomitant diagnosis of AD. In addition, the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the axonal transport proteins kinesin and dynein were substantially decreased in DP relative to NDC participants. Traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for dementia development, and our findings are consistent with permanent structural and functional damage in the cerebral cortex and white matter of boxers. Understanding the precise threshold of damage needed for the induction of pathology in DP and TBI is vital. PMID:23268705

  16. Quantification of AES depth profiles by the MRI model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovač, Janez; Zalar, Anton; Praček, Borut

    2003-02-01

    The main physical effects that contribute to interface broadening in the sputter depth profiles of polycrystalline metallic multilayer structures were studied by comparison of measured and simulated AES depth profiles. An algorithm based on the so-called mixing-roughness-information depth (MRI) model was used to simulate AES depth profiles of Ni/Cr multilayer structures with different roughnesses of the initial surfaces. The simulated depth profiles were compared with measurements performed at two different depth profiling parameters on the Ni/Cr and Al/Ni/Cr multilayer structures with an initial surface roughness of about 1.0 and 21.5 nm, respectively. The comparison of simulated and measured depth profiles enabled us to separate and estimate different contributions to the interface broadening, as well as their dependence on the sputter depth. We found that roughness was the dominant factor related to depth resolution with respect to the information depth and atomic mixing contribution. The values of roughness introduced into the simulation algorithm coincided well with the values measured by AFM at the initial surface and after depth profiling. The results showed the capability of the simulation procedure based on the MRI model to separate and evaluate different contributions to the depth resolution.

  17. Profiling and Quantification of Phenolics in Stevia rebaudiana Leaves.

    PubMed

    Karaköse, Hande; Müller, Anja; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2015-10-21

    Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) is a plant from the Asteraceae family with significant economic value because of the steviol glycoside sweeteners in its leaves. Chlorogenic acids and flavonoid glycosides of S. rebaudiana from seven different botanical varieties cultivated over two years and harvested three times a year in eight European locations were profiled and quantified in a total of 166 samples. Compounds quantified include chlorogenic acids as well as flavonoid glycosides and aglycons. All phenolic concentration profiles show a perfect Gaussian distribution. Principal component analyses allow distinction between varieties of different geographical origin and distinction between different plant varieties. Although concentrations of all chlorogenic acids showed a positive correlation, no correlation was observed for flavonoid glycosides. Conclusions from these findings with respect to the biosynthesis and functional role of phenolics in S. rebaudiana are discussed. PMID:26333998

  18. Profiling and Quantification of Phenolics in Stevia rebaudiana Leaves.

    PubMed

    Karaköse, Hande; Müller, Anja; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2015-10-21

    Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) is a plant from the Asteraceae family with significant economic value because of the steviol glycoside sweeteners in its leaves. Chlorogenic acids and flavonoid glycosides of S. rebaudiana from seven different botanical varieties cultivated over two years and harvested three times a year in eight European locations were profiled and quantified in a total of 166 samples. Compounds quantified include chlorogenic acids as well as flavonoid glycosides and aglycons. All phenolic concentration profiles show a perfect Gaussian distribution. Principal component analyses allow distinction between varieties of different geographical origin and distinction between different plant varieties. Although concentrations of all chlorogenic acids showed a positive correlation, no correlation was observed for flavonoid glycosides. Conclusions from these findings with respect to the biosynthesis and functional role of phenolics in S. rebaudiana are discussed.

  19. Tract profiles of white matter properties: automating fiber-tract quantification.

    PubMed

    Yeatman, Jason D; Dougherty, Robert F; Myall, Nathaniel J; Wandell, Brian A; Feldman, Heidi M

    2012-01-01

    Tractography based on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) data is a method for identifying the major white matter fascicles (tracts) in the living human brain. The health of these tracts is an important factor underlying many cognitive and neurological disorders. In vivo, tissue properties may vary systematically along each tract for several reasons: different populations of axons enter and exit the tract, and disease can strike at local positions within the tract. Hence quantifying and understanding diffusion measures along each fiber tract (Tract Profile) may reveal new insights into white matter development, function, and disease that are not obvious from mean measures of that tract. We demonstrate several novel findings related to Tract Profiles in the brains of typically developing children and children at risk for white matter injury secondary to preterm birth. First, fractional anisotropy (FA) values vary substantially within a tract but the Tract FA Profile is consistent across subjects. Thus, Tract Profiles contain far more information than mean diffusion measures. Second, developmental changes in FA occur at specific positions within the Tract Profile, rather than along the entire tract. Third, Tract Profiles can be used to compare white matter properties of individual patients to standardized Tract Profiles of a healthy population to elucidate unique features of that patient's clinical condition. Fourth, Tract Profiles can be used to evaluate the association between white matter properties and behavioral outcomes. Specifically, in the preterm group reading ability is positively correlated with FA measured at specific locations on the left arcuate and left superior longitudinal fasciculus and the magnitude of the correlation varies significantly along the Tract Profiles. We introduce open source software for automated fiber-tract quantification (AFQ) that measures Tract Profiles of MRI parameters for 18 white matter tracts. With further validation, AFQ Tract

  20. Unrequited: neurochemical enhancement of love.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Rebecca

    2015-07-01

    I raise several concerns with Earp and colleagues' analysis of enhancement through neurochemical modulation of love as a key issue in contemporary neuroethics. These include: (i) strengthening their deflation of medicalization concerns by showing how the objection that love should be left outside of the scope of medicine would directly undermine the goal of medicine; (ii) developing stronger analysis of the social and political concerns relevant to neurochemical modulation of love, by exploring and suggesting possible counters to ways in which 'wellbeing' may be used as a tool of oppression; (iii) providing reasons to support a broad need for ecological investigation of, and indeed ecological education concerning, neurotechnology; (iv) suggesting ways in which philosophy, and the humanities more broadly, remain directly relevant to responding effectively to issues in contemporary neuroethics.

  1. Cariprazine (RGH-188), a dopamine D(3) receptor-preferring, D(3)/D(2) dopamine receptor antagonist-partial agonist antipsychotic candidate: in vitro and neurochemical profile.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Béla; Horváth, Attila; Némethy, Zsolt; Schmidt, Eva; Laszlovszky, István; Bugovics, Gyula; Fazekas, Károly; Hornok, Katalin; Orosz, Szabolcs; Gyertyán, István; Agai-Csongor, Eva; Domány, György; Tihanyi, Károly; Adham, Nika; Szombathelyi, Zsolt

    2010-04-01

    Cariprazine {RGH-188; trans-N-[4-[2-[4-(2,3-dichlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl]ethyl]cyclohexyl]-N',N'-dimethylurea hydrochloride}, a novel candidate antipsychotic, demonstrated approximately 10-fold higher affinity for human D(3) versus human D(2L) and human D(2S) receptors (pKi 10.07, 9.16, and 9.31, respectively). It displayed high affinity at human serotonin (5-HT) type 2B receptors (pK(i) 9.24) with pure antagonism. Cariprazine had lower affinity at human and rat hippocampal 5-HT(1A) receptors (pK(i) 8.59 and 8.34, respectively) and demonstrated low intrinsic efficacy. Cariprazine displayed low affinity at human 5-HT(2A) receptors (pK(i) 7.73). Moderate or low affinity for histamine H(1) and 5-HT(2C) receptors (pK(i) 7.63 and 6.87, respectively) suggest cariprazine's reduced propensity for adverse events related to these receptors. Cariprazine demonstrated different functional profiles at dopamine receptors depending on the assay system. It displayed D(2) and D(3) antagonism in [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding assays, but stimulated inositol phosphate (IP) production (pEC(50) 8.50, E(max) 30%) and antagonized (+/-)-quinpirole-induced IP accumulation (pK(b) 9.22) in murine cells expressing human D(2L) receptors. It had partial agonist activity (pEC(50) 8.58, E(max) 71%) by inhibiting cAMP accumulation in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human D(3) receptors and potently antagonized R(+)-2-dipropylamino-7-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphtalene HBr (7-OH-DPAT)-induced suppression of cAMP formation (pK(b) 9.57). In these functional assays, cariprazine showed similar (D(2)) or higher (D(3)) antagonist-partial agonist affinity and greater (3- to 10-fold) D(3) versus D(2) selectivity compared with aripiprazole. In in vivo turnover and biosynthesis experiments, cariprazine demonstrated D(2)-related partial agonist and antagonist properties, depending on actual dopaminergic tone. The antagonist-partial agonist properties of cariprazine at D(3) and D(2) receptors, with very high

  2. Recent Advances in Mass Spectrometry for the Identification of Neuro-chemicals and their Metabolites in Biofluids

    PubMed Central

    Kailasa, Suresh Kumar; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mass spectrometric related techniques have been widely applied for the identification and quantification of neurochemicals and their metabolites in biofluids. This article presents an overview of mass spectrometric techniques applied in the detection of neurological substances and their metabolites from biological samples. In addition, the advances of chromatographic methods (LC, GC and CE) coupled with mass spectrometric techniques for analysis of neurochemicals in pharmaceutical and biological samples are also discussed. PMID:24381533

  3. Neurochemical substrates for opiate reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Koob, G F; Vaccarino, F J; Amalric, M; Bloom, F E

    1986-01-01

    The studies reported herein summarize our work to date aimed at determining the neurochemical substrates for the reinforcing properties of opiates. Rats were trained to self-administer heroin intravenously in daily 3-hour sessions, and pharmacological blockade and neurotoxin-induced lesions were used to define the neurochemical substrates for this reinforcing action. Low-dose DA receptor blockade failed to alter heroin self-administration but significantly increased cocaine self-administration, presumably reflecting a decrease in the reinforcing effectiveness of cocaine. Destruction of presynaptic DA terminals within the N.Acc. produced extinction of cocaine, but not heroin, self-administration. Opiate receptor blockade with systemic naloxone increased heroin, but not cocaine, self-administration. Methylnaloxonium injections into the N.Acc. were effective in increasing heroin self-administration at doses one-eighth those observed for intracerebroventricular injections. Reinforcement has been explored using a place-preference procedure and a self-administration drug-substitution paradigm. Mu/delta agonists such as B-END readily produce a naloxone-reversible place preference. Fentanyl derivatives also produce place preference and substitute for heroin during self-administration. The kappa agonist U50-488 produces place aversion, not place preference, and does not readily substitute for heroin. Altogether, these results suggest that mu/delta receptor subtypes in the region of the N.Acc. may be an important neurochemical substrate for opiate reinforcement.

  4. Behavioral metabolomics analysis identifies novel neurochemical signatures in methamphetamine sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, Daniel E.; McClay, Joseph L.; Vunck, Sarah A.; Batman, Angela M.; Vann, Robert E.; Clark, Shaunna L.; Souza, Renan P.; Crowley, James J.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; van den Oord, Edwin J.C.G.; Beardsley, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral sensitization has been widely studied in animal models and is theorized to reflect neural modifications associated with human psychostimulant addiction. While the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is known to play a role, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying behavioral sensitization remain incompletely understood. In the present study, we conducted the first metabolomics analysis to globally characterize neurochemical differences associated with behavioral sensitization. Methamphetamine-induced sensitization measures were generated by statistically modeling longitudinal activity data for eight inbred strains of mice. Subsequent to behavioral testing, nontargeted liquid and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling was performed on 48 brain samples, yielding 301 metabolite levels per sample after quality control. Association testing between metabolite levels and three primary dimensions of behavioral sensitization (total distance, stereotypy and margin time) showed four robust, significant associations at a stringent metabolome-wide significance threshold (false discovery rate < 0.05). Results implicated homocarnosine, a dipeptide of GABA and histidine, in total distance sensitization, GABA metabolite 4-guanidinobutanoate and pantothenate in stereotypy sensitization, and myo-inositol in margin time sensitization. Secondary analyses indicated that these associations were independent of concurrent methamphetamine levels and, with the exception of the myo-inositol association, suggest a mechanism whereby strain-based genetic variation produces specific baseline neurochemical differences that substantially influence the magnitude of MA-induced sensitization. These findings demonstrate the utility of mouse metabolomics for identifying novel biomarkers, and developing more comprehensive neurochemical models, of psychostimulant sensitization. PMID:24034544

  5. Behavioral metabolomics analysis identifies novel neurochemical signatures in methamphetamine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Adkins, D E; McClay, J L; Vunck, S A; Batman, A M; Vann, R E; Clark, S L; Souza, R P; Crowley, J J; Sullivan, P F; van den Oord, E J C G; Beardsley, P M

    2013-11-01

    Behavioral sensitization has been widely studied in animal models and is theorized to reflect neural modifications associated with human psychostimulant addiction. While the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway is known to play a role, the neurochemical mechanisms underlying behavioral sensitization remain incompletely understood. In this study, we conducted the first metabolomics analysis to globally characterize neurochemical differences associated with behavioral sensitization. Methamphetamine (MA)-induced sensitization measures were generated by statistically modeling longitudinal activity data for eight inbred strains of mice. Subsequent to behavioral testing, nontargeted liquid and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling was performed on 48 brain samples, yielding 301 metabolite levels per sample after quality control. Association testing between metabolite levels and three primary dimensions of behavioral sensitization (total distance, stereotypy and margin time) showed four robust, significant associations at a stringent metabolome-wide significance threshold (false discovery rate, FDR <0.05). Results implicated homocarnosine, a dipeptide of GABA and histidine, in total distance sensitization, GABA metabolite 4-guanidinobutanoate and pantothenate in stereotypy sensitization, and myo-inositol in margin time sensitization. Secondary analyses indicated that these associations were independent of concurrent MA levels and, with the exception of the myo-inositol association, suggest a mechanism whereby strain-based genetic variation produces specific baseline neurochemical differences that substantially influence the magnitude of MA-induced sensitization. These findings demonstrate the utility of mouse metabolomics for identifying novel biomarkers, and developing more comprehensive neurochemical models, of psychostimulant sensitization.

  6. NLX-112, a novel 5-HT1A receptor agonist for the treatment of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: Behavioral and neurochemical profile in rat.

    PubMed

    Iderberg, H; McCreary, A C; Varney, M A; Kleven, M S; Koek, W; Bardin, L; Depoortère, R; Cenci, M A; Newman-Tancredi, A

    2015-09-01

    , probably due to induction of flat body posture and forepaw treading which are typical of 5-HT1A agonists upon acute administration. However, upon repeated administration of NLX-112 (0.63 mg/kg, i.p., twice a day), flat body posture and forepaw treading subsided within 4 days of treatment. Taken together, these observations suggest that NLX-112 could exhibit a novel therapeutic profile, combining robust anti-dyskinetic properties without impairing the therapeutic properties of L-DOPA, and with additional beneficial effects on non-motor (affective) symptoms. PMID:26037043

  7. NLX-112, a novel 5-HT1A receptor agonist for the treatment of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: Behavioral and neurochemical profile in rat.

    PubMed

    Iderberg, H; McCreary, A C; Varney, M A; Kleven, M S; Koek, W; Bardin, L; Depoortère, R; Cenci, M A; Newman-Tancredi, A

    2015-09-01

    , probably due to induction of flat body posture and forepaw treading which are typical of 5-HT1A agonists upon acute administration. However, upon repeated administration of NLX-112 (0.63 mg/kg, i.p., twice a day), flat body posture and forepaw treading subsided within 4 days of treatment. Taken together, these observations suggest that NLX-112 could exhibit a novel therapeutic profile, combining robust anti-dyskinetic properties without impairing the therapeutic properties of L-DOPA, and with additional beneficial effects on non-motor (affective) symptoms.

  8. Quantification and mass isotopomer profiling of α-keto acids in central carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael; Sauer, Uwe; Zamboni, Nicola

    2014-03-18

    Mass spectrometry has been established as a powerful and versatile technique for studying cellular metabolism. Applications range from profiling of metabolites to accurate quantification and tracing of stable isotopes through the biochemical reaction network. Despite broad coverage of central carbon metabolism, most methods fail to provide accurate assessments of the α-keto acids oxaloacetic acid, pyruvate, and glyoxylate because these compounds are highly reactive and degraded during sample processing and mass spectrometric measurement. We present a derivatization procedure to chemically stabilize these compounds readily during quenching of cellular metabolism. Stable derivatives were analyzed by ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry to accurately quantify the abundance of α-keto acids in biological matrices. Eventually, we demonstrated that the developed protocol is suited to measure mass isotopomers of these α-keto acids in tracer studies with stable isotopes. In conclusion, the here described method fills one of the last technical gaps for metabolomics investigations of central carbon metabolism.

  9. Quantification and mass isotopomer profiling of α-keto acids in central carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael; Sauer, Uwe; Zamboni, Nicola

    2014-03-18

    Mass spectrometry has been established as a powerful and versatile technique for studying cellular metabolism. Applications range from profiling of metabolites to accurate quantification and tracing of stable isotopes through the biochemical reaction network. Despite broad coverage of central carbon metabolism, most methods fail to provide accurate assessments of the α-keto acids oxaloacetic acid, pyruvate, and glyoxylate because these compounds are highly reactive and degraded during sample processing and mass spectrometric measurement. We present a derivatization procedure to chemically stabilize these compounds readily during quenching of cellular metabolism. Stable derivatives were analyzed by ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry to accurately quantify the abundance of α-keto acids in biological matrices. Eventually, we demonstrated that the developed protocol is suited to measure mass isotopomers of these α-keto acids in tracer studies with stable isotopes. In conclusion, the here described method fills one of the last technical gaps for metabolomics investigations of central carbon metabolism. PMID:24533614

  10. Effects of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on the neurochemical profiles in the rat brain with streptozotocin-induced diabetes detected using in vivo 1H MR spectroscopy at 9.4 T

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Tung; Lee, Phil; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Smirnova, Irina V.; Choi, In-Young

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hyperglycemia could lead to cerebral metabolic alterations and CNS injury. However, findings of metabolic alterations in poorly managed diabetes in humans and animal models are rather inconsistent. We have characterized the cerebral metabolic consequences of untreated hyperglycemia from the onset to the chronic stage in a streptozotocin-induced rat model of diabetes. In vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to measure over 20 neurochemicals longitudinally. Upon the onset of hyperglycemia (acute state), increases in brain glucose levels were accompanied by increases in osmolytes and ketone bodies, all of which remained consistently high through the chronic state of over 10 weeks of hyperglycemia. Only after over 4 weeks of hyperglycemia, the levels of other neurochemicals including N-acetylaspartate and glutathione were significantly reduced and these alterations persisted into the chronic stage. However, glucose transport was not altered in chronic hyperglycemia of over 10 weeks. When glucose levels were acutely restored to euglycemia, some neurochemical changes were irreversible, indicating the impact of prolonged uncontrolled hyperglycemia on the CNS. Furthermore, progressive changes in neurochemical levels from control to acute and chronic conditions demonstrated the utility of 1H MRS as a noninvasive tool in monitoring the disease progression in diabetes. PMID:22353009

  11. The Impact of Neurochemical Mediators on Antidepressant Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite marked differences in the psychobiological profiles of depressed patients, clinical research has not supported selection of antidepressant (AD) medications based on neurochemistry. Prescribers have been advised to start all patients on the same class of ADs and then switch or combine them until benefit is achieved. New research may transform this practice. By matching clinical moderators to neurochemical mediators, health professionals may finally be able to overcome the disappointing remission rates associated with initial AD treatments and avoid the progressively worsening results associated with current trial and error approaches. PMID:24047106

  12. Simultaneous wireless electrophysiological and neurochemical monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murari, Kartikeya; Mollazadeh, Mohsen; Thakor, Nitish; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2008-08-01

    Information processing and propagation in the central nervous system is mostly electrical in nature. At synapses, electrical signals cause the release of neurotransmitters like dopamine, glutamate etc., that are sensed by post-synaptic neurons resulting in signal propagation or inhibition. It can be very informative to monitor electrical and neurochemical signals simultaneously to understand the mechanisms underlying normal or abnormal brain function. We present an integrated system for the simultaneous wireless acquisition of neurophysiological and neurochemical activity. Applications of the system to neuroscience include monitoring EEG and glutamate in rat somatosensory cortex following global ischemia.

  13. Detection and Quantification of Rotenoids from Clitoria fairchildiana and its Lipids Profile.

    PubMed

    Santos, Rauldenis A F; David, Jorge M; David, Juceni P

    2016-05-01

    This work describes the isolation and quantification of rotenoids from crude organic extracts of different parts of Clitoria fairchildiana R. A. Howard (Leguminosae) by HPLC-DAD. The lipid composition and the Artemia salina cytotoxic activities of the isolates were also conducted. Clitoriacetal (1), 6-deoxyclitoriacetal (2), stemonal and stemonone were isolated by chromatographic procedures and identified by usual spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques. Clitoriacetal and 6-deoxyclitoriacetal were not found in all parts of the plant, such as leaves and petals, but in the roots they occur in higher concentration. The activity against brine shrimp revealed that the root extract (LD50 = 158 ppm) was the more active. PMID:27319136

  14. Metabolic Profiling and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Mouse Brain by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Christian; Hiller, Karsten; Buttini, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites are key mediators of cellular functions, and have emerged as important modulators in a variety of diseases. Recent developments in translational biomedicine have highlighted the importance of not looking at just one disease marker or disease inducing molecule, but at populations thereof to gain a global understanding of cellular function in health and disease. The goal of metabolomics is the systematic identification and quantification of metabolite populations. One of the most pressing issues of our times is the understanding of normal and diseased nervous tissue functions. To ensure high quality data, proper sample processing is crucial. Here, we present a method for the extraction of metabolites from brain tissue, their subsequent preparation for non-targeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) measurement, as well as giving some guidelines for processing of raw data. In addition, we present a sensitive screening method for neurotransmitters based on GC-MS in selected ion monitoring mode. The precise multi-analyte detection and quantification of amino acid and monoamine neurotransmitters can be used for further studies such as metabolic modeling. Our protocol can be applied to shed light on nervous tissue function in health, as well as neurodegenerative disease mechanisms and the effect of experimental therapeutics at the metabolic level. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584556

  15. Neurochemical measurements in the zebrafish brain

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lauren J.; McCutcheon, James E.; Young, Andrew M. J.; Norton, William H. J.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is an ideal model organism for behavioral genetics and neuroscience. The high conservation of genes and neurotransmitter pathways between zebrafish and other vertebrates permits the translation of research between species. Zebrafish behavior can be studied at both larval and adult stages and recent research has begun to establish zebrafish models for human disease. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemical technique that permits the detection of neurotransmitter release and reuptake. In this study we have used in vitro FSCV to measure the release of analytes in the adult zebrafish telencephalon. We compare different stimulation methods and present a characterization of neurochemical changes in the wild-type zebrafish brain. This study represents the first FSCV recordings in zebrafish, thus paving the way for neurochemical analysis of the fish brain. PMID:26441575

  16. Profiling and relative quantification of phosphatidylethanolamine based on acetone stable isotope derivatization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Wei, Fang; Xu, Ji-qu; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xu-yan; Han, Xianlin; Quek, Siew-young; Huang, Feng-hong; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is considered to be one of the pivotal lipids for normal cellular function as well as disease initiation and progression. In this study, a simple, efficient, reliable, and inexpensive method for the qualitative analysis and relative quantification of PE, based on acetone stable isotope derivatization combined with double neutral loss scan-shotgun electrospray ionization tandem-quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis (ASID-DNLS-Shotgun ESI-MS/MS), was developed. The ASID method led to alkylation of the primary amino groups of PE with an isopropyl moiety. The use of acetone (d0-acetone) and deuterium-labeled acetone (d6-acetone) introduced a 6 Da mass shift that was ideally suited for relative quantitative analysis, and enhanced sensitivity for mass analysis. The DNLS model was introduced to simultaneously analyze the differential derivatized PEs by shotgun ESI-MS/MS with high selectivity and accuracy. The reaction specificity, labeling efficiency, and linearity of the ASID method were thoroughly evaluated in this study. Its excellent applicability was validated by qualitative and relative quantitative analysis of PE species presented in liver samples from rats fed different diets. Using the ASID-DNLS-Shotgun ESI-MS/MS method, 45 PE species from rat livers have been identified and quantified in an efficient manner. The level of total PEs tended to decrease in the livers of rats on high fat diets compared with controls. The levels of PE 32:1, 34:3, 34:2, 36:3, 36:2, 42:10, plasmalogen PE 36:1 and lyso PE 22:6 were significantly reduced, while levels of PE 36:1 and lyso PE 16:0 increased.

  17. Molecular Detection, Quantification, and Toxigenicity Profiling of Aeromonas spp. in Source- and Drinking-Water

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Boakai K; Harden, Carol; Selvaraju, Suresh B; Pradhan, Suman; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2014-01-01

    Aeromonas is ubiquitous in aquatic environments and has been associated with a number of extra-gastrointestinal and gastrointestinal illnesses. This warrants monitoring of raw and processed water sources for pathogenic and toxigenic species of this human pathogen. In this study, a total of 17 different water samples [9 raw and 8 treated samples including 4 basin water (partial sand filtration) and 4 finished water samples] were screened for Aeromonas using selective culturing and a genus-specific real-time quantitative PCR assay. The selective culturing yielded Aeromonas counts ranging 0 – 2 x 103CFU/ml and 15 Aeromonas isolates from both raw and treated water samples. The qPCR analysis indicated presence of a considerable nonculturable population (3.4 x 101 – 2.4 x 104 cells/ml) of Aeromonas in drinking water samples. Virulence potential of the Aeromonas isolates was assessed by multiplex/singleplex PCR-based profiling of the hemolysin and enterotoxin genes viz cytotoxic heat-labile enterotoxin (act), heat-labile cytotonic enterotoxin (alt), heat-stable cytotonic enterotoxin (ast), and aerolysin (aerA) genes. The water isolates yielded five distinct toxigenicity profiles, viz. act, alt, act+alt, aerA+alt, and aerA+alt+act. The alt gene showed the highest frequency of occurrence (40%), followed by the aerA (20%), act (13%), and ast (0%) genes. Taken together, the study demonstrated the occurrence of a considerable population of nonculturable Aeromonads in water and prevalence of toxigenic Aeromonas spp. potentially pathogenic to humans. This emphasizes the importance of routine monitoring of both source and drinking water for this human pathogen and role of the developed molecular approaches in improving the Aeromonas monitoring scheme for water. PMID:24949108

  18. Molecular Detection, Quantification, and Toxigenicity Profiling of Aeromonas spp. in Source- and Drinking-Water.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Boakai K; Harden, Carol; Selvaraju, Suresh B; Pradhan, Suman; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2014-01-01

    Aeromonas is ubiquitous in aquatic environments and has been associated with a number of extra-gastrointestinal and gastrointestinal illnesses. This warrants monitoring of raw and processed water sources for pathogenic and toxigenic species of this human pathogen. In this study, a total of 17 different water samples [9 raw and 8 treated samples including 4 basin water (partial sand filtration) and 4 finished water samples] were screened for Aeromonas using selective culturing and a genus-specific real-time quantitative PCR assay. The selective culturing yielded Aeromonas counts ranging 0 - 2 x 10(3)CFU/ml and 15 Aeromonas isolates from both raw and treated water samples. The qPCR analysis indicated presence of a considerable nonculturable population (3.4 x 10(1) - 2.4 x 10(4) cells/ml) of Aeromonas in drinking water samples. Virulence potential of the Aeromonas isolates was assessed by multiplex/singleplex PCR-based profiling of the hemolysin and enterotoxin genes viz cytotoxic heat-labile enterotoxin (act), heat-labile cytotonic enterotoxin (alt), heat-stable cytotonic enterotoxin (ast), and aerolysin (aerA) genes. The water isolates yielded five distinct toxigenicity profiles, viz. act, alt, act+alt, aerA+alt, and aerA+alt+act. The alt gene showed the highest frequency of occurrence (40%), followed by the aerA (20%), act (13%), and ast (0%) genes. Taken together, the study demonstrated the occurrence of a considerable population of nonculturable Aeromonads in water and prevalence of toxigenic Aeromonas spp. potentially pathogenic to humans. This emphasizes the importance of routine monitoring of both source and drinking water for this human pathogen and role of the developed molecular approaches in improving the Aeromonas monitoring scheme for water.

  19. Attomole quantification and global profile of RNA modifications: Epitranscriptome of human neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Basanta-Sanchez, Maria; Temple, Sally; Ansari, Suraiya A.; D'Amico, Anna; Agris, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    Exploration of the epitranscriptome requires the development of highly sensitive and accurate technologies in order to elucidate the contributions of the more than 100 RNA modifications to cell processes. A highly sensitive and accurate ultra-high performance liquid chromatography—tandem mass spectrometry method was developed to simultaneously detect and quantify 28 modified and four major nucleosides in less than 20 min. Absolute concentrations were calculated using extinction coefficients of each of the RNA modifications studied. A comprehensive RNA modifications database of UV profiles and extinction coefficient is reported within a 2.3–5.2 % relative standard deviation. Excellent linearity was observed 0.99227–0.99999 and limit of detection values ranged from 63.75 attomoles to 1.21 femtomoles. The analytical performance was evaluated by analyzing RNA modifications from 100 ng of RNA from human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells. Modifications were detected at concentrations four orders of magnitude lower than the corresponding parental nucleosides, and as low as 23.01 femtograms, 64.09 attomoles. Direct and global quantitative analysis of RNA modifications are among the advantages of this new approach. PMID:26438536

  20. Attomole quantification and global profile of RNA modifications: Epitranscriptome of human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Basanta-Sanchez, Maria; Temple, Sally; Ansari, Suraiya A; D'Amico, Anna; Agris, Paul F

    2016-02-18

    Exploration of the epitranscriptome requires the development of highly sensitive and accurate technologies in order to elucidate the contributions of the more than 100 RNA modifications to cell processes. A highly sensitive and accurate ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed to simultaneously detect and quantify 28 modified and four major nucleosides in less than 20 min. Absolute concentrations were calculated using extinction coefficients of each of the RNA modifications studied. A comprehensive RNA modifications database of UV profiles and extinction coefficient is reported within a 2.3-5.2 % relative standard deviation. Excellent linearity was observed 0.99227-0.99999 and limit of detection values ranged from 63.75 attomoles to 1.21 femtomoles. The analytical performance was evaluated by analyzing RNA modifications from 100 ng of RNA from human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells. Modifications were detected at concentrations four orders of magnitude lower than the corresponding parental nucleosides, and as low as 23.01 femtograms, 64.09 attomoles. Direct and global quantitative analysis of RNA modifications are among the advantages of this new approach.

  1. Neuroprotective and neurochemical properties of mint extracts.

    PubMed

    López, Víctor; Martín, Sara; Gómez-Serranillos, Maria Pilar; Carretero, Maria Emilia; Jäger, Anna K; Calvo, Maria Isabel

    2010-06-01

    Mints are aromatic plants with a tradition as medicinal remedies and culinary herbs. With the aim of investigating potential central nervous system (CNS) activities of traditional medicinal plants, four species and one hybrid of the genus Mentha (M. aquatica, M. longifolia, M. pulegium, M. suaveolens and M. x piperita) were selected. Methanolic extracts of the plants were tested for protective effects against hydrogen-peroxide-induced toxicity in PC12 cells, antioxidant activity (by ABTS and X/XO methods) and neurochemical properties (MAO-A inhibition, AChE inhibition and affinity to the GABA(A) receptor). Mentha x piperita and Mentha aquatica produced significant (p < 0.05) protection of the PC12 cells against oxidative stress. All the plants exhibited antioxidant and MAO-A inhibitory activities, M. x piperita being the most active. M. aquatica showed the highest affinity to the GABA(A)-receptor assay. Results demonstrate that mints might have effect on the CNS.

  2. Non-invasive detection of neurochemical changes prior to overt pathology in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    PubMed

    Emir, Uzay E; Brent Clark, Howard; Vollmers, Manda L; Eberly, Lynn E; Öz, Gülin

    2013-12-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a hereditary, progressive and fatal movement disorder that primarily affects the cerebellum. Non-invasive imaging markers to detect early disease in SCA1 will facilitate testing and implementation of potential therapies. We have previously demonstrated the sensitivity of neurochemical levels measured by (1) H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to progressive neurodegeneration using a transgenic mouse model of SCA1. In order to investigate very early neurochemical changes related to neurodegeneration, here we utilized a knock-in mouse model, the Sca1(154Q/2Q) line, which displays milder cerebellar pathology than the transgenic model. We measured cerebellar neurochemical profiles of Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice and wild-type littermates using 9.4T MRS at ages 6, 12, 24, and 39 weeks and assessed the cerebellar pathology of a subset of the mice at each time point. The Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice displayed very mild cerebellar pathology even at 39 weeks, however, were distinguished from wild types by MRS starting at 6 weeks. Taurine and total choline levels were significantly lower at all ages and glutamine and total creatine levels were higher starting at 12 weeks in Sca1(154Q/2Q) mice than controls, demonstrating the sensitivity of neurochemical levels to neurodegeneration related changes in the absence of overt pathology. We measured cerebellar neurochemical alterations in a knock-in mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, a hereditary movement disorder, using ultra-high field magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Very early neurochemical alterations were detectable prior to overt pathology in the volume-of-interest for MRS. Alterations were indicative of osmolytic changes and of disturbances in membrane phospholipid and energy metabolism.

  3. Neurochemical biomarkers in Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bibl, Mirko; Esselmann, Hermann

    2012-01-01

    Neurochemical biomarkers for diagnosing dementias are currently under intensive investigation and the field is rapidly expanding. The main protagonists and the best defined among them are cerebrospinal fluid levels of Aβ42, tau and its phosphorylated forms (p-tau). In addition, novel cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers are emerging and their multiparametric assessment seems most promising for increasing the accuracy in neurochemical dementia diagnostics. The combined assessment of Aβ42 and p-tau has recently shown value for diagnosing prodromal states of Alzheimer’s dementia, that is, mild cognitive impairment. Disease-specific biomarkers for other degenerative dementias are still missing, but some progress has recently been made. As lumbar puncture is an additional burden for the patient, blood-based neurochemical biomarkers are definitely warranted and promising new discoveries have been made in this direction. These diagnostic developments have implicit therapeutic consequences and give rise to new requirements for future neurochemical dementia diagnostics. PMID:23139704

  4. Identification and quantification of mixed sources of oil spills based on distributions and isotope profiles of long-chain n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Xiong, Yongqiang

    2009-12-01

    Combined with quantitative determination of concentration and isotopic composition of petroleum hydrocarbons, weathering simulation experiments on artificially mixed oils and their two end-member oils are performed for identification and quantification of mixed sources. The >C(18)n-alkanes show no appreciable losses during a short-term weathering process. An approach based on distribution of long-chain n-alkanes (>C(18)) is suggested for estimating the contribution proportion of each source in mixed oils. Stable carbon isotope profile of individual n-alkanes is a powerful tool to differentiate sources of oil spills, but unavailable to accurately allocate each contribution due to a relatively large analytical error.

  5. Metabolic and neurochemical profiles in insulin-treated diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Bellush, L L; Reid, S G

    1994-01-01

    Plasma glucose concentration was measured at 3-h intervals in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats placed on various insulin replacement regimens using three different kinds of insulin. High insulin dosages produced at least periodic hypoglycemia, even though there were no overt signs of insulin overdose. Low- and single-dose regimens produced periods of hyperglycemia. Both high and low doses of protamine zinc insulin normalized diabetes-induced reductions in 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid [5-HIAA; the principal metabolite of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] and 5-HT turnover (5-HIAA/5-HT), despite the failure of the low-dose regimen to normalize plasma glucose. Diabetic rats evidenced continued hyperphagia and hyperdipsia during insulin treatment, and insulin treatment also induced hyperphagia and excessive weight gain in nondiabetic rats. Insulin treatment only partially normalized diabetes-induced adrenal hypertrophy. Adrenal hypertrophy is an indication of a continued stresslike physiological state in diabetes even during insulin therapy. This state may be involved in the enhanced risk in diabetic humans for development of anxiety disorders and clinical depression. PMID:7508209

  6. Caffeine tolerance: behavioral, electrophysiological and neurochemical evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.T.; Khan, S.; Forde, J.; Hirsh, K.R.

    1985-06-17

    The development of tolerance to the stimulatory action of caffeine upon mesencephalic reticular neurons and upon spontaneous locomotor activity was evaluated in rats after two weeks of chronic exposure to low doses of caffeine (5-10 mg/kg/day via their drinking water). These doses are achievable through dietary intake of caffeine-containing beverages in man. Concomitant measurement of (/sup 3/H)-CHA binding in the mesencephalic reticular formation was also carried out in order to explore the neurochemical basis of the development of tolerance. Caffeine, 2.5 mg/kg i.v., markedly increased the firing rate of reticular neurons in caffeine naive rats but failed to modify the neuronal activity in a group exposed chronically to low doses of caffeine. In addition, in spontaneous locomotor activity studies, the data show a distinct shift to the right of the caffeine dose-response curve in caffeine pretreated rats. These results clearly indicate that tolerance develops to the stimulatory action of caffeine upon the reticular formation at the single neuronal activity level as well as upon spontaneous locomotor activity. Furthermore, in chronically caffeine exposed rats, an increase in the number of binding sites for (/sup 3/H)-CHA was observed in reticular formation membranes without any change in receptor affinity. 28 references, 4 figures.

  7. Neurochemical mechanisms underlying responses to psychostimulants

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Hitzemann, R.; Wang, G.J. |

    1994-11-01

    This study employed positron emission tomography (PET) to investigate biochemical and metabolic characteristics of the brain of individuals which could put them at risk for drug addiction. It takes advantage of the normal variability between individuals in response to psychoactive drugs to investigate relation between mental state, brain neurochemistry and metabolism and the behavioral response to drugs. We discuss its use to assess if there is an association between mental state and dompaminergic reactivity in response to the psychostimulant drug methylphenidate (MP). Changes in synaptic dopamine induced by MP were evaluated with PET and [11C]raclopride, a D{sub 2} receptor radioligand that is sensitive to endogenous dopamine. Methylpphenidate significantly decreased striatal [11C]raclopride binding. The study showed a correlation between the magnitude of the dopamine-induced changes by methylphenidate, and the mental state of the subjects. Subjects reporting high levels of anxiety and restlessness at baseline had larger changes in MP-induced dopamine changes than those that did not. Further investigations on the relation between an individual`s response to a drug and his/her mental state and personality as well as his neurochemical brain composition may enable to understand better differences in drug addiction vulnerability.

  8. Profiling and accurate quantification of Rubus ellagitannins and ellagic acid conjugates using direct UPLC-Q-TOF HDMS and HPLC-DAD analysis.

    PubMed

    Gasperotti, Mattia; Masuero, Domenico; Vrhovsek, Urska; Guella, Graziano; Mattivi, Fulvio

    2010-04-28

    Accurate quantification and structural characterization of ellagitannins and ellagic acid conjugates in food, beverages, and food supplements are essential starting points for studying their effect on human health. However, accuracy is hindered both by the lack of pure standard compounds and by methods that maintain the compounds in their native form, avoiding any chemical modification of the structure. The objective of this work was to develop a new method for the purification, chromatographic separation, and accurate quantification of ellagitannins and ellagic acid conjugates to provide thorough characterization of the diversity in composition of 11 Rubus cultivars grown in Trentino, Italy. As such, two major steps were required: (i) the isolation and purification (with associated detailed structural characterization and determination of their molar extinction coefficients) of sanguiin H-6 and lambertianin C, providing essential data for their use, together with ellagic acid, as external standards, and (ii) the determination of the chemical structure of 20 novel minor ellagitannins and 4 ellagic acid conjugates on the basis of their Q-TOF-HDMS and DAD spectra. This survey of ellagitannins and ellagic acid conjugates provides evidence for the existence of significant differences in the pattern between and within blackberry and raspberry cultivars. To our knowledge, this is the first paper that has combined detailed metabolite profiling with accurate quantification of the main ellagitannins in Rubus using their respective standards.

  9. The neurochemical maturation of the rabbit cerebellum.

    PubMed Central

    Lossi, L; Ghidella, S; Marroni, P; Merighi, A

    1995-01-01

    The immunocytochemical distribution of several neuronal and glial antigens was investigated in the cerebellum of the developing and adult rabbit. Neurofilament positive neurons appeared at embryonic day (E) 25. Purkinje cells transiently expressed neurofilament polypeptides from postnatal day (P) 0 to 15. At later postnatal ages, staining was localised to the parallel fibres, the axonal arbors of the basket cells and fibres of the white matter. Neuron specific enolase (NSE) immunoreactivity was first detected at E25. At P0 Purkinje cells were positive and their staining intensity increased up to P25. From P30 to adulthood virtually all cells in the molecular and Purkinje cell layers were stained. Scattered PGP 9.5-immunoreactive neurons appeared in the cerebellar anlage at P25. Purkinje and Golgi cells were labelled by P0. Synaptophysin immunoreactivity was first observed at P0 in the form of a fine punctate reaction surrounding the perikarya and proximal dendrites of Purkinje cells. By P10, it became particularly intense within the cerebellar glomeruli of the granular layer. Neurons of the deep cerebellar nuclei expressed NSE and PGP 9.5 starting from E25. GFAP and S-100 immunoreactivities were first detected at P10. GFAP-immunopositive astrocytes progressively increased in number up to adulthood. S-100-immunoreactive glial cells were detected throughout the white and grey matter. Bergmann glial cells and their fibres were strongly immunoreactive. Vimentin positive glial cells and fibres were first observed at E15 and persisted up to adulthood. Double labelling experiments using a monoclonal antibody against the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a cyclin synthesised by mitotic cells, showed that neuronal and/or glial polypeptides are expressed only by fully differentiated postmitotic cells. These results indicate that major events in the neurochemical maturation of the rabbit cerebellum occur during the first month after birth, when the same pattern of

  10. A neurochemical closed-loop controller for deep brain stimulation: toward individualized smart neuromodulation therapies.

    PubMed

    Grahn, Peter J; Mallory, Grant W; Khurram, Obaid U; Berry, B Michael; Hachmann, Jan T; Bieber, Allan J; Bennet, Kevin E; Min, Hoon-Ki; Chang, Su-Youne; Lee, Kendall H; Lujan, J L

    2014-01-01

    Current strategies for optimizing deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy involve multiple postoperative visits. During each visit, stimulation parameters are adjusted until desired therapeutic effects are achieved and adverse effects are minimized. However, the efficacy of these therapeutic parameters may decline with time due at least in part to disease progression, interactions between the host environment and the electrode, and lead migration. As such, development of closed-loop control systems that can respond to changing neurochemical environments, tailoring DBS therapy to individual patients, is paramount for improving the therapeutic efficacy of DBS. Evidence obtained using electrophysiology and imaging techniques in both animals and humans suggests that DBS works by modulating neural network activity. Recently, animal studies have shown that stimulation-evoked changes in neurotransmitter release that mirror normal physiology are associated with the therapeutic benefits of DBS. Therefore, to fully understand the neurophysiology of DBS and optimize its efficacy, it may be necessary to look beyond conventional electrophysiological analyses and characterize the neurochemical effects of therapeutic and non-therapeutic stimulation. By combining electrochemical monitoring and mathematical modeling techniques, we can potentially replace the trial-and-error process used in clinical programming with deterministic approaches that help attain optimal and stable neurochemical profiles. In this manuscript, we summarize the current understanding of electrophysiological and electrochemical processing for control of neuromodulation therapies. Additionally, we describe a proof-of-principle closed-loop controller that characterizes DBS-evoked dopamine changes to adjust stimulation parameters in a rodent model of DBS. The work described herein represents the initial steps toward achieving a "smart" neuroprosthetic system for treatment of neurologic and psychiatric disorders

  11. Neurochemical, morphologic, and laminar characterization of cortical projection neurons in the cingulate motor areas of the macaque monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nimchinsky, E. A.; Hof, P. R.; Young, W. G.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The primate cingulate gyrus contains multiple cortical areas that can be distinguished by several neurochemical features, including the distribution of neurofilament protein-enriched pyramidal neurons. In addition, connectivity and functional properties indicate that there are multiple motor areas in the cortex lining the cingulate sulcus. These motor areas were targeted for analysis of potential interactions among regional specialization, connectivity, and cellular characteristics such as neurochemical profile and morphology. Specifically, intracortical injections of retrogradely transported dyes and intracellular injection were combined with immunocytochemistry to investigate neurons projecting from the cingulate motor areas to the putative forelimb region of the primary motor cortex, area M1. Two separate groups of neurons projecting to area M1 emanated from the cingulate sulcus, one anterior and one posterior, both of which furnished commissural and ipsilateral connections with area M1. The primary difference between the two populations was laminar origin, with the anterior projection originating largely in deep layers, and the posterior projection taking origin equally in superficial and deep layers. With regard to cellular morphology, the anterior projection exhibited more morphologic diversity than the posterior projection. Commissural projections from both anterior and posterior fields originated largely in layer VI. Neurofilament protein distribution was a reliable tool for localizing the two projections and for discriminating between them. Comparable proportions of the two sets of projection neurons contained neurofilament protein, although the density and distribution of the total population of neurofilament protein-enriched neurons was very different in the two subareas of origin. Within a projection, the participating neurons exhibited a high degree of morphologic heterogeneity, and no correlation was observed between somatodendritic morphology and

  12. BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROCHEMICAL CONSEQUENCES OF DEVELOPMENTAL ORGANOTIN EXPOSURE IN RATS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Behavioral and Neurochemical Consequences of Developmental Organotin Exposure in Rats.
    Ehman, K.,1 Jenkins, S.,2 Barone Jr., S.2 and Moser, V.2 1Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 2Neurotoxicology Division, U.S. Environmental Protection ...

  13. Development of the Neurochemical Architecture of the Central Complex

    PubMed Central

    Boyan, George S.; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The central complex represents one of the most conspicuous neuroarchitectures to be found in the insect brain and regulates a wide repertoire of behaviors including locomotion, stridulation, spatial orientation and spatial memory. In this review article, we show that in the grasshopper, a model insect system, the intricate wiring of the fan-shaped body (FB) begins early in embryogenesis when axons from the first progeny of four protocerebral stem cells (called W, X, Y, Z, respectively) in each brain hemisphere establish a set of tracts to the primary commissural system. Decussation of subsets of commissural neurons at stereotypic locations across the brain midline then establishes a columnar neuroarchitecture in the FB which is completed during embryogenesis. Examination of the expression patterns of various neurochemicals in the central complex including neuropeptides, a neurotransmitter and the gas nitric oxide (NO), show that these appear progressively and in a substance-specific manner during embryogenesis. Each neuroactive substance is expressed by neurons located at stereotypic locations in a given central complex lineage, confirming that the stem cells are biochemically multipotent. The organization of axons expressing the various neurochemicals within the central complex is topologically related to the location, and hence birthdate, of the neurons within the lineages. The neurochemical expression patterns within the FB are layered, and so reflect the temporal topology present in the lineages. This principle relates the neuroanatomical to the neurochemical architecture of the central complex and so may provide insights into the development of adaptive behaviors.

  14. Neurochemical Correlates of Autistic Disorder: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Kristen S. L.; Aman, Michael G.; Arnold, L. Eugene

    2006-01-01

    Review of neurochemical investigations in autistic disorder revealed that a wide array of transmitter systems have been studied, including serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, acetylcholine, oxytocin, endogenous opioids, cortisol, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). These studies have been complicated by the fact that autism is a very…

  15. Development of the Neurochemical Architecture of the Central Complex.

    PubMed

    Boyan, George S; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The central complex represents one of the most conspicuous neuroarchitectures to be found in the insect brain and regulates a wide repertoire of behaviors including locomotion, stridulation, spatial orientation and spatial memory. In this review article, we show that in the grasshopper, a model insect system, the intricate wiring of the fan-shaped body (FB) begins early in embryogenesis when axons from the first progeny of four protocerebral stem cells (called W, X, Y, Z, respectively) in each brain hemisphere establish a set of tracts to the primary commissural system. Decussation of subsets of commissural neurons at stereotypic locations across the brain midline then establishes a columnar neuroarchitecture in the FB which is completed during embryogenesis. Examination of the expression patterns of various neurochemicals in the central complex including neuropeptides, a neurotransmitter and the gas nitric oxide (NO), show that these appear progressively and in a substance-specific manner during embryogenesis. Each neuroactive substance is expressed by neurons located at stereotypic locations in a given central complex lineage, confirming that the stem cells are biochemically multipotent. The organization of axons expressing the various neurochemicals within the central complex is topologically related to the location, and hence birthdate, of the neurons within the lineages. The neurochemical expression patterns within the FB are layered, and so reflect the temporal topology present in the lineages. This principle relates the neuroanatomical to the neurochemical architecture of the central complex and so may provide insights into the development of adaptive behaviors. PMID:27630548

  16. Development of the Neurochemical Architecture of the Central Complex

    PubMed Central

    Boyan, George S.; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The central complex represents one of the most conspicuous neuroarchitectures to be found in the insect brain and regulates a wide repertoire of behaviors including locomotion, stridulation, spatial orientation and spatial memory. In this review article, we show that in the grasshopper, a model insect system, the intricate wiring of the fan-shaped body (FB) begins early in embryogenesis when axons from the first progeny of four protocerebral stem cells (called W, X, Y, Z, respectively) in each brain hemisphere establish a set of tracts to the primary commissural system. Decussation of subsets of commissural neurons at stereotypic locations across the brain midline then establishes a columnar neuroarchitecture in the FB which is completed during embryogenesis. Examination of the expression patterns of various neurochemicals in the central complex including neuropeptides, a neurotransmitter and the gas nitric oxide (NO), show that these appear progressively and in a substance-specific manner during embryogenesis. Each neuroactive substance is expressed by neurons located at stereotypic locations in a given central complex lineage, confirming that the stem cells are biochemically multipotent. The organization of axons expressing the various neurochemicals within the central complex is topologically related to the location, and hence birthdate, of the neurons within the lineages. The neurochemical expression patterns within the FB are layered, and so reflect the temporal topology present in the lineages. This principle relates the neuroanatomical to the neurochemical architecture of the central complex and so may provide insights into the development of adaptive behaviors. PMID:27630548

  17. Neurochemical changes within human early blind occipital cortex.

    PubMed

    Weaver, K E; Richards, T L; Saenz, M; Petropoulos, H; Fine, I

    2013-11-12

    Early blindness results in occipital cortex neurons responding to a wide range of auditory and tactile stimuli. These changes in tuning properties are accompanied by an extensive reorganization of the occipital cortex that includes alterations in anatomical structure, neurochemical and metabolic pathways. Although it has been established in animal models that neurochemical pathways are heavily affected by early visual deprivation, the effects of blindness on these pathways in humans is still not well characterized. Here, using (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy in nine early blind and normally sighted subjects, we find that early blindness is associated with higher levels of creatine, choline and myo-Inositol and indications of lower levels of GABA within the occipital cortex. These results suggest that the cross-modal responses associated with early blindness may, at least in part, be driven by changes within occipital biochemical pathways.

  18. Qualitative profiling and quantification of neonicotinoid metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taira, Kumiko; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Aoyama, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    Neonicotinoid pesticides have been widely applied for the production of fruits and vegetables, and occasionally detected in conventionally grown produce. Thus oral exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides may exist in the general population; however, neonicotinoid metabolites in human body fluids have not been investigated comprehensively. The purpose of this study is the qualitative profiling and quantitative analysis of neonicotinoid metabolites in the human spot urine by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Human urine samples were collected from three patients suspected of subacute exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides. A qualitative profiling of urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) with a database of nominal molecular weights of 57 known metabolites of three neonicotinoid pesticides (acetamiprid, Imidacloprid, and clothianidin), as well as the parent compounds. Then a quantitative analysis of selected urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with a standard pesticide and metabolite, which were detected by the qualitative profiling. The result of qualitative profiling showed that seven metabolites, i.e. an acetamiprid metabolite, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid; three Imidacloprid metabolites, 5-hydroxy-Imidacloprid, 4,5-dihydroxy-imidacloprid, 4,5-dehydro-Imidacloprid; a common metabolite of acetamiprid and Imidacloprid, N-(6-chloronicotinoyl)-glycine; and two clothianidin metabolites, N-desmethyl-clothianidin, N-(2-(methylsulfanyl)thiazole-5-carboxyl)-glycine, as well as acetamiprid, were detected in the urine of three cases. The result of the quantitative analysis showed N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was determined in the urine of one case, which had been collected on the first visit, at a concentration of 3.2 ng/mL. This is the first report on the qualitative and quantitative detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the human

  19. Qualitative Profiling and Quantification of Neonicotinoid Metabolites in Human Urine by Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Kumiko; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Aoyama, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    Neonicotinoid pesticides have been widely applied for the production of fruits and vegetables, and occasionally detected in conventionally grown produce. Thus oral exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides may exist in the general population; however, neonicotinoid metabolites in human body fluids have not been investigated comprehensively. The purpose of this study is the qualitative profiling and quantitative analysis of neonicotinoid metabolites in the human spot urine by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Human urine samples were collected from three patients suspected of subacute exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides. A qualitative profiling of urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) with a database of nominal molecular weights of 57 known metabolites of three neonicotinoid pesticides (acetamiprid, Imidacloprid, and clothianidin), as well as the parent compounds. Then a quantitative analysis of selected urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with a standard pesticide and metabolite, which were detected by the qualitative profiling. The result of qualitative profiling showed that seven metabolites, i.e. an acetamiprid metabolite, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid; three Imidacloprid metabolites, 5-hydroxy-Imidacloprid, 4,5-dihydroxy-imidacloprid, 4,5-dehydro-Imidacloprid; a common metabolite of acetamiprid and Imidacloprid, N-(6-chloronicotinoyl)-glycine; and two clothianidin metabolites, N-desmethyl-clothianidin, N-(2-(methylsulfanyl)thiazole-5-carboxyl)-glycine, as well as acetamiprid, were detected in the urine of three cases. The result of the quantitative analysis showed N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was determined in the urine of one case, which had been collected on the first visit, at a concentration of 3.2 ng/mL. This is the first report on the qualitative and quantitative detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the human

  20. Qualitative profiling and quantification of neonicotinoid metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taira, Kumiko; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Aoyama, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    Neonicotinoid pesticides have been widely applied for the production of fruits and vegetables, and occasionally detected in conventionally grown produce. Thus oral exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides may exist in the general population; however, neonicotinoid metabolites in human body fluids have not been investigated comprehensively. The purpose of this study is the qualitative profiling and quantitative analysis of neonicotinoid metabolites in the human spot urine by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Human urine samples were collected from three patients suspected of subacute exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides. A qualitative profiling of urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) with a database of nominal molecular weights of 57 known metabolites of three neonicotinoid pesticides (acetamiprid, Imidacloprid, and clothianidin), as well as the parent compounds. Then a quantitative analysis of selected urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with a standard pesticide and metabolite, which were detected by the qualitative profiling. The result of qualitative profiling showed that seven metabolites, i.e. an acetamiprid metabolite, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid; three Imidacloprid metabolites, 5-hydroxy-Imidacloprid, 4,5-dihydroxy-imidacloprid, 4,5-dehydro-Imidacloprid; a common metabolite of acetamiprid and Imidacloprid, N-(6-chloronicotinoyl)-glycine; and two clothianidin metabolites, N-desmethyl-clothianidin, N-(2-(methylsulfanyl)thiazole-5-carboxyl)-glycine, as well as acetamiprid, were detected in the urine of three cases. The result of the quantitative analysis showed N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was determined in the urine of one case, which had been collected on the first visit, at a concentration of 3.2 ng/mL. This is the first report on the qualitative and quantitative detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the human

  1. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa's ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarizes and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics. PMID:26973593

  2. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa’s ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC), it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarizes and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics. PMID:26973593

  3. Cerebellar neurochemical alterations in spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 appear to include glutathione deficiency.

    PubMed

    Doss, Sarah; Rinnenthal, Jan Leo; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Brandt, Alexander U; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Lux, Silke; Maul, Stephan; Würfel, Jens; Endres, Matthias; Klockgether, Thomas; Minnerop, Martina; Paul, Friedemann

    2015-08-01

    Autosomal dominant ataxia type 14 (SCA14) is a rare usually adult-onset progressive disorder with cerebellar neurodegeneration caused by mutations in protein kinase C gamma. We set out to examine cerebellar and extracerebellar neurochemical changes in SCA14 by MR spectroscopy. In 13 SCA14 patients and 13 healthy sex- and age-matched controls, 3-T single-voxel brain proton MR spectroscopy was performed in a cerebellar voxel of interest (VOI) at TE = 30 ms to obtain a neurochemical profile of metabolites with short relaxation times. In the cerebellum and in additional VOIs in the prefrontal cortex, motor cortex, and somatosensory cortex, a second measurement was performed at TE = 144 ms to mainly extract the total N-acetyl-aspartate (tNAA) signal besides the signals for total creatine (tCr) and total choline (tCho). The cerebellar neurochemical profile revealed a decrease in glutathione (6.12E-06 ± 2.50E-06 versus 8.91E-06 ± 3.03E-06; p = 0028) and tNAA (3.78E-05 ± 5.67E-06 versus 4.25E-05 ± 5.15E-06; p = 0023) and a trend for reduced glutamate (2.63E-05 ± 6.48E-06 versus 3.15E-05 ± 7.61E-06; p = 0062) in SCA14 compared to controls. In the tNAA-focused measurement, cerebellar tNAA (296.6 ± 42.6 versus 351.7 ± 16.5; p = 0004) and tCr (272.1 ± 25.2 versus 303.2 ± 31.4; p = 0004) were reduced, while the prefrontal, somatosensory and motor cortex remained unaffected compared to controls. Neuronal pathology in SCA14 detected by MR spectroscopy was restricted to the cerebellum and did not comprise cortical regions. In the cerebellum, we found in addition to signs of neurodegeneration a glutathione reduction, which has been associated with cellular damage by oxidative stress in other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Friedreich's ataxia.

  4. A novel Whole Air Sample Profiler (WASP) for the quantification of volatile organic compounds in the boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, J. E.; Su, L.; Guenther, Alex B.; Karl, Thomas G.

    2013-10-16

    The emission and fate of reactive VOCs is of inherent interest to those studying chemical biosphere-atmosphere interactions. In-canopy VOC observations are obtainable using tower-based samplers, but the lack of suitable sampling systems for the full boundary 5 layer has limited the data characterizing the vertical structure of such gases above the canopy height and still in the boundary layer. This is the important region where many reactive VOCs are oxidized or otherwise removed. Here we describe an airborne sampling system designed to collect a vertical profile of air into a 3/800 OD tube 150m in length. The inlet ram air pressure is used to flow sampled air through the 10 tube, which results in a varying flow rate based on aircraft speed and altitude. Since aircraft velocity decreases during ascent, it is necessary to account for the variable flow rate into the tube. This is accomplished using a reference gas that is pulsed into the air stream so that the precise altitude of the collected air can be reconstructed post-collection. The pulsed injections are also used to determine any significant effect 15 from diffusion/mixing within the sampling tube, either during collection or subsequent extraction for gas analysis. This system has been successfully deployed, and we show some measured vertical profiles of isoprene and its oxidation products methacrolein and methyl vinyl ketone from a mixed canopy near Columbia, Missouri.

  5. Human methamphetamine pharmacokinetics simulated in the rat: behavioral and neurochemical effects of a 72-h binge.

    PubMed

    Kuczenski, Ronald; Segal, David S; Melega, William P; Lacan, Goran; McCunney, Stanley J

    2009-10-01

    Bingeing is one pattern of high-dose methamphetamine (METH) abuse, which involves continuous drug taking over several days and can result in psychotic behaviors for which the brain pathology remains poorly defined. A corresponding animal model of this type of METH exposure may provide novel insights into the neurochemical and behavioral sequelae associated with this condition. Accordingly, to simulate the pharmacokinetic profile of a human METH binge exposure in rats, we used a computer-controlled, intravenous METH procedure (dynamic infusion, DI) to overcome species differences in METH pharmacokinetics and to replicate the human 12-h plasma METH half-life. Animals were treated over 13 weeks with escalating METH doses, using DI, and then exposed to a binge in which drug was administered every 3 h for 72 h. Throughout the binge, behavioral effects included unabated intense oral stereotypies in the absence of locomotion and in the absence of sleep. Decrements in regional brain dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin levels, measured at 1 and 10 h after the last injection of the binge, had, with the exception of caudate-putamen dopamine and frontal cortex serotonin, recovered by 48 h. At 10 h after the last injection of the binge, [(3)H]ligand binding to dopamine and vesicular monoamine transporters in caudate-putamen were reduced by 35 and 13%, respectively. In a separate METH binge-treated cohort, post-binge behavioral alterations were apparent in an attenuated locomotor response to a METH challenge infusion at 24 h after the last injection of the binge. Collectively, the changes we characterized during and after a METH binge suggest that for human beings under similar exposure conditions, multiple time-dependent neurochemical deficits contribute to their behavioral profiles.

  6. HUMAN METHAMPHETAMINE PHARMACOKINETICS SIMULATED IN THE RAT: BEHAVIORAL AND NEUROCHEMICAL EFFECTS OF A 72- HOUR BINGE

    PubMed Central

    Kuczenski, Ronald; Segal, David S.; Melega, William P.; Lacan, Goran; McCunney, Stanley J.

    2009-01-01

    Bingeing is one pattern of high dose methamphetamine (METH) abuse which involves continuous drug taking over several days and can result in psychotic behaviors for which the brain pathology remains poorly-defined. A corresponding animal model of this type of METH exposure may provide novel insights into the neurochemical and behavioral sequelae associated with this condition. Accordingly, to simulate the pharmacokinetic profile of a human METH binge exposure in rats we used a computer-controlled, intravenous METH procedure (dynamic infusion) to overcome species differences in METH pharmacokinetics and to replicate the human 12-h plasma METH half-life. Animals were treated over 13 weeks with escalating METH doses, using dynamic infusion, and then exposed to a binge in which drug was administered every 3 h for 72h. Throughout the binge, behavioral effects included unabated intense oral stereotypies in the absence of locomotion and in the absence of sleep. Decrements in regional brain dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin levels, measured at 1 and 10 h after the last injection of the binge, had, with the exception of caudate-putamen dopamine and frontal cortex serotonin, recovered by 48 h. At 10 h after the last injection of the binge, [3H]ligand binding to dopamine and vesicular monoamine transporters in caudate-putamen were reduced by 35% and 13%, respectively. In a separate METH binge treated cohort, post-binge behavioral alterations were apparent in an attenuated locomotor response to a METH challenge infusion at 24h after the last injection of the binge. Collectively, the changes we characterized during and following a METH binge suggest that for humans under similar exposure conditions, multiple time-dependent neurochemical deficits contribute to their behavioral profiles. PMID:19571794

  7. Quantification and fatty acid profiles of sulfolipids in two halophytes and a glycophyte grown under different salt concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Balasubramanian; Zorn, Holger; Papenbrock, Jutta

    2004-01-01

    This study was aimed at understanding the role of sulfolipids in salt tolerance mechanisms of the halophytes Aster tripolium L., Compositae, and Sesuvium portulacastrum L., Aizoaceae, and of the glycophyte Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., Brassicaceae. In Aster and Sesuvium the sulfolipid contents increased significantly under salt stress conditions (517 mM or 864 mM). In Arabidopsis, changes in sulfolipid contents were not observed (NaCl up to 100 mM). The fatty acid profile of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) in Aster was modified with increasing NaCl concentrations. LC-MS analyses of sulfolipids from Aster and Sesuvium revealed the presence of 18:3/18:3 and 16:0/18:3 molecules. Obviously, the function of sulfolipids during salt stress differs between halophytic species and between halophytes and glycophytes where sulfolipid accumulation was not observed. PMID:15666543

  8. Profile and quantification of human stratum corneum ceramides by normal-phase liquid chromatography coupled with dynamic multiple reaction monitoring of mass spectrometry: development of targeted lipidomic method and application to human stratum corneum of different age groups.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhi-Xin; Zhang, Jin-Lan; Shen, Chun-Ping; Ma, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Skin, the largest organ of the human body, serves as the primary barrier to the external environment. Ceramides are one of the main constituents of stratum corneum (SC), playing an important role in skin barrier function. Therefore, comprehensive profiling and quantification of SC ceramide is important. Herein, a new targeted lipidomic method for human SC ceramide profiling and quantification is presented and tested. Normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with dynamic multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (NP-HPLC-dMRM-MS) was used to separate ceramides into subclasses and then characterize different ceramides within each subclass on the basis of their characteristics. In total, 483 ceramides were quantified in a single run within 20 min, covering 12 subclasses as well as some glycosylated ceramides not previously reported. Each subclass had typical standard substances (if available) that served to establish representative standard curves and were used for related substances with no standards. Linearity range, limit of quantification (LOQ), limit of detection (LOD), precision, accuracy, stability, and matrix effects were validated. dMRM increased sensitivity and accuracy greatly compared with common MRM (cMRM). This method was successfully applied to the study of human SC from different age groups. A total of 193 potential biomarkers were found to indicate age differences between children and adults. This method is an innovative approach for high-throughput quantification of SC ceramide. Graphical Abstract Method establishment (MRM spectra by the established method) and method application (score scatter plots of authentic samples). PMID:27473427

  9. Integrated identification, qualification and quantification strategy for pharmacokinetic profile study of Guizhi Fuling capsule in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yun-Xi; Jin, Xiao-Liang; Gu, Shi-Yin; Peng, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Rong; Ou-Yang, Bing-Chen; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Aa, Ji-Ye; Wang, Guang-Ji; Sun, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Guizhi Fuling capsule (GZFL), a traditional Chinese medicine formulation, is widely used in China to relieve pain from dysmenorrhea and is now in a Phase II clinical trial in the USA. Due to the low exposure of the five main medicative ingredients (amygdalin, cinnamic acid, gallic acid, paeoniflorin and paeonol) of GZFL in human, a strategy was built to qualitatively and quantitatively identify the possible metabolites of GZFL and to describe the pharmacokinetic profiles of GZFL in human. In this strategy, LC-Q-TOF/MS was used to identify and structurally elucidate the possible metabolites of GZFL in vivo; and a time-based metabolite-confirming step (TBMCs) was used to confirm uncertain metabolites. The simultaneously quantitation results by LC-MS/MS showed low exposure of the five medicative ingredients. According to the strategy we built, a total of 36 metabolites were found and structurally elucidated. The simultaneously semi-quantitative analysis by LC-MS/MS showed that obvious time-concentration curves could be established for 12 of the metabolites, and most of them showed a relatively higher exposure. This study provides a better understanding of the metabolic processes of GZFL in human. PMID:27527657

  10. Quantification of oxidative stress phenotypes based on high-throughput growth profiling of protein kinase and phosphatase knockouts.

    PubMed

    Altıntaş, Ali; Martini, Jacopo; Mortensen, Uffe H; Workman, Christopher T

    2016-02-01

    Cellular responses to oxidative stress are important for restoring redox balance and ensuring cell survival. Genetic defects in response factors can lead to impaired response to oxidative damage and contribute to disease and aging. In single cell organisms, such as yeasts, the integrity of the oxidative stress response can be observed through its influences on growth characteristics. In this study, we investigated the time-dependent batch growth effects as a function of oxidative stress levels in protein kinase and phosphatase deletion backgrounds of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In total, 41 different protein kinases and phosphatase mutants were selected for their known activities in oxidative stress or other stress response pathways and were investigated for their dosage-dependent response to hydrogen peroxide. Detailed growth profiles were analyzed after the induction of stress for growth rate, lag time duration and growth efficiency, and by a novel method to identify stress-induced diauxic shift delay. This approach extracts more phenotypic information than traditional plate-based methods due to the assessment of time dynamics in the time scale of minutes. With this approach, we were able to identify surprisingly diverse sensitivity and resistance patterns as a function of gene knockout.

  11. Integrated identification, qualification and quantification strategy for pharmacokinetic profile study of Guizhi Fuling capsule in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yun-Xi; Jin, Xiao-Liang; Gu, Shi-Yin; Peng, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Rong; Ou-Yang, Bing-Chen; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Aa, Ji-Ye; Wang, Guang-Ji; Sun, Jian-Guo

    2016-08-16

    Guizhi Fuling capsule (GZFL), a traditional Chinese medicine formulation, is widely used in China to relieve pain from dysmenorrhea and is now in a Phase II clinical trial in the USA. Due to the low exposure of the five main medicative ingredients (amygdalin, cinnamic acid, gallic acid, paeoniflorin and paeonol) of GZFL in human, a strategy was built to qualitatively and quantitatively identify the possible metabolites of GZFL and to describe the pharmacokinetic profiles of GZFL in human. In this strategy, LC-Q-TOF/MS was used to identify and structurally elucidate the possible metabolites of GZFL in vivo; and a time-based metabolite-confirming step (TBMCs) was used to confirm uncertain metabolites. The simultaneously quantitation results by LC-MS/MS showed low exposure of the five medicative ingredients. According to the strategy we built, a total of 36 metabolites were found and structurally elucidated. The simultaneously semi-quantitative analysis by LC-MS/MS showed that obvious time-concentration curves could be established for 12 of the metabolites, and most of them showed a relatively higher exposure. This study provides a better understanding of the metabolic processes of GZFL in human.

  12. Integrated identification, qualification and quantification strategy for pharmacokinetic profile study of Guizhi Fuling capsule in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yun-Xi; Jin, Xiao-Liang; Gu, Shi-Yin; Peng, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Rong; Ou-Yang, Bing-Chen; Wang, Yu; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Zhen-Zhong; Aa, Ji-Ye; Wang, Guang-Ji; Sun, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Guizhi Fuling capsule (GZFL), a traditional Chinese medicine formulation, is widely used in China to relieve pain from dysmenorrhea and is now in a Phase II clinical trial in the USA. Due to the low exposure of the five main medicative ingredients (amygdalin, cinnamic acid, gallic acid, paeoniflorin and paeonol) of GZFL in human, a strategy was built to qualitatively and quantitatively identify the possible metabolites of GZFL and to describe the pharmacokinetic profiles of GZFL in human. In this strategy, LC-Q-TOF/MS was used to identify and structurally elucidate the possible metabolites of GZFL in vivo; and a time-based metabolite-confirming step (TBMCs) was used to confirm uncertain metabolites. The simultaneously quantitation results by LC-MS/MS showed low exposure of the five medicative ingredients. According to the strategy we built, a total of 36 metabolites were found and structurally elucidated. The simultaneously semi-quantitative analysis by LC-MS/MS showed that obvious time-concentration curves could be established for 12 of the metabolites, and most of them showed a relatively higher exposure. This study provides a better understanding of the metabolic processes of GZFL in human. PMID:27527657

  13. Quantification of Hydrogen Concentrations in Surface and Interface Layers and Bulk Materials through Depth Profiling with Nuclear Reaction Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Markus; Ohno, Satoshi; Ogura, Shohei; Fukutani, Katsuyuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-29

    Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) via the resonant (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C reaction is a highly effective method of depth profiling that quantitatively and non-destructively reveals the hydrogen density distribution at surfaces, at interfaces, and in the volume of solid materials with high depth resolution. The technique applies a (15)N ion beam of 6.385 MeV provided by an electrostatic accelerator and specifically detects the (1)H isotope in depths up to about 2 μm from the target surface. Surface H coverages are measured with a sensitivity in the order of ~10(13) cm(-2) (~1% of a typical atomic monolayer density) and H volume concentrations with a detection limit of ~10(18) cm(-3) (~100 at. ppm). The near-surface depth resolution is 2-5 nm for surface-normal (15)N ion incidence onto the target and can be enhanced to values below 1 nm for very flat targets by adopting a surface-grazing incidence geometry. The method is versatile and readily applied to any high vacuum compatible homogeneous material with a smooth surface (no pores). Electrically conductive targets usually tolerate the ion beam irradiation with negligible degradation. Hydrogen quantitation and correct depth analysis require knowledge of the elementary composition (besides hydrogen) and mass density of the target material. Especially in combination with ultra-high vacuum methods for in-situ target preparation and characterization, (1)H((15)N,αγ)(12)C NRA is ideally suited for hydrogen analysis at atomically controlled surfaces and nanostructured interfaces. We exemplarily demonstrate here the application of (15)N NRA at the MALT Tandem accelerator facility of the University of Tokyo to (1) quantitatively measure the surface coverage and the bulk concentration of hydrogen in the near-surface region of a H2 exposed Pd(110) single crystal, and (2) to determine the depth location and layer density of hydrogen near the interfaces of thin SiO2 films on Si(100).

  14. Neurochemical changes in the pericalcarine cortex in congenital blindness attributable to bilateral anophthalmia.

    PubMed

    Coullon, Gaelle S L; Emir, Uzay E; Fine, Ione; Watkins, Kate E; Bridge, Holly

    2015-09-01

    Congenital blindness leads to large-scale functional and structural reorganization in the occipital cortex, but relatively little is known about the neurochemical changes underlying this cross-modal plasticity. To investigate the effect of complete and early visual deafferentation on the concentration of metabolites in the pericalcarine cortex, (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed in 14 sighted subjects and 5 subjects with bilateral anophthalmia, a condition in which both eyes fail to develop. In the pericalcarine cortex, where primary visual cortex is normally located, the proportion of gray matter was significantly greater, and levels of choline, glutamate, glutamine, myo-inositol, and total creatine were elevated in anophthalmic relative to sighted subjects. Anophthalmia had no effect on the structure or neurochemistry of a sensorimotor cortex control region. More gray matter, combined with high levels of choline and myo-inositol, resembles the profile of the cortex at birth and suggests that the lack of visual input from the eyes might have delayed or arrested the maturation of this cortical region. High levels of choline and glutamate/glutamine are consistent with enhanced excitatory circuits in the anophthalmic occipital cortex, which could reflect a shift toward enhanced plasticity or sensitivity that could in turn mediate or unmask cross-modal responses. Finally, it is possible that the change in function of the occipital cortex results in biochemical profiles that resemble those of auditory, language, or somatosensory cortex.

  15. Neurochemical changes in the pericalcarine cortex in congenital blindness attributable to bilateral anophthalmia

    PubMed Central

    Coullon, Gaelle S. L.; Emir, Uzay E.; Fine, Ione; Watkins, Kate E.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital blindness leads to large-scale functional and structural reorganization in the occipital cortex, but relatively little is known about the neurochemical changes underlying this cross-modal plasticity. To investigate the effect of complete and early visual deafferentation on the concentration of metabolites in the pericalcarine cortex, 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed in 14 sighted subjects and 5 subjects with bilateral anophthalmia, a condition in which both eyes fail to develop. In the pericalcarine cortex, where primary visual cortex is normally located, the proportion of gray matter was significantly greater, and levels of choline, glutamate, glutamine, myo-inositol, and total creatine were elevated in anophthalmic relative to sighted subjects. Anophthalmia had no effect on the structure or neurochemistry of a sensorimotor cortex control region. More gray matter, combined with high levels of choline and myo-inositol, resembles the profile of the cortex at birth and suggests that the lack of visual input from the eyes might have delayed or arrested the maturation of this cortical region. High levels of choline and glutamate/glutamine are consistent with enhanced excitatory circuits in the anophthalmic occipital cortex, which could reflect a shift toward enhanced plasticity or sensitivity that could in turn mediate or unmask cross-modal responses. Finally, it is possible that the change in function of the occipital cortex results in biochemical profiles that resemble those of auditory, language, or somatosensory cortex. PMID:26180125

  16. Behavioral and neurochemical changes following predatory stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Belzung, C; El Hage, W; Moindrot, N; Griebel, G

    2001-09-01

    This article had several objectives. First it aimed at investigating the anxiogenic-like behaviors elicited by unavoidable cat exposure and/or cat odor across nine strains of mice (BALB/c, C57BL/6, C3H, CBA, DBA/2, NMRI, NZB, SJL, Swiss) in a modified version of the free-exploration test. The second objective was to investigate possible neurochemical changes following cat exposure in Swiss mice by measuring the turnover of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) in several brain regions known to be involved in the modulation of emotional processes (hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum). Finally, the third objective was to examine the effects of anxiolytic drug treatments on the anxiogenic responses elicited by a cat odor (i.e. a feces) in Swiss mice previously exposed to a cat using the free-exploration test. Results from the strain comparison showed that mice could be divided into three distinct groups: two non-reactive strains (NZB and SJL) which were relatively insensitive to predatory exposure and/or odor; five intermediate-reactive strains (Swiss, NMRI, CBA, C3H and BALB/c) which displayed clear anxiogenic-like responses only when exposed to both cat and, subsequently, to feces; and two high reactive strains (C57BL/6 and DBA/2) which showed anxiogenic-like reactions following cat exposure, regardless of the stimulus (clay or feces) present in the free-exploration cage. Neurochemical data revealed that, while brain levels of NA, DA, 5-HT in cat exposed Swiss mice were not significantly different from those of control animals, turnover rates of these monoamines were increased in the hippocampus (NA and 5-HT), hypothalamus and striatum (DA) after cat exposure. Results from pharmacological experiments indicated that repeated administration of the 5-HT reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (5-20 mg/kg, twice a day, for 5 days) completely abolished avoidance of the cat feces in Swiss mice previously exposed to the predator. Neither acute nor repeated

  17. Probing the neurochemical basis of synaesthesia using psychophysics

    PubMed Central

    Terhune, Devin B.; Song, Seoho M.; Duta, Mihaela D.; Kadosh, Roi Cohen

    2014-01-01

    The neurochemical mechanisms that contribute to synaesthesia are poorly understood, but multiple models implicate serotonin and GABA in the development of this condition. Here we used psychophysical tasks to test the predictions that synaesthetes would display behavioral performance consistent with reduced GABA and elevated serotonin in primary visual cortex. Controls and synaesthetes completed the orientation-specific surround suppression (OSSS) and tilt-after effect (TAE) tasks, previously shown to relate to GABA and serotonin levels, respectively. Controls and synaesthetes did not differ in the performance parameter previously associated with GABA or in the magnitude of the TAE. However, synaesthetes did display lower contrast difference thresholds in the OSSS task than controls when no surround (NS) was present. These results are inconsistent with the hypothesized roles of GABA and serotonin in this condition, but provide preliminary evidence that synaesthetes exhibit enhanced contrast discrimination. PMID:24600378

  18. Neurobehavioral and neurochemical effects of prenatal ethanol administration in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, S.; Briggs, F. )

    1992-01-01

    Effects of prenatal ethanol exposure in rats on the behavior and on the levels of multiple neurotransmitters in the brain have been investigated. Timed pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: ethanol-exposed, pair-fed control and nutritional control. Ethanol was administered through Leiber-DeCarli liquid diet containing 6% ethanol (v/v) throughout the gestation period in ethanol-exposed rats. Male offspring were tested for alternations in neurobehavioral and neurochemical parameters. Animals exposed to ethanol in utero exhibited lower birth weights, delayed motor development, delayed learning and no catch-up growth, as well as significant alterations in levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin and GABA in discrete brain areas.

  19. [Neuroanatomical, genetic and neurochemical aspects of infantile autism].

    PubMed

    Gerhant, Aneta; Olajossy, Marcin; Olajossy-Hilkesberger, Luiza

    2013-01-01

    Infantile autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in communication, reciprocal social interaction and restricted repetitive behaviors or interests. Although the cause of these disorders is not yet known, studies strongly suggest a genetic basis with a complex mode of inheritance. The etiopathogenetic processes of autism are extremely complex, which is reflected in the varying course and its symptomatology. Trajectories of brain development and volumes of its structures are aberrant in autistic patients. It is suggested that disturbances in sertotoninergic, gabaergic, glutaminergic, cholinergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission can be responsible for symptoms of autism as well as can disturb the development of the young brain. The objective of this article is to present the results of reasearch on neuroanatomical, neurochemical and genetic aspects of autism.

  20. Noninvasive Quantification of 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Gliomas with IDH1 and IDH2 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Emir, Uzay E; Larkin, Sarah J; de Pennington, Nick; Voets, Natalie; Plaha, Puneet; Stacey, Richard; Al-Qahtani, Khalid; Mccullagh, James; Schofield, Christopher J; Clare, Stuart; Jezzard, Peter; Cadoux-Hudson, Tom; Ansorge, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDH1/2) occur often in diffuse gliomas, where they are associated with abnormal accumulation of the oncometabolite 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Monitoring 2-HG levels could provide prognostic information in this disease, but detection strategies that are noninvasive and sufficiently quantitative have yet to be developed. In this study, we address this need by presenting a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) acquisition scheme that uses an ultrahigh magnetic field (≥ 7T) capable of noninvasively detecting 2-HG with quantitative measurements sufficient to differentiate mutant cytosolic IDH1 and mitochondrial IDH2 in human brain tumors. Untargeted metabolomics analysis of in vivo (1)H-MRS spectra discriminated between IDH-mutant tumors and healthy tissue, and separated IDH1 from IDH2 mutations. High-quality spectra enabled the quantification of neurochemical profiles consisting of at least eight metabolites, including 2-HG, glutamate, lactate, and glutathione in both tumor and healthy tissue voxels. Notably, IDH2 mutation produced more 2-HG than IDH1 mutation, consistent with previous findings in cell culture. By offering enhanced sensitivity and specificity, this scheme can quantitatively detect 2-HG and associated metabolites that may accumulate during tumor progression, with implications to better monitor patient responses to therapy. PMID:26669865

  1. Immunohistochemical and neurochemical correlates of learning deficits in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Stemmelin, J; Lazarus, C; Cassel, S; Kelche, C; Cassel, J C

    2000-01-01

    This study examined whether cholinergic and monoaminergic dysfunctions in the brain could be related to spatial learning capabilities in 26-month-old, as compared to three-month-old, Long-Evans female rats. Performances were evaluated in the water maze task and used to constitute subgroups with a cluster analysis statistical procedure. In the first experiment (histological approach), the first cluster contained young rats and aged unimpaired rats, the second one aged rats with moderate impairment and the third one aged rats with severe impairment. Aged rats showed a reduced number of choline acetyltransferase- and p75(NTR)-positive neurons in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis, and choline acetyltransferase-positive neurons in the striatum. In the second experiment (neurochemical approach), the three clusters comprised young rats, aged rats with moderate impairment and aged rats with severe impairment. Alterations related to aging consisted of reduced concentration of acetylcholine, norepinephrine and serotonin in the striatum, serotonin in the occipital cortex, dopamine and norepinephrine in the dorsal hippocampus, and norepinephrine in the ventral hippocampus. In the first experiment, there were significant correlations between water maze performance and the number of; (i) choline acetyltransferase- and p75(NTR)-positive neurons in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis; (ii) choline acetyltransferase-positive neurons in the striatum and; (iii) p75(NTR)-positive neurons in the medial septum. In the second experiment, water maze performance was correlated with the concentration of; (i) acetylcholine and serotonin in the striatum; (ii) serotonin and norepinephrine in the dorsal hippocampus; (iii) norepinephrine in the frontoparietal cortex and; (iv) with other functional markers such as the 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid/serotonin ratio in the striatum, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/dopamine ratio in the dorsal hippocampus, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid/serotonin and

  2. Neurochemical Analysis of Primary Motor Cortex in Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neena K.; Brooks, William M.; Popescu, Anda E.; VanDillen, Linda; George, Steven Z.; McCarson, Kenneth E.; Gajewski, Byron J.; Gorman, Patrick; Cirstea, Carmen M.

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of the primary motor cortex (M1) in chronic low back pain (LBP) is a relatively new concept. Decreased M1 excitability and an analgesic effect after M1 stimulation have been recently reported. However, the neurochemical changes underlying these functional M1 changes are unknown. The current study investigated whether neurochemicals specific to neurons and glial cells in both right and left M1 are altered. N-Acetylaspartate (NAA) and myo-inositol (mI) were measured with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in 19 subjects with chronic LBP and 14 healthy controls. We also examined correlations among neurochemicals within and between M1 and relationships between neurochemical concentrations and clinical features of pain. Right M1 NAA was lower in subjects with LBP compared to controls (p = 0.008). Left M1 NAA and mI were not significantly different between LBP and control groups. Correlations between neurochemical concentrations across M1s were different between groups (p = 0.008). There were no significant correlations between M1 neurochemicals and pain characteristics. These findings provide preliminary evidence of neuronal depression and altered neuronal-glial interactions across M1 in chronic LBP. PMID:23766894

  3. Social Stress and Psychosis Risk: Common Neurochemical Substrates?

    PubMed

    Mizrahi, Romina

    2016-02-01

    Environmental risk factors have been implicated in the etiology of psychotic disorders, with growing evidence showing the adverse effects of migration, social marginalization, urbanicity, childhood trauma, social defeat, and other adverse experiences on mental health in vulnerable populations. Collectively, social stress may be one mechanism that could link these environmental risk factors. The exact mechanism(s) by which social stress can affect brain function, and in particular the molecular targets involved in psychosis (such as the dopaminergic (DA) system), is (are) not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss the interplay between social environmental risk factors and molecular changes in the human brain; in particular, we will highlight the impact of social stress on three specific neurochemical systems: DA, neuroinflammation/immune, and endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling. We have chosen the latter two molecular pathways based on emerging evidence linking schizophrenia to altered neuroinflammatory processes and cannabis use. We further identify key developmental periods in which social stress interacts with these pathways, suggesting window(s) of opportunities for novel interventions. Taken together, we suggest that they may have a key role in the pathogenesis and disease progression, possibly provide novel treatment options for schizophrenia, and perhaps even prevent it. PMID:26346639

  4. Neurochemical Effects of Chronic Administration of Calcitriol in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Pei; Zhang, Li-Hong; Cai, Hua-Lin; Li, Huan-De; Liu, Yi-Ping; Tang, Mi-Mi; Dang, Rui-Li; Zhu, Wen-Ye; Xue, Ying; He, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Despite accumulating data showing the various neurological actions of vitamin D (VD), its effects on brain neurochemistry are still far from fully understood. To further investigate the neurochemical influence of VD, we assessed neurotransmitter systems in the brain of rats following 6-week calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) administration (50 ng/kg/day or 100 ng/kg/day). Both the two doses of calcitriol enhanced VDR protein level without affecting serum calcium and phosphate status. Rats treated with calcitriol, especially with the higher dose, exhibited elevated γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) status. Correspondingly, the mRNA expression of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 67 was increased. 100 ng/kg of calcitriol administration also increased glutamate and glutamine levels in the prefrontal cortex, but did not alter glutamine synthetase (GS) expression. Additionally, calcitriol treatment promoted tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2) expression without changing dopamine and serotonin status. However, the concentrations of the metabolites of dopamine and serotonin were increased and the drug use also resulted in a significant rise of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) expression, which might be responsible to maintain the homeostasis of dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmission. Collectively, the present study firstly showed the effects of calcitriol in the major neurotransmitter systems, providing new evidence for the role of VD in brain function. PMID:25533012

  5. The neurochemical basis of photic entrainment of the circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, Michael A.; Buckley, Becky; Lutton, Lewis M.

    1992-01-01

    Circadian rhythmicity in mammals is controlled by the action of a light-entrainable hypothalamus, in association with two cell clusters known as the supra chiasmatic nuclei (SCN). In the absence of temporal environmental clues, this pacemaker continues to measure time by an endogenous mechanism (clock), driving biochemical, physiological, and behavioral rhythms that reflect the natural period of the pacemaker oscillation. This endogenous period usually differs slightly from 24 hours (i.e., circadian). When mammals are maintained under a 24 hour light-dark (LD) cycle, the pacemaker becomes entrained such that the period of the pacemaker oscillation matches that of the LD cycle. Potentially entraining photic information is conveyed to the SCN via a direct retinal projection, the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). RHT neurotransmission is thought to be mediated by the release of excitatory amino acids (EAA) in the SCN. In support of this hypothesis, recent experiments using nocturnal rodents have shown that EAA antagonists block the effects of light on pacemaker-driven behavioral rhythms, and attenuate light induced gene expression in SCN cells. An understanding of the neurochemical basis of the photic entrainment process would facilitate the development of pharmacological strategies for maintaining synchrony among shift workers in environments, such as the Space Station, which provide unreliable or conflicting temporal photic clues.

  6. Neurochemical background and approaches in the understanding of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The problems and nature of space motion sickness were defined. The neurochemical and neurophysiological bases of vestibular system function and of the expression of motion sickness wre reviewed. Emphasis was given to the elucidation of the neuropharmacological mechanisms underlying the effects of scopolamine and amphetamine on motion sickness. Characterization of the ascending reticular activating system and the limbic system provided clues to the etiology of the side effects of scopolamine. The interrelationship between central cholinergic pathways and the peripheral (autonomic) expression of motion sickness was described. A correlation between the stress of excessive motion and a variety of hormonal responses to that stress was also detailed. The cholinergic system is involved in the efferent modulation of the vestibular hair cells, as an afferent modulator of the vestibular nuclei, in the activation of cortical and limbic structures, in the expression of motion sickness symptoms and most likely underscores a number of the hormonal changes that occur in stressful motion environments. The role of lecithin in the regulation of the levels of neurotransmitters was characterized as a possible means by which cholinergic neurochemistry can be modulated.

  7. Effect of Artificial Gravity: Central Nervous System Neurochemical Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; D'Amelio, Fernando; Eng, Lawrence F.

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project was to assess chemical and morphological modifications occurring in muscle receptors and the central nervous system of animals subjected to altered gravity (2 x Earth gravity produced by centrifugation and simulated micro gravity produced by hindlimb suspension). The underlying hypothesis for the studies was that afferent (sensory) information sent to the central nervous system by muscle receptors would be changed in conditions of altered gravity and that these changes, in turn, would instigate a process of adaptation involving altered chemical activity of neurons and glial cells of the projection areas of the cerebral cortex that are related to inputs from those muscle receptors (e.g., cells in the limb projection areas). The central objective of this research was to expand understanding of how chronic exposure to altered gravity, through effects on the vestibular system, influences neuromuscular systems that control posture and gait. The project used an approach in which molecular changes in the neuromuscular system were related to the development of effective motor control by characterizing neurochemical changes in sensory and motor systems and relating those changes to motor behavior as animals adapted to altered gravity. Thus, the objective was to identify changes in central and peripheral neuromuscular mechanisms that are associated with the re-establishment of motor control which is disrupted by chronic exposure to altered gravity.

  8. Neuroanatomical and neurochemical bases of theory of mind.

    PubMed

    Abu-Akel, Ahmad; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a novel neurobiological model of theory of mind (ToM) that incorporates both neuroanatomical and neurochemical levels of specificity. Within this model, cortical and subcortical regions are functionally organized into networks that subserve the ability to represent cognitive and affective mental states to both self and other. The model maintains that (1) cognitive and affective aspects of ToM are subserved by dissociable, yet interacting, prefrontal networks. The cognitive ToM network primarily engages the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and the dorsal striatum; and the affective ToM network primarily engages the ventromedial and orbitofrontal cortices, the ventral anterior cingulate cortex, the amygdala and the ventral striatum; (2) self and other mental-state representation is processed by distinct brain regions within the mentalizing network, and that the ability to distinguish between self and other mental states is modulated by a functionally interactive dorsal and ventral attention/selection systems at the temporoparietal junction and the anterior cingulate cortex; and (3) ToM functioning is dependent on the integrity of the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems which are primarily engaged in the maintenance and application processes of represented mental states. In addition to discussing the mechanisms involved in mentalizing in terms of its component processes, we discuss the model's implications to pathologies that variably impact one's ability to represent, attribute and apply mental states. PMID:21803062

  9. Recent neurochemical basis of inert gas narcosis and pressure effects.

    PubMed

    Rostain, J C; Balon, N

    2006-01-01

    Compressed air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture produces from 0.3 MPa nitrogen narcosis. The traditional view was that anaesthesia or narcosis occurs when the volume of a hydrophobic site is caused to expand beyond a critical amount by the absorption of molecules of a narcotic gas. The observation of the pressure reversal effect on general anaesthesia has for a long time supported the lipid theory. However, recently, protein theories are in increasing consideration since results have been interpreted as evidence for a direct anaesthetic-protein interaction. The question is to know whether inert gases act by binding processes on proteins of neurotransmitter receptors. Compression with breathing mixtures where nitrogen is replaced by helium which has a low narcotic potency induces from 1 MPa, the high pressure nervous syndrome which is related to neurochemical disturbances including changes of the amino-acid and monoamine neurotransmissions. The use of narcotic gas (nitrogen or hydrogen) added to a helium-oxygen mixture, reduced some symptoms of the HPNS but also had some effects due to an additional effect of the narcotic potency of the gas. The researches performed at the level of basal ganglia of the rat brain and particularly the nigro-striatal pathway involved in the control of the motor, locomotor and cognitive functions, disrupted by narcosis or pressure, have indicated that GABAergic neurotransmission is implicated via GABAa receptors.

  10. Wireless Amperometric Neurochemical Monitoring Using an Integrated Telemetry Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Roham, Masoud; Halpern, Jeffrey M.; Martin, Heidi B.; Chiel, Hillel J.

    2015-01-01

    An integrated circuit for wireless real-time monitoring of neurochemical activity in the nervous system is described. The chip is capable of conducting high-resolution amperometric measurements in four settings of the input current. The chip architecture includes a first-order ΔΣ modulator (ΔΣM) and a frequency-shift-keyed (FSK) voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) operating near 433 MHz. It is fabricated using the AMI 0.5 μm double-poly triple-metal n-well CMOS process, and requires only one off-chip component for operation. Measured dc current resolutions of ~250 fA, ~1.5 pA, ~4.5 pA, and ~17 pA were achieved for input currents in the range of ±5, ±37, ±150, and ±600 nA, respectively. The chip has been interfaced with a diamond-coated, quartz-insulated, microneedle, tungsten electrode, and successfully recorded dopamine concentration levels as low as 0.5 μM wirelessly over a transmission distance of ~0.5 m in flow injection analysis experiments. PMID:18990633

  11. A review of recent neurochemical data on inert gas narcosis.

    PubMed

    Rostain, J C; Lavoute, C; Risso, J J; Vallée, N; Weiss, M

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen narcosis occurs in humans at around 0.4 MPa (4 ATA). Hydrogen narcosis occurs between 2.6 and 3.0 MPa. In rats, nitrogen disturbances occur from 1 MPa and a loss of righting reflex around 4 MPa. Neurochemical studies in striatum of rats with nitrogen at 3 MPa (75% of anesthesia threshold) with differential pulse voltammetry have demonstrated a decrease in dopamine (DA) release by neurons originated from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Such a decrease is found also with compressed argon, which is more narcotic than nitrogen and with the anesthetic gas nitrous oxide. Inversely, compressed helium with its very low narcotic potency induces DA increase. Microdialysis studies in the striatum have indicated that nitrogen also induces a decrease of glutamate concentration. Nitrogen pressure did not modify NMDA glutamate receptor activities in SNc or striatum but enhanced GABAA receptors activities in SNc. Repetitive exposures to nitrogen narcosis suppressed the DA decrease and induced an increase. This fact and the lack of improvement of motor disturbances did not support the hypothesis of a physiological adaptation. The desensitization of the GABAA receptors on DA cells during recurrent exposures and the parallel long-lasting decrease of glutamate coupled to the increase in NMDA receptor sensitivity suggest a nitrogen neurotoxicity or addiction induced by recurrent exposures. The differential changes produced by inert gases indifferent neurotransmitter receptors would support the binding protein theory. PMID:21384763

  12. Neurochemical properties of the middle cervical ganglion in the sheep.

    PubMed

    Arciszewski, Marcin Bartłomiej; Wasowicz, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    The neurochemical properties of the ovine middle cervical ganglion (MCG) were studied using antibodies raised against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DbetaH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and galanin (GAL). Double-labelling immunocytochemistry revealed that the vast majority (95.5 +/- 0.8%) of postganglionic sympathetic MCG neurons expressed simultaneously both catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes (neurons were TH/DbetaH-positive). A large population of noradrenergic neurons exhibited immunoreactivity (IR) to NPY (62.2 +/- 2.2%), but single NPY-positive perikarya-lacking noradrenergic markers were also observed (2.0 +/- 0.3%). None of the examined MCG neuronal somata contained SP, CGRP, GAL or VIP. A moderate number of noradrenergic nerve fibres located amongst neuronal cell bodies was also found. In small number of these terminals the presence of NPYor GAL (but not CGRP or VIP) was detected. The ovine MCG was numerously innervated with SP-immunoreactive nerve fibres which sometimes formed basket-like formations around postganglionic neurons. The MCG exhibited a sparse CGRP-immunoreactive innervation and lacked VIP-positive nerve terminals. In many aspects the chemical coding of MCG postganglionic neurons and nerve terminals resembles that found in other mammalian cervico-thoracic paravertebral ganglia, but some important species-dependent differences exist. The functional implications of these differences remain to be elucidated. PMID:16447916

  13. Neurochemical Changes Associated with Stress-Induced Sleep Disturbance in Rats: In Vivo and In Vitro Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Do-Wan; Chung, Seockhoon; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Kim, Su Jung; Woo, Chul-Woong; Kim, Sang-Tae; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Kyung Won; Kim, Jeong-Kon; Lee, Jin Seong; Choi, Choong Gon; Shim, Woo Hyun; Choi, Yoonseok; Woo, Dong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to quantitatively assess the changes in the cerebral neurochemical profile and to identify those factors that contribute to the alteration of endogenous biomolecules when rats are subjected to stress-induced sleep disturbance. We exposed Sprague-Dawley rats (controls: n = 9; stress-induced sleep perturbation rats: n = 11) to a psychological stressor (cage exchange method) to achieve stress-induced sleep perturbation. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging assessments were carried out using a high-resolution 9.4 T system. For in vivo neurochemical analysis, a single voxel was localized in the right dorsal hippocampal region, and in vivo spectra were quantified for 17 cerebral neurochemical signals. Rats were sacrificed upon completion of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy protocol, and whole-brain tissue was harvested from twenty subjects. The dopamine and serotonin signals were obtained by performing in vitro liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry on the harvested tissue. In the right dorsal hippocampal region, the gamma-aminobutyric-acid (GABA) and glutamine (Gln) concentrations were significantly higher in the sleep-perturbed rats than in the sham controls. The ratios of Gln/Glu (glutamate), Gln/tCr (total-creatine), and GABA/Glu were also significantly higher in the sleep-perturbed group, while serotonin concentrations were significantly lower in the sleep-perturbed rats. Pearson correlation results among individual rat data indicate that concentrations of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) were significantly higher in SSP rats. A larger correlation coefficient was also observed for the SSP rats. Analysis of the correlation between the in vivo and in vitro signals indicated that the concentrations of Gln, 5-HT, and DA exhibited a significant negative correlation in the SSP rat data but not in that of control rats. The authors propose that the altered and correlated GABA, Gln, 5-HT, and DA concentrations/ratios could be considered

  14. Neurochemical Changes Associated with Stress-Induced Sleep Disturbance in Rats: In Vivo and In Vitro Measurements.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do-Wan; Chung, Seockhoon; Yoo, Hyun Ju; Kim, Su Jung; Woo, Chul-Woong; Kim, Sang-Tae; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Kyung Won; Kim, Jeong-Kon; Lee, Jin Seong; Choi, Choong Gon; Shim, Woo Hyun; Choi, Yoonseok; Woo, Dong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to quantitatively assess the changes in the cerebral neurochemical profile and to identify those factors that contribute to the alteration of endogenous biomolecules when rats are subjected to stress-induced sleep disturbance. We exposed Sprague-Dawley rats (controls: n = 9; stress-induced sleep perturbation rats: n = 11) to a psychological stressor (cage exchange method) to achieve stress-induced sleep perturbation. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging assessments were carried out using a high-resolution 9.4 T system. For in vivo neurochemical analysis, a single voxel was localized in the right dorsal hippocampal region, and in vivo spectra were quantified for 17 cerebral neurochemical signals. Rats were sacrificed upon completion of the magnetic resonance spectroscopy protocol, and whole-brain tissue was harvested from twenty subjects. The dopamine and serotonin signals were obtained by performing in vitro liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry on the harvested tissue. In the right dorsal hippocampal region, the gamma-aminobutyric-acid (GABA) and glutamine (Gln) concentrations were significantly higher in the sleep-perturbed rats than in the sham controls. The ratios of Gln/Glu (glutamate), Gln/tCr (total-creatine), and GABA/Glu were also significantly higher in the sleep-perturbed group, while serotonin concentrations were significantly lower in the sleep-perturbed rats. Pearson correlation results among individual rat data indicate that concentrations of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) were significantly higher in SSP rats. A larger correlation coefficient was also observed for the SSP rats. Analysis of the correlation between the in vivo and in vitro signals indicated that the concentrations of Gln, 5-HT, and DA exhibited a significant negative correlation in the SSP rat data but not in that of control rats. The authors propose that the altered and correlated GABA, Gln, 5-HT, and DA concentrations/ratios could be considered

  15. Neurochemical Evidence of Potential Neurotoxicity After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalm, Marie; Abel, Edvard; Wasling, Pontus; Nyman, Jan; Hietala, Max Albert; Bremell, Daniel; Hagberg, Lars; Elam, Mikael; Blennow, Kaj; Björk-Eriksson, Thomas; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To examine whether cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for neuroaxonal damage, neuroglial activation, and amyloid β–related processes could characterize the neurochemical response to cranial radiation. Methods and Materials: Before prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) of patients with small cell lung cancer, each patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, lumbar puncture, and Mini-Mental State Examination of cognitive function. These examinations were repeated at approximately 3 and 12 months after radiation. Results: The major findings were as follows. (1) Cerebrospinal fluid markers for neuronal and neuroglial injury were elevated during the subacute phase after PCI. Neurofilament and T-tau increased 120% and 50%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). The same was seen for the neuroglial markers YKL-40 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, which increased 144% and 106%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). (2) The levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein-α and -β were reduced 44% and 46%, respectively, 3 months after PCI, and the levels continued to decrease as long as 1 year after treatment (P<.05). (3) Mini-Mental State Examination did not reveal any cognitive decline, indicating that a more sensitive test should be used in future studies. Conclusion: In conclusion, we were able to detect radiation therapy–induced changes in several markers reflecting neuronal injury, inflammatory/astroglial activation, and altered amyloid precursor protein/amyloid β metabolism, despite the low number of patients and quite moderate radiation doses (20-30 Gy). These changes are hypothesis generating and could potentially be used to assess the individual risk of developing long-term symptoms of chronic encephalopathy after PCI. This has to be evaluated in large studies with extended clinical follow-up and more detailed neurocognitive assessments.

  16. Caffeine triggers behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Ardais, A P; Borges, M F; Rocha, A S; Sallaberry, C; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2014-06-13

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide but concerns arise about the growing intake of caffeine-containing drinks by adolescents since the effects of caffeine on cognitive functions and neurochemical aspects of late brain maturation during adolescence are poorly known. We now studied the behavioral impact in adolescent male rats of regular caffeine intake at low (0.1mg/mL), moderate (0.3mg/mL) and moderate/high (1.0mg/mL) doses only during their active period (from 7:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M.). All tested doses of caffeine were devoid of effects on locomotor activity, but triggered anxiogenic effects. Caffeine (0.3 and 1mg/mL) improved the performance in the object recognition task, but the higher dose of caffeine (1.0mg/mL) decreased the habituation to an open-field arena, suggesting impaired non-associative memory. All tested doses of caffeine decreased the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein and synaptosomal-associated protein-25, but failed to modify neuron-specific nuclear protein immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Caffeine (0.3-1mg/mL) increased the density of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and proBDNF density as well as adenosine A1 receptor density in the hippocampus, whereas the higher dose of caffeine (1mg/mL) increased the density of proBDNF and BDNF and decreased A1 receptor density in the cerebral cortex. These findings document an impact of caffeine consumption in adolescent rats with a dual impact on anxiety and recognition memory, associated with changes in BDNF levels and decreases of astrocytic and nerve terminal markers without overt neuronal damage in hippocampal and cortical regions.

  17. Neurochemical Characterization of the Tree Shrew Dorsal Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Matthew W.; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Melendez-Ferro, Miguel; Perez-Costas, Emma

    2011-01-01

    The striatum is a major component of the basal ganglia and is associated with motor and cognitive functions. Striatal pathologies have been linked to several disorders, including Huntington’s, Tourette’s syndrome, obsessive–compulsive disorders, and schizophrenia. For the study of these striatal pathologies different animal models have been used, including rodents and non-human primates. Rodents lack on morphological complexity (for example, the lack of well defined caudate and putamen nuclei), which makes it difficult to translate data to the human paradigm. Primates, and especially higher primates, are the closest model to humans, but there are ever-increasing restrictions to the use of these animals for research. In our search for a non-primate animal model with a striatum that anatomically (and perhaps functionally) can resemble that of humans, we turned our attention to the tree shrew. Evolutionary genetic studies have provided strong data supporting that the tree shrews (Scadentia) are one of the closest groups to primates, although their brain anatomy has only been studied in detail for specific brain areas. Morphologically, the tree shrew striatum resembles the primate striatum with the presence of an internal capsule separating the caudate and putamen, but little is known about its neurochemical composition. Here we analyzed the expression of calcium-binding proteins, the presence and distribution of the striosome and matrix compartments (by the use of calbindin, tyrosine hydroxylase, and acetylcholinesterase immunohistochemistry), and the GABAergic system by immunohistochemistry against glutamic acid decarboxylase and Golgi impregnation. In summary, our results show that when compared to primates, the tree shrew dorsal striatum presents striking similarities in the distribution of most of the markers studied, while presenting some marked divergences when compared to the rodent striatum. PMID:21887131

  18. Quantification of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-protein adducts in the in vivo gastric digesta of mini-pigs using a GC-MS/MS method with accuracy profile validation.

    PubMed

    Delosière, Mylène; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique; Chantelauze, Céline; Durand, Denys; Thomas, Agnès; Joly, Charlotte; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle; Rémond, Didier; Comte, Blandine; Gladine, Cécile; Guy, Alexandre; Durand, Thierry; Laurentie, Michel; Dufour, Claire

    2016-08-10

    Hydroxyalkenals are lipid oxidation end-products resulting from the oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). This study aimed at quantifying the production of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-protein adducts (HNE-P) via Michael addition from n-6 PUFA oxidation in the gastric digesta of mini-pigs after the consumption of meat-based meals with different plant antioxidant contents. Using the accuracy profile procedure, we validated an extraction protocol for the quantification of HNE-P by GC-MS/MS in gastric contents. The formation of HNE-P in the gastric compartment was observed for the first time, with concentrations ranging from less than 0.52 to 1.33 nmol HNE-P per 500 mg digesta. Nevertheless, most gastric HNE-P levels were below the limit of quantification of 0.52 nmol HNE-P per 500 mg digesta. In this animal study, the protective effect of plant antioxidant sources on HNE-P formation was not evidenced contrasting with the results using TBARS as markers. PMID:27418316

  19. Chemical profiling and quantification of Gua-Lou-Gui-Zhi decoction by high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and ultra-performance liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Huang, Mingqing; Li, Huang; Chen, Xianwen; Zhang, Yuqin; Liu, Jie; Xu, Wei; Chu, Kedan; Chen, Lidian

    2015-04-01

    Gua-Lou-Gui-Zhi decoction (GLGZD) is a classical formula of traditional Chinese medicine, which has been commonly used to treat dysfunction after stroke, epilepsy and spinal cord injury. In this study, a systematic method was established for chemical profiling and quantification analysis of the major constituents in GLGZD. For qualitative analysis, a method of high performance liquid chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF MS) was developed. 106 compounds, including monoterpene glycosides, galloyl glucoses, phenolic acids, flavonoids, gingerols and triterpene saponins were identified or tentatively presumed by comparison with reference standards or literature data. According to the qualitative results, a new quantitative analysis method of ultra-performance liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (QqQ-MS) was established. 24 representative compounds were simultaneously detected in 10 batches of GLGZD samples in 7.5 min. The calibration curves for all analytes showed good linearity (r>0.9959) within the test ranges. The LODs and the LOQs were less than 30.6 and 70.9 ng/mL, respectively. The RSDs of intra- and inter-day precision, repeatability and stability were below 3.64%, 4.85%, 4.84% and 3.87%, respectively. The overall recoveries ranged from 94.94% to 103.66%, with the RSDs within 5.12%. This study established a high sensitive and efficient method for the integrating quality control, including identification and quantification of Chinese medicinal preparation.

  20. Social vs. environmental stress models of depression from a behavioural and neurochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Venzala, E; García-García, A L; Elizalde, N; Tordera, R M

    2013-07-01

    Major depression is a mental disorder often preceded by exposure to chronic stress or stressful life events. Recently, animal models based on social conflict such as chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) are proposed to be more relevant to stress-induced human psychopathology compared to environmental models like the chronic mild stress (CMS). However, while CMS reproduces specifically core depressive symptoms such as anhedonia and helplessness, CSDS studies rely on the analysis of stress-induced social avoidance, addressing different neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we study comparatively the two models from a behavioural and neurochemical approach and their possible relevance to human depression. Mice (C57BL/6) were exposed to CMS or CSDS for six weeks and ten days. Anhedonia was periodically evaluated. A battery of test applied during the fourth week after the stress procedure included motor activity, memory, anxiety, social interaction and helplessness. Subsequently, we examined glutamate, GABA, 5-HT and dopamine levels in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and brainstem. CMS induced a clear depressive-like profile including anhedonia, helplessness and memory impairment. CSDS induced anhedonia, hyperactivity, anxiety and social avoidance, signs also common to anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorders. While both models disrupted the excitatory inhibitory balance in the prefrontal cortex, CMS altered importantly this balance in the brainstem. Moreover, CSDS decreased dopamine in the prefrontal cortex and brainstem. We suggests that while depressive-like behaviours might be associated to altered aminoacid neurotransmission in cortical and brain stem areas, CSDS induced anxiety behaviours might be linked to specific alteration of dopaminergic pathways involved in rewarding processes.

  1. Physiological, Morphological and Neurochemical Characterization of Neurons Modulated by Movement

    PubMed Central

    Dessem, Dean

    2011-01-01

    The role of individual neurons and their function in neuronal circuits is fundamental to understanding the neuronal mechanisms of sensory and motor functions. Most investigations of sensorimotor mechanisms rely on either examination of neurons while an animal is static1,2 or record extracellular neuronal activity during a movement.3,4 While these studies have provided the fundamental background for sensorimotor function, they either do not evaluate functional information which occurs during a movement or are limited in their ability to fully characterize the anatomy, physiology and neurochemical phenotype of the neuron. A technique is shown here which allows extensive characterization of individual neurons during an in vivo movement. This technique can be used not only to study primary afferent neurons but also to characterize motoneurons and sensorimotor interneurons. Initially the response of a single neuron is recorded using electrophysiological methods during various movements of the mandible followed by determination of the receptive field for the neuron. A neuronal tracer is then intracellularly injected into the neuron and the brain is processed so that the neuron can be visualized with light, electron or confocal microscopy (Fig. 1). The detailed morphology of the characterized neuron is then reconstructed so that neuronal morphology can be correlated with the physiological response of the neuron (Figs. 2,3). In this communication important key details and tips for successful implementation of this technique are provided. Valuable additional information can be determined for the neuron under study by combining this method with other techniques. Retrograde neuronal labeling can be used to determine neurons with which the labeled neuron synapses; thus allowing detailed determination of neuronal circuitry. Immunocytochemistry can be combined with this method to examine neurotransmitters within the labeled neuron and to determine the chemical phenotypes of

  2. Flip angle profile correction for T₁ and T₂ quantification with look-locker inversion recovery 2D steady-state free precession imaging.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Mitchell A; Nguyen, Thanh D; Spincemaille, Pascal; Prince, Martin R; Weinsaft, Jonathan W; Wang, Yi

    2012-11-01

    Fast methods using balanced steady-state free precession have been developed to reduce the scan time of T₁ and T₂ mapping. However, flip angle (FA) profiles created by the short radiofrequency pulses used in steady-state free precession deviate substantially from the ideal rectangular profile, causing T₁ and T₂ mapping errors. The purpose of this study was to develop a FA profile correction for T₁ and T₂ mapping with Look-Locker 2D inversion recovery steady-state free precession and to validate this method using 2D spin echo as a reference standard. Phantom studies showed consistent improvement in T₁ and T₂ accuracy using profile correction at multiple FAs. Over six human calves, profile correction provided muscle T₁ estimates with mean error ranging from excellent (-0.6%) at repetition time/FA = 18 ms/60° to acceptable (6.8%) at repetition time/FA = 4.9 ms/30°, while muscle T₂ estimates were less accurate with mean errors of 31.2% and 47.9%, respectively.

  3. Roadmap and standard operating procedures for biobanking and discovery of neurochemical markers in ALS.

    PubMed

    Otto, Markus; Bowser, Robert; Turner, Martin; Berry, James; Brettschneider, Johannes; Connor, James; Costa, Júlia; Cudkowicz, Merit; Glass, Jonathan; Jahn, Olaf; Lehnert, Stefan; Malaspina, Andrea; Parnetti, Lucilla; Petzold, Axel; Shaw, Pamela; Sherman, Alexander; Steinacker, Petra; Süssmuth, Sigurd; Teunissen, Charlotte; Tumani, Hayrettin; Wuolikainen, Anna; Ludolph, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Despite major advances in deciphering the neuropathological hallmarks of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), validated neurochemical biomarkers for monitoring disease activity, earlier diagnosis, defining prognosis and unlocking key pathophysiological pathways are lacking. Although several candidate biomarkers exist, translation into clinical application is hindered by small sample numbers, especially longitudinal, for independent verification. This review considers the potential routes to the discovery of neurochemical markers in ALS, and provides a consensus statement on standard operating procedures that will facilitate multicenter collaboration, validation and ultimately clinical translation. PMID:22214350

  4. N-(4-((2-(trifluoromethyl)-3-hydroxy-4-(isobutyryl)phenoxy)methyl)benzyl)-1-methyl-1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide (THIIC), a novel metabotropic glutamate 2 potentiator with potential anxiolytic/antidepressant properties: in vivo profiling suggests a link between behavioral and central nervous system neurochemical changes.

    PubMed

    Fell, Matthew J; Witkin, Jeffrey M; Falcone, Julie F; Katner, Jason S; Perry, Kenneth W; Hart, John; Rorick-Kehn, Linda; Overshiner, Carl D; Rasmussen, Kurt; Chaney, Stephen F; Benvenga, Mark J; Li, Xia; Marlow, Deanna L; Thompson, Linda K; Luecke, Susan K; Wafford, Keith A; Seidel, Wesley F; Edgar, Dale M; Quets, Anne T; Felder, Christian C; Wang, XuShan; Heinz, Beverly A; Nikolayev, Alexander; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Mayhugh, Daniel; Khilevich, Albert; Zhang, Deyi; Ebert, Philip J; Eckstein, James A; Ackermann, Bradley L; Swanson, Steven P; Catlow, John T; Dean, Robert A; Jackson, Kimberley; Tauscher-Wisniewski, Sitra; Marek, Gerard J; Schkeryantz, Jeffrey M; Svensson, Kjell A

    2011-01-01

    The normalization of excessive glutamatergic neurotransmission through the activation of metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) receptors may have therapeutic potential in a variety of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety/depression and schizophrenia. Here, we characterize the pharmacological properties of N-(4-((2-(trifluoromethyl)-3-hydroxy-4-(isobutyryl)phenoxy)methyl)benzyl)-1-methyl-1H-imidazole-4-carboxamide (THIIC), a structurally novel, potent, and selective allosteric potentiator of human and rat mGlu2 receptors (EC(50) = 23 and 13 nM, respectively). THIIC produced anxiolytic-like efficacy in the rat stress-induced hyperthermia assay and the mouse stress-induced elevation of cerebellar cGMP and marble-burying assays. THIIC also produced robust activity in three assays that detect antidepressant-like activity, including the mouse forced-swim test, the rat differential reinforcement of low rate 72-s assay, and the rat dominant-submissive test, with a maximal response similar to that of imipramine. Effects of THIIC in the forced-swim test and marble burying were deleted in mGlu2 receptor null mice. Analysis of sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) showed that THIIC had a sleep-promoting profile with increased non-rapid eye movement (REM) and decreased REM sleep. THIIC also decreased the dark phase increase in extracellular histamine in the medial prefrontal cortex and decreased levels of the histamine metabolite tele-methylhistamine (t-MeHA) in rat cerebrospinal fluid. Collectively, these results indicate that the novel mGlu2-positive allosteric modulator THIIC has robust activity in models used to predict anxiolytic/antidepressant efficacy, substantiating, at least with this molecule, differentiation in the biological impact of mGlu2 potentiation versus mGlu2/3 orthosteric agonism. In addition, we provide evidence that sleep EEG and CSF t-MeHA might function as viable biomarker approaches to facilitate the translational development of THIIC and other mGlu2

  5. Examining Neurochemical Determinants of Inspection Time: Development of a Biological Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stough, Con; Thompson, J. C.; Bates, T. C.; Nathan, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes results of several studies of the neurochemical determinants of inspection time (IT), outlining the significance of several studies in which performance on the IT task is measured before and after modulating key human central nervous system neurotransmitters and receptor systems. Results of these studies suggest a primarily cholinergic…

  6. Compulsive Behavior and Eye Blink in Prader-Willi Syndrome: Neurochemical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holsen, Laura; Thompson, Travis

    2004-01-01

    Compulsive behavior in Prader-Willi syndrome is well-documented, though the neurochemical basis of these behaviors remains unknown. We studied a group of 16 people with Prader-Willi syndrome and a comparison group of 19 people with intellectual disability. Using eye-blink rate as an indirect measure of central nervous system dopamine, we found a…

  7. Quantification of ammonia oxidation rates and the distribution of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria in marine sediment depth profiles from Catalina Island, California

    PubMed Central

    Beman, J. M.; Bertics, Victoria J.; Braunschweiler, Thomas; Wilson, Jesse M.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial communities present in marine sediments play a central role in nitrogen biogeochemistry at local to global scales. Along the oxidation–reduction gradients present in sediment profiles, multiple nitrogen cycling processes (such as nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation) are active and actively coupled to one another – yet the microbial communities responsible for these transformations and the rates at which they occur are still poorly understood. We report pore water geochemical (O2, NH4+, and NO3−) profiles, quantitative profiles of archaeal and bacterial amoA genes, and ammonia oxidation rate measurements, from bioturbated marine sediments of Catalina Island, California. Across triplicate sediment cores collected offshore at Bird Rock (BR) and within Catalina Harbor (CH), oxygen penetration (0.24–0.5 cm depth) and the abundance of amoA genes (up to 9.30 × 107 genes g–1) varied with depth and between cores. Bacterial amoA genes were consistently present at depths of up to 10 cm, and archaeal amoA was readily detected in BR cores, and CH cores from 2008, but not 2007. Although detection of DNA is not necessarily indicative of active growth and metabolism, ammonia oxidation rate measurements made in 2008 (using isotope tracer) demonstrated the production of oxidized nitrogen at depths where amoA was present. Rates varied with depth and between cores, but indicate that active ammonia oxidation occurs at up to 10 cm depth in bioturbated CH sediments, where it may be carried out by either or both ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria. PMID:22837756

  8. Quantification of the pulse wave velocity of the descending aorta using axial velocity profiles from phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsi-Yu; Peng, Hsu-Hsia; Wang, Jaw-Lin; Wen, Chih-Yung; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2006-10-01

    The pulse wave velocity (PWV) of aortic blood flow is considered a surrogate for aortic compliance. A new method using phase-contrast (PC)-MRI is presented whereby the spatial and temporal profiles of axial velocity along the descending aorta can be analyzed. Seventeen young healthy volunteers (the YH group), six older healthy volunteers (the OH group), and six patients with coronary artery disease (the CAD group) were studied. PC-MRI covering the whole descending aorta was acquired, with velocity gradients encoding the in-plane velocity. From the corrected axial flow velocity profiles, PWV was determined from the slope of an intersecting line between the presystolic and early systolic phases. Furthermore, the aortic elastic modulus (Ep) was derived from the ratio of the brachial pulse pressure to the strain of the aortic diameter. The PWV increased from YH to OH to CAD (541 +/- 94, 808 +/- 184, 1121 +/- 218 cm/s, respectively; P = 0.015 between YH and OH; P = 0.023 between OH and CAD). There was a high correlation between PWV and Ep (r = 0.861, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that age and CAD were independent risk factors for an increase in the PWV. Compared to existing methods, our method requires fewer assumptions and provides a more intuitive and objective way to estimate the PWV.

  9. Specific targeted quantification combined with non-targeted metabolite profiling for quality evaluation of Gastrodia elata tubers from different geographical origins and cultivars.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Dong; Fan, Ya-Xi; Jin, Can-Can; Wang, Fei; Xin, Gui-Zhong; Li, Ping; Li, Hui-Jun

    2016-06-10

    Gastrodia elata tuber (GET) has been widely used as a famous herbal medicine in China and other East Asian countries. In this work, we developed a comprehensive strategy integrating targeted and non-targeted analyses for quality evaluation and discrimination of GET from different geographical origins and cultivars. Firstly, 43 batches of GET samples of five cultivars from three regions in China were efficiently quantified by a "single standard to determine multi-components" (SSDMC) method. Six marker compounds were simultaneously determined within 11min using gastrodin as the internal standard. It showed that samples from different regions and cultivars could not be differentiated by the contents of six marker compounds. Secondly, a non-targeted metabolite profiling analysis was performed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF/MS). Samples from different geographical origins and cultivars were clearly discriminated by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). 147 discriminant ions contributing to the group separation were selected from 1194 aligned variables. Furthermore, based on the relative intensities of discriminant ions, support vector machines (SVM) was employed to predict the geographical origins of GET. The obtained SVM model showed excellent prediction performance with an average prediction accuracy of 100%. These results demonstrated that the UHPLC-QTOF/MS-based non-targeted metabolite profiling analysis, as a vital supplement to targeted analysis, can be used to discriminate the geographical origins and cultivars of GET.

  10. Specific targeted quantification combined with non-targeted metabolite profiling for quality evaluation of Gastrodia elata tubers from different geographical origins and cultivars.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Dong; Fan, Ya-Xi; Jin, Can-Can; Wang, Fei; Xin, Gui-Zhong; Li, Ping; Li, Hui-Jun

    2016-06-10

    Gastrodia elata tuber (GET) has been widely used as a famous herbal medicine in China and other East Asian countries. In this work, we developed a comprehensive strategy integrating targeted and non-targeted analyses for quality evaluation and discrimination of GET from different geographical origins and cultivars. Firstly, 43 batches of GET samples of five cultivars from three regions in China were efficiently quantified by a "single standard to determine multi-components" (SSDMC) method. Six marker compounds were simultaneously determined within 11min using gastrodin as the internal standard. It showed that samples from different regions and cultivars could not be differentiated by the contents of six marker compounds. Secondly, a non-targeted metabolite profiling analysis was performed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF/MS). Samples from different geographical origins and cultivars were clearly discriminated by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). 147 discriminant ions contributing to the group separation were selected from 1194 aligned variables. Furthermore, based on the relative intensities of discriminant ions, support vector machines (SVM) was employed to predict the geographical origins of GET. The obtained SVM model showed excellent prediction performance with an average prediction accuracy of 100%. These results demonstrated that the UHPLC-QTOF/MS-based non-targeted metabolite profiling analysis, as a vital supplement to targeted analysis, can be used to discriminate the geographical origins and cultivars of GET. PMID:27157425

  11. The neurochemical profile of the hippocampus in isoflurane-treated and unanesthetized rat pups

    PubMed Central

    Akulov, Andrey E.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo study of cerebral metabolism in neonatal animals by high-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is an important tool for deciphering the developmental origins of adult diseases. Up to date, all in vivo spectrum acquisition procedures have been performed in neonatal rodents under anesthesia. However, it is still unknown if the inhaled anesthetic isoflurane, which is commonly used in magnetic resonance imaging studies, could affect metabolite levels in the brain of neonatal rats. Moreover, the unanesthetized MRS preparation that uses neonatal rodent pups is still lacking. Here, a novel restraint protocol was developed for neonatal rats in accordance with the European Directive 2010/63/EU. This protocol shares the same gradation of severity as the protocol for non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging of animals with appropriate sedation or anesthesia. Such immobilization of neonatal rats without anesthesia can be implemented for MRS studies when an interaction between anesthetic and target drugs is expected. Short-term isoflurane treatment did not affect the levels of key metabolites in the hippocampi of anesthetized pups and, in contrast to juvenile and adult rodents, it is suitable for MRS studies in neonatal rats when the interaction between anesthetic and target drugs is not expected. PMID:27486369

  12. Efficient quantification of the health-relevant anthocyanin and phenolic acid profiles in commercial cultivars and breeding selections of blueberries ( Vaccinium spp.).

    PubMed

    Yousef, Gad G; Brown, Allan F; Funakoshi, Yayoi; Mbeunkui, Flaubert; Grace, Mary H; Ballington, James R; Loraine, Ann; Lila, Mary A

    2013-05-22

    Anthocyanins and phenolic acids are major secondary metabolites in blueberry with important implications for human health maintenance. An improved protocol was developed for the accurate, efficient, and rapid comparative screening for large blueberry sample sets. Triplicates of six commercial cultivars and four breeding selections were analyzed using the new method. The compound recoveries ranged from 94.2 to 97.5 ± 5.3% when samples were spiked with commercial standards prior to extraction. Eighteen anthocyanins and 4 phenolic acids were quantified in frozen and freeze-dried fruits. Large variations for individual and total anthocyanins, ranging from 201.4 to 402.8 mg/100 g, were assayed in frozen fruits. The total phenolic acid content ranged from 23.6 to 61.7 mg/100 g in frozen fruits. Across all genotypes, freeze-drying resulted in minor reductions in anthocyanin concentration (3.9%) compared to anthocyanins in frozen fruits. However, phenolic acids increased by an average of 1.9-fold (±0.3) in the freeze-dried fruit. Different genotypes frequently had comparable overall levels of total anthocyanins and phenolic acids, but differed dramatically in individual profiles of compounds. Three of the genotypes contained markedly higher concentrations of delphinidin 3-O-glucoside, cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, and malvidin 3-O-glucoside, which have previously been implicated as bioactive principles in this fruit. The implications of these findings for human health benefits are discussed. PMID:23635035

  13. Soil organic carbon stocks quantification in Mediterranean natural areas, a trade-off between entire soil profiles and soil control sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Brevik, Eric. C.; Cerdá, Artemi

    2015-04-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is extremely important in the global carbon (C) cycle; also, SOC is a soil property subject to changes, inasmuch as SOC is highly variable in space and time. The scientific community is researching the fate of the organic carbon in the ecosystems and this is why there is a blooming interest on this topic (Oliveira et al., 2014; Kukal et al., 2015). Soil organic matter play a key role in the Soil System (Fernández-Romero et al., 2014; Parras-Alcántara and Lozano García, 2014; Lozano-García and Parras-Alcántara; Parras-Alcántara et al., 2015).Globally it is known that soil C sequestration is a strategy to mitigate climate change. Over time, some researchers have analyzed entire soil profiles (ESP) by pedogenetic horizons and other researchers have analyzed soil control sections (SCS) (edaphic controls to different thickness), and in each case the benefits of the methodology established was justified. However, very few studies compare both methods (ESP versus SCS). This research sought to analyze the SOC stock (SOCS) variability using both methods (ESP and SCS) in The Despeñaperros Natural Park, a nature reserve that consists of a 76.8 km2 forested area in southern Spain. The park is in a Mediterranean environment and is a natural area (free of human disturbance). Thirty-four sampling points were selected in the study zone. Each sampling point was analyzed in two different ways, as ESP (by horizons) and as SCS with different depth increments (0-25, 25-50, 50-75 and 75-100 cm). The major goal of this research was to study the SOCS variability at regional scale. The studied soils were classified as Phaeozems, Cambisols, Regosols and Leptosols. The total SOCS in the Despeñaperros Natural Park was over 28.2% greater when SCS were used compared to ESP, ranging from 0.8144 Tg C to 0.6353 Tg C respectively (1 Tg = 10E12 g). However, when the top soil (surface horizon and superficial section control) was analyzed, this difference increased to

  14. Neurochemical phenotype of cytoglobin-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2014-09-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb), a novel oxygen-binding protein, is expressed in the majority of tissues and has been proposed to function in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism in the vasculature and to have cytoprotective properties. However, the overall functions of Cygb remain elusive. Cygb is also expressed in a subpopulation of brain neurons. Recently, it has been shown that stress upregulates Cygb expression in the brain and the majority of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive neurons, an enzyme that produces NO, co-express Cygb. However, there are more neurons expressing Cygb than nNOS, thus a large number of Cygb neurons remain uncharacterized by the neurochemical content. The aim of the present study was to provide an additional and more detailed neurochemical phenotype of Cygb-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus. The rat hippocampus was chosen due to the abundance of Cygb, as well as this limbic structure being an important target in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Using triple immunohistochemistry, it was demonstrated that nearly all the parvalbumin- and heme oxygenase 1-positive neurons co-express Cygb and to a large extent, these neuron populations are distinct from the population of Cygb neurons co-expressing nNOS. Furthermore, it was shown that the majority of neurons expressing somastostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide also co-express Cygb and nNOS. Detailed information regarding the neurochemical phenotype of Cygb neurons in the hippocampus can be a valuable tool in determining the function of Cygb in the brain.

  15. Behavioural and neurochemical features of olfactory bulbectomized rats resembling depression with comorbid anxiety.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dayong; Noda, Yukihiro; Tsunekawa, Hiroko; Zhou, Yuan; Miyazaki, Masayuki; Senzaki, Koji; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2007-03-28

    In order to probe the nature and validity of olfactory bulbectomized (OB) rats as a model of depression, we reevaluated their behavioural and neurochemical deficits in relation to the symptoms and neurochemical abnormalities of depression using our protocols, which distinguish anhedonia-resembling behaviour in sexual behavioural test, the hippocampus (Hip)-dependent long-term memory and anxiety-resembling behaviour specially. Besides exploratory hyperactivity in response to a novel environmental stress resembling the psychomotor agitation, OB rats showed a decrease of libido, and a deficit of long-term explicit memory, resembling loss of interest and cognitive deficits in depressive patients, respectively. OB rats also exhibited the anxiety symptom-resembling behaviour in social interaction and plus-maze tests. In the OB rats, we found degenerated neurons in the piriform cortex, decreased protein expression of NMDA receptor subunit 1 (NR1), but not NR2A or NR2B, in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), Hip and amygdala (Amg), and decreased phosphorylation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) in the PFC and Hip, but not Amg. The behavioural and neurochemical abnormalities in OB rats, except for the performance in the plus-maze task and neuronal degeneration, were significantly attenuated by repeated treatment with desipramine (10 mg/kg), a typical antidepressant. The present study indicated that OB rats may be a model of depression with comorbid anxiety, characterized by agitation, sexual and cognitive dysfunction, neuronal degeneration, decreased protein expression of NR1, and decreased phosphorylation of CREB.

  16. A Diamond-Based Electrode for Detection of Neurochemicals in the Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Bennet, Kevin E; Tomshine, Jonathan R; Min, Hoon-Ki; Manciu, Felicia S; Marsh, Michael P; Paek, Seungleal B; Settell, Megan L; Nicolai, Evan N; Blaha, Charles D; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Chang, Su-Youne; Lee, Kendall H

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS), a surgical technique to treat certain neurologic and psychiatric conditions, relies on pre-determined stimulation parameters in an open-loop configuration. The major advancement in DBS devices is a closed-loop system that uses neurophysiologic feedback to dynamically adjust stimulation frequency and amplitude. Stimulation-driven neurochemical release can be measured by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), but existing FSCV electrodes rely on carbon fiber, which degrades quickly during use and is therefore unsuitable for chronic neurochemical recording. To address this issue, we developed durable, synthetic boron-doped diamond-based electrodes capable of measuring neurochemical release in humans. Compared to carbon fiber electrodes, they were more than two orders-of-magnitude more physically-robust and demonstrated longevity in vitro without deterioration. Applied for the first time in humans, diamond electrode recordings from thalamic targets in patients (n = 4) undergoing DBS for tremor produced signals consistent with adenosine release at a sensitivity comparable to carbon fiber electrodes. (Clinical trials # NCT01705301). PMID:27014033

  17. A Diamond-Based Electrode for Detection of Neurochemicals in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bennet, Kevin E.; Tomshine, Jonathan R.; Min, Hoon-Ki; Manciu, Felicia S.; Marsh, Michael P.; Paek, Seungleal B.; Settell, Megan L.; Nicolai, Evan N.; Blaha, Charles D.; Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Chang, Su-Youne; Lee, Kendall H.

    2016-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS), a surgical technique to treat certain neurologic and psychiatric conditions, relies on pre-determined stimulation parameters in an open-loop configuration. The major advancement in DBS devices is a closed-loop system that uses neurophysiologic feedback to dynamically adjust stimulation frequency and amplitude. Stimulation-driven neurochemical release can be measured by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), but existing FSCV electrodes rely on carbon fiber, which degrades quickly during use and is therefore unsuitable for chronic neurochemical recording. To address this issue, we developed durable, synthetic boron-doped diamond-based electrodes capable of measuring neurochemical release in humans. Compared to carbon fiber electrodes, they were more than two orders-of-magnitude more physically-robust and demonstrated longevity in vitro without deterioration. Applied for the first time in humans, diamond electrode recordings from thalamic targets in patients (n = 4) undergoing DBS for tremor produced signals consistent with adenosine release at a sensitivity comparable to carbon fiber electrodes. (Clinical trials # NCT01705301). PMID:27014033

  18. Age-related neurochemical changes in the rhesus macaque inferior colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Engle, James R.; Gray, Daniel T.; Turner, Heather; Udell, Julia B.; Recanzone, Gregg H.

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is marked by audiometric hearing deficits that propagate along the auditory pathway. Neurochemical changes as a function of aging have also been identified in neurons along the auditory pathway in both rodents and carnivores, however, very little is known about how these neurochemicals change in the non-human primate. To examine how these compensatory neurochemical changes relate to normal aging and audiometric sensitivity along the auditory pathway, we collected auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and brain specimens from seven rhesus monkeys spanning in age from 15 to 35 years old, and examined the relationship between click evoked ABR thresholds and the ABR evoked pure tone average (PTA) and changes in the number of parvalbumin and NADPH-diaphorase positive cells in the auditory midbrain. We found that the number of parvalbumin positive cells in the central nucleus and the surrounding cortex regions of the inferior colliculus were strongly correlated with advancing age and ABR PTA. We also found that the numbers of NADPHd positive cells in these same regions were not associated with normal aging or changes in the ABR thresholds. These findings suggest that the auditory midbrain undergoes an up-regulation of parvalbumin expressing neurons with aging that is related to changes in the processing of frequencies across the audiometric range. PMID:24795627

  19. Neurochemical phenotype of cytoglobin-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    HUNDAHL, CHRISTIAN ANSGAR; FAHRENKRUG, JAN; HANNIBAL, JENS

    2014-01-01

    Cytoglobin (Cygb), a novel oxygen-binding protein, is expressed in the majority of tissues and has been proposed to function in nitric oxide (NO) metabolism in the vasculature and to have cytoprotective properties. However, the overall functions of Cygb remain elusive. Cygb is also expressed in a subpopulation of brain neurons. Recently, it has been shown that stress upregulates Cygb expression in the brain and the majority of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive neurons, an enzyme that produces NO, co-express Cygb. However, there are more neurons expressing Cygb than nNOS, thus a large number of Cygb neurons remain uncharacterized by the neurochemical content. The aim of the present study was to provide an additional and more detailed neurochemical phenotype of Cygb-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus. The rat hippocampus was chosen due to the abundance of Cygb, as well as this limbic structure being an important target in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Using triple immunohistochemistry, it was demonstrated that nearly all the parvalbumin- and heme oxygenase 1-positive neurons co-express Cygb and to a large extent, these neuron populations are distinct from the population of Cygb neurons co-expressing nNOS. Furthermore, it was shown that the majority of neurons expressing somastostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide also co-express Cygb and nNOS. Detailed information regarding the neurochemical phenotype of Cygb neurons in the hippocampus can be a valuable tool in determining the function of Cygb in the brain. PMID:25054000

  20. Cocaine-induced endocannabinoid release modulates behavioral and neurochemical sensitization in mice.

    PubMed

    Mereu, Maddalena; Tronci, Valeria; Chun, Lauren E; Thomas, Alexandra M; Green, Jennifer L; Katz, Jonathan L; Tanda, Gianluigi

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system has been implicated in the development of synaptic plasticity induced by several drugs abused by humans, including cocaine. However, there remains some debate about the involvement of cannabinoid receptors/ligands in cocaine-induced plasticity and corresponding behavioral actions. Here, we show that a single cocaine injection in Swiss-Webster mice produces behavioral and neurochemical alterations that are under the control of the endocannabinoid system. This plasticity may be the initial basis for changes in brain processes leading from recreational use of cocaine to its abuse and ultimately to dependence. Locomotor activity was monitored with photobeam cell detectors, and accumbens shell/core microdialysate dopamine levels were monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Development of single-trial cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization, measured as increased distance traveled in sensitized mice compared to control mice, was paralleled by a larger stimulation of extracellular dopamine levels in the core but not the shell of the nucleus accumbens. Both the behavioral and neurochemical effects were reversed by CB1 receptor blockade produced by rimonabant pre-treatments. Further, both behavioral and neurochemical cocaine sensitization were facilitated by pharmacological blockade of endocannabinoid metabolism, achieved by inhibiting the fatty acid amide hydrolase enzyme. In conclusion, our results suggest that a single unconditioned exposure to cocaine produces sensitization through neuronal alterations that require regionally specific release of endocannabinoids. Further, the present results suggest that endocannabinoids play a primary role from the earliest stage of cocaine use, mediating the inception of long-term brain-adaptive responses, shaping central pathways and likely increasing vulnerability to stimulant abuse disorders.

  1. Neurochemical and behavioural impact of C18 fatty acids in male mice postweaning.

    PubMed

    Yamamuro, Yutaka; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Abe, Shin; Takenaga, Fumio

    2013-06-01

    Dietary components, particularly essential fatty acids, affect the expression and maintenance of normal physiological phenotypes. However, the influence of C18 fatty acids that are abundantly present in the normal diet is unclear. We focused on the behavioural and neurochemical effects of C18 fatty acids during postweaning development in male mice. An AIN-93G diet supplemented with 8% stearic acid (C18:0), 3% oleic acid (C18:1), 3% linoleic acid (C18:2) or 3% α-linolenic acid (C18:3) was provided from four weeks of age for eight weeks. At 12 weeks of age, novel exploratory behaviour and social interaction tests were carried out. One week after the last behavioural test, the brain of each mouse was removed. The frequency of social interactive behaviour was decreased by approximately 70% in the C18:0 group compared to the basal diet group, but there was no difference in cumulative time. The frequency of social interaction showed a positive correlation to cumulative time in mice fed with the experimental diets except for C18:0. Dietary C18 fatty acids following weaning had no impact on brain fatty acid composition except for the C18:3 diet. Furthermore, the neurochemical properties to be especially noted were that choline acetyltransferase activity was absolutely higher in C18:0 diet-fed mice than in the other groups, especially in the frontal cortex where it was 1.7-fold higher than in the basal diet-fed group. The present results reveal a significant possibility of neurochemical and behavioural effects of dietary fatty acids, and saturated fatty acids are of special importance during the postweaning period.

  2. Large-scale neurochemical metabolomics analysis identifies multiple compounds associated with methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    McClay, Joseph L; Adkins, Daniel E; Vunck, Sarah A; Batman, Angela M; Vann, Robert E; Clark, Shaunna L; Beardsley, Patrick M; van den Oord, Edwin J C G

    2013-04-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is an illegal stimulant drug of abuse with serious negative health consequences. The neurochemical effects of MA have been partially characterized, with a traditional focus on classical neurotransmitter systems. However, these directions have not yet led to novel drug treatments for MA abuse or toxicity. As an alternative approach, we describe here the first application of metabolomics to investigate the neurochemical consequences of MA exposure in the rodent brain. We examined single exposures at 3 mg/kg and repeated exposures at 3 mg/kg over 5 days in eight common inbred mouse strains. Brain tissue samples were assayed using high-throughput gas and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, yielding quantitative data on >300 unique metabolites. Association testing and false discovery rate control yielded several metabolome-wide significant associations with acute MA exposure, including compounds such as lactate (p = 4.4 × 10(-5), q = 0.013), tryptophan (p = 7.0 × 10(-4), q = 0.035) and 2-hydroxyglutarate (p = 1.1 × 10(-4), q = 0.022). Secondary analyses of MA-induced increase in locomotor activity showed associations with energy metabolites such as succinate (p = 3.8 × 10(-7)). Associations specific to repeated (5 day) MA exposure included phosphocholine (p = 4.0 × 10(-4), q = 0.087) and ergothioneine (p = 3.0 × 10(-4), q = 0.087). Our data appear to confirm and extend existing models of MA action in the brain, whereby an initial increase in energy metabolism, coupled with an increase in behavioral locomotion, gives way to disruption of mitochondria and phospholipid pathways and increased endogenous antioxidant response. Our study demonstrates the power of comprehensive MS-based metabolomics to identify drug-induced changes to brain metabolism and to develop neurochemical models of drug effects.

  3. Discovery of drugs to treat cocaine dependence: behavioral and neurochemical effects of atypical dopamine transport inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tanda, Gianluigi; Newman, Amy H; Katz, Jonathan L

    2009-01-01

    Stimulant drugs acting at the dopamine transporter (DAT), like cocaine, are widely abused, yet effective medical treatments for this abuse have not been found. Analogs of benztropine (BZT) that, like cocaine, act at the DAT have effects that differ from cocaine and in some situations block the behavioral, neurochemical, and reinforcing actions of cocaine. Neurochemical studies of dopamine levels in brain and behavioral studies have demonstrated that BZT analogs have a relatively slow onset and reduced maximal effects compared to cocaine. Pharmacokinetic studies, however, indicated that the BZT analogs rapidly access the brain at concentrations above their in vitro binding affinities, while binding in vivo demonstrates apparent association rates for BZT analogs lower than that for cocaine. Additionally, the off-target effects of these compounds do not fully explain their differences from cocaine. Initial structure-activity studies indicated that BZT analogs bind to DAT differently from cocaine and these differences have been supported by site-directed mutagenesis studies of the DAT. In addition, BZT analog-mediated inhibition of uptake was more resistant to mutations producing inward conformational DAT changes than cocaine analogs. The BZT analogs have provided new insights into the relation between the molecular and behavioral actions of cocaine and the diversity of effects produced by dopamine transport inhibitors. Novel interactions of BZT analogs with the DAT suggest that these drugs may have a pharmacology that would be useful in their development as treatments for cocaine abuse.

  4. The trace amine-associated receptor 1 modulates methamphetamine's neurochemical and behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Cotter, Rachel; Pei, Yue; Mus, Liudmila; Harmeier, Anja; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Hoener, Marius C; Canales, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    The newly discovered trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) has the ability to regulate both dopamine function and psychostimulant action. Here, we tested in rats the ability of RO5203648, a selective TAAR1 partial agonist, to modulate the physiological and behavioral effects of methamphetamine (METH). In experiment 1, RO5203468 dose- and time-dependently altered METH-induced locomotor activity, manifested as an early attenuation followed by a late potentiation of METH's stimulating effects. In experiment 2, rats received a 14-day treatment regimen during which RO5203648 was co-administered with METH. RO5203648 dose-dependently attenuated METH-stimulated hyperactivity, with the effects becoming more apparent as the treatments progressed. After chronic exposure and 3-day withdrawal, rats were tested for locomotor sensitization. RO5203648 administration during the sensitizing phase prevented the development of METH sensitization. However, RO5203648, at the high dose, cross-sensitized with METH. In experiment 3, RO5203648 dose-dependently blocked METH self-administration without affecting operant responding maintained by sucrose, and exhibited lack of reinforcing efficacy when tested as a METH's substitute. Neurochemical data showed that RO5203648 did not affect METH-mediated DA efflux and uptake inhibition in striatal synaptosomes. In vivo, however, RO5203648 was able to transiently inhibit METH-induced accumulation of extracellular DA levels in the nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these data highlight the significant potential of TAAR1 to modulate METH's neurochemical and behavioral effects.

  5. Assessing principal component regression prediction of neurochemicals detected with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Keithley, Richard B; Wightman, R Mark

    2011-06-01

    Principal component regression is a multivariate data analysis approach routinely used to predict neurochemical concentrations from in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry measurements. This mathematical procedure can rapidly be employed with present day computer programming languages. Here, we evaluate several methods that can be used to evaluate and improve multivariate concentration determination. The cyclic voltammetric representation of the calculated regression vector is shown to be a valuable tool in determining whether the calculated multivariate model is chemically appropriate. The use of Cook's distance successfully identified outliers contained within in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry training sets. This work also presents the first direct interpretation of a residual color plot and demonstrated the effect of peak shifts on predicted dopamine concentrations. Finally, separate analyses of smaller increments of a single continuous measurement could not be concatenated without substantial error in the predicted neurochemical concentrations due to electrode drift. Taken together, these tools allow for the construction of more robust multivariate calibration models and provide the first approach to assess the predictive ability of a procedure that is inherently impossible to validate because of the lack of in vivo standards. PMID:21966586

  6. [Event related brain potentials as indicators of neurochemical dysfunctions in psychiatric patients].

    PubMed

    Hegerl, U; Juckel, G; Möller, H J

    1996-05-01

    The increasing knowledge concerning anatomical structures and cellular processes underlying event-related potentials (ERP) and methodological advances in ERP data analysis are beginning to bridge the gap between ERP and neurochemical aspects. ERP reflect directly postsynaptic effects of cortical neurotransmitters (e.g. GABA, glutamate) and indirectly modulating effects of neuromodulators (e.g. serotonin, acetylcholine) on cortical neuronal functioning and are therefore promising as noninvasive indicators of the functioning of neurochemical systems. Several recent reports are summarised suggesting that quite specific relationships may exist between certain ERP parameters and central cholinergic, noradrenergic and especially serotonergic function. Converging arguments from preclinical and clinical studies are presented supporting the hypothesis that the dependence of the response of primary auditory cortices on stimulus intensity (loudness) is regulated by the level of central serotonergic neurotransmission. This intensity dependence is shown to be of clinical value because, within different diagnostic categories, subgroups of patients with a serotonergic dysfunction can be identified and can be treated more specifically with serotonergic drugs. PMID:9005344

  7. Cognitive inflexibility after prefrontal serotonin depletion is behaviorally and neurochemically specific.

    PubMed

    Clarke, H F; Walker, S C; Dalley, J W; Robbins, T W; Roberts, A C

    2007-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that prefrontal serotonin depletion impairs orbitofrontal cortex (OFC)-mediated serial discrimination reversal (SDR) learning but not lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC)-mediated attentional set shifting. To address the neurochemical specificity of this reversal deficit, Experiment 1 compared the effects of selective serotonin and selective dopamine depletions of the OFC on performance of the SDR task. Whereas serotonin depletions markedly impaired performance, OFC dopamine depletions were without effect. The behavioral specificity of this reversal impairment was investigated in Experiment 2 by examining the effect of OFC serotonin depletion on performance of a modified SDR task designed to distinguish between 3 possible causes of the impairment. The results showed that the reversal deficit induced by prefrontal serotonin depletion was not due to a failure to approach a previously unrewarded stimulus (enhanced learned avoidance) or reduced proactive interference. Instead, it was due specifically to a failure to inhibit responding to the previously rewarded stimulus. The neurochemical and behavioral specificity of this particular form of cognitive inflexibility is of particular relevance to our understanding of the aetiology and treatment of inflexible behavior apparent in many neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders involving the PFC.

  8. Altered neurochemical levels in the rat brain following chronic nicotine treatment.

    PubMed

    Falasca, Sara; Ranc, Vaclav; Petruzziello, Filomena; Khani, Abbas; Kretz, Robert; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Rainer, Gregor

    2014-09-01

    Converging evidence shows that neurochemical systems are crucial mediators of nicotine dependence. Our present study evaluates the effect of 3-month chronic nicotine treatment on the levels of multiple quaternary ammonium compounds as well as glutamate and gamma aminobutyric acid in the rat prefrontal cortex, dorsal striatum and hypothalamus. We observed a marked decrease of acetylcholine levels in the dorsal striatum (22.88%, p<0.01), reflecting the impact of chronic nicotine in local interneuron circuits. We found decreases of carnitine in the dorsal striatum and prefrontal cortex (19.44%, p<0.01; 13.58%, p<0.01, respectively), but robust enhancements of carnitine in the hypothalamus (26.59%, p<0.01), which may reflect the alterations in food and water intake during chronic nicotine treatment. Finally, we identified an increase of prefrontal cortex glutamate levels (8.05%, p<0.05), supporting previous studies suggesting enhanced prefrontal activity during chronic drug use. Our study shows that quaternary ammonium compounds are regulated in a highly brain region specific manner during chronic nicotine treatment, and provides novel insights into neurochemical regulation during nicotine use.

  9. [Neurochemical mechanisms of depression-like behavior in WAG/Rij rats].

    PubMed

    Sarkisova, K Iu; Kulikov, M A; Kudrin, V S; Narkevich, V B; Midzianovskaia, I S; Biriukova, L M; Folomkina, A A; Basian, A S

    2013-01-01

    Behavior in the light-dark choice, open-field, sucrose consumption/preference and forced swimming tests, monoamines and their metabolites level in 6 brain structures (prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, striatum, hypothalamus, hippocampus, amygdala), and density of D2-like dopamine receptors in 21 brain regions were studied in WAG/Rij and Wistar rats. WAG/Rij rats exhibited symptoms of depression-like behavior such as increased immobility in the forced swim test and decreased sucrose consumption/preference (anhedonia). Substantial changes in behavior indicating increased anxiety in WAG/Rij rats were not revealed. Neurochemical abnormalities suggesting hypofunction of the mesolimbic dopaminergic brain system were found in "depressive" WAG/Rij rats compared with "normal" Wistar rats: decreased levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-methoxytyramine in the nucleus accumbens, and increased density of D2-like dopamine receptors in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. Reduced levels of dopamine were also observed in the prefrontal cortex and striatum. No substantial changes in the content of monoamines and their metabolites have been revealed in the hypothalamus, hippocampus and amygdala as well as in the content ofserotonin and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid in all studied brain structures with the exception of increased level ofserotonin in the amygdala. Results suggest that hypofunction of the mesolimbic dopaminergic brain system (nucleus accumbens) is a neurochemical mechanism of depression-like behavior in WAG/Rij rats. PMID:24450162

  10. The effect of spinal cord injury on the neurochemical properties of vagal sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Herrity, April N.; Petruska, Jeffrey C.; Stirling, David P.; Rau, Kristofer K.

    2015-01-01

    The vagus nerve is composed primarily of nonmyelinated sensory neurons whose cell bodies are located in the nodose ganglion (NG). The vagus has widespread projections that supply most visceral organs, including the bladder. Because of its nonspinal route, the vagus nerve itself is not directly damaged from spinal cord injury (SCI). Because most viscera, including bladder, are dually innervated by spinal and vagal sensory neurons, an impact of SCI on the sensory component of vagal circuitry may contribute to post-SCI visceral pathologies. To determine whether SCI, in male Wistar rats, might impact neurochemical characteristics of NG neurons, immunohistochemical assessments were performed for P2X3 receptor expression, isolectin B4 (IB4) binding, and substance P expression, three known injury-responsive markers in sensory neuronal subpopulations. In addition to examining the overall population of NG neurons, those innervating the urinary bladder also were assessed separately. All three of the molecular markers were represented in the NG from noninjured animals, with the majority of the neurons binding IB4. In the chronically injured rats, there was a significant increase in the number of NG neurons expressing P2X3 and a significant decrease in the number binding IB4 compared with noninjured animals, a finding that held true also for the bladder-innervating population. Overall, these results indicate that vagal afferents, including those innervating the bladder, display neurochemical plasticity post-SCI that may have implications for visceral homeostatic mechanisms and nociceptive signaling. PMID:25855310

  11. The effect of spinal cord injury on the neurochemical properties of vagal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Herrity, April N; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Stirling, David P; Rau, Kristofer K; Hubscher, Charles H

    2015-06-15

    The vagus nerve is composed primarily of nonmyelinated sensory neurons whose cell bodies are located in the nodose ganglion (NG). The vagus has widespread projections that supply most visceral organs, including the bladder. Because of its nonspinal route, the vagus nerve itself is not directly damaged from spinal cord injury (SCI). Because most viscera, including bladder, are dually innervated by spinal and vagal sensory neurons, an impact of SCI on the sensory component of vagal circuitry may contribute to post-SCI visceral pathologies. To determine whether SCI, in male Wistar rats, might impact neurochemical characteristics of NG neurons, immunohistochemical assessments were performed for P2X3 receptor expression, isolectin B4 (IB4) binding, and substance P expression, three known injury-responsive markers in sensory neuronal subpopulations. In addition to examining the overall population of NG neurons, those innervating the urinary bladder also were assessed separately. All three of the molecular markers were represented in the NG from noninjured animals, with the majority of the neurons binding IB4. In the chronically injured rats, there was a significant increase in the number of NG neurons expressing P2X3 and a significant decrease in the number binding IB4 compared with noninjured animals, a finding that held true also for the bladder-innervating population. Overall, these results indicate that vagal afferents, including those innervating the bladder, display neurochemical plasticity post-SCI that may have implications for visceral homeostatic mechanisms and nociceptive signaling. PMID:25855310

  12. The neurochemical mobile with non-linear interaction matrix: an exploratory computational model.

    PubMed

    Qi, Z; Fieni, D; Tretter, F; Voit, E O

    2013-05-01

    Several years ago, the "neurochemical mobile" was introduced as a visual tool for explaining the different balances between neurotransmitters in the brain and their role in mental disorders. Here we complement this concept with a non-linear computational systems model representing the direct and indirect interactions between neurotransmitters, as they have been described in the "neurochemical interaction matrix." The model is constructed within the framework of biochemical systems theory, which facilitates the mapping of numerically ill-characterized systems into a mathematical and computational construct that permits a variety of analyses. Simulations show how short- and long-term perturbations in any of the neurotransmitters migrate through the entire system, thereby affecting the balances within the mobile. In cases of short-term alterations, transients are of particular interest, whereas long-term changes shed light on persistently altered, allostatic states, which in mental diseases and sleep disorders could be due to a combination of unfavorable factors, resulting from a specific genetic predisposition, epigenetic effects, disease, or the repeated use of drugs, such as opioids and amphetamines.

  13. REM sleep deprivation generates cognitive and neurochemical disruptions in the intranigral rotenone model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Ana Carolina D; Castro, Marcela Alexandra V; Jose, Elis Angela K; Delattre, Ana Márcia; Dombrowski, Patrícia A; Da Cunha, Claudio; Ferraz, Anete C; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2013-11-01

    The recently described intranigral rotenone model of Parkinson's disease (PD) in rodents provides an interesting model for studying mechanisms of toxin-induced dopaminergic neuronal injury. The relevance of this model remains unexplored with regard to sleep disorders that occur in PD. On this basis, the construction of a PD model depicting several behavioral and neurochemical alterations related to sleep would be helpful in understanding the association between PD and sleep regulation. We performed bilateral intranigral injections of rotenone (12 μg) on day 0 and the open-field test initially on day 20 after rotenone. Acquisition phase of the object-recognition test, executed also during day 20, was followed by an exact period of 24 hr of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (REMSD; day 21). In the subsequent day (22), the rats were re-exposed to the open-field test and to the object-recognition test (choice phase). After the last session of behavioral tests, the rat brains were immediately dissected, and their striata were collected for neurochemical purposes. We observed that a brief exposure to REMSD was able to impair drastically the object-recognition test, similarly to a nigrostriatal lesion promoted by intranigral rotenone. However, the combination of REMSD and rotenone surprisingly did not inflict memory impairment, concomitant with a moderate compensatory mechanism mediated by striatal dopamine release. In addition, we demonstrated the existence of changes in serotonin and noradrenaline neurotransmissions within the striatum mostly as a function of REMSD and REMSD plus rotenone, respectively.

  14. Neurochemical Approaches in the Laboratory Diagnosis of Parkinson and Parkinson Dementia Syndromes: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jesse, Sarah; Steinacker, Petra; Lehnert, Stefan; Gillardon, Frank; Hengerer, Bastian; Otto, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD) is rendered on the basis of clinical parameters, whereby laboratory chemical tests or morphological imaging is only called upon to exclude other neurodegenerative diseases. The differentiation between PD and other diseases of the basal ganglia, especially the postsynaptic Parkinson syndromes multisystem atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), is of decisive importance, on the one hand, for the response to an appropriate therapy, and on the other hand, for the respective prognosis of the disease. However, particularly at the onset of symptoms, it is difficult to precisely distinguish these diseases from each other, presenting with an akinetic-rigid syndrome. It is not yet possible to conduct a neurochemical differentiation of Parkinson syndromes. Therefore, a reliable biomarker is still to be found that might predict the development of Parkinson dementia. Since this situation is currently the subject of various different studies, the following synopsis is intended to provide a brief summary of the investigations addressing the field of the early neurochemical differential diagnosis of Parkinson syndromes and the early diagnosis of Parkinson dementia, from direct α-synuclein detection to proteomic approaches. In addition, an overview of the tested biomarkers will be given with regard to their possible introduction as a screening method. PMID:19298613

  15. Effects of mercury on neurochemical receptors in wild river otters (Lontra canadensis).

    PubMed

    Basu, Niladri; Scheuhammer, Anton; Grochowina, Nicole; Klenavic, Kate; Evans, Douglas; O'Brien, Mike; Chan, Hing Man

    2005-05-15

    Fish-eating wildlife, such as river otters (Lontra canadensis), accumulate mercury (Hg) at concentrations known to impair animal behavior, but few studies have explored the underlying biochemical changes that precede clinical neurotoxicity. The objective of this study was to determine if Hg exposure can be related to concentrations of neurochemical receptors in river otters. River otter carcasses (n = 66) were collected in Ontario and Nova Scotia (Canada) by local trappers in 2002-2004. Concentrations of Hg (total and organic) were measured in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Saturation binding curves for the cholinergic muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor and dopamine-2 (D2) receptor were completed for each animal to calculate receptor density (Bmax) and ligand affinity (Kd). Negative correlations were found between concentrations of Hg and mACh receptor Bmax (r(total) Hg = -0.458, r(inorganic) Hg = -0.454, r(organic) Hg = -0.443) in the cerebral cortex. A negative correlation was also found between concentrations of total Hg and D2 receptor Bmax (r = -0.292) in the cerebral cortex. These results suggest that neurochemical receptors may prove useful as novel biomarkers of Hg exposure and neurotoxic effects in wildlife. Given the importance of cholinergic and dopaminergic systems in animal physiology, the ecological implications of these changes need to be investigated.

  16. Quantification of Endogenous Retinoids

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Maureen A.; Napoli, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous physiological processes require retinoids, including development, nervous system function, immune responsiveness, proliferation, differentiation, and all aspects of reproduction. Reliable retinoid quantification requires suitable handling and, in some cases, resolution of geometric isomers that have different biological activities. Here we describe procedures for reliable and accurate quantification of retinoids, including detailed descriptions for handling retinoids, preparing standard solutions, collecting samples and harvesting tissues, extracting samples, resolving isomers, and detecting with high sensitivity. Sample-specific strategies are provided for optimizing quantification. Approaches to evaluate assay performance also are provided. Retinoid assays described here for mice also are applicable to other organisms including zebrafish, rat, rabbit, and human and for cells in culture. Retinoid quantification, especially that of retinoic acid, should provide insight into many diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and cancer. PMID:20552420

  17. Software-assisted serum metabolite quantification using NMR.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young-Sang; Hyeon, Jin-Seong; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2016-08-31

    The goal of metabolomics is to analyze a whole metabolome under a given set of conditions, and accurate and reliable quantitation of metabolites is crucial. Absolute concentration is more valuable than relative concentration; however, the most commonly used method in NMR-based serum metabolic profiling, bin-based and full data point peak quantification, provides relative concentration levels of metabolites and are not reliable when metabolite peaks overlap in a spectrum. In this study, we present the software-assisted serum metabolite quantification (SASMeQ) method, which allows us to identify and quantify metabolites in NMR spectra using Chenomx software. This software uses the ERETIC2 utility from TopSpin to add a digitally synthesized peak to a spectrum. The SASMeQ method will advance NMR-based serum metabolic profiling by providing an accurate and reliable method for absolute quantification that is superior to bin-based quantification. PMID:27506360

  18. Quantification of Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Plants are a rich source of secondary metabolites that have medicinal and aromatic properties. Secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, iridoids and phenolics generally produced by plants for their defence mechanisms have been implicated in the therapeutic properties of most medicinal plants. Hence, quantification of these metabolites will aid to discover new and effective drugs from plant sources and also to scientifically validate the existing traditional practices. Quantification of large group of phytochemicals such as phenolics and flavonoids is quantified in this context.

  19. An acute dose of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol affects behavioral and neurochemical indices of mesolimbic dopaminergic activity.

    PubMed

    Navarro, M; Fernández-Ruiz, J J; de Miguel, R; Hernández, M L; Cebeira, M; Ramos, J A

    1993-10-21

    Cannabinoid consumption has been reported to affect several neurotransmitter systems and their related behaviors. The present study has been designed to examine cannabinoid effects on certain behaviors, which have been currently located in the limbic forebrain, in parallel to their effects on mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons. To this end, male rats treated with an oral dose of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or vehicle were used 1 h after treatment for two different behavioral tests or neurochemical analyses of mesolimbic dopaminergic activity. Treatments, behavioral tests and sacrifice were performed in the dark phase of photoperiod because it corresponds to the maximum behavioral expression in the rat. Behavioral tests were a dark-light emergence test, which allows measurements of emotional reactivity, and a socio-sexual approach behavior test, which allows measurements of sexual motivation and also of spontaneous and stereotypic activities. Neurochemical analyses consisted of measurements of dopamine (DA) and L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) contents, tyrosine hydroxylase activity, in vitro DA release and number and affinity of D1 receptors in the limbic forebrain. Results were as follows. THC exposure markedly altered the pattern executed by the animals in both tests. Concretely, THC-exposed animals exhibited a low number of visits to an incentive female in addition to high time spent in the vicinity of an incentive male, both observed in the socio-sexual approach behavior test, and an increased emergence latency to go out of a dark compartment in the dark-light emergence test. However, the fact that THC also decreased spontaneous activity and the frequency of rearing and self-grooming behaviors, in addition to the observations of either low total number of visits to both incentive sexual areas or high escape latency to go out of a light compartment, when the animal is placed in this compartment, also suggest the possible existence of an accompanying

  20. The neural basis of the complex mental task of meditation: neurotransmitter and neurochemical considerations.

    PubMed

    Newberg, A B; Iversen, J

    2003-08-01

    Meditation is a complex mental process involving changes in cognition, sensory perception, affect, hormones, and autonomic activity. Meditation has also become widely used in psychological and medical practices for stress management as well as a variety of physical and mental disorders. However, until now, there has been limited understanding of the overall biological mechanism of these practices in terms of the effects in both the brain and body. We have previously described a rudimentary neuropsychological model to explain the brain mechanisms underlying meditative experiences. This paper provides a substantial development by integrating neurotransmitter systems and the results of recent brain imaging advances into the model. The following is a review and synthesis of the current literature regarding the various neurophysiological mechanisms and neurochemical substrates that underlie the complex processes of meditation. It is hoped that this model will provide hypotheses for future biological and clinical studies of meditation.

  1. Convulsant activity and neurochemical alterations induced by a fraction obtained from fruit Averrhoa carambola (Oxalidaceae: Geraniales).

    PubMed

    Carolino, Ruither O G; Beleboni, Renê O; Pizzo, Andrea B; Vecchio, Flavio Del; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Moyses-Neto, Miguel; Santos, Wagner F Dos; Coutinho-Netto, Joaquim

    2005-06-01

    We obtained a neurotoxic fraction (AcTx) from star fruit (Averrhoa carambola) and studied its effects on GABAergic and glutamatergic transmission systems. AcTx had no effect on GABA/glutamate uptake or release, or on glutamate binding. However, it specifically inhibited GABA binding in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50)=0.89muM). Video-electroencephalogram recordings demonstrated that following cortical administration of AcTx, animals showed behavioral changes, including tonic-clonic seizures, evolving into status epilepticus, accompanied by cortical epileptiform activity. Chemical characterization of AcTx showed that this compound is a nonproteic molecule with a molecular weight less than 500, differing from oxalic acid. This neurotoxic fraction of star fruit may be considered a new tool for neurochemical and neuroethological research.

  2. Postnatal choline supplementation in preweanling mice: sexually dimorphic behavioral and neurochemical effects.

    PubMed

    Ricceri, L; Berger-Sweeney, J

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of postnatal choline supplementation on neurochemical and behavioral parameters in preweanling BALB/cByJ mice. Mouse pups were injected daily subcutaneously with choline chloride (0.85 mM/g body weight) from Postnatal Day (PND) 1 to PND 16. Pups performed a passive avoidance (PA) learning task on PND 17-18 and a 30-min locomotor activity test on PND 19. The choline treatment affected retention of the PA task on PND 18. The treatment also increased locomotor activity in females, but not in males, on PND 19. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) enzymatic activity was measured on PND 20 and revealed that choline administration in the first 2 weeks of postnatal life selectively affects male pups. Choline's effect, as seen in previous rat experiments, was to decrease ChAT activity in the hippocampal region.

  3. Cognitive, emotional and neurochemical effects of repeated maternal separation in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Xue, Xiaofang; Shao, Shuang; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2013-06-26

    As an adverse early life experience, maternal separation (MS) induces profound neurochemical, cognitive and emotional dysfunction. Previous studies have reported that MS affected prepulse inhibition (PPI), anxiety-related behaviors, dopaminergic and serotonergic activity in adult rats, and in the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated (4h/day) maternal separation during postnatal days 1-21 on PPI and anxiety-related behaviors in an elevated plus maze, as well as dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) and 5-HT1A receptor expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc) and hippocampus in adolescent rats. Our findings show that repeated MS results in reduced PPI, increased anxiety-related behaviors, decreased DRD2 protein expression in the NAc and hippocampus, and decreased 5-HT1A protein expression in the mPFC and hippocampus in adolescent rats. These data further demonstrate that MS can be used as an animal model of neuropsychiatric disease.

  4. The gyri of the octopus vertical lobe have distinct neurochemical identities.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Shuichi; Ragsdale, Clifton W

    2015-06-15

    The cephalopod vertical lobe is the largest learning and memory structure known in invertebrate nervous systems. It is part of the visual learning circuit of the central brain, which also includes the superior frontal and subvertical lobes. Despite the well-established functional importance of this system, little is known about neuropil organization of these structures and there is to date no evidence that the five longitudinal gyri of the vertical lobe, perhaps the most distinctive morphological feature of the octopus brain, differ in their connections or molecular identities. We studied the histochemical organization of these structures in hatchling and adult Octopus bimaculoides brains with immunostaining for serotonin, octopus gonadotropin-releasing hormone (oGNRH), and octopressin-neurophysin (OP-NP). Our major finding is that the five lobules forming the vertical lobe gyri have distinct neurochemical signatures. This is most prominent in the hatchling brain, where the median and mediolateral lobules are enriched in OP-NP fibers, the lateral lobule is marked by oGNRH innervation, and serotonin immunostaining heavily labels the median and lateral lobules. A major source of input to the vertical lobe is the superior frontal lobe, which is dominated by a neuropil of interweaving fiber bundles. We have found that this neuropil also has an intrinsic neurochemical organization: it is partitioned into territories alternately enriched or impoverished in oGNRH-containing fascicles. Our findings establish that the constituent lobes of the octopus superior frontal-vertical system have an intricate internal anatomy, one likely to reflect the presence of functional subsystems within cephalopod learning circuitry.

  5. Neurochemical and neuroanatomical identification of central pattern generator neuron homologues in Nudipleura molluscs.

    PubMed

    Lillvis, Joshua L; Gunaratne, Charuni A; Katz, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    Certain invertebrate neurons can be identified by their behavioral functions. However, evolutionary divergence can cause some species to not display particular behaviors, thereby making it impossible to use physiological characteristics related to those behaviors for identifying homologous neurons across species. Therefore, to understand the neural basis of species-specific behavior, it is necessary to identify homologues using characteristics that are independent of physiology. In the Nudipleura mollusc Tritonia diomedea, Cerebral Neuron 2 (C2) was first described as being a member of the swim central pattern generator (CPG). Here we demonstrate that neurochemical markers, in conjunction with previously known neuroanatomical characteristics, allow C2 to be uniquely identified without the aid of electrophysiological measures. Specifically, C2 had three characteristics that, taken together, identified the neuron: 1) a white cell on the dorsal surface of the cerebral ganglion, 2) an axon that projected to the contralateral pedal ganglion and through the pedal commissure, and 3) immunoreactivity for the peptides FMRFamide and Small Cardioactive Peptide B. These same anatomical and neurochemical characteristics also uniquely identified the C2 homologue in Pleurobranchaea californica (called A1), which was previously identified by its analogous role in the Pleurobranchaea swim CPG. Furthermore, these characteristics were used to identify C2 homologues in Melibe leonina, Hermissenda crassicornis, and Flabellina iodinea, species that are phylogenetically closer to Tritonia than Pleurobranchaea, but do not display the same swimming behavior as Tritonia or Pleurobranchaea. These identifications will allow future studies comparing and contrasting the physiological properties of C2 across species that can and cannot produce the type of swimming behavior exhibited by Tritonia.

  6. The gyri of the octopus vertical lobe have distinct neurochemical identities.

    PubMed

    Shigeno, Shuichi; Ragsdale, Clifton W

    2015-06-15

    The cephalopod vertical lobe is the largest learning and memory structure known in invertebrate nervous systems. It is part of the visual learning circuit of the central brain, which also includes the superior frontal and subvertical lobes. Despite the well-established functional importance of this system, little is known about neuropil organization of these structures and there is to date no evidence that the five longitudinal gyri of the vertical lobe, perhaps the most distinctive morphological feature of the octopus brain, differ in their connections or molecular identities. We studied the histochemical organization of these structures in hatchling and adult Octopus bimaculoides brains with immunostaining for serotonin, octopus gonadotropin-releasing hormone (oGNRH), and octopressin-neurophysin (OP-NP). Our major finding is that the five lobules forming the vertical lobe gyri have distinct neurochemical signatures. This is most prominent in the hatchling brain, where the median and mediolateral lobules are enriched in OP-NP fibers, the lateral lobule is marked by oGNRH innervation, and serotonin immunostaining heavily labels the median and lateral lobules. A major source of input to the vertical lobe is the superior frontal lobe, which is dominated by a neuropil of interweaving fiber bundles. We have found that this neuropil also has an intrinsic neurochemical organization: it is partitioned into territories alternately enriched or impoverished in oGNRH-containing fascicles. Our findings establish that the constituent lobes of the octopus superior frontal-vertical system have an intricate internal anatomy, one likely to reflect the presence of functional subsystems within cephalopod learning circuitry. PMID:25644267

  7. Individual differences in the forced swimming test and neurochemical kinetics in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sequeira-Cordero, Andrey; Mora-Gallegos, Andrea; Cuenca-Berger, Patricia; Fornaguera-Trías, Jaime

    2014-04-10

    Individual differences in the forced swimming test (FST) could be associated with differential temporal dynamics of gene expression and neurotransmitter activity. We tested juvenile male rats in the FST and classified the animals into those with low and high immobility according to the amount of immobility time recorded in FST. These groups and a control group which did not undergo the FST were sacrificed either 1, 6 or 24 h after the test. We analyzed the expression of the CRF, CRFR1, BDNF and TrkB in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens as well as norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, glutamate, GABA and glutamine in the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens. Animals with low immobility showed significant reductions of BDNF expression across time points in both the prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens when compared with non-swim control. Moreover, rats with high immobility only showed a significant decrease of BDNF expression in the prefrontal cortex 6h after the FST. Regarding neurotransmitters, only accumbal dopamine turnover and hippocampal glutamate content showed an effect of individual differences (i.e. animals with low and high immobility), whereas nearly all parameters showed significant differences across time points. Correlational analyses suggest that immobility in the FST, probably reflecting despair, is related to prefrontal cortical BDNF and to the kinetics observed in several other neurochemical parameters. Taken together, our results suggest that individual differences observed in depression-like behavior can be associated not only with changes in the concentrations of key neurochemical factors but also with differential time courses of such factors. PMID:24518862

  8. Ranitidine reduced levodopa-induced dyskinesia by remodeling neurochemical changes in hemiparkinsonian model of rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hongjuan; Yang, Xinxin; Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Shenyang; Zu, Jie; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Xia; Cui, Guiyun; Hua, Fang; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2015-01-01

    Background Levodopa (l-dopa) remains the best drug in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Unfortunately, long-term l-dopa caused motor complications, one of which is l-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). The precise mechanisms of LID are not fully understood. We have previously reported that ranitidine could reduce LID by inhibiting the activity of protein kinase A pathway in a rat model of PD. It is demonstrated that neurotransmitters such as γ-aminobutyric-acid (GABA) and glutamate (Glu) are also involved in the expression of LID. But whether ranitidine could reduce LID by remodeling the neurochemical changes is unknown. Methods In the present study, we produced PD rats by injection of 6-hydroxydopamine. Then PD rats were treated with vehicle, l-dopa (6 mg/kg, plus benserazide 12 mg/kg, intraperitoneal [ip]) or l-dopa (6 mg/kg, plus benserazide 12 mg/kg, ip) plus ranitidine (10 mg/kg, oral). Abnormal voluntary movements were adopted to measure the antidyskinetic effect of ranitidine in PD rats. Rotarod tests were used to observe whether ranitidine treatment affects the antiparkinsonian effect of l-dopa. In vivo microdialysis was used to measure nigral GABA and striatal Glu in PD rats. Results We found that ranitidine pretreatment reduced abnormal voluntary movements in l-dopa-primed PD rats without affecting the antiparkinsonian effect of l-dopa. In parallel with behavioral improvement, ranitidine pretreatment reduced protein kinase A activity and suppressed the surge of nigral GABA and striatal Glu. Conclusion These data indicated that ranitidine could reduce LID by modeling neurochemical changes induced by l-dopa, suggesting a novel mechanism of ranitidine in the treatment of LID. PMID:26064051

  9. Behavioural and neurochemical comparison of chronic intermittent cathinone, mephedrone and MDMA administration to the rat.

    PubMed

    Shortall, Sinead E; Macerola, Alice E; Swaby, Rabbi T R; Jayson, Rebecca; Korsah, Chantal; Pillidge, Katharine E; Wigmore, Peter M; Ebling, Francis J P; Richard Green, A; Fone, Kevin C F; King, Madeleine V

    2013-09-01

    The synthetic cathinone derivative, mephedrone, is a controlled substance across Europe. Its effects have been compared by users to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), but little data exist on its pharmacological properties. This study compared the behavioural and neurochemical effects of mephedrone with cathinone and MDMA in rats. Young-adult male Lister hooded rats received i.p. cathinone (1 or 4 mg/kg), mephedrone (1, 4 or 10mg/kg) or MDMA (10mg/kg) on two consecutive days weekly for 3 weeks or as a single acute injection (for neurochemical analysis). Locomotor activity (LMA), novel object discrimination (NOD), conditioned emotional response (CER) and prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI) were measured following intermittent drug administration. Dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and their major metabolites were measured in striatum, frontal cortex and hippocampus by high performance liquid chromatography 7 days after intermittent dosing and 2h after acute injection. Cathinone (1, 4 mg/kg), mephedrone (10mg/kg) and MDMA (10mg/kg) induced hyperactivity following the first and sixth injections and sensitization to cathinone and mephedrone occurred with chronic dosing. All drugs impaired NOD and mephedrone (10mg/kg) reduced freezing in response to contextual re-exposure during the CER retention trial. Acute MDMA reduced hippocampal 5-HT and 5-HIAA but the only significant effect on dopamine, 5-HT and their metabolites following chronic dosing was altered hippocampal 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), following mephedrone (4, 10mg/kg) and MDMA. At the doses examined, mephedrone, cathinone, and MDMA induced similar effects on behaviour and failed to induce neurotoxic damage when administered intermittently over 3 weeks.

  10. Mercury exposure and neurochemical biomarkers in multiple brain regions of Wisconsin river otters (Lontra canadensis).

    PubMed

    Dornbos, Peter; Strom, Sean; Basu, Niladri

    2013-04-01

    River otters are fish-eating wildlife that bioaccumulate high levels of mercury (Hg). Mercury is a proven neurotoxicant to mammalian wildlife, but little is known about the underlying, sub-clinical effects. Here, the overall goal was to increase understanding of Hg's neurological risk to otters. First, Hg values across several brain regions and tissues were characterized. Second, in three brain regions with known sensitivity to Hg (brainstem, cerebellum, and occipital cortex), potential associations among Hg levels and neurochemical biomarkers [N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptor] were explored. There were no significant differences in Hg levels across eight brain regions (rank order, highest to lowest: frontal cortex, cerebellum, temporal cortex, occipital cortex, parietal cortex, basal ganglia, brainstem, and thalamus), with mean values ranging from 0.7 to 1.3 ug/g dry weight. These brain levels were significantly lower than mean values in the muscle (2.1 ± 1.4 ug/g), liver (4.7 ± 4.3 ug/g), and fur (8.8 ± 4.8 ug/g). While a significant association was found between Hg and NMDA receptor levels in the brain stem (P = 0.028, rp = -0.293), no relationships were found in the cerebellum and occipital cortex. For the GABA receptor, no relationships were found. The lack of consistent Hg-associated neurochemical changes is likely due to low brain Hg levels in these river otters, which are amongst the lowest reported.

  11. Previous Ketamine Produces an Enduring Blockade of Neurochemical and Behavioral Effects of Uncontrollable Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dolzani, Samuel D.; Tilden, Scott; Christianson, John P.; Kubala, Kenneth H.; Bartholomay, Kristi; Sperr, Katherine; Ciancio, Nicholas; Watkins, Linda R.; Maier, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    Recent interest in the antidepressant and anti-stress effects of subanesthetic doses of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, has identified mechanisms whereby ketamine reverses the effect of stress, but little is known regarding the prophylactic effect ketamine might have on future stressors. Here we investigate the prophylactic effect of ketamine against neurochemical and behavioral changes that follow inescapable, uncontrollable tail shocks (ISs) in Sprague Dawley rats. IS induces increased anxiety, which is dependent on activation of serotonergic (5-HT) dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) neurons that project to the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Ketamine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administered 2 h, 1 week, or 2 weeks before IS prevented the increased extracellular levels of 5-HT in the BLA typically produced by IS. In addition, ketamine administered at these time points blocked the decreased juvenile social investigation produced by IS. Microinjection of ketamine into the prelimbic (PL) region of the medial prefrontal cortex duplicated the effects of systemic ketamine, and, conversely, systemic ketamine effects were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of the PL. Although IS does not activate DRN-projecting neurons from the PL, IS did so after ketamine, suggesting that the prophylactic effect of ketamine is a result of altered functioning of this projection. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The reported data show that systemic ketamine, given up to 2 weeks before a stressor, blunts behavioral and neurochemical effects of the stressor. The study also advances understanding of the mechanisms involved and suggests that ketamine acts at the prelimbic cortex to sensitize neurons that project to and inhibit the DRN. PMID:26740657

  12. Repeated ketamine treatment induces sex-specific behavioral and neurochemical effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Thelen, Connor; Sens, Jonathon; Mauch, Joseph; Pandit, Radhika; Pitychoutis, Pothitos M

    2016-10-01

    One of the most striking discoveries in the treatment of major depression was the finding that infusion of a single sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine induces rapid and sustained antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant depressed patients. However, ketamine's antidepressant-like actions are transient and can only be sustained by repeated drug treatment. Despite the fact that women experience major depression at roughly twice the rate of men, research regarding the neurobiological antidepressant-relevant effects of ketamine has focused almost exclusively on the male sex. Importantly, knowledge regarding the sex-differentiated effects, the frequency and the dose on which repeated ketamine administration stops being beneficial, is limited. In the current study, we investigated the behavioral, neurochemical and synaptic molecular effects of repeated ketamine treatment (10mg/kg; 21days) in male and female C57BL/6J mice. We report that ketamine induced beneficial antidepressant-like effects in male mice, but induced both anxiety-like (i.e., decreased time spent in the center of the open field arena) and depressive-like effects (i.e., enhanced immobility duration in the forced swim test; FST) in their female counterparts. Moreover, repeated ketamine treatment induced sustained sex-differentiated neurochemical and molecular effects, as it enhanced hippocampal synapsin protein levels and serotonin turnover in males, but attenuated glutamate and aspartate levels in female mice. Taken together, our findings indicate that repeated ketamine treatment induces opposite behavioral effects in male and female mice, and thus, present data have far-reaching implications for the sex-oriented use of ketamine in both experimental and clinical research settings. PMID:27343934

  13. REM sleep deprivation reverses neurochemical and other depressive-like alterations induced by olfactory bulbectomy.

    PubMed

    Maturana, Maira J; Pudell, Cláudia; Targa, Adriano D S; Rodrigues, Laís S; Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Fortes, Mariana H; Dos Santos, Patrícia; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Zanata, Sílvio M; Ferraz, Anete C; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2015-02-01

    There is compelling evidence that sleep deprivation (SD) is an effective strategy in promoting antidepressant effects in humans, whereas few studies were performed in relevant animal models of depression. Acute administration of antidepressants in humans and rats generates a quite similar effect, i.e., suppression of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Then, we decided to investigate the neurochemical alterations generated by a protocol of rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REMSD) in the notably known animal model of depression induced by the bilateral olfactory bulbectomy (OBX). REMSD triggered antidepressant mechanisms such as the increment of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), which were strongly correlated to the swimming time (r = 0.83; P < 0.0001) and hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) content (r = 0.66; P = 0.004). Moreover, there was a strong correlation between swimming time and hippocampal 5-HT levels (r = 0.70; P = 0.003), strengthen the notion of an antidepressant effect associated to REMSD in the OBX rats. In addition, REMSD robustly attenuated the hippocampal 5-HT deficiency produced by the OBX procedure. Regarding the rebound (REB) period, we observed the occurrence of a sustained antidepressant effect, indicated mainly by the swimming and climbing times which could be explained by the maintenance of the increased nigral BDNF expression. Hence, hippocampal 5-HT levels remained enhanced in the OBX group after this period. We suggested that the neurochemical complexity inflicted by the OBX model, counteracted by REMSD, is directly correlated to the nigral BDNF expression and hippocampal 5-HT levels. The present findings provide new information regarding the antidepressant mechanisms triggered by REMSD.

  14. Individual differences in the forced swimming test and neurochemical kinetics in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Sequeira-Cordero, Andrey; Mora-Gallegos, Andrea; Cuenca-Berger, Patricia; Fornaguera-Trías, Jaime

    2014-04-10

    Individual differences in the forced swimming test (FST) could be associated with differential temporal dynamics of gene expression and neurotransmitter activity. We tested juvenile male rats in the FST and classified the animals into those with low and high immobility according to the amount of immobility time recorded in FST. These groups and a control group which did not undergo the FST were sacrificed either 1, 6 or 24 h after the test. We analyzed the expression of the CRF, CRFR1, BDNF and TrkB in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and nucleus accumbens as well as norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin, glutamate, GABA and glutamine in the hippocampus and nucleus accumbens. Animals with low immobility showed significant reductions of BDNF expression across time points in both the prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens when compared with non-swim control. Moreover, rats with high immobility only showed a significant decrease of BDNF expression in the prefrontal cortex 6h after the FST. Regarding neurotransmitters, only accumbal dopamine turnover and hippocampal glutamate content showed an effect of individual differences (i.e. animals with low and high immobility), whereas nearly all parameters showed significant differences across time points. Correlational analyses suggest that immobility in the FST, probably reflecting despair, is related to prefrontal cortical BDNF and to the kinetics observed in several other neurochemical parameters. Taken together, our results suggest that individual differences observed in depression-like behavior can be associated not only with changes in the concentrations of key neurochemical factors but also with differential time courses of such factors.

  15. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of the dopamine transporter ligand 4-chlorobenztropine alone and in combination with cocaine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tolliver, B K; Newman, A H; Katz, J L; Ho, L B; Fox, L M; Hsu, K; Berger, S P

    1999-04-01

    demonstrate that DA transporter ligands that do not share the neurochemical and behavioral profiles of cocaine nevertheless may enhance the effects of cocaine in vivo.

  16. Quantification of nonclassicality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrke, C.; Sperling, J.; Vogel, W.

    2012-11-01

    To quantify single-mode nonclassicality, we start from an operational approach. A positive semidefinite observable is introduced to describe a measurement setup. The quantification is based on the negativity of the normally ordered version of this observable. Perfect operational quantumness corresponds to the quantum-noise-free measurement of the chosen observable. Surprisingly, even moderately squeezed states may exhibit perfect quantumness for a properly designed measurement. The quantification is also considered from an axiomatic viewpoint, based on the algebraic structure of the quantum states and the quantum superposition principle. Basic conclusions from both approaches are consistent with this fundamental principle of the quantum world.

  17. Quantification of Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Plants are a rich source of secondary metabolites that have medicinal and aromatic properties. Secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, iridoids and phenolics generally produced by plants for their defence mechanisms have been implicated in the therapeutic properties of most medicinal plants. Hence, quantification of these metabolites will aid to discover new and effective drugs from plant sources and also to scientifically validate the existing traditional practices. Quantification of large group of phytochemicals such as phenolics and flavonoids is quantified in this context. PMID:26939265

  18. Vanillin Attenuated Behavioural Impairments, Neurochemical Deficts, Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis Against Rotenone Induced Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Dhanalakshmi, Chinnasamy; Janakiraman, Udaiyappan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Kalandar, Ameer; Khan, Mohammed Abdul Sattar; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2016-08-01

    Vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde), a pleasant smelling organic aromatic compound, is widely used as a flavoring additive in food, beverage, cosmetic and drug industries. It is reported to cross the blood brain barrier and also displayed antioxidant and neuroprotective activities. We previously reported the neuroprotective effect of vanillin against rotenone induced in in vitro model of PD. The present experiment was aimed to analyze the neuroprotective effect of vanillin on the motor and non-motor deficits, neurochemical variables, oxidative, anti-oxidative indices and the expression of apoptotic markers against rotenone induced rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rotenone treatment exhibited motor and non-motor impairments, neurochemical deficits, oxidative stress and apoptosis, whereas oral administration of vanillin attenuated the above-said indices. However further studies are needed to explore the mitochondrial protective and anti-inflammatory properties of vanillin, as these processes play a vital role in the cause and progression of PD. PMID:27038927

  19. Sleep and neurochemical modulation by the nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPAR-α) in rat.

    PubMed

    Mijangos-Moreno, Stephanie; Poot-Aké, Alwin; Guzmán, Khalil; Arankowsky-Sandoval, Gloria; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Zaldívar-Rae, Jaime; Sarro-Ramírez, Andrea; Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is a nuclear protein that plays an essential role in diverse neurobiological processes. However, the role of PPARα on the sleep modulation is unknown. Here, rats treated with an intrahypothalamic injection of Wy14643 (10μg/1μL; PPARα agonist) enhanced wakefulness and decreased slow wave sleep and rapid eye movement sleep whereas MK-886 (10μg/1μL; PPARα antagonist) promoted opposite effects. Moreover, Wy14643 increased dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, and adenosine contents collected from nucleus accumbens. The levels of these neurochemicals were diminished after MK-886 treatment. The current findings suggest that PPARα may participate in the sleep and neurochemical modulation. PMID:26450400

  20. Vanillin Attenuated Behavioural Impairments, Neurochemical Deficts, Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis Against Rotenone Induced Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Dhanalakshmi, Chinnasamy; Janakiraman, Udaiyappan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Kalandar, Ameer; Khan, Mohammed Abdul Sattar; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2016-08-01

    Vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde), a pleasant smelling organic aromatic compound, is widely used as a flavoring additive in food, beverage, cosmetic and drug industries. It is reported to cross the blood brain barrier and also displayed antioxidant and neuroprotective activities. We previously reported the neuroprotective effect of vanillin against rotenone induced in in vitro model of PD. The present experiment was aimed to analyze the neuroprotective effect of vanillin on the motor and non-motor deficits, neurochemical variables, oxidative, anti-oxidative indices and the expression of apoptotic markers against rotenone induced rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Rotenone treatment exhibited motor and non-motor impairments, neurochemical deficits, oxidative stress and apoptosis, whereas oral administration of vanillin attenuated the above-said indices. However further studies are needed to explore the mitochondrial protective and anti-inflammatory properties of vanillin, as these processes play a vital role in the cause and progression of PD.

  1. Expanding neurochemical investigations with multi-modal recording: simultaneous fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, iontophoresis, and patch clamp measurements.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, D C; McKinney, C J; Manis, P B; Wightman, R M

    2016-08-01

    Multi-modal recording describes the simultaneous collection of information across distinct domains. Compared to isolated measurements, such studies can more easily determine relationships between varieties of phenomena. This is useful for neurochemical investigations which examine cellular activity in response to changes in the local chemical environment. In this study, we demonstrate a method to perform simultaneous patch clamp measurements with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using optically isolated instrumentation. A model circuit simulating concurrent measurements was used to predict the electrical interference between instruments. No significant impact was anticipated between methods, and predictions were largely confirmed experimentally. One exception was due to capacitive coupling of the FSCV potential waveform into the patch clamp amplifier. However, capacitive transients measured in whole-cell current clamp recordings were well below the level of biological signals, which allowed the activity of cells to be easily determined. Next, the activity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) was examined in the presence of an FSCV electrode to determine how the exogenous potential impacted nearby cells. The activities of both resting and active MSNs were unaffected by the FSCV waveform. Additionally, application of an iontophoretic current, used to locally deliver drugs and other neurochemicals, did not affect neighboring cells. Finally, MSN activity was monitored during iontophoretic delivery of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter. Membrane depolarization and cell firing were observed concurrently with chemical changes around the cell resulting from delivery. In all, we show how combined electrophysiological and electrochemical measurements can relate information between domains and increase the power of neurochemical investigations.

  2. The morphologic and neurochemical basis of dementia: aging, hierarchical patterns of lesion distribution and vulnerable neuronal phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hof, P R; Giannakopoulos, P; Vickers, J C; Bouras, C; Morrison, J H

    1995-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia in elderly individuals. Approximately 11% of the population older than 65, and up to 50% of individuals over 85 qualify as having "probable Alzheimer's disease" on the basis of clinical evaluation. Since the early description of the clinical symptoms and neuropathologic features of Alzheimer's disease, there has been an extraordinary growth in the knowledge of the morphologic and molecular characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. Although the pathogenetic events that lead to dementia are not yet fully understood, several hypotheses regarding the formation of the hallmark pathologic structures of Alzheimer's disease have been proposed. In this context, the use of specific histochemical techniques in the primate brain has greatly expanded our understanding of neuron typology, connectivity and circuit distribution in relation to neurochemical identity. In this respect, very specific subsets of cortical neurons and cortical afferents can be identified by their particular content of certain neurotransmitters and structural proteins. In this article, we discuss the possible relationships between the distribution of pathologic changes in aging, Alzheimer's disease, and possibly related dementing conditions, in the context of the specific elements of the cortical circuitry that are affected by these alterations. Also, evidence for links between the neurochemical phenotype of a given neuron and its relative vulnerability or resistance to the degenerative process are presented in order to correlate the distribution of cellular pathologic changes, neurochemical characteristics related to vulnerability, and affected cortical circuits.

  3. Neurochemical and cellular specializations in the mammalian neocortex reflect phylogenetic relationships: evidence from primates, cetaceans, and artiodactyls.

    PubMed

    Hof, P R; Glezer, I I; Nimchinsky, E A; Erwin, J M

    2000-06-01

    Most of the available data on the cytoarchitecture of the cerebral cortex in mammals rely on Nissl, Golgi, and myelin stains and few studies have explored the differential morphologic and neurochemical phenotypes of neuronal populations. In addition, the majority of studies addressing the distribution and morphology of identified neuronal subtypes have been performed in common laboratory animals such as the rat, mouse, cat, and macaque monkey, as well as in postmortem analyses in humans. Several neuronal markers, such as neurotransmitters or structural proteins, display a restricted cellular distribution in the mammalian brain, and recently, certain cytoskeletal proteins and calcium-binding proteins have emerged as reliable markers for morphologically distinct subpopulations of neurons in a large number of mammalian species. In this article, we review the morphologic characteristics and distribution of three calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumin, calbindin, and calretinin, and of the neurofilament protein triplet, a component of the neuronal cytoskeleton, to provide an overview of the presence and cellular typology of these proteins in the neocortex of various mammalian taxa. Considering the remarkable diversity in gross morphological patterns and neuronal organization that occurred during the evolution of mammalian neocortex, the distribution of these neurochemical markers may help define taxon-specific patterns. In turn, such patterns can be used as reliable phylogenetic traits to assess the degree to which neurochemical specialization of neurons, as well as their regional and laminar distribution in the neocortex, represent derived or ancestral features, and differ in certain taxa from the laboratory species that are most commonly studied.

  4. Neurochemical Organization and Experience-Dependent Activation of Estrogen-Associated Circuits in the Songbird Auditory Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin Kwon; Burrows, Kaiping; Tremere, Liisa A.; Pinaud, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The classic steroid hormone estradiol is rapidly produced by central auditory neurons in the songbird brain and instantaneously modulates auditory coding to enhance the neural and behavioral discrimination of acoustic signals. Although these recent advances highlight novel roles for estradiol in the regulation of central auditory processing, current knowledge on the functional and neurochemical organization of estrogen-associated circuits, as well as the impact of sensory experience in these auditory forebrain networks, remains very limited. Here we show that both estrogen-producing and -sensitive neurons are highly expressed in the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM), the zebra finch analog of the mammalian auditory association cortex, but not other auditory forebrain areas. We further demonstrate that auditory experience primarily engages estrogen-producing, and to a lesser extent, estrogen-responsive neurons in NCM, that these neuronal populations moderately overlap, and that acute episodes of sensory experience do not quantitatively affect these circuits. Finally, we show that whereas estrogen-producing cells are neurochemically heterogenous, estrogen-sensitive neurons are primarily glutamatergic. These findings reveal the neurochemical and functional organization of estrogen-associated circuits in the auditory forebrain, demonstrate their activation and stability in response to sensory experience in behaving animals, and highlight estrogenic circuits as fundamental components of central networks supporting sensory processing. PMID:21707790

  5. Negotiating the neurochemical self: anti-depressant consumption in women's recovery from depression.

    PubMed

    Fullagar, Simone

    2009-07-01

    Anti-depressant treatment can be viewed as an exercise of biopower that is articulated through policies and practices aimed at the reduction of depression, population healthcare costs and effects on labour force productivity. Drawing upon a feminist governmentality perspective, this article examines the discourses that shaped women's experiences of anti-depressant medication in an Australian qualitative study on recovery from depression. The majority of women had been prescribed anti-depressants to treat a chemical imbalance in the brain, manage symptoms and restore normal functioning. One-third of participants identified anti-depressants as helpful in their recovery, while two-thirds were either highly ambivalent about, or critical of, medication as a solution to depression. Thirty-one women who identified the ;positive' benefits of anti-depressants actively constituted themselves as biomedical consumers seeking to redress a chemical imbalance. The problem of depression, the emergence of molecular science and the push for pharmacological solutions are contributing to the discursive formation of new subject positions - such as the neurochemically deficient self. Three themes were identified in relation to medication use, namely restoring normality, signifying recovery success and control/uncertainty. Anti-depressant medication offered women a normalized pathway to successful recovery that stood in stark contrast to the biologically deficient and morally failing self. These women's stories importantly reveal the gender relations and paradoxes arising from biopolitical technologies that shape selfhood for women in advanced liberal societies.

  6. Regulation of dihydropyridine calcium antagonist binding sites in the rat hippocampus following neurochemical lesions.

    PubMed

    Bolger, G T; Basile, A S; Janowsky, A J; Paul, S M; Skolnick, P

    1987-01-01

    The effects of catecholaminergic, cholinergic, serotonergic, and glutaminergic terminal destruction and neurotransmitter depletion on [3H]nitrendipine binding to rat brain membranes were determined using the neurotoxins 6-hydroxydopamine, 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, and kainic acid and the neurotransmitter-depleting agent reserpine. Following intracisternal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine there were time-dependent increases (14-23%) in the density but not change in the affinity of hippocampal [3H]nitrendipine binding sites. 6-Hydroxydopamine significantly increased [3H]nitrendipine binding in the hippocampus 4 and 10 days following injection. However, no significant change in binding was observed at 16 and 26 days. [3H]Nitrendipine binding in the cerebral cortex, striatum, cerebellum, and brain stem was unaffected by 6-hydroxydopamine. Neither 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine nor kainic acid affected [3H]nitrendipine binding in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Acute and chronic reserpinization also did not affect [3H]nitrendipine binding in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. These results indicate that dihydropyridine calcium antagonist bindings sites in rat brain are subject to brain region-specific regulation following neurochemical lesions and may be present in their largest densities on postsynaptic membranes.

  7. Whole-cell Patch-clamp Recordings from Morphologically- and Neurochemically-identified Hippocampal Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Sam A.; Song, Jie; Vida, Imre

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic inhibitory interneurons play a central role within neuronal circuits of the brain. Interneurons comprise a small subset of the neuronal population (10-20%), but show a high level of physiological, morphological, and neurochemical heterogeneity, reflecting their diverse functions. Therefore, investigation of interneurons provides important insights into the organization principles and function of neuronal circuits. This, however, requires an integrated physiological and neuroanatomical approach for the selection and identification of individual interneuron types. Whole-cell patch-clamp recording from acute brain slices of transgenic animals, expressing fluorescent proteins under the promoters of interneuron-specific markers, provides an efficient method to target and electrophysiologically characterize intrinsic and synaptic properties of specific interneuron types. Combined with intracellular dye labeling, this approach can be extended with post-hoc morphological and immunocytochemical analysis, enabling systematic identification of recorded neurons. These methods can be tailored to suit a broad range of scientific questions regarding functional properties of diverse types of cortical neurons. PMID:25350149

  8. Genetic or pharmacological blockade of noradrenaline synthesis enhances the neurochemical, behavioural, and neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Weinshenker, David; Ferrucci, Michela; Busceti, Carla L.; Biagioni, Francesca; Lazzeri, Gloria; Liles, L. Cameron; Lenzi, Paola; Murri, Luigi; Paparelli, Antonio; Fornai, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) lesions of the locus coeruleus (LC), the major brain noradrenergic nucleus, exacerbate the damage to nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) terminals caused by the psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH). However, because noradrenergic terminals contain other neuromodulators and the noradrenaline (NA) transporter, which may act as a neuroprotective buffer, it was unclear whether this enhancement of METH neurotoxicity was caused by the loss of noradrenergic innervation or the loss of NA itself. We addressed the specific role of NA by comparing the effects of METH in mice with noradrenergic lesions (DSP-4) and those with intact noradrenergic terminals but specifically lacking NA (genetic or acute pharmacological blockade of the NA biosynthetic enzyme dopamine β-hydroxylase; DBH). We found that genetic deletion of DBH (DBH −/− mice) and acute treatment of wild-type mice with a DBH inhibitor (fusaric acid) recapitulated the effects of DSP-4 lesions on METH responses. All three methods of NA depletion enhanced striatal DA release, extracellular oxidative stress (as measured by in vivo microdialysis of DA and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid), and behavioural stereotypies following repeated METH administration. These effects accompanied a worsening of the striatal DA neuron terminal damage and ultrastructural changes to medium spiny neurons. We conclude that NA itself is neuroprotective and plays a fundamental role in the sensitivity of striatal DA terminals to the neurochemical, behavioural, and neurotoxic effects of METH. PMID:18042179

  9. Neurochemical and behavioral effects of Cinnamomi cassiae (Lauraceae) bark aqueous extract in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Bano, Farhat; Ikram, Huma; Akhtar, Naheed

    2014-05-01

    Obesity is a risk factor leading to a number of chronic and metabolic disorders. Obesity is the fifth leading cause of global deaths. At least 2.8 million adults are dying each year as being overweight or obese. Cinnamomi cassiae is widely used traditional medicinal plant, used indigenously, to decrease glucose and cholesterol. 5-Hydroxy tryptamine (5-HT; Serotonin) is an important neurotransmitter reported to be involved in the pathophysiology of anorexia. Present study was designed to investigate the neurochemical and behavioral effects of cinnamon bark aqueous extract (CBAE) in obese rats and to find the possible involvement of 5-HT in reducing the body weight in these experimental animals. CBAE was repeatedly administered orally in the test animals for 5 weeks. A decrease in the food intake along with a concomitant increase in brain 5-HT level was observed in rats administered with CBAE. Findings may help in extending therapeutics in the pathophysiology of obesity and related eating disorders. Decrease activities in behavioral models were also monitored in CBAE treated animals.

  10. Effects of melatonin on aluminium-induced neurobehavioral and neurochemical changes in aging rats.

    PubMed

    Allagui, M S; Feriani, A; Saoudi, M; Badraoui, R; Bouoni, Z; Nciri, R; Murat, J C; Elfeki, A

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential protective effects of melatonin (Mel) against aluminium-induced neurodegenerative changes in aging Wistar rats (24-28months old). Herein, aluminium chloride (AlCl3) (50mg/kg BW/day) was administered by gavage, and melatonin (Mel) was co-administered to a group of Al-treated rats by an intra-peritoneal injection at a daily dose of 10mg/kg BW for four months. The findings revealed that aluminium administration induced a significant decrease in body weight associated with marked mortality for the old group of rats, which was more pronounced in old Al-treated rats. Behavioural alterations were assessed by 'open fields', 'elevated plus maze' and 'Radial 8-arms maze' tests. The results demonstrated that Mel co-administration alleviated neurobehavioral changes in both old and old Al-treated rats. Melatonin was noted to play a good neuroprotective role, reducing lipid peroxidation (TBARs), and enhancing enzymatic (SOD, CAT and GPx) activities in the brain organs of old control and old Al-treated rats. Mel treatment also reversed the decrease of AChE activity in the brain tissues, which was confirmed by histological sections. Overall, the results showed that Mel administration can induce beneficial effects for the treatment of Al-induced neurobehavioral and neurochemical changes in the central nervous system (CNS).

  11. Neurochemical mechanism of action of drugs which modify feeding via the serotoninergic system.

    PubMed

    Garattini, S; Mennini, T; Bendotti, C; Invernizzi, R; Samanin, R

    1986-01-01

    The neurochemical mechanisms by which drugs acting on central serotoninergic system modify feeding were reviewed. Fenfluramine, a clinically effective appetite suppressant, releases serotonin from nerve terminals and inhibits its reuptake, and considerable evidence suggests that these effects mediate its anorectic activity. The D isomer of fenfluramine is particularly specific in affecting serotonin mechanisms and causing anorexia. Transmitters other than serotonin such as acetylcholine, catecholamines and GABA are also affected by systemic administration of fenfluramine, but some of these effects are secondary to fenfluramine's action on serotoninergic mechanisms. Moreover, there is no evidence that these brain substances are involved in fenfluramine's ability to cause anorexia. Several studies with drugs affecting different serotonin mechanisms such as release and uptake or mimicking the action of serotonin at post-synaptic receptors suggest that increase serotonin release and direct stimulation of postsynaptic receptors are the most effective mechanisms for causing depression of food intake, although inhibition of serotonin uptake may also contribute in appropriate conditions. Development of serotonin receptor hyposensitivity and, in some instances, decreased serotonin levels may lead to tolerance to the anorectic activity of drugs enhancing serotonin transmission, the degree of this depending critically on the type of effect on serotonin mechanisms and intensity and duration of serotonin receptor activation. Recent evidence suggests that a decrease in serotonin function causes stimulation of feeding. This may lead to development of new strategies for the treatment of clinical anorexias.

  12. The psychological and neurochemical mechanisms of drug memory reconsolidation: implications for the treatment of addiction.

    PubMed

    Milton, Amy L; Everitt, Barry J

    2010-06-01

    Memory reconsolidation is the process by which memories, destabilised at retrieval, require restabilisation to persist in the brain. It has been demonstrated that even old, well-established memories require reconsolidation following retrieval; therefore, memory reconsolidation could potentially be exploited to disrupt, or even erase, aberrant memories that underlie psychiatric disorders, thereby providing a novel therapeutic target. Drug addiction is one such disorder; it is both chronic and relapsing, and one prominent risk factor for a relapse episode is the presentation of environmental cues that have previously been associated with drugs of abuse. This 'cue-induced relapse' can be accounted for in psychological terms by reinforcing memories of the pavlovian association between the cue and the drug, which can thus influence behaviour through at least three psychologically and neurobiologically dissociable mechanisms: conditioned reinforcement, conditioned approach and conditioned motivation. As each of these psychological processes could contribute to the resumption of drug-seeking following abstinence, it is important to develop treatments that can reduce drug-seeking re-established via influences on each or all of these pavlovian processes, in order to minimise the risk of a subsequent relapse. Investigation of the memory reconsolidation mechanisms of the memories underlying conditioned reinforcement, conditioned approach and conditioned motivation indicate that they depend upon different neurochemical systems, including the glutamatergic and adrenergic systems within limbic corticostriatal circuitry. We also discuss here the subsequent translation to the clinic of this preclinical work.

  13. Chronic and acute alcohol administration induced neurochemical changes in the brain: comparison of distinct zebrafish populations.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Diptendu; Shams, Soaleha; Gerlai, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The zebrafish is increasingly utilized in the analysis of the effects of ethanol (alcohol) on brain function and behavior. We have shown significant population-dependent alcohol-induced changes in zebrafish behavior and have started to analyze alterations in dopaminergic and serotoninergic responses. Here, we analyze the effects of alcohol on levels of selected neurochemicals using a 2 × 3 (chronic × acute) between-subject alcohol exposure paradigm randomized for two zebrafish populations, AB and SF. Each fish first received the particular chronic treatment (0 or 0.5 vol/vol% alcohol) and subsequently the acute exposure (0, 0.5 or 1.0% alcohol). We report changes in levels of dopamine, DOPAC, serotonin, 5HIAA, glutamate, GABA, aspartate, glycine and taurine as quantified from whole brain extracts using HPLC. We also analyze monoamine oxidase and tyrosine hydroxylase enzymatic activity. The results demonstrate that compared to SF, AB is more responsive to both acute alcohol exposure and acute alcohol withdrawal at the level of neurochemistry, a finding that correlates well with prior behavioral observations and one which suggests the involvement of genes in the observed alcohol effects. We discuss correlations between the current results and prior behavioral findings, and stress the importance of characterization of zebrafish strains for future behavior genetic and psychopharmacology studies.

  14. A subpopulation of neurochemically-identified ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons is excited by intravenous cocaine.

    PubMed

    Mejias-Aponte, Carlos A; Ye, Changquan; Bonci, Antonello; Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Morales, Marisela

    2015-02-01

    Systemic administration of cocaine is thought to decrease the firing rates of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. However, this view is based on categorizations of recorded neurons as DA neurons using preselected electrophysiological characteristics lacking neurochemical confirmation. Without applying cellular preselection, we recorded the impulse activity of VTA neurons in response to cocaine administration in anesthetized adult rats. The phenotype of recorded neurons was determined by their juxtacellular labeling and immunohistochemical detection of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a DA marker. We found that intravenous cocaine altered firing rates in the majority of recorded VTA neurons. Within the cocaine-responsive neurons, half of the population was excited and the other half was inhibited. Both populations had similar discharge rates and firing regularities, and most neurons did not exhibit changes in burst firing. Inhibited neurons were more abundant in the posterior VTA, whereas excited neurons were distributed evenly throughout the VTA. Cocaine-excited neurons were more likely to be excited by footshock. Within the subpopulation of TH-positive neurons, 36% were excited by cocaine and 64% were inhibited. Within the subpopulation of TH-negative neurons, 44% were excited and 28% were inhibited. Contrary to the prevailing view that all DA neurons are inhibited by cocaine, we found a subset of confirmed VTA DA neurons that is excited by systemic administration of cocaine. We provide evidence indicating that DA neurons are heterogeneous in their response to cocaine and that VTA non-DA neurons play an active role in processing systemic cocaine. PMID:25653355

  15. A Subpopulation of Neurochemically-Identified Ventral Tegmental Area Dopamine Neurons Is Excited by Intravenous Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Mejias-Aponte, Carlos A.; Ye, Changquan; Bonci, Antonello; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic administration of cocaine is thought to decrease the firing rates of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. However, this view is based on categorizations of recorded neurons as DA neurons using preselected electrophysiological characteristics lacking neurochemical confirmation. Without applying cellular preselection, we recorded the impulse activity of VTA neurons in response to cocaine administration in anesthetized adult rats. The phenotype of recorded neurons was determined by their juxtacellular labeling and immunohistochemical detection of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a DA marker. We found that intravenous cocaine altered firing rates in the majority of recorded VTA neurons. Within the cocaine-responsive neurons, half of the population was excited and the other half was inhibited. Both populations had similar discharge rates and firing regularities, and most neurons did not exhibit changes in burst firing. Inhibited neurons were more abundant in the posterior VTA, whereas excited neurons were distributed evenly throughout the VTA. Cocaine-excited neurons were more likely to be excited by footshock. Within the subpopulation of TH-positive neurons, 36% were excited by cocaine and 64% were inhibited. Within the subpopulation of TH-negative neurons, 44% were excited and 28% were inhibited. Contrary to the prevailing view that all DA neurons are inhibited by cocaine, we found a subset of confirmed VTA DA neurons that is excited by systemic administration of cocaine. We provide evidence indicating that DA neurons are heterogeneous in their response to cocaine and that VTA non-DA neurons play an active role in processing systemic cocaine. PMID:25653355

  16. Mercury exposure and neurochemical impacts in bald eagles across several Great Lakes states.

    PubMed

    Rutkiewicz, Jennifer; Nam, Dong-Ha; Cooley, Thomas; Neumann, Kay; Padilla, Irene Bueno; Route, William; Strom, Sean; Basu, Niladri

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we assessed mercury (Hg) exposure in several tissues (brain, liver, and breast and primary feathers) in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) collected from across five Great Lakes states (Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin) between 2002-2010, and assessed relationships between brain Hg and neurochemical receptors (NMDA and GABA(A)) and enzymes (glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)). Brain total Hg (THg) levels (dry weight basis) averaged 2.80 μg/g (range: 0.2-34.01), and levels were highest in Michigan birds. THg levels in liver (r(p) = 0.805) and breast feathers (r(p) = 0.611) significantly correlated with those in brain. Brain Hg was not associated with binding to the GABA(A) receptor. Brain THg and inorganic Hg (IHg) were significantly positively correlated with GS activity (THg r(p) = 0.190; IHg r(p) = 0.188) and negatively correlated with NMDA receptor levels (THg r(p) = -0245; IHg r(p) = -0.282), and IHg was negatively correlated with GAD activity (r(s) = -0.196). We also report upon Hg demethylation and relationships between Hg and Se in brain and liver. These results suggest that bald eagles in the Great Lakes region are exposed to Hg at levels capable of causing subclinical neurological damage, and that when tissue burdens are related to proposed avian thresholds approximately 14-27% of eagles studied here may be at risk.

  17. [Motivation and Emotional States: Structural Systemic, Neurochemical, Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Bazyan, A S

    2016-01-01

    The structural, systemic, neurochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms of organization and coding motivation and emotional states are describe. The GABA and glutamatergic synaptic systems of basal ganglia form a neural network and participate in the implementation of voluntary behavior. Neuropeptides, neurohormones and paracrine neuromodulators involved in the organization of motivation and emotional states, integrated with synaptic systems, controlled by neural networks and organizing goal-directed behavior. Structural centers for united and integrated of information in voluntary and goal-directed behavior are globus pallidus. Substantia nigra pars reticulata switches the information from corticobasal networks to thalamocortical networks, induces global dopaminergic (DA) signal and organize interaction of mesolimbic and nigostriatnoy DA systems controlled by prefrontal and motor cortex. Together with the motor cortex, substantia nigra displays information in the brainstem and spinal cord to implementation of behavior. Motivation states are formed in the interaction of neurohormonal and neuropeptide systems by monoaminergic systems of brain. Emotional states are formed by monoaminergic systems of the mid-brain, where the leading role belongs to the mesolimbic DA system. The emotional and motivation state of the encoded specific epigenetic molecular and chemical pattern of neuron. PMID:27149821

  18. Subchronic steroid administration induces long lasting changes in neurochemical and behavioral response to cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Kailanto, Sanna; Kankaanpää, Aino; Seppälä, Timo

    2011-11-01

    The abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs), such as nandrolone, is not only a problem in the world of sports but is associated with the polydrug use of non-athletes. Among other adverse effects, AAS abuse has been associated with long term or even persistent psychiatric problems. We have previously found that nandrolone decanoate treatment could produce prolonged changes in rats' brain reward circuits associated to drug dependence. The aim in this study was to evaluate whether AAS-induced neurochemical and behavioral changes are reversible. The increases in extracellular dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) concentration, as well as stereotyped behavior and locomotor activity (LMA) evoked by cocaine were attenuated by pretreatment with nandrolone. The recovery period, which was needed for the DA system to return back to the basic level, was fairly long compared to the dosing period of the steroid. In the 5-HT system, the time that system needed to return back to the basal level, was even longer than in the DA system. The attenuation was still seen though there were no detectable traces of nandrolone in the blood samples. Given that accumbal outflow of DA and 5-HT, as well as LMA and stereotyped behavior are all related to reward of stimulant drugs, this study suggests that nandrolone decanoate has significant, long-lasting but reversible effects on the rewarding properties of cocaine.

  19. Sonic hedgehog maintains cellular and neurochemical homeostasis in the adult nigrostriatal circuit.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Reyes, Luis E; Verbitsky, Miguel; Blesa, Javier; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice; Paredes, Daniel; Tillack, Karsten; Phani, Sudarshan; Kramer, Edgar R; Przedborski, Serge; Kottmann, Andreas H

    2012-07-26

    Non cell-autonomous processes are thought to play critical roles in the cellular maintenance of the healthy and diseased brain but mechanistic details remain unclear. We report that the interruption of a non cell-autonomous mode of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling originating from dopaminergic neurons causes progressive, adult-onset degeneration of dopaminergic, cholinergic, and fast spiking GABAergic neurons of the mesostriatal circuit, imbalance of cholinergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission, and motor deficits reminiscent of Parkinson's disease. Variable Shh signaling results in graded inhibition of muscarinic autoreceptor- and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-expression in the striatum. Reciprocally, graded signals that emanate from striatal cholinergic neurons and engage the canonical GDNF receptor Ret inhibit Shh expression in dopaminergic neurons. Thus, we discovered a mechanism for neuronal subtype specific and reciprocal communication that is essential for neurochemical and structural homeostasis in the nigrostriatal circuit. These results provide integrative insights into non cell-autonomous processes likely at play in neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:22841315

  20. Mercury exposure and neurochemical impacts in bald eagles across several Great Lakes states.

    PubMed

    Rutkiewicz, Jennifer; Nam, Dong-Ha; Cooley, Thomas; Neumann, Kay; Padilla, Irene Bueno; Route, William; Strom, Sean; Basu, Niladri

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we assessed mercury (Hg) exposure in several tissues (brain, liver, and breast and primary feathers) in bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) collected from across five Great Lakes states (Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin) between 2002-2010, and assessed relationships between brain Hg and neurochemical receptors (NMDA and GABA(A)) and enzymes (glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)). Brain total Hg (THg) levels (dry weight basis) averaged 2.80 μg/g (range: 0.2-34.01), and levels were highest in Michigan birds. THg levels in liver (r(p) = 0.805) and breast feathers (r(p) = 0.611) significantly correlated with those in brain. Brain Hg was not associated with binding to the GABA(A) receptor. Brain THg and inorganic Hg (IHg) were significantly positively correlated with GS activity (THg r(p) = 0.190; IHg r(p) = 0.188) and negatively correlated with NMDA receptor levels (THg r(p) = -0245; IHg r(p) = -0.282), and IHg was negatively correlated with GAD activity (r(s) = -0.196). We also report upon Hg demethylation and relationships between Hg and Se in brain and liver. These results suggest that bald eagles in the Great Lakes region are exposed to Hg at levels capable of causing subclinical neurological damage, and that when tissue burdens are related to proposed avian thresholds approximately 14-27% of eagles studied here may be at risk. PMID:21735125

  1. Sex differences in neurochemical markers that correlate with behavior in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Frick, K M; Burlingame, L A; Delaney, S S; Berger-Sweeney, J

    2002-01-01

    Sex differences in neurochemical markers that correlate with behavior in aging mice NEUROBIOL AGING. We examined whether the enzymatic activities of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) were altered similarly with age in male and female mice, and whether these changes were correlated with age-related alterations in memory and anxiety. ChAT and GAD activities were measured in neocortex, hippocampus, and striatum of behaviorally characterized male and female C57BL/6 mice (5, 17, and 25 months). Generally, ChAT activity was increased, and GAD activity decreased, with age. However, disparate changes were revealed between the sexes; activities of both enzymes were decreased in 17-month males, whereas alterations in females were not observed until 25-months. Furthermore, enzyme-behavior correlations differed between the sexes; in males, ChAT activity was related to one behavioral task, whereas in females, activities of both enzymes were correlated with multiple tasks. Significant enzyme-behavior correlations were most evident at 17 months of age, likely the result of behavioral and enzymatic sex differences at this age. These data represent the first comprehensive report illustrating differential alterations of ChAT and GAD activities in aging male and female mice.

  2. Neurochemical factors underlying individual differences in locomotor activity and anxiety-like behavioral responses in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Muraleetharan, Arrujyan; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Variation among individuals may arise for several reasons, and may have diverse underlying mechanisms. Individual differences have been studied in a variety of species, but recently a new model organism has emerged in this field that offers both sophistication in phenotypical characterization and powerful mechanistic analysis. Recently, zebrafish, one of the favorites of geneticists, have been shown to exhibit consistent individual differences in baseline locomotor activity. In the current study, we further explore this finding and examine whether individual differences in locomotor activity correlate with anxiety-like behavioral measures and with levels of dopamine, serotonin and the metabolites of these neurotransmitters. In addition, we examine whether individual differences in locomotor activity are also associated with reactivity to the locomotor stimulant effects of and neurochemical responses to acute ethanol exposure (30min long, 1% v/v ethanol bath application). Principal component analyses revealed a strong association among anxiety-like responses, locomotor activity, serotonin and dopamine levels. Furthermore, ethanol exposure was found to abolish the locomotion-dependent anxiety-like behavioral and serotonergic responses suggesting that this drug also engages a common underlying pathway. Overall, our results provide support for an important role of the serotonergic system in mediating individual differences in anxiety-like responses and locomotor activity in zebrafish and for a minor modulatory role of the dopaminergic system.

  3. [Motivation and Emotional States: Structural Systemic, Neurochemical, Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Bazyan, A S

    2016-01-01

    The structural, systemic, neurochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms of organization and coding motivation and emotional states are describe. The GABA and glutamatergic synaptic systems of basal ganglia form a neural network and participate in the implementation of voluntary behavior. Neuropeptides, neurohormones and paracrine neuromodulators involved in the organization of motivation and emotional states, integrated with synaptic systems, controlled by neural networks and organizing goal-directed behavior. Structural centers for united and integrated of information in voluntary and goal-directed behavior are globus pallidus. Substantia nigra pars reticulata switches the information from corticobasal networks to thalamocortical networks, induces global dopaminergic (DA) signal and organize interaction of mesolimbic and nigostriatnoy DA systems controlled by prefrontal and motor cortex. Together with the motor cortex, substantia nigra displays information in the brainstem and spinal cord to implementation of behavior. Motivation states are formed in the interaction of neurohormonal and neuropeptide systems by monoaminergic systems of brain. Emotional states are formed by monoaminergic systems of the mid-brain, where the leading role belongs to the mesolimbic DA system. The emotional and motivation state of the encoded specific epigenetic molecular and chemical pattern of neuron.

  4. ETIOLOGY, TRIGGERS AND NEUROCHEMICAL CIRCUITS ASSOCIATED WITH UNEXPECTED, EXPECTED, AND LABORATORY-INDUCED PANIC ATTACKS

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Philip L.; Federici, Lauren M.; Shekhar, Anantha

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a severe anxiety disorder that is characterized by recurrent panic attacks (PA), which can be unexpected (uPA, i.e., no clear identifiable trigger) or expected (ePA). Panic typically involves an abrupt feeling of catastrophic fear or distress accompanied by physiological symptoms such as palpitations, racing heart, thermal sensations, and sweating. Recurrent uPA and ePA can also lead to agoraphobia, where subjects with PD avoid situations that were associated with PA. Here we will review recent developments in our understanding of PD, which includes discussions on: symptoms and signs associated with uPA and ePAs; Diagnosis of PD and the new DSM-V; biological etiology such as heritability and gene x environment and gene x hormonal development interactions; comparisons between laboratory and naturally occurring uPAs and ePAs; neurochemical systems that are associated with clinical PAs (e.g. gene associations; targets for triggering or treating PAs), adaptive fear and panic response concepts in the context of new NIH RDoc approach; and finally strengths and weaknesses of translational animal models of adaptive and pathological panic states. PMID:25130976

  5. Placebo and nocebo effects: a complex interplay between psychological factors and neurochemical networks.

    PubMed

    Frisaldi, Elisa; Piedimonte, Alessandro; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Placebo and nocebo effects have recently emerged as an interesting model to understand some of the intricate underpinnings of the mind-body interaction. A variety of psychological mechanisms, such as expectation, conditioning, anxiety modulation, and reward, have been identified, and a number of neurochemical networks have been characterized across different conditions, such as pain and motor disorders. What has emerged from the recent insights into the neurobiology of placebo and nocebo effects is that the psychosocial context around the patient and the therapy, which represents the ritual of the therapeutic act, may change the biochemistry and the neuronal circuitry of the patient's brain. Furthermore, the mechanisms activated by placebos and nocebos have been found to be the same as those activated by drugs, which suggests a cognitive/affective interference with drug action. Overall, these findings highlight the important role of therapeutic rituals in the overall therapeutic outcome, including hypnosis, which may have profound implications both in routine medical practice and in the clinical trials setting. PMID:25928679

  6. Neurochemical and Neuropharmacological Aspects of Circadian Disruptions: An Introduction to Asynchronization

    PubMed Central

    Kohyama, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Circadian disruptions are common in modern society, and there is an urgent need for effective treatment strategies. According to standard diagnostic criteria, most adolescents showing both insomnia and daytime sleepiness are diagnosed as having behavioral-induced sleep efficiency syndrome resulting from insomnia due to inadequate sleep hygiene. However, a simple intervention of adequate sleep hygiene often fails to treat them. As a solution to this clinical problem, the present review first overviews the basic neurochemical and neuropharmachological aspects of sleep and circadian rhythm regulation, then explains several circadian disruptions from similar viewpoints, and finally introduces the clinical notion of asynchronization. Asynchronization is designated to explain the pathophysiology/pathogenesis of exhibition of both insomnia and hypersomnia in adolescents, which comprises disturbances in various aspects of biological rhythms. The major triggers for asynchronization are considered to be a combination of light exposure during the night, which disturbs the biological clock and decreases melatonin secretion, as well as a lack of light exposure in the morning, which prohibits normal synchronization of the biological clock to the 24-hour cycle of the earth and decreases the activity of serotonin. In the chronic phase of asynchronization, involvement of both wake- and sleep-promoting systems is suggested. Both conventional and alternative therapeutic approaches for potential treatment of asynchronization are suggested. PMID:22131941

  7. Influence of the novel antidepressant tianeptine on neurochemical, neuroendocrinological, and behavioral effects of stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Broqua, P; Baudrie, V; Laude, D; Chaouloff, F

    1992-02-15

    Tianeptine is a novel tricyclic agent that activates the neuronal uptake of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). Taking into account the antidepressant effect of tianeptine in animals and humans, we have measured the influence of a pretreatment with tianeptine (10 mg/kg IP 1 hr beforehand) on some consequences of a single 2-hr restraint stress session in male rats. Thus, we have analyzed (1) 5-HT metabolism in various brain regions and plasma glucose (an index of sympathoadrenal activity) and corticosterone levels at the end of stress, and (2) open field scores 18-19 hr after immobilization in saline- or tianeptine-pretreated rats. Tianeptine was found to leave unaltered stress-induced increases in cortical, hippocampal, hypothalamic, midbrain, and striatal serotonergic metabolism. Similarly, stress-elicited elevations in plasma glucose and corticosterone levels were not affected by tianeptine pretreatment. On the other hand, tianeptine pretreatment reversed stress-induced deficit in exploratory activity. To test whether the latter positive effect of tianeptine was associated with changes in plasma glucose and corticosterone levels during the early phase of stress, we have measured plasma glucose and corticosterone levels (at 0, 5, 15, 30, and 60 min) in resting and stressed (catheterized) rats. The results indicated that tianeptine pretreatment did not alter plasma glucose and corticosterone early responses to stress. Although this study confirmed the antidepressant effect of tianeptine, the neurochemical and neuroendocrinological mechanisms underlying this positive effect remain to be determined.

  8. 18-Methoxycoronaridine acts in the medial habenula to attenuate behavioral and neurochemical sensitization to nicotine.

    PubMed

    Eggan, Branden L; McCallum, Sarah E

    2016-07-01

    Systemic 18-methoxycoronaridine, an alpha3beta4 nicotinic antagonist, slows the rate of induction of behavioral sensitization to nicotine (Glick et al., 1996; 2011). The primary mechanism of action of 18-MC is believed to be the inhibition of α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors which are densely expressed in the medial habenula and interpeduncular nucleus (Pace et al., 2004; Glick et al., 2012). Recently, these habenular nicotinic receptors and their multiple roles in nicotine aversion and withdrawal have been increasingly emphasized (Antolin-Fontes et al., 2015). Here, we investigated the effects of 18-MC on both behavioral and neurochemical sensitization to nicotine. Daily systemic administration of 18-MC slowed the rate of induction of behavioral sensitization to nicotine but failed to block the expression of a sensitized locomotor response when absent. In contrast, in nicotine sensitized animals, systemic 18-MC significantly reduced the expression of behavioral sensitization. Results from intra-habenular administration of 18-MC paralleled these findings in that the expression of behavioral sensitization was also reduced in sensitized animals. Consistent with its effects on behavioral sensitization, intra-MHb treatment with 18-MC completely abolished sensitized dopamine responses in the nucleus accumbens in nicotine sensitized animals. These results show that α3β4 nicotinic receptors in the MHb contribute to nicotine sensitization, a phenomenon associated with drug craving and relapse.

  9. Behavioral, Neurochemical and Neuroendocrine Effects of Abnormal Savda Munziq in the Chronic Stress Mice

    PubMed Central

    Amat, Nurmuhammat; Hoxur, Parida; Ming, Dang; Matsidik, Aynur; Kijjoa, Anake; Upur, Halmurat

    2012-01-01

    Oral administration of Abnormal Savda Munsiq (ASMq), a herbal preparation used in Traditional Uighur Medicine, was found to exert a memory-enhancing effect in the chronic stressed mice, induced by electric foot-shock. The memory improvement of the stressed mice was shown by an increase of the latency time in the step-through test and the decrease of the latency time in the Y-maze test. Treatment with ASMq was found to significantly decrease the serum levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), corticosterone (CORT) and β-endorphin (β-EP) as well as the brain and serum level of norepinephrine (NE). Furthermore, ASMq was able to significantly reverse the chronic stress by decreasing the brain and serum levels of the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPAC). The results obtained from this study suggested that the memory-enhancing effect of ASMq was mediated through regulations of neurochemical and neuroendocrine systems. PMID:22919413

  10. Neurochemical biomarkers in the diagnosis of frontotemporal lobar degeneration: an update.

    PubMed

    Oeckl, Patrick; Steinacker, Petra; Feneberg, Emily; Otto, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a spectrum of rare neurodegenerative diseases with overlapping symptoms and neuropathology. It includes the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), the semantic and non-fluent variant of primary progressive aphasia (svPPA and nfvPPA), FTD with motor neuron disease (FTD-MND), progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal syndrome. The diagnosis of the FTLD spectrum of diseases is based on clinical symptoms which hampers the differentiation of the diseases among each other and with other disorders that show a similar clinical appearance resulting in a high rate of misdiagnoses. This highlights the need for objective and selective measures in the diagnostic criteria and there is extensive research on neurochemical biomarkers in FTLD as one option to address this unmet clinical need. Here, we review the advances in CSF biomarker research in FTLD in the last 2 years with regard to the validation of previously suggested and identification of new biomarker candidates for the differential diagnosis of FTLD. New biomarkers for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are urgently needed to support differential diagnosis within the disease spectrum and with related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD). Here, we review the advances in cerebrospinal fluid biomarker research in FTLD and provide a list of promising candidate markers.

  11. A subpopulation of neurochemically-identified ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons is excited by intravenous cocaine.

    PubMed

    Mejias-Aponte, Carlos A; Ye, Changquan; Bonci, Antonello; Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Morales, Marisela

    2015-02-01

    Systemic administration of cocaine is thought to decrease the firing rates of ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. However, this view is based on categorizations of recorded neurons as DA neurons using preselected electrophysiological characteristics lacking neurochemical confirmation. Without applying cellular preselection, we recorded the impulse activity of VTA neurons in response to cocaine administration in anesthetized adult rats. The phenotype of recorded neurons was determined by their juxtacellular labeling and immunohistochemical detection of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a DA marker. We found that intravenous cocaine altered firing rates in the majority of recorded VTA neurons. Within the cocaine-responsive neurons, half of the population was excited and the other half was inhibited. Both populations had similar discharge rates and firing regularities, and most neurons did not exhibit changes in burst firing. Inhibited neurons were more abundant in the posterior VTA, whereas excited neurons were distributed evenly throughout the VTA. Cocaine-excited neurons were more likely to be excited by footshock. Within the subpopulation of TH-positive neurons, 36% were excited by cocaine and 64% were inhibited. Within the subpopulation of TH-negative neurons, 44% were excited and 28% were inhibited. Contrary to the prevailing view that all DA neurons are inhibited by cocaine, we found a subset of confirmed VTA DA neurons that is excited by systemic administration of cocaine. We provide evidence indicating that DA neurons are heterogeneous in their response to cocaine and that VTA non-DA neurons play an active role in processing systemic cocaine.

  12. Evidence for sugar addiction: Behavioral and neurochemical effects of intermittent, excessive sugar intake

    PubMed Central

    Avena, Nicole M.; Rada, Pedro; Hoebel, Bartley G.

    2008-01-01

    The experimental question is whether or not sugar can be a substance of abuse and lead to a natural form of addiction. “Food addiction” seems plausible because brain pathways that evolved to respond to natural rewards are also activated by addictive drugs. Sugar is noteworthy as a substance that releases opioids and dopamine and thus might be expected to have addictive potential. This review summarizes evidence of sugar dependence in an animal model. Four components of addiction are analyzed. “Bingeing”, “withdrawal”, “craving” and cross-sensitization are each given operational definitions and demonstrated behaviorally with sugar bingeing as the reinforcer. These behaviors are then related to neurochemical changes in the brain that also occur with addictive drugs. Neural adaptations include changes in dopamine and opioid receptor binding, enkephalin mRNA expression and dopamine and acetylcholine release in the nucleus accumbens. The evidence supports the hypothesis that under certain circumstances rats can become sugar dependent. This may translate to some human conditions as suggested by the literature on eating disorders and obesity. PMID:17617461

  13. Neurochemical and behavioral effects elicited by bupropion and diethylpropion in rats.

    PubMed

    Santamaría, Abel; Arias, Hugo R

    2010-07-29

    This study is an attempt to demonstrate whether bupropion (BP) and diethylpropion (DEP) exert their pharmacological actions by similar neurochemical mechanisms in the dorsal striatum. In this regard, the release of dopamine (DA), glutamate (Glu), and GABA, was determined in the rat dorsal striatum after acute (5 min) and chronic (15 consecutive days) treatments, and subsequently correlated with the locomotor activities produced by these drugs. The results from the acute experiments indicate that BP and DEP (40 mg/kg) increase locomotor activity, whereas chronic DEP treatment decreases locomotor activity by unspecific mechanisms. Acute BP treatment produces significant DA and Glu, but not GABA, releases. A lesser extent of DA release and tissue content of DA and its metabolites, and consequently less locomotor activity, was observed after chronic BP treatment. Acute DEP (5mg/kg) was only able to slightly increase DA release and to decrease the tissue levels of DA, but no other markers, with practically nil locomotor activity, whereas chronic DEP produced even less neurotransmitter release. The observed difference between BP and DEP might be based on that although both drugs inhibit the DA and norepinephrine transporters, the BP-induced nicotinic receptor inhibition has yet to be demonstrated for DEP.

  14. Comparative neurochemical profile of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine and its metabolite alpha-methyldopamine on key targets of MDMA neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Escubedo, E; Abad, S; Torres, I; Camarasa, J; Pubill, D

    2011-01-01

    The neurotoxicity of MDMA or "Ecstasy" in rats is selectively serotonergic, while in mice it is both dopaminergic and serotonergic. MDMA metabolism may play a key role in this neurotoxicity. The function of serotonin and dopamine transporter and the effect of MDMA and its metabolites on them are essential to understand MDMA neurotoxicity. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the effects of MDMA and its metabolite alpha-methyldopamine (MeDA) on several molecular targets, mainly the dopamine and serotonin transporter functionality, to provide evidence for the role of this metabolite in the neurotoxicity of MDMA in rodents. MeDA had no affinity for the serotonin transporter but competed with serotonin for its uptake. It had no persistent effects on the functionalism of the serotonin transporter, in contrast to the effect of MDMA. Moreover, MeDA inhibited the uptake of dopamine into the serotonergic terminal and also MAO(B) activity. MeDA inhibited dopamine uptake with a lower IC(50) value than MDMA. After drug washout, the inhibition by MeDA persisted while that of MDMA was significantly reduced. The effect of MDMA on the dopamine transporter is related with dopamine release from vesicular stores, as this inhibition disappeared in reserpine-treated animals. However, the effect of MeDA seems to be a persistent conformational change of this transporter. Moreover, in contrast with MDMA, MeDA did not show affinity for nicotinic receptors, so no effects of MeDA derived from these interactions can be expected. The metabolite reduced cell viability at lower concentrations than MDMA. Apoptosis plays a key role in MDMA induced cellular toxicity but necrosis is the major process involved in MeDA cytotoxicity. We conclude that MeDA could protect against the serotonergic lesion induced by MDMA but potentiate the dopaminergic lesion as a result of the persistent blockade of the dopamine transporter induced this metabolite.

  15. Quantificational logic of context

    SciTech Connect

    Buvac, Sasa

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we extend the Propositional Logic of Context, to the quantificational (predicate calculus) case. This extension is important in the declarative representation of knowledge for two reasons. Firstly, since contexts are objects in the semantics which can be denoted by terms in the language and which can be quantified over, the extension enables us to express arbitrary first-order properties of contexts. Secondly, since the extended language is no longer only propositional, we can express that an arbitrary predicate calculus formula is true in a context. The paper describes the syntax and the semantics of a quantificational language of context, gives a Hilbert style formal system, and outlines a proof of the system`s completeness.

  16. The proteomics quantification dilemma.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, Peter R

    2014-07-31

    Proteomics is dominated today by the protein expression discourse, which favorites the bottom-up approach because of its high throughput and its high sensitivity. For quantification this proceeding is misleading, if a protein is present with more than one protein species in the sample to be analyzed. The protein speciation discourse considers this more realistic situation and affords the top-down procedures or at least a separation of the protein species in advance to identification and quantification. Today all of the top-down procedures are one order of magnitude less sensitive than the bottom-up ones. To increase sensitivity and to increase throughput are major challenges for proteomics of the next years. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 20years of Proteomics in memory of Viatliano Pallini. Guest Editors: Luca Bini, Juan J. Calvete, Natacha Turck, Denis Hochstrasser and Jean-Charles Sanchez. PMID:24681132

  17. SERS Quantification of Entacapone Isomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, Marina; Biljan, Tomislav

    2010-08-01

    Raman spectroscopy, due to its non-destructive character and speed, has found widespread use in pharmaceutical applications [1]. It is also being used for quantifying various isomer mixtures, best known being the quantification of xylene isomers [2-3]. Solid-state isomer quantification of entacapone was earlier reported [4]. Here, we report quantification of isomer mixture of an active pharmaceutical substance, in solution, by SERS.

  18. Sex-dependent neurochemical effects of environmental enrichment in the visual system.

    PubMed

    Bessinis, D P; Dalla, C; Kokras, N; Pitychoutis, P M; Papadopoulou-Daifoti, Z

    2013-12-19

    Sex differences in the visual system have been reported in aspects of human vision, such as color perception, peripheral vision and even in the activation of the primary visual cortex. Similarly sex differences have been identified in the visual system of laboratory animals such as monkeys and rats. On the other hand, environmental enrichment (EE) has long been known to affect visual tissues. Taking into consideration the variation in the experimental approaches concerning EE and the sex differences in the visual system, we investigated in male and female rats the serotonergic and dopaminergic effects of EE in the retina and the visual cortex at different time points (i.e. P0-25, P0-P90 and P90-P150). Early EE in adulthood increased the serotonergic activity of the male visual cortex and the female retina (P0-P90). In addition early enrichment (P0-P90) increased dopaminergic activity in the female retina and in the visual cortex of both sexes. Late enrichment increased the serotonergic activity in the retina and visual cortex of both sexes (P90-P150), but increased the dopaminergic activity in the visual cortex only in male animals. In the present study we expose marked sex differences in the neurochemistry of visual tissues and we demonstrate for the first time that EE can in fact modify the serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in the retina and visual cortex. Overall, the present study underpins the sex-dependent neurochemical status of the visual system and provides insights into the different mechanisms underlying visual processing in the two sexes.

  19. Short term cadmium administration dose dependently elicits immediate biochemical, neurochemical and neurobehavioral dysfunction in male rats.

    PubMed

    Haider, Saida; Anis, Lubna; Batool, Zehra; Sajid, Irfan; Naqvi, Fizza; Khaliq, Saima; Ahmed, Shoaib

    2015-02-01

    Cadmium is a toxic environmental and industrial pollutant. Cadmium toxicity has been reported to produce biochemical and behavioral dysfunction that may cause adverse effects on several organs including the central nervous system. The present study was designed to investigate the neurotoxic effects of Cadmium Chloride (CdCl2) at three different doses by using different behavioral models. Lipid peroxidation (LPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were also monitored following acute intraperitoneal injection of cadmium. Twenty four adult locally bred Albino Wistar rats were divided into control and 3 test groups (n = 6). Control rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline (0.9% NaCl) and test groups were injected with CdCl2 (1 mg/kg, 2 mg/kg and 3 mg/kg) dissolved in physiological solution. Behavioral activities of rats were monitored after 1 h of cadmium injection. Locomotor activity and depression-like symptoms were measured by Open Field Test (OFT) and Forced Swimming Test (FST) respectively. Anxiety like behavior was monitored using Light-dark Transition (LDT) test and memory functions of rats were assessed by Morris Water Maze test (MWM). In the present study acute cadmium administration dose dependently increased anxiety in rats as compared to control rats. A significant increase in depression-like symptoms was also exhibited by cadmium treated rats. These behavioral dysfunctions may be attributed to the decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and simultaneously increased brain lipid peroxidation (LPO). Moreover learning and memory assessed by MWM showed dose dependent impairment in memory function in cadmium treated rats as compared to control rats. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was also decreased in brains of cadmium administered rats. It is suggested in this study that behavioral, biochemical and neurochemical dysfunctions caused by acute cadmium administration occur in a dose dependent manner.

  20. Neurochemical metabolomics reveals disruption to sphingolipid metabolism following chronic haloperidol administration

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Joseph L.; Vunck, Sarah A.; Batman, Angela M.; Crowley, James J.; Vann, Robert E.; Beardsley, Patrick M.; van den Oord, Edwin J.

    2015-01-01

    Haloperidol is an effective antipsychotic drug for treatment of schizophrenia, but prolonged use can lead to debilitating side effects. To better understand the effects of long-term administration, we measured global metabolic changes in mouse brain following 3 mg/kg/day haloperidol for 28 days. These conditions lead to movement-related side effects in mice akin to those observed in patients after prolonged use. Brain tissue was collected following microwave tissue fixation to arrest metabolism and extracted metabolites were assessed using both liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (MS). Over 300 unique compounds were identified across MS platforms. Haloperidol was found to be present in all test samples and not in controls, indicating experimental validity. Twenty-one compounds differed significantly between test and control groups at the p < 0.05 level. Top compounds were robust to analytical method, also being identified via partial least squares discriminant analysis. Four compounds (sphinganine, N-acetylornithine, leucine and adenosine diphosphate) survived correction for multiple testing in a non-parametric analysis using false discovery rate threshold < 0.1. Pathway analysis of nominally significant compounds (p < 0.05) revealed significant findings for sphingolipid metabolism (p = 0.02) and protein biosynthesis (p = 0.03). Altered sphingolipid metabolism is suggestive of disruptions to myelin. This interpretation is supported by our observation of elevated N-acetylaspartylglutamate in the haloperidol-treated mice (p = 0.004), a marker previously associated with demyelination. This study further demonstrates the utility of murine neurochemical metabolomics as a method to advance understanding of CNS drug effects. PMID:25850894

  1. Neurochemical Metabolomics Reveals Disruption to Sphingolipid Metabolism Following Chronic Haloperidol Administration.

    PubMed

    McClay, Joseph L; Vunck, Sarah A; Batman, Angela M; Crowley, James J; Vann, Robert E; Beardsley, Patrick M; van den Oord, Edwin J

    2015-09-01

    Haloperidol is an effective antipsychotic drug for treatment of schizophrenia, but prolonged use can lead to debilitating side effects. To better understand the effects of long-term administration, we measured global metabolic changes in mouse brain following 3 mg/kg/day haloperidol for 28 days. These conditions lead to movement-related side effects in mice akin to those observed in patients after prolonged use. Brain tissue was collected following microwave tissue fixation to arrest metabolism and extracted metabolites were assessed using both liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (MS). Over 300 unique compounds were identified across MS platforms. Haloperidol was found to be present in all test samples and not in controls, indicating experimental validity. Twenty-one compounds differed significantly between test and control groups at the p < 0.05 level. Top compounds were robust to analytical method, also being identified via partial least squares discriminant analysis. Four compounds (sphinganine, N-acetylornithine, leucine and adenosine diphosphate) survived correction for multiple testing in a non-parametric analysis using false discovery rate threshold < 0.1. Pathway analysis of nominally significant compounds (p < 0.05) revealed significant findings for sphingolipid metabolism (p = 0.015) and protein biosynthesis (p = 0.024). Altered sphingolipid metabolism is suggestive of disruptions to myelin. This interpretation is supported by our observation of elevated N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate in the haloperidol-treated mice (p = 0.004), a marker previously associated with demyelination. This study further demonstrates the utility of murine neurochemical metabolomics as a method to advance understanding of CNS drug effects.

  2. Beneficial behavioral, neurochemical and molecular effects of 1-(R)-aminoindan in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Badinter, Felix; Amit, Tamar; Bar-Am, Orit; Youdim, Moussa B H; Weinreb, Orly

    2015-12-01

    Previous neuroprotective studies demonstrated that 1-(R)-aminoindan (AI), which is the major metabolite of the anti-Parkinsonian drug rasagiline, possesses beneficial pharmacological effects in various cell culture and animal models of neurodegeneration. The present study was aimed at investigating the possible neuroprotective effects of AI on cognitive impairments and neurochemical alterations in aged mice. Our findings provide evidence that following chronic systemic treatment with AI (5 mg/kg; daily; 3 months) of aged mice (24 months old), the compound exerted a significant positive impact on neuropsychiatric functions and cognitive behavior deficits, assessed in a variety of tasks (spatial learning and memory retention, working memory, learning abilities and nest building behavior) and produced an antidepressant-like effect. In addition, chronic AI treatment significantly enhanced expression levels of neurotrophins, including brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), tyrosine kinase- B (Trk-B) receptor and synaptic plasticity markers, such as synapsin-1 and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43) in the striatum and hippocampus in aged mice. Our results also indicate that AI treatment up-regulated the expression levels of the pro-survival Bcl-2 mRNA, increased the anti-apoptotic index Bcl-2/Bax and enhanced the activity of the antioxidant enzyme catalase in the brain of aged mice. These effects of AI were also confirmed in aged rats (24 months old). Altogether, the present findings indicate that AI can induce neuroprotective effects on age-related alterations in neurobehavioral functions and exerts neurotrophic up-regulatory and anti-apoptotic properties in aged animals. PMID:26087462

  3. Neurochemical and electrophysiological diagnosis of reversible neurotoxicity in earthworms exposed to sublethal concentrations of CL-20

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Niladri; Scheuhammer, Anton M.; Perkins, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    Background, aim, and scope Hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) is a relatively new energetic compound sharing some degree of structural similarity with hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), a known neurotoxic compound. Previously, we demonstrated using a noninvasive electrophysiological technique that CL-20 was a more potent neurotoxicant than RDX to the earthworm Eisenia fetida. In the present study, we investigated the effect of CL-20 exposure and subsequent recovery on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) to further define the mechanism of reversible neurotoxicity of CL-20 in E. fetida. Materials and methods We used a noninvasive electrophysiological technique to evaluate neurotoxicity in CL-20-treated worms, and then measured how such exposures altered levels of whole-body mAChR in the same animals. Results and discussion A good correlation exists between these two types of endpoints. Effect on mAChR levels was most prominent at day 6 of exposure. After 7 days of recovery, both conduction velocity and mAChR were significantly restored. Our results show that sublethal concentrations of CL-20 significantly reduced mAChR levels in a concentration- and duration-dependent manner, which was accompanied with significant decreases in the conduction velocity of the medial and lateral giant nerve fibers. After 7-day post exposure recovery, worms restored both neurochemical (mAChR) and neurophysiological (conduction velocity) endpoints that were reduced during 6-day exposures to CL-20 concentrations from 0.02 to 0.22 µg/cm2. Conclusions and perspectives Our findings support the idea that CL-20 induced neurotoxic effects are reversible, and suggest that CL-20 neurotoxicity may be mediated through the cholinergic system. Future studies will investigate other neurotransmission systems such as GABA, glutamate, and monoamine. Ion channels in the nerve membrane should be examined to further define the precise mechanisms underlying CL-20 neurotoxicity. PMID

  4. Antidepressant-like effect of trans-resveratrol in chronic stress model: behavioral and neurochemical evidences.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yingcong; Wang, Rui; Chen, Chunbai; Du, Xia; Ruan, Lina; Sun, Jiao; Li, Jianxin; Zhang, Lu; O'Donnell, James M; Pan, Jianchun; Xu, Ying

    2013-03-01

    Trans-resveratrol is a phenolic compound enriched in polygonum cuspidatum and has diverse biological activities. There is only limited information about the antidepressant-like effect of trans-resveratrol. The present study investigated whether trans-resveratrol has antidepressant-like activity in rats exposed to chronic stress by using two behavioral tasks, shuttle box and sucrose preference tests. The monoamines (5-HT, noradrenaline and dopamine) and their metabolites as well as monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzyme activities in different brain regions were also measured. Compared to unstressed rats, those exposed to chronic stress paradigm showed performance deficits in the shuttle box, reduced sucrose preference, less weight gain and the increase in the ratio of adrenal gland to body weight, which were reversed by chronic treatment with trans-resveratrol (40 and 80 mg/kg, i.g.). The neurochemical assay showed that higher dose of trans-resveratrol (80 mg/kg) produced a marked increase of 5-HT levels in three brain regions, the frontal cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus. Noradrenaline and dopamine levels were also increased both in the frontal cortex and striatum. Furthermore, chronic treatment with trans-resveratrol was found to inhibit monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) activity in all the four brain regions, particularly in the frontal cortex and hippocampus; while MAO-B activity was not affected. These findings indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of trans-resveratrol involves the regulation of the central serotonin and noradrenaline levels and the related MAO-A activities. PMID:23174668

  5. Multimodal neuroimaging based classification of autism spectrum disorder using anatomical, neurochemical, and white matter correlates

    PubMed Central

    Libero, Lauren E.; DeRamus, Thomas P.; Lahti, Adrienne C.; Deshpande, Gopikrishna; Kana, Rajesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques, such as fMRI, structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) have uncovered evidence for widespread functional and anatomical brain abnormalities in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) suggesting it to be a system-wide neural systems disorder. Nevertheless, most previous studies have focused on examining one index of neuropathology through a single neuroimaging modality, and seldom using multiple modalities to examine the same cohort of individuals. The current study aims to bring together multiple brain imaging modalities (structural MRI, DTI, and 1H-MRS) to investigate the neural architecture in the same set of individuals (19 high-functioning adults with ASD and 18 typically developing (TD) peers). Morphometry analysis revealed increased cortical thickness in ASD participants, relative to typical controls, across the left cingulate, left pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus, left inferior temporal cortex, and right precuneus, and reduced cortical thickness in right cuneus and right precentral gyrus. ASD adults also had reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) and increased radial diffusivity (RD) for two clusters on the forceps minor of the corpus callosum, revealed by DTI analyses. 1H-MRS results showed a reduction in the N-acetylaspartate/Creatine ratio in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) in ASD participants. A decision tree classification analysis across the three modalities resulted in classification accuracy of 91.9% with FA, RD, and cortical thickness as key predictors. Examining the same cohort of adults with ASD and their TD peers, this study found alterations in cortical thickness, white matter (WM) connectivity, and neurochemical concentration in ASD. These findings underscore the potential for multimodal imaging to better inform on the neural characteristics most relevant to the disorder. PMID:25797658

  6. Brain Histamine Is Crucial for Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors‘ Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Munari, Leonardo; Provensi, Gustavo; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Galeotti, Nicoletta; Cassano, Tommaso; Benetti, Fernando; Corradetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Backgound: The neurobiological changes underlying depression resistant to treatments remain poorly understood, and failure to respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may result from abnormalities of neurotransmitter systems that excite serotonergic neurons, such as histamine. Methods: Using behavioral (tail suspension test) and neurochemical (in vivo microdialysis, Western-blot analysis) approaches, here we report that antidepressant responses to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (citalopram or paroxetine) are abolished in mice unable to synthesize histamine due to either targeted disruption of histidine decarboxylase gene (HDC-/-) or injection of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, a suicide inhibitor of this enzyme. Results: In the tail suspension test, all classes of antidepressants tested reduced the immobility time of controls. Systemic reboxetine or imipramine reduced the immobility time of histamine-deprived mice as well, whereas selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors did not even though their serotonergic system is functional. In in vivo microdialysis experiments, citalopram significantly increased histamine extraneuronal levels in the cortex of freely moving mice, and methysergide, a serotonin 5-HT1/5-HT2 receptor antagonist, abolished this effect, thus suggesting the involvement of endogenous serotonin. CREB phosphorylation, which is implicated in the molecular mechanisms of antidepressant treatment, was abolished in histamine-deficient mice treated with citalopram. The CREB pathway is not impaired in HDC-/- mice, as administration of 8-bromoadenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate increased CREB phosphorylation, and in the tail suspension test it significantly reduced the time spent immobile by mice of both genotypes. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors selectively require the integrity of the brain histamine system to exert their preclinical responses. PMID:25899065

  7. Expanding neurochemical investigations with multi-modal recording: simultaneous fast-scan cyclic voltammetry, iontophoresis, and patch clamp measurements.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, D C; McKinney, C J; Manis, P B; Wightman, R M

    2016-08-01

    Multi-modal recording describes the simultaneous collection of information across distinct domains. Compared to isolated measurements, such studies can more easily determine relationships between varieties of phenomena. This is useful for neurochemical investigations which examine cellular activity in response to changes in the local chemical environment. In this study, we demonstrate a method to perform simultaneous patch clamp measurements with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) using optically isolated instrumentation. A model circuit simulating concurrent measurements was used to predict the electrical interference between instruments. No significant impact was anticipated between methods, and predictions were largely confirmed experimentally. One exception was due to capacitive coupling of the FSCV potential waveform into the patch clamp amplifier. However, capacitive transients measured in whole-cell current clamp recordings were well below the level of biological signals, which allowed the activity of cells to be easily determined. Next, the activity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) was examined in the presence of an FSCV electrode to determine how the exogenous potential impacted nearby cells. The activities of both resting and active MSNs were unaffected by the FSCV waveform. Additionally, application of an iontophoretic current, used to locally deliver drugs and other neurochemicals, did not affect neighboring cells. Finally, MSN activity was monitored during iontophoretic delivery of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter. Membrane depolarization and cell firing were observed concurrently with chemical changes around the cell resulting from delivery. In all, we show how combined electrophysiological and electrochemical measurements can relate information between domains and increase the power of neurochemical investigations. PMID:27314130

  8. Relationships among mercury, selenium, and neurochemical parameters in common loons (Gavia immer) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Scheuhammer, A M; Basu, N; Burgess, N M; Elliott, J E; Campbell, G D; Wayland, M; Champoux, L; Rodrigue, J

    2008-02-01

    Fish-eating birds can be exposed to levels of dietary methylmercury (MeHg) known or suspected to adversely affect normal behavior and reproduction, but little is known regarding Hg's subtle effects on the avian brain. In the current study, we explored relationships among Hg, Se, and neurochemical receptors and enzymes in two fish-eating birds--common loons (Gavia immer) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). In liver, both species demonstrated a wide range of total Hg (THg) concentrations, substantial demethylation of MeHg, and a co-accumulation of Hg and Se. In liver, there were molar excesses of Se over Hg up to about 50-60 microg/g THg, above which there was an approximate 1:1 molar ratio of Hg:Se in both species. However, in brain, bald eagles displayed a greater apparent ability to demethylate MeHg than common loons. There were molar excesses of Se over Hg in brains of bald eagles across the full range of THg concentrations, whereas common loons often had extreme molar excesses of Hg in their brains, with a higher proportion of THg remaining as MeHg compared with eagles. There were significant positive correlations between brain THg and muscarinic cholinergic receptor concentrations in both species studied; whereas significant negative correlations were observed between N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor levels and brain Hg concentration. There were no significant correlations between brain Se and neurochemical receptors or enzymes (cholinesterase and monoamine oxidase) in either species. Our findings suggest that there are significant differences between common loons and bald eagles with respect to cerebral metabolism and toxicodynamics of MeHg and Se. These interspecies differences may influence relative susceptibility to MeHg toxicity; however, neurochemical responses to Hg in both species were similar.

  9. Relationships among mercury, selenium, and neurochemical parameters in common loons (Gavia immer) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

    PubMed

    Scheuhammer, A M; Basu, N; Burgess, N M; Elliott, J E; Campbell, G D; Wayland, M; Champoux, L; Rodrigue, J

    2008-02-01

    Fish-eating birds can be exposed to levels of dietary methylmercury (MeHg) known or suspected to adversely affect normal behavior and reproduction, but little is known regarding Hg's subtle effects on the avian brain. In the current study, we explored relationships among Hg, Se, and neurochemical receptors and enzymes in two fish-eating birds--common loons (Gavia immer) and bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). In liver, both species demonstrated a wide range of total Hg (THg) concentrations, substantial demethylation of MeHg, and a co-accumulation of Hg and Se. In liver, there were molar excesses of Se over Hg up to about 50-60 microg/g THg, above which there was an approximate 1:1 molar ratio of Hg:Se in both species. However, in brain, bald eagles displayed a greater apparent ability to demethylate MeHg than common loons. There were molar excesses of Se over Hg in brains of bald eagles across the full range of THg concentrations, whereas common loons often had extreme molar excesses of Hg in their brains, with a higher proportion of THg remaining as MeHg compared with eagles. There were significant positive correlations between brain THg and muscarinic cholinergic receptor concentrations in both species studied; whereas significant negative correlations were observed between N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor levels and brain Hg concentration. There were no significant correlations between brain Se and neurochemical receptors or enzymes (cholinesterase and monoamine oxidase) in either species. Our findings suggest that there are significant differences between common loons and bald eagles with respect to cerebral metabolism and toxicodynamics of MeHg and Se. These interspecies differences may influence relative susceptibility to MeHg toxicity; however, neurochemical responses to Hg in both species were similar. PMID:17899374

  10. DNA polymerase profiling.

    PubMed

    Summerer, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    We report a simple homogeneous fluorescence assay for quantification of DNA polymerase function in high throughput. The fluorescence signal is generated by the DNA polymerase triggering opening of a molecular beacon extension of the template strand. A resulting distance alteration is reported by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two dyes introduced into the molecular beacon stem. We describe real-time reaction profiling of two model DNA polymerases. We demonstrate kinetic characterization, rapid optimization of reaction conditions, and inhibitor profiling using the presented assay. Furthermore, to supersede purification steps in screening procedures of DNA polymerase mutant libraries, detection of enzymatic activity in bacterial expression lysates is described.

  11. Neurochemical mechanisms and pharmacologic strategies in managing nausea and vomiting related to cyclic vomiting syndrome and other gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Bashashati, Mohammad; McCallum, Richard W

    2014-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are common gastrointestinal complaints which could be triggered by stimuli in both the peripheral and central nervous systems. They may be considered as defense mechanisms when threatening toxins/agents enter the gastrointestinal tract or there is excessive retention of gastrointestinal contents due to obstruction. The pathophysiology of nausea and vomiting is complex and much still remains unknown. Therefore, treatments are restricted or ineffective in many cases. Nausea and vomiting with functional etiologies including cyclic vomiting syndrome are challenging in gastroenterology. In this article, we review potential pathways, neurochemical transmitters, and their receptors which are possibly involved in the pathophysiology of nausea and vomiting including the entity cyclic vomiting syndrome.

  12. [Neurochemical characteristics of rats during flight on the Kosmos-782 artificial satellite and after returning to earth].

    PubMed

    Gazenko, O G; Demin, N N; Panov, A N; Rashevskaia, D A; Rubinskaia, N L

    1979-01-01

    The brain of rats flown aboard the biosatellite Cosmos-782 was sampled immediately postflight and taken under neurochemical study. It was shown cytospectrophotometrically that the absolute content of RNA decreased by 20% in the cytoplasm of cerebellar Purkinje cells and remained unaltered in glial cells-satellites, and that the protein content did not change. In the frontal cortex (homogenates) the concentration of sulfhydryl groups decreased by 26%, activity of nonspecific cholinesterase by 33%. The activity of the latter in the cerebellum also diminished.

  13. Differential effects of two lots of aroclor 1254: congener-specific analysis and neurochemical end points.

    PubMed Central

    Kodavanti, P R; Kannan, N; Yamashita, N; Derr-Yellin, E C; Ward, T R; Burgin, D E; Tilson, H A; Birnbaum, L S

    2001-01-01

    the effects on ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) or methoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (MROD) activities. It is possible that the differential effects seen in neuronal cells could be caused by differences in the composition of ortho-congeners in these two mixtures, because PCBs with ortho-lateral substitutions can exhibit different activities on the selected neurochemical end points. Because of these differential effects with different lot numbers, the composition of Aroclor mixtures used in investigations should be disclosed. PMID:11713001

  14. Symmetry quantification and mapping using convergent beam electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyou-Hyun; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new algorithm to quantify symmetry recorded in convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) patterns and use it for symmetry mapping in materials applications. We evaluate the effectiveness of the profile R-factor (R(p)) and the normalized cross-correlation coefficient (γ) for quantifying the amount of symmetry in a CBED pattern. The symmetry quantification procedures are automated and the algorithm is implemented as a DM (Digital Micrograph(©)) script. Experimental and simulated CBED patterns recorded from a Si single crystal are used to calibrate the proposed algorithm for the symmetry quantification. The proposed algorithm is then applied to a Si sample with defects to test the sensitivity of symmetry quantification to defects. Using the mirror symmetry as an example, we demonstrate that the normalized cross-correlation coefficient provides an effective and robust measurement of the symmetry recorded in experimental CBED patterns. PMID:23142747

  15. Behavior in the forced swim test and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus in young rats after 2-week zinc deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tamano, Haruna; Kan, Fumika; Kawamura, Mika; Oku, Naoto; Takeda, Atsushi

    2009-12-01

    Abnormal behavior in zinc deficiency and its cause are poorly understood. In the present paper, behavior in the forced swim test and neurochemical changes in the brain associated with its behavior were studied focused on abnormal corticosterone secretion in zinc deficiency. The effect of chronic corticosterone treatment was also studied. Immobility time in the forced swim test was increased in young rats fed a zinc-deficient diet for 2 weeks, as well as corticosterone (40mg/kg/dayx14 days)-treated control rats. The basal Ca(2+) levels in the hippocampus, which were determined by fluo-4FF, AM, were increased in both brain slices from zinc-deficient and corticosterone-treated rats. Serum glucose level was decreased in zinc deficiency and hippocampal glucose metabolism, which is determined by [(14)C]2-deoxyglucose uptake, was elevated. Hippocampal ATP level was not decreased, whereas, the concentrations of glutamate, GABA and glutamine in the hippocampus, unlike the whole brain, were decreased in zinc deficiency. However, the decrease in these amino acids was restored by adrenalectomy prior to zinc deficiency. These results suggest that glucose is insufficient for the synthesis of amino acids in the hippocampus of zinc-deficient rats. It is likely that the neurochemical and metabolic changes in the hippocampus, which may be associated with abnormal corticosterone secretion, is the base of abnormal behavior associated with neuropsychological symptoms in zinc deficiency. PMID:19463882

  16. Place conditioning and neurochemical responses elicited by the aftereffect of acute stressor exposure involving an elevated stand.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying-Ling; Chen, Jin-Chung; Liao, Ruey-Ming

    2011-10-24

    Acute exposure to an elevated stand has been used as an inescapable mild stressor for rats. The present study examined the effects of this stressor using a place conditioning behavioral test and neurochemical assays of dopamine and its metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. The behavioral data showed that a conditioned place preference was formed as an aftereffect of the elevated stand stressor. In a separate experiment, neurochemical assay showed an immediate increase of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens after 30min exposure to the elevated stand stressor. In addition, the DOPAC content in the nucleus accumbens was significantly increased at 30min after this stressor. No significant change in dopamine or DOPAC levels in the medial prefrontal cortex was detected for up to 60min after stressor manipulation. These results suggest that an increase in dopamine activity in the nucleus accumbens is involved in the development of conditioned place preference elicited by the aftereffects of the elevated stand stressor.

  17. Behavioral, neurochemical and neuroendocrine effects of the ethanolic extract from Curcuma longa L. in the mouse forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Xia, X; Cheng, G; Pan, Y; Xia, Z H; Kong, L D

    2007-03-21

    Curcuma longa L. (turmeric) has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine as a treatment for mental disorders including depression. The studies described here were undertaken to determine the behavioral, neurochemical and neuroendocrine effects of the ethanolic extract from Curcuma longa using the forced swimming test (FST) in male ICR strain of mice. The ethanolic extract was found to reduce the duration of immobility in the mouse FST when orally administered for 21 days. The extract markedly attenuated swim stress-induced decreases in serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, noradrenaline and dopamine concentrations, as well as increases in serotonin turnover. Furthermore, the ethanolic extract of Curcuma longa significantly reversed the swim stress-induced increases in serum corticotropin-releasing factor and cortisol levels. Under these conditions, the ethanolic extract of Curcuma longa was partly different from fluoxetine and amitriptyline. These results suggested that antidepressant properties of the ethanolic extract of Curcuma longa was mediated through regulations of neurochemical and neuroendocrine systems and it may be a useful agent against depression.

  18. Neurochemical substrates of the rewarding effects of MDMA: implications for the development of pharmacotherapies to MDMA dependence.

    PubMed

    Roger-Sánchez, Concepción; García-Pardo, María P; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Miñarro, Jose; Aguilar, María A

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, studies with animal models of reward, such as the intracranial self-stimulation, self-administration, and conditioned place preference paradigms, have increased our knowledge on the neurochemical substrates of the rewarding effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymetamphetamine (MDMA) in rodents. However, pharmacological and neuroimaging studies with human participants are scarce. Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)], dopamine (DA), endocannabinoids, and endogenous opiates are the main neurotransmitter systems involved in the rewarding effects of MDMA in rodents, but other neurotransmitters such as glutamate, acetylcholine, adenosine, and neurotensin are also involved. The most important finding of recent research is the demonstration of differential involvement of specific neurotransmitter receptor subtypes (5-HT2, 5-HT3, DA D1, DA D2, CB1, μ and δ opioid, etc.) and extracellular proteins (DA and 5-HT transporters) in the acquisition, expression, extinction, and reinstatement of MDMA self-administration and conditioned place preference. It is important to extend the research on the effects of different compounds acting on these receptors/transporters in animal models of reward, especially in priming-induced, cue-induced, and stress-induced reinstatement. Increase in knowledge of the neurochemical substrates of the rewarding effects of MDMA may contribute to the design of new pharmacological treatments for individuals who develop MDMA dependence. PMID:26650254

  19. Accurate Peptide Fragment Mass Analysis: Multiplexed Peptide Identification and Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Chad R.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Hoopmann, Michael R.; Baker, Tahmina; Bruce, James E.

    2012-01-01

    FT All Reaction Monitoring (FT-ARM) is a novel approach for the identification and quantification of peptides that relies upon the selectivity of high mass accuracy data and the specificity of peptide fragmentation patterns. An FT-ARM experiment involves continuous, data-independent, high mass accuracy MS/MS acquisition spanning a defined m/z range. Custom software was developed to search peptides against the multiplexed fragmentation spectra by comparing theoretical or empirical fragment ions against every fragmentation spectrum across the entire acquisition. A dot product score is calculated against each spectrum in order to generate a score chromatogram used for both identification and quantification. Chromatographic elution profile characteristics are not used to cluster precursor peptide signals to their respective fragment ions. FT-ARM identifications are demonstrated to be complementary to conventional data-dependent shotgun analysis, especially in cases where the data-dependent method fails due to fragmenting multiple overlapping precursors. The sensitivity, robustness and specificity of FT-ARM quantification are shown to be analogous to selected reaction monitoring-based peptide quantification with the added benefit of minimal assay development. Thus, FT-ARM is demonstrated to be a novel and complementary data acquisition, identification, and quantification method for the large scale analysis of peptides. PMID:22288382

  20. Consequence of boar edible tissue consumption on urinary profiles of nandrolone metabolites. II. Identification and quantification of 19-norsteroids responsible for 19-norandrosterone and 19-noretiocholanolone excretion in human urine.

    PubMed

    De Wasch, K; Le Bizec, B; De Brabander, H; André, F; Impens, S

    2001-01-01

    In previous work (Le Bizec et al., Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2000; 14: 1058), it was demonstrated that a boar meal intake could lead to possible false accusations of abuse of 17beta-nortestosterone in antidoping control. The aim of the present study was to identify and quantify endogenous 19-norsteroids in boar edible tissue at concentrations that can alter the steroid urinary profile in humans, and lead to excretion of 19-norandrosterone (19-NA) and 19-noretiocholanolone (19-NE). The samples were analysed in two laboratories. The methodologies used for extraction and detection (GC/MS(EI) and LC/MS/MS(APCI+)) are compared and discussed. 19-Norandrostenedione (NAED), 17beta- and 17alpha-nortestosterone (bNT, aNT), and 17beta- and 17alpha-testosterone (bT, aT) were quantified. The largest concentrations of NAED and bNT were observed in testicles (83 and 172 microg/kg), liver (17 and 63 microg/kg) and kidney (45 and 38 microg/kg). A correlation between the bNT and NAED content of a typical meal prepared with boar parts and the excreted concentrations of 19-NA and 19-NE in human urine was demonstrated.

  1. Quantification of human responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinlage, R. C.; Gantner, T. E.; Lim, P. Y. W.

    1992-01-01

    Human perception is a complex phenomenon which is difficult to quantify with instruments. For this reason, large panels of people are often used to elicit and aggregate subjective judgments. Print quality, taste, smell, sound quality of a stereo system, softness, and grading Olympic divers and skaters are some examples of situations where subjective measurements or judgments are paramount. We usually express what is in our mind through language as a medium but languages are limited in available choices of vocabularies, and as a result, our verbalizations are only approximate expressions of what we really have in mind. For lack of better methods to quantify subjective judgments, it is customary to set up a numerical scale such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 1, 2, 3, ..., 9, 10 for characterizing human responses and subjective judgments with no valid justification except that these scales are easy to understand and convenient to use. But these numerical scales are arbitrary simplifications of the complex human mind; the human mind is not restricted to such simple numerical variations. In fact, human responses and subjective judgments are psychophysical phenomena that are fuzzy entities and therefore difficult to handle by conventional mathematics and probability theory. The fuzzy mathematical approach provides a more realistic insight into understanding and quantifying human responses. This paper presents a method for quantifying human responses and subjective judgments without assuming a pattern of linear or numerical variation for human responses. In particular, quantification and evaluation of linguistic judgments was investigated.

  2. Molecular and neurochemical biomarkers in Arctic beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) were correlated to brain mercury and selenium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ostertag, Sonja K; Shaw, Alyssa C; Basu, Niladri; Chan, Hing Man

    2014-10-01

    Mercury (Hg) concentrations have increased in western Arctic beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) since the industrial revolution. Methylmercruy (MeHg) is a known neurotoxicant, yet little is known about the risk of exposure for beluga whales. Selenium (Se) has been linked to demethylation of MeHg in cetaceans, but its role in attenuating Hg toxicity in beluga whales is poorly understood. The objective of this study is to explore relationships between Hg and Se concentrations and neurochemical biomarkers in different brain regions of beluga whales in order to assess potential neurotoxicological risk of Hg exposure in this population. Brain tissue was sampled from hunter-harvested beluga whales from the western Canadian Arctic in 2008 and 2010. Neurochemical and molecular biomarkers were measured with radioligand binding assays and quantitative PCR, respectively. Total Hg (HgT) concentration ranged from 2.6-113 mg kg(-1) dw in temporal cortex. Gamma-amminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) binding in the cerebellum was negatively associated with HgT, MeHg and total Se (SeT) concentrations (p ≤ 0.05). The expression of mRNA for GABAA-R subunit α2 was negatively associated with HgT and MeHg (p ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, GABAA-R binding was positively correlated to mRNA expression for GABAA-R α2 subunit, and negatively correlated to the expression of mRNA for GABAA-R α4 subunit (p ≤ 0.05). The expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) subunit 2b mRNA expression was negatively associated with iHglabile concentration in the cerebellum (p ≤ 0.05). Variation of molecular and/or biochemical components of the GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling pathways were associated with MeHg exposure in beluga whales. Our results show that MeHg exposure is associated with neurochemical variation in the cerebellum of beluga whales and Se may partially protect from MeHg-associated neurotoxicity.

  3. Maturation of the prolactin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptide responses to ether stress and morphine: neurochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C A; Negro-Vilar, A

    1986-02-01

    The hormonal and neurochemical responses to acute ether stress, morphine, and/or naloxone were analyzed in infantile (13-day-old) and prepubertal (36-day-old) male CD rats in an attempt to identify a possible neurochemical correlate(s) for the previously demonstrated requisite maturation of the PRL response to ether stress. Neuronal serotonin (5-HT), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) activities were examined in the medial preoptic hypothalamic area (MPOH), medial basal hypothalamic area (MBH), and median eminence (ME). Ether stress increased plasma PRL, ACTH, and beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (beta end) as well as NE metabolism in the MPOH and MBH and neuronal 5-HT activity in the MBH, and decreased neuronal DA activity in the ME of prepubertal animals. Ether stress elicited similar changes in infantile animals, with the important exceptions that plasma PRL, neuronal 5-HT activity in the MBH, and neuronal DA synthesis in the ME were not affected at this earlier age. Morphine increased plasma PRL, ACTH, and beta end levels, elevated neuronal NE and 5-HT activities in the MPOH and MBH, and decreased DA synthesis in the ME in both infantile and prepubertal animals. Naloxone administration did not alter basal hormone concentrations or neuronal monoamine activity in any brain area, but did prevent all of the morphine-induced changes as well as the ether stress-induced changes in PRL, MBH neuronal 5-HT activity, and DA synthesis in the ME of prepubertal animals. In addition, naloxone augmented the ether stress-induced increases in ACTH and beta end in prepubertal rats. Indirect stimulation of 5-HT neurons by administration of the amino acid precursor of 5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptophan, resulted in decreased DA synthesis in the ME of infantile animals and increased plasma PRL levels in that age group, indicating that this portion of the neurochemical connection is already present in infantile animals. Furthermore, the 5-hydroxytryptophan-induced increase in PRL was

  4. Molecular and neurochemical biomarkers in Arctic beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) were correlated to brain mercury and selenium concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ostertag, Sonja K; Shaw, Alyssa C; Basu, Niladri; Chan, Hing Man

    2014-10-01

    Mercury (Hg) concentrations have increased in western Arctic beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) since the industrial revolution. Methylmercruy (MeHg) is a known neurotoxicant, yet little is known about the risk of exposure for beluga whales. Selenium (Se) has been linked to demethylation of MeHg in cetaceans, but its role in attenuating Hg toxicity in beluga whales is poorly understood. The objective of this study is to explore relationships between Hg and Se concentrations and neurochemical biomarkers in different brain regions of beluga whales in order to assess potential neurotoxicological risk of Hg exposure in this population. Brain tissue was sampled from hunter-harvested beluga whales from the western Canadian Arctic in 2008 and 2010. Neurochemical and molecular biomarkers were measured with radioligand binding assays and quantitative PCR, respectively. Total Hg (HgT) concentration ranged from 2.6-113 mg kg(-1) dw in temporal cortex. Gamma-amminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R) binding in the cerebellum was negatively associated with HgT, MeHg and total Se (SeT) concentrations (p ≤ 0.05). The expression of mRNA for GABAA-R subunit α2 was negatively associated with HgT and MeHg (p ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, GABAA-R binding was positively correlated to mRNA expression for GABAA-R α2 subunit, and negatively correlated to the expression of mRNA for GABAA-R α4 subunit (p ≤ 0.05). The expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) subunit 2b mRNA expression was negatively associated with iHglabile concentration in the cerebellum (p ≤ 0.05). Variation of molecular and/or biochemical components of the GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling pathways were associated with MeHg exposure in beluga whales. Our results show that MeHg exposure is associated with neurochemical variation in the cerebellum of beluga whales and Se may partially protect from MeHg-associated neurotoxicity. PMID:25171565

  5. Visualization and Quantification of Rotor Tip Vortices in Helicopter Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David L.; Ahmad, Jasim U.; Holst, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an automated approach for effective extraction, visualization, and quantification of vortex core radii from the Navier-Stokes simulations of a UH-60A rotor in forward flight. We adopt a scaled Q-criterion to determine vortex regions and then perform vortex core profiling in these regions to calculate vortex core radii. This method provides an efficient way of visualizing and quantifying the blade tip vortices. Moreover, the vortices radii are displayed graphically in a plane.

  6. Abuse-Related Neurochemical Effects of Para-Substituted Methcathinone Analogs in Rats: Microdialysis Studies of Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine and Serotonin.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Julie A; Sakloth, Farhana; Kolanos, Renata; Glennon, Richard A; Lazenka, Matthew F; Negus, S Stevens; Banks, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Methcathinone (MCAT) is a monoamine releaser and parent compound to a new class of designer drugs that includes the synthetic cathinones mephedrone and flephedrone. Using MCAT and a series of para-substituted (or 4-substituted) MCAT analogs, it has been previously shown that expression of abuse-related behavioral effects in rats correlates both with the volume of the para substituent and in vitro neurochemical selectivity to promote monoamine release via the dopamine (DA) versus serotonin (5-HT) transporters in rat brain synaptosomes. The present study used in vivo microdialysis to determine the relationship between these previous measures and the in vivo neurochemical selectivity of these compounds to alter nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA and 5-HT levels. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with bilateral guide cannulae targeting the NAc. MCAT and five para-substituted analogs (4-F, 4-Cl, 4-Br, 4-CH3, and 4-OCH3) produced dose- and time-dependent increases in NAc DA and/or 5-HT levels. Selectivity was determined as the dose required to increase peak 5-HT levels by 250% divided by the dose required to increase peak DA levels by 250%. This measure of in vivo neurochemical selectivity varied across compounds and correlated with 1) in vivo expression of abuse-related behavioral effects (r = 0.89, P = 0.02); 2) in vitro selectivity to promote monoamine release via DA and 5-HT transporters (r = 0.95, P < 0.01); and 3) molecular volume of the para substituent (r = -0.85, P = 0.03). These results support a relationship between these molecular, neurochemical, and behavioral measures and support a role for molecular structure as a determinant of abuse-related neurochemical and behavioral effects of MCAT analogs.

  7. Development of the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Bledsoe, Jonathan M.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Covey, Daniel P.; Blaha, Charles D.; Agnesi, Filippo; Mohseni, Pedram; Whitlock, Sidney; Johnson, David M.; Horne, April; Bennet, Kevin E.; Lee, Kendall H.; Garris, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Object Emerging evidence supports the hypothesis that modulation of specific central neuronal systems contributes to the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation (DBS) and motor cortex stimulation (MCS). Real-time monitoring of the neurochemical output of targeted regions may therefore advance functional neurosurgery by, among other goals, providing a strategy for investigation of mechanisms, identification of new candidate neurotransmitters, and chemically guided placement of the stimulating electrode. The authors report the development of a device called the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS) for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring during functional neurosurgery. This device supports fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) for real-time, spatially and chemically resolved neurotransmitter measurements in the brain. Methods The FSCV study consisted of a triangle wave scanned between −0.4 and 1 V at a rate of 300 V/second and applied at 10 Hz. All voltages were compared with an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The CFM was constructed by aspirating a single carbon fiber (r = 2.5 μm) into a glass capillary and pulling the capillary to a microscopic tip by using a pipette puller. The exposed carbon fiber (that is, the sensing region) extended beyond the glass insulation by ~ 100 μm. The neurotransmitter dopamine was selected as the analyte for most trials. Proof-of-principle tests included in vitro flow injection and noise analysis, and in vivo measurements in urethane-anesthetized rats by monitoring dopamine release in the striatum following high-frequency electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle. Direct comparisons were made to a conventional hardwired system. Results The WINCS, designed in compliance with FDA-recognized consensus standards for medical electrical device safety, consisted of 4 modules: 1) front-end analog circuit for FSCV (that is, current-to-voltage transducer

  8. Chronic MDMA induces neurochemical changes in the hippocampus of adolescent and young adult rats: Down-regulation of apoptotic markers.

    PubMed

    García-Cabrerizo, Rubén; García-Fuster, M Julia

    2015-07-01

    While hippocampus is a brain region particularly susceptible to the effects of MDMA, the cellular and molecular changes induced by MDMA are still to be fully elucidated, being the dosage regimen, the species and the developmental stage under study great variables. This study compared the effects of one and four days of MDMA administration following a binge paradigm (3×5 mg/kg, i.p., every 2 h) on inducing hippocampal neurochemical changes in adolescent (PND 37) and young adult (PND 58) rats. The results showed that chronic MDMA caused hippocampal protein deficits in adolescent and young adult rats at different levels: (1) impaired serotonergic (5-HT2A and 5-HT2C post-synaptic receptors) and GABAergic (GAD2 enzyme) signaling, and (2) decreased structural cytoskeletal neurofilament proteins (NF-H, NF-M and NF-L). Interestingly, these effects were not accompanied by an increase in apoptotic markers. In fact, chronic MDMA inhibited proteins of the apoptotic pathway (i.e., pro-apoptotic FADD, Bax and cytochrome c) leading to an inhibition of cell death markers (i.e., p-JNK1/2, cleavage of PARP-1) and suggesting regulatory mechanisms in response to the neurochemical changes caused by the drug. The data, together with the observed lack of GFAP activation, support the view that chronic MDMA effects, regardless of the rat developmental age, extends beyond neurotransmitter systems to impair other hippocampal structural cell markers. Interestingly, inhibitory changes in proteins from the apoptotic pathway might be taking place to overcome the protein deficits caused by MDMA.

  9. Biofuel cell-based self-powered biogenerators for online continuous monitoring of neurochemicals in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hanjun; Yu, Ping; Lu, Xulin; Lin, Yuqing; Ohsaka, Takeo; Mao, Lanqun

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates a new electrochemical method for continuous neurochemical sensing with a biofuel cell-based self-powered biogenerator as the detector for the analysis of microdialysate continuously sampled from rat brain, with glucose as an example analyte. To assemble a glucose/O(2) biofuel cell that can be used as a self-powered biogenerator for glucose sensing, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) was used as the bioanodic catalyst for the oxidation of glucose with methylene green (MG) adsorbed onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the electrocatalyst for the oxidation of dihydronicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). Laccase crosslinked onto SWNTs was used as the biocathodic catalyst for the O(2) reduction. To enable the bioanode and biocathode to work efficiently in their individually favorable solutions and to eliminate the interference between the glucose bioanode and O(2) biocathode, the biofuel cell-based biogenerator was built in a co-laminar microfluidic chip so that the bioanodic and biocathodic streams could be independently optimized to provide conditions favorable for each of the bioelectrodes. By using a home-made portable voltmeter to output the voltage generated on an external resistor, the biogenerator was used for glucose sensing based on a galvanic cell mechanism. In vitro experiments demonstrate that, under the optimized conditions, the voltage generated on an external resistor shows a linear relationship with the logarithmic glucose concentration within a concentration range of 0.2 mM to 1.0 mM. Moreover, the biogenerator exhibits a high stability and a good selectivity for glucose sensing. The validity of the biofuel cell-based self-powered biogenerator for continuous neurochemical sensing was illustrated by online continuous monitoring of striatum glucose in rat brain through the combination of in vivo microdialysis. This study offers a new and technically simple platform for continuously monitoring physiologically important

  10. Acute but not chronic administration of pioglitazone promoted behavioral and neurochemical protective effects in the MPTP model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Barbiero, Janaína K; Santiago, Ronise M; Lima, Marcelo M S; Ariza, Deborah; Morais, Lívia H; Andreatini, Roberto; Vital, Maria A B F

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the neurochemical, motor and cognitive effects of pioglitazone in a rat model of Parkinson's disease induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). In the first experiment, we administered MPTP, and 1h later administered a single oral dose of pioglitazone (5, 15 and 30 mg/kg). The following day, we performed the open-field test and neurochemical dose response curve. We demonstrated that 30 mg/kg of pioglitazone was capable of restoring striatal dopamine (DA) concentrations and motor behaviors. A second experiment was conducted to test the effects of two protocols (acute and chronic) of pioglitazone (30 mg/kg) administration in the open-field test, two-way active avoidance task and in the DA and metabolites levels. The acute protocol consisted of a single oral administration 1 h after MPTP, whereas the chronic protocol was performed with daily administrations starting 1 h after MPTP and ending 22 days after that. Results showed that neither protocol was able to reverse the cognitive impairment promoted by MPTP. We also demonstrated that acute treatment generated some level of neuroprotection, as confirmed by the absence of DA reduction in the group treated with pioglitazone in comparison to the sham group. By contrast, chronic treatment leaded to a reduction of striatal DA, close to MPTP administration alone. These findings suggest that acute administration of pioglitazone (30 mg/kg) was more efficient in generating beneficial effects on motor behaviors and in striatal DA levels. Nevertheless, we failed to demonstrate that pioglitazone administration improved performance on a dopamine-related cognitive task after MPTP.

  11. Chronic MDMA induces neurochemical changes in the hippocampus of adolescent and young adult rats: Down-regulation of apoptotic markers.

    PubMed

    García-Cabrerizo, Rubén; García-Fuster, M Julia

    2015-07-01

    While hippocampus is a brain region particularly susceptible to the effects of MDMA, the cellular and molecular changes induced by MDMA are still to be fully elucidated, being the dosage regimen, the species and the developmental stage under study great variables. This study compared the effects of one and four days of MDMA administration following a binge paradigm (3×5 mg/kg, i.p., every 2 h) on inducing hippocampal neurochemical changes in adolescent (PND 37) and young adult (PND 58) rats. The results showed that chronic MDMA caused hippocampal protein deficits in adolescent and young adult rats at different levels: (1) impaired serotonergic (5-HT2A and 5-HT2C post-synaptic receptors) and GABAergic (GAD2 enzyme) signaling, and (2) decreased structural cytoskeletal neurofilament proteins (NF-H, NF-M and NF-L). Interestingly, these effects were not accompanied by an increase in apoptotic markers. In fact, chronic MDMA inhibited proteins of the apoptotic pathway (i.e., pro-apoptotic FADD, Bax and cytochrome c) leading to an inhibition of cell death markers (i.e., p-JNK1/2, cleavage of PARP-1) and suggesting regulatory mechanisms in response to the neurochemical changes caused by the drug. The data, together with the observed lack of GFAP activation, support the view that chronic MDMA effects, regardless of the rat developmental age, extends beyond neurotransmitter systems to impair other hippocampal structural cell markers. Interestingly, inhibitory changes in proteins from the apoptotic pathway might be taking place to overcome the protein deficits caused by MDMA. PMID:26068050

  12. Quantification of microvessels in canine lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Tonar, Zbynĕk; Egger, Gunter F; Witter, Kirsti; Wolfesberger, Birgitt

    2008-10-01

    Quantification of microvessels in tumors is mostly based on counts of vessel profiles in tumor hot spots. Drawbacks of this method include low reproducibility and large interobserver variance, mainly as a result of individual differences in sampling of image fields for analysis. Our aim was to test an unbiased method for quantifying microvessels in healthy and tumorous lymph nodes of dogs. The endothelium of blood vessels was detected in paraffin sections by a combination of immunohistochemistry (von Willebrand factor) and lectin histochemistry (wheat germ agglutinin) in comparison with detection of basal laminae by laminin immunohistochemistry or silver impregnation. Systematic uniform random sampling of 50 image fields was performed during photo-documentation. An unbiased counting frame (area 113,600 microm(2)) was applied to each micrograph. The total area sampled from each node was 5.68 mm(2). Vessel profiles were counted according to stereological counting rules. Inter- and intraobserver variabilities were tested. The application of systematic uniform random sampling was compared with the counting of vessel profiles in hot spots. The unbiased estimate of the number of vessel profiles per unit area ranged from 100.5 +/- 44.0/mm(2) to 442.6 +/- 102.5/mm(2) in contrast to 264 +/- 72.2/mm(2) to 771.0 +/- 108.2/mm(2) in hot spots. The advantage of using systematic uniform random sampling is its reproducibility, with reasonable interobserver and low intraobserver variance. This method also allows for the possibility of using archival material, because staining quality is not limiting as it is for image analysis, and artifacts can easily be excluded. However, this method is comparatively time-consuming.

  13. Conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, alters behavioral and neurochemical effects of ethanol in mice.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, Gessynger; Ferreira-Santos, Mariane; Marin, Marcelo T

    2016-05-15

    Ethanol abuse potential is mainly due to its reinforcing properties, crucial in the transition from the recreational to pathological use. These properties are mediated by mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways and neuroadaptations in these pathways seem to be responsible for addiction. Both pathways are modulated by other neurotransmitters systems, including neuronal histaminergic system. Among the histamine receptors, H3 receptor stands out due to its role in modulation of histamine and other neurotransmitters release. Thus, histaminergic system, through H3 receptors, may have an important role in ethanol addiction development. Aiming to understand these interactions, conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, was given to mice subjected to the evaluation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation, ethanol CPP and quantification of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites in mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal pathways following acute ethanol treatment. Systemic conessine administration exacerbated ethanol effects on locomotor activity. Despite of conessine reinforcing effect on CPP, this drug did not alter acquisition of ethanol CPP. Ethanol treatment affects the serotoninergic neurotransmission in the ventral tegmental area, the dopaminergic neurotransmission in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) and caudate-putamen nucleus (CPu) and the noradrenergic neurotransmission in the CPu. In the PFC, conessine blocked ethanol effects on dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. The blockade of H3 receptors and ethanol seem to interact in the modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission of nigrostriatal pathway, decreasing dopamine metabolites in substantia nigra. In conclusion, conessine was able to change psychostimulant effect of ethanol, without altering its reinforcing properties. This exacerbation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation would be related to alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal pathway. PMID

  14. MAMA Software Features: Quantification Verification Documentation-1

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy E.; Porter, Reid B.

    2014-05-21

    This document reviews the verification of the basic shape quantification attributes in the MAMA software against hand calculations in order to show that the calculations are implemented mathematically correctly and give the expected quantification results.

  15. Transplacental Exposure to AZT Induces Adverse Neurochemical and Behavioral Effects in a Mouse Model: Protection by L-Acetylcarnitine

    PubMed Central

    Venerosi Pesciolini, Aldina; Tramutola, Antonella; Ajmone-Cat, Maria Antonietta; Cinque, Carlo; Alemà, Giovanni Sebastiano; Giovine, Angela; Peluso, Gianfranco; Minghetti, Luisa; Nicolai, Raffaella; Calamandrei, Gemma; Casolini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Maternal-fetal HIV-1 transmission can be prevented by administration of AZT, alone or in combination with other antiretroviral drugs to pregnant HIV-1-infected women and their newborns. In spite of the benefits deriving from this life-saving prophylactic therapy, there is still considerable uncertainty on the potential long-term adverse effects of antiretroviral drugs on exposed children. Clinical and experimental studies have consistently shown the occurrence of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress following prenatal treatment with antiretroviral drugs, and clinical evidence suggests that the developing brain is one of the targets of the toxic action of these compounds possibly resulting in behavioral problems. We intended to verify the effects on brain and behavior of mice exposed during gestation to AZT, the backbone of antiretroviral therapy during human pregnancy. We hypothesized that glutamate, a neurotransmitter involved in excitotoxicity and behavioral plasticity, could be one of the major actors in AZT-induced neurochemical and behavioral alterations. We also assessed the antioxidant and neuroprotective effect of L-acetylcarnitine, a compound that improves mitochondrial function and is successfully used to treat antiretroviral-induced polyneuropathy in HIV-1 patients. We found that transplacental exposure to AZT given per os to pregnant mice from day 10 of pregnancy to delivery impaired in the adult offspring spatial learning and memory, enhanced corticosterone release in response to acute stress, increased brain oxidative stress also at birth and markedly reduced expression of mGluR1 and mGluR5 subtypes and GluR1 subunit of AMPA receptors in the hippocampus. Notably, administration during the entire pregnancy of L-acetylcarnitine was effective in preventing/ameliorating the neurochemical, neuroendocrine and behavioral adverse effects induced by AZT in the offspring. The present preclinical findings provide a mechanistic hypothesis for

  16. Absolute protein quantification of the yeast chaperome under conditions of heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Rebecca J.; Lawless, Craig; Holman, Stephen W.; Lanthaler, Karin; Beynon, Robert J.; Grant, Chris M.; Hubbard, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Chaperones are fundamental to regulating the heat shock response, mediating protein recovery from thermal‐induced misfolding and aggregation. Using the QconCAT strategy and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) for absolute protein quantification, we have determined copy per cell values for 49 key chaperones in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under conditions of normal growth and heat shock. This work extends a previous chemostat quantification study by including up to five Q‐peptides per protein to improve confidence in protein quantification. In contrast to the global proteome profile of S. cerevisiae in response to heat shock, which remains largely unchanged as determined by label‐free quantification, many of the chaperones are upregulated with an average two‐fold increase in protein abundance. Interestingly, eight of the significantly upregulated chaperones are direct gene targets of heat shock transcription factor‐1. By performing absolute quantification of chaperones under heat stress for the first time, we were able to evaluate the individual protein‐level response. Furthermore, this SRM data was used to calibrate label‐free quantification values for the proteome in absolute terms, thus improving relative quantification between the two conditions. This study significantly enhances the largely transcriptomic data available in the field and illustrates a more nuanced response at the protein level. PMID:27252046

  17. Good quantification practices of flavours and fragrances by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Begnaud, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, chromatographic techniques with mass spectrometric detection have been increasingly used to monitor the rapidly expanded list of regulated flavour and fragrance ingredients. This trend entails a need for good quantification practices suitable for complex media, especially for multi-analytes. In this article, we present experimental precautions needed to perform the analyses and ways to process the data according to the most recent approaches. This notably includes the identification of analytes during their quantification and method validation, when applied to real matrices, based on accuracy profiles. A brief survey of application studies based on such practices is given. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Quantitative mass spectrometry’. PMID:27644977

  18. Best practices for metabolite quantification in drug development: updated recommendation from the European Bioanalysis Forum.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Philip; Blech, Stefan; White, Stephen; Green, Martha; Delatour, Claude; McDougall, Stuart; Mannens, Geert; Smeraglia, John; Williams, Stephen; Young, Graeme

    2016-06-01

    Metabolite quantification and profiling continues to grow in importance in today's drug development. The guidance provided by the 2008 FDA Metabolites in Safety Testing Guidance and the subsequent ICH M3(R2) Guidance (2009) has led to a more streamlined process to assess metabolite exposures in preclinical and clinical studies in industry. In addition, the European Bioanalysis Forum (EBF) identified an opportunity to refine the strategies on metabolite quantification considering the experience to date with their recommendation paper on the subject dating from 2010 and integrating the recent discussions on the tiered approach to bioanalytical method validation with focus on metabolite quantification. The current manuscript summarizes the discussion and recommendations from a recent EBF Focus Workshop into an updated recommendation for metabolite quantification in drug development.

  19. Senescence-accelerated mouse (SAM) as an animal model of senile dementia: pharmacological, neurochemical and molecular biological approach.

    PubMed

    Okuma, Y; Nomura, Y

    1998-12-01

    To elucidate the fundamental mechanism of age-related deficiencies of learning and to develop effective drugs for intervention in age-related diseases such as learning dysfunctions, pertinent animal models that have characteristics closely similar to human dysfunctions should be established. SAM (senescence-accelerated mouse) has been established as a murine model of the SAM strains, groups of related inbred strains including nine strains of accelerated senescence-prone, short-lived mice (SAMP) and three strains of accelerated senescence-resistant, long-lived mice (SAMR). SAMP-strain mice show relatively strain-specific age-associated phenotypic pathologies such as shortened life span and early manifestation of senescence. Among the SAMP-strain mice, SAMP8 mice show an age-related deterioration in learning ability. Here, the neuropathological, neurochemical and pharmacological features of SAM are reported, especially for SAMP8. Moreover, the effects of several drugs on the biochemical and behavioral alterations in SAMP8 and the etiologic manifestation of accelerated senescence are also discussed. PMID:9920195

  20. Interaction between handling induced stress and anxiolytic effects of ethanol in zebrafish: A behavioral and neurochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Fulcher, Niveen; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Stress is often considered an important factor in the development of alcohol addiction. In rodents, various types of stressors have been shown to potentiate the effects of alcohol on behavioral responses, and to increase consumption of this substance. However, few have investigated the interaction between stress and alcohol in zebrafish. In the current study we present a repeated handling stress paradigm we developed for zebrafish, and examine whether stress alters alcohol induced behavioral and neurochemical responses. Our results show that repeated handling of zebrafish conducted for 2 consecutive days is sufficient to increase anxiety-like behavioral responses quantified 24h post-stressor. Repeatedly handled zebrafish also exhibited a reduction in the levels of serotonin's metabolite, 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (quantified by high precision liquid chromatography) compared to unhandled controls. A 60-min acute exposure to 1% ethanol was found to significantly increase locomotor activity and decrease anxiety-like behavioral responses in stressed zebrafish but not in controls. Furthermore, unhandled control zebrafish exhibited a significant increase in whole-brain dopamine levels following exposure to ethanol but the increase was not observed in repeatedly handled fish. Our findings suggest that ethanol induced locomotor activity and anxiolysis is potentiated by handling stress and may be partially mediated by changes in dopaminergic and serotonergic activity. Overall, we demonstrate the validity of our repeated handling stressor paradigm for zebrafish, which can be used to investigate the interaction between stress and ethanol.

  1. Benefits of agomelatine in behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alterations in prenatal valproic acid induced autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, B M; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-12-01

    Valproic acid administration during gestational period causes behavior and biochemical deficits similar to those observed in humans with autism spectrum disorder. Although worldwide prevalence of autism spectrum disorder has been increased continuously, therapeutic agents to ameliorate the social impairment are very limited. The present study has been structured to investigate the therapeutic potential of melatonin receptor agonist, agomelatine in prenatal valproic acid (Pre-VPA) induced autism spectrum disorder in animals. Pre-VPA has produced reduction in social interaction (three chamber social behavior apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complex I, II, IV). Furthermore, Pre-VPA has increased locomotor activity (actophotometer), anxiety, brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, and catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage in animals. Treatment with agomelatine has significantly attenuated Pre-VPA induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, agomelatine also attenuated Pre-VPA induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative stress, nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage. It is concluded that, Pre-VPA has induced autism spectrum disorder, which was attenuated by agomelatine. Agomelatine has shown ameliorative effect on behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alteration in Pre-VPA exposed animals. Thus melatonin receptor agonists may provide beneficial therapeutic strategy for managing autism spectrum disorder.

  2. Lack of Specific Involvement of (+)-Naloxone and (+)-Naltrexone on the Reinforcing and Neurochemical Effects of Cocaine and Opioids.

    PubMed

    Tanda, Gianluigi; Mereu, Maddalena; Hiranita, Takato; Quarterman, Juliana C; Coggiano, Mark; Katz, Jonathan L

    2016-10-01

    Effective medications for drug abuse remain a largely unmet goal in biomedical science. Recently, the (+)-enantiomers of naloxone and naltrexone, TLR4 antagonists, have been reported to attenuate preclinical indicators of both opioid and stimulant abuse. To further examine the potential of these compounds as drug-abuse treatments, we extended the previous assessments to include a wider range of doses and procedures. We report the assessment of (+)-naloxone and (+)-naltrexone on the acute dopaminergic effects of cocaine and heroin determined by in vivo microdialysis, on the reinforcing effects of cocaine and the opioid agonist, remifentanil, tested under intravenous self-administration procedures, as well as the subjective effects of cocaine determined by discriminative-stimulus effects in rats. Pretreatments with (+)-naloxone or (+)-naltrexone did not attenuate, and under certain conditions enhanced the stimulation of dopamine levels produced by cocaine or heroin in the nucleus accumbens shell. Furthermore, although an attenuation of either cocaine or remifentanil self-administration was obtained at the highest doses of (+)-naloxone and (+)-naltrexone, those doses also attenuated rates of food-maintained behaviors, indicating a lack of selectivity of TLR4 antagonist effects for behaviors reinforced with drug injections. Drug-discrimination studies failed to demonstrate a significant interaction of (+)-naloxone with subjective effects of cocaine. The present studies demonstrate that under a wide range of doses and experimental conditions, the TLR4 antagonists, (+)-naloxone and (+)-naltrexone, did not specifically block neurochemical or behavioral abuse-related effects of cocaine or opioid agonists. PMID:27296151

  3. Distinct synaptic and neurochemical changes to the granule cell-CA3 projection in Bassoon mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Dieni, Sandra; Nestel, Sigrun; Sibbe, Mirjam; Frotscher, Michael; Hellwig, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Proper synaptic function depends on a finely-tuned balance between events such as protein synthesis and structural organization. In particular, the functional loss of just one synaptic-related protein can have a profound impact on overall neuronal network function. To this end, we used a mutant mouse model harboring a mutated form of the presynaptic scaffolding protein Bassoon (Bsn), which is phenotypically characterized by: (i) spontaneous generalized epileptic seizure activity, representing a chronically-imbalanced neuronal network; and (ii) a dramatic increase in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein concentration, a key player in synaptic plasticity. Detailed morphological and neurochemical analyses revealed that the increased BDNF levels are associated with: (i) modified neuropeptide distribution; (ii) perturbed expression of selected markers of synaptic activation or plasticity; (iii) subtle changes to microglial structure; and (iv) morphological alterations to the mossy fiber (MF) synapse. These findings emphasize the important contribution of Bassoon protein to normal hippocampal function, and further characterize the Bsn-mutant as a useful model for studying the effects of chronic changes to network activity.

  4. Neurochemical abnormalities in anterior cingulate cortex on betel quid dependence: a 2D 1H MRS investigation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Li, Jianjun; Huang, Shixiong; Zhao, Zhongyan; Yang, Guoshuai; Pan, Mengjie; Li, Changqing; Chen, Feng; Pan, Suyue

    2015-01-01

    The effects of betel quid dependence (BQD) on biochemical changes remain largely unknown. Individuals with impaired cognitive control of behavior often reveal altered neurochemicals in Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) and those changes are usually earlier than structural alteration. Here, we examined BQD individuals (n = 33) and age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy control participants (n = 32) in an 2D 1H-MRS study to observe brain biochemical alterations in the anterior cingulated cortex (ACC) associated with the severity of BQD and duration of BQD. In the bilateral ACC, our study found NAA/Cr were lower in BQD individuals compared to the healthy controls, Cho/Cr and Glx/Cr were higher in individuals with BQD compared to the healthy group, but increase was noted for mI/Cr in BQD individuals only in the left ACC. NAA/Cr ratios of the right ACC negatively correlated with BQDS and duration, NAA/Cr ratios of the left ACC negatively correlated with duration, Glx/Cr ratios of the right ACC positively correlated with BQDS. The findings of the study support previous analyses of a role for ACC area in the mediation of BQ addiction and mechanistically explain past observations of reduced ACC grey matter in BQD patients. These data jointly point to state related abnormalities of BQ effect and provide a novel strategy of therapeutic intervention designed to normalize Glu transmission and function during treating BQ addiction. PMID:26885276

  5. Towards drug quantification in human skin with confocal Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Lutz; Selzer, Dominik; Fluhr, Joachim W; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Windbergs, Maike

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the penetration behaviour of drugs into human skin is a prerequisite for the rational development and evaluation of effective dermal drug delivery. The general procedure for the acquisition of quantitative drug penetration profiles in human skin is performed by sequential segmentation and extraction. Unfortunately, this technique is destructive, laborious and lacks spatial resolution. Confocal Raman microscopy bares the potential of a chemically selective, label free and nondestructive analysis. However, the acquisition of quantitative drug depth profiles within skin by Raman microscopy is impeded by imponderable signal attenuation inside the tissue. In this study, we present a chemical semi-solid matrix system simulating the optical properties of human skin. This system serves as a skin surrogate for investigation of Raman signal attenuation under controlled conditions. Caffeine was homogeneously incorporated within the skin surrogate, and Raman intensity depth profiles were acquired. A mathematical algorithm describing the Raman signal attenuation within the surrogate was derived from these profiles. Human skin samples were incubated with caffeine, and Raman intensity depth profiles were similarly acquired. The surrogate algorithm was successfully applied to correct the drug profiles in human skin for signal attenuation. For the first time, a mathematical algorithm was established, which allows correction of Raman signal attenuation in human skin, thus facilitating reliable drug quantification in human skin by confocal Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Gas plume quantification in downlooking hyperspectral longwave infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, Caroline S.; Davenport, Michael R.

    2010-10-01

    Algorithms have been developed to support quantitative analysis of a gas plume using down-looking airborne hyperspectral long-wave infrared (LWIR) imagery. The resulting gas quantification "GQ" tool estimates the quantity of one or more gases at each pixel, and estimates uncertainty based on factors such as atmospheric transmittance, background clutter, and plume temperature contrast. GQ uses gas-insensitive segmentation algorithms to classify the background very precisely so that it can infer gas quantities from the differences between plume-bearing pixels and similar non-plume pixels. It also includes MODTRAN-based algorithms to iteratively assess various profiles of air temperature, water vapour, and ozone, and select the one that implies smooth emissivity curves for the (unknown) materials on the ground. GQ then uses a generalized least-squares (GLS) algorithm to simultaneously estimate the most likely mixture of background (terrain) material and foreground plume gases. Cross-linking of plume temperature to the estimated gas quantity is very non-linear, so the GLS solution was iteratively assessed over a range of plume temperatures to find the best fit to the observed spectrum. Quantification errors due to local variations in the camera-topixel distance were suppressed using a subspace projection operator. Lacking detailed depth-maps for real plumes, the GQ algorithm was tested on synthetic scenes generated by the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) software. Initial results showed pixel-by-pixel gas quantification errors of less than 15% for a Freon 134a plume.

  7. Microfluidic Platform with In-Chip Electrophoresis Coupled to Mass Spectrometry for Monitoring Neurochemical Release from Nerve Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangtang; Hu, Hankun; Zhao, Shulin; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2016-05-17

    Chemical stimulus-induced neurotransmitter release from neuronal cells is well-documented. However, the dynamic changes in neurochemical release remain to be fully explored. In this work, a three-layered microfluidic chip was fabricated and evaluated for studying the dynamics of neurotransmitter release from PC-12 cells. The chip features integration of a nanoliter sized chamber for cell perfusion, pneumatic pressure valves for fluidic control, a microfluidic channel for electrophoretic separation, and a nanoelectrospray emitter for ionization in MS detection. Deploying this platform, a microchip electrophoresis-mass spectrometric method (MCE-MS) was developed to simultaneously quantify important neurotransmitters, including dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), aspartic acid (Asp), and glutamic acid (Glu) without need for labeling or enrichment. Monitoring neurotransmitter release from PC-12 cells exposed to KCl (or alcohol) revealed that all four neurotransmitters investigated were released. Two release patterns were observed, one for the two monoamine neurotransmitters (i.e., DA and 5-HT) and another for the two amino acid neurotransmitters. Release dynamics for the two monoamine neurotransmitters was significantly different. The cells released DA most quickly and heavily in response to the stimulation. After exposure to the chemical stimulus for 4 min, the DA level in the perfusate from the cells was 86% lower than that at the beginning. Very interestingly, the cells started to release 5-HT in large quantities when they stopped releasing DA. These results suggest that DA and 5-HT are packaged into different vesicle pools and they are mobilized differently in response to chemical stimuli. The microfluidic platform proposed is proven useful for monitoring cellular release in biological studies. PMID:27111409

  8. Behavioral and neurochemical characterization of TrkB-dependent mechanisms of agomelatine in glucocorticoid receptor-impaired mice.

    PubMed

    Boulle, F; Velthuis, H; Koedam, K; Steinbusch, H W; van den Hove, D L A; Kenis, G; Gabriel, C; Mocaer, E; Franc, B; Rognan, D; Mongeau, R; Lanfumey, L

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that impairment of the stress response, in particular the negative feedback regulation mechanism exerted by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, might be responsible for the hippocampal atrophy observed in depressed patients. Antidepressants, possibly through the activation of BDNF signaling, may enhance neuroplasticity and restore normal hippocampal functions. In this context, glucocorticoid receptor-impaired (GR-i) mice-a transgenic mouse model of reduced GR-induced negative feedback regulation of the HPA axis-were used to investigate the role of BDNF/TrkB signaling in the behavioral and neurochemical effects of the new generation antidepressant drug, agomelatine. GR-i mice exhibited marked alterations in depressive-like and anxiety-like behaviors, together with a decreased cell proliferation and altered levels of neuroplastic and epigenetic markers in the hippocampus. GR-i mice and their wild-type littermates were treated for 21 days with vehicle, agomelatine (50mg/kg/day; i.p) or the TrkB inhibitor Ana-12 (0.5mg/kg/day, i.p) alone, or in combination with agomelatine. Chronic treatment with agomelatine resulted in antidepressant-like effects in GR-i mice and reversed the deficit in hippocampal cell proliferation and some of the alterations of mRNA plasticity markers in GR-i mice. Ana-12 blocked the effect of agomelatine on motor activity as well as its ability to restore a normal hippocampal cell proliferation and expression of neurotrophic factors. Altogether, our findings indicate that agomelatine requires TrkB signaling to reverse some of the molecular and behavioral alterations caused by HPA axis impairment. PMID:26653128

  9. Neuregulin-1β Regulates the migration of Different Neurochemical Phenotypic Neurons from Organotypically Cultured Dorsal Root Ganglion Explants.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Liu, Guixiang; Li, Hao; Bi, Yanwen

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin-1β (NRG-1β) has multiple roles in the development and function in the nervous system and exhibits potent neuroprotective properties. In the present study, organotypically cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants were used to evaluate the effects of NRG-1β on migration of two major phenotypic classes of DRG neurons. The signaling pathways involved in these effects were also determined. Organotypically cultured DRG explants were exposed to NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 (10 μmol/L) plus NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) inhibitor PD98059 (10 μmol/L) plus NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), and LY294002 (10 μmol/L) plus PD98059 (10 μmol/L) plus NRG-1β (20 nmol/L), respectively, for 3 days. The DRG explants were continuously exposed to culture media as a control. After that, all above cultures were processed for detecting the mRNA levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and neurofilament-200 (NF-200) by real-time PCR analysis. CGRP and NF-200 expression in situ was determined by fluorescent labeling technique. The results showed that NRG-1β elevated the mRNA and protein levels of CGRP and NF-200. NRG-1β also increased the number and the percentage of CGRP-immunoreactive (IR) migrating neurons and NF-200-IR migrating neurons. Inhibitors (LY294002, PD98059) either alone or in combination blocked the effects of NRG-1β. The contribution of NRG-1β on modulating distinct neurochemical phenotypic plasticity of DRG neurons suggested that NRG-1β signaling system might play an important role on the biological effects of primary sensory neurons.

  10. Water temperature determines neurochemical and behavioural responses to forced swim stress: an in vivo microdialysis and biotelemetry study in rats.

    PubMed

    Linthorst, Astrid C E; Flachskamm, Cornelia; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2008-03-01

    Forced swimming is a behavioural stress model increasingly used to investigate the neurocircuitry of stress responses. Although forced swim stress clearly is a psychological stressor (anxiety, panic), its physical aspects are often neglected. There are indications that behavioural and neurochemical responses to swim stress depend on the water temperature. Thus, we investigated the responsiveness of hippocampal serotonergic neurotransmission (important in the coordination of stress responses), and of behaviour and core body temperature to forced swimming at different water temperatures (19, 25 and 35 degrees C). In vivo microdialysis and biotelemetry in freely-behaving rats were used. Dialysates were analysed for serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-HIAA (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid) by HPLC with electrochemical detection. Forced swimming in water at 25 and 19 degrees C decreased core body temperature by 8 and 12 degrees C, respectively. A rapid and pronounced increase in hippocampal 5-HT and 5-HIAA was found in rats that swam at 35 degrees C, whereas biphasic responses in 5-HT and 5-HIAA were observed at 25 and 19 degrees C. Also swim stress behaviour and post-stress home cage behaviour depended on the water temperature. Comparing the serotonergic and core body temperature changes revealed that a combination of two different 5-HT and 5-HIAA responses seems to shape the neurotransmitter response. Swimming-induced increases in hippocampal extracellular concentrations of 5-HT and 5-HIAA occurred at all water temperatures, but these increases were temporarily quenched, or concentrations were transistently decreased, when core body temperature fell below 31 degrees C in water at 25 or 19 degrees C. These data demonstrate that water temperature is a key factor determining the impact of forced swim stress on behaviour and neurochemistry, and underscore that changes in these parameters should be interpreted in the light of the autonomic responses induced by this stressor

  11. In vivo and In vitro neurochemical-based assessments of wastewater effluents from the Maumee River area of concern.

    PubMed

    Arini, Adeline; Cavallin, Jenna E; Berninger, Jason P; Marfil-Vega, Ruth; Mills, Marc; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Basu, Niladri

    2016-04-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents contain potentially neuroactive chemicals though few methods are available to screen for the presence of such agents. Here, two parallel approaches (in vivo and in vitro) were used to assess WWTP exposure-related changes to neurochemistry. First, fathead minnows (FHM, Pimephales promelas) were caged for four days along a WWTP discharge zone into the Maumee River (Ohio, USA). Grab water samples were collected and extracts obtained for the detection of alkylphenols, bisphenol A (BPA) and steroid hormones. Second, the extracts were then used as a source of in vitro exposure to brain tissues from FHM and four additional species relevant to the Great Lakes ecosystem (rainbow trout (RT), river otter (RO), bald eagle (BE) and human (HU)). The ability of the wastewater (in vivo) or extracts (in vitro) to interact with enzymes (monoamine oxidase (MAO) and glutamine synthetase (GS)) and receptors (dopamine (D2) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA)) involved in dopamine and glutamate-dependent neurotransmission were examined on brain homogenates. In vivo exposure of FHM led to significant decreases of NMDA receptor binding in females (24-42%), and increases of MAO activity in males (2.8- to 3.2-fold). In vitro, alkylphenol-targeted extracts significantly inhibited D2 (66% in FHM) and NMDA (24-54% in HU and RT) receptor binding, and induced MAO activity in RT, RO, and BE brains. Steroid hormone-targeted extracts inhibited GS activity in all species except FHM. BPA-targeted extracts caused a MAO inhibition in FHM, RT and BE brains. Using both in vivo and in vitro approaches, this study shows that WWTP effluents contain agents that can interact with neurochemicals important in reproduction and other neurological functions. Additional work is needed to better resolve in vitro to in vivo extrapolations (IVIVE) as well as cross-species differences.

  12. Effect of JWH-250, JWH-073 and their interaction on "tetrad", sensorimotor, neurological and neurochemical responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Ossato, Andrea; Canazza, Isabella; Trapella, Claudio; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; De Luca, Maria Antonietta; Rimondo, Claudia; Varani, Katia; Borea, Pier Andrea; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Marti, Matteo

    2016-06-01

    JWH-250 and JWH-073 are two synthetic cannabinoid agonists with nanomolar affinity at CB1 and CB2 receptors. They are illegally marketed within "herbal blend" for theirs psychoactive effects greater than those produced by Cannabis. Recently, we analyzed an "herbal" preparation containing a mixture of both JWH-250 and JWH-073. The present study was aimed at investigating the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological activity of JWH-250 and JWH-073 in male CD-1 mice. In vitro competition binding experiments performed on mouse and human CB1 and CB2 receptors revealed a nanomolar affinity and potency of the JWH-250 and JWH-073. In vivo studies showed that JWH-250 and JWH-073, administered separately, induced a marked hypothermia, increased pain threshold to both noxious mechanical and thermal stimuli, caused catalepsy, reduced motor activity, impaired sensorimotor responses (visual, acoustic and tactile), caused seizures, myoclonia, hyperreflexia and promote aggressiveness in mice. Moreover, microdialysis study in freely moving mice showed that systemic administration of JWH-250 and JWH-073 stimulated dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens in a dose-dependent manner. Behavioral, neurological and neurochemical effects were fully prevented by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist AM 251. Co-administration of ineffective doses of JWH-250 and JWH-073 impaired visual sensorimotor responses, improved mechanical pain threshold and stimulated mesolimbic DA transmission in mice, living unchanged all other behavioral and physiological parameters. For the first time the present study demonstrates the overall pharmacological effects induced by the administration of JWH-250 and JWH-073 in mice and it reveals their potentially synergistic action suggesting that co-administration of different synthetic cannabinoids may potentiate the detrimental effects of individual compounds increasing their dangerousness and abuse potential. PMID:26780169

  13. Neurochemical, behavioral and physiological effects of pharmacologically enhanced serotonin levels in serotonin transporter (SERT)-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Meredith A.; Jensen, Catherine L.; French, Helen T.; Stein, Alison R.; Huang, Su-Jan; Tolliver, Teresa J.; Murphy, Dennis L.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale Serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout (−/−) mice have an altered phenotype in adulthood, including high baseline anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, associated with increased baseline extracellular serotonin levels throughout life. Objectives To examine the effects of increases in serotonin following administration of the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP) in SERT wildtype (+/+), heterozygous (+/−) and −/− mice. Results 5-HTP increased serotonin in all five brain areas examined, with ~2–5-fold increases in SERT +/+ and +/− mice, and greater 4.5–11.7-fold increases in SERT −/− mice. Behaviorally, 5-HTP induced exaggerated serotonin syndrome behaviors in SERT −/− mice, with similar effects in male and female mice. Studies suggest promiscuous serotonin uptake by the dopamine transporter (DAT) in SERT −/− mice, and here, the DAT blocker GBR 12909 enhanced 5-HTP-induced behaviors in SERT −/− mice. Physiologically, 5-HTP induced exaggerated temperature effects in SERT-deficient mice. The 5-HT1A antagonist WAY 100635 decreased 5-HTP-induced hypothermia in SERT +/+ and +/− mice, with no effect in SERT −/− mice, whereas the 5-HT7 antagonist SB 269970 decreased this exaggerated response in SERT −/− mice only. WAY 100635 and SB 269970 together completely blocked 5-HTP-induced hypothermia in SERT +/− and −/− mice. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that SERT −/− mice have exaggerated neurochemical, behavioral and physiological responses to further increases in serotonin, and provide the first evidence of intact 5-HT7 receptor function in SERT −/− mice, with interesting interactions between 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptors. As roles for 5-HT7 receptors in anxiety and depression were recently established, the current findings have implications for understanding the high anxiety and depressive-like phenotype of SERT-deficient mice. PMID:18712364

  14. Non-parametric analysis of neurochemical effects and Arc expression in amphetamine-induced 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalization.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Adam; Daszczuk, Patrycja; Kursa, Miron Bartosz; Turzyńska, Danuta; Sobolewska, Alicja; Lehner, Małgorzata; Boguszewski, Paweł M; Szyndler, Janusz

    2016-10-01

    A number of studies have identified the importance of dopaminergic, opioid, serotonergic, noradrenergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in amphetamine-induced "50-kHz" ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs). Amphetamine became a topic of interest for many researchers interested in USVs due to its ability to induce 50-kHz USVs. To date, it has been difficult to identify the neurotransmitters responsible for this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to determine the following: (i) concentrations of neurotransmitters in selected structures of the rat brain after re-exposure of the rats to amphetamine administration; (ii) changes in Arc in the medial prefrontal cortex, striatum, nucleus accumbens core and shell, hippocampus, amygdala and ventral tegmental area; and (iii) a biological basis for differences in 50-kHz USV emissions in response to amphetamine administration. Re-exposure to amphetamine increased 50-kHz USVs. This parameter do not correlate with distance covered by the investigated animals. An increased concentration of noradrenaline in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) strongly correlated with the number of 50-kHz USVs. We found that NAcc noradrenaline concentrations negatively correlated with the concentration of dopamine and dopamine metabolites and positively correlated with the concentration of GABA and 5-HIAA (serotonin metabolite) in this structure. We have also identified a positive correlation between striatal 3-MT (dopamine metabolite) concentrations and Arc expression in the hippocampal DG as well as a negative correlation between the concentration of GABA in the amygdala and Arc expression in the central amygdala. Thus, the relationship between the emission of 50-kHz USVs and the neurochemical changes that occur after re-exposure to amphetamine indicates cross-talk between NA, DA, 5-HT and GABA neurotransmission in the NAcc.

  15. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of chronic L-DOPA treatment on non-motor sequelae in the hemiparkinsonian rat

    PubMed Central

    Eskow Jaunarajs, Karen L.; Dupre, Kristin B.; Ostock, Corinne Y.; Button, Thomas; Deak, Terrence; Bishop, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Depression and anxiety are prevalent non-motor symptoms that worsen quality of life for Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. While dopamine (DA) cell loss is a commonly proposed mechanism, the reported efficacy of DA replacement therapy with L-DOPA on affective symptoms is inconsistent. In order to delineate the effects of DA denervation and chronic L-DOPA treatment on affective behaviors, male Sprague-Dawley rats received unilateral 6-OHDA or sham lesions and were treated daily with L-DOPA (12 mg/kg + benserazide, 15 mg/kg, sc) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl, 0.1% ascorbic acid) for 28 days before commencing investigations into anxiety (locomotor chambers, social interaction) and depression-like behaviors (forced swim test) during the OFF phase of L-DOPA. One h after final treatments, rats were killed and striatum, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala were analyzed via high performance liquid chromatography for monoamine levels. In locomotor chambers and social interaction, DA lesions exerted mild anxiogenic effects. Surprisingly, chronic L-DOPA treatment did not improve these effects. While DA lesion reduced climbing behaviors on day 2 of exposure to the forced swim test, chronic L-DOPA treatment did not reverse these effects. Neurochemically, L-DOPA treatment in hemiparkinsonian rats reduced NE levels in the prefrontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampus. Collectively, the present data suggest that chronic L-DOPA therapy in severely DA-lesioned rats does not improve non-motor symptoms and may impair non-dopaminergic processes, indicating that long-term L-DOPA therapy does not exert necessary cause neuroplastic changes for improving affect. PMID:20838211

  16. In vivo and In vitro neurochemical-based assessments of wastewater effluents from the Maumee River area of concern.

    PubMed

    Arini, Adeline; Cavallin, Jenna E; Berninger, Jason P; Marfil-Vega, Ruth; Mills, Marc; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Basu, Niladri

    2016-04-01

    Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents contain potentially neuroactive chemicals though few methods are available to screen for the presence of such agents. Here, two parallel approaches (in vivo and in vitro) were used to assess WWTP exposure-related changes to neurochemistry. First, fathead minnows (FHM, Pimephales promelas) were caged for four days along a WWTP discharge zone into the Maumee River (Ohio, USA). Grab water samples were collected and extracts obtained for the detection of alkylphenols, bisphenol A (BPA) and steroid hormones. Second, the extracts were then used as a source of in vitro exposure to brain tissues from FHM and four additional species relevant to the Great Lakes ecosystem (rainbow trout (RT), river otter (RO), bald eagle (BE) and human (HU)). The ability of the wastewater (in vivo) or extracts (in vitro) to interact with enzymes (monoamine oxidase (MAO) and glutamine synthetase (GS)) and receptors (dopamine (D2) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA)) involved in dopamine and glutamate-dependent neurotransmission were examined on brain homogenates. In vivo exposure of FHM led to significant decreases of NMDA receptor binding in females (24-42%), and increases of MAO activity in males (2.8- to 3.2-fold). In vitro, alkylphenol-targeted extracts significantly inhibited D2 (66% in FHM) and NMDA (24-54% in HU and RT) receptor binding, and induced MAO activity in RT, RO, and BE brains. Steroid hormone-targeted extracts inhibited GS activity in all species except FHM. BPA-targeted extracts caused a MAO inhibition in FHM, RT and BE brains. Using both in vivo and in vitro approaches, this study shows that WWTP effluents contain agents that can interact with neurochemicals important in reproduction and other neurological functions. Additional work is needed to better resolve in vitro to in vivo extrapolations (IVIVE) as well as cross-species differences. PMID:26736051

  17. Behavioral, neurochemical and histological alterations promoted by bilateral intranigral rotenone administration: a new approach for an old neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Camila G; Barbiero, Janaína K; Ariza, Deborah; Dombrowski, Patrícia A; Sabioni, Pamela; Bortolanza, Mariza; Da Cunha, Claudio; Vital, Maria A B F; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2012-04-01

    Rotenone exposure in rodents provides an interesting model for studying mechanisms of toxin-induced dopaminergic neuronal injury. However, several aspects remain unclear regarding the effects and the accuracy of rotenone as an animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD). In order to counteract these limitations, this study characterized a precise neurotoxin-delivery strategy employing the bilateral intranigral administration protocol of rotenone as a reliable model of PD. We performed bilateral intranigral injections of rotenone (12 μg) and subsequent general activity (1, 10, 20, and 30 days after rotenone) and cognitive (7, 8, 15, and 30 days after rotenone) evaluations followed by neurochemical and immunohistochemical tests. We have observed that rotenone was able to produce a remarkable reduction on the percentage of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons (about 60%) within the substantia nigra pars compacta. Dopamine (DA) was severely depleted at 30 days after rotenone administration, similarly to its metabolites. In addition, an increase in DA turnover was detected at the same time-point. In parallel, striatal serotonin and its metabolite were found to be increased 30 days after the neurotoxic insult, without apparent modification in the serotonin turnover. Besides, motor behavior was impaired, mainly 1 day after rotenone. Furthermore, learning and memory processes were severely disrupted in different time-points, particularly at the training and test session (30 days). We now provide further evidence of a time-dependent neurodegeneration associated to cognitive impairment after the single bilateral intranigral administration of rotenone. Thus, it is proposed that the current rotenone protocol provides an improvement regarding the existing rotenone models of PD.

  18. Non-parametric analysis of neurochemical effects and Arc expression in amphetamine-induced 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalization.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Adam; Daszczuk, Patrycja; Kursa, Miron Bartosz; Turzyńska, Danuta; Sobolewska, Alicja; Lehner, Małgorzata; Boguszewski, Paweł M; Szyndler, Janusz

    2016-10-01

    A number of studies have identified the importance of dopaminergic, opioid, serotonergic, noradrenergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in amphetamine-induced "50-kHz" ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs). Amphetamine became a topic of interest for many researchers interested in USVs due to its ability to induce 50-kHz USVs. To date, it has been difficult to identify the neurotransmitters responsible for this phenomenon. The aim of this study was to determine the following: (i) concentrations of neurotransmitters in selected structures of the rat brain after re-exposure of the rats to amphetamine administration; (ii) changes in Arc in the medial prefrontal cortex, striatum, nucleus accumbens core and shell, hippocampus, amygdala and ventral tegmental area; and (iii) a biological basis for differences in 50-kHz USV emissions in response to amphetamine administration. Re-exposure to amphetamine increased 50-kHz USVs. This parameter do not correlate with distance covered by the investigated animals. An increased concentration of noradrenaline in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) strongly correlated with the number of 50-kHz USVs. We found that NAcc noradrenaline concentrations negatively correlated with the concentration of dopamine and dopamine metabolites and positively correlated with the concentration of GABA and 5-HIAA (serotonin metabolite) in this structure. We have also identified a positive correlation between striatal 3-MT (dopamine metabolite) concentrations and Arc expression in the hippocampal DG as well as a negative correlation between the concentration of GABA in the amygdala and Arc expression in the central amygdala. Thus, the relationship between the emission of 50-kHz USVs and the neurochemical changes that occur after re-exposure to amphetamine indicates cross-talk between NA, DA, 5-HT and GABA neurotransmission in the NAcc. PMID:27288591

  19. Neurochemical effects of a 20 kHz magnetic field on the central nervous system in prenatally exposed mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dimberg, Y.

    1995-09-01

    C57/B1 mice were exposed during pregnancy (gestation days 0--19) to a 20 kHz magnetic field (MF). The asymmetric sawtooth-waveform magnetic field in the exposed racks had a flux density of 15 {micro}T (peak to peak). After 19 days, the exposure was terminated, and the mice were housed individually under normal laboratory conditions. On postnatal day (PD) 1, PD21, and PD308, various neurochemical markers in the brains of the offspring were investigated and the brains weighed. No significant difference was found in the whole brain weight at PD1 or PD21 between exposed offspring and control animals. However, on PD308, a significant decrease in weight of the whole brain was detected in exposed animals. No significant differences were found in the weight of cortex, hippocampus, septum, or cerebellum on nay of the sampling occasions, nor were any significant differences detected in protein-, DNA-level, nerve growth factor (NGF), acetylcholine esterase- (AChE), or 2{prime},3{prime}-cyclic nucleotide 3{prime}-phosphodiesterase- (CNP; marker for oligodendrocytes) activities on PD21 in cerebellum. Cortex showed a more complex pattern of response to MF: MF treatment resulted in a decrease in DNA level and increases in the activities of CNP, AChE, and NGF protein. On PD308, the amount of DNA was significantly reduced in MF-treated cerebellum and CNP activity was still enhanced in MF-treated cortex compared to controls. Most of the effect of MF treatment during the embryonic period were similar to those induced by ionizing radiation but much weaker. However, the duration of the exposure required to elucidate the response of different markers to MF seems to be greater and effects appear later during development compared to responses to ionizing radiation.

  20. Benefits of agomelatine in behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alterations in prenatal valproic acid induced autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hariom; Sharma, B M; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2015-12-01

    Valproic acid administration during gestational period causes behavior and biochemical deficits similar to those observed in humans with autism spectrum disorder. Although worldwide prevalence of autism spectrum disorder has been increased continuously, therapeutic agents to ameliorate the social impairment are very limited. The present study has been structured to investigate the therapeutic potential of melatonin receptor agonist, agomelatine in prenatal valproic acid (Pre-VPA) induced autism spectrum disorder in animals. Pre-VPA has produced reduction in social interaction (three chamber social behavior apparatus), spontaneous alteration (Y-Maze), exploratory activity (Hole board test), intestinal motility, serotonin levels (prefrontal cortex and ileum) and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity (complex I, II, IV). Furthermore, Pre-VPA has increased locomotor activity (actophotometer), anxiety, brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive species, glutathione, and catalase), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), inflammation (brain and ileum myeloperoxidase activity), calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage in animals. Treatment with agomelatine has significantly attenuated Pre-VPA induced reduction in social interaction, spontaneous alteration, exploratory activity intestinal motility, serotonin levels and prefrontal cortex mitochondrial complex activity. Furthermore, agomelatine also attenuated Pre-VPA induced increase in locomotion, anxiety, brain oxidative stress, nitrosative stress, inflammation, calcium levels and blood brain barrier leakage. It is concluded that, Pre-VPA has induced autism spectrum disorder, which was attenuated by agomelatine. Agomelatine has shown ameliorative effect on behavioral, neurochemical and blood brain barrier alteration in Pre-VPA exposed animals. Thus melatonin receptor agonists may provide beneficial therapeutic strategy for managing autism spectrum disorder. PMID:26498253

  1. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) on regulation of thyroid-, growth-, and neurochemically related developmental processes in young rats

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez de Ku, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Neonatal exposure to the toxic chemical polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) induces hypothyroidism and retarded growth. Neonatal rats made hypothyroid by chemical or surgical means experience retarded growth and subnormal activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) This study compared thyroid-, growth-, and neurochemically-related processes altered by hypothyroidism induced by other means, with PCB-induced hypothyroidism: (1) titers of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH); (2) titers of hormones that regulate growth [growth hormone (GH), insulin-growth like factor-I (IGF-1), growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SS)]; or (3) brain ChAT activity. Whether PCB-induced growth retardation and other alterations are secondary to accompanying hypothyroidism rather than or in addition to a direct effect of PCB was also examined. Pregnant rats were fed chow containing 0 (controls), 62.5, 125, or 250 ppm PCB (entering offspring through placenta and milk) throughout pregnancy and lactation. Neonates exposed to PCB displayed many alterations similar to those made hypothyroid by other means: depression of overall and skeletal growth, circulating by other means: depression of overall and skeletal growth, circulating T[sub 4] levels and ChAT activity, and no change in hypothalamic GHRH and SS concentrations. Differences included a paradoxical increase in circulating GH levels, and no significant alteration of circulation IGF-1 and TSH levels and pituitary GH and TSH levels (although trends were in the expected direction). Thus, PCB-induced hypothyroidism may partially cause altered skeletal growth, circulating GH and TSH concentrations, and ChAT activity. Both T[sub 4] and T[sub 3] injections returned circulating TSH and GH levels and pituitary TSH content toward control levels; T[sub 3] restored skeletal, but not overall growth; and T[sub 4] elevated ChAT activity.

  2. Neurochemical phenotype of corticocortical connections in the macaque monkey: quantitative analysis of a subset of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive projection neurons in frontal, parietal, temporal, and cingulate cortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Nimchinsky, E. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The neurochemical characteristics of the neuronal subsets that furnish different types of corticocortical connections have been only partially determined. In recent years, several cytoskeletal proteins have emerged as reliable markers to distinguish subsets of pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex of primates. In particular, previous studies using an antibody to nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI-32) have revealed a consistent degree of regional and laminar specificity in the distribution of a subpopulation of pyramidal cells in the primate cerebral cortex. The density of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons was shown to vary across corticocortical pathways in macaque monkeys. In the present study, we have used the antibody SMI-32 to examine further and to quantify the distribution of a subset of corticocortically projecting neurons in a series of long ipsilateral corticocortical pathways in comparison to short corticocortical, commissural, and limbic connections. The results demonstrate that the long association pathways interconnecting the frontal, parietal, and temporal neocortex have a high representation of neurofilament protein-enriched pyramidal neurons (45-90%), whereas short corticocortical, callosal, and limbic pathways are characterized by much lower numbers of such neurons (4-35%). These data suggest that different types of corticocortical connections have differential representation of highly specific neuronal subsets that share common neurochemical characteristics, thereby determining regional and laminar cortical patterns of morphological and molecular heterogeneity. These differences in neuronal neurochemical phenotype among corticocortical circuits may have considerable influence on cortical processing and may be directly related to the type of integrative function subserved by each cortical pathway. Finally, it is worth noting that neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons are dramatically affected in the course of

  3. The Qiagen Investigator® Quantiplex HYres as an alternative kit for DNA quantification.

    PubMed

    Frégeau, Chantal J; Laurin, Nancy

    2015-05-01

    The Investigator® Quantiplex HYres kit was evaluated as a potential replacement for dual DNA quantification of casework samples. This kit was determined to be highly sensitive with a limit of quantification and limit of detection of 0.0049ng/μL and 0.0003ng/μL, respectively, for both human and male DNA, using full or half reaction volumes. It was also accurate in assessing the amount of male DNA present in 96 mock and actual casework male:female mixtures (various ratios) processed in this exercise. The close correlation between the male/human DNA ratios expressed in percentages derived from the Investigator® Quantiplex HYres quantification results and the male DNA proportion calculated in mixed AmpFlSTR® Profiler® Plus or AmpFlSTR® Identifiler® Plus profiles, using the Amelogenin Y peak and STR loci, allowed guidelines to be developed to facilitate decisions regarding when to submit samples to Y-STR rather than autosomal STR profiling. The internal control (IC) target was shown to be more sensitive to inhibitors compared to the human and male DNA targets included in the Investigator® Quantiplex HYres kit serving as a good quality assessor of DNA extracts. The new kit met our criteria of enhanced sensitivity, accuracy, consistency, reliability and robustness for casework DNA quantification. PMID:25603128

  4. Detection and Quantification of Neurotransmitters in Dialysates

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.; Denoroy, Luc

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive analytical methods are needed for the separation and quantification of neurotransmitters obtained in microdialysate studies. This unit describes methods that permit quantification of nanomolar concentrations of monoamines and their metabolites (high-pressure liquid chromatography electrochemical detection), acetylcholine (HPLC-coupled to an enzyme reactor), and amino acids (HPLC-fluorescence detection; capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection). PMID:19575473

  5. Jugular venous overflow of noradrenaline from the brain: a neurochemical indicator of cerebrovascular sympathetic nerve activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David A; Lambert, Gavin; Secher, Niels H; Raven, Peter B; van Lieshout, Johannes; Esler, Murray D

    2009-06-01

    A novel neurochemical method was applied for studying the activity of sympathetic nerves in the human cerebral vascular system. The aim was to investigate whether noradrenaline plasma kinetic measurements made with internal jugular venous sampling reflect cerebrovascular sympathetic activity. A database was assembled of fifty-six healthy subjects in whom total body noradrenaline spillover (indicative of whole body sympathetic nervous activity), brain noradrenaline spillover and brain lipophlic noradrenaline metabolite (3,4-dihydroxyphenolglycol (DHPG) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG)) overflow rates were measured. These measurements were also made following ganglion blockade (trimethaphan, n = 6), central sympathetic inhibition (clonidine, n = 4) and neuronal noradrenaline uptake blockade (desipramine, n = 13) and in a group of patients (n = 9) with pure autonomic failure (PAF). The mean brain noradrenline spillover and brain noradrenaline metabolite overflow in healthy subjects were 12.5 +/- 1.8, and 186.4 +/- 25 ng min(-1), respectively, with unilateral jugular venous sampling for both. Total body noradrenaline spillover was 605.8 ng min(-1) +/- 34.4 ng min(-1). As expected, trimethaphan infusion lowered brain noradrenaline spillover (P = 0.03), but perhaps surprisingly increased jugular overflow of brain metabolites (P = 0.01). Suppression of sympathetic nervous outflow with clonidine lowered brain noradrenaline spillover (P = 0.004), without changing brain metabolite overflow (P = 0.3). Neuronal noradrenaline uptake block with desipramine lowered the transcranial plasma extraction of tritiated noradrenaline (P = 0.001). The PAF patients had 77% lower brain noradrenaline spillover than healthy recruits (P = 0.06), indicating that in them sympathetic nerve degeneration extended to the cerebral circulation, but metabolites overflow was similar to healthy subjects (P = 0.3). The invariable discordance between noradrenline spillover and noradrenaline

  6. A quantitative study of neurochemically defined excitatory interneuron populations in laminae I–III of the mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Furuta, Takahiro; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Excitatory interneurons account for the majority of neurons in laminae I–III, but their functions are poorly understood. Several neurochemical markers are largely restricted to excitatory interneuron populations, but we have limited knowledge about the size of these populations or their overlap. The present study was designed to investigate this issue by quantifying the neuronal populations that express somatostatin (SST), neurokinin B (NKB), neurotensin, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and the γ isoform of protein kinase C (PKCγ), and assessing the extent to which they overlapped. Since it has been reported that calretinin- and SST-expressing cells have different functions, we also looked for co-localisation of calretinin and SST. Results SST, preprotachykinin B (PPTB, the precursor of NKB), neurotensin, PKCγ or calretinin were detected with antibodies, while cells expressing GRP were identified in a mouse line (GRP-EGFP) in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was expressed under control of the GRP promoter. We found that SST-, neurotensin-, PPTB- and PKCγ-expressing cells accounted for 44%, 7%, 12% and 21% of the neurons in laminae I–II, and 16%, 8%, 4% and 14% of those in lamina III, respectively. GRP-EGFP cells made up 11% of the neuronal population in laminae I–II. The neurotensin, PPTB and GRP-EGFP populations showed very limited overlap, and we estimate that between them they account for ∼40% of the excitatory interneurons in laminae I–II. SST which is expressed by ∼60% of excitatory interneurons in this region, was found in each of these populations, as well as in cells that did not express any of the other peptides. Neurotensin and PPTB were often found in cells with PKCγ, and between them, constituted around 60% of the PKCγ cells. Surprisingly, we found extensive co-localisation of SST and calretinin. Conclusions These results suggest that cells expressing neurotensin, NKB or GRP form largely non-overlapping sets

  7. Neurochemical Changes in the Mouse Hippocampus Underlying the Antidepressant Effect of Genetic Deletion of P2X7 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Csölle, Cecilia; Baranyi, Mária; Zsilla, Gabriella; Kittel, Agnes; Gölöncsér, Flóra; Illes, Peter; Papp, Edit; Vizi, E Sylvester; Sperlágh, Beáta

    2013-01-01

    Recent investigations have revealed that the genetic deletion of P2X7 receptors (P2rx7) results in an antidepressant phenotype in mice. However, the link between the deficiency of P2rx7 and changes in behavior has not yet been explored. In the present study, we studied the effect of genetic deletion of P2rx7 on neurochemical changes in the hippocampus that might underlie the antidepressant phenotype. P2X7 receptor deficient mice (P2rx7-/-) displayed decreased immobility in the tail suspension test (TST) and an attenuated anhedonia response in the sucrose preference test (SPT) following bacterial endotoxin (LPS) challenge. The attenuated anhedonia was reproduced through systemic treatments with P2rx7 antagonists. The activation of P2rx7 resulted in the concentration-dependent release of [(3)H]glutamate in P2rx7+/+ but not P2rx7-/- mice, and the NR2B subunit mRNA and protein was upregulated in the hippocampus of P2rx7-/- mice. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression was higher in saline but not LPS-treated P2rx7-/- mice; the P2rx7 antagonist Brilliant blue G elevated and the P2rx7 agonist benzoylbenzoyl ATP (BzATP) reduced BDNF level. This effect was dependent on the activation of NMDA and non-NMDA receptors but not on Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1,5). An increased 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation was also observed in the dentate gyrus derived from P2rx7-/- mice. Basal level of 5-HT was increased, whereas the 5HIAA/5-HT ratio was lower in the hippocampus of P2rx7-/- mice, which accompanied the increased uptake of [(3)H]5-HT and an elevated number of [(3)H]citalopram binding sites. The LPS-induced elevation of 5-HT level was absent in P2rx7-/- mice. In conclusion there are several potential mechanisms for the antidepressant phenotype of P2rx7-/- mice, such as the absence of P2rx7-mediated glutamate release, elevated basal BDNF production, enhanced neurogenesis and increased 5-HT bioavailability in the hippocampus.

  8. In ovo exposure to organophosphorous flame retardants: survival, development, neurochemical, and behavioral changes in white leghorn chickens.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Mark; Rutkiewicz, Jennifer; Mittal, Krittika; Fernie, Kimberly; Basu, Niladri

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphorous flame retardants (OPFRs) are contaminants of emerging concern. There is growing evidence of environmental contamination and exposures to both humans and wildlife. Here, the objective was to increase understanding of the potential neurodevelopmental effects of two relevant OPFRs, TMPP (tri (methylphenyl) phosphate; a non-halogen-containing OPFR) and TDCIPP (tris (1,3-dichloro-isopropyl) phosphate; a halogen-containing OPFR) in an avian embryo/chick model. We injected white leghorn chicken eggs with a range of TMPP (0, 10, 100, and 1000 ng/g) or TDCIPP (0, 10, 100, 1000, 50,000 ng/g) concentrations at incubation day 0 exposing embryos throughout the ~21-day in ovo period. Hatching success was unaffected by TMPP, but TDCIPP-exposed chicks had higher early-incubation mortality in 100 and 50,000 ng/g groups. On 7-9-day-old chicks, we assessed behavior via tests concerning righting reflex, angled balance beams, gait patterns, wing flap reflex, and open field movements. Chicks exposed to 100 ng/g TDCIPP achieved 40% lower maximum velocity in the open field test than vehicle-exposed controls, while those exposed to 1000 ng/g TDCIPP achieved 20% higher maximum velocity than vehicle-exposed controls. Chicks exposed to 50,000 ng/g TDCIPP showed reduced righting response success. There were no dose- or treatment-related differences in angled beam, gait analysis, or wing flap reflex tests. Cerebrum hemispheres from 10-day-old chicks were examined for neurochemistry (acetylcholinesterase [AChE] activity and both nicotinic [nACh] and muscarinic [mACh] acetylcholine receptor levels) and cerebellums were examined for histopathology. TDCIPP-exposed chicks had reduced number of degenerate Purkinje cells (TDCIPP, 1000 ng/g), possibly indicating disruption of neurodevelopment. No neurochemical effects were found in TMPP- or TDCIPP-exposed chicks. In general this study shows some possible neurodevelopmental effects in chicks exposed to TDCIPP when levels greatly

  9. In ovo exposure to organophosphorous flame retardants: survival, development, neurochemical, and behavioral changes in white leghorn chickens.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Mark; Rutkiewicz, Jennifer; Mittal, Krittika; Fernie, Kimberly; Basu, Niladri

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphorous flame retardants (OPFRs) are contaminants of emerging concern. There is growing evidence of environmental contamination and exposures to both humans and wildlife. Here, the objective was to increase understanding of the potential neurodevelopmental effects of two relevant OPFRs, TMPP (tri (methylphenyl) phosphate; a non-halogen-containing OPFR) and TDCIPP (tris (1,3-dichloro-isopropyl) phosphate; a halogen-containing OPFR) in an avian embryo/chick model. We injected white leghorn chicken eggs with a range of TMPP (0, 10, 100, and 1000 ng/g) or TDCIPP (0, 10, 100, 1000, 50,000 ng/g) concentrations at incubation day 0 exposing embryos throughout the ~21-day in ovo period. Hatching success was unaffected by TMPP, but TDCIPP-exposed chicks had higher early-incubation mortality in 100 and 50,000 ng/g groups. On 7-9-day-old chicks, we assessed behavior via tests concerning righting reflex, angled balance beams, gait patterns, wing flap reflex, and open field movements. Chicks exposed to 100 ng/g TDCIPP achieved 40% lower maximum velocity in the open field test than vehicle-exposed controls, while those exposed to 1000 ng/g TDCIPP achieved 20% higher maximum velocity than vehicle-exposed controls. Chicks exposed to 50,000 ng/g TDCIPP showed reduced righting response success. There were no dose- or treatment-related differences in angled beam, gait analysis, or wing flap reflex tests. Cerebrum hemispheres from 10-day-old chicks were examined for neurochemistry (acetylcholinesterase [AChE] activity and both nicotinic [nACh] and muscarinic [mACh] acetylcholine receptor levels) and cerebellums were examined for histopathology. TDCIPP-exposed chicks had reduced number of degenerate Purkinje cells (TDCIPP, 1000 ng/g), possibly indicating disruption of neurodevelopment. No neurochemical effects were found in TMPP- or TDCIPP-exposed chicks. In general this study shows some possible neurodevelopmental effects in chicks exposed to TDCIPP when levels greatly

  10. Species, Sex and Individual Differences in the Vasotocin/Vasopressin System: Relationship to Neurochemical Signaling in the Social Behavior Neural Network

    PubMed Central

    Albers, H. Elliott

    2014-01-01

    Arginine-vasotocin(AVT)/arginine vasopressin (AVP) are members of the AVP/oxytocin (OT) superfamily of peptides that are involved in the regulation of social behavior, social cognition and emotion. Comparative studies have revealed that AVT/AVP and their receptors are found throughout the “Social Behavior Neural Network” and display the properties expected from a signaling system that controls social behavior (i.e., species, sex and individual differences and modulation by gonadal hormones and social factors). Neurochemical signaling within the SBNN likely involves a complex combination of synaptic mechanisms that co-release multiple chemical signals (e.g., classical neurotransmitters and AVT/AVP as well as other peptides) and non-synaptic mechanisms (i.e., volume transmission). Crosstalk between AVP/OT peptides and receptors within the SBNN is likely. A better understanding of the functional properties of neurochemical signaling in the SBNN will allow for a more refined examination of the relationships between this peptide system and species, sex and individual differences in sociality. PMID:25102443

  11. Repeated exposure of adult rats to Aroclor 1254 induces neuronal injury and impairs the neurochemical manifestations of the NMDA receptor-mediated intracellular signaling in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hilgier, Wojciech; Łazarewicz, Jerzy W; Strużynska, Lidia; Frontczak-Baniewicz, Małgorzata; Albrecht, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Aroclor 1254 is a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a class of environmental toxins which cause a wide spectrum of neurotoxic effects. Learning and memory deficits are the profound effects of PCBs which may be related to hippocampal dysfunction. To get insight into the underlying neurochemical mechanisms, we employed the microdialysis technique to investigate the effect of repeated exposure of adult male Wistar rats to Aroclor 1254 (10mg/kg b.w., daily, ig., for 14days), on the neurochemical parameters of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus in vivo assessed using the microdialysis technique. The results demonstrated that exposure to Aroclor 1254, which was associated with substantial neuronal damage and loss in the hippocampus, markedly decreased the NMDA-induced extracellular accumulation of newly loaded (45)CaCl(2), cGMP and glutamate, and reduced the basal content of the NO precursor, arginine, indicating inhibition of the NMDA/NO/cGMP pathway. Aroclor 1254 exposure also decreased the basal microdialysate content of glutamate and glutamine, which may cause inadequate supply of the neurotransmitter glutamate, while the level of two other neuroactive amino acids, aspartate or taurine was not affected by the exposure. The results underscore neuronal lesion and inhibition of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic signaling in hippocampus as a potential major contributor to the cognitive deficits associated with exposure to PCB.

  12. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and the regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways: a revolving neurochemical axis for therapeutic intervention?

    PubMed

    Haddad, John J

    2005-11-01

    Excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS) is mediated by the release of glutamate from presynaptic terminals onto postsynaptic channels gated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA (AMPA and KA) receptors. Extracellular signals control diverse neuronal functions and are responsible for mediating activity-dependent changes in synaptic strength and neuronal survival. Influx of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](e)) through the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) is required for neuronal activity to change the strength of many synapses. At the molecular level, the NMDAR interacts with signaling modules, which, like the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) superfamily, transduce excitatory signals across neurons. Recent burgeoning evidence points to the fact that MAPKs play a crucial role in regulating the neurochemistry of NMDARs, their physiologic and biochemical/biophysical properties, and their potential role in pathophysiology. It is the purpose of this review to discuss: (i) the MAPKs and their role in a plethora of cellular functions; (ii) the role of MAPKs in regulating the biochemistry and physiology of NMDA receptors; (iii) the kinetics of MAPK-NMDA interactions and their biologic and neurochemical properties; (iv) how cellular signaling pathways, related cofactors and intracellular conditions affect NMDA-MAPK interactions and (v) the role of NMDA-MAPK pathways in pathophysiology and the evolution of disease conditions. Given the versatility of the NMDA-MAPK interactions, the NMDA-MAPK axis will likely form a neurochemical target for therapeutic interventions.

  13. Anti-depressant like effect of curcumin and its combination with piperine in unpredictable chronic stress-induced behavioral, biochemical and neurochemical changes.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Mohit Kumar; Bishnoi, Mahendra; Kulkarni, Shrinivas K

    2009-03-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment extracted from rhizomes of the plant Curcuma longa (turmeric), has been widely used as food additive and also as a herbal medicine throughout Asia. The present study was designed to study the pharmacological, biochemical and neurochemical effects of daily administration of curcumin to rats subjected to chronic unpredictable stress. Curcumin treatment (20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days) significantly reversed the chronic unpredictable stress-induced behavioral (increase immobility period), biochemical (increase monoamine oxidase activity) and neurochemical (depletion of brain monoamine levels) alterations. The combination of piperine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days), a bioavailability enhancer, with curcumin (20 and 40 mg/kg, i.p., 21 days) showed significant potentiation of its anti-immobility, neurotransmitter enhancing (serotonin and dopamine) and monoamine oxidase inhibitory (MAO-A) effects as compared to curcumin effect per se. This study provided a scientific rationale for the use of curcumin and its co-administration with piperine in the treatment of depressive disorders.

  14. Species, sex and individual differences in the vasotocin/vasopressin system: relationship to neurochemical signaling in the social behavior neural network.

    PubMed

    Albers, H Elliott

    2015-01-01

    Arginine-vasotocin (AVT)/arginine vasopressin (AVP) are members of the AVP/oxytocin (OT) superfamily of peptides that are involved in the regulation of social behavior, social cognition and emotion. Comparative studies have revealed that AVT/AVP and their receptors are found throughout the "social behavior neural network (SBNN)" and display the properties expected from a signaling system that controls social behavior (i.e., species, sex and individual differences and modulation by gonadal hormones and social factors). Neurochemical signaling within the SBNN likely involves a complex combination of synaptic mechanisms that co-release multiple chemical signals (e.g., classical neurotransmitters and AVT/AVP as well as other peptides) and non-synaptic mechanisms (i.e., volume transmission). Crosstalk between AVP/OT peptides and receptors within the SBNN is likely. A better understanding of the functional properties of neurochemical signaling in the SBNN will allow for a more refined examination of the relationships between this peptide system and species, sex and individual differences in sociality.

  15. Dysregulation of brain reward systems in eating disorders: neurochemical information from animal models of binge eating, bulimia nervosa, and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Avena, Nicole M; Bocarsly, Miriam E

    2012-07-01

    Food intake is mediated, in part, through brain pathways for motivation and reinforcement. Dysregulation of these pathways may underlay some of the behaviors exhibited by patients with eating disorders. Research using animal models of eating disorders has greatly contributed to the detailed study of potential brain mechanisms that many underlie the causes or consequences of aberrant eating behaviors. This review focuses on neurochemical evidence of reward-related brain dysfunctions obtained through animal models of binge eating, bulimia nervosa, or anorexia nervosa. The findings suggest that alterations in dopamine (DA), acetylcholine (ACh) and opioid systems in reward-related brain areas occur in response to binge eating of palatable foods. Moreover, animal models of bulimia nervosa suggest that while bingeing on palatable food releases DA, purging attenuates the release of ACh that might otherwise signal satiety. Animal models of anorexia nervosa suggest that restricted access to food enhances the reinforcing effects of DA when the animal does eat. The activity-based anorexia model suggests alterations in mesolimbic DA and serotonin occur as a result of restricted eating coupled with excessive wheel running. These findings with animal models complement data obtained through neuroimaging and pharmacotherapy studies of clinical populations. Information on the neurochemical consequences of the behaviors associated with these eating disorders will be useful in understanding these complex disorders and may inform future therapeutic approaches, as discussed here. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central Control of Food Intake'.

  16. Neurochemical Plasticity of the Coeliac-Superior Mesenteric Ganglion Complex Neurons Projecting to the Prepyloric Area of the Porcine Stomach following Hyperacidity.

    PubMed

    Palus, Katarzyna; Całka, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine neurochemical properties of the coeliac-superior mesenteric ganglion (CSMG) neurons supplying the prepyloric area of the porcine stomach in physiological state and following experimentally induced hyperacidity. To localize sympathetic neurons innervating the studied area of stomach, the neuronal retrograde tracer Fast Blue (FB) was applied to control animals and hydrochloric acid infusion (HCl) groups. After 23 days, animals of the HCl group were reintroduced into a state of general anesthesia and intragastrically given 5 mL/kg of body weight of 0.25 M aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid. On the 28th day, all animals were sacrificed. The CSMG complexes were then collected and processed for double-labeling immunofluorescence. In the control animals, FB-positive perikarya displayed immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and galanin (GAL). Experimentally induced gastric hyperacidity changed the neurochemical phenotype of the studied neurons. An upregulated expression of GAL and NPY and the de novo synthesis of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and leu5-enkephalin (LENK) as well as downregulated expression of TH and DβH in the stomach-projecting neurons were observed. These findings enrich existing knowledge about the participation of these active substances in adaptive mechanism(s) of the sympathetic neurons during pathological processes within the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27293908

  17. Neurochemical Plasticity of the Coeliac-Superior Mesenteric Ganglion Complex Neurons Projecting to the Prepyloric Area of the Porcine Stomach following Hyperacidity

    PubMed Central

    Całka, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine neurochemical properties of the coeliac-superior mesenteric ganglion (CSMG) neurons supplying the prepyloric area of the porcine stomach in physiological state and following experimentally induced hyperacidity. To localize sympathetic neurons innervating the studied area of stomach, the neuronal retrograde tracer Fast Blue (FB) was applied to control animals and hydrochloric acid infusion (HCl) groups. After 23 days, animals of the HCl group were reintroduced into a state of general anesthesia and intragastrically given 5 mL/kg of body weight of 0.25 M aqueous solution of hydrochloric acid. On the 28th day, all animals were sacrificed. The CSMG complexes were then collected and processed for double-labeling immunofluorescence. In the control animals, FB-positive perikarya displayed immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and galanin (GAL). Experimentally induced gastric hyperacidity changed the neurochemical phenotype of the studied neurons. An upregulated expression of GAL and NPY and the de novo synthesis of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and leu5-enkephalin (LENK) as well as downregulated expression of TH and DβH in the stomach-projecting neurons were observed. These findings enrich existing knowledge about the participation of these active substances in adaptive mechanism(s) of the sympathetic neurons during pathological processes within the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27293908

  18. Progressive damage state evolution and quantification in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Subir; Banerjee, Sourav

    2016-04-01

    Precursor damage state quantification can be helpful for safety and operation of aircraft and defense equipment's. Damage develops in the composite material in the form of matrix cracking, fiber breakages and deboning, etc. However, detection and quantification of the damage modes at their very early stage is not possible unless modifications of the existing indispensable techniques are conceived, particularly for the quantification of multiscale damages at their early stage. Here, we present a novel nonlocal mechanics based damage detection technique for precursor damage state quantification. Micro-continuum physics is used by modifying the Christoffel equation. American society of testing and materials (ASTM) standard woven carbon fiber (CFRP) specimens were tested under Tension-Tension fatigue loading at the interval of 25,000 cycles until 500,000 cycles. Scanning Acoustic Microcopy (SAM) and Optical Microscopy (OM) were used to examine the damage development at the same interval. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) velocity profile on a representative volume element (RVE) of the specimen were calculated at the regular interval of 50,000 cycles. Nonlocal parameters were calculated form the micromorphic wave dispersion curve at a particular frequency of 50 MHz. We used a previously formulated parameter called "Damage entropy" which is a measure of the damage growth in the material calculated with the loading cycle. Damage entropy (DE) was calculated at every pixel on the RVE and the mean of DE was plotted at the loading interval of 25,000 cycle. Growth of DE with fatigue loading cycles was observed. Optical Imaging also performed at the interval of 25,000 cycles to investigate the development of damage inside the materials. We also calculated the mean value of the Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) velocity and plotted with fatigue cycle which is correlated further with Damage Entropy (DE). Statistical analysis of the Surface Acoustic Wave profile (SAW) obtained at different

  19. Processing and domain selection: Quantificational variability effects

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jesse A.; Clifton, Charles; Frazier, Lyn

    2014-01-01

    Three studies investigated how readers interpret sentences with variable quantificational domains, e.g., The army was mostly in the capital, where mostly may quantify over individuals or parts (Most of the army was in the capital) or over times (The army was in the capital most of the time). It is proposed that a general conceptual economy principle, No Extra Times (Majewski 2006, in preparation), discourages the postulation of potentially unnecessary times, and thus favors the interpretation quantifying over parts. Disambiguating an ambiguously quantified sentence to a quantification over times interpretation was rated as less natural than disambiguating it to a quantification over parts interpretation (Experiment 1). In an interpretation questionnaire, sentences with similar quantificational variability were constructed so that both interpretations of the sentence would require postulating multiple times; this resulted in the elimination of the preference for a quantification over parts interpretation, suggesting the parts preference observed in Experiment 1 is not reducible to a lexical bias of the adverb mostly (Experiment 2). An eye movement recording study showed that, in the absence of prior evidence for multiple times, readers exhibit greater difficulty when reading material that forces a quantification over times interpretation than when reading material that allows a quantification over parts interpretation (Experiment 3). These experiments contribute to understanding readers’ default assumptions about the temporal properties of sentences, which is essential for understanding the selection of a domain for adverbial quantifiers and, more generally, for understanding how situational constraints influence sentence processing. PMID:25328262

  20. Advancing agricultural greenhouse gas quantification*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olander, Lydia; Wollenberg, Eva; Tubiello, Francesco; Herold, Martin

    2013-03-01

    1. Introduction Better information on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and mitigation potential in the agricultural sector is necessary to manage these emissions and identify responses that are consistent with the food security and economic development priorities of countries. Critical activity data (what crops or livestock are managed in what way) are poor or lacking for many agricultural systems, especially in developing countries. In addition, the currently available methods for quantifying emissions and mitigation are often too expensive or complex or not sufficiently user friendly for widespread use. The purpose of this focus issue is to capture the state of the art in quantifying greenhouse gases from agricultural systems, with the goal of better understanding our current capabilities and near-term potential for improvement, with particular attention to quantification issues relevant to smallholders in developing countries. This work is timely in light of international discussions and negotiations around how agriculture should be included in efforts to reduce and adapt to climate change impacts, and considering that significant climate financing to developing countries in post-2012 agreements may be linked to their increased ability to identify and report GHG emissions (Murphy et al 2010, CCAFS 2011, FAO 2011). 2. Agriculture and climate change mitigation The main agricultural GHGs—methane and nitrous oxide—account for 10%-12% of anthropogenic emissions globally (Smith et al 2008), or around 50% and 60% of total anthropogenic methane and nitrous oxide emissions, respectively, in 2005. Net carbon dioxide fluxes between agricultural land and the atmosphere linked to food production are relatively small, although significant carbon emissions are associated with degradation of organic soils for plantations in tropical regions (Smith et al 2007, FAO 2012). Population growth and shifts in dietary patterns toward more meat and dairy consumption will lead to

  1. Mass Spectrometric Quantification of N-Linked Glycans by Reference to Exogenous Standards.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Nickita; Porterfield, Mindy; Struwe, Weston B; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Rudd, Pauline M; Tiemeyer, Michael; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Environmental and metabolic processes shape the profile of glycoprotein glycans expressed by cells, whether in culture, developing tissues, or mature organisms. Quantitative characterization of glycomic changes associated with these conditions has been achieved historically by reductive coupling of oligosaccharides to various fluorophores following release from glycoprotein and subsequent HPLC or capillary electrophoretic separation. Such labeling-based approaches provide a robust means of quantifying glycan amount based on fluorescence yield. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, has generally been limited to relative quantification in which the contribution of the signal intensity for an individual glycan is expressed as a percent of the signal intensity summed over the total profile. Relative quantification has been valuable for highlighting changes in glycan expression between samples; sensitivity is high, and structural information can be derived by fragmentation. We have investigated whether MS-based glycomics is amenable to absolute quantification by referencing signal intensities to well-characterized oligosaccharide standards. We report the qualification of a set of N-linked oligosaccharide standards by NMR, HPLC, and MS. We also demonstrate the dynamic range, sensitivity, and recovery from complex biological matrices for these standards in their permethylated form. Our results indicate that absolute quantification for MS-based glycomic analysis is reproducible and robust utilizing currently available glycan standards. PMID:27432553

  2. A sensitive and selective quantification of catecholamine neurotransmitters in rat microdialysates by pre-column dansyl chloride derivatization using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nirogi, Ramakrishna; Komarneni, Prashanth; Kandikere, Vishwottam; Boggavarapu, Rajeshkumar; Bhyrapuneni, Gopinadh; Benade, Vijay; Gorentla, Srinivasarao

    2013-01-15

    A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous quantification of catecholamine neurotransmitters in microdialysates was developed. The catecholamine neurotransmitters dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) were pre-column derivatized with dansyl chloride and analyzed. A gradient elution method was used to separate the analytes from the interferences on an Agilent Poroshell 120 EC-C18 outer porous micro particulate column. The method was robust and sensitive to determine with the lower limit of quantification value of 0.068pmol/mL and 0.059pmol/mL for DA and NE, respectively. It has acceptable precision and accuracy for concentrations over the standard curve range. The method was successfully applied for simultaneous quantitation of DA and NE in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) dialysates of rats obtained from a microdialysis study dosed with vehicle and atomoxetine through intra peritoneal (i.p.) route at a dose of 3mg/kg to monitor the change in extracellular concentrations. Thus, accomplishment of this method would facilitate the neurochemical monitoring for discovery of new chemical entities targeted for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). PMID:23270937

  3. The NASA Langley Multidisciplinary Uncertainty Quantification Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the formulation of an uncertainty quantification challenge problem consisting of five subproblems. These problems focus on key aspects of uncertainty characterization, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty propagation, extreme-case analysis, and robust design.

  4. Direct qPCR quantification using the Quantifiler(®) Trio DNA quantification kit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jason Yingjie

    2014-11-01

    The effectiveness of a direct quantification assay is essential to the adoption of the combined direct quantification/direct STR workflow. In this paper, the feasibility of using the Quantifiler(®) Trio DNA quantification kit for the direct quantification of forensic casework samples was investigated. Both low-level touch DNA samples and blood samples were collected on PE swabs and quantified directly. The increased sensitivity of the Quantifiler(®) Trio kit enabled the detection of less than 10pg of DNA in unprocessed touch samples and also minimizes the stochastic effect experienced by different targets in the same sample. The DNA quantity information obtained from a direct quantification assay using the Quantifiler(®) Trio kit can also be used to accurately estimate the optimal input DNA quantity for a direct STR amplification reaction. The correlation between the direct quantification results (Quantifiler(®) Trio kit) and the direct STR results (GlobalFiler™ PCR amplification kit(*)) for low-level touch DNA samples indicates that direct quantification using the Quantifiler(®) Trio DNA quantification kit is more reliable than the Quantifiler(®) Duo DNA quantification kit for predicting the STR results of unprocessed touch DNA samples containing less than 10pg of DNA.

  5. MAMA Software Features: Visual Examples of Quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Christy E.; Porter, Reid B.

    2014-05-20

    This document shows examples of the results from quantifying objects of certain sizes and types in the software. It is intended to give users a better feel for some of the quantification calculations, and, more importantly, to help users understand the challenges with using a small set of ‘shape’ quantification calculations for objects that can vary widely in shapes and features. We will add more examples to this in the coming year.

  6. Quantification of gap junction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ek-Vitorín, Jose F; Burt, Janis M

    2005-12-01

    Gap junctions, which are essential for functional coordination and homeostasis within tissues, permit the direct intercellular exchange of small molecules. The abundance and diversity of this exchange depends on the number and selectivity of the comprising channels and on the transjunctional gradient for and chemical character of the permeant molecules. Limited knowledge of functionally significant permeants and poor detectability of those few that are known have made it difficult to define channel selectivity. Presented herein is a multifaceted approach to the quantification of gap junction selectivity that includes determination of the rate constant for intercellular diffusion of a fluorescent probe (k2-DYE) and junctional conductance (gj) for each junction studied, such that the selective permeability (k2-DYE/gj) for dyes with differing chemical characteristics or junctions with differing connexin (Cx) compositions (or treatment conditions) can be compared. In addition, selective permeability can be correlated using single-channel conductance when this parameter is also measured. Our measurement strategy is capable of detecting 1) rate constants and selective permeabilities that differ across three orders of magnitude and 2) acute changes in that rate constant. Using this strategy, we have shown that 1) the selective permeability of Cx43 junctions to a small cationic dye varied across two orders of magnitude, consistent with the hypothesis that the various channel configurations adopted by Cx43 display different selective permeabilities; and 2) the selective permeability of Cx37 vs. Cx43 junctions was consistently and significantly lower. PMID:16093281

  7. Stirling Convertor Fasteners Reliability Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Korovaichuk, Igor; Kovacevich, Tiodor; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    Onboard Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) being developed for NASA s deep-space science and exploration missions require reliable operation for up to 14 years and beyond. Stirling power conversion is a candidate for use in an RPS because it offers a multifold increase in the conversion efficiency of heat to electric power and reduced inventory of radioactive material. Structural fasteners are responsible to maintain structural integrity of the Stirling power convertor, which is critical to ensure reliable performance during the entire mission. Design of fasteners involve variables related to the fabrication, manufacturing, behavior of fasteners and joining parts material, structural geometry of the joining components, size and spacing of fasteners, mission loads, boundary conditions, etc. These variables have inherent uncertainties, which need to be accounted for in the reliability assessment. This paper describes these uncertainties along with a methodology to quantify the reliability, and provides results of the analysis in terms of quantified reliability and sensitivity of Stirling power conversion reliability to the design variables. Quantification of the reliability includes both structural and functional aspects of the joining components. Based on the results, the paper also describes guidelines to improve the reliability and verification testing.

  8. Pioneer Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Channa Beth

    1987-01-01

    Profiles Herbert A. Sweet, founder and director of Acorn Farms Day Camp (Indiana) for 44 years. Includes reminiscences about the camp's program, staffing, food, World War II, affiliation with the American Camping Association, and camps/directors of today. (NEC)

  9. Leadership Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teach, Beverly; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents profiles of two leaders in the field of educational media and technology: Carolyn Guss and Mendel Sherman, both retired professors from Indiana University's program in Information Systems Technology. (KRN)

  10. Brain region-specific perfluoroalkylated sulfonate (PFSA) and carboxylic acid (PFCA) accumulation and neurochemical biomarker responses in east Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Eggers Pedersen, Kathrine; Basu, Niladri; Letcher, Robert; Greaves, Alana K; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune; Styrishave, Bjarne

    2015-04-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) is a growing class of contaminants in the Arctic environment, and include the established perfluorinated sulfonates (PFSAs; especially perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)) and carboxylic acids (PFCAs). PFSAs and PFCAs of varying chain length have been reported to bioaccumulate in lipid rich tissues of the brain among other tissues such as liver, and can reach high concentrations in top predators including the polar bear. PFCA and PFSA bioaccummulation in the brain has the potential to pose neurotoxic effects and therefore we conducted a study to investigate if variations in neurochemical transmitter systems i.e. the cholinergic, glutaminergic, dopaminergic and GABAergic, could be related to brain-specific bioaccumulation of PFASs in East Greenland polar bears. Nine brain regions from nine polar bears were analyzed for enzyme activity (monoamine oxidase (MAO), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glutamine synthetase (GS)) and receptor density (dopamine-2 (D2), muscarinic cholinergic (mAChR) and gamma-butyric acid type A (GABA-A)) along with PFSA and PFCA concentrations. Average brain ∑PFSA concentration was 25ng/g ww where PFOS accounted for 91%. Average ∑PFCA concentration was 88ng/g ww where PFUnDA, PFDoDA and PFTrDA combined accounted for 79%. The highest concentrations of PFASs were measured in brain stem, cerebellum and hippocampus. Correlative analyses were performed both across and within brain regions. Significant positive correlations were found between PFASs and MAO activity in occipital lobe (e.g. ∑PFCA; rp=0.83, p=0.041, n=6) and across brain regions (e.g. ∑PFCA; rp=0.47, p=0.001, ∑PFSA; rp=0.44, p>0.001; n=50). GABA-A receptor density was positively correlated with two PFASs across brain regions (PFOS; rp=0.33, p=0.02 and PFDoDA; rp=0.34, p=0.014; n=52). Significant negative correlations were found between mAChR density and PFASs in cerebellum (e.g. ∑PFCA; rp=-0.95, p=0.013, n=5) and across brain regions (e.g.

  11. [The experimental development of the concept of O. S. Adrianov on the correlation of functional and neurochemical processes: regulatory peptides in mediator system dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Popova, N S; Dovedova, E L; Kachalova, L M; Gershteĭn, L M

    2000-01-01

    The article is devoted to commemoration of full member of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Oleg Andreevich Adrianov, who would have celebrated his 75-th anniversary in 1998. O. S. Adrianov, author of numerous works on physiology and morphology of central nervous system, in the recent years of his was studying the problem of the processes relationship at macro and micro levels of brain organization. Further to the concept created by O.S. Adrianov, data on action of two peptides: delta-sleep and tafcine, on behavior, neurophysiological and neurochemical processes have been consolidated. Experimental data were obtained for rabbits, cats, and dogs, both intact and in the state of pathology (psychomotoric excitement, bradykinesia, penicillin epilepsy). Impact of peptides on convergation processes is discussed: peptide of delta-sleep depresses reactions of brain structures to photo- and phono-stimulation, and activates the serotoninergic system in general; tafcine enforces the convergation processes and activates the dopaminergic system.

  12. Brain region-specific perfluoroalkylated sulfonate (PFSA) and carboxylic acid (PFCA) accumulation and neurochemical biomarker responses in east Greenland polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Eggers Pedersen, Kathrine; Basu, Niladri; Letcher, Robert; Greaves, Alana K; Sonne, Christian; Dietz, Rune; Styrishave, Bjarne

    2015-04-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) is a growing class of contaminants in the Arctic environment, and include the established perfluorinated sulfonates (PFSAs; especially perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)) and carboxylic acids (PFCAs). PFSAs and PFCAs of varying chain length have been reported to bioaccumulate in lipid rich tissues of the brain among other tissues such as liver, and can reach high concentrations in top predators including the polar bear. PFCA and PFSA bioaccummulation in the brain has the potential to pose neurotoxic effects and therefore we conducted a study to investigate if variations in neurochemical transmitter systems i.e. the cholinergic, glutaminergic, dopaminergic and GABAergic, could be related to brain-specific bioaccumulation of PFASs in East Greenland polar bears. Nine brain regions from nine polar bears were analyzed for enzyme activity (monoamine oxidase (MAO), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glutamine synthetase (GS)) and receptor density (dopamine-2 (D2), muscarinic cholinergic (mAChR) and gamma-butyric acid type A (GABA-A)) along with PFSA and PFCA concentrations. Average brain ∑PFSA concentration was 25ng/g ww where PFOS accounted for 91%. Average ∑PFCA concentration was 88ng/g ww where PFUnDA, PFDoDA and PFTrDA combined accounted for 79%. The highest concentrations of PFASs were measured in brain stem, cerebellum and hippocampus. Correlative analyses were performed both across and within brain regions. Significant positive correlations were found between PFASs and MAO activity in occipital lobe (e.g. ∑PFCA; rp=0.83, p=0.041, n=6) and across brain regions (e.g. ∑PFCA; rp=0.47, p=0.001, ∑PFSA; rp=0.44, p>0.001; n=50). GABA-A receptor density was positively correlated with two PFASs across brain regions (PFOS; rp=0.33, p=0.02 and PFDoDA; rp=0.34, p=0.014; n=52). Significant negative correlations were found between mAChR density and PFASs in cerebellum (e.g. ∑PFCA; rp=-0.95, p=0.013, n=5) and across brain regions (e.g.

  13. [Demographic and epidemiological quantification in Balearic hygienism, 1850-1930].

    PubMed

    Pujadas-Mora, Joana-Maria

    2012-01-01

    At the end of the 19th century, social medicine promoted the use of quantification as a means to evaluate the health status of populations. In Majorca, hygienists such as the physicians Enric Fajarnés, Bernat Riera, Antoni Mayol and Emili Darder and the civil engineer Eusebi Estada sought a better understanding of health status by considering the population growth, the demographic and epidemiological profile and the influence of weather on mortality. These calculations showed that the Balearic population had a good health status in comparison to the population of mainland Spain, although less so in the international context. These results were explained by the benevolence of the insular climate, a factor that would also guarantee the success of the public health reforms proposed.

  14. Neurochemical and electrophysiological deficits in the ventral hippocampus and selective behavioral alterations caused by high-fat diet in female C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Krishna, S; Keralapurath, M M; Lin, Z; Wagner, J J; de La Serre, C B; Harn, D A; Filipov, N M

    2015-06-25

    Mounting experimental evidence, predominantly from male rodents, demonstrates that high-fat diet (HFD) consumption and ensuing obesity are detrimental to the brain. To shed additional light on the neurological consequences of HFD consumption in female rodents and to determine the relatively early impact of HFD in the likely continuum of neurological dysfunction in the context of chronic HFD intake, this study investigated effects of HFD feeding for up to 12weeks on selected behavioral, neurochemical, and electrophysiological parameters in adult female C57BL/6 mice; particular focus was placed on the ventral hippocampus (vHIP). Selected locomotor, emotional and cognitive functions were evaluated using behavioral tests after 5weeks on HFD or control (low-fat diet) diets. One week later, mice were sacrificed and brain regional neurochemical (monoamine) analysis was performed. Behaviorally naïve mice were maintained on their respective diets for an additional 5-6weeks at which time synaptic plasticity was determined in ex vivo slices from the vHIP. HFD-fed female mice exhibited increased: (i) locomotor activity in the open field testing, (ii) mean turn time on the pole test, (iii) swimming time in the forced swim test, and (iv) number of marbles buried in the marble burying test. In contrast, the novel object recognition memory was unaffected. Mice on HFD also had decreased norepinephrine and dopamine turnover, respectively, in the prefrontal cortex and the vHIP. HFD consumption for a total of 11-12weeks altered vHIP synaptic plasticity, evidenced by significant reductions in the paired-pulse ratio and long-term potentiation (LTP) magnitude. In summary, in female mice, HFD intake for several weeks induced multiple behavioral alterations of mainly anxiety-like nature and impaired monoamine pathways in a brain region-specific manner, suggesting that in the female, certain behavioral domains (anxiety) and associated brain regions, i.e., the vHIP, are preferentially

  15. Chronic marijuana smoke exposure in the rhesus monkey. IV: Neurochemical effects and comparison to acute and chronic exposure to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, S F; Newport, G D; Scallet, A C; Paule, M G; Bailey, J R; Slikker, W

    1991-11-01

    THC is the major psychoactive constituent of marijuana and is known to produce psychopharmacological effects in humans. These studies were designed to determine whether acute or chronic exposure to marijuana smoke or THC produces in vitro or in vivo neurochemical alterations in rat or monkey brain. For the in vitro study, THC was added (1-100 nM) to membranes prepared from different regions of the rat brain and muscarinic cholinergic (MCh) receptor binding was measured. For the acute in vivo study, rats were injected IP with vehicle, 1, 3, 10, or 30 mg THC/kg and sacrificed 2 h later. For the chronic study, rats were gavaged with vehicle or 10 or 20 mg THC/kg daily, 5 days/week for 90 days and sacrificed either 24 h or 2 months later. Rhesus monkeys were exposed to the smoke of a single 2.6% THC cigarette once a day, 2 or 7 days a week for 1 year. Approximately 7 months after the last exposure, animals were sacrificed by overdose with pentobarbital for neurochemical analyses. In vitro exposure to THC produced a dose-dependent inhibition of MCh receptor binding in several brain areas. This inhibition of MCh receptor binding, however, was also observed with two other nonpsychoactive derivatives of marijuana, cannabidiol and cannabinol. In the rat in vivo study, we found no significant changes in MCh or other neurotransmitter receptor binding in hippocampus, frontal cortex or caudate nucleus after acute or chronic exposure to THC. In the monkey brain, we found no alterations in the concentration of neurotransmitters in caudate nucleus, frontal cortex, hypothalamus or brain stem.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Unique Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects Induced by Repeated Adolescent Consumption of Caffeine-Mixed Alcohol in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Robins, Meridith T.; Lu, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The number of highly caffeinated products has increased dramatically in the past few years. Among these products, highly caffeinated energy drinks are the most heavily advertised and purchased, which has resulted in increased incidences of co-consumption of energy drinks with alcohol. Despite the growing number of adolescents and young adults reporting caffeine-mixed alcohol use, knowledge of the potential consequences associated with co-consumption has been limited to survey-based results and in-laboratory human behavioral testing. Here, we investigate the effect of repeated adolescent (post-natal days P35-61) exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol in C57BL/6 mice on common drug-related behaviors such as locomotor sensitivity, drug reward and cross-sensitivity, and natural reward. To determine changes in neurological activity resulting from adolescent exposure, we monitored changes in expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the dopaminergic reward pathway as a sign of long-term increases in neuronal activity. Repeated adolescent exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure induced significant locomotor sensitization, desensitized cocaine conditioned place preference, decreased cocaine locomotor cross-sensitivity, and increased natural reward consumption. We also observed increased accumulation of ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens following repeated adolescent caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure compared to alcohol or caffeine alone. Using our exposure model, we found that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence causes unique behavioral and neurochemical effects not observed in mice exposed to caffeine or alcohol alone. Based on similar findings for different substances of abuse, it is possible that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence could potentially alter or escalate future substance abuse as means to compensate for these behavioral and neurochemical alterations. PMID:27380261

  17. The misfolded pro-inflammatory protein S100A9 disrupts memory via neurochemical remodelling instigating an Alzheimer's disease-like cognitive deficit.

    PubMed

    Gruden, Marina A; Davydova, Tatiana V; Wang, Chao; Narkevich, Victor B; Fomina, Valentina G; Kudrin, Vladimir S; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A; Sewell, Robert D E

    2016-06-01

    Memory deficits may develop from a variety of neuropathologies including Alzheimer's disease dementia. During neurodegenerative conditions there are contributory factors such as neuroinflammation and amyloidogenesis involved in memory impairment. In the present study, dual properties of S100A9 protein as a pro-inflammatory and amyloidogenic agent were explored in the passive avoidance memory task along with neurochemical assays in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of aged mice. S100A9 oligomers and fibrils were generated in vitro and verified by AFM, Thioflavin T and A11 antibody binding. Native S100A9 as well as S100A9 oligomers and fibrils or their combination were administered intranasally over 14 days followed by behavioral and neurochemical analysis. Both oligomers and fibrils evoked amnestic activity which correlated with disrupted prefrontal cortical and hippocampal dopaminergic neurochemistry. The oligomer-fibril combination produced similar but weaker neurochemistry to the fibrils administered alone but without passive avoidance amnesia. Native S100A9 did not modify memory task performance even though it generated a general and consistent decrease in monoamine levels (DA, 5-HT and NA) and increased metabolic marker ratios of DA and 5-HT turnover (DOPAC/DA, HVA/DA and 5-HIAA) in the prefrontal cortex. These results provide insight into a novel pathogenetic mechanism underlying amnesia in a fear-aggravated memory task based on amyloidogenesis of a pro-inflammatory factor leading to disrupted brain neurochemistry in the aged brain. The data further suggests that amyloid species of S100A9 create deleterious effects principally on the dopaminergic system and this novel finding might be potentially exploited during dementia management through a neuroprotective strategy.

  18. Unique Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects Induced by Repeated Adolescent Consumption of Caffeine-Mixed Alcohol in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Robins, Meridith T; Lu, Julie; van Rijn, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    The number of highly caffeinated products has increased dramatically in the past few years. Among these products, highly caffeinated energy drinks are the most heavily advertised and purchased, which has resulted in increased incidences of co-consumption of energy drinks with alcohol. Despite the growing number of adolescents and young adults reporting caffeine-mixed alcohol use, knowledge of the potential consequences associated with co-consumption has been limited to survey-based results and in-laboratory human behavioral testing. Here, we investigate the effect of repeated adolescent (post-natal days P35-61) exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol in C57BL/6 mice on common drug-related behaviors such as locomotor sensitivity, drug reward and cross-sensitivity, and natural reward. To determine changes in neurological activity resulting from adolescent exposure, we monitored changes in expression of the transcription factor ΔFosB in the dopaminergic reward pathway as a sign of long-term increases in neuronal activity. Repeated adolescent exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure induced significant locomotor sensitization, desensitized cocaine conditioned place preference, decreased cocaine locomotor cross-sensitivity, and increased natural reward consumption. We also observed increased accumulation of ΔFosB in the nucleus accumbens following repeated adolescent caffeine-mixed alcohol exposure compared to alcohol or caffeine alone. Using our exposure model, we found that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence causes unique behavioral and neurochemical effects not observed in mice exposed to caffeine or alcohol alone. Based on similar findings for different substances of abuse, it is possible that repeated exposure to caffeine-mixed alcohol during adolescence could potentially alter or escalate future substance abuse as means to compensate for these behavioral and neurochemical alterations. PMID:27380261

  19. Synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and its halogenated derivatives JWH-018-Cl and JWH-018-Br impair Novel Object Recognition in mice: Behavioral, electrophysiological and neurochemical evidence.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, M; Ossato, A; Canazza, I; Trapella, C; Borelli, A C; Beggiato, S; Rimondo, C; Serpelloni, G; Ferraro, L; Marti, M

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that an impairment of learning and memory function is one of the major physiological effects caused by natural or synthetic cannabinoid consumption in rodents, nonhuman primates and in humans. JWH-018 and its halogenated derivatives (JWH-018-Cl and JWH-018-Br) are synthetic CB1/CB2 cannabinoid agonists, illegally marketed as "Spice" and "herbal blend" for their Cannabis-like psychoactive effects. In the present study the effects of acute exposure to JWH-018, JWH-018-Cl, JWH-018-Br (JWH-018-R compounds) and Δ(9)-THC (for comparison) on Novel Object Recognition test (NOR) has been investigated in mice. Moreover, to better characterize the effects of JWH-018-R compounds on memory function, in vitro electrophysiological and neurochemical studies in hippocampal preparations have been performed. JWH-018, JWH-018-Cl and JWH-018-Br dose-dependently impaired both short- and long-memory retention in mice (respectively 2 and 24 h after training session). Their effects resulted more potent respect to that evoked by Δ(9)-THC. Moreover, in vitro studies showed as JWH-018-R compounds negatively affected electrically evoked synaptic transmission, LTP and aminoacid (glutamate and GABA) release in hippocampal slices. Behavioral, electrophysiological and neurochemical effects were fully prevented by CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 pretreatment, suggesting a CB1 receptor involvement. These data support the hypothesis that synthetic JWH-018-R compounds, as Δ(9)-THC, impair cognitive function in mice by interfering with hippocampal synaptic transmission and memory mechanisms. This data outline the danger that the use and/or abuse of these synthetic cannabinoids may represent for the cognitive process in human consumer.

  20. The misfolded pro-inflammatory protein S100A9 disrupts memory via neurochemical remodelling instigating an Alzheimer's disease-like cognitive deficit.

    PubMed

    Gruden, Marina A; Davydova, Tatiana V; Wang, Chao; Narkevich, Victor B; Fomina, Valentina G; Kudrin, Vladimir S; Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A; Sewell, Robert D E

    2016-06-01

    Memory deficits may develop from a variety of neuropathologies including Alzheimer's disease dementia. During neurodegenerative conditions there are contributory factors such as neuroinflammation and amyloidogenesis involved in memory impairment. In the present study, dual properties of S100A9 protein as a pro-inflammatory and amyloidogenic agent were explored in the passive avoidance memory task along with neurochemical assays in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of aged mice. S100A9 oligomers and fibrils were generated in vitro and verified by AFM, Thioflavin T and A11 antibody binding. Native S100A9 as well as S100A9 oligomers and fibrils or their combination were administered intranasally over 14 days followed by behavioral and neurochemical analysis. Both oligomers and fibrils evoked amnestic activity which correlated with disrupted prefrontal cortical and hippocampal dopaminergic neurochemistry. The oligomer-fibril combination produced similar but weaker neurochemistry to the fibrils administered alone but without passive avoidance amnesia. Native S100A9 did not modify memory task performance even though it generated a general and consistent decrease in monoamine levels (DA, 5-HT and NA) and increased metabolic marker ratios of DA and 5-HT turnover (DOPAC/DA, HVA/DA and 5-HIAA) in the prefrontal cortex. These results provide insight into a novel pathogenetic mechanism underlying amnesia in a fear-aggravated memory task based on amyloidogenesis of a pro-inflammatory factor leading to disrupted brain neurochemistry in the aged brain. The data further suggests that amyloid species of S100A9 create deleterious effects principally on the dopaminergic system and this novel finding might be potentially exploited during dementia management through a neuroprotective strategy. PMID:26965570

  1. Synthetic cannabinoid JWH-018 and its halogenated derivatives JWH-018-Cl and JWH-018-Br impair Novel Object Recognition in mice: Behavioral, electrophysiological and neurochemical evidence.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, M; Ossato, A; Canazza, I; Trapella, C; Borelli, A C; Beggiato, S; Rimondo, C; Serpelloni, G; Ferraro, L; Marti, M

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that an impairment of learning and memory function is one of the major physiological effects caused by natural or synthetic cannabinoid consumption in rodents, nonhuman primates and in humans. JWH-018 and its halogenated derivatives (JWH-018-Cl and JWH-018-Br) are synthetic CB1/CB2 cannabinoid agonists, illegally marketed as "Spice" and "herbal blend" for their Cannabis-like psychoactive effects. In the present study the effects of acute exposure to JWH-018, JWH-018-Cl, JWH-018-Br (JWH-018-R compounds) and Δ(9)-THC (for comparison) on Novel Object Recognition test (NOR) has been investigated in mice. Moreover, to better characterize the effects of JWH-018-R compounds on memory function, in vitro electrophysiological and neurochemical studies in hippocampal preparations have been performed. JWH-018, JWH-018-Cl and JWH-018-Br dose-dependently impaired both short- and long-memory retention in mice (respectively 2 and 24 h after training session). Their effects resulted more potent respect to that evoked by Δ(9)-THC. Moreover, in vitro studies showed as JWH-018-R compounds negatively affected electrically evoked synaptic transmission, LTP and aminoacid (glutamate and GABA) release in hippocampal slices. Behavioral, electrophysiological and neurochemical effects were fully prevented by CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 pretreatment, suggesting a CB1 receptor involvement. These data support the hypothesis that synthetic JWH-018-R compounds, as Δ(9)-THC, impair cognitive function in mice by interfering with hippocampal synaptic transmission and memory mechanisms. This data outline the danger that the use and/or abuse of these synthetic cannabinoids may represent for the cognitive process in human consumer. PMID:27346209

  2. Quantification of carbon nanomaterials in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haifang; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Cao, Aoneng; Liu, Yuanfang

    2013-03-19

    A diverse array of carbon nanomaterials (NMs), including fullerene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene, nanodiamonds, and carbon nanoparticles, have been discovered and widely applied in a variety of industries. Carbon NMs have been detected in the environment and have a strong possibility of entering the human body. The safety of carbon NMs has thus become a serious concern in academia and society. To achieve strict biosafety assessments, researchers need to fully understand the effects and fates of NMs in the human body, including information about absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADME/T). To acquire the ADME data, researchers must quantify NMs, but carbon NMs are very difficult to quantify in vivo. The carbon background in a typical biological system is high, particularly compared with the much lower concentration of carbon NMs. Moreover, carbon NMs lack a specific detection signal. Therefore, isotopic labeling, with its high sensitivity and specificity, is the first choice to quantify carbon NMs in vivo. Previously, researchers have used many isotopes, including ¹³C, ¹⁴C, ¹²⁵I, ¹³¹I, ³H, ⁶⁴Cu, ¹¹¹In, ⁸⁶Y, 99mTc, and ⁶⁷Ga, to label carbon NMs. We used these isotopic labeling methods to study the ADME of carbon NMs via different exposure pathways in animal models. Except for the metabolism of carbon NMs, which has seldom been investigated, significant amounts of data have been reported on the in vivo absorption, distribution, excretion, and toxicity of carbon NMs, which have revealed characteristic behaviors of carbon NMs, such as reticuloendothelial system (RES) capture. However, the complexity of the biological systems and diverse preparation and functionalization of the same carbon NMs have led to inconsistent results across different studies. Therefore, the data obtained so far have not provided a compatible and systematic profile of biosafety. Further efforts are needed to address these problems. In

  3. Flow Cytometric Methods for Indirect Analysis and Quantification of Gametogenesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Chlorophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Tomkins, Joseph L.

    2016-01-01

    Induction of sexual reproduction in the facultatively sexual Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is cued by depletion of nitrogen. We explore the capacity for indirect monitoring of population variation in the gametogenic process using flow cytometry. We describe a high-throughput method capable of identifying fluorescence, ploidy and scatter profiles that track vegetative cells entering and undergoing gametogenesis. We demonstrate for the first time, that very early and late growth phases reduce the capacity to distinguish putative gametes from vegetative cells based on scatter and fluorescence profiles, and that early/mid-logarithmic cultures show the optimal distinction between vegetative cells and gamete scatter profiles. We argue that early/mid logarithmic cultures are valuable in such high throughput comparative approaches when investigating optimisation or quantification of gametogenesis based on scatter and fluorescence profiles. This approach provides new insights into the impact of culture conditions on gametogenesis, while documenting novel scatter and fluorescence profile shifts which typify the process. This method has potential applications to; enabling quick high-throughput monitoring, uses in increasing efficiency in the quantification of gametogenesis, as a method of comparing the switch between vegetative and gametic states across treatments, and as criteria for enrichment of gametic phenotypes in cell sorting assays. PMID:27676075

  4. Separation and quantification of microalgal carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Templeton, David W; Quinn, Matthew; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Hyman, Deborah; Laurens, Lieve M L

    2012-12-28

    Structural carbohydrates can constitute a large fraction of the dry weight of algal biomass and thus accurate identification and quantification is important for summative mass closure. Two limitations to the accurate characterization of microalgal carbohydrates are the lack of a robust analytical procedure to hydrolyze polymeric carbohydrates to their respective monomers and the subsequent identification and quantification of those monosaccharides. We address the second limitation, chromatographic separation of monosaccharides, here by identifying optimum conditions for the resolution of a synthetic mixture of 13 microalgae-specific monosaccharides, comprised of 8 neutral, 2 amino sugars, 2 uronic acids and 1 alditol (myo-inositol as an internal standard). The synthetic 13-carbohydrate mix showed incomplete resolution across 11 traditional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, but showed improved resolution and accurate quantification using anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) as well as alditol acetate derivatization followed by gas chromatography (for the neutral- and amino-sugars only). We demonstrate the application of monosaccharide quantification using optimized chromatography conditions after sulfuric acid analytical hydrolysis for three model algae strains and compare the quantification and complexity of monosaccharides in analytical hydrolysates relative to a typical terrestrial feedstock, sugarcane bagasse.

  5. Carotid intraplaque neovascularization quantification software (CINQS).

    PubMed

    Akkus, Zeynettin; van Burken, Gerard; van den Oord, Stijn C H; Schinkel, Arend F L; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Bosch, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Intraplaque neovascularization (IPN) is an important biomarker of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. As IPN can be detected by contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), imaging-biomarkers derived from CEUS may allow early prediction of plaque vulnerability. To select the best quantitative imaging-biomarkers for prediction of plaque vulnerability, a systematic analysis of IPN with existing and new analysis algorithms is necessary. Currently available commercial contrast quantification tools are not applicable for quantitative analysis of carotid IPN due to substantial motion of the carotid artery, artifacts, and intermittent perfusion of plaques. We therefore developed a specialized software package called Carotid intraplaque neovascularization quantification software (CINQS). It was designed for effective and systematic comparison of sets of quantitative imaging biomarkers. CINQS includes several analysis algorithms for carotid IPN quantification and overcomes the limitations of current contrast quantification tools and existing carotid IPN quantification approaches. CINQS has a modular design which allows integrating new analysis tools. Wizard-like analysis tools and its graphical-user-interface facilitate its usage. In this paper, we describe the concept, analysis tools, and performance of CINQS and present analysis results of 45 plaques of 23 patients. The results in 45 plaques showed excellent agreement with visual IPN scores for two quantitative imaging-biomarkers (The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.92 and 0.93). PMID:25561454

  6. Profile summary.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    All drugs appearing in the Adis Profile Summary table have been selected based on information contained in R&D Insight trade mark, a proprietary product of Adis International. The information in the profiles is gathered from the world's medical and scientific literature, at international conferences and symposia, and directly from the developing companies themselves. The emphasis of Drugs in R&D is on the clinical potential of new drugs, and selection of agents for inclusion is based on products in late-phase clinical development that have recently had a significant change in status.

  7. Direct recognition and quantification by voltammetry of thiol/thioamide mixes in seawater.

    PubMed

    Laglera, Luis M; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio

    2012-01-30

    Thiols and thioamides form part of the pool of reduced sulfur substances (RSS) that modify the health of aquatic ecosystems acting as radical scavengers and heavy metal ligands. Their concentrations could be easily determined in seawater by cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) were it not be for the coalescence of their responses in a single peak. Here, we modified the traditional CSV method of RSS analysis to allow individual recognition and quantification in thiol/thioamide mixes. Glutathione, cysteine, thiourea and thioacetamide in UV digested seawater were repeatedly analyzed shifting the deposition potential (E(dep)) in the range +0.07 to -0.4V at high resolution. The representation of peak height (i(p)) and peak potential (E(p)) vs E(dep) resulted in different and distinctive profiles for each substance that allowed the selection of adequate E(dep) ranges for their separate quantification. Copper saturation modified thiol profiles and cancelled the response of thioamides. The vs E(dep) profiles explained the nature of the different thiols and thioamides present in the sample and permitted their individual quantification with excellent accuracy. The utility of the method was put to test with seawater modified with natural unknown RSS from pore waters and Posidonia oceanica exudates. Although both samples gave similar CSV signals, the vs E(dep) profiles unveiled completely different electrochemical behaviors incompatible with a similar nature. Based on those profiles we hypothesized that pore waters released a glutathione/thiourea mix and that one or several unidentified RSS formed part of P. oceanica exudates. The analytical scheme proposed here opens a new door to the use of direct voltammetry in the qualitative and quantitative determination of RSS in natural waters. PMID:22284523

  8. Ranking Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Werf, Martin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the "U.S. News" ranking profiles of four colleges, namely: (1) Smith College; (2) Washington University in St. Louis; (3) Colorado State University at Fort Collins; and (4) Whitman College. Smith College was in the top 10 of the nation's liberal-arts colleges, or just outside it, almost since the "U.S. News" rankings began.…

  9. Advancing agricultural greenhouse gas quantification*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olander, Lydia; Wollenberg, Eva; Tubiello, Francesco; Herold, Martin

    2013-03-01

    1. Introduction Better information on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and mitigation potential in the agricultural sector is necessary to manage these emissions and identify responses that are consistent with the food security and economic development priorities of countries. Critical activity data (what crops or livestock are managed in what way) are poor or lacking for many agricultural systems, especially in developing countries. In addition, the currently available methods for quantifying emissions and mitigation are often too expensive or complex or not sufficiently user friendly for widespread use. The purpose of this focus issue is to capture the state of the art in quantifying greenhouse gases from agricultural systems, with the goal of better understanding our current capabilities and near-term potential for improvement, with particular attention to quantification issues relevant to smallholders in developing countries. This work is timely in light of international discussions and negotiations around how agriculture should be included in efforts to reduce and adapt to climate change impacts, and considering that significant climate financing to developing countries in post-2012 agreements may be linked to their increased ability to identify and report GHG emissions (Murphy et al 2010, CCAFS 2011, FAO 2011). 2. Agriculture and climate change mitigation The main agricultural GHGs—methane and nitrous oxide—account for 10%-12% of anthropogenic emissions globally (Smith et al 2008), or around 50% and 60% of total anthropogenic methane and nitrous oxide emissions, respectively, in 2005. Net carbon dioxide fluxes between agricultural land and the atmosphere linked to food production are relatively small, although significant carbon emissions are associated with degradation of organic soils for plantations in tropical regions (Smith et al 2007, FAO 2012). Population growth and shifts in dietary patterns toward more meat and dairy consumption will lead to

  10. Selective neurodegeneration, neuropathology and symptom profiles in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel, Henry J; Thu, Doris; Hogg, Virginia; Tippett, Lynette; Faull, Richard L M

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by a CAG repeat expansion in exon 1 of the Huntington gene (HD) also known as IT15. Despite the disease being caused by dysfunction ofa single gene, expressed as an expanded polyglutamine in the huntingtin protein, there is a major variability in the symptom profile of patients with Huntington's disease as well as great variability in the neuropathology. The symptoms vary throughout the course of the disease and vary greatly between cases. These symptoms present as varying degrees of involuntary movements, mood, personality changes, cognitive changes and dementia. To determine whether there is a morphological basis for this symptom variability, recent studies have investigated the cellular and neurochemical changes in the striatum and cerebral cortex in the human brain to determine whether there is a link between the pathology in these regions and the symptomatology shown by individual cases. These studies together revealed that cases showing mainly mood symptom profiles correlated with marked degeneration in the striosomal compartment of the striatum, or in the anterior cingulate gyrus of the cerebral cortex. In contrast, in cases with mainly motor symptoms neurodegeneration was especially marked in the primary motor cortex with variable degeneration in both the striosomes and matrix compartments of the striatum. These studies suggest that the variable degeneration of the striatum and cerebral cortex correlates with the variable profiles of Huntington's disease.

  11. Lightning Nitrogen Oxides (LNOx) Vertical Profile Quantification and 10 Year Trend Analysis using Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Satellite Measurements, Air Quality Station (AQS) Surface Measurements, The National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and Simulated by Cloud Resolving Chemical Transport Model (REAM Cloud)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smeltzer, C. D.; Wang, Y.; Koshak, W. J.

    2014-12-01

    Vertical profiles and emission lifetimes of lightning nitrogen oxides (LNOx) are derived using the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). Approximately 200 million flashes, over a 10 year climate period, from the United States National Lighting Detection Network (NLDN), are aggregated with OMI cloud top height to determine the vertical LNOx structure. LNOx lifetime is determined as function of LNOx signal in a 36 kilometer vertical column from the time of the last known flash to depletion of the LNOx signal. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Air Quality Station (AQS) surface data further support these results by demonstrating as much as a 200% increase in surface level NO2 during strong thunderstorm events and a lag as long as 5 to 8 hours from the lightning event to the peak surface event, indicating a evolutional process. Analysis of cloud resolving chemical transport model (REAM Cloud) demonstrates that C-shaped LNOx profiles, which agree with OMI vertical profile observations, evolve due to micro-scale convective meteorology given inverted C-shaped LNOx emission profiles as determined from lightning radio telemetry. It is shown, both in simulations and in observations, that the extent to which the LNOx vertical distribution is C-shaped and the lifetime of LNOx is proportional to the shear-strength of the thunderstorm. Micro-scale convective meteorology is not adequately parameterized in global scale and regional scale chemical transport models (CTM). Therefore, these larger scale CTMs ought to use a C-shape emissions profile to best reproduce observations until convective parameterizations are updated. These findings are used to simulate decadal LNOx and lightning ozone climatology over the Continental United States (CONUS) from 2004-2014.

  12. Uncertainty quantification in the catalytic partial oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navalho, Jorge E. P.; Pereira, José M. C.; Ervilha, Ana R.; Pereira, José C. F.

    2013-12-01

    This work focuses on uncertainty quantification of eight random parameters required as input for 1D modelling of methane catalytic partial oxidation within a highly dense foam reactor. Parameters related to geometrical properties, reactor thermophysics and catalyst loading are taken as uncertain. A widely applied 1D heterogeneous mathematical model that accounts for proper transport and surface chemistry steps is considered for the evaluation of deterministic samples. The non-intrusive spectral projection approach based on polynomial chaos expansion is applied to determine the stochastic temperature and species profiles along the reactor axial direction as well as their ensemble mean and error bars with a confidence interval of 95%. Probability density functions of relevant variables in specific reactor sections are also analysed. A different contribution is noticed from each random input to the total uncertainty range. Porosity, specific surface area and catalyst loading appear as the major sources of uncertainty to bulk gas and surface temperature and species molar profiles. Porosity and the mean pore diameter have an important impact on the pressure drop along the whole reactor as expected. It is also concluded that any trace of uncertainty in the eight input random variables can be almost dissipated near the catalyst outlet section for a long-enough catalyst, mainly due to the approximation to thermodynamic equilibrium.

  13. Quantification of Cannabinoid Content in Cannabis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Zhang, F.; Jia, K.; Wen, M.; Yuan, Ch.

    2015-09-01

    Cannabis is an economically important plant that is used in many fields, in addition to being the most commonly consumed illicit drug worldwide. Monitoring the spatial distribution of cannabis cultivation and judging whether it is drug- or fiber-type cannabis is critical for governments and international communities to understand the scale of the illegal drug trade. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the cannabinoids content in cannabis could be spectrally quantified using a spectrometer and to identify the optimal wavebands for quantifying the cannabinoid content. Spectral reflectance data of dried cannabis leaf samples and the cannabis canopy were measured in the laboratory and in the field, respectively. Correlation analysis and the stepwise multivariate regression method were used to select the optimal wavebands for cannabinoid content quantification based on the laboratory-measured spectral data. The results indicated that the delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content in cannabis leaves could be quantified using laboratory-measured spectral reflectance data and that the 695 nm band is the optimal band for THC content quantification. This study provides prerequisite information for designing spectral equipment to enable immediate quantification of THC content in cannabis and to discriminate drug- from fiber-type cannabis based on THC content quantification in the field.

  14. Colour thresholding and objective quantification in bioimaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Gerber, M. A.; Torre-Bueno, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Computer imaging is rapidly becoming an indispensable tool for the quantification of variables in research and medicine. Whilst its use in medicine has largely been limited to qualitative observations, imaging in applied basic sciences, medical research and biotechnology demands objective quantification of the variables in question. In black and white densitometry (0-256 levels of intensity) the separation of subtle differences between closely related hues from stains is sometimes very difficult. True-colour and real-time video microscopy analysis offer choices not previously available with monochrome systems. In this paper we demonstrate the usefulness of colour thresholding, which has so far proven indispensable for proper objective quantification of the products of histochemical reactions and/or subtle differences in tissue and cells. In addition, we provide interested, but untrained readers with basic information that may assist decisions regarding the most suitable set-up for a project under consideration. Data from projects in progress at Tulane are shown to illustrate the advantage of colour thresholding over monochrome densitometry and for objective quantification of subtle colour differences between experimental and control samples.

  15. HPC Analytics Support. Requirements for Uncertainty Quantification Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Patrick R.; Purohit, Sumit; Rodriguez, Luke R.

    2015-05-01

    This report outlines techniques for extending benchmark generation products so they support uncertainty quantification by benchmarked systems. We describe how uncertainty quantification requirements can be presented to candidate analytical tools supporting SPARQL. We describe benchmark data sets for evaluating uncertainty quantification, as well as an approach for using our benchmark generator to produce data sets for generating benchmark data sets.

  16. Time-dependent behavioral, neurochemical, and metabolic dysregulation in female C57BL/6 mice caused by chronic high-fat diet intake.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Saritha; Lin, Zhoumeng; de La Serre, Claire B; Wagner, John J; Harn, Donald H; Pepples, Lacey M; Djani, Dylan M; Weber, Matthew T; Srivastava, Leena; Filipov, Nikolay M

    2016-04-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity is associated not only with metabolic dysregulation, e.g., impaired glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity, but also with neurological dysfunction manifested with aberrant behavior and/or neurotransmitter imbalance. Most studies have examined HFD's effects predominantly in male subjects, either in the periphery or on the brain, in isolation and after a finite feeding period. In this study, we evaluated the time-course of selected metabolic, behavioral, and neurochemical effects of HFD intake in parallel and at multiple time points in female (C57BL/6) mice. Peripheral effects were evaluated at three feeding intervals (short: 5-6 weeks, long: 20-22 weeks, and prolonged: 33-36 weeks). Central effects were evaluated only after long and prolonged feeding durations; we have previously reported those effects after the short (5-6 weeks) feeding duration. Ongoing HFD feeding resulted in an obese phenotype characterized by increased visceral adiposity and, after prolonged HFD intake, an increase in liver and kidney weights. Peripherally, 5 weeks of HFD intake was sufficient to impair glucose tolerance significantly, with the deleterious effects of HFD being greater with prolonged intake. Similarly, 5 weeks of HFD consumption was sufficient to impair insulin sensitivity. However, sensitivity to insulin after prolonged HFD intake was not different between control, low-fat diet (LFD) and HFD-fed mice, most likely due to age-dependent decrease in insulin sensitivity in the LFD-fed mice. HFD intake also induced bi-phasic hepatic inflammation and it increased gut permeability. Behaviorally, prolonged intake of HFD caused mice to be hypoactive and bury fewer marbles in a marble burying task; the latter was associated with significantly impaired hippocampal serotonin homeostasis. Cognitive (short-term recognition memory) function of mice was unaffected by chronic HFD feeding. Considering our prior findings of short-term (5-6 weeks) HFD

  17. Nanoparticle-based detection and quantification of DNA with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wei Jie; Yung, Lin Yue Lanry

    2007-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA detection is important in various biomedical applications such as gene expression profiling, disease diagnosis and treatment, drug discovery and forensic analysis. Here we report a gold nanoparticle-based method that allows DNA detection and quantification and is capable of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination. The precise quantification of single-stranded DNA is due to the formation of defined nanoparticle-DNA conjugate groupings in the presence of target/linker DNA. Conjugate groupings were characterized and quantified by gel electrophoresis. A linear correlation between the amount of target DNA and conjugate groupings was found. For SNP detection, single base mismatch discrimination was achieved for both the end- and center-base mismatch. The method described here may be useful for the development of a simple and quantitative DNA detection assay. PMID:17720714

  18. In Vitro/In Vivo Toxicity Evaluation and Quantification of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Ujwal S.; Adireddy, Shiva; Jaiswal, Ashvin; Mandava, Sree; Lee, Benjamin R.; Chrisey, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing biomedical applications of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in academic and commercial settings have alarmed the scientific community about the safety and assessment of toxicity profiles of IONPs. The great amount of diversity found in the cytotoxic measurements of IONPs points toward the necessity of careful characterization and quantification of IONPs. The present document discusses the major developments related to in vitro and in vivo toxicity assessment of IONPs and its relationship with the physicochemical parameters of IONPs. Major discussion is included on the current spectrophotometric and imaging based techniques used for quantifying, and studying the clearance and biodistribution of IONPs. Several invasive and non-invasive quantification techniques along with the pitfalls are discussed in detail. Finally, critical guidelines are provided to optimize the design of IONPs to minimize the toxicity. PMID:26501258

  19. The challenges for molecular nutrition research 2: quantification of the nutritional phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Keijer, Jaap; Kleemann, Robert; Elliott, Ruan; Drevon, Christian A.; McArdle, Harry; Gibney, Mike; Müller, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In quantifying the beneficial effect of dietary interventions in healthy subjects, nutrition research meets a number of new challenges. Inter individual variation in biomarker values often is larger than the effect related to the intervention. Healthy subjects have a remarkable capacity to maintain homeostasis, both through direct metabolic regulation, metabolic compensation of altered diets, and effective defence and repair mechanisms in oxidative and inflammatory stress. Processes involved in these regulatory activities essentially different from processes involved in early onset of diet related diseases. So, new concepts and approaches are needed to better quantify the subtle effects possibly achieved by dietary interventions in healthy subjects. Apart from quantification of the genotype and food intake (these are discussed in separate reviews in this series), four major areas of innovation are discussed: the biomarker profile concept, perturbation of homeostasis combined with omics analysis, imaging, modelling and fluxes. All of these areas contribute to a better understanding and quantification of the nutritional phenotype. PMID:18850187

  20. Adolescent exposure to cocaine increases anxiety-like behavior and induces morphologic and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Mao, Z; Zhu, C; Li, M; Cao, C; Guan, Y; Yuan, J; Xie, G; Guan, X

    2016-01-28

    Repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence may affect both physical and psychological conditions in the brain, and increase the risk of psychiatric disorders and addiction behaviors in adulthood. Adolescence represents a critical development period for the hippocampus. Moreover, different regions of the hippocampus are involved in different functions. Dorsal hippocampus (dHP) has been implicated in learning and memory, whereas ventral hippocampus (vHP) plays an important role in emotional processing. In this study, the rats that were exposed to cocaine during adolescence (postnatal days, P28-P42) showed higher anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze test in adulthood (P80), but displayed normal spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze test. Furthermore, repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence lead to alterations in morphology of pyramidal neurons, activities of astrocytes, and levels of proteins that involved in synaptic transmission, apoptosis, inflammation and addiction in both dHP and vHP of adult rats. These findings suggest that repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence in rats may elicit morphologic and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus when the animals reach adulthood. These changes may contribute to the increased susceptibility for psychiatric disorders and addiction seen in adults. PMID:26621120

  1. Desipramine attenuates forced swim test-induced behavioral and neurochemical alterations in mice: an in vivo(1)H-MRS study at 9.4T.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Young; Lee, Yun-Jung; Kim, Hyeonjin; Lee, Do-Wan; Woo, Dong-Cheol; Choi, Chi-Bong; Chae, Jeong-Ho; Choe, Bo-Young

    2010-08-12

    The forced swim test (FST) is a behavioral paradigm that is predicative of antidepressant activity in rodents. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of desipramine (DMI) pretreatment on behavioral and regional neurochemical responses in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and hippocampus of mice exposed to the FST using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS). An ultra short echo stimulated echo acquisition (STEAM) localization sequence (TR/TM/TE=5000/20/2.2ms) was used to measure in vivo proton spectra from the left DLPFC (voxel volume: 7microl) and hippocampus (6microl) of C57BL/6 mice at 9.4T and acquired proton spectra post-processed offline with LCModel. The FST induced significant increase of glutamate (Glu) and myo-inositol (mIns) concentrations in the left DLPFC and hippocampus, respectively. In addition, creatine+phosphocreatine (Cr+PCr) concentrations in the left DLPFC were significantly decreased as compared to control. The metabolic alterations induced by the FST were reverted to level similar to control by acute DMI administration. Our results suggest that glutamatergic activity and glial cell dysfunction may contribute to the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying depression and that modulation of synaptic neurotransmitter concentrations represents a potential target for antidepressant drug development. PMID:20542016

  2. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 antibody attenuates thermal hyperalgesia in the dorsal root ganglion: Neurochemical changes and behavioral studies after sciatic nerve-pinch injury.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qiong; Yu, Chao; Zhu, Yao-Feng; Li, Chun-Yan; Tian, Rong-Bo; Li, Xian-Hui

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress is generated in several peripheral nerve injury models.Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is activated to have a role in antioxidant effect. After nerve injury, the severely painful behavior is also performed. However, little has been explored regarding the function of Nrf2 in this painful process. Therefore, in this study, we compared the effects of Nrf2 antibody administration following sciatic nerve-pinch injury on painful behavior induced in young mice and neurochemical changes in dorsal root ganglion neurons. After pinch nerve injury, we found that the magnitude of the thermal allodynia was significantly decreased after application of Nrf2 antibody (5ul, 1mg/ml) in such injured animals and phosphorylated ERK(p-ERK) as well as the apoptotic protein (i.e., Bcl-6) in DRG neurons were also down-regulated in the anti-Nrf2-treated injured groups compared to the saline-treated groups. Taken collectively, these data suggested that the Nrf2 antibody reduced thermal hyperalgesia via ERK pathway and the down regulation of Bcl-6 protein from the apoptosis pathway might be protecting against the protein deletions caused by anti-Nrf2 effect and suggested the new therapeutic strategy with Nrf2 inhibitor following nerve injury. PMID:27316447

  3. In vivo and in vitro changes in neurochemical parameters related to mercury concentrations from specific brain regions of polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Krey, Anke; Kwan, Michael; Chan, Hing Man

    2014-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) has been detected in polar bear brain tissue, but its biological effects are not well known. Relationships between Hg concentrations and neurochemical enzyme activities and receptor binding were assessed in the cerebellum, frontal lobes, and occipital lobes of 24 polar bears collected from Nunavik (Northern Quebec), Canada. The concentration-response relationship was further studied with in vitro experiments using pooled brain homogenate of 12 randomly chosen bears. In environmentally exposed brain samples, there was no correlative relationship between Hg concentration and cholinesterase (ChE) activity or muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) binding in any of the 3 brain regions. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in the occipital lobe showed a negative correlative relationship with total Hg concentration. In vitro experiments, however, demonstrated that Hg (mercuric chloride and methylmercury chloride) can inhibit ChE and MAO activities and muscarinic mAChR binding. These results show that Hg can alter neurobiochemical parameters but the current environmental Hg exposure level does have an effect on the neurochemistry of polar bears from northern Canada. PMID:25264143

  4. Adolescent exposure to cocaine increases anxiety-like behavior and induces morphologic and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W; Mao, Z; Zhu, C; Li, M; Cao, C; Guan, Y; Yuan, J; Xie, G; Guan, X

    2016-01-28

    Repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence may affect both physical and psychological conditions in the brain, and increase the risk of psychiatric disorders and addiction behaviors in adulthood. Adolescence represents a critical development period for the hippocampus. Moreover, different regions of the hippocampus are involved in different functions. Dorsal hippocampus (dHP) has been implicated in learning and memory, whereas ventral hippocampus (vHP) plays an important role in emotional processing. In this study, the rats that were exposed to cocaine during adolescence (postnatal days, P28-P42) showed higher anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze test in adulthood (P80), but displayed normal spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze test. Furthermore, repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence lead to alterations in morphology of pyramidal neurons, activities of astrocytes, and levels of proteins that involved in synaptic transmission, apoptosis, inflammation and addiction in both dHP and vHP of adult rats. These findings suggest that repeated exposure to cocaine during adolescence in rats may elicit morphologic and neurochemical changes in the hippocampus when the animals reach adulthood. These changes may contribute to the increased susceptibility for psychiatric disorders and addiction seen in adults.

  5. Possible nitric oxide modulation in protective effect of FK-506 against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced behavioral, oxidative, neurochemical, and mitochondrial alterations in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Puneet; Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Anil

    2010-10-01

    FK-506 is an immunosuppressant being widely used for allograft rejection cases in the present clinical scenario. Recently, the neuroprotective effect of FK-506 has also been reported against a number of neurodegenerative diseases in rodents. This study was designed to explore the possible protective effect of FK-506 and its interaction with nitric-oxide modulators against 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP)-induced behavioural, biochemical, neurochemical, and mitochondrial alterations in striatum, cortex, and hippocampus regions of the brain. Systemic administration of 3-nitropropionic acid produces Huntington-like symptoms in rats. 3-NP (10 mg/kg) treatment for 14 days impaired locomotor activity, grip strength, and body weight. 3-NP treatment significantly raised malondialdehyde, nitrite concentration, depleted antioxidant enzymes (SOD and catalase), and levels of bioamines (dopamine and norepinephrine) in striatum, cortex, and hippocampus areas of rat brain. Significant alterations in mitochondrial enzyme complexes (I, II, and IV) activities and mitochondrial redox activity have also been altered significantly by 3-NP. Pretreatment with FK-506 (0.5, 1, and 2 mg/kg) significantly reversed these behavioral, biochemical, and cellular alterations. L-arginine treatment with a subeffective dose FK-506 (1 mg/kg) reversed the protective effect of FK-506. However, L-NAME pretreatment with FK-506 (1 mg/kg) potentiated the protective effect of FK-506. The present study shows that FK-506 attenuates 3-NP-induced neurotoxicity and nitric-oxide modulation might be involved in its protective action. PMID:20550427

  6. Behavioral and Neurochemical Effects of Alpha-Lipoic Acid in the Model of Parkinson's Disease Induced by Unilateral Stereotaxic Injection of 6-Ohda in Rat

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Dayane Pessoa; De Sousa, Caren Nádia Soares; Araújo, Paulo Victor Pontes; Menezes, Carlos Eduardo de Souza; Sousa Rodrigues, Francisca Taciana; Escudeiro, Sarah Souza; Lima, Nicole Brito Cortez; Patrocínio, Manoel Claúdio Azevedo; Aguiar, Lissiana Magna Vasconcelos; Viana, Glauce Socorro de Barros; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate behavioral and neurochemical effects of α-lipoic acid (100 mg/kg or 200 mg/kg) alone or associated with L-DOPA using an animal model of Parkinson's disease induced by stereotaxic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in rat striatum. Motor behavior was assessed by monitoring body rotations induced by apomorphine, open field test and cylinder test. Oxidative stress was accessed by determination of lipid peroxidation using the TBARS method, concentration of nitrite and evaluation of catalase activity. α-Lipoic acid decreased body rotations induced by apomorphine, as well as caused an improvement in motor performance by increasing locomotor activity in the open field test and use of contralateral paw (in the opposite side of the lesion produced by 6-OHDA) at cylinder test. α-lipoic acid showed antioxidant effects, decreasing lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels and interacting with antioxidant system by decreasing of endogenous catalase activity. Therefore, α-lipoic acid prevented the damage induced by 6-OHDA or by chronic use of L-DOPA in dopaminergic neurons, suggesting that α-lipoic could be a new therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease prevention and treatment. PMID:24023579

  7. Morphology, projection pattern, and neurochemical identity of Cajal's "centrifugal neurons": the cells of origin of the tectoventrogeniculate pathway in pigeon (Columba livia) and chicken (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Vega-Zuniga, Tomas; Mpodozis, Jorge; Karten, Harvey J; Marín, Gonzalo; Hain, Sarah; Luksch, Harald

    2014-07-01

    The nucleus geniculatus lateralis pars ventralis (GLv) is a prominent retinal target in all amniotes. In birds, it is in receipt of a dense and topographically organized retinal projection. The GLv is also the target of substantial and topographically organized projections from the optic tectum and the visual wulst (hyperpallium). Tectal and retinal afferents terminate homotopically within the external GLv-neuropil. Efferents from the GLv follow a descending course through the tegmentum and can be traced into the medial pontine nucleus. At present, the cells of origin of the Tecto-GLv projection are only partially described. Here we characterized the laminar location, morphology, projection pattern, and neurochemical identity of these cells by means of neural tracer injections and intracellular fillings in slice preparations and extracellular tracer injections in vivo. The Tecto-GLv projection arises from a distinct subset of layer 10 bipolar neurons, whose apical dendrites show a complex transverse arborization at the level of layer 7. Axons of these bipolar cells arise from the apical dendrites and follow a course through the optic tract to finally form very fine and restricted terminal endings inside the GLv-neuropil. Double-label experiments showed that these bipolar cells were choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunoreactive. Our results strongly suggest that Tecto-GLv neurons form a pathway by which integrated tectal activity rapidly feeds back to the GLv and exerts a focal cholinergic modulation of incoming retinal inputs.

  8. In vivo and in vitro changes in neurochemical parameters related to mercury concentrations from specific brain regions of polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Krey, Anke; Kwan, Michael; Chan, Hing Man

    2014-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) has been detected in polar bear brain tissue, but its biological effects are not well known. Relationships between Hg concentrations and neurochemical enzyme activities and receptor binding were assessed in the cerebellum, frontal lobes, and occipital lobes of 24 polar bears collected from Nunavik (Northern Quebec), Canada. The concentration-response relationship was further studied with in vitro experiments using pooled brain homogenate of 12 randomly chosen bears. In environmentally exposed brain samples, there was no correlative relationship between Hg concentration and cholinesterase (ChE) activity or muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) binding in any of the 3 brain regions. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in the occipital lobe showed a negative correlative relationship with total Hg concentration. In vitro experiments, however, demonstrated that Hg (mercuric chloride and methylmercury chloride) can inhibit ChE and MAO activities and muscarinic mAChR binding. These results show that Hg can alter neurobiochemical parameters but the current environmental Hg exposure level does have an effect on the neurochemistry of polar bears from northern Canada.

  9. An enteric nervous system progenitor cell implant promotes a behavioral and neurochemical improvement in rats with a 6-OHDA-induced lesion.

    PubMed

    Parra-Cid, Carmen; García-López, Julieta; García, Esperanza; Ibarra, Clemente

    2014-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) of mammals is derived from neural crest (NC) cells during embryogenesis and at the beginning of postnatal life. However, neural progenitor cells from the ENS (or ENSPC) are also found in the adult intestine and can be used for neuronal regeneration in diseases that lead to a loss of cell population, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), in which there is a decrease of dopaminergic neurons. The objective of this study was to evaluate the capacity of ENSPC to restore damaged nervous tissue and to show that they are functional for a behavioral and neurochemical recovery. We found that animals with ENSPC implants exhibited a motor recovery of 35% vs. the lesion group. In addition, DA levels were partially restored in 34%, while Homovanillic acid (HVA) levels remained at 21% vs. the group with a 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced lesion, suggesting that ENSPC represent a possible alternative in the study of cell transplants and the preservation of functional dopaminergic neurons in PD.

  10. Neurochemical pathways that converge on thalamic trigeminovascular neurons: potential substrate for modulation of migraine by sleep, food intake, stress and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Noseda, Rodrigo; Kainz, Vanessa; Borsook, David; Burstein, Rami

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic thalamic regulation of sensory signals allows the cortex to adjust better to rapidly changing behavioral, physiological and environmental demands. To fulfill this role, thalamic neurons must themselves be subjected to constantly changing modulatory inputs that originate in multiple neurochemical pathways involved in autonomic, affective and cognitive functions. Our overall goal is to define an anatomical framework for conceptualizing how a 'decision' is made on whether a trigeminovascular thalamic neuron fires, for how long, and at what frequency. To begin answering this question, we determine which neuropeptides/neurotransmitters are in a position to modulate thalamic trigeminovascular neurons. Using a combination of in-vivo single-unit recording, juxtacellular labeling with tetramethylrhodamine dextran (TMR) and in-vitro immunohistochemistry, we found that thalamic trigeminovascular neurons were surrounded by high density of axons containing biomarkers of glutamate, GABA, dopamine and serotonin; moderate density of axons containing noradrenaline and histamine; low density of axons containing orexin and melanin concentrating hormone (MCH); but not axons containing CGRP, serotonin 1D receptor, oxytocin or vasopressin. In the context of migraine, the findings suggest that the transmission of headache-related nociceptive signals from the thalamus to the cortex may be modulated by opposing forces (i.e., facilitatory, inhibitory) that are governed by continuous adjustments needed to keep physiological, behavioral, cognitive and emotional homeostasis.

  11. Innervation of vas deferens and accessory male genital glands in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). Neurochemical characteristics and relationships to the reproductive activity.

    PubMed

    Mirabella, Nicola; Squillacioti, Caterina; Varricchio, Ettore; Genovese, Angelo; Paino, Giuseppe

    2003-05-01

    Autonomic nerves supplying mammalian male internal genital organs have an important role in the regulation of reproductive function. To find out the relationships between the neurochemical content of these nerves and the reproductive activity, we performed a histochemical and immunohistochemical study in a species, the water buffalo, exhibiting a seasonal sexual behaviour. The distribution of noradrenergic and nitric oxide synthase (NOS)- and peptide-containing nerves was evaluated during the mating and non-mating periods. Fresh segments of vas deferens and accessory genital glands were collected immediately after slaughter and immersed in 4% paraformaldehyde. Frozen sections were obtained and processed according to single and double labelling immunofluorescent procedures or NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry. During the mating period, a dense noradrenergic innervation was observed to supply the vas deferens as well as the accessory genital glands. NOS- and peptide-containing nerves were also observed but with a lower density. During the non-mating period noradrenergic nerves dramatically reduced. In addition, neuropeptide Y (NPY)- and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-containing nerves were also reduced. These findings suggest the presence of complex interactions between androgen hormones and the autonomic nerve supply in the regulation of male water buffalo reproductive functions.

  12. Freshwater phytoplankton quantification by chlorophyll a: a comparative study of in vitro, in vivo and in situ methods.

    PubMed

    Gregor, J; Marsálek, B

    2004-02-01

    Standard ISO method for chlorophyll a quantification (extraction into ethanol, spectrophotometrical quantification at 665 and 750 nm), spectrofluorometry (reader for 96 wells, excitation 410 nm, emission 670 nm), and a submersible fluorescence probe for in situ phytoplankton quantification (excitation 410, 525, 570, 590, and 610 nm, emission 685 nm) were compared in different freshwater environments-reservoirs and rivers. The ISO method is accepted as a standard method but requires sample handling and transport to the laboratory. Spectrofluorometry is a sensitive method, even for natural phytoplankton populations. Nevertheless, it cannot be recommended for the quantification of cyanobacterial water blooms because colonial and filamentous species such as Microcystis, Anabaena, or Aphanizomenon display unacceptable variability (18-33%). The submersible probe featured high correlation with a standard ISO method (r=0.97, P<0.05). This probe can provide the selective measurement of technologically important phytoplankton groups like cyanobacteria, diatoms, green algae, and cryptophytes in lake vertical profiles of up to 100 m. The limitation of this instrument is the possible reabsorption of the light signal, e.g. in the presence of humic substances, or dense algal blooms. The use of submersible probes for in situ phytoplankton quantification can be recommended as a sensitive tool for water management, especially in the case of drinking water resources.

  13. MPI Profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Han, D K; Jones, T R

    2005-02-11

    The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is the de facto message-passing standard for massively parallel programs. It is often the case that application performance is a crucial factor, especially for solving grand challenge problems. While there have been many studies on the scalability of applications, there have not been many focusing on the specific types of MPI calls being made and their impact on application performance. Using a profiling tool called mpiP, a large spectrum of parallel scientific applications were surveyed and their performance results analyzed.

  14. Metabolic Profiling and Phenotyping of Central Nervous System Diseases: Metabolites Bring Insights into Brain Dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Davidovic, Laetitia

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic phenotyping corresponds to the large-scale quantitative and qualitative analysis of the metabolome i.e., the low-molecular weight <1 KDa fraction in biological samples, and provides a key opportunity to advance neurosciences. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry are the main analytical platforms used for metabolic profiling, enabling detection and quantitation of a wide range of compounds of particular neuro-pharmacological and physiological relevance, including neurotransmitters, secondary messengers, structural lipids, as well as their precursors, intermediates and degradation products. Metabolic profiling is therefore particularly indicated for the study of central nervous system by probing metabolic and neurochemical profiles of the healthy or diseased brain, in preclinical models or in human samples. In this review, we introduce the analytical and statistical requirements for metabolic profiling. Then, we focus on key studies in the field of metabolic profiling applied to the characterization of animal models and human samples of central nervous system disorders. We highlight the potential of metabolic profiling for pharmacological and physiological evaluation, diagnosis and drug therapy monitoring of patients affected by brain disorders. Finally, we discuss the current challenges in the field, including the development of systems biology and pharmacology strategies improving our understanding of metabolic signatures and mechanisms of central nervous system diseases. PMID:25616565

  15. Sensitive Targeted Quantification of ERK Phosphorylation Dynamics and Stoichiometry in Human Cells without Affinity Enrichment

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Gao, Yuqian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chrisler, William B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Wu, Chaochao; He, Jintang; Bloodsworth, Kent J.; Zhao, Rui; Camp II, David G.; Liu, Tao; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.; Wiley, H. Steven; Qian, Weijun

    2014-12-17

    Mass spectrometry-based targeted quantification is a promising technology for site-specific quantification of posttranslational modifications (PTMs). However, a major constraint of most targeted MS approaches is the limited sensitivity for quantifying low-abundance PTMs, requiring the use of affinity reagents to enrich specific PTMs. Herein, we demonstrate the direct site-specific quantification of ERK phosphorylation isoforms (pT, pY, pTpY) and their relative stoichiometries using a highly sensitive targeted MS approach termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM). PRISM provides effective enrichment of target peptides within a given fraction from complex biological matrix with minimal sample losses, followed by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) quantification. The PRISM-SRM approach enabled direct quantification of ERK phosphorylation in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from as little as 25 µg tryptic peptides from whole cell lysates. Compared to immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, PRISM provided >10-fold improvement in signal intensities, presumably due to the better peptide recovery of PRISM for handling small size samples. This approach was applied to quantify ERK phosphorylation dynamics in HMEC treated by different doses of EGF at both the peak activation (10 min) and steady state (2 h). At 10 min, the maximal ERK activation was observed with 0.3 ng/mL dose, whereas the maximal steady state level of ERK activation at 2 h was at 3 ng/ml dose, corresponding to 1200 and 9000 occupied receptors, respectively. At 10 min, the maximally activated pTpY isoform represented ~40% of total ERK, falling to less than 10% at 2 h. The time course and dose-response profiles of individual phosphorylated ERK isoforms indicated that singly phosphorylated pT-ERK never increases significantly, while the increase of pY-ERK paralleled that of pTpY-ERK. This data supports for a processive, rather than

  16. Sensitive Targeted Quantification of ERK Phosphorylation Dynamics and Stoichiometry in Human Cells without Affinity Enrichment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, Tujin; Gao, Yuqian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Chrisler, William B.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Wu, Chaochao; He, Jintang; Bloodsworth, Kent J.; et al

    2014-12-17

    Mass spectrometry-based targeted quantification is a promising technology for site-specific quantification of posttranslational modifications (PTMs). However, a major constraint of most targeted MS approaches is the limited sensitivity for quantifying low-abundance PTMs, requiring the use of affinity reagents to enrich specific PTMs. Herein, we demonstrate the direct site-specific quantification of ERK phosphorylation isoforms (pT, pY, pTpY) and their relative stoichiometries using a highly sensitive targeted MS approach termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM). PRISM provides effective enrichment of target peptides within a given fraction from complex biological matrix with minimal sample losses, followed by selected reactionmore » monitoring (SRM) quantification. The PRISM-SRM approach enabled direct quantification of ERK phosphorylation in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from as little as 25 µg tryptic peptides from whole cell lysates. Compared to immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography, PRISM provided >10-fold improvement in signal intensities, presumably due to the better peptide recovery of PRISM for handling small size samples. This approach was applied to quantify ERK phosphorylation dynamics in HMEC treated by different doses of EGF at both the peak activation (10 min) and steady state (2 h). At 10 min, the maximal ERK activation was observed with 0.3 ng/mL dose, whereas the maximal steady state level of ERK activation at 2 h was at 3 ng/ml dose, corresponding to 1200 and 9000 occupied receptors, respectively. At 10 min, the maximally activated pTpY isoform represented ~40% of total ERK, falling to less than 10% at 2 h. The time course and dose-response profiles of individual phosphorylated ERK isoforms indicated that singly phosphorylated pT-ERK never increases significantly, while the increase of pY-ERK paralleled that of pTpY-ERK. This data supports for a processive, rather than

  17. Influence of laser scanner range measurement noise on the quantification of rock surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshelham, Kourosh; Altundag, Dogan

    2010-05-01

    The roughness of rock surfaces is traditionally measured by using manual tools such as carpenter's comp and compass and disc clinometers. The manual measurements are limited to small samples at accessible parts of the rock. Terrestrial laser scanning is an attractive alternative measurement technique, which offers large coverage, high resolution, and the ability to reach inaccessible high rock faces. The application of laser scanning to the study of rock surface roughness faces a major challenge: the inherent range imprecision hinders the quantification of roughness parameters. In practice, when roughness is in millimeter scale it is often lost in the range measurement noise. The parameters derived from the data, therefore, reflect noise rather than the actual roughness of the surface. In this paper, we investigate the influence of laser scanner range measurement noise on the quantification of rock surfaces roughness. We show that measurement noise leads to the overestimation of roughness parameters. We also demonstrate the application of wavelet de-noising method to eliminating noise from laser scanner data and deriving realistic roughness parameters. A slightly metamorphosed limestone rock in the east bank of the Meuse River in southern Belgium was scanned with a Faro LS880 terrestrial laser scanner. The scanner was positioned at approximately 5 meters distance to the rock surface, and operated at the highest possible angular resolution, i.e. 0.009 degrees. The resulting point cloud contained about 1.2 million points on the rock surface with a point-spacing of 1 mm on average. According to the technical specifications of the laser scanner, the nominal range precision at a perpendicular incidence angle, which was roughly the case in our scan, is between 0.7 mm and 5.2 mm respectively for objects of 90% and 10% reflectivity at a distance of 10 m. To serve as reference roughness data were also collected manually along three profiles on the rock surface by using a

  18. Sulphite quantification on damaged stones and mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobbi, G.; Zappia, G.; Sabbioni, C.

    An analytical procedure was developed for the simultaneous identification and quantification of the sulphite and main anions found in degradation patinas on historic buildings and monuments, as well as on stones and mortars exposed in simulation chamber and field tests. The quantification of anions was performed by means of ion chromatography (IC), after the stabilisation of sulphite with a D(-) fructose solution. The utilisation of two different chromatographic columns, connected in series, allowed the simultaneous determination of fluoride, acetate, formate, chloride, nitrite, bromide, iodide, oxyhalides, nitrate, phosphate, sulphite, sulphate and oxalate, in a time of approximately 25 min, without interference and with high reproducibility. Finally, the results show how in the majority of cases the formation of sulphite is an intermediate stage in the sulphation process affecting building materials exposed to the environment and needs to be measured together with sulphate, in order to obtain a correct interpretation of degradation mechanisms on such materials.

  19. Whitepaper on Uncertainty Quantification for MPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark L.

    2015-12-17

    The MPACT code provides the ability to perform high-fidelity deterministic calculations to obtain a wide variety of detailed results for very complex reactor core models. However MPACT currently does not have the capability to propagate the effects of input data uncertainties to provide uncertainties in the calculated results. This white paper discusses a potential method for MPACT uncertainty quantification (UQ) based on stochastic sampling.

  20. Automated quantification of synapses by fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schätzle, Philipp; Wuttke, René; Ziegler, Urs; Sonderegger, Peter

    2012-02-15

    The quantification of synapses in neuronal cultures is essential in studies of the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Conventional counting of synapses based on morphological or immunocytochemical criteria is extremely work-intensive. We developed a fully automated method which quantifies synaptic elements and complete synapses based on immunocytochemistry. Pre- and postsynaptic elements are detected by their corresponding fluorescence signals and their proximity to dendrites. Synapses are defined as the combination of a pre- and postsynaptic element within a given distance. The analysis is performed in three dimensions and all parameters required for quantification can be easily adjusted by a graphical user interface. The integrated batch processing enables the analysis of large datasets without any further user interaction and is therefore efficient and timesaving. The potential of this method was demonstrated by an extensive quantification of synapses in neuronal cultures from DIV 7 to DIV 21. The method can be applied to all datasets containing a pre- and postsynaptic labeling plus a dendritic or cell surface marker.

  1. Protein quantification using a cleavable reporter peptide.

    PubMed

    Duriez, Elodie; Trevisiol, Stephane; Domon, Bruno

    2015-02-01

    Peptide and protein quantification based on isotope dilution and mass spectrometry analysis are widely employed for the measurement of biomarkers and in system biology applications. The accuracy and reliability of such quantitative assays depend on the quality of the stable-isotope labeled standards. Although the quantification using stable-isotope labeled peptides is precise, the accuracy of the results can be severely biased by the purity of the internal standards, their stability and formulation, and the determination of their concentration. Here we describe a rapid and cost-efficient method to recalibrate stable isotope labeled peptides in a single LC-MS analysis. The method is based on the equimolar release of a protein reference peptide (used as surrogate for the protein of interest) and a universal reporter peptide during the trypsinization of a concatenated polypeptide standard. The quality and accuracy of data generated with such concatenated polypeptide standards are highlighted by the quantification of two clinically important proteins in urine samples and compared with results obtained with conventional stable isotope labeled reference peptides. Furthermore, the application of the UCRP standards in complex samples is described.

  2. Protein quantification using a cleavable reporter peptide.

    PubMed

    Duriez, Elodie; Trevisiol, Stephane; Domon, Bruno

    2015-02-01

    Peptide and protein quantification based on isotope dilution and mass spectrometry analysis are widely employed for the measurement of biomarkers and in system biology applications. The accuracy and reliability of such quantitative assays depend on the quality of the stable-isotope labeled standards. Although the quantification using stable-isotope labeled peptides is precise, the accuracy of the results can be severely biased by the purity of the internal standards, their stability and formulation, and the determination of their concentration. Here we describe a rapid and cost-efficient method to recalibrate stable isotope labeled peptides in a single LC-MS analysis. The method is based on the equimolar release of a protein reference peptide (used as surrogate for the protein of interest) and a universal reporter peptide during the trypsinization of a concatenated polypeptide standard. The quality and accuracy of data generated with such concatenated polypeptide standards are highlighted by the quantification of two clinically important proteins in urine samples and compared with results obtained with conventional stable isotope labeled reference peptides. Furthermore, the application of the UCRP standards in complex samples is described. PMID:25411902

  3. Numerical approach for quantification of epistemic uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakeman, John; Eldred, Michael; Xiu, Dongbin

    2010-06-01

    In the field of uncertainty quantification, uncertainty in the governing equations may assume two forms: aleatory uncertainty and epistemic uncertainty. Aleatory uncertainty can be characterised by known probability distributions whilst epistemic uncertainty arises from a lack of knowledge of probabilistic information. While extensive research efforts have been devoted to the numerical treatment of aleatory uncertainty, little attention has been given to the quantification of epistemic uncertainty. In this paper, we propose a numerical framework for quantification of epistemic uncertainty. The proposed methodology does not require any probabilistic information on uncertain input parameters. The method only necessitates an estimate of the range of the uncertain variables that encapsulates the true range of the input variables with overwhelming probability. To quantify the epistemic uncertainty, we solve an encapsulation problem, which is a solution to the original governing equations defined on the estimated range of the input variables. We discuss solution strategies for solving the encapsulation problem and the sufficient conditions under which the numerical solution can serve as a good estimator for capturing the effects of the epistemic uncertainty. In the case where probability distributions of the epistemic variables become known a posteriori, we can use the information to post-process the solution and evaluate solution statistics. Convergence results are also established for such cases, along with strategies for dealing with mixed aleatory and epistemic uncertainty. Several numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the procedure and properties of the proposed methodology.

  4. Automated Template Quantification for DNA Sequencing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Ivanetich, Kathryn M.; Yan, Wilson; Wunderlich, Kathleen M.; Weston, Jennifer; Walkup, Ward G.; Simeon, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The quantification of plasmid DNA by the PicoGreen dye binding assay has been automated, and the effect of quantification of user-submitted templates on DNA sequence quality in a core laboratory has been assessed. The protocol pipets, mixes and reads standards, blanks and up to 88 unknowns, generates a standard curve, and calculates template concentrations. For pUC19 replicates at five concentrations, coefficients of variance were 0.1, and percent errors were from 1% to 7% (n = 198). Standard curves with pUC19 DNA were nonlinear over the 1 to 1733 ng/μL concentration range required to assay the majority (98.7%) of user-submitted templates. Over 35,000 templates have been quantified using the protocol. For 1350 user-submitted plasmids, 87% deviated by ≥ 20% from the requested concentration (500 ng/μL). Based on data from 418 sequencing reactions, quantification of user-submitted templates was shown to significantly improve DNA sequence quality. The protocol is applicable to all types of double-stranded DNA, is unaffected by primer (1 pmol/μL), and is user modifiable. The protocol takes 30 min, saves 1 h of technical time, and costs approximately $0.20 per unknown. PMID:16461949

  5. Attenuation of cisplatin-induced emetogenesis by standardized Bacopa monnieri extracts in the pigeon: behavioral and neurochemical correlations.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Ihsan; Subhan, Fazal; Rudd, John A; Rauf, Khalid; Alam, Javaid; Shahid, Muhammad; Sewell, Robert D E

    2014-11-01

    Nausea and vomiting are the most distressing and common side effects of cancer chemotherapy which often result in patient noncompliance. In the present study, standardized methanolic and n-butanolic fractions of Bacopa monnieri were evaluated against cisplatin-induced emesis in the pigeon in relation to their activity on central and intestinal neurotransmitters levels. Cisplatin (7.0 mg/kg, i. v.) induced reproducible emesis without lethality in healthy pigeons. The methanolic (10-40 mg/kg) and the bacoside-rich n-butanolic fractions of B. monnieri (5-20 mg/kg), as well as the antioxidant N-(2-mercaptopropionyl) glycine (10 mg/kg), attenuated cisplatin-induced emesis by 66.3% (p < 0.05), 71.6% (p < 0.001), and 76.5% (p < 0.001), respectively, where the standard antiemetic metoclopramide (30 mg/kg) produced a 48.9% reduction (p < 0.01). The methanolic and n-butanolic fractions of B. monnieri at all of the doses tested significantly reduced the serotonin concentration (p < 0.001) in the brain stem and intestine 3 h after cisplatin administration, while at the 18th h, B. monnieri treatments attenuated not only the dopamine upsurge in the area postrema and brain stem (p < 0.05-0.001), but also the intestinal 5-HT concentration (p < 0.01-0.001). B. monnieri treatments alone did not alter the basal neurotransmitters or their metabolites in the brain areas and intestine. The prolonged suppressive effect of B. monnieri treatments on the behavioral signs of cisplatin-induced emesis, the subsequent supportive neural evidence, and the safety and tolerability profile suggest that B. monnieri methanolic and bacoside-rich n-butanolic fractions might be a valuable adjunct in the treatment of emetogenic chemotherapy, and this warrants further study in other models of emesis.

  6. Alterations in stress-associated behaviors and neurochemical markers in adult rats after neonatal short-lasting local inflammatory insult.

    PubMed

    Anseloni, V C Z; He, F; Novikova, S I; Turnbach Robbins, M; Lidow, I A; Ennis, M; Lidow, M S

    2005-01-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in long-term consequences of neonatal pain because modern neonatal intensive care units routinely employ procedures that cause considerable pain and may be followed by local inflammation and hyperalgesia lasting for several hours or even days. To address this question, we developed a rat model of short lasting (<2 days) early local inflammatory insult produced by a single injection of 0.25% carrageenan (CAR) into the plantar surface of a hindpaw. Previously, we demonstrated that rats receiving this treatment within the first week after birth grow into adults with a global reduction in responsiveness to acute pain. Here, we report that these animals also manifest a low anxiety trait associated with reduced emotional responsiveness to stress. This conclusion is based in the following observations: (a) rats in our model display reduced anxiety on an elevated plus-maze; (b) in the forced swim test, these rats exhibit behavioral characteristics associated with stronger ability for stress coping; and (c) these animals have reduced basal and stress-induced plasma levels of such stress-related neuroendocrine markers as corticotropin-releasing factor, vasopressin, and adrenocorticotrophic hormone. In addition, we used DNA microarray and real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to profile long-term changes in gene expression in the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG; a region involved in both stress and pain modulation) in our animal model. Among the affected genes, serotonergic receptors were particularly well represented. Specifically, we detected increase in the expression of 5-HT1A, 5-HT1D, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT4 receptors. Several of these receptors are known to be involved in the anxiolytic and analgesic activity of the PAG. Finally, to determine whether neonatal inflammatory insult induces elevation in maternal care, which may play a role in generating long-term behavioral alterations seen in our model, we

  7. The impact of environmental enrichment on sex-specific neurochemical circuitries - effects on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Chourbaji, S; Hörtnagl, H; Molteni, R; Riva, M A; Gass, P; Hellweg, R

    2012-09-18

    Experimental evidence in mice indicates that environmental conditions affect females and males differently. However, in a recent study analyzing the heterozygous mutation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), both sexes presented a similar emotional phenotype, which became obvious only under impoverished, but not in enriched conditions suggesting an "enrichment-induced" rescue. To investigate the basis of this behavioral "rescue" effect, we analyzed neurochemical changes (BDNF expression, serotonergic changes, and corticosterone) in the hippocampus, frontal cortex and hypothalamus of animals housed under respective conditions. In male mice, enrichment induced an increase of BDNF expression in the hippocampus of both BDNF heterozygous (BDNF(+/-)) and wild-types. Notably, in enriched-reared BDNF(+/-) mice BDNF mRNA and protein increased to levels comparable to those of wild-types in impoverished environment. In the frontal cortex of males, only wild-types presented an enrichment-induced increase of BDNF mRNA, while no effect of environment could be detected in BDNF protein levels of the male hypothalamus. A further male-specific effect of "environment" is the significant reduction of hypothalamic 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in enriched-housed wild-types. In female mice, environmental enrichment did not affect BDNF expression in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. However, comparable to males, an enrichment-induced increase of BDNF mRNA was detected in the frontal cortex of wild-types only. In contrast to males, no influence of environment on serotonergic parameters was observed. Male and female corticosterone levels were neither affected by "genotype" nor by "environment". In conclusion, we propose that the rescue of the emotional phenotype by environmental enrichment in BDNF(+/-) mice is directed by distinct mechanisms in males and females. Only in male BDNF(+/-) mice the rescue is related to an increase in hippocampal BDNF expression suggesting that enrichment

  8. Influences of Chronic Mild Stress Exposure on Motor, Non-Motor Impairments and Neurochemical Variables in Specific Brain Areas of MPTP/Probenecid Induced Neurotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Janakiraman, Udaiyappan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy Justin; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Barathidasan, Rajamani; SaravanaBabu, Chidambaram; Guillemin, Gilles J; Khan, Mohammed A S

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is regarded as a movement disorder mainly affecting the elderly population and occurs due to progressive loss of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in nigrostriatal pathway. Patients suffer from non-motor symptoms (NMS) such as depression, anxiety, fatigue and sleep disorders, which are not well focussed in PD research. Depression in PD is a predominant /complex symptom and its pathology lies exterior to the nigrostriatal system. The main aim of this study is to explore the causative or progressive effect of chronic mild stress (CMS), a paradigm developed as an animal model of depression in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (25 mg/kg. body wt.) with probenecid (250 mg/kg, s.c.) (MPTP/p) induced mice model of PD. After ten i.p. injections (once in 3.5 days for 5 weeks) of MPTP/p or exposure to CMS for 4 weeks, the behavioural (motor and non-motor) impairments, levels and expressions of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), DAergic markers such as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine transporter (DAT), vesicular monoamine transporters-2 (VMAT 2) and α-synuclein in nigrostriatal (striatum (ST) and substantia nigra (SN)) and extra-nigrostriatal (hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum) tissues were analysed. Significantly decreased DA and 5-HT levels, TH, DAT and VMAT 2 expressions and increased motor deficits, anhedonia-like behaviour and α-synuclein expression were found in MPTP/p treated mice. Pre and/or post exposure of CMS to MPTP/p mice further enhanced the MPTP/p induced DA and 5-HT depletion, behaviour abnormalities and protein expressions. Our results could strongly confirm that the exposure of stress after MPTP/p injections worsens the symptoms and neurochemicals status of PD.

  9. Influences of Chronic Mild Stress Exposure on Motor, Non-Motor Impairments and Neurochemical Variables in Specific Brain Areas of MPTP/Probenecid Induced Neurotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Janakiraman, Udaiyappan; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy Justin; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Barathidasan, Rajamani; SaravanaBabu, Chidambaram; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Khan, Mohammed A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is regarded as a movement disorder mainly affecting the elderly population and occurs due to progressive loss of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in nigrostriatal pathway. Patients suffer from non-motor symptoms (NMS) such as depression, anxiety, fatigue and sleep disorders, which are not well focussed in PD research. Depression in PD is a predominant /complex symptom and its pathology lies exterior to the nigrostriatal system. The main aim of this study is to explore the causative or progressive effect of chronic mild stress (CMS), a paradigm developed as an animal model of depression in1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (25 mg/kg. body wt.) with probenecid (250 mg/kg, s.c.) (MPTP/p) induced mice model of PD. After ten i.p. injections (once in 3.5 days for 5 weeks) of MPTP/p or exposure to CMS for 4 weeks, the behavioural (motor and non-motor) impairments, levels and expressions of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), DAergic markers such as tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine transporter (DAT), vesicular monoamine transporters—2 (VMAT 2) and α-synuclein in nigrostriatal (striatum (ST) and substantia nigra (SN)) and extra-nigrostriatal (hippocampus, cortex and cerebellum) tissues were analysed. Significantly decreased DA and 5-HT levels, TH, DAT and VMAT 2 expressions and increased motor deficits, anhedonia-like behaviour and α-synuclein expression were found in MPTP/p treated mice. Pre and/or post exposure of CMS to MPTP/p mice further enhanced the MPTP/p induced DA and 5-HT depletion, behaviour abnormalities and protein expressions. Our results could strongly confirm that the exposure of stress after MPTP/p injections worsens the symptoms and neurochemicals status of PD. PMID:26765842

  10. Stress and combined exposure to low doses of pyridostigmine bromide, DEET, and permethrin produce neurochemical and neuropathological alterations in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, A; Abou-Donia, Suzanne; El-Masry, Eman; Shetty, Ashok; Abou-Donia, Mohamed

    2004-01-23

    Exposure to a combination of stress and low doses of the chemicals pyridostigmine bromide (PB), DEET, and permethrin in adult rats, a model of Gulf War exposure, produces blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and neuronal cell death in the cingulate cortex, dentate gyrus, thalamus, and hypothalamus. In this study, neuropathological alterations in other areas of the brain where no apparent BBB disruption was observed was studied following such exposure. Animals exposed to both stress and chemical exhibited decreased brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellum and decreased m2 muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor ligand binding in the midbrain and cerebellum. These alterations were associated with significant neuronal cell death, reduced microtubule-associated protein (MAP-2) expression, and increased glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the cerebral cortex and the hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA3. In the cerebellum, the neurochemical alterations were associated with Purkinje cell loss and increased GFAP immunoreactivity in the white matter. However, animals subjected to either stress or chemicals alone did not show any of these changes in comparison to vehicle-treated controls. Collectively, these results suggest that prolonged exposure to a combination of stress and the chemicals PB, DEET, and permethrin can produce significant damage to the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, even in the absence of apparent BBB damage. As these areas of the brain are respectively important for the maintenance of motor and sensory functions, learning and memory, and gait and coordination of movements, such alterations could lead to many physiological, pharmacological, and behavioral abnormalities, particularly motor deficits and learning and memory dysfunction. PMID:14675905

  11. Peripheral neuritis and increased spinal cord neurochemicals are induced in a model of repetitive motion injury with low force and repetition exposure.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Melanie B; Barr, Ann E; Kietrys, David M; Al-Shatti, Talal; Amin, Mamta; Barbe, Mary F

    2008-07-01

    Performance of high repetition tasks with or without force is associated with peripheral tissue inflammation, decreased nerve function and motor dysfunction. Here, we examined whether a low repetition task with negligible force (LRNF) produces fewer tissue and behavioral pathologies than previously observed with high repetition tasks using our rat model of repetitive motion injury (RMI). Thirty-seven rats were randomized into control or LRNF groups, the latter reaching and grasping a 45 mg food pellet at a rate of 3 reaches/min. This task was performed in 4, 0.5 5 h sessions with 1.5 5 h rest periods for 3 days/week for up to 12 weeks. Examination of distal median nerve, forelimb flexor tendons and bones for ED1-positive cells (macrophages and osteoclasts) revealed increases in nerve and bone in week 12. The nerve also contained increased TNF-alpha expressing cells in week 12. Examination of spinal cord dorsal horns revealed increased immunoexpression of Substance P in week 8 and neurokinin-1 in weeks 8 and 12 in the superficial lamina. Motor behavioral analyses showed no changes in reach rate across weeks, slightly reduced task duration (a measurement of voluntary task participation) in week 12, but significantly increased extra arm movement reversals during reaching in week 8. These extra movement reversals were corrections for missed food pellets during a reach. Thus, performance of even a low repetition, negligible force upper extremity task for 3 months can induce mild peripheral tissue inflammation, neurochemical increases in spinal cord dorsal horns, and declines in fine motor control.

  12. Combined lesions of cholinergic and serotonergic neurons in the rat brain using 192 IgG-saporin and 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine: neurochemical and behavioural characterization.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, O; Jeltsch, H; Lehnardt, O; Pain, L; Lazarus, C; Cassel, J C

    2000-01-01

    This study assessed behavioural and neurochemical effects of i.c.v. injections of both the cholinergic toxin 192 IgG-saporin (2 microgram) and the serotonergic toxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT; 150 microgram) in Long-Evans female rats. Dependent behavioural variables were locomotor activity, forced T-maze alternation, beam walking, Morris water-maze (working and reference memory) and radial-maze performances. After killing by microwave irradiation, the concentrations of acetylcholine, monoamines and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were measured in the hippocampus, frontoparietal cortex and striatum. 192 IgG-saporin reduced the concentration of acetylcholine by approximately 40% in the frontoparietal cortex and hippocampus, but had no effect in the striatum. 5,7-DHT lesions reduced the concentration of serotonin by 60% in the frontoparietal cortex and 80% in the hippocampus and striatum. Noradrenaline was unchanged in all structures except the ventral hippocampus where it was slightly increased in rats given 192 IgG-saporin. Cholinergic lesions induced severe motor deficits but had no other effect. Serotonergic lesions produced diurnal and nocturnal hyperactivity but had no other effect. Rats with combined lesions were more active than those with only serotonergic lesions, showed motor dysfunctions similar to those found in rats with cholinergic lesions alone, and exhibited impaired performances in the T-maze alternation test, the water-maze working memory test and the radial-maze. Taken together and although cholinergic lesions were not maximal, these data show that 192 IgG-saporin and 5,7-DHT lesions can be combined to selectively damage cholinergic and serotonergic neurons, and confirm that cholinergic-serotonergic interactions play an important role in some aspects of memory, particularly in spatial working memory. PMID:10651861

  13. Classification and quantification of bacteriophage taxa in human gut metagenomes

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Alison S; Yamada, Takuji; Kristensen, David M; Kultima, Jens Roat; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Koonin, Eugene V; Bork, Peer

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages have key roles in microbial communities, to a large extent shaping the taxonomic and functional composition of the microbiome, but data on the connections between phage diversity and the composition of communities are scarce. Using taxon-specific marker genes, we identified and monitored 20 viral taxa in 252 human gut metagenomic samples, mostly at the level of genera. On average, five phage taxa were identified in each sample, with up to three of these being highly abundant. The abundances of most phage taxa vary by up to four orders of magnitude between the samples, and several taxa that are highly abundant in some samples are absent in others. Significant correlations exist between the abundances of some phage taxa and human host metadata: for example, ‘Group 936 lactococcal phages' are more prevalent and abundant in Danish samples than in samples from Spain or the United States of America. Quantification of phages that exist as integrated prophages revealed that the abundance profiles of prophages are highly individual-specific and remain unique to an individual over a 1-year time period, and prediction of prophage lysis across the samples identified hundreds of prophages that are apparently active in the gut and vary across the samples, in terms of presence and lytic state. Finally, a prophage–host network of the human gut was established and includes numerous novel host–phage associations. PMID:24621522

  14. MLPA diagnostics of complex microbial communities: relative quantification of bacterial species in oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Terefework, Zewdu; Pham, Chi L; Prosperi, Anja C; Entius, Mark M; Errami, Abdellatif; van Spanning, Rob J M; Zaura, Egija; Ten Cate, Jacob M; Crielaard, Wim

    2008-12-01

    A multitude of molecular methods are currently used for identification and characterization of oral biofilms or for community profiling. However, multiplex PCR techniques that are able to routinely identify several species in a single assay are not available. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) identifies up to 45 unique fragments in a single tube PCR. Here we report a novel use of MLPA in the relative quantification of targeted microorganisms in a community of oral microbiota. We designed 9 species specific probes for: Actinomyces gerencseriae, Actinomyces naeslundii, Actinomyces odontolyticus, Candida albicans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Rothia dentocariosa, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis and Veillonella parvula; and genus specific probes for selected oral Streptococci and Lactobacilli based on their 16S rDNA sequences. MLPA analysis of DNA pooled from the strains showed the expected specific MLPA products. Relative quantification of a serial dilution of equimolar DNA showed that as little as 10 pg templates can be detected with clearly discernible signals. Moreover, a 2 to 7% divergence in relative signal ratio of amplified probes observed from normalized peak area values suggests MLPA can be a cheaper alternative to using qPCR for quantification. We observed 2 to 6 fold fluctuations in signal intensities of MLPA products in DNAs isolated from multispecies biofilms grown in various media for various culture times. Furthermore, MLPA analyses of DNA isolated from saliva obtained from different donors gave a varying number and intensity of signals. This clearly shows the usefulness of MLPA in a quantitative description of microbial shifts.

  15. Relative and absolute quantification of postsynaptic density proteome isolated from rat forebrain and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dongmei; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Rush, John; Ramm, Elizabeth; Schlager, Max A; Duong, Duc M; Xu, Ping; Wijayawardana, Sameera R; Hanfelt, John; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Sheng, Morgan; Peng, Junmin

    2006-06-01

    The postsynaptic density (PSD) of central excitatory synapses is essential for postsynaptic signaling, and its components are heterogeneous among different neuronal subtypes and brain structures. Here we report large scale relative and absolute quantification of proteins in PSDs purified from adult rat forebrain and cerebellum. PSD protein profiles were determined using the cleavable ICAT strategy and LC-MS/MS. A total of 296 proteins were identified and quantified with 43 proteins exhibiting statistically significant abundance change between forebrain and cerebellum, indicating marked molecular heterogeneity of PSDs between different brain regions. Moreover we utilized absolute quantification strategy, in which synthetic isotope-labeled peptides were used as internal standards, to measure the molar abundance of 32 key PSD proteins in forebrain and cerebellum. These data confirm the abundance of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and PSD-95 and reveal unexpected stoichiometric ratios between glutamate receptors, scaffold proteins, and signaling molecules in the PSD. Our data also demonstrate that the absolute quantification method is well suited for targeted quantitative proteomic analysis. Overall this study delineates a crucial molecular difference between forebrain and cerebellar PSDs and provides a quantitative framework for measuring the molecular stoichiometry of the PSD. PMID:16507876

  16. Quantification of phytochelatins and their metal(loid) complexes: critical assessment of current analytical methodology.

    PubMed

    Wood, B Alan; Feldmann, Jörg

    2012-04-01

    Whilst there are a variety of methods available for the quantification of biothiols in sample extracts, each has their own inherent advantages and limitations. The ease with which thiols readily oxidise not only hinders their quantification but also alters the speciation profile. The challenge faced by the analyst is not only to preserve the speciation of the sample, but also to select a method which allows the retrieval of the desired information. Given that sulfur is not a chromophore and that it cannot easily be monitored by ICP-MS, a number of direct and indirect methods have been developed for this purpose. In order to assess these methods, they are compared in the context of the measurement of arsenic-phytochelatin complexes in plant extracts. The inherent instability of such complexes, along with the instabilities of reduced glutathione and phytochelatin species,necessitates a rapid and sensitive analytical protocol. Whilst being a specific example, the points raised and discussed in this review will also be applicable to the quantification of biothiols and thiol-metal(loid) species in a wide range of systems other than just the analysis of arsenic-phytochelatin species in plant extracts.

  17. Triacylglycerol profiling of microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bensheng; Vieler, Astrid; Li, Chao; Jones, A Daniel; Benning, Christoph

    2013-10-01

    Triacylglycerols (TAGs) from microalgae can serve as feedstock for the production of biofuels. To gain a comprehensive understanding of TAG metabolism in algae through genetic and molecular approaches, and to improve algal biofuel production, efficient and quantitative phenotyping methods focusing on TAGs are required. Towards this end, a facile ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry protocol was developed for TAG profiling, achieving identification and quantification of intact TAG molecular species in two algae. TAG profiling was performed in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Nannochloropsis oceanica grown in nitrogen (N)-replete or N-depleted medium. For the quantification of algal TAGs and fatty acids, two sets of internal standards were developed by taking advantage of the presence of pheophytin and specific fatty acids in algal samples. Comparison of algal TAG levels was simplified by using these internal standards for TAG analysis, paving the way for high-throughput mutant screening. PMID:23948268

  18. QUANTIFICATION OF TISSUE PROPERTIES IN SMALL VOLUMES

    SciTech Connect

    J. MOURANT; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    The quantification of tissue properties by optical measurements will facilitate the development of noninvasive methods of cancer diagnosis and detection. Optical measurements are sensitive to tissue structure which is known to change during tumorigenesis. The goals of the work presented in this paper were to verify that the primary scatterers of light in cells are structures much smaller than the nucleus and then to develop an optical technique that can quantify parameters of structures the same size as the scattering features in cells. Polarized, elastic back-scattering was found to be able to quantify changes in scattering properties for turbid media consisting of scatterers of the size found in tissue.

  19. Tutorial examples for uncertainty quantification methods.

    SciTech Connect

    De Bord, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    This report details the work accomplished during my 2015 SULI summer internship at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA. During this internship, I worked on multiple tasks with the common goal of making uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods more accessible to the general scientific community. As part of my work, I created a comprehensive numerical integration example to incorporate into the user manual of a UQ software package. Further, I developed examples involving heat transfer through a window to incorporate into tutorial lectures that serve as an introduction to UQ methods.

  20. Adjoint-Based Uncertainty Quantification with MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Seifried, Jeffrey E.

    2011-09-01

    This work serves to quantify the instantaneous uncertainties in neutron transport simulations born from nuclear data and statistical counting uncertainties. Perturbation and adjoint theories are used to derive implicit sensitivity expressions. These expressions are transformed into forms that are convenient for construction with MCNP6, creating the ability to perform adjoint-based uncertainty quantification with MCNP6. These new tools are exercised on the depleted-uranium hybrid LIFE blanket, quantifying its sensitivities and uncertainties to important figures of merit. Overall, these uncertainty estimates are small (< 2%). Having quantified the sensitivities and uncertainties, physical understanding of the system is gained and some confidence in the simulation is acquired.

  1. Quantification of key long-term risks at CO₂ sequestration sites: Latest results from US DOE's National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Pawar, Rajesh; Bromhal, Grant; Carroll, Susan; Chu, Shaoping; Dilmore, Robert; Gastelum, Jason; Oldenburg, Curt; Stauffer, Philip; Zhang, Yingqi; Guthrie, George

    2014-12-31

    Risk assessment for geologic CO₂ storage including quantification of risks is an area of active investigation. The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is a US-Department of Energy (US-DOE) effort focused on developing a defensible, science-based methodology and platform for quantifying risk profiles at geologic CO₂ sequestration sites. NRAP has been developing a methodology that centers round development of an integrated assessment model (IAM) using system modeling approach to quantify risks and risk profiles. The IAM has been used to calculate risk profiles with a few key potential impacts due to potential CO₂ and brine leakage. The simulation results are also used to determine long-term storage security relationships and compare the long-term storage effectiveness to IPCC storage permanence goal. Additionally, we also demonstrate application of IAM for uncertainty quantification in order to determine parameters to which the uncertainty in model results is most sensitive.

  2. Quantification of key long-term risks at CO₂ sequestration sites: Latest results from US DOE's National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Project

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pawar, Rajesh; Bromhal, Grant; Carroll, Susan; Chu, Shaoping; Dilmore, Robert; Gastelum, Jason; Oldenburg, Curt; Stauffer, Philip; Zhang, Yingqi; Guthrie, George

    2014-12-31

    Risk assessment for geologic CO₂ storage including quantification of risks is an area of active investigation. The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is a US-Department of Energy (US-DOE) effort focused on developing a defensible, science-based methodology and platform for quantifying risk profiles at geologic CO₂ sequestration sites. NRAP has been developing a methodology that centers round development of an integrated assessment model (IAM) using system modeling approach to quantify risks and risk profiles. The IAM has been used to calculate risk profiles with a few key potential impacts due to potential CO₂ and brine leakage. The simulation results are alsomore » used to determine long-term storage security relationships and compare the long-term storage effectiveness to IPCC storage permanence goal. Additionally, we also demonstrate application of IAM for uncertainty quantification in order to determine parameters to which the uncertainty in model results is most sensitive.« less

  3. Virus detection and quantification using electrical parameters

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Mustafa, Farah; Ali, Lizna M.; Rizvi, Tahir A.

    2014-01-01

    Here we identify and quantitate two similar viruses, human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV), suspended in a liquid medium without labeling, using a semiconductor technique. The virus count was estimated by calculating the impurities inside a defined volume by observing the change in electrical parameters. Empirically, the virus count was similar to the absolute value of the ratio of the change of the virus suspension dopant concentration relative to the mock dopant over the change in virus suspension Debye volume relative to mock Debye volume. The virus type was identified by constructing a concentration-mobility relationship which is unique for each kind of virus, allowing for a fast (within minutes) and label-free virus quantification and identification. For validation, the HIV and FIV virus preparations were further quantified by a biochemical technique and the results obtained by both approaches corroborated well. We further demonstrate that the electrical technique could be applied to accurately measure and characterize silica nanoparticles that resemble the virus particles in size. Based on these results, we anticipate our present approach to be a starting point towards establishing the foundation for label-free electrical-based identification and quantification of an unlimited number of viruses and other nano-sized particles. PMID:25355078

  4. Quantification of prebiotics in commercial infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Sabater, Carlos; Prodanov, Marin; Olano, Agustín; Corzo, Nieves; Montilla, Antonia

    2016-03-01

    Since breastfeeding is not always possible, infant formulas (IFs) are supplemented with prebiotic oligosaccharides, such as galactooligosaccharides (GOS) and/or fructooligosaccharides (FOS) to exert similar effects to those of the breast milk. Nowadays, a great number of infant formulas enriched with prebiotics are disposal in the market, however there are scarce data about their composition. In this study, the combined use of two chromatographic methods (GC-FID and HPLC-RID) for the quantification of carbohydrates present in commercial infant formulas have been used. According to the results obtained by GC-FID for products containing prebiotics, the content of FOS, GOS and GOS/FOS was in the ranges of 1.6-5.0, 1.7-3.2, and 0.08-0.25/2.3-3.8g/100g of product, respectively. HPLC-RID analysis allowed quantification of maltodextrins with degree of polymerization (DP) up to 19. The methodology proposed here may be used for routine quality control of infant formula and other food ingredients containing prebiotics.

  5. Simple quantification of in planta fungal biomass.

    PubMed

    Ayliffe, Michael; Periyannan, Sambasivam K; Feechan, Angela; Dry, Ian; Schumann, Ulrike; Lagudah, Evans; Pryor, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    An accurate assessment of the disease resistance status of plants to fungal pathogens is an essential requirement for the development of resistant crop plants. Many disease resistance phenotypes are partial rather than obvious immunity and are frequently scored using subjective qualitative estimates of pathogen development or plant disease symptoms. Here we report a method for the accurate comparison of total fungal biomass in plant tissues. This method, called the WAC assay, is based upon the specific binding of the plant lectin wheat germ agglutinin to fungal chitin. The assay is simple, high-throughput, and sensitive enough to discriminate between single Puccinia graminis f.sp tritici infection sites on a wheat leaf segment. It greatly lends itself to replication as large volumes of tissue can be pooled from independent experiments and assayed to provide truly representative quantification, or, alternatively, fungal growth on a single, small leaf segment can be quantified. In addition, as the assay is based upon a microscopic technique, pathogen infection sites can also be examined at high magnification prior to quantification if desired and average infection site areas are determined. Previously, we have demonstrated the application of the WAC assay for quantifying the growth of several different pathogen species in both glasshouse grown material and large-scale field plots. Details of this method are provided within.

  6. Virus detection and quantification using electrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Mustafa, Farah; Ali, Lizna M.; Rizvi, Tahir A.

    2014-10-01

    Here we identify and quantitate two similar viruses, human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV), suspended in a liquid medium without labeling, using a semiconductor technique. The virus count was estimated by calculating the impurities inside a defined volume by observing the change in electrical parameters. Empirically, the virus count was similar to the absolute value of the ratio of the change of the virus suspension dopant concentration relative to the mock dopant over the change in virus suspension Debye volume relative to mock Debye volume. The virus type was identified by constructing a concentration-mobility relationship which is unique for each kind of virus, allowing for a fast (within minutes) and label-free virus quantification and identification. For validation, the HIV and FIV virus preparations were further quantified by a biochemical technique and the results obtained by both approaches corroborated well. We further demonstrate that the electrical technique could be applied to accurately measure and characterize silica nanoparticles that resemble the virus particles in size. Based on these results, we anticipate our present approach to be a starting point towards establishing the foundation for label-free electrical-based identification and quantification of an unlimited number of viruses and other nano-sized particles.

  7. Quantification of ontogenetic allometry in ammonoids.

    PubMed

    Korn, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Ammonoids are well-known objects used for studies on ontogeny and phylogeny, but a quantification of ontogenetic change has not yet been carried out. Their planispirally coiled conchs allow for a study of "longitudinal" ontogenetic data, that is data of ontogenetic trajectories that can be obtained from a single specimen. Therefore, they provide a good model for ontogenetic studies of geometry in other shelled organisms. Using modifications of three cardinal conch dimensions, computer simulations can model artificial conchs. The trajectories of ontogenetic allometry of these simulations can be analyzed in great detail in a theoretical morphospace. A method for the classification of conch ontogeny and quantification of the degree of allometry is proposed. Using high-precision cross-sections, the allometric conch growth of real ammonoids can be documented and compared. The members of the Ammonoidea show a wide variety of allometric growth, ranging from near isometry to monophasic, biphasic, or polyphasic allometry. Selected examples of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic ammonoids are shown with respect to their degree of change during ontogeny of the conch.

  8. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  9. Quantification of ontogenetic allometry in ammonoids.

    PubMed

    Korn, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Ammonoids are well-known objects used for studies on ontogeny and phylogeny, but a quantification of ontogenetic change has not yet been carried out. Their planispirally coiled conchs allow for a study of "longitudinal" ontogenetic data, that is data of ontogenetic trajectories that can be obtained from a single specimen. Therefore, they provide a good model for ontogenetic studies of geometry in other shelled organisms. Using modifications of three cardinal conch dimensions, computer simulations can model artificial conchs. The trajectories of ontogenetic allometry of these simulations can be analyzed in great detail in a theoretical morphospace. A method for the classification of conch ontogeny and quantification of the degree of allometry is proposed. Using high-precision cross-sections, the allometric conch growth of real ammonoids can be documented and compared. The members of the Ammonoidea show a wide variety of allometric growth, ranging from near isometry to monophasic, biphasic, or polyphasic allometry. Selected examples of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic ammonoids are shown with respect to their degree of change during ontogeny of the conch. PMID:23134208

  10. Profiling and Racial Profiling: An Interactive Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semple, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Racial Profiling has been recognized as a serious problem that affects many segments of our society and is especially notable in law enforcement. Governments and police services have pronounced that racial profiling is not acceptable and will not be tolerated. They have gone to great lengths in trying to eradicate racial profiling through…

  11. Combining confocal Raman microscopy and freeze-drying for quantification of substance penetration into human skin.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Lutz; Anderski, Juliane; Planz, Viktoria; Kostka, Karl-Heinz; Windbergs, Maike

    2014-12-01

    In the area of dermatological research, the knowledge of rate and extent of substance penetration into the human skin is essential not only for evaluation of therapeutics, but also for risk assessment of chemicals and cosmetic ingredients. Recently, confocal Raman microscopy emerged as a novel analytical technique for analysis of substance skin penetration. In contrast to destructive drug extraction and quantification, the technique is non-destructive and provides high spatial resolution in three dimensions. However, the generation of time-resolved concentration depth profiles is restrained by ongoing diffusion of the penetrating substance during analysis. To prevent that, substance diffusion in excised human skin can instantly be stopped at defined time points by freeze-drying the sample. Thus, combining sample preparation by freeze-drying with drug quantification by confocal Raman microscopy yields a novel analytical platform for non-invasive and quantitative in vitro analysis of substance skin penetration. This work presents the first proof-of-concept study for non-invasive quantitative substance depth profiling in freeze-dried excised human stratum corneum by confocal Raman microscopy. PMID:25219950

  12. Accurate Proteome-wide Label-free Quantification by Delayed Normalization and Maximal Peptide Ratio Extraction, Termed MaxLFQ *

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jürgen; Hein, Marco Y.; Luber, Christian A.; Paron, Igor; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Mann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Protein quantification without isotopic labels has been a long-standing interest in the proteomics field. However, accurate and robust proteome-wide quantification with label-free approaches remains a challenge. We developed a new intensity determination and normalization procedure called MaxLFQ that is fully compatible with any peptide or protein separation prior to LC-MS analysis. Protein abundance profiles are assembled using the maximum possible information from MS signals, given that the presence of quantifiable peptides varies from sample to sample. For a benchmark dataset with two proteomes mixed at known ratios, we accurately detected the mixing ratio over the entire protein expression range, with greater precision for abundant proteins. The significance of individual label-free quantifications was obtained via a t test approach. For a second benchmark dataset, we accurately quantify fold changes over several orders of magnitude, a task that is challenging with label-based methods. MaxLFQ is a generic label-free quantification technology that is readily applicable to many biological questions; it is compatible with standard statistical analysis workflows, and it has been validated in many and diverse biological projects. Our algorithms can handle very large experiments of 500+ samples in a manageable computing time. It is implemented in the freely available MaxQuant computational proteomics platform and works completely seamlessly at the click of a button. PMID:24942700

  13. Enrichment and quantification of monoacylglycerols and free fatty acids by solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chu, Boon-Seang; Nagy, Kornél

    2013-08-01

    Quantification of monoacylglycerols (MAG) and free fatty acids (FA) is of interest in biological systems, in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical products. This manuscript describes and validates a reversed phase liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry based approach for simultaneous quantification of these analytes in fats and oils. Purification and concentration of MAG/FA were performed using cation exchange solid phase extraction, which allowed elimination of the abundant triacylglycerols. Following cleanup and concentration, the analytes were separated and detected with the aid of volatile ammonium-formate buffer. MAG were detected in positive ion mode, while FA were detected in negative ion mode. The method was validated by the method of standard additions and using stable isotope labeled internal standards. The results confirm the feasibility of quantifying these two classes of analytes simultaneously without any chemical derivatization. The obtained main quantitative features include: (1) lower limits of quantification 1-30ppm for MAG analytes, (2) lower limits of quantification 90-300ppm for FA analytes, (3) averaged inter-batch precision 6%, and (4) averaged bias -0.2% for MAG and 0.5% for FA. Various animal fat and vegetable oil samples were characterized for their MAG/FA profile indicating the usefulness of the method to address quality and authenticity of fats and oils.

  14. COMPENDEX Profiling Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standera, Oldrich

    This manual provides instructions for completing the COMPENDEX (Computerized Engineering Index) Profile Submission Form used to prepare Current Information Selection (CIS) profiles. An annotated bibliography lists nine items useful in searching for proper profile words. (AB)

  15. Forced degradation and impurity profiling: recent trends in analytical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepti; Basniwal, Pawan Kumar

    2013-12-01

    This review describes an epigrammatic impression of the recent trends in analytical perspectives of degradation and impurities profiling of pharmaceuticals including active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) as well as drug products during 2008-2012. These recent trends in forced degradation and impurity profiling were discussed on the head of year of publication; columns, matrix (API and dosage forms) and type of elution in chromatography (isocratic and gradient); therapeutic categories of the drug which were used for analysis. It focuses distinctly on comprehensive update of various analytical methods including hyphenated techniques for the identification and quantification of thresholds of impurities and degradants in different pharmaceutical matrices. PMID:23969330

  16. Forced degradation and impurity profiling: recent trends in analytical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jain, Deepti; Basniwal, Pawan Kumar

    2013-12-01

    This review describes an epigrammatic impression of the recent trends in analytical perspectives of degradation and impurities profiling of pharmaceuticals including active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) as well as drug products during 2008-2012. These recent trends in forced degradation and impurity profiling were discussed on the head of year of publication; columns, matrix (API and dosage forms) and type of elution in chromatography (isocratic and gradient); therapeutic categories of the drug which were used for analysis. It focuses distinctly on comprehensive update of various analytical methods including hyphenated techniques for the identification and quantification of thresholds of impurities and degradants in different pharmaceutical matrices.

  17. An improved competitive inhibition enzymatic immunoassay method for tetrodotoxin quantification.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Amber N; Williams, Becky L; French, Susannah S

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been a challenge in both ecological and medical research due to the cost, time and training required of most quantification techniques. Here we present a modified Competitive Inhibition Enzymatic Immunoassay for the quantification of TTX, and to aid researchers in the optimization of this technique for widespread use with a high degree of accuracy and repeatability.

  18. Analysis of the interplay between neurochemical control of respiration and upper airway mechanics producing upper airway obstruction during sleep in humans.

    PubMed

    Longobardo, G S; Evangelisti, C J; Cherniack, N S

    2008-02-01

    Increased loop gain (a function of both controller gain and plant gain), which results in instability in feedback control, is of major importance in producing recurrent central apnoeas during sleep but its role in causing obstructive apnoeas is not clear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of loop gain in producing obstructive sleep apnoeas. Owing to the complexity of factors that may operate to produce obstruction during sleep, we used a mathematical model to sort them out. The model used was based on our previous model of neurochemical control of breathing, which included the effects of chemical stimuli and changes in alertness on respiratory pattern generator activity. To this we added a model of the upper airways that contained a narrowed section which behaved as a compressible elastic tube and was tethered during inspiration by the contraction of the upper airway dilator muscles. These muscles in the model, as in life, responded to changes in hypoxia, hypercapnia and alertness in a manner similar to the action of the chest wall muscles, opposing the compressive action caused by the negative intraluminal pressure generated during inspiration which was magnified by the Bernoulli Effect. As the velocity of inspiratory airflow increased, with sufficiently large increase in airflow velocity, obstruction occurred. Changes in breathing after sleep onset were simulated. The simulations showed that increases in controller gain caused the more rapid onset of obstructive apnoeas. Apnoea episodes were terminated by arousal. With a constant controller gain, as stiffness decreased, obstructed breaths appeared and periods of obstruction recurred longer after sleep onset before disappearing. Decreased controller gain produced, for example, by breathing oxygen eliminated the obstructive apnoeas resulting from moderate reductions in constricted segment stiffness. This became less effective as stiffness was reduced more. Contraction of the upper airway muscles

  19. Repeated, Intermittent Social Defeat across the Entire Juvenile Period Resulted in Behavioral, Physiological, Hormonal, Immunological, and Neurochemical Alterations in Young Adult Male Golden Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei-Chun; Liu, Ching-Yi; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain is vulnerable to social defeat during the juvenile period. As complements of human studies, animal models of social defeat provide a straightforward approach to investigating the functional and neurobiological consequences of social defeats. Taking advantage of agonist behavior and social defeat in male golden hamster, a set of 6 experiments was conducted to investigate the consequences at multiple levels in young adulthood resulting from repeated, intermittent social defeats or “social threats” across the entire juvenile period. Male hamsters at postnatal day 28 (P28) were randomly assigned to either the social defeat, “social threat”, or arena control group, and they correspondingly received a series of nine social interaction trials (i.e., either social defeat, “social threat”, or arena control conditions) from P33 to P66. At the behavioral level (Experiment 1), we found that repeated social defeats (but not “social threats”) significantly impacted locomotor activity in the familiar context and social interaction in the familiar/unfamiliar social contexts. At the physiological and hormonal levels (Experiments 2 and 3), repeated social defeat significantly enhanced the cortisol and norepinephrine concentrations in blood. Enlargement of the spleen was also found in the social defeat and “social threat” groups. At the immunological level (Experiment 4), the social defeat group showed lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the hypothalamus and hippocampus but higher concentration of IL-6 in the striatum compared to the other two groups. At the neurochemical level (Experiment 5), the socially defeated hamsters mainly displayed reductions of dopamine, dopamine metabolites, and 5-HT levels in the striatum and decreased level of 5-HT in the hippocampus. In Experiment 6, an increase in the spine density of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was specifically observed in the “social threat” group. Collectively, our

  20. Repeated, Intermittent Social Defeat across the Entire Juvenile Period Resulted in Behavioral, Physiological, Hormonal, Immunological, and Neurochemical Alterations in Young Adult Male Golden Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wei-Chun; Liu, Ching-Yi; Lai, Wen-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The developing brain is vulnerable to social defeat during the juvenile period. As complements of human studies, animal models of social defeat provide a straightforward approach to investigating the functional and neurobiological consequences of social defeats. Taking advantage of agonist behavior and social defeat in male golden hamster, a set of 6 experiments was conducted to investigate the consequences at multiple levels in young adulthood resulting from repeated, intermittent social defeats or "social threats" across the entire juvenile period. Male hamsters at postnatal day 28 (P28) were randomly assigned to either the social defeat, "social threat", or arena control group, and they correspondingly received a series of nine social interaction trials (i.e., either social defeat, "social threat", or arena control conditions) from P33 to P66. At the behavioral level (Experiment 1), we found that repeated social defeats (but not "social threats") significantly impacted locomotor activity in the familiar context and social interaction in the familiar/unfamiliar social contexts. At the physiological and hormonal levels (Experiments 2 and 3), repeated social defeat significantly enhanced the cortisol and norepinephrine concentrations in blood. Enlargement of the spleen was also found in the social defeat and "social threat" groups. At the immunological level (Experiment 4), the social defeat group showed lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the hypothalamus and hippocampus but higher concentration of IL-6 in the striatum compared to the other two groups. At the neurochemical level (Experiment 5), the socially defeated hamsters mainly displayed reductions of dopamine, dopamine metabolites, and 5-HT levels in the striatum and decreased level of 5-HT in the hippocampus. In Experiment 6, an increase in the spine density of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was specifically observed in the "social threat" group. Collectively, our findings indicate that repeated

  1. Survey and Evaluate Uncertainty Quantification Methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Engel, David W.; Eslinger, Paul W.

    2012-02-01

    The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and academic institutions that will develop and deploy state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development, demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. The CCSI Toolset will provide end users in industry with a comprehensive, integrated suite of scientifically validated models with uncertainty quantification, optimization, risk analysis and decision making capabilities. The CCSI Toolset will incorporate commercial and open-source software currently in use by industry and will also develop new software tools as necessary to fill technology gaps identified during execution of the project. The CCSI Toolset will (1) enable promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of devices and processes; (2) reduce the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes; (3) quantify the technical risk in taking technology from laboratory-scale to commercial-scale; and (4) stabilize deployment costs more quickly by replacing some of the physical operational tests with virtual power plant simulations. The goal of CCSI is to deliver a toolset that can simulate the scale-up of a broad set of new carbon capture technologies from laboratory scale to full commercial scale. To provide a framework around which the toolset can be developed and demonstrated, we will focus on three Industrial Challenge Problems (ICPs) related to carbon capture technologies relevant to U.S. pulverized coal (PC) power plants. Post combustion capture by solid sorbents is the technology focus of the initial ICP (referred to as ICP A). The goal of the uncertainty quantification (UQ) task (Task 6) is to provide a set of capabilities to the user community for the quantification of uncertainties associated with the carbon

  2. Feature isolation and quantification of evolving datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Identifying and isolating features is an important part of visualization and a crucial step for the analysis and understanding of large time-dependent data sets (either from observation or simulation). In this proposal, we address these concerns, namely the investigation and implementation of basic 2D and 3D feature based methods to enhance current visualization techniques and provide the building blocks for automatic feature recognition, tracking, and correlation. These methods incorporate ideas from scientific visualization, computer vision, image processing, and mathematical morphology. Our focus is in the area of fluid dynamics, and we show the applicability of these methods to the quantification and tracking of three-dimensional vortex and turbulence bursts.

  3. Poliovirus: Generation, Quantification, Propagation, Purification, and Storage

    PubMed Central

    Burrill, Cecily P.; Strings, Vanessa R.; Andino, Raul

    2016-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) is the prototypical picornavirus. It is a non-enveloped RNA virus with a small (~7.5 kb) genome of positive polarity. It has long served as a model to study RNA virus biology, pathogenesis, and evolution. cDNA clones of several strains are available, and infectious virus can be produced by the transfection of in vitro transcribed viral genomes into an appropriate host cell. PV infects many human and non-human primate cell lines including HeLa and HeLa S3 cells, and can grow to high titer in culture. Protocols for the production, propagation, quantification, and purification of PV are presented. A separate chapter concerning the generation and characterization of PV mutants will also be presented. PMID:23686830

  4. Uncertainty quantification in DIC with Kriging regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dezhi; DiazDelaO, F. A.; Wang, Weizhuo; Lin, Xiaoshan; Patterson, Eann A.; Mottershead, John E.

    2016-03-01

    A Kriging regression model is developed as a post-processing technique for the treatment of measurement uncertainty in classical subset-based Digital Image Correlation (DIC). Regression is achieved by regularising the sample-point correlation matrix using a local, subset-based, assessment of the measurement error with assumed statistical normality and based on the Sum of Squared Differences (SSD) criterion. This leads to a Kriging-regression model in the form of a Gaussian process representing uncertainty on the Kriging estimate of the measured displacement field. The method is demonstrated using numerical and experimental examples. Kriging estimates of displacement fields are shown to be in excellent agreement with 'true' values for the numerical cases and in the experimental example uncertainty quantification is carried out using the Gaussian random process that forms part of the Kriging model. The root mean square error (RMSE) on the estimated displacements is produced and standard deviations on local strain estimates are determined.

  5. Quantification of Condylar Resorption in TMJ Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, LHS; Hajati, A-K; Paniagua, B; Lim, PF; Walker, DG; Palconet, G; Nackley, AG; Styner, M; Ludlow, JB; Zhu, H; Phillips, C

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study was performed to determine the condylar morphological variation of osteoarthritic (OA) and asymptomatic temporomandibular joints (TMJ) and to determine its correlation with pain intensity and duration. STUDY DESIGN Three dimensional surface models of mandibular condyles were constructed from Cone-Beam CT images of 29 female patients with TMJ OA (Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders Group III) and 36 female asymptomatic subjects. Shape Correspondence was used to localize and quantify the condylar morphology. Statistical analysis was performed with MANCOVA analysis using Hotelling T2 metric based on covariance matrices, and Pearson correlation. RESULTS OA condylar morphology was statistically significantly different from the asymptomatic condyles (p<0.05). 3D morphological variation of the OA condyles was significantly correlated with pain intensity and duration. CONCLUSION 3D quantification of condylar morphology revealed profound differences between OA and asymptomatic condyles and the extent of the resorptive changes paralleled pain severity and duration. PMID:20382043

  6. Quantification of adipose tissue insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Esben; Jensen, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    In metabolically healthy humans, adipose tissue is exquisitely sensitive to insulin. Similar to muscle and liver, adipose tissue lipolysis is insulin resistant in adults with central obesity and type 2 diabetes. Perhaps uniquely, however, insulin resistance in adipose tissue may directly contribute to development of insulin resistance in muscle and liver because of the increased delivery of free fatty acids to those tissues. It has been hypothesized that insulin adipose tissue resistance may precede other metabolic defects in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Therefore, precise and reproducible quantification of adipose tissue insulin sensitivity, in vivo, in humans, is an important measure. Unfortunately, no consensus exists on how to determine adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. We review the methods available to quantitate adipose tissue insulin sensitivity and will discuss their strengths and weaknesses.

  7. Recurrence quantification analysis of global stock markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastos, João A.; Caiado, Jorge

    2011-04-01

    This study investigates the presence of deterministic dependencies in international stock markets using recurrence plots and recurrence quantification analysis (RQA). The results are based on a large set of free float-adjusted market capitalization stock indices, covering a period of 15 years. The statistical tests suggest that the dynamics of stock prices in emerging markets is characterized by higher values of RQA measures when compared to their developed counterparts. The behavior of stock markets during critical financial events, such as the burst of the technology bubble, the Asian currency crisis, and the recent subprime mortgage crisis, is analyzed by performing RQA in sliding windows. It is shown that during these events stock markets exhibit a distinctive behavior that is characterized by temporary decreases in the fraction of recurrence points contained in diagonal and vertical structures.

  8. Quantification of Glutathione in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Caito, Samuel W.; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant intracellular thiol with diverse functions from redox signaling, xenobiotic detoxification, and apoptosis. The quantification of GSH is an important measure for redox capacity and oxidative stress. This protocol quantifies total GSH from Caenorhabditis elegans, an emerging model organism for toxicology studies. GSH is measured using the 5,5′-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) cycling method originally created for cell and tissue samples but optimized for whole worm extracts. DTNB reacts with GSH to from a 5′-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid (TNB) chromophore with maximum absorbance of 412 nm. This method is both rapid and sensitive, making it ideal for studies involving a large number of transgenic nematode strains. PMID:26309452

  9. Carotenoid Extraction and Quantification from Capsicum annuum

    PubMed Central

    Richins, Richard D.; Kilcrease, James; Rodgriguez-Uribe, Laura; O'Connell, Mary A.

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are ubiquitous pigments that play key roles in photosynthesis and also accumulate to high levels in fruit and flowers. Specific carotenoids play essential roles in human health as these compounds are precursors for Vitamin A; other specific carotenoids are important sources of macular pigments and all carotenoids are important anti-oxidants. Accurate determination of the composition and concentration of this complex set of natural products is therefore important in many different scientific areas. One of the richest sources of these compounds is the fruit of Capsicum; these red, yellow and orange fruit accumulate multiple carotenes and xanthophylls. This report describes the detailed method for the extraction and quantification of specific carotenes and xanthophylls. PMID:27570797

  10. [Quantification of motor activity in biomedicine].

    PubMed

    Giannazzo, E

    1993-01-01

    A computer-assisted analysis of motor activity was carried out using ultrasound waves, that are not invasive and free from any kind of interference, because of their specific characteristics. We worked out the Doppler's effect which determines a frequency variation on the reflected wave from any body in motion. That variation is linked to the velocity of the moving body and the superimposition of the emitted wave with those reflected, results in beats, which have a frequency proportional to the motor activity velocity. Our research group planned and carried out an electronic quantification apparatus that can be interfaced with a personal computer system by means of an Analog to Digital acquisition card. The performed test on the apparatus confirmed that the theory that the number of antinodes detected was proportional to the space covered by the moving body. The equipment was also tested on several types of animals.

  11. Quantification of uncertainty in geochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Gowri; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.; Robinson, Bruce A.; Aceves, Alejandro B.

    2007-12-01

    Predictions of reactive transport in the subsurface are routinely compromised by both model (structural) and parametric uncertainties. We present a set of computational tools for quantifying these two types of uncertainties. The model uncertainty is resolved at the molecular scale where epistemic uncertainty incorporates aleatory uncertainty. The parametric uncertainty is resolved at both molecular and continuum (Darcy) scales. We use the proposed approach to quantify uncertainty in modeling the sorption of neptunium through a competitive ion exchange. This radionuclide is of major concern for various high-level waste storage projects because of its relatively long half-life and its high-solubility and low-sorption properties. We demonstrate how parametric and model uncertainties affect one's ability to estimate the distribution coefficient. The uncertainty quantification tools yield complete probabilistic descriptions of key parameters affecting the fate and migration of neptunium in the subsurface rather than the lower statistical moments. This is important, since these distributions are highly skewed.

  12. Kinetic quantification of plyometric exercise intensity.

    PubMed

    Ebben, William P; Fauth, McKenzie L; Garceau, Luke R; Petushek, Erich J

    2011-12-01

    Ebben, WP, Fauth, ML, Garceau, LR, and Petushek, EJ. Kinetic quantification of plyometric exercise intensity. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3288-3298, 2011-Quantification of plyometric exercise intensity is necessary to understand the characteristics of these exercises and the proper progression of this mode of exercise. The purpose of this study was to assess the kinetic characteristics of a variety of plyometric exercises. This study also sought to assess gender differences in these variables. Twenty-six men and 23 women with previous experience in performing plyometric training served as subjects. The subjects performed a variety of plyometric exercises including line hops, 15.24-cm cone hops, squat jumps, tuck jumps, countermovement jumps (CMJs), loaded CMJs equal to 30% of 1 repetition maximum squat, depth jumps normalized to the subject's jump height (JH), and single leg jumps. All plyometric exercises were assessed with a force platform. Outcome variables associated with the takeoff, airborne, and landing phase of each plyometric exercise were evaluated. These variables included the peak vertical ground reaction force (GRF) during takeoff, the time to takeoff, flight time, JH, peak power, landing rate of force development, and peak vertical GRF during landing. A 2-way mixed analysis of variance with repeated measures for plyometric exercise type demonstrated main effects for exercise type and all outcome variables (p ≤ 0.05) and for the interaction between gender and peak vertical GRF during takeoff (p ≤ 0.05). Bonferroni-adjusted pairwise comparisons identified a number of differences between the plyometric exercises for the outcome variables assessed (p ≤ 0.05). These findings can be used to guide the progression of plyometric training by incorporating exercises of increasing intensity over the course of a program. PMID:22080319

  13. Quantification of heterogeneity observed in medical images

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There has been much recent interest in the quantification of visually evident heterogeneity within functional grayscale medical images, such as those obtained via magnetic resonance or positron emission tomography. In the case of images of cancerous tumors, variations in grayscale intensity imply variations in crucial tumor biology. Despite these considerable clinical implications, there is as yet no standardized method for measuring the heterogeneity observed via these imaging modalities. Methods In this work, we motivate and derive a statistical measure of image heterogeneity. This statistic measures the distance-dependent average deviation from the smoothest intensity gradation feasible. We show how this statistic may be used to automatically rank images of in vivo human tumors in order of increasing heterogeneity. We test this method against the current practice of ranking images via expert visual inspection. Results We find that this statistic provides a means of heterogeneity quantification beyond that given by other statistics traditionally used for the same purpose. We demonstrate the effect of tumor shape upon our ranking method and find the method applicable to a wide variety of clinically relevant tumor images. We find that the automated heterogeneity rankings agree very closely with those performed visually by experts. Conclusions These results indicate that our automated method may be used reliably to rank, in order of increasing heterogeneity, tumor images whether or not object shape is considered to contribute to that heterogeneity. Automated heterogeneity ranking yields objective results which are more consistent than visual rankings. Reducing variability in image interpretation will enable more researchers to better study potential clinical implications of observed tumor heterogeneity. PMID:23453000

  14. Uncertainty Quantification of Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, D. D.; Brandon, S. T.; Covey, C. C.; Domyancic, D. M.; Johannesson, G.; Klein, R.; Tannahill, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Significant uncertainties exist in the temperature response of the climate system to changes in the levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide. We report progress to quantify the uncertainties of equilibrium climate sensitivity using perturbed parameter ensembles of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Through a strategic initiative at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have been developing uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods and incorporating them into a software framework called the UQ Pipeline. We have applied this framework to generate a large number of ensemble simulations using Latin Hypercube and other schemes to sample up to three dozen uncertain parameters in the atmospheric (CAM) and sea ice (CICE) model components of CESM. The parameters sampled are related to many highly uncertain processes, including deep and shallow convection, boundary layer turbulence, cloud optical and microphysical properties, and sea ice albedo. An extensive ensemble database comprised of more than 46,000 simulated climate-model-years of recent climate conditions has been assembled. This database is being used to train surrogate models of CESM responses and to perform statistical calibrations of the CAM and CICE models given observational data constraints. The calibrated models serve as a basis for propagating uncertainties forward through climate change simulations using a slab ocean model configuration of CESM. This procedure is being used to quantify the probability density function of equilibrium climate sensitivity accounting for uncertainties in climate model processes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and was funded by the Uncertainty Quantification Strategic Initiative Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project at LLNL under project tracking code 10-SI-013. (LLNL-ABS-491765)

  15. Metabolic Profiling of Alpine and Ecuadorian Lichens.

    PubMed

    Mittermeier, Verena K; Schmitt, Nicola; Volk, Lukas P M; Suárez, Juan Pablo; Beck, Andreas; Eisenreich, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Non-targeted ¹H-NMR methods were used to determine metabolite profiles from crude extracts of Alpine and Ecuadorian lichens collected from their natural habitats. In control experiments, the robustness of metabolite detection and quantification was estimated using replicate measurements of Stereocaulon alpinum extracts. The deviations in the overall metabolite fingerprints were low when analyzing S. alpinum collections from different locations or during different annual and seasonal periods. In contrast, metabolite profiles observed from extracts of different Alpine and Ecuadorian lichens clearly revealed genus- and species-specific profiles. The discriminating functions determining cluster formation in principle component analysis (PCA) were due to differences in the amounts of genus-specific compounds such as sticticin from the Sticta species, but also in the amounts of ubiquitous metabolites, such as sugar alcohols or trehalose. However, varying concentrations of these metabolites from the same lichen species e.g., due to different environmental conditions appeared of minor relevance for the overall cluster formation in PCA. The metabolic clusters matched phylogenetic analyses using nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of lichen mycobionts, as exemplified for the genus Sticta. It can be concluded that NMR-based non-targeted metabolic profiling is a useful tool in the chemo-taxonomy of lichens. The same approach could also facilitate the discovery of novel lichen metabolites on a rapid and systematical basis.

  16. Improved quantification of microbial CH4 oxidation efficiency in arctic wetland soils using carbon isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, I.; Knoblauch, C.; Gebert, J.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2013-04-01

    Permafrost-affected tundra soils are significant sources of the climate-relevant trace gas methane (CH4). The observed accelerated warming of the arctic will cause deeper permafrost thawing, followed by increased carbon mineralization and CH4 formation in water-saturated tundra soils, thus creating a positive feedback to climate change. Aerobic CH4 oxidation is regarded as the key process reducing CH4 emissions from wetlands, but quantification of turnover rates has remained difficult so far. The application of carbon stable isotope fractionation enables the in situ quantification of CH4 oxidation efficiency in arctic wetland soils. The aim of the current study is to quantify CH4 oxidation efficiency in permafrost-affected tundra soils in Russia's Lena River delta based on stable isotope signatures of CH4. Therefore, depth profiles of CH4 concentrations and δ13CH4 signatures were measured and the fractionation factors for the processes of oxidation (αox) and diffusion (αdiff) were determined. Most previous studies employing stable isotope fractionation for the quantification of CH4 oxidation in soils of other habitats (such as landfill cover soils) have assumed a gas transport dominated by advection (αtrans = 1). In tundra soils, however, diffusion is the main gas transport mechanism and diffusive stable isotope fractionation should be considered alongside oxidative fractionation. For the first time, the stable isotope fractionation of CH4 diffusion through water-saturated soils was determined with an αdiff = 1.001 ± 0.000 (n = 3). CH4 stable isotope fractionation during diffusion through air-filled pores of the investigated polygonal tundra soils was αdiff = 1.013 ± 0.003 (n = 18). Furthermore, it was found that αox differs widely between sites and horizons (mean αox = 1.017 ± 0.009) and needs to be determined on a case by case basis. The impact of both fractionation factors on the quantification of CH4 oxidation was analyzed by considering both the

  17. Improved quantification of microbial CH4 oxidation efficiency in Arctic wetland soils using carbon isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, I.; Knoblauch, C.; Gebert, J.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2012-12-01

    Permafrost-affected tundra soils are significant sources of the climate-relevant trace gas methane (CH4). The observed accelerated warming of the Arctic will cause a deeper permafrost thawing followed by increased carbon mineralization and CH4 formation in water saturated tundra soils which might cause a positive feedback to climate change. Aerobic CH4 oxidation is regarded as the key process reducing CH4 emissions from wetlands, but quantification of turnover rates has remained difficult so far. The application of carbon stable isotope fractionation enables the in situ quantification of CH4 oxidation efficiency in arctic wetland soils. The aim of the current study is to quantify CH4 oxidation efficiency in permafrost-affected tundra soils in Russia's Lena River Delta based on stable isotope signatures of CH4. Therefore, depth profiles of CH4 concentrations and δ13CH4-signatures were measured and the fractionation factors for the processes of oxidation (αox) and diffusion (αdiff) were determined. Most previous studies employing stable isotope fractionation for the quantification of CH4 oxidation in soils of other habitats (e.g. landfill cover soils) have assumed a gas transport dominated by advection (αtrans = 1). In tundra soils, however, diffusion is the main gas transport mechanism, aside from ebullition. Hence, diffusive stable isotope fractionation has to be considered. For the first time, the stable isotope fractionation of CH4 diffusion through water-saturated soils was determined with an αdiff = 1.001 ± 0.000 (n = 3). CH4 stable isotope fractionation during diffusion through air-filled pores of the investigated polygonal tundra soils was αdiff = 1.013 ± 0.003 (n = 18). Furthermore, it was found that αox differs widely between sites and horizons (mean αox, = 1.017 ± 0.009) and needs to be determined individually. The impact of both fractionation factors on the quantification of CH4 oxidation was analyzed by considering both the potential diffusion

  18. A validated ultra high pressure liquid chromatographic method for qualification and quantification of folic acid in pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Deconinck, E; Crevits, S; Baten, P; Courselle, P; De Beer, J

    2011-04-01

    A fully validated UHPLC method for the identification and quantification of folic acid in pharmaceutical preparations was developed. The starting conditions for the development were calculated starting from the HPLC conditions of a validated method. These start conditions were tested on four different UHPLC columns: Grace Vision HT™ C18-P, C18, C18-HL and C18-B (2 mm × 100 mm, 1.5 μm). After selection of the stationary phase, the method was further optimised by testing two aqueous and two organic phases and by adapting to a gradient method. The obtained method was fully validated based on its measurement uncertainty (accuracy profile) and robustness tests. A UHPLC method was obtained for the identification and quantification of folic acid in pharmaceutical preparations, which will cut analysis times and solvent consumption.

  19. Towards uncertainty quantification and parameter estimation for Earth system models in a component-based modeling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckham, Scott D.; Kelbert, Anna; Hill, Mary C.; Hutton, Eric W. H.

    2016-05-01

    Component-based modeling frameworks make it easier for users to access, configure, couple, run and test numerical models. However, they do not typically provide tools for uncertainty quantification or data-based model verification and calibration. To better address these important issues, modeling frameworks should be integrated with existing, general-purpose toolkits for optimization, parameter estimation and uncertainty quantification. This paper identifies and then examines the key issues that must be addressed in order to make a component-based modeling framework interoperable with general-purpose packages for model analysis. As a motivating example, one of these packages, DAKOTA, is applied to a representative but nontrivial surface process problem of comparing two models for the longitudinal elevation profile of a river to observational data. Results from a new mathematical analysis of the resulting nonlinear least squares problem are given and then compared to results from several different optimization algorithms in DAKOTA.

  20. Quantification soil production and erosion using isotopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosseto, Anthony; Suresh, P. O.

    2010-05-01

    Soil is a critical resource, especially in the context of a rapidly growing world's population. Thus, it is crucial to be able to quantify how soil resources evolve with time and how fast they become depleted. Over the past few years, the application of cosmogenic isotopes has permitted to constrain rates of soil denudation. By assuming constant soil thickness, it is also possible to use these denudation rates to infer soil production rates (Heimsath et al. 1997). However, in this case, it is not possible to discuss any imbalance between erosion and production, which is the core question when interested in soil resource sustainability. Recently, the measurement of uranium-series isotopes in soils has been used to quantify the residence time of soil material in the weathering profile and to infer soil production rates (Dequincey et al. 2002; Dosseto et al. 2008). Thus, the combination of U-series and cosmogenic isotopes can be used to discuss how soil resources evolve with time, whether they are depleting, increasing or in steady-state. Recent work has been undertaken in temperate southeastern Australia where a several meters thick saprolite is developed over a graniodioritc bedrock and underlains a meter or less of soil (Dosseto et al., 2008) and in tropical Puerto Rico, also in a granitic catchment. Results show that in an environment where human activity is minimal, soil and saprolite are renewed as fast as they are destroyed through denudation. Further work is investigating these processes at other sites in southeastern Australia (Frogs Hollow; Heimsath et al. 2001) and Puerto Rico (Rio Mameyes catchment; andesitic bedrock). Results will be presented and a review of the quantification of the rates of soil evolution using isotopic techniques will be given. Dequincey, O., F. Chabaux, et al. (2002). Chemical mobilizations in laterites: Evidence from trace elements and 238U-234U-230Th disequilibria. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 66(7): 1197-1210. Dosseto, A., S. P

  1. Quantification of fructo-oligosaccharides based on the evaluation of oligomer ratios using an artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Onofrejová, Lucia; Farková, Marta; Preisler, Jan

    2009-04-13

    The application of an internal standard in quantitative analysis is desirable in order to correct for variations in sample preparation and instrumental response. In mass spectrometry of organic compounds, the internal standard is preferably labelled with a stable isotope, such as (18)O, (15)N or (13)C. In this study, a method for the quantification of fructo-oligosaccharides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) was proposed and tested on raftilose, a partially hydrolysed inulin with a degree of polymeration 2-7. A tetraoligosaccharide nystose, which is chemically identical to the raftilose tetramer, was used as an internal standard rather than an isotope-labelled analyte. Two mathematical approaches used for data processing, conventional calculations and artificial neural networks (ANN), were compared. The conventional data processing relies on the assumption that a constant oligomer dispersion profile will change after the addition of the internal standard and some simple numerical calculations. On the other hand, ANN was found to compensate for a non-linear MALDI response and variations in the oligomer dispersion profile with raftilose concentration. As a result, the application of ANN led to lower quantification errors and excellent day-to-day repeatability compared to the conventional data analysis. The developed method is feasible for MS quantification of raftilose in the range of 10-750 pg with errors below 7%. The content of raftilose was determined in dietary cream; application can be extended to other similar polymers. It should be stressed that no special optimisation of the MALDI process was carried out. A common MALDI matrix and sample preparation were used and only the basic parameters, such as sampling and laser energy, were optimised prior to quantification.

  2. Quantification of uncertainties for application in detonation simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Miao; Ma, Zhibo

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation has become an important means in designing detonation systems, and the quantification of its uncertainty is also necessary to reliability certification. As to quantifying the uncertainty, it is the most important to analyze how the uncertainties occur and develop, and how the simulations develop from benchmark models to new models. Based on the practical needs of engineering and the technology of verification & validation, a framework of QU(quantification of uncertainty) is brought forward in the case that simulation is used on detonation system for scientific prediction. An example is offered to describe the general idea of quantification of simulation uncertainties.

  3. 3'-end sequencing for expression quantification (3SEQ) from archival tumor samples.

    PubMed

    Beck, Andrew H; Weng, Ziming; Witten, Daniela M; Zhu, Shirley; Foley, Joseph W; Lacroute, Phil; Smith, Cheryl L; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Sidow, Arend; West, Robert B

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression microarrays are the most widely used technique for genome-wide expression profiling. However, microarrays do not perform well on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue (FFPET). Consequently, microarrays cannot be effectively utilized to perform gene expression profiling on the vast majority of archival tumor samples. To address this limitation of gene expression microarrays, we designed a novel procedure (3'-end sequencing for expression quantification (3SEQ)) for gene expression profiling from FFPET using next-generation sequencing. We performed gene expression profiling by 3SEQ and microarray on both frozen tissue and FFPET from two soft tissue tumors (desmoid type fibromatosis (DTF) and solitary fibrous tumor (SFT)) (total n = 23 samples, which were each profiled by at least one of the four platform-tissue preparation combinations). Analysis of 3SEQ data revealed many genes differentially expressed between the tumor types (FDR<0.01) on both the frozen tissue (approximately 9.6K genes) and FFPET (approximately 8.1K genes). Analysis of microarray data from frozen tissue revealed fewer differentially expressed genes (approximately 4.64K), and analysis of microarray data on FFPET revealed very few (69) differentially expressed genes. Functional gene set analysis of 3SEQ data from both frozen tissue and FFPET identified biological pathways known to be important in DTF and SFT pathogenesis and suggested several additional candidate oncogenic pathways in these tumors. These findings demonstrate that 3SEQ is an effective technique for gene expression profiling from archival tumor samples and may facilitate significant advances in translational cancer research.

  4. Optimization of a method for the profiling and quantification of saponins in different green asparagus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Castilla, Sara; Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; Fuentes-Alventosa, Jose María; Jiménez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocío; Cermeño-Sacristán, Pedro; Espejo-Calvo, Juan Antonio; Guillén-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-07-01

    The main goal of this study was the optimization of a HPLC-MS method for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of asparagus saponins. The method includes extraction with aqueous ethanol, cleanup by solid phase extraction, separation by reverse phase chromatography, electrospray ionization, and detection in a single quadrupole mass analyzer. The method was used for the comparison of selected genotypes of Huétor-Tájar asparagus landrace and selected varieties of commercial diploid hybrids of green asparagus. The results showed that while protodioscin was almost the only saponin detected in the commercial hybrids, eight different saponins were detected in the Huétor-Tájar asparagus genotypes. The mass spectra indicated that HT saponins are derived from a furostan type steroidal genin having a single bond between carbons 5 and 6 of the B ring. The total concentration of saponins was found to be higher in triguero asparagus than in commercial hybrids.

  5. Uncertainty quantification in reacting flow modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Le MaÒitre, Olivier P.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Knio, Omar M.; Ghanem, Roger Georges; Najm, Habib N.

    2003-10-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) in the computational modeling of physical systems is important for scientific investigation, engineering design, and model validation. In this work we develop techniques for UQ based on spectral and pseudo-spectral polynomial chaos (PC) expansions, and we apply these constructions in computations of reacting flow. We develop and compare both intrusive and non-intrusive spectral PC techniques. In the intrusive construction, the deterministic model equations are reformulated using Galerkin projection into a set of equations for the time evolution of the field variable PC expansion mode strengths. The mode strengths relate specific parametric uncertainties to their effects on model outputs. The non-intrusive construction uses sampling of many realizations of the original deterministic model, and projects the resulting statistics onto the PC modes, arriving at the PC expansions of the model outputs. We investigate and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, and identify their utility under different conditions. We also outline areas where ongoing and future research are needed to address challenges with both approaches.

  6. Shape regression for vertebra fracture quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Michael Tillge; de Bruijne, Marleen; Tanko, Laszlo B.; Nielsen, Mads

    2005-04-01

    Accurate and reliable identification and quantification of vertebral fractures constitute a challenge both in clinical trials and in diagnosis of osteoporosis. Various efforts have been made to develop reliable, objective, and reproducible methods for assessing vertebral fractures, but at present there is no consensus concerning a universally accepted diagnostic definition of vertebral fractures. In this project we want to investigate whether or not it is possible to accurately reconstruct the shape of a normal vertebra, using a neighbouring vertebra as prior information. The reconstructed shape can then be used to develop a novel vertebra fracture measure, by comparing the segmented vertebra shape with its reconstructed normal shape. The vertebrae in lateral x-rays of the lumbar spine were manually annotated by a medical expert. With this dataset we built a shape model, with equidistant point distribution between the four corner points. Based on the shape model, a multiple linear regression model of a normal vertebra shape was developed for each dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation. The reconstructed shape was calculated for each dataset using these regression models. The average prediction error for the annotated shape was on average 3%.

  7. Classification and quantification of leaf curvature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyuan; Jia, Liguo; Mao, Yanfei; He, Yuke

    2010-01-01

    Various mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana deficient in polarity, cell division, and auxin response are characterized by certain types of leaf curvature. However, comparison of curvature for clarification of gene function can be difficult without a quantitative measurement of curvature. Here, a novel method for classification and quantification of leaf curvature is reported. Twenty-two mutant alleles from Arabidopsis mutants and transgenic lines deficient in leaf flatness were selected. The mutants were classified according to the direction, axis, position, and extent of leaf curvature. Based on a global measure of whole leaves and a local measure of four regions in the leaves, the curvature index (CI) was proposed to quantify the leaf curvature. The CI values accounted for the direction, axis, position, and extent of leaf curvature in all of the Arabidopsis mutants grown in growth chambers. Comparison of CI values between mutants reveals the spatial and temporal variations of leaf curvature, indicating the strength of the mutant alleles and the activities of the corresponding genes. Using the curvature indices, the extent of curvature in a complicated genetic background becomes quantitative and comparable, thus providing a useful tool for defining the genetic components of leaf development and to breed new varieties with leaf curvature desirable for the efficient capture of sunlight for photosynthesis and high yields. PMID:20400533

  8. Quantification of moving target cyber defenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farris, Katheryn A.; Cybenko, George

    2015-05-01

    Current network and information systems are static, making it simple for attackers to maintain an advantage. Adaptive defenses, such as Moving Target Defenses (MTD) have been developed as potential "game-changers" in an effort to increase the attacker's workload. With many new methods being developed, it is difficult to accurately quantify and compare their overall costs and effectiveness. This paper compares the tradeoffs between current approaches to the quantification of MTDs. We present results from an expert opinion survey on quantifying the overall effectiveness, upfront and operating costs of a select set of MTD techniques. We find that gathering informed scientific opinions can be advantageous for evaluating such new technologies as it offers a more comprehensive assessment. We end by presenting a coarse ordering of a set of MTD techniques from most to least dominant. We found that seven out of 23 methods rank as the more dominant techniques. Five of which are techniques of either address space layout randomization or instruction set randomization. The remaining two techniques are applicable to software and computer platforms. Among the techniques that performed the worst are those primarily aimed at network randomization.

  9. Detection of aneuploidies by paralogous sequence quantification

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, S; Choudhury, U; Merla, G; Howald, C; Sylvan, A; Antonarakis, S

    2004-01-01

    Background: Chromosomal aneuploidies are a common cause of congenital disorders associated with cognitive impairment and multiple dysmorphic features. Pre-natal diagnosis of aneuploidies is most commonly performed by the karyotyping of fetal cells obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling, but this method is labour intensive and requires about 14 days to complete. Methods: We have developed a PCR based method for the detection of targeted chromosome number abnormalities termed paralogous sequence quantification (PSQ), based on the use of paralogous genes. Paralogous sequences have a high degree of sequence identity, but accumulate nucleotide substitutions in a locus specific manner. These sequence differences, which we term paralogous sequence mismatches (PSMs), can be quantified using pyrosequencing technology, to estimate the relative dosage between different chromosomes. We designed 10 assays for the detection of trisomies of chromosomes 13, 18, and 21 and sex chromosome aneuploidies. Results: We evaluated the performance of this method on 175 DNAs, highly enriched for abnormal samples. A correct and unambiguous diagnosis was given for 119 out of 120 aneuploid samples as well as for all the controls. One sample which gave an intermediate value for the chromosome 13 assays could not be diagnosed. Conclusions: Our data suggests that PSQ is a robust, easy to interpret, and easy to set up method for the diagnosis of common aneuploidies, and can be performed in less than 48 h, representing a competitive alternative for widespread use in diagnostic laboratories. PMID:15591276

  10. Quantification of the vocal folds’ dynamic displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Socorro Hernández-Montes, María; Muñoz, Silvino; De La Torre, Manuel; Flores, Mauricio; Pérez, Carlos; Mendoza-Santoyo, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Fast dynamic data acquisition techniques are required to investigate the motional behavior of the vocal folds (VFs) when they are subjected to a steady air-flow through the trachea. High-speed digital holographic interferometry (DHI) is a non-invasive full-field-of-view technique that has proved its usefulness to study rapid and non-repetitive object movements. Hence it is an ideal technique used here to measure VF displacements and vibration patterns at 2000 fps. Analyses from a set of 200 displacement images showed that VFs’ vibration cycles are established along their width (y) and length (x). Furthermore, the maximum deformation for the right and left VFs’ area may be quantified from these images, which in itself represents an important result in the characterization of this structure. At a controlled air pressure, VF displacements fall within the range ~100-1740 nm, with a calculated precision and accuracy that yields a variation coefficient of 1.91%. High-speed acquisition of full-field images of VFs and their displacement quantification are on their own significant data in the study of their functional and physiological behavior since voice quality and production depend on how they vibrate, i.e. their displacement amplitude and frequency. Additionally, the use of high speed DHI avoids prolonged examinations and represents a significant scientific and technological alternative contribution in advancing the knowledge and working mechanisms of these tissues.

  11. Quantification of biological aging in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Belsky, Daniel W.; Caspi, Avshalom; Houts, Renate; Cohen, Harvey J.; Corcoran, David L.; Danese, Andrea; Harrington, HonaLee; Israel, Salomon; Levine, Morgan E.; Schaefer, Jonathan D.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Ben; Yashin, Anatoli I.; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E.

    2015-01-01

    Antiaging therapies show promise in model organism research. Translation to humans is needed to address the challenges of an aging global population. Interventions to slow human aging will need to be applied to still-young individuals. However, most human aging research examines older adults, many with chronic disease. As a result, little is known about aging in young humans. We studied aging in 954 young humans, the Dunedin Study birth cohort, tracking multiple biomarkers across three time points spanning their third and fourth decades of life. We developed and validated two methods by which aging can be measured in young adults, one cross-sectional and one longitudinal. Our longitudinal measure allows quantification of the pace of coordinated physiological deterioration across multiple organ systems (e.g., pulmonary, periodontal, cardiovascular, renal, hepatic, and immune function). We applied these methods to assess biological aging in young humans who had not yet developed age-related diseases. Young individuals of the same chronological age varied in their “biological aging” (declining integrity of multiple organ systems). Already, before midlife, individuals who were aging more rapidly were less physically able, showed cognitive decline and brain aging, self-reported worse health, and looked older. Measured biological aging in young adults can be used to identify causes of aging and evaluate rejuvenation therapies. PMID:26150497

  12. Comparison of analysis methods for airway quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odry, Benjamin L.; Kiraly, Atilla P.; Novak, Carol L.; Naidich, David P.

    2012-03-01

    Diseased airways have been known for several years as a possible contributing factor to airflow limitation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD). Quantification of disease severity through the evaluation of airway dimensions - wall thickness and lumen diameter - has gained increased attention, thanks to the availability of multi-slice computed tomography (CT). Novel approaches have focused on automated methods of measurement as a faster and more objective means that the visual assessment routinely employed in the clinic. Since the Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM) method of airway measurement was introduced two decades ago [1], several new techniques for quantifying airways have been detailed in the literature, but no approach has truly become a standard for such analysis. Our own research group has presented two alternative approaches for determining airway dimensions, one involving a minimum path and the other active contours [2, 3]. With an increasing number of techniques dedicated to the same goal, we decided to take a step back and analyze the differences of these methods. We consequently put to the test our two methods of analysis and the FWHM approach. We first measured a set of 5 airways from a phantom of known dimensions. Then we compared measurements from the three methods to those of two independent readers, performed on 35 airways in 5 patients. We elaborate on the differences of each approach and suggest conclusions on which could be defined as the best one.

  13. Numerical Uncertainty Quantification for Radiation Analysis Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brooke; Blattnig, Steve; Clowdsley, Martha

    2007-01-01

    Recently a new emphasis has been placed on engineering applications of space radiation analyses and thus a systematic effort of Verification, Validation and Uncertainty Quantification (VV&UQ) of the tools commonly used for radiation analysis for vehicle design and mission planning has begun. There are two sources of uncertainty in geometric discretization addressed in this paper that need to be quantified in order to understand the total uncertainty in estimating space radiation exposures. One source of uncertainty is in ray tracing, as the number of rays increase the associated uncertainty decreases, but the computational expense increases. Thus, a cost benefit analysis optimizing computational time versus uncertainty is needed and is addressed in this paper. The second source of uncertainty results from the interpolation over the dose vs. depth curves that is needed to determine the radiation exposure. The question, then, is what is the number of thicknesses that is needed to get an accurate result. So convergence testing is performed to quantify the uncertainty associated with interpolating over different shield thickness spatial grids.

  14. Quality Quantification of Evaluated Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Varet, S.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.

    2015-01-15

    Presently, several methods are used to estimate the covariance matrix of evaluated nuclear cross sections. Because the resulting covariance matrices can be different according to the method used and according to the assumptions of the method, we propose a general and objective approach to quantify the quality of the covariance estimation for evaluated cross sections. The first step consists in defining an objective criterion. The second step is computation of the criterion. In this paper the Kullback-Leibler distance is proposed for the quality quantification of a covariance matrix estimation and its inverse. It is based on the distance to the true covariance matrix. A method based on the bootstrap is presented for the estimation of this criterion, which can be applied with most methods for covariance matrix estimation and without the knowledge of the true covariance matrix. The full approach is illustrated on the {sup 85}Rb nucleus evaluations and the results are then used for a discussion on scoring and Monte Carlo approaches for covariance matrix estimation of the cross section evaluations.

  15. Quantification of perceived macro-uniformity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Youn; Bang, Yousun; Choh, Heui-Keun

    2011-01-01

    Macro-uniformity refers to the subjective impression of overall uniformity in the print sample. By the efforts of INCITS W1.1 team, macro-uniformity is categorized into five types of attributes: banding, streaks, mottle, gradients, and moiré patterns, and the ruler samples are generated with perceptual scales. W1.1 macro-uniformity ruler is useful for judging the levels of print defect, but it is not an easy task to reproduce the samples having the same perceptual scales at different times in different places. An objective quantification method is more helpful and convenient for developers to analyze print quality and design printing system components. In this paper, we propose a method for measuring perceived macro-uniformity for a given print using a flat-bed scanner. First, banding, 2D noise, and gradients are separately measured, and they are converted to the perceptual scales based on subjective results of each attribute. The correlation coefficients between the measured values of the attributes and the perceptual scales are 0.92, 0.97, and 0.86, respectively. Another subjective test is performed to find the relationship between the overall macro-uniformity and the three attributes. The weighting factors are obtained by the experimental result, and the final macro-uniformity grade is determined by the weighted sums of each attribute.

  16. Quantification of bromophenols in Islay whiskies.

    PubMed

    Bendig, Paul; Lehnert, Katja; Vetter, Walter

    2014-04-01

    Two single malt whiskies from the Scottish island Islay, i.e., Laphroiag and Lagavulin, are characterized by an iodine-like flavor associated with marine environments. In this study we investigated if this flavor impression could be due to bromophenols which are character impact compounds of marine fish and shrimps. In this study we developed a method suited for the determination of dibromo- and tribromophenols in whisky. Aliquots were O-acetylated, and quantification was carried out with gas chromatography with electron-capture negative ion mass spectrometry (GC/ECNI-MS). Both Islay whiskies contained more than 400 ng/L bromophenols with 2,6-dibromophenol being the most relevant homologue (>300 ng/L, respectively). These concentrations are at least 1 order of magnitude higher than the taste threshold of 2,6-dibromophenol in water. A third Islay whisky, Bowmore, contained ∼100 ng/L bromophenols while seventeen other whiskies from other regions in Scotland as well as from the USA, Ireland, and Germany contained at least 1 order of magnitude less than the two whiskies with the marine taste. Accordingly, bromophenols may contribute to the marine flavor and taste of Laphroaig and Lagavulin.

  17. Legionella spp. isolation and quantification from greywater

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Sara; Blanky, Marina; Friedler, Eran; Halpern, Malka

    2015-01-01

    Legionella, an opportunistic human pathogen whose natural environment is water, is transmitted to humans through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Legionella has been isolated from a high diversity of water types. Due its importance as a pathogen, two ISO protocols have been developed for its monitoring. However, these two protocols are not suitable for analyzing Legionella in greywater (GW). GW is domestic wastewater excluding the inputs from toilets and kitchen. It can serve as an alternative water source, mainly for toilet flushing and garden irrigation; both producing aerosols that can cause a risk for Legionella infection. Hence, before reuse, GW has to be treated and its quality needs to be monitored. The difficulty of Legionella isolation from GW strives in the very high load of contaminant bacteria. Here we describe a modification of the ISO protocol 11731:1998 that enables the isolation and quantification of Legionella from GW samples. The following modifications were made:•To enable isolation of Legionella from greywater, a pre-filtration step that removes coarse matter is recommended.•Legionella can be isolated after a combined acid-thermic treatment that eliminates the high load of contaminant bacteria in the sample. PMID:26740925

  18. Legionella spp. isolation and quantification from greywater.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Sara; Blanky, Marina; Friedler, Eran; Halpern, Malka

    2015-01-01

    Legionella, an opportunistic human pathogen whose natural environment is water, is transmitted to humans through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Legionella has been isolated from a high diversity of water types. Due its importance as a pathogen, two ISO protocols have been developed for its monitoring. However, these two protocols are not suitable for analyzing Legionella in greywater (GW). GW is domestic wastewater excluding the inputs from toilets and kitchen. It can serve as an alternative water source, mainly for toilet flushing and garden irrigation; both producing aerosols that can cause a risk for Legionella infection. Hence, before reuse, GW has to be treated and its quality needs to be monitored. The difficulty of Legionella isolation from GW strives in the very high load of contaminant bacteria. Here we describe a modification of the ISO protocol 11731:1998 that enables the isolation and quantification of Legionella from GW samples. The following modifications were made:•To enable isolation of Legionella from greywater, a pre-filtration step that removes coarse matter is recommended.•Legionella can be isolated after a combined acid-thermic treatment that eliminates the high load of contaminant bacteria in the sample.

  19. Uncertainty quantification for systems of conservation laws

    SciTech Connect

    Poette, Gael Despres, Bruno Lucor, Didier

    2009-04-20

    Uncertainty quantification through stochastic spectral methods has been recently applied to several kinds of non-linear stochastic PDEs. In this paper, we introduce a formalism based on kinetic theory to tackle uncertain hyperbolic systems of conservation laws with Polynomial Chaos (PC) methods. The idea is to introduce a new variable, the entropic variable, in bijection with our vector of unknowns, which we develop on the polynomial basis: by performing a Galerkin projection, we obtain a deterministic system of conservation laws. We state several properties of this deterministic system in the case of a general uncertain system of conservation laws. We then apply the method to the case of the inviscid Burgers' equation with random initial conditions and we present some preliminary results for the Euler system. We systematically compare results from our new approach to results from the stochastic Galerkin method. In the vicinity of discontinuities, the new method bounds the oscillations due to Gibbs phenomenon to a certain range through the entropy of the system without the use of any adaptative random space discretizations. It is found to be more precise than the stochastic Galerkin method for smooth cases but above all for discontinuous cases.

  20. Uncertainty Quantification of Modelling of Equiaxed Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, K.; Krane, M. J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations of metal alloy solidification are used to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. Often validation of such models has been done through comparison to sparse experimental data, to which agreement can be misinterpreted due to both model and experimental uncertainty. Uncertainty quantification (UQ) and sensitivity analysis are performed on a transient model of solidification of Al-4.5 wt.% Cu in a rectangular cavity, with equiaxed (grain refined) solidification morphology. This model solves equations for momentum, temperature, and species conservation; UQ and sensitivity analysis are performed for the degree of macrosegregation. A Smolyak sparse grid algorithm is used to select input values to construct a response surface fit to model outputs. The response surface is then used as a surrogate for the solidification model to determine the sensitivities and probability density functions of the model outputs. Uncertain model inputs of interest include the secondary dendrite arm spacing, equiaxed particle size, and fraction solid at which the rigid mushy zone forms. Similar analysis was also performed on a transient model of direct chill casting of the same alloy.

  1. DNA profiles from fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Criminal investigations would be considerably improved if DNA profiles could be routinely generated from single fingermarks. Here we report a direct DNA profiling method that was able to generate interpretable profiles from 71% of 170 fingermarks. The data are based on fingermarks from all 5 digits of 34 individuals. DNA was obtained from the fingermarks using a swab moistened with Triton-X, and the fibers were added directly to one of two commercial DNA profiling kits. All profiles were obtained without increasing the number of amplification cycles; therefore, our method is ideally suited for adoption by the forensic science community. We indicate the use of the technique in a criminal case in which a DNA profile was generated from a fingermark on tape that was wrapped around a drug seizure. Our direct DNA profiling approach is rapid and able to generate profiles from touched items when current forensic practices have little chance of success.

  2. New method for stem cell quantification: applications to the management of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Legros, M; Fleury, J; Curé, H; Condat, P; Lenat, A; Subtil, E; Sanderson, D; Communal, Y; Basile, M; Tavernier, F

    1995-01-01

    A dramatic increase in peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) is observed after high-dose chemotherapy followed by haematopoietic growth factors. The degree of mobilisation of PBSC is quantified by the level of clonogenic cells detected by CFU assays (CFU-GM or CFU-GEMM) or CD34+ cell determination. Working under the hypothesis that, in peripheral blood, mononuclear cells in DNA synthesis (MCDS) are proliferating stem cells, we decided to detect these cells by flow cytometric measurement of their DNA content. The relations between the number of MCDS and well-known haematopoietic progenitor indicators such as CFU-GM or CD34+ cells were analysed. We studied the kinetics of recruitment of PBSC in cancer patients, treated with rmeHuG-CSF following VP-16 cytoxan chemotherapy, until the first day of leukapheresis. For the 31 patients studied the individual curves of peripheral MCDS and CFU-GM reconstitutions showed identical profiles and a good correlation was noted between the numbers of peripheral MCDS and CFU-GM (r = 0.73). In the leukapheresis product, the predictive value of MCDS was equivalent to CFU-GM for PBSC quantification (r = 0.70). In conclusion, MCDS analysis by flow cytometry provides reliable results and appears to be an alternative to CFU-GM assay or CD34+ cell determination for PBSC quantification.

  3. Profiles in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortimore, Jo, Ed.

    This publication traces developments in the use of profiles produced over the last two years and attempts to face some difficult and controversial issues raised repeatedly in any consideration of profiling. The introduction addresses assessment issues. Section 2 discusses the technical issues surrounding profiles, or records of achievement, and…

  4. Quantification and Propagation of Nuclear Data Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rising, Michael E.

    The use of several uncertainty quantification and propagation methodologies is investigated in the context of the prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) uncertainties and its impact on critical reactor assemblies. First, the first-order, linear Kalman filter is used as a nuclear data evaluation and uncertainty quantification tool combining available PFNS experimental data and a modified version of the Los Alamos (LA) model. The experimental covariance matrices, not generally given in the EXFOR database, are computed using the GMA methodology used by the IAEA to establish more appropriate correlations within each experiment. Then, using systematics relating the LA model parameters across a suite of isotopes, the PFNS for both the uranium and plutonium actinides are evaluated leading to a new evaluation including cross-isotope correlations. Next, an alternative evaluation approach, the unified Monte Carlo (UMC) method, is studied for the evaluation of the PFNS for the n(0.5 MeV)+Pu-239 fission reaction and compared to the Kalman filter. The UMC approach to nuclear data evaluation is implemented in a variety of ways to test convergence toward the Kalman filter results and to determine the nonlinearities present in the LA model. Ultimately, the UMC approach is shown to be comparable to the Kalman filter for a realistic data evaluation of the PFNS and is capable of capturing the nonlinearities present in the LA model. Next, the impact that the PFNS uncertainties have on important critical assemblies is investigated. Using the PFNS covariance matrices in the ENDF/B-VII.1 nuclear data library, the uncertainties of the effective multiplication factor, leakage, and spectral indices of the Lady Godiva and Jezebel critical assemblies are quantified. Using principal component analysis on the PFNS covariance matrices results in needing only 2-3 principal components to retain the PFNS uncertainties. Then, using the polynomial chaos expansion (PCE) on the uncertain output

  5. Quantification of isotopic turnover in agricultural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, A.; Auerswald, K.; Schnyder, H.

    2012-04-01

    The isotopic turnover, which is a proxy for the metabolic rate, is gaining scientific importance. It is quantified for an increasing range of organisms, from microorganisms over plants to animals including agricultural livestock. Additionally, the isotopic turnover is analyzed on different scales, from organs to organisms to ecosystems and even to the biosphere. In particular, the quantification of the isotopic turnover of specific tissues within the same organism, e.g. organs like liver and muscle and products like milk and faeces, has brought new insights to improve understanding of nutrient cycles and fluxes, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of isotopic turnover is important in many areas, including physiology, e.g. milk synthesis, ecology, e.g. soil retention time of water, and medical science, e.g. cancer diagnosis. So far, the isotopic turnover is quantified by applying time, cost and expertise intensive tracer experiments. Usually, this comprises two isotopic equilibration periods. A first equilibration period with a constant isotopic input signal is followed by a second equilibration period with a distinct constant isotopic input signal. This yields a smooth signal change from the first to the second signal in the object under consideration. This approach reveals at least three major problems. (i) The input signals must be controlled isotopically, which is almost impossible in many realistic cases like free ranging animals. (ii) Both equilibration periods may be very long, especially when the turnover rate of the object under consideration is very slow, which aggravates the first problem. (iii) The detection of small or slow pools is improved by large isotopic signal changes, but large isotopic changes also involve a considerable change in the input material; e.g. animal studies are usually carried out as diet-switch experiments, where the diet is switched between C3 and C4 plants, since C3 and C4 plants differ strongly in their isotopic signal. The

  6. Sputter-depth profiling for thin-film analysis.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, S

    2004-01-15

    Following a brief historical background, the concepts and the present state of sputter-depth profiling for thin-film analysis are outlined. There are two main branches: either the removed matter (as in mass- or optical-spectroscopy-based secondary-ion mass spectrometry or glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy), or the remaining surface (as in Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) is characterized. These complementary methods show the same result if there is no preferential sputtering of a component. The common root of both is the fundamental ion-solid interaction. Understanding of how the latter influences the depth resolution has led to important improvements in experimental profiling conditions such as sample rotation and the use of low-energy ions at glancing incidence. Modern surface-analysis instruments can provide high-resolution depth profiles on the nanometre scale. Mathematical models of different sophistication were developed to allow deconvolution of the measured profile or quantification by reconstruction of the in-depth distribution of composition. For the latter purpose, the usefulness of the so-called mixing-roughness-information (MRI) depth model is outlined on several thin-film structures (e.g. AlAs/GaAs and Si/Ge), including its extension to quantification of sputter-depth profiles in layer structures with preferential sputtering of one component (Ta/Si). Using the MRI model, diffusion coefficients at interfaces as low as 10(-22) m(2) s(-1) can be determined. Fundamental limitations of sputter-depth profiling are mainly traced back to the stochastic nature of primary-particle energy transfer to the sputtered particle, promoting atomic mixing and the development of surface roughness. Owing to more sophisticated experimental methods, such as low-energy cluster ion bombardment, glancing ion incidence or 'backside' sputtering, these ultimate limitations can be reduced to the atomic monolayer scale.

  7. Rapid digital quantification of microfracture populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Leonel A.; Laubach, Stephen E.

    2006-03-01

    Populations of microfractures are a structural fabric in many rocks deformed at upper crustal conditions. In some cases these fractures are visible in transmitted-light microscopy as fluid-inclusion planes or cement filled microfractures, but because SEM-based cathodoluminescence (CL) reveals more fractures and delineates their shapes, sizes, and crosscutting relations, it is a more effective structural tool. Yet at magnifications of 150-300×, at which many microfractures are visible, SEM-CL detectors image only small sample areas (0.5-0.1 mm 2) relative to fracture population patterns. The substantial effort required to image and measure centimeter-size areas at high-magnification has impeded quantitative study of microfractures. We present a method for efficient collection of mosaics of high-resolution CL imagery, a preparation method that allows samples to be any size while retaining continuous imagery of rock (no gaps), and software that facilitates fracture mapping and data reduction. Although the method introduced here was developed for CL imagery, it can be used with any other kind of images, including mosaics from petrographic microscopes. Compared with manual measurements, the new method increases several fold the number of microfractures imaged without a proportional increase in level of effort, increases the accuracy and repeatability of fracture measurements, and speeds quantification and display of fracture population attributes. We illustrate the method on microfracture arrays in dolostone from NE Mexico and sandstone from NW Scotland. We show that key aspects of microfracture population attributes are only fully manifest at scales larger than a single thin section.

  8. Fluorometric quantification of natural inorganic polyphosphate.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Julia M; Ingall, Ellery D

    2010-06-15

    Polyphosphate, a linear polymer of orthophosphate, is abundant in the environment and a key component in wastewater treatment and many bioremediation processes. Despite the broad relevance of polyphosphate, current methods to quantify it possess significant disadvantages. Here, we describe a new approach for the direct quantification of inorganic polyphosphate in complex natural samples. The protocol relies on the interaction between the fluorochrome 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and dissolved polyphosphate. With the DAPI-based approach we describe, polyphosphate can be quantified at concentrations ranging from 0.5-3 microM P in a neutral-buffered freshwater matrix with an accuracy of +/-0.03 microM P. The patterns of polyphosphate concentration versus fluorescence yielded by standards exhibit no chain length dependence across polyphosphates ranging from 15-130 phosphorus units in size. Shorter length polyphosphate molecules (e.g., polyphosphate of three and five phosphorus units in length) contribute little to no signal in this approach, as these molecules react only slightly or not at all with DAPI in the concentration range tested. The presence of salt suppresses fluorescence from intermediate polyphosphate chain lengths (e.g., 15 phosphorus units) at polyphosphate concentrations ranging from 0.5-3 microM P. For longer chain lengths (e.g., 45-130 phosphorus units), this salt interference is not evident at conductivities up to approximately 10mS/cm. Our results indicate that standard polyphosphates should be stored frozen for no longer than 10-15 days to avoid inconsistent results associated with standard degradation. We have applied the fluorometric protocol to the analysis of five well-characterized natural samples to demonstrate the use of the method. PMID:20507063

  9. Simultaneous quantification of cholesterol sulfate, androgen sulfates, and progestagen sulfates in human serum by LC-MS/MS[S

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Guijo, Alberto; Oji, Vinzenz; Hartmann, Michaela F.; Traupe, Heiko; Wudy, Stefan A.

    2015-01-01

    Steroids are primarily present in human fluids in their sulfated forms. Profiling of these compounds is important from both diagnostic and physiological points of view. Here, we present a novel method for the quantification of 11 intact steroid sulfates in human serum by LC-MS/MS. The compounds analyzed in our method, some of which are quantified for the first time in blood, include cholesterol sulfate, pregnenolone sulfate, 17-hydroxy-pregnenolone sulfate, 16-α-hydroxy-dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, androstenediol sulfate, androsterone sulfate, epiandrosterone sulfate, testosterone sulfate, epitestosterone sulfate, and dihydrotestosterone sulfate. The assay was conceived to quantify sulfated steroids in a broad range of concentrations, requiring only 300 μl of serum. The method has been validated and its performance was studied at three quality controls, selected for each compound according to its physiological concentration. The assay showed good linearity (R2 > 0.99) and recovery for all the compounds, with limits of quantification ranging between 1 and 80 ng/ml. Averaged intra-day and between-day precisions (coefficient of variation) and accuracies (relative errors) were below 10%. The method has been successfully applied to study the sulfated steroidome in diseases such as steroid sulfatase deficiency, proving its diagnostic value. This is, to our best knowledge, the most comprehensive method available for the quantification of sulfated steroids in human blood. PMID:26239050

  10. Does zero really mean nothing?-first experiences with the new PowerQuant(TM) system in comparison to established real-time quantification kits.

    PubMed

    Poetsch, Micaela; Konrad, Helen; Helmus, Janine; Bajanowski, Thomas; von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole

    2016-07-01

    DNA quantification is an important step in the molecular genetic analysis of a forensic sample, hopefully providing reliable data on DNA content for a subsequent generation of reproducible STR profiles for identification. For several years, this quantification has usually been done by real-time PCR protocols and meanwhile a variety of assays are commercially available from different companies. The newest one is the PowerQuant(TM) assay by Promega Inc. which is advertised with the promise that a determined DNA concentration of 0 ng/μl in a forensic sample guarantees the impossibility to achieve true STR results, thus allowing to exclude such samples from STR analysis to save time and money. Thus, the goal of this study was to thoroughly verify the quantification step with regard to its suitability as a screening method. We have evaluated the precision and reliability of four different real-time PCR quantification assays by systematically testing DNA dilutions and forensic samples with various DNA contents. Subsequently, each sample was subjected to the Powerplex® ESX 17 fast kit to determine a reliable cutoff level for exclusion of definitely negative samples from STR analysis. An accurate quantification of different cell line DNA dilutions was not possible with any kit. However, at least the PowerQuant(TM) assay provided suitable data analyzing forensic samples, whereas in other systems up to 46 % of negative samples still displayed reliable STR analysis results. All in all, the PowerQuant(TM) assay represents a big step forward, but the evaluation of real-time PCR quantification results has still to be done with great care. PMID:26972802

  11. Quantification of chemical gaseous plumes on hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Sidi

    The passive remote chemical plume quantification problem may be approached from multiple aspects, corresponding to a variety of physical effects that may be exploited. Accordingly, a diversity of statistical quantification algorithms has been proposed in the literature. The ultimate performance and algorithmic complexity of each is influenced by the assumptions made about the scene, which may include the presence of ancillary measurements or particular background/plume features that may or may not be present. In this work, we evaluate and investigate the advantages and limitations of a number of quantification algorithms that span a variety of such assumptions. With these in-depth insights we gain, a new quantification algorithm is proposed for single gas quantification which is superior to all state-of-the-art algorithms in every almost every aspects including applicability, accuracy, and efficiency. The new method, called selected-band algorithm, achieves its superior performance through an accurate estimation of the unobservable off-plume radiance. The reason why off-plume radiance is recoverable relies on a common observation that most chemical gases only exhibit strong absorptive behavior in certain spectral bands. Those spectral bands where the gas absorption is almost zero or small are ideal to carry out background estimation. In this thesis, the new selected-band algorithm is first derived from its favorable narrow-band sharp-featured gas and then extended to an iterative algorithm that suits all kinds of gases. The performance improvement is verified by simulated data for a variety of experimental settings.

  12. GMO quantification: valuable experience and insights for the future.

    PubMed

    Milavec, Mojca; Dobnik, David; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing; Gruden, Kristina; Zel, Jana

    2014-10-01

    Cultivation and marketing of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been unevenly adopted worldwide. To facilitate international trade and to provide information to consumers, labelling requirements have been set up in many countries. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is currently the method of choice for detection, identification and quantification of GMOs. This has been critically assessed and the requirements for the method performance have been set. Nevertheless, there are challenges that should still be highlighted, such as measuring the quantity and quality of DNA, and determining the qPCR efficiency, possible sequence mismatches, characteristics of taxon-specific genes and appropriate units of measurement, as these remain potential sources of measurement uncertainty. To overcome these problems and to cope with the continuous increase in the number and variety of GMOs, new approaches are needed. Statistical strategies of quantification have already been proposed and expanded with the development of digital PCR. The first attempts have been made to use new generation sequencing also for quantitative purposes, although accurate quantification of the contents of GMOs using this technology is still a challenge for the future, and especially for mixed samples. New approaches are needed also for the quantification of stacks, and for potential quantification of organisms produced by new plant breeding techniques. PMID:25182968

  13. GMO quantification: valuable experience and insights for the future.

    PubMed

    Milavec, Mojca; Dobnik, David; Yang, Litao; Zhang, Dabing; Gruden, Kristina; Zel, Jana

    2014-10-01

    Cultivation and marketing of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been unevenly adopted worldwide. To facilitate international trade and to provide information to consumers, labelling requirements have been set up in many countries. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is currently the method of choice for detection, identification and quantification of GMOs. This has been critically assessed and the requirements for the method performance have been set. Nevertheless, there are challenges that should still be highlighted, such as measuring the quantity and quality of DNA, and determining the qPCR efficiency, possible sequence mismatches, characteristics of taxon-specific genes and appropriate units of measurement, as these remain potential sources of measurement uncertainty. To overcome these problems and to cope with the continuous increase in the number and variety of GMOs, new approaches are needed. Statistical strategies of quantification have already been proposed and expanded with the development of digital PCR. The first attempts have been made to use new generation sequencing also for quantitative purposes, although accurate quantification of the contents of GMOs using this technology is still a challenge for the future, and especially for mixed samples. New approaches are needed also for the quantification of stacks, and for potential quantification of organisms produced by new plant breeding techniques.

  14. Rapid and portable electrochemical quantification of phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Kolliopoulos, Athanasios V; Kampouris, Dimitrios K; Banks, Craig E

    2015-04-21

    Phosphorus is one of the key indicators of eutrophication levels in natural waters where it exists mainly as dissolved phosphorus. Various analytical protocols exist to provide an offsite analysis, and a point of site analysis is required. The current standard method recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the detection of total phosphorus is colorimetric and based upon the color of a phosphomolybdate complex formed as a result of the reaction between orthophosphates and molybdates ions where ascorbic acid and antimony potassium tartrate are added and serve as reducing agents. Prior to the measurements, all forms of phosphorus are converted into orthophosphates via sample digestion (heating and acidifying). The work presented here details an electrochemical adaptation of this EPA recommended colorimetric approach for the measurement of dissolved phosphorus in water samples using screen-printed graphite macroelectrodes for the first time. This novel indirect electrochemical sensing protocol allows the determination of orthophosphates over the range from 0.5 to 20 μg L(-1) in ideal pH 1 solutions utilizing cyclic voltammetry with a limit of detection (3σ) found to correspond to 0.3 μg L(-1) of phosphorus. The reaction time and influence of foreign ions (potential interferents) upon this electroanalytical protocol was also investigated, where it was found that a reaction time of 5 min, which is essential in the standard colorimetric approach, is not required in the new proposed electrochemically adapted protocol. The proposed electrochemical method was independently validated through the quantification of orthophosphates and total dissolved phosphorus in polluted water samples (canal water samples) with ion chromatography and ICP-OES, respectively. This novel electrochemical protocol exhibits advantages over the established EPA recommended colorimetric determination for total phosphorus with lower detection limits and shorter experimental times

  15. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques of SCALE/TSUNAMI

    SciTech Connect

    Rearden, Bradley T; Mueller, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) code system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation (TSUNAMI). The TSUNAMI code suite can quantify the predicted change in system responses, such as k{sub eff}, reactivity differences, or ratios of fluxes or reaction rates, due to changes in the energy-dependent, nuclide-reaction-specific cross-section data. Where uncertainties in the neutron cross-section data are available, the sensitivity of the system to the cross-section data can be applied to propagate the uncertainties in the cross-section data to an uncertainty in the system response. Uncertainty quantification is useful for identifying potential sources of computational biases and highlighting parameters important to code validation. Traditional validation techniques often examine one or more average physical parameters to characterize a system and identify applicable benchmark experiments. However, with TSUNAMI correlation coefficients are developed by propagating the uncertainties in neutron cross-section data to uncertainties in the computed responses for experiments and safety applications through sensitivity coefficients. The bias in the experiments, as a function of their correlation coefficient with the intended application, is extrapolated to predict the bias and bias uncertainty in the application through trending analysis or generalized linear least squares techniques, often referred to as 'data adjustment.' Even with advanced tools to identify benchmark experiments, analysts occasionally find that the application models include some feature or material for which adequately similar benchmark experiments do not exist to support validation. For example, a criticality safety analyst may want to take credit for the presence of fission products in spent nuclear fuel. In such cases, analysts sometimes rely on 'expert judgment' to select an

  16. Rapid and portable electrochemical quantification of phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Kolliopoulos, Athanasios V; Kampouris, Dimitrios K; Banks, Craig E

    2015-04-21

    Phosphorus is one of the key indicators of eutrophication levels in natural waters where it exists mainly as dissolved phosphorus. Various analytical protocols exist to provide an offsite analysis, and a point of site analysis is required. The current standard method recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the detection of total phosphorus is colorimetric and based upon the color of a phosphomolybdate complex formed as a result of the reaction between orthophosphates and molybdates ions where ascorbic acid and antimony potassium tartrate are added and serve as reducing agents. Prior to the measurements, all forms of phosphorus are converted into orthophosphates via sample digestion (heating and acidifying). The work presented here details an electrochemical adaptation of this EPA recommended colorimetric approach for the measurement of dissolved phosphorus in water samples using screen-printed graphite macroelectrodes for the first time. This novel indirect electrochemical sensing protocol allows the determination of orthophosphates over the range from 0.5 to 20 μg L(-1) in ideal pH 1 solutions utilizing cyclic voltammetry with a limit of detection (3σ) found to correspond to 0.3 μg L(-1) of phosphorus. The reaction time and influence of foreign ions (potential interferents) upon this electroanalytical protocol was also investigated, where it was found that a reaction time of 5 min, which is essential in the standard colorimetric approach, is not required in the new proposed electrochemically adapted protocol. The proposed electrochemical method was independently validated through the quantification of orthophosphates and total dissolved phosphorus in polluted water samples (canal water samples) with ion chromatography and ICP-OES, respectively. This novel electrochemical protocol exhibits advantages over the established EPA recommended colorimetric determination for total phosphorus with lower detection limits and shorter experimental times

  17. Area correlation constraint for the MCR-ALS quantification of cholesterol using EEM fluorescence data: A new approach.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Tauler, Romá; de Lima, Kássio Michell Gomes

    2016-09-21

    This work demonstrates the use of a new additional constraint for the Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) algorithm called "area correlation constraint", introduced to build calibration models for Excitation Emission Matrix (EEM) data. We propose the application of area correlation constraint MCR-ALS for the quantification of cholesterol using a simulated data set and an experimental data system (cholesterol in a ternary mixture). This new constraint includes pseudo-univariate local regressions using the area of resolved profiles against reference values during the alternating least squares optimization, to provide directly accurate quantifications of a specific analyte in concentration units. In the two datasets investigated in this work, the new constraint retrieved correctly the analyte and interference spectral profiles and performed accurate estimations of cholesterol concentrations in test samples. This the first study using the proposed area constraint using EEM measurements. This new constraint approach emerges as a new possibility to be tested in general cases of second-order multivariate calibration data in the presence of unknown interferents or in more involved higher order calibration cases.

  18. Quantification of blending of olive oils and edible vegetable oils by triacylglycerol fingerprint gas chromatography and chemometric tools.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Samblás, Cristina; Marini, Federico; Cuadros-Rodríguez, Luis; González-Casado, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    A reliable procedure for the identification and quantification of the adulteration of olive oils in terms of blending with other vegetable oils (sunflower, corn, seeds, sesame and soya) has been developed. From the analytical viewpoint, the whole procedure relies only on the results of the determination of the triacylglycerol profile of the oils by high temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The chromatographic profiles were pre-treated (baseline correction, peak alignment using iCoshift algorithm and mean centering) before building the models. At first, a class-modeling approach, Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) was used to identify the vegetable oil used blending. Successively, a separate calibration model for each kind of blending was built using Partial Least Square (PLS). The correlation coefficients of actual versus predicted concentrations resulting from multivariate calibration models were between 0.95 and 0.99. In addition, Genetic algorithms (GA-PLS), were used, as variable selection method, to improve the models which yielded R(2) values higher than 0.90 for calibration set. This model had a better predictive ability than the PLS without feature selection. The results obtained showed the potential of this method and allowed quantification of blends of olive oil in the vegetable oils tested containing at least 10% of olive oil.

  19. Area correlation constraint for the MCR-ALS quantification of cholesterol using EEM fluorescence data: A new approach.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Tauler, Romá; de Lima, Kássio Michell Gomes

    2016-09-21

    This work demonstrates the use of a new additional constraint for the Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) algorithm called "area correlation constraint", introduced to build calibration models for Excitation Emission Matrix (EEM) data. We propose the application of area correlation constraint MCR-ALS for the quantification of cholesterol using a simulated data set and an experimental data system (cholesterol in a ternary mixture). This new constraint includes pseudo-univariate local regressions using the area of resolved profiles against reference values during the alternating least squares optimization, to provide directly accurate quantifications of a specific analyte in concentration units. In the two datasets investigated in this work, the new constraint retrieved correctly the analyte and interference spectral profiles and performed accurate estimations of cholesterol concentrations in test samples. This the first study using the proposed area constraint using EEM measurements. This new constraint approach emerges as a new possibility to be tested in general cases of second-order multivariate calibration data in the presence of unknown interferents or in more involved higher order calibration cases. PMID:27590541

  20. Real-Time PCR for Gene Expression Quantification in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Segundo-Val, Ignacio San; García-Solaesa, Virginia; García-Sánchez, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has become the reference technique for studying gene expression in recent years. The application of qPCR to the study of asthma provides very useful information regarding the gene expression mechanisms. The quantification of RNA from cDNA can be performed by using fluorescent dyes or specific sequence probes. Here, we describe the protocol to quantify gene expression levels using SYBR Green as fluorescent dye. The protocol starts with the RNA extraction, followed by reverse transcription to obtain cDNA, quantification and finally data analysis.

  1. Real-Time PCR for Gene Expression Quantification in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Segundo-Val, Ignacio San; García-Solaesa, Virginia; García-Sánchez, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has become the reference technique for studying gene expression in recent years. The application of qPCR to the study of asthma provides very useful information regarding the gene expression mechanisms. The quantification of RNA from cDNA can be performed by using fluorescent dyes or specific sequence probes. Here, we describe the protocol to quantify gene expression levels using SYBR Green as fluorescent dye. The protocol starts with the RNA extraction, followed by reverse transcription to obtain cDNA, quantification and finally data analysis. PMID:27300530

  2. Quantification of Line Tracking Solutions for Automotive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jane; Rourke, Rick F.; Groll, Dave; Tavora, Peter W.

    Unlike line tracking in automotive painting applications, line tracking for automotive general assembly applications requires position tracking in order to perform assembly operations to a required assembly tolerance. Line tracking quantification experiments have been designed and conducted for a total of 16 test cases for two line tracking scenarios with three types of line tracking solutions: encoder based tracking, encoder plus static vision based tracking, and the analog sensor-based tracking for general assembly robotic automation. This chapter presents the quantification results, identifies key performance drivers, and illustrates their implications for automotive assembly applications.

  3. Quantification is Neither Necessary Nor Sufficient for Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Luca; Maul, Andrew; Torres Irribarra, David; Wilson, Mark

    2013-09-01

    Being an infrastructural, widespread activity, measurement is laden with stereotypes. Some of these concern the role of measurement in the relation between quality and quantity. In particular, it is sometimes argued or assumed that quantification is necessary for measurement; it is also sometimes argued or assumed that quantification is sufficient for or synonymous with measurement. To assess the validity of these positions the concepts of measurement and quantitative evaluation should be independently defined and their relationship analyzed. We contend that the defining characteristic of measurement should be the structure of the process, not a feature of its results. Under this perspective, quantitative evaluation is neither sufficient nor necessary for measurement.

  4. Clinical PET Myocardial Perfusion Imaging and Flow Quantification.

    PubMed

    Juneau, Daniel; Erthal, Fernanda; Ohira, Hiroshi; Mc Ardle, Brian; Hessian, Renée; deKemp, Robert A; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac PET imaging is a powerful tool for the assessment of coronary artery disease. Many tracers with different advantages and disadvantages are available. It has several advantages over single photon emission computed tomography, including superior accuracy and lower radiation exposure. It provides powerful prognostic information, which can help to stratify patients and guide clinicians. The addition of flow quantification enables better detection of multivessel disease while providing incremental prognostic information. Flow quantification provides important physiologic information, which may be useful to individualize patient therapy. This approach is being applied in some centers, but requires standardization before it is more widely applied. PMID:26590781

  5. Detection and quantification of chimerism by droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    George, David; Czech, Juliann; John, Bobby; Yu, Min; Jennings, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantification of chimerism and microchimerism is proving to be increasingly valuable for hematopoietic cell transplantation as well as non-transplant conditions. However, methods that are available to quantify low-level chimerism lack accuracy. Therefore, we developed and validated a method for quantifying chimerism based on digital PCR technology. We demonstrate accurate quantification that far exceeds what is possible with analog qPCR down to 0.01% with the potential to go even lower. Also, this method is inherently more informative than qPCR. We expect the advantages of digital PCR will make it the preferred method for chimerism analysis.

  6. Brief review of uncertainty quantification for particle image velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farias, M. H.; Teixeira, R. S.; Koiller, J.; Santos, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Metrological studies for particle image velocimetry (PIV) are recent in literature. An attempt to evaluate the uncertainty quantifications (UQ) of the PIV velocity field are in evidence. Therefore, a short review on main sources of uncertainty in PIV and available methodologies for its quantification are presented. In addition, the potential of some mathematical techniques, coming from the area of geometric mechanics and control, that could interest the fluids UQ community are highlighted as good possibilities. “We must measure what is measurable and make measurable what cannot be measured” (Galileo)

  7. A quick colorimetric method for total lipid quantification in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Byreddy, Avinesh R; Gupta, Adarsha; Barrow, Colin J; Puri, Munish

    2016-06-01

    Discovering microalgae with high lipid productivity are among the key milestones for achieving sustainable biodiesel production. Current methods of lipid quantification are time intensive and costly. A rapid colorimetric method based on sulfo-phospho-vanillin (SPV) reaction was developed for the quantification of microbial lipids to facilitate screening for lipid producing microalgae. This method was successfully tested on marine thraustochytrid strains and vegetable oils. The colorimetric method results correlated well with gravimetric method estimates. The new method was less time consuming than gravimetric analysis and is quantitative for lipid determination, even in the presence of carbohydrates, proteins and glycerol. PMID:27050419

  8. Quantification of toxicological effects for dichloromethane. Draft report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    The source documents for background information used to develop the report on the quantification of toxicological effects for dichloromethane are the health assessment document (HAD) for dichloromethane and a subsequent addendum to the HAD (U.S. EPA, 1985b). In addition, some references published since 1985 are discussed. To summarize the results of the quantification of toxicological effects, a One-day Health Advisory of 10,000 ug/L for a 10-kg child was calculated, based on an acute oral study in rats reported by Kimura et al. (1971). No suitable data for the derivation of a Ten-day Health Advisory were found in the available literature.

  9. Practical quantification of necrosis in histological whole-slide images.

    PubMed

    Homeyer, André; Schenk, Andrea; Arlt, Janine; Dahmen, Uta; Dirsch, Olaf; Hahn, Horst K

    2013-06-01

    Since the histological quantification of necrosis is a common task in medical research and practice, we evaluate different image analysis methods for quantifying necrosis in whole-slide images. In a practical usage scenario, we assess the impact of different classification algorithms and feature sets on both accuracy and computation time. We show how a well-chosen combination of multiresolution features and an efficient postprocessing step enables the accurate quantification necrosis in gigapixel images in less than a minute. The results are general enough to be applied to other areas of histological image analysis as well. PMID:23796718

  10. Reliability quantification and visualization for electric microgrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panwar, Mayank

    and parallel with the area Electric Power Systems (EPS), (3) includes the local EPS and may include portions of the area EPS, and (4) is intentionally planned. A more reliable electric power grid requires microgrids to operate in tandem with the EPS. The reliability can be quantified through various metrics for performance measure. This is done through North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) metrics in North America. The microgrid differs significantly from the traditional EPS, especially at asset level due to heterogeneity in assets. Thus, the performance cannot be quantified by the same metrics as used for EPS. Some of the NERC metrics are calculated and interpreted in this work to quantify performance for a single asset and group of assets in a microgrid. Two more metrics are introduced for system level performance quantification. The next step is a better representation of the large amount of data generated by the microgrid. Visualization is one such form of representation which is explored in detail and a graphical user interface (GUI) is developed as a deliverable tool to the operator for informative decision making and planning. Electronic appendices-I and II contain data and MATLAB© program codes for analysis and visualization for this work.

  11. Remote sensing for quantification of agronomic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Dana Grace

    Remote sensing (RS) may be used to rapidly assess surface features and facilitate natural resource management, precision agriculture and soil survey. Information obtained in such a way would streamline data collection and improve diagnostic capabilities. Current RS technology has had limited testing, particularly within the Southeast. Our study was designed to evaluate RS as a rapid assessment tool in three different natural resource applications: nitrogen (N) management in a corn crop (Zea mays L.), assessment of in situ crop residue cover, and quantification of near-surface soil properties. In 2000, study sites were established in four physiographic provinces of Alabama: Tennessee Valley, Ridge and Valley, Appalachian Plateau, and Coastal Plain. Spectral measurements were acquired via spectroradiometer (350--1050 nm), airborne ATLAS multispectral scanner (400--12,500 nm), and IKONOS satellite (450--900 nm). Corn plots were established from fresh-tilled ground in a completely randomized design at the Appalachian Plateau and Coastal Plain study sites in 2000. Plots received four N rates (0, 56, 112, and 168 kg N ha-1 ), and were maintained for three consecutive growing seasons. Spectroradiometer data were acquired biweekly from V6-R2 and ATLAS and IKONOS were acquired per availability. Results showed vegetation indices derived from hand-held spectroradiometer measurements as early as V6-V8 were linearly related to yield and tissue N. ATLAS imagery showed promise at the AP site during the V6 stage (r2 = 0.66), but no significant relationships between plant N and IKONOS imagery were observed. Residue plots (15m x 15m) were established at the Appalachian Plateau and Coastal Plain in 2000 and 200. Residue treatments consisted of hand applied wheat straw cover (0, 10 20, 50, or 80%) arranged in a completely randomized design. Spectroradiometer data were acquired monthly and ATLAS and IKONOS were acquired per availability. Residue cover estimates were best with ATLAS

  12. Metabolic profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Berit; Zöller, Daniela; Erban, Alexander; Fehrle, Ines; Hartmann, Jürgen; Niehl, Annette; Kopka, Joachim; Fisahn, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic phenotyping at cellular resolution may be considered one of the challenges in current plant physiology. A method is described which enables the cell type-specific metabolic analysis of epidermal cell types in Arabidopsis thaliana pavement, basal, and trichome cells. To achieve the required high spatial resolution, single cell sampling using microcapillaries was combined with routine gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) based metabolite profiling. The identification and relative quantification of 117 mostly primary metabolites has been demonstrated. The majority, namely 90 compounds, were accessible without analytical background correction. Analyses were performed using cell type-specific pools of 200 microsampled individual cells. Moreover, among these identified metabolites, 38 exhibited differential pool sizes in trichomes, basal or pavement cells. The application of an independent component analysis confirmed the cell type-specific metabolic phenotypes. Significant pool size changes between individual cells were detectable within several classes of metabolites, namely amino acids, fatty acids and alcohols, alkanes, lipids, N-compounds, organic acids and polyhydroxy acids, polyols, sugars, sugar conjugates and phenylpropanoids. It is demonstrated here that the combination of microsampling and GC-MS based metabolite profiling provides a method to investigate the cellular metabolism of fully differentiated plant cell types in vivo. PMID:20150518

  13. Improved Strategies and Optimization of Calibration Models for Real-time PCR Absolute Quantification

    EPA Science Inventory

    Real-time PCR absolute quantification applications rely on the use of standard curves to make estimates of DNA target concentrations in unknown samples. Traditional absolute quantification approaches dictate that a standard curve must accompany each experimental run. However, t...

  14. Campus Profile 98.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glendale Community Coll., CA. Planning and Research Office.

    Glendale Community College's Campus Profile is designed to assist faculty, staff, and students in understanding the college's diverse operations. Organized around an outline from the state accountability model, this statistical report focuses on the academic years 1995-1997. "Campus Profile '98" includes more accountability performance measures…

  15. Capillary rise quantifications based on in-situ artificial deuterium peak displacement and laboratory soil characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünberger, O.; Michelot, J. L.; Bouchaou, L.; Macaigne, P.; Hsissou, Y.; Hammecker, C.

    2011-05-01

    In arid environments, water rises from the saturated level of a shallow aquifer to the drying soil surface where evaporation occurs. This process plays important roles in terms of plant survival, salt balance and aquifer budget. A new field quantification method of this capillary rise flow is proposed using micro-injections (6 μL) of a deuterium-enriched solution (δ value of 63 000‰ vs. V-SMOW) into unsaturated soil at a 1 m depth. Evaluation of peak displacement from profile sampling 35 days later delivered an estimate that was compared with outputs of numerical simulation based on laboratory hydrodynamic measurements assuming a steady state regime. A rate of 3.7 cm y-1 was estimated at a Moroccan site, where the aquifer water depth was 2.44 m. This value was higher than that computed from the relationship between evaporation rates and water level depth based on natural isotopic profile estimates, but it was lower than every estimate established using integration of the van Genuchten closed-form functions for soil hydraulic conductivity and retention curve.

  16. [Quantification of physiological aminoacids using aTRAQ(®) kit: evaluation and implementation of new markers].

    PubMed

    Boemer, François; Schoos, Roland; Deberg, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, physiological amino acids profiling is based primarily on ion exchange chromatography (IEC) coupled to a post-column derivatization with ninhydrin and UV detection at two wavelengths. Unfortunately, this technique suffers various drawbacks such as long analysis time, high sample volume and specific costs related to the maintenance of a dedicated equipment. These reasons have led us to consider a technology switch to a mass spectrometry method. We tested the kit aTRAQ amino acids analysis for physiological samples (AB Sciex), offering a selective quantification of more than 40 amino acids, and have implemented the acquisition of various original markers to the initial method. The accuracy profiles established for each amino acid show that the results are very reliable. The linearity is assured between 1 and 1.000 μmol/L for most analytes. Result comparison with IEC method showed good agreement. Reference ranges are similar to those defined for the IEC method and patients with inborn errors of metabolism were readily identified. The aTRAQ method offers a valid alternative to IEC method with several advantages: reduced sample volume, decreased run time and increased specificity. However, the procedure requires a thorough review of all chromatographic peaks, process that considerably lengthens the overall time of the procedure. Finally, financial and practical considerations of both techniques have to be counterbalanced before initiating any methodological transition. PMID:26411910

  17. Rapid Quantification and Validation of Lipid Concentrations within Liposomes.

    PubMed

    Roces, Carla B; Kastner, Elisabeth; Stone, Peter; Lowry, Deborah; Perrie, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of the lipid content in liposomal adjuvants for subunit vaccine formulation is of extreme importance, since this concentration impacts both efficacy and stability. In this paper, we outline a high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detector (HPLC-ELSD) method that allows for the rapid and simultaneous quantification of lipid concentrations within liposomal systems prepared by three liposomal manufacturing techniques (lipid film hydration, high shear mixing, and microfluidics). The ELSD system was used to quantify four lipids: 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), cholesterol, dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide, and ᴅ-(+)-trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate (TDB). The developed method offers rapidity, high sensitivity, direct linearity, and a good consistency on the responses (R² > 0.993 for the four lipids tested). The corresponding limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.11 and 0.36 mg/mL (DMPC), 0.02 and 0.80 mg/mL (cholesterol), 0.06 and 0.20 mg/mL (DDA), and 0.05 and 0.16 mg/mL (TDB), respectively. HPLC-ELSD was shown to be a rapid and effective method for the quantification of lipids within liposome formulations without the need for lipid extraction processes. PMID:27649231

  18. Detection and Quantification of Magnetically Labeled Cells by Cellular MRI

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Frank, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Labeling cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles, paramagnetic contrast agent (gadolinium) or perfluorocarbons allows for the possibility of tracking single or clusters of labeled cells within target tissues following either direct implantation or intravenous injection. This review summarizes the practical issues regarding detection and quantification of magnetically labeled cells with various MRI contrast agents with a focus on SPIO nanoparticles. PMID:18995978

  19. Colorimetric Quantification and in Situ Detection of Collagen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esteban, Francisco J.; del Moral, Maria L.; Sanchez-Lopez, Ana M.; Blanco, Santos; Jimenez, Ana; Hernandez, Raquel; Pedrosa, Juan A.; Peinado, Maria A.

    2005-01-01

    A simple multidisciplinary and inexpensive laboratory exercise is proposed, in which the undergraduate student may correlate biochemical and anatomical findings. The entire practical session can be completed in one 2.5-3 hour laboratory period, and consists of the quantification of collagen and total protein content from tissue sections--without…

  20. Literacy and Language Education: The Quantification of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Tara

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes international policy contexts of adult literacy and language assessment and the shift toward standardization through measurement tools. It considers the implications the quantification of learning outcomes has for pedagogy and practice and for the social inclusion of transnational migrants.

  1. The Role of Uncertainty Quantification for Reactor Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatores, Massimo; Palmiotti, Giuseppe; Aliberti, G.

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of uncertainties is a crucial step in design. The comparison of a-priori uncertainties with the target accuracies, allows to define needs and priorities for uncertainty reduction. In view of their impact, the uncertainty analysis requires a reliability assessment of the uncertainty data used. The choice of the appropriate approach and the consistency of different approaches are discussed.

  2. The Role of Uncertainty Quantification for Reactor Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatores, M.; Aliberti, G.; Palmiotti, G.

    2015-01-15

    The quantification of uncertainties is a crucial step in design. The comparison of a-priori uncertainties with the target accuracies, allows to define needs and priorities for uncertainty reduction. In view of their impact, the uncertainty analysis requires a reliability assessment of the uncertainty data used. The choice of the appropriate approach and the consistency of different approaches are discussed.

  3. 15 CFR 990.52 - Injury assessment-quantification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... incident. (c) Natural recovery. To quantify injury, trustees must estimate, quantitatively or qualitatively, the time for natural recovery without restoration, but including any response actions. The analysis of...—quantification. (a) General. In addition to determining whether injuries have resulted from the...

  4. 15 CFR 990.52 - Injury assessment-quantification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... incident. (c) Natural recovery. To quantify injury, trustees must estimate, quantitatively or qualitatively, the time for natural recovery without restoration, but including any response actions. The analysis of...—quantification. (a) General. In addition to determining whether injuries have resulted from the...

  5. 15 CFR 990.52 - Injury assessment-quantification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... incident. (c) Natural recovery. To quantify injury, trustees must estimate, quantitatively or qualitatively, the time for natural recovery without restoration, but including any response actions. The analysis of...—quantification. (a) General. In addition to determining whether injuries have resulted from the...

  6. Infectious Viral Quantification of Chikungunya Virus-Virus Plaque Assay.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Parveen; Lee, Regina Ching Hua; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2016-01-01

    The plaque assay is an essential method for quantification of infectious virus titer. Cells infected with virus particles are overlaid with a viscous substrate. A suitable incubation period results in the formation of plaques, which can be fixed and stained for visualization. Here, we describe a method for measuring Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) titers via virus plaque assays.

  7. Rapid Quantification and Validation of Lipid Concentrations within Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Roces, Carla B.; Kastner, Elisabeth; Stone, Peter; Lowry, Deborah; Perrie, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of the lipid content in liposomal adjuvants for subunit vaccine formulation is of extreme importance, since this concentration impacts both efficacy and stability. In this paper, we outline a high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detector (HPLC-ELSD) method that allows for the rapid and simultaneous quantification of lipid concentrations within liposomal systems prepared by three liposomal manufacturing techniques (lipid film hydration, high shear mixing, and microfluidics). The ELSD system was used to quantify four lipids: 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC), cholesterol, dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA) bromide, and d-(+)-trehalose 6,6′-dibehenate (TDB). The developed method offers rapidity, high sensitivity, direct linearity, and a good consistency on the responses (R2 > 0.993 for the four lipids tested). The corresponding limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.11 and 0.36 mg/mL (DMPC), 0.02 and 0.80 mg/mL (cholesterol), 0.06 and 0.20 mg/mL (DDA), and 0.05 and 0.16 mg/mL (TDB), respectively. HPLC-ELSD was shown to be a rapid and effective method for the quantification of lipids within liposome formulations without the need for lipid extraction processes. PMID:27649231

  8. Quantification and Single-Spore Detection of Phakopsora pachyrhizi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The microscopic identification and quantification of Phakopsora pachyrhizi spores from environmental samples, spore traps, and laboratory specimens can represent a challenge. Such reports, especially from passive spore traps, commonly describe the number of “rust-like” spores; for other forensic sa...

  9. Identification and Quantification Soil Redoximorphic Features by Digital Image Processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil redoximorphic features (SRFs) have provided scientists and land managers with insight into relative soil moisture for approximately 60 years. The overall objective of this study was to develop a new method of SRF identification and quantification from soil cores using a digital camera and imag...

  10. Evaluation of Digital PCR for Absolute RNA Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Rebecca; Mason, Deborah J.; Foy, Carole A.; Huggett, Jim F.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression measurements detailing mRNA quantities are widely employed in molecular biology and are increasingly important in diagnostic fields. Reverse transcription (RT), necessary for generating complementary DNA, can be both inefficient and imprecise, but remains a quintessential RNA analysis tool using qPCR. This study developed a Transcriptomic Calibration Material and assessed the RT reaction using digital (d)PCR for RNA measurement. While many studies characterise dPCR capabilities for DNA quantification, less work has been performed investigating similar parameters using RT-dPCR for RNA analysis. RT-dPCR measurement using three, one-step RT-qPCR kits was evaluated using single and multiplex formats when measuring endogenous and synthetic RNAs. The best performing kit was compared to UV quantification and sensitivity and technical reproducibility investigated. Our results demonstrate assay and kit dependent RT-dPCR measurements differed significantly compared to UV quantification. Different values were reported by different kits for each target, despite evaluation of identical samples using the same instrument. RT-dPCR did not display the strong inter-assay agreement previously described when analysing DNA. This study demonstrates that, as with DNA measurement, RT-dPCR is capable of accurate quantification of low copy RNA targets, but the results are both kit and target dependent supporting the need for calibration controls. PMID:24073259

  11. Comparison of DNA Quantification Methods for Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Jérôme D.; Ludlow, Andrew T.; LaRanger, Ryan; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is a powerful tool that depends on loading a precise amount of DNA onto a flowcell. NGS strategies have expanded our ability to investigate genomic phenomena by referencing mutations in cancer and diseases through large-scale genotyping, developing methods to map rare chromatin interactions (4C; 5C and Hi-C) and identifying chromatin features associated with regulatory elements (ChIP-seq, Bis-Seq, ChiA-PET). While many methods are available for DNA library quantification, there is no unambiguous gold standard. Most techniques use PCR to amplify DNA libraries to obtain sufficient quantities for optical density measurement. However, increased PCR cycles can distort the library’s heterogeneity and prevent the detection of rare variants. In this analysis, we compared new digital PCR technologies (droplet digital PCR; ddPCR, ddPCR-Tail) with standard methods for the titration of NGS libraries. DdPCR-Tail is comparable to qPCR and fluorometry (QuBit) and allows sensitive quantification by analysis of barcode repartition after sequencing of multiplexed samples. This study provides a direct comparison between quantification methods throughout a complete sequencing experiment and provides the impetus to use ddPCR-based quantification for improvement of NGS quality. PMID:27048884

  12. Quantification of Wheat Grain Arabinoxylans Using a Phloroglucinol Colorimetric Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arabinoxylans (AX) play a critical role in end-use quality and nutrition of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). An efficient, accurate method of AX quantification is desirable as AX plays an important role in processing, end use quality and human health. The objective of this work was to evaluate a stand...

  13. A Quantification Approach to Popular American Theatre: Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Alan

    A previously relatively unexplored area of theater history studies is the quantification of titles, authors, and locations of productions of plays in Canada and the United States. Little is known, for example, about the number of times any one play was staged, especially in the earlier days of American drama. A project which counts productions on…

  14. a New Approach for Sediment Balance Quantification and Wind Erosion Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouerchefani, Dalel; Callot, Yann; Delaitre, Eric; Abdeljaouad, Saadi

    2014-05-01

    Studies on spatio-temporal heterogeneity of land surface in arid and semi-arid regions in relation to wind erosion are very few. These are ad hoc and instantaneous measurements of physical parameters, taking little account of aeolian landforms as markers of a changing environment. This is a handicap in the analysis of these spaces, in particular their sedimentary dynamic. Design methods for understanding the specific organization of aeolian landforms and their spatio-temporal monitoring is therefore essential. This allows quantifying the annual and seasonal sedimentary budgets of bad-instrumented sites which have not automatic recordings of meteorological variables In this work, we propose a method for multi-temporal quantification of sediment balance across a transect. This method were applied and validated in the Oglet Merteba study site. It has the advantage of linking the amount of sand deposited / eroded with changing surface conditions. It is to delineate and compare apparently accumulation and deflation areas with those having real positive and negative sedimentary budget. To do this, linear analysis techniques 'point quadrat' and 'profile leveling' were applied to a 500 m length transect. Measurements of variables related to aeolian landforms, soil and vegetation characteristics were undertaken during 2 years. The results show that the overall balance of Oglet Merteba is positive but with important seasonal fluctuations. Accumulation areas may actually be deflation zones, despite the presence of indicators showing the contrary. Conversely areas mapped as deflation zones can correspond really to zones of accumulation. This work is a contribution for the quantification of sedimentary budgets at the site level. It allows, when integrated in an Observatory approach, to harmonize the methods of data collection/analysis to regularly produce a synthesis of the situation of the local environment in a format that enables comparisons to that space as well time scales.

  15. Methane Emission Quantification at the Farm Scale Using Boundary-Layer Volume Budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieger, J.; Eugster, W.; Siegwolf, R. T.; Buchmann, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    Agriculture plays an important role in the global greenhouse gas budget. Especially emissions of CH4 from livestock and manure management are of key importance. In Switzerland, roughly 80% of all national methane emissions originate from the agricultural sector. However, methane emissions in Switzerland so far were not measured but were estimated via emission factors for enteric fermentation of livestock and for manure management. This results in high uncertainties associated with emission estimates (up to 55%). Our study aims at quantifying methane emissions at the farm scale. We explored whether boundary-layer budget quantifications of methane can be used for the validation of emission estimates, and hence for the reduction of associated uncertainties in national inventory reports under the Kyoto Protocol. We will present methane emission budgets based on concentration profiles obtained from tethered balloon measurements from several campaigns carried out over two consecutive years (2011 and 2012). We will show how CH4 emissions at the farm scale (0.5 - 5 km2) were quantified using this boundary-layer budgeting approach. Clear diurnal courses of CH4 fluxes showed, that the temporal and spatial variability of emissions and atmospheric processes played an important role for source strength estimation. As an effect of these processes, budget quantifications differed up to 45% compared to the national inventory estimates. While the major determinants of methane emission budgets are still unclear, we will show that the δ13C ratios in CH4 concentrations did provide additional information about the processes responsible for the CH4 fluxes obtained.

  16. Limits of detection and quantification in comprehensive multidimensional separations. 1. A theoretical look.

    PubMed

    de la Mata, A Paulina; Harynuk, James J

    2012-08-01

    Comprehensive multidimensional separations (e.g., GC×GC, LC×LC, etc.) are increasingly popular tools for the analysis of complex samples, due to their many advantages, such as vastly increased peak capacity, and improvements in sensitivity. The most well-established of these techniques, GC×GC, has revolutionized analytical separations in fields as diverse as petroleum, environmental research, food and flavors, and metabolic profiling. Using multidimensional approaches, analytes can be quantified at levels substantially lower than those possible by one-dimensional techniques. However, it has also been shown that the modulation process introduces a new source of error to the measurement. In this work, we present the results of a study into the limits of quantification and detection (LOQ and LOD) in comprehensive multidimensional separations using GC×GC and the more popular "two-step" integration algorithm as an example. Simulation of chromatographic data permits precise control of relevant parameters of peak geometry and modulation phase. Results are expressed in terms of the dimensionless parameter of signal-to-noise ratio of the base peak (S/N(BP)) making them transportable to any result where quantification is performed using a two-step algorithm. Based on these results, the LOD is found to depend upon the modulation ratio used for the experiment and vary between a S/N(BP) of 10-17, while the LOQ depends on both the modulation ratio and the phase of the modulation for the peak and ranges from a S/N(BP) of 10 to 50, depending on the circumstances. PMID:22813213

  17. Proteomics of Microparticles with SILAC Quantification (PROMIS-Quan): A Novel Proteomic Method for Plasma Biomarker Quantification*

    PubMed Central

    Harel, Michal; Oren-Giladi, Pazit; Kaidar-Person, Orit; Shaked, Yuval; Geiger, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased proteomic analysis of plasma samples holds the promise to reveal clinically invaluable disease biomarkers. However, the tremendous dynamic range of the plasma proteome has so far hampered the identification of such low abundant markers. To overcome this challenge we analyzed the plasma microparticle proteome, and reached an unprecedented depth of over 3000 plasma proteins in single runs. To add a quantitative dimension, we developed PROMIS-Quan—PROteomics of MIcroparticles with Super-Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) Quantification, a novel mass spectrometry-based technology for plasma microparticle proteome quantification. PROMIS-Quan enables a two-step relative and absolute SILAC quantification. First, plasma microparticle proteomes are quantified relative to a super-SILAC mix composed of cell lines from distinct origins. Next, the absolute amounts of selected proteins of interest are quantified relative to the super-SILAC mix. We applied PROMIS-Quan to prostate cancer and compared plasma microparticle samples of healthy individuals and prostate cancer patients. We identified in total 5374 plasma-microparticle proteins, and revealed a predictive signature of three proteins that were elevated in the patient-derived plasma microparticles. Finally, PROMIS-Quan enabled determination of the absolute quantitative changes in prostate specific antigen (PSA) upon treatment. We propose PROMIS-Quan as an innovative platform for biomarker discovery, validation, and quantification in both the biomedical research and in the clinical worlds. PMID:25624350

  18. Differential effects of environmental enrichment and isolation housing on the hormonal and neurochemical responses to stress in the prefrontal cortex of the adult rat: relationship to working and emotional memories.

    PubMed

    Garrido, P; De Blas, M; Ronzoni, G; Cordero, I; Antón, M; Giné, E; Santos, A; Del Arco, A; Segovia, G; Mora, F

    2013-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the modulation of the stress responses by the environmental conditions and its putative neurobiological mechanisms. For that an integrative study on the effects of environmental enrichment and isolation housing on (1) the corticosterone, dopamine and acetylcholine responses to acute restraint stress in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of the awake rat; (2) the mRNA levels of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the PFC, and (3) the behavioral responses to stress, related to the PFC (habituation to a novel environment, spatial-working memory and inhibitory avoidance response) was performed. Male Wistar rats were maintained from 3 to 6 months of age in two different conditions: enriched (EC) or impoverished (IC). Animals were stereotaxically implanted with bilateral guide cannulae in the PFC to perform microdialysis experiments to evaluate the concentrations of corticosterone, dopamine and acetylcholine. EC animals showed lower increases of corticosterone and dopamine but not of acetylcholine than IC animals in the PFC in response to acute restraint stress (20 min). In the PFC, GR mRNA levels showed a trend towards an enhancement in EC animals. EC reduced the days to learn the spatial working memory task (radial-water maze). Spatial working memory, however, was not different between groups in either basal or stress conditions. Inhibitory avoidance response was reduced in EC rats. The changes produced by EC in the neurochemical, neuroendocrine and behavioral parameters evaluated suggest that EC rats could show a better coping during an acute stress challenge.

  19. Morphology, Projection Pattern and Neurochemical Identity of Cajal’s “Centrifugal Neurons”: The Cells of Origin of the Tectoventrogeniculate Pathway in Pigeon (Columba livia) and Chicken (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Vega-Zuniga, Tomas; Mpodozis, Jorge; Karten, Harvey J.; Marín, Gonzalo; Hain, Sarah; Luksch, Harald

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus geniculatus lateralis pars ventralis (GLv) is a prominent retinal target in all amniotes. In birds, it is in receipt of a dense and topographically organized retinal projection. The GLv is also the target of substantial and topographically organized projections from the optic tectum and the visual wulst (Hyperpallium). Tectal and retinal afferents terminate homotopically within the external GLv-neuropil. Efferents from the GLv follow a descending course through the tegmentum, and can be traced into the medial pontine nucleus. At present, the cells of origin of the Tecto-GLv projection are only partially described. Here we have characterized the laminar location, morphology, projection pattern and neurochemical identity of these cells, by means of neural tracer injections and intracellular fillings in slice preparations and extracellular tracer injections in-vivo. The Tecto-GLv projection arises from a distinct subset of layer 10 bipolar neurons, whose apical dendrites show a complex transverse arborization at the level of layer 7. Axons of these bipolar cells arise from the apical dendrites and follow a course through the optic tract to finally form very fine and restricted terminal endings inside the GLv-neuropil. Double label experiments showed that these bipolar cells were ChAT immunoreactive. Our results strongly suggest that Tecto-GLv neurons form a pathway by which integrated tectal activity rapidly feeds back to the GLv and exerts a focal cholinergic modulation of incoming retinal inputs. PMID:24435811

  20. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  1. Attitude profile design program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Attitude Profile Design (APD) Program was designed to be used as a stand-alone addition to the Simplex Computation of Optimum Orbital Trajectories (SCOOT). The program uses information from a SCOOT output file and the user defined attitude profile to produce time histories of attitude, angular body rates, and accelerations. The APD program is written in standard FORTRAN77 and should be portable to any machine that has an appropriate compiler. The input and output are through formatted files. The program reads the basic flight data, such as the states of the vehicles, acceleration profiles, and burn information, from the SCOOT output file. The user inputs information about the desired attitude profile during coasts in a high level manner. The program then takes these high level commands and executes the maneuvers, outputting the desired information.

  2. Profiles in Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    These articles put a face to some of the thousands of individuals who contribute to NCI’s cancer research efforts. The profiles highlight the work of scientists and clinicians and describe the circumstances and motivation behind their work.

  3. Expedition 29 Crew Profile

    NASA Video Gallery

    The six members of Expedition 29 are profiled and interviewed. NASA astronauts Mike Fossum and Dan Burbank; JAXA astronaut Satoshi Furukawa; and cosmonauts Anton Shkaplerov and Anatoly Ivanishin di...

  4. BWR AXIAL PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    J. Huffer

    2004-09-28

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop axial profiles for estimating the axial variation in burnup of a boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly spent nuclear fuel (SNF) given the average burnup of an assembly. A discharged fuel assembly typically exhibits higher burnup in the center and lower burnup at the ends of the assembly. Criticality safety analyses taking credit for SNF burnup must account for axially varying burnup relative to calculations based on uniformly distributed assembly average burnup due to the under-burned tips. Thus, accounting for axially varying burnup in criticality analyses is also referred to as accounting for the ''end effect'' react