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Sample records for neuroendocrine tumours transfected

  1. Neuroendocrine tumours - Medical therapy: Biological.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Anja; Krug, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSA) are well established antisecretory drugs that have been used as first line treatment for symptomatic control in hormonally active neuroendocrine tumours (NET) for three decades. Both available depot formulations of SSA, long-acting repeatable (LAR) octreotide and lanreotide autogel, seem similarly effective and well tolerated, although comparative trials in NET have not been performed. The importance of SSA as antiproliferative treatment has been increasingly recognized during recent years. Two placebo-controlled trials demonstrated significant prolongation of progression free survival under SSA treatment. However, objective response as assessed by imaging is rare. Interferon-α (IFNα) also has antisecretory and antiproliferative efficacy in NET. Due to the less favourable toxicity profile it mainly has a role as add-on option in the refractory setting, especially in carcinoid syndrome patients. Further studies are needed to evaluate the antiproliferative efficacy of the multiligand SSA pasireotide and the role of pegylated IFNα. PMID:26971845

  2. Consensus on biomarkers for neuroendocrine tumour disease

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, Kjell; Modlin, Irvin M; De Herder, Wouter; Pavel, Marianne; Klimstra, David; Frilling, Andrea; Metz, David C; Heaney, Anthony; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Strosberg, Jonathan; Meyer, Timothy; Moss, Steven F; Washington, Kay; Wolin, Edward; Liu, Eric; Goldenring, James

    2016-01-01

    Management of neuroendocrine neoplasia represents a clinical challenge because of its late presentation, lack of treatment options, and limitations in present imaging modalities and biomarkers to guide management. Monoanalyte biomarkers have poor sensitivity, specificity, and predictive ability. A National Cancer Institute summit, held in 2007, on neuroendocrine tumours noted biomarker limitations to be a crucial unmet need in the management of neuroendocrine tumours. A multinational consensus meeting of multidisciplinary experts in neuroendocrine tumours assessed the use of current biomarkers and defined the perquisites for novel biomarkers via the Delphi method. Consensus (at >75%) was achieved for 88 (82%) of 107 assessment questions. The panel concluded that circulating multianalyte biomarkers provide the highest sensitivity and specificity necessary for minimum disease detection and that this type of biomarker had sufficient information to predict treatment effectiveness and prognosis. The panel also concluded that no monoanalyte biomarker of neuroendocrine tumours has yet fulfilled these criteria and there is insufficient information to support the clinical use of miRNA or circulating tumour cells as useful prognostic markers for this disease. The panel considered that trials measuring multianalytes (eg, neuroendocrine gene transcripts) should also identify how such information can optimise the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:26370353

  3. CT/MRI of neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Reznek, Rodney H

    2006-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are often thought to be rare and rather recherché cancers which are of little concern to the general physician, surgeon or radiologist because of their rarity and esoteric nature. In fact, while relatively uncommon, the total group of gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP) tumours incorporates the spectrum of all types of carcinoids, incuding bronchial carcinoids, and the whole gamut of islet-cell tumours. Some of these may present as functioning tumours, with a plethora of hormonal secretions and concomitant clinical syndromes, and GEPs in general have an incidence around 30 per million population per year. This means that in the whole European Union, for example, there will be in the region of 12000 new patients every year presenting with one or another manifestation of these tumours. Furthermore, the comparatively long survival of many of these patients, compared to more common adenocarcinomas or epithelial tumours, implies that the point prevalence is also not inconsiderable. However, it is undoubtedly true that these tumours can be difficult to identify, especially in their early stages, and it is then that radiological investigation becomes of paramount importance. Having taken into account all these considerations, most investigators would initiate investigation of a suspected or biochemically proven islet-cell tumour with cross-sectional imaging—either CT or MRI. This will clearly identify the larger lesions, allow assessment of the entire abdomen, and provide valuable information on the presence of hepatic metastates. PMID:17114072

  4. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Brabander, Tessa; Teunissen, Jaap J M; Van Eijck, Casper H J; Franssen, Gaston J H; Feelders, Richard A; de Herder, Wouter W; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the number of neuroendocrine tumours that are detected is increasing. A relative new and promising therapy for patients with metastasised or inoperable disease is peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). This therapy involves an infusion of somatostatin analogues linked to radionuclides like Yttrium-90 or Lutetium-177. Objective response rates are reported in 15-35%. Response rates may vary between type of tumour and radionuclide. Besides the objective response rate, overall survival and progression free survival increase significantly. Also, the quality of life improves as well. Serious side-affects are rare. PRRT is usually well tolerated, also in patients with extensive metastasised disease. Recent studies combined PRRT with other types of therapies. Unfortunately no randomised trials comparing these strategies are available. In the future, more research is needed to evaluate the best therapy combinations or sequence of therapies. PMID:26971847

  5. Familial syndromes associated with neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Komarowska, Hanna; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours may be associated with familial syndromes. At least eight inherited syndromes predisposing to endocrine neoplasia have been identified. Two of these are considered to be major factors predisposing to benign and malignant endocrine tumours, designated multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and type 2 (MEN1 and MEN2). Five other autosomal dominant diseases show more heterogeneous clinical patterns, such as the Carney complex, hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome, Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and tuberous sclerosis. The molecular and cellular interactions underlying the development of most endocrine cells and related organs represent one of the more complex pathways not yet to be deciphered. Almost all endocrine cells are derived from the endoderm and neuroectoderm. It is suggested that within the first few weeks of human development there are complex interactions between, firstly, the major genes involved in the initiation of progenitor-cell differentiation, secondly, factors secreted by the surrounding mesenchyme, and thirdly, a series of genes controlling cell differentiation, proliferation and migration. Together these represent a formula for the harmonious development of endocrine glands and tissue. PMID:26557756

  6. p53 tumour suppressor gene expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, C; Ziske, C; Wiedenmann, B; Moelling, K

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumours grow slower and metastasise later than ductal and acinar carcinomas. The expression of the p53 tumour suppressor gene in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells is unknown. Pancreatic neuroendocrine cell lines (n = 5) and human tumour tissues (n = 19) were studied for changed p53 coding sequence, transcription, and translation. Proliferative activity of tumour cells was determined analysing Ki-67 expression. No mutation in the p53 nucleotide sequence of neuroendocrine tumour cell was found. However, an overexpression of p53 could be detected in neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines at a protein level. As no p53 mutations were seen, it is suggested that post-translational events can also lead to an overexpression of p53. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8675094

  7. Genetics of neuroendocrine and carcinoid tumours.

    PubMed

    Leotlela, P D; Jauch, A; Holtgreve-Grez, H; Thakker, R V

    2003-12-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) originate in tissues that contain cells derived from the embryonic neural crest, neuroectoderm and endoderm. Thus, NETs occur at many sites in the body, although the majority occur within the gastro-entero-pancreatic axis and can be subdivided into those of foregut, midgut and hindgut origin. Amongst these, only those of midgut origin are generally argentaffin positive and secrete serotonin, and hence only these should be referred to as carcinoid tumours. NETs may occur as part of complex familial endocrine cancer syndromes, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), although the majority occur as non-familial (i.e. sporadic) isolated tumours. Molecular genetic studies have revealed that the development of NETs may involve different genes, each of which may be associated with several different abnormalities that include point mutations, gene deletions, DNA methylation, chromosomal losses and chromosomal gains. Indeed, the foregut, midgut and hindgut NETs develop via different molecular pathways. For example, foregut NETs have frequent deletions and mutations of the MEN1 gene, whereas midgut NETs have losses of chromosome 18, 11q and 16q and hindgut NETs express transforming growth factor-alpha and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Furthermore, in lung NETs, a loss of chromosome 3p is the most frequent change and p53 mutations and chromosomal loss of 5q21 are associated with more aggressive tumours and poor survival. In addition, methylation frequencies of retinoic acid receptor-beta, E-cadherin and RAS-associated domain family genes increase with the severity of lung NETs. Thus the development and progression of NETs is associated with specific genetic abnormalities that indicate the likely involvement of different molecular pathways.

  8. Metastatic breast cancer presenting as a primary hindgut neuroendocrine tumour.

    PubMed

    Okines, Alicia F C; Hawkes, Eliza A; Rao, Sheela; VAN As, Nicholas; Marsh, Henry; Riddell, Angela; Wilson, Philip O G; Osin, Peter; Wotherspoon, Andrew C; Wetherspoon, Andrew C

    2010-07-01

    The examination of limited, potentially non-representative fragments of tumour tissue from a core biopsy can be misleading and misdirect subsequent treatment, especially in cases where a primary tumour has not been identified. This case report is of a 65-year-old woman presenting with a destructive sacral mass, diagnosed on radiological imaging and core biopsy as a hindgut neuroendocrine tumour, which on histopathological review of the subsequently resected tumour was found instead to represent a metastasis from an occult hormone-positive breast cancer with neuroendocrine features.

  9. [Medical treatment of digestive neuroendocrine tumours].

    PubMed

    Panzuto, F; Nasoni, S; Delle Fave, G

    2001-09-01

    Surgery is the only therapy able to cure patients with digestive neuroendocrine tumor. However, due to the presence of diffuse metastases, radical surgery is often not feasible. In these cases, medical treatment plays a critical role, because of its ability to control symptoms in functioning tumors and to inhibit tumor growth. Different therapeutic approaches, such as chemotherapy, hepatic artery chemoembolization and targeted radio-nuclide therapy can be used alone or combined to the biologic treatment with somatostatin analogues and interferon. However, an accurate staging by imaging procedures plus a histological, immunohistochemical and biomolecular examination must be performed before planning an optimal medical treatment. PMID:11753237

  10. Treatment of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours with etoposide and cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Mitry, E; Baudin, E; Ducreux, M; Sabourin, J-C; Rufié, P; Aparicio, T; Lasser, P; Elias, D; Duvillard, P; Schlumberger, M; Rougier, P

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate by a retrospective analysis of 53 patients the efficacy of chemotherapy combining etoposide and cisplatin in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumours. The regimen was a combination of etoposide 100 mg m–2 day–1 for 3 days and cisplatin 100 mg m–2 on day 1, given by 2-h intravenous infusion, administered every 21 days. Twelve patients had a well-differentiated and 41 a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumour. Toxicity of treatment was assessed in 50 patients and efficacy in 52 patients. Among the 11 patients with a well-differentiated tumour evaluable for tumoural response, only one (9.4%) had a partial response for 8.5 months. Forty-one patients with a poorly differentiated tumour showed an objective response rate of 41.5% (four complete and 13 partial responses); the median duration of response was 9.2 months, the median overall survival 15 months and the median progression-free survival 8.9 months. Haematological grade 3–4 toxicity was observed in 60% of the cases with one treatment-related death, digestive grade 3–4 toxicity in 40% and grade 3 alopecia was constant. No severe renal, hearing and neurological toxicities were observed (grade 1 in 6%, 14%, 72% respectively and no grade >1). We confirm that poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours are chemosensitive to the etoposide plus cisplatin combination. However, the prognosis remains poor with a 2-year survival lower than 20% confirming that new therapeutic strategies have to be developed. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10604732

  11. Lutetium-labelled peptides for therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Kam, B L R; Teunissen, J J M; Krenning, E P; de Herder, W W; Khan, S; van Vliet, E I; Kwekkeboom, D J

    2012-02-01

    Treatment with radiolabelled somatostatin analogues is a promising new tool in the management of patients with inoperable or metastasized neuroendocrine tumours. Symptomatic improvement may occur with (177)Lu-labelled somatostatin analogues that have been used for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). The results obtained with (177)Lu-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotate (DOTATATE) are very encouraging in terms of tumour regression. Dosimetry studies with (177)Lu-DOTATATE as well as the limited side effects with additional cycles of (177)Lu-DOTATATE suggest that more cycles of (177)Lu-DOTATATE can be safely given. Also, if kidney-protective agents are used, the side effects of this therapy are few and mild and less than those from the use of (90)Y-[DOTA(0),Tyr(3)]octreotide (DOTATOC). Besides objective tumour responses, the median progression-free survival is more than 40 months. The patients' self-assessed quality of life increases significantly after treatment with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. Lastly, compared to historical controls, there is a benefit in overall survival of several years from the time of diagnosis in patients treated with (177)Lu-DOTATATE. These findings compare favourably with the limited number of alternative therapeutic approaches. If more widespread use of PRRT can be guaranteed, such therapy may well become the therapy of first choice in patients with metastasized or inoperable neuroendocrine tumours.

  12. Medical treatment for gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Berardi, Rossana; Morgese, Francesca; Torniai, Mariangela; Savini, Agnese; Partelli, Stefano; Rinaldi, Silvia; Caramanti, Miriam; Ferrini, Consuelo; Falconi, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) represents a various family of rare tumours. Surgery is the first choice in GEP-NENs patients with localized disease whilst in the metastatic setting many other treatment options are available. Somatostatin analogues are indicated for symptoms control in functioning tumours. Furthermore they may be effective to inhibit tumour progression. GEP-NENs pathogenesis has been extensively studied in the last years therefore several driver mutations pathway genes have been identified as crucial factors in their tumourigenesis. GEP-NENs can over-express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic-fibroblastic growth factor, transforming growth factor (TGF-α and -β), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and their receptors PDGF receptor, IGF-1 receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, VEGF receptor, and c-kit (stem cell factor receptor) that can be considered as potential targets. The availability of new targeted agents, such as everolimus and sunitinib that are effective in advanced and metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, has provided new treatment opportunities. Many trials combing new drugs are ongoing. PMID:27096034

  13. Medical management of secretory syndromes related to gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Weickert, Martin O; Randeva, Harpal S; Kaltsas, Gregory; Grossman, Ashley

    2016-09-01

    Although recent epidemiological evidence indicates that the prevalence of non-functioning gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) is rising, a significant number of GEP-NETs still present with symptoms related to the secretion of biologically active substances leading to the development of distinct clinical syndromes. In the past, these syndromes were associated with substantial morbidity and mortality due to the lack of specific therapies; however, since the introduction of long-acting somatostatin analogues and medications such as proton pump inhibitors, their control has been greatly improved. As a result, nowadays, the main cause of morbidity and mortality in GEP-NETs is mostly directly related to tumour growth and the extent of metastatic disease. However, in some patients with functioning tumours and extensive disease, control of the secretory syndrome still remains problematic, necessitating the employment of several cytoreductive techniques, which may not always be sufficient. Recently, new agents directed against tumour growth, or exerting increased binding activity to receptors expressed in these tumours, or interfering with the synthetic pathway of some of the compounds secreted by these tumours, have been developed. Since there are no specific guidelines addressing the totality of the management of the secretory syndromes related to GEP-NETs, this review aims at critically analysing the medical management of previously recognised secretory syndromes; it also addresses areas of uncertainty, assesses the newer therapeutic developments and also addresses recently described but poorly characterised secretory syndromes related to GEP-NETs. PMID:27461388

  14. Clinical applications of 68Ga-DOTANOC in neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Lopci, E; Nanni, C; Rampin, L; Rubello, D; Fanti, S

    2008-09-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are relatively rare neoplasms affecting principally the gastroenteropancreatic tract, but with potential ubiquitary location, as the neural crest cells, origin of this group of tumours, are dispersed in various organs and tissues. After the discovery of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) over-expression in this group of neoplasms, NET management has significantly improved. This is witnessed by the development of new tracers in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of NETs belonging to the family of radio-labelled somatostatin analogues, that significantly improved the accuracy of diagnosis and, more recently, opened the way to the innovative targeted radionuclide therapies. First introduced in clinical application in 2005, 68Ga-DOTANOC (one of the most used radio-labelled somatostatin analog for PET imaging) has revealed promising results in preliminary studies for the main clinical indications: staging NET; suspected NET of unknown primary; follow-up, restaging and, finally, for pre- and post-treatment evaluation of receptor radionuclide therapies. Due to its technically simple production, favourable biodistribution, biokinetics, dosimetry and high affinity for SSTR and thanks to the possibility of hybrid scans PET/computed tomography (CT) with better spatial resolution and localisation of the lesions, 68Ga-DOTANOC can advance as the new gold standard for imaging in neuroendocrine tumours.

  15. Melatonin Immunoreactivity in Malignant Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Söderquist, Fanny; Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Rasmusson, Annica J.; Ali, Abir; Stridsberg, Mats; Cunningham, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (SI-NETs) are derived from enterochromaffin cells. After demonstrating melatonin in enterochromaffin cells, we hypothesized that SI-NETs may express and secrete melatonin, which may have an impact on clinical factors and treatment response. Methods Tumour tissue from 26 patients with SI-NETs, representing paired sections of primary tumour and metastasis, were immunohistochemically stained for melatonin and its receptors, MT1 and MT2. Plasma melatonin and immunoreactivity (IR) for melatonin, MT1 and MT2 in tumour cells were compared to other tumour markers and clinical parameters. Melatonin was measured at two time points in fasting morning plasma from 43 patients with SI-NETs. Results Melatonin IR was found in all SI-NETS. Melatonin IR intensity in primary tumours correlated inversely to proliferation index (p = 0.022) and patients reported less diarrhoea when melatonin IR was high (p = 0.012). MT1 IR was low or absent in tumours. MT2 expression was medium to high in primary tumours and generally reduced in metastases (p = 0.007). Plasma-melatonin ranged from 4.5 to 220.0 pg/L. Higher levels were associated with nausea at both time points (p = 0.027 and p = 0.006) and flush at the second sampling. In cases with disease stabilization or remission (n = 34), circulating melatonin levels were reduced in the second sample (p = 0.038). Conclusion Immunoreactive melatonin is present in SI-NETs. Circulating levels of melatonin in patients with SI-NETs are reduced after treatment. Our results are congruent with recent understanding of melatonin’s endocrine and paracrine functions and SI-NETs may provide a model for further studies of melatonin function. PMID:27736994

  16. An unusual case of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour of the ileum with peritoneal carcinomatosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Celotti, Andrea; Pulcini, Giuseppe; Schieppati, Mattia; Ministrini, Silvia; Berruti, Alfredo; Ronconi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are a family of neoplasms that come from neuroendocrine cells and express neural markers, such as synaptophysin or chromogranin A.The current classifications of these tumours are presented by the WHO 2000 classification, based on histological parameters, and the WHO 2010 classification, based on the proliferative index, that divides the NETs into a neuroendocrine tumour of a low grade, neuroendocrine tumour of a intermediate grade and neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) of a high grade.We are reporting a very rare case of a G1 low-grade neuroendocrine tumour (NET) of the ileum with a peritoneal carcinomatosis.This case is challenging because the tumour expresses low proliferative index as G1 tumours, but it has an aggressive clinical behaviour such as node metastasis and peritoneal carcinomatosis.The peritoneal carcinomatosis is not actually considered by the current classifications of NETs, so it is difficult to predict the prognosis of this patient.

  17. Radionuclide therapy in neuroendocrine tumours: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gulenchyn, K Y; Yao, X; Asa, S L; Singh, S; Law, C

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate the effects of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals in patients with different types of advanced neuroendocrine tumour (NETs). A literature search was carried out in MEDLINE and EMBASE from January 1998 to November 2010. The Cochrane Library (to Issue 10, 2010) and the Standards and Guidelines Evidence Inventory of Cancer Guidelines, including over 1100 English-language cancer guidelines from January 2003 to June 2010, were also checked. No existing systematic reviews or clinical practice guidelines based on a systematic review or randomised controlled trials focusing on this topic were found. Twenty-four fully published articles were abstracted and summarised: 16 articles focused on five peptide receptor radionuclide therapy ((111)In-DTPAOC, (90)Y-DOTALAN, (90)Y-DOTATOC, (90)Y-DOTATATE, and (177)Lu-DOTATATE) and eight focused on (131)I-MIBG treatment. Limited evidence from a historical comparison of studies in one centre supported that (177)Lu-DOTATATE might be associated with greater clinical outcomes compared with (90)Y-DOTATOC or (111)In-DTPAOC. The severe toxicities for (177)Lu-DOTATATE included hepatic insufficiency in 0.6%, myelodysplastic syndrome in 0.8% and renal insufficiency in 0.4% of patients in this study. Insufficient evidence suggested efficacy of (131)I-MIBG in adult NET patients, but the overall tumour response rate from (131)I-MIBG was 27-75% for malignant neuroblastoma, paraganglioma or pheochromocytoma. Haematological toxicities were the main severe side-effects after (131)I-MIBG and 4% of patients developed secondary malignancies in one study. To date, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy seems to be an acceptable option and is relatively safe in adult advanced NET patients with receptor uptake positive on scintigraphy, but patients' renal function must be monitored. (131)I-MIBG may be effective for malignant neuroblastoma, paraganglioma or pheochromocytoma, but its side-effects need to be

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of a rare sinonasal neuroendocrine tumour: adding to the evidence.

    PubMed

    Gudlavalleti, Aashrai; Dean, Ryan; Liu, Yuxin; Dhamoon, Amit S

    2016-01-01

    Sinonasal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare, aggressive neoplasms with a high recurrence potential. There are no robust protocols for the management of these tumours. An 81-year-old man presented with an incidental sinonasal mass visualised on CT scan of head. Over the next few weeks he developed new onset, progressively worsening headache, right eye ptosis and restricted extraocular movements. Imaging confirmed a rapidly enlarging tumour involving the right nasal cavity and the orbit. Biopsy showed a large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the right ethmoidal sinus. The patient was treated with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy and radiation. Repeat imaging showed decrease in tumour volume. The patient continues to do well and follows up regularly with our oncology service. Current protocols comprising chemotherapy after radiation are based on limited studies. A regimen involving concurrent chemoradiation also appears to aid in tumour volume reduction. Additional studies are required to formulate robust clinical protocols for management of sinonasal NETs. PMID:27624450

  19. A case of insulin and ACTH co-secretion by a neuroendocrine tumour

    PubMed Central

    Solomou, S; Khan, R; Propper, D; Berney, D; Druce, M

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 33-year-old male was diagnosed with a metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma of uncertain primary. He defaulted from follow-up without therapy and some months later developed episodic severe hypoglycaemia, which was found to be associated with inappropriately elevated insulin and C-peptide levels. It was considered likely that the neuroendocrine tumour was the source of the insulin secretion. Diazoxide and somatostatin analogue were used to control hypoglycaemia. Much later in the course of the disease, he developed metabolic derangement, increased skin pigmentation and psychological disturbance, without frankly Cushingoid physical findings. Investigations revealed highly elevated cortisol levels (the levels having previously been normal) with markedly raised ACTH levels, consistent with the co-secretion of ACTH and insulin by the tumour. Treatment with metyrapone improved his psychological state and electrolyte imbalance. Unfortunately, despite several cycles of first-, second- and third-line chemotherapy from the start of the first hormonal presentation onwards, imaging revealed widespread progressive metastatic disease and the patient eventually passed away. This case highlights the importance of keeping in mind the biochemical heterogeneity of endocrine tumours during their treatment. Learning points The clinical presentation of insulin-secreting tumours includes symptoms of neuroglycopaenia and sympathetic overstimulation.Tumour-associated hypoglycaemia can be due to pancreatic insulinomas, and although ectopic hormone production occurs in a number of tumours, ectopic secretion of insulin is rare.A possible switch in the type of hormone produced can occur during the growth and progression of neuroendocrine tumours and, when treating neuroendocrine tumours, it is important to keep in mind their biochemical heterogeneity. PMID:24683485

  20. [Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. What do we know of their history?].

    PubMed

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Starting with Paul Langerhans, who first described pancreatic islets in 1869, this article reviews the various protagonists who, in the last century and a half, have contributed to the discovery of the main hormones originating in the pancreas, the analytical methods for their measurement, the imaging techniques for identifying tumoural location, and the various pancreatic neoplasms.

  1. Transfected lymphocyte extracts of patients with urological tumours: complement temperature-sensitive adenovirus mutants in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ongrádi, J; Csata, S; Farkas, J; Nász, I; Bendinelli, M

    1994-01-01

    Patients with renal or bladder cancers exhibit a unique association with adenovirus (Ad) infections. About 60% of them contain antibodies to Ad early antigens. Both in their tumour cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) they have detectable early Ad antigens known to be involved in malignant cell transformation. Transfection of tumour cell extracts resulted in complementing temperature-sensitive (ts) Ad mutants at nonpermissive temperatures (39 degrees C) indicating that some cells of the tumour mass possess active functions for Ad. Only 4 to 18% of control subjects were positive in these tests. Here we studied whether lymphocytes might be involved in tumourigenesis by Ad. PBL extracts of patients were transfected into HEp-2 culture cells, which were subsequently superinfected with Ad-5 ts18 and ts19 mutants at 39 degrees C. Titration of virus yields indicated complementation in 76% of patients with renal and bladder cancers in contrast to 20% of control individuals. Complementing ability of lymphocytes which had been prestimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) approached that of tumour extracts. It means that both specimens contain advanced functions in contrast to resting lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are nonpermissive for latently carried Ad infections. Expression, possible transfer of early Ad gene products via frequent contacts with tissue cells can result in removal of tumour suppressor gene products from complexes regulating cell cycle negatively. Further interaction with hormone-sensitive protooncogenes explains tissue, age and gender specificity of urological malignancies. These phenomena suggest an important cofactorial role for Ad in kidney and bladder tumours.

  2. Case report. Peripancreatic intranodal haemangioma mimicking pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour: imaging and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Karaosmanoglu, A D; Arellano, R; Baker, G

    2011-12-01

    Haemangiomas are common benign tumours that are generally detected within the skin, mucosal surfaces and soft tissues. However, intranodal haemangiomas are extremely rare and are among the benign primary vascular abnormalities of the lymph nodes that include lymphangioma, haemangioendothelioma, angiomyomatous hamartoma and haemangiomas. In this case report, we present the imaging and pathological findings of an intranodal haemangioma in the pancreatic head simulating a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an intranodal haemangioma in this location.

  3. Guidelines for the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine (including carcinoid) tumours (NETs)

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A; Ardill, J; Bax, N; Breen, D J; Caplin, M E; Corrie, P; Davar, J; Davies, A H; Lewington, V; Meyer, T; Newell-Price, J; Poston, G; Reed, N; Rockall, A; Steward, W; Thakker, R V; Toubanakis, C; Valle, J; Verbeke, C; Grossman, A B

    2011-01-01

    These guidelines update previous guidance published in 2005. They have been revised by a group who are members of the UK and Ireland Neuroendocrine Tumour Society with endorsement from the clinical committees of the British Society of Gastroenterology, the Society for Endocrinology, the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland (and its Surgical Specialty Associations), the British Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology and others. The authorship represents leaders of the various groups in the UK and Ireland Neuroendocrine Tumour Society, but a large amount of work has been carried out by other specialists, many of whom attended a guidelines conference in May 2009. We have attempted to represent this work in the acknowledgements section. Over the past few years, there have been advances in the management of neuroendocrine tumours, which have included clearer characterisation, more specific and therapeutically relevant diagnosis, and improved treatments. However, there remain few randomised trials in the field and the disease is uncommon, hence all evidence must be considered weak in comparison with other more common cancers. PMID:22052063

  4. Elevated CA 19-9 levels observed in association with a pulmonary neuroendocrine tumour and amyloid.

    PubMed

    Faruqi, Shoaib; Gumparthy, Krishna; Wahbi, Zaroug

    2013-01-01

    Investigations completed in a 77-year-old ex-smoker presenting with weight loss showed raised CA 19-9 levels. The findings of chest radiograph, abdominal computed tomography (CT) and gastrointestinal endoscopic examinations were all normal. On follow-up, the patient developed left upper lobe collapse on chest radiograph with increasing CA 19-9 levels. Chest CT findings suggested the presence of a left upper lobe tumour. The results of a biopsy of the left upper lobe nodule seen on bronchoscopy suggested a diagnosis of amyloidosis; however, this was not the only diagnosis. The left upper lobe mass comprised a neuroendocrine tumour with amyloid deposition just beneath the bronchial epithelium and focally between the nests of the tumour cells. We report and discuss this uncommon association and presentation.

  5. Neuroendocrine tumours of the head and neck: anatomical, functional and molecular imaging and contemporary management

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Navaraj; Prestwich, Robin; Chowdhury, Fahmid; Patel, Chirag

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the head and neck are rare neoplasms and can be of epithelial or non-epithelial differentiation. Although the natural history of NETs is variable, it is crucial to establish an early diagnosis of these tumours as they can be potentially curable. Conventional anatomical imaging and functional imaging using radionuclide scintigraphy and positron emission tomography/computed tomography can be complementary for the diagnosis, staging and monitoring of treatment response. This article describes and illustrates the imaging features of head and neck NETs, discusses the potential future role of novel positron-emitting tracers that are emerging into clinical practice and reviews contemporary management of these tumours. Familiarity with the choice of imaging techniques and the variety of imaging patterns and treatment options should help guide radiologists in the management of this rare but important subgroup of head and neck neoplasms. PMID:24240099

  6. Bowel parasitosis and neuroendocrine tumours of the appendix. A report from the Italian TREP project.

    PubMed

    Virgone, C; Cecchetto, G; Besutti, V; Ferrari, A; Buffa, P; Alaggio, R; Alessandrini, L; Dall'Igna, P

    2015-05-01

    Five children with a neuroendocrine tumour (NET) of the appendix associated with a parasitic bowel infection are described, and the possibility of inflammation-triggered carcinogenesis is discussed. Schistosoma haematobium is linked primarily to bladder cancer but it has been reported in association with several other histotypes, including NETs of the gastrointestinal tract. Conversely, Enterobius vermicularis has not yet been claimed to participate in the onset of pre-cancerous conditions or tumours. The rare occurrence of contemporary appendiceal NETs and parasitic infection, raises the intriguing hypothesis of an inflammation-related carcinogenesis, although a cause-effect relationship cannot be established. Larger international series of childhood appendiceal NETs, which also include countries with higher prevalence of parasitic bowel infections, are needed to further clarify this possible cause-effect relationship.

  7. Hitting the target: where do molecularly targeted therapies fit in the treatment scheduling of neuroendocrine tumours?

    PubMed

    Karpathakis, Anna; Caplin, Martyn; Thirlwell, Christina

    2012-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are a rare and heterogeneous group of tumours whose incidence is increasing and their prevalence is now greater than that of any other upper gastrointestinal tumour. Diagnosis can be challenging, and up to 25% of patients present with metastatic disease. Following the recent FDA approval of two new molecularly targeted therapies for the treatment of advanced pancreatic NETs (pNETs), the first in 25 years, we review all systemic therapies and suggest where these newer targeted therapies fit in the treatment schedule for these challenging tumours. Clinical trial data relating to the routine use of sunitinib and everolimus in low-intermediate-grade pNETs are summarised alongside newer molecularly targeted agents undergoing clinical assessment in NETs. We particularly focus on the challenge of optimal scheduling of molecularly targeted treatments around existing systemic and localised treatment such as chemotherapy or radiotargeted therapy. We also discuss application of current evidence to subgroups of patients who have not so far been directly addressed such as those with poorer performance status or patients receiving radical surgery who may benefit from adjuvant treatment.

  8. Challenges and controversies in management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours in patients with MEN1.

    PubMed

    Yates, Christopher J; Newey, Paul J; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2015-11-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), an autosomal dominant disorder, is characterised by the occurrence of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (P-NETs) in association with parathyroid and pituitary tumours. P-NETs, which include gastrinomas, insulinomas, and non-functioning tumours, occur in more than 80% of MEN1 patients and account for 50% of disease-specific deaths. However, there is no consensus about the optimal methods for detecting and treating P-NETs in MEN1 patients, and extrapolations from approaches used in patients with non-familial (sporadic) P-NETs require caution because of differences, such as the younger age of onset, multi-focality of P-NETs, and concomitant presence of other tumours in MEN1 patients. Thus, the early detection of P-NETs by circulating biomarkers and imaging modalities, and their appropriate treatments by surgical approaches and/or radionuclide therapy, chemotherapy, and biotherapy pose challenges and controversies. These challenges and controversies will be reviewed and possible approaches proposed. PMID:26165399

  9. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours: Report of Two Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Orgera, Gianluigi; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Monfardini, Lorenzo; Bonomo, Guido; Della Vigna, Paolo; Fazio, Nicola; Orsi, Franco

    2011-04-15

    We describe the use of ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for ablation of two pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs; insulinomas) in two inoperable young female patients. Both suffered from episodes of severe nightly hypoglycemia that was not efficiently controlled by medical treatment. After HIFU ablation, local disease control and symptom relief were achieved without postinterventional complications. The patients remained free of symptoms during 9-month follow-up. The lesions appeared to be decreased in volume, and there was decreased enhancing pattern in the multidetector computed tomography control (MDCT). HIFU is likely to be a valid alternative for symptoms control in patients with pancreatic NETs. However, currently the procedure should be reserved for inoperable patients for whom symptoms cannot be controlled by medical therapy.

  10. Pathogenic PALB2 mutation in metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine tumour: A case report

    PubMed Central

    CHAN, DAVID; CLARKE, STEPHEN; GILL, ANTHONY J.; CHANTRILL, LORRAINE; SAMRA, JAS; LI, BOB T.; BARNES, TRISTAN; NAHAR, KAZI; PAVLAKIS, NICK

    2015-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNET) comprise ~3% of primary pancreatic neoplasms and they are more heterogeneous in their histological character and outcome. This is the case report of a 73-year-old female patient with synchronously diagnosed pancreatic adenocarcinoma and PNET, which is likely associated with a pathogenic partner and localizer of breast cancer 2, early onset (PALB2) mutation. The potential pathogenic significance of PALB2 and its association with various malignancies were investigated and the potential role of PALB2 in conferring sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents, such as mitomycin C and cisplatin, was discussed. This case report highlights the significance of ongoing research into the molecular pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer, which may help guide the selection of optimal treatments for this disease, as well as the need for ongoing study of PALB2 as a possible predictive marker of response to DNA-damaging agents. PMID:26171187

  11. Predictive factors of response to mTOR inhibitors in neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Fanciulli, Giuseppe; Malandrino, Pasqualino; Ramundo, Valeria; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-03-01

    Medical treatment of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) has drawn a lot of attention due to the recent demonstration of efficacy of several drugs on progression-free survival, including somatostatin analogs, small tyrosine kinase inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors (or rapalogs). The latter are approved as therapeutic agents in advanced pancreatic NETs and have been demonstrated to be effective in different types of NETs, with variable efficacy due to the development of resistance to treatment. Early detection of patients that may benefit from rapalogs treatment is of paramount importance in order to select the better treatment and avoid ineffective and expensive treatments. Predictive markers for therapeutic response are under intensive investigation, aiming at a tailored patient management and more appropriate resource utilization. This review summarizes the available data on the tissue, circulating and imaging markers that are potentially predictive of rapalog efficacy in NETs. PMID:26666705

  12. Predictive factors of response to mTOR inhibitors in neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Fanciulli, Giuseppe; Malandrino, Pasqualino; Ramundo, Valeria; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-03-01

    Medical treatment of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) has drawn a lot of attention due to the recent demonstration of efficacy of several drugs on progression-free survival, including somatostatin analogs, small tyrosine kinase inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors (or rapalogs). The latter are approved as therapeutic agents in advanced pancreatic NETs and have been demonstrated to be effective in different types of NETs, with variable efficacy due to the development of resistance to treatment. Early detection of patients that may benefit from rapalogs treatment is of paramount importance in order to select the better treatment and avoid ineffective and expensive treatments. Predictive markers for therapeutic response are under intensive investigation, aiming at a tailored patient management and more appropriate resource utilization. This review summarizes the available data on the tissue, circulating and imaging markers that are potentially predictive of rapalog efficacy in NETs.

  13. MicroRNAs associated with small bowel neuroendocrine tumours and their metastases.

    PubMed

    Miller, Helen C; Frampton, Adam E; Malczewska, Anna; Ottaviani, Silvia; Stronach, Euan A; Flora, Rashpal; Kaemmerer, Daniel; Schwach, Gert; Pfragner, Roswitha; Faiz, Omar; Kos-Kudła, Beata; Hanna, George B; Stebbing, Justin; Castellano, Leandro; Frilling, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Novel molecular analytes are needed in small bowel neuroendocrine tumours (SBNETs) to better determine disease aggressiveness and predict treatment response. In this study, we aimed to profile the global miRNome of SBNETs, and identify microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in tumour progression for use as potential biomarkers. Two independent miRNA profiling experiments were performed (n=90), including primary SBNETs (n=28), adjacent normal small bowel (NSB; n=14), matched lymph node (LN) metastases (n=24), normal LNs (n=7), normal liver (n=2) and liver metastases (n=15). We then evaluated potentially targeted genes by performing integrated computational analyses. We discovered 39 miRNAs significantly deregulated in SBNETs compared with adjacent NSB. The most upregulated (miR-204-5p, miR-7-5p and miR-375) were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Two miRNAs (miR-1 and miR-143-3p) were significantly downregulated in LN and liver metastases compared with primary tumours. Furthermore, we identified upregulated gene targets for miR-1 and miR-143-3p in an existing SBNET dataset, which could contribute to disease progression, and show that these miRNAs directly regulate FOSB and NUAK2 oncogenes. Our study represents the largest global miRNA profiling of SBNETs using matched primary tumour and metastatic samples. We revealed novel miRNAs deregulated during SBNET disease progression, and important miRNA-mRNA interactions. These miRNAs have the potential to act as biomarkers for patient stratification and may also be able to guide treatment decisions. Further experiments to define molecular mechanisms and validate these miRNAs in larger tissue cohorts and in biofluids are now warranted. PMID:27353039

  14. Validation of the EORTC QLQ-GINET21 questionnaire for assessing quality of life of patients with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Yadegarfar, G; Friend, L; Jones, L; Plum, L M; Ardill, J; Taal, B; Larsson, G; Jeziorski, K; Kwekkeboom, D; Ramage, J K

    2013-01-01

    Background: Quality of life is an important end point in clinical trials, yet there are few quality of life questionnaires for neuroendocrine tumours. Methods: This international multicentre validation study assesses the QLQ-GINET21 Quality of Life Questionnaire in 253 patients with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours. All patients were requested to complete two quality of life questionnaires – the EORTC Core Quality of Life questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and the QLQ-GINET21 – at baseline, and at 3 and 6 months post-baseline; the psychometric properties of the questionnaire were then analysed. Results: Analysis of QLQ-GINET21 scales confirmed appropriate aggregation of the items, except for treatment-related symptoms, where weight gain showed low correlation with other questions in the scale; weight gain was therefore analysed as a single item. Internal consistency of scales using Cronbach's α coefficient was >0.7 for all parts of the QLQ-GINET21 at 6 months. Intraclass correlation was >0.85 for all scales. Discriminant validity was confirmed, with values <0.70 for all scales compared with each other. Scores changed in accordance with alterations in performance status and in response to expected clinical changes after therapies. Mean scores were similar for pancreatic and other tumours. Conclusion: The QLQ-GINET21 is a valid and responsive tool for assessing quality of life in the gut, pancreas and liver neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:23322194

  15. Ki-67 index and response to chemotherapy in patients with neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Childs, Alexa; Kirkwood, Amy; Edeline, Julien; Luong, Tu Vinh; Watkins, Jennifer; Lamarca, Angela; Alrifai, Doraid; Nsiah-Sarbeng, Phyllis; Gillmore, Roopinder; Mayer, Astrid; Thirlwell, Christina; Sarker, Debashis; Valle, Juan W; Meyer, Tim

    2016-07-01

    Chemotherapy (CT) is widely used for neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), but there are no validated biomarkers to predict response. The Ki-67 proliferation index has been proposed as a means of selecting patients for CT, but robust data are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between response to chemotherapy and Ki-67 in NET. We reviewed data from 222 NET patients treated with CT. Tumours were graded according to Ki-67 index: G1 ≤2%, G2 3-20% and G3 >20%. Response was assessed according to RECIST and survival calculated from start of chemotherapy to death. To explore Ki-67 as a marker of response, we calculated the likelihood ratio and performed receiver operating characteristic analysis. Overall, 193 patients had a documented Ki-67 index, of which 173 were also evaluable for radiological response: 10% were G1, 46% G2 and 43% G3; 46% were pancreatic NET (PNET). Median overall survival was 22.1 months. Overall response rate was 30% (39% in PNET vs 22% in non-PNET) and 43% of patients had stable disease. Response rate increased with grade: 6% in G1 tumours, 24% in G2 and 43% in G3. However, maximum likelihood ratio was 2.3 at Ki-67=35%, and the area under the ROC curve was 0.60. As reported previously, a high Ki-67 was an adverse prognostic factor for overall survival. In conclusion, response to CT increases with Ki-67 index, but Ki-67 alone is an unreliable means to select patients for CT. Improved methods to stratify patients for systemic therapy are required. PMID:27412968

  16. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A.; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W.; Strowski, Mathias Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highly Ca2+ permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca2+ response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca2+-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation. PMID:27450545

  17. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W; Strowski, Mathias Z

    2016-08-01

    Highly Ca(2+) permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca(2+) response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation. PMID:27450545

  18. Primary neuroendocrine tumour of the right ventricle presenting with heart failure and cyanosis.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Syed Yaseen; Henry, David; Furukawa, Satoshi; Haber, Howard

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old woman presented to the emergency department owing to exertional dyspnoea and bilateral leg oedema for 3 weeks. Her vital signs included the following: heart rate of 95 bpm, respiratory rate of 24 breaths/min, oxygen saturation of 73% on room air and a blood pressure of 184/108 mm Hg. Physical examination revealed tachypnoea with clear lungs to auscultation, elevated jugular veins, cyanosis and bilateral pitting oedema. A chest X-ray demonstrated cardiomegaly without obvious pulmonary oedema. A CT of the chest was negative for pulmonary embolus; however, the scan did reveal a large right ventricular (RV) mass. An echocardiogram with bubble study confirmed a patent foramen ovale with significant right-to-left shunting and a large RV mass that significantly obstructed the pulmonary outflow tract. A cardiac biopsy revealed a low-grade neuroendocrine tumour. The patient underwent successful debridement and adjuvant chemotherapy. She improved greatly and was asymptomatic at a 9-month follow-up visit. PMID:26969366

  19. Malignant neuroendocrine tumour of the gallbladder with elevated carcinoembryonic antigen: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Furrukh, Muhammad; Qureshi, Asim; Saparamadu, Anna; Kumar, Shiyam

    2013-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman presented to a tertiary care centre with signs and symptoms of acute cholecystitis, cholelithiasis and diagnoses of a high-grade neuroendocrine tumour of the gallbladder primarily with peritoneal and liver metastases. She had a liver abscess secondary to Salmonella and Enterococcus fecalis that was drained and treated with appropriate antibiotics. Interestingly, the serum chromogranin A levels were within normal limits, but carcinoembryonic antigen was elevated, which helped evaluate responses and pick progression. She was treated with 10 cycles of palliative chemotherapy when malignancy associated complications started to recur, that is, cholangitis, worsening pain, cachexia, intestinal obstruction, etc leading to chemotherapy delays. Her disease progressed during these times with rapid deterioration of performance status. She died of septic complications postlaparotomy for intestinal obstruction. Her progression-free survival remained for 8 months with subjective and objective improvements, and her overall survival remained at 13 months. We describe the course of her illness and give a brief review of the literature. PMID:23661652

  20. GEP-NETS update: functional localisation and scintigraphy in neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas (GEP-NETs).

    PubMed

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-05-01

    For patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas (GEP) (GEP-NETs), excellent care should ideally be provided by a multidisciplinary team of skilled health care professionals. In these patients, a combination of nuclear medicine imaging and conventional radiological imaging techniques is usually mandatory for primary tumour visualisation, tumour staging and evaluation of treatment. In specific cases, as in patients with occult insulinomas, sampling procedures can provide a clue as to where to localise the insulin-hypersecreting pancreatic NETs. Recent developments in these fields have led to an increase in the detection rate of primary GEP-NETs and their metastatic deposits. Radiopharmaceuticals targeted at specific tumour cell properties and processes can be used to provide sensitive and specific whole-body imaging. Functional imaging also allows for patient selection for receptor-based therapies and prediction of the efficacy of such therapies. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (CT) and single-photon emission CT/CT are used to map functional images with anatomical localisations. As a result, tumour imaging and tumour follow-up strategies can be optimised for every individual GEP-NET patient. In some cases, functional imaging might give indications with regard to future tumour behaviour and prognosis.

  1. Incidence of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, M; Kim, M; Faggiano, A; de Herder, W W; Valk, G D

    2014-06-01

    Based on the current medical literature, the worldwide incidence of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) seems to have increased; however, a systematic literature overview is lacking. This study aimed to collect all available data on the incidence of gastroenteropancreatic (GEP)-NETs and characteristics of population to establish their epidemiology. A sensitive MEDLINE search was carried out. The papers were selected via a cascade process that restricted the initial pool of 7991 articles to 33, using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Original articles evaluating the incidence of sporadic GEP-NETs in regional, institutional and national registries were considered. The majority of data originated from the US National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database and from national cancer registries in Western Europe. Generally, because of the retrospective nature of existing databases the outcomes of studies might be biased, which hinders the drawing of firm conclusions. The age-adjusted incidence of GEP-NETs has increased steadily over the past four decades (1973-2007), increasing 3.65-fold in the USA and 3.8- to 4.8-fold in the UK. Incidence has changed variably from one anatomical site to another. The greatest increase in incidence occurred for gastric and rectal NETs, while the smallest increase occurred for small intestine NETs. There were gender and racial differences, which differed site by site and, in some cases, changed over time. The incidence rates (IRs) of GEP-NETs have increased significantly in the last 40 years. Data are only available from North America, Western Europe and Japan. A site-by-site analysis revealed that the IRs of some NETs increased more than those of others.

  2. Filamin-A is required to mediate SST2 effects in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Eleonora; Cambiaghi, Valeria; Zerbi, Alessandro; Carnaghi, Carlo; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Peverelli, Erika; Spada, Anna; Mantovani, Giovanna; Lania, Andrea G

    2016-03-01

    Somatostatin receptor type 2 (SST2) is the main pharmacological target of somatostatin (SS) analogues widely used in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (P-NETs), this treatment being ineffective in a subset of patients. Since it has been demonstrated that Filamin A (FLNA) is involved in mediating GPCR expression, membrane anchoring and signalling, we investigated the role of this cytoskeleton protein in SST2 expression and signalling, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and cell migration in human P-NETs and in QGP1 cell line. We demonstrated that FLNA silencing was not able to affect SST2 expression in P-NET cells in basal conditions. Conversely, a significant reduction in SST2 expression (-43 ± 21%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells) was observed in FLNA silenced QGP1 cells after long term SST2 activation with BIM23120. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of BIM23120 on cyclin D1 expression (-46 ± 18%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells), P-ERK1/2 levels (-42 ± 14%; P < 0.05 vs untreated cells), cAMP accumulation (-24 ± 3%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells), VEGF expression (-31 ± 5%, P < 0.01 vs untreated cells) and in vitro release (-40 ± 24%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells) was completely lost after FLNA silencing. Interestingly, BIM23120 promoted cell adhesion (+86 ± 45%, P < 0.05 vs untreated cells) and inhibited cell migration (-24 ± 2%, P < 0.00001 vs untreated cells) in P-NETs cells and these effects were abolished in FLNA silenced cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that FLNA plays a crucial role in SST2 expression and signalling, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and cell migration in P-NETs and in QGP1 cell line, suggesting a possible role of FLNA in determining the different responsiveness to SS analogues observed in P-NET patients. PMID:26733502

  3. Rare neuroendocrine tumours: results of the surveillance of rare cancers in Europe project.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Trama, Annalisa; Otter, Renée; Larrañaga, Nerea; Tavilla, Andrea; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Dei Tos, Angelo Paolo; Baudin, Eric; Poston, Graeme; Links, Thera

    2013-07-01

    Because of the low incidence, and limited opportunities for large patient volume experiences, there are very few relevant studies of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). A large population-based database (including cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002 and registered in 76 population-based cancer registries [CRs]), provided by the project 'surveillance of rare cancers in Europe' (RARECARE) is used to describe the basic indicators of incidence, prevalence and survival of NETs, giving a unique overview on the burden of NETs in Europe. NETs at all cancer sites, excluding lung, were analysed in this study. In total over 20,000 incident cases of NETs were analysed and a data quality check upon specific NETs was performed. The overall incidence rate for NETs was 25/1,000,000 and was highest in patients aged 65 years and older with well differentiated endocrine carcinomas (non-functioning pancreatic and gastrointestinal) (40 per 1,000,000). We estimated that slightly more than 100,000 people were diagnosed with NETs and still alive in EU27 at the beginning of 2008. Overall, NETs had a 5 year relative survival of 50%; survival was low (12%) for poorly differentiated endocrine carcinoma, and relatively high (64%) for well differentiated carcinoma (not functioning of the pancreas and digestive organs). Within NETs, endocrine carcinoma of thyroid gland had the best 5-year relative survival (82%). Because of the complexity and number of the different disciplines involved with NETs (as they arise in many organs), a multidisciplinary approach delivered in highly qualified reference centres and an international network between those centres is recommended.

  4. A thymic neuroendocrine tumour in a young female: a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Farah, G; Stokes, V J; Wang, L M; Grossman, A B

    2016-01-01

    Summary We present a case of a young female patient with a rare cause of relapsing and remitting Cushing’s syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion from a thymic neuroendocrine tumour. A 34-year-old female presented with a constellation of symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome, including facial swelling, muscle weakness and cognitive impairment. We use the terms ‘relapsing and remitting’ in this case report, given the unpredictable time course of symptoms, which led to a delay of 2 years before the correct diagnosis of hypercortisolaemia. Diagnostic workup confirmed ectopic ACTH secretion, and a thymic mass was seen on mediastinal imaging. The patient subsequently underwent thymectomy with complete resolution of her symptoms. Several case series have documented the association of Cushing’s syndrome with thymic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs), although to our knowledge there are a few published cases of patients with relapsing and remitting symptoms. This case is also notable for the absence of features of the MEN-1 syndrome, along with the female gender of our patient and her history of non-smoking. Learning points Ectopic corticotrophin (ACTH) secretion should always be considered in the diagnostic workup of young patients with Cushing’s syndrome There is a small but growing body of literature describing the correlation between ectopic ACTH secretion and thymic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) The possibility of a MEN-1 syndrome should be considered in all patients with thymic NETs, and we note the observational association with male gender and cigarette smoking in this cohort An exception to these associations is the finding of relatively high incidence of thymic NETs among female non-smoking MEN-1 patients in the Japanese compared with Western populations The relapsing and remitting course of our patient’s symptoms is noteworthy, given the paucity of this finding among other published cases PMID:27252866

  5. Current Status of Interventional Radiology in the Management of Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours (GEP-NETs)

    SciTech Connect

    Orgera, Gianluigi; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Cappucci, Matteo; Gourtsoyianni, Sofia; Tipaldi, Marcello Andrea; Hatzidakis, Adam; Rebonato, Alberto; Rossi, Michele

    2015-02-15

    Within the group of Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NETs), several heterogeneous malignancies are included with a variety of clinical manifestations and imaging characteristics. Often these cases are inoperable and minimal invasive treatment offered by image-guided procedures appears to be the only option. Interventional radiology offers a valid solution in the management of primary and metastatic GEP-NETs. The purpose of this review article is to describe the current status of the role of Interventional Radiology in the management of GEP-NETs.

  6. Well-Differentiated Grade 2, Type 3 Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumour with Bilateral Metastatic Ovarian Involvement: Report of an Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Manneh, Ray; Castellano, Daniel; Caso, Oscar; Loinaz, Carmelo; Jiménez, Jesús; Estenoz, Juana; Calatayud, Maria; Sepúlveda, Juan M.; García-Carbonero, Rocio

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of metastatic gastric neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) is challenging. In oligometastatic cases, surgical resection is recommended whenever possible. Somatostatin analogues have been used to decrease gastrin levels, and available evidence suggests that these drugs can also reduce recurrences. Here we present a highly unusual case involving a patient with a well-differentiated grade 2, type 3 gastric NET with exclusive metastatic bilateral ovarian involvement. To our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature, as the cause of ovarian involvement is usually due to local invasion rather than metastasis. We believe this case is of interest not only due to the unusual presentation, but also because it makes us consider adjuvant treatment with somatostatin analogues in patients with low-grade tumours and a positive postoperative octreoscan. PMID:27239181

  7. INSL5 is a novel marker for human enteroendocrine cells of the large intestine and neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Hammje, Katrin; Adham, Ibrahim; Ghia, Jean-Eric; Del Bigio, Marc R; Krcek, Jerry; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Klonisch, Thomas; Hombach-Klonisch, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    We report for the first time the distribution of human INSL5 and its cognate leucine rich G-protein coupled receptor RXFP4 in the large intestine and in neuroendocrine/carcinoid tissues. Immunoreactive INSL5 was uniquely expressed by enteroendocrine cells (EECs) located within the colonic mucosa, whereas colonocytes were immunopositive for RXFP4. INSL5+ and RXFP4+ cells were also detected in human neuroendocrine/carcinoid tissues. We employed a recently described Insl5 knockout mouse model and 2 mouse models of induced colitis to address the relevance of Insl5 in EEC development and in acute inflammation of the colon. We identified INSL5 as a specific marker for synaptophysin+ EECs in the mucosa of the normal human and mouse colon. Insl5 was not essential for the development of mouse synaptophysin+ EECs. The mouse models of chemically induced colitis (dextran sulfate sodium and dinitrobenzene-sulfonic acid) failed to show changes in the numbers of Insl5+ EECs at inflammatory sites during the acute phase of colitis. In conclusion, we showed that INSL5 is a novel marker of colorectal EECs and provide first evidence for the presence of a potentially autocrine/paracrine INSL5-RXFP4 signaling system in the normal human and mouse colon and in rare human neuroendocrine tumours.

  8. Pazopanib and depot octreotide in advanced, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours: a multicentre, single-group, phase 2 study

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Alexandria T; Halperin, Daniel M; Chan, Jennifer A; Fogelman, David R; Hess, Kenneth R; Malinowski, Paige; Regan, Eileen; Ng, Chaan S; Yao, James C; Kulke, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Treatment options for advanced, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) remain scarce. Pazopanib is an orally bioavailable, small molecule, multitargeted kinase inhibitor that inhibits VEGF receptors 1, 2, and 3. We did a study of the efficacy of pazopanib with depot octreotide in patients with advanced NETs. Methods We did a parallel cohort study of patients with metastatic or locally advanced grade 1–2 carcinoid tumours or pancreatic NETs, by use of a single-group, two-stage design. Patients received pazopanib 800 mg orally once per day and octreotide at their preprotocol dosage. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving an objective response, as assessed by investigators, by intention-to-treat analysis. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT00454363, and was completed in March, 2014. Findings Between April 12, 2007, and July 2, 2009, we enrolled 52 patients, including 32 individuals with pancreatic NETs and 20 individuals with carcinoid tumours. Seven (21.9%, 95% CI 11.0–38.8) of 32 patients with pancreatic NETs achieved an objective response. We detected no responses in the first stage of the cohort with carcinoid tumours, and we terminated accrual at 20 patients. Toxic effects included one patient with grade 4 hypertriglyceridaemia and one with grade 4 thrombosis, with the most common grade three events being aminotransferase increases and neutropenia, each of which happened in 3 patients. In all 52 patients, the most frequently observed toxic effects were fatigue (39 [75%]), nausea (33 [63%]), diarrhoea (33 [63%]), and hypertension (28 [54%]). Interpretation Treatment with pazopanib is associated with tumour response for patients with pancreatic NETs, but not for carcinoid tumours; a randomised controlled phase 3 study to assess pazopanib in advanced pancreatic NETs is warranted. Funding US National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health. PMID:25956795

  9. Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the small intestine and the appendix - management guidelines (recommended by the Polish Network of Neuroendocrine Tumours).

    PubMed

    Bolanowski, Marek; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Bobek-Billewicz, Barbara; Handkiewicz-Junak, Daria; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz; Nowakowska-Duława, Ewa; Steinhof-Radwańska, Katarzyna; Zajęcki, Wojciech; Zemczak, Anna; Kos-Kudła, Beata

    2013-01-01

    We present revised Polish guidelines regarding the management of patients harbouring neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) of the small intestine and appendix. The small intestine, especially the ileum, is the most common origin of these neoplasms. Most of them are well differentiated with slow growth. Rarely, they are less differentiated, growing fast with a poor prognosis. Since symptoms can be atypical, the diagnosis is often accidental. Typical symptoms of carcinoid syndrome occur in less than 10% of patients. The most useful laboratory marker is chromogranin A; 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid is helpful in the monitoring of carcinoid syndrome. Ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, colonoscopy, video capsule endoscopy, balloon enteroscopy and somatostatin receptors scintigraphy are used in the visualisation. A histological report is crucial for the proper diagnostics and therapy of NENs, and it has been extensively described. The treatment of choice is surgery, either radical or palliative. Somatostatin analogues are crucial in the pharmacological treatment of the hormonally active and non-active small intestine NENs and NENs of the appendix. Radioisotope therapy is possible in patients with a good expression of somatostatin receptors. Chemotherapy is not effective in general. Everolimus therapy can be applied in patients with generalised NENs of the small intestine in progression and where there has been a failure or an inability to use other treatment options. Finally, we make recommendations regarding the monitoring of patients with NENs of the small intestine and appendix.

  10. Screening for malnutrition in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Sheharyar A; Burch, Nicola; Druce, Maralyn; Hattersley, John G; Khan, Saboor; Gopalakrishnan, Kishore; Darby, Catherine; Wong, John L H; Davies, Louise; Fletcher, Simon; Shatwell, William; Sothi, Sharmila; Randeva, Harpal S; Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Weickert, Martin O

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether screening for malnutrition using the validated malnutrition universal screening tool (MUST) identifies specific characteristics of patients at risk, in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting University Hospitals Coventry & Warwickshire NHS Trust; European Neuroendocrine Tumour Society Centre of Excellence. Participants Patients with confirmed GEP-NET (n=161) of varying primary tumour sites, functioning status, grading, staging and treatment modalities. Main outcome measure To identify disease and treatment-related characteristics of patients with GEP-NET who score using MUST, and should be directed to detailed nutritional assessment. Results MUST score was positive (≥1) in 14% of outpatients with GEP-NET. MUST-positive patients had lower faecal elastase concentrations compared to MUST-negative patients (244±37 vs 383±20 µg/g stool; p=0.018), and were more likely to be on treatment with long-acting somatostatin analogues (65 vs 38%, p=0.021). MUST-positive patients were also more likely to have rectal or unknown primary NET, whereas, frequencies of other GEP-NET including pancreatic NET were comparable between MUST-positive and MUST-negative patients. Conclusions Given the frequency of patients identified at malnutrition risk using MUST in our relatively large and diverse GEP-NET cohort and the clinical implications of detecting malnutrition early, we recommend routine use of malnutrition screening in all patients with GEP-NET, and particularly in patients who are treated with long-acting somatostatin analogues. PMID:27147385

  11. Somatostatin analogues according to Ki67 index in neuroendocrine tumours: an observational retrospective-prospective analysis from real life.

    PubMed

    Faggiano, Antongiulio; Carratù, Anna Chiara; Guadagno, Elia; Tafuto, Salvatore; Tatangelo, Fabiana; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Mocerino, Carmela; Palmieri, Giovannella; Damiano, Vincenzo; Siciliano, Roberta; Leo, Silvana; Mauro, Annamaria; Tozzi, Lucia Franca; Battista, Claudia; De Rosa, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2016-02-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) have shown limited and variable antiproliferative effects in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Whether tumour control by SSAs depends on grading based on the 2010 WHO NET classification is still unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of long-acting SSAs in NETs according to Ki67 index. An observational Italian multicentre study was designed to collect data in patients with gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NETs under SSA treatment. Both retrospective and prospective data were included and they were analysed in line with Ki67 index, immunohistochemically evaluated in tumour samples and graded according to WHO classification (G1 = Ki67 index 0-2%, G2 = Ki67 index 3-20%, G3 = Ki67 index > 20%). Among 601 patients with NET, 140 with a histologically confirmed gastro-entero-pancreatic or thoracic NET or NET with unknown primary were treated with lanreotide autogel or octreotide LAR. An objective tumour response was observed in 11%, stability in 58% and progression in 31%. Objective response and tumour stability were not significantly different between G1 and G2 NETs. Progression free survival was longer but not significantly different in G1 than G2 NETs (median: 89 vs 43 months, p = 0.15). The median PFS was significantly longer in NETs showing Ki67 < 5% than in those showing Ki67 ≥ 5% (89 vs 35 months, p = 0.005). SSA therapy shows significant antiproliferative effects in well differentiated low/intermediate-proliferating NETs, not only G1 but also in G2 type. A Ki67 index of 5% seems to work better than 3% to select the best candidates for SSA therapy. PMID:26701729

  12. The insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 is a promising target for novel treatment approaches in neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumours.

    PubMed

    Höpfner, Michael; Baradari, Viola; Huether, Alexander; Schöfl, Christof; Scherübl, Hans

    2006-03-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NET) represent a heterogeneous tumour entity. The anti-neoplastic therapy of advanced NET disease is still unsatisfactory and innovative therapeutic approaches are needed. As NET frequently express insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their receptors (IGFR), known to promote survival, oncogenic transformation, tumour growth and spreading, the inhibition of the IGF/IGF-receptor system may offer possibilities for novel targeted treatment strategies of NET. Here, we studied the anti-neoplastic effects of an inhibition of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-1R) signalling in NET cells by the novel IGF-1R tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibitor NVP-AEW541, whose anti-neoplastic potency has not yet been tested in NET disease. Using two human NET cell lines with different growth characteristics, we demonstrated that NVP-AEW541 dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of NET cells by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Anti-neoplastic effects of NVP-AEW541 were also detected in primary cultures of human neuroendocrine gastrointestinal tumours. Apoptosis was characterized by activation of the apoptotic key enzyme, caspase-3, as well as by detection of changes in the expression of the pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, BAX and Bcl-2, after NVP-AEW541 treatment. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1/S checkpoint. The anti-neoplastic effects of NVP-AEW541 involved the inactivation of ERK1/2. Induction of immediate cytotoxicity did not account for the anti-neoplastic effects of NVP-AEW541, as shown by measurement of lactate dehydrogenase release. Moreover, additive anti-neoplastic effects were observed when NVP-AEW541 was combined with cytostatics such as doxorubicin or the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, fluvastatin. This is the first report on the induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by the IGF-1R-TK inhibitor, NVP-AEW541, in NET cells. The inhibition of the IGF/IGFR system appears to be a promising novel approach

  13. The novel Raf inhibitor Raf265 decreases Bcl-2 levels and confers TRAIL-sensitivity to neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Zitzmann, Kathrin; de Toni, Enrico; von Rüden, Janina; Brand, Stephan; Göke, Burkhard; Laubender, Rüdiger P; Auernhammer, Christoph J

    2011-04-01

    The tumour-selective death receptor ligand tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising agent for the treatment of human cancer. However, many tumours have evolved mechanisms to resist TRAIL-induced apoptosis. A number of studies have demonstrated that aberrant PI(3)K-Akt-mTOR survival signalling may confer TRAIL resistance by altering the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Here, we show that neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cell lines of heterogeneous origin exhibit a range of TRAIL sensitivities and that TRAIL sensitivity correlates with the expression of FLIP(S), caspase-8, and Bcl-2. Neither single mTOR inhibition by everolimus nor dual mTOR/PI(3)K inhibition by NVP-BEZ235 was able to enhance TRAIL susceptibility in any of the tested cell lines. In contrast, dual PI(3)K-Akt-mTOR and Raf-MEK-Erk pathway inhibition by the IGF-1R inhibitor NVP-AEW541 effectively restored TRAIL sensitivity in NCI-H727 bronchus carcinoid cells. Furthermore, blocking Raf-MEK-Erk signalling by the novel Raf inhibitor Raf265 significantly enhanced TRAIL sensitivity in NCI-H727 and CM insulinoma cells. While having no effect on FLIP(S) or caspase-8 expression, Raf265 strongly decreased Bcl-2 levels in those cell lines susceptible to its TRAIL-sensitizing action. Taken together, our findings suggest that combinations of Raf-MEK-Erk pathway inhibitors and TRAIL might offer a novel therapeutic strategy in NET disease.

  14. Exome sequencing identifies ATP4A gene as responsible of an atypical familial type I gastric neuroendocrine tumour.

    PubMed

    Calvete, Oriol; Reyes, Jose; Zuñiga, Sheila; Paumard-Hernández, Beatriz; Fernández, Victoria; Bujanda, Luís; Rodriguez-Pinilla, María S; Palacios, Jose; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Banka, Siddharth; Newman, William G; Cañamero, Marta; Pritchard, D Mark; Benítez, Javier

    2015-05-15

    Gastric neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) arise from enterochromaffin-like cells, which are located in oxyntic glands within the stomach. Type I tumours represent 70-80% of gastric NETs and are associated with hypergastrinaemia, chronic atrophic gastritis and achlorhydria. Gastrin is involved in the endocrine regulation of gastric acid production. Most type I gastric NETs are sporadic, have a good prognosis and their genetic basis are unknown. We performed an exome sequencing study in a family with consanguineous parents and 10 children, five of whom were affected by type I gastric NET. Atypical clinical traits included an earlier age of onset (around 30 years), aggressiveness (three had nodal infiltration requiring total gastrectomy and one an adenocarcinoma) and iron-deficiency rather than megaloblastic anaemia. We identified a homozygous missense mutation in the 14th exon of the ATP4A gene (c.2107C>T), which encodes the proton pump responsible for acid secretion by gastric parietal cells. The amino acid p.Arg703Cys is highly conserved across species and originates a change of one of the transmembrane domains that avoids the liberation of protons from cells to stomach. This is consistent with the achlorhydria that was observed in the affected individuals. No germline or somatic mutations in the ATP4A gene were found in sporadic gastric NET patients. Based on the results of this large family, it seems that this atypical form of gastric NET has an earlier age of onset, behaves more aggressively and has atypical clinical traits that differentiated from other studied cases. PMID:25678551

  15. The use of targeted therapies in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: patient assessment, treatment administration, and management of adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Pavlakis, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Together with the use of novel oral targeted therapies, a multidisciplinary approach can be used to effectively treat patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs). Here we review the integration of the oncology nurse to the newly developed oral treatment setting for patients with pNETs. From the outset, the nurse must be involved in various processes, including performance of baseline assessments (e.g. blood pathology, cardiac and lung function testing, patient history) and general medical observations, treatment administration, dietary guidance, evaluation of comorbidities, and review of concomitant medications. Patient education and establishment of a strong partnership in care before the start of pNET therapy ultimately increase treatment adherence and reduce potential toxicities. Regular review of general patient status and disease progression and continuous monitoring of adverse events also help enhance treatment outcomes and subsequently improve quality of life. Nurses’ knowledge of agent-specific toxicities and prompt, proactive management is a critical aspect of care. In essence, as the pNET treatment landscape evolves, the role of the healthcare professional in overall patient care must shift accordingly. PMID:23997829

  16. A Phase II Study of BEZ235 in Patients with Everolimus-resistant, Advanced Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    FAZIO, NICOLA; BUZZONI, ROBERTO; BAUDIN, ERIC; ANTONUZZO, LORENZO; HUBNER, RICHARD A.; LAHNER, HARALD; DE HERDER, WOUTER W.; RADERER, MARKUS; TEULÉ, ALEXANDRE; CAPDEVILA, JAUME; LIBUTTI, STEVEN K.; KULKE, MATTHEW H.; SHAH, MANISHA; DEY, DEBARSHI; TURRI, SABINE; AIMONE, PAOLA; MASSACESI, CRISTIAN; VERSLYPE, CHRIS

    2016-01-01

    Background This was a two-stage, phase II trial of the dual phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor BEZ235 in patients with everolimus-resistant pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs) (NCT01658436). Patients and Methods In stage 1, 11 patients received 400 mg BEZ235 orally twice daily (bid). Due to tolerability concerns, a further 20 patients received BEZ235 300 mg bid. Stage 2 would be triggered by a 16-week progression-free survival (PFS) rate of ≥60% in stage 1. Results As of 30 June, 2014, 29/31 patients had discontinued treatment. Treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events were reported in eight (72.7%) patients at 400 mg and eight (40.0%) patients at 300 mg, including hyperglycaemia, diarrhoea, nausea, and vomiting. The estimated 16-week PFS rate was 51.6% (90% confidence interval=35.7–67.3%). Conclusion BEZ235 was poorly tolerated by patients with everolimus-resistant pNETs at 400 and 300 mg bid doses. Although evidence of disease stability was observed, the study did not proceed to stage 2. PMID:26851029

  17. Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the endometrium and the importance of pathologic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Estruch, Adriana; Minig, Lucas; Illueca, Carmen; Romero, Ignacio; Guinot, Jose Luis; Poveda, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the endometrium is a very rare entity. They are very aggressive tumours, with a poor prognosis. They represent a clinical challenge because of a lack of a standardised treatment. We see here a case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of a lobular breast carcinoma, diagnosed in 2002. After presenting with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding in October 2014, she underwent a hysteroscopy-guided biopsy which revealed a metastasis of breast carcinoma. A hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy was performed because of uncontrolled uterine bleeding. The pathologic diagnosis was small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium. A surgical complete cytoreduction was achieved after the case being presented in a multidisciplinary tumour board. Pathologic results revealed metastasis from peritoneal implants of SCC on the endometrium, and metastasis in pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes from serous carcinoma of the endometrium. A total of four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy based on cisplatin (80mg/m² day one) and etoposide (100mg/m² day one, two, three) every 21 days was given. The patient experienced persistent disease and died 17 months after the diagnosis. SCC of the endometrium is a very rare and aggressive disease that requires an individualised multidisciplinary management. PMID:27610194

  18. Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the endometrium and the importance of pathologic diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Estruch, Adriana; Minig, Lucas; Illueca, Carmen; Romero, Ignacio; Guinot, Jose Luis; Poveda, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the endometrium is a very rare entity. They are very aggressive tumours, with a poor prognosis. They represent a clinical challenge because of a lack of a standardised treatment. We see here a case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of a lobular breast carcinoma, diagnosed in 2002. After presenting with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding in October 2014, she underwent a hysteroscopy-guided biopsy which revealed a metastasis of breast carcinoma. A hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy was performed because of uncontrolled uterine bleeding. The pathologic diagnosis was small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium. A surgical complete cytoreduction was achieved after the case being presented in a multidisciplinary tumour board. Pathologic results revealed metastasis from peritoneal implants of SCC on the endometrium, and metastasis in pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes from serous carcinoma of the endometrium. A total of four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy based on cisplatin (80mg/m² day one) and etoposide (100mg/m² day one, two, three) every 21 days was given. The patient experienced persistent disease and died 17 months after the diagnosis. SCC of the endometrium is a very rare and aggressive disease that requires an individualised multidisciplinary management. PMID:27610194

  19. Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the endometrium and the importance of pathologic diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Estruch, Adriana; Minig, Lucas; Illueca, Carmen; Romero, Ignacio; Guinot, Jose Luis; Poveda, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the endometrium is a very rare entity. They are very aggressive tumours, with a poor prognosis. They represent a clinical challenge because of a lack of a standardised treatment. We see here a case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of a lobular breast carcinoma, diagnosed in 2002. After presenting with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding in October 2014, she underwent a hysteroscopy-guided biopsy which revealed a metastasis of breast carcinoma. A hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy was performed because of uncontrolled uterine bleeding. The pathologic diagnosis was small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium. A surgical complete cytoreduction was achieved after the case being presented in a multidisciplinary tumour board. Pathologic results revealed metastasis from peritoneal implants of SCC on the endometrium, and metastasis in pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes from serous carcinoma of the endometrium. A total of four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy based on cisplatin (80mg/m² day one) and etoposide (100mg/m² day one, two, three) every 21 days was given. The patient experienced persistent disease and died 17 months after the diagnosis. SCC of the endometrium is a very rare and aggressive disease that requires an individualised multidisciplinary management.

  20. Antiproliferative effects of lanreotide autogel in patients with progressive, well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumours: a Spanish, multicentre, open-label, single arm phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatostatin analogues (SSAs) are indicated to relieve carcinoid syndrome but seem to have antiproliferative effects on neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). This is the first prospective study investigating tumour stabilisation with the long-acting SSA lanreotide Autogel in patients with progressive NETs. Methods This was a multicentre, open-label, phase II trial conducted in 17 Spanish specialist centres. Patients with well-differentiated NETs and radiologically confirmed progression within the previous 6 months received lanreotide Autogel, 120 mg every 28 days over ≤92 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were response rate, tumour biomarkers, symptom control, quality of life (QoL), and safety. Radiographic imaging was assessed by a blinded central radiologist. Results Of 30 patients included in the efficacy and safety analyses, 40% had midgut tumours and 27% pancreatic tumours; 63% of tumours were functioning. Median PFS time was 12.9 (95% CI: 7.9, 16.5) months, and most patients achieved disease stabilisation (89%) or partial response (4%). No deterioration in QoL was observed. Nineteen patients (63%) experienced treatment-related adverse events, most frequently diarrhoea and asthenia; only one treatment-related adverse event (aerophagia) was severe. Conclusion Lanreotide Autogel provided effective tumour stabilisation and PFS >12 months in patients with progressive NETs ineligible for surgery or chemotherapy, with a safety profile consistent with the pharmacology of the class. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00326469; EU Clinical Trial Register EudraCT no 2004-002871-18. PMID:24053191

  1. Current knowledge on the sensitivity of the (68)Ga-somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography and the SUVmax reference range for management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Virgolini, Irene; Gabriel, Michael; Kroiss, Alexander; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Prommegger, Rupert; Warwitz, Boris; Nilica, Bernhard; Roig, Llanos Geraldo; Rodrigues, Margarida; Uprimny, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Physiologically increased pancreatic uptake at the head/uncinate process is observed in more than one-third of patients after injection of one of the three (68)Ga-labelled octreotide-based peptides used for somatostatin (sst) receptor (r) imaging. There are minor differences between these (68)Ga-sstr-binding peptides in the imaging setting. On (68)Ga-sstr-imaging the physiological uptake can be diffuse or focal and usually remains stable over time. Differences in the maximal standardised uptake values (SUVmax) reported for the normal pancreas as well as for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (PNET) lesions may be related to several factors, including (a) differences in the peptide binding affinities as well as differences in sstr subtype expression of pancreatic α- and β-cells, and heterogeneity / density of tumour cells, (b) differences in scanner resolution, image reconstruction techniques and acquisition protocols, (c) mostly retrospective study designs, (d) mixed patient populations, or (e) interference with medications such as treatment with long-acting sst analogues. The major limitation in most of the studies lies in the lack of histopathological confirmation of abnormal findings. There is a significant overlap between the calculated SUVmax-values for physiological pancreas and PNET-lesions of the head/uncinate process that do not favour the use of quantitative parameters in the clinical setting. Anecdotal long-term follow-up studies have even indicated that increased uptake in the head/uncinate process still can turn out to be malignant over years of follow up. SUVmax-data for the pancreatic body and tail are limited. Therefore, any visible focal tracer uptake in the pancreas must be considered as suspicious for malignancy irrespective of quantitative parameters. In general, sstr-PET/CT has significant implications for the management of NET patients leading to a change in treatment decision in about one-third of patients. Therefore, follow-up with (68)Ga

  2. [177Lu-DOTA]0-D-Phe1-Tyr3-Octreotide (177Lu-DOTATOC) For Peptide Receptor Radiotherapy in Patients with Advanced Neuroendocrine Tumours: A Phase-II Study

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Richard P.; Kluge, Andreas W.; Kulkarni, Harshad; Schorr-Neufing, Ulrike; Niepsch, Karin; Bitterlich, Norman; van Echteld, Cees J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To characterise efficacy and safety of 177Lu-DOTATOC as agent for peptide receptor radiotherapy (PRRT) of advanced neuroendocrine tumours (NET). Patients and methods: Fifty-six subjects with metastasized and progressive NET (50% gastroenteral, 26.8% pancreatic, 23.2% other primary sites) treated consecutively with 177Lu-DOTATOC were analysed retrospectively. Subjects were administered 177Lu-DOTATOC (mean 2.1 cycles; range 1-4) as 7.0GBq (median) doses at three-monthly intervals. Efficacy was analysed using CT and/or MRI according to RECIST 1.1 criteria and results were stratified for the number of administered cycles and the primary tumour origin. Results: In the total NET population (A), median progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 17.4 and 34.2 months, respectively, assessed in a follow-up time (mean ± SD) of 16.1 ± 12.4 months. In patients receiving more than one cycle, mean follow-up time was 22.4 ± 11.0 months for all NETs (B) and PFS was 32.0 months for all NETs (B), 34.5 months for GEP-NET (C), and 11.9 months for other NETs (D). Objective response rates (Complete/Partial Responses) were 33.9%, 40.6%, 54.2%, and 0% for A, B, C, and D groups, respectively, while disease control rates in the same were 66.1%, 93.8%, 100%, and 75%. Complete responses (16.1%, 18.8% and 25.0% for groups A, B and C) were high, 78% of which were maintained throughout the follow up. There were no serious adverse events. One case of self-limiting grade 3 myelotoxicity was reported. Although 20% of patients had mild renal insufficiency at baseline, there was no evidence of exacerbated or de novo renal toxicity after treatment. Conclusion: 177Lu-DOTATOC is a novel agent for PRRT with major potential to induce objective tumour responses and sustained disease control in progressive neuroendocrine tumours, even when administered in moderate activities. The observed safety profile suggests a particularly favourable therapeutic index, including in patients with

  3. Modifications in the head group and in the spacer of cholesterol-based cationic lipids promote transfection in melanoma B16-F10 cells and tumours.

    PubMed

    Reynier, P; Briane, D; Coudert, R; Fadda, G; Bouchemal, N; Bissieres, P; Taillandier, E; Cao, A

    2004-01-01

    A series of four cationic lipids derived from cholesterol was synthesised and their efficiencies to vectorise nucleic acids were compared. The investigation concerns the effects of systematic chemical modifications in the polar head and in the spacer. The cationic lipid molecules used are in the same family of 3beta[N-(N',N',N'-trimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol iodide (TMAEC-Chol), presenting a spacer of two or three carbons and a quaternary ammonium polar head ramified with methyl or ethyl groups. These lipids formed stable liposomes sizing from 100 to 200 nm when prepared with the colipid dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). The goal of this work was to investigate the effect of the chemical structure of these cationic lipids on lipofection. Their ability to form complexes with DNA, their cytotoxicity and their transfection efficiency in vitro and in vivo were studied. Results were compared with those obtained from the well known cholesterol-based cationic lipid DC-Chol. In a melanoma cell line (B16-F10), results showed that either the polar head or the spacer affected the cytotoxicity. Cationic lipids with three ethyl groups in the head are more toxic than those with three methyl groups while cationic lipids with three carbons in the spacer are less toxic than those with two carbons in the spacer. The best transfection level was obtained in vitro and in vivo with cationic lipids having 3C in the spacer. Data indicated that among these lipids, in vivo gene transfer is advantaged by the methylated polar head while in vitro the best level was obtained with the ethylated one. Finally, it was observed that the chemical structure influences the transfection in the presence of serum while the complex charge and the DOPE ratios in liposomes preferentially affect the interaction with erythrocytes. Argumentations are proposed to explain the discrepancies between in vitro and in vivo transfection results concerning the optimal charge ratio and the chemical

  4. Mutation-targeted therapy with sunitinib or everolimus in patients with advanced low-grade or intermediate-grade neuroendocrine tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas with or without cytoreductive surgery: protocol for a phase II clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Neychev, Vladimir; Steinberg, Seth M; Cottle-Delisle, Candice; Merkel, Roxanne; Nilubol, Naris; Yao, Jianhua; Meltzer, Paul; Pacak, Karel; Marx, Stephen; Kebebew, Electron

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Finding the optimal management strategy for patients with advanced, metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas is a work in progress. Sunitinib and everolimus are currently approved for the treatment of progressive, unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic low-grade or intermediate-grade pancreatic NETs. However, mutation-targeted therapy with sunitinib or everolimus has not been studied in this patient population. Methods and analysis This prospective, open-label phase II clinical trial was designed to determine if mutation-targeting therapy with sunitinib or everolimus for patients with advanced low-grade or intermediate-grade NETs is more effective than historically expected results with progression-free survival (PFS) as the primary end point. Patients ≥18 years of age with progressive, low-grade or intermediate-grade locally advanced or metastatic NETs are eligible for this study. Patients will undergo tumour biopsy (if they are not a surgical candidate) for tumour genotyping. Patients will be assigned to sunitininb or everolimus based on somatic/germline mutations profile. Patients who have disease progression on either sunitinib or everolimus will crossover to the other drug. Treatment will continue until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, or consent to withdrawal. Using the proposed criteria, 44 patients will be accrued within each treatment group during a 48-month period (a total of 88 patients for the 2 treatments), and followed for up to an additional 12 months (a total of 60 months from entry of the first patient) to achieve 80% power in order to test whether there is an improvement in PFS compared to historically expected results, with a 0.10 α level one-sided significance test. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol was approved by the institutional review board of the National Cancer Institute (NCI-IRB Number 15C0040; iRIS Reference Number 339636). The results will be

  5. Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detection of primary site in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumours of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making: experience from a tertiary care centre in India

    PubMed Central

    Pankaj, Promila; Verma, Ritu; Jain, Anjali; Belho, Ethel S.; Mahajan, Harsh

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare, heterogeneous group of tumours which usually originate from small, occult primary sites and are characterized by over-expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using Ga-68-labeled-somatostatin-analogues have shown superiority over other modalities for imaging of NETs. The objective of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the efficacy of Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT imaging in detecting the primary site in patients with metastatic NETs of unknown origin and its impact on clinical decision making in such patients. Methods Between December 2011 and September 2014, a total of 263 patients underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT study in our department for various indications. Out of them, 68 patients (45 males, 23 females; mean age, 54.9±10.7 years; range, 31–78 years) with histopathologically proven metastatic NETs and unknown primary site (CUP-NET) on conventional imaging, who underwent Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan as part of their clinical work-up were included for analyses. Histopathology (wherever available) and/or follow-up imaging were taken as reference standard. Quantitative estimation of SSTR expression in the form of maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of detected primary and metastatic sites was calculated. Follow-up data of individual patients was collected through careful survey of hospital medical records and telephonic interviews. Results Maximum patients presented to our department with hepatic metastasis (50 out of 68 patients) and grade I NETs (>50%). Ga-68 DOTANOC PET/CT scan identified primary sites in 40 out of these 68 patients i.e., in approximately 59% patients. Identified primary sites were: small intestine [19], rectum [8], pancreas [7], stomach [4], lung [1] and one each in rare sites in kidney and prostate. In one patient, 2 primary sites were identified (one each in stomach and duodenum). Mean SUVmax of the detected primary sites was

  6. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  7. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Ru-Wen; Tsoi, Daphne T.

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy is a common cause of disseminated intravascular coagulation and usually presents as a chronic disorder in solid organ tumours. We present a rare case of recurrent acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in neuroendocrine carcinoma after manipulation, firstly, by core biopsy and, later, by cytotoxic therapy causing a release of procoagulants and cytokines from lysed tumour cells. This is reminiscent of tumour lysis syndrome where massive quantities of intracellular electrolytes and nucleic acid are released, causing acute metabolic imbalance and renal failure. This case highlights the potential complication of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation after trauma to malignant cells. PMID:23139666

  8. Neuroendocrine Adenoma of the Middle Ear: A Rare Histopathological Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    McGinness, Sam; Coleman, Hedley; Varikatt, Winny; da Cruz, Melville

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours occur throughout the body but are rare in the head and neck region and particularly rare in the middle ear. Clinical findings are often nonspecific and therefore pose a diagnostic challenge. Furthermore, the nomenclature of neuroendocrine tumours of the middle ear is historically controversial. Herein a case is presented of a middle ear adenoma in a 33-year-old patient who presented with otalgia, hearing loss, and facial nerve palsy. A brief discussion is included regarding the histopathological features of middle ear adenomas and seeks to clarify the correct nomenclature for these tumours. PMID:27429819

  9. [Anorectal neuroendocrine carcinoma: observations on a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Messinetti, S; Giacomelli, L; Drudi, F M; Innocenzi, D; Porcelli, C; Fabrizio, G; Finizio, R; Manno, A; Granai, A V

    1994-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours of the anorectum are rare (0.7% of malignant rectal tumours). Because of this rarity several aspects of the management of these tumours remain controversial. Diagnosis may be delayed because of failure to recognize their morphological characteristics and histological appearance may not reflect their biological behaviour. Immunocytochemistry for neuroendocrine-cells are essential to identify different types of carcinoid tumours and to do differential diagnosis from other malignant tumours. All that allow an exact therapeutic approach to these tumours. The tumours less than cm 1 in diameter can be safely treated by local excision; the tumours more than cm 1 in diameter are treated by radical surgery (AAP).

  10. Generalised hyperpigmentation caused by ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome with recurrent thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hye-Rim; Won, Chong Hyun; Chang, Sung Eun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Moon, Kee Chan

    2015-05-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome is a rare cause of generalised hyperpigmentation. The clinical features are due to the excessive ectopic secretion of adenocorticotropin by diverse neuroendocrine or non-endocrine tumours. Here, we describe a rare case of ectopic ACTH syndrome developing from recurring thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma, which first presented as generalised hyperpigmentation.

  11. Neuroendocrine hyperplasia —

    Cancer.gov

    Groups of uniform small cells with scant cytoplasm and round to oval nuclei with dense speckled chromatin form clusters thickening bronchiolar wall and/or protruding into the lumen. Immunohistochemical staining for markers of neuroendocrine differentiation, such as synaptophysin, CGRP and chromogranin, is required for accurate identification. Not reported to occur spontaneously. Neuroendocrine hyperplasia must be differentiated from normal groups of neuroendocrine cells found more prominently in some mouse strains.

  12. Immunotherapy for neuroblastoma using syngeneic fibroblasts transfected with IL-2 and IL-12.

    PubMed

    Barker, S E; Grosse, S M; Siapati, E K; Kritz, A; Kinnon, C; Thrasher, A J; Hart, S L

    2007-07-16

    Cytokine-modified tumour cells have been used in clinical trials for immunotherapy of neuroblastoma, but primary tumour cells from surgical biopsies are difficult to culture. Autologous fibroblasts, however, are straightforward to manipulate in culture and easy to transfect using nonviral or viral vectors. Here we have compared the antitumour effect of fibroblasts and tumour cells transfected ex vivo to coexpress interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-12 in a syngeneic mouse model of neuroblastoma. Coinjection of cytokine-modified fibroblasts with Neuro-2A tumour cells abolished their in vivo tumorigenicity. Treatment of established tumours with three intratumoral doses of transfected fibroblasts showed a significant therapeutic effect with reduced growth or complete eradication of tumours in 90% of mice, associated with extensive leukocyte infiltration. Splenocytes recovered from vaccinated mice showed enhanced IL-2 production following Neuro-2A coculture, and increased cytotoxicity against Neuro-2A targets compared with controls. Furthermore, 100% of the tumour-free mice exhibited immune memory against tumour cells when rechallenged three months later. The potency of transfected fibroblasts was equivalent to that of tumour cells in all experiments. We conclude that syngeneic fibroblasts cotransfected with IL-2 and IL-12 mediate therapeutic effects against established disease, and are capable of generating immunological memory. Furthermore, as they are easier to recover and manipulate than autologous tumour cells, fibroblasts provide an attractive alternative immunotherapeutic strategy for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  13. Pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinoma in a four-month-old dog.

    PubMed

    Saegusa, S; Yamamura, H; Morita, T; Hasegawa, A

    1994-11-01

    A 4-month-old male Siberian Husky dog had a history of coughing, high fever and anorexia. Thoracic radiographs revealed increased radiographic density in the cranial and middle lobes of the right lung, with pleural effusion. Cytological examination of the pleural fluid suggested carcinomatous pleuritis. Right-side thoracotomy and resection of the cranial and middle lobes were performed. Histopathological examination of the resected tissue revealed an anaplastic large cell carcinoma. The tumour cells were positive for neuron specific enolase and also contained neuroendocrine granules. A particularly unusual feature of this case of pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinoma was the young age of the affected animal.

  14. Chemotherapy for neuroendocrine tumors: the Beatson Oncology Centre experience.

    PubMed

    Hatton, M Q; Reed, N S

    1997-01-01

    The role of chemotherapy in malignant neuroendocrine tumours is difficult to assess because of their rarity and variation in biological behaviour. We present a retrospective review of chemotherapy given to 18 patients with metastatic and one with locally advanced neuroendocrine tumours. There were eight poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumours, six thyroid medullary carcinomas, two phaeochromocytomas, two pancreatic islet cell tumours and one undifferentiated neuroblastoma. Four patients were given 3-weekly dacarbazine, vincristine and cyclophosphamide (DOC) chemotherapy. In eight patients, this regimen was modified by substituting the dacarbazine and cisplatin and etoposide (OPEC). A further six patients were treated with dacarbazine reintroduced into the 3-weekly regimen (DOPEC). The remaining patient received cisplatin and etoposide. There were two complete responses (both with OPEC) and eight partial responses (two with DOC, three with OPEC and three with DOPEC). Five patients had stable disease and four progressed. Four received further chemotherapy on relapse, producing one complete and one partial response. The median response duration to initial chemotherapy was 10 months (range 3-34). The median survival was 12 months (range 1-42). The main toxicity was haematological, with grade 3-4 neutropenia in 12 patients; eight suffered episodes of sepsis. One death was treatment related. Other toxicity was mild although three patients discontinued vincristine with grade 2 neurotoxicity. The response rate and side effects of these three regimens appear comparable. We conclude that, although these patient numbers are small, combination chemotherapy produces an encouraging response rate (53%; 95% CI 30-75) in malignant neuroendocrine tumours, with acceptable toxicity. PMID:9448967

  15. Single cell optical transfection.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, David J; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Campbell, Paul; Dholakia, Kishan

    2010-06-01

    The plasma membrane of a eukaryotic cell is impermeable to most hydrophilic substances, yet the insertion of these materials into cells is an extremely important and universal requirement for the cell biologist. To address this need, many transfection techniques have been developed including viral, lipoplex, polyplex, capillary microinjection, gene gun and electroporation. The current discussion explores a procedure called optical injection, where a laser field transiently increases the membrane permeability to allow species to be internalized. If the internalized substance is a nucleic acid, such as DNA, RNA or small interfering RNA (siRNA), then the process is called optical transfection. This contactless, aseptic, single cell transfection method provides a key nanosurgical tool to the microscopist-the intracellular delivery of reagents and single nanoscopic objects. The experimental possibilities enabled by this technology are only beginning to be realized. A review of optical transfection is presented, along with a forecast of future applications of this rapidly developing and exciting technology. PMID:20064901

  16. Neuroendocrine-immune interactions.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J A; Scanes, C G

    1994-07-01

    The role of the neuroendocrine system in influencing both immune development and function has become an area of active research within many model systems, including the chicken. It is now clear that the neuroendocrine system can exert immediate feedback regulation on the immune system as well as control specific aspects of immune differentiation and development. The primary lymphoid organs of avian species (i.e., the thymus and the bursa of Fabricius) are also known to function as endocrine organs. These produce hormonal products that influence the development of lymphoid cells and that may feed back on the neuroendocrine system. In conjunction with the endocrine activities of the primary lymphoid organs, immune and accessory cells are known to produce a variety of secreted products or cytokines that have the potential not only for the regulation of immune function but also for mediating neuroendocrine activities. Finally, it has been demonstrated in a variety of species that leukocytes are capable of producing endocrine mediators previously believed to be produced only under the direct control of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Thus, there are numerous possibilities for bidirectional interactions between the immune and neuroendocrine systems. This discussion focuses primarily on these interactions with an emphasis on the means by which the hormonal mediators, growth hormone and thyroid hormone, may affect the thymus and the thymic microenvironment. The role of the adrenocorticoids and gonadal steroids in regulating immune function and their involvement in immune feedback circuits are also discussed.

  17. Transfection using DEAE-dextran.

    PubMed

    Selden, R F

    2001-05-01

    Two protocols for DEAE-dextran transfection of cells are provided in this unit. The Basic Protocol describes a procedure used to transfect adherent cells and the first Alternate Protocol presents a method used to transfect suspension cells. If an increase in transfection efficiency is needed, cells can be treated with chloroquine as described in the second Alternate Protocol.

  18. Graphene based gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liangzhu; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhuang

    2011-03-01

    Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI-10k polymer. The positively charged GO-PEI complexes are able to further bind with plasmid DNA (pDNA) for intracellular transfection of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene in HeLa cells. While EGFP transfection with PEI-1.2k appears to be ineffective, high EGFP expression is observed using the corresponding GO-PEI-1.2k as the transfection agent. On the other hand, GO-PEI-10k shows similar EGFP transfection efficiency but lower toxicity compared with PEI-10k. Our results suggest graphene to be a novel gene delivery nano-vector with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, promising for future applications in non-viral based gene therapy.Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI

  19. Neonatal tumours.

    PubMed

    Moore, S W

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal or perinatal tumours frequently relate to prenatal or developmental events and have a short exposure window which provides an opportunity to study tumours in a selective sensitive period of development. As a result, they display a number of host-specific features which include occasional spontaneous maturational changes with cells still responding to developmental influences. Neonatal tumours (NNT) are studied for a number of important reasons. Firstly, many of the benign tumours arising from soft tissue appear to result from disturbances in growth and development and some are associated with other congenital anomalies. Study of these aspects may open the door for investigation of genetic and epigenetic changes in genes controlling foetal development as well as environmental and drug effects during pregnancy. Secondly, the clinical behaviour of NNT differs from that of similar tumours occurring later in childhood. In addition, certain apparently malignant NNT can 'change course' in infancy leading to the maturation of apparently highly malignant tumours. Thirdly, NNT underline the genetic associations of most tumours but appear to differ in the effects of proto-oncogenes and other oncogenic factors. In this context, there are also connections between the foetal and neonatal period and some "adult" cancers. Fourthly, they appear to arise in a period in which minimal environmental interference has occurred, thus providing a unique potential window of opportunity to study the pathogenesis of tumour behaviour. This study will seek to review what is currently known in each of these areas of study as they apply to NNT. Further study of the provocative differences in tumour behaviour in neonates provides insights into the natural history of cancer in humans and promotes novel cancer therapies.

  20. Neuroendocrine Role for VGF

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jo E.; Brameld, John M.; Jethwa, Preeti H.

    2015-01-01

    The vgf gene (non-acronymic) is highly conserved and was identified on the basis of its rapid induction in vitro by nerve growth factor, although can also be induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and glial-derived growth factor. The VGF gene gives rise to a 68 kDa precursor polypeptide, which is induced robustly, relatively selectively and is synthesized exclusively in neuronal and neuroendocrine cells. Post-translational processing by neuroendocrine specific prohormone convertases in these cells results in the production of a number of smaller peptides. The VGF gene and peptides are widely expressed throughout the brain, particularly in the hypothalamus and hippocampus, in peripheral tissues including the pituitary gland, the adrenal glands, and the pancreas, and in the gastrointestinal tract in both the myenteric plexus and in endocrine cells. VGF peptides have been associated with a number of neuroendocrine roles, and in this review, we aim to describe these roles to highlight the importance of VGF as therapeutic target for a number of disorders, particularly those associated with energy metabolism, pain, reproduction, and cognition. PMID:25699015

  1. Neuroendocrine mechanisms in athletes.

    PubMed

    Misra, Madhusmita

    2014-01-01

    Athletic activity may be associated with alterations in various neuroendocrine axes depending on the state of energy availability. In addition, genetic factors and an underlying predilection for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may predispose some athletes to develop functional hypothalamic amenorrhea earlier than other athletes. In conditions of low energy availability associated with athletic activity, changes that occur in various neuroendocrine axes are primarily adaptive, and aim to either conserve energy for the most essential functions, or allow the body to draw on its reserves to meet energy needs. These hormonal changes, however, then lead to changes in body composition and bone metabolism. Impaired bone accrual in younger athletes and low bone density in older athletes constitutes the major pathologic consequence of neuroendocrine changes associated with low energy availability. The female athlete triad of low energy availability, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone density is prevalent in certain kinds of sports and activities, particularly endurance sports, gymnastics, and ballet. It is essential to screen for this condition in athletes at every preparticipation physical and during office visits, and to put in place an effective treatment team to manage the triad early, in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25248600

  2. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Esmati, Ebrahim; Babaei, Mohammad; Matini, Amirhassan; Ashtiani, Monir Sadat Mirai; Hamed, Ehsan Akbari; Nosrati, Hassan; Razi, Farideh; Ganjalikhani, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinoma usually originates from lung. Few data exist in the literature regarding neuroendocrine carcinoma of the tongue. Patient data including history, surgical procedure, histology, and radiology investigations were collected and summarized. A 40-year-old woman was referred after partial glossectomy. Squamous mucosa with neoplasm and cells with round nuclei and light cytoplasm was reported in the tongue biopsy. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining was positive for cytokeratin, neuron specific enolase, synaptophysin and chromogranin and negative for leukocyte common antigen. This case showed a high proliferative activity (Ki-67 labeling index were 60%). These IHC findings were in favor of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. After surgery, she received chemotherapy and chemoradiation. The diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors in the present case is based on immunohistochemical markers and cellular shapes. Postoperative chemoradiotherapy is a critical element of therapy for head and neck high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas, our patient received this treatment after surgery. PMID:26458666

  3. Transfection using DEAE-dextran.

    PubMed

    Gulick, T

    2001-05-01

    Transfection of cultured mammalian cells using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-dextran/DNA can be an attractive alternative to other transfection methods in many circumstances. The major advantages of the technique are its relative simplicity and speed, limited expense, and remarkably reproducible interexperimental and intraexperimental transfection efficiency. Disadvantages include inhibition of cell growth and induction of heterogeneous morphological changes in cells. Furthermore, the concentration of serum in the culture medium must be transiently reduced during the transfection. In general, DEAE-dextran DNA transfection is ideal for transient transfections with promoter/reporter plasmids in analyses of promoter and enhancer functions, and is suitable for overexpression of recombinant protein in transient transfections or for generation of stable cell lines using vectors designed to exist in the cell as episomes. This unit presents a general description of DEAE-dextran transfection, as well as two more specific protocols for typical experimental applications. The basic protocol is suitable for transfection of anchorage-dependent (attached) cells. For cells that grow in suspension, electroporation or lipofection is usually preferred, although DEAE-dextran-mediated transfection can be used.

  4. Transfection using DEAE-dextran.

    PubMed

    Gulick, Tod

    2003-08-01

    Transfection of cultured mammalian cells using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-dextran/DNA can be an attractive alternative to other transfection methods in many circumstances. The major advantages of the technique are its relative simplicity and speed, limited expense, and remarkably reproducible interexperimental and intraexperimental transfection efficiency. Disadvantages include inhibition of cell growth and induction of heterogeneous morphological changes in cells. Furthermore, the concentration of serum in the culture medium must be transiently reduced during the transfection. In general, DEAE-dextran DNA transfection is ideal for transient transfections with promoter/reporter plasmids in analyses of promoter and enhancer functions, and is suitable for overexpression of recombinant protein in transient transfections or for generation of stable cell lines using vectors designed to exist in the cell as episomes. This unit presents a general description of DEAE-dextran transfection, as well as two more specific protocols for typical experimental applications. The basic protocol is suitable for transfection of anchorage-dependent (attached) cells. For cells that grow in suspension, electroporation or lipofection is usually preferred, although DEAE-dextran-mediated transfection can be used.

  5. Transfection using DEAE-dextran.

    PubMed

    Gulick, T

    2001-05-01

    Transfection of cultured mammalian cells using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-dextran/DNA can be an attractive alternative to other transfection methods in many circumstances. The major advantages of the technique are its relative simplicity and speed, limited expense, and remarkably reproducible interexperimental and intraexperimental transfection efficiency. Disadvantages include inhibition of cell growth and induction of heterogeneous morphological changes in cells. Furthermore, the concentration of serum in the culture medium must be transiently reduced during the transfection. In general, DEAE-dextran DNA transfection is ideal for transient transfections with promoter/reporter plasmids in analyses of promoter and enhancer functions, and is suitable for overexpression of recombinant protein in transient transfections or for generation of stable cell lines using vectors designed to exist in the cell as episomes. This unit presents a general description of DEAE-dextran transfection, as well as two more specific protocols for typical experimental applications. The Basic Protocol is suitable for transfection of anchorage-dependent (attached) cells. For cells that grow in suspension, electroporation or lipofection is usually preferred, although DEAE-dextran-mediated transfection can be used.

  6. [Grading of neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W; Schnabel, P A; Komminoth, P

    2016-07-01

    The current WHO classification of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) differentiates between typical carcinoids (low grade NET), atypical carcinoids (intermediate grade NET) and small cell and large cell carcinomas (high grade NET) according to the prognosis. Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas are graded in an identical way. Together with the TNM system this enables a preoperative estimation of the prognosis in biopsies and fine needle aspirates. Well-differentiated tumors are graded into G1 tumors by the number of mitoses, <2 per 10 high-power fields (HPF) and the Ki-67 (index <3 %) and G2 tumors (2-20 mitoses/10 HPF, Ki-67 3-20 %). Discrepancies between the number of mitoses and the Ki-67 index are not uncommon and in these cases the higher value of the two should be applied. The more differentiated tumors of the G3 type have to be differentiated from undifferentiated carcinomas of the small cell type and large cell type with a much poorer prognosis. Prognosis relevant grading of thyroid cancers is achieved by special subtyping so that the G1-G3 system is not applicable. The rare cancers of the parathyroid gland and of the pituitary gland are not graded. Adrenal tumors also have no grading system. The prognosis is dependent on the Ki-67 index and with some reservations on the established scoring systems. PMID:27379621

  7. Epidemiology of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Merav; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Valk, Gerlof D

    2015-01-01

    Formerly named carcinoids, neuroendocrine tumors originate from diffuse endocrine cells, can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, endocrine pancreas and bronchopulmonary (BP) tree, and have a wide range of malignant potential. This chapter summarizes the data available on the epidemiology of neuroendocrine neoplasia (NEN) from around the world, including the relative frequency according to organ of origin, annual incidence rates (IR) and trends in IR at the various anatomic sites, age and stage at presentation, racial and gender differences in IR and 5-year survival rates. Over time, changes have been made in the classification and registration of NEN, both in the same registry and across the globe, thus confounding the possibility to draw conclusions as to the true rise in IR of NEN that is observed all over the world. BP NEN has become the most common site in many western countries, while NEN of the rectum is more common in the Far East. In some countries, appendiceal NEN is the most common site in females. When compared to adenocarcinoma of the same location, the prognosis of NEN patients is better. Five-year survival rates are highest for NEN originating in the rectum and appendix, but lower in small intestinal and pancreatic NEN. Future research is needed to understand the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to NEN epidemiology. PMID:26303701

  8. Endocannabinoid Regulation of Neuroendocrine Systems.

    PubMed

    Tasker, Jeffrey G; Chen, Chun; Fisher, Marc O; Fu, Xin; Rainville, Jennifer R; Weiss, Grant L

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a part of the brain that is critical for sustaining life through its homeostatic control and integrative regulation of the autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine systems. Neuroendocrine function in mammals is mediated mainly through the control of pituitary hormone secretion by diverse neuroendocrine cell groups in the hypothalamus. Cannabinoid receptors are expressed throughout the hypothalamus, and endocannabinoids have been found to exert pronounced regulatory effects on neuroendocrine function via modulation of the outputs of several neuroendocrine systems. Here, we review the physiological regulation of neuroendocrine function by endocannabinoids, focusing on the role of endocannabinoids in the neuroendocrine regulation of the stress response, food intake, fluid homeostasis, and reproductive function. Cannabis sativa (marijuana) has a long history of recreational and/or medicinal use dating back to ancient times. It was used as an analgesic, anesthetic, and antianxiety herb as early as 2600 B.C. The hedonic, anxiolytic, and mood-elevating properties of cannabis have also been cited in ancient records from different cultures. However, it was not until 1964 that the psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, was isolated and its chemical structure determined (Gaoni & Mechoulam, 1964). PMID:26638767

  9. Current concepts in neuroendocrine disruption.

    PubMed

    León-Olea, Martha; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Orlando, Edward F; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S; Wolstenholme, Jennifer T; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  10. Current Concepts in Neuroendocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  11. Partial processing of the neuropeptide Y precursor in transfected CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Wulff, B S; O'Hare, M M; Boel, E; Theill, L E; Schwartz, T W

    1990-02-12

    The activation of regulatory peptides by post-translational modification of their biosynthetic precursors is generally thought to occur only in neuroendocrine cells. We have selected clones of Chinese hamster ovary cells, a non-neuroendocrine cell line, which were transfected with a eukaryotic expression vector coding for the precursor for neuropeptide Y. Although the majority of the immunoreactive NPY was found in the form of pro-NPY, some degree of intracellular proteolytic processing of the precursor occurred in all clones. Part of the intracellular NPY immunoreactivity was even correctly amidated. Extracellular degradation of pro-NPY in the tissue culture medium generated immunoreactivity which corresponded in size to NPY. It is concluded that precursor processing can occur in non-neuroendocrine cells both as a biological process within the cells and as apparent processing, degradation in the tissue culture medium.

  12. Transfection of Platyhelminthes

    PubMed Central

    Moguel, Bárbara; Bobes, Raúl J.; Carrero, Julio C.; Laclette, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Flatworms are one of the most diverse groups within Lophotrochozoa with more than 20,000 known species, distributed worldwide in different ecosystems, from the free-living organisms in the seas and lakes to highly specialized parasites living in a variety of hosts, including humans. Several infections caused by flatworms are considered major neglected diseases affecting countries in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. For several decades, a particular interest on free-living flatworms was due to their ability to regenerate considerable portions of the body, implying the presence of germ cells that could be important for medicine. The relevance of reverse genetics for this group is clear; understanding the phenotypic characteristics of specific genes will shed light on developmental traits of free-living and parasite worms. The genetic manipulation of flatworms will allow learning more about the mechanisms for tissue regeneration, designing new and more effective anthelmintic drugs, and explaining the host-parasite molecular crosstalk so far partially inaccessible for experimentation. In this review, availability of transfection techniques is analyzed across flatworms, from the initial transient achievements to the stable manipulations now developed for free-living and parasite species. PMID:26090388

  13. Transfection of Platyhelminthes.

    PubMed

    Moguel, Bárbara; Bobes, Raúl J; Carrero, Julio C; Laclette, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Flatworms are one of the most diverse groups within Lophotrochozoa with more than 20,000 known species, distributed worldwide in different ecosystems, from the free-living organisms in the seas and lakes to highly specialized parasites living in a variety of hosts, including humans. Several infections caused by flatworms are considered major neglected diseases affecting countries in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. For several decades, a particular interest on free-living flatworms was due to their ability to regenerate considerable portions of the body, implying the presence of germ cells that could be important for medicine. The relevance of reverse genetics for this group is clear; understanding the phenotypic characteristics of specific genes will shed light on developmental traits of free-living and parasite worms. The genetic manipulation of flatworms will allow learning more about the mechanisms for tissue regeneration, designing new and more effective anthelmintic drugs, and explaining the host-parasite molecular crosstalk so far partially inaccessible for experimentation. In this review, availability of transfection techniques is analyzed across flatworms, from the initial transient achievements to the stable manipulations now developed for free-living and parasite species.

  14. Gastric hyperplastic polyps coexisting with early gastric cancers, adenoma and neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Karpińska-Kaczmarczyk, K; Lewandowska, M; Białek, A; Ławniczak, M; Urasińska, E

    2016-03-01

    Gastric hyperplastic polyps (GHP) constitute up to 93% of all benign epithelial polyps of the stomach. The average probability of malignant transformation in GHP is 0.6-22% in large series. The aim of the study was to present the coexistence of GHP with early gastric cancer (EGC), gastric adenoma (GA), neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (NH) and well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour (NET G1). Three cases were studied to reveal clinical data and morphological changes and to assess the relationship between GHP and accompanying gastric neoplastic lesions. PMID:27179272

  15. Gastric calcifying fibrous tumour

    PubMed Central

    Attila, Tan; Chen, Dean; Gardiner, Geoffrey W; Ptak, Theadore W; Marcon, Norman E

    2006-01-01

    Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours); however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases. PMID:16858502

  16. Poorly differentiated tumours of the anal canal: a diagnostic strategy for the surgical pathologist.

    PubMed

    Balachandra, B; Marcus, V; Jass, J R

    2007-01-01

    Poorly differentiated malignancies affecting the anal canal are uncommon but pose diagnostic difficulties because of the wide range of normal cell types that may occur within a limited anatomical region. The range of lesions that may present as poorly differentiated tumours includes squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, small and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma expressing epithelial cytokeratins and other patterns of mixed differentiation, undifferentiated carcinoma, malignant melanoma, lymphoma and secondary tumours. This review discusses the differential diagnosis of these neoplasms with the aid of short illustrative case studies.

  17. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Advanced Neuroendocrine Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-15

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor

  18. [Neuroendocrine disturbances in obesity].

    PubMed

    Isidro, M L; Alvarez, P; Martínez, T; Cordido, F

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is associated with different disturbances in endocrine function. Both spontaneous growth hormone (GH) secretion and its response to several stimuli have shown to be reduced in obese patients. The GH responses to GH-releasing hormone and other challenges by pyridostigmine suggest that the reduction in GH secretion is related to an increased somatostatinergic tone. Other experiments point to a down-regulation of somatostatin receptors in the somatotroph cell. Ghrelin administration is followed by a massive GH release, but the possibility that ghrelin or GHRH deficiency are the cause of GH deficiency in obesity is unlikely. The increase in free fatty acids in obesity might be related to GH reduction, since acipimox administration is able to reverse GH secretion. In women, abdominal obesity is associated with hyperandrogenism and low sex hormone-binding globulin levels. Obese men have low testosterone and gonadotrophin concentrations, specially in cases of morbid obesity. An increase in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and some resistance to dexamethasone suppression have been described in abdominal obesity. This effect may be due to neuroendocrine alterations related to a genetic origin. Adrenal hyperfunction may favour cardiovascular and metabolic complications. There are no disturbances in thyroid function. Sometimes a reduction in prolactin response to several stimuli has been reported. This effect may be due to hyperinsulinaemia or to disturbances in the dopaminergic tone.

  19. Imaging of testicular tumours.

    PubMed

    Owens, E J; Kabala, J; Goddard, P

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis, pathology and imaging of testicular tumours, predominantly germ cell tumours. It will discuss the imaging techniques used in their diagnosis, staging and surveillance.

  20. Histopathology of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Nishi, Takayuki; Tanaka, Akira; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) arise from neuroendocrine cells distributed mainly in the mucosa and submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of NENs of the digestive system was changed, categorizing these tumors as grade 1 neuroendocrine tumor (NET), grade-2NET, neuroendocrine carcinoma (large- or small-cell type), or mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Such a classification is based on the Ki-67 index and mitotic count in histological material. For the accurate pathological diagnosis and grading of NENs, it is important to clearly recognize the characteristic histological features of GI-NENs and to understand the correct method of counting Ki-67 and mitoses. In this review, we focus on the histopathological features of GI-NENs, particularly regarding biopsy and cytological diagnoses, neuroendocrine markers, genetic and molecular features, and the evaluation of the Ki-67 index and mitotic count. In addition, we will address the histological features of GI-NEN in specific organs. PMID:23346552

  1. Neuroendocrine effects of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Russel J.

    1991-09-01

    The light/dark cycle to which animals, and possibly humans, are exposed has a major impact on their physiology. The mechanisms whereby specific tissues respond to the light/dark cycle involve the pineal hormone melatonin. The pineal gland, an end organ of the visual system in mammals, produces the hormone melatonin only at night, at which time it is released into the blood. The duration of elevated nightly melatonin provides every tissue with information about the time of day and time of year (in animals that are kept under naturally changing photoperiods). Besides its release in a circadian mode, melatonin is also discharged in a pulsatile manner; the physiological significance, if any, of pulsatile melatonin release remains unknown. The exposure of animals including man to light at night rapidly depresses pineal melatonin synthesis and, therefore, blood melatonin levels drop precipitously. The brightness of light at night required to depress melatonin production is highly species specific. In general, the pineal gland of nocturnally active mammals, which possess rod-dominated retinas, is more sensitive to inhibition by light than is the pineal gland of diurnally active animals (with cone-dominated retinas). Because of the ability of the light/dark cycle to determine melatonin production, the photoperiod is capable of influencing the function of a variety of endocrine and non-endocrine organs. Indeed, melatonin is a ubiquitously acting pineal hormone with its effects on the neuroendocrine system having been most thoroughly investigated. Thus, in nonhuman photoperiodic mammals melatonin regulates seasonal reproduction; in humans also, the indole has been implicated in the control of reproductive physiology.

  2. Imaging of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Kjell; Sundin, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) comprise a heterogeneous group of malignancies with a very variable clinical expression and progression. They present unique properties that are important to consider for radiological and nuclear imaging, such as APUD-characteristics (amine precursor uptake and dearboxylation), as well as the expression of somatostatin receptors. The most common localizations are the lungs, gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. The only curative treatment is surgery, but more than 50% present metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. The systemic treatment includes chemotherapy and targeted agents, as well as peptide receptor radiotherapy. The diagnosis and follow-up of these tumors necessitate a large number of different imaging methods, such as CT, MRI, US, SRS and PET. Ultrasonography offers the possibility to take guided biopsies from different lesions. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy was developed in the 1990s and nowadays presents the standard of care for NETs in most countries. The procedure offers a total body examination and a better staging of the disease. However, it has been replaced in most centers by PET/CT with 68Ga-DOTA-somatostatin analogues with a superior spatial resolution and faster imaging (one-stop procedure). Another tracer used for PET/CT is 18FDG, particularly for high-grade tumors. Other more specific tracers are 18F-L-DOPA, 11C-L-DOPA and 11C-5-hydroxytryptophan, which have demonstrated excellent imaging results. The new targeted agents present a challenge in the evaluation procedure of treatment and, therefore, new imaging techniques and an improvement of currently available techniques are mandatory. PMID:27002535

  3. Neuroendocrine carcinoma arising in soft tissue: three case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hyer, Steve L; McAleese, Jonathan; Harmer, Clive L

    2007-01-01

    Background Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are tumours arising from neuroendocrine cells of neural crest origin. They are characterised by the presence of neurosecretory granules which react positively to silver stains and to specific markers including neuron specific enolase, synaptophysin and chromogranin. Metastasis to the skin occurs infrequently but primary soft tissue NET is excessively rare. Case presentation We report our experience with 3 such cases. In the first case, the NET originated in muscle and was treated with wide surgical excision and adjuvant radiotherapy. The second case presented as a subcutaneous mass in the foot and the tumour was positive on 123I mIBG scan. She has had prolonged recurrence-free survival following primary hypo-fractionated radiotherapy. In the third case, a cutaneous nodule proved to be a NET and at surgery, lymph node disease was present. He has remained disease-free after surgical excision without the need for external beam radiotherapy. Conclusion These tumours appear to have a good prognosis. Complete excision offers potentially curative treatment. Adjuvant radiotherapy may be helpful when the tumour margin is narrow. For patients with unresectable disease or where surgery would not be appropriate, radiotherapy appears to be an effective therapeutic option. PMID:17620120

  4. Integrated Electrowetting Nanoinjector for Single Cell Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Shekaramiz, Elaheh; Varadarajalu, Ganeshkumar; Day, Philip J.; Wickramasinghe, H. Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Single cell transfection techniques are essential to understand the heterogeneity between cells. We have developed an integrated electrowetting nanoinjector (INENI) to transfect single cells. The high transfection efficiency, controlled dosage delivery and ease of INENI fabrication promote the widespread application of the INENI in cell transfection assays. PMID:27374766

  5. [Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the breast].

    PubMed

    Anlauf, M; Neumann, M; Bomberg, S; Luczak, K; Heikaus, S; Gustmann, C; Antke, C; Ezziddin, S; Fottner, C; Pavel, M; Pape, U-F; Rinke, A; Lahner, H; Schott, M; Cremer, B; Hörsch, D; Baum, R P; Groh, U; Alkatout, I; Rudlowski, C; Scheler, P; Zirbes, T K; Hoffmann, J; Fehm, T; Gabbert, H E; Baldus, S E

    2015-05-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the breast are specific tumor entities. According to the literature up to 5% of breast neoplasms are malignant epithelial neoplasms of the breast. They are defined by a neuroendocrine (NE) architecture and cytology combined with an expression of the neuroendocrine vesicle markers chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin. The diagnosis is supplemented by the receptor status and the proliferative activity. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of 2012 the following groups of NEN are distinguished: (1) invasive breast carcinoma with NE differentiation, (2) well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET) and (3) poorly differentiated small cell carcinoma (NEC). This review article focuses on (1) the definition and basic principles of diagnostics, (2) the history, nomenclature and WHO classification from 2003 and 2012, (3) the frequency of breast NEN, (4) the hereditary background and functional activity, (5) the expression of receptors and (6) the possible clinical implications. In addition, the first results of a retrospective single center study (n = 465 patients with breast cancer over a time period of 4 years) on the frequency of NEN of the breast at the Breast Center of the University Hospital Düsseldorf are presented. In this study a frequency of 4.5% of NEN was found based on a diagnostic cut-off of > 50% Chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin positive tumor cells.

  6. Neuroendocrine dysfunction in Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tzioufas, Athanasios G; Tsonis, John; Moutsopoulos, Haralampos M

    2008-01-01

    Interactions among the immune, nervous and endocrine systems, which are mediated by hormones, neuropeptides, neurotransmitters, cytokines and their receptors, appear to play an important role in modulating host susceptibility and resistance to inflammatory disease. The neuroendocrine system has two main components: the central and the peripheral. The central compartment is located in the locus ceruleus, the brainstem centers of the autonomic system and the paraventricular nucleus; the peripheral mainly consists of the sympathetic/adrenomedullary system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA), the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and the neuroendocrine tissue located in several organs throughout the body. Hormones and neuropeptides may influence the activities of lymphoid organs and cells via endocrine and local autocrine/paracrine pathways or alter the function of different cell types in target organs. Recent studies highlighted alterations of the neuroendocrine system in systemic autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjogren's syndrome (SS). SS, a prototype autoimmune disorder, has a wide clinical spectrum, extending from organ involvement (autoimmune exocrinopathy) to systemic disease and B cell lymphoma. In SS, several functions of the neuroendocrine system are impaired. First, the HPA axis appears to be disturbed, since significantly lower basal ACTH and cortisol levels were found in patients with SS and were associated with a blunted pituitary and adrenal response to ovine corticotropin-releasing factor compared to normal controls. Second, HPG axis is also involved, since lack of estrogens is associated with human disease and the development of autoimmune exocrinopathy in several experimental models. Finally, exocrine glands are enriched with neuroendocrine-related molecules, adjacent to local autoimmune lesions. Certain clinical manifestations of the disease, including the sicca manifestations

  7. Tumour biology: Senescence in premalignant tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, Manuel; Gil, Jesús; Efeyan, Alejo; Guerra, Carmen; Schuhmacher, Alberto J.; Barradas, Marta; Benguría, Alberto; Zaballos, Angel; Flores, Juana M.; Barbacid, Mariano; Beach, David; Serrano, Manuel

    2005-08-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence is a cellular response that may be crucial for protection against cancer development, but its investigation has so far been restricted to cultured cells that have been manipulated to overexpress an oncogene. Here we analyse tumours initiated by an endogenous oncogene, ras, and show that senescent cells exist in premalignant tumours but not in malignant ones. Senescence is therefore a defining feature of premalignant tumours that could prove valuable in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer.

  8. Development of luciferase tagged brain tumour models in mice for chemotherapy intervention studies.

    PubMed

    Kemper, E M; Leenders, W; Küsters, B; Lyons, S; Buckle, T; Heerschap, A; Boogerd, W; Beijnen, J H; van Tellingen, O

    2006-12-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is considered one of the major causes for the low efficacy of cytotoxic compounds against primary brain tumours. The aim of this study was to develop intracranial tumour models in mice featuring intact or locally disrupted BBB properties, which can be used in testing chemotherapy against brain tumours. These tumours were established by intracranial injection of suspensions of different tumour cell lines. All cell lines had been transfected with luciferase to allow non-invasive imaging of tumour development using a super-cooled CCD-camera. Following their implantation, tumours developed which displayed the infiltrative, invasive or expansive growth patterns that are also found in primary brain cancer or brain metastases. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed that the Mel57, K1735Br2 and RG-2 lesions grow without disruption of the BBB, whereas the BBB was leaky in the U87MG and VEGF-A-transfected Mel57 lesions. This was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Bioluminescence measurements allowed the visualisation of tumour burden already within 4 days after injection of the tumour cells. The applicability of our models for performing efficacy studies was demonstrated in an experiment using temozolomide as study drug. In conclusion, we have developed experimental brain tumour models with partly disrupted, or completely intact BBB properties. In vivo imaging by luciferase allows convenient follow-up of tumour growth and these models will be useful for chemotherapeutic intervention studies.

  9. Safety and Tolerability of Everolimus as Second-line Treatment in Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma / Neuroendocrine Carcinoma G3 (WHO 2010) and Neuroendocrine Tumor G3 - an Investigator Initiated Phase II Study

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-18

    Poorly Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma,; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 3; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 1 [Well-differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma] That Switched to G3; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma, Grade 2 [Moderately Differentiated Neuroendocrine Carcinoma] That Switched to G3; Neuroendocrine Tumor, Grade 3 and Disease Progression as Measured by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST 1.1.)

  10. Neuroendocrine regulation of maternal behavior.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The expression of maternal behavior in mammals is regulated by the developmental and experiential events over a female's lifetime. In this review the relationships between the endocrine and neural systems that play key roles in these developmental and experiential processes that affect both the establishment and maintenance of maternal care are presented. The involvement of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and lactogens are discussed in the context of ligand, receptor, and gene activity in rodents and to a lesser extent in higher mammals. The roles of neuroendocrine factors, including oxytocin, vasopressin, classical neurotransmitters, and other neural gene products that regulate aspects of maternal care are set forth, and the interactions of hormones with central nervous system mediators of maternal behavior are discussed. The impact of prior developmental factors, including epigenetic events, and maternal experience on subsequent maternal care are assessed over the course of the female's lifespan. It is proposed that common neuroendocrine mechanisms underlie the regulation of maternal care in mammals.

  11. Notch Signaling in Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, Judy S.; Singleton, Ciera S.; Miele, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoids and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors that arise from the neuroendocrine cells of the GI tract, endocrine pancreas, and the respiratory system. NETs remain significantly understudied with respect to molecular mechanisms of pathogenesis, particularly the role of cell fate signaling systems such as Notch. The abundance of literature on the Notch pathway is a testament to its complexity in different cellular environments. Notch receptors can function as oncogenes in some contexts and tumor suppressors in others. The genetic heterogeneity of NETs suggests that to fully understand the roles and the potential therapeutic implications of Notch signaling in NETs, a comprehensive analysis of Notch expression patterns and potential roles across all NET subtypes is required. PMID:27148486

  12. Tumour cells engineered to secrete interleukin-15 augment anti-tumour immune responses in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hazama, S; Noma, T; Wang, F; Iizuka, N; Ogura, Y; Yoshimura, K; Inoguchi, E; Hakozaki, M; Hirose, K; Suzuki, T; Oka, M

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effect of interleukin-15 (IL-15) gene transfer into tumour cells on the host's anti-tumour response. In BALB/c mice IL-15 producing Meth-A cells (Meth-A/IL-15) underwent complete rejection, in a response characterized by massive infiltration of CD4+ T-cells and neutrophils. In contrast, Meth-A cells transfected with vector alone (Meth-A/Neo) grew rapidly. Moreover, rechallenged parental cells also were rejected in association with CD8+ T-cell infiltration. However, in nude mice there was no drastic difference between Meth-A/IL-15 and Meth-A/Neo cells. These results demonstrate that IL-15-secreting tumour cells can stimulate local and systemic T-cell-dependent immunity and therefore may have a potential role in cancer therapy. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10424745

  13. [Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the mediastinum].

    PubMed

    Brcic, L; Heidinger, M; Popper, H

    2016-09-01

    Primary neuroendocrine tumors (NET) in the mediastinum are very rare and among them thymic NETs are the most common. They represent 5 % of all thymic and mediastinal tumors. The WHO classification from 2015 subdivides thymic NETs into three groups; low grade (typical carcinoid), intermediate grade (atypical carcinoid) and high grade (large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and small cell carcinoma). Through this change of mediastinal/thymic NET classification into three groups of malignancy, the nomenclature was adapted to that of the lungs, while the histological criteria for each entity remained the same. Thymic NETs typically occur in middle-aged adults and predominantly in males. Approximately 30 % are asymptomatic and the rest present with symptoms caused by local tumor growth, distant metastases and/or endocrine manifestations. Carcinoids can also occur as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and at the time of diagnosis commonly present with regional lymph node or distant metastases, which most often affect the lungs and bones. For the correct diagnosis tumor cell morphology, mitotic count and/or necrosis are crucial. Patients with typical carcinoids have the best prognosis, whereas the prognosis is slightly worse for atypical carcinoids but very poor for large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas. Small cell carcinomas have the worst prognosis and the shortest median survival time of approximately 14 months.

  14. [Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the mediastinum].

    PubMed

    Brcic, L; Heidinger, M; Popper, H

    2016-09-01

    Primary neuroendocrine tumors (NET) in the mediastinum are very rare and among them thymic NETs are the most common. They represent 5 % of all thymic and mediastinal tumors. The WHO classification from 2015 subdivides thymic NETs into three groups; low grade (typical carcinoid), intermediate grade (atypical carcinoid) and high grade (large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and small cell carcinoma). Through this change of mediastinal/thymic NET classification into three groups of malignancy, the nomenclature was adapted to that of the lungs, while the histological criteria for each entity remained the same. Thymic NETs typically occur in middle-aged adults and predominantly in males. Approximately 30 % are asymptomatic and the rest present with symptoms caused by local tumor growth, distant metastases and/or endocrine manifestations. Carcinoids can also occur as a part of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) and at the time of diagnosis commonly present with regional lymph node or distant metastases, which most often affect the lungs and bones. For the correct diagnosis tumor cell morphology, mitotic count and/or necrosis are crucial. Patients with typical carcinoids have the best prognosis, whereas the prognosis is slightly worse for atypical carcinoids but very poor for large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas. Small cell carcinomas have the worst prognosis and the shortest median survival time of approximately 14 months. PMID:27507161

  15. Neuroendocrine cancer vaccines in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bridle, Byram W

    2011-06-01

    This article focuses on neuroendocrine cancer vaccines that have been evaluated in human clinical trials within the last 5 years. The definition of what constitutes a neuroendocrine tumor requires clarification. Strategies and barriers common to cancer vaccines are highlighted. In general, neuroendocrine cancer is rare; however, special attention will be paid to neuroblastoma and small-cell-lung cancer owing to their relatively higher prevalence. A variety of other neuroendocrine tumor vaccine trials will also be addressed. The common problem of generating only sporadic tumor-specific immune responses that are of low-magnitude will be discussed in detail, with recommendations for future directions.

  16. Transient transfection of purified Babesia bovis merozoites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transient transfection of intraerythrocytic Babesia bovis parasites has been previously reported. In this study, we describe the development and optimization of methods for transfection of purified B. bovis merozoites using either nucleofection (Amaxa) or conventional electroporation (Gene Pulser II...

  17. Anti-VEGF antibody therapy does not promote metastasis in genetically engineered mouse tumour models.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mallika; Couto, Suzana S; Forrest, William F; Lima, Anthony; Cheng, Jason H; Molina, Rafael; Long, Jason E; Hamilton, Patricia; McNutt, Angela; Kasman, Ian; Nannini, Michelle A; Reslan, Hani Bou; Cao, Tim C; Ho, Calvin C K; Barck, Kai H; Carano, Richard A D; Foreman, Oded; Eastham-Anderson, Jeffrey; Jubb, Adrian M; Ferrara, Napoleone; Johnson, Leisa

    2012-08-01

    Resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy can occur via several potential mechanisms. Unexpectedly, recent studies showed that short-term inhibition of either VEGF or VEGFR enhanced tumour invasiveness and metastatic spread in preclinical models. In an effort to evaluate the translational relevance of these findings, we examined the consequences of long-term anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody therapy in several well-validated genetically engineered mouse tumour models of either neuroendocrine or epithelial origin. Anti-VEGF therapy decreased tumour burden and increased overall survival, either as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy, in all four models examined. Importantly, neither short- nor long-term exposure to anti-VEGF therapy altered the incidence of metastasis in any of these autochthonous models, consistent with retrospective analyses of clinical trials. In contrast, we observed that sunitinib treatment recapitulated previously reported effects on tumour invasiveness and metastasis in a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (PNET) model. Consistent with these results, sunitinib treatment resulted in an up-regulation of the hypoxia marker GLUT1 in PNETs, whereas anti-VEGF did not. These results indicate that anti-VEGF mediates anti-tumour effects and therapeutic benefits without a paradoxical increase in metastasis. Moreover, these data underscore the concept that drugs targeting VEGF ligands and receptors may affect tumour metastasis in a context-dependent manner and are mechanistically distinct from one another.

  18. Histological characterisation and prognostic evaluation of 62 gastric neuroendocrine carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohui; Ye, Yuhong; Shi, Xi; Zhu, Kunshou; Huang, Liming; Zhang, Sheng; Ying, Mingang; Lin, Xuede

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study To determine the significance of expression of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and Ki-67 and their association with clinicopathological parameters, and to find out the possible prognostic factors in gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma (G-NEC). Material and methods We investigated the immunohistochemical features and prognosis of 62 G-NECs, and evaluated the association among expressions of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and Ki-67, clinicopathological variables, and outcome. Results Chromogranin A expression was found more commonly in small-cell NECs (9/9, 100%) than in large-cell NECs (27/53, 51%) (p = 0.008). No statistical significance was found in Ki-67 (p = 0.494) or synaptophysin (p > 0.1) expression between NEC cell types. Correlation analyses revealed that Ki-67 expression was significantly associated with mid-third disease of stomach (p = 0.005) and vascular involvement (p = 0.006), and had a trend of significant correlation with tumour relapse (p = 0.078). High expression of chromogranin A was significantly associated with histology of small-cell NECs (p = 0.008) and lesser tumour greatest dimension (p = 0.038). The prognostic significance was determined by means of Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank tests, and as a result, early TNM staging and postoperative chemotherapy were found to be correlated with longer overall survival (p < 0.05). Univariate analysis revealed associations between poor prognosis in NECs and several factors, including high TNM staging (p = 0.048), vascular involvement (p = 0.023), relapse (p = 0.004), and microscopic/macroscopic residual tumour (R1/2, p < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, relapse was identified as the sole independent prognostic factor. Conclusions No significant correlation between survival and expression of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, or Ki-67 has been determined in G-NECs. Our study indicated that early diagnosis, no-residual-tumour resection, and postoperative chemotherapy were

  19. GNA15 expression in small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasia: functional and signalling pathway analyses.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Sara; Giovinazzo, Francesco; Alaimo, Daniele; Lawrence, Ben; Pfragner, Roswitha; Bassi, Claudio; Modlin, Irvin; Kidd, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasia (GEP-NEN) comprises a heterogeneous group of tumours that exhibit widely divergent biological behaviour. The identification of new targetable GPCR-pathways involved in regulating cell function could help to identify new therapeutic strategies. We assessed the function of a haematopoietic stem cell heterotrimeric G-protein, Gα15, in gut neuroendocrine cell models and examined the clinical implications of its over expression. Functional assays were undertaken to define the role of GNA15 in the small intestinal NEN cell line KRJ-I and in clinical samples from small intestinal NENs using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blot, proliferation and apoptosis assays, immunoprecipitation, immunohistochemistry (IHC) and automated quantitative analysis (AQUA). GNA15 was not expressed in normal neuroendocrine cells but was overexpressed in GEP-NEN cell lines. In KRJ-I cells, decreased expression of GNA15 was associated with inhibition of proliferation, activation of apoptosis and differential effects on pro-proliferative ERK, NFκB and Akt pathway signalling. Moreover, Gα15 was demonstrated to couple to the ß1 adrenergic receptor and modulated proliferative signals through this GPCR. Transcript and protein levels of GNA15 were significantly elevated in primary and metastatic tumours compared to normal mucosa and were particularly increased in low Ki-67 expressing tumours. IHC and AQUA revealed that a higher Gα15 expression was associated with a poorer survival. GNA15 may have a pathobiological role in SI-NENs. Targeting this signalling mediator could provide an opportunity for the development of new therapeutic strategies for this tumour type. PMID:25701539

  20. Bronchial mucous gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Spencer, H

    1979-07-27

    Tumours arising in the bronchial mucous glands closely resemble tumours arising in the mixed salivary glands. Bronchial mucous gland tumours account for less than 0.5 per cent of all lung tumours. Twenty six tumours are reviewed and they have been divided into five types, (a) adenoidcystic carcinomas, (b) muco-epidermoid tumors, (c) mixed (pleomorphic) tumors, (d) cystadenomas and (f) oxyphilic adenoma. The clinical features, and postoperative course of the patients are reviewed. Adenocystic carcinomas, arising in the bronchus frequently involve the neighbouring trachea and spread mainly by direct infiltration. Most muco-epidermoid bronchial tumours were confined to young persons, and the only malignant muco-epidermoid tumour occurred in an elderly person. The prognosis in young persons is good provided the tumours are completely excised. The two mixed bronchial tumours resembled their salivary counterparts and one subsequently behaved as a carcinoma and metastasised. Bronchial cystadenomas all proved to be benign tumours but in two cases were associated with surface papillary proliferation. The only example of an oxyphil cell adenoma was discovered at post mortem examination. The histogenesis of the tumours is considered.

  1. Diffuse Idiopathic Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Cell Hyperplasia and Neuroendocrine Hyperplasia of Infancy.

    PubMed

    Carr, Laurie L; Kern, Jeffrey A; Deutsch, Gail H

    2016-09-01

    Although incidental reactive pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (PNECH) is seen on biopsy specimens in adults with chronic lung disease, disorders characterized by marked PNECH are rare. Primary hyperplasia of neuroendocrine cells in the lung and obstructive lung disease related to remodeling or physiologic constriction of small airways define diffuse idiopathic neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) in the adult and neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy (NEHI) in children. DIPENCH and NEHI share a similar physiology, typical imaging appearance, and increased neuroendocrine cells on biopsy. However, there are important differences related to the underlying disease mechanisms leading to disparate outcomes.

  2. Irradiation Decreases the Neuroendocrine Biomarker Pro-Opiomelanocortin in Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Suzanne L.; Bryant, Jennifer L.; Babur, Muhammad; Riddell, Philip W.; Behrouzi, Roya; Williams, Kaye J.; White, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an extremely aggressive disease, commonly displaying therapy-resistant relapse. We have previously identified neuroendocrine and epithelial phenotypes in SCLC tumours and the neuroendocrine marker, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), correlated with worse overall survival in patients. However, the effect of treatment on these phenotypes is not understood. The current study aimed to determine the effect of repeated irradiation treatment on SCLC cell phenotype, focussing on the neuroendocrine marker, POMC. Results Human SCLC cells (DMS 79) were established as subcutaneous xenograft tumours in CBA nude mice and then exposed to repeated 2Gy irradiation. In untreated animals, POMC in the blood closely mirrored tumour growth; an ideal characteristic for a circulating biomarker. Following repeated localised irradiation in vivo, circulating POMC decreased (p< 0.01), in parallel with a decrease in tumour size, but remained low even when the tumours re-established. The excised tumours displayed reduced and distinctly heterogeneous expression of POMC compared to untreated tumours. There was no difference in the epithelial marker, cytokeratin. However, there were significantly more N-cadherin positive cells in the irradiated tumours. To investigate the tumour response to irradiation, DMS79 cells were repeatedly irradiated in vitro and the surviving cells selected. POMC expression was reduced, while mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, β1-integrin, fibroblast-specific protein 1, β-catenin and Zeb1 expression were amplified in the more irradiation-primed cells. There were no consistent changes in epithelial marker expression. Cell morphology changed dramatically with repeatedly irradiated cells displaying a more elongated shape, suggesting a switch to a more mesenchymal phenotype. Conclusions In summary, POMC biomarker expression and secretion were reduced in SCLC tumours which regrew after irradiation and in repeatedly irradiation (irradiation

  3. Circulating tumour cells: insights into tumour heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, D F; Paoletti, C

    2013-08-01

    Tumour heterogeneity is a major barrier to cure breast cancer. It can exist between patients with different intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer or within an individual patient with breast cancer. In the latter case, heterogeneity has been observed between different metastatic sites, between metastatic sites and the original primary tumour, and even within a single tumour at either a metastatic or a primary site. Tumour heterogeneity is a function of two separate, although linked, processes. First, genetic instability is a hallmark of malignancy, and results in 'fixed' genetic changes that are almost certainly carried forward through progression of the cancer over time, with increasingly complex additional genetic changes in new metastases as they arise. The second type of heterogeneity is due to differential but 'plastic' expression of various genes important in the biology and response to various therapies. Together, these processes result in highly variable cancers with differential response, and resistance, to both targeted (e.g. endocrine or anti-human epithelial growth receptor type 2 (HER2) agents) and nontargeted therapies (e.g. chemotherapy). Ideally, tumour heterogeneity would be monitored over time, especially in relation to therapeutic strategies. However, biopsies of metastases require invasive and costly procedures, and biopsies of multiple metastases, or serially over time, are impractical. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) represent a potential surrogate for tissue-based cancer and therefore might provide the opportunity to monitor serial changes in tumour biology. Recent advances have enabled accurate and reliable quantification and molecular characterization of CTCs with regard to a number of important biomarkers including oestrogen receptor alpha and HER2. Preliminary data have demonstrated that expression of these markers between CTCs in individual patients with metastatic breast cancer reflects the heterogeneity of the underlying tumours. Future

  4. Tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour's survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible.

  5. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma Is a Rare but Important Tumour Found in the Oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Kadhim, Mohammad Murad Kasim; Jespersen, Marie Louise; Pilegaard, Hans Kristian; Nordsmark, Marianne; Villadsen, Gerda Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is a rare tumour of the gastrointestinal tract that consists of a dual adenocarcinomatous and neuroendocrine differentiation, each component representing at least 30% of the tumour. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with two-month history of postprandial pain and vomiting. Gastric endoscopy revealed a polypoid mass in the lower part of the oesophagus. In contrast to the majority of these tumours, this biopsy was immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A, and synaptophysin and Ki-67 index was 50% and the tumour was diagnosed as poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the oesophagus. The patient underwent surgery and lower oesophagus resection was performed. Based on the histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the tumour in the oesophagogastrectomy specimen, a mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) was diagnosed. The objective of this case report is to advocate for the focus on the MANEC diagnosis as such patients need to be referred to a centre of excellence with expertise in NET tumours, to have the correct diagnostic work-up, treatment, and secondary diagnostic procedures performed at progression, as this will have paramount influence of the choice of treatment. PMID:26955490

  6. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma Is a Rare but Important Tumour Found in the Oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Kadhim, Mohammad Murad Kasim; Jespersen, Marie Louise; Pilegaard, Hans Kristian; Nordsmark, Marianne; Villadsen, Gerda Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is a rare tumour of the gastrointestinal tract that consists of a dual adenocarcinomatous and neuroendocrine differentiation, each component representing at least 30% of the tumour. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with two-month history of postprandial pain and vomiting. Gastric endoscopy revealed a polypoid mass in the lower part of the oesophagus. In contrast to the majority of these tumours, this biopsy was immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A, and synaptophysin and Ki-67 index was 50% and the tumour was diagnosed as poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the oesophagus. The patient underwent surgery and lower oesophagus resection was performed. Based on the histopathology and immunohistochemistry of the tumour in the oesophagogastrectomy specimen, a mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) was diagnosed. The objective of this case report is to advocate for the focus on the MANEC diagnosis as such patients need to be referred to a centre of excellence with expertise in NET tumours, to have the correct diagnostic work-up, treatment, and secondary diagnostic procedures performed at progression, as this will have paramount influence of the choice of treatment. PMID:26955490

  7. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  8. Transfection in the third dimension

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Anandika; Oshita, Victor; Segura, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of parameters that modulate gene transfer in 3-D will assist in the formation of gene delivery systems and scaffolds, which can mediate efficient non-viral delivery for guiding in-vivo tissue regeneration and therapy. We have previously demonstrated the cell area and length, integrin expression, and RhoGTPases mediated signalling to be pivotal parameters that guide gene transfer to mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) cultured in 2-D and are modulated by ECM proteins. In this study, we were interested in determining if cationic polymer mediated gene transfer to cells seeded in 3-D would occur through different mechanisms as compared to 2-D. In particular, we examined the endocytosis pathways used to internalize polyplexes, and the role of cytoskeletal dynamics and RhoGTPases on non-viral gene transfer for cells seeded in 2-D and 3-D. Inhibition of clathrin- and caveolae- mediated endocytosis resulted in more drastic decrease in overall transgene expression for cells seeded in 3-D than those in 2-D. In addition, polyplex internalization was only significantly decreased in 3-D when clathrin-mediated endocytosis was inhibited, while caveolae-mediated endocytosis inhibition for cells seeded in 2-D resulted in the strongest polyplex internalization inhibition. Actin and microtubule polymerization affected 2-D and 3-D transfection differently. Microtubule depolymerization enhanced transgene expression in 2-D, but inhibited transgene expression in 3-D. Last, inhibition of RhoGTPases also affected 2-D and 3-D transfection differently. The inhibition of ROCK effector resulted in a decrease of transgene expression and internalization for cells seeded in 3-D, but not 2-D and the inhibition of effector PAK1 resulted in an increase of transgene expression for both 2-D and 3-D. Overall, our study suggests that the process of gene transfer occurs through different mechanisms for cells seeded in 2-D compared to those seeded in 3-D. PMID:23929354

  9. Update on pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Logan R.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are relatively rare tumors comprising 1-2% of all pancreas neoplasms. In the last 10 years our understanding of this disease has increased dramatically allowing for advancements in the treatment of pNETs. Surgical excision remains the primary therapy for localized tumors and only potential for cure. New surgical techniques using laparoscopic approaches to complex pancreatic resections are a major advancement in surgical therapy and increasingly possible. With early detection being less common, most patients present with metastatic disease. Management of these patients requires multidisciplinary care combining the best of surgery, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. In addition to surgical advances, recently, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy and targeted molecular therapy. PMID:25493258

  10. Gastric Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarun; Alekshun, Todd J.

    2010-01-01

    Case: A 63-year-old male presented with unintentional weight loss of 20 pounds over a 4-month duration. He reported loss of appetite, intermittent post-prandial nausea, bloating and early satiety. He also complained of dyspepsia and had been treated for reflux during the previous 2 years. He denied vomiting, dysphagia, odynophagia, abdominal pain, melena, hematochezia, or alterations in bowel habits. Additionally, he denied fevers, night sweats, cough, or dyspnea. He quit smoking 25 years ago, and denied alcohol use. His past medical history was significant for basal cell carcinoma treated with local curative therapy and he was without recurrence on surveillance. Pertinent family history included a paternal uncle with lung cancer at the age of 74. Physical examination was unremarkable except for occult heme-positive stools. Laboratory evaluation revealed elevated liver enzymes (ALT-112, AST-81, AlkPhos-364). CT scan of the chest, abdomen and pelvis showed diffuse heterogeneous liver with extensive nodularity, raising the concern for metastases. Serum tumor-markers: PSA, CEA, CA 19-9, and AFP were all within normal limits. Screening colonoscopy was normal, but esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed a malignant-appearing ulcerative lesion involving the gastro-esophageal junction and gastric cardia. Pathology confirmed an invasive gastric large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of a hepatic lesion revealed malignant cells with cytologic features consistent with large-cell type carcinoma and positive immunostaining for synaptophysin favoring neuroendocrine differentiation. A PET-CT demonstrated intense diffuse FDG uptake of the liver, suggesting diffuse hepatic parenchymal infiltration by tumor. There were multiple foci of intense osseous FDG uptake with corresponding osteolytic lesions seen on CT scan. The remaining intra-abdominal and intra-thoracic structures were unremarkable. The patient will receive palliative systemic therapy

  11. Fountain of steroid from an ectopic ACTH-producing tumour

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Tom Edward Ngo; Jimeno, Cecilia Alegado

    2013-01-01

    This case is of a 39-year-old Filipino woman who within 2 months developed, Cushing's features she had no known comorbidities and no history of steroid intake. The patient also presented with hyperpigmentation of knuckles and toes, metabolic alkalosis and persistent hypokalaemia noted as proximal muscle weakness. The patient was referred to our institution for acutely worsening behavioural and psychiatric changes. Work-up for endogenous Cushing's syndrome revealed a significant adrenocorticotropic hormone production from an ectopic source. Further imaging was requested to locate the tumour, but the patient eventually succumbed to the drastic complications of hypercortisolism. On autopsy, the patient was found to have an ectopic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour located at the pancreatic head with metastasis to the right hepatic lobe. PMID:23861274

  12. Uveal tumour resection

    PubMed Central

    Char, D.; Miller, T.; Crawford, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To review the ocular retention rates, visual results, and metastases in uveal tumours managed with eye wall resection techniques.
METHODS—This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive local uveal tumour resections performed by a single surgeon. All enucleation specimens were reviewed by one author. Both parametric and non-parametric analysis of data were performed.
RESULTS—138 eyes were scheduled for eye wall resection surgery. The mean age was 52 years (range 11-86 years). Tumours involved predominantly the iris in 14 cases, iris-ciliary body in 57, ciliary body alone in 18 patients, and in 49 cases the choroid was involved (ciliochoroidal, iris-ciliary body-choroid, or choroid). 125 eyes harboured melanomas; posterior tumours were more likely to have epithelioid cells (p<0.05). The mean follow up was 6 years. The mean clock hours in iris and iris-ciliary body tumours was 3.5. In tumours that involved the choroid the mean largest diameter was 12.9 mm and the mean thickness 8.5 mm. 105 of 138 (76%) eyes were retained. Histological assessment of surgical margins did not correlate evidence of tumour in enucleated eyes or metastatic disease. Surgical margins of more anterior tumours were more likely to be clear on histological evaluation (p<0.05). Approximately 53% of retained eyes had a final visual acuity of ⩾20/40; visual results were significantly better in more anteriorly located tumours (p<0.05). All retained iris tumour cases had ⩾20/40 final visual acuity. In tumours that involved the choroid nine of 31 retained eyes kept that level of visual acuity. Eight patients developed metastases; all metastatic events developed in patients with tumours that involved the choroid, and seven of eight were mixed cell melanomas.
CONCLUSIONS—76% of eyes were retained and 53% of these had a final visual acuity of ⩾20/40. Only 7% of uveal melanoma patients developed metastatic disease with a mean follow up of 6 years. Survival did not

  13. Transfection of immortalized keratinocytes by low toxic poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-based polymers.

    PubMed

    Van Overstraeten-Schlögel, Nancy; Ho-Shim, Yong; Tevel, Virginie; Bontems, Sébastien; Dubois, Philippe; Raes, Martine

    2012-01-01

    Skin carcinoma are among the most spread diagnosed tumours in the world. In this study, we investigated the transfection of immortalized keratinocytes, used as an in vitro model for skin carcinoma, using antisense technology and poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA)-based polymers, with original architecture and functionalities. We tested PDMAEMA polymers with different structures: linear, with two (DEA-PDMAEMA) or three (TEA-PDMAEMA) arms. The cytotoxicity of these polymers was assessed over a wide range of apparent M n (from 7600 to 64 600). At a N/P ratio of 7.38, cytotoxicity increases with the M n. Keratinocytes were transfected with a fluorescent oligonucleotide and then analyzed by flow cytometry. For the three architectures tested, the percentage of transfected cells and abundance of internalized oligonucleotide were closely related to the M n of the polymer. Confocal microscopy and FACS analyses showed a wide spread fine granular distribution of the oligonucleotide up to 3 days post-transfection. Then, we assessed the silencing efficiency of the polymers, targeting GFP in GFP expressing keratinocytes. The maximal silencing effect (±40%) was obtained using a DEA-PDMAEMA polymer (M n = 30 300). These results suggest that PDMAEMA-based polymers can be efficiently used to transfect immortalized keratinocytes and, thus, open new perspectives in the therapy of skin carcinoma.

  14. Cixutumumab, Everolimus, and Octreotide Acetate in Treating Patients With Advanced Low to Intermediate Grade Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-14

    Gastrin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Paraganglioma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  15. Optimization of Gene Transfection in Murine Myeloma Cell Lines using Different Transfection Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Mahdi; Hemmati, Sheyda; Hadavi, Reza; Amirghofran, Zahra; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Shokri, Fazel

    2010-01-01

    Purification and isolation of cellular target proteins for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production is a difficult and time-consuming process. Immunization of mice with murine cell lines stably transfected with genes coding for xenogenic target molecules is an alternative method for mouse immunization and MAb production. Here we present data on transfection efficiency of some commercial reagents used for transfection of murine myeloma cell lines. Little is known about transfectability of murine myeloma cell lines by different transfection reagents. Mouse myeloma cell lines (SP2/0, NS0, NS1, Ag8, and P3U1) were transfected with pEGFP-N1 vector using Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec commercial transfection reagents in different combinations. The transfection permissible HEK293-FT cell line was used as a control in transfection procedure. Transfected cells, expressing the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP), were analyzed by flow cytometry 48 hrs post transfection. Our results showed transfection efficiency of 71%, 57% and 22% for HEK293-FT, 5.5%, 3.4% and 1% for SP2/0, 55.7%, 21.1% and 9.3% for NS0, 8.2%, 6% and 5.5% for NS1, 22%, 49.2% and 5.5% for Ag8 and 6.3%, 21.5% and 4.6% for P3U1 cell lines after transfection with Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec reagents, respectively. Our data indicate that NS0 and Ag8 are efficiently transfected by Lipofectamine 2000 and jetPEI reagents. Finally, we propose Ag8 and NS0 cell lines as suitable host cells for efficient expression of target genes which can be used for mouse immunization and MAb production. PMID:23408356

  16. Histological characterisation and prognostic evaluation of 62 gastric neuroendocrine carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohui; Ye, Yuhong; Shi, Xi; Zhu, Kunshou; Huang, Liming; Zhang, Sheng; Ying, Mingang; Lin, Xuede

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study To determine the significance of expression of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and Ki-67 and their association with clinicopathological parameters, and to find out the possible prognostic factors in gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma (G-NEC). Material and methods We investigated the immunohistochemical features and prognosis of 62 G-NECs, and evaluated the association among expressions of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and Ki-67, clinicopathological variables, and outcome. Results Chromogranin A expression was found more commonly in small-cell NECs (9/9, 100%) than in large-cell NECs (27/53, 51%) (p = 0.008). No statistical significance was found in Ki-67 (p = 0.494) or synaptophysin (p > 0.1) expression between NEC cell types. Correlation analyses revealed that Ki-67 expression was significantly associated with mid-third disease of stomach (p = 0.005) and vascular involvement (p = 0.006), and had a trend of significant correlation with tumour relapse (p = 0.078). High expression of chromogranin A was significantly associated with histology of small-cell NECs (p = 0.008) and lesser tumour greatest dimension (p = 0.038). The prognostic significance was determined by means of Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and log-rank tests, and as a result, early TNM staging and postoperative chemotherapy were found to be correlated with longer overall survival (p < 0.05). Univariate analysis revealed associations between poor prognosis in NECs and several factors, including high TNM staging (p = 0.048), vascular involvement (p = 0.023), relapse (p = 0.004), and microscopic/macroscopic residual tumour (R1/2, p < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis, relapse was identified as the sole independent prognostic factor. Conclusions No significant correlation between survival and expression of synaptophysin, chromogranin A, or Ki-67 has been determined in G-NECs. Our study indicated that early diagnosis, no-residual-tumour resection, and postoperative chemotherapy were

  17. [Surgery for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Shibata, Chikashi; Egawa, Shin-Ichi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Morikawa, Takanori; Naitoh, Takeshi; Unno, Michiaki; Sasaki, Iwao

    2012-11-01

    Approximately half of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are nonfunctioning, and insulinoma and gastrinoma are frequent forms of functioning tumors. The treatment of patients with PNETs should be based on the consideration that more than half are malignant except for insulinomas. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is often complicated with gastrinoma. Endoscopic ultrasound and somatostain receptor scintigraphy are useful in diagnosing PNETs, and the selective arterial secretagogue injection test is performed if necessary. WHO2010 is available as a histopathologic grading system of malignancy. Although surgical resection should first be considered as a treatment for PNETs, liver metastasis is a major factor hindering resection. In Japan, the choices of drugs to treat liver metastases are too few. In patients with MEN1 in whom PNETS are frequently multiple, we should perform procedures that preserve pancreatic function, although some patients may require total pancreatectomy for the complete resection of tumors. The indications for total pancreatectomy should be determined individually based on the tumor status and patient age. PMID:23330458

  18. Neuroendocrine hormone amylin in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Xi; Pan, Yan-Hong; Huang, Yan-Mei; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-05-10

    The neuroendocrine hormone amylin, also known as islet amyloid polypeptide, is co-localized, co-packaged and co-secreted with insulin from adult pancreatic islet β cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Specifically, amylin reduces secretion of nutrient-stimulated glucagon, regulates blood pressure with an effect on renin-angiotensin system, and delays gastric emptying. The physiological actions of human amylin attribute to the conformational α-helix monomers whereas the misfolding instable oligomers may be detrimental to the islet β cells and further transform to β-sheet fibrils as amyloid deposits. No direct evidence proves that the amylin fibrils in amyloid deposits cause diabetes. Here we also have performed a systematic review of human amylin gene changes and reported the S20G mutation is minor in the development of diabetes. In addition to the metabolic effects, human amylin may modulate autoimmunity and innate inflammation through regulatory T cells to impact on both human type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27162583

  19. Transgenerational neuroendocrine disruption of reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Deena M.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is associated with dysfunctions of metabolism, energy balance, thyroid function and reproduction, and an increased risk of endocrine cancers. These multifactorial disorders can be ‘programmed’ through molecular epigenetic changes induced by exposure to EDCs early in life, the expression of which may not manifest until adulthood. In some cases, EDCs have detrimental effects on subsequent generations, which indicates that traits for disease predisposition may be passed to future generations by nongenomic inheritance. This Review discusses current understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms that underlie sexual differentiation of reproductive neuroendocrine systems in mammals and summarizes the literature on transgenerational epigenetic effects of representative EDCs: vinclozolin, diethylstilbesterol, bisphenol A and polychlorinated biphenyls. The article differentiates between context-dependent epigenetic transgenerational changes—namely, those that require environmental exposure, either via the EDC itself or through behavioral or physiological differences in parents—and germline-dependent epigenetic mechanisms. These processes, albeit discrete, are not mutually exclusive and can involve similar molecular mechanisms including DNA methylation and histone modifications and may predispose exposed individuals to transgenerational disruption of reproductive processes. New insights stress the crucial need to develop a clear understanding of how EDCs may program the epigenome of exposed individuals and their descendants. PMID:21263448

  20. Cell biology: Targeted transfection by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirlapur, Uday K.; König, Karsten

    2002-07-01

    The challenge for successful delivery of foreign DNA into cells in vitro, a key technique in cell and molecular biology with important biomedical implications, is to improve transfection efficiency while leaving the cell's architecture intact. Here we show that a variety of mammalian cells can be directly transfected with DNA without perturbing their structure by first creating a tiny, localized perforation in the membrane using ultrashort (femtosecond), high-intensity, near-infrared laser pulses. Not only does this superior optical technique give high transfection efficiency and cell survival, but it also allows simultaneous evaluation of the integration and expression of the introduced gene.

  1. Cisplatin and Etoposide or Temozolomide and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Gastrointestinal Tract or Pancreas That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-05

    Colorectal Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Esophageal Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gallbladder Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Gastric Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Pancreatic Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Small Intestinal Large Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

  2. A bipartite graph of Neuroendocrine System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhong-Wei; Zou, Sheng-Rong; Peng, Yu-Jing; Zhou, Ta; Gu, Chang-Gui; He, Da-Ren

    2008-03-01

    We present an empirical investigation on the neuroendocrine system and suggest describe it by a bipartite graph. In the net the cells can be regarded as collaboration acts and the mediators can be regarded as collaboration actors. The act degree stands for the number of the cells that secrete a single mediator. Among them bFGF (the basic fibroblast growth factor) has the largest node act degree. It is the most important mitogenic cytokine, followed by TGF-beta, IL-6, IL1-beta, VEGF, IGF-1and so on. They are critical in neuroendocrine system to maintain bodily healthiness, emotional stabilization and endocrine harmony. The act degree distribution shows a shifted power law (SPL) function forms [1]. The average act degree of neuroendocrine network is h=3.01, It means that each mediator is secreted by three cells on average. The similarity, which stands for the average probability of secreting the same mediators by all neuroendocrine cells, is observed as s=0.14. Our results may be used in the research of the medical treatment of neuroendocrine diseases. [1] Assortativity and act degree distribution of some collaboration networks, Hui Chang, Bei-Bei Su, Yue-Ping Zhou, Daren He, Physica A, 383 (2007) 687-702

  3. Immune-Neuroendocrine Interactions and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jara, Luis J.; Navarro, Carmen; Medina, Gabriela; Vera-Lastra, Olga; Blanco, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between immune-neuroendocrine system is firmly established. The messengers of this connection are hormones, neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and cytokines. The immune-neuroendocrine system have the capacity to synthesize and release these molecules, which, in turn, can stimulate or suppress the activity of immune or neuroendocrine cells by binding to receptors. In fact, hormones, neuropeptides and neurotransmitters participate in innate and adaptive immune response.Autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) are characterized by aberrant production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are a potent activator of the HPA axis. In consequence, high levels of pro-inflammatory hormones such as estrogens and prolactin, and low levels of glucocorticoids, an anti-inflammatory hormone, have been described in the active phase of ARD. In addition, high levels of pro-inflammatory hormones and cytokines have also been frequently detected in organ involvement of patients with ARD, suggesting an abnormal local neuroendocrine immune interaction. There is evidence that hormonal changes may appear before the symptomatic phase of the disease. Therefore, it is possible that a pro-inflammatory hormone favors the rupture of tolerance, which is a key feature of autoimmune diseases. The interactions between the immune-neuroendocrine system have a major impact on our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms, diagnosis and therapy of ARD. PMID:17162354

  4. Cationic phospholipids: structure transfection activity relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana; Tenchov, Boris

    2010-01-18

    Synthetic cationic lipids are presently the most widely used non-viral gene carriers. Examined here is a particularly attractive cationic lipid class, triester phosphatidylcholines (PCs) exhibiting low toxicities and good transfection efficiency. Similarly to other cationic lipids, they form stable complexes (lipoplexes) with the polyanionic nucleic acids. A summary of studies on a set of {approx}30 cationic PCs reveals the existence of a strong, systematic dependence of their transfection efficiency on the lipid hydrocarbon chain structure: transfection activity increases with increase of chain unsaturation from 0 to 2 double bonds per lipid and decreases with increase of chain length in the range {approx}30-50 total number of chain carbon atoms. Maximum transfection was observed for ethyl phosphate PCs (EPCs) with monounsaturated 14:1 chains (total of 2 double bonds and 30 chain carbon atoms). Lipid phase behavior is known to depend strongly on the chain molecular structure and the above relationships thus substantiate a view that cationic PC phase propensities are an important determinant of their activity. Indeed, X-ray structural studies show that the rate of DNA release from lipoplexes as well as transfection activity well correlate with non-lamellar phase progressions observed in cationic PC mixtures with membrane lipids. These findings appear to be of considerable interest because, according to current views, key processes in lipid-mediated transfection such as lipoplex disassembly and DNA release within the cells are believed to take place upon cationic lipid mixing with cellular lipids.

  5. Neuroendocrine aspects of Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martino, Davide; Macerollo, Antonella; Leckman, James F

    2013-01-01

    There is sparse evidence suggesting the participation of neuroendocrine mechanisms, mainly involving sex and stress steroid hormones, to the pathophysiology of neurodevelopmental disorders such as Tourette syndrome (TS) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Patients with TS exhibit a sex-specific variability in gender distribution (male/female ratio=3-4/1) and in its natural history, with a severity peak in the period around puberty. The administration of exogenous androgens may worsen tics in males with TS, whereas drugs counteracting the action of testosterone might show some antitic efficacy. This suggests a higher susceptibility of patients with TS to androgen steroids. There are insufficient data on the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in TS. However, preliminary evidence suggests that a subgroup of women with TS might be more sensitive to the premenstrual trough of estrogen levels. Patients with TS exhibit differences in a number of behavioral, cognitive, and anatomical traits that appear to be sex related. There is a body of evidence supporting, albeit indirectly, the hypothesis of an increased exposure to androgenic steroids during the very early phases of neural development. Animal models in rodents suggest a complex role of gonadal hormones upon the modulation of anxiety-related and stereotyped behaviors during adult life. Patients with TS exhibit an enhanced reactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to external stressors, despite a preserved diurnal cortisol rhythm and a normal restoration of the baseline activity of the axis following the acute stress response. Preliminary evidence suggests the possible implication of oxytocin (OT) in disorders related to the TS spectrum, especially non-tic-related OCD. The injection of OT in the amygdala of rodents was shown to be able to induce hypergrooming, suggesting the possible involvement of this neuropeptide in the pathophysiology of complex, stereotyped behaviors. In

  6. Guidelines for biomarker testing in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a national consensus of the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology.

    PubMed

    García-Carbonero, R; Vilardell, F; Jiménez-Fonseca, P; González-Campora, R; González, E; Cuatrecasas, M; Capdevila, J; Aranda, I; Barriuso, J; Matías-Guiu, X

    2014-03-01

    The annual incidence of neuroendocrine tumours in the Caucasian population ranges from 2.5 to 5 new cases per 100,000 inhabitants. Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours is a family of neoplasms widely variable in terms of anatomical location, hormone composition, clinical syndromes they cause and in their biological behaviour. This high complexity and clinical heterogeneity, together with the known difficulty of predicting their behaviour from their pathological features, are reflected in the many classifications that have been developed over the years in this field. This article reviews the main tissue and clinical biomarkers and makes recommendations for their use in medical practice. This document represents a consensus reached jointly by the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) and the Spanish Society of Pathology (SEAP).

  7. Tumours of the thymus

    PubMed Central

    Sellors, T. Holmes; Thackray, A. C.; Thomson, A. D.

    1967-01-01

    Eighty-eight cases of thymoma are discussed with the object of trying to co-ordinate the histological and clinical features. The pathological specimens were in all cases obtained at operation. The pathology classification introduced by Thomson and Thackray in 1957 has been found to correspond adequately with the clinical pattern. The most common groups of tumours are basically epithelial and can be separated into five or six subdivisions, each of which has a separate pattern of behaviour. Lymphoid and teratomatous tumours also occur, but there were only two examples in this series. Clinically, separation of patients who suffered from myasthenia (38) and those who did not (50) affords the first main grouping. The majority of patients who had myasthenia gravis had tumours classified as epidermoid (19) and lymphoepithelial (14), the former with a more malignant appearance and behaviour than the latter. Removal of the tumour with or without radiation gave considerable and sometimes complete relief from myasthenic symptoms. Non-myasthenic thymoma (50) was usually discovered as a result of pressure signs or in the course of routine radiography. Spindle or oval celled tumours followed a benign pattern whereas undifferentiated thymoma was in every sense malignant, as also were teratomatous growths. Granulomatous or Hodgkin-like thymomas were of special interest and had an unpredictable course, some patients surviving many years after what was regarded as inadequate treatment. The place of radiotherapy as a pre- or post-operative agent complementary to surgery is discussed. Images PMID:6033387

  8. Salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Speight, P M; Barrett, A W

    2002-09-01

    Salivary gland tumours are a relatively rare and morphologically diverse group of lesions. Although most clinicians and pathologists will have encountered the more common benign neoplasms, few have experience of the full range of salivary cancers, which are best managed in specialist centres. This review considers some current areas of difficulty and controversy in the diagnosis and management of these neoplasms. The classification of these lesions is complex, encompassing nearly 40 different entities, but precise classification and terminology is essential for an accurate diagnosis and for the allocation of tumours to prognostic groups. For many salivary tumours diagnosis is straightforward but the wide range of morphological diversity between and within tumour types means that a diagnosis may not be possible on small incisional biopsies and careful consideration of the clinical and pathological features together is essential. Although tumour grading is important and helpful, it is not an independent prognostic indicator and must be considered in the context of stage. Large malignancies tend to have a poor prognosis regardless of grade and even high-grade neoplasms may do well when they are small. A helpful guide to management of salivary cancers is the '4 cm rule'.

  9. Structural pathology underlying neuroendocrine dysfunction in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Morris B.; Wang, Lei; Wachi, Carly; Daudi, Sheeraz; Csernansky, John; Marlow-O'Connor, Megan; Keedy, Sarah; Torres, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Polydipsic hyponatremic schizophrenic (PHS) patients exhibit altered neuroendocrine activity that has been linked to their life-threatening water imbalance, as well as to impaired function and reduced volume of the anterior hippocampus. Polydipsic patients without hyponatremia (polydipsic normonatremic schizophrenics: PNS) exhibit similar, albeit less marked, changes in neuroendocrine activity and anterior hippocampal function, but not reduced anterior hippocampal volume. Indeed, reduced anterior hippocampal volume is seen in patients with normal water balance (nonpolydipsic normonatremic schizophrenics: NNS) whose neuroendocrine activity and anterior hippocampal function differ markedly from those with polydipsia. In an effort to reconcile these findings we measured hippocampal, amygdala and 3rd ventricle shapes in 26 schizophrenic patients (10 PNS, 7 PHS, 9 NNS) and 12 healthy controls matched for age and gender. Bilateral inward deformations were localized to the anterior lateral hippocampal surface (part of a neurocircuit which modulates neuroendocrine responses to psychological stimuli) in PHS and to a lesser extent in PNS, while deformations in NNS were restricted to the medial surface. Proportional deformations of the right medial amygdala, a key segment of this neurocircuit, were seen in both polydipsic groups, and correlated with the volume of the 3rd ventricle, which lies adjacent to the neuroendocrine nuclei. Finally, these structural findings were most marked in those with impaired hippocampal-mediated stress responses. These results reconcile previously conflicting data, and support the view that anterior lateral hippocampal pathology disrupts neuroendocrine function in polydipsic patients with and without hyponatremia. The relationship of these findings to the underlying mental illness remains to be established. PMID:21093493

  10. Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumor Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Mark A.; Hobday, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    In the care of patients with hepatic neuroendocrine metastases, medical oncologists should work in multidisciplinary fashion with surgeons, interventional radiologists, and radiation oncologists to assess the potential utility of liver-directed and systemic therapies. This paper addresses the various roles and evidence basis for cytoreductive surgery, thermal ablation (radiofrequency, microwave, and cryoablation), and embolization (bland embolization (HAE), chemoembolization (HACE), and radioembolization) as liver-directed therapies. Somatostatin analogues, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and the newer agents everolimus and suntinib are discussed as a means for controlling intra- and extrahepatic disease, along with peptide receptor radiotherapy (PRRT). Finally, the experience with orthotopic liver transplant for neuroendocrine tumors is described. PMID:23227348

  11. Developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems.

    PubMed

    Ralevski, Alexandra; Horvath, Tamas L

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that the perinatal environment may alter the developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems in a manner that predisposes offspring to the development of metabolic syndrome. Although it is unclear how these effects might be mediated, it has been shown that changes in neuroendocrine programing during critical periods of development, either via maternal metabolic programming or other factors, can alter a fetus's metabolic fate. This review summarizes the hypothalamic circuits that mediate energy homeostasis and discusses the various factors that may influence the development and functioning of these neural systems, as well as the possible cognitive impairments that may arise as a result of these metabolic influences.

  12. Neuroendocrine Disruption: More than Hormones are Upset

    PubMed Central

    Waye, Andrew; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2011-01-01

    Only a small proportion of the published research on endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC) directly examined effects on neuroendocrine processes. There is an expanding body of evidence that anthropogenic chemicals exert effects on neuroendocrine systems and that these changes might impact peripheral organ systems and physiological processes. Neuroendocrine disruption extends the concept of endocrine disruption to include the full breadth of integrative physiology (i.e., more than hormones are upset). Pollutants may also disrupt numerous other neurochemical pathways to affect an animal's capacity to reproduce, develop and grow, or deal with stress and other challenges. Several examples are presented in this review, from both vertebrates and invertebrates, illustrating that diverse environmental pollutants including pharmaceuticals, organochlorine pesticides, and industrial contaminants have the potential to disrupt neuroendocrine control mechanisms. While most investigations on EDC are carried out with vertebrate models, an attempt is also made to highlight the importance of research on invertebrate neuroendocrine disruption. The neurophysiology of many invertebrates is well described and many of their neurotransmitters are similar or identical to those in vertebrates; therefore, lessons learned from one group of organisms may help us understand potential adverse effects in others. This review argues for the adoption of systems biology and integrative physiology to address the effects of EDC. Effects of pulp and paper mill effluents on fish reproduction are a good example of where relatively narrow hypothesis testing strategies (e.g., whether or not pollutants are sex steroid mimics) have only partially solved a major problem in environmental biology. It is clear that a global, integrative physiological approach, including improved understanding of neuroendocrine control mechanisms, is warranted to fully understand the impacts of pulp and paper mill effluents

  13. Retroperitoneal cystic neuroendocrine tumor. A case report.

    PubMed

    Scapinello, A; D'Amore, E S; Cavazzana, A O; Gramegna, V; Ninfo, V

    1995-10-01

    A 21 cm retroperitoneal cystic mass was excised from a 71 year old woman. The cyst was filled with a hemorrhagic fluid and contained a 5 cm parietal hemorrhagic nodule. On histology, the nodule was composed of a uniform population of round cells arranged in trabeculae and nests. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive to cytokeratin, EMA, NSE, chromogranin A, pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and Gastrin (G). Ultrastructural observation of neurosecretory granules confirmed the neuroendocrine nature of the tumor. No other lesions were detected and a diagnosis of primary epithelial neuroendocrine tumor was rendered. The histogenesis of the tumor including the possibility of a paraganglionic origin is discussed.

  14. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonize a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT), which spreads among dogs, and devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), among Tasmanian devils. CTVT are generally not fatal as a tumour-specific host immune response controls or clears the tumours after transmission and a period of growth. In contrast, the growth of DFTD tumours is not controlled by the Tasmanian devil's immune system and the disease causes close to 100% mortality, severely impacting the devil population. To avoid the immune response of the host both DFTD and CTVT use a variety of immune escape strategies that have similarities to many single organism tumours, including MHC loss and the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines. However, both tumours appear to have a complex interaction with the immune system of their respective host, which has evolved over the relatively long life of these tumours. The Tasmanian devil is struggling to survive with the burden of this disease and it is only with an understanding of how DFTD passes between individuals that a vaccine might be developed. Further, an understanding of how these tumours achieve natural transmissibility should provide insights into general mechanisms of immune escape that emerge during tumour evolution. PMID:25187312

  15. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome.

  16. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome. PMID:23716380

  17. Primary retroperitoneal tumours and cysts.

    PubMed

    Bors, G; Polyák, L; Frang, D

    1986-01-01

    The authors give a summarizing report on retroperitoneal tumours and cysts. They review the origin and classification of tumours and cysts, their diagnostic and differential diagnostic possibilities as well as the therapeutic measures. Finally, their own 3 cases are reported.

  18. Medical Treatment of Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rinke, Anja; Michl, Patrick; Gress, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of the clinically and prognostically heterogeneous neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) should be based on a multidisciplinary approach, including surgical, interventional, medical and nuclear medicine-based therapeutic options. Medical therapies include somatostatin analogues, interferon-α, mTOR inhibitors, multikinase inhibitors and systemic chemotherapy. For the selection of the appropriate medical treatment the hormonal activity, primary tumor localization, tumor grading and growth behaviour as well as the extent of the disease must be considered. Somatostatin analogues are mainly indicated in hormonally active tumors for symptomatic relief, but antiproliferative effects have also been demonstrated, especially in well-differentiated intestinal NET. The efficacy of everolimus and sunitinib in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNET) has been demonstrated in large placebo-controlled clinical trials. pNETs are also chemosensitive. Streptozocin-based chemotherapeutic regimens are regarded as current standard of care. Temozolomide in combination with capecitabine is an alternative that has shown promising results that need to be confirmed in larger trials. Currently, no comparative studies and no molecular markers are established that predict the response to medical treatment. Therefore the choice of treatment for each pNET patient is based on individual parameters taking into account the patient’s preference, expected side effects and established response criteria such as proliferation rate and tumor load. Platin-based chemotherapy is still the standard treatment for poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. Clearly, there is an unmet need for new systemic treatment options in patients with extrapancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:24213230

  19. Pulmonary Large-Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Morena; Della Corte, Carminia Maria; Papaccio, Federica; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2015-01-01

    Lung neuroendocrine tumors are a heterogeneous subtype of pulmonary cancers representing approximately 20% of all lung cancers, including small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC). The frequency appears to be approximately 3% for LCNEC. Diagnosis of LCNEC requires attention to neuroendocrine features by light microscopy and confirmation by immunohistochemical staining for neuroendocrine markers. Both SCLC and pulmonary LCNEC are high-grade and poor-prognosis tumors, with higher incidence in males and smokers and peripheral localization. LCNEC is very rare, and the precise diagnosis on small specimens is very difficult, so we have still too few data to define a standard of treatment for pulmonary LCNECs. Data of literature, most based on retrospective analysis, indicated a poor 5-year overall survival, with a high incidence of recurrence after surgery, even in stage I disease. Primary surgery should be the first option in all operable patients because there is no validate therapeutic approach for LCNEC due to lack of clinical trials in this setting. Neoadjuvant platinum-based regimens remain only an option for potentially resectable tumors. In advanced stages, SCLC-like chemotherapy seems the best option of treatment, with a good response rate but a poor overall survival (from 8 to 16 months in different case series). New agents are under clinical investigation to improve LCNEC patients’ outcome. We reviewed all data on treatment options feasible for pulmonary LCNEC, both for localized and extensive disease. PMID:26039012

  20. Skin manifestations of endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Jonathan S; Braverman, Irwin M

    2016-06-01

    The skin signs of benign and malignant endocrine and neuroendocrine tumors are manifold and early identification of these dermatologic features is crucial in initiating timely diagnosis and management. This article reviews the salient cutaneous features of these tumors that arise in the classic endocrine glands, lung and gastrointestinal tract either as individual neoplasms or as part of a syndrome.

  1. Neuroendocrine host factors and inflammatory disease susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Ligier, S; Sternberg, E M

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial, resulting from a combination of genetically predetermined host characteristics and environmental exposures. As the term autoimmune implies, immune dysfunction and dysregulated self-tolerance are key elements in the pathophysiology of all these diseases. The neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous systems are increasingly recognized as modulators of the immune response at the levels of both early inflammation and specific immunity. As such, alterations in their response represent a potential mechanism by which pathologic autoimmunity may develop. Animal models of autoimmune diseases show pre-existing changes in neuroendocrine responses to a variety of stimuli, and both animal and human studies have shown altered stress responses in the setting of active immune activation. The potential role of the neuroendocrine system in linking environmental exposures and autoimmune diseases is 2-fold. First, it may represent a direct target for toxic compounds. Second, its inadequate function may result in the inappropriate response of the immune system to an environmental agent with immunogenic properties. This article reviews the relationship between autoimmune diseases and the neuroendocrine system and discusses the difficulties and pitfalls of investigating a physiologic response that is sensitive to such a multiplicity of environmental exposures. PMID:10502534

  2. NEUROENDOCRINE AND REPRODUCTIVE EFFECTS OF PESTICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neuroendocrine and Reproductive Effects of Pesticides

    1Stoker, TE, Goldman 2, JM and Cooper 2, RL.

    1Gamete and Early Embryogenesis Biology Branch and 2 Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laborat...

  3. Experimental research on wild-type p53 plasmid transfected into retinoblastoma cells and tissues using an ultrasound microbubble intensifier.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Zhou, X; Diao, L; Wang, Z

    2010-01-01

    The transfection efficiency of wild-type p53 (wtp53) was investigated in retinoblastoma (RB) Y79 cells using an ultrasound microbubble technique. A human RB nude mouse xenograft tumour model was also used to investigate whether this technique could deliver wtp53 into solid tumours. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) demonstrated that wtp53 was successfully transfected into Y79 cells in the plasmid with microbubbles and ultrasound group and in the plasmid with liposomes group, but not in the plasmid with ultrasound group or in the untreated control group. Flow cytometry showed that apoptosis was highest in the microbubbles and ultrasound group (25.58%) compared with the plasmid with liposomes group (19.50%), and the other two groups (< 10%). RT-PCR also showed that the wtp53 gene was successfully transfected into solid tumours in the plasmid with microbubbles and ultrasound group. This study provides preliminary evidence in support of a potential new approach to RB gene therapy. PMID:20819437

  4. Experimental research on wild-type p53 plasmid transfected into retinoblastoma cells and tissues using an ultrasound microbubble intensifier.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Zhou, X; Diao, L; Wang, Z

    2010-01-01

    The transfection efficiency of wild-type p53 (wtp53) was investigated in retinoblastoma (RB) Y79 cells using an ultrasound microbubble technique. A human RB nude mouse xenograft tumour model was also used to investigate whether this technique could deliver wtp53 into solid tumours. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) demonstrated that wtp53 was successfully transfected into Y79 cells in the plasmid with microbubbles and ultrasound group and in the plasmid with liposomes group, but not in the plasmid with ultrasound group or in the untreated control group. Flow cytometry showed that apoptosis was highest in the microbubbles and ultrasound group (25.58%) compared with the plasmid with liposomes group (19.50%), and the other two groups (< 10%). RT-PCR also showed that the wtp53 gene was successfully transfected into solid tumours in the plasmid with microbubbles and ultrasound group. This study provides preliminary evidence in support of a potential new approach to RB gene therapy.

  5. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  6. Elastosis in malignant tumours.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, C; Greeff, H; Murray, J F; Posen, J; Schmaman, A

    1985-07-01

    Elastosis is common in infiltrating ductal and lobular carcinomas of the breast, occurring in approximately 90% of cases. It is also well described in some benign lesions of the breast and tumours of the salivary gland. Reports of venous elastosis in association with large-bowel carcinomas are rare. We describe elastosis in single cases of prostatic, gastric, bronchiolar-alveolar and cervical carcinoma.

  7. Frequent loss of Fas expression and function in human lung tumours with overexpression of FasL in small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Viard-Leveugle, Isabelle; Veyrenc, Sylvie; French, Lars E; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth

    2003-10-01

    Fas (CD95) and its ligand FasL signal apoptosis and are involved in tissue homeostasis and the elimination of target cells by cytotoxic T cells. Corruption of this signalling pathway in tumour cells, for example by reduced Fas expression or increased FasL expression, can participate in tumour development and immune escape. The present study has analysed Fas/FasL expression and Fas death signalling function in vivo in lung tumour tissues [57 non-small cell lung carcinomas and 64 neuroendocrine lung tumours including small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC)] in comparison with normal lung tissue, and in vitro in neuroendocrine tumour cell lines in comparison with normal human bronchial epithelial cells. The Fas expression score was markedly decreased compared with normal lung tissue in 90% of the 121 lung tumours and was completely lost in 24%. The Fas staining pattern suggested cytoplasmic Fas expression in tumours, whereas membrane expression was observed in normal lung tissue. Loss of Fas at the cell surface was also shown in vitro by FACS analysis of neuroendocrine tumour cell lines and was concomitant with the resistance of tumour cells to FasL-mediated apoptosis according to in vitro cell viability. The lack of cell surface Fas expression in tumour cell lines resulted from the lack of intracellular Fas protein due to impaired Fas gene transcription. The FasL expression score was also decreased in most non-small cell lung carcinomas compared with normal bronchial cells, whereas 91% of SCLCs had higher expression than normal cells. FasL overexpression was related to advanced tumour stage as well as to a Fas/FasL ratio less than 1. It is concluded that a marked decrease in Fas expression may be part of lung tumourigenesis allowing tumour cells to escape from apoptosis. FasL overexpression in the context of Fas down-regulation in SCLC predicts the ability of SCLC cells to induce paracrine killing of Fas-expressing cytotoxic T cells. In lung tumours, Fas restoration may

  8. Laryngeal solitary fibrous tumour.

    PubMed

    Stomeo, Francesco; Padovani, Davide; Bozzo, Corrado; Pastore, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) are rare neoplasms, with an uncommon laryngeal involvement. Only five cases of laryngeal localization have been described in literature. The following is a case of a 75-year-old man with a supraglottic neoplasm of the larynx; after the biopsy immunohistochemical study demonstrated a strong positivity for vimentin, CD34 and Bcl-2. The neoplasm was consequently classified as a SFT. CO(2) laser surgery of the supraglottic larynx, with a wide excision of the neoplasm, was performed. Twenty-four months on, the patient is alive, well and free of disease. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for laryngeal SFT, but tumour-free resection margins must be achieved to prevent the possibility of local recurrence. Endoscopic resection by means of the CO(2) laser must be accurately planned with MRI or CT imaging to confirm of this kind of surgery.

  9. Electrochemotherapy of Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sersa, Gregor; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2008-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy is a combined use of certain chemotherapeutic drugs and electric pulses applied to the treated tumour nodule. Local application of electric pulses to the tumour increases drug delivery into cells, specifically at the site of electric pulse application. Drug uptake by delivery of electric pulses is increased for only those chemotherapeutic drugs whose transport through the plasma membrane is impeded. Among many drugs that have been tested so far, bleomycin and cisplatin found their way from preclinical testing to clinical use. Clinical data collected within a number of clinical studies indicate that approximately 80% of the treated cutaneous and subcutaneous tumour nodules of different malignancies are in an objective response, from these, approximately 70% in complete response after a single application of electrochemotherapy. Usually only one treatment is needed, however, electrochemotherapy can be repeated several times every few weeks with equal effectiveness each time. The treatment results in an effective eradication of the treated nodules, with a good cosmetic effect without tissue scarring. PMID:19229171

  10. Neuroendocrine Profile in the Night Eating Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Birketvedt, Grethe Støa; Geliebter, Allan; Florholmen, Jon; Gluck, Marci E

    2014-03-01

    Night eating syndrome (NES) has recently been getting more attention as a recognized eating disorder. NES is characterized by a delay in the circadian pattern of food intake, associated with morning anorexia, evening hyperphagia, awakenings from sleep with ingestion of food, depressed mood, and obesity. Although the behavioral characteristics of NES were first described in 1955, the neuroendocrine characteristics have only been described recently. Researchers have examined several hormones that appear to differ in night eaters compared to controls, including melatonin, leptin, and cortisol. Researchers have more recently examined the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in more detail, with emphasis on corticotrophin releasing hormone. Further studies have examined ghrelin, growth hormone, prolactin, and IGF-1, with differences observed in the circadian pattern of these hormones in those with NES compared to controls. Despite increasing interest in the neuroendocrine profile of night eating behavior, the biological basis of NES is still not well understood.

  11. Developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems.

    PubMed

    Ralevski, Alexandra; Horvath, Tamas L

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that the perinatal environment may alter the developmental programming of hypothalamic neuroendocrine systems in a manner that predisposes offspring to the development of metabolic syndrome. Although it is unclear how these effects might be mediated, it has been shown that changes in neuroendocrine programing during critical periods of development, either via maternal metabolic programming or other factors, can alter a fetus's metabolic fate. This review summarizes the hypothalamic circuits that mediate energy homeostasis and discusses the various factors that may influence the development and functioning of these neural systems, as well as the possible cognitive impairments that may arise as a result of these metabolic influences. PMID:26391503

  12. Neuroendocrine Causes of Amenorrhea—An Update

    PubMed Central

    Fourman, Lindsay T.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Secondary amenorrhea—the absence of menses for three consecutive cycles—affects approximately 3–4% of reproductive age women, and infertility—the failure to conceive after 12 months of regular intercourse—affects approximately 6–10%. Neuroendocrine causes of amenorrhea and infertility, including functional hypothalamic amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia, constitute a majority of these cases. Objective: In this review, we discuss the physiologic, pathologic, and iatrogenic causes of amenorrhea and infertility arising from perturbations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, including potential genetic causes. We focus extensively on the hormonal mechanisms involved in disrupting the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Conclusions: A thorough understanding of the neuroendocrine causes of amenorrhea and infertility is critical for properly assessing patients presenting with these complaints. Prompt evaluation and treatment are essential to prevent loss of bone mass due to hypoestrogenemia and/or to achieve the time-sensitive treatment goal of conception. PMID:25581597

  13. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: biology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Cynthia; Chai, Wanxing; Yu, Victoria E.; Yu, Run

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs), a group of endocrine tumors arising in the pancreas, are among the most common neuroendocrine tumors. The genetic causes of familial and sporadic PNETs are somewhat understood, but their molecular pathogenesis remains unknown. Most PNETs are indolent but have malignant potential. The biological behavior of an individual PNET is unpredictable; higher tumor grade, lymph node and liver metastasis, and larger tumor size generally indicate a less favorable prognosis. Endocrine testing, imaging, and histological evidence are necessary to accurately diagnose PNETs. A 4-pronged aggressive treatment approach consisting of surgery, locoregional therapy, systemic therapy, and complication control has become popular in academic centers around the world. The optimal application of the multiple systemic therapeutic modalities is under development; efficacy, safety, availability, and cost should be considered when treating a specific patient. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of specific types of PNETs and familial PNET syndromes, including the novel Mahvash disease, are summarized. PMID:23237225

  14. Network of immune-neuroendocrine interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Besedovsky, H; Sorkin, E

    1977-01-01

    In order to bring the self-regulated immune system into conformity with other body systems its functioning within the context of an immune-neuroendocrine network is proposed. This hypothesis is based on the existence of afferent--efferent pathways between immune and neuroendocrine structures. Major endocrine responses occur as a consequence of antigenic stimulation and changes in the electrical activity of the hypothalamus also take place; both of these alterations are temporally related to the immune response itself. This endocrine response has meaningful implications for immunoregulation and for immunospecificity. During ontogeny, there is also evidence for the operations of a complex network between the endocrine and immune system, a bidirectional interrelationship that may well affect each developmental stage of both functions. As sequels the functioning of the immune system and the outcome of this interrelation could be decisive in lymphoid cell homeostasis, self-tolerance, and could also have significant implications for pathology. PMID:849642

  15. Cutaneous Metastasis of Neuroendocrine Carcinoma with Unknown Primary Site: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Gustavo Moreira; Quintella, Danielle; Cuzzi, Tullia; Rodrigues, Rosangela; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia

    2015-01-01

    We report a new case of neuroendocrine carcinoma for which it was not possible to find the primary site until now. The recent medical literature about skin metastasis of neuroendocrine carcinoma (neuroendocrine tumor) is discussed. PMID:26557073

  16. A functional cyclic AMP response element plays a crucial role in neuroendocrine cell type-specific expression of the secretory granule protein chromogranin A.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Mahata, S K; Mahata, M; Webster, N J; Parmer, R J; O'Connor, D T

    1995-01-01

    specificity of the promoter. The functional activity of the CRE site was confirmed through studies of the endogenous chromogranin A gene. Northern mRNA analysis showed that expression of the endogenous chromogranin A gene was stimulated seven- to eightfold by cAMP in PC12 cells, whereas no induction occurred in the NIH3T3 cells. Similar cAMP induction was obtained with the transfected chromogranin A promoter in PC12 cells, and abolition of the CRE site (by deletion or point mutation) eliminated the induction. Thus, the CRE site in the chromogranin A proximal promoter is functional and plays a crucial, indeed indispensable, role in neuroendocrine-specific expression of the gene. These results also provide insight into transcriptional mechanisms governing acquisition of the neuroendocrine secretory phenotype. Images PMID:7615829

  17. Neuroendocrine regulation of appetitive ingestive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Keen-Rhinehart, Erin; Ondek, Katelynn; Schneider, Jill E.

    2013-01-01

    Food availability in nature is often irregular, and famine is commonplace. Increased motivation to engage in ingestive behaviors increases the chance of survival, providing additional potential opportunities for reproduction. Because of the advantages conferred by entraining ingestive behavior to environmental conditions, neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating the motivation to acquire and ingest food have evolved to be responsive to exogenous (i.e., food stored for future consumption) and endogenous (i.e., body fat stores) fuel availability. Motivated behaviors like eating occur in two phases. The appetitive phase brings animals into contact with food (e.g., foraging, food hoarding), and the more reflexive consummatory phase results in ingestion (e.g., chewing, swallowing). Quantifiable appetitive behaviors are part of the natural ingestive behavioral repertoire of species such as hamsters and humans. This review summarizes current knowledge about neuroendocrine regulators of ingestive behavior, with an emphasis appetitive behavior. We will discuss hormonal regulators of appetitive ingestive behaviors, including the orexigenic hormone ghrelin, which potently stimulates foraging and food hoarding in Siberian hamsters. This section includes a discussion of the hormone leptin, its relation to endogenous fat stores, and its role in food deprivation-induced increases in appetitive ingestive behaviors. Next, we discuss how hormonal regulators interact with neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of ingestive behaviors, such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), to regulate ingestive behavior. Finally, we discuss the potential impact that perinatal nutrient availability can have on the neuroendocrine regulation of ingestive behavior. Understanding the hormonal mechanisms that connect metabolic fuel availability to central appetite regulatory circuits should provide a better understanding of the

  18. Biochemical diagnosis of neuroendocrine GEP tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, K.

    1997-01-01

    Neuroendocrine gut and pancreatic tumors are known to contain and secret different peptide hormones and amines. During the last two decades, many radioimmunoassays and Elizas have been developed to analyze these substances in blood and urine, which has enabled clinicians to improve the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with various neuroendocrine tumors. Due to cost constraints in medical care, it is important to try to define the most useful biochemical markers from the clinical point of view. The glycoprotein chromogranin A has been shown to be a useful marker for diagnosing various neuroendocrine tumors, both by histopathology and circulating tumor markers. In patients with demonstrable endocrine tumors, about 90 percent of the patients present high circulating levels of chromogranin A. A hundred-fold increase of plasma chromogranin is seen in patients with midgut carcinoid tumors and liver metastases. The plasma levels of chromogranin A reflect the tumor mass and can be used for monitoring the patient during treatment and follow-up, although the day-to-day variation might be 30-40 percent. High circulating levels of the chromogranin A might be an indicator of bad prognosis in patients with malignant carcinoid tumors. Besides analyzing plasma chromogranin A, specific analyses such as urinary 5-HIAA in midgut carcinoid patients, serum gastrin in patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and insulin/proinsulin in patients with hypoglycemia should be performed. In patients with small tumor masses or intermittent symptoms, provocative tests such as a meal stimulation test, secretin test or pentagastrin stimulation of tachykinin release can supplement the basal measurements of peptides and amines. To fully evaluate the growth potential in neuroendocrine tumors, traditional biochemical markers should be supplemented with indicators of growth proliferation (Ki-67, PCNA) and immunohistochemical staining for the adhesion molecule CD44 and the PDGF-alpha receptor

  19. [Neuroendocrine tumors: Peptide receptors radionuclide therapy (PRRT)].

    PubMed

    Papamichail, Dimitris G; Exadaktylou, Paraskevi E; Chatzipavlidou, Vasiliki D

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (neuroendocrine tumors-NET) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with a common embryological origin and diverse biological behavior, derived from cells of the neuroendocrine system, the system APUD (amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation). They are characterized by overexpression of all five somatostatin receptors (SSTR1-SSTR5), particularly type 2 (SST2). Surgical resection of the tumor is the treatment option, with a possibility of complete remission in patients with limited disease. Somatostatin analogs (octreotide and lanreotide) are the treatment of choice in patients with residual disease, particularly when it comes to NET non-pancreatic origin. Systemic chemotherapy is administered primarily to patients with poorly differentiated carcinomas. PRRT treatment is recommended in case of non-responsiveness of the disease. The ideal candidates for PRRT are patients with unresectable disease of high and intermediate differentiation. Somatostatine analogs radiolabelled with Indium-111 ((111)In), Yttrium-90 ((90)Y), Lutetium-177 ((177)Lu) and Bismuth-213 ((213)Bi), are selectively concentrated in the tumor cells, causing maximum tissue damage to tumors and with fewer effects on healthy tissue and the immune system. In the current review, it was demonstrated that patients with unresectable grade 1 or 2 disease showed increased PFS (progression free survival) and OS (overall survival), while quality of life was improved after PRRT treatment as compared to somatostatin analogs, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. PMID:27035909

  20. Surgical management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Wataru; Tezuka, Koji; Hirai, Ichiro

    2011-10-01

    This study outlines the surgical management and clinicopathological findings of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (P-NETs). There are various surgical options, such as enucleation of the tumor, spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy, distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy, pancreatoduodenectomy, and duodenum-preserving pancreas head resection. Lymph node dissection is performed for malignant cases. New guidelines and classifications have been proposed and are now being used in clinical practice. However, there are still no clear indications for organ-preserving pancreatic resection or lymph node dissection. Hepatectomy is the first choice for liver metastases of well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma without extrahepatic metastases. On the other hand, cisplatin-based combination therapy is performed as first-line chemotherapy for metastatic poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. Other treatment options are radiofrequency ablation, transarterial chemoembolization/embolization, and liver transplantation. Systematic chemotherapy and biotherapy, such as that with somatostatin analogue and interferon-α, are used for recurrence after surgery. The precise surgical techniques for enucleation of the tumor and spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy are described. PMID:21922354

  1. [Neuroendocrine tumors: Peptide receptors radionuclide therapy (PRRT)].

    PubMed

    Papamichail, Dimitris G; Exadaktylou, Paraskevi E; Chatzipavlidou, Vasiliki D

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (neuroendocrine tumors-NET) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with a common embryological origin and diverse biological behavior, derived from cells of the neuroendocrine system, the system APUD (amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation). They are characterized by overexpression of all five somatostatin receptors (SSTR1-SSTR5), particularly type 2 (SST2). Surgical resection of the tumor is the treatment option, with a possibility of complete remission in patients with limited disease. Somatostatin analogs (octreotide and lanreotide) are the treatment of choice in patients with residual disease, particularly when it comes to NET non-pancreatic origin. Systemic chemotherapy is administered primarily to patients with poorly differentiated carcinomas. PRRT treatment is recommended in case of non-responsiveness of the disease. The ideal candidates for PRRT are patients with unresectable disease of high and intermediate differentiation. Somatostatine analogs radiolabelled with Indium-111 ((111)In), Yttrium-90 ((90)Y), Lutetium-177 ((177)Lu) and Bismuth-213 ((213)Bi), are selectively concentrated in the tumor cells, causing maximum tissue damage to tumors and with fewer effects on healthy tissue and the immune system. In the current review, it was demonstrated that patients with unresectable grade 1 or 2 disease showed increased PFS (progression free survival) and OS (overall survival), while quality of life was improved after PRRT treatment as compared to somatostatin analogs, chemotherapy and other targeted therapies.

  2. The axon guidance molecule semaphorin 3F is a negative regulator of tumor progression and proliferation in ileal neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Bollard, Julien; Massoma, Patrick; Vercherat, Cécile; Blanc, Martine; Lepinasse, Florian; Gadot, Nicolas; Couderc, Christophe; Poncet, Gilles; Walter, Thomas; Joly, Marie-Odile; Hervieu, Valérie; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Roche, Colette

    2015-11-01

    Gastro-intestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs) are rare neoplasms, frequently metastatic, raising difficult clinical and therapeutic challenges due to a poor knowledge of their biology. As neuroendocrine cells express both epithelial and neural cell markers, we studied the possible involvement in GI-NETs of axon guidance molecules, which have been shown to decrease tumor cell proliferation and metastatic dissemination in several tumor types. We focused on the role of Semaphorin 3F (SEMA3F) in ileal NETs, one of the most frequent subtypes of GI-NETs.SEMA3F expression was detected in normal neuroendocrine cells but was lost in most of human primary tumors and all their metastases. SEMA3F loss of expression was associated with promoter gene methylation. After increasing endogenous SEMA3F levels through stable transfection, enteroendocrine cell lines STC-1 and GluTag showed a reduced proliferation rate in vitro. In two different xenograft mouse models, SEMA3F-overexpressing cells exhibited a reduced ability to form tumors and a hampered liver dissemination potential in vivo. This resulted, at least in part, from the inhibition of mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways.This study demonstrates an anti-tumoral role of SEMA3F in ileal NETs. We thus suggest that SEMA3F and/or its cellular signaling pathway could represent a target for ileal NET therapy.

  3. Maspin as a Tumour Suppressor in Salivary Gland Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Nipun; Sheirawan, Mohammad Kinan; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran; Alenzi, Faris; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Nasser; Baroudi, Kusai; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2014-01-01

    Maspin is a protein that belongs to serin protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. The purpose of this study was to review the literature concerning the expression of maspin in salivary gland tumours. A literature search was done using MEDLINE, accessed via the National Library of Medicine PubMed interface. Statistical analysis was not done because only seven studies were available in literature, the collected data were different and the results could not be compared. Expression of maspin was down regulated in more aggressive salivary gland tumours. Maspin may function as a tumour suppressor in salivary gland tumours. PMID:25654053

  4. Lipid-based Transfection Reagents Exhibit Cryo-induced Increase in Transfection Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sork, Helena; Nordin, Joel Z; Turunen, Janne J; Wiklander, Oscar PB; Bestas, Burcu; Zaghloul, Eman M; Margus, Helerin; Padari, Kärt; Duru, Adil D; Corso, Giulia; Bost, Jeremy; Vader, Pieter; Pooga, Margus; Smith, CI Edvard; Wood, Matthew JA; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Hällbrink, Mattias; Andaloussi, Samir EL

    2016-01-01

    The advantages of lipid-based transfection reagents have permitted their widespread use in molecular biology and gene therapy. This study outlines the effect of cryo-manipulation of a cationic lipid-based formulation, Lipofectamine 2000, which, after being frozen and thawed, showed orders of magnitude higher plasmid delivery efficiency throughout eight different cell lines, without compromising cell viability. Increased transfection efficiency with the freeze-thawed reagent was also seen with 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate oligonucleotide delivery and in a splice-correction assay. Most importantly, a log-scale improvement in gene delivery using the freeze-thawed reagent was seen in vivo. Using three different methods, we detected considerable differences in the polydispersity of the different nucleic acid complexes as well as observed a clear difference in their surface spreading and sedimentation, with the freeze-thawed ones displaying substantially higher rate of dispersion and deposition on the glass surface. This hitherto overlooked elevated potency of the freeze-thawed reagent facilitates the targeting of hard-to-transfect cells, accomplishes higher transfection rates, and decreases the overall amount of reagent needed for delivery. Additionally, as we also saw a slight increase in plasmid delivery using other freeze-thawed transfection reagents, we postulate that freeze-thawing might prove to be useful for an even wider variety of transfection reagents. PMID:27111416

  5. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  6. Analysis of tumour cell composition in tumours composed of paired mixtures of mammary tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, B. E.; Miller, F. R.; Wilburn, D. J.; Heppner, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    In order to quantitate the effects of tumour subpopulation interactions, we have devised a method to determine the subpopulation composition of tumours by using paired tumour cell lines able to grow in different selective media. Line 4T07 forms colonies in thioguanine but not in HAT and line 168 forms colonies in HAT but not in thioguanine. An independent technique of determining tumour cell content was used to validate this method: line 168 and 4T07 cells are distinguishable by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide for DNA content. Mixtures of cell suspensions prepared from each unmixed tumour, as well as from tumours arising from mixtures of these lines, were analysed by both the colony formation assay and by the DNA content assay. The colony formation assay yielded values in good agreement with the DNA content assay, but was considerably more sensitive in that it was able to quantitate minority subpopulations that constituted less than 10% of the tumour. Both methods revealed that in tumours arising from mixtures, the tumour cells were almost entirely line 4T07, even when the inoculum had contained a high proportion of 168 cells. Since line 168 cells are very tumorigenic per se, these results suggest that line 4T07 cells are capable of interfering with 168 proliferation in mixed tumours, either directly or through a host-mediated mechanism. PMID:3426919

  7. The neuroendocrine phenotype of gastric myofibroblasts and its loss with cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Balabanova, Silvia; Holmberg, Chris; Steele, Islay; Ebrahimi, Bahram; Rainbow, Lucille; Burdyga, Ted; McCaig, Cathy; Tiszlavicz, Lazso; Lertkowit, Nantaporn; Giger, Olivier T.; Oliver, Simon; Prior, Ian; Dimaline, Rod; Simpson, Deborah; Beynon, Rob; Hegyi, Peter; Wang, Timothy C.; Dockray, Graham J.; Varro, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Stromal cells influence cancer progression. Myofibroblasts are an important stromal cell type, which influence the tumour microenvironment by release of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, proteases, cytokines and chemokines. The mechanisms of secretion are poorly understood. Here, we describe the secretion of marker proteins in gastric cancer and control myofibroblasts in response to insulin-like growth factor (IGF) stimulation and, using functional genomic approaches, we identify proteins influencing the secretory response. IGF rapidly increased myofibroblast secretion of an ECM protein, TGFβig-h3. The secretory response was not blocked by inhibition of protein synthesis and was partially mediated by increased intracellular calcium (Ca2+). The capacity for evoked secretion was associated with the presence of dense-core secretory vesicles and was lost in cells from patients with advanced gastric cancer. In cells responding to IGF-II, the expression of neuroendocrine marker proteins, including secretogranin-II and proenkephalin, was identified by gene array and LC-MS/MS respectively, and verified experimentally. The expression of proenkephalin was decreased in cancers from patients with advanced disease. Inhibition of secretogranin-II expression decreased the secretory response to IGF, and its over-expression recovered the secretory response consistent with a role in secretory vesicle biogenesis. We conclude that normal and some gastric cancer myofibroblasts have a neuroendocrine-like phenotype characterized by Ca2+-dependent regulated secretion, dense-core secretory vesicles and expression of neuroendocrine marker proteins; loss of the phenotype is associated with advanced cancer. A failure to regulate myofibroblast protein secretion may contribute to cancer progression. PMID:24710625

  8. LET-painting increases tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Niels; Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Scifoni, Emanuele; Krämer, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver; Mortensen, Lise Saksø; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B

    2014-01-01

    LET-painting was suggested as a method to overcome tumour hypoxia. In vitro experiments have demonstrated a well-established relationship between the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and linear energy transfer (LET), where OER approaches unity for high-LET values. However, high-LET radiation also increases the risk for side effects in normal tissue. LET-painting attempts to restrict high-LET radiation to compartments that are found to be hypoxic, while applying lower LET radiation to normoxic tissues. Methods. Carbon-12 and oxygen-16 ion treatment plans with four fields and with homogeneous dose in the target volume, are applied on an oropharyngeal cancer case with an identified hypoxic entity within the tumour. The target dose is optimised to achieve a tumour control probability (TCP) of 95% when assuming a fully normoxic tissue. Using the same primary particle energy fluence needed for this plan, TCP is recalculated for three cases assuming hypoxia: first, redistributing LET to match the hypoxic structure (LET-painting). Second, plans are recalculated for varying hypoxic tumour volume in order to investigate the threshold volume where TCP can be established. Finally, a slight dose boost (5-20%) is additionally allowed in the hypoxic subvolume to assess its impact on TCP. Results. LET-painting with carbon-12 ions can only achieve tumour control for hypoxic subvolumes smaller than 0.5 cm(3). Using oxygen-16 ions, tumour control can be achieved for tumours with hypoxic subvolumes of up to 1 or 2 cm(3). Tumour control can be achieved for tumours with even larger hypoxic subvolumes, if a slight dose boost is allowed in combination with LET-painting. Conclusion. Our findings clearly indicate that a substantial increase in tumour control can be achieved when applying the LET-painting concept using oxygen-16 ions on hypoxic tumours, ideally with a slight dose boost.

  9. A phase II study of tamoxifen plus melatonin in metastatic solid tumour patients.

    PubMed

    Lissoni, P; Paolorossi, F; Tancini, G; Ardizzoia, A; Barni, S; Brivio, F; Maestroni, G J; Chilelli, M

    1996-11-01

    Preliminary data would suggest that the pineal hormone, melatonin (MLT), may enhance tamoxifen (TMX) anti-tumour efficacy. Both MLT and TMX have been used as single agents in the palliative treatment of metastatic neoplasms, other than the classical hormone-dependent tumours, without, however, any clear efficacy. On this basis, a phase II study with TMX plus MLT has been performed in untreatable metastatic solid tumour patients. The study included 25 metastatic solid tumour patients other than breast cancer and prostate cancer (six unknown primary tumour; four melanoma; four uterine cervix carcinoma; five pancreatic cancer; three hepatocarcinoma; two ovarian cancer; one non-small-cell lung cancer), for whom no other effective standard therapy was available, because of poor clinical conditions, no response to previous chemotherapies and/or chemotherapy-resistant tumours. Both drugs were given orally every day until disease progression (TMX, 20 mg day-1 at noon; MLT, 20 mg day-1 in the evening). Three patients had a partial response (PR) (12%; 95% confidence limits 2-24%) (one cervix carcinoma; one melanoma; one unknown primary tumour). A stable disease (SD) was achieved in 13 other patients, whereas the remaining nine patients progressed. Performance status (PS) improved in 9/25 patients, whose median score increased from 50% to 70%. Finally, a survival longer than 1 year was observed in 7/25 (28%) patients. This phase II study would suggest that the neuroendocrine combination with TMX plus MLT may have some benefit in untreatable metastatic solid tumour patients, either in controlling cancer cell proliferation or improving the PS.

  10. A phase II study of tamoxifen plus melatonin in metastatic solid tumour patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lissoni, P.; Paolorossi, F.; Tancini, G.; Ardizzoia, A.; Barni, S.; Brivio, F.; Maestroni, G. J.; Chilelli, M.

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary data would suggest that the pineal hormone, melatonin (MLT), may enhance tamoxifen (TMX) anti-tumour efficacy. Both MLT and TMX have been used as single agents in the palliative treatment of metastatic neoplasms, other than the classical hormone-dependent tumours, without, however, any clear efficacy. On this basis, a phase II study with TMX plus MLT has been performed in untreatable metastatic solid tumour patients. The study included 25 metastatic solid tumour patients other than breast cancer and prostate cancer (six unknown primary tumour; four melanoma; four uterine cervix carcinoma; five pancreatic cancer; three hepatocarcinoma; two ovarian cancer; one non-small-cell lung cancer), for whom no other effective standard therapy was available, because of poor clinical conditions, no response to previous chemotherapies and/or chemotherapy-resistant tumours. Both drugs were given orally every day until disease progression (TMX, 20 mg day-1 at noon; MLT, 20 mg day-1 in the evening). Three patients had a partial response (PR) (12%; 95% confidence limits 2-24%) (one cervix carcinoma; one melanoma; one unknown primary tumour). A stable disease (SD) was achieved in 13 other patients, whereas the remaining nine patients progressed. Performance status (PS) improved in 9/25 patients, whose median score increased from 50% to 70%. Finally, a survival longer than 1 year was observed in 7/25 (28%) patients. This phase II study would suggest that the neuroendocrine combination with TMX plus MLT may have some benefit in untreatable metastatic solid tumour patients, either in controlling cancer cell proliferation or improving the PS. PMID:8912546

  11. VEGF targets the tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-12-01

    The function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cancer is not limited to angiogenesis and vascular permeability. VEGF-mediated signalling occurs in tumour cells, and this signalling contributes to key aspects of tumorigenesis, including the function of cancer stem cells and tumour initiation. In addition to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases, the neuropilins are crucial for mediating the effects of VEGF on tumour cells, primarily because of their ability to regulate the function and the trafficking of growth factor receptors and integrins. This has important implications for our understanding of tumour biology and for the development of more effective therapeutic approaches.

  12. Brain Tumours Simulating Psychiatric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G. E.

    1963-01-01

    Brain tumours may present with symptoms indistinguishable from psychiatric disease. The impression of most psychiatrists is that individuals suffering from brain tumour rarely appear among their patients. A priori reasoning based on evidence from neurological, neurosurgical and pathological sources suggests the contrary. The present study is a frequency analysis of cases of previously undiagnosed brain tumours admitted to either an open psychoneurotic ward or a mental hospital over a period of 15 years. The results support the impression held by psychiatrists that brain tumours are uncommon among psychiatric patients. PMID:13954870

  13. Toward Contactless Biology: Acoustophoretic DNA Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Vasileiou, Thomas; Foresti, Daniele; Bayram, Adem; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Acoustophoresis revolutionized the field of container-less manipulation of liquids and solids by enabling mixing procedures which avoid contamination and loss of reagents due to the contact with the support. While its applications to chemistry and engineering are straightforward, additional developments are needed to obtain reliable biological protocols in a contactless environment. Here, we provide a first, fundamental step towards biological reactions in air by demonstrating the acoustophoretic DNA transfection of mammalian cells. We developed an original acoustophoretic design capable of levitating, moving and mixing biological suspensions of living mammalians cells and of DNA plasmids. The precise and sequential delivery of the mixed solutions into tissue culture plates is actuated by a novel mechanism based on the controlled actuation of the acoustophoretic force. The viability of the contactless procedure is tested using a cellular model sensitive to small perturbation of neuronal differentiation pathways. Additionally, the efficiency of the transfection procedure is compared to standard, container-based methods for both single and double DNA transfection and for different cell types including adherent growing HeLa cancer cells, and low adhesion neuron-like PC12 cells. In all, this work provides a proof of principle which paves the way to the development of high-throughput acoustophoretic biological reactors. PMID:26828312

  14. Toward Contactless Biology: Acoustophoretic DNA Transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Thomas; Foresti, Daniele; Bayram, Adem; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-02-01

    Acoustophoresis revolutionized the field of container-less manipulation of liquids and solids by enabling mixing procedures which avoid contamination and loss of reagents due to the contact with the support. While its applications to chemistry and engineering are straightforward, additional developments are needed to obtain reliable biological protocols in a contactless environment. Here, we provide a first, fundamental step towards biological reactions in air by demonstrating the acoustophoretic DNA transfection of mammalian cells. We developed an original acoustophoretic design capable of levitating, moving and mixing biological suspensions of living mammalians cells and of DNA plasmids. The precise and sequential delivery of the mixed solutions into tissue culture plates is actuated by a novel mechanism based on the controlled actuation of the acoustophoretic force. The viability of the contactless procedure is tested using a cellular model sensitive to small perturbation of neuronal differentiation pathways. Additionally, the efficiency of the transfection procedure is compared to standard, container-based methods for both single and double DNA transfection and for different cell types including adherent growing HeLa cancer cells, and low adhesion neuron-like PC12 cells. In all, this work provides a proof of principle which paves the way to the development of high-throughput acoustophoretic biological reactors.

  15. Glyoxalase I in detoxification: studies using a glyoxalase I transfectant cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, S; Walsh, E S; Tew, K D

    1995-01-01

    The glyoxalase system (glyoxalase I, glyoxalase II and GSH as cofactor) is involved in the detoxification of methylglyoxal (a byproduct of the glycolytic pathway) and other alpha-oxoaldehydes. We have transfected a 622 bp cDNA encoding human glyoxalase I into murine NIH3T3 cells. The recipient cells were shown to express elevated transcript and protein levels and a 10-fold increase in glyoxalase I enzyme activity. This was accompanied by an increased tolerance for exogenous methylglyoxal and enhanced resistance to the cytotoxic effects of two glyoxalase I inhibitors (s-p-bromobenzylglutathione diethyl ester and s-p-bromobenzylglutathione dicyclopentyl ester), a glutathione analogue [gamma-glutamyl-(S)-(benzyl)cysteinyl-(R)-(-)-phenylglycine diethyl ester] and the anti-cancer drugs mitomycin C and adriamycin. Steady-state levels of GSH were significantly lower in the transfected cells, perhaps reflecting increased flux as a consequence of elevated glyoxalase activity. This decrease did not alter the sensitivity to the alkylating agent chlorambucil. Although transfection did not affect the growth or doubling time of the NIH3T3 cells, analysis of glyoxalase I activity showed a consistent increase in tumour tissue when compared with pair-matched controls. Thus increased glyoxalase I is associated with the malignant phenotype and may also contribute to protection against the cytotoxicity of certain anti-cancer drugs. Images Figure 1 PMID:7619046

  16. Malignant testicular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Pierre Del; Tawil, Elie; Béland, Gilles

    1974-01-01

    A series of 71 patients with malignant testicular tumours treated primarily by orchiectomy and irradiation is reviewed with respect to pathological and clinical features and modes of treatment. The three-year crude survival rate in 36 patients with seminoma was 86% and in 24 patients with carcinoma it was 41.7%. There were no survivors among patients with choriocarcinoma. Our results are comparable with those of other series. A prospective study is proposed of the value of irradiation and subsequent limited lymph node dissection following orchiectomy in cases of carcinoma of the testis. PMID:4855670

  17. Programming of neuroendocrine self in the thymus and its defect in the development of neuroendocrine autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Geenen, Vincent; Bodart, Gwennaëlle; Henry, Séverine; Michaux, Hélène; Dardenne, Olivier; Charlet-Renard, Chantal; Martens, Henri; Hober, Didier

    2013-01-01

    For centuries after its first description by Galen, the thymus was considered as only a vestigial endocrine organ until the discovery in 1961 by Jacques FAP Miller of its essential role in the development of T (thymo-dependent) lymphocytes. A unique thymus first appeared in cartilaginous fishes some 500 million years ago, at the same time or shortly after the emergence of the adaptive (acquired) immune system. The thymus may be compared to a small brain or a computer highly specialized in the orchestration of central immunological self-tolerance. This was a necessity for the survival of species, given the potent evolutionary pressure imposed by the high risk of autotoxicity inherent in the stochastic generation of the diversity of immune cell receptors that characterize the adaptive immune response. A new paradigm of "neuroendocrine self-peptides" has been proposed, together with the definition of "neuroendocrine self." Neuroendocrine self-peptides are secreted by thymic epithelial cells (TECs) not according to the classic model of neuroendocrine signaling, but are processed for presentation by, or in association with, the thymic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene/protein controls the transcription of neuroendocrine genes in TECs. The presentation of self-peptides in the thymus is responsible for the clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells, which emerge during the random recombination of gene segments that encode variable parts of the T cell receptor for the antigen (TCR). At the same time, self-antigen presentation in the thymus generates regulatory T (Treg) cells that can inhibit, in the periphery, those self-reactive T cells that escaped negative selection in the thymus. Several arguments indicate that the origin of autoimmunity directed against neuroendocrine glands results primarily from a defect in the intrathymic programming of self-tolerance to neuroendocrine functions. This defect may be genetic or

  18. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  19. Environmental toxicant effects on neuroendocrine function.

    PubMed

    Gore, A C

    2001-03-01

    Exposure to environmental toxicants can have profound effects on normal growth and development. However, the mechanisms by which these toxicants exert these effects are not well understood. Many environmental toxicants alter reproductive function and have effects on the central nervous system and behavior, yet the link between these reproductive and neurologic phenomena has not been systematically investigated. The neuroendocrine (hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal) axis, which integrates inputs to and outputs from the nervous and reproductive systems, is functionally and anatomically situated to mediate effects of environmental toxicants, particularly those that are endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), on developmental processes. This article reviews the current literature on EDC effects on the neuroendocrine system, particularly at the level of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, the key cells involved in the regulation of reproductive function. The focus of this article is on two polychlorinated biphenyl mixtures (Aroclor 1221, Aroclor 1254) and two organochlorine pesticides (methoxychlor and chlorpyrifos). Some experimental data are presented for each of the four urban environmental toxicants on GnRH cells in vitro and in vivo. The results of in vitro experiments indicate that all four of the toxicants profoundly affect hypothalamic GnRH gene expression, cell survival, and neurite outgrowth, demonstrating direct effects of EDCs on a GnRH cell line. In in vivo experiments, three of the toxicants (Aroclor 1221, methoxychlor, and chlorpyrifos) caused significant alterations in GnRH mRNA levels in female rats. Both the in vitro and in vivo findings support the novel concept of chlorpyrifos as an EDC. The results, taken together with the literature, support the hypothesis that the neuroendocrine axis, and specifically GnRH neurons, are sensitive to urban environmental toxicants, and that reproductive and neurologic effects of EDCs may be

  20. Neuroendocrine mechanisms in pregnancy and parturition.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, Felice; Imperatore, Alberto; Challis, John R G

    2010-12-01

    The complex mechanisms controlling human parturition involves mother, fetus, and placenta, and stress is a key element activating a series of physiological adaptive responses. Preterm birth is a clinical syndrome that shares several characteristics with term birth. A major role for the neuroendocrine mechanisms has been proposed, and placenta/membranes are sources for neurohormones and peptides. Oxytocin (OT) is the neurohormone whose major target is uterine contractility and placenta represents a novel source that contributes to the mechanisms of parturition. The CRH/urocortin (Ucn) family is another important neuroendocrine pathway involved in term and preterm birth. The CRH/Ucn family consists of four ligands: CRH, Ucn, Ucn2, and Ucn3. These peptides have a pleyotropic function and are expressed by human placenta and fetal membranes. Uterine contractility, blood vessel tone, and immune function are influenced by CRH/Ucns during pregnancy and undergo major changes at parturition. Among the others, neurohormones, relaxin, parathyroid hormone-related protein, opioids, neurosteroids, and monoamines are expressed and secreted from placental tissues at parturition. Preterm birth is the consequence of a premature and sustained activation of endocrine and immune responses. A preterm birth evidence for a premature activation of OT secretion as well as increased maternal plasma CRH levels suggests a pathogenic role of these neurohormones. A decrease of maternal serum CRH-binding protein is a concurrent event. At midgestation, placental hypersecretion of CRH or Ucn has been proposed as a predictive marker of subsequent preterm delivery. While placenta represents the major source for CRH, fetus abundantly secretes Ucn and adrenal dehydroepiandrosterone in women with preterm birth. The relevant role of neuroendocrine mechanisms in preterm birth is sustained by basic and clinic implications.

  1. The role of the ras oncogene in the formation of tumours.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, P X; Harris, H

    1988-07-01

    A c-Ha-ras 1 oncogene, cloned from the EJ human bladder carcinoma cell line, was inserted into a shuttle vector carrying the selectable marker gene gpt that encodes the enzyme xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. This construct, pSV2gptEJ, was transfected into NIH 3T3 cells by the calcium phosphate precipitation method and cells that had incorporated the plasmid were selected by growth in the presence of mycophenolic acid to which gpt confers resistance. A number of transfectant clones were tested for tumorigenicity by inoculation into nude mice. The take incidence was variable and the tumours arose only after a prolonged latent period. Many inocula produced no tumours. These results were consistent with the view that the tumours arose by selective overgrowth of minority cell populations. Cell lines were derived by explantation of these tumours and were back-selected in 2-thioxanthine, a cytotoxic analogue of the xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase substrate. Five clones were obtained that did not express detectable levels of the c-Ha-ras 1 oncogene product, p21ras. All of them showed a less-transformed morphology than the transfected NIH 3T3 cells from which they originated. Nonetheless three of these clones were found to be tumorigenic at all sites tested. This finding demonstrates that once tumorigenic variants have been selected from the ras-transformed cells, continued production of the p21ras protein is not necessary for the maintenance of tumorigenicity. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that the transfection procedure itself introduced major and stable perturbations of the genome of the transfected cells and confirmed that tumours were produced by selective overgrowth of variants with a chromosome constitution palpably different from that of the majority of the cells injected. In the light of the complex background of genomic changes produced in NIH 3T3 cells by transfection with the c-Ha-ras 1 oncogene, no conclusion can be drawn in genetic

  2. The role of the ras oncogene in the formation of tumours.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, P X; Harris, H

    1988-07-01

    A c-Ha-ras 1 oncogene, cloned from the EJ human bladder carcinoma cell line, was inserted into a shuttle vector carrying the selectable marker gene gpt that encodes the enzyme xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. This construct, pSV2gptEJ, was transfected into NIH 3T3 cells by the calcium phosphate precipitation method and cells that had incorporated the plasmid were selected by growth in the presence of mycophenolic acid to which gpt confers resistance. A number of transfectant clones were tested for tumorigenicity by inoculation into nude mice. The take incidence was variable and the tumours arose only after a prolonged latent period. Many inocula produced no tumours. These results were consistent with the view that the tumours arose by selective overgrowth of minority cell populations. Cell lines were derived by explantation of these tumours and were back-selected in 2-thioxanthine, a cytotoxic analogue of the xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase substrate. Five clones were obtained that did not express detectable levels of the c-Ha-ras 1 oncogene product, p21ras. All of them showed a less-transformed morphology than the transfected NIH 3T3 cells from which they originated. Nonetheless three of these clones were found to be tumorigenic at all sites tested. This finding demonstrates that once tumorigenic variants have been selected from the ras-transformed cells, continued production of the p21ras protein is not necessary for the maintenance of tumorigenicity. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that the transfection procedure itself introduced major and stable perturbations of the genome of the transfected cells and confirmed that tumours were produced by selective overgrowth of variants with a chromosome constitution palpably different from that of the majority of the cells injected. In the light of the complex background of genomic changes produced in NIH 3T3 cells by transfection with the c-Ha-ras 1 oncogene, no conclusion can be drawn in genetic

  3. Dural invasion by pituitary tumours.

    PubMed

    Shaffi, O M; Wrightson, P

    1975-04-23

    In 12 cases of pituitary tumour the dura mater of the sella turcica or diaphragma sellae in contact with the tumour was examined histologically. In nine cases tumour cells were found lying deep in the substance of the dura. Dura from the sella of seven subjects without pituitary disease, obtianed at autopsy, showed no inclusions of pituitary tissue. Four of the cases studied were known before death to suffer from an invasive pituitary adenoma. Of eight surviving cases operated upon in the last two years, five showed dural invasion by tumour. The present report suggests that the condition may be more frequent than expected and that with more study it may provide an index of prognosis. It also defines a requirement for the surgeon aiming to prevent recurrence of tumour after operation or to achieve a complete endocrine ablation.

  4. Molecular aspects of prostate cancer with neuroendocrine differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Connie S.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine differentiation (NED), which is not uncommon in prostate cancer, is increases in prostate cancer after androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and generally appears in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Neuroendocrine cells, which are found in normal prostate tissue, are a small subset of cells and have unique function in regulating the growth of prostate cells. Prostate cancer with NED includes different types of tumor, including focal NED, pure neuroendocrine tumor or mixed neuroendocrine-adenocarcinoma. Although more and more studies are carried out on NED in prostate cancer, the molecular components that are involved in NED are still poorly elucidated. We review neuroendocrine cells in normal prostate tissue, NED in prostate cancer, terminology of NED and biomarkers used for detecting NED in routine pathological practice. Some recently reported molecular components which drive NED in prostate cancer are listed in the review. PMID:27041934

  5. A Rare Location of a Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Jonathan B; Zayat, Vania

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) arising in the duodenum are rare neoplasms that are often classified as indolent and have a low potential to metastasize. Although rare, multiple reports cite an increasing incidence of duodenal NETs. Symptoms are usually nonspecific and the diagnosis is made via endoscopy. Endoscopic resection is the mainstay of therapy. The prognosis is usually favorable. We describe a case of a duodenal NET that presented with vague symptoms in order to increase the awareness of this rare but increasing in frequency entity. PMID:27774362

  6. Heavy ion tumour therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, M.

    2000-03-01

    Ion beams represent a promising radiotherapy modality for the treatment of deep seated tumours. Compared to conventional photon beams, in particular beams of heavier ions like e.g. carbon show several advantages which are related to their different physical and radiobiological properties: The dose increases with penetration depth and shows a sharp distal fall off at the end of the particle range, i.e., the depth dose profile is inverted compared to photon beams. They exhibit an increased biological effectiveness in particular at the end of their range and thus in the target volume. The spatial distribution of stopping particles can be monitored by means of PET-techniques making use of the small amount of radioactive projectile fragments. Ion beams were first used for medical applications in 1954 in Berkeley. Since then, several treatment facilities for tumour therapy have been established worldwide, and approximately 25 000 patients have been treated with protons and 3000 patients with heavier ions successfully. As an example, the specific advantages of the heavy ion therapy facility at GSI Darmstadt established in cooperation with the Radiological Clinics and DKFZ Heidelberg and FZ Rossendorf will be described. In contrast to most existing facilities, it is based on an active beam delivery system, using magnetic deflection of a pencil beam (raster scan) and accelerator energy variation to adjust the penetration depth. Thus, an optimal conformation of the dose to the target volume is achieved. PET-measurements allow for a quasi on-line monitoring of the 3D distribution of stopping particles and in particular of the position of the distal edge of the dose distribution. Furthermore, in the treatment planning procedure the radiobiological properties of ion beams are taken into account in great detail. In December 1997, patient treatments started at GSI, and up to now 42 patients were treated with carbon ions alone or in a mixed carbon/photon beam regime.

  7. Solid-cystic (papillary-cystic) tumours within and outside the pancreas in men: report of two patients.

    PubMed

    Klöppel, G; Maurer, R; Hofmann, E; Lüthold, K; Oscarson, J; Forsby, N; Ihse, I; Ljungberg, O; Heitz, P U

    1991-01-01

    Solid-cystic (papillary-cystic) tumours (SCT) of the pancreas are distinctive neoplasms with a predilection for young female patients. This is the first detailed report describing the occurrence of SCT in two young male patients. Except for the extapancreatic occurrence of one of the tumours (in the retroperitoneal region behind the head of the pancreas), all other clinicopathological features were identical to those characterizing the SCT in women. Immunostaining was (at least focally) positive for Lu 5 (broad spectrum keratin marker), vimentin and alpha-1-antitrypsin. The tumours were negative for neuroendocrine markers (except for neuron-specific enolase), pancreatic hormones and enzymes, pancreatic stone protein, carcinoembryonic antigen, CA 19-9 and nuclear oestrogen and progesterone receptors. This report does not support the suggested female sex hormone dependence of SCT.

  8. Advances in the Diagnosis of Neuroendocrine Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Harshad R; Singh, Aviral; Baum, Richard P

    2016-09-01

    Somatostatin receptor PET/CT using (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs, is a mainstay for the evaluation of the somatostatin receptor status in neuroendocrine neoplasms. In addition, the assessment of glucose metabolism by (18)F-FDG PET/CT at diagnosis can overcome probable shortcomings of histopathologic grading. This offers a systematic theranostic approach for the management of neuroendocrine neoplasms, that is, patient selection for the appropriate treatment-surgery, somatostatin analogs, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, targeted therapies like everolimus and sunitinib, or chemotherapy-and also for therapy response monitoring. Novel targets, for example, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in higher-grade tumors and glucagon like peptide-1 receptor in insulinomas, appear promising for imaging. Scandium-44 and Copper-64, especially on account of their longer half-life (for pretherapeutic dosimetry) and cyclotron production (which favors mass production), might be the potential alternatives to (68)Ga for PET/CT imaging. The future of molecular imaging lies in Radiomics, that is, qualitative and quantitative characterization of tumor phenotypes in correlation with tumor genomics and proteomics, for a personalized cancer management. PMID:27553465

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Cos Escuín, Julio

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors (PNT) encompass a broad spectrum of tumors including typical carcinoid (TC) and atypical (AC) tumors, large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Although no variety can be considered benign, AC and TC have a much lower metastatic potential, are usually diagnosed in early stages, and most are candidates for surgical treatment. Several chemotherapy (CT) regimens are available in the case of recurrence or in advanced stages, although scientific evidence is insufficient. LCNEC, which is currently classified alongside large-cell carcinomas, have molecular features, biological behavior and CT sensitivity profile closely resembling SCLC. Pathological diagnosis is often difficult, despite the availability of immunohistochemical techniques, and surgical specimens may be necessary. The diagnostic tests used are similar to those used in other lung tumors, with some differences in the optimal tracer in positron emission tomography. The new TNM classification is useful for staging these tumors. Carcinoid syndrome, very rare in PNT, may cause symptoms that are difficult to control and requires special therapy with somatostatin analogs and other drugs. Overall, with the exception of SCLC, new trials are needed to provide a response to the many questions arising with regard to the best treatment in each lineage and each stage.

  10. Neuroendocrine control of ionic balance in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Kumai, Yusuke; Perry, Steve F

    2016-08-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an emerging model for integrative physiological research. In this mini-review, we discuss recent advances in the neuroendocrine control of ionic balance in this species, and identify current knowledge gaps and issues that would benefit from further investigation. Zebrafish inhabit a hypo-ionic environment and therefore are challenged by a continual loss of ions to the water. To maintain ionic homeostasis, they must actively take up ions from the water and reduce passive ion loss. The adult gill or the skin of larvae are the primary sites of ionic regulation. Current models for the uptake of major ions in zebrafish incorporate at least three types of ion transporting cells (also called ionocytes); H(+)-ATPase-rich cells for Na(+) uptake, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase-rich cells for Ca(2+) uptake, and Na(+)/Cl(-)-cotransporter expressing cells for both Na(+) and Cl(-) uptake. The precise molecular mechanisms regulating the paracellular loss of ions remain largely unknown. However, epithelial tight junction proteins, including claudins, are thought to play a critical role in reducing ion losses to the surrounding water. Using the zebrafish model, several key neuroendocrine factors were identified as regulators of epithelial ion movement, including the catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline), cortisol, the renin-angiotensin system, parathyroid hormone and prolactin. Increasing evidence also suggests that gasotransmitters, such as H2S, are involved in regulating ion uptake.

  11. Gestational dexamethasone alters fetal neuroendocrine axis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, R G

    2016-09-01

    This study tested whether the maternal transport of dexamethasone (DEXA) may affect the development of the neuroendocrine system. DEXA (0.2mg/kg b.w., subcutaneous injection) was administered to pregnant rats from gestation day (GD) 1-20. In the DEXA-treated group, a decrease in maternal serum thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), and increase in thyrotropin (TSH) levels (hypothyroid status) were observed at GDs 15 & 20 with respect to control group. The reverse pattern (hyperthyroid status) was observed in their fetuses at embryonic days (EDs) 15 & 20. Although the maternal body weight was diminished, the weight of the thyroid gland was increased at studied GDs as compared to the control group. The fetal growth retardation, hyperleptinemia, hyperinsulinism, and cytokines distortions (transforming growth factor-beta; TGF-β, tumor necrosis factor-alpha; TNF-α, and interferon-γ; IFN-γ) were noticed at examined EDs if compared to the control group. Alternatively, the maternofetal thyroid dysfunctions due to the maternal DEXA administration attenuated the levels of fetal cerebral norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E), and elevated the levels of dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) at considered days. These alterations were age-dependent and might damage the nerve transmission. Finally, maternal DEXA might act as neuroendocrine disruptor causing dyshormonogenesis and fetal cerebral dysfunction. PMID:27220267

  12. Diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de Cos Escuín, Julio

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors (PNT) encompass a broad spectrum of tumors including typical carcinoid (TC) and atypical (AC) tumors, large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Although no variety can be considered benign, AC and TC have a much lower metastatic potential, are usually diagnosed in early stages, and most are candidates for surgical treatment. Several chemotherapy (CT) regimens are available in the case of recurrence or in advanced stages, although scientific evidence is insufficient. LCNEC, which is currently classified alongside large-cell carcinomas, have molecular features, biological behavior and CT sensitivity profile closely resembling SCLC. Pathological diagnosis is often difficult, despite the availability of immunohistochemical techniques, and surgical specimens may be necessary. The diagnostic tests used are similar to those used in other lung tumors, with some differences in the optimal tracer in positron emission tomography. The new TNM classification is useful for staging these tumors. Carcinoid syndrome, very rare in PNT, may cause symptoms that are difficult to control and requires special therapy with somatostatin analogs and other drugs. Overall, with the exception of SCLC, new trials are needed to provide a response to the many questions arising with regard to the best treatment in each lineage and each stage. PMID:24685201

  13. From sequence to molecular pathology, and a mechanism driving the neuroendocrine phenotype in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lapuk, Anna V; Wu, Chunxiao; Wyatt, Alexander W; McPherson, Andrew; McConeghy, Brian J; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Mo, Fan; Zoubeidi, Amina; Anderson, Shawn; Bell, Robert H; Haegert, Anne; Shukin, Robert; Wang, Yuzhuo; Fazli, Ladan; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Jones, Edward C; Hach, Faraz; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Boutros, Paul C; Bristow, Robert G; Zhao, Yongjun; Marra, Marco A; Fanjul, Andrea; Maher, Christopher A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Rubin, Mark A; Beltran, Himisha; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Gleave, Martin E; Volik, Stanislav V; Collins, Colin C

    2012-07-01

    The current paradigm of cancer care relies on predictive nomograms which integrate detailed histopathology with clinical data. However, when predictions fail, the consequences for patients are often catastrophic, especially in prostate cancer where nomograms influence the decision to therapeutically intervene. We hypothesized that the high dimensional data afforded by massively parallel sequencing (MPS) is not only capable of providing biological insights, but may aid molecular pathology of prostate tumours. We assembled a cohort of six patients with high-risk disease, and performed deep RNA and shallow DNA sequencing in primary tumours and matched metastases where available. Our analysis identified copy number abnormalities, accurately profiled gene expression levels, and detected both differential splicing and expressed fusion genes. We revealed occult and potentially dormant metastases, unambiguously supporting the patients' clinical history, and implicated the REST transcriptional complex in the development of neuroendocrine prostate cancer, validating this finding in a large independent cohort. We massively expand on the number of novel fusion genes described in prostate cancer; provide fresh evidence for the growing link between fusion gene aetiology and gene expression profiles; and show the utility of fusion genes for molecular pathology. Finally, we identified chromothripsis in a patient with chronic prostatitis. Our results provide a strong foundation for further development of MPS-based molecular pathology.

  14. Benign cardiac tumours, malignant arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kimberley A; Wong, Kenny K; Tipple, Marion; Sanatani, Shubhayan

    2010-01-01

    Four cases of pediatric cardiac tumours (PCTs) associated with ventricular arrhythmias are reported. Sudden cardiac death attributable to the tumour occurred in two children. A third child received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and the fourth had persistent ventricular arrhythmia despite medical therapy. Most PCTs are considered benign; however, the development of malignant arrhythmias may complicate the management of these tumours in some patients. The literature regarding the arrhythmogenic potential of PCTs and the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in these patients is reviewed. The series highlights the deficiency of prognostic information for this cohort. PMID:20151061

  15. Malignant tumours of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Ryska, M; Hrabal, P

    2015-12-01

    No comprehensive knowledge of duodenal tumours exists in the current literature; individual types of malignant tumours may be described within malignancies of the small bowel, sets of case reports, or individual cases. Ampullary carcinomas are the exception and they are detailed in the current WHO histological classification of tumours of digestive system. Neither national nor international literature sources provide a comprehensive review of their therapy. The situation is similar when searching for surgical procedures. Resection procedures on the duodenum should thus be performed in specialized centres with sufficient experience with hepato-pancreato-biliary surgery. PMID:26767899

  16. Intra-tumoural microvessel density in human solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, J; Byers, R; Jayson, G C

    2002-01-01

    Over the last decade assessment of angiogenesis has emerged as a potentially useful biological prognostic and predictive factor in human solid tumours. With the development of highly specific endothelial markers that can be assessed in histological archival specimens, several quantitative studies have been performed in various solid tumours. The majority of published studies have shown a positive correlation between intra-tumoural microvessel density, a measure of tumour angiogenesis, and prognosis in solid tumours. A minority of studies have not demonstrated an association and this may be attributed to significant differences in the methodologies employed for sample selection, immunostaining techniques, vessel counting and statistical analysis, although a number of biological differences may account for the discrepancy. In this review we evaluate the quantification of angiogenesis by immunohistochemistry, the relationship between tumour vascularity and metastasis, and the clinicopathological studies correlating intra-tumoral microvessel density with prognosis and response to anti-cancer therapy. In view of the extensive nature of this retrospective body of data, comparative studies are needed to identify the optimum technique and endothelial antigens (activated or pan-endothelial antigens) but subsequently prospective studies that allocate treatment on the basis of microvessel density are required. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1566–1577. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600315 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12085206

  17. Stable transfection of protein kinase C alpha cDNA in hormone-dependent breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Tonetti, D A; Chisamore, M J; Grdina, W; Schurz, H; Jordan, V C

    2000-01-01

    An inverse relationship between protein kinase C (PKC) activity and oestrogen receptor (ER) expression in human breast cell lines and tumours has been firmly established over the past 10 years. To determine whether specific alterations in PKC expression accompany hormone-independence, we examined the expression of PKC isozymes in the hormone-independent human breast cancer cell clones MCF-7 5C and T47D:C42 compared with their hormone-dependent counterparts, MCF-7 A4, MCF-7 WS8 and T47D:A18 respectively. Both hormone-independent cell clones exhibit elevated PKCα expression and increased basal AP-1 activity compared with the hormone-dependent cell clones. To determine whether PKCα overexpression is sufficient to mediate the hormone-independent phenotype, we stably transfected an expression plasmid containing PKCα cDNA to the T47D:A18 and MCF-7 A4 cell lines. This is the first report of PKCα transfection in T47D cells. In contrast to MCF-7 cells, T47D has the propensity to lose the ER and more readily forms tamoxifen-stimulated tumours in athymic mice. We find that in T47D:A18/PKCα clones, there is concomitant up-regulation of PKC βI and δ, whereas in the MCF-7 A4/PKCα transfectants PKC ɛ is up-regulated. In T47D:A18, but not in MCF-7 A4, PKCα stable transfection is accompanied by down-regulation of ER function whilst basal AP-1 activity is elevated. Our results suggest PKCα overexpression may play a role in growth signalling during the shift from hormone dependent to hormone-independent breast cancers. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10952784

  18. Rewiring macrophages for anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunqin; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-06-28

    Tumour-associated macrophages facilitate cancer progression, but whether they can be reprogrammed to elicit an anti-tumour response remains unclear. Deletion of the microRNA-processing enzyme Dicer is now shown to rewire macrophages to an anti-tumour mode, leading to an enhanced response to immunotherapy and inhibition of tumour progression. PMID:27350442

  19. Leydig cell tumours in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mengel, W; Knorr, D

    1983-01-01

    Two cases of Leydig cell tumours in childhood are presented. In one case, delayed diagnosis and operation led to pubertas praecox vera whereas in the other case normal growth and development occurred after early diagnosis and operation. PMID:6878724

  20. A rare benign ovarian tumour.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Marta Morna; Cunha, Teresa Margarida; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Esteves, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumour (SST) of the ovary is an extremely rare and benign ovarian neoplasm, accounting for 6% of the sex cord stromal ovarian tumours subtype. Usually, it is found during the second and third decades of life. Patients commonly present with pelvic pain, a palpable pelvic mass or menstrual irregularity. We report a case of a 20-year-old woman reporting of mild pelvic pain, with normal laboratory data. On imaging examinations, a large right adnexal tumour was found, with features suggesting an ovarian sex cord tumour. The patient underwent right salpingo-oophorectomy, diagnosing a SST of the ovary. This paper also reviews the literature, and emphasises the typical pathological and imaging characteristics of these rare benign ovarian lesions, and their impact, in a conservative surgery. PMID:26933186

  1. Multicellular Streaming in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef

    As early as 400 BCE, the Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus recognized that solid tumours are stiffer than surrounding tissue. However, cancer cell lines are softer, and softer cells facilitate invasion. This paradox raises several questions: Does softness emerge from adaptation to mechanical and chemical cues in the external microenvironment, or are soft cells already present inside a primary solid tumour? If the latter, how can a more rigid tissue contain more soft cells? Here we show that in primary tumour samples from patients with mammary and cervix carcinomas, cells do exhibit a broad distribution of rigidities, with a higher fraction of softer and more contractile cells compared to normal tissue. Mechanical modelling based on patient data reveals that, surprisingly, tumours with a significant fraction of very soft cells can still remain rigid. Moreover, in tissues with the observed distributions of cell stiffnesses, softer cells spontaneously self-organize into lines or streams, possibly facilitating cancer metastasis.

  2. Tumour of the juxtaoral organ.

    PubMed

    Bénateau, H; Rigau, V; Comoz, F; Benchemam, Y; Galateau, F; Compère, J F

    2003-02-01

    The juxtaoral organ is a normal and constant structure of the oral cavity. It consists of benign epithelial nests. We describe an intraoral tumour of the juxtaoral organ in a child. The tumour was not diagnosed after clinical and radiological examinations because it is extremely rare. A histological examination revealed a tumour of the juxtaoral organ, presumed to be neuroid hamartoma. This is only the second time that a tumour of the juxtaoral organ has been described in a child. We also describe the location, the embryology, the histology and the function of this organ. This is important because this structure can be confused with carcinomas of the oral cavity when examining frozen sections.

  3. Neuroendocrine and immune system responses with spaceflights.

    PubMed

    Tipton, C M; Greenleaf, J E; Jackson, C G

    1996-08-01

    Despite the fact that the first human was in space during 1961 and individuals have existed in a microgravity environment for more than a year, there are limited spaceflight data available on the responses of the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Because of mutual interactions between these respective integrative systems, it is inappropriate to assume that the responses of one have no impact on functions of the other. Blood and plasma volume consistently decrease with spaceflight; hence, blood endocrine and immune constituents will be modified by both gravitational and measurement influences. The majority of the in-flight data relates to endocrine responses that influence fluids and electrolytes during the first month in space. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), aldosterone, and anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) appear to be elevated with little change in the atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP). Flight results longer than 60 d show increased ADH variability with elevations in angiotensin and cortisol. Although post-flight results are influenced by reentry and recovery events, ACTH and ADH appear to be consistently elevated with variable results being reported for the other hormones. Limited in-flight data on insulin and growth hormone levels suggest they are not elevated to counteract the loss in muscle mass. Post-flight results from short- and long-term flights indicate that thyroxine and insulin are increased while growth hormone exhibits minimal change. In-flight parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are variable for several weeks after which they remain elevated. Post-flight PTH was increased on missions that lasted either 7 or 237 d, whereas calcitonin concentrations were increased after 1 wk but decreased after longer flights. Leukocytes are elevated in flights of various durations because of an increase in neutrophils. The majority of post-flights data indicates immunoglobulin concentrations are not significantly changed from pre-flight measurements. However, the numbers of T

  4. Pituitary tumours: acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie; Kamenicky, Peter; Cazabat, Laure; Young, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Excessive production of the growth hormone (GH) is responsible for acromegaly. It is related to a pituitary GH-secreting adenoma in most cases. Prevalence is estimated 40-130 per million inhabitants. It is characterised by slowly progressive acquired somatic disfigurement (mainly involving the face and extremities) and systemic manifestations. The rheumatologic, cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic consequences determine its prognosis. The diagnosis is confirmed by an increased serum GH concentration, unsuppressible by an oral glucose load and by detection of increased levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Treatment is aimed at correcting (or preventing) tumour compression by excising the disease-causing lesion, and at reducing GH and IGF-I levels to normal values. When surgery, the usual first-line treatment, fails to correct GH/IGF-I hypersecretion, medical treatment with somatostatin analogues and/or radiotherapy can be used. The GH-receptor antagonist (pegvisomant) is helpful in patients who are resistant to somatostatin analogues. Thanks to this multistep therapeutic strategy, adequate hormonal disease control is achieved in most cases, allowing a normal life expectancy. PMID:19945023

  5. Imaging of skull base tumours.

    PubMed

    Thust, Stefanie Catherine; Yousry, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    The skull base is a highly complex and difficult to access anatomical region, which constitutes a relatively common site for neoplasms. Imaging plays a central role in establishing the differential diagnosis, to determine the anatomic tumour spread and for operative planning. All skull base imaging should be performed using thin-section multiplanar imaging, whereby CT and MRI can be considered complimentary. An interdisciplinary team approach is central to improve the outcome of these challenging tumours.

  6. Plasma-mediated transfection of RPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, D.; Chalberg, T.; Vankov, A.; Huie, P.; Molnar, F. E.; Butterwick, A.; Calos, M.; Marmor, M.; Blumenkranz, M. S.

    2006-02-01

    A major obstacle in applying gene therapy to clinical practice is the lack of efficient and safe gene delivery techniques. Viral delivery has encountered a number of serious problems including immunological reactions and malignancy. Non-viral delivery methods (liposomes, sonoporation and electroporation) have either low efficiency in-vivo or produce severe collateral damage to ocular tissues. We discovered that tensile stress greatly increases the susceptibility of cellular membranes to electroporation. For synchronous application of electric field and mechanical stress, both are generated by the electric discharge itself. A pressure wave is produced by rapid vaporization of the medium. To prevent termination of electric current by the vapor cavity it is ionized thus restoring its electric conductivity. For in-vivo experiments with rabbits a plasmid DNA was injected into the subretinal space, and RPE was treated trans-sclerally with an array of microelectodes placed outside the eye. Application of 250-300V and 100-200 μs biphasic pulses via a microelectrode array resulted in efficient transfection of RPE without visible damage to the retina. Gene expression was quantified and monitored using bioluminescence (luciferase) and fluorescence (GFP) imaging. Transfection efficiency of RPE with this new technique exceeded that of standard electroporation by a factor 10,000. Safe and effective non-viral DNA delivery to the mammalian retina may help to materialize the enormous potential of the ocular gene therapy. Future experiments will focus on continued characterization of the safety and efficacy of this method and evaluation of long-term transgene expression in the presence of phiC31 integrase.

  7. MRI characteristics of midbrain tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, B; Wang, C C; Wang, J

    1999-03-01

    We diagnosed 60 cases of midbrain tumours by MRI between 1993 to 1997. There were 39 males and 21 females, aged 2-64 years, mean 25.6 years. We found 38 patients with true intramedullary mid-brain tumours, 11 predominantly in the tectum, 20 in the tegmentum and 7 with a downward extension to the pons; there were 7 within the cerebral aqueduct. There were 22 patients with infiltrating midbrain tumours extending from adjacent structures, 11 cases each from the thalamus and pineal region. All patients received surgical treatment. Gross total resection was achieved in 42 cases, subtotal (> 75 %) resection in 18. Pathological diagnoses included 16 low-grade and 15 high-grade astrocytomas; 5 oligodendroastrocytomas; 2 ependymomas; 11 glioblastomas; and 11 pineal parenchymal or germ-cell tumours. Midbrain tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with wide variation in clinical and MRI features, related to the site and type of tumour. MRI not only allows precise analysis of their growth pattern, but also can lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis in the majority of cases.

  8. Endoscopic Ultrasound in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is an advanced endoscopic technique currently used in the staging and diagnosis of many gastrointestinal neoplasms. The proximity of the echoendoscope to the gastrointestinal tract lends itself to a detailed view of the luminal pathology and the pancreas. This unique ability enables endoscopists to use EUS in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). Diagnostic EUS allows previously unidentified NETs to be localized. EUS also determines tumor management by staging the GEP-NETS, enabling the clinicians to choose the appropriate endoscopic or surgical management. The ability to obtain a tissue diagnosis with EUS guidance enables disease confirmation. Finally, recent developments suggest that EUS may be used to deliver therapeutic agents for the treatment of NETs. This review will highlight the advances in our knowledge of EUS in the clinical management of these tumors. PMID:23170141

  9. New pharmacologic therapies for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Ben; Gustafsson, Bjorn I; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin

    2010-09-01

    Successful treatment of unresectable and metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) requires the thoughtful choice of systemic therapy as a component of a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. The role of somatostatin analogues is established in symptom relief, but the efficacy of interferon and radiopeptide targeted therapy is not clear. The utility of a variety of tyrosine kinase and antiangiogenic agents is variable and under investigation, whereas the role of cytotoxic chemotherapy in poorly differentiated GEP-NETs is accepted. Overall, the ideal treatment of more indolent tumors is less certain. Reassessments of the GEP-NET pathology classification has provided improved logic for the role of a variety of agents, whereas the precise positioning of many new agents that target molecular pathways of angiogenesis and proliferation is under examination. This article describes the current options for systemic therapy for GEP-NETs within the framework of the current World Health Organization classification system. PMID:20951920

  10. Diagnosis of functioning pancreaticoduodenal neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Masayuki; Nakamoto, Yuji; Uose, Suguru; Komoto, Izumi; Awane, Masaaki; Taki, Yoshiro

    2015-08-01

    Functioning pancreaticoduodenal neuroendocrine tumors (PD-NETs) are popular in a textbook, but they are still unfamiliar to a general clinician, and delay of diagnosis or misdiagnosis has been reported even today. It is a consensus that sporadic functioning PD-NET is cured only by surgical resection. So, early detection and early resection is the gold standard for the treatment of functioning PD-NET. Functioning PD-NETs in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN 1) are often multiple. You should check about MEN 1 whenever you encountered multiple PD-NET. They are diagnosed in younger age than sporadic cases. In most cases they are accompanied with numerous microscopic or macroscopic nonfunctioning P-NETs, which are potentially metastatic and the most common cause of death in MEN 1 patients. PMID:25624017

  11. Octreotide and Lanreotide in Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Pokuri, Venkata K; Fong, Mei Ka; Iyer, Renuka

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are heterogeneous, rare malignancies that arise most commonly in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. They often secrete vasoactive substances resulting in carcinoid syndrome and the tumor cells exclusively express somatostatin receptors. Octreotide and lanreotide are the two synthetic somatostatin analogs used for the control of carcinoid symptoms and tumor progression in advanced inoperable disease. Recent pivotal trials (PROMID and CLARINET studies) established their antitumor activity. We discuss the available data to support their use as symptom controlling and antiproliferative agents. This article also reviews the guidelines (National Comprehensive Cancer Network and North American Neuro Endocrine Tumor Society), cost-analysis (suggesting the cost-effectiveness of lanreotide autogel compared to higher doses of octreotide long acting release formulation in refractory patients), and future directions of somatostatin analogs in the management of patients refractory to conventional doses of octreotide and lanreotide. PMID:26743514

  12. [Renal neuroendocrine tumor (carcinoid) : a case report].

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Yusuke; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Nakai, Yasutomo; Takayama, Hitoshi; Tsujimura, Akira; Nonomura, Norio

    2013-11-01

    A 32-year-old man was referred to our hospital for treatment of left renal cystic tumor, which was detected by computed tomographic (CT) scan 3 years ago. CT scan showed a multilocular cyst (5 cm in diameter) with a solid tumor in the left kidney which was enhanced with contrast. There was no evidence of extrarenal invasion or distant metastasis. We performed retroperitoneal laparoscopic radical nephrectomy. Pathological examinations revealed a cellular arrangement specific to carcinoid tumor and positive for CD56 (NCAM) and neuron-specific enolase. The cell proliferation rate was estimated to be under 2% with Ki67 staining. The pathological diagnosis was renal neuroendocrine tumor (carcinoid). At the 9-month follow up, he had no evidence of local recurrence or metastasis.

  13. Oncocytic lesions of the neuroendocrine system.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Z W; LiVolsi, V A

    1999-05-01

    Oncocytic tumors are rare tumors that have been described in many organs throughout the body, mainly in salivary, parathyroid, thyroid, and adrenal glands and in the kidney. A wide spectrum of benign and malignant oncocytic tumors can arise in various organs of the neuroendocrine system. They are usually defined as tumors that are composed predominantly or exclusively of oncocytic cells. A majority of these tumors are benign; however, in some endocrine organs such as the thyroid the diagnosis of oncocytic/Hürthle cell carcinoma portends a more aggressive clinical course than non-Hürthle cell follicular carcinoma. Therefore, it is important to follow strict criteria to diagnose and differentiate between benign and malignant oncocytic tumors. In this review we will discuss the clinicopathologic features of various oncocytic tumors of the endocrine glands.

  14. Optimization of Transfection Conditions for siRNA Screening.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Justin J; Azorsa, David O

    2016-01-01

    RNAi screening of mammalian cells is often performed using siRNAs and cationic lipids as transfection reagents. Efficiency of transfection depends on growth characteristics of the cells and the cationic lipid used. With a large selection of cationic lipids available, it can often be difficult to select the optimal lipid and lipid:siRNA (vol:wt) ratio. Here, we describe the process of optimizing siRNA transfection conditions for efficient reverse transfection of mammalian cells using specific positive and negative siRNA controls. PMID:27581281

  15. Mammalian cell transfection: the present and the future

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Kyung

    2010-01-01

    Transfection is a powerful analytical tool enabling study of the function of genes and gene products in cells. The transfection methods are broadly classified into three groups; biological, chemical, and physical. These methods have advanced to make it possible to deliver nucleic acids to specific subcellular regions of cells by use of a precisely controlled laser-microcope system. The combination of point-directed transfection and mRNA transfection is a new way of studying the function of genes and gene products. However, each method has its own advantages and disadvantages so the optimum method depends on experimental design and objective. PMID:20549496

  16. Photoreception for circadian, neuroendocrine, and neurobehavioral regulation.

    PubMed

    Hanifin, John P; Brainard, George C

    2007-03-01

    In the art and science of lighting, four traditional objectives have been to provide light that: 1) is optimum for visual performance; 2) is visually comfortable; 3) permits aesthetic appreciation of the space; and 4) conserves energy. Over the past 25 years, it has been demonstrated that there are nonvisual, systemic effects of light in healthy humans. Furthermore, light has been used to successfully treat patients with selected affective and sleep disorders as well as healthy individuals who have circadian disruption due to shift work, transcontinental jet travel, or space flight. Recently, there has been an upheaval in the understanding of photoreceptive input to the circadian system of humans and other mammals. Analytical action spectra in rodents, primates, and humans have identified 446-484 nm (predominantly the blue part of the spectrum) as the most potent wavelength region for neuroendocrine, circadian, and neurobehavioral responses. Those studies suggested that a novel photosensory system, distinct from the visual rods and cones, is primarily responsible for this regulation. Studies have now shown that this new photosensory system is based on a small population of widely dispersed retinal ganglion cells that are intrinsically responsive to light, and project to the suprachiasmatic nuclei and other nonvisual centers in the brain. These light-sensitive retinal ganglion cells contain melanopsin, a vitamin A photopigment that mediates the cellular phototransduction cascade. Although light detection for circadian and neuroendocrine phototransduction seems to be mediated principally by a novel photosensory system in the eye, the classic rod and cone photoreceptors appear to play a role as well. These findings are important in understanding how humans adapt to lighting conditions in modern society and will provide the basis for major changes in future architectural lighting strategies.

  17. Management of gastric and duodenal neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Mizuno, Ken-Ichi; Takeuchi, Manabu; Terai, Shuji

    2016-08-14

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs) are rare neoplasms, like all NETs. However, the incidence of GI-NETS has been increasing in recent years. Gastric NETs (G-NETs) and duodenal NETs (D-NETs) are the common types of upper GI-NETs based on tumor location. G-NETs are classified into three distinct subgroups: type I, II, and III. Type I G-NETs, which are the most common subtype (70%-80% of all G-NETs), are associated with chronic atrophic gastritis, including autoimmune gastritis and Helicobacter pylori associated atrophic gastritis. Type II G-NETs (5%-6%) are associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1-ZES). Both type I and II G-NETs are related to hypergastrinemia, are small in size, occur in multiple numbers, and are generally benign. In contrast, type III G-NETs (10%-15%) are not associated with hypergastrinemia, are large-sized single tumors, and are usually malignant. Therefore, surgical resection and chemotherapy are generally necessary for type III G-NETs, while endoscopic resection and follow-up, which are acceptable for the treatment of most type I and II G-NETs, are only acceptable for small and well differentiated type III G-NETs. D-NETs include gastrinomas (50%-60%), somatostatin-producing tumors (15%), nonfunctional serotonin-containing tumors (20%), poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (< 3%), and gangliocytic paragangliomas (< 2%). Most D-NETs are located in the first or second part of the duodenum, with 20% occurring in the periampullary region. Therapy for D-NETs is based on tumor size, location, histological grade, stage, and tumor type. While endoscopic resection may be considered for small nonfunctional D-NETs (G1) located in the higher papilla region, surgical resection is necessary for most other D-NETs. However, there is no consensus regarding the ideal treatment of D-NETs. PMID:27570419

  18. Management of gastric and duodenal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Satoru; Mizuno, Ken-ichi; Takeuchi, Manabu; Terai, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs) are rare neoplasms, like all NETs. However, the incidence of GI-NETS has been increasing in recent years. Gastric NETs (G-NETs) and duodenal NETs (D-NETs) are the common types of upper GI-NETs based on tumor location. G-NETs are classified into three distinct subgroups: type I, II, and III. Type I G-NETs, which are the most common subtype (70%-80% of all G-NETs), are associated with chronic atrophic gastritis, including autoimmune gastritis and Helicobacter pylori associated atrophic gastritis. Type II G-NETs (5%-6%) are associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (MEN1-ZES). Both type I and II G-NETs are related to hypergastrinemia, are small in size, occur in multiple numbers, and are generally benign. In contrast, type III G-NETs (10%-15%) are not associated with hypergastrinemia, are large-sized single tumors, and are usually malignant. Therefore, surgical resection and chemotherapy are generally necessary for type III G-NETs, while endoscopic resection and follow-up, which are acceptable for the treatment of most type I and II G-NETs, are only acceptable for small and well differentiated type III G-NETs. D-NETs include gastrinomas (50%-60%), somatostatin-producing tumors (15%), nonfunctional serotonin-containing tumors (20%), poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (< 3%), and gangliocytic paragangliomas (< 2%). Most D-NETs are located in the first or second part of the duodenum, with 20% occurring in the periampullary region. Therapy for D-NETs is based on tumor size, location, histological grade, stage, and tumor type. While endoscopic resection may be considered for small nonfunctional D-NETs (G1) located in the higher papilla region, surgical resection is necessary for most other D-NETs. However, there is no consensus regarding the ideal treatment of D-NETs. PMID:27570419

  19. TNM Staging of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Zeng, Lin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Wei-guo; Wang, Li; Ke, Neng-wen; Liu, Xu-bao; Tian, Bo-le

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and compare the surgical outcome of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) using the 2 tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) systems by both the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Staging Manual (seventh edition) and the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS). Moreover, we sought to validate the prognostic value of the new AJCC criterion. Data of 145 consecutive patients who were all surgically treated and histologically diagnosed as p-NETs from January 2002 to June 2013 in our single institution were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates for AJCC classifications of stages I, II, III, and IV were 79.5%, 63.1%, 15.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). As for the ENETS system, the OS rates at 5 years for stages I, II, III, and IV were 75.5%, 72.7%, 29.0%, and NA, respectively, (P < 0.005). Both criteria present no statistically notable difference between stage I and stage II (P > 0.05) but between stage I and stages III and IV (P < 0.05), as well as those between stage II and stages III and IV (P < 0.05). Difference between stage III and IV by ENETS was significant (P = 0.031), whereas that by the AJCC was not (P = 0.144). What's more, the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) was statistically significant in both uni- and multivariate analyses by Cox regression (P < 0.005 and P = 0.025, respectively). Our study indicated that the ENETS TNM staging system might be superior to the AJCC Staging Manual (seventh edition) for the clinical practice of p-NETs. Together with tumor grade and radical resection, the new AJCC system was also validated to be an independent predictor for p-NETs. PMID:25816036

  20. Prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Evans, Neil P; Bellingham, Michelle; Robinson, Jane E

    2016-07-01

    It is now well recognized that the gestational environment can have long-lasting effects not only on the life span and health span of an individual but also, through potential epigenetic changes, on future generations. This article reviews the "prenatal programming" of the neuroendocrine systems that regulate reproduction, with a specific focus on the lessons learned using ovine models. The review examines the critical roles played by steroids in normal reproductive development before considering the effects of prenatal exposure to exogenous steroid hormones including androgens and estrogens, the effects of maternal nutrition and stress during gestation, and the effects of exogenous chemicals such as alcohol and environment chemicals. In so doing, it becomes evident that, to maximize fitness, the regulation of reproduction has evolved to be responsive to many different internal and external cues and that the GnRH neurosecretory system expresses a degree of plasticity throughout life. During fetal life, however, the system is particularly sensitive to change and at this time, the GnRH neurosecretory system can be "shaped" both to achieve normal sexually differentiated function but also in ways that may adversely affect or even prevent "normal function". The exact mechanisms through which these programmed changes are brought about remain largely uncharacterized but are likely to differ depending on the factor, the timing of exposure to that factor, and the species. It would appear, however, that some afferent systems to the GnRH neurons such as kisspeptin, may be critical in this regard as it would appear to be sensitive to a wide variety of factors that can program reproductive function. Finally, it has been noted that the prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function can be associated with epigenetic changes, which would suggest that in addition to direct effects on the exposed offspring, prenatal programming could have transgenerational effects on

  1. Benign gastric neuroendocrine tumors in three snow leopards (Panthera uncia).

    PubMed

    Dobson, Elizabeth C; Naydan, Dianne K; Raphael, Bonnie L; McAloose, Denise

    2013-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are relatively rare neoplasms arising from neuroendocrine cells that are distributed throughout the body and are predominant in the gastrointestinal tract. This report describes benign, well-differentiated gastric neuroendocrine tumors in three captive snow leopards (Panthera uncia). All tumors were well circumscribed, were within the gastric mucosa or submucosa, and had histologic and immunohistochemical features of neuroendocrine tumors. Histologic features included packeted cuboidal to columnar epithelial cells that were arranged in palisades or pseudorosettes and contained finely granular cellular cytoplasm with centrally placed, round nuclei. Cytoplasmic granules of neoplastic cells strongly expressed chromogranin A, variably expressed neuron-specific enolase, and did not express synaptophysin or gastrin. Each leopard died or was euthanatized for reasons unrelated to its tumor.

  2. Cervical neuroendocrine tumor in a young female with Lynch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yousef, Ibraheem; Siyam, Fadi; Layfield, Lester; Freter, Carl; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors rarely occur in the cervix or other components of the reproductive system. These tumors have been associated with microsatellite instability, are very aggressive and often associated with poor outcome. Lynch syndrome is an inherited cancer syndrome that has also been associated with microsatellite instability. Here we report a 34-year-old female with Lynch syndrome and a family history of loss of DNA mismatch of the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer repair gene expression who presented with a neuroendocrine tumor of her cervix as the first manifestation of Lynch syndrome. This is the first case reported of a neuroendocrine tumor of the cervix in a patient with Lynch syndrome. We also review the relationship between Lynch Syndrome and neuroendocrine tumors. PMID:24878972

  3. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Go ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  4. Benign gastric neuroendocrine tumors in three snow leopards (Panthera uncia).

    PubMed

    Dobson, Elizabeth C; Naydan, Dianne K; Raphael, Bonnie L; McAloose, Denise

    2013-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are relatively rare neoplasms arising from neuroendocrine cells that are distributed throughout the body and are predominant in the gastrointestinal tract. This report describes benign, well-differentiated gastric neuroendocrine tumors in three captive snow leopards (Panthera uncia). All tumors were well circumscribed, were within the gastric mucosa or submucosa, and had histologic and immunohistochemical features of neuroendocrine tumors. Histologic features included packeted cuboidal to columnar epithelial cells that were arranged in palisades or pseudorosettes and contained finely granular cellular cytoplasm with centrally placed, round nuclei. Cytoplasmic granules of neoplastic cells strongly expressed chromogranin A, variably expressed neuron-specific enolase, and did not express synaptophysin or gastrin. Each leopard died or was euthanatized for reasons unrelated to its tumor. PMID:23805563

  5. Mutations in the p53 gene occur in diverse human tumour types.

    PubMed

    Nigro, J M; Baker, S J; Preisinger, A C; Jessup, J M; Hostetter, R; Cleary, K; Bigner, S H; Davidson, N; Baylin, S; Devilee, P

    1989-12-01

    The p53 gene has been a constant source of fascination since its discovery nearly a decade ago. Originally considered to be an oncogene, several convergent lines of research have indicated that the wild-type gene product actually functions as a tumour suppressor gene. For example, expression of the neoplastic phenotype is inhibited, rather than promoted, when rat cells are transfected with the murine wild-type p53 gene together with mutant p53 genes and/or other oncogenes. Moreover, in human tumours, the short arm of chromosome 17 is often deleted. In colorectal cancers, the smallest common region of deletion is centred at 17p13.1; this region harbours the p53 gene, and in two tumours examined in detail, the remaining (non-deleted) p53 alleles were found to contain mutations. This result was provocative because allelic deletion coupled with mutation of the remaining allele is a theoretical hallmark of tumour-suppressor genes. In the present report, we have attempted to determine the generality of this observation; that is, whether tumours with allelic deletions of chromosome 17p contain mutant p53 genes in the allele that is retained. Our results suggest that (1) most tumours with such allelic deletions contain p53 point mutations resulting in amino-acid substitutions, (2) such mutations are not confined to tumours with allelic deletion, but also occur in at least some tumours that have retained both parental 17p alleles, and (3) p53 gene mutations are clustered in four 'hot-spots' which exactly coincide with the four most highly conserved regions of the gene. These results suggest that p53 mutations play a role in the development of many common human malignancies.

  6. Therapy-induced tumour secretomes promote resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Obenauf, Anna C.; Zou, Yilong; Ji, Andrew L.; Vanharanta, Sakari; Shu, Weiping; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Bosenberg, Marcus C.; Wiesner, Thomas; Rosen, Neal; Lo, Roger S.; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance invariably limits the clinical efficacy of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors against cancer1,2. Here we show that targeted therapy with BRAF, ALK, or EGFR kinase inhibitors induces a complex network of secreted signals in drug-stressed melanoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells. This therapy-induced secretome (TIS) stimulates the outgrowth, dissemination, and metastasis of drug-resistant cancer cell clones and supports the survival of drug-sensitive cancer cells, contributing to incomplete tumour regression. The vemurafenib reactive secretome in melanoma is driven by down-regulation of the transcription factor FRA1. In situ transcriptome analysis of drug-resistant melanoma cells responding to the regressing tumour microenvironment revealed hyperactivation of multiple signalling pathways, most prominently the AKT pathway. Dual inhibition of RAF and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways blunted the outgrowth of the drug-resistant cell population in BRAF mutant melanoma tumours, suggesting this combination therapy as a strategy against tumour relapse. Thus, therapeutic inhibition of oncogenic drivers induces vast secretome changes in drug-sensitive cancer cells, paradoxically establishing a tumour microenvironment that supports the expansion of drug-resistant clones, but is susceptible to combination therapy. PMID:25807485

  7. Immunohistochemical study of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in Panthera tigris tigris.

    PubMed

    Nyska, A; Goldstein, J; Eshkar, G; Klein, B

    1996-07-01

    The histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a case of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor are described in a 14-yr-old female Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) housed at the New Biblical Zoo of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel, 1994. The neoplastic cells were immunohistochemically negative for insulin and glucagon, slightly positive for neuron-specific enolase, moderately positive for serotonin and somatostatin, and markedly positive for chromogranine A and gastrin. This is the first documentation of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in the tiger.

  8. Fast-growing large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Lukina, Olga; Gorbunkov, Stanislav; Dvorakovskaja, Ivetta; Varlamov, Vladimir; Akopov, Andrey

    2011-05-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinomas combine a heterogeneous group of tumors occurring in lungs on a rare occasion, and in some cases, they appear to have extraordinary quick growth and extrapulmonary localization. In this case we present a 42-year-old patient who underwent a right upper lobectomy for emphysema, and 6 months later, the tumor developed again into a giant neuroendocrine carcinoma of the mediastinum. PMID:21524479

  9. Immunohistochemical study of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in Panthera tigris tigris.

    PubMed

    Nyska, A; Goldstein, J; Eshkar, G; Klein, B

    1996-07-01

    The histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a case of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor are described in a 14-yr-old female Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) housed at the New Biblical Zoo of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel, 1994. The neoplastic cells were immunohistochemically negative for insulin and glucagon, slightly positive for neuron-specific enolase, moderately positive for serotonin and somatostatin, and markedly positive for chromogranine A and gastrin. This is the first documentation of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor in the tiger. PMID:8827685

  10. Multiple tumours in survival estimates.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Stefano; De Angelis, Roberta; Ciccolallo, Laura; Carrani, Eugenio; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Grande, Enrico; Zigon, Giulia; Brenner, Hermann

    2009-04-01

    In international comparisons of cancer registry based survival it is common practice to restrict the analysis to first primary tumours and exclude multiple cancers. The probability of correctly detecting subsequent cancers depends on the registry's running time, which results in different proportions of excluded patients and may lead to biased comparisons. We evaluated the impact on the age-standardised relative survival estimates of also including multiple primary tumours. Data from 2,919,023 malignant cancers from 69 European cancer registries participating in the EUROCARE-4 collaborative study were used. A total of 183,683 multiple primary tumours were found, with an overall proportion of 6.3% over all the considered cancers, ranging from 0.4% (Naples, Italy) to 12.9% (Iceland). The proportion of multiple tumours varied greatly by type of tumour, being higher for those with high incidence and long survival (breast, prostate and colon-rectum). Five-year relative survival was lower when including patients with multiple cancers. For all cancers combined the average difference was -0.4 percentage points in women and -0.7 percentage points in men, and was greater for older registries. Inclusion of multiple tumours led to lower survival in 44 out of 45 cancer sites analysed, with the greatest differences found for larynx (-1.9%), oropharynx (-1.5%), and penis (-1.3%). Including multiple primary tumours in survival estimates for international comparison is advisable because it reduces the bias due to different observation periods, age, registration quality and completeness of registration. The general effect of inclusion is to reduce survival estimates by a variable amount depending on the proportion of multiple primaries and cancer site.

  11. [Contemporary management of neuroendocrine neoplasms of the female genital organs].

    PubMed

    Kuc-Rajca, Małgorzata; Dańska-Bidzińska, Anna

    2011-09-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms are a rare and heterogeneous group of diseases that account for only 2% of all gynecologic malignancies. The most common types are ovarian carcinoid tumor and small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the cervix. The tumors are staged according to FIGO clinical staging system. The diagnosis is usually made retrospectively after obtaining the results of histopathological evaluation of the primary tumor They rarely cause syndromes related to hormone overexpression. Neuroendocrine neoplasms are characterized by aggressive behaviour Even at an early stage there is high incidence of nodal and distant metastases. Survival is poor regardless of stage at diagnosis. The most important is to diagnose the neuroendocrine tumor accurately and treat it in multimodal, aggressive approach to control the disease better and reduce the incidence of reccurences. Apart from typical therapeutic approach, treatment may encompass isotope therapy using radiolabeled somatostatin analogs. This method should be reserved for patients with expression of somatostatin receptors detected by the somatostatin receptor scyntygraphy. Data concerning the management of neuroendocrin tumors are based mainly on retrospective studies and clinical case series. Lack of randomized trials makes it impossible to select the best treatment option. Better understanding of the biology of neuroendocrine tumors, especially the molecular genetics, will in the future help to determine the optimal treatment strategies for these tumors.

  12. Tenascin in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Soini, Y; Pääkkö, P; Virtanen, I; Lehto, V P

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of tenascin immunoreactivity was analysed in salivary gland tissue and in various benign and malignant tumours of the salivary gland. In the non-neoplastic tissue, tenascin was seen in the areas of basement membranes of the ductal epithelium. No immunoreactivity could be observed in the serous or mucous glands. In pleomorphic adenomas, tenascin immunoreactivity could be seen in the stromal compartment. It was more pronounced in the dense stromal areas and chondroid elements than in the myxoid area. In Warthin's tumours, strong tenascin immunoreactivity could be observed in the basement membrane zone of the epithelial component. In the lymphatic component, faint reticular staining could be seen. In adenoid cystic carcinomas, acinic cell tumours and mucoepidermoid carcinomas, tenascin showed a linear stromal distribution. No intracytoplasmic immunoreactivity could be seen in any of the cases. The widespread tenascin positivity in salivary gland tumours suggests that tenascin may play a role in the induction and progression of salivary gland tumours, presumably by interfering with the normal parenchymal-mesenchymal interaction.

  13. Serotonin and the 5-HT7 receptor: the link between hepatocytes, IGF-1 and small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Svejda, Bernhard; Kidd, Mark; Timberlake, Andrew; Harry, Kathy; Kazberouk, Alexander; Schimmack, Simon; Lawrence, Ben; Pfragner, Roswitha; Modlin, Irvin M

    2013-07-01

    Platelet-derived serotonin (5-HT) is involved in liver regeneration. The liver is also the metastatic site for malignant enterochromaffin (EC) cell "carcinoid" (neuroendocrine) neoplasms, the principal cellular source of 5-HT. We hypothesized that 5-HT produced by metastatic EC cells played a role in the hepatic tumor-microenvironment principally via 5-HT₇ receptor-mediated activation of hepatocyte IGF-1 synthesis and secretion. Using isolated rat hepatocytes, we evaluated 5-HT₇ receptor expression (using PCR, sequencing and western blot). ELISA, cell transfection and western blots delineated 5-HT-mediated signaling pathways (pCREB, AKT and ERK). IGF-1 synthesis/secretion was evaluated using QPCR and ELISA. IGF-1 was tested on small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasm proliferation, while IGF-1 production and 5-HT₇ expression were examined in an in vivo SCID metastasis model. Our results demonstrated evidence for a functional 5-HT₇ receptor. 5-HT activated cAMP/PKA activity, pCREB (130-205%, P < 0.05) and pERK/pAKT (1.2-1.75, P < 0.05). Signaling was reversed by the 5-HT₇ receptor antagonist SB269970. IGF-1 significantly stimulated proliferation of two small intestinal neuroendocrine neoplasm cell lines (EC₅₀: 7-70 pg/mL) and could be reversed by the small molecule inhibitor BMS-754807. IGF-1 and 5-HT were elevated (40-300×) in peri-tumoral hepatic tissue in nude mice, while 5-HT₇ was increased fourfold compared to sham-operated animals. We conclude that hepatocytes express a cAMP-coupled 5-HT₇ receptor, which, at elevated 5-HT concentrations that occur in liver metastases, signals via CREB/AKT and is linked to IGF-1 synthesis and secretion. Because IGF-1 regulates NEN proliferation, identification of a role for 5-HT₇ in the hepatic metastatic tumor microenvironment suggests the potential for novel therapeutic strategies for amine-producing mid-gut tumors. PMID:23578138

  14. Tuberculosis simulating brain tumour.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, U R; Farooq, M; Rauf, F; Bhatti, S K

    2011-06-30

    The purpose of the study is to highlight the varied presentation of tuberculosis (TB) simulating a brain tumour. Headache and seizures are becoming frequent presenting complaints without any history of tuberculosis. The study comprises 1200 patients of both sexes with ages ranging from ten to sixty years. CT scan and MRI brain control with and without contrast medium were the investigations performed in these cases. In some patients Electroencephalography (EEG), cerebral angiography (DSA) and spectroscopy were also performed. The final diagnosis of tuberculosis was made on the basis of craniotomy, stereotactic and burr hole biopsies with histopathology in most of the cases. Forty per cent of the patients were followed up for eight months. They were put on anti-tuberculosis treatment with symptomatic and anti-epileptic drugs. The incidence was 544 and 757 per 100,000 in Africa and Indo Pakistan respectively. The male to female ratio was 1:1. Tuberculosis, especially with CNS involvement, is not only common in immunosuppressed patients in our setting, but TB has been and remains an important public health problem. TB may involve the CNS either as meningitis or as parenchymal granulomas or abscesses. Patients with brain TB usually present with fever, multiple cranial nerve involvement and occasional behavioural changes. CSF findings remain non specific in most cases. The most common sites are the cerebral hemisphere and basal ganglion in adults and the cerebellum in children. Tuberculosis has unique findings on brain CT and MRI. Cortical and subcortical locations are typical whereas the brain stem is a less common site. Tuberculosis lesions are usually solitary but multiple in 10% to 35% of cases. In spite of all these facts some cases of brain TB still need aggressive neurointervention to reach the final diagnosis of brain TB. Tuberculosis in the CNS may manifest in many different ways. So one should always include tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis in the

  15. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  16. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    PubMed

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  17. Lgr5-expressing stem cells are not the cells of origin of pyloric neuroendocrine carcinomas in mice.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Elena; Kronast, Mira; Tölge, Mariana; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In intestinal and pyloric epithelia, leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5)-expressing cells represent long-lived adult stem cells that give rise to all epithelial cell types, including endocrine cells. Ablation of the Apc gene in Lgr5-expressing cells leads to intestinal and pyloric adenomas. To assess whether all epithelial tumours of the gastrointestinal tract are derived from LGR5-positive stem cells, we crossed Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creER(T2) mice, which express EGFP and Cre recombinase driven by the Lgr5 promoter, with CEA424-SV40-TAg mice, which develop pyloric neuroendocrine carcinomas of epithelial origin. In 19 day-old mice, single SV40 T antigen (TAg)-positive cells were identified preferentially at the the bases of pyloric glands, close to the stem cell compartment. However, contrary to previous publications describing subpopulations of LGR5-positive cells in gastrointestinal neoplasia, we could not detect Lgr5-EGFP-positive tumour cells in malignant lesions. The lack of expression of the Wnt target gene Lgr5 is probably not caused by suppression of Wnt signalling by TAg, since β-catenin-mediated Wnt signalling, as measured by the TOPflash assay, was not inhibited. To determine the cellular origin of CEA424-SV40-TAg tumours, we performed tracing experiments using Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-creERT2:CEA424-SV40-TAg:ROSA26-tdRFP mice. Following tamoxifen induction, it was possible to efficiently trace the progeny of Lgr5-expressing cells in gastrointestinal tissue via red fluorescent protein (RFP) expression. No RFP-positive tumour cells were detected, even when RFP gene activation occurred in 7 day-old mice well before the appearance of TAg-positive tumour cells. Hence, we conclude that Lgr5-expressing stem cells probably do not constitute the cells of origin in CEA424-SV40-TAg mice. Consequently, not all epithelial tumours in the pyloric region are initiated by transformation of LGR5-positive stem cells. Thus, additional long-lived LGR5

  18. Highly Efficient Transfection of Human THP-1 Macrophages by Nucleofection

    PubMed Central

    Maeß, Marten B.; Wittig, Berith; Lorkowski, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages, as key players of the innate immune response, are at the focus of research dealing with tissue homeostasis or various pathologies. Transfection with siRNA and plasmid DNA is an efficient tool for studying their function, but transfection of macrophages is not a trivial matter. Although many different approaches for transfection of eukaryotic cells are available, only few allow reliable and efficient transfection of macrophages, but reduced cell vitality and severely altered cell behavior like diminished capability for differentiation or polarization are frequently observed. Therefore a transfection protocol is required that is capable of transferring siRNA and plasmid DNA into macrophages without causing serious side-effects thus allowing the investigation of the effect of the siRNA or plasmid in the context of normal cell behavior. The protocol presented here provides a method for reliably and efficiently transfecting human THP-1 macrophages and monocytes with high cell vitality, high transfection efficiency, and minimal effects on cell behavior. This approach is based on Nucleofection and the protocol has been optimized to maintain maximum capability for cell activation after transfection. The protocol is adequate for adherent cells after detachment as well as cells in suspension, and can be used for small to medium sample numbers. Thus, the method presented is useful for investigating gene regulatory effects during macrophage differentiation and polarization. Apart from presenting results characterizing macrophages transfected according to this protocol in comparison to an alternative chemical method, the impact of cell culture medium selection after transfection on cell behavior is also discussed. The presented data indicate the importance of validating the selection for different experimental settings. PMID:25226503

  19. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  20. Neuroendocrine and Immune System Responses with Spaceflights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, Charles M.; Greenleaf, John E.; Jackson, Catherine G. R.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the fact that the first human was in space during 1961 and individuals have existed in a microgravity environment for more than a year, there are limited spaceflight data available on the responses of the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Because of mutual interactions between these respective integrative systems, it is inappropriate to assume that the responses of one have no impact on functions of the other. Blood and plasma volume consistently decrease with spaceflight; hence, blood endocrine and immune constituents will be modified by both gravitational and measurement influences. The majority of the in-flight data relates to endocrine responses that influence fluids and electrolytes during the first month in space. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), aldo-sterone. and anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) appear to be elevated with little change in the atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP). Flight results longer than 60 d show increased ADH variability with elevations in angiotensin and cortisol. Although post-flight results are influenced by reentry and recovery events, ACTH and ADH appear to be consistently elevated with variable results being reported for the other hormones. Limited in-flight data on insulin and growth hormone levels suggest they are not elevated to counteract the loss in muscle mass. Post-flight results from short- and long-term flights indicate that thyroxine and insulin are increased while growth hormone exhibits minimal change. In-flight parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are variable for several weeks after which they remain elevated. Post-flight PTH was increased on missions that lasted either 7 or 237 d, whereas calcitonin concentrations were increased after 1 wk but decreased after longer flights. Leukocytes are elevated in flights of various durations because of an increase in neutrophils. The majority of post-flight data indicates immunoglobulin concentrations are not significantly changed from pre-flight measurements. However, the numbers of T

  1. Tailored nanoparticles for tumour therapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei-Shin; Drake, Philip; Cho, Hui-Ju; Kao, Chao-Hung; Lee, Kun-Feng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Lin, Xi-Zhang; Lin, Yuh-Jiuan

    2012-06-01

    Gd doped iron-oxide nanoparticles were developed for use in tumour therapy via magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The effect of the Gd3+ dopant on the particle size and magnetic properties was investigated. The final particle composition varied from Gd0.01Fe2.99O4 to Gd0.04Fe2.96O4 as determined by Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). TEM image analysis showed the average magnetic core diameters to be 12 nm and 33 nm for the lowest and highest Gd levels respectively. The specific power adsorption rate (SAR) determined with a field strength of 246 Oe and 52 kHz had a maximum of 38Wg(-1) [Fe] for the Gd0.03Fe2.97O4 sample. This value is about 4 times higher than the reported SAR values for Fe3O4. The potential for in vivo tumour therapy was investigated using a mouse model. The mouse models treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 displayed much slower tumour growth after the first treatment cycle, the tumour had increased its mass by 25% after 7 days post treatment compared to a 79% mass increase over the same period for those models treated with standard iron-oxide or saline solution. After a second treatment cycle the mouse treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 showed complete tumour regression with no tumour found for at least 5 days post treatment. PMID:22905580

  2. Transfection of isolated rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, granulosa cells through chemical transfection and electroporation at 12°C.

    PubMed

    Marivin, E; Mourot, B; Loyer, P; Rime, H; Bobe, J; Fostier, A

    2015-09-15

    Over-expression or inhibition of gene expression can be efficiently used to analyse the functions and/or regulation of target genes. Modulation of gene expression can be achieved through transfection of exogenous nucleic acids into target cells. Such techniques require the development of specific protocols to transfect cell cultures with nucleic acids. The aim of this study was to develop a method of transfection suitable for rainbow trout granulosa cells in primary culture. After the isolation of rainbow trout granulosa cells, chemical transfection of cells with a fluorescent morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) was tested using FuGENE HD at 12 °C. Electroporation was also employed to transfect these cells with either a plasmid or MO. Transfection was more efficient using electroporation (with the following settings: 1200 V/40 ms/1p) than chemical transfection, but electroporation by itself was deleterious, resulting in a decrease of the steroidogenic capacity of the cells, measured via estradiol production from its androgenic substrate. The disturbance of cell biology induced by the transfection method per se should be taken into account in data interpretation when investigating the effects of under- or over-expression of candidate genes.

  3. Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of tracheostomy site in a patient with a history of juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Violet Wilmot, Victoria; Nixon, Iain James; Nixon, Ioanna Fragkandrea

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis is the commonest cause of benign epithelial tumours of the larynx. Following diagnostic biopsy, surgical debulking is the mainstay of therapy. The condition is often recurrent with further papillomas forming after debridement, requiring serial procedures and occasionally demanding tracheostomy. Rarely, the disease can undergo malignant transformation; most commonly to squamous cell carcinoma. We describe the first reported case of small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma occurring in the previous tracheostomy site of a 29-year-old male with a history of juvenile laryngeal papillomatosis. The patient, with a background of multiple treatments for juvenile papillomas, presented with voice change, breathing difficultly and erythema at the site of previous tracheostomy. Induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation was used to treat the lesion with a good response to initial therapy. PMID:27507691

  4. [Surgical treatment for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasmas].

    PubMed

    Wu, Junli; Guo, Feng; Wei, Jishu; Lu, Zipeng; Chen, Jianmin; Gao, Wentao; Li, Qiang; Jiang, Kuirong; Dai, Cuncai; Miao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasmas (PNENs) are classified into functioning & non-functioning tumors. The radical surgery is the only effective way for the cure & long-term survival. For the locoregional resectable tumors, the surgical resection is the first choice of treatment; the surgical procedures include local resection (enucleation) and standard resection. For the insulinomas and non-functioning tumors less than 2 cm, local resection (enucleation),distal pancreatectomy with spleen-preservation or segmental pancreatectomy are the commonly selected procedures. The radical resections with regional lymph nodes dissection, including pancreaticoduodenectomy, distal pancreatectomy and middle segmental pancreatectomy, should be applied for tumors more than 2 cm or malignant ones. For the locoregional advanced or unresectable functioning tumors, debulking surgery should be performed and more than 90% of the lesions including primary and metastatic tumors should be removed; for the non-functioning tumors, if complicated with biliary & digestive tract obstruction or hemorrhage, the primary tumors should be resected. The liver is the most frequent site of metastases for PNENs and three types of metastases are defined. For typeⅠmetastasis, patients are recommended for surgery if there are no contraindications; For type II metastasis, debulking surgery should be applied and at least 90% of metastatic lesions should be resected, and for patients with primary tumors removed and no extrahepatic metastases, or for patients with well-differentiated (G1/G2) tumors, liver transplantation may be indicated. For the unresectable type Ⅲ metastasis, multiple adjuvant therapies should be chosen. PMID:27045238

  5. Neuroendocrine aspects of aging in women.

    PubMed

    Hall, J E; Gill, S

    2001-09-01

    In women, the loss of ovarian function at menopause is associated with marked changes in hypothalamic and pituitary function. In addition, the steady decline in serum levels of LH, FSH, and FAS with age following menopause provides clear evidence for age-related neuroendocrine changes independent of the changes occurring owing to loss of ovarian feedback on the hypothalamic and pituitary components of the reproductive axis. An increase in the overall amount of GnRH secreted occurs despite a 30% decrease in GnRH pulse frequency with aging. This observation implies that the amount of GnRH secreted with each secretory bolus is greater in older postmenopausal women when compared with younger postmenopausal women. Thus, there may be a prominent pituitary component to the age-related decline in gonadotropin secretion. Recent studies indicate that the response to estrogen negative feedback at the hypothalamic level is preserved with aging, whereas the response to estrogen positive feedback may decrease with reproductive aging; however, the response to estrogen positive feedback in women has not been investigated with respect to aging, per se. It will be important to determine whether these age-related changes in hypothalamic-pituitary function contribute to reproductive senescence in normal women, as has been suggested for similar changes in animal models.

  6. Posttraumatic stress disorder: neuroendocrine and pharmacotherapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Amihaesei, Ioana Cristina; Mungiu, O C

    2012-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is represented by the development of characteristic symptoms, that appear following direct/indirect exposure to a traumatic event in which physical harm was threatened, witnessed or experienced. PTSD can also occur after the unexpected death of a family member or close friend, following a serious harm or threat of death or injury to a loved one, or in case of divorce or unemplyoement. It occurs in 1%-4% of the population. As neuroendocrine pattern, PTSD is characterized by abnormal low cortisol levels and higher than normal epinephrine and norepinephrine levels. In chronique forms a total decrease of the hippocampal volume, was found, region of the brain involved in processing memories and in the memorization process. Symptoms are grouped in three main categories: re-experiencing the event, accompanied by anxiety, nightmares and flashbacks; persistent avoidance of any reminders of the event, feeling detached or estranged from others; persistent anxiety and/or physical reactivity. As treatment, besides various psychotherapy techniques, various classes of psychotropic drugs are used, such as morphine, antipsychotics, usual or atypical antidepressants, anticonvulsants, to reduce anxiety, avoidance, nightmares and hyperexcitability.

  7. Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MORISHITA, ASAHIRO; YONEYAMA, HIROHITO; NOMURA, TAKAKO; SAKAMOTO, TEPPEI; FUJITA, KOJI; TANI, JOJI; MIYOSHI, HISAAKI; HABA, REIJI; MASAKI, TSUTOMU

    2016-01-01

    We herein present a case of an 87-year-old patient with multiple liver tumors identified on abdominal ultrasound. The assessment performed on admission included physical examination, computed tomography (CT) during hepatic angiography and CT during arterial portography. The examination revealed contrast enhancement of a proportion of the liver tumors (20 mm maximum diameter) during the arterial phase and mild contrast washout of those tumors during the delayed phase. On contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging using gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid, certain liver tumors exhibited contrast enhancement during the early phase and contrast washout during the hepatocyte phase in both lobes. By contrast, no lesions were identified during positron emission tomography imaging of the liver. A liver biopsy was performed and immunohistochemical staining revealed enhanced expression of cytokeratin AE1/AE3, synaptophysin, chromogranin A and CD56 and no expression of hepatocyte antigen or CΚ7. The mindbomb E3 ubiquitin protein ligase-1 index was ~2% in most of the tumor. The liver tumors were finally diagnosed as multiple intrahepatic metastases from a primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor (PHNET). The patient underwent transarterial chemoembolisation with a combination of miriplatin (84 mg) mixed with gelatin sponge particles and lipiodol. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of PHNET in an patient aged >85 years. PMID:27284429

  8. GEPNETs update: Radionuclide therapy in neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Wouter A; Bodei, Lisa; Mueller-Brand, Jan; de Herder, Wouter W; Kvols, Larry K; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2015-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a promising new treatment modality for inoperable or metastasized gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEPNETs) patients. Most studies report objective response rates in 15-35% of patients. Also, outcome in terms of progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival compares very favorably with that for somatostatin analogs, chemotherapy, or new, 'targeted' therapies. They also compare favorably to PFS data for liver-directed therapies. Two decades after the introduction of PRRT, there is a growing need for randomized controlled trials comparing PRRT to 'standard' treatment, that is treatment with agents that have proven benefit when tested in randomized trials. Combining PRRT with liver-directed therapies or with targeted therapies could improve treatment results. The question to be answered, however, is whether a combination of therapies performed within a limited time-span from one another results in a better PFS than a strategy in which other therapies are reserved until after (renewed) tumor progression. Randomized clinical trials comparing PRRT with other treatment modalities should be undertaken to determine the best treatment options and treatment sequelae for patients with GEPNETs.

  9. Nuclear Medicine Imaging of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Brabander, Tessa; Kwekkeboom, Dik J; Feelders, Richard A; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Teunissen, Jaap J M

    2015-01-01

    An important role is reserved for nuclear imaging techniques in the imaging of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) with (111)In-DTPA-octreotide is currently the most important tracer in the diagnosis, staging and selection for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). In the past decade, different positron-emitting tomography (PET) tracers have been developed. The largest group is the (68)Gallium-labeled somatostatin analogs ((68)Ga-SSA). Several studies have demonstrated their superiority compared to SRS in sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, patient comfort and effective dose are favorable for (68)Ga-SSA. Other PET targets like β-[(11)C]-5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan ((11)C-5-HTP) and 6-(18)F-L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine ((18)F-DOPA) were developed recently. For insulinomas, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor imaging is a promising new technique. The evaluation of response after PRRT and other therapies is a challenge. Currently, the official follow-up is performed with radiological imaging techniques. The role of nuclear medicine may increase with the newest tracers for PET. In this review, the different nuclear imaging techniques and tracers for the imaging of NETs will be discussed.

  10. Phyllodes tumour in pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Way, Jeffrey C.; Culham, Beverley A.

    1998-01-01

    Phyllodes tumour (cystosarcoma phyllodes) is a rare breast tumour that grows rapidly and to a relatively large size, especially during pregnancy. These tumours may be classified as benign, borderline or malignant. They have a high incidence of local recurrence but little tendency to metastasize to distant organs. The question of whether the tumour is hormone dependent remains unresolved. This report describes the case of a patient who had a phyllodes tumour that first became apparent in her 31st week of pregnancy. After enucleation and subsequent wide excision she remained tumour free through a second pregnancy. Although the follow-up period is short, it appears that subsequent pregnancy is not necessarily associated with recurrent or new disease for patients who have had their initial tumour completely excised. The goal for the management of these tumours is complete surgical excision. PMID:9793511

  11. The treatment of sublingual gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, G; Yang, X; Tang, E; Wen, J; Lu, M; Hu, Q

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed the clinical and histological features and therapeutic efficacy of 25 cases of sublingual gland tumours from 1998 to 2008. There were 17 female patients and 8 male, the ratio of females to males was 2.1:1. The mean age was 48.6 years. 4 cases were benign tumours (16%). 21 cases were malignant sublingual gland tumours (84%) and of these, 18 were adenoid cystic carcinoma (86%). Adenoid cystic carcinoma was mainly of the histological type, and the other histological classifications included mucoepidermoid carcinoma, pleomorphic adenoma, myoepithelioma, oncocytoma and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma. Sublingual gland tumours are rare and most are malignant. For malignant sublingual gland tumours, early diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment, especially for tumours with nerve involvement, is the key to improving prognosis. Free radial forearm flap or pectoralis major myocutaneous flap are appropriate methods for mouth floor reconstruction. For benign sublingual gland tumours, the resection of tumour and sublingual gland is the preferred treatment.

  12. Hydrophobic Moiety of Cationic Lipids Strongly Modulates Their Transfection Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana; Tenchov, Boris; Wang, Li; MacDonald, Robert C.

    2010-01-18

    Synthetic cationic lipids are widely used components of nonviral gene carriers, and the factors regulating their transfection efficiency are the subject of considerable interest. In view of the important role that electrostatic interactions with the polyanionic nucleic acids play in formation of lipoplexes, a common empirical approach to improving transfection has been the synthesis and testing of amphiphiles with new versions of positively charged polar groups, while much less attention has been given to the role of the hydrophobic lipid moieties. On the basis of data for {approx}20 cationic phosphatidylcholine (PC) derivatives, here we demonstrate that hydrocarbon chain variations of these lipids modulate by over 2 orders of magnitude their transfection efficiency. The observed molecular structure-activity relationship manifests in well-expressed dependences of activity on two important molecular characteristics, chain unsaturation and total number of carbon atoms in the lipid chains, which is representative of the lipid hydrophobic volume and hydrophilic-lipophilic ratio. Transfection increases with decrease of chain length and increase of chain unsaturation. Maximum transfection was found for cationic PCs with monounsaturated 14:1 chains. It is of particular importance that the high-transfection lipids strongly promote cubic phase formation in zwitterionic membrane phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). These remarkable correlations point to an alternative, chain-dependent process in transfection, not related to the electrostatic cationic-anionic lipid interactions.

  13. Role of transfection and clonal selection in mediating radioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, F.S.; Taghia, A. ); Bristow, R.G. ); Ong, A.; Borek, C. New England Medical Center, Boston, MA )

    1991-12-01

    Transfected oncogenes have been reported to increase the radioresistance of rodent cells Whether transfected nononcogenic DNA sequences and subsequent clonal selection can result in radioresistant cell populations is unknown. The present set of experiments describe the in vitro radiosensitivity and tumorigenicity of selected clones of primary rat embryo cells and human glioblastoma cells, after transfection with a neomycin-resistance marker (pSV2neo or pCMVneo) and clonal selection. Radiobiological data comparing the surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF{sub 2}) and the mean inactivation dose shown the induction of radioresistance in two rat embryo cell clones and one glioblastoma clone, as compared to untransfected cells. Wild-type and transfectant clones were injected into three strains of immune-deficient mice (scid, NIH, and nu/nu) to assay for tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. only the glioblastoma parent line and its transfectant clones were tumorigenic. The results show that transfection of a neomycin-resistance marker and clonal selection can impart radioresistance on both normal and tumor cells. The work also indicates that altered radiation sensitivity does not necessarily correlate with changes in cell-cycle kinetics at the time of irradiation, tumorigenicity, or altered metastatic potential. The findings have critical implications for transfection studies investigating determinants of cellular radiosensitivity.

  14. Role of transfection and clonal selection in mediating radioresistance.

    PubMed Central

    Pardo, F S; Bristow, R G; Taghian, A; Ong, A; Borek, C

    1991-01-01

    Transfected oncogenes have been reported to increase the radioresistance of rodent cells. Whether transfected nononcogenic DNA sequences and subsequent clonal selection can result in radioresistant cell populations is unknown. The present set of experiments describe the in vitro radiosensitivity and tumorigenicity of selected clones of primary rat embryo cells and human glioblastoma cells, after transfection with a neomycin-resistance marker (pSV2neo or pCMVneo) and clonal selection. Radiobiological data comparing the surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) and the mean inactivation dose show the induction of radioresistance in two rat embryo cell clones and one glioblastoma clone, as compared to untransfected cells. Wild-type and transfectant clones were injected into three strains of immune-deficient mice (scid, NIH, and nu/nu) to assay for tumorigenicity and metastatic potential. Only the glioblastoma parent line and its transfectant clones were tumorigenic. None of the cells produced spontaneous or experimentally induced metastases. Flow cytometric analyses indicated that the induction of radioresistance could not be attributed to changes in cell kinetics at the time of irradiation. Our results show that transfection of a neomycin-resistance marker and clonal selection can impart radioresistance on both normal and tumor cells. The work also indicates that altered radiation sensitivity does not necessarily correlate with changes in cell-cycle kinetics at the time of irradiation, tumorigenicity, or altered metastatic potential. Our findings have critical implications for transfection studies investigating determinants of cellular radiosensitivity. PMID:1961732

  15. [Transfection of HL-60 cells by Venus lentiviral vector].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Hu, Shao-Yan; Cen, Jian-Nong; Chen, Zi-Xing

    2013-06-01

    In order to study the potential of Venus, lentiviral vector, applied to acute myeloid leukemia, the recombinant vector Venus-C3aR was transfected into 293T packing cells by DNA-calcium phosphate coprecipitation. All virus stocks were collected and transfected into HL-60, the GFP expression in HL-60 cells was measured by flow cytometry. The expression level of C3aR1 in transfected HL-60 cells was identified by RT-PCR and flow cytometry. The lentiviral toxicity on HL-60 was measured by using CCK-8 method and the ability of cell differentiation was observed. The results indicated that the transfection efficacy of lentiviral vector on HL-60 cells was more than 95%, which meets the needs for further study. C3aR1 expression on HL-60 cells increased after being transfected with recombinant lentiviral vector. Before and after transfection, the proliferation and differentiation of cells were not changed much. It is concluded that the lentiviral vector showed a high efficacy to transfect AML cells and can be integrated in genome of HL-60 cells to realize the stable expression of interest gene. Meanwhile, lentiviral vector can not affect HL-60 cell ability to proliferate and differentiate.

  16. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  17. Mixed tumour of the vagina.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, M; Endo, Y; Ishikawa, E; Ushigome, S

    1996-05-01

    A 33-year-old Japanese woman presented with a polypoid 2.5 x 2.5 x 1.9 cm mass located in the posterior wall of the lower vagina. Microscopically, the tumour was composed of benign epithelial and stromal-type elements. Predominant epithelial elements were mucinous glands with squamous metaplasia and islands of mature squamous epithelium. The stromal-type cells showed reticular or short fascicular patterns with a transition to the epithelial elements. There was no dual epithelial-myoepithelial combination in the glands as seen in so-called mixed tumours (pleomorphic adenomas) of the salivary gland. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial elements were strongly positive for cytokeratin, PKK1 and epithelial membrane antigen, while the stromal-type cells co-expressed PKK1 and vimentin. Staining for S-100 protein, muscle actin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin, and CD34 was uniformly negative in the tumour cells. The DNA pattern was diploid. The patient is alive and well without recurrence for 50 months after excision. These results indicate that an epithelial cell proliferation, probably of the remnant vestibular gland, plays a major role in the development of mixed tumours of the vagina.

  18. Tumour vasculature--a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, C. T.; Winslet, M. C.; Bradley, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour vasculature is vital for the establishment, growth and metastasis of solid tumours. Its physiological properties limit the effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer strategies. Therapeutic approaches directed at the tumour vasculature are reviewed, suggesting the potential of anti-angiogenesis and the targeting of vascular proliferation antigens as cancer treatments. PMID:7543770

  19. Lipid-based transfection reagents can interfere with cholesterol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Danielli, Mauro; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2016-02-15

    Lipid-based transfection reagents are widely used for delivery of small interfering RNA into cells. We examined whether the commonly used commercial transfection reagents DharmaFECT-4 and Lipofectamine 2000 can interfere with lipid metabolism by studying cholesterogenesis. Cholesterol de novo synthesis from [(14)C]acetate was assessed in human hepatocyte-derived Huh-7 cells. The results revealed that DharmaFECT, but not Lipofectamine, markedly inhibited cholesterol biosynthesis by approximately 70%. Cell viability was not significantly altered. These findings suggest that caution is required in the choice of certain lipid-based transfection reagents for gene silencing experiments, particularly when assessing cholesterol metabolism.

  20. LTβR signalling preferentially accelerates oncogenic AKT-initiated liver tumours

    PubMed Central

    Scarzello, Anthony J; Jiang, Qun; Back, Timothy; Dang, Hien; Hodge, Deborah; Hanson, Charlotte; Subleski, Jeffrey; Weiss, Jonathan M; Stauffer, Jimmy K; Chaisaingmongkol, Jitti; Rabibhadana, Siritida; Ruchirawat, Mathuros; Ortaldo, John; Wang, Xin Wei; Norris, Paula S; Ware, Carl F; Wiltrout, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The relative contributions of inflammatory signalling and sequential oncogenic dysregulation driving liver cancer pathogenesis remain incompletely understood. Lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR) signalling is critically involved in hepatitis and liver tumorigenesis. Therefore, we explored the interdependence of inflammatory lymphotoxin signalling and specific oncogenic pathways in the progression of hepatic cancer. Design Pathologically distinct liver tumours were initiated by hydrodynamic transfection of oncogenic V-Akt Murine Thymoma Viral Oncogene Homolog 1 (AKT)/β-catenin or AKT/Notch expressing plasmids. To investigate the relationship of LTβR signalling and specific oncogenic pathways, LTβR antagonist (LTβR-Fc) or agonist (anti-LTβR) were administered post oncogene transfection. Initiated livers/tumours were investigated for changes in oncogene expression, tumour proliferation, progression, latency and pathology. Moreover, specific LTβR-mediated molecular events were investigated in human liver cancer cell lines and through transcriptional analyses of samples from patients with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). Results AKT/β-catenin-transfected livers displayed increased expression of LTβ and LTβR, with antagonism of LTβR signalling reducing tumour progression and enhancing survival. Conversely, enforced LTβR-activation of AKT/β-catenin-initiated tumours induced robust increases in proliferation and progression of hepatic tumour phenotypes in an AKT-dependent manner. LTβR-activation also rapidly accelerated ICC progression initiated by AKT/Notch, but not Notch alone. Moreover, LTβR-accelerated development coincides with increases of Notch, Hes1, c-MYC, pAKT and β-catenin. We further demonstrate LTβR signalling in human liver cancer cell lines to be a regulator of Notch, pAKTser473 and β-catenin. Transcriptome analysis of samples from patients with ICC links increased LTβR network expression with poor patient survival, increased

  1. Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumor: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jeong Eun; Kim, Byung Seok; Lee, Chang Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Primary hepatic neuroendocrine tumors (PHNETs) are extremely rare and difficult to distinguish from other liver tumors, such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma, based on medical imaging findings. A 70-year-old man was referred for evaluation of liver mass incidentally discovered on abdominal computed tomography. The characteristic finding from dynamic liver magnetic resonance imaging led to a diagnosis of HCC. The patient underwent right hepatectomy. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examination revealed grade 2 neuroendocrine tumor. The postoperative 24-h urinary excretion of 5-hydroxy-indolacetic acid was within the normal range. Further imaging investigations were performed. No other lesions were found making probable the diagnosis of PHNET. This case shows that the diagnosis of PHNET is a medical challenge, requiring differentiation of PHNETs other hepatic masses and exclusion of occult primary neuroendocrine tumors. The diagnosis of PHNET can be ascertained after long term follow-up to exclude another primary origin. PMID:27574614

  2. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the extrahepatic bile duct: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Oshiro, Yukio; Gen, Ryozo; Hashimoto, Shinji; Oda, Tatsuya; Sato, Taiki; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) originating from the gastrointestinal hepatobiliary-pancreas is a rare, invasive, and progressive disease, for which the prognosis is extremely poor. The patient was a 72-year-old man referred with complaints of jaundice. He was diagnosed with middle extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (cT4N1M0, cStage IV). He underwent a right hepatectomy combined with extrahepatic bile duct and portal vein resection after percutaneous transhepatic portal vein embolization. Microscopic examination showed a large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma according to the WHO criteria for the clinicopathologic classification of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Currently, the patient is receiving combination chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for postoperative multiple liver metastases. Although NEC is difficult to diagnose preoperatively, it should be considered an uncommon alternative diagnosis. PMID:27570432

  3. Mitral prolapse. A heart anomaly in a clinical neuroendocrine context.

    PubMed

    Parlapiano, C; Paoletti, V; Alessandri, N; Campana, E; Giovanniello, T; Pantone, P; Califano, F; Borgia, M C

    2000-06-01

    Mitral valve prolapse was identified as a separate nosological entity by Barlow in 1963. A characteristic of this cardiac anomaly is blood reflux into the left atrium during the systole owing to the lack of adhesion between valve flaps. The presence of symptoms linked to neuroendocrine dysfunctions or to the autonomic nervous system lead to the onset of the pathology known as mitral valve prolapse syndrome (MVPs). It is usually diagnosed by chance in asymptomatic patients during routine tests. MVPs includes complex alterations to the neurovegetative system and a high clinical incidence of neuropsychiatric symptoms, like anxiety and panic attacks. A neuroendocrine mechanism thought to underlie panic attacks was recently proposed based on a biological model. In general, the cardiovascular anomaly manifested by patients with MVPs could be defined in neuroendocrine-constitutional terms. PMID:11048469

  4. Metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma of aortic body origin in a cat.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Sonya C; Smith, Annette N; Kuo, Kendon W; Fish, Eric J; Koehler, Jey W; Martinez-Romero, Gisela; Bacek, Lenore M

    2016-09-01

    An 8-year-old, female spayed Domestic Shorthair cat was presented to the Auburn University Emergency and Critical Care service for evaluation of pleural effusion and a suspected intrathoracic mass. Computed tomography was performed which confirmed the presence of a large intrathoracic mass, likely heart-based. Fine-needle aspirates were obtained and a cytologic diagnosis of a neuroendocrine tumor was made. Treatment with toceranib phosphate was briefly attempted at home by the owners. The cat died at home approximately 6 weeks after diagnosis. Necropsy and subsequent histopathologic examination revealed a metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma of aortic body origin. Aortic body tumors are extremely rare in cats and to the authors' knowledge, a neuroendocrine carcinoma of aortic body origin with distant metastases has not yet been reported in a cat. PMID:27564688

  5. The metabolic syndrome--a neuroendocrine disorder?

    PubMed

    Björntorp, P; Rosmond, R

    2000-03-01

    Central obesity is a powerful predictor for disease. By utilizing salivary cortisol measurements throughout the day, it has now been possible to show on a population basis that perceived stress-related cortisol secretion frequently is elevated in this condition. This is followed by insulin resistance, central accumulation of body fat, dyslipidaemia and hypertension (the metabolic syndrome). Socio-economic and psychosocial handicaps are probably central inducers of hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis. Alcohol, smoking and traits of psychiatric disease are also involved. In a minor part of the population a dysregulated, depressed function of the HPA axis is present, associated with low secretion of sex steroid and growth hormones, and increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system. This condition is followed by consistent abnormalities indicating the metabolic syndrome. Such 'burned-out' function of the HPA axis has previously been seen in subjects exposed to environmental stress of long duration. The feedback control of the HPA axis by central glucocorticoid receptors (GR) seems inefficient, associated with a polymorphism in the 5' end of the GR gene locus. Homozygotes constitute about 14% of Swedish men (women to be examined). Such men have a poorly controlled cortisol secretion, abdominal obesity, insulin resistance and hypertension. Furthermore, polymorphisms have been identified in the regulatory domain of the GR gene that are associated with elevated cortisol secretion; polymorphisms in dopamine and leptin receptor genes are associated with sympathetic nervous system activity, with elevated and low blood pressure, respectively. These results suggest a complex neuroendocrine background to the metabolic syndrome, where the kinetics of the regulation of the HPA axis play a central role.

  6. Neuroendocrine correlates of temperamental traits in humans.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Zaimovic, A; Timpano, M; Zambelli, U; Delsignore, R; Brambilla, F

    2000-07-01

    Studies investigating temperament traits in humans and their biological correlates have found high levels of novelty seeking (NS) linked with dopaminergic system changes, and particularly a deficit of dopamine transporter. Harm avoidance and reward dependence, on the other hand, appeared to be associated, respectively with serotonin and noradrenaline changes. In the present study, we have investigated the dopaminergic (DA), serotonergic (5-HT), and noradrenergic (NE) functions in healthy volunteers by challenging the monoamine systems with the DA agonist bromocriptine, the 5-HT agonist D-fenfluramine, and the NE agonist clonidine, respectively. Parallel to this investigation, we examined the temperament traits of our subjects by measuring NS, harm avoidance (HA) and reward dependence (RD) using the 'Three-dimensional Personality Questionnaire' (TPQ). The aims of the study were to see whether or not the monoamine functions were correlated with temperament traits. Bromocriptine challenge induced a significant GH increase and a significant suppression of PRL. D-fenfluramine test significantly increased PRL and cortisol plasma levels and Clonidine test induced a significant rise in GH values. NS scores showed a significant direct correlation with brom-stimulated GH values (r=0.426, P<0.05) and a significant inverse correlation with brom-inhibited PRL values (r=-0.498, P<0.01). HA scores correlated significantly with D-fen-stimulated PRL and CORT AUCs, (PRL: r=0.424, P<0.05; CORT: r=0. 595, P<0.005). RD scores correlated positively with clon-stimulated GH values (r=0.55; F=8.6; P<0.01) and negatively with brom-inhibited-PRL AUCs (r=-0.439, P<0.05). Our data support Cloninger theory concerning the biological correlates of temperamental traits, and evidence the link between the neuroendocrine responses to dynamic challenges and stable temperament features.

  7. Autophagy sensitivity of neuroendocrine lung tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Keun; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    2013-12-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) phenotypes characterize a spectrum of lung tumors, including low-grade typical and intermediate-grade atypical carcinoid, high-grade large-cell NE carcinoma and small cell lung carcinoma. Currently, no effective treatments are available to cure NE lung tumors, demanding identification of biological features specific to these tumors. Here, we report that autophagy has an important role for NE lung tumor cell proliferation and survival. We found that the expression levels of the autophagy marker LC3 are relatively high in a panel of lung tumor cell lines expressing high levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a key NE marker in lung tumors. In response to bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, NE lung tumor cells exhibited cytotoxicity whereas non-NE lung tumor cells exhibited cytostasis, indicating a distinct role of autophagy for NE lung tumor cell survival. Intriguingly, in certain NE lung tumor cell lines, the levels of processed LC3 (LC3-II) were inversely correlated with AKT activity. When AKT activity was inhibited using AKTi or MK2206, the levels of LC3-II and SQSTM1/p62 were increased. In contrast, torin 1, rapamycin or mTOR knockdown increased p62 levels, suggesting that these two pathways have opposing effects on autophagy in certain NE lung tumors. Moreover, inhibition of one pathway resulted in reduced activity of the other, suggesting that these two pathways crosstalk in the tumors. These results suggest that NE lung tumor cells share a common feature of autophagy and are more sensitive to autophagy inhibition than non-NE lung tumor cells. PMID:24126619

  8. Transfection of insect cell in suspension for efficient baculovirus generation.

    PubMed

    Roest, S; Kapps-Fouthier, S; Klopp, J; Rieffel, S; Gerhartz, B; Shrestha, B

    2016-01-01

    Baculovirus (BV) mediated insect cell expression system utilizes transfection as a first step to introduce recombinant baculovirus DNA into insect cells. Many labs are still relying on the conventional liposome based transfection method in adherent culture. Here we describe a more efficient method that can replace the existing method. This method is economical and does not require any special adjustment in existing labs. •An innovative method of transfecting insect cells in suspension using polyethyleneimine (PEI) is described here.•The beauty of this method is minimal intermediate manipulation of culture during transfection and virus generation.•The method significantly reduces the chances of cross contamination of viruses while handling multiple targets and constructs as well as the other microbial contamination. PMID:27222826

  9. Neuroendocrine-immune interactions and responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Fragala, Maren S; Kraemer, William J; Denegar, Craig R; Maresh, Carl M; Mastro, Andrea M; Volek, Jeff S

    2011-08-01

    This article reviews the interaction between the neuroendocrine and immune systems in response to exercise stress, considering gender differences. The body's response to exercise stress is a system-wide effort coordinated by the integration between the immune and the neuroendocrine systems. Although considered distinct systems, increasing evidence supports the close communication between them. Like any stressor, the body's response to exercise triggers a systematic series of neuroendocrine and immune events directed at bringing the system back to a state of homeostasis. Physical exercise presents a unique physiological stress where the neuroendocrine and immune systems contribute to accommodating the increase in physiological demands. These systems of the body also adapt to chronic overload, or exercise training. Such adaptations alleviate the magnitude of subsequent stress or minimize the exercise challenge to within homeostatic limits. This adaptive capacity of collaborating systems resembles the acquired, or adaptive, branch of the immune system, characterized by the memory capacity of the cells involved. Specific to the adaptive immune response, once a specific antigen is encountered, memory cells, or lymphocytes, mount a response that reduces the magnitude of the immune response to subsequent encounters of the same stress. In each case, the endocrine response to physical exercise and the adaptive branch of the immune system share the ability to adapt to a stressful encounter. Moreover, each of these systemic responses to stress is influenced by gender. In both the neuroendocrine responses to exercise and the adaptive (B lymphocyte) immune response, gender differences have been attributed to the 'protective' effects of estrogens. Thus, this review will create a paradigm to explain the neuroendocrine communication with leukocytes during exercise by reviewing (i) endocrine and immune interactions; (ii) endocrine and immune systems response to physiological stress

  10. [Molecular targeted drugs for soft tissue sarcoma and neuroendocrine tumor].

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke

    2015-08-01

    Both the soft tissue sarcomas and the neuroendocrine tumors are rare diseases. Therefore the recruiting of these patients was more difficult than other cancer species, and the development of the new therapy for these diseases did not readily advance. However, the identification of driver molecules for each sub-type enabled us to the development of the molecular targeted drugs. As for the GIST, several TKIs are used, but in late years it is found that susceptibility of TKIs varies according to difference in second mutation. In this chapter, the molecular target drug for the soft tissue sarcoma and the neuroendocrine tumor is reviewed. PMID:26281696

  11. Neuroendocrine tumor of the gallbladder with spectral CT.

    PubMed

    Du, Hai; Zhang, Haoliang; Xu, Yandong; Wang, Li

    2014-12-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are neoplasms that arise from neural crest argyrophil cells, and often occur to the elderly, female and patients with cholelithiasis. In this case, the female patient was 38 years old and admitted into the hospital for interrupted right upward abdominal pain for 2 years plus aggravated with nausea and anorexia for 1 week. Ultrasound showed gallbladder space-occupying lesions and spectral computed tomography (CT) suggested of retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis. The patient was diagnosed with gallbladder neuroendocrine carcinoma after the surgery.

  12. [State of neuroendocrine systems and immunity in patients with burns].

    PubMed

    Nazarov, I P; Popov, A A; Mal'tseva, M A; Osetrov, I V; Kokaulina, G D; Popova, E A

    1994-01-01

    The study of hormonal shifts and immunity in 95 patients with burns has revealed hyperergic reaction of the neuroendocrine system in the early period after trauma, accompanied by a marked and prolonged inhibition of cellular and humoral immunity. The use of antistress agents (clofelin, pentamine) and intravenous laser blood irradiation leads to a more prompt arrest of hyperergic reaction of the neuroendocrine system and to the reduction of immunosuppressing effect of burn trauma, which decreases the number of pyoseptic complications from 26.4 to 16% and total lethality from 16 to 3.8%.

  13. Recent advances in systemic therapy for gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pelley, R J; Bukowski, R M

    1999-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are rare tumors which can be classified as amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation tumors (APU-Domas). Although the majority of clinically apparent tumors are malignant, they are frequently slow growing. Despite this characteristic, they may generate disabling hormonal syndromes requiring aggressive treatment to achieve palliation. Recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of these tumors has led to better medical therapy with chemotherapeutic agents, somatostatin analogues, and biologic therapies. This review will update the recent efforts in systemic therapies of the gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

  14. An invertebrate-specific miRNA targeted the ancient cholinergic neuroendocrine system of oyster.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Hao; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Huan; Song, Linsheng

    2016-08-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is the main neurotransmitter in the cholinergic neuroendocrine system and plays an indispensable role in modulating diverse immune responses. As important transporters in choline uptake, choline transporter-like proteins (CTLs) can control ACh synthesis and release indirectly in multiple organisms. In this study, cgi-miR-2d, an invertebrate-specific miRNA in oyster Crassostrea gigas, is proved to repress the synthesis/release of ACh by targeting CgCTL1 and choline uptake in haemocytes during the early stage of pathogen infection. In short, an opposite expression pattern between CgCTL1 and cgi-miR-2d is observed during Vibrio splendidus infection, accompanied by changes in haemolymph ACh. In addition, the expression level of CgCTL1 is found to be significantly repressed after cgi-miR-2d overexpression in vivo, while both haemocyte choline and haemolymph ACh are also decreased simultaneously, similar to the finding in CgCTL1 knock-down assay. As a result, the expression of two tumour necrosis factor-like proteins and the bacteriostatic activity of oyster haemocytes are found to be altered significantly by either gain-of-function cgi-miR-2d or knock-down of CgCTL1. To our knowledge, this is the first miRNA identified in invertebrates that can target the ancient cholinergic system and augment immune response during infection. PMID:27488375

  15. An invertebrate-specific miRNA targeted the ancient cholinergic neuroendocrine system of oyster

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Zhou, Zhi; Wang, Hao; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Huan; Song, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is the main neurotransmitter in the cholinergic neuroendocrine system and plays an indispensable role in modulating diverse immune responses. As important transporters in choline uptake, choline transporter-like proteins (CTLs) can control ACh synthesis and release indirectly in multiple organisms. In this study, cgi-miR-2d, an invertebrate-specific miRNA in oyster Crassostrea gigas, is proved to repress the synthesis/release of ACh by targeting CgCTL1 and choline uptake in haemocytes during the early stage of pathogen infection. In short, an opposite expression pattern between CgCTL1 and cgi-miR-2d is observed during Vibrio splendidus infection, accompanied by changes in haemolymph ACh. In addition, the expression level of CgCTL1 is found to be significantly repressed after cgi-miR-2d overexpression in vivo, while both haemocyte choline and haemolymph ACh are also decreased simultaneously, similar to the finding in CgCTL1 knock-down assay. As a result, the expression of two tumour necrosis factor-like proteins and the bacteriostatic activity of oyster haemocytes are found to be altered significantly by either gain-of-function cgi-miR-2d or knock-down of CgCTL1. To our knowledge, this is the first miRNA identified in invertebrates that can target the ancient cholinergic system and augment immune response during infection. PMID:27488375

  16. Tumours of Oddi: Diagnosis and Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jeppsson, B.; El-Khoury, W.; Hannoun, L.; Frileux, P.; Huguet, C.; Malafosse, M.; Parc, R.

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective review of 56 patients operated upon for tumours of Oddi was performed in order to determine optimal diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Common presenting symptoms were jaundice (86%) and anemia (21%). Mean size of the tumour was 2.3 cm. Five tumours were benign and 51 were malignant. According to the classification of Martin, five were grade I: 10 grade II; 18 grade III; and 18 grade IV. Forty-seven patients underwent resection of the tumour: three local excisions for small benign tumors, six ampullectomies (followed in three by a Whipples’ procedure for recurrence) and 41 Whipples’ procedures. The hospital mortality was 5.3%, minor complications appeared in 21%. The overall five years survival was 41%. It was 75% in grade I, 50% in grade II, 40% in grade III and 10% in grade IV. The patients who received ampullectomies were alive with a follow-up of one, two and three years. All patients operated upon for a benign tumour were alive except one who died of cardiac failure. Ultrasonography and duodenoscopy are the most useful tests for the diagnosis of tumours of Oddi. Prognosis depends on the degree of infiltration of the duodenal wall and the presence of positive lymph nodes. Whipples’ procedure is best but ampullectomy can be used in elderly or poor risk patients. Malignant tumours of the ampullary region are infrequent and reported to constitute betwee 0.02 and five percent of all cancers of the digestive tract. With wider application of endoscopic techniques, there has been an increasing interest in this group of tumours during recent years. In the literature tumours of Oddi are usually reported in the group of periampullary tumours, including tumours of the ampulla itself, duodenal wall surrounding the ampulla, the distal part of the common bile duct and head of the pancreas. We have wanted to distinguish specifically the tumours of the ampulla of Vater and have adopted the term tumour of Oddi introduced by Marchal and Hureau

  17. Cationic Phospholipids Forming Cubic Phases: Lipoplex Structure and Transfection Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana; Wang, Li; MacDonald, Robert C.

    2008-10-29

    The transfection activity and the phase behavior of two novel cationic O-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-hexylphosphocholine (C6-DOPC) and 1,2-dierucoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (di22:1-EPC), have been examined with the aim of more completely understanding the mechanism of lipid-mediated DNA delivery. Both lipids form cubic phases: C6-DOPC in the entire temperature range from -10 to 90 C, while di22:1-EPC exhibits an irreversible lamellar-cubic transition between 50 and 70 C on heating. The lipoplexes formed by C6-DOPC arrange into hexagonal phase, while the lipoplexes of di22:1-EPC are lamellar. Both lipids exhibit lower transfection activity than the lamellar-forming 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EDOPC). Thus, for the studied cationic phospholipid-DNA systems, the lipoplex phase state is a factor that does not seem to correlate with transfection activity. The parameter that exhibits better correlation with the transfection activity within the present data set is the phase state of the lipid dispersion prior to the addition of DNA. Thus, the lamellar lipid dispersion (EDOPC) produces more efficient lipoplexes than the dispersion with coexisting lamellar and cubic aggregates (diC22:1-EPC), which is even more efficient than the purely cubic dispersions (C6-DOPC; diC22:1-EPC after heating). It could be inferred from these data and from previous research that cubic phase lipid aggregates are unlikely to be beneficial to transfection. The lack of correlation between the phase state of lipoplexes and their transfection activity observed within the present data set does not mean that lipid phase state is generally unimportant for lipofection: a viewpoint now emerging from our previous studies is that the critical factor in lipid-mediated transfection is the structural evolution of lipoplexes within the cell, upon interacting and mixing with cellular lipids.

  18. Optimization of lentiviral vector production using polyethylenimine-mediated transfection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong; Garson, Kenneth; Li, Li; Vanderhyden, Barbara C

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to optimize the polyethylenimine (PEI)-mediated transfection method in order to simplify the efficient production of lentiviral vectors (LvVs), and to compare the CaPO4- and PEI-mediated transfection methods for producing LvVs. Different titration methods of LvV stocks, as well as different culture media, culture durations, cell densities and DNA quantities were compared to obtain an optimized procedure for the production of LvVs. Optimization of the production method for LvVs was achieved using PEI-mediated transient transfections. Serum-free Opti-MEM(®) was used to directly produce LvVs that could be harvested 48 h after transfection. Furthermore, a cell density of 15×10(6) cells/10-cm plate and a DNA concentration of 1X were selected for the optimum production of LvVs. The optimized LvV titration method was simple and direct; it involved LvVs carrying fluorescent reporters, which proved to be faster than the standard methods but equally as sensitive. In conclusion, a scalable process for production of LvVs by PEI-mediated transfection was established and optimized. The optimized PEI-mediated transfection method was easy to use, as well as providing greater reliability with a higher degree of reproducibility and consistency. Despite using less DNA, the PEI-mediated transfection method resulted in viral titers that were the same as those achieved using the CaPO4-mediated method.

  19. Novel germline mutations in the PTEN tumour suppressor gene found in women with multiple cancers

    PubMed Central

    De Vivo, I.; Gertig, D.; Nagase, S.; Hankinson, S.; O'Brien, R.; Speizer, F.; Parsons, R.; Hunter, D.

    2000-01-01

    Germline mutations in PTEN can predispose people to Cowden syndrome (CS) and Bannayan-Ruvalcaba-Riley (BRR) syndrome, rare, autosomal dominantly inherited neoplastic disorders. To determine whether germline mutations in PTEN contribute to genetic predisposition to multiple primary tumours within the general population, we conducted a nested case-control study, among 32 826 members of the prospective Nurses' Health Study cohort; cases were women with more than one primary tumour at different anatomical sites. We screened all nine exons of PTEN and flanking intronic splice sites for all 103 eligible cases using SSCP and sequencing. We observed two novel germline heterozygous missense mutations in exon 5 in five of the cases; three were V119L and two were V158L. Neither mutation was observed in 115 controls free of diagnosed cancer (p=0.02). Both mutants showed partial tumour suppressor activity when compared to wild type PTEN when transfected into a PTEN null breast cancer cell line. The phenotype was cell line specific suggesting that genetic background affects growth suppression activity of the mutants. These data provide evidence that germline mutations in PTEN may be a more frequent predisposing factor for cancers in women than previously suggested.


Keywords: population based; tumour suppressor; multiple cancers; germline mutations PMID:10807691

  20. The non tumour uptake of (111)In-octreotide creates new clinical indications in benign diseases, but also in oncology.

    PubMed

    Cascini, G L; Cuccurullo, V; Mansi, L

    2010-02-01

    The use of somatostatin (SS) analogues in humans takes advantage by the availability of many related chemical forms that can be used for receptor therapy and, after radiolabelling, for diagnostic imaging and radionuclide therapy. The first proposed radiocompound, yet clinically widely diffuse, has been (111)In-octreotide (OCT), followed by positron emission tomography (PET) and beta emitter tracers. The main field of clinical applications is in neuroendocrine tumours (NET), starting by the demonstration of SS receptors (SSR) on the majority of NET, particularly on gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tumours. Uptake of SS analogues can also be due to a SSR expression on non malignant cells when activated, as lymphocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts , vascular cells. Because of this uptake clinical indications can be found also in active benign diseases, as Grave's ophthalmopathy, rheumatoid arthritis, histiocitosis, sarcoidosis, idiopatic pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, these cells can also determine the OCT in vivo uptake in tumours non expressing in vitro SSR, as non-snall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Because of a different kinetic respect to SCLC a differential histotype diagnosis could be obtained. Starting from this premise OCT can also allows radioguided surgery in tumours non expressing SSR. Finally a relevant clinical role can be defined in the a priori recruitment and as marker of therapeutic efficacy in all the therapeutic strategies utilizing SSR, both in malignant and benign diseases.

  1. A retroperitoneal neuroendocrine tumor in ectopic pancreatic tissue.

    PubMed

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Al-Bassiouni, Fahim; El-Ela, Monir Abo; Al-Gemeie, Emad Hamza; Ezzat, Reem

    2013-07-01

    Ectopic pancreas is the relatively uncommon presence of pancreatic tissue outside the normal location of the pancreas. We report a case of abdominal pain due to retroperitoneal neuroendocrine tumor arising from heterotopic pancreatic tissue between the duodenal wall and the head of the pancreas. Patient underwent surgical enucleation of the tumor.

  2. Diffuse endocrine system, neuroendocrine tumors and immunity: what's new?

    PubMed

    Ameri, Pietro; Ferone, Diego

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, research into the modulation of immunity by the neuroendocrine system has flourished, unravelling significant effects of several neuropeptides, including somatostatin (SRIH), and especially cortistatin (CST), on immune cells. Scientists have learnt that the diffuse neuroendocrine system can regulate the immune system at all its levels: innate immunity, adaptive immunity, and maintenance of immune tolerance. Compelling studies with animal models have demonstrated that some neuropeptides may be effective in treating inflammatory disorders, such as sepsis, and T helper 1-driven autoimmune diseases, like Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. Here, the latest findings concerning the neuroendocrine control of the immune system are discussed, with emphasis on SRIH and CST. The second part of the review deals with the immune response to neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). The anti-NET immune response has been described in the last years and it is still being characterized, similarly to what is happening for several other types of cancer. In parallel with investigations addressing the mechanisms by which the immune system contrasts NET growth and spreading, ground-breaking clinical trials of dendritic cell vaccination as immunotherapy for metastatic NETs have shown in principle that the immune reaction to NETs can be exploited for treatment.

  3. Capnocytophaga Lung Abscess in a Patient with Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Thirumala, Raghu; Babady, N. Esther; Kamboj, Mini; Chawla, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    Capnocytophaga species are known commensals of the oral cavity of humans and animals (mainly dogs and cats) and are a rare cause of respiratory tract infections. We report a case of cavitary lung abscess caused by a Capnocytophaga species in a patient with a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. PMID:22075586

  4. Capnocytophaga lung abscess in a patient with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Thirumala, Raghu; Rappo, Urania; Babady, N Esther; Kamboj, Mini; Chawla, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    Capnocytophaga species are known commensals of the oral cavity of humans and animals (mainly dogs and cats) and are a rare cause of respiratory tract infections. We report a case of cavitary lung abscess caused by a Capnocytophaga species in a patient with a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. PMID:22075586

  5. A Retroperitoneal Neuroendocrine Tumor in Ectopic Pancreatic Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Okasha, Hussein Hassan; Al-Bassiouni, Fahim; El-Ela, Monir Abo; Al-Gemeie, Emad Hamza; Ezzat, Reem

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic pancreas is the relatively uncommon presence of pancreatic tissue outside the normal location of the pancreas. We report a case of abdominal pain due to retroperitoneal neuroendocrine tumor arising from heterotopic pancreatic tissue between the duodenal wall and the head of the pancreas. Patient underwent surgical enucleation of the tumor. PMID:24949389

  6. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(cip1/waf1) enhances the cytotoxicity of ganciclovir in HSV-tk transfected ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ziller, Christelle; Lincet, Hubert; Muller, Christian D; Staedel, Cathy; Behr, Jean-Paul; Poulain, Laurent

    2004-08-20

    Suicide gene therapy could be an attractive addition to the treatment of ovarian carcinomas, for which acquired chemoresistance frequently results in treatment failure. Here we show that transfection of the HSV-tk gene, followed by incubation with up to 1 mM ganciclovir fails to induce cell death in SKOV3 chemoresistant human ovarian carcinoma cells. However, co-transfection of HSV-tk with Cip1/Waf1 encoding the p21(cip1/waf1) inhibitor of cdks, allows 100 microM ganciclovir to eradicate the population of tumor cells. Potentiation of a drug by co-transfer of HSV-tk with Cip1/Waf1could thus represent another therapeutic approach for tumours that are resistant to conventional therapy. PMID:15246560

  7. Neuroendocrine system response modulates oxidative cellular damage in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Qi; Shinozawa, Yotaro; Sasaki, Junichi; Takuma, Kiyotsugu; Akaishi, Satoshi; Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Endo, Tomoyuki; Nomura, Ryosuke; Kobayashi, Michio; Kudo, Daisuke; Hojo, Nobuko

    2007-02-01

    Oxygen-derived free radicals play important roles in pathophysiological processes in critically ill patients, but the data characterizing relationships between radicals and neuroendocrine system response are sparse. To search the cue to reduce the oxidative cellular damage from the point of view of neuroendocrine system response, we studied the indicators of neuroendocrine and inflammatory responses excreted in urine in 14 burn patients (42.3 +/- 31.4 years old, and 32.3 +/- 27.6% burn of total body surface area [%TBSA]) during the first seven days post burn. The daily mean amounts of urinary excretion of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG), a marker of oxidative cellular damage, were above the upper limit of the standard value during the studied period. The total amount of urinary excretion of 8-OHdG in the first day post burn correlated with burn severity indices: %TBSA (r = 0.63, p = 0.021) and burn index (r = 0.70, p = 0.008). The daily urinary excretion of 8-OHdG correlated with the daily urinary excretion of norepinephrine and nitrite plus nitrate (NOx) during the studied period except day 2 post burn, and correlated with the daily urinary excretion of 17-hydroxycorticosteriod (17-OHCS) in days 2, 3, and 7 post burn. These data suggest that oxidative cellular damage correlates with burn severity and neuroendocrine system response modulates inflammation and oxidative cellular damage. Modulation of neuroendocrine system response and inflammation in the treatment in the early phase of burn may be useful to reduce the oxidative cellular damage and to prevent multiple organ failures in patients with extensive burn.

  8. Benign tumours of the bone: A review☆

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, David N.; Pelly, Theo; Kulendran, Myutan; Caris, Jochem A.

    2015-01-01

    Benign tumours of the bone are not cancerous and would not metastasise to other regions of the body. However, they can occur in any part of the skeleton, and can still be dangerous as they may grow and compress healthy bone tissue. There are several types of benign tumours that can be classified by the type of matrix that the tumour cells produce; such as bone, cartilage, fibrous tissue, fat or blood vessel. Overall, 8 different types can be distinguished: osteochondroma, osteoma, osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, giant cell tumour, aneurysmal bone cyst, fibrous dysplasia and enchondroma. The incidence of benign bone tumours varies depending on the type. However, they most commonly arise in people less than 30 years old, often triggered by the hormones that stimulate normal growth. The most common type is osteochondroma. This review discusses the different types of common benign tumours of the bone based on information accumulated from published literature. PMID:26579486

  9. Solitary fibrous tumour: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sharmila; Shet, Tanuja M; Chinoy, R F; Kane, S V

    2007-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a rare spindle cell neoplasm arising at pleural and extrapleural sites. Five cases of SFT diagnosed at our institution over a five year period were reviewed. Haematoxylin and eosin stained histological sections, immuno-histochemical markers including CD34 and electron microscopy were the different methods used to study these tumours. Three histological features were consistently observed in all the tumours: the tumours were composed of short spindle cells separated by dense collagen bands and arranged in alternate hypocellular and hypercellular areas. CD34 positivity was seen in all the cases. SFT's have been reported to behave in an unpredictable fashion and hence prolonged follow up is essential. Histology, CD34 positivity and electron microscopy are useful tools in diagnosing SFT. While the pleural tumours can be diagnosed based on histology, this must be substantiated by ancillary techniques in case of extrapleural tumours.

  10. [Solitary fibrous tumours of the kidney].

    PubMed

    Gres, Pascal; Avances, Christophe; Ben Naoum, Kamel; Chapuis, Héliette; Costa, Pierre

    2004-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) are mesenchymal tumours that usually arise from the pleura. Renal SFT are exceptional (9 cases reported in the literature). The authors report a new case discovered during assessment of HT and treated by radical right nephrectomy. The histological appearance is characteristic: a tumour with a fibrous centre, composed of a monomorphic proliferation of spindle cells, with positive CD 34, CD 99, and bcl 2 labelling. The prognosis after complete resection is generally favourable.

  11. Solitary fibrous tumour of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Piattelli, A; Fioroni, M; Rubini, C

    1998-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a neoplasm most often localised in the pleura and peritoneum. The tumour is composed of spindled fibroblastic cells arranged in a haphazard way. Recently SFT has been described in many locations. Only one case of oral SFT has been described in the cheek: this is the second case of an oral SFT located in the tongue. The differential diagnosis must be made from many soft tissue tumours. SFTs stain strongly, in almost all cases, for CD34.

  12. [Adenomatoid tumour of the adrenal gland].

    PubMed

    Bandier, Philippe Claus; Hansen, Alastair; Thorelius, Lars

    2009-01-26

    An adenomatoid tumour in the right suprarenal gland was discovered during clinical cancer staging of a 73-year-old woman. Adenomatoid tumours in the suprarenal glands are rare and are most often found incidentally. A definitive diagnosis is made on the basis of histology since imaging methods are non-specific. Differential diagnoses comprise malignant vascular neoplasm or adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry or electron microscopy allows uncomplicated distinction between these tumours. In general, it is recommended to obtain biopsies from suprarenal processes.

  13. Evaluation of the magnetic field requirements for nanomagnetic gene transfection

    PubMed Central

    Fouriki, A.; Farrow, N.; Clements, M.A.; Dobson, J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to examine the effects of magnet distance (and by proxy, field strength) on nanomagnetic transfection efficiency. Methods non-viral magnetic nanoparticle-based transfection was evaluated using both static and oscillating magnet arrays. Results Fluorescence intensity (firefly luciferase) of transfected H292 cells showed no increase using a 96-well NdFeB magnet array when the magnets were 5 mm from the cell culture plate or nearer. At 6 mm and higher, fluorescence intensity decreased systematically. Conclusion In all cases, fluorescence intensity was higher when using an oscillating array compared to a static array. For distances closer than 5 mm, the oscillating system also outperformed Lipofectamine 2000™. PMID:22110859

  14. Transient transfection of mammalian cells using a violet diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Mapa, Maria Leilani; Angus, Liselotte; Ploschner, Martin; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate the first use of the violet diode laser for transient mammalian cell transfection. In contrast to previous studies, which showed the generation of stable cell lines over a few weeks, we develop a methodology to transiently transfect cells with an efficiency of up to ~40%. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells are exposed to a tightly focused 405-nm laser in the presence of plasmid DNA encoding for a mitochondrial targeted red fluorescent protein. We report transfection efficiencies as a function of laser power and exposure time for our system. We also show, for the first time, that a continuous wave laser source can be successfully applied to selective gene silencing experiments using small interfering RNA. This work is a major step towards an inexpensive and portable phototransfection system.

  15. Gastric stromal tumours: a practical approach.

    PubMed Central

    Mihssin, N.; Moorthy, K.; Sengupta, A.; Houghton, P. W.

    2000-01-01

    Recent findings on the pathological diversity of gastric stromal tumours and their unpredictable behaviour prompted us to review our series of 16 patients who had undergone surgery for these tumours from 1991 to 1998. There were 13 benign and 3 malignant lesions. The majority of patients presented with either upper gastrointestinal bleeding or anaemia alone (12 of 16). Endoscopy was an extremely useful diagnostic tool, revealing the lesion as an intraluminal protuberant tumour with or without ulcer in 10 cases and as an ulcer alone in 4 cases, and in 1 case features suggesting an extrinsic mass. All the patients in the series underwent surgery. We used staplers (AutosutureR TA 55) to excise the tumours in 7 cases, all of which on histological examination were benign with clear resection margins. Gastric resections were performed in 5 cases for either large tumours or those situated at the fundus or antrum and local excision of the remaining 4. The mean follow-up of these patients was 24 months. Two patients with malignant lesions died of irresectable recurrences, one 2 months and one 18 months after surgery. There have been no recurrences in the tumours diagnosed as benign on histology. Tumour size, position and the ability to apply the stapler leaving adequate margin below the tumour should be the determinants of extent and type of excision. Reliable determinants of behaviour are tumour size, grade and mitotic index. Images Figure 1 PMID:11103152

  16. Solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura.

    PubMed

    Sikri, V; Chawla, R

    2013-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the pleura is a rare, usually benign primary tumour of the pleura. Spectrum of presentation can vary from an incidental finding on chest radiograph done for some other purpose, features of compression of surrounding structures to symptoms resulting from the tumour per se. We report a case of a female who presented with complaints of cough and chest pain in whom a diagnosis of SFT was confirmed on tru-cut biopsy and immunohistochemistry studies. The patient underwent thoracotomy and successful removal of the tumour.

  17. Oncogenic osteomalacia: strange tumours in strange places.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, D.; Bar, R. S.; Weidner, N.; Wener, M.; Lee, F.

    1985-01-01

    Two patients presented with hypophosphataemic osteomalacia and were subsequently found to have small tumours unusual histopathology and location causing the osteomalacia. Each tumour was found after an intensive search for occult masses. Studies of vitamin D metabolism and renal tubular function before and after surgery yielded further insight into the pathophysiology of oncogenic osteomalacia. These cases demonstrate that microscopic quantities of tumour are capable of causing the syndrome and further illustrate the high index of suspicion often necessary to locate causative tumours in patients with hypophosphataemic osteomalacia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:4022870

  18. Physicochemical and transfection properties of cationic Hydroxyethylcellulose/DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fayazpour, Farzaneh; Lucas, Bart; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Sanders, Niek N; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C

    2006-10-01

    In this study the physicochemical and transfection properties of cationic hydroxyethylcellulose/plasmid DNA (pDNA) nanoparticles were investigated and compared with the properties of DNA nanoparticles based on polyethylene imine (PEI), which is widely investigated as a gene carrier. The two types of cationic hydroxyethylcelluloses studied, polyquaternium-4 (PQ-4) and polyquaternium-10 (PQ-10), are already commonly used in cosmetic and topical drug delivery devices. Both PQ-4 and PQ-10 spontaneously interact with pDNA with the formation of nanoparticles approximately 200 nm in size. Gel electrophoresis and fluorescence dequenching experiments indicated that the interactions between pDNA and the cationic celluloses were stronger than those between pDNA and PEI. The cationic cellulose/pDNA nanoparticles transfected cells to a much lesser extent than the PEI-based pDNA nanoparticles. The low transfection property of the PQ-4/pDNA nanoparticles was attributed to their neutrally charged surface, which does not allow an optimal binding of PQ-4/pDNA nanoparticles to cellular membranes. Although the PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles were positively charged and thus expected to be taken up by cells, they were also much less efficient in transfecting cells than were PEI/pDNA nanoparticles. Agents known to enhance the endosomal escape were not able to improve the transfection properties of PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles, indicating that a poor endosomal escape is, most likely, not the major reason for the low transfection activity of PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles. We hypothesized that the strong binding of pDNA to PQ-10 prohibits the release of pDNA from PQ-10 once the PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles arrive in the cytosol of the cells. Tailoring the nature and extent of the cationic side chains on this type of cationic hydroxyethylcellulose may be promising to further enhance their DNA delivery properties.

  19. Physicochemical and transfection properties of cationic Hydroxyethylcellulose/DNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fayazpour, Farzaneh; Lucas, Bart; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen; Sanders, Niek N; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C

    2006-10-01

    In this study the physicochemical and transfection properties of cationic hydroxyethylcellulose/plasmid DNA (pDNA) nanoparticles were investigated and compared with the properties of DNA nanoparticles based on polyethylene imine (PEI), which is widely investigated as a gene carrier. The two types of cationic hydroxyethylcelluloses studied, polyquaternium-4 (PQ-4) and polyquaternium-10 (PQ-10), are already commonly used in cosmetic and topical drug delivery devices. Both PQ-4 and PQ-10 spontaneously interact with pDNA with the formation of nanoparticles approximately 200 nm in size. Gel electrophoresis and fluorescence dequenching experiments indicated that the interactions between pDNA and the cationic celluloses were stronger than those between pDNA and PEI. The cationic cellulose/pDNA nanoparticles transfected cells to a much lesser extent than the PEI-based pDNA nanoparticles. The low transfection property of the PQ-4/pDNA nanoparticles was attributed to their neutrally charged surface, which does not allow an optimal binding of PQ-4/pDNA nanoparticles to cellular membranes. Although the PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles were positively charged and thus expected to be taken up by cells, they were also much less efficient in transfecting cells than were PEI/pDNA nanoparticles. Agents known to enhance the endosomal escape were not able to improve the transfection properties of PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles, indicating that a poor endosomal escape is, most likely, not the major reason for the low transfection activity of PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles. We hypothesized that the strong binding of pDNA to PQ-10 prohibits the release of pDNA from PQ-10 once the PQ-10/pDNA nanoparticles arrive in the cytosol of the cells. Tailoring the nature and extent of the cationic side chains on this type of cationic hydroxyethylcellulose may be promising to further enhance their DNA delivery properties. PMID:17025362

  20. [Pancreatic tumour in a child].

    PubMed

    Schouenborg Schultz, Thea; Thyssen Vestergaard, Esben

    2014-07-28

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom in children and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) has a prevalence of 8.4% in childhood. In 90-95% of RAPs no organic disease is identified. Thus, it is important that the few of somatic origin are diagnosed. We describe a case concerning a 12-year-old girl, diagnosed with a solid pseudopapillary tumour of the pancreas. The symptoms were RAP and postprandial vomiting. The purpose of this article is to increase the knowledge of "alarm findings" indicating an organic disease in children with RAP. PMID:25292323

  1. Radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours

    PubMed Central

    Goh, PYT

    2006-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established local therapy for hepatic malignancies. It is rapidly emerging as an effective treatment modality for small lesions elsewhere in the body, in particular, the kidney and the lung. It is a relatively safe and minimally invasive treatment for small lung malignancies, both primary and secondary. In particular, it is the preferred form of treatment for non-surgical candidates. This paper describes the technique employed for radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours, as well as the protocol established, at the Mount Elizabeth Hospital, Singapore. PMID:21614247

  2. A review of bovine urothelial tumours and tumour-like lesions of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Roperto, S; Borzacchiello, G; Brun, R; Leonardi, L; Maiolino, P; Martano, M; Paciello, O; Papparella, S; Restucci, B; Russo, V; Salvatore, G; Urraro, C; Roperto, F

    2010-01-01

    Four hundred bovine urothelial tumours and tumour-like lesions were classified in accordance with the 2004 World Health Organization (WHO) morphological classification for human urothelial tumours. The spectrum of neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder of cattle is becoming wider and bovine urothelial tumours share striking morphological features with their human counterparts. A classification system based on the WHO scheme would also be appropriate for the classification of bovine bladder tumours. Bovine urothelial tumours are most often multiple. Four distinct growth patterns of bovine urothelial tumours and tumour-like lesions are recognized: flat, exophytic or papillary, endophytic and invasive. Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is the most common flat urothelial lesion, accounting for approximately 4% of urothelial tumours. CIS is detected adjacent to papillary and invasive tumours in 80-90% of cases. Approximately 3% of papillary lesions are papillomas and approximately 5% are 'papillary urothelial neoplasms of low malignant potential' (PUNLMP). Low-grade carcinoma is the most common urothelial tumour of cattle. High-grade carcinomas, and low and high-grade invasive tumours, are less commonly seen. Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) infection and ingestion of bracken fern both play a central role in carcinogenesis of these lesions.

  3. Transillumination imaging of intraocular tumours.

    PubMed

    Kjersem, Bård; Krohn, Jørgen

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss a recently described modification of a standard photo slit lamp system for ocular transillumination, with special emphasis on the light transmission through the eye wall and the photographic technique. Transillumination photography was carried out with the Haag-Streit Photo-Slit Lamp BX 900 (Haag-Streit AG, Koeniz, Switzerland). After having released the background lighting optic fibre cable from its holder, the patient was positioned at the slit lamp, and the fibre tip was gently pressed against the sclera or the cornea of the patient's eye. During about 1/1000 of a second, the eye was illuminated by the flash and the scleral shadow of the tumour was exposed to the camera sensor. The images were of good diagnostic quality, making it easy to outline the tumours and to evaluate the involvement of intraocular structures. None of the examined patients experienced discomfort or negative side effects. The method is recommended in cases where photographic transillumination documentation of intraocular pathologies is considered important. PMID:23641762

  4. MiR-203 is downregulated in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and can suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis of tumours.

    PubMed

    Tian, Linli; Li, Minghua; Ge, Jingchun; Guo, Yan; Sun, Yanan; Liu, Ming; Xiao, Hui

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been recognised to regulate cancer development and progression in carcinogenesis as either oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes. However, whether miR-203 plays a crucial role in human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) remains largely unclear. In the study, we have found that miR-203 expression was significantly lower in LSCC tissues than that in corresponding adjacent non-neoplastic tissues and was negatively correlated with ASAP1 expression level. Lower expression of miR-203 was significantly related to poor differentiation, advanced clinical stages, T3-4 tumour grade, lymph node metastasis and decreased 5-year overall survival. Transfection with miR-203 inhibited proliferation, reduced invasion, induced apoptosis and caused G1 phase cell cycle arrest of Hep-2 cells in vitro, suggesting that miR-203 functioned as a tumour suppressor. We have also tested that over-expression of miR-203 may both suppress the growth of xenograft tumours in mice and downregulate the expressions of ASAP1 in vivo. Furthermore, miR-203 may regulate the expressions of mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker of E-cadherin and cancer stem cells (CSCs) marker of CD44. These findings suggest that miR-203 plays a role as a tumour suppressor in LSCC, likely by regulating ASAP1, probably in relation to EMT and CSCs and may serve as a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  5. A transgenic mouse model for tumour immunotherapy: induction of an anti-idiotype response to human MUC1

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, R W; Ross, E L; Lee-MacAry, A E; Laylor, R; Burchell, J; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Snary, D

    2000-01-01

    MUC1 is a membrane bound, polymorphic epithelial mucin expressed at the luminal surface of glandular epithelium. It is highly expressed in an underglycosylated form on carcinomas and metastatic lesions and is, therefore, a potential target for immunotherapy of cancer. The monoclonal antibody HMFG1 binds the linear core protein sequence, PDTR, contained within the immunodominant domain of the tandem repeat of MUC1. The efficacy of murine and humanized HMFG1 (Ab1) used as an anti-idiotypic vaccine was examined in mice transgenic for human MUC1 (MUC1.Tg) challenged with murine epithelial tumour cells transfected with human MUC1. Humoral idiotypic cascade through Ab2 and Ab3 antibodies was observed in MUC1.Tg mice following multiple antibody inoculations in the presence of adjuvant. Impaired tumour growth at day 35 and highest Ab3 levels were found in mice that had received mHMFG1 with RAS adjuvant. However, comparison of Ab3 levels in individual mice with tumour size in all treatment groups did not show a correlation between smaller tumours and increased levels of anti-idiotype antibody. This suggests that the anti-tumour effects of anti-idiotype vaccination are not solely related to the induction of idiotypic antibody cascades and probably involve other mechanisms. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027434

  6. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination.

  7. Small Interfering RNA Transfection Across a Phospholipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Van; Choubey, Amit; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2012-02-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules play a pivotal role in silencing gene expression via the RNA interference mechanism. We have performed steered MD simulations to study the transfection of a bare siRNA and siRNA/Oleic Acid (OA) complex across the dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine (DPPC) bilayer at T = 323 K. Bare siRNA induces the formation of frustrated lipid gel domains, whereas in the presence of siRNA/OA complex the membrane is found to be in the liquid-ordered phase. In both cases the stress profiles across the membrane indicate that the membrane is under tension near the head groups and highly compressed at the water-hydrophobic interface. During transfection, the membrane is deformed and the lateral stress is significantly lowered for the bare siRNA and siRNA/OA complex. The bare siRNA transfects through a lipid-nanopore of hydrophilic head-groups and hydrophobic carbon chains, whereas the siRNA/OA complex transfects through a lipid-nanopore of hydrophilic head groups.

  8. Optical transfection using an endoscope-like system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Nan; Gunn-Moore, Frank; Dholakia, Kishan

    2011-02-01

    Optical transfection is a powerful method for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to biological cells. A tightly focused pulsed laser beam may transiently change the permeability of a cell membrane to facilitate the delivery of foreign genetic material into cells. We report the first realization of an endoscope-like integrated system for optical transfection. An imaging fiber (coherent optical fiber bundle) with ~6000 cores (pixels) embedded in a fiber cladding of ~300 μm in diameter, produces an image circle (area) of ~270 μm diam. This imaging fiber, with an ordered axicon lens array chemically etched at its exit face, is used for the delivery of a femtosecond laser to the cell membrane for optical transfection along with subcellular resolution imaging. A microcapillary-based microfluidic system for localized drug delivery was also combined in this miniature, flexible system. Using this novel system, a plasmid transfection efficiency up to ~72% was obtained for CHO-K1 cells. This endoscope-like system opens a range of exciting applications, in particular, in the targeted in vivo optical microsurgery area.

  9. Carbon nanoparticles for gene transfection in eukaryotic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zanin, H; Hollanda, L M; Ceragioli, H J; Ferreira, M S; Machado, D; Lancellotti, M; Catharino, R R; Baranauskas, V; Lobo, A O

    2014-06-01

    For the first time, oxygen terminated cellulose carbon nanoparticles (CCN) was synthesised and applied in gene transfection of pIRES plasmid. The CCN was prepared from catalytic of polyaniline by chemical vapour deposition techniques. This plasmid contains one gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in eukaryotic cells, making them fluorescent. This new nanomaterial and pIRES plasmid formed π-stacking when dispersed in water by magnetic stirring. The frequencies shift in zeta potential confirmed the plasmid strongly connects to the nanomaterial. In vitro tests found that this conjugation was phagocytised by NG97, NIH-3T3 and A549 cell lines making them fluorescent, which was visualised by fluorescent microscopy. Before the transfection test, we studied CCN in cell viability. Both MTT and Neutral Red uptake tests were carried out using NG97, NIH-3T3 and A549 cell lines. Further, we use metabolomics to verify if small amounts of nanomaterial would be enough to cause some cellular damage in NG97 cells. We showed two mechanisms of action by CCN-DNA complex, producing an exogenous protein by the transfected cell and metabolomic changes that contributed by better understanding of glioblastoma, being the major finding of this work. Our results suggested that this nanomaterial has great potential as a gene carrier agent in non-viral based therapy, with low cytotoxicity, good transfection efficiency, and low cell damage in small amounts of nanomaterials in metabolomic tests.

  10. [Cashmere goat bacterial artificial chromosome recombination and cell transfection system].

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian; Cao, Zhongyang; Yang, Yaohui; Cao, Gengsheng

    2016-03-01

    The Cashmere goat is mainly used to produce cashmere, which is very popular for its delicate fiber, luscious softness and natural excellent warm property. Keratin associated protein (KAP) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) of the Cashmere goat play an important role in the proliferation and development of cashmere fiber follicle cells. Bacterial artificial chromosome containing kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4 genes were used to increase the production and quality of Cashmere. First, we constructed bacterial artificial chromosomes by homology recombination. Then Tol2 transposon was inserted into bacterial artificial chromosomes that were then transfected into Cashmere goat fibroblasts by Amaxa Nucleofector technology according to the manufacture's instructions. We successfully constructed the BAC-Tol2 vectors containing target genes. Each vector contained egfp report gene with UBC promoter, Neomycin resistant gene for cell screening and two loxp elements for resistance removing after transfected into cells. The bacterial artificial chromosome-Tol2 vectors showed a high efficiency of transfection that can reach 1% to 6% with a highest efficiency of 10%. We also obtained Cashmere goat fibroblasts integrated exogenous genes (kap6.3, kap8.1 and bmp4) preparing for the clone of Cashmere goat in the future. Our research demonstrates that the insertion of Tol2 transposons into bacterial artificial chromosomes improves the transfection efficiency and accuracy of bacterial artificial chromosome error-free recombination. PMID:27349114

  11. In vivo electrical conductivity of hepatic tumours.

    PubMed

    Haemmerich, Dieter; Staelin, S T; Tsai, J Z; Tungjitkusolmun, S; Mahvi, D M; Webster, J G

    2003-05-01

    Knowledge of electrical tissue conductivity is necessary to determine deposition of electromagnetic energy and can further be used to diagnostically differentiate between normal and neoplastic tissue. We measured 17 rats with a total of 24 tumours of the K12/TRb rat colon cancer cell line. In each animal we measured in vivo hepatic tumour and normal tissue conductivity at seven frequencies from 10 Hz to 1 MHz, at different tumour stages between 6 and 12 weeks after induction. Conductivity of normal liver tissue was 1.26 +/- 0.15 mS cm(-1) at 10 Hz, and 4.61 +/- 0.42 mS cm(-1) at 1 MHz. Conductivity of tumour was 2.69 +/- 0.91 mS cm(-1) at 10 Hz, and 5.23 +/- 0.82 mS cm(-1) at 1 MHz. Conductivity was significantly different between normal and tumour tissue (p < 0.05). We determined the percentage of necrosis and fibrosis at the measurement site. We fitted the conductivity data to the Cole-Cole model. For the tumour data we determined Spearman's correlation coefficients between the Cole-Cole parameters and age, necrosis, fibrosis and tumour volume and found significant correlation between necrosis and the Cole-Cole parameters (p < 0.05). We conclude that necrosis within the tumour and the associated membrane breakdown is likely responsible for the observed change in conductivity.

  12. Cartilage-containing tumours of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Bateson, Eric M.

    1967-01-01

    An unusual case is reported of a woman aged 27 years who presented with four intrapulmonary cartilage-containing tumours which were resected from the left lung. The appearance of two new shadows in the chest several years later suggested that two of the resected tumours had recurred. Three of the four resected tumours consisted entirely of cartilage and bone and other connective tissues. The fourth tumour, although consisting almost entirely of cartilage and connective tissue, also contained epithelial tissue in the form of two small clefts, one in the periphery and the other in a connective tissue septum between the lobules of cartilage of the tumour. These tumours are regarded as a variation of the more typical cartilage-containing tumour of the lung which contains many spaces lined by respiratory epithelium and is regarded as a neoplasm arising in the connective tissue beneath the mucosa of a small bronchus with subsequent expansion into its lumen and enclosing spaces lined by the mucosal epithelium during its eccentric growth. The tumours consisting almost entirely of cartilage without spaces lined by epithelial cells are thought to expand into the adjacent lung tissue and not into the bronchial lumen. Therefore there is no inclusion of respiratory epithelium from the mucosa of the bronchus of origin. Images PMID:6033393

  13. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. Discussion In this paper, available data on the relationship between hypoxia and FDG uptake by tumour tissue in vitro and in vivo are reviewed. In pre-clinical in vitro studies, acute hypoxia was consistently shown to increase FDG uptake by normal and tumour cells within a couple of hours after onset with mobilisation or modification of glucose transporters optimising glucose uptake, followed by a delayed response with increased rates of transcription of GLUT mRNA. In pre-clinical imaging studies on chronic hypoxia that compared FDG uptake by tumours grown in rat or mice to uptake by FMISO, the pattern of normoxic and hypoxic regions within the human tumour xenografts, as imaged by FMISO, largely correlated with glucose metabolism although minor locoregional differences could not be excluded. In the clinical setting, data are limited and discordant. Conclusion Further evaluation of FDG uptake by various tumour types in relation to intrinsic and bioreductive markers of hypoxia and response to radiotherapy or hypoxia-dependent drugs is needed to fully assess its application as a marker of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:18509637

  14. Küttner's tumour: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tagnon, B; Weynand, B; Reychler, H

    2008-01-01

    Küttner's tumour (chronic sclerosing sialadenitis) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the salivary glands. It is a totally benign lesion. However, because of its clinical features, the clinical diagnosis is often that of a salivary gland neoplasm. We present a case of unilateral Küttner's tumour in the left submandibular salivary gland and discuss clinical, imaging and histological features.

  15. Paraneoplastic syndromes in patients with laryngeal neuroendocrine carcinomas: clinical manifestations and prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Ferlito, Alfio; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Bishop, Justin A; Hunt, Jennifer L; Vander Poorten, Vincent; Williams, Michelle D; Triantafyllou, Asterios; Devaney, Kenneth O; Gnepp, Douglas R; Kusafuka, Kimihide; Halmos, Gyorgy B; Westra, William H; Takes, Robert P; Thompson, Lester D R

    2016-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are associated with a variety of malignant neoplasms and are systemic and non-metastatic manifestations that develop in a minority of cancer patients. This review examines all published cases of paraneoplastic syndromes associated with neuroendocrine carcinomas of the larynx. There are a total of ten patients reported with paraneoplastic syndromes associated with laryngeal neuroendocrine carcinomas in the literature. Of these, nine died and the tenth is alive with liver metastases. There were five cases of small-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma, four cases of moderately differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma, and one case of well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma associated with paraneoplastic syndromes. As these syndromes have significant clinical relevance, physicians should be aware of the possible presence of paraneoplastic syndromes in the diagnostic process of patients with neuroendocrine carcinoma of the larynx.

  16. Strain elastography features of epidermoid tumours in superficial soft tissue: differences from other benign soft-tissue tumours and malignant tumours

    PubMed Central

    Park, H J; Lee, S M; Kim, W T; Lee, S; Ahn, K S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated ultrasonographic features of superficial epidermoid tumour with a focus on strain elastography (SE) features that will help in the differential diagnosis of epidermoid tumour from other benign and malignant soft-tissue tumours. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated ultrasonographic and SE data of 103 surgically confirmed superficial soft-tissue tumours and tumour-like lesions: 29 cases of epidermoid tumour, 46 cases of other benign tumours and 28 cases of malignant tumour. SE and B-mode imaging were performed at the same time. SE characteristics were assigned into four grades (1–4) according to their elasticity. Interobserver agreement for the four SE scores between the two radiologists was analysed using kappa statistics. We classified each SE finding as a hard lesion (SE Score 3–4) or soft lesion (SE Score 1–2) and compared these findings using the χ2 test to identify whether a significant difference in mass hardness existed among epidermoid tumour, other benign tumour and malignant tumour. Results: Overall interobserver agreement according to the four SE scores was moderate (κ = 0.540), and overall agreement for the hardness [soft (Score 1–2) or hard (Score 3–4)] was almost perfect (κ = 0.825). Malignant tumours showed higher SE scores (3–4, hard nature) than did epidermoid tumour or other benign soft-tissue tumours. There were no differences in SE score between epidermoid tumour and other benign tumours. Conclusion: Superficial epidermoid tumour exhibits a softer nature than does malignant tumour but does not have a different SE pattern from other benign tumours. Advances in knowledge: SE features of epidermoid tumour might be helpful in differentiating from other benign and malignant tumours. PMID:25827206

  17. ¹⁷⁷Lu-Labeled Agents for Neuroendocrine Tumor Therapy and Bone Pain Palliation in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Balter, Henia; Victoria, Trindade; Mariella, Terán; Javier, Gaudiano; Rodolfo, Ferrando; Andrea, Paolino; Graciela, Rodriguez; Juan, Hermida; Eugenia, De Marco; Patricia, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Lutetium-177 is an emerging radionuclide due its convenient chemical and nuclear properties. In this paper we describe the development and evaluation in Uruguay of the targeted 177Lu labelled radiopharmaceuticals EDTMP (for bone pain palliation) and DOTA-TATE (neuroendocrine tumors). We optimized the preparation of these 177Lu radiopharmaceuticals including radiolabelling, quality control methods, in vitro and in vivo stability and their therapeutic application in patients. Radiation dosimetry aspects of 177Lu are also included. Nine male patients with prostate cancer and four female patients with breast carcinoma with multiple bone metastatic lesions were treated with 177Lu-EDTMP. Four patients with gastroentheropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NET) and one patient with bronchial NET were treated with 1- 3 cycles with a cumulative dose of 4.44-22.2 GBq of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE. Scintigraphic images of the patients treated with 177Lu-EDTMP evidenced high and rapid uptake in bone metastasis, remaining after 7 days post administration. Images allow skeletal visualization with high definition and demonstrate increased uptake in bone metastases. For 177Lu-DOTA-TATE, partial remissions were obtained in 4 patients and the remaining patient did not show significant progression 3 months after the second cycle. No serious adverse effects were registered, even in two patients with confirmed renal disease and high risk for renal disease Dosimetry assessments confirm the predictive value of the personalized therapy with radiolabelled peptides. We found it is possible to accumulate high therapeutic doses in tumours in sequential administrations of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE, increasing the probability of biological response without significant impairment of the renal function in patients with risk factors. These results demonstrate the attractive therapeutic properties of these two 177Lu labelled agents and the feasibility of this metabolic therapy in regions far away from 177Lu producing

  18. ¹⁷⁷Lu-Labeled Agents for Neuroendocrine Tumor Therapy and Bone Pain Palliation in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Balter, Henia; Victoria, Trindade; Mariella, Terán; Javier, Gaudiano; Rodolfo, Ferrando; Andrea, Paolino; Graciela, Rodriguez; Juan, Hermida; Eugenia, De Marco; Patricia, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Lutetium-177 is an emerging radionuclide due its convenient chemical and nuclear properties. In this paper we describe the development and evaluation in Uruguay of the targeted 177Lu labelled radiopharmaceuticals EDTMP (for bone pain palliation) and DOTA-TATE (neuroendocrine tumors). We optimized the preparation of these 177Lu radiopharmaceuticals including radiolabelling, quality control methods, in vitro and in vivo stability and their therapeutic application in patients. Radiation dosimetry aspects of 177Lu are also included. Nine male patients with prostate cancer and four female patients with breast carcinoma with multiple bone metastatic lesions were treated with 177Lu-EDTMP. Four patients with gastroentheropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NET) and one patient with bronchial NET were treated with 1- 3 cycles with a cumulative dose of 4.44-22.2 GBq of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE. Scintigraphic images of the patients treated with 177Lu-EDTMP evidenced high and rapid uptake in bone metastasis, remaining after 7 days post administration. Images allow skeletal visualization with high definition and demonstrate increased uptake in bone metastases. For 177Lu-DOTA-TATE, partial remissions were obtained in 4 patients and the remaining patient did not show significant progression 3 months after the second cycle. No serious adverse effects were registered, even in two patients with confirmed renal disease and high risk for renal disease Dosimetry assessments confirm the predictive value of the personalized therapy with radiolabelled peptides. We found it is possible to accumulate high therapeutic doses in tumours in sequential administrations of 177Lu-DOTA-TATE, increasing the probability of biological response without significant impairment of the renal function in patients with risk factors. These results demonstrate the attractive therapeutic properties of these two 177Lu labelled agents and the feasibility of this metabolic therapy in regions far away from 177Lu producing

  19. [The behavioral-neuroendocrine mechanism of development of homosexuality].

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui; Tai, Fa-Dao

    2007-10-01

    In this review, we primarily focus on the behavioral-neuroendocrine mechanism of development of homosexuality from genetic, neuroendocrine neuroanatomical and behavioral studies. Besides the influence of genetics and environment, sexual orientation was determined by the early perinatal hormone exposure. Gonadal steroidal hormone interacted with many neurotransmitters in individual development by hypothalamus pituitary adrenal axis and hypothalamus pituitary gonadal axis, which regulated the individual's sexual orientation. It was summarized here about the future directions on sexual orientation and demonstrated problems which would have to investigate next step. All these may be beneficial for our understanding of the homosexuality and paying attention to psychological and physiological health of homosexuality, which is useful to prevent the development of teenage homosexuality.

  20. Neuroendocrine cells are present in the domestic fowl ovary

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Pablo G; Báez Saldaña, Armida; Fortoul Van Der Goes, Teresa; González del Pliego, Margarita; Gutiérrez Ospina, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine cells are present in virtually all organs of the vertebrate body; however, it is yet uncertain whether they exist in the ovaries. Previous reports of ovarian neurons and neuron-like cells in mammals and birds might have resulted from misidentification. The aim of the present work was to determine the identity of neuron-like cells in immature ovaries of the domestic fowl. Cells immunoreactive to neurofilaments, synaptophysin, and chromogranin-A, with small, dense-core secretory granules, were consistently observed throughout the sub-cortical ovarian medulla and cortical interfollicular stroma. These cells also displayed immunoreactivity for tyrosine, tryptophan and dopamine β-hydroxylases, as well as to aromatic L-DOPA decarboxylase, implying their ability to synthesize both catecholamines and indolamines. Our results support the argument that the ovarian cells previously reported as neuron-like in birds, are neuroendocrine cells. PMID:23083425

  1. NEUROENDOCRINE ACTIONS AND REGULATION OF HYPOTHALAMIC NEUROPEPTIDE Y DURING LACTATION

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, W,R.; Ramoz, G.; Torto, R.; Keefe, K.A.; Wang, J. J.; Kalra, S. P.

    2007-01-01

    The expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its co-messenger, agouti-related peptide (AgRP), in arcuate neurons of the hypothalamus is increased during lactation in rats. Our research has been addressing the questions of the physiological actions of these peptides during lactation and the physiological signals associated with lactation that result in increased expression of their genes. Our studies indicate that NPY and AgRP exert pleiotropic actions during lactation that help integrate neuroendocrine regulation of energy balance with controls over anterior and posterior pituitary hormone secretion. Further, reciprocal signaling to the NPY/AgRP system by leptin and ghrelin is responsible for the changes in expression of these hypothalamic peptides in lactating animals, and thus, may contribute to regulation of food intake and the various neuroendocrine adaptations of lactation. PMID:17241697

  2. Neuropsychology of Neuroendocrine Dysregulation after Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Zihl, Josef; Almeida, Osborne F X

    2015-05-20

    Endocrine dysfunction is a common effect of traumatic brain injury (TBI). In addition to affecting the regulation of important body functions, the disruption of endocrine physiology can significantly impair mental functions, such as attention, memory, executive function, and mood. This mini-review focuses on alterations in mental functioning that are associated with neuroendocrine disturbances in adults who suffered TBI. It summarizes the contribution of hormones to the regulation of mental functions, the consequences of TBI on mental health and neuroendocrine homeostasis, and the effects of hormone substitution on mental dysfunction caused by TBI. The available empirical evidence suggests that comprehensive assessment of mental functions should be standard in TBI subjects presenting with hormone deficiency and that hormone replacement therapy should be accompanied by pre- and post-assessments.

  3. Proposed Morphologic Classification of Prostate Cancer With Neuroendocrine Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Jonathan I.; Amin, Mahul B.; Beltran, Himisha; Lotan, Tamara L.; Mosquera, Juan-Miguel; Reuter, Victor E.; Robinson, Brian D.; Troncoso, Patricia; Rubin, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    On July 31, 2013, the Prostate Cancer Foundation assembled a working committee on the molecular biology and pathologic classification of neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer. The committee consisted of genitourinary oncologists, urologists, urological surgical pathologists, basic scientists, and translational researchers, with expertise in this field. It was concluded that the proceedings of the meeting should be reported in 2 manuscripts appealing to different target audiences, one to focus on surgical pathology and the other to review the molecular aspects of this disease. New clinical and molecular data emerging from prostate cancers treated by contemporary androgen deprivation therapies, as well as primary lesions, have highlighted the need for refinement of diagnostic terminology to encompass the full spectrum of neuroendocrine differentiation. It is envisioned that specific criteria associated with the refined diagnostic terminology will lead to clinically relevant pathologic diagnoses that will stimulate further clinical and molecular investigation and identification of appropriate targeted therapies. PMID:24705311

  4. Surgical management of neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lyen C; Poultsides, George A; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2011-08-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (islet cell tumors) and of the luminal gastrointestinal tract (carcinoids) are a heterogeneous group of epithelial neoplasms that share certain common characteristics. First, they are similar histologically and are difficult to distinguish under light microscopy. Second, they can be associated with hypersecretory syndromes. Third, they are generally slow-growing and have a better prognosis than adenocarcinomas at the same site; however, they do become incurable when they progress to unresectable metastatic disease. Surgery is the only curative treatment and is recommended for most patients for whom cross-sectional imaging suggests that complete resection is possible. This article reviews the surgical management of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors, including the preoperative control of hormonal symptoms, extent of resection required, postoperative outcomes, and differing management strategies as determined by whether the tumor has arisen sporadically or as part of a familial disorder, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). PMID:21936439

  5. Gastroenteropancreatic (neuro)endocrine neoplasms: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Rindi, Guido; Bordi, C; La Rosa, S; Solcia, E; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2011-03-01

    Based on the year 2000 World Health Organization (WHO) classification and the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS) grading and staging proposals, we here define the minimal guidelines for pathology reporting of (neuro)endocrine neoplasms. The macroscopical description is recommended according to standard procedures and the microscopical description according to recognized architectural and cytological features for endocrine lesions. Minimal diagnostic immunohistochemistry entails the use of chromogranin A, synaptophysin and Ki67. Other potentially useful tests are those for CD56 N-CAM, PGP 9.5 and hormones for diagnosis, the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 for potential radiodiagnostics and therapy, and transcription factors like TTF1 and CDX2, for site of origin. Grading definition is always mandatory as well as TNM staging for surgical specimens.

  6. A rare case of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Diwei; Tan, Amanda Jia Hui; De Sousa, Agnelo Francis; Singh-Rai, Rajinder

    2014-01-01

    We present a very rare case of de novo large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) of the prostate in an 84-year-old man on a background of high grade, superficially invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Pure LCNEC of the prostate is extremely rare. Most LCNEC of the prostate are thought to originate by clonal progression under the selection pressure of therapy and refractory to long-term hormonal treatment for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. De novo LCNEC is only described in case reports and is thought to develop via direct malignant transformation. Limited data in the English literature makes it difficult to accurately predict the prognosis of LCNEC of the prostate. However, current evidence suggesting that increasing neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate adenocarcinoma is associated with a higher stage, high-grade disease and a worse prognosis. PMID:25331150

  7. Optimization of tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours by radiation dose redistribution: a modelling study.

    PubMed

    Søvik, Aste; Malinen, Eirik; Bruland, Øyvind S; Bentzen, Søren M; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-01-21

    Tumour hypoxia is a known cause of clinical resistance to radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to model the effects on tumour control probability (TCP) of selectively boosting the dose to hypoxic regions in a tumour, while keeping the mean tumour dose constant. A tumour model with a continuous oxygen distribution, incorporating pO(2) histograms published for head and neck patients, was developed. Temporal and spatial variations in the oxygen distribution, non-uniform cell density and cell proliferation during treatment were included in the tumour modelling. Non-uniform dose prescriptions were made based on a segmentation of the tumours into four compartments. The main findings were: (1) Dose redistribution considerably improved TCP for all tumours. (2) The effect on TCP depended on the degree of reoxygenation during treatment, with a maximum relative increase in TCP for tumours with poor or no reoxygenation. (3) Acute hypoxia reduced TCP moderately, while underdosing chronic hypoxic cells gave large reductions in TCP. (4) Restricted dose redistribution still gave a substantial increase in TCP as compared to uniform dose boosts. In conclusion, redistributing dose according to tumour oxygenation status might increase TCP when the tumour response to radiotherapy is limited by chronic hypoxia. This could potentially improve treatment outcome in a subpopulation of patients who respond poorly to conventional radiotherapy. PMID:17202629

  8. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kooijmans, Sander A. A.; Aleza, Clara Gómez; Roffler, Steve R.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Vader, Pieter; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells. Methods EV producing cells were transfected with vectors encoding for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nanobodies, which served as targeting ligands for tumour cells, fused to glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor signal peptides derived from decay-accelerating factor (DAF). EVs were isolated using ultrafiltration/size-exclusion liquid chromatography and characterized using western blotting, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and electron microscopy. EV–tumour cell interactions were analyzed under static conditions using flow cytometry and under flow conditions using a live-cell fluorescence microscopy-coupled perfusion system. Results EV analysis showed that GPI-linked nanobodies were successfully displayed on EV surfaces and were highly enriched in EVs compared with parent cells. Display of GPI-linked nanobodies on EVs did not alter general EV characteristics (i.e. morphology, size distribution and protein marker expression), but greatly improved EV binding to tumour cells dependent on EGFR density under static conditions. Moreover, nanobody-displaying EVs showed a significantly improved cell association to EGFR-expressing tumour cells under flow conditions. Conclusions We show that nanobodies can be anchored on the surface of EVs via GPI, which alters their cell targeting behaviour. Furthermore, this study highlights GPI-anchoring as a new tool in the EV toolbox, which may be applied for EV display of a variety of proteins, such as antibodies, reporter proteins and signaling molecules. PMID:26979463

  9. Tumour-promoting activity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their oxygenated or nitrated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Misaki, Kentaro; Takamura-Enya, Takeji; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji; Yanagida, Mitsuaki

    2016-03-01

    Various types of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in diesel exhaust particles are thought to contribute to carcinogenesis in mammals. Although the carcinogenicity, mutagenicity and tumour-initiating activity of these compounds have been evaluated, their tumour-promoting activity is unclear. In the present study, to determine the tumour-inducing activity of PACs, including previously known mutagenic compounds in atmospheric environments, a transformation assay for promoting activity mediated by the release of contact inhibition was conducted for six polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), seven oxygenated PAHs (oxy-PAHs) and seven nitrated PAHs (nitro-PAHs) using mouse embryonic fibroblast cells transfected with the v-Ha-ras gene (Bhas 42 cells). Of these, two PAHs [benzo[k]fluoranthene (B[k]FA) and benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]FA)], one oxy-PAH [6H-benzo[cd]pyren-6-one (BPO)] and two nitro-PAHs (3-nitro-7H-benz[de]anthracen-7-one and 6-nitrochrysene) were found to exhibit particularly powerful tumour-promoting activity (≥10 foci following exposure to <100nM). In addition, clear mRNA expression of CYP1A1, which is associated with aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activation, was observed following the exposure of cells to two PAHs (B[k]FA and B[b]FA) and three oxy-PAHs (1,2-naphthoquinone, 11H-benzo[b]fluoren-11-one and BPO). Further, an HO-1 antioxidant response activation was observed following exposure to B[k]FA, B[b]FA and BPO, suggesting that the induction of tumour-promoting activity in these compounds is correlated with the dysfunction of signal transduction via AhR-mediated responses and/or oxidative stress responses.

  10. Characterization of twenty-five ovarian tumour cell lines that phenocopy primary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ince, Tan A.; Sousa, Aurea D.; Jones, Michelle A.; Harrell, J. Chuck; Agoston, Elin S.; Krohn, Marit; Selfors, Laura M.; Liu, Wenbin; Chen, Ken; Yong, Mao; Buchwald, Peter; Wang, Bin; Hale, Katherine S.; Cohick, Evan; Sergent, Petra; Witt, Abigail; Kozhekbaeva, Zhanna; Gao, Sizhen; Agoston, Agoston T.; Merritt, Melissa A.; Foster, Rosemary; Rueda, Bo R.; Crum, Christopher P.; Brugge, Joan S.; Mills, Gordon B.

    2015-01-01

    Currently available human tumour cell line panels consist of a small number of lines in each lineage that generally fail to retain the phenotype of the original patient tumour. Here we develop a cell culture medium that enables us to routinely establish cell lines from diverse subtypes of human ovarian cancers with >95% efficiency. Importantly, the 25 new ovarian tumour cell lines described here retain the genomic landscape, histopathology and molecular features of the original tumours. Furthermore, the molecular profile and drug response of these cell lines correlate with distinct groups of primary tumours with different outcomes. Thus, tumour cell lines derived using this methodology represent a significantly improved platform to study human tumour pathophysiology and response to therapy. PMID:26080861

  11. Solitary fibrous tumour of the renal peripelvis.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, M; Nikaido, T

    1997-05-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare spindle cell neoplasms generally associated with the serosal surface, especially the pleura. This report describes two SFTs arising in the renal peripelvis, occurring in 33- and 36-year-old females. The lesions lacked the characteristic features of other recognized neoplasms that occur in the kidney. Immunohistochemically, the tumour cells were diffusely and strongly positive for vimentin and CD34, and some tumour cells expressed alpha-smooth muscle actin. Both tumours were diploid by flow cytometry. Both patients have had benign clinical courses with 7.5- and 1-year follow-up. The findings suggest that the SFTs may originate from peripelvic mesenchymal cells, a new location for SFT. SFT should be included in the differential diagnosis of spindle cell tumours arising in the renal pelvis and peripelvis.

  12. Assessment of intracranial metastases from neuroendocrine tumors/carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ragab Shalaby, Ahmed M.; Kazuei, Hoshi; Koichi, Honma; Naguib, Saeed; Al-Menawei, Lubna A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The most common sites of origin for neuroendocrine carcinoma are gastrointestinal tract and its accessory glands, and lungs. Materials and Methods: One-hundred fifty cases diagnosed with metastatic brain lesions were retrieved from hospital records within 5 years. For these cases, the primary neoplasm, histopathological classification, metastasis, treatment, and fate all were studied. Results: Intracranial deposits were detected in 10%. The primary lesion was in the lungs in 87% of patients, and 1 patient in the breast and 1 in esophagus. Pathological classification of the primary lesion was Grade 2 (MIB-1: 3–20%) in 1 patient and neuroendocrine carcinoma (MIB-1: ≥21%) in 14 patients. The median period from onset of the primary lesion up to diagnosis of brain metastasis was 12.8 months. About 33% of patients had a single metastasis whereas 67% patients had multiple metastases. Brain metastasis was extirpated in 33% of patients. Stereotactic radiotherapy alone was administered in 20% of patients, and brain metastasis was favorably controlled in most of the patients with coadministration of cranial irradiation as appropriate. The median survival period from diagnosis of brain metastasis was 8.1 months. Conclusion: Most of patients with brain metastasis from neuroendocrine carcinoma showed the primary lesion in the lungs, and they had multiple metastases to the liver, lymph nodes, bones, and so forth at the time of diagnosis of brain metastasis. The guidelines for accurate diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine carcinoma should be immediately established based on further analyses of those patients with brain metastasis. PMID:27365963

  13. Primary small cell undifferentiated (neuroendocrine) carcinoma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Shetty, Premalatha

    2014-01-01

    Primary small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SNEC) of the paranasal sinuses is an extremely rare and distinctive tumor with aggressive clinical behavior. Moreover, SNECs originating in the head and neck region have been reported to be highly aggressive and to have a poor prognosis. This report describes a patient with a maxillary sinus SNEC who was successfully treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy. PMID:24639904

  14. Perinatal programming of neuroendocrine mechanisms connecting feeding behavior and stress

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Feeding behavior is closely regulated by neuroendocrine mechanisms that can be influenced by stressful life events. However, the feeding response to stress varies among individuals with some increasing and others decreasing food intake after stress. In addition to the impact of acute lifestyle and genetic backgrounds, the early life environment can have a life-long influence on neuroendocrine mechanisms connecting stress to feeding behavior and may partially explain these opposing feeding responses to stress. In this review I will discuss the perinatal programming of adult hypothalamic stress and feeding circuitry. Specifically I will address how early life (prenatal and postnatal) nutrition, early life stress, and the early life hormonal profile can program the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the endocrine arm of the body's response to stress long-term and how these changes can, in turn, influence the hypothalamic circuitry responsible for regulating feeding behavior. Thus, over- or under-feeding and/or stressful events during critical windows of early development can alter glucocorticoid (GC) regulation of the HPA axis, leading to changes in the GC influence on energy storage and changes in GC negative feedback on HPA axis-derived satiety signals such as corticotropin-releasing-hormone. Furthermore, peripheral hormones controlling satiety, such as leptin and insulin are altered by early life events, and can be influenced, in early life and adulthood, by stress. Importantly, these neuroendocrine signals act as trophic factors during development to stimulate connectivity throughout the hypothalamus. The interplay between these neuroendocrine signals, the perinatal environment, and activation of the stress circuitry in adulthood thus strongly influences feeding behavior and may explain why individuals have unique feeding responses to similar stressors. PMID:23785312

  15. The neuroendocrine functions of the parathyroid hormone 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Dimitrov, Eugene; Palkovits, Miklós; Usdin, Ted B

    2012-01-01

    The G-protein coupled parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2R) is concentrated in endocrine and limbic regions in the forebrain. Its endogenous ligand, tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39), is synthesized in only two brain regions, within the posterior thalamus and the lateral pons. TIP39-expressing neurons have a widespread projection pattern, which matches the PTH2R distribution in the brain. Neuroendocrine centers including the preoptic area, the periventricular, paraventricular, and arcuate nuclei contain the highest density of PTH2R-positive networks. The administration of TIP39 and an antagonist of the PTH2R as well as the investigation of mice that lack functional TIP39 and PTH2R revealed the involvement of the PTH2R in a variety of neural and neuroendocrine functions. TIP39 acting via the PTH2R modulates several aspects of the stress response. It evokes corticosterone release by activating corticotropin-releasing hormone-containing neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Block of TIP39 signaling elevates the anxiety state of animals and their fear response, and increases stress-induced analgesia. TIP39 has also been suggested to affect the release of additional pituitary hormones including arginine-vasopressin and growth hormone. A role of the TIP39-PTH2R system in thermoregulation was also identified. TIP39 may play a role in maintaining body temperature in a cold environment via descending excitatory pathways from the preoptic area. Anatomical and functional studies also implicated the TIP39-PTH2R system in nociceptive information processing. Finally, TIP39 induced in postpartum dams may play a role in the release of prolactin during lactation. Potential mechanisms leading to the activation of TIP39 neurons and how they influence the neuroendocrine system are also described. The unique TIP39-PTH2R neuromodulator system provides the possibility for developing drugs with a novel mechanism of action to control neuroendocrine disorders.

  16. The Neuroendocrine Functions of the Parathyroid Hormone 2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Dobolyi, Arpád; Dimitrov, Eugene; Palkovits, Miklós; Usdin, Ted B.

    2012-01-01

    The G-protein coupled parathyroid hormone 2 receptor (PTH2R) is concentrated in endocrine and limbic regions in the forebrain. Its endogenous ligand, tuberoinfundibular peptide of 39 residues (TIP39), is synthesized in only two brain regions, within the posterior thalamus and the lateral pons. TIP39-expressing neurons have a widespread projection pattern, which matches the PTH2R distribution in the brain. Neuroendocrine centers including the preoptic area, the periventricular, paraventricular, and arcuate nuclei contain the highest density of PTH2R-positive networks. The administration of TIP39 and an antagonist of the PTH2R as well as the investigation of mice that lack functional TIP39 and PTH2R revealed the involvement of the PTH2R in a variety of neural and neuroendocrine functions. TIP39 acting via the PTH2R modulates several aspects of the stress response. It evokes corticosterone release by activating corticotropin-releasing hormone-containing neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. Block of TIP39 signaling elevates the anxiety state of animals and their fear response, and increases stress-induced analgesia. TIP39 has also been suggested to affect the release of additional pituitary hormones including arginine-vasopressin and growth hormone. A role of the TIP39-PTH2R system in thermoregulation was also identified. TIP39 may play a role in maintaining body temperature in a cold environment via descending excitatory pathways from the preoptic area. Anatomical and functional studies also implicated the TIP39-PTH2R system in nociceptive information processing. Finally, TIP39 induced in postpartum dams may play a role in the release of prolactin during lactation. Potential mechanisms leading to the activation of TIP39 neurons and how they influence the neuroendocrine system are also described. The unique TIP39-PTH2R neuromodulator system provides the possibility for developing drugs with a novel mechanism of action to control neuroendocrine disorders

  17. Neuroendocrine secretory protein 7B2: structure, expression and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Mbikay, M; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M

    2001-01-01

    7B2 is an acidic protein residing in the secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Its sequence has been elucidated in many phyla and species. It shows high similarity among mammals. A Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro polyproline motif is its most conserved feature, being carried by both vertebrate and invertebrate sequences. It is biosynthesized as a precursor protein that is cleaved into an N-terminal fragment and a C-terminal peptide. In neuroendocrine cells, 7B2 functions as a specific chaperone for the proprotein convertase (PC) 2. Through the sequence around its Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro motif, it binds to an inactive proPC2 and facilitates its transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to later compartments of the secretory pathway where the zymogen is proteolytically matured and activated. Its C-terminal peptide can inhibit PC2 in vitro and may contribute to keep the enzyme transiently inactive in vivo. The PC2-7B2 model defines a new neuroendocrine paradigm whereby proteolytic activation of prohormones and proneuropeptides in the secretory pathway is spatially and temporally regulated by the dynamics of interactions between converting enzymes and their binding proteins. Interestingly, unlike PC2-null mice, which are viable, 7B2-null mutants die early in life from Cushing's disease due to corticotropin ('ACTH') hypersecretion by the neurointermediate lobe, suggesting a possible involvement of 7B2 in secretory granule formation and in secretion regulation. The mechanism of this regulation is yet to be elucidated. 7B2 has been shown to be a good marker of several neuroendocrine cell dysfunctions in humans. The possibility that anomalies in its structure and expression could be aetiological causes of some of these dysfunctions warrants investigation. PMID:11439082

  18. Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy in the Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kwekkeboom, Dik J; Krenning, Eric P

    2016-02-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is a promising new treatment modality for inoperable or metastasized gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors patients. Most studies report objective response rates in 15% to 35% of patients. Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) compare favorably with that for somatostatin analogues, chemotherapy, or newer, "targeted" therapies. Prospective, randomized data regarding the potential PFS and OS benefit of PRRT compared with standard therapies is anticipated.

  19. Effects of Neuroendocrine CB1 Activity on Adult Leydig Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids control male reproduction acting at central and local level via cannabinoid receptors. The cannabinoid receptor CB1 has been characterized in the testis, in somatic and germ cells of mammalian and non-mammalian animal models, and its activity related to Leydig cell differentiation, steroidogenesis, spermiogenesis, sperm quality, and maturation. In this short review, we provide a summary of the insights concerning neuroendocrine CB1 activity in male reproduction focusing on adult Leydig cell ontogenesis and steroid biosynthesis. PMID:27375550

  20. [Hyperplastic polyp with neoplastic transformation in a patient with atrophic gastritis and multiple gastric neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Moura, E G H; Domingos, T A; Alvarado, H; Iriya, K; Kishi, H S; Martins, B C; Moura, E T H; P, P Sakai

    2012-01-01

    Hyperplastic gastric polyps are often found at GI endoscopy and are not considered premalignant lesions, although some cases of malignancy have been reported. Neuroendocrine tumors, conversely, are rare and account for approximately 1% to 2% of gastric polyps. Both hyperplastic gastric polyps and neuroendocrine tumors are related to gastric atrophy. The case of a hyperplastic polyp with multifocal areas of adenocarcinoma within the polyp associated to multiple gastric neuroendocrine tumors is reported.

  1. Primary large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the scrotum.

    PubMed

    Maricić, Anton; Katunarić, Miljenko; Sutalo, Nikica; Tomic, Snjezana; Jurisic, Davor; Petkovic, Marija; Zamolo, Gordana

    2010-06-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) mostly develop from the neural crest cells but a few arise from neuroectoderm. They are common in the lungs and gastrointestinal tract but rare in the genitourinary tract. A 78-year-old man with no family history of malignant or hereditary diseases presented with a 3-month history of a rapidly growing asymptomatic scrotal nodule and swelling in the groin. He had a negative history of sexually transmitted disease and of trauma, fungal infection or chronic irritation in the scrotal area; there was no history of radiotherapy or exposure to chemicals or arsenic. Both the scrotal and groin lesions were excised with a minimum of 1.2 cm of normal skin. Examination of the specimen revealed a confined poorly differentiated large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma with a metastasis to the inguinal lymph nodes. Three months after the excision we found a local recurrence. The recurrent tumor revealed tumor tissue concurrent with the primary lesion. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no previously published case reports on neuroendocrine tumor of the scrotum.

  2. Neuroendocrine mechanisms for immune system regulation during stress in fish.

    PubMed

    Nardocci, Gino; Navarro, Cristina; Cortés, Paula P; Imarai, Mónica; Montoya, Margarita; Valenzuela, Beatriz; Jara, Pablo; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Fernández, Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    In the last years, the aquaculture crops have experienced an explosive and intensive growth, because of the high demand for protein. This growth has increased fish susceptibility to diseases and subsequent death. The constant biotic and abiotic changes experienced by fish species in culture are challenges that induce physiological, endocrine and immunological responses. These changes mitigate stress effects at the cellular level to maintain homeostasis. The effects of stress on the immune system have been studied for many years. While acute stress can have beneficial effects, chronic stress inhibits the immune response in mammals and teleost fish. In response to stress, a signaling cascade is triggered by the activation of neural circuits in the central nervous system because the hypothalamus is the central modulator of stress. This leads to the production of catecholamines, corticosteroid-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone and glucocorticoids, which are the essential neuroendocrine mediators for this activation. Because stress situations are energetically demanding, the neuroendocrine signals are involved in metabolic support and will suppress the "less important" immune function. Understanding the cellular mechanisms of the neuroendocrine regulation of immunity in fish will allow the development of new pharmaceutical strategies and therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of diseases triggered by stress at all stages of fish cultures for commercial production. PMID:25123831

  3. [Symptoms and diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive system].

    PubMed

    Gyökeres, Tibor

    2011-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive system can cause very diverse clinical symptoms. Due to the secretion of biogenic amines, peptides and hormones secreted by the tumor cells, various paraneoplastic syndromes can evolve, on the other hand, the growth and spreading of hormonally inactive tumors can result in different local symptoms. Patients can be symptom-free for a long time or aspecific, often periodical symptoms can prevent recognition or lead to misdiagnosis for years. The symptomatology of hormonally active tumors, derived mainly from the pancreas is very characteristic. Carcinoid syndrome can be seen in 10-18% of patients with neuroendocrine tumors. In this review, the critical appreciation of laboratory and imaging modalities is discussed. Among the major new developments in this field, the introduction of serum chromogranin A assay and new small bowel examination methods should be mentioned. Capsule endoscopy and balloon enteroscopy can provide possibility of much more earlier diagnosis, as previously. The worldwide spreading of endoscopic ultrasound and fine needle biopsy allows the detection and clear localization of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  4. Low ambient temperature and neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia in men.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Kvetnanský, R; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H; Nazar, K; Vigas, M

    1995-12-01

    Nutritional factors, such as an excess or a deficiency of glucose, play an important role in neuroendocrine regulations. Hormonal and metabolic responses to hypoglycemia were examined in healthy non-obese volunteers under conditions of low ambient temperature. Hypoglycemia was induced by intravenous injection of insulin in two randomized trials performed at room temperature and at 4 degrees C. At room temperature, the typical neuroendocrine response to hypoglycemia was established. The increases of ACTH, beta-endorphin, growth hormone and cortisol in response to insulin hypoglycemia failed to be modified by low ambient temperature. Acute cold exposure significantly reduced epinephrine and totally inhibited prolactin response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In spite of significant changes in epinephrine response to hypoglycemia at low ambient temperature, no striking differences in plasma glucose levels compared to those measured at room temperature were observed. However, under conditions of low temperature the reestablishment of normoglycemia was delayed. No changes in free fatty acids were found under our experimental conditions. The presented data show that low ambient temperature exerts selective effects on some neuroendocrine and metabolic parameters. PMID:8653553

  5. A Rare Case of Diffuse Idiopathic Pulmonary Neuroendocrine Cell Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ofikwu, Godwin; Mani, Vishnu R.; Rajabalan, Ajai; Adu, Albert; Ahmed, Leaque; Vega, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) is a rare clinical condition with only about 100 cases reported in the literature. It is characterized by primary hyperplasia of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs) which are specialized epithelial cells located throughout the entire respiratory tract, from the trachea to the terminal airways. DIPNECH appears in various forms that include diffuse proliferation of scattered neuroendocrine cells, small nodules, or a linear proliferation. It is usually seen in middle-aged, nonsmoking women with symptoms of cough, dyspnea, and wheezing. We present a 45-year-old, nonsmoking woman who presented with symptoms of DIPNECH associated with bilateral pulmonary nodules and left hilar adenopathy. Of interest, DIPNECH in our patient was associated with metastatic pulmonary carcinoids, papillary carcinoma of the left breast, oncocytoma and angiomyolipoma of her left kidney, and cortical nodules suggestive of tuberous sclerosis. She had video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), modified radical mastectomy with reconstruction, and radical nephrectomy. She is currently symptom-free most of the time with over two years of follow-up. PMID:26609460

  6. Stimulation of human Jurkat cells by monoclonal antibody crosslinking of transfected-Ly-6A.2 (TAP) molecules.

    PubMed

    McGrew, J T; Rock, K L

    1991-10-01

    Monoclonal antibody crosslinking of phosphatidylinositol-anchored Ly-6A.2 molecules on the surface of murine T lymphocytes leads to cell activation and secretion of IL-2. To examine the potential activity of these molecules in human T cells we transfected the Ly-6A.2 gene into Jurkat cells. Transfection of Jurkat cells with genomic Ly-6A.2 sequences results in low levels of Ly-6A.2 on the cell surface. However, linking the Ly-6A.2 sequences to the enhancer from the human CD2 gene results in greatly increased expression of Ly-6A.2. These molecules are anchored to the membrane via a phosphatidylinositol linkage. Crosslinking of Ly-6A.2 molecules with soluble mAb stimulates the transfected Jurkat cells to produce IL-2. This stimulation is abrogated by treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. The transfected human T cells displayed the same unusual crosslinking requirements for stimulation with anti-Ly-6A.2 mAbs as previously observed for murine T cells. Crosslinking of Ly-6A.2 with soluble antibodies is stimulatory, whereas immobilized antibodies are inactive. The crosslinking requirements for antiCD3 mAb stimulation display a reciprocal pattern. These data demonstrate that the Ly-6A.2 pathway for T cell activation is conserved between human and murine T cells.

  7. Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the ileocecal junction with well differentiation adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuming; Li, Yan; Feng, Hua; Wang, Chengxin; Chen, Jiaxun; Liu, Lijiang

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are unique and rare tumors originating from neuroendocrine cells. Large cell neuroendocrine tumors have been found in almost every organ such as gastrointestinal tract, bronchopulmonary, pancreas, uterine cervix, urinary bladder and salivary gland, but primary sites in gastrointestinal tract and lung are the most frequent. These neoplasms show neuroendocrine differentiation in organizational structure, which requires further confirmation with immunohistochemistry or electron microscope. In immunohistochemistry staining, pure neuroendocrine areas are diffusely stained positive for synaptophysin (Syn), chromogranin (CgA) and CD56.At least two neuroendocrine markers (Syn, CgA or CD56) must be diffusely stained positive to establish a diagnosis for large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. We studied a rare case of large cell neuroendocrine tumor that was originated from the ileocecal junction and showed CgA, Syn and CD56 triple-negative. The tumor, however, showed typical morphologic and immunohistochemical features of neuroendocrine differentiation; it also exhibited well differentiation and a significant peritumoral lymphoid reaction. Furthermore, we also found the intracytoplasmic neurosecretory granules through the electron micrograph examination.

  8. Primary renal carcinoid tumour with lung metastasis misdiagnosed as renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Daboul, Nour; Monga, Dulabh; Bunker, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old man with a history of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) diagnosed 10 years prior, status post right nephrectomy, presented for evaluation of pulmonary nodules. A year after the nephrectomy, he had undergone cutaneous metastasectomy in the right flank area, and a further 2 years later he had had his second cutaneous metastasectomy in the right chest wall. Both cutaneous pathologies had, at the time, shown metastatic neoplasm with histological features compatible with those of the previous renal tumour. He was treated with sorafenib. 3 years later he developed asymptomatic pulmonary nodules, which gradually doubled in size over the next 2.5 years. He underwent bronchoscopy and left lower lobe biopsy. Pathology revealed a metastatic renal carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumour. Second review of the previous renal neoplasm and the cutaneous metastatic pathology showed trabecular architecture, consistent with carcinoid, but mimicking the long parallel arrays that have been described in some cases of papillary RCC. PMID:26951438

  9. Study of mechanisms of electric field-induced DNA transfection. III. Electric parameters and other conditions for effective transfection.

    PubMed

    Xie, T D; Tsong, T Y

    1992-07-01

    Electric parameters, osmolality, temperature, and pH of the suspending medium and the growth phase of cells, etc., are known to influence the efficiency of the pulsed electric field (PEF)-induced DNA transfection of cells. PEF-induced transfection of Escherichia coli JM105 by plasmid DNA PUC18, PUC19, PBR322, and PMSG has been used as a model system to establish quantitative relationships between these parameters and transfection efficiency. The main findings are summarized for experiments using unipolar square wave PEF. (a) For a given field strength (up to 6 kV/cm), the transfection efficiency (TE) was linearly dependent on the pulse width (up to 1 ms). (b) When field strength is fixed, Log [TE] correlated with the number of pulses applied. Similarly, when field duration was fixed, Log [TE] correlated with the number of pulses. (c) In the absence of MgCl2, TE showed a maximal value at 50 mM sucrose and was reduced by several fold at lower and higher sucrose concentrations. Cell survival was nearly constant in the range 1-300 mM sucrose. (d) E. coli in the early and mid-exponential growth phases was more susceptible to PEF for DNA transfection than it was in the stationary phase. (e) For a given set of electric parameters, TE was the highest at neutral pH and was greatly reduced at acidic and alkaline pH. (f) Increasing the temperature from 0 to 37 degrees C resulted in the reduction of TE by three orders of magnitude. This could reflect a rapid shrinking of pores at higher temperatures. (g) TE was inversely proportional to the square of the size of the plasmid DNA. By adjusting the above parameters to optimize transfection, a TE of 1010 1microg-1 DNA (PUC18) has been recorded. Further improvement in percent cell transfection may be expected by a more exhaustive search of conditions than the present study has done.

  10. An improved assay for (68)Ga-hydroxide in (68)Ga-DOTATATE formulations intended for neuroendocrine tumour imaging.

    PubMed

    Ali, Masood; Hsieh, William; Tsopelas, Chris

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to identify a more rapid assay for (68)Ga(OH)3 impurity in (68)Ga-DOTATATE formulations. Three methods were used to prepare (68)Ga(OH)3 reference material (pharmacopoeial, bench titration and automated radiosynthesis), and four quality control methods for its assessment (thin layer chromatography, membrane filtration, HPLC and solid phase extraction). The optimal method of preparing (68)Ga(OH)3 was by titrating (68)Ga(3+) with buffered sodium hydroxide solutions to pH 5.6 ± 0.2. The precipitate was quantitatively isolated by membrane filtration (0.02 µm)/hydrochloric acid (HCl; pH 5.6) solvent, and also it remained 100% at the origin on instant thin layer chromatography with silica gel paper/HCl (pH 5.6) solvent. For (68)Ga-DOTATATE samples, the thin layer chromatography technique was used with a single paper strip developed separately on two occasions, once in HCl (pH 5.6) and next in methanol solvent. This so-called double-developed (DD) method separated (68)Ga(OH)3 impurity located at the origin, from (68)Ga-DOTATATE plus (68)Ga(3+) at ~Rf 0.4, and it was superior to the other methods. It assayed for the impurity similarly to the pharmacopoeial method. The advantages of the DD method were that it required inexpensive test materials and it reproducibly determined % (68)Ga(OH)3 in (68)Ga-DOTATATE in 12 min, 13 min earlier than the pharmacopoeial method. This time efficiency resulted in a surplus of 12% (68)Ga-DOTATATE counts in the product vial, and this provided a contingency of radioactivity or time for the injection/imaging processes in the Nuclear Medicine Department. PMID:26201091

  11. Transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Massoud, A; Powell, M; Williams, R; Hindmarsh, P; Brook, C

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 29 January 1997
 OBJECTIVES—Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the preferred method for the excision of pituitary microadenomas in adults. This study was carried out to establish the long term efficacy and safety of TSS in children.
STUDY DESIGN—A 14 year retrospective analysis was carried out on 23 children (16 boys and seven girls), all less than 18 years of age, who had undergone TSS at our centre.
RESULTS—Twenty nine transsphenoidal surgical procedures were carried out. The most common diagnosis was an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) secreting adenoma (14 (61%) patients). The median length of follow up was 8.0 years (range 0.3-14.0 years). Eighteen (78%) patients were cured after the first procedure. No death was related to the operation. The most common postoperative complication was diabetes insipidus, which was transient in most patients. Other complications were headaches in two patients and cerebrospinal fluid leaks in two patients. De novo endocrine deficiencies after TSS in children were as follows: three (14%) patients developed panhypopituitarism, eight (73%) developed growth hormone insufficiency, three (14%) developed secondary hypothyroidism, and four (21%) developed gonadotrophin deficiency. Permanent ACTH deficiency occurred in five (24%) patients, though all patients received postoperative glucocorticoid treatment until dynamic pituitary tests were performed three months after TSS.
CONCLUSIONS—TSS in children is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours, provided it is performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise. Surgical complications are minimal. Postoperative endocrine deficit is considerable, but is only permanent in a small proportion of patients.

 • Transsphenoidal surgery is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours in children • Transsphenoidal surgery should be performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise • Surgical complications of

  12. 60 YEARS OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY: MEMOIR: Harris' neuroendocrine revolution: of portal vessels and self-priming.

    PubMed

    Fink, George

    2015-08-01

    Geoffrey Harris, while still a medical student at Cambridge, was the first researcher (1937) to provide experimental proof for the then tentative view that the anterior pituitary gland was controlled by the CNS. The elegant studies carried out by Harris in the 1940s and early 1950s, alone and in collaboration with John Green and Dora Jacobsohn, established that this control was mediated by a neurohumoral mechanism that involved the transport by hypophysial portal vessel blood of chemical substances from the hypothalamus to the anterior pituitary gland. The neurohumoral control of anterior pituitary secretion was proved by the isolation and characterisation of the 'chemical substances' (mainly neuropeptides) and the finding that these substances were released into hypophysial portal blood in a manner consistent with their physiological functions. The new discipline of neuroendocrinology - the way that the brain controls endocrine glands and vice versa - revolutionised the treatment of endocrine disorders such as growth and pubertal abnormalities, infertility and hormone-dependent tumours, and it underpins our understanding of the sexual differentiation of the brain and key aspects of behaviour and mental disorder. Neuroendocrine principles are illustrated in this Thematic Review by way of Harris' major interest: hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal control. Attention is focussed on the measurement of GnRH in hypophysial portal blood and the role played by the self-priming effect of GnRH in promoting the onset of puberty and enabling the oestrogen-induced surge or pulses of GnRH to trigger the ovulatory gonadotrophin surge in humans and other spontaneously ovulating mammals. PMID:25967698

  13. Solitary fibrous tumour of the pancreas: a new member of the small group of mesenchymal pancreatic tumours.

    PubMed

    Lüttges, J; Mentzel, T; Hübner, G; Klöppel, G

    1999-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours usually occur in the pleura, but occasionally they appear in extraserosal soft tissues or parenchymatous organs, where their diagnosis often causes problems. This report describes a solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the pancreas in a 50-year-old woman treated by left-side pancreatectomy. The tumour showed immunocytochemical reactivity for CD34, CD99 and bcl-2. Because of its favourable prognosis, SFT must be clearly distinguished from leiomyosarcoma, the most frequent nonepithelial tumour of the pancreas. Other mesenchymal tumours that may occur in the pancreas include tumours of the peripheral nerve sheath, fibrous histiocytic tumours and rare vascular tumours.

  14. Functional polarization of tumour-associated macrophages by tumour-derived lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Colegio, Oscar R; Chu, Ngoc-Quynh; Szabo, Alison L; Chu, Thach; Rhebergen, Anne Marie; Jairam, Vikram; Cyrus, Nika; Brokowski, Carolyn E; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Phillips, Gillian M; Cline, Gary W; Phillips, Andrew J; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-09-25

    Macrophages have an important role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. To perform this function, macrophages must have the capacity to monitor the functional states of their 'client cells': namely, the parenchymal cells in the various tissues in which macrophages reside. Tumours exhibit many features of abnormally developed organs, including tissue architecture and cellular composition. Similarly to macrophages in normal tissues and organs, macrophages in tumours (tumour-associated macrophages) perform some key homeostatic functions that allow tumour maintenance and growth. However, the signals involved in communication between tumours and macrophages are poorly defined. Here we show that lactic acid produced by tumour cells, as a by-product of aerobic or anaerobic glycolysis, has a critical function in signalling, through inducing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the M2-like polarization of tumour-associated macrophages. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this effect of lactic acid is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Finally, we show that the lactate-induced expression of arginase 1 by macrophages has an important role in tumour growth. Collectively, these findings identify a mechanism of communication between macrophages and their client cells, including tumour cells. This communication most probably evolved to promote homeostasis in normal tissues but can also be engaged in tumours to promote their growth.

  15. Paediatric extracranial germ-cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Furqan; Murray, Matthew J; Amatruda, James F; Coleman, Nicholas; Nicholson, James C; Hale, Juliet P; Pashankar, Farzana; Stoneham, Sara J; Poynter, Jenny N; Olson, Thomas A; Billmire, Deborah F; Stark, Daniel; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Frazier, A Lindsay

    2016-04-01

    Management of paediatric extracranial germ-cell tumours carries a unique set of challenges. Germ-cell tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that present across a wide age range and vary in site, histology, and clinical behaviour. Patients with germ-cell tumours are managed by a diverse array of specialists. Thus, staging, risk stratification, and treatment approaches for germ-cell tumours have evolved disparately along several trajectories. Paediatric germ-cell tumours differ from the adolescent and adult disease in many ways, leading to complexities in applying age-appropriate, evidence-based care. Suboptimal outcomes remain for several groups of patients, including adolescents, and patients with extragonadal tumours, high tumour markers at diagnosis, or platinum-resistant disease. Survivors have significant long-term toxicities. The challenge moving forward will be to translate new insights from molecular studies and collaborative clinical data into improved patient outcomes. Future trials will be characterised by improved risk-stratification systems, biomarkers for response and toxic effects, rational reduction of therapy for low-risk patients and novel approaches for poor-risk patients, and improved international collaboration across paediatric and adult cooperative research groups. PMID:27300675

  16. The Laser Treatment of Experimental Malignant Tumours

    PubMed Central

    McGuff, Paul E.; Deterling, Ralph A.; Gottlieb, Leonard S.; Fahimi, H. Dariush; Bushnell, David; Roeber, Fred

    1964-01-01

    Some of the results of experiments performed during the past two years to assess effects of laser energy on experimental malignant tumours are reviewed. Twenty types of malignant tumours (most in the cheek pouch and 11 of human origin) were treated in over 700 Syrian hamsters. Results of laser treatment of malignant melanomas and thyroidal carcinomas are presented. A human patient with malignant melanoma treated by laser energy is described. Investigation of thermal effect revealed that the laser-treated tumour remained warm for about one minute, while the cautery-treated tumour cooled to normal temperature in five seconds. Direct action of laser on superficial tumours is possible; deeper lesions must be exposed surgically. Laser energy has a selective effect on certain malignant tumours, resulting in their progressive regression and ultimate dissolution. All hamsters with implanted malignant melanomas and carcinomas of human origin, after completion of a course of laser treatment, showed no gross or histologic evidence of tumour up to the date of last observation. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2aFig. 2bFig. 2cFig. 2dFig. 2eFig. 2fFig. 3Fig. 4aFig. 4bFig. 4cFig. 4dFig. 4eFig. 4fFig. 4gFig. 6 PMID:14229757

  17. MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Bent, C L; Sahdev, A; Rockall, A G; Singh, N; Sohaib, S A; Reznek, R H

    2009-04-01

    This review was performed to describe the range of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of borderline ovarian tumours. The MRI findings in 26 patients with 31 borderline ovarian tumours (mean age: 40.1 years, range: 14-85 years) were retrospectively reviewed. For each tumour, site, size, MRI characteristics, and enhancement following gadolinium administration were recorded. There were 20 serous and 11 mucinous borderline ovarian subtypes. Nine of 26 patients demonstrated bilateral disease on MRI; synchronous contralateral ovarian disease included three benign, five serous borderline, and one serous invasive tumour. A history of a metachronous mucinous borderline tumour was identified in one patient. MRI appearances were classified into four morphological categories: group 1 (6/31, 19%), unilocular cysts; group 2 (6/31, 19%), minimally septate cysts with papillary projections; group 3 (14/31, 45%), markedly septate lesions with plaque-like excrescences; and group 4 (5/31, 16%), predominantly solid with exophytic papillary projections, all of serous subtype. There was a significant difference in mean volume between serous (841.5 cm(3)) and mucinous (6358.2 cm(3)) subtypes (p=0.009). All tumours demonstrated at least one MRI feature suggestive of malignancy. The present review demonstrates the variable MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours along with imaging features suggestive of tumour subtype. In patients in whom the clinical features are suggestive of a borderline ovarian tumour (young age and normal or minimally elevated CA125), the ability to predict a borderline disease using morphological features observed on MRI would be extremely helpful in surgical planning, with the potential to offer fertility or ovary-preserving surgery. Future studies are required to further this aim.

  18. Influence of femtosecond laser radiation on cells of the transplantable tumour Krebs-2

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Popova, N A; Nikolin, V P; Kaledin, V I; Kirpichnikov, A V; Pestryakov, Efim V

    2012-06-30

    The influence of femtosecond radiation of a titaniumsapphire laser on cells of the transplantable ascitic tumour Krebs-2 was studied. After in vitro irradiation by the pulsed fundamentalharmonic radiation with the wavelength 800 nm, pulse duration 30 fs, repetition rate 1 kHz, mean power 100 and 300 mW and exposure time 3 min, as well as by the second-harmonic radiation (40 nm, 50 fs, 120 mW), all cells were diffusely stained by the vital stain trypan blue, which may be an evidence of their death or abnormalities of membrane permeability. However, implantation of such cells to experimental animals led to formation of tumours at the transplantation site with the kinetics slightly different from the control one. In the group of mice to which the cells were inoculated after irradiation with second harmonic pulses of titanium-sapphire laser the inhibition of tumour growth was observed due to partial death of cells under the action of UV spectral components. To explain the mechanism of the observed phenomenon the possibility of pore formation (photoporation) in the cell membrane, described earlier in the papers on foreign DNA transfection into cells, is considered.

  19. Effect of pantoprazole to enhance activity of docetaxel against human tumour xenografts by inhibiting autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Q; Joshua, A M; Saggar, J K; Yu, M; Wang, M; Kanga, N; Zhang, J Y; Chen, X; Wouters, B G; Tannock, I F

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autophagy allows recycling of cellular components and may facilitate cell survival after chemotherapy. Pantoprazole inhibits proton pumps and is reported to inhibit autophagy. Here we evaluate the effects of pantoprazole to modify cytotoxicity of the anticancer drug docetaxel, and underlying mechanisms. Methods: Effects of docetaxel±pantoprazole were studied against wild-type and autophagy-deficient PC3 cells and against four human xenografts. Effects of pantoprazole on autophagy were evaluated by quantifying LC3-I, LC3-II and p62 proteins in western blots, and by fluorescent microscopy of cells transfected with RFP-GFP-LC3. The distribution of drug effects and of autophagy was quantified in tumour sections in relation to blood vessels and hypoxia by immunohistochemistry using γH2AX, cleaved caspase-3, Ki67 and LC3/ p62. Results: Pantoprazole increased the toxicity of docetaxel in vitro, increased docetaxel-induced expression of γH2AX and cleaved caspase-3, and decreased Ki67 in tumour sections. Pantoprazole increased growth delay of four human xenografts of low, moderate and high sensitivity to docetaxel, with minimal increase in toxicity. Docetaxel led to increased autophagy throughout tumour sections. Pantoprazole inhibited autophagy, and effects of pantoprazole were reduced against genetically modified cells with decreased ability to undergo autophagy. Conclusions: Autophagy is a mechanism of resistance to docetaxel chemotherapy that may be modified by pantoprazole to improve therapeutic index. PMID:25647012

  20. Primary Axillary Porocarcinoma: A Rare Cutaneous Tumour.

    PubMed

    Devi, Nalli R Sumitra; Valarmathi, K; Lilly, Mary; Satish, Selvi; Mishra, Nidhi

    2016-02-01

    Eccrine porocarcinoma, a rare cutaneous malignant tumour accounts for a fraction of sweat gland tumours. This tumour is found to originate from the intraepithelial parts of the sweat glands. It commonly involves the lower extremities in elderly patients and carries an aggressive behaviour. Cutaneous and visceral metastasis can occur and hence prompt treatment is mandatory. Surgical excision is the mainstay of treatment modality. We hereby present a case of eccrine porocarcinoma in a 50-year-old male in the right axillary region presenting as a verrucous lesion. PMID:27042472

  1. The combined epithelial odontogenic tumour in Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Siar, C H; Ng, K H

    1991-04-01

    The combined epithelial odontogenic tumour represents a hybrid lesion comprising primarily areas of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour intermixed with foci of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour. Five such cases retrieved from the files of the Division of Stomatology, Institute for Medical Research, Kuala Lumpur, and four others from the existing literature were analysed. A mean age of 18.8 years, a female preponderance (66.7%) with a male to female ratio of 1:2 and predilection for the mandible (55.6%) were observed. All cases were treated by conservative surgery and the lack of recurrence confirmed the innocuous nature of this lesion.

  2. The prophylaxis of nonindustrial urothelial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Mount, Balfour M.

    1973-01-01

    Present knowledge concerning carcinogenesis and the natural history of urothelial tumours precludes firm conclusions relative to nonindustrial prophylaxis. However, a number of measures are consistent with current data and may be instituted for those patients with a demonstrated propensity to urothelial tumours. Their acceptability is based on the lack of associated toxicity for the patient. These measures include the elimination of significant infection, cigarettes, artificial sweeteners, analgesic abuse and coffee, the administration of vitamins C and B6, and in selected cases, the use of thiotepa. It is emphasized that the merit of these steps in altering the natural history of urothelial tumours is uncertain. PMID:4197537

  3. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Behranwala, Kasim A; Straker, Peter; Wan, Andrew; Fisher, Cyril; Thompson, Jeremy N

    2005-01-01

    Background Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT) is a benign, nonmetastasizing proliferation of myofibroblasts with a potential for local infiltration, recurrence and persistent local growth. Case report We report a case of a 51 year-old female, who had excision of a gallbladder tumour. Histopathology showed it to be IMT of the gallbladder. Conclusion The approach to these tumours should be primarily surgical resection to obtain a definitive diagnosis and relieve symptoms. IMT has a potential for local infiltration, recurrence and persistent local growth. PMID:15862123

  4. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Behranwala, Kasim A; Straker, Peter; Wan, Andrew; Fisher, Cyril; Thompson, Jeremy N

    2005-04-29

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT) is a benign, nonmetastasizing proliferation of myofibroblasts with a potential for local infiltration, recurrence and persistent local growth. CASE REPORT: We report a case of a 51 year-old female, who had excision of a gallbladder tumour. Histopathology showed it to be IMT of the gallbladder. CONCLUSION: The approach to these tumours should be primarily surgical resection to obtain a definitive diagnosis and relieve symptoms. IMT has a potential for local infiltration, recurrence and persistent local growth. PMID:15862123

  5. Warthin's tumour: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Taylor, T R; Cozens, N J A; Robinson, I

    2009-11-01

    Warthin's tumour (benign cystadenolymphoma) is the second most common salivary gland tumour after pleomorphic salivary adenoma, and it is commonly encountered in routine head and neck ultrasonography. Tissue diagnosis can be achieved by fine-needle aspiration. Infarction and inflammatory response following fine-needle aspiration is previously described in excision specimens. We describe 7 cases of radiologically infarcting Warthin's tumours in situ in a retrospective analysis of 76 patients, and demonstrate an approximate incidence of at least 9% of infarction following fine-needle aspiration in lesions left in situ. We recommend the possibility of infarction and associated clinical symptoms being incorporated into pre-fine-needle aspiration patient counselling.

  6. Synchronous extra-parotid Warthin's tumour.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, H; Kirkham, N; Hogbin, B M

    1989-08-01

    Warthin's tumour (also known as adenolymphoma or papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum) is benign and accounts for 12 per cent of all neoplasms of the parotid gland. A case of extra-parotid Warthin's tumour occurring synchronously in a peri-parotid lymph node is described. This is not a metastatic phenomenon and occurs as a result of salivary gland inclusions of local lymph nodes during the embryological development of the parotid. Extra-parotid Warthin's tumour should be regarded as a benign incidental finding and the prognosis is excellent.

  7. Photoporation and cell transfection using a violet diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, L.; Agate, B.; Comrie, M.; Ferguson, R.; Lake, T. K.; Morris, J. E.; Carruthers, A. E.; Brown, C. T. A.; Sibbett, W.; Bryant, P. E.; Gunn-Moore, F.; Riches, A. C.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2005-01-01

    The introduction and subsequent expression of foreign DNA inside living mammalian cells (transfection) is achieved by photoporation with a violet diode laser. We direct a compact 405 nm laser diode source into an inverted optical microscope configuration and expose cells to 0.3 mW for 40 ms. The localized optical power density of ~1200 MW/m2 is six orders of magnitude lower than that used in femtosecond photoporation (~104 TW/m2). The beam perforates the cell plasma membrane to allow uptake of plasmid DNA containing an antibiotic resistant gene as well as the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. Successfully transfected cells then expand into clonal groups which are used to create stable cell lines. The use of the violet diode laser offers a new and simple poration technique compatible with standard microscopes and is the simplest method of laser-assisted cell poration reported to date.

  8. Surface modified gold nanowires for mammalian cell transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chiung-Wen; Lai, Jun-Jung; Wei, Kung Hwa; Chen, Peilin

    2008-01-01

    Aminothiol modified gold nanowires have been used as vectors for the delivery of plasmid DNA into two different types of mammalian cells: 3T3 and HeLa. It was measured that positively charged gold nanowires with a diameter of 200 nm and a length around 5 µm were capable of carrying 1 pg of plasmid DNA per nanowire into cells. Compared with other transfection reagents, the gold nanowires exhibited the highest transfection efficiency while almost no cytotoxicity was observed. In addition, it has been shown that individual nanowires can be visualized with sub-micrometer resolution, which may allow the use of functionalized multi-segment nanowires as local probes for the investigation of the microenvironment inside cells.

  9. High Throughput siRNA Screening Using Reverse Transfection.

    PubMed

    von Schantz, Carina; Saarela, Jani

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a commonly used technique to knockdown gene function. Here, we describe a high throughput screening method for siRNA mediated gene silencing of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 using reverse transfection. Furthermore, we describe the setup for two separate methods for detecting viable and dead cells using either homogenous assays or image-based analysis. PMID:27581282

  10. Ultrasonic enhancement of gene transfection in murine melanoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Bao, S; Gies, R A; Thrall, B D

    1999-11-01

    The enhancement of gene transfection by ultrasound (US) was evaluated in vitro and in vivo using the B16 mouse melanoma model. Cultured cells were either exposed in suspensions in vitro or implanted subcutaneously in female C57BL/6 mice for 10-14 days and, subsequently exposed, in vivo. For comparison to results with a luciferase plasmid, a reporter plasmid for green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to evaluate transfection efficiency. US was supplied by a system, similar to a Dornier HM-3 lithotripter, that produced shock waves (SW) of 24.4 MPa peak positive and 5.2 MPa peak negative pressure amplitudes at the focus. The plasmids were mixed with the suspensions to achieve 20 ,microL mL(-1), or were injected intratumorally to provide 0.2 mg DNA per mL of tumor. Acoustic cavitation was promoted by retaining 0.2 mL of air in the 1.2-mL exposure chambers in vitro and by injecting air at 10% of tumor volume in vivo. In vitro, cell counts declined to 5.3% of shams after 800 SW exposure, with 1.4% of the cells expressing GFP after 2 days of culture. In vivo, 2 days after 400 SW exposure, viable-cell recovery from excised tumors was reduced to 4.2% of shams and cell transfection was enhanced by a factor of about 8, reaching 2.5% of cell counts (p < 0.005 in t-test). These results show that strong tumor ablation induced by US shock wave treatment can be coupled with simultaneous enhancement of gene transfection. PMID:10626630

  11. Enhanced transfection of brain tumor suppressor genes by photochemical internalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chih H.; Sun, Chung-Ho; Zhou, Yi-Hong; Madsen, Steen J.; Hirschberg, Henry

    2011-03-01

    One of many limitations for cancer gene therapy is the inability of the therapeutic gene to transfect a sufficient number of tumor cells. Photochemical internalization (PCI) is a photodynamic therapy-based approach for improving the delivery of macromolecules and genes into the cell cytosol. The utility of PCI for the delivery of a tumor suppressor gene (PAX-6) was investigated in monolayers and spheroids consisting of F98 rat glioma cells.

  12. Isolation and Transfection of Primary Culture Bovine Retinal Pericytes.

    PubMed

    Primo, Vincent A; Arboleda-Velasquez, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes an enzymatic approach for isolating homogeneous cultures of pericytes from retinas of bovine source. In summary, retinas are dissected, washed, digested, filtered, cultured in specific media to select for pericytes, and finally expanded for a low passage culture of about 14 million bovine retinal pericytes (BRP) within 4-6 weeks. This protocol also describes a liposomal-based technique for transfection of BRPs. PMID:27172949

  13. Characterization of cell lines stably transfected with rubella virus replicons

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Xu, Jie; Frey, Teryl K.

    2012-07-20

    Rubella virus (RUBV) replicons expressing a drug resistance gene and a gene of interest were used to select cell lines uniformly harboring the replicon. Replicons expressing GFP and a virus capsid protein GFP fusion (C-GFP) were compared. Vero or BHK cells transfected with either replicon survived drug selection and grew into a monolayer. However, survival was {approx}9-fold greater following transfection with the C-GFP-replicon than with the GFP-expressing replicon and while the C-GFP-replicon cells grew similarly to non-transfected cells, the GFP-replicon cells grew slower. Neither was due to the ability of the CP to enhance RNA synthesis but survival during drug selection was correlated with the ability of CP to inhibit apoptosis. Additionally, C-GFP-replicon cells were not cured of the replicon in the absence of drug selection. Interferon-alpha suppressed replicon RNA and protein synthesis, but did not cure the cells, explaining in part the ability of RUBV to establish persistent infections.

  14. DNA uptake, intracellular trafficking and gene transfection after ultrasound exposure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Yan, Jing; Santangelo, Philip J; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2016-07-28

    Ultrasound has been studied as a promising tool for intracellular gene delivery. In this work, we studied gene transfection of a human prostate cancer cell line exposed to megahertz pulsed ultrasound in the presence of contrast agent and assessed the efficiency of fluorescently labelled DNA delivery into cell nuclei, which is necessary for gene transfection. At the sonication conditions studied, ~30% of cells showed DNA uptake 30min after sonication, but that fraction decreased over time to ~10% of cells after 24h. Most cells containing DNA had DNA in their nuclei, but the amount varied significantly. Transfection efficiency peaked at ~10% at 8h post sonication. Among those cells containing DNA, ~30% of DNA was localized in the cell nuclei, ~30% was in autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes and the remainder was "free" in the cytoplasm 30min after sonication. At later times up to 24h, ~30% of DNA continued to be found in the nuclei and most or all of the rest of the DNA was in autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes. These results demonstrate that ultrasound can deliver DNA into cell nuclei shortly after sonication and that the rest of the DNA can be cleared by autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes. PMID:27165808

  15. Hormonal induction of transfected genes depends on DNA topology.

    PubMed

    Piña, B; Haché, R J; Arnemann, J; Chalepakis, G; Slater, E P; Beato, M

    1990-02-01

    Plasmids containing the hormone regulatory element of mouse mammary tumor virus linked to the thymidine kinase promoter of herpes simplex virus and the reporter gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase of Escherichia coli respond to glucocorticoids and progestins when transfected into appropriate cells. In the human mammary tumor cell line T47D, the response to progestins, but not to glucocorticoids, is highly dependent on the topology of the transfected DNA. Although negatively supercoiled plasmids respond optimally to the synthetic progestin R5020, their linearized counterparts exhibit markedly reduced progestin inducibility. This is not due to changes in the efficiency of DNA transfection, since the amount of DNA incorporated into the cell nucleus is not significantly dependent on the initial topology of the plasmids. In contrast, cotransfection experiments with glucocorticoid receptor cDNA in the same cell line show no significant influence of DNA topology on induction by dexamethasone. A similar result was obtained with fibroblasts that contain endogenous glucocorticoid receptors. When the distance between receptor-binding sites or between the binding sites and the promoter was increased, the dependence of progestin induction on DNA topology was more pronounced. In contrast to the original plasmid, these constructs also revealed a similar topological dependence for induction by glucocorticoids. The differential influence of DNA topology is not due to differences in the affinity of the two hormone receptors for DNA of various topologies, but probably reflects an influence of DNA topology on the interaction between different DNA-bound receptor molecules and between receptors and other transcription factors.

  16. Cell transfection as a tool to study growth hormone action

    SciTech Connect

    Norstedt, G.; Enberg, B.; Francis, S.

    1994-12-31

    The isolation of growth hormone receptor (GHR) cDNA clones has made possible the transfection of GHRs into cultured cells. Our aim in this minireview is to show how the application of such approaches have benefited GHR research. GH stimulation of cells expressing GHR cDNAs can cause an alteration of cellular function that mimic those of the endogenous GHR. GHR cDNA transfected cells also offer a system where the mechanism of GH action can be studied. Such a system has been used to demonstrate that the GHR itself becomes tyrosine phosphorylated and that further phosphorylation of downstream proteins is important in GH action. The GH signals are transmitted to the nucleus and GH regulated genes have now begun to be characterized. The ability to use cell transfection for mechanistic studies of GH action will be instrumental to define domains within the receptor that are of functional importance and to determined pathways whereby GH signals are conveyed within the cell. 33 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Towards gene therapy based on femtosecond optical transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antkowiak, M.; Torres-Mapa, M. L.; McGinty, J.; Chahine, M.; Bugeon, L.; Rose, A.; Finn, A.; Moleirinho, S.; Okuse, K.; Dallman, M.; French, P.; Harding, S. E.; Reynolds, P.; Gunn-Moore, F.; Dholakia, K.

    2012-06-01

    Gene therapy poses a great promise in treatment and prevention of a variety of diseases. However, crucial to studying and the development of this therapeutic approach is a reliable and efficient technique of gene and drug delivery into primary cell types. These cells, freshly derived from an organ or tissue, mimic more closely the in vivo state and present more physiologically relevant information compared to cultured cell lines. However, primary cells are known to be difficult to transfect and are typically transfected using viral methods, which are not only questionable in the context of an in vivo application but rely on time consuming vector construction and may also result in cell de-differentiation and loss of functionality. At the same time, well established non-viral methods do not guarantee satisfactory efficiency and viability. Recently, optical laser mediated poration of cell membrane has received interest as a viable gene and drug delivery technique. It has been shown to deliver a variety of biomolecules and genes into cultured mammalian cells; however, its applicability to primary cells remains to be proven. We demonstrate how optical transfection can be an enabling technique in research areas, such as neuropathic pain, neurodegenerative diseases, heart failure and immune or inflammatory-related diseases. Several primary cell types are used in this study, namely cardiomyocytes, dendritic cells, and neurons. We present our recent progress in optimizing this technique's efficiency and post-treatment cell viability for these types of cells and discuss future directions towards in vivo applications.

  18. Enhanced apoptotic response to photodynamic therapy after bcl-2 transfection.

    PubMed

    Kim, H R; Luo, Y; Li, G; Kessel, D

    1999-07-15

    Apoptosis is a cellular death process involving the sequential activation of a series of caspases, endonucleases, and other enzymes. The initiation of apoptosis can be inhibited by overexpression of bcl-2 and certain other members of a related family of proteins. We examined the effects of bcl-2 overexpression on the apoptotic response to photodynamic therapy (PDT), using aluminum phthalocyanine as the photosensitizing agent. In this study, we compared the immortalized human breast epithelial cell line MCF10A with a subline (MCF10A/bcl-2) transfected with the human bcl-2 gene. The latter was approximately 2-fold more sensitive to the phototoxic effects of PDT. At a 50 mJ/cm2 light dose, photodamage to MCF-10A/bcl-2 resulted in a greater loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential (delta(psi)m), enhanced release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, a more rapid and greater activation of caspase-3, and a greater apoptotic response. Western blot analysis revealed that the transfected cell line showed overexpression of both bcl-2 and bax, and that PDT caused selective destruction of bcl-2, leaving bax unaffected. The greater apoptotic response by the transfected line is, therefore, attributed to the higher bax:bcl-2 ratio after photodamage.

  19. Regional tumour glutamine supply affects chromatin and cell identity.

    PubMed

    Højfeldt, Jonas W; Helin, Kristian

    2016-09-28

    Limited perfusion of solid tumours produces a nutrient-deprived tumour core microenvironment. Low glutamine levels in the tumour core are now shown to lead to reduced levels of α-ketoglutarate and decreased histone demethylase activity, thereby promoting a less differentiated and more therapy-resistant state of the tumour cells.

  20. Regional tumour glutamine supply affects chromatin and cell identity.

    PubMed

    Højfeldt, Jonas W; Helin, Kristian

    2016-09-28

    Limited perfusion of solid tumours produces a nutrient-deprived tumour core microenvironment. Low glutamine levels in the tumour core are now shown to lead to reduced levels of α-ketoglutarate and decreased histone demethylase activity, thereby promoting a less differentiated and more therapy-resistant state of the tumour cells. PMID:27684506

  1. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour in a 20-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Virupakshappa, Deepti; Rajashekhara, Bhari Sharanesha; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Das, Nagarajappa

    2014-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour is a relatively rare and distinct odontogenic tumour that is exclusively odontogenic epithelium in origin. It comprises 3% of all odontogenic tumours. This report describes the surgical therapy, clinical course and morphological characteristics of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumour that developed in the left maxilla of a 20-year-old patient. PMID:24810436

  2. Ovarian tumours in pregnancy: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Pakhee; Kehoe, Sean

    2011-04-01

    Ovarian tumours in pregnancy are a diagnostic and management challenge that is increasingly being faced by the clinician. While most masses are benign and resolve spontaneously, there are others that persist and indicate the need for surgical management. Ultrasound not only detects asymptomatic masses but also helps to guide their management based on presence or absence of features suspicious of malignancy. The role of tumour markers in pregnancy is limited due to their non-specific nature. Most masses treated in pregnancy are benign (most commonly dermoids), and most malignancies are either of low malignant potential or germ cell tumours, usually early stage disease. Surgical management is indicated for symptomatic masses or those with increasing size or complexity indicating possible malignancy. Both laparoscopy and laparotomy have similar results with regard to obstetric outcome. Conservative management is preferred in the remainder. MRI may help in better characterization of doubtful masses. National tumour registries can help to establish guidelines.

  3. A rare solitary fibrous tumour of kidney.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Tilak Bahadur; Nepal, Umesh

    2013-01-01

    A solitary fibrous tumour is an unusual spindle cell neoplasm. It frequently arises from the serosal surface of pleural cavity but has recently been described in diverse extrapleural sites. Urogenital localization is rare and only 36 cases of solitary fibrous tumours of the kidney have been described on published report. We report a case of a large solitary fibrous tumour clinically and radiologically thought to be renal cell carcinoma arising in the kidney of a 30 year old female. The radical nephrectomy was performed. The tumour was a well- circumscribed, solid mass attached to the renal pelvis without necrosis and haemorrhage. Histopathologically, a spindle cell neoplasia with alternating hypo and hypercellular areas, storiform, fascicular and hemangipericytoma like growth pattern and less cellular dense collagen deposits were observed. Immunohistochemical studies revealed reactivity for CD34, CD99 and Bcl-2 protein. PMID:24362666

  4. Tumour marker detection in oesophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mealy, K; Feely, J; Reid, I; McSweeney, J; Walsh, T; Hennessy, T P

    1996-10-01

    Levels of the tumour markers CEA, CA 19-9, CA 125 and SCC were measured in 58 patients presenting with oesophageal carcinoma and compared with levels in patients with benign oesophageal disease and levels in normal volunteers. CEA and CA 19-9 were significantly increased in the patients with oesophageal cancer, however, individual sensitivity for CEA, CA 19-9, CA 125 and SCC was only 28, 34, 10, and 32%, respectively. The combined sensitivity of all markers was 64% and specificity was 80%. There was no difference in combined tumour marker sensitivity between squamous or adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus. No consistent change in marker levels occurred with treatment, and tumour marker levels could not be significantly correlated with stage of disease or short-term survival. These results indicate that tumour marker sensitivity is too low for oesophageal cancer screening and has poor prognostic significance in those undergoing treatment.

  5. Dentigerous Cyst Associated with Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Uppala, Divya; Talasila, Sunil; Babu, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT), a tumour composed of odontogenic epithelium, is an uncommon tumour of odontogenic origin that accounts for only 2.2- 7.1% of all odontogenic tumours. Very few cases of AOT associated with Dentigerous cyst (DC) have been reported till date, most cases are in females and have a striking tendency to occur in the anterior maxilla. The present case is that of a 14-year-old female who revealed a large radiolucent lesion associated with the crown of an unerupted canine located in the left maxillary anterior region. The microscopic examination revealed the presence of AOT in the fibrous capsule of a DC. In this paper, we describe the importance of grossing, sectioning and complete examination of the slide to diagnose such hybrid lesions. PMID:26155575

  6. Mesenchymal phosphaturic tumour: early detection of recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Allevi, Fabiana; Rabbiosi, Dimitri; Mandalà, Marco; Colletti, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The case of a recurrent phosphaturic mesenchymal tumour of the maxillary sinus 10 years after the first surgical excision is reported. The neoplasm first presented with paraneoplastic osteomalacia causing a pathological femur fracture. A right maxillary sinus tumour was identified and treated thereafter. The patient had no local symptoms and serum electrolytes returned to normal after surgical removal of the tumour. However, 10 years later, the patient's urine Ca and P levels increased and an octreoscan detected a new tumour in the right maxillary sinus. Early diagnosis prevented the effects of the paraneoplastic activity of the neoplasm. This case emphasises the importance of specific, close follow-up, because the neoplasm rarely produces local signs indicating its position. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a late relapse presenting without relevant symptoms (local pain or swelling or pathological fractures). PMID:24827649

  7. Systemic Effects of Non-Endocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, James D.; Rona, George

    1964-01-01

    Tumours of non-endocrine origin may exert deleterious effects by elaborating active principles which disturb body regulation. Systemic manifestations are fairly common with neoplasms of the lung, kidney, gastro-intestinal tract and thymus. The secretion of these tumours may have a known chemical structure (serotonin), may present hormone-like action (parathormone, antidiuretic hormone, insulinoid), or have well-defined biological properties (erythropoietin, gastrin-like principle). Tumours may stimulate endocrine glands by an unknown mechanism, producing disorders such as Cushing's syndrome, hypercalcemia, gynecomastia and hypoglycemia. Thymomas may be associated with autoimmune diseases. Tumours may extensively utilize or excrete some metabolite (glucose) or electrolyte (Na or K). Awareness of the systemic effects of various neoplasms may lead to an early diagnosis and proper treatment of these manifestations. PMID:14204555

  8. Suppression of tumour growth by orally administered osteopontin is accompanied by alterations in tumour blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Rittling, S R; Wejse, P L; Yagiz, K; Warot, G A; Hui, T

    2014-01-01

    Background: The integrin-binding protein osteopontin is strongly associated with tumour development, yet is an abundant dietary component as a constituent of human and bovine milk. Therefore, we tested the effect of orally administered osteopontin (o-OPN) on the development of subcutaneous tumours in mice. Methods: Bovine milk osteopontin was administered in drinking water to tumour-bearing immune-competent mice. Tumour growth, proliferation, necrosis, apoptosis and blood vessel size and number were measured. Expression of the α9 integrin was determined. Results: o-OPN suppressed tumour growth, increased the extent of necrosis, and induced formation of abnormally large blood vessels. Anti-OPN reactivity detected in the plasma of OPN-null mice fed OPN suggested that tumour-blocking peptides were absorbed during digestion, but the o-OPN effect was likely distinct from that of an RGD peptide. Expression of the α9 integrin was detected on both tumour cells and blood vessels. Potential active peptides from the α9 binding site of OPN were identified by mass spectrometry following in vitro digestion, and injection of these peptides suppressed tumour growth. Conclusions: These results suggest that peptides derived from o-OPN are absorbed and interfere with tumour growth and normal vessel development. o-OPN-derived peptides that target the α9 integrin are likely involved. PMID:24473400

  9. Unusual mass in the parapharyngeal space: a Warthin's tumour.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C-K Leslie; Sood, Sanjai; Bradley, Patrick J; Krishnan, Suren

    2006-03-01

    Parapharyngeal space (PPS) tumours are uncommon and can be a diagnostic challenge as the presenting symptoms are often vague and non-specific. Most of the PPS tumours are salivary tumours (pleomorphic adenoma being the most frequent diagnosis), and are thought to originate from minor salivary glands or the deep lobe of the parotid gland. Warthin's tumour, another benign salivary tumour involving the PPS has been rarely reported. A case of bilateral, metachronous Warthin's tumour involving the PPS is reported here. PPS Warthin's tumour is a very rare condition that if undiagnosed may result in considerable morbidity.

  10. Pineal anlage tumour - a rare entity with divergent histology.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Arvind; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Suri, Vaishali; Sarkar, Chitra; Sharma, B S; Garg, Ajay

    2011-06-01

    Pineal anlage tumour is a rare tumour of the pineal gland that is not listed in the 2007 World Health Organization classification of tumours of the central nervous system. Pineal anlage has been defined as a primary pineal tumour with both neuroepithelial and ectomesenchymal differentiation but without endodermal differentiation. We report a pineal anlage tumour in a 4-month-old boy, the youngest patient reported with this rare tumour, with a brief review of the literature. Clinicians and neuropathologists should be aware of this entity as it is likely to be misdiagnosed as a teratoma or a melanocytic tumour of the central nervous system.

  11. Cervical intra-/extramedullary solitary fibrous tumour.

    PubMed

    Ogungbo, B; Prakash, S; Kulkarni, G; Bradey, N; Marks, S M; Scoones, D

    2005-06-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with a 9-month history of symptoms of right-sided weakness, tingling and hypersentivity to clothes on both sides of the body. MRI revealed a large intraspinal intradural tumour at the level of C3-C4 in the cervical cord. The final histology was a solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the cervical spinal cord. The radiological diagnosis, surgical management and histology are reviewed.

  12. Delivery of episomal vectors into primary cells by means of commercial transfection reagents.

    PubMed

    Han, Na Rae; Lee, Hyun; Baek, Song; Yun, Jung Im; Park, Kyu Hyun; Lee, Seung Tae

    2015-05-29

    Although episomal vectors are commonly transported into cells by electroporation, a number of electroporation-derived problems have led to the search for alternative transfection protocols, such as the use of transfection reagents, which are inexpensive and easy to handle. Polyplex-mediated transport of episomal vectors into the cytoplasm has been conducted successfully in immortalized cell lines, but no report exists of successful transfection of primary cells using this method. Accordingly, we sought to optimize the conditions for polyplex-mediated transfection for effective delivery of episomal vectors into the cytoplasm of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Episomal vectors were complexed with the commercially available transfection reagents Lipofectamine 2000, FuGEND HD and jetPEI. The ratio of transfection reagent to episomal vectors was varied, and the subsequent transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity of the complexes were analyzed using flow cytometry and trypan blue exclusion assay, respectively. No cytotoxicity and the highest transfection yield were observed when the ratio of transfection reagent to episomal vector was 4 (v/wt) in the cases of Lipofectamine 2000 and FuGENE HD, and 2 in the case of jetPEI. Of the three transfection reagents tested, jetPEI showed the highest transfection efficiency without any cytotoxicity. Thus, we confirmed that the transfection reagent jetPEI could be used to effectively deliver episomal vectors into primary cells without electroporation.

  13. Mixed Adeno-neuroendocrine Carcinoma: An Aggressive Clinical Entity

    PubMed Central

    Brathwaite, Shayna; Rock, Jonathan; Yearsley, Martha M.; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Wei, Lai; Frankel, Wendy L.; Hays, John; Wu, Christina; Abdel-Misih, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    Background Mixed adeno-neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC) is a rare pathologic diagnosis recently defined by the World Health Organization in 2010. Due to poor understanding of MANEC as a clinical entity, there is significant variation in the management of these patients. The purpose of our study was to characterize MANEC to develop evidence-based treatment strategies. Methods The Ohio State University patient database was queried for the diagnosis of MANEC and 46 patients were identified. For comparison, the database also was queried for goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) of the appendix, signet ring cell carcinoma, and carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumor of the appendix. Charts were then retrospectively reviewed for clinicopathologic characteristics, patient treatment, and survival data. Results The mean age of diagnosis of MANEC was 54 years. Eighty-seven percent of MANEC arose from the appendix, with 28 % of patients undergoing appendectomy and 35 % undergoing right hemicolectomy as their index operation. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for chromogranin (82 %), synaptophysin (97 %), and CD56 (67 %). Sixty-seven percent of patients presented with stage IV disease and 41 % had nodal metastases. Overall survival was 4.1 years, which was statistically significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) compared with carcinoid tumors (13.4 years), GCC (15.4 years), and signet ring carcinoma (2.2 years). Conclusions MANEC is a more aggressive clinical entity than both GCC of the appendix and carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumors of the appendix. Based on these findings, we recommend patients with MANEC tumors undergo aggressive multidisciplinary cancer management and close surveillance. PMID:26965701

  14. Neuroendocrine aging in birds: comparing lifespan differences and conserved mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ottinger, Mary Ann

    2007-05-01

    As more comparative data become available, it is clear that the process of aging has fundamental similarities across classes of vertebrates. Birds provide a fascinating collection of species because of the considerable range in reproductive lifespan and variation in reproductive strategies that often relate to lifespan. One fascinating aspect of the comparative biology of aging in different avian species is the conserved mechanisms that appear very similar to those observed in mammals. Despite marked differences in sexual differentiation and reproductive function, including a single functional ovary and the internal testes, there appears to be remarkable similarity in elements of neuroendocrine aging and their end results. Furthermore, although beyond the scope of this review, the intense endocrine and energetic demands on many species of temperate zone birds for long migration and the accompanying seasonal alterations in endocrine responses add an additional layer of complexity in understanding aging. It is the purpose of this review to focus on neuroendocrine changes that accompany aging in a short-lived bird, with mention of some of the available data in field birds and long-lived species. Unfortunately, few neuroendocrine data are available for these long-lived avian species. It would be very interesting to determine if these long-lived birds somehow manage to delay the cascade of changes that contribute to the demise of metabolic and reproductive endocrine function. This review will also attempt to integrate the time-related events that occur in the responses of the hypothalamus and the gonads, especially relative to the neuroregulatory systems that have been implicated in the age-related decline in reproductive function. Finally, emerging areas of interest will be considered in the context of future research areas. PMID:17452025

  15. Brain tumour-associated status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Goonawardena, Janindu; Marshman, Laurence A G; Drummond, Katharine J

    2015-01-01

    We have reviewed the scant literature on status epilepticus in patients with brain tumours. Patients with brain tumour-associated epilepsy (TAE) appear less likely to develop status epilepticus (TASE) than patients with epilepsy in the general population (EGP) are to develop status epilepticus (SEGP). TASE is associated with lesions in similar locations as TAE; in particular, the frontal lobes. However, in contrast to TAE, where seizures commence early in the course of the disease or at presentation, TASE is more likely to occur later in the disease course and herald tumour progression. In marked contrast to TAE, where epilepsy risk is inversely proportional to Word Health Organization tumour grade, TASE risk appears to be directly proportional to tumour grade (high grade gliomas appear singularly predisposed). Whilst anti-epileptic drug (AED) resistance is more common in TAE than EGP (with resistance directly proportional to tumour grade and frontal location), TASE appears paradoxically more responsive to simple AED regimes than either TAE or SEGP. Although some results suggest that mortality may be higher with TASE than with SEGP, it is likely that (as with SEGP) the major determinant of mortality is the underlying disease process. Because all such data have been derived from retrospective studies, because TASE and SEGP are less common than TAE and EGP, and because TASE and SEGP classification has often been inconsistent, findings can only be considered preliminary: multi-centre, prospective studies are required. Whilst preliminary, our review suggests that TASE has a distinct clinical profile compared to TAE and SEGP.

  16. Solitary fibrous tumour of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Mohtarrudin, N; Nor Hanipah, Z; Mohd Dusa, N

    2016-04-01

    Extrapleural solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare tumours characterized by patternless spindle cells with haemangiopericytoma-like vascular spaces. Previously the tumours have been classified as haemangiopericytoma, an entity that is now considered obsolete. We report a case of extrapleural SFT arising in the soft tissue of the chest wall. The patient was a 31-year-old Malay lady presenting with a mobile swelling of the right chest wall for more than five years. During excision the tumour was noted to be well-circumscribed and yellowish in colour, giving an impression of lipoma. Microscopically, the tumour had patternless architecture, characterized by hypocellular and hypercellular areas. It was composed of uniform, spindle-shaped cells displaying oval nuclei, inconspicuous nucleoli, pale cytoplasm and indistinct cell borders. The mitotic count was 2 per 10 HPF. Branching, medium-sized thin-walled blood vessels in a haemangiopericytomatous growth pattern, some with hyalinised wall were identified. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive to CD99 and CD34 and were non-immunoreactive to Desmin, Smooth Muscle Actin, S100 protein and EMA. We elucidate the challenges in diagnosing this tumour in this unusual location.

  17. Solitary fibrous tumour of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Mohtarrudin, N; Nor Hanipah, Z; Mohd Dusa, N

    2016-04-01

    Extrapleural solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare tumours characterized by patternless spindle cells with haemangiopericytoma-like vascular spaces. Previously the tumours have been classified as haemangiopericytoma, an entity that is now considered obsolete. We report a case of extrapleural SFT arising in the soft tissue of the chest wall. The patient was a 31-year-old Malay lady presenting with a mobile swelling of the right chest wall for more than five years. During excision the tumour was noted to be well-circumscribed and yellowish in colour, giving an impression of lipoma. Microscopically, the tumour had patternless architecture, characterized by hypocellular and hypercellular areas. It was composed of uniform, spindle-shaped cells displaying oval nuclei, inconspicuous nucleoli, pale cytoplasm and indistinct cell borders. The mitotic count was 2 per 10 HPF. Branching, medium-sized thin-walled blood vessels in a haemangiopericytomatous growth pattern, some with hyalinised wall were identified. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive to CD99 and CD34 and were non-immunoreactive to Desmin, Smooth Muscle Actin, S100 protein and EMA. We elucidate the challenges in diagnosing this tumour in this unusual location. PMID:27126667

  18. Smooth muscle tumours of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, T.; Danton, M. H.; Parks, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Neoplasms arising from smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are uncommon, comprising only 1% of gastrointestinal tumours. A total of 51 cases of smooth muscle tumour of the GI tract were analysed; 44 leiomyomas and 7 leiomyosarcomas. Lesions occurred in all areas from the oesophagus to the rectum, the stomach being the commonest site. Thirty-six patients had clinical features referable to the tumour. The tumour was detected during investigation or management of an unrelated disease process in 15 patients. The clinical presentation varied depending on tumour location, but abdominal pain and GI bleeding were the commonest presenting symptoms. The lesion was demonstrated preoperatively, mainly by endoscopy and barium studies, in 27 patients. Surgical excision was the treatment of choice, where possible. There was no recurrence in the leiomyoma group but four patients died in the leiomyosarcoma group. Although rare, smooth muscle tumours should be considered in situations where clinical presentation and investigations are not suggestive of any common GI disorder. The preoperative assessment and diagnosis is difficult because of the variability in clinical features and their inaccessibility to routine GI investigation. It is recommended that, where possible, the lesion, whether symptomatic or discovered incidentally, should be excised completely to achieve a cure and prevent future complications. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2221768

  19. Myeloid cells in tumour-immune interactions.

    PubMed

    Kareva, Irina; Berezovskaya, Faina; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2010-07-01

    Despite highly developed specific immune responses, tumour cells often manage to escape recognition by the immune system, continuing to grow uncontrollably. Experimental work suggests that mature myeloid cells may be central to the activation of the specific immune response. Recognition and subsequent control of tumour growth by the cells of the specific immune response depend on the balance between immature (ImC) and mature (MmC) myeloid cells in the body. However, tumour cells produce cytokines that inhibit ImC maturation, altering the balance between ImC and MmC. Hence, the focus of this manuscript is on the study of the potential role of this inhibiting mechanism on tumour growth dynamics. A conceptual predator-prey type model that incorporates the dynamics and interactions of tumour cells, CD8(+) T cells, ImC and MmC is proposed in order to address the role of this mechanism. The prey (tumour) has a defence mechanism (blocking the maturation of ImC) that prevents the predator (immune system) from recognizing it. The model, a four-dimensional nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations, is reduced to a two-dimensional system using time-scale arguments that are tied to the maturation rate of ImC. Analysis shows that the model is capable of supporting biologically reasonable patterns of behaviour depending on the initial conditions. A range of parameters, where healing without external influences can occur, is identified both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  20. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  1. Psychoneuroendocrine research in depression. I. Hormone levels of different neuroendocrine axes and the dexamethasone suppression test.

    PubMed

    Rupprecht, R; Lesch, K P

    1989-01-01

    Psychoneuroendocrinology is of major importance in the biological research of depression. Most studies have focussed on the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis but other endocrine systems such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT), hypothalamic-pituitary-somatotropic (HPS), and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis have also been shown to be involved in the psychobiology of depression. There are close interrelations between various endocrine axes which possibly are affected during depressive illness. A variety of neuroendocrine abnormalities has been detected in depressive disorder but the pathophysiology of these derangements remains still unclear. Although the currently used neuroendocrine tests are not of diagnostic validity they may help to clarify the pathophysiological significance of the complex regulatory mechanisms of different neuroendocrine axes in affective disorders. Neuroendocrine regulation is determined both by peripheral and central mechanisms which both have to be adequately considered as well as potent interactions between various endocrine systems in further neuroendocrine depression research.

  2. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater causing ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KATO, AKIHISA; HAYASHI, KAZUKI; NAITOH, ITARU; SENO, KYOJI; OKADA, YUKIKO; BAN, TESSHIN; KONDO, HIROMU; NISHI, YUJI; UMEMURA, SHUICHIRO; HORI, YASUKI; NATSUME, MAKOTO; JOH, TAKASHI

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is rarely secreted by neuroendocrine tumors. Although neuroendocrine tumors may occur at any site in the gastrointestinal system, they very rarely occur in the ampulla of Vater and have a poor prognosis. The present study described the first Cushing's syndrome as a result of ectopic ACTH arising from the ampulla of Vater neuroendocrine carcinoma. A 69-year-old female was admitted with clinical features of Cushing's syndrome, confirmed biochemically by hypokalemia, and elevated levels of ACTH and cortisol. In further investigations, a tumor of the ampulla of Vater and liver metastases were detected. Pathological analysis of the biopsy confirmed a neuroendocrine carcinoma, which was immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, cluster of differentiation 56 and ACTH. Therefore, the present study diagnosed a functional and metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater with ectopic ACTH production causing Cushing's syndrome. The patient succumbed to mortality 4 months later, despite administration of combined chemotherapy with irinotecan and cisplatin. PMID:27330779

  3. Cell type-specific gene expression in the neuroendocrine system. A neuroendocrine-specific regulatory element in the promoter of chromogranin A, a ubiquitous secretory granule core protein.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Rozansky, D J; Webster, N J; O'Connor, D T

    1994-01-01

    The acidic secretory protein chromogranin A universally occurs in amine and peptide hormone and neurotransmitter storage granules throughout the neuroendocrine system. What factors govern the activity of the chromogranin A gene, to yield such a widespread yet neuroendocrine-selective pattern of expression? To address this question, we isolated the mouse chromogranin A gene promoter. The promoter conferred cell type-specific expression in several neuroendocrine cell types (adrenal medullary chromaffin cells, anterior pituitary corticotropes, and anterior pituitary somatolactotropes) but not in control (fibroblast or kidney) cells. In neuroendocrine cells, analysis of promoter deletions established both positive and negative transcriptional regulatory domains. A distal positive domain (-4.8/-2.2 kbp) was discovered, as well as negative (-258/-181 bp) and positive (-147/-61 bp) domains in the proximate promoter. The proximate promoter contained a minimal neuroendocrine-specific element between -77 and -61 bp. Sequence alignment of the mouse promoter with corresponding regions in rat and bovine clones indicated that the mouse sequence shares over 85% homology with rat and 52% with bovine promoters. DNaseI footprinting and electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays demonstrated the presence of nuclear factors in neuroendocrine cells that recognized the proximate promoter. We conclude that the chromogranin A promoter contains both positive and negative domains governing its cell type-specific pattern of transcription, and that a small proximate region of the promoter, containing novel as well as previously described elements, interacts specifically with neuroendocrine nuclear proteins, and is thereby sufficient to ensure widespread neuroendocrine expression of the gene. Images PMID:8040254

  4. [What is new in the pathology of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors?].

    PubMed

    Komminoth, P; Perren, A

    2015-05-01

    The diagnostics of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNEN) have changed in recent years especially concerning the World Health Organization (WHO) classification, TNM staging and grading. Furthermore, some new prognostic and predictive immunohistochemical markers have been introduced. Most progress, however, has been made in the molecular pathogenesis of these neoplasms. Using next generation sequencing techniques, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, hypoxia and epigenetic changes were identified as key players in tumorigenesis. In this article the most important developments of morphological as well as immunohistochemical diagnostics together with the molecular background of PanNEN are summarized.

  5. Multidisciplinary management of nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumor of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Folkert, Ian W; Hernandez, Paul; Roses, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are a rare and diverse group of tumors; nonfunctional (NF) PNETs account for the majority of cases. Most patients with NF-PNETs have metastatic disease at the time of presentation. A variety of treatment modalities exist, including medical, liver directed, and surgical treatments. Aggressive surgical management is associated with prolonged survival, however available data are limited by selection bias and the frequent combination of PNETs with carcinoid tumors. Although few patients with metastatic disease will be cured, application of currently available therapies in a multidisciplinary setting can lead to excellent outcomes with prolonged patient survival. PMID:27003988

  6. Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Avid Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor.

    PubMed

    Vamadevan, Shankar; Shetty, Deepa; Le, Ken; Bui, Chuong; Mansberg, Robert; Loh, Han

    2016-10-01

    Ga-PSMA PET/CT is increasingly used to evaluate recurrent prostatic malignancy due to its high specificity. A 75-year-old man with a previous history of treated prostate cancer 3 years earlier presented with rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level and underwent Ga-PSMA PET/CT which demonstrated a PSMA-avid focus in the neck of the pancreas. Triple-phase abdominal CT demonstrated enhancement in the arterial phase and to a lesser extent the venous phase of a soft tissue mass in the neck of the pancreas. Cytological and histopathological examination of the soft tissue mass confirmed a low-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor.

  7. Tumour nuclear oestrogen receptor beta 1 correlates inversely with parathyroid tumour weight

    PubMed Central

    Haglund, Felix; Rosin, Gustaf; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Juhlin, C Christofer; Pernow, Ylva; Norenstedt, Sophie; Dinets, Andrii; Larsson, Catharina; Hartman, Johan; Höög, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrinopathy, frequently caused by a parathyroid adenoma, rarely by a parathyroid carcinoma that lacks effective oncological treatment. As the majority of cases are present in postmenopausal women, oestrogen signalling has been implicated in the tumourigenesis. Oestrogen receptor beta 1 (ERB1) and ERB2 have been recently identified in parathyroid adenomas, the former inducing genes coupled to tumour apoptosis. We applied immunohistochemistry and slide digitalisation to quantify nuclear ERB1 and ERB2 in 172 parathyroid adenomas, atypical adenomas and carcinomas, and ten normal parathyroid glands. All the normal parathyroid glands expressed ERB1 and ERB2. The majority of tumours expressed ERB1 (70.6%) at varying intensities, and ERB2 (96.5%) at strong intensities. Parathyroid carcinomas expressed ERB1 in three out of six cases and ERB2 in five out of six cases. The intensity of tumour nuclear ERB1 staining significantly correlated inversely with tumour weight (P=0.011), and patients whose tumours were classified as ERB1-negative had significantly greater tumour weight as well as higher serum calcium (P=0.002) and parathyroid hormone levels (P=0.003). Additionally, tumour nuclear ERB1 was not expressed differentially with respect to sex or age of the patient. Levels of tumour nuclear ERB2 did not correlate with clinical characteristics. In conclusion, decreased ERB1 immunoreactivity is associated with increased tumour weight in parathyroid adenomas. Given the previously reported correlation with tumour-suppressive signalling, selective oestrogen receptor modulation (SERMs) may play a role in the treatment of parathyroid carcinomas. Future studies of SERMs and oestrogen treatment in PHPT should consider tumour weight as a potential factor in pharmacological responsiveness. PMID:25648860

  8. Tumour nuclear oestrogen receptor beta 1 correlates inversely with parathyroid tumour weight.

    PubMed

    Haglund, Felix; Rosin, Gustaf; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Juhlin, C Christofer; Pernow, Ylva; Norenstedt, Sophie; Dinets, Andrii; Larsson, Catharina; Hartman, Johan; Höög, Anders

    2015-03-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrinopathy, frequently caused by a parathyroid adenoma, rarely by a parathyroid carcinoma that lacks effective oncological treatment. As the majority of cases are present in postmenopausal women, oestrogen signalling has been implicated in the tumourigenesis. Oestrogen receptor beta 1 (ERB1) and ERB2 have been recently identified in parathyroid adenomas, the former inducing genes coupled to tumour apoptosis. We applied immunohistochemistry and slide digitalisation to quantify nuclear ERB1 and ERB2 in 172 parathyroid adenomas, atypical adenomas and carcinomas, and ten normal parathyroid glands. All the normal parathyroid glands expressed ERB1 and ERB2. The majority of tumours expressed ERB1 (70.6%) at varying intensities, and ERB2 (96.5%) at strong intensities. Parathyroid carcinomas expressed ERB1 in three out of six cases and ERB2 in five out of six cases. The intensity of tumour nuclear ERB1 staining significantly correlated inversely with tumour weight (P=0.011), and patients whose tumours were classified as ERB1-negative had significantly greater tumour weight as well as higher serum calcium (P=0.002) and parathyroid hormone levels (P=0.003). Additionally, tumour nuclear ERB1 was not expressed differentially with respect to sex or age of the patient. Levels of tumour nuclear ERB2 did not correlate with clinical characteristics. In conclusion, decreased ERB1 immunoreactivity is associated with increased tumour weight in parathyroid adenomas. Given the previously reported correlation with tumour-suppressive signalling, selective oestrogen receptor modulation (SERMs) may play a role in the treatment of parathyroid carcinomas. Future studies of SERMs and oestrogen treatment in PHPT should consider tumour weight as a potential factor in pharmacological responsiveness. PMID:25648860

  9. Genetic deletion of osteopontin in TRAMP mice skews prostate carcinogenesis from adenocarcinoma to aggressive human-like neuroendocrine cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Giorgio; Jachetti, Elena; Comuzzi, Barbara; Dugo, Matteo; Arioli, Ivano; Miotti, Silvia; Sangaletti, Sabina; Di Carlo, Emma; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P.

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted glycoprotein, that belongs to the non-structural extracellular matrix (ECM), and its over expression in human prostate cancer has been associated with disease progression, androgen independence and metastatic ability. Nevertheless, the pathophysiology of OPN in prostate tumorigenesis has never been studied. We crossed TRansgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mice with OPN deficient (OPN−/−) mice and followed tumor onset and progression in these double mutants. Ultrasound examination detected the early onset of a rapidly growing, homogeneous and spherical tumor in about 60% of OPN−/− TRAMP mice. Such neoplasms seldom occurred in parental TRAMP mice otherwise prone to adenocarcinomas and were characterized for being androgen receptor negative, highly proliferative and endowed with neuroendocrine (NE) features. Gene expression profiling showed up-regulation of genes involved in tumor progression, cell cycle and neuronal differentiation in OPN-deficient versus wild type TRAMP tumors. Down-regulated genes included key genes of TGFa pathway, including SMAD3 and Filamin, which were confirmed at the protein level. Furthermore, NE genes and particularly those characterizing early prostatic lesions of OPN-deficient mice were found to correlate with those of human prostate NE tumours. These data underscore a novel role of OPN in the early stages of prostate cancer growth, protecting against the development of aggressive NE tumors. PMID:26700622

  10. The treatment of cranial germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Brandes, A A; Pasetto, L M; Monfardini, S

    2000-08-01

    Germ cell tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) include many subtypes whose response to treatment varies, even though the symptoms and radiological appearances are similar. Five-year survival rates are 96% for germinomas, 100% for mature teratomas, 67% for immature teratomas and 69% for immature teratomas mixed with germinomas; for beta-HCG secreting germinomas the rate is only 38%. Patients with choriocarcinoma, embryonal carcinoma, or yolk sac tumour have the lowest survival rates; patients with germinoma or mature teratoma have longer survival rates. Although a wider resection is associated with a higher rate of survival for patients with non-germinomatous germ cell (NGGC) tumours, to date an aggressive surgical approach has been advocated only for pineal region tumours, but not for hypothalamic/neurohypophyseal tumours. Beside the delayed injury induced by radiotherapy, the late injury induced by chemotherapy is becoming increasingly evident. Cisplatin is considered an indispensable drug, but it may cause renal damage, ototoxicity, peripheral neuropathy and sterility, while etoposide is associated with an excess frequency of second neoplasms. Taking into account all of the published literature, the following therapeutic options are suggested: in pure germinoma tumours (GT) radiotherapy alone will usually ensure adequate control of the disease, and the long-term sequelae may be limited by reducing the dose delivered, as was proposed for germ cell testicular tumours, to 30 Gy to limited fields plus 25-30 Gy to the spinal axis if there is disseminated disease. In cases of recurrence, which should be uncommon, patients may be rescued with both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In NGGC tumours, the prognosis is more unfavourable and there is often dissemination to the spine at diagnosis; however, the tumour's high chemosensitivity suggests neoadjuvant treatment chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for three cycles followed by consolidation radiotherapy with

  11. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach

    PubMed Central

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination. PMID:26861829

  12. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach.

    PubMed

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination. PMID:26861829

  13. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-02-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination.

  14. MicroRNA Regulation of Brain Tumour Initiating Cells in Central Nervous System Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Thusyanth; Bakhshinyan, David; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K.

    2015-01-01

    CNS tumours occur in both pediatric and adult patients and many of these tumours are associated with poor clinical outcome. Due to a paradigm shift in thinking for the last several years, these tumours are now considered to originate from a small population of stem-like cells within the bulk tumour tissue. These cells, termed as brain tumour initiating cells (BTICs), are perceived to be regulated by microRNAs at the posttranscriptional/translational levels. Proliferation, stemness, differentiation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, apoptosis, and cell cycle constitute some of the significant processes modulated by microRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. Characterization and functional studies on oncogenic or tumour suppressive microRNAs are made possible because of developments in sequencing and microarray techniques. In the current review, we bring recent knowledge of the role of microRNAs in BTIC formation and therapy. Special attention is paid to two highly aggressive and well-characterized brain tumours: gliomas and medulloblastoma. As microRNA seems to be altered in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, “microRNA therapy” may now have potential to improve outcomes for brain tumour patients. In this rapidly evolving field, further understanding of miRNA biology and its contribution towards cancer can be mined for new therapeutic tools. PMID:26064134

  15. A nanoparticle formulation that selectively transfects metastatic tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Hendricks, William; Liu, Guosheng; McCaffery, J. Michael; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Huso, David L.; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of malignant disease in light of the large number of potent, tumor-specific therapeutic payloads potentially available for delivery. To be effective, gene therapy vehicles must be able to deliver their therapeutic payloads to metastatic lesions after systemic administration. Here we describe nanoparticles comprised of a core of high molecular weight linear polyethylenimine (LPEI) complexed with DNA and surrounded by a shell of polyethyleneglycol-modified (PEGylated) low molecular weight LPEI. Compared with a state-of-the-art commercially available in vivo gene delivery formulation, i.v. delivery of the core/PEGylated shell (CPS) nanoparticles provided more than a 16,000-fold increase in the ratio of tumor to nontumor transfection. The vast majority of examined liver and lung metastases derived from a colorectal cancer cell line showed transgene expression after i.v. CPS injection in an animal model of metastasis. Histological examination of tissues from transfected mice revealed that the CPS nanoparticles selectively transfected neoplastic cells rather than stromal cells within primary and metastatic tumors. However, only a small fraction of neoplastic cells (<1%) expressed the transgene, and the extent of delivery varied with the tumor cell line, tumor site, and host mouse strain used. Our results demonstrate that these CPS nanoparticles offer substantial advantages over previously described formulations for in vivo nanoparticle gene therapeutics. At the same time, they illustrate that major increases in the effectiveness of such approaches are needed for utility in patients with metastatic cancer. PMID:23959886

  16. Tissue Engineering Using Transfected Growth-Factor Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madry, Henning; Langer, Robert S.; Freed, Lisa E.; Trippel, Stephen; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2005-01-01

    A method of growing bioengineered tissues includes, as a major component, the use of mammalian cells that have been transfected with genes for secretion of regulator and growth-factor substances. In a typical application, one either seeds the cells onto an artificial matrix made of a synthetic or natural biocompatible material, or else one cultures the cells until they secrete a desired amount of an extracellular matrix. If such a bioengineered tissue construct is to be used for surgical replacement of injured tissue, then the cells should preferably be the patient s own cells or, if not, at least cells matched to the patient s cells according to a human-leucocyteantigen (HLA) test. The bioengineered tissue construct is typically implanted in the patient's injured natural tissue, wherein the growth-factor genes enhance metabolic functions that promote the in vitro development of functional tissue constructs and their integration with native tissues. If the matrix is biodegradable, then one of the results of metabolism could be absorption of the matrix and replacement of the matrix with tissue formed at least partly by the transfected cells. The method was developed for articular chondrocytes but can (at least in principle) be extended to a variety of cell types and biocompatible matrix materials, including ones that have been exploited in prior tissue-engineering methods. Examples of cell types include chondrocytes, hepatocytes, islet cells, nerve cells, muscle cells, other organ cells, bone- and cartilage-forming cells, epithelial and endothelial cells, connective- tissue stem cells, mesodermal stem cells, and cells of the liver and the pancreas. Cells can be obtained from cell-line cultures, biopsies, and tissue banks. Genes, molecules, or nucleic acids that secrete factors that influence the growth of cells, the production of extracellular matrix material, and other cell functions can be inserted in cells by any of a variety of standard transfection techniques.

  17. Calcium dynamics in the secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Cellular Ca(2+)signaling results from a complex interplay among a variety of Ca(2+) fluxes going across the plasma membrane and across the membranes of several organelles, together with the buffering effect of large numbers of Ca(2+)-binding sites distributed along the cell architecture. Endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and even nucleus have all been involved in cellular Ca(2+) signaling, and the mechanisms for Ca(2+) uptake and release from these organelles are well known. In neuroendocrine cells, the secretory granules also constitute a very important Ca(2+)-storing organelle, and the possible role of the stored Ca(2+) as a trigger for secretion has attracted considerable attention. However, this possibility is frequently overlooked, and the main reason for that is that there is still considerable uncertainty on the main questions related with granular Ca(2+) dynamics, e.g., the free granular [Ca(2+)], the physical state of the stored Ca(2+) or the mechanisms for Ca(2+) accumulation and release from the granules. This review will give a critical overview of the present state of knowledge and the main conflicting points on secretory granule Ca(2+) homeostasis in neuroendocrine cells.

  18. Neuroendocrine Carcinomas of the Gastroenteropancreatic System: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Ilett, Emma Elizabeth; Langer, Seppo W.; Olsen, Ingrid Holst; Federspiel, Birgitte; Kjær, Andreas; Knigge, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    To date, empirical literature has generally been considered lacking in relation to neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs), the highly malignant subgroup of neuroendocrine neoplasms. NECs are often found in the lungs or the gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) system and can be of small or large cell type. Concentrating on GEP-NECs, we can conclude that survival times are poor, with a median of only 4–16 months depending on disease stage and primary site. Further, this aggressive disease appears to be on the rise, with incidence numbers increasing while survival times are stagnant. Treatment strategies concerning surgery are often undecided and second-line chemotherapy is not yet established. After an analysis of over 2600 articles, we can conclude that there is indeed more empirical literature concerning GEP-NECs available than previously assumed. This unique review is based on 333 selected articles and contains detailed information concerning all aspects of GEP-NECs. Namely, the classification, histology, genetic abnormalities, epidemiology, origin, biochemistry, imaging, treatment and survival of GEP-NECs are described. Also, organ-specific summaries with more detail in relation to disease presentation, diagnosis, treatment and survival are presented. Finally, key points are discussed with directions for future research priorities. PMID:26854147

  19. Leptin as a modulator of neuroendocrine function in humans.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sami M; Hamnvik, Ole-Petter R; Brinkoetter, Mary; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2012-07-01

    Leptin, a peptide hormone secreted by adipocytes in proportion of the amount of energy stored in fat, plays a central role in regulating human energy homeostasis. In addition, leptin plays a significant permissive role in the physiological regulation of several neuroendocrine axes, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal, -thyroid, -growth hormone, and -adrenal axes. Decreased levels of leptin, also known as hypoleptinemia, signal to the brain a state of energy deprivation. Hypoleptinemia can be a congenital or acquired condition, and is associated with alterations of the aforementioned axes aimed at promoting survival. More specifically, gonadotropin levels decrease and become less pulsatile under conditions of energy deprivation, and these changes can be at least partially reversed through leptin administration in physiological replacement doses. Similarly, leptin deficiency is associated with thyroid axis abnormalities including abnormal levels of thyrotropin-releasing hormone, and leptin administration may at least partially attenuate this effect. Leptin deficiency results in decreased insulin-like growth factor 1 levels which can be partially ameliorated through leptin administration, and leptin appears to have a much more pronounced effect on the growth of rodents than that of humans. Similarly, adrenal axis function is regulated more tightly by low leptin in rodents than in humans. In addition to congenital leptin deficiency, conditions that may be associated with decreased leptin levels include hypothalamic amenorrhea, anorexia nervosa, and congenital or acquired lipodystrophy syndromes. Accumulating evidence from proof of concept studies suggests that leptin administration, in replacement doses, may ameliorate neuroendocrine abnormalities in individuals who suffer from these conditions.

  20. Personality, manual preference and neuroendocrine reactivity in hirsute subjects.

    PubMed

    Martin Martins, J; Do Vale, S; Trinca, A; Saldanha, C; Martins E Silva, J

    2004-09-30

    Behavioral and neuroendocrine differences may be postulated in hirsute subjects since central effects of gonadal steroids are well established. We conducted a controlled clinical study with 25 consecutive young hirsute participants compared with 20 consecutive controls. Neuropsychological evaluation included the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) and the Edinburgh Inventory of Manual Preference (EIMP). Neuroendocrine reactivity was assessed by the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol responses to corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). Hirsute participants presented a flattened personality profile with lower neurotic triad scores--146 +/- 20 versus 166 +/- 28. Left-hand preference was more common in hirsute participants--4/21 versus 0/20. Decreased ACTH [area under the curve (AUC)--36 +/-2 8 vs. 72 +/- 63 pg/ml h] and cortisol (AUC--18 +/- 4 vs. 25 +/- 10 microg/dl h) responses to CRH were found in the hirsute group. In the hirsute group, higher manual preference scores were associated with lower ACTH responses to CRH, while the opposite association was found in the control group. In the hirsute group, the hyporeactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis was associated with lower behavior-deviant scores, while in the control group, the hyporeactive HPA axis was associated with more psychopathology. We conclude that personality and HPA axis reactivity are different in hirsute female participants when compared with controls, with a trend for differences regarding handedness. Personality and handedness are differently associated with HPA reactivity. Distinctive features in hirsute participants are probably established very early during ontogenic development.

  1. Neuroendocrine control by kisspeptins: role in metabolic regulation of fertility.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Victor M; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The neurohormonal control of reproduction involves a hierarchical network of central and peripheral signals in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Development and function of this neuroendocrine system is the result of a lifelong delicate balance between endogenous regulators and environmental cues, including nutritional and metabolic factors. Kisspeptins are the peptide products of KISS1, which operate via the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR54 (also known as Kiss1R). These peptides have emerged as essential upstream regulators of neurons secreting gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), the major hypothalamic node for the stimulatory control of the HPG axis. They are potent elicitors of gonadotropin secretion in various species and physiological settings. Moreover, Kiss1 neurons in the hypothalamus participate in crucial features of reproductive maturation and function, such as brain-level sex differentiation, puberty onset and the neuroendocrine regulation of gonadotropin secretion and ovulation. Cotransmitters of Kiss1 neurons, such as neurokinin B, with roles in controlling the HPG axis have been identified by genetic, neuroanatomical and physiological studies. In addition, a putative role has been proposed for Kiss1 neurons in transmitting metabolic information to GnRH neurons, although the precise mechanisms are as yet unclear. In this Review, we present the major reproductive features of kisspeptins, especially their interplay with neurokinin B and potential roles in the metabolic control of puberty and fertility, and suggest new avenues for research.

  2. Olfaction Modulates Reproductive Plasticity Through Neuroendocrine Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Jessica N.; Mutlu, Ayse Sena; Xia, Fan; Wang, Meng C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Reproductive plasticity describes the ability of organisms to adjust parameters such as volume, rate, or timing of progeny production in order to maximize successful reproduction under different environmental conditions. Reproductive plasticity in response to environmental variation has been observed in a wide range of animals [1-4]; however, the mechanisms involved in translating environmental cues into reproductive outcomes remain unknown. Here we show that olfaction modulates reproductive timing and senescence through neuroendocrine signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans. On their preferred diet, worms demonstrate an increased rate of reproduction and an early onset of reproductive aging. Perception of the preferred diet's odor by AWB olfactory neurons elicits these adjustments by increasing germline proliferation, and optogenetic stimulation of AWB neurons is sufficient to accelerate reproductive timing in the absence of dietary inputs. Furthermore, AWB neurons act through neuropeptide signaling to regulate reproductive rate and senescence. These findings reveal a neuroendocrine nexus linking olfactory sensation and reproduction in response to environmental variation, and indicate the significance of olfaction in the regulation of reproductive decline during aging. PMID:26279229

  3. Divergent clonal evolution of castration resistant neuroendocrine prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, Himisha; Prandi, Davide; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Benelli, Matteo; Puca, Loredana; Cyrta, Joanna; Marotz, Clarisse; Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Chakravarthi, Balabhadrapatruni V.S.K.; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Tomlins, Scott A.; Nanus, David M.; Tagawa, Scott T.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Garraway, Levi A.; Rubin, Mark A.; Demichelis, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    An increasingly recognized resistance mechanism to androgen receptor (AR)-directed therapy in prostate cancer involves epithelial plasticity, wherein tumor cells demonstrate low to absent AR expression and often neuroendocrine features. The etiology and molecular basis for these “alternative” treatment-resistant cell states remain incompletely understood. Here, by analyzing whole exome sequencing data of metastatic biopsies from patients, we observed significant genomic overlap between castration resistant adenocarcinoma (CRPC-Adeno) and neuroendocrine histologies (CRPC-NE); analysis of serial progression samples points to a model most consistent with divergent clonal evolution. Genome-wide DNA methylation revealed marked epigenetic differences between CRPC-NE and CRPC-Adeno that also designated cases of CRPC-Adeno with clinical features of AR-independence as CRPC-NE, suggesting that epigenetic modifiers may play a role in the induction and/or maintenance of this treatment-resistant state. This study supports the emergence of an alternative, “AR-indifferent” cell state through divergent clonal evolution as a mechanism of treatment resistance in advanced prostate cancer. PMID:26855148

  4. Small bowel neuroendocrine tumors: From pathophysiology to clinical approach

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Sofia; Rosa, Bruno; Cotter, José

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), defined as epithelial tumors with predominant neuroendocrine differentiation, are among the most frequent types of small bowel neoplasm. They represent a rare, slow-growing neoplasm with some characteristics common to all forms and others attributable to the organ of origin. The diagnosis of this subgroup of neoplasia is not usually straight-forward for several reasons. Being a rare form of neoplasm they are frequently not readily considered in the differential diagnosis. Also, clinical manifestations are nonspecific lending the clinician no clue that points directly to this entity. However, the annual incidence of NETs has risen in the last years to 40 to 50 cases per million probably not due to a real increase in incidence but rather due to better diagnostic tools that have become progressively available. Being a rare malignancy, investigation regarding its pathophysiology and efforts toward better understanding and classification of these tumors has been limited until recently. Clinical societies dedicated to this matter are emerging (NANETS, ENETS and UKINETS) and several guidelines were published in an effort to standardize the nomenclature, grading and staging systems as well as diagnosis and management of NETs. Also, some investigation on the genetic behavior of small bowel NETs has been recently released, shedding some light on the pathophysiology of these tumors, and pointing some new directions on the possible treating options. In this review we focus on the current status of the overall knowledge about small bowel NETs, focusing on recent breakthroughs and its potential application on clinical practice. PMID:26909234

  5. Working formulation of neuroendocrine tumors of the skin and breast.

    PubMed

    Asioli, Sofia; Foschini, Maria Pia; Masetti, Riccardo; Eusebi, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    In the skin and breast, endocrine tumors are composed of a heterogeneous mixture of endocrine and exocrine cells. The definition of "pure" endocrine carcinomas is a matter for debate, and as a consequence, there is lack of uniform diagnostic criteria. There are no significant clinical differences in either overall or disease-free survival between matched neoplasms with endocrine and without endocrine differentiation nor between the degree of endocrine differentiation and tumor size, stage, or prevalence of vascular invasion for both sites (skin and breast). Here, endocrine tumors of the skin and breast are grouped respectively into three categories that include most of the neuroendocrine tumors of the skin and breast as seen in routine practice. It was felt that the number of different types of neuroendocrine tumors is so conspicuous that it is impossible to organize them in an orderly classification. It has been proposed therefore, for practical diagnostic routine purposes, to arrange these neoplasms into a working formulation. The latter includes heterogeneous lesions respectively of the skin and breast within the same group that have clinical features in common. PMID:24729037

  6. Neuroendocrine Carcinomas of the Gastroenteropancreatic System: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Ilett, Emma Elizabeth; Langer, Seppo W; Olsen, Ingrid Holst; Federspiel, Birgitte; Kjær, Andreas; Knigge, Ulrich

    2015-04-08

    To date, empirical literature has generally been considered lacking in relation to neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs), the highly malignant subgroup of neuroendocrine neoplasms. NECs are often found in the lungs or the gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) system and can be of small or large cell type. Concentrating on GEP-NECs, we can conclude that survival times are poor, with a median of only 4-16 months depending on disease stage and primary site. Further, this aggressive disease appears to be on the rise, with incidence numbers increasing while survival times are stagnant. Treatment strategies concerning surgery are often undecided and second-line chemotherapy is not yet established. After an analysis of over 2600 articles, we can conclude that there is indeed more empirical literature concerning GEP-NECs available than previously assumed. This unique review is based on 333 selected articles and contains detailed information concerning all aspects of GEP-NECs. Namely, the classification, histology, genetic abnormalities, epidemiology, origin, biochemistry, imaging, treatment and survival of GEP-NECs are described. Also, organ-specific summaries with more detail in relation to disease presentation, diagnosis, treatment and survival are presented. Finally, key points are discussed with directions for future research priorities.

  7. Endoscopic imaging in the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pellicano, Rinaldo; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Altruda, Fiorella; Bruno, Mauro; Saracco, Giorgio M; De Angelis, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors deriving from the gastrointestinal (GI) neuroendocrine system. Since these neoplasms are usually very small, located deeply within the retroperitoneum or into an extramucosal site of the GI tract and, lastly, because they may be multi-sited, radiological imaging modalities, in combination with endoscopy, are the diagnostic workhorses in patients with GEP-NETs. Endoscopic approach is useful for detection, bioptic diagnosis and curative resection of small GEP-NETs of stomach, duodenum, jejuno-ileum, and colon-rectum. Moreover, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), associated with high frequency miniprobes, is a valuable procedure in regional staging of lesions of the GI wall and can provide information which has a remarkable impact on therapeutic choices. EUS is still the sole technique, in a substantial number of cases, providing a definitive diagnosis of pancreatic insulinoma and it detects and follows small lesions of the pancreas in patients with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 syndrome. EUS should be performed in those cases in which morphological or molecular imaging modalities need to be supported because of negative or dubious results. In this review we describe the applications of endoscopic procedures in the management of GEP-NETs. PMID:27600643

  8. AACE/ACE disease state clinical review: pancreatic neuroendocrine incidentalomas.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Miguel F; Åkerström, Göran; Angelos, Peter; Grant, Clive S; Hoff, Ana O; Pantoja, Juan Pablo; Pérez-Johnston, Rocio; Sahani, Dushyant V; Wong, Richard J; Randolph, Gregory

    2015-05-01

    Incidental detection of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) has substantially increased over the last decade due to widespread use of advanced imaging studies. Reliable initial imaging-based characterization is crucial for the differential diagnosis from other exocrine neoplasms and to determine the appropriate management plan. Measurements of chromogranin A, pancreatic polypeptide, and calcitonin are recommended for the biochemical evaluation. A thorough medical history needs to be performed to rule out multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) type 1. The European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS)/Tumor Node Metastasis (TNM) staging system together with a grading based on the Ki-67 proliferation index and mitotic counts has proven to give more appropriate prognostic information than the World Health Organization (WHO)/American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM staging but may still fail to safely differentiate benign from malignant lesions. Poorly differentiated PNETs generally present with metastases and are rarely amenable for resection. Well- or intermediately differentiated tumors ≥2 cm with imaging evidence of malignancy or with a Ki-67 >2% should be resected. It has been suggested that non-MEN related, nonfunctioning, and asymptomatic PNETs <2 cm with a Ki-67 index ≤2% carry a low risk of metastasis and may be observed in the absence of clinical or radiologic criteria of malignancy or progression, especially in older patients. However, because metastases may occur with long delay with smaller PNETS, physicians should consider patient age, lesion location, and the risks of operation, and patients not undergoing surgery need to be closely followed closely.

  9. Divergent clonal evolution of castration-resistant neuroendocrine prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Himisha; Prandi, Davide; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Benelli, Matteo; Puca, Loredana; Cyrta, Joanna; Marotz, Clarisse; Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Chakravarthi, Balabhadrapatruni V S K; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Tomlins, Scott A; Nanus, David M; Tagawa, Scott T; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Elemento, Olivier; Sboner, Andrea; Garraway, Levi A; Rubin, Mark A; Demichelis, Francesca

    2016-03-01

    An increasingly recognized resistance mechanism to androgen receptor (AR)-directed therapy in prostate cancer involves epithelial plasticity, in which tumor cells demonstrate low to absent AR expression and often have neuroendocrine features. The etiology and molecular basis for this 'alternative' treatment-resistant cell state remain incompletely understood. Here, by analyzing whole-exome sequencing data of metastatic biopsies from patients, we observed substantial genomic overlap between castration-resistant tumors that were histologically characterized as prostate adenocarcinomas (CRPC-Adeno) and neuroendocrine prostate cancer (CRPC-NE); analysis of biopsy samples from the same individuals over time points to a model most consistent with divergent clonal evolution. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis revealed marked epigenetic differences between CRPC-NE tumors and CRPC-Adeno, and also designated samples of CRPC-Adeno with clinical features of AR independence as CRPC-NE, suggesting that epigenetic modifiers may play a role in the induction and/or maintenance of this treatment-resistant state. This study supports the emergence of an alternative, 'AR-indifferent' cell state through divergent clonal evolution as a mechanism of treatment resistance in advanced prostate cancer.

  10. Neuroendocrine response to casino gambling in problem gamblers.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Gerhard; Schwertfeger, Jan; Exton, Michael S; Janssen, Onno E; Knapp, Wolfram; Stadler, Michael A; Schedlowski, Manfred; Krüger, Tillmann H C

    2004-11-01

    Problematic gambling is thought to be influenced by neurobiological mechanisms. However, the neuroendocrine response to gambling is largely unknown. Therefore, the effect of casino gambling on the sympathoadrenal system, the HPA-axis, and pituitary hormones were analyzed. Fourteen male problem gamblers and 15 non-problem gamblers were examined in a balanced cross-over design. In the experimental session, participants played blackjack in a casino wagering their own money. During the control session, subjects played cards for accumulation of points. Heart rate and endocrine measures were recorded at baseline, at 30, 60 and 90 min during gambling/card playing, and after the game. Heart rate and norepinephrine levels increased with the onset of blackjack in both groups, with problem gamblers showing significantly higher levels across the entire gambling session. In addition, dopamine levels were significantly higher in problem gamblers during casino gambling compared to non-problem gamblers. Cortisol levels were transiently increased with the onset of blackjack in both groups. Casino gambling as a "real life" situation induces activation of the HPA-axis and the sympathoadrenergic system, with significantly more pronounced changes in problem gamblers. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of neuroendocrine disturbances in problem gambling.

  11. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: clinical features, diagnosis and medical treatment: advances

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, Robert T.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) comprise with gastrointestinal carcinoids, the main groups of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Although these two groups of GI-NETs share many features including histological aspects; over-/ectopic expression of somatostatin receptors; the ability to ectopically secrete hormones/peptides/amines which can result in distinct functional syndromes; similar approaches used for tumor localization and some aspects of treatment, it is now generally agreed they should be considered separate. They differ in their pathogenesis, hormonal syndromes produced, many aspects of biological behavior and most important, in their response to certain anti-tumor treatment (chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapies). In this chapter the clinical features of the different types of pNETs will be considered as well as aspects of their diagnosis and medical treatment of the hormone-excess state. Emphasis will be on controversial areas or recent advances. The other aspects of the management of these tumors (surgery, treatment of advanced disease, tumor localization) are not dealt with here, because they are covered in other chapters in this volume. PMID:23582916

  12. Transient and stable transfection in the protozoan parasite Entamoeba invadens.

    PubMed

    Ehrenkaufer, Gretchen M; Singh, Upinder

    2012-07-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an important human pathogen and a major health problem worldwide. Many aspects of parasite biology can be studied with the exception of stage conversion, which cannot be reproduced adequately in E. histolytica. The reptile parasite Entamoeba invadens is a vital model system for studying stage conversion since it can be induced to undergo both encystation and excystation with high efficiency in vitro. However, functional studies using E. invadens have been limited by the lack of genetic tools in this species. Here, we report a new method for both transient and stable transfection of E. invadens. These new tools will greatly enhance research into Entamoeba development.

  13. Preparation of Gene Gun Bullets and Biolistic Transfection of Neurons in Slice Culture

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Georgia; Zito, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Biolistic transfection is a physical means of transfecting cells by bombarding tissue with high velocity DNA coated particles. We provide a detailed protocol for biolistic transfection of rat hippocampal slices, from the initial preparation of DNA coated bullets to the final shooting of the organotypic slice cultures using a gene gun. Gene gun transfection is an efficient and easy means of transfecting neurons and is especially useful for fluorescently labeling a small subset of cells in tissue slice. In this video, we first outline the steps required to coat gold particles with DNA. We next demonstrate how to line the inside of plastic tubing with the gold/DNA bullets, and how to cut this tubing to obtain the plastic cartridges for loading into the gene gun. Finally, we perform biolistic transfection of rat hippocampal slice cultures, demonstrating handling of the Bio-Rad Helios gene gun, and offering trouble shooting advice to obtain healthy and optimally transfected tissue slices. PMID:19066564

  14. Improvement of efficiency and viability in plasma gene transfection by plasma minimization and optimization electrode configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinno, Masafumi; Tachibana, Kunihide; Motomura, Hideki; Saeki, Noboru; Satoh, Susumu

    2016-07-01

    Plasma gene transfection is expected as a safe and useful method of gene transfection. However, in this method, there is difficulty in keeping both high transfection efficiency and less cell damage simultaneously. The authors have evaluated transfection efficiency and cell viability using four different plasma sources, such as arc discharge, plasma jet, dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), and microplasma. A high transfection efficiency was achieved by discharge forms in which the electric current flows via the cells. This suggested that an electric current plays an important role in plasma gene transfection. The total volume of gas flow must be small or zero and the area in which the cells are directly irradiated by plasma must be small in order to achieve a higher cell viability. The microplasma that satisfies these conditions achieved both the highest transfection efficiency and the highest cell viability simultaneously.

  15. Preparation of gene gun bullets and biolistic transfection of neurons in slice culture.

    PubMed

    Woods, Georgia; Zito, Karen

    2008-02-13

    Biolistic transfection is a physical means of transfecting cells by bombarding tissue with high velocity DNA coated particles. We provide a detailed protocol for biolistic transfection of rat hippocampal slices, from the initial preparation of DNA coated bullets to the final shooting of the organotypic slice cultures using a gene gun. Gene gun transfection is an efficient and easy means of transfecting neurons and is especially useful for fluorescently labeling a small subset of cells in tissue slice. In this video, we first outline the steps required to coat gold particles with DNA. We next demonstrate how to line the inside of plastic tubing with the gold/DNA bullets, and how to cut this tubing to obtain the plastic cartridges for loading into the gene gun. Finally, we perform biolistic transfection of rat hippocampal slice cultures, demonstrating handling of the Bio-Rad Helios gene gun, and offering trouble shooting advice to obtain healthy and optimally transfected tissue slices.

  16. Vascular tumours in infants. Part I: benign vascular tumours other than infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Hoeger, P H; Colmenero, I

    2014-09-01

    Vascular anomalies can be subdivided into vascular tumours and vascular malformations (VMs). While most VMs are present at birth and do not exhibit significant postnatal growth, vascular tumours are characterized by their dynamics of growth and (sometimes) spontaneous regression. This review focuses on benign vascular tumours other than infantile haemangiomas (IHs), namely pyogenic granuloma, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, glomangioma, rapidly involuting and noninvoluting congenital haemangioma, verrucous haemangioma and spindle cell haemangioma. While some of them bear clinical resemblance to IH, they can be separated by age of appearance, growth characteristics and/or negative staining for glucose transporter 1. Separation of these tumours from IH is necessary because their outcome and therapeutic options are different. Semimalignant and malignant vascular tumours will be addressed in a separate review.

  17. Synchronous gastric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour with gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach and hepatic syringious haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, D; Chatziralli, IP; Papadopoulos, V; Filitantzi, C; Demertzidis, C

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the stomach is a very rare lesion. A case of a gastric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach and hepatic syringious haemangioma is described. We report an 80-year-old male who had an exophytic mass in the area of the pylorus and the duodenum, where hepatic cysts were found in the magnetic resonance (MRI) scan on examination of hypochromic microcytic anaemia, and prolapsus and torsion of the bulb of the stomach found during gastroscopy. During surgical excision of the exophytic mass, a gastrointestinal stromal tumour from the gastric fundus and a syringious haemangioma from the superior hepatic surface were resected. All tumours were treated successfully by surgical excision. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Neither recurrence nor metastasis was found after a 12-month follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such an association is reported in the literature. PMID:24960722

  18. Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumours and nested stromal epithelial tumours of the liver.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sunayana; Bihari, Chhagan

    2016-04-01

    Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumour of liver (DNSTL), nested stromal-epithelial tumour (NSET) and calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumour (CNSET) are recently described entities with similar morphology, immunohistochemistry and molecular genetics. These are rare entities with only three large case series described till date. These tumours commonly present in the paediatric age group. NSETs, in addition have been described to be associated with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production and Cushingoid features. It is important to discuss this rare group of tumours with a low malignant potential as the most common radiological differential diagnosis is hepatoblastoma, which has a relatively poorer prognosis. Thus, a pathologist needs to keep this entity in mind, so as to offer a correct histological diagnosis.

  19. Tumour-specific CD4 T cells eradicate melanoma via indirect recognition of tumour-derived antigen.

    PubMed

    Shklovskaya, Elena; Terry, Alexandra M; Guy, Thomas V; Buckley, Adrian; Bolton, Holly A; Zhu, Erhua; Holst, Jeff; Fazekas de St. Groth, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    The importance of CD4 T cells in tumour immunity has been increasingly recognised, with recent reports describing robust CD4 T cell-dependent tumour control in mice whose immune-regulatory mechanisms have been disturbed by irradiation, chemotherapy, immunomodulatory therapy and/or constitutive immunodeficiency. Tumour control in such models has been attributed in large part to direct Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II-dependent CD4 T cell killing of tumour cells. To test whether CD4 T cells can eradicate tumours without directly killing tumour cells, we developed an animal model in which tumour-derived antigen could be presented to T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic CD4 T cells by host but not tumour MHC class II molecules. In I-E(+) mice bearing I-E(null) tumours, naive I-E-restricted CD4 T cells proliferated locally in tumour-draining lymph nodes after recognising tumour-derived antigen on migratory dendritic cells. In lymphopaenic but not immunosufficient hosts, CD4 T cells differentiated into polarised T helper type 1 (Th1) cells expressing interferon gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin (IL)-2 but little IL-17, and cleared established tumours. Tumour clearance was enhanced by higher TCR affinity for tumour antigen-MHC class II and was critically dependent on IFNγ, as demonstrated by early tumour escape in animals treated with an IFNγ blocking antibody. Thus, CD4 T cells and IFNγ can control tumour growth without direct T-cell killing of tumour cells, and without requiring additional adaptive immune cells such as CD8 T cells and B cells. Our results support a role for effective CD4 T cell-dependent tumour immunity against MHC class II-negative tumours. PMID:26837456

  20. Glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes in human tumours and tumour derived cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, A. D.; Forrester, L. M.; Hayes, J. D.; Wareing, C. J.; Carmichael, J.; Harris, A. L.; Mooghen, M.; Wolf, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that glutathione S-transferases play a role in the intrinsic and acquired resistance of tumours to anticancer drugs. In view of the wide use of tumour cell lines to understand the factors which confer either sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapeutic agents we have determined glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and isozyme composition in nine human cell lines. These data have been compared with the values obtained in solid tumours. In most cases overall GST activity was higher in the tumours than in the cell lines. This was most pronounced for the breast tumour samples relative to MCF7 cell line. The pi class GST subunit was present at similar concentration in the cell lines and the tumours, and in most cases was the most abundant subunit present. The alpha and mu class GST were expressed in most of the cell lines but at much lower concentration than the pi class subunit. Also considerable variability particularly in the expression of the mu subunits was observed. This was also the case for the expression of these subunits in the solid tumour samples. The levels of these GSTs (when expressed) in the solid tumours was invariably higher than that observed in the cell lines. There are therefore several similarities but also some significant differences in GST expression in solid tumours and cell lines. Whether the differences are because expression is lost during the generation of the cell lines or whether it reflects the individuality of human tumours remains to be clearly established. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2789940

  1. Targeting ALCAM in the cryo-treated tumour microenvironment successfully induces systemic anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Kudo-Saito, Chie; Fuwa, Takafumi; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Cryoablative treatment has been widely used for treating cancer. However, the therapeutic efficacies are still controversial. The molecular mechanisms of the cryo-induced immune responses, particularly underlying the ineffectiveness, remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we identified a new molecular mechanism involved in the cryo failure. We used cryo-ineffective metastatic tumour models that murine melanoma B16-F10 cells were subcutaneously and intravenously implanted into C57BL/6 mice. When the subcutaneous tumours were treated cryoablation on day 7 after tumour implantation, cells expressing activated leucocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) were significantly expanded not only locally in the treated tumours but also systemically in spleen and bone marrow of the mice. The cryo-induced ALCAM(+) cells including CD45(-) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells significantly suppressed interferon γ production and cytotoxicity of tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells via ALCAM expressed in these cells. This suggests that systemic expansion of the ALCAM(+) cells negatively switches host-immune directivity to the tumour-supportive mode. Intratumoural injection with anti-ALCAM blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) following the cryo treatment systemically induced tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells with higher cytotoxic activities, resulting in suppression of tumour growth and metastasis in the cryo-resistant tumour models. These suggest that expansion of ALCAM(+) cells is a determinant of limiting the cryo efficacy. Further combination with an immune checkpoint inhibitor anti-CTLA4 mAb optimized the anti-tumour efficacy of the dual-combination therapy. Targeting ALCAM may be a promising strategy for overcoming the cryo ineffectiveness leading to the better practical use of cryoablation in clinical treatment of cancer.

  2. Improving tumour heterogeneity MRI assessment with histograms

    PubMed Central

    Just, N

    2014-01-01

    By definition, tumours are heterogeneous. They are defined by marked differences in cells, microenvironmental factors (oxygenation levels, pH, VEGF, VPF and TGF-α) metabolism, vasculature, structure and function that in turn translate into heterogeneous drug delivery and therapeutic outcome. Ways to estimate quantitatively tumour heterogeneity can improve drug discovery, treatment planning and therapeutic responses. It is therefore of paramount importance to have reliable and reproducible biomarkers of cancerous lesions' heterogeneity. During the past decade, the number of studies using histogram approaches increased drastically with various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques (DCE-MRI, DWI, SWI etc.) although information on tumour heterogeneity remains poorly exploited. This fact can be attributed to a poor knowledge of the available metrics and of their specific meaning as well as to the lack of literature references to standardised histogram methods with which surrogate markers of heterogeneity can be compared. This review highlights the current knowledge and critical advances needed to investigate and quantify tumour heterogeneity. The key role of imaging techniques and in particular the key role of MRI for an accurate investigation of tumour heterogeneity is reviewed with a particular emphasis on histogram approaches and derived methods. PMID:25268373

  3. Mast cells, angiogenesis, and tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in tumours was described by Ehrlich in his doctoral thesis. Since this early account, ample evidence has been provided highlighting participation of MCs to the inflammatory reaction that occurs in many clinical and experimental tumour settings. MCs are bone marrow-derived tissue-homing leukocytes that are endowed with a panoply of releasable mediators and surface receptors. These cells actively take part to innate and acquired immune reactions as well as to a series of fundamental functions such as angiogenesis, tissue repair, and tissue remodelling. The involvement of MCs in tumour development is debated. Although some evidence suggests that MCs can promote tumourigenesis and tumour progression, there are some clinical sets as well as experimental tumour models in which MCs seem to have functions that favour the host. One of the major issues linking MCs to cancer is the ability of these cells to release potent pro-angiogenic factors. This review will focus on the most recent acquisitions about this intriguing field of research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mast cells in inflammation.

  4. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy.

  5. Giant malignant phyllodes tumour of breast.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Ramakrishnan; Savasere, Thejas; Prabhuswamy, Vinod Kumar; Babu, Rajashekhara; Shivaswamy, Sadashivaiah

    2014-01-01

    The term phyllodes tumour includes lesions ranging from completely benign tumours to malignant sarcomas. Clinically phyllodes tumours are smooth, rounded, and usually painless multinodular lesions indistinguishable from fibroadenomas. Percentage of phyllodes tumour classified as malignant ranges from 23% to 50%. We report a case of second largest phyllodes tumour in a 35-year-old lady who presented with swelling of right breast since 6 months, initially small in size, that progressed gradually to present size. Examination revealed mass in the right breast measuring 36×32 cms with lobulated firm surface and weighing 10 kgs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was reported as borderline phyllodes; however core biopsy examination showed biphasic neoplasm with malignant stromal component. Simple mastectomy was done and specimen was sent for histopathological examination which confirmed the core biopsy report. Postoperatively the patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The patient is on follow-up for a year and has not shown any evidence of metastasis or recurrence. PMID:25548696

  6. Neuroendoscopic management of pineal region tumours.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, E; Santamarta, D; Garcia-Fructuoso, G; Caral, L; Rumià, J

    1997-01-01

    The management of pineal tumours remains controversial. During 1994 we treated four consecutive adults (16-44 yrs) harbouring a pineal tumour with a neuroendoscopic procedure. All of them presented with hydrocephalus. Pre-operative workup included cranial computerized tomography (CT), craniospinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and serum levels of biological tumour markers. The endoscopic procedure consisted of a third ventriculostomy followed by biopsy with a flexible, steerable neuroendoscope. Histological diagnosis was achieved in three patients who no longer required a shunt device. Recorded complications were: bleeding during ventriculostomy that prevented us from obtaining a good sample for biopsy, short-term memory loss that cleared over a two-week period, and transient increase of pre-operative hemiparesis. Complications and morbidity are emphasized so as to be avoided with further technical experience. Neuroendoscopy affords a minimally invasive way of reaching three objectives by one-step surgery in the management of pineal region lesions: 1) CSF sample for analysis of tumour markers. 2) Treatment of hydrocephalus by third ventriculostomy. 3) Several biopsy specimens can be obtained identifying tumours which will require further open surgery or adjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy. PMID:9059706

  7. Epidemiological study of salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Frade Gonzalez, C; Lozano Ramirez, A; Garcia Caballero, T; Labella Caballero, T

    1999-01-01

    Tumours located in the salivary glands form the most heterogeneous group in all human oncological pathology. They show various epidemiological, clinical and evolutionary characteristics which separate them from other neoplasms of the head and neck. In this paper, we have carried out a study on their epidemiological aspects, collecting 80 cases diagnosed in the ENT Service of the University Hospital Complex of Santiago over 17 years. The incidence was 1.22 cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The frequency was higher in males (58.75%) and in the 7th decade of age. A predominance was noticed in females under 40 years of age and in males over this age, but the differences were not statistically significant. The most frequent site was the parotid gland, and we could not find any case in the sublingual gland. In 52.5% of cases the tumour was benign, pleomorphic adenoma being the most prevalent. Among malignant tumours, the epidermoid carcinoma stood out in our series. The prevalence of benign tumours in females and of malignant tumours in males was clear, with significant differences. We compare our results with the data published in the literature.

  8. Non-communicable diseases: is their emergence in industrialized societies related to changes in neuroendocrine function?

    PubMed

    Bickler, S W

    2000-05-01

    This hypothesis suggests that industrialization alters the human neuroendocrine system. The neuroendocrine changes come about because of changes in environmental stimuli. It is further proposed that changes in neuroendocrine function can account for the contrasting pattern of non-communicable diseases in traditional and industrialized societies. The hypothesis is based on subtle clinical differences in traditional and industrialized societies, and the evolving concept of neuroendocrine regulation of physiological processes. Compared to traditional societies, individuals from industrialized communities tend to have lower pain tolerance, slower gastrointestinal transit-time, and a greater chance of having a calcified pineal gland. These changes parallel the increasing incidence of non-communicable diseases in industrialized societies. There is sufficient reason to suspect the variations in pain tolerance, gastrointestinal transit-time and pineal gland calcification represent changes in neuroendocrine function. Programming of the neuroendocrine system by environmental events early in life is one possible mechanism whereby these changes might be effected. Understanding the physiological changes that occur with industrialization, and how environmental stimuli interact with the developing neuroendocrine system might lead to new strategies for the prevention and treatment of non-communicable diseases. PMID:10859694

  9. The clinical significance of neuroendocrine differentiation in T3-T4 node-negative colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong Beom; Yang, Shin Suk; Lee, Woo Yong; Song, Sang Yong; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Shin, Hee Jung; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Chun, Ho-Kyung

    2010-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the clinical significance of neuroendocrine differentiation in cases of T3-T4 node-negative colorectal cancer. Eighty-nine patients diagnosed with T3-T4 node-negative colorectal cancer who underwent curative resection were enrolled. Tumors expressing neuroendocrine markers were classified as either low expression (neuroendocrine marker) or high expression (>2% cells staining positive for a neuroendocrine marker). Immunohistochemical staining for chromogranin A and synaptophysin revealed high expression in 27 (30.3%) and 69 (77.5%) of the 89 patients, respectively. All tumors that showed high expression of chromogranin A also displayed high expression of synaptophysin. With the exception of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen, no statistically significant correlation was found between neuroendocrine differentiation and all other clinicopathologic variables. Analysis using the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariate Cox regression model demonstrated that neuroendocrine differentiation for chromogranin A and synaptophysin was not associated with disease-free survival. Therefore, neuroendocrine differentiation markers would not be useful variables for prognostic assessment of patients with T3-T4 node-negative colorectal cancer.

  10. Neuroendocrine and pharmacological manipulations to assess how caloric restriction increases life span.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, C V; Bray, G A; Atkinson, R L; Bartke, A; Finch, C E; Maratos-Flier, E; Crawley, J N; Nelson, J F

    2001-03-01

    As part of an effort to review current understanding of the mechanisms by which caloric restriction (CR) extends maximum life span, the authors of the present review were requested to develop a list of key issues concerning the potential role of neuroendocrine systems in mediating these effects. It has long been hypothesized that failure of specific neuroendocrine functions during aging leads to key age-related systemic and physiological failures, and more recently it has been postulated that physiological neuroendocrine responses to CR may increase life span. However, although the acute neuroendocrine responses to fasting have been well studied, it is not clear that these responses are necessarily identical to those observed in response to the chronic moderate (30% to 50% reduction) CR that increases maximum life span. Therefore the recommendations of this panel fall into two categories. First, further characterization of neuroendocrine responses to CR over the entire life span is needed. Second, rigorous interventional studies are needed to test the extent to which neuroendocrine responses to CR mediate the effects of CR on life span, or alternatively if CR protects the function of essential neuroendocrine cells whose impairment reduces life span. Complementary studies using rodent models, nonhuman primates, and humans will be essential to assess the generality of elucidated mechanisms, and to determine if such mechanisms might apply to humans. PMID:12088210

  11. In vitro transformation of mouse testis cells by oncogene transfection.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Hiroko; Lee, Jiyoung; Tanaka, Takashi; Ishii, Kei; Toyokuni, Shinya; Kanatsu-Shinohara, Mito; Shinohara, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are unique in that they exhibit diverse biological characteristics and pathological features. Although several in vivo GCT models are available, studies on GCTs are hampered because in vivo development of GCTs is time consuming and prevents a detailed molecular analysis of the transformation process. Here we developed a novel strategy to transform mouse testis cells in vitro. Lentivirus-mediated transfection of dominant negative Trp53, Myc, and activated Hras1 into a CD9-expressing testis cells caused tumorigenic conversion in vitro. Although these cells resembled embryonic stem (ES) cells, they were aneuploid and lacked Nanog expression, which is involved in the maintenance of the undifferentiated state in ES cells. Euploid ES-like cells were produced by transfecting the Yamanaka factors (Pou5f1, Myc, Klf4, and Sox2) into the same cell population. Although these cells expressed Nanog, they were distinct from ES cells in that they expressed CD44, a cancer stem cell antigen. Both treatments induced similar changes in the DNA methylation patterns in differentially methylated regions of imprinted genes. Moreover, despite the differences in their phenotype and karyotype, both cell types similarly produced mixed GCTs on transplantation, which were composed of teratomas, seminomas, and embryonal carcinomas. Thus, in vitro testis cell transformation facilitates an analysis of the GCT formation process, and our results also suggest the close similarity between GCT formation and reprogramming. PMID:22357549

  12. Lipophosphoramidate-based bipolar amphiphiles: their syntheses and transfection properties.

    PubMed

    Berchel, Mathieu; Le Gall, Tony; Lozach, Olivier; Haelters, Jean-Pierre; Montier, Tristan; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2016-03-14

    Six new cationic bolaamphiphiles (also called bipolar amphiphiles, bolaform amphiphiles, or bolalipids) were readily prepared by a thiol-ene click reaction that engaged a mercapto-alcohol (mercapto-ethanol or mercapto-hexanol) and a cationic based lipophosphoramidate. The cationic lipophosphoramidates contain two lipid chains that end in an alkene group and a selected cationic polar head group (trimethylammonium, dimethyl hydroxyethyl ammonium, or methylimidazolium). These compounds were formulated in water (with or without DOPE as a colipid) to produce supramolecular aggregates. These aggregates, before (i.e. bolasomes) and after (i.e. bolaplexes) mixing with plasmid DNA (pDNA) at various charge ratios, were characterized with regard to their sizes and zeta potentials. In the case of bolasomes, the suspensions were unstable since precipitation occurred after only a few hours at room temperature. On the other hand, bolaplex formulations exhibited clearly a better colloidal stability. Then, the gene delivery properties of the cationic bolasomes were investigated using two human-derived epithelial cell lines (A549 and 16HBE). Compared to the commercially available lipofection reagent (Lipofectamine), most of the cationic bolaamphiphiles were able to efficiently transfect these cells when they were formulated with DOPE in a 1 : 1 molar ratio. We report herein that bolaamphiphiles possessing a trimethylammonium or a dimethyl hydroxyethyl ammonium head group were the most efficient in terms of transfection efficiency while exhibiting no significant cytotoxicity.

  13. Pedunculated solitary fibrous tumours arising from the pleura.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, A; Kilic, D; Hatipoglu, A; Bakirci, T; Bilezikci, B

    2006-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is one of the rare tumours which arise from visceral pleura. Klemperer and Rabin first described SFT as a distinct clinical entity among primary pleural tumoUrs in 1931. Approximately 820 cases have been reported in literature to date. The management of patients with SFT is complete resection of the tumour and follow up of the patient to detect any possible late recurrence. In the present paper, we report two cases of pedunculated solitary fibrous tumours of the pleura that appeared as a wandering chest nodule to which surgical resection undertaken at our hospital. The aim is to summarise our experience in the management of solitary fibrous tumour.

  14. Salivary gland tumours in Zimbabwe: report of 282 cases.

    PubMed

    Chidzonga, M M; Lopez Perez, V M; Portilla-Alvarez, A L

    1995-08-01

    Tumours of the salivary glands are relatively uncommon. In a review of 282 black patients seen at Harare Central Hospital, Zimbabwe, the relative incidence of various tumour types and the age and sex distribution were similar to those reported in other series. There were more tumours of the minor salivary glands than in reported Western series. There were more tumours of the minor salivary glands than in reported Western series. Pain and rapid growth were significant in distinguishing malignant from benign tumours. Malignant tumours were more common in elderly than in young patients.

  15. A robust transfection reagent for the transfection of CHO and HEK293 cells and production of recombinant proteins and lentiviral particles - PTG1.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Cristine; Gross, Fabian; Guégan, Philippe; Cheradame, Hervé; Midou, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Bioproduction of recombinant proteins (r-proteins) and recombinant lentiviral particles (r-lentiviral particles) requires robust transfections consisting of efficient protocols that are easy to implement, with good reproducibility for a maximum production of proteins and lentiviral particles in a short time with low cytotoxicity. This study evaluates the capacity of histidinylated polyethyleneimine I (PTG1) to facilitate robust DNA transfection, with low cytotoxicity, of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells for the production of r-proteins and r-lentiviral particles. We report that PTG1 transfection of cells in suspension with a plasmid DNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein leads to 72 and 97% of transfected CHO and HEK293T cells respectively, and does not significantly affect cell viability. PTG1 transfection of 100 mL of CHO-S cell culture in suspension at a cell density of 2 × 10(6) cells /mL resulted in a high level of transfected cells and protein expression after transfection with 0.75 μg/mL plasmid DNA. Transfection with PTG1 is more efficient than LipofectAmine2000™, and gene expression is higher than observed with FreeStyle™ and JetPEI®. Tri-transfection of HEK293T packaging cells leads to the production of a higher level of r-lentiviral particles compared to the calcium phosphate method, and permits two harvests of viral particles within three days. These results show that PTG1 is a powerful new transfection reagent for cell lines frequently used for recombinant protein and lentiviral particle production. PTG1 could be used in protocols for bioproduction of therapeutic proteins such as antibodies for cancer treatments and viral vectors for gene therapy applications. PMID:25215936

  16. [Parotid tumours. Only 31% of mixed tumours. In one hundred and seventy-five parotidectomies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Massoud, E; Tarabay, F

    1982-06-10

    This article reports on an analytical study into the etiological aspects of 175 parotidectomies carried out in the Lebanon. In comparing our results with the classical data, we reached a certain number of interesting conclusions. Our study confirms classical breakdown of parotid tumours with 80% benign and 20% malignant. We also confirm the rise in the incidence of malignancy in line with age, and its classical predominance in male patients. Classically, the benign tumours can be divided into 80% mixed tumours, 8% warthin, and 6 to 7% other rare tumours. Our data concerning this breakdown of benign tumours is very different. We found 31% of mixed tumours, which is in line with the figure given by A. Palva. We can therefore conclude that mixed tumours are not the most common form of benign parotid tumours and that the so-called rare tumours account for 69% benign tumours. They include hemangiomas, tubercles, salivary cysts, chronic parotidits and Warthin's tumours. Another difference between the conclusions of our study and classical data concern warthin tumours, which account fort 18% of cases as compared to only 6% in the classical data. We can therefore conclude that the so-called "rare benign tumours of the parotid" show a far higher incidence in our country than the classical 6%, and in fact come far closer to 50% of all cases of benign tumours.

  17. Immunolocalization of steroid hormone receptors in normal and tumour cells: mechanisms of their cellular traffic.

    PubMed

    Perrot-Applanat, M; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Milgrom, E

    1992-01-01

    Experimental conditions are described for the detection of steroid receptors in tissue sections or cells at the light microscope level. Current knowledge about the ultrastructural distribution of these receptors is summarized; the mechanisms of their nuclear localization are described. Karyophilic signals involved in nuclear translocation are characterized by means of in vitro mutagenesis of steroid receptor cDNAs. Studies analysing the subcellular distribution of various transfected receptor mutants in energy depleted cells together with fusion experiments provide evidence for nucleoplasmic shuttling of progesterone receptors. We conclude that the "nuclear" location of the wild type progesterone receptor reflects a dynamic equilibrium between active nuclear import and outward diffusion. We also describe the use of immunocytochemistry in pathology, especially for the detection of steroid receptors in hormone dependent tumours. PMID:1423330

  18. Unusual presentation of a scrotal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Debashis; Parr, Nijel J

    2014-01-01

    A 59-year-old man had a wide excision of the right-sided scrotal cancer in the neck of the scrotum. On dissection it became apparent that the tumour had developed a blood supply from the right spermatic cord. Histology revealed G2T2 squamous cell carcinoma. A biopsy from an abnormal skin area from the opposite groin reported chronic folliculitis. He underwent an ultrasound scanning of the groin and fine-needle aspiration, which did not show any suspicious features. Follow-up CT of the abdomen and pelvis after 6 weeks did not show any evidence of intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy. Another CT has been arranged within the next 3 months to confirm that the spread of the tumour does not follow the pattern of a testicular tumour. PMID:24879734

  19. Insulin receptor activation in solitary fibrous tumours.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Chang, Q; Rubin, B P; Fletcher, C D M; Morgan, T W; Mentzer, S J; Sugarbaker, D J; Fletcher, J A; Xiao, S

    2007-04-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are known to overexpress insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2). The down-stream oncogenic pathways of IGF-2, however, are not clear. Here we report uniform activation of the insulin receptor (IR) pathway in SFTs, which are mesenchymal tumours frequently associated with hypoglycaemia. Whereas the IR and its downstream signalling pathways were constitutively activated in SFTs, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) was not expressed in these tumours. We also find that SFT cells secrete IGF-2 and proliferate in serum-free medium, consistent with an IGF-2/IR autocrine loop. The aetiological relevance of IGF-2 is supported by expression of IR-A, the IR isoform with high affinity for IGF-2, in all SFTs. Our studies suggest that IR activation plays an oncogenic role in SFTs.

  20. Surgery for locally aggressive bone tumours.

    PubMed

    Devitt, A; O'Sullivan, T; Kavanagh, M; Hurson, B J

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of 16 patients with aggressive benign bone tumours and one patient with a low grade malignancy with a combined regimen of cryosurgery, phenolization and acrylic cementation is reported. Patients were aged between 9 and 51 years and were treated by this method between the years 1986 and 1993. Minimal follow up was 13 months. The commonest histological diagnosis was giant cell tumour (7), followed by aneurysmal bone cyst (6), chondromyxoidfibroma (3) and low grade chondrosarcoma (1). Patients were assessed for functional outcome and local recurrence. On average 86 per cent of premorbid function was restored at follow up and there was one local recurrence (6.29 per cent). We conclude that this is a satisfactory method of gaining local control of these tumours. PMID:8990655

  1. Unusual presentation of a scrotal tumour.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debashis; Parr, Nijel J

    2014-05-30

    A 59-year-old man had a wide excision of the right-sided scrotal cancer in the neck of the scrotum. On dissection it became apparent that the tumour had developed a blood supply from the right spermatic cord. Histology revealed G2T2 squamous cell carcinoma. A biopsy from an abnormal skin area from the opposite groin reported chronic folliculitis. He underwent an ultrasound scanning of the groin and fine-needle aspiration, which did not show any suspicious features. Follow-up CT of the abdomen and pelvis after 6 weeks did not show any evidence of intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy. Another CT has been arranged within the next 3 months to confirm that the spread of the tumour does not follow the pattern of a testicular tumour.

  2. Tumours of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Hussain, Shakir; Carter, Simon R

    2015-09-01

    Sarcomas are rare tumours and particularly rarer in the foot and ankle region. The complex anatomy of the foot and ankle makes it unique and hence poses a challenge to the surgeon for limb salvage surgery. Other lesions found in the foot and ankle region are benign bone and soft tissue tumours, metastasis and infection. The purpose of this article is to discuss the relevance of the complex anatomy of the foot and ankle in relation to tumours, clinical features, their general management principles and further discussion about some of the more common bone and soft tissue lesions. Discussion of every single bone and soft tissue lesion in the foot and ankle region is beyond the scope of this article.

  3. Tumour Angiogenesis and Angiogenic Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Lalita; Puri, Naveen; Satpute, Pranali; Sharma, Vandana

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex process depending on the coordination of many regulators and there by activating angiogenic switch. Recent advances in understanding of angiogenic mechanism have lead to the development of several anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic agents that use the strategy of regulation of angiogenic switch. Antiangiogenic therapy is a form of treatment not cure for cancer and represents a highly effective strategy for destroying tumour because vascular supply is the fundamental requirement for growth of tumour. Because of the quiescent nature of normal adult vasculature, angiogenic inhibitors are expected to confer a degree of specificity when compared to nonspecific modalities of chemo and radiotherapy, so it has the advantage of less toxicities, does not induce drug resistance and deliver a relatively non toxic, long term treatment of tumour. PMID:26266204

  4. Endoscopic mucosal resection of duodenal bulb adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine features: An extremely rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming-Yao; Wang, Yu; Meng, Xiao-Yan; Xie, Hua-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Duodenal adenocarcinoma, especially duodenal bulb with neuroendocrine features (NEF), is extremely rare. Here, we report one such case of duodenal bulb adenocarcinoma with neuroendocrine features. A 63-year-old Han Chinese woman was admitted to our department with the diagnosis of a duodenal bulb polyp and underwent an endoscopic mucosal resection. The pathological findings confirmed it as duodenal bulb adenocarcinoma with NEF. The patient remains curative after one and half a years of follow-up. Duodenal adenocarcinoma with NEF might be a low malignant neuroendocrine tumor rather than a conventional adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic treatment, including endoscopic mucosal resection, might be an ideal option for the adenocarcinomas with NEF. PMID:26140012

  5. Processing of two homologous precursors, pro-neuropeptide Y and pro-pancreatic polypeptide, in transfected cell lines expressing different precursor convertases.

    PubMed

    Wulff, B S; Johansen, T E; Dalbøge, H; O'Hare, M M; Schwartz, T W

    1993-06-25

    The processing of two homologous precursors, pro-neuropeptide Y (pro-NPY) and pro-pancreatic poly-peptide (pro-PP), was studied in four neuroendocrine cell lines after transfection: CA-77 medullary thyroid carcinoma cells, AtT-20 corticotrope pituitary cells, RIN2A-19 pancreatic endocrine cells, and NB1 neuroblastoma cells. Northern blot analysis indicated that the AtT-20 cells only expressed precursor convertase 3; in contrast, NB1 cells only expressed precursor convertase 2, whereas the RIN2A-19 and CA-77 cells expressed both enzymes. Despite these differences in expression pattern of precursor convertases the four cell lines were, surprisingly, indistinguishable in respect to their processing of pro-PP and pro-NPY. In all four cell lines, pro-NPY was almost completely converted to NPY, and, in all four cell lines, only around 50% of the PP precursor was converted to PP. The relatively poor processing efficiency of pro-PP was rather similar to the processing efficiency of the endogenously produced precursors in the respective cell lines, pro-calcitonin (CA-77), proopiomelanocortin (AtT-20), proinsulin (RIN2A-19), and pro-vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (NB1). At least in the CA-77 cells, NPY and PP were apparently sorted to the regulated secretory pathway, as upon stimulation with secretagogue the release of the transfected peptides increased in parallel with the endogenously expressed peptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide. Mutagenesis studies showed that on the N-terminal side of the di-basic processing site, the otherwise important difference in structure between PP and NPY, a proline for glutamine in position 34, was not responsible for the difference in processing efficiency. On the C-terminal side of the processing site, the efficient processing of pro-NPY could not be transferred to pro-PP by exchanging the whole C-terminal domains of the precursors. It is concluded that pro-NPY is processed more efficiently than pro-PP in all neuroendocrine cell lines

  6. Brain tumour-associated status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Goonawardena, Janindu; Marshman, Laurence A G; Drummond, Katharine J

    2015-01-01

    We have reviewed the scant literature on status epilepticus in patients with brain tumours. Patients with brain tumour-associated epilepsy (TAE) appear less likely to develop status epilepticus (TASE) than patients with epilepsy in the general population (EGP) are to develop status epilepticus (SEGP). TASE is associated with lesions in similar locations as TAE; in particular, the frontal lobes. However, in contrast to TAE, where seizures commence early in the course of the disease or at presentation, TASE is more likely to occur later in the disease course and herald tumour progression. In marked contrast to TAE, where epilepsy risk is inversely proportional to Word Health Organization tumour grade, TASE risk appears to be directly proportional to tumour grade (high grade gliomas appear singularly predisposed). Whilst anti-epileptic drug (AED) resistance is more common in TAE than EGP (with resistance directly proportional to tumour grade and frontal location), TASE appears paradoxically more responsive to simple AED regimes than either TAE or SEGP. Although some results suggest that mortality may be higher with TASE than with SEGP, it is likely that (as with SEGP) the major determinant of mortality is the underlying disease process. Because all such data have been derived from retrospective studies, because TASE and SEGP are less common than TAE and EGP, and because TASE and SEGP classification has often been inconsistent, findings can only be considered preliminary: multi-centre, prospective studies are required. Whilst preliminary, our review suggests that TASE has a distinct clinical profile compared to TAE and SEGP. PMID:25150762

  7. Endocrine and neuroendocrine regulation of fathering behavior in birds.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Sharon E

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care". Although paternal care is generally rare among vertebrates, care of eggs and young by male birds is extremely common and may take on a variety of forms across species. Thus, birds provide ample opportunities for investigating both the evolution of and the proximate mechanisms underpinning diverse aspects of fathering behavior. However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the endocrine and neuroendocrine influences on paternal care in this vertebrate group. In this review, I focus on proximate mechanisms of paternal care in birds. I place an emphasis on specific hormones that vary predictably and/or unpredictably during the parental phase in both captive and wild birds: prolactin and progesterone are generally assumed to enhance paternal care, whereas testosterone and corticosterone are commonly-though not always correctly-assumed to inhibit paternal care. In addition, because endocrine secretions are not the sole mechanistic influence on paternal behavior, I also explore potential roles for certain neuropeptide systems (specifically the oxytocin-vasopressin nonapeptides and gonadotropin inhibitory hormone) and social and experiential factors in influencing paternal behavior in birds. Ultimately, mechanistic control of fathering behavior in birds is complex, and I suggest specific avenues for future research with the goal of narrowing gaps in our understanding of this complexity. Such avenues include (1) experimental studies that carefully consider not only endocrine and neuroendocrine mechanisms of paternal behavior, but also the ecology, phylogenetic history, and social context of focal species; (2) investigations that focus on individual variation in both hormonal and behavioral responses during the parental phase; (3) studies that investigate mechanisms of maternal and paternal care independently, rather than assuming that the mechanistic foundations of care are similar between the sexes; (4

  8. Enhancing magnetic nanoparticle-based DNA transfection: Intracellular-active cassette features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, Matthew Martin

    Efficient plasmid DNA transfection of embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, neural cell lines and the majority of primary cell lines is a current challenge in gene therapy research. Magnetic nanoparticle-based DNA transfection is a gene vectoring technique that is promising because it is capable of outperforming most other non-viral transfection methods in terms of both transfection efficiency and cell viability. The nature of the DNA vector implemented depends on the target cell phenotype, where the particle surface chemistry and DNA binding/unbinding kinetics of the DNA carrier molecule play a critical role in the many steps required for successful gene transfection. Accordingly, Neuromag, an iron oxide/polymer nanoparticle optimized for transfection of neural phenotypes, outperforms many other nanoparticles and lipidbased DNA carriers. Up to now, improvements to nanomagnetic transfection techniques have focused mostly on particle functionalization and transfection parameter optimization (cell confluence, growth media, serum starvation, magnet oscillation parameters, etc.). None of these parameters are capable of assisting the nuclear translocation of delivered plasmid DNA once the particle-DNA complex is released from the endosome and dissociates in the cell's cytoplasm. In this study, incorporation of a DNA targeting sequence (DTS) feature in the transfecting plasmid DNA confers improved nuclear translocation, demonstrating significant improvement in nanomagnetic transfection efficiency in differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Other parameters, such as days in vitro, are also found to play a role and represent potential targets for further optimization.

  9. Magnetic nanoparticles as gene delivery agents: enhanced transfection in the presence of oscillating magnet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBain, S. C.; Griesenbach, U.; Xenariou, S.; Keramane, A.; Batich, C. D.; Alton, E. W. F. W.; Dobson, J.

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle-based gene transfection has been shown to be effective in combination with both viral vectors and with non-viral agents. In these systems, therapeutic or reporter genes are attached to magnetic nanoparticles which are then focused to the target site/cells via high-field/high-gradient magnets. The technique has been shown to be efficient and rapid for in vitro transfection and compares well with cationic lipid-based reagents, producing good overall transfection levels with lower doses and shorter transfection times. In spite of its potential advantages (particularly for in vivo targeting), the overall transfection levels do not generally exceed those of other non-viral agents. In order to improve the overall transfection levels while maintaining the advantages inherent in this technique, we have developed a novel, oscillating magnet array system which adds lateral motion to the particle/gene complex in order to promote transfection. Experimental results indicate that the system significantly enhances overall in vitro transfection levels in human airway epithelial cells compared to both static field techniques (p<0.005) and the cationic lipids (p<0.001) tested. In addition, it has the previously demonstrated advantages of magnetofection—rapid transfection times and requiring lower levels of DNA than cationic lipid-based transfection agents. This method shows potential for non-viral gene delivery both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Incidence, histopathologic analysis and distribution of tumours of the hand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this large collective and meticulous study of primary bone tumours and tumourous lesions of the hand was to enhance the knowledge about findings of traumatological radiographs and improve differential diagnosis. Methods This retrospective study reviewed data collected from 1976 until 2006 in our Bone Tumour Registry. The following data was documented: age, sex, radiological investigations, tumour location, histopathological features including type and dignity of the tumour, and diagnosis. Results The retrospective analysis yielded 631 patients with a mean age of 35.9 ± 19.2 years. The majority of primary hand tumours were found in the phalanges (69.7%) followed by 24.7% in metacarpals and 5.6% in the carpals. Only 10.6% of all cases were malignant. The major lesion type was cartilage derived at 69.1%, followed by bone cysts 11.3% and osteogenic tumours 8.7%. The dominant tissue type found in phalanges and metacarpals was of cartilage origin. Osteogenic tumours were predominant in carpal bones. Enchondroma was the most commonly detected tumour in the hand (47.1%). Conclusions All primary skeletal tumours can be found in the hand and are most often of cartilage origin followed by bone cysts and osteogenic tumours. This study furthermore raises awareness about uncommon or rare tumours and helps clinicians to establish proper differential diagnosis, as the majority of detected tumours of the hand are asymptomatic and accidental findings on radiographs. PMID:24885007

  11. Sertoliform cystadenoma: a rare benign tumour of the rete testis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Sertoliform cystadenoma of the rete testis represents an uncommon benign tumour. They appear in patients from 26 to 62 years of age. We describe a case of a 66-year-old man with a tumour in the area of the epididymal head. The tumour markers were not increased. Under the assumption of a malignant testicular tumour an inguinal orchiectomy was performed. The cut surface of this tumour was of grey/white color and showed small cysts. The tumour consisted of two compartments. The epithelial like tumour cells showed a sertoliform growth pattern and cystic dilatations. In between the tumour cells repeatedly actin expressing sclerotic areas could be recognized as the second tumour component. Proliferative activity was not increased. Immunohistochemically the tumour cells were positiv for inhibin, S-100, and CD 99. Alpha feto protein (AFP), human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG) and placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) as well as synaptophysin, epithelial membrane antigene (EMA), and BCL-2 were not expressed. As far as we know this is the sixth reported case of this tumour. Because of the benign nature of this tumour the correct diagnosis is important for the intra- and postoperative management. Here we present a case of this rare tumour and discuss potential differential diagnosis. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1956026143857335 PMID:23406299

  12. Treatment of primary brain tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Shanne

    This article considers the complexities of caring for patients with primary brain tumours. The incidence, classification and clinical signs and symptoms are outlined. Adult patients experience disabling effects as a result of a brain tumour, which is often accompanied by high morbidity and mortality rates. The various treatment options available are summarised. However, for many patients, there are limited curative treatment options and the main focus is palliative care. The nurse's contribution to care and support of these patients and their families is discussed, with the aim of improving their quality of life.

  13. Stochastic Gompertz model of tumour cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lo, C F

    2007-09-21

    In this communication, based upon the deterministic Gompertz law of cell growth, a stochastic model in tumour growth is proposed. This model takes account of both cell fission and mortality too. The corresponding density function of the size of the tumour cells obeys a functional Fokker--Planck equation which can be solved analytically. It is found that the density function exhibits an interesting "multi-peak" structure generated by cell fission as time evolves. Within this framework the action of therapy is also examined by simply incorporating a therapy term into the deterministic cell growth term.

  14. Metastatic colonization by circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C

    2016-01-21

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in people with cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating tumour cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are only now starting to understand. These include infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue. They make metastasis a highly inefficient process. However, once metastases have been established, current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. An improved understanding of the mechanistic determinants of such colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer.

  15. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours.

    PubMed

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-03-22

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated haematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells - macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes - are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immunosuppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response.

  16. A Large Extragnathic Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M.; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Narasimhamurthy, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are developmental cysts which occur typically in the jawbones. They present more commonly in the posterior mandible of young adults than the maxilla. OKCs have been reclassified under odontogenic tumours in 2005 by the WHO and have since been termed as keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs). Here we report a case of a recurrent buccal lesion in a 62-year-old man which was provisionally diagnosed as a space infection (buccal abscess) but surprisingly turned out to be a soft tissue KCOT in an unusual location on histopathologic examination. PMID:26770859

  17. Mouse in utero electroporation: controlled spatiotemporal gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Asuka; Yoshida, Aya C; Kubota, Mayumi; Ogawa, Masaharu; Shimogori, Tomomi

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand the function of genes expressed in specific region of the developing brain, including signaling molecules and axon guidance molecules, local gene transfer or knock- out is required. Gene targeting knock-in or knock-out into local regions is possible to perform with combination with a specific CRE line, which is laborious, costly, and time consuming. Therefore, a simple transfection method, an in utero electroporation technique, which can be performed with short time, will be handy to test the possible function of candidate genes prior to the generation of transgenic animals. In addition to this, in utero electroporation targets areas of the brain where no specific CRE line exists, and will limit embryonic lethality. Here, we present a method of in utero electroporation combining two different types of electrodes for simple and convenient gene transfer into target areas of the developing brain. First, a unique holding method of embryos using an optic fiber optic light cable will make small embryos (from E9.5) visible for targeted DNA solution injection into ventricles and needle type electrodes insertion to the targeted brain area. The patterning of the brain such as cortical area occur at early embryonic stage, therefore, these early electroporation from E9.5 make a big contribution to understand entire area patterning event. Second, the precise shape of a capillary prevents uterine damage by making holes by insertion of the capillary. Furthermore, the precise shape of the needle electrodes are created with tungsten and platinum wire and sharpened using sand paper and insulated with nail polish, a method which is described in great detail in this protocol. This unique technique allows transfection of plasmid DNA into restricted areas of the brain and will enable small embryos to be electroporated. This will help to, open a new window for many scientists who are working on cell differentiation, cell migration, axon guidance in very early

  18. Histopathologically Proven Autoimmune Pancreatitis Mimicking Neuroendocrine Tumor or Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onda, Shinji; Okamoto, Tomoyoshi; Kanehira, Masaru; Fujioka, Shuichi; Harada, Tohru; Hano, Hiroshi; Fukunaga, Masaharu; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be difficult to distinguish from pancreatic cancer. We report a case of histopathologically proven AIP mimicking neuroendocrine tumor (NET) or pancreatic cancer in a 53-year-old man. He was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of a pancreatic mass detected on ultrasonography at a medical check-up. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a 15-mm hypoechoic mass located in the pancreatic body. Computed tomography revealed a tumor without any contrast enhancement, and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the mass to be hyperintense on diffusion-weighted image. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed slight dilatation of a branch of the pancreatic duct without stricture of the main pancreatic duct. The common bile duct seemed intact. Under suspicion of a non-functioning NET or malignant neoplasm, laparotomy was performed. At laparotomy, an elastic firm and well-circumscribed mass was found suggestive of a non-functioning NET, thus enucleation was performed. Histopathologically, the lesion corresponded to AIP. PMID:22423237

  19. Neuroendocrine contributions to sexual partner preference in birds.

    PubMed

    Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth

    2011-04-01

    A majority of birds are socially monogamous, providing exceptional opportunities to discover neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying preferences for opposite-sex partners where the sexes form extended affiliative relationships. Zebra finches have been the focus of the most systematic program of research to date in any socially monogamous animal. In this species, sexual partner preference can be partially or largely sex reversed with hormone manipulations during early development, suggesting a role for organizational hormone actions. This same conclusion emerges from research with Japanese quail, which do not form long-term pairs. In zebra finches, social experience manipulations during juvenile development also can sex reverse partner preference, either alone or in combination with an early hormone manipulation. Although there are several candidate brain regions where neural mechanisms could underlie these effects of hormones or social experience, the necessary research has not yet been done to determine their involvement. The neuroendocrinology of avian sexual partner preference is still frontier territory.

  20. Neuroendocrine control of photoperiodic changes in immune function

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Zachary M.; Borniger, Jeremy C.; Cisse, Yasmine M.; Abi Salloum, Bachir A.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal variation in immune function putatively maximizes survival and reproductive success. Day length (photoperiod) is the most potent signal for time of year. Animals typically organize breeding, growth, and behavior to adapt to spatial and temporal niches. Outside the tropics individuals monitor photoperiod to support adaptations favoring survival and reproductive success. Changes in day length allow anticipation of seasonal changes in temperature and food availability that are critical for reproductive success. Immune function is typically bolstered during winter, whereas reproduction and growth are favored during summer. We provide an overview of how photoperiod influences neuronal function and melatonin secretion, how melatonin acts directly and indirectly to govern seasonal changes in immune function, and the manner by which other neuroendocrine effectors such as glucocorticoids, prolactin, thyroid, and sex steroid hormones modulate seasonal variations in immune function. Potential future research avenues include commensal gut microbiota and light pollution influences on photoperiodic responses. PMID:25456047