Science.gov

Sample records for neuronal phase-response curves

  1. Measurement of infinitesimal phase response curves from noisy real neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Keisuke; Omori, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Shigeo; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Okada, Masato; Aonishi, Toru

    2011-10-01

    We sought to measure infinitesimal phase response curves (iPRCs) from rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. It is difficult to measure iPRCs from noisy neurons because of the dilemma that either the linearity or the signal-to-noise ratio of responses to external perturbations must be sacrificed. To overcome this difficulty, we used an iPRC measurement model formulated as the Langevin phase equation (LPE) to extract iPRCs in the Bayesian scheme. We then simultaneously verified the effectiveness of the measurement model and the reliability of the estimated iPRCs by demonstrating that LPEs with the estimated iPRCs could predict the stochastic behaviors of the same neurons, whose iPRCs had been measured, when they were perturbed by periodic stimulus currents. Our results suggest that the LPE is an effective model for real oscillating neurons and that many theoretical frameworks based on it may be applicable to real nerve systems.

  2. Linear control of neuronal spike timing using phase response curves.

    PubMed

    Stigen, Tyler; Danzl, Per; Moehlis, Jeff; Netoff, Theoden

    2009-01-01

    We propose a simple, robust, linear method to control the spike timing of a periodically firing neuron. The control scheme uses the neuron's phase response curve to identify an area of optimal sensitivity for the chosen stimulation parameters. The spike advance as a function of current pulse amplitude is characterized at the optimal phase and a linear least-squares regression is fit to the data. The inverted regression is used as the control function for this method. The efficacy of this method is demonstrated through numerical simulations of a Hodgkin-Huxley style neuron model as well as in real neurons from rat hippocampal slice preparations. The study shows a proof of concept for the application of a linear control scheme to control neuron spike timing in-vitro. This study was done on an individual cell level, but translation to a tissue or network level is possible. Control schemes of this type could be implemented in a closed loop implantable device to treat neuromotor disorders involving pathologically neuronal activity such as epilepsy or Parkinson's disease.

  3. On the Firing Rate Dependency of the Phase Response Curve of Rat Purkinje Neurons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Couto, João; Linaro, Daniele; De Schutter, E; Giugliano, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous spiking during cerebellar tasks has been observed across Purkinje cells: however, little is known about the intrinsic cellular mechanisms responsible for its initiation, cessation and stability. The Phase Response Curve (PRC), a simple input-output characterization of single cells, can provide insights into individual and collective properties of neurons and networks, by quantifying the impact of an infinitesimal depolarizing current pulse on the time of occurrence of subsequent action potentials, while a neuron is firing tonically. Recently, the PRC theory applied to cerebellar Purkinje cells revealed that these behave as phase-independent integrators at low firing rates, and switch to a phase-dependent mode at high rates. Given the implications for computation and information processing in the cerebellum and the possible role of synchrony in the communication with its post-synaptic targets, we further explored the firing rate dependency of the PRC in Purkinje cells. We isolated key factors for the experimental estimation of the PRC and developed a closed-loop approach to reliably compute the PRC across diverse firing rates in the same cell. Our results show unambiguously that the PRC of individual Purkinje cells is firing rate dependent and that it smoothly transitions from phase independent integrator to a phase dependent mode. Using computational models we show that neither channel noise nor a realistic cell morphology are responsible for the rate dependent shift in the phase response curve. PMID:25775448

  4. Functional Phase Response Curves: A Method for Understanding Synchronization of Adapting Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jianxia; Canavier, Carmen C.; Butera, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Phase response curves (PRCs) for a single neuron are often used to predict the synchrony of mutually coupled neurons. Previous theoretical work on pulse-coupled oscillators used single-pulse perturbations. We propose an alternate method in which functional PRCs (fPRCs) are generated using a train of pulses applied at a fixed delay after each spike, with the PRC measured when the phasic relationship between the stimulus and the subsequent spike in the neuron has converged. The essential information is the dependence of the recovery time from pulse onset until the next spike as a function of the delay between the previous spike and the onset of the applied pulse. Experimental fPRCs in Aplysia pacemaker neurons were different from single-pulse PRCs, principally due to adaptation. In the biological neuron, convergence to the fully adapted recovery interval was slower at some phases than that at others because the change in the effective intrinsic period due to adaptation changes the effective phase resetting in a way that opposes and slows the effects of adaptation. The fPRCs for two isolated adapting model neurons were used to predict the existence and stability of 1:1 phase-locked network activity when the two neurons were coupled. A stability criterion was derived by linearizing a coupled map based on the fPRC and the existence and stability criteria were successfully tested in two-simulated-neuron networks with reciprocal inhibition or excitation. The fPRC is the first PRC-based tool that can account for adaptation in analyzing networks of neural oscillators. PMID:19420126

  5. Functional phase response curves: a method for understanding synchronization of adapting neurons.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianxia; Canavier, Carmen C; Butera, Robert J

    2009-07-01

    Phase response curves (PRCs) for a single neuron are often used to predict the synchrony of mutually coupled neurons. Previous theoretical work on pulse-coupled oscillators used single-pulse perturbations. We propose an alternate method in which functional PRCs (fPRCs) are generated using a train of pulses applied at a fixed delay after each spike, with the PRC measured when the phasic relationship between the stimulus and the subsequent spike in the neuron has converged. The essential information is the dependence of the recovery time from pulse onset until the next spike as a function of the delay between the previous spike and the onset of the applied pulse. Experimental fPRCs in Aplysia pacemaker neurons were different from single-pulse PRCs, principally due to adaptation. In the biological neuron, convergence to the fully adapted recovery interval was slower at some phases than that at others because the change in the effective intrinsic period due to adaptation changes the effective phase resetting in a way that opposes and slows the effects of adaptation. The fPRCs for two isolated adapting model neurons were used to predict the existence and stability of 1:1 phase-locked network activity when the two neurons were coupled. A stability criterion was derived by linearizing a coupled map based on the fPRC and the existence and stability criteria were successfully tested in two-simulated-neuron networks with reciprocal inhibition or excitation. The fPRC is the first PRC-based tool that can account for adaptation in analyzing networks of neural oscillators.

  6. Anticipated synchronization in neuronal circuits unveiled by a phase-response-curve analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matias, Fernanda S.; Carelli, Pedro V.; Mirasso, Claudio R.; Copelli, Mauro

    2017-05-01

    Anticipated synchronization (AS) is a counterintuitive behavior that has been observed in several systems. When AS occurs in a sender-receiver configuration, the latter can predict the future dynamics of the former for certain parameter values. In particular, in neuroscience AS was proposed to explain the apparent discrepancy between information flow and time lag in the cortical activity recorded in monkeys. Despite its success, a clear understanding of the mechanisms yielding AS in neuronal circuits is still missing. Here we use the well-known phase-response-curve (PRC) approach to study the prototypical sender-receiver-interneuron neuronal motif. Our aim is to better understand how the transitions between delayed to anticipated synchronization and anticipated synchronization to phase-drift regimes occur. We construct a map based on the PRC method to predict the phase-locking regimes and their stability. We find that a PRC function of two variables, accounting simultaneously for the inputs from sender and interneuron into the receiver, is essential to reproduce the numerical results obtained using a Hodgkin-Huxley model for the neurons. On the contrary, the typical approximation that considers a sum of two independent single-variable PRCs fails for intermediate to high values of the inhibitory coupling strength of the interneuron. In particular, it loses the delayed-synchronization to anticipated-synchronization transition.

  7. Effect of phase response curve skewness on synchronization of electrically coupled neuronal oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Dodla, Ramana; Wilson, Charles J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate why electrically coupled neuronal oscillators synchronize or fail to synchronize using the theory of weakly coupled oscillators. Stability of synchrony and antisynchrony is predicted analytically and verified using numerical bifurcation diagrams. The shape of the phase response curve (PRC), the shape of the voltage time course, and the frequency of spiking are freely varied to map out regions of parameter spaces that hold stable solutions. We find that type-1 and type-2 PRCs can both hold synchronous and antisynchronous solutions, but the shape of the PRC and the voltage determine the extent of their stability. This is achieved by introducing a five-piecewise linear model to the PRC, and a three-piecewise linear model to the voltage time course, and then analyzing the resultant eigenvalue equations that determine the stability of the phase-locked solutions. A single time parameter defines the skewness of the PRC, and another single time parameter defines the spike width and frequency. Our approach gives a comprehensive picture of the relation between the PRC shape, voltage time course and the stability of the resultant synchronous and antisynchronous solutions. PMID:23777519

  8. Influences of membrane properties on phase response curve and synchronization stability in a model globus pallidus neuron.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Fukai, Tomoki; Kitano, Katsunori

    2012-06-01

    The activity patterns of the globus pallidus (GPe) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) are closely associated with motor function and dysfunction in the basal ganglia. In the pathological state caused by dopamine depletion, the STN-GPe network exhibits rhythmic synchronous activity accompanied by rebound bursts in the STN. Therefore, the mechanism of activity transition is a key to understand basal ganglia functions. As synchronization in GPe neurons could induce pathological STN rebound bursts, it is important to study how synchrony is generated in the GPe. To clarify this issue, we applied the phase-reduction technique to a conductance-based GPe neuronal model in order to derive the phase response curve (PRC) and interaction function between coupled GPe neurons. Using the PRC and interaction function, we studied how the steady-state activity of the GPe network depends on intrinsic membrane properties, varying ionic conductances on the membrane. We noted that a change in persistent sodium current, fast delayed rectifier Kv3 potassium current, M-type potassium current and small conductance calcium-dependent potassium current influenced the PRC shape and the steady state. The effect of those currents on the PRC shape could be attributed to extension of the firing period and reduction of the phase response immediately after an action potential. In particular, the slow potassium current arising from the M-type potassium and the SK current was responsible for the reduction of the phase response. These results suggest that the membrane property modulation controls synchronization/asynchronization in the GPe and the pathological pattern of STN-GPe activity.

  9. Phase response curve analysis of a full morphological globus pallidus neuron model reveals distinct perisomatic and dendritic modes of synaptic integration

    PubMed Central

    Schultheiss, Nathan W.; Edgerton, Jeremy R.; Jaeger, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Synchronization of globus pallidus (GP) neurons and cortically-entrained oscillations between GP and other basal ganglia nuclei are key features of the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. Phase response curves (PRCs), which tabulate the effects of phasic inputs within a neuron's spike cycle on output spike timing, are efficient tools for predicting the emergence of synchronization in neuronal networks and entrainment to periodic input. In this study we apply physiologically realistic synaptic conductance inputs to a full morphological GP neuron model to determine the phase response properties of the soma and different regions of the dendritic tree. We find that perisomatic excitatory inputs delivered throughout the inter-spike interval advance the phase of the spontaneous spike cycle yielding a type I PRC. In contrast, we demonstrate that distal dendritic excitatory inputs can either delay or advance the next spike depending on whether they occur early or late in the spike cycle. We find this latter pattern of responses, summarized by a biphasic (type II) PRC, was a consequence of dendritic activation of the small conductance calcium-activated potassium current, SK. We also evaluate the spike-frequency dependence of somatic and dendritic PRC shapes, and we demonstrate the robustness of our results to variations of conductance densities, distributions, and kinetic parameters. We conclude that the distal dendrite of GP neurons embodies a distinct dynamical subsystem that could promote synchronization of pallidal networks to excitatory inputs. These results highlight the need to consider different effects of perisomatic and dendritic inputs in the control of network behavior. PMID:20164360

  10. Collective phase response curves for heterogeneous coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannay, Kevin M.; Booth, Victoria; Forger, Daniel B.

    2015-08-01

    Phase response curves (PRCs) have become an indispensable tool in understanding the entrainment and synchronization of biological oscillators. However, biological oscillators are often found in large coupled heterogeneous systems and the variable of physiological importance is the collective rhythm resulting from an aggregation of the individual oscillations. To study this phenomena we consider phase resetting of the collective rhythm for large ensembles of globally coupled Sakaguchi-Kuramoto oscillators. Making use of Ott-Antonsen theory we derive an asymptotically valid analytic formula for the collective PRC. A result of this analysis is a characteristic scaling for the change in the amplitude and entrainment points for the collective PRC compared to the individual oscillator PRC. We support the analytical findings with numerical evidence and demonstrate the applicability of the theory to large ensembles of coupled neuronal oscillators.

  11. Phase-response curves and synchronized neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Smeal, Roy M.; Ermentrout, G. Bard; White, John A.

    2010-01-01

    We review the principal assumptions underlying the application of phase-response curves (PRCs) to synchronization in neuronal networks. The PRC measures how much a given synaptic input perturbs spike timing in a neural oscillator. Among other applications, PRCs make explicit predictions about whether a given network of interconnected neurons will synchronize, as is often observed in cortical structures. Regarding the assumptions of the PRC theory, we conclude: (i) The assumption of noise-tolerant cellular oscillations at or near the network frequency holds in some but not all cases. (ii) Reduced models for PRC-based analysis can be formally related to more realistic models. (iii) Spike-rate adaptation limits PRC-based analysis but does not invalidate it. (iv) The dependence of PRCs on synaptic location emphasizes the importance of improving methods of synaptic stimulation. (v) New methods can distinguish between oscillations that derive from mutual connections and those arising from common drive. (vi) It is helpful to assume linear summation of effects of synaptic inputs; experiments with trains of inputs call this assumption into question. (vii) Relatively subtle changes in network structure can invalidate PRC-based predictions. (viii) Heterogeneity in the preferred frequencies of component neurons does not invalidate PRC analysis, but can annihilate synchronous activity. PMID:20603361

  12. Estimation of the phase response curve from Parkinsonian tremor

    PubMed Central

    Saifee, Tabish A.; Edwards, Mark J.; Kassavetis, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    Phase response curves (PRCs), characterizing the response of an oscillator to weak external perturbation, have been estimated from a broad range of biological oscillators, including single neurons in vivo. PRC estimates, in turn, provide an intuitive insight into how oscillatory systems become entrained and how they can be desynchronized. Here, we explore the application of PRC theory to the case of Parkinsonian tremor. Initial attempts to establish a causal effect of subthreshold transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to primary motor cortex on the filtered tremor phase were unsuccessful. We explored the possible explanations of this and demonstrate that assumptions made when estimating the PRC in a traditional setting, such as a single neuron, are not arbitrary when applied to the case of tremor PRC estimation. We go on to extract the PRC of Parkinsonian tremor using an iterative method that requires varying the definition of the tremor cycle and estimating the PRC at multiple peristimulus time samples. Justification for this method is supported by estimates of PRC from simulated single neuron data. We provide an approach to estimating confidence limits for tremor PRC and discuss the interpretational caveats introduced by tremor harmonics and the intrinsic variability of the tremor's period. PMID:26561596

  13. Phase response curves in the characterization of epileptiform activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Velazquez, J. L.; Galán, R. F.; Dominguez, L. Garcia; Leshchenko, Y.; Lo, S.; Belkas, J.; Erra, R. Guevara

    2007-12-01

    Coordinated cellular activity is a major characteristic of nervous system function. Coupled oscillator theory offers unique avenues to address cellular coordination phenomena. In this study, we focus on the characterization of the dynamics of epileptiform activity, based on some seizures that manifest themselves with very periodic rhythmic activity, termed absence seizures. Our approach consists in obtaining experimentally the phase response curves (PRCs) in the neocortex and thalamus, and incorporating these PRCs into a model of coupled oscillators. Phase preferences of the stationary states and their stability are determined, and these results from the model are compared with the experimental recordings, and interpreted in physiological terms.

  14. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Franović, Igor; Kostić, Srdjan; Perc, Matjaž; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-15

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period.

  15. Phase response curves for models of earthquake fault dynamics.

    PubMed

    Franović, Igor; Kostić, Srdjan; Perc, Matjaž; Klinshov, Vladimir; Nekorkin, Vladimir; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    We systematically study effects of external perturbations on models describing earthquake fault dynamics. The latter are based on the framework of the Burridge-Knopoff spring-block system, including the cases of a simple mono-block fault, as well as the paradigmatic complex faults made up of two identical or distinct blocks. The blocks exhibit relaxation oscillations, which are representative for the stick-slip behavior typical for earthquake dynamics. Our analysis is carried out by determining the phase response curves of first and second order. For a mono-block fault, we consider the impact of a single and two successive pulse perturbations, further demonstrating how the profile of phase response curves depends on the fault parameters. For a homogeneous two-block fault, our focus is on the scenario where each of the blocks is influenced by a single pulse, whereas for heterogeneous faults, we analyze how the response of the system depends on whether the stimulus is applied to the block having a shorter or a longer oscillation period.

  16. Robust Entrainment of Circadian Oscillators Requires Specific Phase Response Curves

    PubMed Central

    Pfeuty, Benjamin; Thommen, Quentin; Lefranc, Marc

    2011-01-01

    The circadian clocks keeping time in many living organisms rely on self-sustained biochemical oscillations entrained by external cues, such as light, to the 24-h cycle induced by Earth's rotation. However, environmental cues are unreliable due to the variability of habitats, weather conditions, or cue-sensing mechanisms among individuals. A tempting hypothesis is that circadian clocks have evolved so as to be robust to fluctuations in the signal that entrains them. To support this hypothesis, we analyze the synchronization behavior of weakly and periodically forced oscillators in terms of their phase response curve (PRC), which measures phase changes induced by a perturbation applied at different times of the cycle. We establish a general relationship between the robustness of key entrainment properties, such as stability and oscillator phase, on the one hand, and the shape of the PRC as characterized by a specific curvature or the existence of a dead zone, on the other hand. The criteria obtained are applied to computational models of circadian clocks and account for the disparate robustness properties of various forcing schemes. Finally, the analysis of PRCs measured experimentally in several organisms strongly suggests a case of convergent evolution toward an optimal strategy for maintaining a clock that is accurate and robust to environmental fluctuations. PMID:21641300

  17. In search of a phase response curve for lithium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Readey, M.A.; Groh, K.R.; Ehret, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    Male rats were free-run, and one day later were exposed to a single, punctate dose of 5 mM LiCl/kg body weight by injection at one of eight equally spaced times throughout the 24-h period. For each of the six days following injection, a separate phase response curve was derived from core-temperature chronograms. Unlike the classical response induced by chronobiotics such as dexamethasone, alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, and theophylline, statistically significant phase shifts for lithium were observed only on the first day following injection. These induced phase changes were not permanent, but instead were transient. By the sixth day of free-run, all experimental rats had drifted to the control acrophase; i.e., by the end of the experiment, most of the treated rats again had phase and confidence arcs not significantly different from their controls. The confidence arcs of the acrophases of the individual animals on the subsequent days post injection reveal that in this experiment, lithium was transiently dyschronogenic rather than definitively chronobiotic. The results suggest that punctate rather than chronic administration of lithium, followed by strict orthochronal administration of traditional zeitgebers, would be an effective way of restoring circadian synchrony in an internally desynchronized system. 122 refs.

  18. Human Adolescent Phase Response Curves to Bright White Light.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Stephanie J; Eastman, Charmane I

    2017-08-01

    Older adolescents are particularly vulnerable to circadian misalignment and sleep restriction, primarily due to early school start times. Light can shift the circadian system and could help attenuate circadian misalignment; however, a phase response curve (PRC) to determine the optimal time for receiving light and avoiding light is not available for adolescents. We constructed light PRCs for late pubertal to postpubertal adolescents aged 14 to 17 years. Participants completed 2 counterbalanced 5-day laboratory sessions after 8 or 9 days of scheduled sleep at home. Each session included phase assessments to measure the dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light-dark (wake-sleep) cycle (2 h dim [~20 lux] light, 2 h dark). In one session, intermittent bright white light (~5000 lux; four 20-min exposures) was alternated with 10 min of dim room light once per day for 3 consecutive days. The time of light varied among participants to cover the 24-h day. For each individual, the phase shift to bright light was corrected for the free-run derived from the other laboratory session with no bright light. One PRC showed phase shifts in response to light start time relative to the DLMO and another relative to home sleep. Phase delay shifts occurred around the hours corresponding to home bedtime. Phase advances occurred during the hours surrounding wake time and later in the afternoon. The transition from delays to advances occurred at the midpoint of home sleep. The adolescent PRCs presented here provide a valuable tool to time bright light in adolescents.

  19. Effect of phase response curve skew on synchronization with and without conduction delays

    PubMed Central

    Canavier, Carmen C.; Wang, Shuoguo; Chandrasekaran, Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    A central problem in cortical processing including sensory binding and attentional gating is how neurons can synchronize their responses with zero or near-zero time lag. For a spontaneously firing neuron, an input from another neuron can delay or advance the next spike by different amounts depending upon the timing of the input relative to the previous spike. This information constitutes the phase response curve (PRC). We present a simple graphical method for determining the effect of PRC shape on synchronization tendencies and illustrate it using type 1 PRCs, which consist entirely of advances (delays) in response to excitation (inhibition). We obtained the following generic solutions for type 1 PRCs, which include the pulse-coupled leaky integrate and fire model. For pairs with mutual excitation, exact synchrony can be stable for strong coupling because of the stabilizing effect of the causal limit region of the PRC in which an input triggers a spike immediately upon arrival. However, synchrony is unstable for short delays, because delayed inputs arrive during a refractory period and cannot trigger an immediate spike. Right skew destabilizes antiphase and enables modes with time lags that grow as the conduction delay is increased. Therefore, right skew favors near synchrony at short conduction delays and a gradual transition between synchrony and antiphase for pairs coupled by mutual excitation. For pairs with mutual inhibition, zero time lag synchrony is stable for conduction delays ranging from zero to a substantial fraction of the period for pairs. However, for right skew there is a preferred antiphase mode at short delays. In contrast to mutual excitation, left skew destabilizes antiphase for mutual inhibition so that synchrony dominates at short delays as well. These pairwise synchronization tendencies constrain the synchronization properties of neurons embedded in larger networks. PMID:24376399

  20. Robust Measurements of Phase Response Curves Realized via Multicycle Weighted Spike-Triggered Averages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Takashi; Ota, Kaiichiro; Aoyagi, Toshio

    2017-02-01

    Phase reduction has been extensively used to study rhythmic phenomena. As a result of phase reduction, the rhythm dynamics of a given system can be described using the phase response curve. Measuring this characteristic curve is an important step toward understanding a system's behavior. Recently, a basic idea for a new measurement method (called the multicycle weighted spike-triggered average method) was proposed. This paper confirms the validity of this method by providing an analytical proof and demonstrates its effectiveness in actual experimental systems by applying the method to an oscillating electric circuit. Some practical tips to use the method are also presented.

  1. A New Approach for Determining Phase Response Curves Reveals that Purkinje Cells Can Act as Perfect Integrators

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Arnd; Häusser, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar Purkinje cells display complex intrinsic dynamics. They fire spontaneously, exhibit bistability, and via mutual network interactions are involved in the generation of high frequency oscillations and travelling waves of activity. To probe the dynamical properties of Purkinje cells we measured their phase response curves (PRCs). PRCs quantify the change in spike phase caused by a stimulus as a function of its temporal position within the interspike interval, and are widely used to predict neuronal responses to more complex stimulus patterns. Significant variability in the interspike interval during spontaneous firing can lead to PRCs with a low signal-to-noise ratio, requiring averaging over thousands of trials. We show using electrophysiological experiments and simulations that the PRC calculated in the traditional way by sampling the interspike interval with brief current pulses is biased. We introduce a corrected approach for calculating PRCs which eliminates this bias. Using our new approach, we show that Purkinje cell PRCs change qualitatively depending on the firing frequency of the cell. At high firing rates, Purkinje cells exhibit single-peaked, or monophasic PRCs. Surprisingly, at low firing rates, Purkinje cell PRCs are largely independent of phase, resembling PRCs of ideal non-leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. These results indicate that Purkinje cells can act as perfect integrators at low firing rates, and that the integration mode of Purkinje cells depends on their firing rate. PMID:20442875

  2. Optimal Design for Hetero-Associative Memory: Hippocampal CA1 Phase Response Curve and Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Ryota; Ota, Keisuke; Aonishi, Toru

    2013-01-01

    Recently reported experimental findings suggest that the hippocampal CA1 network stores spatio-temporal spike patterns and retrieves temporally reversed and spread-out patterns. In this paper, we explore the idea that the properties of the neural interactions and the synaptic plasticity rule in the CA1 network enable it to function as a hetero-associative memory recalling such reversed and spread-out spike patterns. In line with Lengyel’s speculation (Lengyel et al., 2005), we firstly derive optimally designed spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) rules that are matched to neural interactions formalized in terms of phase response curves (PRCs) for performing the hetero-associative memory function. By maximizing object functions formulated in terms of mutual information for evaluating memory retrieval performance, we search for STDP window functions that are optimal for retrieval of normal and doubly spread-out patterns under the constraint that the PRCs are those of CA1 pyramidal neurons. The system, which can retrieve normal and doubly spread-out patterns, can also retrieve reversed patterns with the same quality. Finally, we demonstrate that purposely designed STDP window functions qualitatively conform to typical ones found in CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:24204822

  3. The h channel mediates location dependence and plasticity of intrinsic phase response in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Rishikesh; Johnston, Daniel

    2008-05-28

    The presence of phenomenological inductances in neuronal membrane has been known for more than one-half a century. Despite this, the dramatic contributions of such inductive elements to the amplitude and, especially, phase of neuronal impedance, and their roles in modulating temporal dynamics of neuronal responses have surprisingly remained unexplored. In this study, we demonstrate that the h channel contributes a location-dependent and plastic phenomenological inductive component to the input impedance of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Specifically, we show that the h channels introduce an apparent negative delay in the local voltage response of these neurons with respect to the injected current within the theta frequency range. The frequency range and the extent of this lead expand with increases in h current either through hyperpolarization, or with increasing distance of dendritic location from the soma. We also demonstrate that a spatially widespread increase in this inductive phase component accompanies long-term potentiation. Finally, using impedance analysis, we show that both location and activity dependence of intrinsic phase response are attributable not to changes in a capacitive or a leak component, but to changes in h-channel properties. Our results suggest that certain voltage-gated ion channels can differentially regulate internal time delays within neurons, thus providing them with an independent control mechanism in temporal coding of neuronal information. Our analyses and results also establish impedance as a powerful measure of intrinsic dynamics and excitability, given that it quantifies temporal relationships among signals and excitability as functions of input frequency.

  4. Characterizing dynamic interactions between ultradian glucocorticoid rhythmicity and acute stress using the phase response curve.

    PubMed

    Rankin, James; Walker, Jamie J; Windle, Richard; Lightman, Stafford L; Terry, John R

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a dynamic oscillatory hormone signalling system that regulates the pulsatile secretion of glucocorticoids from the adrenal glands. In addition to regulation of basal levels of glucocorticoids, the HPA axis provides a rapid hormonal response to stress that is vitally important for homeostasis. Recently it has become clear that glucocorticoid pulses encode an important biological signal that regulates receptor signalling both in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues. It is therefore important to understand how stressful stimuli disrupt the pulsatile dynamics of this system. Using a computational model that incorporates the crucial feed-forward and feedback components of the axis, we provide novel insight into experimental observations that the size of the stress-induced hormonal response is critically dependent on the timing of the stress. Further, we employ the theory of Phase Response Curves to show that an acute stressor acts as a phase-resetting mechanism for the ultradian rhythm of glucocorticoid secretion. Using our model, we demonstrate that the magnitude of an acute stress is a critical factor in determining whether the system resets via a Type 1 or Type 0 mechanism. By fitting our model to our in vivo stress-response data, we show that the glucocorticoid response to an acute noise stress in rats is governed by a Type 0 phase-resetting curve. Our results provide additional evidence for the concept of a deterministic sub-hypothalamic oscillator regulating the ultradian glucocorticoid rhythm, which constitutes a highly responsive peripheral hormone system that interacts dynamically with hypothalamic inputs to regulate the overall hormonal response to stress.

  5. Multidimensional representations of the phase response curve for both type 1 and type 2 membrane excitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raidt, Robert; Smith, Andrew J.; Oprisan, Sorinel A.

    2012-02-01

    Neurons are complex excitable cells with a highly nonlinear response to external perturbations, such as presynaptic inputs and biological noise. Single-cell activity is determined by the properties of ionic channels and the ionic makeup of cell's environment and is mathematically described by coupled and nonlinear evolution equations. The phase resetting curve (PRC) reduces the complexity of the biophysical mechanisms involved in generating action potentials to tabulating advances or delays of subsequent spikes of a neuron due to an external perturbation. The PRC is widely used to predict the activity of large neural networks that by replacing the computationally intensive integration of evolution equations with lookup tables. The fundamental assumption of the PRC approach in predicting phase-locked modes in coupled neural networks is that the transient PRC measured for isolated and bursting neurons (open-loop) remains the same under the recurrent inputs of a phase-locked mode (close-loop). The novelties of our approach are: 1) the use of discrete sine transforms (DST's) to store the PRC's as a series of coefficients, and 2) the use of multidimensional stacks to represent multidimensional objects.

  6. Investigating inter-segmental connections between thoracic ganglia in the stick insect by means of experimental and simulated phase response curves.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Tibor I; Grabowska, Martyna; Rosjat, Nils; Hellekes, Katja; Borgmann, Anke; Daun-Gruhn, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    The neuronal networks that control the motion of the individual legs in insects, in particular in the stick insect, are located in the pro-, meso- and meta-thoracic ganglia. They ensure high flexibility of movement control. Thus, the legs can move in an apparently independent way, e.g., during search movements, but also in tight coordination during locomotion. The latter is evidently a very important behavioural mode. It has, therefore, inspired a large number of studies, all aiming at uncovering the nature of the inter-leg coordination. One of the basic questions has been as to how the individual control networks in the three thoracic ganglia are connected to each other. One way to study this problem is to use phase response curves. They can reveal properties of the coupling between oscillatory systems, such as the central pattern generators in the control networks in the thoracic ganglia. In this paper, we report results that we have achieved by means of a combined experimental and modelling approach. We have calculated phase response curves from data obtained in as yet unpublished experiments as well as from those in previously published ones. By using models of the connected pro- and meso-thoracic control networks of the protractor and retractor neuromuscular systems, we have also produced simulated phase response curves and compared them with the experimental ones. In this way, we could gain important information of the nature of the connections between the aforementioned control networks. Specifically, we have found that connections from both the protractor and the retractor "sides" of the pro-thoracic network to the meso-thoracic one are necessary for producing phase response curves that show close similarity to the experimental ones. Furthermore, the strength of the excitatory connections has been proven to be crucial, while the inhibitory connections have essentially been irrelevant. We, thus, suggest that this type of connection might also be present in

  7. Human phase response curve to intermittent blue light using a commercially available device

    PubMed Central

    Revell, Victoria L; Molina, Thomas A; Eastman, Charmane I

    2012-01-01

    Light shifts the timing of the circadian clock according to a phase response curve (PRC). To date, all human light PRCs have been to long durations of bright white light. However, melanopsin, the primary photopigment for the circadian system, is most sensitive to short wavelength blue light. Therefore, to optimise light treatment it is important to generate a blue light PRC. We used a small, commercially available blue LED light box, screen size 11.2 × 6.6 cm at ∼50 cm, ∼200 μW cm−2, ∼185 lux. Subjects participated in two 5 day laboratory sessions 1 week apart. Each session consisted of circadian phase assessments to obtain melatonin profiles before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light–dark cycle (2.5 h wake in dim light, 1.5 h sleep in the dark), forced desynchrony protocol. During one session subjects received intermittent blue light (three 30 min pulses over 2 h) once a day for the 3 days of free-running, and in the other session (control) they remained in dim room light, counterbalanced. The time of blue light was varied among subjects to cover the entire 24 h day. For each individual, the phase shift to blue light was corrected for the free-run determined during the control session. The blue light PRC had a broad advance region starting in the morning and extending through the afternoon. The delay region started a few hours before bedtime and extended through the night. This is the first PRC to be constructed to blue light and to a stimulus that could be used in the real world. PMID:22753544

  8. A phase response curve to single bright light pulses in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalsa, Sat Bir S.; Jewett, Megan E.; Cajochen, Christian; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The circadian pacemaker is differentially sensitive to the resetting effects of retinal light exposure, depending upon the circadian phase at which the light exposure occurs. Previously reported human phase response curves (PRCs) to single bright light exposures have employed small sample sizes, and were often based on relatively imprecise estimates of circadian phase and phase resetting. In the present study, 21 healthy, entrained subjects underwent pre- and post-stimulus constant routines (CRs) in dim light (approximately 2-7 lx) with maintained wakefulness in a semi-recumbent posture. The 6.7 h bright light exposure stimulus consisted of alternating 6 min fixed gaze (approximately 10 000 lx) and free gaze (approximately 5000-9000 lx) exposures. Light exposures were scheduled across the circadian cycle in different subjects so as to derive a PRC. Plasma melatonin was used to determine the phase of the onset, offset, and midpoint of the melatonin profiles during the CRs. Phase shifts were calculated as the difference in phase between the pre- and post-stimulus CRs. The resultant PRC of the midpoint of the melatonin rhythm revealed a characteristic type 1 PRC with a significant peak-to-trough amplitude of 5.02 h. Phase delays occurred when the light stimulus was centred prior to the critical phase at the core body temperature minimum, phase advances occurred when the light stimulus was centred after the critical phase, and no phase shift occurred at the critical phase. During the subjective day, no prolonged 'dead zone' of photic insensitivity was apparent. Phase shifts derived using the melatonin onsets showed larger magnitudes than those derived from the melatonin offsets. These data provide a comprehensive characterization of the human PRC under highly controlled laboratory conditions.

  9. A three pulse phase response curve to three milligrams of melatonin in humans

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Helen J; Revell, Victoria L; Eastman, Charmane I

    2008-01-01

    Exogenous melatonin is increasingly used for its phase shifting and soporific effects. We generated a three pulse phase response curve (PRC) to exogenous melatonin (3 mg) by administering it to free-running subjects. Young healthy subjects (n = 27) participated in two 5 day laboratory sessions, each preceded by at least a week of habitual, but fixed sleep. Each 5 day laboratory session started and ended with a phase assessment to measure the circadian rhythm of endogenous melatonin in dim light using 30 min saliva samples. In between were three days in an ultradian dim light (< 150 lux)–dark cycle (LD 2.5 : 1.5) during which each subject took one pill per day at the same clock time (3 mg melatonin or placebo, double blind, counterbalanced). Each individual's phase shift to exogenous melatonin was corrected by subtracting their phase shift to placebo (a free-run). The resulting PRC has a phase advance portion peaking about 5 h before the dim light melatonin onset, in the afternoon. The phase delay portion peaks about 11 h after the dim light melatonin onset, shortly after the usual time of morning awakening. A dead zone of minimal phase shifts occurred around the first half of habitual sleep. The fitted maximum advance and delay shifts were 1.8 h and 1.3 h, respectively. This new PRC will aid in determining the optimal time to administer exogenous melatonin to achieve desired phase shifts and demonstrates that using exogenous melatonin as a sleep aid at night has minimal phase shifting effects. PMID:18006583

  10. Evaluation of the Phase-Dependent Rhythm Control of Human Walking Using Phase Response Curves

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Aoi, Shinya; Imai, Takashi; Aoyagi, Toshio; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Humans and animals control their walking rhythms to maintain motion in a variable environment. The neural mechanism for controlling rhythm has been investigated in many studies using mechanical and electrical stimulation. However, quantitative evaluation of rhythm variation in response to perturbation at various timings has rarely been investigated. Such a characteristic of rhythm is described by the phase response curve (PRC). Dynamical simulations of human skeletal models with changing walking rhythms (phase reset) described a relation between the effective phase reset on stability and PRC, and phase reset around touch-down was shown to improve stability. A PRC of human walking was estimated by pulling the swing leg, but such perturbations hardly influenced the stance leg, so the relation between the PRC and walking events was difficult to discuss. This research thus examines human response to variations in floor velocity. Such perturbation yields another problem, in that the swing leg is indirectly (and weakly) perturbed, so the precision of PRC decreases. To solve this problem, this research adopts the weighted spike-triggered average (WSTA) method. In the WSTA method, a sequential pulsed perturbation is used for stimulation. This is in contrast with the conventional impulse method, which applies an intermittent impulsive perturbation. The WSTA method can be used to analyze responses to a large number of perturbations for each sequence. In the experiment, perturbations are applied to walking subjects by rapidly accelerating and decelerating a treadmill belt, and measured data are analyzed by the WSTA and impulse methods. The PRC obtained by the WSTA method had clear and stable waveforms with a higher temporal resolution than those obtained by the impulse method. By investigation of the rhythm transition for each phase of walking using the obtained PRC, a rhythm change that extends the touch-down and mid-single support phases is found to occur. PMID:27203839

  11. A phase response curve to single bright light pulses in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalsa, Sat Bir S.; Jewett, Megan E.; Cajochen, Christian; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2003-01-01

    The circadian pacemaker is differentially sensitive to the resetting effects of retinal light exposure, depending upon the circadian phase at which the light exposure occurs. Previously reported human phase response curves (PRCs) to single bright light exposures have employed small sample sizes, and were often based on relatively imprecise estimates of circadian phase and phase resetting. In the present study, 21 healthy, entrained subjects underwent pre- and post-stimulus constant routines (CRs) in dim light (approximately 2-7 lx) with maintained wakefulness in a semi-recumbent posture. The 6.7 h bright light exposure stimulus consisted of alternating 6 min fixed gaze (approximately 10 000 lx) and free gaze (approximately 5000-9000 lx) exposures. Light exposures were scheduled across the circadian cycle in different subjects so as to derive a PRC. Plasma melatonin was used to determine the phase of the onset, offset, and midpoint of the melatonin profiles during the CRs. Phase shifts were calculated as the difference in phase between the pre- and post-stimulus CRs. The resultant PRC of the midpoint of the melatonin rhythm revealed a characteristic type 1 PRC with a significant peak-to-trough amplitude of 5.02 h. Phase delays occurred when the light stimulus was centred prior to the critical phase at the core body temperature minimum, phase advances occurred when the light stimulus was centred after the critical phase, and no phase shift occurred at the critical phase. During the subjective day, no prolonged 'dead zone' of photic insensitivity was apparent. Phase shifts derived using the melatonin onsets showed larger magnitudes than those derived from the melatonin offsets. These data provide a comprehensive characterization of the human PRC under highly controlled laboratory conditions.

  12. Photic entrainment of Period mutant mice is predicted from their phase response curves

    PubMed Central

    Pendergast, Julie S.; Friday, Rio C.; Yamazaki, Shin

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental property of circadian clocks is that they entrain to environmental cues. The circadian genes, Period1 and Period2, are involved in entrainment of the mammalian circadian system. To investigate the roles of the Period genes in photic entrainment, we constructed phase response curves (PRC) to light pulses for C57BL/6J wild-type, Per1−/−, Per2−/−, and Per3−/− mice and tested whether the PRCs accurately predict entrainment to non-24 light-dark cycles (T-cycles) and constant light (LL). The PRCs of wild-type and Per3−/− mice are similar in shape and amplitude and have relatively large delay zones and small advance zones, resulting in successful entrainment to T26, but not T21, with similar phase angles. Per1−/− mice have a high-amplitude PRC, resulting in entrainment to a broad range of T-cycles. Per2−/− mice also entrain to a wide range of T-cycles because the advance portion of their PRC is larger than wild-types. Period aftereffects following entrainment to T-cycles were similar among all genotypes. We found that the ratio of the advance portion to the delay portion of the PRC accurately predicts the lengthening of the period of the activity rhythm in LL. Wild-type, Per1−/−, and Per3−/− mice had larger delay zones than advance zones and lengthened (>24hrs) periods in LL, while Per2−/− mice had delay and advance zones that were equal in size and no period lengthening in LL. Together, these results demonstrate that PRCs are powerful tools for predicting and understanding photic entrainment of circadian mutant mice. PMID:20826680

  13. Human phase response curve to intermittent blue light using a commercially available device.

    PubMed

    Revell, Victoria L; Molina, Thomas A; Eastman, Charmane I

    2012-10-01

    Light shifts the timing of the circadian clock according to a phase response curve (PRC). To date, all human light PRCs have been to long durations of bright white light. However, melanopsin, the primary photopigment for the circadian system, is most sensitive to short wavelength blue light. Therefore, to optimise light treatment it is important to generate a blue light PRC.We used a small, commercially available blue LED light box, screen size 11.2 × 6.6 cm at ∼50 cm, ∼200 μW cm(−2), ∼185 lux. Subjects participated in two 5 day laboratory sessions 1 week apart. Each session consisted of circadian phase assessments to obtain melatonin profiles before and after 3 days of free-running through an ultradian light–dark cycle (2.5 h wake in dim light, 1.5 h sleep in the dark), forced desynchrony protocol. During one session subjects received intermittent blue light (three 30 min pulses over 2 h) once a day for the 3 days of free-running, and in the other session (control) they remained in dim room light, counterbalanced. The time of blue light was varied among subjects to cover the entire 24 h day. For each individual, the phase shift to blue light was corrected for the free-run determined during the control session. The blue light PRC had a broad advance region starting in the morning and extending through the afternoon. The delay region started a few hours before bedtime and extended through the night. This is the first PRC to be constructed to blue light and to a stimulus that could be used in the real world.

  14. Effects of induced wheel running on the circadian activity rhythms of Syrian hamsters: entrainment and phase response curve.

    PubMed

    Reebs, S G; Mrosovsky, N

    1989-01-01

    The goal of this study was to provide an example of nonsocial and nonphotic entrainment in Syrian hamsters, together with a corresponding phase response curve (PRC). Fourteen male hamsters were given 2-hr bouts of induced activity (mostly wheel running) at 23.83-hr intervals in constant darkness (DD). The activity onsets of 10 hamsters entrained to this manipulation, with no anticipatory activity present. After entrainment, the rhythms resumed free-running from a time 0.66-3.91 hr after the onset of the last bout of induced activity. Postentrainment free-running periods were shorter than pre-entrainment values. The PRC for 2-hr pulses of induced activity in DD revealed phase advances induced in some animals between circadian time (CT) 4 and CT 11 (approximately the last half of the hamsters' rest period), and delays between CT 23 and CT 3 and between CT 17 and CT 20. The CTs for phase advances are compatible with the phase angle differences observed between rhythm and zeitgeber at the end of entrainment. Many features of the results (not all animals entraining, PRC characteristics, lack of observable anticipation to the daily stimuli, phase relationship between zeitgeber and activity rhythms) are similar to those from a previous study on social entrainment in this species (Mrosovsky, 1988). These similarities reinforce the idea that induced activity and social zeitgebers act on activity rhythms via a common mechanism.

  15. The h channel mediates location-dependence and plasticity of intrinsic phase response in rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Rishikesh; Johnston, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The presence of phenomenological inductances in neuronal membrane has been known for more than half a century. In spite of this, the dramatic contributions of such inductive elements to the amplitude and, especially, phase of neuronal impedance, and their roles in modulating temporal dynamics of neuronal responses have surprisingly remained unexplored. In this study, we demonstrate that the h channel contributes a location-dependent and plastic phenomenological inductive component to the input impedance of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Specifically, we show that the h channels introduce an apparent negative delay in the local voltage response of these neurons with respect to the injected current within the theta frequency range. The frequency-range and the extent of this lead expand with increases in h current either through hyperpolarization, or with increasing distance of dendritic location from the soma. We also demonstrate that a spatially widespread increase in this inductive phase component accompanies long-term potentiation. Finally, employing impedance analysis, we show that both location- and activity-dependence of intrinsic phase response are not due to changes in a capacitive or a leak component, but due to changes in h channel properties. Our results suggest that certain voltage-gated ion channels can differentially regulate internal time delays within neurons, thus providing them with an independent control mechanism in temporal coding of neuronal information. Our analyses and results also establish impedance as a powerful measure of intrinsic dynamics and excitability, given that it quantifies excitability and temporal relationships among signals as functions of input frequency. PMID:18509046

  16. Human phase response curve to a single 6.5 h pulse of short-wavelength light

    PubMed Central

    Rüger, Melanie; St Hilaire, Melissa A; Brainard, George C; Khalsa, Sat-Bir S; Kronauer, Richard E; Czeisler, Charles A; Lockley, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    The photic resetting response of the human circadian pacemaker depends on the timing of exposure, and the direction and magnitude of the resulting shift is described by a phase response curve (PRC). Previous PRCs in humans have utilized high-intensity polychromatic white light. Given that the circadian photoreception system is maximally sensitive to short-wavelength visible light, the aim of the current study was to construct a PRC to blue (480 nm) light and compare it to a 10,000 lux white light PRC constructed previously using a similar protocol. Eighteen young healthy participants (18–30 years) were studied for 9–10 days in a time-free environment. The protocol included three baseline days followed by a constant routine (CR) to assess initial circadian phase. Following this CR, participants were exposed to a 6.5 h 480 nm light exposure (11.8 μW cm−2, 11.2 lux) following mydriasis via a modified Ganzfeld dome. A second CR was conducted following the light exposure to re-assess circadian phase. Phase shifts were calculated from the difference in dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) between CRs. Exposure to 6.5 h of 480 nm light resets the circadian pacemaker according to a conventional type 1 PRC with fitted maximum delays and advances of −2.6 h and 1.3 h, respectively. The 480 nm PRC induced ∼75% of the response of the 10,000 lux white light PRC. These results may contribute to a re-evaluation of dosing guidelines for clinical light therapy and the use of light as a fatigue countermeasure. PMID:23090946

  17. The Rhythm Aftereffect: Support for Time Sensitive Neurons with Broad Overlapping Tuning Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Mark W.; Rasmussen, Ian P.

    2007-01-01

    Ivry [Ivry, R. B. (1996). The representation of temporal information in perception and motor control. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 6, 851-857.] proposed that explicit coding of brief time intervals is accomplished by neurons that are tuned to a preferred temporal interval and have broad overlapping tuning curves. This proposal is analogous to…

  18. The Rhythm Aftereffect: Support for Time Sensitive Neurons with Broad Overlapping Tuning Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Mark W.; Rasmussen, Ian P.

    2007-01-01

    Ivry [Ivry, R. B. (1996). The representation of temporal information in perception and motor control. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 6, 851-857.] proposed that explicit coding of brief time intervals is accomplished by neurons that are tuned to a preferred temporal interval and have broad overlapping tuning curves. This proposal is analogous to…

  19. Determine Neuronal Tuning Curves by Exploring Optimum Firing Rate Distribution for Information Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fang; Wang, Zhijie; Fan, Hong

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposed a new method to determine the neuronal tuning curves for maximum information efficiency by computing the optimum firing rate distribution. Firstly, we proposed a general definition for the information efficiency, which is relevant to mutual information and neuronal energy consumption. The energy consumption is composed of two parts: neuronal basic energy consumption and neuronal spike emission energy consumption. A parameter to model the relative importance of energy consumption is introduced in the definition of the information efficiency. Then, we designed a combination of exponential functions to describe the optimum firing rate distribution based on the analysis of the dependency of the mutual information and the energy consumption on the shape of the functions of the firing rate distributions. Furthermore, we developed a rapid algorithm to search the parameter values of the optimum firing rate distribution function. Finally, we found with the rapid algorithm that a combination of two different exponential functions with two free parameters can describe the optimum firing rate distribution accurately. We also found that if the energy consumption is relatively unimportant (important) compared to the mutual information or the neuronal basic energy consumption is relatively large (small), the curve of the optimum firing rate distribution will be relatively flat (steep), and the corresponding optimum tuning curve exhibits a form of sigmoid if the stimuli distribution is normal. PMID:28270760

  20. Determine Neuronal Tuning Curves by Exploring Optimum Firing Rate Distribution for Information Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Han, Fang; Wang, Zhijie; Fan, Hong

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposed a new method to determine the neuronal tuning curves for maximum information efficiency by computing the optimum firing rate distribution. Firstly, we proposed a general definition for the information efficiency, which is relevant to mutual information and neuronal energy consumption. The energy consumption is composed of two parts: neuronal basic energy consumption and neuronal spike emission energy consumption. A parameter to model the relative importance of energy consumption is introduced in the definition of the information efficiency. Then, we designed a combination of exponential functions to describe the optimum firing rate distribution based on the analysis of the dependency of the mutual information and the energy consumption on the shape of the functions of the firing rate distributions. Furthermore, we developed a rapid algorithm to search the parameter values of the optimum firing rate distribution function. Finally, we found with the rapid algorithm that a combination of two different exponential functions with two free parameters can describe the optimum firing rate distribution accurately. We also found that if the energy consumption is relatively unimportant (important) compared to the mutual information or the neuronal basic energy consumption is relatively large (small), the curve of the optimum firing rate distribution will be relatively flat (steep), and the corresponding optimum tuning curve exhibits a form of sigmoid if the stimuli distribution is normal.

  1. Phase response function for oscillators with strong forcing or coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinshov, Vladimir; Yanchuk, Serhiy; Stephan, Artur; Nekorkin, Vladimir

    2017-06-01

    Phase response curve (PRC) is an extremely useful tool for studying the response of oscillatory systems, e.g., neurons, to sparse or weak stimulation. Here we develop a framework for studying the response to a series of pulses which are frequent or/and strong. In this case the effect of a stimulus does not vanish before the next one arrives, so the standard PRC fails. In the present letter, we introduce the so-called phase response function (PRF) that measures the phase response even when the system is far from the limit cycle. The PRF uses the history of several previous pulses and does not need the information about the distance from the limit cycle. As a result, an oscillator with pulse input is reduced to a phase system. We illustrate our approach by its application to various systems, such as the Morris-Lecar, Hodgkin-Huxley neuron models, and others. We show that the PRF allows predicting the dynamics of forced and coupled oscillators even when the PRC fails. Thus, the PRF provides an effective tool that may be used for simulation of neural, chemical, optic and other oscillatory systems.

  2. A broadly applicable 3-D neuron tracing method based on open-curve snake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Narayanaswamy, Arunachalam; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Roysam, Badrinath

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a broadly applicable algorithm and a comprehensive open-source software implementation for automated tracing of neuronal structures in 3-D microscopy images. The core 3-D neuron tracing algorithm is based on three-dimensional (3-D) open-curve active Contour (Snake). It is initiated from a set of automatically detected seed points. Its evolution is driven by a combination of deforming forces based on the Gradient Vector Flow (GVF), stretching forces based on estimation of the fiber orientations, and a set of control rules. In this tracing model, bifurcation points are detected implicitly as points where multiple snakes collide. A boundariness measure is employed to allow local radius estimation. A suite of pre-processing algorithms enable the system to accommodate diverse neuronal image datasets by reducing them to a common image format. The above algorithms form the basis for a comprehensive, scalable, and efficient software system developed for confocal or brightfield images. It provides multiple automated tracing modes. The user can optionally interact with the tracing system using multiple view visualization, and exercise full control to ensure a high quality reconstruction. We illustrate the utility of this tracing system by presenting results from a synthetic dataset, a brightfield dataset and two confocal datasets from the DIADEM challenge.

  3. Differential effects of conductances on the phase resetting curve of a bursting neuronal oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Prinz, Astrid A.

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsically oscillating neurons in the crustacean pyloric circuit have membrane conductances that influence their spontaneous activity patterns and responses to synaptic activity. The relationship between the magnitudes of these membrane conductances and the response of the oscillating neurons to synaptic input has not yet been fully or systematically explored. We examined this relationship using the phase resetting curve (PRC), which summarizes the change in the cycle period of a neuronal oscillator as a function of the input’s timing within the oscillation. We first utilized a large database of single-compartment model neurons to determine the effect of individual membrane conductances on PRC shape; we found that the effects vary across conductance space, but on average, the hyperpolarization-activated and leak conductances advance the PRC. We next investigated how membrane conductances affect PRCs of the isolated pacemaker kernel in the pyloric circuit of Cancer borealis by: (1) tabulating PRCs while using dynamic clamp to artificially add varying levels of specific conductances, and (2) tabulating PRCs before and after blocking the endogenous hyperpolarization-activated current. We additionally used a previously described four-compartment model to determine how the location of the hyperpolarization-activated conductance influences that current’s effect on the PRC. We report that while dynamic-clamp-injected leak current has much smaller effects on the PRC than suggested by the single-compartment model, an increase in the hyperpolarization-activated conductance both advances and reduces the noisiness of the PRC in the pacemaker kernel of the pyloric circuit in both modeling and experimental studies. PMID:25835323

  4. Interaction function of coupled bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shi; Jiadong, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    The interaction functions of electrically coupled Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) neurons for different firing patterns are investigated in this paper. By applying the phase reduction technique, the phase response curve (PRC) of the spiking neuron and burst phase response curve (BPRC) of the bursting neuron are derived. Then the interaction function of two coupled neurons can be calculated numerically according to the PRC (or BPRC) and the voltage time course of the neurons. Results show that the BPRC is more and more complicated with the increase of the spike number within a burst, and the curve of the interaction function oscillates more and more frequently with it. However, two certain things are unchanged: ϕ = 0, which corresponds to the in-phase synchronization state, is always the stable equilibrium, while the anti-phase synchronization state with ϕ = 0.5 is an unstable equilibrium. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11272065 and 11472061).

  5. Segmentation of neuronal structures using SARSA (λ)-based boundary amendment with reinforced gradient-descent curve shape fitting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Fu, Yuchen; Shen, Bairong

    2014-01-01

    The segmentation of structures in electron microscopy (EM) images is very important for neurobiological research. The low resolution neuronal EM images contain noise and generally few features are available for segmentation, therefore application of the conventional approaches to identify the neuron structure from EM images is not successful. We therefore present a multi-scale fused structure boundary detection algorithm in this study. In the algorithm, we generate an EM image Gaussian pyramid first, then at each level of the pyramid, we utilize Laplacian of Gaussian function (LoG) to attain structure boundary, we finally assemble the detected boundaries by using fusion algorithm to attain a combined neuron structure image. Since the obtained neuron structures usually have gaps, we put forward a reinforcement learning-based boundary amendment method to connect the gaps in the detected boundaries. We use a SARSA (λ)-based curve traveling and amendment approach derived from reinforcement learning to repair the incomplete curves. Using this algorithm, a moving point starts from one end of the incomplete curve and walks through the image where the decisions are supervised by the approximated curve model, with the aim of minimizing the connection cost until the gap is closed. Our approach provided stable and efficient structure segmentation. The test results using 30 EM images from ISBI 2012 indicated that both of our approaches, i.e., with or without boundary amendment, performed better than six conventional boundary detection approaches. In particular, after amendment, the Rand error and warping error, which are the most important performance measurements during structure segmentation, were reduced to very low values. The comparison with the benchmark method of ISBI 2012 and the recent developed methods also indicates that our method performs better for the accurate identification of substructures in EM images and therefore useful for the identification of imaging

  6. Segmentation of Neuronal Structures Using SARSA (λ)-Based Boundary Amendment with Reinforced Gradient-Descent Curve Shape Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Fu, Yuchen; Shen, Bairong

    2014-01-01

    The segmentation of structures in electron microscopy (EM) images is very important for neurobiological research. The low resolution neuronal EM images contain noise and generally few features are available for segmentation, therefore application of the conventional approaches to identify the neuron structure from EM images is not successful. We therefore present a multi-scale fused structure boundary detection algorithm in this study. In the algorithm, we generate an EM image Gaussian pyramid first, then at each level of the pyramid, we utilize Laplacian of Gaussian function (LoG) to attain structure boundary, we finally assemble the detected boundaries by using fusion algorithm to attain a combined neuron structure image. Since the obtained neuron structures usually have gaps, we put forward a reinforcement learning-based boundary amendment method to connect the gaps in the detected boundaries. We use a SARSA (λ)-based curve traveling and amendment approach derived from reinforcement learning to repair the incomplete curves. Using this algorithm, a moving point starts from one end of the incomplete curve and walks through the image where the decisions are supervised by the approximated curve model, with the aim of minimizing the connection cost until the gap is closed. Our approach provided stable and efficient structure segmentation. The test results using 30 EM images from ISBI 2012 indicated that both of our approaches, i.e., with or without boundary amendment, performed better than six conventional boundary detection approaches. In particular, after amendment, the Rand error and warping error, which are the most important performance measurements during structure segmentation, were reduced to very low values. The comparison with the benchmark method of ISBI 2012 and the recent developed methods also indicates that our method performs better for the accurate identification of substructures in EM images and therefore useful for the identification of imaging

  7. Seeing a straight line on a curved surface: decoupling of patterns from surfaces by single IT neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ratan Murty, N. Apurva

    2016-01-01

    We have no difficulty seeing a straight line drawn on a paper even when the paper is bent, but this inference is in fact nontrivial. Doing so requires either matching local features or representing the pattern after factoring out the surface shape. Here we show that single neurons in the monkey inferior temporal (IT) cortex show invariant responses to patterns across rigid and nonrigid changes of surfaces. We recorded neuronal responses to stimuli in which the pattern and the surrounding surface were varied independently. In a subset of neurons, we found pattern-surface interactions that produced similar responses to stimuli across congruent pattern and surface transformations. These interactions produced systematic shifts in curvature tuning of patterns when overlaid on convex and flat surfaces. Our results show that surfaces are factored out of patterns by single neurons, thereby enabling complex perceptual inferences. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We have no difficulty seeing a straight line on a curved piece of paper, but in fact, doing so requires decoupling the shape of the surface from the pattern itself. Here we report a novel form of invariance in the visual cortex: single neurons in monkey inferior temporal cortex respond similarly to congruent transformations of patterns and surfaces, in effect decoupling patterns from the surface on which they are overlaid. PMID:27733595

  8. [Influence of temperature on the calibration curves in IRMA for neuron-specific enolase and its physicochemical interpretation].

    PubMed

    Peris Conejero, T; Olivares Pallerols, R; Moreno Frigols, J L

    2009-01-01

    immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) is one of the principal methods used for the analytical determination of neuron specific enolase (NSE) concentration. We studied the influence of temperature on the calibration curves obtained by this method, and a physicochemical justification based on two theoretical models is proposed. we used a commercially available RIA kit for NSE and a gamma counter. Data was analysed using Statistical software. activity bound to the antibody increases with temperature, producing results that are consistent with two modifications to the four parameter and Langmuir equations. the two models used successfully reproduce the results, with the adsorption model being preferable due to its greater simplicity and clearer physical significance.

  9. The influence of population size, noise strength and behavioral task on best-encoded stimulus for neurons with unimodal or monotonic tuning curves

    PubMed Central

    Yarrow, Stuart; Seriès, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Tuning curves and receptive fields are widely used to describe the selectivity of sensory neurons, but the relationship between firing rates and information is not always intuitive. Neither high firing rates nor high tuning curve gradients necessarily mean that stimuli at that part of the tuning curve are well represented by a neuron. Recent research has shown that trial-to-trial variability (noise) and population size can strongly affect which stimuli are most precisely represented by a neuron in the context of a population code (the best-encoded stimulus), and that different measures of information can give conflicting indications. Specifically, the Fisher information is greatest where the tuning curve gradient is greatest, such as on the flanks of peaked tuning curves, but the stimulus-specific information (SSI) is greatest at the tuning curve peak for small populations with high trial-to-trial variability. Previous research in this area has focussed upon unimodal (peaked) tuning curves, and in this article we extend these analyses to monotonic tuning curves. In addition, we examine how stimulus spacing in forced choice tasks affects the best-encoded stimulus. Our results show that, regardless of the tuning curve, Fisher information correctly predicts the best-encoded stimulus for large populations and where the stimuli are closely spaced in forced choice tasks. In smaller populations with high variability, or in forced choice tasks with widely-spaced choices, the best-encoded stimulus falls at the peak of unimodal tuning curves, but is more variable for monotonic tuning curves. Task, population size and variability all need to be considered when assessing which stimuli a neuron represents, but the best-encoded stimulus can be estimated on a case-by case basis using commonly available computing facilities. PMID:25774131

  10. Multipulse phase resetting curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Giri P.; Bazhenov, Maxim; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce and study systematically, in terms of phase response curves, the effect of dual-pulse excitation on the dynamics of an autonomous oscillator. Specifically, we test the deviations from linear summation of phase advances resulting from two small perturbations. We analytically derive a correction term, which generally appears for oscillators whose intrinsic dimensionality is >1. The nonlinear correction term is found to be proportional to the square of the perturbation. We demonstrate this effect in the Stuart-Landau model and in various higher dimensional neuronal models. This deviation from the superposition principle needs to be taken into account in studies of networks of pulse-coupled oscillators. Further, this deviation could be used in the verification of oscillator models via a dual-pulse excitation.

  11. Transcranial electrical brain stimulation modulates neuronal tuning curves in perception of numerosity and duration

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Amir Homayoun; Brunec, Iva K.; Walsh, Vincent; Penny, Will D.; Spiers, Hugo J.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation method with many putative applications and reported to effectively modulate behaviour. However, its effects have yet to be considered at a computational level. To address this we modelled the tuning curves underlying the behavioural effects of stimulation in a perceptual task. Participants judged which of the two serially presented images contained more items (numerosity judgement task) or was presented longer (duration judgement task). During presentation of the second image their posterior parietal cortices (PPCs) were stimulated bilaterally with opposite polarities for 1.6 s. We also examined the impact of three stimulation conditions on behaviour: anodal right-PPC and cathodal left-PPC (rA-lC), reverse order (lA-rC) and no-stimulation condition. Behavioural results showed that participants were more accurate in numerosity and duration judgement tasks when they were stimulated with lA-rC and rA-lC stimulation conditions respectively. Simultaneously, a decrease in performance on numerosity and duration judgement tasks was observed when the stimulation condition favoured the other task. Thus, our results revealed a double-dissociation of laterality and task. Importantly, we were able to model the effects of stimulation on behaviour. Our computational modelling showed that participants' superior performance was attributable to a narrower tuning curve — smaller standard deviation of detection noise. We believe that this approach may prove useful in understanding the impact of brain stimulation on other cognitive domains. PMID:25130301

  12. [Theoretical volt-ampere input curve of a neuron with NC-dendrites after a uniform shift in clamped potential of the soma].

    PubMed

    Butrimas, P; Gutman, A

    1981-01-01

    Dendritic membrane current-voltage curve (CVC) was estimated from motoneuron input CVC. The effect of the clamped potential shifting rate on NC-dendrite input CVC was analyzed. The influence of the membrane negative conductivity upon the input curve hysteresis was calculated. We propose the combined use of hysteresis and nonstationarity features of the negative resistance part of neuron input CVC for crucial experimental solution of ohmic or N-dendrite controversy.

  13. Spike width and frequency alter stability of phase-locking in electrically coupled neurons.

    PubMed

    Dodla, Ramana; Wilson, Charles J

    2013-06-01

    The stability of phase-locked states of electrically coupled type-1 phase response curve neurons is studied using piecewise linear formulations for their voltage profile and phase response curves. We find that at low frequency and/or small spike width, synchrony is stable, and antisynchrony unstable. At high frequency and/or large spike width, these phase-locked states switch their stability. Increasing the ratio of spike width to spike height causes the antisynchronous state to transition into a stable synchronous state. We compute the interaction function and the boundaries of stability of both these phase-locked states, and present analytical expressions for them. We also study the effect of phase response curve skewness on the boundaries of synchrony and antisynchrony.

  14. Phase response theory extended to nonoscillatory network components

    PubMed Central

    Sieling, Fred H.; Archila, Santiago; Hooper, Ryan; Canavier, Carmen C.; Prinz, Astrid A.

    2012-01-01

    New tools for analysis of oscillatory networks using phase response theory (PRT) under the assumption of pulsatile coupling have been developed steadily since the 1980s, but none have yet allowed for analysis of mixed systems containing nonoscillatory elements. This caveat has excluded the application of PRT to most real systems, which are often mixed. We show that a recently developed tool, the functional phase resetting curve (fPRC), provides a serendipitous benefit: it allows incorporation of nonoscillatory elements into systems of oscillators where PRT can be applied. We validate this method in a model system of neural oscillators and a biological system, the pyloric network of crustacean decapods. PMID:23004844

  15. Predicting neural network firing pattern from phase resetting curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oprisan, Sorinel; Oprisan, Ana

    2007-04-01

    Autonomous neural networks called central pattern generators (CPG) are composed of endogenously bursting neurons and produce rhythmic activities, such as flying, swimming, walking, chewing, etc. Simplified CPGs for quadrupedal locomotion and swimming are modeled by a ring of neural oscillators such that the output of one oscillator constitutes the input for the subsequent neural oscillator. The phase response curve (PRC) theory discards the detailed conductance-based description of the component neurons of a network and reduces them to ``black boxes'' characterized by a transfer function, which tabulates the transient change in the intrinsic period of a neural oscillator subject to external stimuli. Based on open-loop PRC, we were able to successfully predict the phase-locked period and relative phase between neurons in a half-center network. We derived existence and stability criteria for heterogeneous ring neural networks that are in good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Synchronization properties of heterogeneous neuronal networks with mixed excitability type.

    PubMed

    Leone, Michael J; Schurter, Brandon N; Letson, Benjamin; Booth, Victoria; Zochowski, Michal; Fink, Christian G

    2015-03-01

    We study the synchronization of neuronal networks with dynamical heterogeneity, showing that network structures with the same propensity for synchronization (as quantified by master stability function analysis) may develop dramatically different synchronization properties when heterogeneity is introduced with respect to neuronal excitability type. Specifically, we investigate networks composed of neurons with different types of phase response curves (PRCs), which characterize how oscillating neurons respond to excitatory perturbations. Neurons exhibiting type 1 PRC respond exclusively with phase advances, while neurons exhibiting type 2 PRC respond with either phase delays or phase advances, depending on when the perturbation occurs. We find that Watts-Strogatz small world networks transition to synchronization gradually as the proportion of type 2 neurons increases, whereas scale-free networks may transition gradually or rapidly, depending upon local correlations between node degree and excitability type. Random placement of type 2 neurons results in gradual transition to synchronization, whereas placement of type 2 neurons as hubs leads to a much more rapid transition, showing that type 2 hub cells easily "hijack" neuronal networks to synchronization. These results underscore the fact that the degree of synchronization observed in neuronal networks is determined by a complex interplay between network structure and the dynamical properties of individual neurons, indicating that efforts to recover structural connectivity from dynamical correlations must in general take both factors into account.

  17. Population Encoding With Hodgkin–Huxley Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Aurel A.

    2013-01-01

    The recovery of (weak) stimuli encoded with a population of Hodgkin–Huxley neurons is investigated. In the absence of a stimulus, the Hodgkin–Huxley neurons are assumed to be tonically spiking. The methodology employed calls for 1) finding an input–output (I/O) equivalent description of the Hodgkin–Huxley neuron and 2) devising a recovery algorithm for stimuli encoded with the I/O equivalent neuron(s). A Hodgkin–Huxley neuron with multiplicative coupling is I/O equivalent with an Integrate-and-Fire neuron with a variable threshold sequence. For bandlimited stimuli a perfect recovery of the stimulus can be achieved provided that a Nyquist-type rate condition is satisfied. A Hodgkin–Huxley neuron with additive coupling and deterministic conductances is first-order I/O equivalent with a Project-Integrate-and-Fire neuron that integrates a projection of the stimulus on the phase response curve. The stimulus recovery is formulated as a spline interpolation problem in the space of finite length bounded energy signals. A Hodgkin–Huxley neuron with additive coupling and stochastic conductances is shown to be first-order I/O equivalent with a Project-Integrate-and-Fire neuron with random thresholds. For stimuli modeled as elements of Sobolev spaces the reconstruction algorithm minimizes a regularized quadratic optimality criterion. Finally, all previous recovery results of stimuli encoded with Hodgkin–Huxley neurons with multiplicative and additive coupling, and deterministic and stochastic conductances are extended to stimuli encoded with a population of Hodgkin–Huxley neurons. PMID:24194625

  18. Population Encoding With Hodgkin-Huxley Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Aurel A

    2010-02-01

    The recovery of (weak) stimuli encoded with a population of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons is investigated. In the absence of a stimulus, the Hodgkin-Huxley neurons are assumed to be tonically spiking. The methodology employed calls for 1) finding an input-output (I/O) equivalent description of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron and 2) devising a recovery algorithm for stimuli encoded with the I/O equivalent neuron(s). A Hodgkin-Huxley neuron with multiplicative coupling is I/O equivalent with an Integrate-and-Fire neuron with a variable threshold sequence. For bandlimited stimuli a perfect recovery of the stimulus can be achieved provided that a Nyquist-type rate condition is satisfied. A Hodgkin-Huxley neuron with additive coupling and deterministic conductances is first-order I/O equivalent with a Project-Integrate-and-Fire neuron that integrates a projection of the stimulus on the phase response curve. The stimulus recovery is formulated as a spline interpolation problem in the space of finite length bounded energy signals. A Hodgkin-Huxley neuron with additive coupling and stochastic conductances is shown to be first-order I/O equivalent with a Project-Integrate-and-Fire neuron with random thresholds. For stimuli modeled as elements of Sobolev spaces the reconstruction algorithm minimizes a regularized quadratic optimality criterion. Finally, all previous recovery results of stimuli encoded with Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with multiplicative and additive coupling, and deterministic and stochastic conductances are extended to stimuli encoded with a population of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons.

  19. Autaptic effects on synchrony of neurons coupled by electrical synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngtae

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we numerically study the effects of a special synapse known as autapse on synchronization of population of Morris-Lecar (ML) neurons coupled by electrical synapses. Several configurations of the ML neuronal populations such as a pair or a ring or a globally coupled network with and without autapses are examined. While most of the papers on the autaptic effects on synchronization have used networks of neurons of same spiking rate, we use the network of neurons of different spiking rates. We find that the optimal autaptic coupling strength and the autaptic time delay enhance synchronization in our neural networks. We use the phase response curve analysis to explain the enhanced synchronization by autapses. Our findings reveal the important relationship between the intraneuronal feedback loop and the interneuronal coupling.

  20. Computation of reduced energy input current stimuli for neuron phase models.

    PubMed

    Anyalebechi, Jason; Koelling, Melinda E; Miller, Damon A

    2014-01-01

    A regularly spiking neuron can be studied using a phase model. The effect of an input stimulus current on the phase time derivative is captured by a phase response curve. This paper adapts a technique that was previously applied to conductance-based models to discover optimal input stimulus currents for phase models. First, the neuron phase response θ(t) due to an input stimulus current i(t) is computed using a phase model. The resulting θ(t) is taken to be a reference phase r(t). Second, an optimal input stimulus current i(*)(t) is computed to minimize a weighted sum of the square-integral `energy' of i(*)(t) and the tracking error between the reference phase r(t) and the phase response due to i(*)(t). The balance between the conflicting requirements of energy and tracking error minimization is controlled by a single parameter. The generated optimal current i(*)t) is then compared to the input current i(t) which was used to generate the reference phase r(t). This technique was applied to two neuron phase models; in each case, the current i(*)(t) generates a phase response similar to the reference phase r(t), and the optimal current i(*)(t) has a lower `energy' than the square-integral of i(t). For constant i(t), the optimal current i(*)(t) need not be constant in time. In fact, i(*)(t) is large (possibly even larger than i(t)) for regions where the phase response curve indicates a stronger sensitivity to the input stimulus current, and smaller in regions of reduced sensitivity.

  1. Effects of Synaptic Plasticity on Phase and Period Locking in a Network of Two Oscillatory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We study the effects of synaptic plasticity on the determination of firing period and relative phases in a network of two oscillatory neurons coupled with reciprocal inhibition. We combine the phase response curves of the neurons with the short-term synaptic plasticity properties of the synapses to define Poincaré maps for the activity of an oscillatory network. Fixed points of these maps correspond to the phase-locked modes of the network. These maps allow us to analyze the dependence of the resulting network activity on the properties of network components. Using a combination of analysis and simulations, we show how various parameters of the model affect the existence and stability of phase-locked solutions. We find conditions on the synaptic plasticity profiles and the phase response curves of the neurons for the network to be able to maintain a constant firing period, while varying the phase of locking between the neurons or vice versa. A generalization to cobwebbing for two-dimensional maps is also discussed. PMID:24791223

  2. PDF neuron firing phase-shifts key circadian activity neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang; Cerullo, Isadora; Chen, Xiao; Rosbash, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Our experiments address two long-standing models for the function of the Drosophila brain circadian network: a dual oscillator model, which emphasizes the primacy of PDF-containing neurons, and a cell-autonomous model for circadian phase adjustment. We identify five different circadian (E) neurons that are a major source of rhythmicity and locomotor activity. Brief firing of PDF cells at different times of day generates a phase response curve (PRC), which mimics a light-mediated PRC and requires PDF receptor expression in the five E neurons. Firing also resembles light by causing TIM degradation in downstream neurons. Unlike light however, firing-mediated phase-shifting is CRY-independent and exploits the E3 ligase component CUL-3 in the early night to degrade TIM. Our results suggest that PDF neurons integrate light information and then modulate the phase of E cell oscillations and behavioral rhythms. The results also explain how fly brain rhythms persist in constant darkness and without CRY. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02780.001 PMID:24939987

  3. PDF neuron firing phase-shifts key circadian activity neurons in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Cerullo, Isadora; Chen, Xiao; Rosbash, Michael

    2014-06-17

    Our experiments address two long-standing models for the function of the Drosophila brain circadian network: a dual oscillator model, which emphasizes the primacy of PDF-containing neurons, and a cell-autonomous model for circadian phase adjustment. We identify five different circadian (E) neurons that are a major source of rhythmicity and locomotor activity. Brief firing of PDF cells at different times of day generates a phase response curve (PRC), which mimics a light-mediated PRC and requires PDF receptor expression in the five E neurons. Firing also resembles light by causing TIM degradation in downstream neurons. Unlike light however, firing-mediated phase-shifting is CRY-independent and exploits the E3 ligase component CUL-3 in the early night to degrade TIM. Our results suggest that PDF neurons integrate light information and then modulate the phase of E cell oscillations and behavioral rhythms. The results also explain how fly brain rhythms persist in constant darkness and without CRY.

  4. Is the Langevin phase equation an efficient model for oscillating neurons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ota, Keisuke; Tsunoda, Takamasa; Omori, Toshiaki; Watanabe, Shigeo; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi; Okada, Masato; Aonishi, Toru

    2009-12-01

    The Langevin phase model is an important canonical model for capturing coherent oscillations of neural populations. However, little attention has been given to verifying its applicability. In this paper, we demonstrate that the Langevin phase equation is an efficient model for neural oscillators by using the machine learning method in two steps: (a) Learning of the Langevin phase model. We estimated the parameters of the Langevin phase equation, i.e., a phase response curve and the intensity of white noise from physiological data measured in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. (b) Test of the estimated model. We verified whether a Fokker-Planck equation derived from the Langevin phase equation with the estimated parameters could capture the stochastic oscillatory behavior of the same neurons disturbed by periodic perturbations. The estimated model could predict the neural behavior, so we can say that the Langevin phase equation is an efficient model for oscillating neurons.

  5. [Excitability curve of alpha motor neurons of the foot dorsal flexor in chemically induced parkinsonian rigidity prior to and following ethylbenzatropine administration].

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, F

    1975-01-01

    For evaluation of the state of excitability of motoneurons in the dorsal flexor of the foot in patients with drug-induced muscle rigidity curves of excitability of motoneurons in the anterior tibial muscle were plotted in 10 patients not receiving psychotropic agents (controls) and 10 patients treated with chlorpromazine. Two variants of experiment wase used: in the 1st variant stimulation of the peroneal nerve behind the fibular capitulum served as the conditioning and testing stimulus, in the 2nd variant stimulation of the tibial nerve in the popliteal fossa was the conditioning stimulus and stimulation of the peroneal nerve in the above way was the testing stimulus. The investigations were carried out before and 30-50 min after intramuscular injection of ethylbenzatropine 5 mg. In the 1st variant the curve of excitability of the motoneurons of the anterior tibial muscle showed the same configuration as the curve of excitability of motoneurons of the soleus muscle in the control group as well as in the treated group. Similarly as in the excitability curve of the soleus muscle five phases could be differentiated in it. Phase III of depression was, however, deeper and phase IV of returning excitability was more evident. In variant II in phase III depression was observed lasting only 40 msec., then in place of return of excitability its decrease was observed. These results were similar to these obtained in the case of conditioning stimulation of afferent fibres of the anterior tibialis muscle, and testing stimulation of the afferent fibres of the soleus muscle. After ethylbenzatropine injection no changes were found in variant I, on the other hand, in variant II a rise of excitability was present in phase III in the control group and in phases III and IV in treated patients. Ethylbenzatropine seemed, thus, to have no effect on the excitability of motoneurons in the dorsal flexor of the foot in the case of conditioning afferent stimulation of the dorsae flexor of the

  6. Input-output relation and energy efficiency in the neuron with different spike threshold dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Neuron encodes and transmits information through generating sequences of output spikes, which is a high energy-consuming process. The spike is initiated when membrane depolarization reaches a threshold voltage. In many neurons, threshold is dynamic and depends on the rate of membrane depolarization (dV/dt) preceding a spike. Identifying the metabolic energy involved in neural coding and their relationship to threshold dynamic is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Here, we use a modified Morris-Lecar model to investigate neuronal input-output property and energy efficiency associated with different spike threshold dynamics. We find that the neurons with dynamic threshold sensitive to dV/dt generate discontinuous frequency-current curve and type II phase response curve (PRC) through Hopf bifurcation, and weak noise could prohibit spiking when bifurcation just occurs. The threshold that is insensitive to dV/dt, instead, results in a continuous frequency-current curve, a type I PRC and a saddle-node on invariant circle bifurcation, and simultaneously weak noise cannot inhibit spiking. It is also shown that the bifurcation, frequency-current curve and PRC type associated with different threshold dynamics arise from the distinct subthreshold interactions of membrane currents. Further, we observe that the energy consumption of the neuron is related to its firing characteristics. The depolarization of spike threshold improves neuronal energy efficiency by reducing the overlap of Na(+) and K(+) currents during an action potential. The high energy efficiency is achieved at more depolarized spike threshold and high stimulus current. These results provide a fundamental biophysical connection that links spike threshold dynamics, input-output relation, energetics and spike initiation, which could contribute to uncover neural encoding mechanism.

  7. Input-output relation and energy efficiency in the neuron with different spike threshold dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Tsang, Kai-Ming; Wei, Xi-Le; Deng, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Neuron encodes and transmits information through generating sequences of output spikes, which is a high energy-consuming process. The spike is initiated when membrane depolarization reaches a threshold voltage. In many neurons, threshold is dynamic and depends on the rate of membrane depolarization (dV/dt) preceding a spike. Identifying the metabolic energy involved in neural coding and their relationship to threshold dynamic is critical to understanding neuronal function and evolution. Here, we use a modified Morris-Lecar model to investigate neuronal input-output property and energy efficiency associated with different spike threshold dynamics. We find that the neurons with dynamic threshold sensitive to dV/dt generate discontinuous frequency-current curve and type II phase response curve (PRC) through Hopf bifurcation, and weak noise could prohibit spiking when bifurcation just occurs. The threshold that is insensitive to dV/dt, instead, results in a continuous frequency-current curve, a type I PRC and a saddle-node on invariant circle bifurcation, and simultaneously weak noise cannot inhibit spiking. It is also shown that the bifurcation, frequency-current curve and PRC type associated with different threshold dynamics arise from the distinct subthreshold interactions of membrane currents. Further, we observe that the energy consumption of the neuron is related to its firing characteristics. The depolarization of spike threshold improves neuronal energy efficiency by reducing the overlap of Na+ and K+ currents during an action potential. The high energy efficiency is achieved at more depolarized spike threshold and high stimulus current. These results provide a fundamental biophysical connection that links spike threshold dynamics, input-output relation, energetics and spike initiation, which could contribute to uncover neural encoding mechanism. PMID:26074810

  8. The phase response and state space of slow wave contractions in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sean P; Huizinga, Jan D

    2017-09-01

    What is the central question of this study? What are the dynamical rules governing interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC)-generated slow wave contractions in the small intestine, as reflected in their phase response curve and state space? What is the main finding and its importance? The phase response curve has a region of phase advance surrounding a phase delay peak. This pattern is important in generating a stable synchrony within the ICC network and is related to the state space of the ICC; in particular, the phase delay peak corresponds to the unstable equilibrium point that threads the ICC's limit cycle. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) generate electrical oscillations in the gut. Synchronization of the ICC population is required for generation of coherent electrical waves ('slow waves') that cause muscular contraction and thereby move gut content. The phase response curve (PRC) is an experimental measure of the dynamical rules governing a population of oscillators that determine their synchrony and gives an experimental window onto the state space of the oscillator, its dynamical landscape. We measured the PRC of slow wave contractions in the mouse small intestine by the novel combination of diameter mapping and single pulse electrical field stimulation. Phase change (τ) was measured as a function of old phase (ϕ) and distance from the stimulation electrode (d). Plots of τ(ϕ, d) showed an arrowhead-shaped region of phase advance enclosing at its base a phase delay peak. The phase change mirrored the perturbed pattern of contraction waves in response to a pulse. The (ϕ, d) plane is the surface of a displacement tube extending from the limit cycle through state space. To visualize the state space vector field on this tube, latent phase (ϕlat ) was calculated from τ. At the transition from advance to delay, isochrons made boomerang turns before tightening and winding around the phase delay peak corresponding to the unstable equilibrium point that threads the

  9. Interplay between excitability type and distributions of neuronal connectivity determines neuronal network synchronization.

    PubMed

    Mofakham, Sima; Fink, Christian G; Booth, Victoria; Zochowski, Michal R

    2016-10-01

    While the interplay between neuronal excitability properties and global properties of network topology is known to affect network propensity for synchronization, it is not clear how detailed characteristics of these properties affect spatiotemporal pattern formation. Here we study mixed networks, composed of neurons having type I and/or type II phase response curves, with varying distributions of local and random connections and show that not only average network properties, but also the connectivity distribution statistics, significantly affect network synchrony. Namely, we study networks with fixed networkwide properties, but vary the number of random connections that nodes project. We show that varying node excitability (type I vs type II) influences network synchrony most dramatically for systems with long-tailed distributions of the number of random connections per node. This indicates that a cluster of even a few highly rewired cells with a high propensity for synchronization can alter the degree of synchrony in the network as a whole. We show this effect generally on a network of coupled Kuramoto oscillators and investigate the impact of this effect more thoroughly in pulse-coupled networks of biophysical neurons.

  10. Interplay between excitability type and distributions of neuronal connectivity determines neuronal network synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mofakham, Sima; Fink, Christian G.; Booth, Victoria; Zochowski, Michal R.

    2016-10-01

    While the interplay between neuronal excitability properties and global properties of network topology is known to affect network propensity for synchronization, it is not clear how detailed characteristics of these properties affect spatiotemporal pattern formation. Here we study mixed networks, composed of neurons having type I and/or type II phase response curves, with varying distributions of local and random connections and show that not only average network properties, but also the connectivity distribution statistics, significantly affect network synchrony. Namely, we study networks with fixed networkwide properties, but vary the number of random connections that nodes project. We show that varying node excitability (type I vs type II) influences network synchrony most dramatically for systems with long-tailed distributions of the number of random connections per node. This indicates that a cluster of even a few highly rewired cells with a high propensity for synchronization can alter the degree of synchrony in the network as a whole. We show this effect generally on a network of coupled Kuramoto oscillators and investigate the impact of this effect more thoroughly in pulse-coupled networks of biophysical neurons.

  11. Phase responses of harmonics reflected from radio-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzaro, Gregory J.; McGowan, Sean F.; Gallagher, Kyle A.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Martone, Anthony F.; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2016-05-01

    The phase responses of nonlinear-radar targets illuminated by stepped frequencies are studied. Data is presented for an experimental radar and two commercial electronic targets at short standoff ranges. The amplitudes and phases of harmonics generated by each target at each frequency are captured over a 100-MHz-wide transmit band. As in the authors' prior work, target detection is demonstrated by receiving at least one harmonic of at least one transmit frequency. In the present work, experiments confirm that the phase of a harmonic reflected from a radio-frequency electronic target at a standoff distance is linear versus frequency. Similar to traditional wideband radar, the change of the reflected phase with respect to frequency indicates the range to the nonlinear target.

  12. Bradford Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of informetric distributions shows that generalized Leimkuhler functions give proper fits to a large variety of Bradford curves, including those exhibiting a Groos droop or a rising tail. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to test goodness of fit, and least-square fits are compared with Egghe's method. (Contains 53 references.) (LRW)

  13. Acute phase response in cattle infected with Anaplasma marginale.

    PubMed

    Nazifi, S; Razavi, S M; Kaviani, F; Rakhshandehroo, E

    2012-03-23

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the acute phase responses via the assessment of the concentration of serum sialic acids (total, lipid bound and protein bound), inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ and TNF-α) and acute phase proteins (Hp and SAA) in 20 adult crossbred cattle naturally infected by Anaplasma marginale. The infected animals were divided into 2 subgroups on the basis of parasitemia rate (<20% and >20%). Also, as a control group, 10 clinically healthy cattle from the same farms were sampled. Our data revealed significant decreases in red blood cell count (RBC), hematocrite (PCV) and hemoglobine (Hb) in infected cattle compared to healthy ones. Conversely, the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, serum sialic acids and the circulatory IFN-γ and TNF-α were increased in the diseased cattle (P<0.05). In addition, it was evident that the progression of parasitemia in infected cattle did not induce any significant alterations in the hematological indices (RBCs, PCV and Hb) and the concentrations of Hp, SAA, ceruloplasmin and fibrinogen. SAA was the most sensitive factor to change in the diseased cattle. Therefore, increase in SAA concentration may be a good indicator of inflammatory process in cattle naturally infected with Anaplasma marginale.

  14. Cephalic phase responses, craving and food intake in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Nederkoorn, C; Smulders, F T; Jansen, A

    2000-08-01

    Cephalic phase responses (CPRs) are elicited during exposure to food cues. They gear up the body to optimize digestion or they compensate for unwanted changes during a meal. The cue reactivity model of binge eating predicts that CPRs are experienced as craving for food, thereby increasing food intake and playing a role in abnormal eating behaviour. The present experiment was designed to measure CPRs in normal women and to examine its relationship with craving, food intake and restraint. Results show that normal subjects do react to food exposure with changes in heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV), salivation, blood pressure, skin conductance and gastric activity. These CPRs presumably gear up the body and presumably do not reflect compensatory responses. Significant correlations between restraint and blood pressure, between blood pressure and craving, and between craving and food intake were also found. These results are in line with the cue reactivity model and suggest that research into physiological CPRs and craving in the field of eating disorders is valuable. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  15. Nonsmooth dynamics in spiking neuron models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombes, S.; Thul, R.; Wedgwood, K. C. A.

    2012-11-01

    Large scale studies of spiking neural networks are a key part of modern approaches to understanding the dynamics of biological neural tissue. One approach in computational neuroscience has been to consider the detailed electrophysiological properties of neurons and build vast computational compartmental models. An alternative has been to develop minimal models of spiking neurons with a reduction in the dimensionality of both parameter and variable space that facilitates more effective simulation studies. In this latter case the single neuron model of choice is often a variant of the classic integrate-and-fire model, which is described by a nonsmooth dynamical system. In this paper we review some of the more popular spiking models of this class and describe the types of spiking pattern that they can generate (ranging from tonic to burst firing). We show that a number of techniques originally developed for the study of impact oscillators are directly relevant to their analysis, particularly those for treating grazing bifurcations. Importantly we highlight one particular single neuron model, capable of generating realistic spike trains, that is both computationally cheap and analytically tractable. This is a planar nonlinear integrate-and-fire model with a piecewise linear vector field and a state dependent reset upon spiking. We call this the PWL-IF model and analyse it at both the single neuron and network level. The techniques and terminology of nonsmooth dynamical systems are used to flesh out the bifurcation structure of the single neuron model, as well as to develop the notion of Lyapunov exponents. We also show how to construct the phase response curve for this system, emphasising that techniques in mathematical neuroscience may also translate back to the field of nonsmooth dynamical systems. The stability of periodic spiking orbits is assessed using a linear stability analysis of spiking times. At the network level we consider linear coupling between voltage

  16. Double-Edged Sword: Musculoskeletal Infection Provoked Acute Phase Response in Children.

    PubMed

    Benvenuti, Michael; An, Thomas; Amaro, Emilie; Lovejoy, Steven; Mencio, Gregory; Martus, Jeffrey; Mignemi, Megan; Schoenecker, Jonathan G

    2017-04-01

    The acute phase response has a crucial role in mounting the body's response to tissue injury. Excessive activation of the acute phase response is responsible for many complications that occur in orthopedic patients. Given that infection may be considered continuous tissue injury that persistently activates the acute phase response, children with musculoskeletal infections are at markedly increased risk for serious complications. Future strategies that modulate the acute phase response have the potential to improve treatment and prevent complications associated with musculoskeletal infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimating mortality risk in preoperative patients using immunologic, nutritional, and acute-phase response variables.

    PubMed Central

    Christou, N V; Tellado-Rodriguez, J; Chartrand, L; Giannas, B; Kapadia, B; Meakins, J; Rode, H; Gordon, J

    1989-01-01

    We measured the delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test response, along with additional variables of host immunocompetence in 245 preoperative patients to determine which variables are associated with septic-related deaths following operation. Of the 14 deaths (5.7%), 12 were related to sepsis and in 2 sepsis was contributory. The DTH response (p less than 0.00001), age (p less than 0.0002), serum albumin (p less than 0.003), hemoglobin (p less than 0.02), and total hemolytic complement (p less than 0.03), were significantly different between those who died and those who lived. By logistic regression analysis, only the DTH skin test response (log likelihood = 41.7, improvement X2 = 6.24, p less than 0.012) and the serum albumin (log likelihood = 44.8, improvement X2 = 17.7, p less than 0.001) were significantly and independently associated with the deaths. The resultant probability of mortality calculation equation was tested in a separate validation group of 519 patients (mortality = 5%) and yielded a good predictive capability as assessed by (1) X2 = 0.08 between observed and expected deaths, NS; (2) Goodman-Kruskall G statistic = 0.673) Receiver-Operating-Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis with an area under the ROC curve, Az = 0.79 +/- 0.05. We conclude that a reduced immune response (DTH skin test anergy) plus a nutritional deficit and/or acute-phase response change are both associated with increased septic-related deaths in elective surgical patients. PMID:2472781

  18. Impact of adaptation currents on synchronization of coupled exponential integrate-and-fire neurons.

    PubMed

    Ladenbauer, Josef; Augustin, Moritz; Shiau, LieJune; Obermayer, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The ability of spiking neurons to synchronize their activity in a network depends on the response behavior of these neurons as quantified by the phase response curve (PRC) and on coupling properties. The PRC characterizes the effects of transient inputs on spike timing and can be measured experimentally. Here we use the adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire (aEIF) neuron model to determine how subthreshold and spike-triggered slow adaptation currents shape the PRC. Based on that, we predict how synchrony and phase locked states of coupled neurons change in presence of synaptic delays and unequal coupling strengths. We find that increased subthreshold adaptation currents cause a transition of the PRC from only phase advances to phase advances and delays in response to excitatory perturbations. Increased spike-triggered adaptation currents on the other hand predominantly skew the PRC to the right. Both adaptation induced changes of the PRC are modulated by spike frequency, being more prominent at lower frequencies. Applying phase reduction theory, we show that subthreshold adaptation stabilizes synchrony for pairs of coupled excitatory neurons, while spike-triggered adaptation causes locking with a small phase difference, as long as synaptic heterogeneities are negligible. For inhibitory pairs synchrony is stable and robust against conduction delays, and adaptation can mediate bistability of in-phase and anti-phase locking. We further demonstrate that stable synchrony and bistable in/anti-phase locking of pairs carry over to synchronization and clustering of larger networks. The effects of adaptation in aEIF neurons on PRCs and network dynamics qualitatively reflect those of biophysical adaptation currents in detailed Hodgkin-Huxley-based neurons, which underscores the utility of the aEIF model for investigating the dynamical behavior of networks. Our results suggest neuronal spike frequency adaptation as a mechanism synchronizing low frequency oscillations in

  19. LCC: Light Curves Classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Light Curves Classifier uses data mining and machine learning to obtain and classify desired objects. This task can be accomplished by attributes of light curves or any time series, including shapes, histograms, or variograms, or by other available information about the inspected objects, such as color indices, temperatures, and abundances. After specifying features which describe the objects to be searched, the software trains on a given training sample, and can then be used for unsupervised clustering for visualizing the natural separation of the sample. The package can be also used for automatic tuning parameters of used methods (for example, number of hidden neurons or binning ratio). Trained classifiers can be used for filtering outputs from astronomical databases or data stored locally. The Light Curve Classifier can also be used for simple downloading of light curves and all available information of queried stars. It natively can connect to OgleII, OgleIII, ASAS, CoRoT, Kepler, Catalina and MACHO, and new connectors or descriptors can be implemented. In addition to direct usage of the package and command line UI, the program can be used through a web interface. Users can create jobs for ”training” methods on given objects, querying databases and filtering outputs by trained filters. Preimplemented descriptors, classifier and connectors can be picked by simple clicks and their parameters can be tuned by giving ranges of these values. All combinations are then calculated and the best one is used for creating the filter. Natural separation of the data can be visualized by unsupervised clustering.

  20. Acute phase response in lame crossbred dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bagga, A.; Randhawa, Swaran Singh; Sharma, S.; Bansal, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was undertaken to study acute phase response based on acute phase proteins (APPs) such as C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin (Hp), serum amyloid A (SAA), and fibrinogen in lame crossbred dairy cattle. Materials and Methods: Lame animals (n=30) were selected within 3-7 days of being noticed as lame by the farm veterinarian, from a local dairy farm in southeast Ludhiana over a period of 6 months, stratified proportionately with respect to stage of lactation with non-lame healthy cows (n=10). All the cows were otherwise healthy and did not have any other inflammatory problems such as pneumonia, enteritis, mastitis, or any kind of acute uterine inflammation. Blood samples were collected from all the animals; serum and plasma samples were separated and stored at −20°C. The levels of CRP, Hp, and SAA were estimated using Sandwich ELISA, whereas fibrinogen was estimated by heat precipitation method. Results: SAA levels in lame cows were significantly higher (22.19±0.85 µg/ml), approximately 3 times as compared to non-lame cows (8.89±0.72 µg/ml), whereas serum Hp concentration was approximately 20 times higher in the lame cattle (21.71±3.32 mg/dl) as compared to non-lame cows (1.17±0.07 mg/dl). Fibrinogen also increased in the lame cattle (3.97±0.22 g/L) as compared to non-lame group (1.40±0.17 g/L). Serum CRP levels analyzed in the lame cattle for the first time in the present study, and significant high concentration was appreciated in lame cattle (4.41±0.33 mg/L) as compared to non-lame cattle (0.61±0.14 mg/L). Lame cattle were having more of sole hemorrhages, sole ulcers, and white line lesions as compared to non-lame cattle. Conclusion: It can be concluded that lame cattle exhibit high levels of APPs including CRP, Hp, SAA, and fibrinogen as compared to non-lame cattle. PMID:27956769

  1. Curves and Their Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Robert C.

    This volume, a reprinting of a classic first published in 1952, presents detailed discussions of 26 curves or families of curves, and 17 analytic systems of curves. For each curve the author provides a historical note, a sketch or sketches, a description of the curve, a discussion of pertinent facts, and a bibliography. Depending upon the curve,…

  2. Mean-field dynamics of a population of stochastic map neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franović, Igor; Maslennikov, Oleg V.; Bačić, Iva; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the emergent regimes and the stimulus-response relationship of a population of noisy map neurons by means of a mean-field model, derived within the framework of cumulant approach complemented by the Gaussian closure hypothesis. It is demonstrated that the mean-field model can qualitatively account for stability and bifurcations of the exact system, capturing all the generic forms of collective behavior, including macroscopic excitability, subthreshold oscillations, periodic or chaotic spiking, and chaotic bursting dynamics. Apart from qualitative analogies, we find a substantial quantitative agreement between the exact and the approximate system, as reflected in matching of the parameter domains admitting the different dynamical regimes, as well as the characteristic properties of the associated time series. The effective model is further shown to reproduce with sufficient accuracy the phase response curves of the exact system and the assembly's response to external stimulation of finite amplitude and duration.

  3. Effect of autaptic activity on the response of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hengtong; Wang, Longfei; Chen, Yueling; Chen, Yong

    2014-09-01

    An autapse is a special synapse that connects a neuron to itself. In this study, we investigated the effect of an autapse on the responses of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to different forms of external stimuli. When the neuron was subjected to a DC stimulus, the firing frequencies and the interspike interval distributions of the output spike trains showed periodic behaviors as the autaptic delay time increased. When the input was a synaptic pulse-like train with random interspike intervals, we observed low-pass and band-pass filtering behaviors. Moreover, the region over which the output ISIs are distributed and the mean firing frequency display periodic behaviors with increasing autaptic delay time. When specific autaptic parameters were chosen, most of the input ISIs could be filtered, and the response spike trains were nearly regular, even with a highly random input. The background mechanism of these observed dynamics has been analyzed based on the phase response curve method. We also found that the information entropy of the output spike train could be modified by the autapse. These results also suggest that the autapse can serve as a regulator of information response in the nervous system.

  4. Effect of autaptic activity on the response of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hengtong; Wang, Longfei; Chen, Yueling; Chen, Yong

    2014-09-01

    An autapse is a special synapse that connects a neuron to itself. In this study, we investigated the effect of an autapse on the responses of a Hodgkin-Huxley neuron to different forms of external stimuli. When the neuron was subjected to a DC stimulus, the firing frequencies and the interspike interval distributions of the output spike trains showed periodic behaviors as the autaptic delay time increased. When the input was a synaptic pulse-like train with random interspike intervals, we observed low-pass and band-pass filtering behaviors. Moreover, the region over which the output ISIs are distributed and the mean firing frequency display periodic behaviors with increasing autaptic delay time. When specific autaptic parameters were chosen, most of the input ISIs could be filtered, and the response spike trains were nearly regular, even with a highly random input. The background mechanism of these observed dynamics has been analyzed based on the phase response curve method. We also found that the information entropy of the output spike train could be modified by the autapse. These results also suggest that the autapse can serve as a regulator of information response in the nervous system.

  5. Silicon Neuron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Many researchers have developed neural architectures based on extremely simplified models of neurons . Recently, researchers have developed an analog...electronic model of a neuron that more accurately reproduces its biological counterpart. This electronic neuron was designed to emulate the ionic...currents present in biological neurons . Based on this neural model, we designed and fabricated an eight input neuron on a 2mm by 2mm 40 pin VLSI (very

  6. Curved Finite Elements and Curve Approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baart, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    The approximation of parameterized curves by segments of parabolas that pass through the endpoints of each curve segment arises naturally in all quadratic isoparametric transformations. While not as popular as cubics in curve design problems, the use of parabolas allows the introduction of a geometric measure of the discrepancy between given and approximating curves. The free parameters of the parabola may be used to optimize the fit, and constraints that prevent overspill and curve degeneracy are introduced. This leads to a constrained optimization problem in two varibles that can be solved quickly and reliably by a simple method that takes advantage of the special structure of the problem. For applications in the field of computer-aided design, the given curves are often cubic polynomials, and the coefficient may be calculated in closed form in terms of polynomial coefficients by using a symbolic machine language so that families of curves can be approximated with no further integration. For general curves, numerical quadrature may be used, as in the implementation where the Romberg quadrature is applied. The coefficient functions C sub 1 (gamma) and C sub 2 (gamma) are expanded as polynomials in gamma, so that for given A(s) and B(s) the integrations need only be done once. The method was used to find optimal constrained parabolic approximation to a wide variety of given curves.

  7. In Utero Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide Alters the Postnatal Acute Phase Response in Beef Heifers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was designed to determine the potential effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal acute phase response (APR) to an LPS challenge in heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were separated into prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 microgr...

  8. Natural variations in the stress and acute phase responses of cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The initial response of the innate immune system upon activation has been defined as the acute phase response (APR). Activation of the APR results in several responses that include fever, metabolic adaptations, and changes in behavior. The APR can be modulated by many factors, with stress being th...

  9. Modulation of the acute phase response in feedlot steers supplemented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was designed to determine the effect of supplementing feedlot steers with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-1079 (SC) on the acute phase response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Steers (n = 18; 266 ± 4 kilograms body weight) were separated into three treatment groups (n = 6/treatm...

  10. From principal curves to granular principal curves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyun; Pedrycz, Witold; Miao, Duoqian; Wei, Zhihua

    2014-06-01

    Principal curves arising as an essential construct in dimensionality reduction and data analysis have recently attracted much attention from theoretical as well as practical perspective. In many real-world situations, however, the efficiency of existing principal curves algorithms is often arguable, in particular when dealing with massive data owing to the associated high computational complexity. A certain drawback of these constructs stems from the fact that in several applications principal curves cannot fully capture some essential problem-oriented facets of the data dealing with width, aspect ratio, width change, etc. Information granulation is a powerful tool supporting processing and interpreting massive data. In this paper, invoking the underlying ideas of information granulation, we propose a granular principal curves approach, regarded as an extension of principal curves algorithms, to improve efficiency and achieve a sound accuracy-efficiency tradeoff. First, large amounts of numerical data are granulated into C intervals-information granules developed with the use of fuzzy C-means clustering and the two criteria of information granulation, which significantly reduce the amount of data to be processed at the later phase of the overall design. Granular principal curves are then constructed by determining the upper and the lower bounds of the interval data. Finally, we develop an objective function using the criteria of information confidence and specificity to evaluate the granular output formed by the principal curves. We also optimize the granular principal curves by adjusting the level of information granularity (the number of clusters), which is realized with the aid of the particle swarm optimization. A number of numeric studies completed for synthetic and real-world datasets provide a useful quantifiable insight into the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  11. Atlas of fatigue curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains more than 500 fatigue curves for industrial ferrous and nonferrous alloys. It also includes a thorough explanation of fatigue testing and interpretation of test results. Each curve is presented independently and includes an explanation of its particular importance. The curves are titled by standard industrial designations (AISI, CDA, AA, etc.) of the metals, and a complete reference is given to the original source to facilitate further research. The collection includes standard S-N curves, curves showing effect of surface hardening on fatigue strength, crack growth-rate curves, curves comparing the fatigue strengths of various alloys, effect of variables (i,e, temperature, humidity, frequency, aging, environment, etc.) and much, much more. This one volume consolidates the fatigue data in a single source.

  12. Phase Response Design of Recursive All-Pass Digital Filters Using a Modified PSO Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Der

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a new design scheme for the phase response of an all-pass recursive digital filter. A variant of particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm will be utilized for solving this kind of filter design problem. It is here called the modified PSO (MPSO) algorithm in which another adjusting factor is more introduced in the velocity updating formula of the algorithm in order to improve the searching ability. In the proposed method, all of the designed filter coefficients are firstly collected to be a parameter vector and this vector is regarded as a particle of the algorithm. The MPSO with a modified velocity formula will force all particles into moving toward the optimal or near optimal solution by minimizing some defined objective function of the optimization problem. To show the effectiveness of the proposed method, two different kinds of linear phase response design examples are illustrated and the general PSO algorithm is compared as well. The obtained results show that the MPSO is superior to the general PSO for the phase response design of digital recursive all-pass filter.

  13. Roles of STAT3 in Protein Secretion Pathways during the Acute-Phase Response

    PubMed Central

    Ahyi, Ayele-Nati N.; Quinton, Lee J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Ferrari, Joseph D.; Pepper-Cunningham, Zachary A.; Mella, Juan R.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    The acute-phase response is characteristic of perhaps all infections, including bacterial pneumonia. In conjunction with the acute-phase response, additional biological pathways are induced in the liver and are dependent on the transcription factors STAT3 and NF-κB, but these responses are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that pneumococcal pneumonia and other severe infections increase expression of multiple components of the cellular secretory machinery in the mouse liver, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) translocon complex, which mediates protein translation into the ER, and the coat protein complexes (COPI and COPII), which mediate vesicular transport of proteins to and from the ER. Hepatocyte-specific mutation of STAT3 prevented the induction of these secretory pathways during pneumonia, with similar results observed following pharmacological activation of ER stress by using tunicamycin. These findings implicate STAT3 in the unfolded protein response and suggest that STAT3-dependent optimization of secretion may apply broadly. Pneumonia also stimulated the binding of phosphorylated STAT3 to promoter regions of secretion-related genes in the liver, supporting a direct role for STAT3 in their transcription. Altogether, these results identify a novel function of STAT3 during the acute-phase response, namely, the induction of secretory machinery in hepatocytes. This may facilitate the processing and delivery of newly synthesized loads of acute-phase proteins, enhancing innate immunity and preventing liver injury during infection. PMID:23460517

  14. Protective effect of resveratrol in endotoxemia-induced acute phase response in rats.

    PubMed

    Sebai, Hichem; Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Sani, Mamane; Aouani, Ezzedine; Ghanem-Boughanmi, Néziha

    2009-04-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a glycolipid component of the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria can elicit a systemic inflammatory process leading to septic shock and death. Acute phase response is characterized by fever, leucocytosis, thrombocytopenia, altered metabolic responses and redox balance by inducing excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4' trihydroxystilbene) is a natural polyphenol exhibiting antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the protective effect of resveratrol on endotoxemia-induced acute phase response in rats. When acutely administered by i.p. route, resveratrol (40 mg/kg b.w.) counteracted the effect of a single injection of LPS (4 mg/kg b.w.) which induced fever, a decrease in white blood cells (WBC) and platelets (PLT) counts. When i.p. administered during 7 days at 20 mg/kg per day (subacute treatment), resveratrol abrogated LPS-induced erythrocytes lipoperoxidation and catalase (CAT) activity depression to control levels. In the plasma compartment, LPS increased malondialdehyde (MDA) via nitric monoxide (NO) elevation and decreased iron level. All these deleterious LPS effects were reversed by a subacute resveratrol pre-treatment via a NO independent way. Resveratrol exhibited potent protective effect on LPS-induced acute phase response in rats.

  15. Impact of neuronal heterogeneity on correlated colored noise-induced synchronization.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pengcheng; Burton, Shawn D; Urban, Nathaniel N; Ermentrout, G Bard

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization plays an important role in neural signal processing and transmission. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of neural synchronization. In recent years, correlated noise-induced synchronization has received support from many theoretical and experimental studies. However, many of these prior studies have assumed that neurons have identical biophysical properties and that their inputs are well modeled by white noise. In this context, we use colored noise to induce synchronization between oscillators with heterogeneity in both phase-response curves and frequencies. In the low noise limit, we derive novel analytical theory showing that the time constant of colored noise influences correlated noise-induced synchronization and that oscillator heterogeneity can limit synchronization. Surprisingly, however, heterogeneous oscillators may synchronize better than homogeneous oscillators given low input correlations. We also find resonance of oscillator synchronization to colored noise inputs when firing frequencies diverge. Collectively, these results prove robust for both relatively high noise regimes and when applied to biophysically realistic spiking neuron models, and further match experimental recordings from acute brain slices.

  16. [Neuronal ageing].

    PubMed

    Piechota, Małgorzata; Sunderland, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Ageing leads to irreversible alterations in the nervous system, which to various extent impair its functions such as capacity to learn and memory. In old neurons and brain, similarly to what may take place in other cells, there is increased oxidative stress, disturbed energetic homeostasis and metabolism, accumulation of damage in proteins and nucleic acids. Characteristic of old neurons are alterations in plasticity, synaptic transmission, sensitivity to neurotrophic factors and cytoskeletal changes. Some markers of senescence, whose one of them is SA-beta-galactosidase were used to show the process of neuronal ageing both in vitro, and in vivo. Some research suggest that, despite the fact that neurons are postmitotic cells, it is cell cycle proteins which play a certain role in their biology, e.g. differentiation. However, their role in neuronal ageing is not known or explained. Ageing is the serious factor of development of neurodegenerative diseases among others Alzheimer disease.

  17. Tornado-Shaped Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez, Sol Sáez; de la Rosa, Félix Martínez; Rojas, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    In Advanced Calculus, our students wonder if it is possible to graphically represent a tornado by means of a three-dimensional curve. In this paper, we show it is possible by providing the parametric equations of such tornado-shaped curves.

  18. Tornado-Shaped Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martínez, Sol Sáez; de la Rosa, Félix Martínez; Rojas, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    In Advanced Calculus, our students wonder if it is possible to graphically represent a tornado by means of a three-dimensional curve. In this paper, we show it is possible by providing the parametric equations of such tornado-shaped curves.

  19. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  20. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Even, Wesley Paul; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  1. Flow-duration curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, James Kincheon

    1959-01-01

    The flow-duration curve is a cumulative frequency curve that shows the percent of time specified discharges were equaled or exceeded during a given period. It combines in one curve the flow characteristics of a stream throughout the range of discharge, without regard to the sequence of occurrence. If the period upon which the curve is based represents the long-term flow of a stream, the curve may be used to predict the distribution of future flows for water- power, water-supply, and pollution studies. This report shows that differences in geology affect the low-flow ends of flow-duration curves of streams in adjacent basins. Thus, duration curves are useful in appraising the geologic characteristics of drainage basins. A method for adjusting flow-duration curves of short periods to represent long-term conditions is presented. The adjustment is made by correlating the records of a short-term station with those of a long-term station.

  2. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  3. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  4. CURVES: curve evolution for vessel segmentation.

    PubMed

    Lorigo, L M; Faugeras, O D; Grimson, W E; Keriven, R; Kikinis, R; Nabavi, A; Westin, C F

    2001-09-01

    The vasculature is of utmost importance in neurosurgery. Direct visualization of images acquired with current imaging modalities, however, cannot provide a spatial representation of small vessels. These vessels, and their branches which show considerable variations, are most important in planning and performing neurosurgical procedures. In planning they provide information on where the lesion draws its blood supply and where it drains. During surgery the vessels serve as landmarks and guidelines to the lesion. The more minute the information is, the more precise the navigation and localization of computer guided procedures. Beyond neurosurgery and neurological study, vascular information is also crucial in cardiovascular surgery, diagnosis, and research. This paper addresses the problem of automatic segmentation of complicated curvilinear structures in three-dimensional imagery, with the primary application of segmenting vasculature in magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) images. The method presented is based on recent curve and surface evolution work in the computer vision community which models the object boundary as a manifold that evolves iteratively to minimize an energy criterion. This energy criterion is based both on intensity values in the image and on local smoothness properties of the object boundary, which is the vessel wall in this application. In particular, the method handles curves evolving in 3D, in contrast with previous work that has dealt with curves in 2D and surfaces in 3D. Results are presented on cerebral and aortic MRA data as well as lung computed tomography (CT) data.

  5. Dynamic phase response and amplitude-phase coupling of self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingnau, Benjamin; Herzog, Bastian; Kolarczik, Mirco; Woggon, Ulrike; Lüdge, Kathy; Owschimikow, Nina

    2017-06-01

    The optical excitation of semiconductor gain media introduces both gain and refractive index changes, commonly referred to as amplitude-phase coupling. Quantum-confined structures with an energetically well separated carrier reservoir usually exhibit a decreased amplitude-phase coupling compared to bulk materials. However, its magnitude and definition is still controversially discussed. We investigate the fundamental processes influencing the amplitude-phase coupling in semiconductor quantum-dot media using a coupled-carrier rate-equation model. We are able to analyze the dependence on the electronic structure and suggest routes towards an optimization of the dynamic phase response of the gain material.

  6. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  7. Curve Stitching in LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscat, Jean-Paul

    1992-01-01

    Uses LOGO to enhance the applicability of curve stitching in the mathematics curriculum. Presents the formulas and computer programs for the construction of parabolas, concentric circles, and epicycloids. Diagrams of constructed figures are provided. (MDH)

  8. Crystallography on Curved Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lucks, Julius; Nelson, David

    2007-03-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical study of the static and dynamical properties that distinguish two dimensional curved crystals from their flat space counterparts. Experimental realizations include block copolymer mono-layers on lithographically patterned substrates and self-assembled colloidal particles on a curved interface. At the heart of our approach lies a simple observation: the packing of interacting spheres constrained to lie on a curved surface is necessarily frustrated even in the absence of defects. As a result, whenever lattice imperfections or topological defects are introduced in the curved crystal they couple to the pre-stress of geometric frustration giving rise to elastic potentials. These geometric potentials are non-local functions of the Gaussian curvature and depend on the position of the defects. They play an important role in stress relaxation dynamics, elastic instabilities and melting.

  9. Principal Curves and Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    the Mahalanobis distance defined in terms of t. In particular when 9 is diagonal the procedure amounts to finding the line that minimizes the weighted...the m~a~l of apj dimensional’ data set. They mhinima, the distance from the poinsa, and provide a mom-linear summary of the data. The carves awe moe...project there. The zmain theorems proms thaprincipal curves mre critical values of the expected squared distance between the points and the curve

  10. Presence of an acute phase response in sheep with clinical classical scrapie

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Work with experimental scrapie in sheep has been performed on-site for many years including studies on PrPSc dissemination and histopathology of organs and tissues both at preclinical and clinical stages. In this work serum was sampled at regular intervals from lambs which were infected immediately after birth and from parallel healthy controls, and examined for acute phase proteins. In contrast to earlier experiments, which extensively studied PrPSc dissemination and histopathology in peripheral tissues and brain, this experiment is focusing on examination of serum for non-PrPSc markers that discriminates the two groups, and give insight into other on-going processes detectable in serum samples. Results There was clear evidence of an acute phase response in sheep with clinical scrapie, both experimental and natural. All the three proteins, ceruloplasmin, haptoglobin and serum amyloid A, were increased at the clinical stage of scrapie. Conclusion There was evidence of a systemic measurable acute phase response at the clinical terminal end-stage of classical scrapie. PMID:22805457

  11. Platelet Induction of the Acute Phase Response Is Protective in Murine Experimental Cerebral Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Aggrey, Angela A.; Srivastava, Kalyan; Field, David J.; Morrell, Craig N.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are most recognized as the cellular mediator of thrombosis, but they are increasingly appreciated for their immunomodulatory roles, including responses to Plasmodium infection. Platelet interactions with endothelial cells and leukocytes contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Recently it has been suggested that platelets not only have an adverse role in cerebral malaria, but platelets may also be protective in animal models of uncomplicated malaria. We now demonstrate that these diverse and seemingly contradictory roles for platelets extend to cerebral malaria models and are dependent on the timing of platelet activation during infection. Our data shows that platelets are activated very early in ECM and have a central role in initiation of the acute phase response to blood stage infection. Unlike platelet depletion or inhibition post infection, pre-infection platelet depletion or treatment with a platelet inhibitor is not protective. Additionally, we show that platelet driven acute phase responses have a major role in protecting mice from ECM by limiting parasite growth. Our data now suggests that platelets have a complex role in ECM pathogenesis: platelets help limit parasite growth early post infection, but with continued platelet activation as the disease progresses, platelets contribute to ECM associated inflammation. PMID:23536632

  12. Highly curved microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Cully, S.; Warren, J.; Gaines, G. A.; Priedhorsky, W.; Bloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several spherically curved microchannel plate (MCP) stack configurations were studied as part of an ongoing astrophysical detector development program, and as part of the development of the ALEXIS satellite payload. MCP pairs with surface radii of curvature as small as 7 cm, and diameters up to 46 mm have been evaluated. The experiments show that the gain (greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 7) and background characteristics (about 0.5 events/sq cm per sec) of highly curved MCP stacks are in general equivalent to the performance achieved with flat MCP stacks of similar configuration. However, gain variations across the curved MCP's due to variations in the channel length to diameter ratio are observed. The overall pulse height distribution of a highly curved surface MCP stack (greater than 50 percent FWHM) is thus broader than its flat counterpart (less than 30 percent). Preconditioning of curved MCP stacks gives comparable results to flat MCP stacks, but it also decreases the overall gain variations. Flat fields of curved MCP stacks have the same general characteristics as flat MCP stacks.

  13. Highly curved microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Cully, S.; Warren, J.; Gaines, G. A.; Priedhorsky, W.; Bloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several spherically curved microchannel plate (MCP) stack configurations were studied as part of an ongoing astrophysical detector development program, and as part of the development of the ALEXIS satellite payload. MCP pairs with surface radii of curvature as small as 7 cm, and diameters up to 46 mm have been evaluated. The experiments show that the gain (greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 7) and background characteristics (about 0.5 events/sq cm per sec) of highly curved MCP stacks are in general equivalent to the performance achieved with flat MCP stacks of similar configuration. However, gain variations across the curved MCP's due to variations in the channel length to diameter ratio are observed. The overall pulse height distribution of a highly curved surface MCP stack (greater than 50 percent FWHM) is thus broader than its flat counterpart (less than 30 percent). Preconditioning of curved MCP stacks gives comparable results to flat MCP stacks, but it also decreases the overall gain variations. Flat fields of curved MCP stacks have the same general characteristics as flat MCP stacks.

  14. Particle-induced pulmonary acute phase response may be the causal link between particle inhalation and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Saber, Anne T; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Jackson, Petra; Poulsen, Sarah Søs; Kyjovska, Zdenka O; Halappanavar, Sabina; Yauk, Carole L; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of ambient and workplace particulate air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One proposed mechanism for this association is that pulmonary inflammation induces a hepatic acute phase response, which increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Induction of the acute phase response is intimately linked to risk of cardiovascular disease as shown in both epidemiological and animal studies. Indeed, blood levels of acute phase proteins, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A, are independent predictors of risk of cardiovascular disease in prospective epidemiological studies. In this review, we present and review emerging evidence that inhalation of particles (e.g., air diesel exhaust particles and nanoparticles) induces a pulmonary acute phase response, and propose that this induction constitutes the causal link between particle inhalation and risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased levels of acute phase mRNA and proteins in lung tissues, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma clearly indicate pulmonary acute phase response following pulmonary deposition of different kinds of particles including diesel exhaust particles, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes. The pulmonary acute phase response is dose-dependent and long lasting. Conversely, the hepatic acute phase response is reduced relative to lung or entirely absent. We also provide evidence that pulmonary inflammation, as measured by neutrophil influx, is a predictor of the acute phase response and that the total surface area of deposited particles correlates with the pulmonary acute phase response. We discuss the implications of these findings in relation to occupational exposure to nanoparticles. How to cite this article: WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2014, 6:517–531. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1279 PMID:24920450

  15. Energy Model of Neuron Activation.

    PubMed

    Romanyshyn, Yuriy; Smerdov, Andriy; Petrytska, Svitlana

    2017-02-01

    On the basis of the neurophysiological strength-duration (amplitude-duration) curve of neuron activation (which relates the threshold amplitude of a rectangular current pulse of neuron activation to the pulse duration), as well as with the use of activation energy constraint (the threshold curve corresponds to the energy threshold of neuron activation by a rectangular current pulse), an energy model of neuron activation by a single current pulse has been constructed. The constructed model of activation, which determines its spectral properties, is a bandpass filter. Under the condition of minimum-phase feature of the neuron activation model, on the basis of Hilbert transform, the possibilities of phase-frequency response calculation from its amplitude-frequency response have been considered. Approximation to the amplitude-frequency response by the response of the Butterworth filter of the first order, as well as obtaining the pulse response corresponding to this approximation, give us the possibility of analyzing the efficiency of activating current pulses of various shapes, including analysis in accordance with the energy constraint.

  16. Desynchronization boost by non-uniform coordinated reset stimulation in ensembles of pulse-coupled neurons.

    PubMed

    Lücken, Leonhard; Yanchuk, Serhiy; Popovych, Oleksandr V; Tass, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    Several brain diseases are characterized by abnormal neuronal synchronization. Desynchronization of abnormal neural synchrony is theoretically compelling because of the complex dynamical mechanisms involved. We here present a novel type of coordinated reset (CR) stimulation. CR means to deliver phase resetting stimuli at different neuronal sub-populations sequentially, i.e., at times equidistantly distributed in a stimulation cycle. This uniform timing pattern seems to be intuitive and actually applies to the neural network models used for the study of CR so far. CR resets the population to an unstable cluster state from where it passes through a desynchronized transient, eventually resynchronizing if left unperturbed. In contrast, we show that the optimal stimulation times are non-uniform. Using the model of weakly pulse-coupled neurons with phase response curves, we provide an approach that enables to determine optimal stimulation timing patterns that substantially maximize the desynchronized transient time following the application of CR stimulation. This approach includes an optimization search for clusters in a low-dimensional pulse coupled map. As a consequence, model-specific non-uniformly spaced cluster states cause considerably longer desynchronization transients. Intriguingly, such a desynchronization boost with non-uniform CR stimulation can already be achieved by only slight modifications of the uniform CR timing pattern. Our results suggest that the non-uniformness of the stimulation times can be a medically valuable parameter in the calibration procedure for CR stimulation, where the latter has successfully been used in clinical and pre-clinical studies for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and tinnitus.

  17. Acute phase response, inflammation and metabolic syndrome biomarkers of Libby asbestos exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Shannahan, Jonathan H.; Alzate, Oscar; Winnik, Witold M.; Andrews, Debora; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Ghio, Andrew J.; Gavett, Stephen H.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2012-04-15

    Identification of biomarkers assists in the diagnosis of disease and the assessment of health risks from environmental exposures. We hypothesized that rats exposed to Libby amphibole (LA) would present with a unique serum proteomic profile which could help elucidate epidemiologically-relevant biomarkers. In four experiments spanning varied protocols and temporality, healthy (Wistar Kyoto, WKY; and F344) and cardiovascular compromised (CVD) rat models (spontaneously hypertensive, SH; and SH heart failure, SHHF) were intratracheally instilled with saline (control) or LA. Serum biomarkers of cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the acute phase response (APR) were analyzed. All rat strains exhibited acute increases in α-2-macroglobulin, and α1-acid glycoprotein. Among markers of inflammation, lipocalin-2 was induced in WKY, SH and SHHF and osteopontin only in WKY after LA exposure. While rat strain- and age-related changes were apparent in MetS biomarkers, no LA effects were evident. The cancer marker mesothelin was increased only slightly at 1 month in WKY in one of the studies. Quantitative Intact Proteomic profiling of WKY serum at 1 day or 4 weeks after 4 weekly LA instillations indicated no oxidative protein modifications, however APR proteins were significantly increased. Those included serine protease inhibitor, apolipoprotein E, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, t-kininogen 1 and 2, ceruloplasmin, vitamin D binding protein, serum amyloid P, and more 1 day after last LA exposure. All changes were reversible after a short recovery regardless of the acute or long-term exposures. Thus, LA exposure induces an APR and systemic inflammatory biomarkers that could have implications in systemic and pulmonary disease in individuals exposed to LA. -- Highlights: ► Biomarkers of asbestos exposure are required for disease diagnosis. ► Libby amphibole exposure is associated with increased human mortality. ► Libby amphibole increases circulating proteins involved

  18. Contact Geometry of Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliou, Peter J.

    2009-10-01

    Cartan's method of moving frames is briefly recalled in the context of immersed curves in the homogeneous space of a Lie group G. The contact geometry of curves in low dimensional equi-affine geometry is then made explicit. This delivers the complete set of invariant data which solves the G-equivalence problem via a straightforward procedure, and which is, in some sense a supplement to the equivariant method of Fels and Olver. Next, the contact geometry of curves in general Riemannian manifolds (M,g) is described. For the special case in which the isometries of (M,g) act transitively, it is shown that the contact geometry provides an explicit algorithmic construction of the differential invariants for curves in M. The inputs required for the construction consist only of the metric g and a parametrisation of structure group SO(n); the group action is not required and no integration is involved. To illustrate the algorithm we explicitly construct complete sets of differential invariants for curves in the Poincaré half-space H3 and in a family of constant curvature 3-metrics. It is conjectured that similar results are possible in other Cartan geometries.

  19. The sales learning curve.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Mark; Holloway, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    When a company launches a new product into a new market, the temptation is to immediately ramp up sales force capacity to gain customers as quickly as possible. But hiring a full sales force too early just causes the firm to burn through cash and fail to meet revenue expectations. Before it can sell an innovative product efficiently, the entire organization needs to learn how customers will acquire and use it, a process the authors call the sales learning curve. The concept of a learning curve is well understood in manufacturing. Employees transfer knowledge and experience back and forth between the production line and purchasing, manufacturing, engineering, planning, and operations. The sales learning curve unfolds similarly through the give-and-take between the company--marketing, sales, product support, and product development--and its customers. As customers adopt the product, the firm modifies both the offering and the processes associated with making and selling it. Progress along the manufacturing curve is measured by tracking cost per unit: The more a firm learns about the manufacturing process, the more efficient it becomes, and the lower the unit cost goes. Progress along the sales learning curve is measured in an analogous way: The more a company learns about the sales process, the more efficient it becomes at selling, and the higher the sales yield. As the sales yield increases, the sales learning process unfolds in three distinct phases--initiation, transition, and execution. Each phase requires a different size--and kind--of sales force and represents a different stage in a company's production, marketing, and sales strategies. Adjusting those strategies as the firm progresses along the sales learning curve allows managers to plan resource allocation more accurately, set appropriate expectations, avoid disastrous cash shortfalls, and reduce both the time and money required to turn a profit.

  20. Cells and secretagogues involved in the human late-phase response.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, E N; Iliopoulos, O; MacDonald, S M; Kagey-Sobotka, A; Lichtenstein, L M

    1989-01-01

    Those scientists interested in allergic inflammatory processes have recently been focusing on the late-phase response, since it appears most similar to the chronic disease states observed in allergic patients. In this review we will focus on the pattern of mediator release and cellular traffic observed in two in vivo human models of the late-phase reaction, one involving the upper airways and the other the skin. We have observed in these models, as had been observed earlier in blood, that the late-phase reaction is associated with a second increase in the level of mediators. We also describe our studies of the secretagogues responsible for this late-phase mediator release and, in so doing, introduce the subjects of histamine-releasing factors and IgE heterogeneity.

  1. Altered Stationary-Phase Response in a Borrelia burgdorferi rpoS Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Abdallah F.; Bono, James L.; Carroll, James A.; Stewart, Philip; Tilly, Kit; Rosa, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    The homolog of the chromosomally encoded stationary-phase sigma factor RpoS in Borrelia burgdorferi was inactivated using gyrBr as a selectable marker. Two-dimensional nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis of stationary-phase cell lysates identified at least 11 differences between the protein profiles of the rpoS mutant and wild-type organisms. Wild-type B. burgdorferi had a growth phase-dependent resistance to 1 N NaCl, similar to the stationary-phase response reported for other bacteria. The B. burgdorferi rpoS mutant strain was less resistant to osmotic stress in stationary phase than the isogenic rpoS wild-type organism. The results indicate that the B. burgdorferi rpoS homolog influences protein composition and participates in stationary-phase-dependent osmotic resistance. This rpoS mutant will be useful for studying regulation of gene expression in response to changing environmental conditions. PMID:10781562

  2. Dynamics of curved interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Escudero, Carlos

    2009-08-15

    Stochastic growth phenomena on curved interfaces are studied by means of stochastic partial differential equations. These are derived as counterparts of linear planar equations on a curved geometry after a reparametrization invariance principle has been applied. We examine differences and similarities with the classical planar equations. Some characteristic features are the loss of correlation through time and a particular behavior of the average fluctuations. Dependence on the metric is also explored. The diffusive model that propagates correlations ballistically in the planar situation is particularly interesting, as this propagation becomes nonuniversal in the new regime.

  3. Proteomics analysis of urine reveals acute phase response proteins as candidate diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Davalieva, Katarina; Kiprijanovska, Sanja; Komina, Selim; Petrusevska, Gordana; Zografska, Natasha Chokrevska; Polenakovic, Momir

    2015-01-01

    Despite the overall success of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in screening and detection of prostate cancer (PCa), its use has been limited due to the lack of specificity. The principal driving goal currently within PCa research is to identify non-invasive biomarker(s) for early detection of aggressive tumors with greater sensitivity and specificity than PSA. In this study, we focused on identification of non-invasive biomarkers in urine with higher specificity than PSA. We tested urine samples from PCa and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients by 2-D DIGE coupled with MS and bioinformatics analysis. Statistically significant (p < 0.05), 1.8 fold variation or more in abundance, showed 41 spots, corresponding to 23 proteins. The Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed significant association with the Acute Phase Response Signaling pathway. Nine proteins with differential abundances were included in this pathway: AMBP, APOA1, FGA, FGG, HP, ITIH4, SERPINA1, TF and TTR. The expression pattern of 4 acute phase response proteins differed from the defined expression in the canonical pathway. The urine levels of TF, AMPB and HP were measured by immunoturbidimetry in an independent validation set. The concentration of AMPB in urine was significantly higher in PCa while levels of TF and HP were opposite (p < 0.05). The AUC for the individual proteins ranged from 0.723 to 0.754. The combination of HP and AMBP yielded the highest accuracy (AUC = 0.848), greater than PSA. The proposed biomarker set is quickly quantifiable and economical with potential to improve the sensitivity and specificity of PCa detection.

  4. Addictive neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kodirov, Sodikdjon A.

    2017-01-01

    Since the reward center is considered to be the area tegmentalis ventralis of the hypothalamus, logically its neurons could mainly be responsible for addiction. However, the literature asserts that almost any neurons of CNS can respond to one or another addictive compound. Obviously not only addictive nicotine, but also alcohol, amphetamine, cannabis, cocaine, heroin and morphine may influence dopaminergic cells alone in VTA. Moreover, paradoxically some of these drugs ameliorate symptoms, counterbalance syndromes, cure diseases and improve health, not only those related to the CNS and in adults, but also almost all other organs and in children, e.g. epilepsy. PMID:28649663

  5. The Disappearing Bell Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Dawn M.

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the history of the bell curve and its application to gifted education and suggests rejection of this paradigm in favor of a focus on criteria rather than norms and a better understanding of the distribution and structure of intelligence. (Contains references.) (DB)

  6. Editorial: The Skewed Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausell, R. Barker

    1995-01-01

    This editorial provides an informal review of "The Bell Curve" (Herrnstein and Murray, 1994). The book, packaged as scientific writing, is an attack on affirmative action and on government attempts to foster egalitarianism. It is a political treatise that assumes that racial differences in intelligence are valid and genetic. (SLD)

  7. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  8. Textbook Factor Demand Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teachers and textbook graphics follow the same basic pattern in illustrating changes in demand curves when product prices increase. Asserts that the use of computer graphics will enable teachers to be more precise in their graphic presentation of price elasticity. (CFR)

  9. Curve Fit Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Suzanne R.; Driskell, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    Graphic tips for using the Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP) are described. The methods to import an image into GSP, define a coordinate system, plot points and curve fit the function using a graphical calculator are demonstrated where the graphic features of GSP allow teachers to expand the use of the technology application beyond the classroom.

  10. Curve Fit Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harper, Suzanne R.; Driskell, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    Graphic tips for using the Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP) are described. The methods to import an image into GSP, define a coordinate system, plot points and curve fit the function using a graphical calculator are demonstrated where the graphic features of GSP allow teachers to expand the use of the technology application beyond the classroom.

  11. Textbook Factor Demand Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teachers and textbook graphics follow the same basic pattern in illustrating changes in demand curves when product prices increase. Asserts that the use of computer graphics will enable teachers to be more precise in their graphic presentation of price elasticity. (CFR)

  12. The Axial Curve Rotator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Walter M.

    This document contains detailed directions for constructing a device that mechanically produces the three-dimensional shape resulting from the rotation of any algebraic line or curve around either axis on the coordinate plant. The device was developed in response to student difficulty in visualizing, and thus grasping the mathematical principles…

  13. Straightening Out Learning Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corlett, E. N.; Morecombe, V. J.

    1970-01-01

    The basic mathematical theory behind learning curves is explained, together with implications for clerical and industrial training, evaluation of skill development, and prediction of future performance. Brief studies of textile worker and typist training are presented to illustrate such concepts as the reduction fraction (a consistent decrease in…

  14. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  15. Functional Interactions between Newborn and Mature Neurons Leading to Integration into Established Neuronal Circuits.

    PubMed

    Boulanger-Weill, Jonathan; Candat, Virginie; Jouary, Adrien; Romano, Sebastián A; Pérez-Schuster, Verónica; Sumbre, Germán

    2017-06-19

    From development up to adulthood, the vertebrate brain is continuously supplied with newborn neurons that integrate into established mature circuits. However, how this process is coordinated during development remains unclear. Using two-photon imaging, GCaMP5 transgenic zebrafish larvae, and sparse electroporation in the larva's optic tectum, we monitored spontaneous and induced activity of large neuronal populations containing newborn and functionally mature neurons. We observed that the maturation of newborn neurons is a 4-day process. Initially, newborn neurons showed undeveloped dendritic arbors, no neurotransmitter identity, and were unresponsive to visual stimulation, although they displayed spontaneous calcium transients. Later on, newborn-labeled neurons began to respond to visual stimuli but in a very variable manner. At the end of the maturation period, newborn-labeled neurons exhibited visual tuning curves (spatial receptive fields and direction selectivity) and spontaneous correlated activity with neighboring functionally mature neurons. At this developmental stage, newborn-labeled neurons presented complex dendritic arbors and neurotransmitter identity (excitatory or inhibitory). Removal of retinal inputs significantly perturbed the integration of newborn neurons into the functionally mature tectal network. Our results provide a comprehensive description of the maturation of newborn neurons during development and shed light on potential mechanisms underlying their integration into a functionally mature neuronal circuit. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Increasing sync rate of pulse-coupled oscillators via phase response function design: theory and application to wireless networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongqiang; Núñez, Felipe; Doyle, Francis J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the synchronization rate of weakly connected pulse-coupled oscillators (PCOs). We prove that besides coupling strength, the phase response function is also a determinant of synchronization rate. Inspired by the result, we propose to increase the synchronization rate of PCOs by designing the phase response function. This has important significance in PCO-based clock synchronization of wireless networks. By designing the phase response function, synchronization rate is increased even under a fixed transmission power. Given that energy consumption in synchronization is determined by the product of synchronization time and transformation power, the new strategy reduces energy consumption in clock synchronization. QualNet experiments confirm the theoretical results. PMID:24391404

  17. Atlas of fatigue curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This Atlas was developed to serve engineers who are looking for fatigue data on a particular metal or alloy. Having these curves compiled in a single book will also facilitate the computerization of the involved data. It is pointed out that plans are under way to make the data in this book available in ASCII files for analysis by computer programs. S-N curves which typify effects of major variables are considered along with low-carbon steels, medium-carbon steels, alloy steels, HSLA steels, high-strength alloy steels, heat-resisting steels, stainless steels, maraging steels, cast irons, and heat-resisting alloys. Attention is also given to aluminum alloys, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, molybdenum, tin alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, zirconium, steel castings, closed-die forgings, powder metallurgy parts, composites, effects of surface treatments, and test results for component parts.

  18. Trishear for curved faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. P.

    2013-08-01

    Fault-propagation folds form an important trapping element in both onshore and offshore fold-thrust belts, and as such benefit from reliable interpretation. Building an accurate geologic interpretation of such structures requires palinspastic restorations, which are made more challenging by the interplay between folding and faulting. Trishear (Erslev, 1991; Allmendinger, 1998) is a useful tool to unravel this relationship kinematically, but is limited by a restriction to planar fault geometries, or at least planar fault segments. Here, new methods are presented for trishear along continuously curved reverse faults defining a flat-ramp transition. In these methods, rotation of the hanging wall above a curved fault is coupled to translation along a horizontal detachment. Including hanging wall rotation allows for investigation of structures with progressive backlimb rotation. Application of the new algorithms are shown for two fault-propagation fold structures: the Turner Valley Anticline in Southwestern Alberta, and the Alpha Structure in the Niger Delta.

  19. Caffeine in hot drinks elicits cephalic phase responses involving cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    McMullen, Michael K; Whitehouse, Julie M; Shine, Gillian; Whitton, Peter A; Towell, Anthony

    2012-09-01

    Caffeine stimulates both oropharyngeal and gut bitter taste receptors (hTAS2Rs) and so has the potential to elicit reflex autonomic responses. Coffee containing 130 mg caffeine has been reported to increase heart rate for 30 min post-ingestion. Whereas added-caffeine, in doses of 25 to 200 mg, ingested with decaffeinated coffee/tea decreases heart rate 10 to 30 min post-ingestion. This study aimed to clarify caffeine's chemosensory impact. Double-espresso coffees were compared to a placebo-control capsule in a double-blind between-measures design. Coffees tested were regular coffee (130 mg caffeine) and decaffeinated coffee with added-caffeine (0, 67 and 134 mg). Cardiovascular measures from three post-ingestion phases: 1) 0 to 5; 2) 10 to 15; and 3) 25 to 30 min; were compared to pre-ingestion measures. Participants comprised 11 women in the control group and 10 women in the test group. Decaffeinated coffee elicited no changes. Decaffeinated coffee with 67 mg caffeine: decreased dp/dt in Phase 1. Decaffeinated coffee with 134 mg caffeine: increased heart rate in Phases 1 and 2; decreased spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity in Phase 1; and increased diastolic pressure in Phases 2 and 3. Regular coffee: increased heart rate in Phases 1 and 2; decreased dp/dt in all phases; and decreased systolic pressure in Phase 1. Caffeine is the substance in regular coffee which elicits chemosensory autonomic reflex responses, which involves heart activity and the baroreflex. Compared to the caffeine in regular coffee, added-caffeine elicits somewhat different chemosensory responses including a more pronounced pressor effect and resetting of the baroreflex. Caffeine in commonly consumed amounts, as well as modulating body processes by blocking adenosine receptors, can elicit reflex autonomic responses during the ingestion of caffeinated drinks. It is plausible that caffeine stimulates hTAS2Rs, during the ingestion of coffee, eliciting cephalic phase responses. These cephalic phase

  20. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  1. Quantization on Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frønsdal, Christian; Kontsevich, Maxim

    2007-02-01

    Deformation quantization on varieties with singularities offers perspectives that are not found on manifolds. The Harrison component of Hochschild cohomology, vanishing on smooth manifolds, reflects information about singularities. The Harrison 2-cochains are symmetric and are interpreted in terms of abelian *-products. This paper begins a study of abelian quantization on plane curves over mathbb{C}, being algebraic varieties of the form {mathbb{C}}^2/R, where R is a polynomial in two variables; that is, abelian deformations of the coordinate algebra mathbb{C}[x,y]/(R). To understand the connection between the singularities of a variety and cohomology we determine the algebraic Hochschild (co)homology and its Barr Gerstenhaber Schack decomposition. Homology is the same for all plane curves mathbb{C}[x,y]/R, but the cohomology depends on the local algebra of the singularity of R at the origin. The Appendix, by Maxim Kontsevich, explains in modern mathematical language a way to calculate Hochschild and Harrison cohomology groups for algebras of functions on singular planar curves etc. based on Koszul resolutions.

  2. Acute-phase responses vary with pathogen identity in house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    PubMed

    Coon, Courtney A C; Warne, Robin W; Martin, Lynn B

    2011-06-01

    Pathogens may induce different immune responses in hosts contingent on pathogen characteristics, host characteristics, or interactions between the two. We investigated whether the broadly effective acute-phase response (APR), a whole body immune response that occurs in response to constitutive immune receptor activation and includes fever, secretion of immune peptides, and sickness behaviors such as anorexia and lethargy, varies with pathogen identity in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus). Birds were challenged with a subcutaneous injection of either a glucan at 0.7 mg/kg (to simulate fungal infection), a synthetic double-stranded RNA at 25 mg/kg (to simulate viral infection), or LPS at 1 mg/kg (to simulate a gram-negative bacterial infection), and then body mass, core body temperature changes, sickness behaviors, and secretion of an acute-phase protein, haptoglobin, were compared. Despite using what are moderate-to-high pyrogen doses for other vertebrates, only house sparrows challenged with LPS showed measurable APRs. Febrile, behavioral, and physiological responses to fungal and viral mimetics had minimal effects.

  3. Effect of exercise and food restriction on selected markers of the acute phase response in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Conn, C A; Kozak, W E; Tooten, P C; Niewold, T A; Borer, K T; Kluger, M J

    1995-02-01

    Acute aerobic exercise has been shown to elicit physiological changes characteristic of the acute phase response (APR), a nonspecific host defense response. Regular evocation of these changes may prime the immune system to improve resistance to disease. Because food deprivation is associated with an impaired APR, food restriction may prevent these beneficial changes. We tested the hypotheses that voluntary exercise elicits an APR and that food restriction modifies this response in four groups of hamsters: ad libitum-fed sedentary, ad libitum-fed exercised, food-restricted sedentary, and food-restricted exercised. Five variables altered during an APR were examined: core temperature, serum iron, serum interleukin-6, serum amyloid A, and serum glucocorticoids measured by biotelemetry, colorimetric analysis, B-9 cell growth assay, indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Blood was drawn during the hamsters' inactive period after 19-20 days of access to running wheels. Resting core temperature was elevated by exercise and depressed by food restriction (P < 0.01). Iron was depressed by food restriction (P < 0.01). Cortisol, but not corticosterone, was elevated by food restriction (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences among groups in interleukin-6 (P > 0.49) or serum amyloid A (P > 0.29). We conclude that there is little evidence that voluntary exercise or exercise combined with food restriction causes an APR in hamsters.

  4. Acrolein-Induced Dyslipidemia and Acute Phase Response Independenly of HMG-CoA Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Prough, Russell A.; Juvan, Peter; Rezen, Tadeja; Rozman, Damjana; Haberzettl, Petra; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2012-01-01

    Scope Aldehydes are ubiquitous natural constituents of foods, water and beverages. Dietary intake represents the greatest source of exposure to acrolein and related aldehydes. Oral acrolein induces dyslipidemia acutely and chronically increases atherosclerosis in mice, yet the mechanisms are unknown. Because lipid synthesis and trafficking are largely under hepatic control, we examined hepatic genes in murine models of acute and chronic oral acrolein exposure. Methods and results Changes in hepatic gene expression were examined using a Steroltalk microarray. Acute acrolein feeding modified plasma and hepatic proteins and increased plasma triglycerides within 15 min. By 6h, acrolein altered hepatic gene expression including Insig1, Insig2 and Hmgcr genes and stimulated an acute phase response (APR) with up-regulation of serum amyloid A genes (Saa) and systemic hypoalbuminemia. To test if decreased HMG-CoA reductase activity could modify acrolein-induced dyslipidemia or the APR, mice were pretreated with simvastatin. Statin treatment, however, did not alter acrolein-induced dyslipidemia or hypoalbuminemia associated with an APR. Few hepatic genes were dysregulated by chronic acrolein feeding in apoE-null mice. These studies confirmed that acute acrolein exposure altered expression of hepatic genes involved with lipid synthesis and trafficking and APR, and thus, indicated a hepatic locus of acrolein-induced dyslipidemia and APR that was independent of HMG CoA-reductase. Conclusion Dietary intake of acrolein could contribute to cardiovascular disease risk by disturbing hepatic function. PMID:21812109

  5. Acute exercise does not induce an acute phase response (APR) in Standardbred trotters.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Lena; Buhl, Rikke; Nostell, Katarina; Bak, Lars; Petersen, Ellen; Lindholm, Maria; Jacobsen, Stine

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether acute strenuous exercise (1600- to 2500-m race) would elicit an acute phase response (APR) in Standardbred trotters. Blood levels of several inflammatory markers [serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin, fibrinogen, white blood cell count (WBC), and iron], muscle enzymes [creatinine kinase (CK) and aspartate transaminase (AST)], and hemoglobin were assessed in 58 Standardbred trotters before and after racing. Hemoglobin levels increased and iron levels decreased 12 to 14 h after racing and haptoglobin concentrations, white blood cell counts, and iron levels were decreased 2 and/or 7 d after racing. Concentrations of CK, AST, SAA, and fibrinogen were unaltered in response to racing. Acute strenuous exercise did not elicit an acute phase reaction. The observed acute increase in hemoglobin levels and decreases in haptoglobin and iron levels may have been caused by exercise-induced hemolysis, which indicates that horses might experience a condition similar to athlete's anemia in humans. The pathogenesis and clinical implications of the hematological and blood-biochemical changes elicited by acute exercise in Standardbred trotters in the present study warrant further investigation.

  6. Undernutrition, the Acute Phase Response to Infection, and Its Effects on Micronutrient Status Indicators12

    PubMed Central

    Bresnahan, Kara A.; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A.

    2014-01-01

    Infection and undernutrition are prevalent in developing countries and demonstrate a synergistic relation. Undernutrition increases infection-related morbidity and mortality. The acute phase response (APR) is an innate, systemic inflammatory reaction to a wide array of disruptions in a host’s homeostasis, including infection. Released from immune cells in response to deleterious stimuli, proinflammatory cytokines act on distant tissues to induce behavioral (e.g., anorexia, weakness, and fatigue) and systemic effects of the APR. Cytokines act to increase energy and protein requirements to manifest fever and support hepatic acute phase protein (APP) production. Blood concentrations of glucose and lipid are augmented to provide energy to immune cells in response to cytokines. Additionally, infection decreases intestinal absorption of nutrients and can cause direct loss of micronutrients. Traditional indicators of iron, zinc, and vitamin A status are altered during the APR, leading to inaccurate estimations of deficiency in populations with a high or unknown prevalence of infection. Blood concentrations of APPs can be measured in nutrition interventions to assess the time stage and severity of infection and correct for the APR; however, standardized cutoffs for nutrition applications are needed. Protein-energy malnutrition leads to increased gut permeability to pathogens, abnormal immune cell populations, and impaired APP response. Micronutrient deficiencies cause specific immune impairments that affect both innate and adaptive responses. This review describes the antagonistic interaction between the APR and nutritional status and emphasizes the need for integrated interventions to address undernutrition and to reduce disease burden in developing countries. PMID:25398733

  7. Monitoring the acute phase response to vaso-occlusive crisis in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, J; Stone, P C; Akinola, N O; Gallimore, J R; Pepys, M B

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To identify suitable acute phase proteins as objective markers of tissue ischaemia during painful vaso-occlusive crises in sickle cell disease. METHODS--The prodromal and established phases of 14 vaso-occlusive crises were studied longitudinally in 10 patients with sickle cell anaemia. Automated solid phase enzyme immunoassays were used to measure the fast responding acute phase proteins C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein. Slower responding glycoproteins (fibrinogen, orosomucoid, sialic acid and concanavalin-A binding) were measured in parallel. RESULTS--C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein increased early in crisis, sometimes within the early (prodromal) phase. Crises that resolved within 24 hours in hospital showed a minor and transient rise compared with crises that required treatment for four days or more. In eight crises treated by patients at home the acute phase response ranged from minor to a level consistent with extensive tissue ischaemia. CONCLUSIONS--Sensitive enzyme immunoassays for C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A protein are of potential value for monitoring the onset of tissue ischaemia in sickle cell crisis and for confirming subsequent resolution. PMID:7510726

  8. The acute phase response of cod (Gadus morhua L.): expression of immune response genes.

    PubMed

    Audunsdottir, Sigridur S; Magnadottir, Bergljot; Gisladottir, Berglind; Jonsson, Zophonias O; Bragason, Birkir Th

    2012-02-01

    An acute phase response (APR) was experimentally induced in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) by intramuscular injection of turpentine oil. The change in the expression of immune related genes was monitored in the anterior kidney and the spleen over a period of 7 days. The genes examined were two types of pentraxins, apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA-I), the complement component C3, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), transferrin, cathelicidin, and hepcidin. All genes were constitutively expressed in both organs and their expression amplified by the turpentine injection. A pattern of response was observed both with respect to the organ preference and to the timing of a maximum response. The increased gene expression of the pentraxins, ApoA-I and C3 was restricted to the anterior kidney, the gene expression of IL-1β, cathelicidin, and transferrin increased in both organs, while hepcidin gene expression was only significantly increased in the spleen. The pentraxins and ApoA-I appear to be early mediators of APR in cod, possibly stimulating C3 and IL-1β response, while the antimicrobial peptides may play a minor role. The increase in transferrin gene expression in both organs, and apparent indifference to cortisol release associated with the turpentine injection, suggests that this could be a typical acute phase protein in cod.

  9. Neurons other than motor neurons in motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Ruffoli, Riccardo; Biagioni, Francesca; Busceti, Carla L; Gaglione, Anderson; Ryskalin, Larisa; Gambardella, Stefano; Frati, Alessandro; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is typically defined by a loss of motor neurons in the central nervous system. Accordingly, morphological analysis for decades considered motor neurons (in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord) as the neuronal population selectively involved in ALS. Similarly, this was considered the pathological marker to score disease severity ex vivo both in patients and experimental models. However, the concept of non-autonomous motor neuron death was used recently to indicate the need for additional cell types to produce motor neuron death in ALS. This means that motor neuron loss occurs only when they are connected with other cell types. This concept originally emphasized the need for resident glia as well as non-resident inflammatory cells. Nowadays, the additional role of neurons other than motor neurons emerged in the scenario to induce non-autonomous motor neuron death. In fact, in ALS neurons diverse from motor neurons are involved. These cells play multiple roles in ALS: (i) they participate in the chain of events to produce motor neuron loss; (ii) they may even degenerate more than and before motor neurons. In the present manuscript evidence about multi-neuronal involvement in ALS patients and experimental models is discussed. Specific sub-classes of neurons in the whole spinal cord are reported either to degenerate or to trigger neuronal degeneration, thus portraying ALS as a whole spinal cord disorder rather than a disease affecting motor neurons solely. This is associated with a novel concept in motor neuron disease which recruits abnormal mechanisms of cell to cell communication.

  10. Curved PVDF airborne transducer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Toda, M

    1999-01-01

    In the application of airborne ultrasonic ranging measurement, a partially cylindrical (curved) PVDF transducer can effectively couple ultrasound into the air and generate strong sound pressure. Because of its geometrical features, the ultrasound beam angles of a curved PVDF transducer can be unsymmetrical (i.e., broad horizontally and narrow vertically). This feature is desired in some applications. In this work, a curved PVDF air transducer is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Two resonances were observed in this transducer. They are length extensional mode and flexural bending mode. Surface vibration profiles of these two modes were measured by a laser vibrometer. It was found from the experiment that the surface vibration was not uniform along the curvature direction for both vibration modes. Theoretical calculations based on a model developed in this work confirmed the experimental results. Two displacement peaks were found in the piezoelectric active direction of PVDF film for the length extensional mode; three peaks were found for the flexural bending mode. The observed peak positions were in good agreement with the calculation results. Transient surface displacement measurements revealed that vibration peaks were in phase for the length extensional mode and out of phase for the flexural bending mode. Therefore, the length extensional mode can generate a stronger ultrasound wave than the flexural bending mode. The resonance frequencies and vibration amplitudes of the two modes strongly depend on the structure parameters as well as the material properties. For the transducer design, the theoretical model developed in this work can be used to optimize the ultrasound performance.

  11. Magnetism in curved geometries

    DOE PAGES

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; ...

    2016-08-17

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. Asmore » a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. Finally, these recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.« less

  12. Magnetism in curved geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-08-17

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. Finally, these recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  13. Magnetism in curved geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streubel, Robert; Fischer, Peter; Kronast, Florian; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Sheka, Denis D.; Gaididei, Yuri; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2016-09-01

    Extending planar two-dimensional structures into the three-dimensional space has become a general trend in multiple disciplines, including electronics, photonics, plasmonics and magnetics. This approach provides means to modify conventional or to launch novel functionalities by tailoring the geometry of an object, e.g. its local curvature. In a generic electronic system, curvature results in the appearance of scalar and vector geometric potentials inducing anisotropic and chiral effects. In the specific case of magnetism, even in the simplest case of a curved anisotropic Heisenberg magnet, the curvilinear geometry manifests two exchange-driven interactions, namely effective anisotropy and antisymmetric exchange, i.e. Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya-like interaction. As a consequence, a family of novel curvature-driven effects emerges, which includes magnetochiral effects and topologically induced magnetization patterning, resulting in theoretically predicted unlimited domain wall velocities, chirality symmetry breaking and Cherenkov-like effects for magnons. The broad range of altered physical properties makes these curved architectures appealing in view of fundamental research on e.g. skyrmionic systems, magnonic crystals or exotic spin configurations. In addition to these rich physics, the application potential of three-dimensionally shaped objects is currently being explored as magnetic field sensorics for magnetofluidic applications, spin-wave filters, advanced magneto-encephalography devices for diagnosis of epilepsy or for energy-efficient racetrack memory devices. These recent developments ranging from theoretical predictions over fabrication of three-dimensionally curved magnetic thin films, hollow cylinders or wires, to their characterization using integral means as well as the development of advanced tomography approaches are in the focus of this review.

  14. Rotation Curves of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnajs, Agris J.

    One can obtain a fairly good understanding of the relation between axially symmetric mass distributions and the rotation curves they produce without resorting to calculations. However it does require a break with tradition. The first step consists of replacing quantities such as surface density, volume density, and circular velocity with the mass in a ring, mass in a spherical shell, and the square of the circular velocity, or more precisely with 2 pi G r mu(r), 4 pi G r^2 rho(r), and Vc^2 (r). These three quantities all have the same dimensions, and are related to each other by scale-free linear operators. The second step consists of introducing ln(r) as the coordinate. On the log scale the scale-free operators becomes the more familiar convolution operations. Convolutions are easily handled by Fourier techniques and a surface density can be converted into a rotation curve or volume density in a small fraction of a second. A simple plot of 2 pi G r mu(r) as a function of ln(r) reveals the relative contributions of different radii to Vc^2(r). Such a plot also constitutes a sanity test for the fitting of various laws to photometric data. There are numerous examples in the literature of excellent fits to the tails that lack data or are poor fits around the maximum of 2 pi G r mu(r). I will discuss some exact relations between the above three quantities as well as some empirical observations such as the near equality of the maxima of 2 pi G r mu(r) and Vc^2 (r) curves for flat mass distributions.

  15. Complementary Curves of Descent

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-16

    provision of law , no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid...curves of descent 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT...NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Naval Academy,Physics Department,Annapolis,MD,21402-1363 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION

  16. Prenatal transportation alters the acute phase response (APR) of bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the acute phase response (APR) to a postnatal Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day...

  17. Yeast cell wall supplementation alters the physiological and acute phase responses of crossbred heifers to an endotoxin challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of feeding yeast cell wall (YCW) products on the physiological and acute phase responses of crossbred newly-received heifers to an endotoxin challenge. Heifers (n = 24; 219 ± 2.4 kg) were separated into treatment groups receiving a Control diet (n = 8), ...

  18. The effect of yeast cell wall supplementation on the physiological and acute phase responses of crossbred heifers to endotoxin challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of feeding yeast cell wall (YCW) products on the physiological and acute phase responses of crossbred newly-received heifers to endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) challenge. Heifers (n=24; 218.9+/-2.4 kg) were obtained from commercial sale barns and tra...

  19. OmniGen-AF supplementation modulated the physiological and acute phase responses of Brahman heifers to an endotoxin challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study examined the effect of feeding OmniGen-AF (OG; Prince Agri Products) on the physiological and acute phase responses (APR) of newly-weaned heifers to an endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) challenge. Brahman heifers (n=24; 183±5 kilograms) from the Texas AgriLife Research Center in Overton...

  20. Dried citrus pulp modulates the physiological and acute phase responses of crossbred heifers to an endotoxin challenge

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study examined the effect of feeding dried citrus pulp (CP) pellets on the physiological and acute phase responses (APR) of newly-received crossbred heifers to an endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) challenge. Heifers (n=24; 218.3±2.4 kg) were obtained from commercial sale barns and transported...

  1. Supplementation of Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product can attenuate the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was designed to determine if feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs would reduce stress and acute phase responses (APR) following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n=30; 6.4±0.1 kilograms body weight) were housed individually in pens with ad libi...

  2. Transforming Curves into Curves with the Same Shape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Michael V.

    Curves are considered to have the same shape when they are related by a similarity transformation of a certain kind. This paper extends earlier work on parallel curves to curves with the same shape. Some examples are given more or less explicitly. A generalization is used to show that the theory is ordinal and to show how the theory may be applied…

  3. Acute phase response and oxidative stress status in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF).

    PubMed

    Guzel, Savas; Andican, Gulnur; Seven, Arzu; Aslan, Mahmure; Bolayirli, Murat; Guzel, Eda Celik; Hamuryudan, Vedat

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to determine acute phase response (APR) and oxidative stress in patients with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) and compare these characteristics with those in healthy controls; 20 patients with FMF and 15 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and leukocyte levels were determined as markers of APR. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), conjugated diene, and lipid hydroperoxide levels were measured as markers of lipid peroxidation. Carbonyl group and thiol (T-SH) levels were analyzed to determine the oxidative damage to proteins, and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was measured to reflect DNA oxidation. The erythrocyte glutathione (GSH) level, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZn SOD), and catalase activities were measured as markers of antioxidant status. Conjugated diene (p < 0.001) and carbonyl group (p < 0.05) levels were significantly higher and GSH-Px activity (p < 0.01) was significantly lower in FMF patients compared with controls. FMF patients in the attack period (n = 8) had significantly higher CRP, ESR, fibrinogen, and leukocyte levels (p < 0.001) than patients in the attack-free period (n = 12). The T-SH level (p < 0.05) was significantly higher and CuZn SOD activity was significantly lower (p < 0.05) in FMF patients in the attack period. The findings revealed upregulated APR during the attack period in FMF patients and enhanced oxidative stress in the FMF patients as compared to controls.

  4. Acute phase response, inflammation and metabolic syndrome biomarkers of Libby asbestos exposure.

    PubMed

    Shannahan, Jonathan H; Alzate, Oscar; Winnik, Witold M; Andrews, Debora; Schladweiler, Mette C; Ghio, Andrew J; Gavett, Stephen H; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2012-04-15

    Identification of biomarkers assists in the diagnosis of disease and the assessment of health risks from environmental exposures. We hypothesized that rats exposed to Libby amphibole (LA) would present with a unique serum proteomic profile which could help elucidate epidemiologically-relevant biomarkers. In four experiments spanning varied protocols and temporality, healthy (Wistar Kyoto, WKY; and F344) and cardiovascular compromised (CVD) rat models (spontaneously hypertensive, SH; and SH heart failure, SHHF) were intratracheally instilled with saline (control) or LA. Serum biomarkers of cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the acute phase response (APR) were analyzed. All rat strains exhibited acute increases in α-2-macroglobulin, and α1-acid glycoprotein. Among markers of inflammation, lipocalin-2 was induced in WKY, SH and SHHF and osteopontin only in WKY after LA exposure. While rat strain- and age-related changes were apparent in MetS biomarkers, no LA effects were evident. The cancer marker mesothelin was increased only slightly at 1 month in WKY in one of the studies. Quantitative Intact Proteomic profiling of WKY serum at 1 day or 4 weeks after 4 weekly LA instillations indicated no oxidative protein modifications, however APR proteins were significantly increased. Those included serine protease inhibitor, apolipoprotein E, α-2-HS-glycoprotein, t-kininogen 1 and 2, ceruloplasmin, vitamin D binding protein, serum amyloid P, and more 1 day after last LA exposure. All changes were reversible after a short recovery regardless of the acute or long-term exposures. Thus, LA exposure induces an APR and systemic inflammatory biomarkers that could have implications in systemic and pulmonary disease in individuals exposed to LA.

  5. Synergistic enhansons located within an acute phase responsive enhancer modulate glucocorticoid induction of angiotensinogen gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Brasier, A R; Ron, D; Tate, J E; Habener, J F

    1990-12-01

    The hepatic transcription of the angiotensinogen gene is regulated by both glucocorticoids and cytokines generated as products of the acute phase reaction. We have identified a multimodular enhancer in the 5'-flanking region of the rat angiotensinogen gene that mediates these responses and consists of an acute phase response element (APRE) flanked on both sides by adjacent glucocorticoid response element consensus motifs (GREs). Induction of transcription by the cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) is glucocorticoid dependent and mediated through the APRE. The APRE binds in a mutually exclusive manner a cytokine/phorbol ester-inducible protein (BPi), indistinguishable from nuclear factor kB, and a family of constitutive liver proteins (BPcs) related to the heat-stable transcription factor C/EBP. Using mutated 5'-flanking sequences of the angiotensinogen gene fused to a firefly luciferase reporter gene transfected into hepatoblastoma (HepG2) cells, we have mapped enhanson sequences required for the transcriptional response to glucocorticoids. Two functionally distinct GREs are identified by deletion and site-directed mutagenesis, both of which mediate glucocorticoid-stimulated transcription in vivo. Glucocorticoid-induced transcription mediated by the angiotensinogen gene enhancer is, furthermore, dependent on the occupancy of the APRE by either the BPi or a member of the BPc family because a mutant APRE that binds neither BPi nor BPc exhibits an attenuated glucocorticoid responsiveness. Mutant APREs that permit exclusive binding of either BPi or BPc synergistically transmit the glucocorticoid response mediated by one or the other of the adjacent GREs. Thus, the induction of angiotensinogen gene transcription involves interaction between the glucocorticoid receptor and either one of the APRE-binding proteins: either the cytokine-inducible NFkB or the constitutive family of C/EBP-like proteins, bound to adjacent enhansons in a mutually synergistic enhancer complex.

  6. Acute-phase response in Babesia canis and Dirofilaria immitis co-infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Milanović, Zorana; Ilić, Anja; Andrić, Jelena Francuski; Radonjić, Vladimir; Beletić, Anđelo; Filipović, Milica Kovačević

    2017-10-01

    Babesia canis and Dirofilaria immitis are emerging and geographically overlapping vector-borne pathogens in dogs. Infection with B. canis leads to acute-phase response (APR) that can be mild to severe and results in either non-complicated or complicated forms of the disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether acute B. canis infection is more severe in dogs with underlying asymptomatic D. immitis infection. Dogs of both sexes, different ages and breeds, with naturally occurring mono-infections with B. canis (n=13) and D. immitis (n=18) and co-infected dogs (n=7) were enrolled as well as healthy controls (n=15). Routine haematology and biochemistry, agarose gel electrophoresis (agEF) protein fraction separation and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for serum amyloid A (SAA) were performed. Based on clinical and laboratory findings, sepsis was diagnosed in the majority of dogs with acute B. canis infection with or without underlying asymptomatic D. immitis infection. Overall, haematology, biochemistry and agEF pattern changes were induced and dictated by acute B. canis infection whether or not the dogs had an asymptomatic D. immitis infection. D. immitis infection slightly influenced the level of anaemia, slightly aggravated the level of dehydration and increased the concentration of γ-globulins in acute-phase B. canis infection. D. immitis infection prevented B. canis-induced leukopenia. SAA equally increased in dogs with acute B. canis infection with or without underlying D. immitis infection. The level of SAA was not changed in dogs with asymptomatic D. immitis when compared to the controls. In conclusion, asymptomatic D. immitis infection does not influence overall APR after acute B. canis infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute phase response in Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Trionyx sinensis) with Aeromonas hydrophila infection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiuxia; Wang, Lu; Feng, Hong; Guo, Qionglin; Dai, Heping

    2011-04-01

    Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Trionyx sinensis) is an important culture reptile. However, little is known about its acute phase response (APR) caused by bacteria. Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a major acute phase protein (APP). In this study, a turtle SAA homologue was identified and described in reptiles. The full-length cDNA of turtle SAA was 554 bp and contained a 381 bp open reading frame (ORF) coding for a protein of 127 aa. Similar to other known SAA genes, the turtle SAA gene contained three exons and two introns. The promoter region of turtle SAA gene contained the consensus binding sites for nuclear factor (NF)-κB and c-Rel. The turtle SAA amino acid sequence shared the highest identity to avian SAA sequences. Meantime, we present the first systematic study with expression levels of five genes encoding APPs in immune response caused by Aeromonas hydrophila infection. After infection, turtle SAA mRNA was induced in liver at 8h, then increased more than 1200-fold at 2d; in spleen and kidney, the SAA mRNAs were also induced during 8h-7d, but the level was far lower than that in the liver. The complement 3 (C3), fibrinogen-gamma chain (Fb-G) and cathepsin L (CathL) mRNAs were increased in liver at 2d, whereas the albumin (ALB) mRNA was significantly decreased during 8h-7d. Our studies suggest that the APR in turtle with A. hydrophila infection is similar to that in mammals, and SAA is a major indicator of bacterial infection, especially at early stage, in reptiles. Additionally, the different expression patterns of five APP genes observed in present studies could provide clues for understanding the innate immune mechanisms in the APR of reptiles. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Characteristic Curves of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumaier, Arnold; Deiters, Ulrich K.

    2016-09-01

    In 1960, E. H. Brown defined a set of characteristic curves (also known as ideal curves) of pure fluids, along which some thermodynamic properties match those of an ideal gas. These curves are used for testing the extrapolation behaviour of equations of state. This work is revisited, and an elegant representation of the first-order characteristic curves as level curves of a master function is proposed. It is shown that Brown's postulate—that these curves are unique and dome-shaped in a double-logarithmic p, T representation—may fail for fluids exhibiting a density anomaly. A careful study of the Amagat curve (Joule inversion curve) generated from the IAPWS-95 reference equation of state for water reveals the existence of an additional branch.

  9. Quantum relative Lorenz curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscemi, Francesco; Gour, Gilad

    2017-01-01

    The theory of majorization and its variants, including thermomajorization, have been found to play a central role in the formulation of many physical resource theories, ranging from entanglement theory to quantum thermodynamics. Here we formulate the framework of quantum relative Lorenz curves, and show how it is able to unify majorization, thermomajorization, and their noncommutative analogs. In doing so, we define the family of Hilbert α divergences and show how it relates with other divergences used in quantum information theory. We then apply these tools to the problem of deciding the existence of a suitable transformation from an initial pair of quantum states to a final one, focusing in particular on applications to the resource theory of athermality, a precursor of quantum thermodynamics.

  10. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  11. Multiple CubicBezier Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Horn, Douglas

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm is described for generating smooth curves of first-order continuity. The algorithm is composed of several cubic Bezier curves joined together at the user defined control points. Introduced is a tension control parameter which can be set thus providing additional flexibility in the design of free-form curves. (KR)

  12. Titration Curves: Fact and Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlain, John

    1997-01-01

    Discusses ways in which datalogging equipment can enable titration curves to be measured accurately and how computing power can be used to predict the shape of curves. Highlights include sources of error, use of spreadsheets to generate titration curves, titration of a weak acid with a strong alkali, dibasic acids, weak acid and weak base, and…

  13. Automated reasoning about cubic curves.

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, R.; McCune, W.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Manitoba

    1995-01-01

    It is well known that the n-ary morphisms defined on projective algebraic curves satisfy some strong local-to-global equational rules of derivation not satisfied in general by universal algebras. For example, every rationally defined group law on a cubic curve must be commutative. Here we extract from the geometry of curves a first order property (gL) satisfied by all morphisms defined on these curves such that the equational consequences known for projective curves can be derived automatically from a set of six rules (stated within the first-order logic with equality). First, the rule (gL) is implemented in the theorem-proving program Otter. Then we use Otter to automatically prove some incidence theorems on projective curves without any further reference to the underlying geometry or topology of the curves.

  14. Soil Water Retention Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. E.; Kim, J.; Cifelli, R.; Chandra, C. V.

    2016-12-01

    Potential water retention, S, is one of parameters commonly used in hydrologic modeling for soil moisture accounting. Physically, S indicates total amount of water which can be stored in soil and is expressed in units of depth. S can be represented as a change of soil moisture content and in this context is commonly used to estimate direct runoff, especially in the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) curve number (CN) method. Generally, the lumped and the distributed hydrologic models can easily use the SCS-CN method to estimate direct runoff. Changes in potential water retention have been used in previous SCS-CN studies; however, these studies have focused on long-term hydrologic simulations where S is allowed to vary at the daily time scale. While useful for hydrologic events that span multiple days, the resolution is too coarse for short-term applications such as flash flood events where S may not recover its full potential. In this study, a new method for estimating a time-variable potential water retention at hourly time-scales is presented. The methodology is applied for the Napa River basin, California. The streamflow gage at St Helena, located in the upper reaches of the basin, is used as the control gage site to evaluate the model performance as it is has minimal influences by reservoirs and diversions. Rainfall events from 2011 to 2012 are used for estimating the event-based SCS CN to transfer to S. As a result, we have derived the potential water retention curve and it is classified into three sections depending on the relative change in S. The first is a negative slope section arising from the difference in the rate of moving water through the soil column, the second is a zero change section representing the initial recovery the potential water retention, and the third is a positive change section representing the full recovery of the potential water retention. Also, we found that the soil water moving has traffic jam within 24 hours after finished first

  15. Optimal compensation for neuron loss

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, David GT; Denève, Sophie; Machens, Christian K

    2016-01-01

    The brain has an impressive ability to withstand neural damage. Diseases that kill neurons can go unnoticed for years, and incomplete brain lesions or silencing of neurons often fail to produce any behavioral effect. How does the brain compensate for such damage, and what are the limits of this compensation? We propose that neural circuits instantly compensate for neuron loss, thereby preserving their function as much as possible. We show that this compensation can explain changes in tuning curves induced by neuron silencing across a variety of systems, including the primary visual cortex. We find that compensatory mechanisms can be implemented through the dynamics of networks with a tight balance of excitation and inhibition, without requiring synaptic plasticity. The limits of this compensatory mechanism are reached when excitation and inhibition become unbalanced, thereby demarcating a recovery boundary, where signal representation fails and where diseases may become symptomatic. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12454.001 PMID:27935480

  16. Birational maps that send biquadratic curves to biquadratic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, John A. G.; Jogia, Danesh

    2015-02-01

    Recently, many papers have begun to consider so-called non-Quispel-Roberts-Thompson (QRT) birational maps of the plane. Compared to the QRT family of maps which preserve each biquadratic curve in a fibration of the plane, non-QRT maps send a biquadratic curve to another biquadratic curve belonging to the same fibration or to a biquadratic curve from a different fibration of the plane. In this communication, we give the general form of a birational map derived from a difference equation that sends a biquadratic curve to another. The necessary and sufficient condition for such a map to exist is that the discriminants of the two biquadratic curves are the same (and hence so are the j-invariants). The result allows existing examples in the literature to be better understood and allows some statements to be made concerning their generality.

  17. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in the human claustrum.

    PubMed

    Hinova-Palova, D V; Edelstein, L; Landzhov, B V; Braak, E; Malinova, L G; Minkov, M; Paloff, A; Ovtscharoff, W

    2014-09-01

    The morphology and distribution of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons (PV-ir) were studied in the human claustrum. PV-ir neurons were observed throughout the claustrum, with the highest numbers noted in the central (broadest) portion as compared with the dorsal and ventral aspects. Reaction product was evident in the neuronal perikarya, dendritic processes, and spines. In the majority of these labeled neurons, the cytoplasm was devoid of lipofuscin pigment. Cell bodies varied widely in both shape and size, ranging from oval and small, to multipolar and large. PV-ir neurons were classified into two groups, primarily based on dendritic morphology: spiny neurons with long and straight dendrites, and aspiny neurons with thin and curving dendritic processes. PV-ir fibers were seen throughout the neuropil, with many immuno-positive puncta noted.

  18. Mechanism of Interaction of Sleep-Affecting Compounds With Neuronal Receptors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    elicited ion currents. Effect of uridine on ion current amplitude was non-monotonic showing a wave-like behavior of dose - response curve with two peaks at...potentiation occurs at the lowest dose of substance. Presence of several peaks in the dose - response curve suggests availability in neuron membrane of...somewhat from the effect in cortical neurons showing the wave-like dose - response curve and blocking effect of DSIP at concentrations higher than 1

  19. Metabolizable protein supply modulated the acute-phase response following vaccination of beef steers.

    PubMed

    Moriel, P; Arthington, J D

    2013-12-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effects of MP supply, through RUP supplementation, on the acute-phase response of beef steers following vaccination. On d 0, Brangus-crossbred steers (n = 24; 173 ± 31 kg; 175 ± 16 d of age) were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 3 isocaloric diets formulated to provide 85, 100, and 115% of the daily MP requirements of a beef steer gaining 0.66 kg of BW daily. Diets were limit-fed at 1.8% of BW (DM basis) and individually provided to steers once daily (0800 h) from d 0 to 29. Steers were weighed on d 0 and 29, following a 12-h period of feed and water withdrawal. On d 7, steers were vaccinated against Mannheimia haemolytica (OneShot, Pfizer), and blood samples were collected on d 0, 7, 8, 10, 14, 21, and 30. Plasma metabolites were analyzed as repeated measures using the MIXED procedure of SAS. Final BW and ADG were similar (P ≥ 0.50) among treatments (mean = 184 ± 9 kg and 0.5 ± 0.08 kg/d, respectively). Effects of time were detected (P < 0.01) for plasma concentrations of all acute-phase proteins, which peaked between d 7 to 14, returning to baseline concentrations by d 29. Treatment effects were not detected (P ≥ 0.19) for plasma concentrations of acid-soluble protein, albumin, fibrinogen, IGF-1 and serum amyloid-A. Plasma concentrations of total protein (TP) and plasma urea nitrogen (PUN) increased (P ≤ 0.05) with increasing supply of MP (87.1, 89.6, and 90.1 ± 1.09 mg TP/mL and 6.1, 8.3, and 10.3 ± 0.41 mg PUN/dL for 85, 100, and 115% MP steers, respectively). From d 10 to 29, steers provided 115% MP had less (P < 0.001) plasma concentrations of ceruloplasmin than steers fed 85 and 100% MP, which had similar plasma ceruloplasmin concentrations. On d 14, plasma concentrations of haptoglobin were greatest (P ≤ 0.06) for steers fed 115% MP, intermediate for 100% MP, and least for 85% MP (0.98, 0.71 and 0.44 ± 0.099 mg/mL, respectively). On d 10, plasma concentrations of creatinine were greater (P = 0.01) for steers

  20. Photic sensitivity ranges of hamster pupillary and circadian phase responses do not overlap.

    PubMed

    Hut, Roelof A; Oklejewicz, Malgorzata; Rieux, Camille; Cooper, Howard M

    2008-02-01

    Mammalian retinal photoreceptors form an irradiance detection system that drives many nonvisual responses to light such as pupil reflex and resetting of the circadian clock. To understand the role of pupil size in circadian light responses, pupil diameter was pharmacologically manipulated and the effect on behavioral phase shifts at different irradiance levels was studied in the Syrian hamster. Dose-response curves for steady-state pupil size and for behavioral phase shifts were constructed for 3 pupil conditions (dilated, constricted, and control). Retinal irradiance was calculated from corneal irradiance, pupil size, retinal surface area, and absorption of ocular media. The sensitivity of photic responses to retinal irradiance is approximately 1.5 log units higher than to corneal irradiance. When plotted against corneal irradiance, pharmacological pupil constriction reduces the light sensitivity of the circadian system, but pupil dilation has no effect. As expected, when plotted against retinal irradiance all dose-response curves superimposed, confirming that the circadian system responds to photon flux on the retina. Pupil dilation does not increase the circadian response to increasing irradiance, since the response of the circadian system attains saturation at irradiance levels lower than those required to induce pupil constriction. The main finding shows that due to the different response sensitivities, the effect of pupil constriction on the light sensitivity of the circadian system in the hamster under natural conditions is virtually negligible. We further suggest the existence of distinct modulating mechanisms for the differential retinal irradiance sensitivity of the pupil system and the circadian system, which enables the different responses to be tuned to their specific tasks while using similar photoreceptive input.

  1. Langevin Equation on Fractal Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satin, Seema; Gangal, A. D.

    2016-07-01

    We analyze random motion of a particle on a fractal curve, using Langevin approach. This involves defining a new velocity in terms of mass of the fractal curve, as defined in recent work. The geometry of the fractal curve, plays an important role in this analysis. A Langevin equation with a particular model of noise is proposed and solved using techniques of the Fα-Calculus.

  2. Reflection of curved shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  3. Reflection of curved shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Shock curvatures are related to pressure gradients, streamline curvatures and vorticity in flows with planar and axial symmetry. Explicit expressions, in an influence coefficient format, are used to relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. Using higher order, von Neumann-type, compatibility conditions, curved shock theory is applied to calculate the flow near singly and doubly curved shocks on curved surfaces, in regular shock reflection and in Mach reflection. Theoretical curved shock shapes are in good agreement with computational fluid dynamics calculations and experiment.

  4. Shape Preserving Interpolation by Curves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-07-01

    curves Given data 1i E R2 , i = 0,..., N, we consider a curve r : [a, b] -- R2 satisfying r(ti) = Ii , i = 0,..., N, (3.1) for values a = to < tj...tN = b. For a closed curve the situation is extended periodically so that Ii +N =10, ti+N =ti, i E Z, r(t+b-a) =r(t), tc R. 3.1 Desirable properties...para- meterisation). When all vi = 0, r will reduce to the usual C2 cubic spline interpolant. As vi --+ oc, the curve is ’pulled tight’ at Ii and as

  5. Learning curves in health care.

    PubMed

    Waldman, J Deane; Yourstone, Steven A; Smith, Howard L

    2003-01-01

    This article explores the uses of learning curve theory in medicine. Though effective application of learning curve theory in health care can result in higher quality and lower cost, it is seldom methodically applied in clinical practice. Fundamental changes are necessary in the corporate culture of medicine in order to capitalize maximally on the benefits of learning.

  6. Acute phase response of selenium status and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood plasma before and after total knee arthroplasty surgery.

    PubMed

    Defi, Irma Ruslina; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Kobayashi, Kenji; Nakazawa, Minato; Shinya, Yanagisawa; Sato, Naoki; Wada, Naoki; Shirakura, Kenji; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2011-12-01

    Several studies show the consistent results of the decrease in plasma or serum selenium (Se) after surgery, and the change is suggested to be a negative acute phase response of Se to the surgical inflammation. Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx), which is included in the acute phase response proteins, is a selenoenzyme. However, previous studies failed to show any changes in GPx activity before and after surgery. In the present study, we investigated the Se- and selenoenzyme responses that accompany the acute inflammatory reactions during and following major surgery. Patients who underwent elective total knee arthroplasty surgery due to knee osteoarthritis at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Gunma University Hospital in Japan were studied. The plasma Se concentration was determined, and the activity of plasma GPx was measured. C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and white blood cell (WBC) count were also analysed. Increases in the inflammatory biomarkers of CRP and WBC showed inflammatory reactions with the surgery. A significant increase in plasma GPx activity (p < 0.05) and decreases in the plasma Se concentration (p < 0.05) and in serum albumin (p < 0.05) after surgery were observed. Since albumin is a Se-containing protein and represents a negative acute phase protein that provides amino acids for the production of other series of acute phase proteins, the present results suggest that there is a redistribution of plasma Se to GPx that occurs as an acute phase response, and the source of Se for GPx could be, at least partly, from albumin.

  7. Acute-phase response following full-mouth versus quadrant non-surgical periodontal treatment: A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Graziani, Filippo; Cei, Silvia; Orlandi, Marco; Gennai, Stefano; Gabriele, Mario; Filice, Natalia; Nisi, Marco; D'Aiuto, Francesco

    2015-09-01

    A moderate acute-phase response occurs 24-h following full-mouth non-surgical treatment (FM-SRP). The aim of this study was to compare acute-phase (24-h) and medium-term (3 months) inflammation after quadrant scaling (Q-SRP) versus FM-SRP. Thirty-eight periodontitis-affected subjects were randomly allocated to FM-SRP or Q-SRP after a baseline visit. Periodontal and anthropometric parameters were collected at baseline and 3 months. Serum samples were drawn at baseline, 1, 7, and 90 days after treatment. High-sensitivity assays of inflammation and endothelial assays were performed. FM-SRP produced a greater acute-phase response after 24 h [threefold increase in C-reactive protein (CRP), twofold increase in interleukin (IL-6), and a slight increase in tumour necrosis factor]. No differences in systemic biomarkers were noted between groups at any later follow-ups. Both periodontal treatments produced a comparable improvement in clinical periodontal parameters with no between-group differences. Treatment time was positively associated with the relative 24-h increase in CRP (R = 0.5, p < 0.001) and IL-6 (R = 0.5, p = 0.002), while the number of deeper (>6 mm) pockets predicted only the relative increase in IL-6 (R = 0.4, p < 0.05). FM-SRP triggers a moderate acute-phase response of 24 h duration compared to Q-SRP. Further research is needed to assess the eventual impact of such findings on the risk of vascular events is advocated. (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01857804). © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Hepatic cytochrome P450 3A drug metabolism is reduced in cancer patients who have an acute-phase response

    PubMed Central

    Rivory, L P; Slaviero, K A; Clarke, S J

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory disease states (infection, arthritis) are associated with reduced drug oxidation by the cytochrome P450 3A system. Many chemotherapy agents are metabolised through this pathway, and disease may therefore influence inter-individual differences in drug pharmacokinetics. The purpose of this study was to assess cytochrome P450 3A function in patients with advanced cancer, and its relation to the acute-phase response. We evaluated hepatic cytochrome P450 3A function in 40 patients with advanced cancer using the erythromycin breath test. Both the traditional C20min measure and the recently proposed 1/TMAX values were estimated. The marker of acute-phase response, C-reactive protein and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, TNFα and IL-8 were measured in serum or plasma at baseline. Cancer patients with an acute phase response (C-reactive protein >10 mg l−1, n=26) had reduced metabolism as measured with the erythromycin breath test 1/TMAX (Kruskal–Wallis Anova, P=0.0062) as compared to controls (C-reactive protein ⩽10 mg l−1, n=14). Indeed, metabolism was significantly associated with C-reactive protein over the whole concentration range of this acute-phase marker (r=−0.64, Spearman Rank Correlation, P<0.00001). C-reactive protein serum levels were significantly correlated with those of IL-6 (Spearman coefficient=0.58, P<0.0003). The reduction in cytochrome P450 3A function with acute-phase reaction was independent of the tumour type and C-reactive protein elevation was associated with poor performance status. This indicates that the sub-group of cancer patients with significant acute-phase response have compromised drug metabolism, which may have implications for the safety of chemotherapy in this population. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 277–280. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600448 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12177794

  9. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-physicochemical properties predict the systemic acute phase response following pulmonary exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Sarah S; Knudsen, Kristina B; Jackson, Petra; Weydahl, Ingrid E K; Saber, Anne T; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been linked to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease in addition to the well-documented physicochemical-dependent adverse lung effects. A proposed mechanism is through a strong and sustained pulmonary secretion of acute phase proteins to the blood. We identified physicochemical determinants of MWCNT-induced systemic acute phase response by analyzing effects of pulmonary exposure to 14 commercial, well-characterized MWCNTs in female C57BL/6J mice pulmonary exposed to 0, 6, 18 or 54 μg MWCNT/mouse. Plasma levels of acute phase response proteins serum amyloid A1/2 (SAA1/2) and SAA3 were determined on day 1, 28 or 92. Expression levels of hepatic Saa1 and pulmonary Saa3 mRNA levels were assessed to determine the origin of the acute phase response proteins. Pulmonary Saa3 mRNA expression levels were greater and lasted longer than hepatic Saa1 mRNA expression. Plasma SAA1/2 and SAA3 protein levels were related to time and physicochemical properties using adjusted, multiple regression analyses. SAA3 and SAA1/2 plasma protein levels were increased after exposure to almost all of the MWCNTs on day 1, whereas limited changes were observed on day 28 and 92. SAA1/2 and SAA3 protein levels did not correlate and only SAA3 protein levels correlated with neutrophil influx. The multiple regression analyses revealed a protective effect of MWCNT length on SAA1/2 protein level on day 1, such that a longer length resulted in lowered SAA1/2 plasma levels. Increased SAA3 protein levels were positively related to dose and content of Mn, Mg and Co on day 1, whereas oxidation and diameter of the MWCNTs were protective on day 28 and 92, respectively. The results of this study reveal very differently controlled pulmonary and hepatic acute phase responses after MWCNT exposure. As the responses were influenced by the physicochemical properties of the MWCNTs, this study provides the first step towards designing

  10. Polish spaces of causal curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Tomasz

    2017-06-01

    We propose and study a new approach to the topologization of spaces of (possibly not all) future-directed causal curves in a stably causal spacetime. It relies on parametrizing the curves ;in accordance; with a chosen time function. Thus obtained topological spaces of causal curves are separable and completely metrizable, i.e. Polish. The latter property renders them particularly useful in the optimal transport theory. To illustrate this fact, we explore the notion of a causal time-evolution of measures in globally hyperbolic spacetimes and discuss its physical interpretation.

  11. Accelerating Around an Unbanked Curve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    FEB 2006 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2006 to 00-00-2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Accelerating Around an Unbanked Curve 5a. CONTRACT...December 2004 issue of TPT presented a problem concerning how a car should acceler-ate around an unbanked curve of constant radius r starting from rest...Accelerating Around an Unbanked Curve Carl E. Mungan, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD 100 THE PHYSICS TEACHER ◆ Vol. 44, February 2006 The shapes

  12. Curved conveyor section guide assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Truszczinski, H.

    1981-02-03

    A guide assembly for a curved conveyor section of a scraperchain conveyor guides the scraper assembly from a first straight conveyor portion round the curved conveyor section to a second straight conveyor portion. This guiding is accomplished by a pair of independently rotatable pulley wheels. A further pair of independently rotatable pulley wheels are provided to guide the drive chain of a plough round the curved conveyor section. This enables the plough to be driven to and fro along the first straight conveyor portion by a drive station attached to the second straight conveyor portion adjacent to the guide assembly.

  13. Predictiveness curves in virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Empereur-Mot, Charly; Guillemain, Hélène; Latouche, Aurélien; Zagury, Jean-François; Viallon, Vivian; Montes, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we aim to transfer to the field of virtual screening the predictiveness curve, a metric that has been advocated in clinical epidemiology. The literature describes the use of predictiveness curves to evaluate the performances of biological markers to formulate diagnoses, prognoses and assess disease risks, assess the fit of risk models, and estimate the clinical utility of a model when applied to a population. Similarly, we use logistic regression models to calculate activity probabilities related to the scores that the compounds obtained in virtual screening experiments. The predictiveness curve can provide an intuitive and graphical tool to compare the predictive power of virtual screening methods. Similarly to ROC curves, predictiveness curves are functions of the distribution of the scores and provide a common scale for the evaluation of virtual screening methods. Contrarily to ROC curves, the dispersion of the scores is well described by predictiveness curves. This property allows the quantification of the predictive performance of virtual screening methods on a fraction of a given molecular dataset and makes the predictiveness curve an efficient tool to address the early recognition problem. To this last end, we introduce the use of the total gain and partial total gain to quantify recognition and early recognition of active compounds attributed to the variations of the scores obtained with virtual screening methods. Additionally to its usefulness in the evaluation of virtual screening methods, predictiveness curves can be used to define optimal score thresholds for the selection of compounds to be tested experimentally in a drug discovery program. We illustrate the use of predictiveness curves as a complement to ROC on the results of a virtual screening of the Directory of Useful Decoys datasets using three different methods (Surflex-dock, ICM, Autodock Vina). The predictiveness curves cover different aspects of the predictive power of

  14. Modulation of C4b-binding protein isoforms during the acute phase response caused by orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Criado-García, O; González-Rubio, C; López-Trascasa, M; Pascual-Salcedo, D; Munuera, L; Rodríguez de Córdoba, S

    1997-01-01

    Orthopedic surgery is described as an event with a high risk of thromboembolic diseases. This is probably a consequence of a synergistic combination of different risk factors in the patients subjected to this type of surgery, including age, immobilization, anesthesia and different hypercoagulable states. After surgery patients develop an acute-phase response that leads to changes in several plasma proteins. One of these proteins is the complement regulator C4b-binding protein (C4BP). We have recently shown that in some acute-phase patients C4BP is incorrectly controlled (with elevation of the C4BP beta-containing isoforms), leading to a potential hypercoagulable state by decreasing the plasma levels of free (active) protein S. Here we have studied whether patients subjected to orthopedic surgery have an appropriate modulation of the C4BP isoforms during their postoperative acute-phase responses. We have analyzed the evolution of the C4BP isoforms in serial samples from 11 patients who have undergone knee (or hip) prosthesis surgery (mean age 70 years), or scoliosis surgery (mean age 18 years). Our data suggest a similar evolution of C4BP isoforms in all these patients, with an almost exclusive increase of C4BP isoforms lacking C4BP beta polypeptides and steady levels of free protein S.

  15. Nonlinear mechanics of rigidifying curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Mosleh, Salem; Santangelo, Christian

    2017-07-01

    Thin shells are characterized by a high cost of stretching compared to bending. As a result isometries of the midsurface of a shell play a crucial role in their mechanics. In turn, curves on the midsurface with zero normal curvature play a critical role in determining the number and behavior of isometries. In this paper, we show how the presence of these curves results in a decrease in the number of linear isometries. Paradoxically, shells are also known to continuously fold more easily across these rigidifying curves than other curves on the surface. We show how including nonlinearities in the strain can explain these phenomena and demonstrate folding isometries with explicit solutions to the nonlinear isometry equations. In addition to explicit solutions, exact geometric arguments are given to validate and guide our analysis in a coordinate-free way.

  16. Flow over riblet curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, J. B. R.; Silva Freire, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    The present work studies the mechanics of turbulent drag reduction over curved surfaces by riblets. The effects of surface modification on flow separation over steep and smooth curved surfaces are investigated. Four types of two-dimensional surfaces are studied based on the morphometric parameters that describe the body of a blue whale. Local measurements of mean velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained through laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV).

  17. Line constrained between two curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Afida; Ali, Jamaludin Md.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, the method of finding the line constrained between two quadratic Bezier curves and also finding the line constrained between a quadratic Bezier curve and a circle is presented. The application of the line constrained can be used in the construction of railway tracks between any obstacle or rolling a ball to the other side of a wall in a way that it just touches the wall. The method used is by using equal root properties of a quadratic equation in order to find one point where the line touches the curve. The work examples involved different curve orientations and different circle positions. Mathematica software is used to compute the solutions for the line constrained and present the solutions graphically. By using the method proposed, the number of intersection points obtained is used to determine the number of lines constrained between two curves and between a curve and a circle. The conclusion on whether all lines are acceptable to be considered as the line constrained are depending on the application of the line.

  18. Neurofibromin and Neuronal Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    for these differences in the response of Nfl-/- neurons. "So What" Section. The learning disabilities associated with NF I constitute a highly variable...and +/+ neurons appear to become more significant with age. Our results may have implications for two areas: 1) the pathogenesis of learning ... disabilities in children with NF I, and 2) therapeutic strategies or targets for prolonging neuron survival, or for increasing neuronal response to protective

  19. Curve Boxplot: Generalization of Boxplot for Ensembles of Curves.

    PubMed

    Mirzargar, Mahsa; Whitaker, Ross T; Kirby, Robert M

    2014-12-01

    In simulation science, computational scientists often study the behavior of their simulations by repeated solutions with variations in parameters and/or boundary values or initial conditions. Through such simulation ensembles, one can try to understand or quantify the variability or uncertainty in a solution as a function of the various inputs or model assumptions. In response to a growing interest in simulation ensembles, the visualization community has developed a suite of methods for allowing users to observe and understand the properties of these ensembles in an efficient and effective manner. An important aspect of visualizing simulations is the analysis of derived features, often represented as points, surfaces, or curves. In this paper, we present a novel, nonparametric method for summarizing ensembles of 2D and 3D curves. We propose an extension of a method from descriptive statistics, data depth, to curves. We also demonstrate a set of rendering and visualization strategies for showing rank statistics of an ensemble of curves, which is a generalization of traditional whisker plots or boxplots to multidimensional curves. Results are presented for applications in neuroimaging, hurricane forecasting and fluid dynamics.

  20. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  1. Modifying the acute phase response of Jersey calves by supplementing milk replacer with omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil.

    PubMed

    Ballou, M A; Cruz, G D; Pittroff, W; Keisler, D H; DePeters, E J

    2008-09-01

    Fifty-one Jersey bull calves (5 +/- 1 d old) were assigned to 1 of 3 milk replacers to determine the effects of increasing doses of n-3 fatty acids from fish oil on the acute phase response after an endotoxin challenge. All calves were fed a 22.5% crude protein and 18% lipid milk replacer (Calva Products, Acampo, CA) supplemented with an additional 2% fatty acids. Treatments differed only in the supplemental lipid source and included a 3:1 mix of corn and canola oils, a 1:1 blend of fish oil (Omega Proteins, Houston, TX) and the 3:1 mix of corn and canola oils, and fish oil only. On d 23, each calf was injected subcutaneously with 4 microg/kg of body weight of Salmonella Typhimurium endotoxin. Clinical, hematological, and biochemical parameters were measured at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, 24, and 72 h post endotoxin challenge. Endotoxin caused a dramatic rise in respiratory rate; feeding fish oil significantly attenuated the increase. Heart rate and rectal temperature were not affected by treatment. Feeding fish oil attenuated the change in serum iron concentration over time. Endotoxin caused severe hypoglycemia, reaching a nadir at 4 h. Calves supplemented with fish oil had reduced concentrations of serum glucose for 8 to 24 h. Furthermore, calves supplemented with fish oil alone had reduced serum insulin at 12, 28, and 24 h. In contrast, endotoxin caused an acute increase in blood urea nitrogen and nonesterified fatty acids; there were significant linear effects of fish oil on both blood urea nitrogen and nonesterified fatty acids. Serum triglycerides were elevated beginning at 12 h after the endotoxin challenge and returned to baseline values within 72 h. Fish oil suppressed the rise in triglycerides during this period, and the effect was linear with increasing fish oil. Serum concentrations of leptin decreased after the endotoxin challenge; however, the treatment did not influence the response. There was no treatment effect on serum aspartate

  2. Diminished acute phase response and increased hepatic inflammation of aged rats in response to intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Christian R; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio; Pérez, Claudio; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Riquelme, Denise M; Ordenes, Gamaliel; Oshima, Kiyoko; Aravena, Mauricio; Pérez, Viviana I; Nishimura, Sumiyo; Sabaj, Valeria; Walter, Robin; Sierra, Felipe

    2008-12-01

    Aging is associated with a deterioration of the acute phase response to inflammatory challenges. However, the nature of these defects remains poorly defined. We analyzed the hepatic inflammatory response after intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) given to Fisher 344 rats aged 6, 15, and 22-23 months. Induction of the acute phase proteins (APPs), haptoglobin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, and T-kininogen was reduced and/or retarded with aging. Initial induction of interleukin-6 in aged rats was normal, but the later response was increased relative to younger counterparts. An exacerbated hepatic injury was observed in aged rats receiving LPS, as evidenced by the presence of multiple microabscesses in portal tracts, confluent necrosis, higher neutrophil accumulation, and elevated serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, relative to younger animals. Our results suggest that aged rats displayed a reduced expression of APPs and increased hepatic injury in response to the inflammatory insult.

  3. Sample skewness as a statistical measurement of neuronal tuning sharpness.

    PubMed

    Samonds, Jason M; Potetz, Brian R; Lee, Tai Sing

    2014-05-01

    We propose using the statistical measurement of the sample skewness of the distribution of mean firing rates of a tuning curve to quantify sharpness of tuning. For some features, like binocular disparity, tuning curves are best described by relatively complex and sometimes diverse functions, making it difficult to quantify sharpness with a single function and parameter. Skewness provides a robust nonparametric measure of tuning curve sharpness that is invariant with respect to the mean and variance of the tuning curve and is straightforward to apply to a wide range of tuning, including simple orientation tuning curves and complex object tuning curves that often cannot even be described parametrically. Because skewness does not depend on a specific model or function of tuning, it is especially appealing to cases of sharpening where recurrent interactions among neurons produce sharper tuning curves that deviate in a complex manner from the feedforward function of tuning. Since tuning curves for all neurons are not typically well described by a single parametric function, this model independence additionally allows skewness to be applied to all recorded neurons, maximizing the statistical power of a set of data. We also compare skewness with other nonparametric measures of tuning curve sharpness and selectivity. Compared to these other nonparametric measures tested, skewness is best used for capturing the sharpness of multimodal tuning curves defined by narrow peaks (maximum) and broad valleys (minima). Finally, we provide a more formal definition of sharpness using a shape-based information gain measure and derive and show that skewness is correlated with this definition.

  4. Sample Skewness as a Statistical Measurement of Neuronal Tuning Sharpness

    PubMed Central

    Samonds, Jason M.; Potetz, Brian R.; Lee, Tai Sing

    2014-01-01

    We propose using the statistical measurement of the sample skewness of the distribution of mean firing rates of a tuning curve to quantify sharpness of tuning. For some features, like binocular disparity, tuning curves are best described by relatively complex and sometimes diverse functions, making it difficult to quantify sharpness with a single function and parameter. Skewness provides a robust nonparametric measure of tuning curve sharpness that is invariant with respect to the mean and variance of the tuning curve and is straightforward to apply to a wide range of tuning, including simple orientation tuning curves and complex object tuning curves that often cannot even be described parametrically. Because skewness does not depend on a specific model or function of tuning, it is especially appealing to cases of sharpening where recurrent interactions among neurons produce sharper tuning curves that deviate in a complex manner from the feedforward function of tuning. Since tuning curves for all neurons are not typically well described by a single parametric function, this model independence additionally allows skewness to be applied to all recorded neurons, maximizing the statistical power of a set of data. We also compare skewness with other nonparametric measures of tuning curve sharpness and selectivity. Compared to these other nonparametric measures tested, skewness is best used for capturing the sharpness of multimodal tuning curves defined by narrow peaks (maximum) and broad valleys (minima). Finally, we provide a more formal definition of sharpness using a shape-based information gain measure and derive and show that skewness is correlated with this definition. PMID:24555451

  5. Relative Locality in Curved Spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy; Rosati, Giacomo

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we construct the action describing dynamics of the particle moving in curved spacetime, with a nontrivial momentum space geometry. Curved momentum space is the core feature of theories where relative locality effects are present. So far aspects of nonlinearities in momentum space have been studied only for flat or constantly expanding (de Sitter) spacetimes, relying on their maximally symmetric nature. The extension of curved momentum space frameworks to arbitrary spacetime geometries could be relevant for the opportunities to test Planck-scale curvature/deformation of particles momentum space. As a first example of this construction we describe the particle with κ-Poincaré momentum space on a circular orbit in Schwarzschild spacetime, where the contributes of momentum space curvature turn out to be negligible. The analysis of this problem relies crucially on the solution of the soccer ball problem.

  6. Phase nucleation in curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo; García, Nicolás; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Lorenzana, José; Daniel, Vega

    Nucleation and growth is the dominant relaxation mechanism driving first-order phase transitions. In two-dimensional flat systems, nucleation has been applied to a wide range of problems in physics, chemistry and biology. Here we study nucleation and growth of two-dimensional phases lying on curved surfaces and show that curvature modifies both critical sizes of nuclei and paths towards the equilibrium phase. In curved space, nucleation and growth becomes inherently inhomogeneous and critical nuclei form faster on regions of positive Gaussian curvature. Substrates of varying shape display complex energy landscapes with several geometry-induced local minima, where initially propagating nuclei become stabilized and trapped by the underlying curvature (Gómez, L. R. et al. Phase nucleation in curved space. Nat. Commun. 6:6856 doi: 10.1038/ncomms7856 (2015).).

  7. Supply curves of conserved energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, A. K.

    1982-05-01

    Supply curves of conserved energy provide an accounting framework that expresses the potential for energy conservation. The economic worthiness of a conservation measure is expressed in terms of the cost of conserved energy, and a measure is considered economical when the cost of conserved energy is less than the price of the energy it replaces. A supply curve of conserved energy is independent of energy prices; however, the economical reserves of conserved energy will depend on energy prices. Double-counting of energy savings and error propagation are common problems when estimating conservation potentials, but supply curves minimize these difficulties and make their consequences predictable. The sensitivity of the cost of conserved energy is examined, as are variations in the optimal investment strategy in response to changes in inputs. Guidelines are presented for predicting the consequences of such changes.

  8. Postpartum Circulating Markers of Inflammation and the Systemic Acute-Phase Response After Early-Onset Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, Bas B; Bruinse, Hein W; Veerbeek, Jan H; Post Uiterweer, Emiel D; Koenen, Steven V; van der Bom, Johanna G; Rijkers, Ger T; Roest, Mark; Franx, Arie

    2016-02-01

    Preeclampsia is an inflammatory-mediated hypertensive disorder of pregnancy and seems to be an early indicator of increased cardiovascular risk, but mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. In this study, we identified levels of circulating inflammatory markers and dynamic changes in the systemic acute-phase response in 44 women with a history of severe early-onset preeclampsia, compared with 29 controls with only uneventful pregnancies at 1.5 to 3.5 years postpartum. Models used were in vivo seasonal influenza vaccination and in vitro whole-blood culture with T-cell stimulants and the toll-like receptor-4 ligand lipopolysaccharide. Outcome measures were C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-18, fibrinogen, myeloperoxidase, and a panel of 13 cytokines representative of the innate and adaptive inflammatory response, in addition to established cardiovascular markers. The in vivo acute-phase response was higher for women with previous preeclampsia than that for controls without such a history, although only significant for C-reactive protein (P=0.04). Preeclampsia was associated with higher IL-1β (P<0.05) and IL-8 (P<0.01) responses to T-cell activation. Hierarchical clustering revealed 2 distinct inflammatory clusters associated with previous preeclampsia: an adaptive response cluster associated with increased C-reactive protein and IL-6 before and after vaccination, increased weight, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; and a toll-like receptor-4 mediated the cluster associated with increased IL-18 before and after vaccination but not associated with other cardiovascular markers. Furthermore, we found interactions between previous preeclampsia, common TLR4 gene variants, and the IL-18 response to vaccination. In conclusion, preeclampsia is associated with alterations in the inflammatory response postpartum mostly independent of other established cardiovascular risk markers. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Protein-energy malnutrition induces an aberrant acute-phase response and modifies the circadian rhythm of core temperature.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shari E; Ramos, Rafaela Andrade; Refinetti, Roberto; Farthing, Jonathan P; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2013-08-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), present in 12%-19% of stroke patients upon hospital admission, appears to be a detrimental comorbidity factor that impairs functional outcome, but the mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Because ischemic brain injury is highly temperature-sensitive, the objectives of this study were to investigate whether PEM causes sustained changes in temperature that are associated with an inflammatory response. Activity levels were recorded as a possible explanation for the immediate elevation in temperature upon introduction to a low protein diet. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats (7 weeks old) were fed a control diet (18% protein) or a low protein diet (PEM, 2% protein) for either 7 or 28 days. Continuous core temperature recordings from bioelectrical sensor transmitters demonstrated a rapid increase in temperature amplitude, sustained over 28 days, in response to a low protein diet. Daily mean temperature rose transiently by day 2 (p = 0.01), falling to normal by day 4 (p = 0.08), after which mean temperature continually declined as malnutrition progressed. There were no alterations in activity mean (p = 0.3) or amplitude (p = 0.2) that were associated with the early rise in mean temperature. Increased serum alpha-2-macroglobulin (p < 0.001) and decreased serum albumin (p ≤ 0.005) combined with a decrease in serum alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (p < 0.001) suggest an atypical acute-phase response. In contrast, a low protein diet had no effect on the signaling pathway of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor, NFκB, in the hippocampus. In conclusion, PEM induces an aberrant and sustained acute-phase response coupled with long-lasting effects on body temperature.

  10. Curve Fit Technique for a Smooth Curve Using Gaussian Sections.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    curve-fitting. Furthermore, the algorithm that does the fitting is simple enough to be used on a programmable calculator . 8 -I.F , A X i 4. Y-14 .4. - -* F.J OR;r IF 17 r*~~ , ac ~J ’a vt. . S ~ :.. *~All, a-4k .16’.- a1 1, t

  11. Active particles on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fily, Yaouen; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael

    Active systems have proved to be very sensitive to the geometry of their environment. This is often achieved by spending significant time at the boundary, probing its shape by gliding along it. I will discuss coarse graining the microscopic dynamics of self-propelled particles on a general curved surface to predict the way the density profile on the surface depends on its geometry. Beyond confined active particles, this formalism is a natural starting point to study objects that cannot leave the boundary at all, such as cells crawling on a curved substrate, animals running on uneven ground, or active colloids trapped at an interface.

  12. Harmonic Measure of Critical Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Bettelheim, E.; Rushkin, I.; Gruzberg, I.A.; Wiegmann, P.

    2005-10-21

    Fractal geometry of critical curves appearing in 2D critical systems is characterized by their harmonic measure. For systems described by conformal field theories with central charge c{<=}1, scaling exponents of the harmonic measure have been computed by Duplantier [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 1363 (2000)] by relating the problem to boundary two-dimensional gravity. We present a simple argument connecting the harmonic measure of critical curves to operators obtained by fusion of primary fields and compute characteristics of the fractal geometry by means of regular methods of conformal field theory. The method is not limited to theories with c{<=}1.

  13. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-03-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  14. Shock detachment from curved wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2017-09-01

    Curved shock theory is used to show that the flow behind attached shocks on doubly curved wedges can have either positive or negative post-shock pressure gradients depending on the freestream Mach number, the wedge angle and the two wedge curvatures. Given enough wedge length, the flow near the leading edge can choke to force the shock to detach from the wedge. This local choking can preempt both the maximum deflection and the sonic criteria for shock detachment. Analytical predictions for detachment by local choking are supported by CFD results.

  15. Macaque inferior temporal neurons are selective for three-dimensional boundaries and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Janssen, P; Vogels, R; Liu, Y; Orban, G A

    2001-12-01

    The lower bank of the superior temporal sulcus (TEs), part of the inferior temporal cortex, contains neurons selective for disparity-defined three-dimensional (3-D) shape. The large majority of these TEs neurons respond to the spatial variation of disparity, i.e., are higher-order disparity selective. To determine whether curved boundaries or curved surfaces by themselves are sufficient to elicit 3-D shape selectivity, we recorded the responses of single higher-order disparity-selective TEs neurons to concave and convex 3-D shapes in which the disparity varied either along the boundary of the shape, or only along its surface. For a majority of neurons, a 3-D boundary was sufficient for 3-D shape selectivity. At least as many neurons responded selectively to 3-D surfaces, and a number of neurons exhibited both surface and boundary selectivity. The second aim of this study was to determine whether TEs neurons can represent differences in second-order disparities along the horizontal axis. The results revealed that TEs neurons can also be selective for horizontal 3-D shapes and can code the direction of curvature (vertical or horizontal). Thus, TEs neurons represent both boundaries and surfaces curved in depth and can signal the direction of curvature along a surface. These results show that TEs neurons use not only boundary but also surface information to encode 3-D shape properties.

  16. NEXT Performance Curve Analysis and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saripalli, Pratik; Cardiff, Eric; Englander, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Performance curves of the NEXT thruster are highly important in determining the thruster's ability in performing towards mission-specific goals. New performance curves are proposed and examined here. The Evolutionary Mission Trajectory Generator (EMTG) is used to verify variations in mission solutions based on both available thruster curves and the new curves generated. Furthermore, variations in BOL and EOL curves are also examined. Mission design results shown here validate the use of EMTG and the new performance curves.

  17. Cajal bodies in neurons.

    PubMed

    Lafarga, Miguel; Tapia, Olga; Romero, Ana M; Berciano, Maria T

    2016-09-14

    Cajal is commonly regarded as the father of modern neuroscience in recognition of his fundamental work on the structure of the nervous system. But Cajal also made seminal contributions to the knowledge of nuclear structure in the early 1900s, including the discovery of the "accessory body" later renamed "Cajal body" (CB). This important nuclear structure has emerged as a center for the assembly of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) required for splicing, ribosome biogenesis and telomere maintenance. The modern era of CB research started in the 1990s with the discovery of coilin, now known as a scaffold protein of CBs, and specific probes for small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). In this review, we summarize what we have learned in the recent decades concerning CBs in post-mitotic neurons, thereby ruling out dynamic changes in CB functions during the cell cycle. We show that CBs are particularly prominent in neurons, where they frequently associate with the nucleolus. Neuronal CBs are transcription-dependent nuclear organelles. Indeed, their number dynamically accommodates to support the high neuronal demand for splicing and ribosome biogenesis required for sustaining metabolic and bioelectrical activity. Mature neurons have canonical CBs enriched in coilin, survival motor neuron protein and snRNPs. Disruption and loss of neuronal CBs associate with severe neuronal dysfunctions in several neurological disorders such as motor neuron diseases. In particular, CB depletion in motor neurons seems to reflect a perturbation of transcription and splicing in spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of infant mortality.

  18. Principal Curves on Riemannian Manifolds.

    PubMed

    Hauberg, Soren

    2016-09-01

    Euclidean statistics are often generalized to Riemannian manifolds by replacing straight-line interpolations with geodesic ones. While these Riemannian models are familiar-looking, they are restricted by the inflexibility of geodesics, and they rely on constructions which are optimal only in Euclidean domains. We consider extensions of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to Riemannian manifolds. Classic Riemannian approaches seek a geodesic curve passing through the mean that optimizes a criteria of interest. The requirements that the solution both is geodesic and must pass through the mean tend to imply that the methods only work well when the manifold is mostly flat within the support of the generating distribution. We argue that instead of generalizing linear Euclidean models, it is more fruitful to generalize non-linear Euclidean models. Specifically, we extend the classic Principal Curves from Hastie & Stuetzle to data residing on a complete Riemannian manifold. We show that for elliptical distributions in the tangent of spaces of constant curvature, the standard principal geodesic is a principal curve. The proposed model is simple to compute and avoids many of the pitfalls of traditional geodesic approaches. We empirically demonstrate the effectiveness of the Riemannian principal curves on several manifolds and datasets.

  19. Archaeomagnetic SV curve for Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ech-chakrouni, Souad; Hus, Jozef

    2017-04-01

    Archaeomagnetic secular variation curves have been established for different countries in Europe, especially when different archeological sites are more or less uniformly distributed in time are available. The disadvantage in that case is that data had to be relocated to a single reference site. The proximity of the reference locality Paris to Belgium makes that we used the French archaeomagnetic SV curve for the last three millennia up to the present for archaeomagnetic dating undated baked structures. In total, 85 baked structures have been examined, unearthed in 24 archaeological sites of the territory of Belgium. The ChRM of each sample was obtained by principal component analysis for at least three demagnetisation steps (Kirschvink 1980). Except for some outliers, the ChRM directions are very coherent with a high confidence factor (α95< 5°) and high concentration factor. The average field directions recorded in the fired materials in most sites satisfy the international criteria used in archaeomagnetism. At present, only six baked structures were dated radiometrically and may be considered as reference data for a limited area about 30500 km2 in Western Europe. The ultimate aim is to construct an archaeomagnetic SV curve for Belgium with Uccle as reference locality, where the first measurement of the geomagnetic field was done in 1895. This curve would include all the available reference data in a radius of about 500 km around Uccle. Keywords: secular variation, archaeomagnetic dating, Belgium.

  20. Interpolation and Polynomial Curve Fitting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yajun; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2014-01-01

    Two points determine a line. Three noncollinear points determine a quadratic function. Four points that do not lie on a lower-degree polynomial curve determine a cubic function. In general, n + 1 points uniquely determine a polynomial of degree n, presuming that they do not fall onto a polynomial of lower degree. The process of finding such a…

  1. Variability among polysulphone calibration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casale, G. R.; Borra, M.; Colosimo, A.; Colucci, M.; Militello, A.; Siani, A. M.; Sisto, R.

    2006-09-01

    Within an epidemiological study regarding the correlation between skin pathologies and personal ultraviolet (UV) exposure due to solar radiation, 14 field campaigns using polysulphone (PS) dosemeters were carried out at three different Italian sites (urban, semi-rural and rural) in every season of the year. A polysulphone calibration curve for each field experiment was obtained by measuring the ambient UV dose under almost clear sky conditions and the corresponding change in the PS film absorbance, prior and post exposure. Ambient UV doses were measured by well-calibrated broad-band radiometers and by electronic dosemeters. The dose-response relation was represented by the typical best fit to a third-degree polynomial and it was parameterized by a coefficient multiplying a cubic polynomial function. It was observed that the fit curves differed from each other in the coefficient only. It was assessed that the multiplying coefficient was affected by the solar UV spectrum at the Earth's surface whilst the polynomial factor depended on the photoinduced reaction of the polysulphone film. The mismatch between the polysulphone spectral curve and the CIE erythemal action spectrum was responsible for the variability among polysulphone calibration curves. The variability of the coefficient was related to the total ozone amount and the solar zenith angle. A mathematical explanation of such a parameterization was also discussed.

  2. Supply Curves of Conserved Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan Kevin

    1982-05-01

    Supply curves of conserved energy provide an accounting framework that expresses the potential for energy conservation. The economic worthiness of a conservation measure is expressed in terms of the cost of conserved energy, and a measure is considered economical when the cost of conserved energy is less than the price of the energy it replaces. A supply curve of conserved energy is independent of energy prices; however, the economical reserves of conserved energy will depend on energy prices. Double-counting of energy savings and error propagation are common problems when estimating conservation potentials, but supply curves minimize these difficulties and make their consequences predictable. The sensitivity of the cost of conserved energy is examined, as are variations in the optimal investment strategy in response to changes in inputs. Guidelines are presented for predicting the consequences of such changes. The conservation supply curve concept can be applied to peak power, water, pollution, and other markets where consumers demand a service rather than a particular good.

  3. Interpolation and Polynomial Curve Fitting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yajun; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2014-01-01

    Two points determine a line. Three noncollinear points determine a quadratic function. Four points that do not lie on a lower-degree polynomial curve determine a cubic function. In general, n + 1 points uniquely determine a polynomial of degree n, presuming that they do not fall onto a polynomial of lower degree. The process of finding such a…

  4. Breakpoint chlorination curves of greywater.

    PubMed

    March, J G; Gual, M

    2007-08-01

    A study on chlorination of raw greywater with hypochlorite is reported in this paper. Samples were chlorinated in a variety of conditions, and residual chlorine (Cl2) was measured spectrophotometrically. For each sample, the chlorination curve (chlorine residuals versus chlorine dose) was obtained. Curves showed the typical hump-and-dip profile attributable to the formation and destruction of chloramines. It was observed that, after reactions with strong reductants and chloramines-forming compounds, the remaining organic matter exerted a certain demand of chlorine. The evolution of chlorination curves with addition of ammonia and dodecylbencene sulfonate sodium salt and with dilution of the greywater sample were studied. In addition, chlorination curves at several contact times have been obtained, resulting in slower chlorine decay in the hump zone than in the dip zone. In addition, the decay of coliforms in chlorinated samples was also investigated. It was found that, for a chlorination dosage corresponding to the maximum of the hump zone (average 8.9 mg Cl2/ L), samples were negative in coliforms after 10 to 30 minutes of contact time. After-growth was not observed within 3 days after chlorination. Implications in chlorination treatments of raw greywater can be derived from these results.

  5. Neuronal and synaptic organization in the gravity receptor system of the statocyst of Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Colmers, W F

    1977-12-28

    The neuronal and synaptic organization of the sensory epithelium (macula) of the gravity receptor system of Octopus vulgaris was investigated by serial electron microscopic reconstruction. Three different types of afferent neurons, unipolar, bipolar, and multipolar, are described. Afferent synapses exist between the secondary sensory cells (hair cells) and the afferent neurons. Consequently, the neurons are first-order neurons. Two morphologically distinct types of afferent synapses could be identified: the most common type, present on every hair cell, has a finger-like postsynaptic process; the second type, which does not occur on every hair cell, has a flat or somewhat curved postsynaptic process. As a rule, the hair cells each form synapses with more than one afferent neuron. The neurons, in turn, form synapses with more than one hair cell. A complicated arrangement of efferent synapses was found at the level of both the hair cells and the neurons. The results are discussed with reference to their physiological consequences.

  6. Comparison of Two Algebraic Methods for Curve/curve Intersection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demontaudouin, Y.; Tiller, W.

    1985-01-01

    Most geometric modeling systems use either polynomial or rational functions to represent geometry. In such systems most computational problems can be formulated as systems of polynomials in one or more variables. Classical elimination theory can be used to solve such systems. Here Cayley's method of elimination is summarized and it is shown how it can best be used to solve the curve/curve intersection problem. Cayley's method was found to be a more straightforward approach. Furthermore, it is computationally simpler, since the elements of the Cayley matrix are one variable instead of two variable polynomials. Researchers implemented and tested both methods and found Cayley's to be more efficient. Six pairs of curves, representing mixtures of lines, circles, and cubic arcs were used. Several examples had multiple intersection points. For all six cases Cayley's required less CPU time than the other method. The average time ratio of method 1 to method 2 was 3.13:1, the least difference was 2.33:1, and the most dramatic was 6.25:1. Both of the above methods can be extended to solve the surface/surface intersection problem.

  7. The role of GABAergic inhibition in shaping directional selectivity of bat inferior collicular neurons determined with temporally patterned pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X M; Jen, P H-S

    2002-11-01

    This study examined the role of GABAergic inhibition in shaping directional selectivity of neurons in the inferior colliculus of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus. When determined with temporally patterned pulse trains at different pulse repetition rates, 93 inferior colliculus neurons displayed three types of directional selectivity curves. A directionally selective curve always showed a maximum to a certain azimuthal angle (the best angle). A hemifield curve showed a maximum to a range of contralateral azimuthal angles. A non-directional curve did not show a maximum to any particular azimuthal angles. Directional selectivity curves of 42% neurons changed from hemifield or non-directional to directionally selective and the best angles of 16-21% neurons shifted toward the midline with increasing pulse repetition rate of pulse trains. Directional selectivity curves of most (74%) neurons that discharged impulses to each pulse of a pulse train also became sharper with increasing pulse repetition rate of pulse trains. Bicuculline application produced more pronounced broadening of directional selective curves of inferior colliculus neurons at higher than at lower pulse repetition rates. As a result, pulse repetition rate-dependent directional selectivity of inferior colliculus neurons was abolished. Possible mechanisms and biological significance of these findings are discussed.

  8. Neurofibromin and Neuronal Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    role of familial pheochromocytoma genes, including succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and Nf1, in modulating neuronal apoptosis following neurotrophin...gene products, in Nf1-/- sensory and sympathetic neurons; this work will also have relevance to the biology of familial pheochromocytoma . "So what...Schlisio, S. (2005). Neuronal apoptosis linked to EglN3 prolyl hydroxylase and familial pheochromocytoma genes: Developmental culling and cancer. Cancer

  9. Neurons and tumor suppressors.

    PubMed

    Zochodne, Douglas W

    2014-08-20

    Neurons choose growth pathways with half hearted reluctance, behavior that may be appropriate to maintain fixed long lasting connections but not to regenerate them. We now recognize that intrinsic brakes on regrowth are widely expressed in these hesitant neurons and include classical tumor suppressor molecules. Here, we review how two brakes, PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) and retinoblastoma emerge as new and exciting knockdown targets to enhance neuron plasticity and improve outcome from damage or disease.

  10. Force-Velocity Curves of Motor Proteins Cooperating In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shtridelman, Yuri; Cahyuti, Thomas; Townsend, Brigitte; DeWitt, David; Macosko, Jed C.

    2008-01-01

    Motor proteins convert chemical energy into work, thereby generating persistent motion of cellular and subcellular objects. The velocities of motor proteins as a function of opposing loads have been previously determined in vitro for single motors. These single molecule “force-velocity curves” have been useful for elucidating motor kinetics and for estimating motor performance under physiological loads due to, for example, the cytoplasmic drag force on transported organelles. Here we report force-velocity curves for single and multiple motors measured in vivo. Using motion enhanced differential interference contrast (MEDIC) movies of living NT2 (neuron-committed teratocarcinoma) cells at 37°C, three parameters were measured—velocity (v), radius (a), and effective cytoplasmic viscosity (η′)—as they applied to moving vesicles. These parameters were combined in Stokes' equation, F = 6πaη′v, to determine the force, F, required to transport a single intracellular particle at velocity, v. In addition, the number of active motors was inferred from the multimodal pattern seen in a normalized velocity histogram. Using this inference, the resulting in vivo force-velocity curve for a single motor agrees with previously reported in vitro single motor force-velocity curves. Interestingly, however, the curves for two and three motors lie significantly higher in both measured velocity and computed force, which suggests that motors can work cooperatively to attain higher transport forces and velocities. PMID:18696014

  11. Descending protocerebral neurons related to the mating dance of the male silkworm moth.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, R; Shibuya, T

    1986-07-09

    Descending protocerebral neurons in the male silkworm moth brain responding to the sexual pheromone (Bombykol) were identified. The neurons responded well with a tonic type of response and the high-frequency spikes evoked continued even after the end of the stimulus. Characteristics of the dose-response curves of the neurons to the pheromone remarkably resembled those of the wing vibration which is one of the mating behavioral components of the male moths.

  12. Immunomodulatory properties of gamithromycin and ketoprofen in lipopolysaccharide-challenged calves with emphasis on the acute-phase response.

    PubMed

    Plessers, Elke; Wyns, Heidi; Watteyn, Anneleen; Pardon, Bart; De Baere, Siegrid; Sys, Stanislas U; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2016-03-01

    Macrolide antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to be modulators of the innate immune response, irrespectively of their antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory actions. Therefore, it was our objective to evaluate whether the macrolide gamithromycin (GAM) and the NSAID ketoprofen (KETO) attenuate the acute-phase response in calves, and whether their combined administration is beneficial due to synergistic and/or additive effects. To this end, both drugs, as well as their combination, were studied in a previously developed inflammation model, i.e., the induction of an acute-phase response by an intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge (0.5 μg/kg body weight). Sixteen 4-week-old Holstein-Friesian calves were randomized into 4 groups: a positive control (+CONTR) group, receiving LPS but no pharmacological treatment (n=4) and a GAM (n=4), a KETO (n=4) and a GAM-KETO (n=4) group, receiving the respective drugs 1h prior to LPS administration. Clinical scoring and blood collection were performed at regular time points until 72 h post LPS challenge. Plasma concentrations of the selected cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)), acute-phase protein (serum amyloid A (SAA)) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were subsequently quantified. Pre-treatment with GAM had no effect in the inflammation model compared to the +CONTR group. KETO, on the other hand, completely inhibited depression, anorexia and fever. This remarkable influence was associated with a significant reduction of PGE2 synthesis by KETO, while the effect on TNF-α, IL-6 and SAA was not straightforward. The combined administration of GAM and KETO provided no synergistic or additive effects in this model, neither clinically nor regarding the studied inflammatory mediators. In conclusion, KETO entirely inhibited PGE2 synthesis, fever development and depression, while GAM did not exert any effect in this model. These results promote the concomitant

  13. Duality concept in curve and surface modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmetova, Maria; Kmet, Tibor

    2012-09-01

    The paper deals with projective construction of envelope conic section, line conic and its corresponding point conic and generally, with dual Bézier curve and its corresponding point curve. Also, the role of dual Bézier curves in surface modelling is studied. Duality concept is useful in both; special plane curve modelling and developable surface modelling.

  14. Infinite swapping in curved spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curotto, E.; Mella, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    We develop an extension of the infinite swapping and partial infinite swapping techniques [N. Plattner, J. D. Doll, P. Dupuis, H. Wang, Y. Liu, and J. E. Gubernatis, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134111 (2011)] to curved spaces. Furthermore, we test the performance of infinite swapping and partial infinite swapping in a series of flat spaces characterized by the same potential energy surface model. We develop a second order variational algorithm for general curved spaces without the extended Lagrangian formalism to include holonomic constraints. We test the new methods by carrying out NVT classical ensemble simulations on a set of multidimensional toroids mapped by stereographic projections and characterized by a potential energy surface built from a linear combination of decoupled double wells shaped purposely to create rare events over a range of temperatures.

  15. Optical conductivity of curved graphene.

    PubMed

    Chaves, A J; Frederico, T; Oliveira, O; de Paula, W; Santos, M C

    2014-05-07

    We compute the optical conductivity for an out-of-plane deformation in graphene using an approach based on solutions of the Dirac equation in curved space. Different examples of periodic deformations along one direction translates into an enhancement of the optical conductivity peaks in the region of the far- and mid-infrared frequencies for periodicities ∼100 nm. The width and position of the peaks can be changed by dialling the parameters of the deformation profiles. The enhancement of the optical conductivity is due to intraband transitions and the translational invariance breaking in the geometrically deformed background. Furthermore, we derive an analytical solution of the Dirac equation in a curved space for a general deformation along one spatial direction. For this class of geometries, it is shown that curvature induces an extra phase in the electron wave function, which can also be explored to produce interference devices of the Aharonov-Bohm type.

  16. Analysis of Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Rhodes, M. D.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Tüysüz, M.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    We have applied the close binary system analysis package WINFITTER to a variety of exoplanet transiting light curves taken both from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and our own ground-based observations. WINFitter has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity brightening and structural parameters derived from Kopal's applications of the relevant Radau equation, and it includes appropriate tests for determinacy and adequacy of its best fitting parameter sets. We discuss a number of issues related to empirical checking of models for stellar limb darkening, surface maculation, Doppler beaming, microvariability, and transit time variation (TTV) effects. The Radau coefficients used in the light curve modeling, in principle, allow structural models of the component stars to be tested.

  17. K2 Mission Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jeffrey C.; morris, robert; Bryson, Steve; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Caldwell, Douglas

    2015-08-01

    The K2 mission is now generating light curves for its ecliptic-field campaigns. Producing good photometry for K2 is more challenging than for Kepler’s prime mission because periodic thruster firings are used to compensate for the loss of two reaction wheels. These firings, referred to as "roll tweaks", result in spacecraft rotation along the barrel axis and high corresponding image motion. The resulting motion-dominated systematic errors are dramatically different than the focus-dominated systematic errors experienced during the prime mission. They also make it challenging to properly identify and remove flux from background objects present in the optimal apertures. We summarize these challenges and describe the resulting modifications to the Kepler pipeline for the processing of K2 data. The quality of the K2 mission light curves is characterized.

  18. Infinite swapping in curved spaces.

    PubMed

    Curotto, E; Mella, Massimo

    2014-01-07

    We develop an extension of the infinite swapping and partial infinite swapping techniques [N. Plattner, J. D. Doll, P. Dupuis, H. Wang, Y. Liu, and J. E. Gubernatis, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 134111 (2011)] to curved spaces. Furthermore, we test the performance of infinite swapping and partial infinite swapping in a series of flat spaces characterized by the same potential energy surface model. We develop a second order variational algorithm for general curved spaces without the extended Lagrangian formalism to include holonomic constraints. We test the new methods by carrying out NVT classical ensemble simulations on a set of multidimensional toroids mapped by stereographic projections and characterized by a potential energy surface built from a linear combination of decoupled double wells shaped purposely to create rare events over a range of temperatures.

  19. Optimal designs for comparing curves

    PubMed Central

    Dette, Holger; Schorning, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    We consider the optimal design problem for a comparison of two regression curves, which is used to establish the similarity between the dose response relationships of two groups. An optimal pair of designs minimizes the width of the confidence band for the difference between the two regression functions. Optimal design theory (equivalence theorems, efficiency bounds) is developed for this non standard design problem and for some commonly used dose response models optimal designs are found explicitly. The results are illustrated in several examples modeling dose response relationships. It is demonstrated that the optimal pair of designs for the comparison of the regression curves is not the pair of the optimal designs for the individual models. In particular it is shown that the use of the optimal designs proposed in this paper instead of commonly used “non-optimal” designs yields a reduction of the width of the confidence band by more than 50%. PMID:27340305

  20. Accelerating Around an Unbanked Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2006-02-01

    The December 2004 issue of TPT presented a problem concerning how a car should accelerate around an unbanked curve of constant radius r starting from rest if it is to avoid skidding. Interestingly enough, two solutions were proffered by readers.2 The purpose of this note is to compare and contrast the two approaches. Further experimental investigation of various turning strategies using a remote-controlled car and overhead video analysis could make for an interesting student project.

  1. Elastic Curves on the Sphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-16

    12 = (K,, + )- (29) K 2 (see [3]). The parameter KM represents the amplitude of the periodic curva - ture function and sm denotes the value at which K...Additamentum De curvis elasticis. Methodus Inveniendi Lineas Curvas Maximi Minimive Proprietate Gaudentes, Ser. 1., Vol. 24, Lausanne 1744. 17 [10...Mathematical Theory of Elasticity. 4th. ed., Cambridge University Press, 1927. [12] G. Nielson. Bernstein/ Bezier Curves and Splines on Spheres based upon

  2. A curved resonant flexoelectric actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuwen; Liu, Kaiyuan; Xu, Minglong; Shen, Shengping

    2017-08-01

    Flexoelectricity is an electro-mechanical coupling effect that exists in all dielectrics and has the potential to replace piezoelectric actuating on the microscale. In this letter, a curved flexoelectric actuator with non-polarized polyvinylidene fluoride is presented and shown to exhibit good electro-mechanical properties. This provides experimental support for a body of theoretical research into converse flexoelectricity in polymeric materials. In addition, this work demonstrates the feasibility of lead-free microscale actuating without piezoelectricity.

  3. Linear stability in networks of pulse-coupled neurons.

    PubMed

    Olmi, Simona; Torcini, Alessandro; Politi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In a first step toward the comprehension of neural activity, one should focus on the stability of the possible dynamical states. Even the characterization of an idealized regime, such as that of a perfectly periodic spiking activity, reveals unexpected difficulties. In this paper we discuss a general approach to linear stability of pulse-coupled neural networks for generic phase-response curves and post-synaptic response functions. In particular, we present: (1) a mean-field approach developed under the hypothesis of an infinite network and small synaptic conductances; (2) a "microscopic" approach which applies to finite but large networks. As a result, we find that there exist two classes of perturbations: those which are perfectly described by the mean-field approach and those which are subject to finite-size corrections, irrespective of the network size. The analysis of perfectly regular, asynchronous, states reveals that their stability depends crucially on the smoothness of both the phase-response curve and the transmitted post-synaptic pulse. Numerical simulations suggest that this scenario extends to systems that are not covered by the perturbative approach. Altogether, we have described a series of tools for the stability analysis of various dynamical regimes of generic pulse-coupled oscillators, going beyond those that are currently invoked in the literature.

  4. Pacemaking Kisspeptin Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Martin J.; Zhang, Chunguang; Qiu, Jian; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons are vital for reproduction. GnRH neurons express the kisspeptin receptor, GPR 54, and kisspeptins potently stimulate the release of GnRH by depolarising and inducing sustained action potential firing in GnRH neurons. As such Kiss1 neurons may be the pre-synaptic pacemaker neurons in the hypothalamic circuitry that controls reproduction. There are at least two different populations of Kiss1 neurons: one in the rostral periventricular area (RP3V) that is stimulated by oestrogens and the other in the arcuate nucleus that is inhibited by oestrogens. How each of these Kiss1 neuronal populations participate in the regulation of the reproductive cycle is currently under intense investigation. Based on electrophysiological studies in the guinea pig and mouse, Kiss1 neurons in general are capable of generating burst firing behavior. Essentially all Kiss1 neurons, which have been studied thus far in the arcuate nucleus, express the ion channels necessary for burst firing, which include hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated cation (HCN) channels and the T-type calcium (Cav3.1) channels. Under voltage clamp conditions, these channels produce distinct currents that under current clamp conditions can generate burst firing behavior. The future challenge is to identify other key channels and synaptic inputs involved in the regulation of the firing properties of Kiss1 neurons and the physiological regulation of the expression of these channels and receptors by oestrogens and other hormones. The ultimate goal is to understand how Kiss1 neurons control the different phases of GnRH neurosecretion and hence reproduction. PMID:23884368

  5. Vitamin B12 enhances the phase-response of circadian melatonin rhythm to a single bright light exposure in humans.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, S; Kohsaka, M; Morita, N; Fukuda, N; Honma, S; Honma, K

    1996-12-13

    Eight young males were subjected to a single blind cross-over test to see the effects of vitamin B12 (methylcobalamin; VB12) on the phase-response of the circadian melatonin rhythm to a single bright light exposure. VB12 (0.5 mg/day) or vehicle was injected intravenously at 1230 h for 11 days, which was followed by oral administration (2 mg x 3/day) for 7 days. A serial blood sampling was performed under dim light condition (less than 200 lx) and plasma melatonin rhythm was determined before and after a single bright light exposure (2500 lx for 3 h) at 0700 h. The melatonin rhythm before the light exposure showed a smaller amplitude in the VB12 trial than in the placebo. The light exposure phase-advanced the melatonin rhythm significantly in the VB12 trail, but not in the placebo. These findings indicate that VB12 enhances the light-induced phase-shift in the human circadian rhythm.

  6. The relationship among acute-phase response proteins, cytokines and hormones in cachectic patients with colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Backgraund Acute-phase response proteins (APRP), cytokines and hormones have been claimed to be an independent prognostic factor of malignancies, however the basis for their association with prognosis remains unexplained. We suggest that in colon malignancies, as similar to pancreatic and lung cancers, changes in APRP are associated with angiogenesis. Methods C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, midkine, VEGF-A, VEGF-C, leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin serum levels are studied in 126 colon cancer patients and 36 healthy subjects. Results We found statistically significant difference and correlations between two groups. We found significantly higher serum CRP, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, TNF-α, VEGF-A, VEGF-C and leptin concentrations in patients relative to controls (p < 0.001). We found lower levels of the serum albumin, midkine, adiponectin and ghrelin in patients compared to control subjects (p < 0.001). Conclusions Cachexia in patients with colon cancers is associated with changes in APRP, cytokines and hormone concentrations. These biomarkers and cachexia together have a direct relationship with accelerated angiogenesis. This may lead to a connection between the outcomes in malignancies and the biomarkers. PMID:20920199

  7. Plasma Proteome Dynamics: Analysis of Lipoproteins and Acute Phase Response Proteins with 2H2O Metabolic Labeling*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Willard, Belinda; Rachdaoui, Nadia; Kirwan, John P.; Sadygov, Rovshan G.; Stanley, William C.; Previs, Stephen; McCullough, Arthur J.; Kasumov, Takhar

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the pathologies related to the regulation of protein metabolism requires methods for studying the kinetics of individual proteins. We developed a 2H2O metabolic labeling technique and software for protein kinetic studies in free living organisms. This approach for proteome dynamic studies requires the measurement of total body water enrichments by GC-MS, isotopic distribution of the tryptic peptide by LC-MS/MS, and estimation of the asymptotical number of deuterium incorporated into a peptide by software. We applied this technique to measure the synthesis rates of several plasma lipoproteins and acute phase response proteins in rats. Samples were collected at different time points, and proteins were separated by a gradient gel electrophoresis. 2H labeling of tryptic peptides was analyzed by ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LTQ MS/MS) for measurement of the fractional synthesis rates of plasma proteins. The high sensitivity of LTQ MS in zoom scan mode in combination with 2H label amplification in proteolytic peptides allows detection of the changes in plasma protein synthesis related to animal nutritional status. Our results demonstrate that fasting has divergent effects on the rate of synthesis of plasma proteins, increasing synthesis of ApoB 100 but decreasing formation of albumin and fibrinogen. We conclude that this technique can effectively measure the synthesis of plasma proteins and can be used to study the regulation of protein homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:22393261

  8. Acute phase response in the primiparous dairy cows after repeated percutaneous liver biopsy during the transition period.

    PubMed

    Jawor, P; Brzozowska, A; Słoniewski, K; Kowalski, Z M; Stefaniak, T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute phase response of dairy cows to repeated liver biopsy in order to estimate the safety of this procedure during the transition period. Liver biopsies (up to 1000 mg of liver tissue) were conducted twice a day, 7 days before expected parturition and 3 days after calving. The number of needle insertions for each biopsy was recorded and was dependent on the amount of obtained tissue. Blood samples were taken on day 7 before expected parturition, then on days 3, 4, 7 and 14 after calving. Body temperature was measured daily in all 30 cows from day 3 until day 14 after calving. The concentrations of haptoglobin, serum amyloid A, fibrinogen and interleukin-6 were determined in serum and plasma. In 16.7% of cows, the rectal body temperature rose by ≥ 0.5°C on the day after liver biopsy. Although the concentrations of haptoglobin, serum amyloid A and fibrinogen increased significantly after calving (p<0.01), there was no influence of the number of biopsies on the acute phase reaction and repeated biopsy during the transition period had no effect on body temperature. Therefore, the procedure may be regarded as safe for cows during the transition period.

  9. Physiological and behavioral responses to an acute-phase response in zebra finches: immediate and short-term effects.

    PubMed

    Sköld-Chiriac, Sandra; Nord, Andreas; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the immune system to clear pathogens and mitigate infection is a costly process that might incur fitness costs. When vertebrates are exposed to pathogens, their first line of defense is the acute-phase response (APR), which consists of a suite of physiological and behavioral changes. The dynamics of the APR are relatively well investigated in mammals and domesticated birds but still rather unexplored in passerine birds. In this study, we injected male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) with a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) to assess the potential physiological, immunological, and behavioral responses during the time course of an APR and also to record any potential short-term effects by measuring the birds during the days after the expected APR. We found that LPS-injected zebra finches decreased activity and gained less body mass during the APR, compared to control individuals. In addition, LPS-injected birds increased their production of LPS-reactive antibodies and reduced their metabolic rate during the days after the expected APR. Our results show that zebra finches demonstrate sickness behaviors during an APR but also that physiological effects persist after the expected time course of an APR. These delayed effects might be either a natural part of the progression of an APR, which is probably true for the antibody response, or a short-term carryover effect, which is probably true for the metabolic response.

  10. Effects of glutamine supplementation on gut barrier, glutathione content and acute phase response in malnourished rats during inflammatory shock

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Liliana; Coëffier, Moïse; Pessot, Florence Le; Miralles-Barrachina, Olga; Hiron, Martine; Leplingard, Antony; Lemeland, Jean-François; Hecketsweiler, Bernadette; Daveau, Maryvonne; Ducrotté, Philippe; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of glutamine on intestinal mucosa integrity, glutathione stores and acute phase response in protein-depleted rats during an inflammatory shock. METHODS: Plasma acute phase proteins (APP), jejunal APP mRNA levels, liver and jejunal glutathione concentrations were measured before and one, three and seven days after turpentine injection in 4 groups of control, protein-restricted, protein-restricted rats supplemented with glutamine or protein powder. Bacterial translocation in mesenteric lymph nodes and intestinal morphology were also assessed. RESULTS: Protein deprivation and turpentine injection significantly reduced jejunal villus height, and crypt depths. Mucosal glutathione concentration significantly decreased in protein-restricted rats. Before turpentine oil, glutamine supplementation restored villus heights and glutathione concentration (3.24 ± 1.05 vs 1.72 ± 0.46 μmol/g tissue, P < 0.05) in the jejunum, whereas in the liver glutathione remained low. Glutamine markedly increased jejunal α1-acid glycoprotein mRNA level after turpentine oil but did not affect its plasma concentration. Bacterial translocation in protein-restricted rats was not prevented by glutamine or protein powder supplementation. CONCLUSION: Glutamine restored gut glutathione stores and villus heights in malnourished rats but had no preventive effect on bacterial translocation in our model. PMID:17569119

  11. Neuronal Mechanisms of Intelligence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-21

    The underlying premise of this research is that the neuron itself is the functional unit in the brain for positive reinforcement . Our early studies...preference studies (an alternative method to self-stimulation for measuring reward). Keywords: Neuronal conditioning; Positive reinforcement ; Learning; and Adaptive networks.

  12. Culturing rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons are widely used to investigate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons may be grown as described under a wide variety of conditions to suit differing experimental procedures, including electrophysiology, morphological analysis of neurite development, and various biochemical and molecular analyses.

  13. Corticospinal mirror neurons.

    PubMed

    Kraskov, A; Philipp, R; Waldert, S; Vigneswaran, G; Quallo, M M; Lemon, R N

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited 'classical' mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation ('suppression mirror-neurons'). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others.

  14. NEURON and Python.

    PubMed

    Hines, Michael L; Davison, Andrew P; Muller, Eilif

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  15. NEURON and Python

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Michael L.; Davison, Andrew P.; Muller, Eilif

    2008-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications. PMID:19198661

  16. Imaging calcium in neurons.

    PubMed

    Grienberger, Christine; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-03-08

    Calcium ions generate versatile intracellular signals that control key functions in all types of neurons. Imaging calcium in neurons is particularly important because calcium signals exert their highly specific functions in well-defined cellular subcompartments. In this Primer, we briefly review the general mechanisms of neuronal calcium signaling. We then introduce the calcium imaging devices, including confocal and two-photon microscopy as well as miniaturized devices that are used in freely moving animals. We provide an overview of the classical chemical fluorescent calcium indicators and of the protein-based genetically encoded calcium indicators. Using application examples, we introduce new developments in the field, such as calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals and the use of calcium imaging for mapping single spine sensory inputs in cortical neurons in vivo. We conclude by providing an outlook on the prospects of calcium imaging for the analysis of neuronal signaling and plasticity in various animal models.

  17. Neuronal signaling through endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cosker, Katharina E; Segal, Rosalind A

    2014-02-01

    The distinctive morphology of neurons, with complex dendritic arbors and extensive axons, presents spatial challenges for intracellular signal transduction. The endosomal system provides mechanisms that enable signaling molecules initiated by extracellular cues to be trafficked throughout the expanse of the neuron, allowing intracellular signals to be sustained over long distances. Therefore endosomes are critical for many aspects of neuronal signaling that regulate cell survival, axonal growth and guidance, dendritic branching, and cell migration. An intriguing characteristic of neuronal signal transduction is that endosomal trafficking enables physiological responses that vary based on the subcellular location of signal initiation. In this review, we will discuss the specialized mechanisms and the functional significance of endosomal signaling in neurons, both during normal development and in disease.

  18. Neuronal Signaling through Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cosker, Katharina E.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    The distinctive morphology of neurons, with complex dendritic arbors and extensive axons, presents spatial challenges for intracellular signal transduction. The endosomal system provides mechanisms that enable signaling molecules initiated by extracellular cues to be trafficked throughout the expanse of the neuron, allowing intracellular signals to be sustained over long distances. Therefore endosomes are critical for many aspects of neuronal signaling that regulate cell survival, axonal growth and guidance, dendritic branching, and cell migration. An intriguing characteristic of neuronal signal transduction is that endosomal trafficking enables physiological responses that vary based on the subcellular location of signal initiation. In this review, we will discuss the specialized mechanisms and the functional significance of endosomal signaling in neurons, both during normal development and in disease. PMID:24492712

  19. Cajal bodies in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lafarga, Miguel; Tapia, Olga; Romero, Ana M.; Berciano, Maria T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cajal is commonly regarded as the father of modern neuroscience in recognition of his fundamental work on the structure of the nervous system. But Cajal also made seminal contributions to the knowledge of nuclear structure in the early 1900s, including the discovery of the “accessory body” later renamed “Cajal body” (CB). This important nuclear structure has emerged as a center for the assembly of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) required for splicing, ribosome biogenesis and telomere maintenance. The modern era of CB research started in the 1990s with the discovery of coilin, now known as a scaffold protein of CBs, and specific probes for small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). In this review, we summarize what we have learned in the recent decades concerning CBs in post-mitotic neurons, thereby ruling out dynamic changes in CB functions during the cell cycle. We show that CBs are particularly prominent in neurons, where they frequently associate with the nucleolus. Neuronal CBs are transcription-dependent nuclear organelles. Indeed, their number dynamically accommodates to support the high neuronal demand for splicing and ribosome biogenesis required for sustaining metabolic and bioelectrical activity. Mature neurons have canonical CBs enriched in coilin, survival motor neuron protein and snRNPs. Disruption and loss of neuronal CBs associate with severe neuronal dysfunctions in several neurological disorders such as motor neuron diseases. In particular, CB depletion in motor neurons seems to reflect a perturbation of transcription and splicing in spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of infant mortality. PMID:27627892

  20. Effect of surgical castration of bull calves at different stages of maturity with or without analgesia on the acute phase response (APR) and complete blood count (CBC)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The study objective was to determine if surgical castration at birth or weaning impacts the acute phase response (APR) or complete blood counts (CBC) and whether concurrent administration of an oral analgesic (meloxicam) ameliorates inflammation. Bull calves (n=29) from the University of Arkansas re...

  1. ROLE OF THE MATERNAL ACUTE PHASE RESPONSE AND TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR ALPHA IN THE DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE IN THE CD-1 MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    The acute phase response (APR) functions to reset metabolic homeostasis following infectious, toxic or traumatic insult. TNF- , a putative mediator of the APR, has been associated with fetal death in rodents and preterm labor and delivery in humans. We hypothesized...

  2. Factors associated with acute-phase response of bisphosphonate-naïve or pretreated women with osteoporosis receiving an intravenous first dose of zoledronate or ibandronate.

    PubMed

    Popp, A W; Senn, R; Curkovic, I; Senn, C; Buffat, H; Popp, P F; Lippuner, K

    2017-03-15

    A first intravenous dose of bisphosphonates may be associated with an acute-phase response (APR). In bisphosphonate-naïve women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, the characteristics and frequency of APR may differ by compound. Prior bisphosphonate exposure was predictive of APR risk and severity.

  3. Modulation of the acute phase response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in pigs supplemented with an all-natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study was designed to determine if feeding a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product to weaned pigs would reduce the stress and acute phase responses (APR) following an acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n = 20; 6.4 +/- 0.2 kg body weight) were obtained and transported to an ...

  4. NLINEAR - NONLINEAR CURVE FITTING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    A common method for fitting data is a least-squares fit. In the least-squares method, a user-specified fitting function is utilized in such a way as to minimize the sum of the squares of distances between the data points and the fitting curve. The Nonlinear Curve Fitting Program, NLINEAR, is an interactive curve fitting routine based on a description of the quadratic expansion of the chi-squared statistic. NLINEAR utilizes a nonlinear optimization algorithm that calculates the best statistically weighted values of the parameters of the fitting function and the chi-square that is to be minimized. The inputs to the program are the mathematical form of the fitting function and the initial values of the parameters to be estimated. This approach provides the user with statistical information such as goodness of fit and estimated values of parameters that produce the highest degree of correlation between the experimental data and the mathematical model. In the mathematical formulation of the algorithm, the Taylor expansion of chi-square is first introduced, and justification for retaining only the first term are presented. From the expansion, a set of n simultaneous linear equations are derived, which are solved by matrix algebra. To achieve convergence, the algorithm requires meaningful initial estimates for the parameters of the fitting function. NLINEAR is written in Fortran 77 for execution on a CDC Cyber 750 under NOS 2.3. It has a central memory requirement of 5K 60 bit words. Optionally, graphical output of the fitting function can be plotted. Tektronix PLOT-10 routines are required for graphics. NLINEAR was developed in 1987.

  5. NLINEAR - NONLINEAR CURVE FITTING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    A common method for fitting data is a least-squares fit. In the least-squares method, a user-specified fitting function is utilized in such a way as to minimize the sum of the squares of distances between the data points and the fitting curve. The Nonlinear Curve Fitting Program, NLINEAR, is an interactive curve fitting routine based on a description of the quadratic expansion of the chi-squared statistic. NLINEAR utilizes a nonlinear optimization algorithm that calculates the best statistically weighted values of the parameters of the fitting function and the chi-square that is to be minimized. The inputs to the program are the mathematical form of the fitting function and the initial values of the parameters to be estimated. This approach provides the user with statistical information such as goodness of fit and estimated values of parameters that produce the highest degree of correlation between the experimental data and the mathematical model. In the mathematical formulation of the algorithm, the Taylor expansion of chi-square is first introduced, and justification for retaining only the first term are presented. From the expansion, a set of n simultaneous linear equations are derived, which are solved by matrix algebra. To achieve convergence, the algorithm requires meaningful initial estimates for the parameters of the fitting function. NLINEAR is written in Fortran 77 for execution on a CDC Cyber 750 under NOS 2.3. It has a central memory requirement of 5K 60 bit words. Optionally, graphical output of the fitting function can be plotted. Tektronix PLOT-10 routines are required for graphics. NLINEAR was developed in 1987.

  6. Fracture toughness curve shift method

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; McCabe, D.E.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to examine the technical basis for the currently accepted methods for shifting fracture toughness curves to account for irradiation damage, and to work through national codes and standards bodies to revise those methods, if a change is warranted. During this reporting period, data from all the relevant HSSI Programs were acquired and stored in a database and evaluated. The results from that evaluation have been prepared in a draft letter report and are summarized here. A method employing Weibull statistics was applied to analyze fracture toughness properties of unirradiated and irradiated pressure vessel steels. Application of the concept of a master curve for irradiated materials was examined and used to measure shifts of fracture toughness transition curves. It was shown that the maximum likelihood approach gave good estimations of the reference temperature, T{sub o}, determined by rank method and could be used for analyzing of data sets where application of the rank method did not prove to be feasible. It was shown that, on average, the fracture toughness shifts generally exceeded the Charpy 41-J shifts; a linear least-squares fit to the data set yielded a slope of 1.15. The observed dissimilarity was analyzed by taking into account differences in effects of irradiation on Charpy impact and fracture toughness properties. Based on these comparisons, a procedure to adjust Charpy 41-J shifts for achieving a more reliable correlation with the fracture toughness shifts was evaluated. An adjustment consists of multiplying the 41-J energy level by the ratio of unirradiated to irradiated Charpy upper shelves to determine an irradiated transition temperature, and then subtracting the unirradiated transition temperature determined at 41 J. For LUS welds, however, an unirradiated level of 20 J (15 ft-1b) was used for the corresponding adjustment for irradiated material.

  7. Dirac's aether in curved spacetime.

    PubMed

    Oliveira; Teixeira

    2000-06-01

    Proca's equations for two types of fields in a Dirac's aether with electric conductivity sigma are solved exactly. The Proca electromagnetic fields are assumed with cylindrical symmetry. The background is a static, curved spacetime whose spatial section is homogeneous and has the topology of either the three-sphere S 3 or the projective three-space P 3. Simple relations between the range of Proca field lambda, the Universe radius R, the limit of photon rest mass mgamma and the conductivity sigma are written down.

  8. Sound propagation over curved barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Allan D.; Main, Geoffrey L.; Kearns, James A.; Hsieh, H.-A.

    1986-01-01

    Wide barriers with curved tops are studied with emphasis placed on circumstances whereby the local radius of curvature R of the barrier is continuous along the surface and is large compared to a wavelength. Results analogous to those given by Hayek et al. (1978) are reviewed and extended to cases where the radius of curvature and the surface impedance may vary with position. Circumstances not easily interpreted within the framework of the model proposed by Keller (1956) and Hayek et al. are also considered.

  9. Sound propagation over curved barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Allan D.; Main, Geoffrey L.; Kearns, James A.; Hsieh, H.-A.

    Wide barriers with curved tops are studied with emphasis placed on circumstances whereby the local radius of curvature R of the barrier is continuous along the surface and is large compared to a wavelength. Results analogous to those given by Hayek et al. (1978) are reviewed and extended to cases where the radius of curvature and the surface impedance may vary with position. Circumstances not easily interpreted within the framework of the model proposed by Keller (1956) and Hayek et al. are also considered.

  10. Curved microchannels and bacterial streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial biofilms are commonly identified as microbial communities attached to a surface and encased in a self-secreted extracellular matrix. Due to their increased resistance to antimicrobial agents, biofilms have an enormous impact on health and medicine (e.g., wound healing, implant-associated infections, disease transmission). On the other hand, they constitute a major component of the stream ecosystem by increasing transport of nutrients and retention of suspended particles. In this talk, we present an experimental study of bacterial biofilm development in a microfluidic device. In particular, we show the formation of filamentous structures, or streamers, in curved channels and how these suspended biofilms are linked to the underlying hydrodynamics.

  11. Compression of contour data through exploiting curve-to-curve dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalabik, N.; Cooper, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    An approach to exploiting curve-to-curve dependencies in order to achieve high data compression is presented. One of the approaches to date of along curve compression through use of cubic spline approximation is taken and extended by investigating the additional compressibility achievable through curve-to-curve structure exploitation. One of the models under investigation is reported on.

  12. Azimuth-dependent recovery cycle affects directional selectivity of bat inferior collicular neurons determined with sound pulses within a pulse train.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Jen, Philip H-S

    2004-09-03

    In our previous study, we have shown that the recovery cycle of most neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, is typically longer at ipsilateral azimuth than at contralateral azimuth under free-field stimulation conditions. The present study is to test the hypothesis that this azimuth-dependent recovery cycle may contribute to the variation of directional selectivity of IC neurons with sequential presented sound pulses within a pulse train. A 300-ms pulse train containing nine sound pulses of 4-ms with an inter-pulse interval of 33.3 ms was delivered at several selected azimuthal angles between +/-80 degrees lateral in the frontal auditory space of a bat. A family of nine directional selectivity curves was plotted with a neuron's number of impulses in response to each individual pulse against the azimuthal angles. The type and sharpness of these directional selectivity curves were then compared in relation to pulse position within the pulse train. All 675 directional selectivity curves obtained from 75 IC neurons could be described as directionally selective (423, 63%), hemifield (220, 32%), or non-directional (32, 5%). The directional selectivity curves of 45 (60%) neurons did not vary with pulse position. However, those of the remaining neurons (30, 40%) changed from one type to another such that the number of neurons with directionally selective curves progressively increased and the number of neurons with hemifield and non-directional selectivity curves decreased with increasing pulse position within the pulse train. Among 68 IC neurons whose directional selectivity curves were compared quantitatively, directional selectivity determined with sequentially presented sound pulses significantly increased in 38 (56%) neurons; decreased in 18 (26%) neurons but did not change in 12 (18%) neurons. This change of directional selectivity was due to the variation in recovery cycle of these IC neurons with azimuthal angle as we

  13. Incomplete suppression of distractor-related activity in the frontal eye field results in curved saccades.

    PubMed

    McPeek, Robert M

    2006-11-01

    Saccades in the presence of distractors show significant trajectory curvature. Based on previous work in the superior colliculus (SC), we speculated that curvature arises when a movement is initiated before competition between the target and distractor goals has been fully resolved. To test this hypothesis, we recorded frontal eye field (FEF) activity for curved and straight saccades in search. In contrast to the SC, activity in FEF is normally poorly correlated with saccade dynamics. However, the FEF, like the SC, is involved in target selection. Thus if curvature is caused by incomplete target selection, we expect to see its neural correlates in the FEF. We found that saccades that curve toward a distractor are accompanied by an increase in perisaccadic activity of FEF neurons coding the distractor location, and saccades that curve away are accompanied by a decrease in activity. In contrast, for FEF neurons coding the target location, there is no significant difference in activity between curved and straight saccades. To establish that the distractor-related activity is causally related to saccade curvature, we applied microstimulation to sites in the FEF before saccades to targets presented without distractors. The stimulation was subthreshold for evoking saccades and the temporal structure of the stimulation train resembled the activity recorded for curved saccades. The resulting movements curved toward the location coded by the stimulation site. These results support the idea that saccade curvature results from incomplete suppression of distractor-related activity during target selection.

  14. Selenium controls the sex-specific immune response and selenoprotein expression during the acute-phase response in mice.

    PubMed

    Stoedter, Mette; Renko, Kostja; Hög, Antonia; Schomburg, Lutz

    2010-07-01

    Selenium modifies inflammatory reactions in rodents and humans. The liver controls metabolism and transport of selenium via hepatically-derived SEPP (selenoprotein P). Intracellular SEPS (selenoprotein S) modifies endoplasmic-reticulum function and immune-cell activity. Polymorphisms in SEPS have been associated with cytokine levels and inflammatory diseases in a subset of clinical studies. In the present study, we hypothesized that sex and selenium represent decisive parameters controlling the immune response and regulation of SEPS expression in vivo. Male and female mice fed a selenium-poor diet were supplemented or not with selenite for 3 days and injected with saline or LPS (lipopolysaccharide) 24 h before analysis. Selenium supplementation mitigated the LPS-induced rise in circulating cytokines in male mice. Serum SepP and selenium concentrations decreased in response to LPS, whereas hepatic SepS was specifically up-regulated despite declining selenium concentrations in the liver. Hepatic SepS induction was mainly controlled by post-transcriptional mechanisms and attributed to hepatocytes by analysing transgenic mice. Notably, selenium supplementation was essential for an optimal SepS induction. We conclude that selenoprotein biosynthesis becomes redirected in hepatocytes during the acute-phase response at the expense of dispensable selenoproteins (e.g. SepP) and in favour of SepS expression, thereby causing declining serum selenium and improving liver function. The selenium status and sex control SepS expression and modify cytokine response patterns in serum, which might explain contradictory results on associations of SEPS genotype and inflammatory diseases in clinical studies.

  15. Infection dynamics and acute phase response of an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae field isolate of moderate virulence in pigs.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Laguna, Jaime; Islas, Armando; Muñoz, Dennis; Ruiz, Alvaro; Villamil, Aura; Carrasco, Librado; Quezada, Manuel

    2014-10-10

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine contagious pleuropneumonia (PCP), causes significant economic losses associated mainly with growth stunting of animals. Although serotypes can be distinguished according to their virulence, most of the studies are focused in A. pleuropneumoniae infections with virulent serotypes. There is little information regarding the role of acute phase proteins (APPs) and proinflammatory cytokines in infections with isolates of mild or moderate virulence. Thus, the present study aims to evaluate the kinetics of infection with an A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 6 (Ap6) field isolate of moderate virulence and the changes in the serum concentration of specific antibodies and different APPs and proinflammatory cytokines. Control animals showed no clinical signs or lesions throughout the study. Infected animals showed increased rectal temperature, respiratory distress and depression from 24hpi, and typical gross and microscopic lesions of PCP from 6hpi onwards. Ap6 was isolated from nasal swabs of four out of five inoculated animals at 24hpi, and from nasal swabs, tonsil and lung samples from all inoculated animals at 72hpi. Specific antibodies against Ap6 or changes in the serum concentration of IL-1β, IL-10 and TNF-α were not detected throughout the study. The serum concentration of IL-6 increased from 6hpi as well as serum A amyloid, C-reactive protein and haptoglobin from 24hpi onwards. Our results highlight the onset of the acute phase response after the infection with a field isolate of A. pleuropneumoniae of moderate virulence from 24hpi onwards which may be of interest in the study of the pathogenesis of this disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Survival of Campylobacter jejuni during Stationary Phase: Evidence for the Absence of a Phenotypic Stationary-Phase Response

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Alison F.; Park, Simon F.; Bovill, Richard; Mackey, Bernard M.

    2001-01-01

    When Campylobacter jejuni NCTC 11351 was grown microaerobically in rich medium at 39°C, entry into stationary phase was followed by a rapid decline in viable numbers to leave a residual population of 1% of the maximum number or less. Loss of viability was preceded by sublethal injury, which was seen as a loss of the ability to grow on media containing 0.1% sodium deoxycholate or 1% sodium chloride. Resistance of cells to mild heat stress (50°C) or aeration was greatest in exponential phase and declined during early stationary phase. These results show that C. jejuni does not mount the normal phenotypic stationary-phase response which results in enhanced stress resistance. This conclusion is consistent with the absence of rpoS homologues in the recently reported genome sequence of this species and their probable absence from strain NCTC 11351. During prolonged incubation of C. jejuni NCTC 11351 in stationary phase, an unusual pattern of decreasing and increasing heat resistance was observed that coincided with fluctuations in the viable count. During stationary phase of Campylobacter coli UA585, nonmotile variants and those with impaired ability to form coccoid cells were isolated at high frequency. Taken together, these observations suggest that stationary-phase cultures of campylobacters are dynamic populations and that this may be a strategy to promote survival in at least some strains. Investigation of two spontaneously arising variants (NM3 and SC4) of C. coli UA585 showed that a reduced ability to form coccoid cells did not affect survival under nongrowth conditions. PMID:11319108

  17. Curved-stem Hip Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Hip resurfacing is an attractive concept because it preserves rather than removes the femoral head and neck. Most early designs had high failure rates, but one unique design had a femoral stem. Because that particular device appeared to have better implant survival, this study assessed the clinical outcome and long-term survivorship of a hip resurfacing prosthesis. Four hundred forty-five patients (561 hips) were retrospectively reviewed after a minimum of 20 years’ followup or until death; 23 additional patients were lost to followup. Patients received a metal femoral prosthesis with a small curved stem. Three types of acetabular reconstructions were used: (1) cemented polyurethane; (2) metal-on-metal; and (3) polyethylene secured with cement or used as the liner of a two-piece porous-coated implant. Long-term results were favorable with the metal-on-metal combination only. The mean overall Harris hip score was 92 at 2 years of followup. None of the 121 patients (133 hips) who received metal-on-metal articulation experienced failure. The failure rate with polyurethane was 100%, and the failure rate with cemented polyethylene was 41%. Hip resurfacing with a curved-stem femoral component had a durable clinical outcome when a metal-on-metal articulation was used. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18338217

  18. Miniature curved artificial compound eyes.

    PubMed

    Floreano, Dario; Pericet-Camara, Ramon; Viollet, Stéphane; Ruffier, Franck; Brückner, Andreas; Leitel, Robert; Buss, Wolfgang; Menouni, Mohsine; Expert, Fabien; Juston, Raphaël; Dobrzynski, Michal Karol; L'Eplattenier, Geraud; Recktenwald, Fabian; Mallot, Hanspeter A; Franceschini, Nicolas

    2013-06-04

    In most animal species, vision is mediated by compound eyes, which offer lower resolution than vertebrate single-lens eyes, but significantly larger fields of view with negligible distortion and spherical aberration, as well as high temporal resolution in a tiny package. Compound eyes are ideally suited for fast panoramic motion perception. Engineering a miniature artificial compound eye is challenging because it requires accurate alignment of photoreceptive and optical components on a curved surface. Here, we describe a unique design method for biomimetic compound eyes featuring a panoramic, undistorted field of view in a very thin package. The design consists of three planar layers of separately produced arrays, namely, a microlens array, a neuromorphic photodetector array, and a flexible printed circuit board that are stacked, cut, and curved to produce a mechanically flexible imager. Following this method, we have prototyped and characterized an artificial compound eye bearing a hemispherical field of view with embedded and programmable low-power signal processing, high temporal resolution, and local adaptation to illumination. The prototyped artificial compound eye possesses several characteristics similar to the eye of the fruit fly Drosophila and other arthropod species. This design method opens up additional vistas for a broad range of applications in which wide field motion detection is at a premium, such as collision-free navigation of terrestrial and aerospace vehicles, and for the experimental testing of insect vision theories.

  19. Wrinkling Crystallography on Curved Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Pedro; Brojan, Miha; Terwagne, Denis; Lagrange, Romain

    2014-03-01

    We present results on an experimental analysis of the morphology of wrinkling patterns on curved surfaces. Our experimental hemispherical samples are fabricated using rapid prototyping and consist of a thin-stiff shell adhered to a soft-thick substrate, both made out of silicone-based rubbers. Pressurizing an inner spherical air cavity enables compression of the samples, thereby morphing the outer thin shell from its initially smooth configuration into a wrinkled state. A variety of patterns with different morphologies can be observed depending on the combination of the sample's geometric and material properties. We focus our attention on the specific pattern mode of hexagonal-like dimples, which we characterize by analyzing their surface profile using a digital 3D scanner. Through digital image processing, we skeletonize these patterns by identifying both the location of the ridges and determining the positions of the dimples. We give emphasis to the effect of curvature on the morphology and topology of these wrinkled patterns and focus on the tiling of the wrinkling units and their statistics of defects. Our results are contrasted with other crystalline planar and curved systems.

  20. Improved capacitive melting curve measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebedash, Alexander; Tuoriniemi, Juha; Pentti, Elias; Salmela, Anssi

    2009-02-01

    Sensitivity of the capacitive method for determining the melting pressure of helium can be enhanced by loading the empty side of the capacitor with helium at a pressure nearly equal to that desired to be measured and by using a relatively thin and flexible membrane in between. This way one can achieve a nanobar resolution at the level of 30 bar, which is two orders of magnitude better than that of the best gauges with vacuum reference. This extends the applicability of melting curve thermometry to lower temperatures and would allow detecting tiny anomalies in the melting pressure, which must be associated with any phenomena contributing to the entropy of the liquid or solid phases. We demonstrated this principle in measurements of the crystallization pressure of isotopic helium mixtures at millikelvin temperatures by using partly solid pure 4He as the reference substance providing the best possible universal reference pressure. The achieved sensitivity was good enough for melting curve thermometry on mixtures down to 100 μK. Similar system can be used on pure isotopes by virtue of a blocked capillary giving a stable reference condition with liquid slightly below the melting pressure in the reference volume. This was tested with pure 4He at temperatures 0.08-0.3 K. To avoid spurious heating effects, one must carefully choose and arrange any dielectric materials close to the active capacitor. We observed some 100 pW loading at moderate excitation voltages.

  1. Neuronal Mechanisms of Intelligence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    RD-R15i 077 NEURONAL MECHANISMS OF INTELLIGENCE(U) CALIFORNIA UNIV i/i IRVINE DEPT OF PHARMACOLOGYV L STEIN ET AL- NOV 84 AFOSR-TR-85-8e73 F49620-8i...ACCESSION NO S. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER * 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S- TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED NEURONAL MECHANISMS OF INTELLIGENCE Final...ide if necessary .dd ti t by block number) Operant Conditioning) dptive Networks1 Neuronal Conditioning) Positive Reinforcement g" z Reward) Learning

  2. Algebra of Neuron Matrices,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-13

    AD-Ri55 296 ALGEBRA OF NEURON MATRICES(U) FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIV i/i WRIGHT-PATTERSON RF8 ON K~ G RGRBRBYRN 13 MAR 85 FTD-ID(RS)T-8@4i-85...ANCLASSIFIED F/G6/6 NL I. 1j.2 U .611111 ’’ K1*10 Vl( PIH OPY Pl (iLUTION TL T CHART I-" FTD-ID(RS )T-0041-85 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION In ALGEBRA OF NEURON ... NEURON MATRICES DTIC TAB Unannounced Q By: K.G. Agababyan JustLficatlon English pages: 10 By Distribution/ Source: Doklady Akademii Nauk SSSR, Vol. 199

  3. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dopaminergic neurons modulate GABA neuron migration in the embryonic midbrain

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Anju; Won, Chungkil; Li, Suyan; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Szabó, Gábor; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal migration, a key event during brain development, remains largely unexplored in the mesencephalon, where dopaminergic (DA) and GABA neurons constitute two major neuronal populations. Here we study the migrational trajectories of DA and GABA neurons and show that they occupy ventral mesencephalic territory in a temporally and spatially specific manner. Our results from the Pitx3-deficient aphakia mouse suggest that pre-existing DA neurons modulate GABA neuronal migration to their final destination, providing novel insights and fresh perspectives concerning neuronal migration and connectivity in the mesencephalon in normal as well as diseased brains. PMID:22872083

  5. Dopaminergic neurons modulate GABA neuron migration in the embryonic midbrain.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Anju; Won, Chungkil; Li, Suyan; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Szabó, Gábor; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2012-09-01

    Neuronal migration, a key event during brain development, remains largely unexplored in the mesencephalon, where dopaminergic (DA) and GABA neurons constitute two major neuronal populations. Here we study the migrational trajectories of DA and GABA neurons and show that they occupy ventral mesencephalic territory in a temporally and spatially specific manner. Our results from the Pitx3-deficient aphakia mouse suggest that pre-existing DA neurons modulate GABA neuronal migration to their final destination, providing novel insights and fresh perspectives concerning neuronal migration and connectivity in the mesencephalon in normal as well as diseased brains.

  6. Application of confocal microscopy on glutamate-induced intracellular calcium transient in neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Geng; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Xiuli; Wu, Yuxiang; Luo, Qingming

    2006-02-01

    Intracellular calcium, as an important second messenger, plays a significant role in cell signaling transduction and metabolism. Glutamate can induce the intracellular calcium transient through triggering diverse signaling pathways. To test the effect of glutamate to neurons, we loaded Fluo-3/Am in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, and then acquired two-dimensional fluorescent image by confocal microscopy and the analyzed fluorescent intensity. In cultured neurons, we observed two types of neurons that have different morphology: bipolar-type and pyramidal-type. Inducing [Ca 2+] i transient by glutamate, we found the amplitude and time constant of the response curves of bipolar neurons are larger than those of pyramidal neurons. Further, we induced [Ca 2+] ii transient under different concentrations of glutamate. Two different types of kinetic of the [Ca 2+] i transient have been found, corresponded to the two kinds of neuron. The amplitude of [Ca 2+] i transient increased when applying higher concentration of glutamate in pyramidal neurons; while it decreased in bipolar ones. Responses of neurons bathing in calcium-free extracellular solution to glutamate were different from those bathing in normal solution. [Ca 2+] i transient of pyramidal neurons caused by any concentration were totally blocked; while [Ca 2+] i transient in bipolar neurons caused by high concentration of glutamate (500μM) were partly inhibited. All of the phenomena suggest that different types of cultured hippocampal neurons may have different mechanism of the response to glutamate.

  7. Neuronal ubiquitin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hallengren, Jada; Chen, Ping-Chung; Wilson, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons have highly specialized intracellular compartments that facilitate the development and activity of the nervous system. Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification that controls many aspects of neuronal function by regulating protein abundance. Disruption of this signaling pathway has been demonstrated in neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Angleman Syndrome. Since many neurological disorders exhibit ubiquitinated protein aggregates, the loss of neuronal ubiquitin homeostasis may be an important contributor of disease. This review discusses the mechanisms utilized by neurons to control the free pool of ubiquitin necessary for normal nervous system development and function as well as new roles of protein ubiquitination in regulating synaptic activity. PMID:23686613

  8. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  9. Parametrizations of elliptic curves by Shimura curves and by classical modular curves

    PubMed Central

    Ribet, Kenneth A.; Takahashi, Shuzo

    1997-01-01

    Fix an isogeny class 𝒜 of semistable elliptic curves over Q. The elements of 𝒜 have a common conductor N, which is a square-free positive integer. Let D be a divisor of N which is the product of an even number of primes—i.e., the discriminant of an indefinite quaternion algebra over Q. To D we associate a certain Shimura curve X0D(N/D), whose Jacobian is isogenous to an abelian subvariety of J0(N). There is a unique A ∈ 𝒜 for which one has a nonconstant map πD : X0D(N/D) → A whose pullback A → Pic0(X0D(N/D)) is injective. The degree of πD is an integer δD which depends only on D (and the fixed isogeny class 𝒜). We investigate the behavior of δD as D varies. PMID:11607751

  10. Laser-induced magnetization curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayoshi, Shintaro; Sato, Masahiro; Oka, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    We propose an all optical ultrafast method to highly magnetize general quantum magnets using a circularly polarized terahertz laser. The key idea is to utilize a circularly polarized laser and its chirping. Through this method, one can obtain magnetization curves of a broad class of quantum magnets as a function of time even without any static magnetic field. We numerically demonstrate the laser-induced magnetization process in realistic quantum spin models and find a condition for the realization. The onset of magnetization can be described by a many-body version of Landau-Zener mechanism. In a particular model, we show that a plateau state with topological properties can be realized dynamically.

  11. Bacterial streamers in curved microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Guglielmini, Laura; Stone, Howard

    2009-11-01

    Biofilms, generally identified as microbial communities embedded in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances, are involved in a wide variety of health-related problems ranging from implant-associated infections to disease transmissions and dental plaque. The usual picture of these bacterial films is that they grow and develop on surfaces. However, suspended biofilm structures, or streamers, have been found in natural environments (e.g., rivers, acid mines, hydrothermal hot springs) and are always suggested to stem from a turbulent flow. We report the formation of bacterial streamers in curved microfluidic channels. By using confocal laser microscopy we are able to directly image and characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of these filamentous structures. Such streamers, which always connect the inner corners of opposite sides of the channel, are always located in the middle plane. Numerical simulations of the flow provide evidences for an underlying hydrodynamic mechanism behind the formation of the streamers.

  12. Curved film cooling admission tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.; Papell, S. S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Effective film cooling to protect a wall surface from a hot fluid which impinges on or flows along the surface is provided. A film of cooling fluid having increased area is provided by changing the direction of a stream of cooling fluid through an angle of from 135 deg. to 165 deg. before injecting it through the wall into the hot flowing gas. The 1, cooling fluid is injected from an orifice through a wall into a hot flowing gas at an angle to form a cooling fluid film. Cooling fluid is supplied to the orifice from a cooling fluid source via a turbulence control passageway having a curved portion between two straight portions. The angle through which the direction of the cooling fluid is turned results in less mixing of the cooling fluid with the hot gas, thereby substantially increasing the length of the film in a downstream direction.

  13. Cubic spline functions for curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    FORTRAN cubic spline routine mathematically fits curve through given ordered set of points so that fitted curve nearly approximates curve generated by passing infinite thin spline through set of points. Generalized formulation includes trigonometric, hyperbolic, and damped cubic spline fits of third order.

  14. Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Curve Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Glaunès, Joan; Miller, Michael I.; Younes, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    We present a matching criterion for curves and integrate it into the large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM) scheme for computing an optimal transformation between two curves embedded in Euclidean space ℝd. Curves are first represented as vector-valued measures, which incorporate both location and the first order geometric structure of the curves. Then, a Hilbert space structure is imposed on the measures to build the norm for quantifying the closeness between two curves. We describe a discretized version of this, in which discrete sequences of points along the curve are represented by vector-valued functionals. This gives a convenient and practical way to define a matching functional for curves. We derive and implement the curve matching in the large deformation framework and demonstrate mapping results of curves in ℝ2 and ℝ3. Behaviors of the curve mapping are discussed using 2D curves. The applications to shape classification is shown and experiments with 3D curves extracted from brain cortical surfaces are presented. PMID:20419045

  15. The Aggregate Demand Curve: A Reply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Richard B.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Responds to claims about the instructional value of the downward-sloping aggregate demand curve in teaching principles of macroeconomics. Examines the effects of interest-rates and the role of money on demand curves. Concludes by arguing against the use of downward-sloping aggregate demand curves in textbooks. (RKM)

  16. The Writhing Number of a Space Curve

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, F. Brock

    1971-01-01

    A geometric invariant of a space curve, the writhing number, is defined and studied. For the central curve of a twisted cord the writhing number measures the extent to which coiling of the central curve has relieved local twisting of the cord. This study originated in response to questions that arise in the study of supercoiled double-stranded DNA rings. PMID:5279522

  17. Cubic spline functions for curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    FORTRAN cubic spline routine mathematically fits curve through given ordered set of points so that fitted curve nearly approximates curve generated by passing infinite thin spline through set of points. Generalized formulation includes trigonometric, hyperbolic, and damped cubic spline fits of third order.

  18. Neuronal Mechanisms of Intelligence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    numbtr) FIELOD GROUP ]SUB-GROJP operant conditioning; neuronal conditioning; positive reinforcement ; reward; learning; adaptive networks; self...gratuitous capacity for operant conditioning, the individual neuron could be an important functional unit for positive reinforcement in the brain. These...the following conditions: 1) if a brain cell with the capacity for positive reinforcement discharges in a burst of activity, and 2) if that cell’s

  19. Motor neurone disease.

    PubMed

    2016-03-23

    Essential facts Motor neurone disease describes a group of related diseases, affecting the neurones in the brain and spinal cord. Progressive, incurable and life-limiting, MND is rare, with about 1,100 people developing it each year in the UK and up to 5,000 people affected at any one time. One third of people will die within a year of diagnosis and more than half within two years. About 5% to 10% are alive at ten years.

  20. [Neuron-glia interactions].

    PubMed

    Belin, M F; Hardin, H

    1991-01-01

    The progress of research in the Central Nervous System (CNS) had led to the consideration of neurons and glia as indissociable functional complexes. Neuron-glia interactions are essential for the maturation of the CNS. Glial cells release trophic factors for neurons (NGF) and neurons release trophic factors for glia (GGF). Furthermore, the latter provide a substrate for the migration of neurons and guidance of axons by mean of adhesion molecules. In adults, the interactions between neurons and glial cells serve to maintain homeostasis. Thus, the glial cells perform the restoration of the metabolic equilibrium overthrown by the transmission of the nerve impulse and provide the glucose required for neuronal activity. The nerve impulse provokes increases in the cellular space of CO2, K+, NH3 and neurotransmitters which must be taken up to allow neuronal activity to continue (in normal conditions). Astrocytes perform the uptake of the extracellular K+ by means of passive ionic channels, ionic voltage-dependent channels and a sodium-potassium-ATPase-dependent pump. The oligodendrocytes are involved in the metabolism of CO2 by converting CO2 into carbonic acid by means of carbonic anhydrase. Oligodendrocytes and astrocytes play a role in terminating neural transmission by the uptake of the amino acid neurotransmitters, such as GABA, glutamate and aspartate. The catabolism of glutamate to glutamine by means of glutamine synthetase allows both the conversion of an excitatory amino acid into a neutral amino acid (which can diffuse in the extracellular space without causing neural transmission) and the reduction of cerebral NH3 content.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Tuning Curves for Arm Posture Control in Motor Cortex Are Consistent with Random Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, L. F.; Vaadia, Eilon

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal responses characterized by regular tuning curves are typically assumed to arise from structured synaptic connectivity. However, many responses exhibit both regular and irregular components. To address the relationship between tuning curve properties and underlying circuitry, we analyzed neuronal activity recorded from primary motor cortex (M1) of monkeys performing a 3D arm posture control task and compared the results with a neural network model. Posture control is well suited for examining M1 neuronal tuning because it avoids the dynamic complexity of time-varying movements. As a function of hand position, the neuronal responses have a linear component, as has previously been described, as well as heterogeneous and highly irregular nonlinearities. These nonlinear components involve high spatial frequencies and therefore do not support explicit encoding of movement parameters. Yet both the linear and nonlinear components contribute to the decoding of EMG of major muscles used in the task. Remarkably, despite the presence of a strong linear component, a feedforward neural network model with entirely random connectivity can replicate the data, including both the mean and distributions of the linear and nonlinear components as well as several other features of the neuronal responses. This result shows that smoothness provided by the regularity in the inputs to M1 can impose apparent structure on neural responses, in this case a strong linear (also known as cosine) tuning component, even in the absence of ordered synaptic connectivity. PMID:27224735

  2. Caloric curve of star clusters.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Self-gravitating systems, such as globular clusters or elliptical galaxies, are the prototypes of many-body systems with long-range interactions, and should be the natural arena in which to test theoretical predictions on the statistical behavior of long-range-interacting systems. Systems of classical self-gravitating particles can be studied with the standard tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics, provided the potential is regularized at small length scales and the system is confined in a box. The confinement condition looks rather unphysical in general, so that it is natural to ask whether what we learn with these studies is relevant to real self-gravitating systems. In order to provide an answer to this question, we consider a basic, simple, yet effective model of globular clusters: the King model. This model describes a self-consistently confined system, without the need of any external box, but the stationary state is a nonthermal one. In particular, we consider the King model with a short-distance cutoff on the interactions, and we discuss how such a cutoff affects the caloric curve, i.e., the relation between temperature and energy. We find that the cutoff stabilizes a low-energy phase, which is absent in the King model without cutoff; the caloric curve of the model with cutoff turns out to be very similar to that of previously studied confined and regularized models, but for the absence of a high-energy gaslike phase. We briefly discuss the possible phenomenological as well as theoretical implications of these results.

  3. AKLSQF - LEAST SQUARES CURVE FITTING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    The Least Squares Curve Fitting program, AKLSQF, computes the polynomial which will least square fit uniformly spaced data easily and efficiently. The program allows the user to specify the tolerable least squares error in the fitting or allows the user to specify the polynomial degree. In both cases AKLSQF returns the polynomial and the actual least squares fit error incurred in the operation. The data may be supplied to the routine either by direct keyboard entry or via a file. AKLSQF produces the least squares polynomial in two steps. First, the data points are least squares fitted using the orthogonal factorial polynomials. The result is then reduced to a regular polynomial using Sterling numbers of the first kind. If an error tolerance is specified, the program starts with a polynomial of degree 1 and computes the least squares fit error. The degree of the polynomial used for fitting is then increased successively until the error criterion specified by the user is met. At every step the polynomial as well as the least squares fitting error is printed to the screen. In general, the program can produce a curve fitting up to a 100 degree polynomial. All computations in the program are carried out under Double Precision format for real numbers and under long integer format for integers to provide the maximum accuracy possible. AKLSQF was written for an IBM PC X/AT or compatible using Microsoft's Quick Basic compiler. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2.1 using 23K of RAM. AKLSQF was developed in 1989.

  4. Caloric curve of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Self-gravitating systems, such as globular clusters or elliptical galaxies, are the prototypes of many-body systems with long-range interactions, and should be the natural arena in which to test theoretical predictions on the statistical behavior of long-range-interacting systems. Systems of classical self-gravitating particles can be studied with the standard tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics, provided the potential is regularized at small length scales and the system is confined in a box. The confinement condition looks rather unphysical in general, so that it is natural to ask whether what we learn with these studies is relevant to real self-gravitating systems. In order to provide an answer to this question, we consider a basic, simple, yet effective model of globular clusters: the King model. This model describes a self-consistently confined system, without the need of any external box, but the stationary state is a nonthermal one. In particular, we consider the King model with a short-distance cutoff on the interactions, and we discuss how such a cutoff affects the caloric curve, i.e., the relation between temperature and energy. We find that the cutoff stabilizes a low-energy phase, which is absent in the King model without cutoff; the caloric curve of the model with cutoff turns out to be very similar to that of previously studied confined and regularized models, but for the absence of a high-energy gaslike phase. We briefly discuss the possible phenomenological as well as theoretical implications of these results.

  5. Corticospinal mirror neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kraskov, A.; Philipp, R.; Waldert, S.; Vigneswaran, G.; Quallo, M. M.; Lemon, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons’ discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited ‘classical’ mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation (‘suppression mirror-neurons’). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others. PMID:24778371

  6. Ghrelin in central neurons.

    PubMed

    Ferrini, F; Salio, C; Lossi, L; Merighi, A

    2009-03-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide synthesized by endocrine cells of the gastric mucosa, is released in the bloodstream in response to a negative energetic status. Since discovery, the hypothalamus was identified as the main source of ghrelin in the CNS, and effects of the peptide have been mainly observed in this area of the brain. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have reported ghrelin synthesis and effects in specific populations of neurons also outside the hypothalamus. Thus, ghrelin activity has been described in midbrain, hindbrain, hippocampus, and spinal cord. The spectrum of functions and biological effects produced by the peptide on central neurons is remarkably wide and complex. It ranges from modulation of membrane excitability, to control of neurotransmitter release, neuronal gene expression, and neuronal survival and proliferation. There is not at present a general consensus concerning the source of ghrelin acting on central neurons. Whereas it is widely accepted that the hypothalamus represents the most important endogenous source of the hormone in CNS, the existence of extra-hypothalamic ghrelin-synthesizing neurons is still controversial. In addition, circulating ghrelin can theoretically be another natural ligand for central ghrelin receptors. This paper gives an overview on the distribution of ghrelin and its receptor across the CNS and critically analyses the data available so far as regarding the effects of ghrelin on central neurotransmission.

  7. Neuron-Microdevice Connections.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regehr, Wade Gordon

    1988-12-01

    A new method for long-term recording and stimulation applicable to cultured neurons has been developed. Silicon -based microelectrodes have been fabricated using integrated -circuit technology and micromachining. The chronic connection is made by positioning the electrode tip into contact with the cell body, and gluing the device to the bottom of the culture dish. These "diving-board electrodes" consist of an insulated lead exposed only at the tip sealed to the cell body of a cultured neuron: A two-way electrical connection to Helisoma B19 neurons has been established for up to four days. Preliminary experiments with cultured superior cervical ganglion neurons indicate diving-board electrodes can be used with cultured neurons larger than 20mum in diameter. In a related technique Helisoma neurons grown on a special dish containing a multielectrode array were found to seal to the dish electrodes, establishing similar long-term connections. This capability will make it possible to conduct experiments with either diving-board electrodes or dishes that cannot be performed using conventional techniques.

  8. Ghrelin in Central Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ferrini, F; Salio, C; Lossi, L; Merighi, A

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide synthesized by endocrine cells of the gastric mucosa, is released in the bloodstream in response to a negative energetic status. Since discovery, the hypothalamus was identified as the main source of ghrelin in the CNS, and effects of the peptide have been mainly observed in this area of the brain. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have reported ghrelin synthesis and effects in specific populations of neurons also outside the hypothalamus. Thus, ghrelin activity has been described in midbrain, hindbrain, hippocampus, and spinal cord. The spectrum of functions and biological effects produced by the peptide on central neurons is remarkably wide and complex. It ranges from modulation of membrane excitability, to control of neurotransmitter release, neuronal gene expression, and neuronal survival and proliferation. There is not at present a general consensus concerning the source of ghrelin acting on central neurons. Whereas it is widely accepted that the hypothalamus represents the most important endogenous source of the hormone in CNS, the existence of extra-hypothalamic ghrelin-synthesizing neurons is still controversial. In addition, circulating ghrelin can theoretically be another natural ligand for central ghrelin receptors. This paper gives an overview on the distribution of ghrelin and its receptor across the CNS and critically analyses the data available so far as regarding the effects of ghrelin on central neurotransmission. PMID:19721816

  9. NeuronBank: A Tool for Cataloging Neuronal Circuitry.

    PubMed

    Katz, Paul S; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Dhawan, Akshaye; Frederick, Chad; Guo, Shuman; Dissanayaka, Rasanjalee; Hiremath, Naveen; Ma, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuyn; Wang, Hsui C; Yang, Hong; Prasad, Sushil; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Zhu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models.

  10. NeuronBank: A Tool for Cataloging Neuronal Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Paul S.; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Dhawan, Akshaye; Frederick, Chad; Guo, Shuman; Dissanayaka, Rasanjalee; Hiremath, Naveen; Ma, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuyn; Wang, Hsui C.; Yang, Hong; Prasad, Sushil; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Zhu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models. PMID:20428500

  11. Computational modeling of neuronal dynamics for systems analysis: application to neurons of the cardiorespiratory NTS in the rat.

    PubMed

    Schwaber, J S; Graves, E B; Paton, J F

    1993-02-26

    of voltage- and calcium-dependent conductances were analyzed for their functional contributions by tuning their kinetics. Specific parameters are given that account for the behavior of each model. Sensitivity analyses by perturbing KCa and KA are shown for both neurons, and I/F curves are presented for the auto-active neuron's stimulated and recorded responses. The potential systems-level functional implications resulting from the different kinetics is demonstrated by driving the S3 model neuron in simulation with the pattern of input produced by model primary baroreceptor afferents. The limitations and significance of this approach are discussed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  12. Acute-phase response to benzo[a]pyrene and induction of rat ALDH3A1.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Periklis; Sotiropoulou, Marianthi; Karamanakos, Petros; Kostoula, Aggeliki; Levidiotou, Stamatia; Marselos, Marios

    2003-02-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase-3A1 (ALDH3A1) enzyme, encoded by a member of the [Ah]-gene family, is dramatically increased (more than 100-fold) by benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and other polycyclic hydrocarbons. Although much is known regarding the mechanism for the drug-metabolizing enzymes up-regulated by the Ah receptor, the physiological role of that tremendously increased ALDH3A1 enzyme activity is not yet fully clarified. The aim of this study was to identify a possible acute-phase response to different classes of xenobiotics affecting the metabolic capacity of the hepatocyte, by studying possible changes of serum acute-phase proteins (APPs) of hepatic origin, before and after BaP administration. Male Wistar rats were used in different series of experiments. The effects of BaP were estimated in terms of dose-response and time-response, with regard to the serum level of several APPs such as alpha-1-acid-glycoprotein (AAG), alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), C-reactive protein (CRP), and haptoglobin (HPT). In parallel experiments, levels of the same proteins have been determined after a time-dependent treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The changes in serum proteins were compared with the results of BaP or LPS administration on both hepatic ALDH3A1 and total ALDH enzyme activities. The results showed that BaP induced CRP and HPT in a time-dependent way, proportional to that caused by LPS. Additionally, ALDH3A1, CRP, and HPT were induced by BaP subacute treatment, whereas another type of ALDH inducer, phenobarbital, did not affect the levels of APPs or ALDH3A1, but did increase ALDH1A3 activity. Former studies of our group have shown that the inhibitory effects of different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on the ALDH3A1 induction were most possibly due to a decreased formation of arachidonic products like prostaglandins. Considering the changes of APPs caused by BaP, this study further supports the suggestion that the induction of ALDH3A1 is related to an

  13. Cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the hepatic erythropoietin expression during acute-phase response: a role for IL-6.

    PubMed

    Ramadori, Pierluigi; Ahmad, Ghayyor; Ramadori, Giuliano

    2010-09-01

    during acute-phase response. The increase of HIF-2alpha, predominantly expressed in endothelial cells and fibroblast-like cells, seems not to be affected by the lack of IL-6.

  14. Acute phase response in lactating dairy cows during hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemic and hyperinsulinemic euglycaemic clamps and after intramammary LPS challenge.

    PubMed

    De Matteis, L; Bertoni, G; Lombardelli, R; Wellnitz, O; Van Dorland, H A; Vernay, M C M B; Bruckmaier, R M; Trevisi, E

    2016-04-14

    The link between energy availability, turnover of energy substrates and the onset of inflammation in dairy cows is complex and poorly investigated. To clarify this, plasma inflammatory variables were measured in mid-lactating dairy cows allocated to three groups: hyperinsulinemic hypoglycaemic clamp, induced by insulin infusion (HypoG, n = 5); hyperinsulinemic euglycaemic clamp, induced by insulin and glucose infusion (EuG; n = 6); control, receiving a saline solution infusion (NaCl; n = 6). At 48 h after the start of i.v. infusions, two udder quarters per cow were challenged with 200 μg of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Individual blood samples were taken before clamps, before LPS challenge (i.e. 48 h after clamps) and 6.5 h after. At 48 h, positive acute phase proteins (posAPP) did not differ among groups, whereas albumin and cholesterol (index of lipoproteins), negative APP (negAPP), were lower (p < 0.05) in EuG compared to NaCl and HypoG. The concentration of IL-6 was greater in EuG (p < 0.05) but only vs. HypoG. At 6.5 h following LPS challenge, IL-6 increased in the NaCl and EuG clamps (p < 0.05), while TNF-α increased (p < 0.05) in the EuG only. Among the posAPP, haptoglobin markedly increased in EuG (p < 0.05), but not in NaCl (p = 0.76) and in HypoG; ceruloplasmin tended to decline during LPS challenge, the reduction was significant when all animals were considered (p < 0.05). Conversely, all the negAPP showed a marked reduction 6.5 h after LPS challenge in the three groups. In conclusion, EuG caused an inflammatory status after 48-h infusion (i.e. decrease of negAPP) and induced a quicker acute phase response (e.g. marked rise of TNF-α, IL-6) after the intramammary LPS challenge. These data suggest that the simultaneous high availability of glucose and insulin at the tissue-level makes dairy cows more susceptible to inflammatory events. In contrast, HypoG seems to attenuate the inflammatory response.

  15. Global dynamics of a stochastic neuronal oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanobe, Takanobu

    2013-11-01

    Nonlinear oscillators have been used to model neurons that fire periodically in the absence of input. These oscillators, which are called neuronal oscillators, share some common response structures with other biological oscillations such as cardiac cells. In this study, we analyze the dependence of the global dynamics of an impulse-driven stochastic neuronal oscillator on the relaxation rate to the limit cycle, the strength of the intrinsic noise, and the impulsive input parameters. To do this, we use a Markov operator that both reflects the density evolution of the oscillator and is an extension of the phase transition curve, which describes the phase shift due to a single isolated impulse. Previously, we derived the Markov operator for the finite relaxation rate that describes the dynamics of the entire phase plane. Here, we construct a Markov operator for the infinite relaxation rate that describes the stochastic dynamics restricted to the limit cycle. In both cases, the response of the stochastic neuronal oscillator to time-varying impulses is described by a product of Markov operators. Furthermore, we calculate the number of spikes between two consecutive impulses to relate the dynamics of the oscillator to the number of spikes per unit time and the interspike interval density. Specifically, we analyze the dynamics of the number of spikes per unit time based on the properties of the Markov operators. Each Markov operator can be decomposed into stationary and transient components based on the properties of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. This allows us to evaluate the difference in the number of spikes per unit time between the stationary and transient responses of the oscillator, which we show to be based on the dependence of the oscillator on past activity. Our analysis shows how the duration of the past neuronal activity depends on the relaxation rate, the noise strength, and the impulsive input parameters.

  16. Enteral application of an immunoglobulin-enriched colostrum milk preparation for reducing endotoxin translocation and acute phase response in patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery--a randomized placebo-controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Bölke, Edwin; Orth, Klaus; Jehle, Peter M; Schwarz, Andreas; Steinbach, Gerold; Schleich, Stefan; Ulmer, Christof; Storck, Martin; Hannekum, Andreas

    2002-11-30

    To evaluate the influence of enteral application of an immunoglobulin enriched bovine milk preparation on endotoxin plasma levels, endotoxin neutralizing capacity of plasma (ENC) and the acute phase response (IL-6, CRP) during and after cardiac surgery, in a pilot study. 60 patients who underwent coronary bypass operations, were evenly enrolled in a placebo-controlled randomized study. The patients were treated by enteral application of either 42 g of a bovine colostrum milk preparation per day or placebo, for 2 days preoperatively. Endotoxin and ENC were sequentially determined intra- and postoperatively by a chromogenic modification of the limulus amebocyte lysate test. Interleukin-6, CRP, transferrin, alpha-2-macroglobulin, albumin, apo-A, apo-B, IgG, IgA, IgM were determined by ELISA and nephelometrically. The clinical course was followed up by daily evaluation of the Apache-II-score. Demographic data were comparable in both groups. No differences of the Apache-II-score (verum group: 6.5 +/- 1.9 vs. controls: 6.8 +/- 1.8 on admission) were observed. Endotoxin and ENC levels were elevated at the end of the operation and seemed to have a trigger function for the acute phase response. However, there was no reduction (calculated as the area under the curve) in patients receiving the colostrum milk preparation throughout the observation period. Plasma levels of endotoxin binding proteins did not differ. Plasma IL-6 concentrations increased to maximal median values of 655 pg/ml in the verum and 786 pg/ml in the control group, respectively 2 and 6 h after surgery. In the colostrum group, there was a tendency to reduced IL-6 levels throughout the observation period. CRP-levels of all patients peaked 48 h after the operation but were lower (p = 0.034) in the verum group. This study revealed that endotoxemia occurs early in an elective non-intestinal surgical intervention, and is followed by a subsequent increase in mediators of the acute phase reaction. The prophylactic

  17. Simulation of Code Spectrum and Code Flow of Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, in cultured neuronal networks on a multielectrode, pseudorandom-like sequences (codes) are detected, and they flow with some spatial decay constant. Each cultured neuronal network is characterized by a specific spectrum curve. That is, we may consider the spectrum curve as a "signature" of its associated neuronal network that is dependent on the characteristics of neurons and network configuration, including the weight distribution. In the present study, we used an integrate-and-fire model of neurons with intrinsic and instantaneous fluctuations of characteristics for performing a simulation of a code spectrum from multielectrodes on a 2D mesh neural network. We showed that it is possible to estimate the characteristics of neurons such as the distribution of number of neurons around each electrode and their refractory periods. Although this process is a reverse problem and theoretically the solutions are not sufficiently guaranteed, the parameters seem to be consistent with those of neurons. That is, the proposed neural network model may adequately reflect the behavior of a cultured neuronal network. Furthermore, such prospect is discussed that code analysis will provide a base of communication within a neural network that will also create a base of natural intelligence.

  18. Gain control of synaptic transfer from second- to third-order neurons of cockroach ocelli

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Synaptic transmission from second- to third-order neurons of cockroach ocelli occurs in an exponentially rising part of the overall sigmoidal characteristic curve relating pre- and postsynaptic voltage. Because of the nonlinear nature of the synapse, linear responses of second-order neurons to changes in ligh intensity are half-wave rectified, i.e., the response to a decrement in light is amplified whereas that to an increment in light is compressed. Here I report that the gain of synaptic transmission from second- to third-order neurons changes by ambient light levels and by wind stimulation applied to the cerci. Transfer characteristics of the synapse were studied by simultaneous intracellular recordings of second- and third-order neurons. Potential changes were evoked in second-order neurons by a sinusoidally modulated light with various mean luminances. With a decrease in the mean luminance (a) the mean membrane potential of second-order neurons was depolarized, (b) the synapse between the second- and third-order neurons operated in a steeper range of the exponential characteristic curve, where the gain to transmit modulatory signals was higher, and (c) the gain of third-order neurons to detect a decrement in light increased. Second-order neurons were depolarized when a wind or tactile stimulus was applied to various parts of the body including the cerci. During a wind-evoked depolarization, the synapse operated in a steeper range of the characteristic curve, which resulted in an increased gain of third-order neurons to detect light decrements. I conclude that the nonlinear nature of the synapse between the second- and third-order neurons provides an opportunity for an adjustment of gain to transmit signals of intensity change. The possibility that a similar gain control occurs in other visual systems and underlies a more advanced visual function, i.e., detection of motion, is discussed. PMID:8741734

  19. Monocyte-conditioned medium, interleukin-1, and tumor necrosis factor stimulate the acute phase response in human hepatoma cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Human hepatoma cells mimic the acute phase response after treatment with monocyte-conditioned medium. Levels of secreted fibrinogen, alpha- 1 acid glycoprotein, C-reactive protein, haptoglobin, and the third component of complement were elevated compared with control levels after 48 h of incubation with conditioned supernatant medium from an enriched fraction of normal peripheral monocytes. Albumin levels declined and alpha-1 antitrypsin remained unchanged. Levels of specific mRNA were measured by hybridization to slot blots and Northern blots and changed in correspondence with protein alterations. Interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor stimulated the third component of complement, but did not elevate any other member of the acute phase group and were therefore only partially active in this system. The identification of an in vitro model of the human acute phase response will permit analysis of the molecular basis for coordinate regulation of this group of facultative genes. PMID:3017995

  20. Effects of different antimicrobial treatments on serum acute phase responses and leucocyte counts in pigs after a primary and a secondary challenge infection with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Sjölund, M; Fossum, C; Martín de la Fuente, A J; Alava, M; Juul-Madsen, H R; Lampreave, F; Wallgren, P

    2011-07-16

    The susceptibility to an initial challenge and a re-challenge inoculation with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was analysed in pigs that were treated with antimicrobials of different efficacies following the first exposure to A pleuropneumoniae. In brief, 30 nine-week-old specific pathogen-free pigs were allocated to five groups of six. After acclimatisation, four groups were inoculated with A pleuropneumoniae serotype 2. At the onset of clinical signs, three of the groups of pigs were treated with enrofloxacin, tetracycline or penicillin. A fourth group served as the inoculated control and the fifth group as a control group that had not been inoculated. On day 28, all five groups were re-challenged with the same strain of A pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 as had been used in the first inoculation. No treatments were carried out at this time. The acute phase responses and differential leucocyte counts were monitored in detail after both inoculations. Leucocytosis and acute phase responses in the forms of serum amyloid A, pig-major acute phase protein and haptoglobin were recorded in all of the inoculated groups after the onset of clinical signs following the first inoculation. A porcine mannan-binding lectin-A response was less evident in the pigs. Acute phase responses resembling those of the first inoculation were observed in the pigs that had not previously been inoculated and in the pigs treated with enrofloxacin. Acute phase responses were not recorded in the other three groups, where the pigs had seroconverted to A pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 following the first inoculation.

  1. Association of apoptosis of neutrophils and eosinophils and their ingestion by macrophages with resolution of the allergen-induced cutaneous late-phase response in atopic human subjects.

    PubMed

    Ying, S; Meng, Q; Taborda-Barata, L; Kay, A B

    1997-01-01

    The allergen-induced cutaneous late-phase response serves as a model of allergic inflammation and is associated with infiltration of neutrophils, eosinophils, T cells, and macrophages. The mechanisms controlling the resolution of allergic inflammatory processes and the fate of infiltrating cells are uncertain. We observed that both the magnitude of the late-phase response and the numbers of infiltrating neutrophils and eosinophils peaked at 6 hr, persisted for 48 hr, but resolved completely by 7 days. In contrast, T-cell and macrophage numbers peaked between 24 and 72 hr after allergen challenge and persisted for up to 7 days. By using the techniques of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotin-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate (dUTP) nickend-labeling (TUNEL) and by combining TUNEL with immunohistochemistry, we tested the hypothesis that the resolution of the late-phase response is associated with apoptosis of neutrophils and eosinophils, with subsequent engulfment of apoptotic cells and apoptotic bodies by tissue macrophages. As the cutaneous late-phase response resolved, there was a progressive increase (peaking at 72 hr) in the total numbers of TUNEL-positive (TUNEL+) cells and in the numbers of macrophages that had engulfed apoptotic cells and bodies. The majority of TUNEL+ cells were identified as neutrophils and eosinophils. In contrast, very little apoptosis was associated with T cells or macrophages. These experiments represent a novel demonstration of cell type-specific apoptosis in vivo in human allergic inflammatory tissue and suggest that phagocytosis by macrophages of apoptotic neutrophils and eosinophils may be a mechanism that regulates resolution of the atopic allergic inflammatory response.

  2. Learning curve of speech recognition.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, Tomi A; Kaipio, Johanna; Koivikko, Mika P

    2013-12-01

    Speech recognition (SR) speeds patient care processes by reducing report turnaround times. However, concerns have emerged about prolonged training and an added secretarial burden for radiologists. We assessed how much proofing radiologists who have years of experience with SR and radiologists new to SR must perform, and estimated how quickly the new users become as skilled as the experienced users. We studied SR log entries for 0.25 million reports from 154 radiologists and after careful exclusions, defined a group of 11 experienced radiologists and 71 radiologists new to SR (24,833 and 122,093 reports, respectively). Data were analyzed for sound file and report lengths, character-based error rates, and words unknown to the SR's dictionary. Experienced radiologists corrected 6 characters for each report and for new users, 11. Some users presented a very unfavorable learning curve, with error rates not declining as expected. New users' reports were longer, and data for the experienced users indicates that their reports, initially equally lengthy, shortened over a period of several years. For most radiologists, only minor corrections of dictated reports were necessary. While new users adopted SR quickly, with a subset outperforming experienced users from the start, identification of users struggling with SR will help facilitate troubleshooting and support.

  3. Is the tautochrone curve unique?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, Pedro; de Melo e Souza, Reinaldo; Farina, C.

    2016-12-01

    We show that there are an infinite number of tautochrone curves in addition to the cycloid solution first obtained by Christiaan Huygens in 1658. We begin by reviewing the inverse problem of finding the possible potential energy functions that lead to periodic motions of a particle whose period is a given function of its mechanical energy. There are infinitely many such solutions, called "sheared" potentials. As an interesting example, we show that a Pöschl-Teller potential and the one-dimensional Morse potentials are sheared relative to one another for negative energies, clarifying why they share the same oscillation periods for their bounded solutions. We then consider periodic motions of a particle sliding without friction over a track around its minimum under the influence of a constant gravitational field. After a brief historical survey of the tautochrone problem we show that, given the oscillation period, there is an infinity of tracks that lead to the same period. As a bonus, we show that there are infinitely many tautochrones.

  4. Understanding Guyton's venous return curves

    PubMed Central

    Feigl, Eric O.

    2011-01-01

    Based on observations that as cardiac output (as determined by an artificial pump) was experimentally increased the right atrial pressure decreased, Arthur Guyton and coworkers proposed an interpretation that right atrial pressure represents a back pressure restricting venous return (equal to cardiac output in steady state). The idea that right atrial pressure is a back pressure limiting cardiac output and the associated idea that “venous recoil” does work to produce flow have confused physiologists and clinicians for decades because Guyton's interpretation interchanges independent and dependent variables. Here Guyton's model and data are reanalyzed to clarify the role of arterial and right atrial pressures and cardiac output and to clearly delineate that cardiac output is the independent (causal) variable in the experiments. Guyton's original mathematical model is used with his data to show that a simultaneous increase in arterial pressure and decrease in right atrial pressure with increasing cardiac output is due to a blood volume shift into the systemic arterial circulation from the systemic venous circulation. This is because Guyton's model assumes a constant blood volume in the systemic circulation. The increase in right atrial pressure observed when cardiac output decreases in a closed circulation with constant resistance and capacitance is due to the redistribution of blood volume and not because right atrial pressure limits venous return. Because Guyton's venous return curves have generated much confusion and little clarity, we suggest that the concept and previous interpretations of venous return be removed from educational materials. PMID:21666119

  5. Differentialless geometry of plane curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latecki, Longin J.; Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1997-10-01

    We introduce a class of planar arcs and curves, called tame arcs, which is general enough to describe the boundaries of planar real objects. A tame arc can have smooth parts as well as sharp corners; thus a polygonal arc is tame. On the other hand, this class of arcs is restrictive enough to rule out pathological arcs which have infinitely many inflections or which turn infinitely often: a tame arc can have only finitely many inflections, and its total absolute turn must be finite. In order to relate boundary properties of discrete objects obtained by segmenting digital images to the corresponding properties of their continuous originals, the theory of tame arcs is based on concepts that can be directly transferred from the continuous to the discrete domain. A tame arc is composed of a finite number of supported arcs. We define supported digital arcs and motivate their definition by the fact that hey can be obtained by digitizing continuous supported arcs. Every digital arc is tame, since it contains a finite number of points, and therefore it can be decomposed into a finite number of supported digital arcs.

  6. Simulations of Closed Timelike Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Todd A.; Wilde, Mark M.

    2017-03-01

    Proposed models of closed timelike curves (CTCs) have been shown to enable powerful information-processing protocols. We examine the simulation of models of CTCs both by other models of CTCs and by physical systems without access to CTCs. We prove that the recently proposed transition probability CTCs (T-CTCs) are physically equivalent to postselection CTCs (P-CTCs), in the sense that one model can simulate the other with reasonable overhead. As a consequence, their information-processing capabilities are equivalent. We also describe a method for quantum computers to simulate Deutschian CTCs (but with a reasonable overhead only in some cases). In cases for which the overhead is reasonable, it might be possible to perform the simulation in a table-top experiment. This approach has the benefit of resolving some ambiguities associated with the equivalent circuit model of Ralph et al. Furthermore, we provide an explicit form for the state of the CTC system such that it is a maximum-entropy state, as prescribed by Deutsch.

  7. Page curves for tripartite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Junha; Lee, Deok Sang; Nho, Dongju; Oh, Jeonghun; Park, Hyosub; Yeom, Dong-han; Zoe, Heeseung

    2017-07-01

    We investigate information flow and Page curves for tripartite systems. We prepare a tripartite system (say, A, B, and C) of a given number of states and calculate information and entropy contents by assuming random states. Initially, every particle was in A (this means a black hole), and as time goes on, particles move to either B (this means Hawking radiation) or C (this means a broadly defined remnant, including a non-local transport of information, the last burst, an interior large volume, or a bubble universe, etc). If the final number of states of the remnant is smaller than that of Hawking radiation, then information will be stored by both the radiation and the mutual information between the radiation and the remnant, while the remnant itself does not contain information. On the other hand, if the final number of states of the remnant is greater than that of Hawking radiation, then the radiation contains negligible information, while the remnant and the mutual information between the radiation and the remnant contain information. Unless the number of states of the remnant is large enough compared to the entropy of the black hole, Hawking radiation must contain information; and we meet the menace of black hole complementarity again. Therefore, this contrasts the tension between various assumptions and candidates of the resolution of the information loss problem.

  8. Synapse-to-neuron ratio is inversely related to neuronal density in mature neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Cullen, D Kacy; Gilroy, Meghan E; Irons, Hillary R; Laplaca, Michelle C

    2010-11-04

    Synapse formation is a fundamental process in neurons that occurs throughout development, maturity, and aging. Although these stages contain disparate and fluctuating numbers of mature neurons, tactics employed by neuronal networks to modulate synapse number as a function of neuronal density are not well understood. The goal of this study was to utilize an in vitro model to assess the influence of cell density and neuronal maturity on synapse number and distribution. Specifically, cerebral cortical neurons were plated in planar culture at densities ranging from 10 to 5000 neurons/mm², and synapse number and distribution were evaluated via immunocytochemistry over 21 days in vitro (DIV). High-resolution confocal microscopy revealed an elaborate three-dimensional distribution of neurites and synapses across the heights of high-density neuronal networks by 21 DIV, which were up to 18 μm thick, demonstrating the complex degree of spatial interactions even in planar high-density cultures. At 7 DIV, the mean number of synapses per neuron was less than 5, and this did not vary as a function of neuronal density. However, by 21 DIV, the number of synapses per neuron had jumped 30- to 80-fold, and the synapse-to-neuron ratio was greatest at lower neuronal densities (< 500 neurons/mm²; mean approximately 400 synapses/neuron) compared to mid and higher neuronal densities (500-4500 neurons/mm²; mean of approximately 150 synapses/neuron) (p<0.05). These results suggest a relationship between neuronal density and synapse number that may have implications in the neurobiology of developing neuronal networks as well as processes of cell death and regeneration.

  9. What Gets a Cell Excited? Kinky Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hodgkin and Huxley's (5) revealing the origins of cellular excitability is one of the great triumphs of physiology. In an extraordinarily deft series of papers, they were able to measure the essential electrical characteristics of neurons and synthesize them into a quantitative model that accounts for the excitability of neurons and other…

  10. What Gets a Cell Excited? Kinky Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hodgkin and Huxley's (5) revealing the origins of cellular excitability is one of the great triumphs of physiology. In an extraordinarily deft series of papers, they were able to measure the essential electrical characteristics of neurons and synthesize them into a quantitative model that accounts for the excitability of neurons and other…

  11. Neuronal migration illuminated

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Niraj

    2011-01-01

    During vertebrate brain development, migration of neurons from the germinal zones to their final laminar positions is essential to establish functional neural circuits.1–3 Whereas key insights into neuronal migration initially came from landmark studies identifying the genes mutated in human cortical malformations,4 cell biology has recently greatly advanced our understanding of how cytoskeletal proteins and molecular motors drive the morphogenic cell movements that build the developing brain. This Commentary & View reviews recent studies examining the role of the molecular motors during neuronal migration and critically examines current models of acto-myosin function in the two-step neuronal migration cycle. Given the apparent emerging diversity of neuronal sub-type cytoskeletal organizations, we propose that two approaches must be taken to resolve differences between the current migration models: the mechanisms of radial and tangential migration must be compared, and the loci of tension generation, migration substrates and sites of adhesion dynamics must be precisely examined in an integrated manner. PMID:20935494

  12. Equine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Url, A; Bauder, B; Thalhammer, J; Nowotny, N; Kolodziejek, J; Herout, N; Fürst, S; Weissenböck, H

    2001-04-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) is an inherited, neurodegenerative disorder with fatal outcome in humans. It has also been described in some animal species; this is the first report of NCL in equines. Three horses showed developmental retardation, slow movements and loss of appetite at the age of six months. Neurological symptoms, as well as visual failure in one case, were noticed at the age of 1 year. Due to slowly progressing deterioration, euthanasia was indicated 1.5 years after onset of conspicuous behavior. At necropsy, slight flattening of the gyri and discoloring of the brain was noticed. Histopathology revealed eosinophilic, autofluorescent material in the perikarya of neurons throughout the brain and spinal cord. Identical material was found in neurons of retina, submucous and myenteric ganglia, as well as in glial cells. Immunohistochemistry, using antiserum against subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase, showed positive signals in neurons and glial cells. Electron microscopical studies revealed fingerprint profiles mixed with rectilinear structures in markedly enlarged lysosomes of neurons and renal tubules, and rectilinear structures mixed with curvilinear bodies in macrophages and lymphocytes of lymph nodes. Thus, our study presents the first occurrence of lysosomal storage disease in horses, further characterized by immunohistochemical and electron microscopical investigations as NCL.

  13. The acute phase response induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide modifies the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of florfenicol in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Pérez, R; Palma, C; Burgos, R; Jeldres, J A; Espinoza, A; Peñailillo, A K

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute phase response (APR) on the pharmaco-kinetics and biotransformation of florfenicol (FFC) in rabbits. Six rabbits (3.0 ± 0.08 kg body weight (bw)) were distributed through a crossover design with 4 weeks of washout period. Pairs of rabbits similar in bw and sex were assigned to experimental groups: Group 1 (LPS) was treated with three intravenous doses of 1 μg/kg bw of E. coli LPS at intervals of 6 h, and Group 2 (control) was treated with an equivalent volume of saline solution (SS) at the same intervals and frequency of Group 1. At 24 h after the first injection of LPS or SS, an intravenous bolus of 20 mg/kg bw of FFC was administered. Blood samples were collected from the auricular vein before drug administration and at different times between 0.05 and 24.0 h after treatment. FFC and florfenicol-amine (FFC-a) were extracted from the plasma, and their concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. A noncompartmental pharmacokinetic model was used for data analysis, and data were compared using the paired Student t-test. The mean values of AUC0-∞ in the endotoxaemic rabbits (26.3 ± 2.7 μg·h/mL) were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than values observed in healthy rabbits (17.2 ± 0.97 μg·h/mL). The total mean plasma clearance (CLT ) decreased from 1228 ± 107.5 mL·h/kg in the control group to 806.4 ± 91.4 mL·h/kg in the LPS-treated rabbits. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in the half-life of elimination was observed in the endotoxaemic rabbits (5.59 ± 1.14 h) compared to the values observed in healthy animals (3.44 ± 0.57 h). In conclusion, the administration of repeated doses of 1 μg/kg E. coli LPS induced an APR in rabbits, producing significant modifications in plasma concentrations of FFC leading to increases in the AUC, terminal half-life and mean residence time (MRT), but a

  14. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Pfisterer, Ulrich; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation. Furthermore, pro-survival factors and intracellular responses depend on the type of neuron and region of the brain. Thus, in addition to some common neuronal pro-survival signaling, different types of neurons possess a variety of 'neuron type-specific' pro-survival constituents that might help them to adapt for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various types of immature neurons. Importantly, we mainly focus on in vivo data to describe neuronal survival specifically in the brain, without extrapolating data obtained in the PNS or spinal cord, and thus emphasize the influence of the complex brain environment on neuronal survival during development. PMID:28252642

  15. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pfisterer, Ulrich; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-03-02

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation. Furthermore, pro-survival factors and intracellular responses depend on the type of neuron and region of the brain. Thus, in addition to some common neuronal pro-survival signaling, different types of neurons possess a variety of 'neuron type-specific' pro-survival constituents that might help them to adapt for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various types of immature neurons. Importantly, we mainly focus on in vivo data to describe neuronal survival specifically in the brain, without extrapolating data obtained in the PNS or spinal cord, and thus emphasize the influence of the complex brain environment on neuronal survival during development.

  16. Mitochondrial trafficking in neurons.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Thomas L

    2013-06-01

    Neurons, perhaps more than any other cell type, depend on mitochondrial trafficking for their survival. Recent studies have elucidated a motor/adaptor complex on the mitochondrial surface that is shared between neurons and other animal cells. In addition to kinesin and dynein, this complex contains the proteins Miro (also called RhoT1/2) and milton (also called TRAK1/2) and is responsible for much, although not necessarily all, mitochondrial movement. Elucidation of the complex has permitted inroads for understanding how this movement is regulated by a variety of intracellular signals, although many mysteries remain. Regulating mitochondrial movement can match energy demand to energy supply throughout the extraordinary architecture of these cells and can control the clearance and replenishing of mitochondria in the periphery. Because the extended axons of neurons contain uniformly polarized microtubules, they have been useful for studying mitochondrial motility in conjunction with biochemical assays in many cell types.

  17. Deployment of a Curved Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.; Knarr, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Structures capable of deployment into complex, three-dimensional trusses have well known space technology applications such as the support of spacecraft payloads, communications antennas, radar reflectors, and solar concentrators. Such deployable trusses could also be useful in terrestrial applications such as the rapid establishment of structures in military and emergency service situations, in particular with regard to the deployment of enclosures for habitat or storage. To minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a single arch-shaped truss is preferable to multiple straight trusses arranged vertically and horizontally. To further minimize the time required to deploy such an enclosure, a synchronous deployment with a single degree of freedom is also preferable. One method of synchronizing deployment of a truss is the use of a series of gears; this makes the deployment sequence predictable and testable, allows the truss to have a minimal stowage volume, and the deployed structure exhibits the excellent stiffness-to-mass and strength-to-mass ratios characteristic of a truss. A concept for using gears with varying ratios to deploy a truss into a curved shape has been developed and appears to be compatible with both space technology applications as well as potential use in terrestrial applications such as enclosure deployment. As is the case with other deployable trusses, this truss is formed using rigid elements (e.g., composite tubes) along the edges, one set of diagonal elements composed of either cables or folding/hinged rigid members, and the other set of diagonal elements formed by a continuous cable that is tightened by a motor or hand crank in order to deploy the truss. Gears of varying ratios are used to constrain the deployment to a single degree of freedom, making the deployment synchronous, predictable, and repeatable. The relative sizes of the gears and the relative dimensions of the diagonal elements determine the deployed geometry (e

  18. Simple models for reading neuronal population codes.

    PubMed Central

    Seung, H S; Sompolinsky, H

    1993-01-01

    In many neural systems, sensory information is distributed throughout a population of neurons. We study simple neural network models for extracting this information. The inputs to the networks are the stochastic responses of a population of sensory neurons tuned to directional stimuli. The performance of each network model in psychophysical tasks is compared with that of the optimal maximum likelihood procedure. As a model of direction estimation in two dimensions, we consider a linear network that computes a population vector. Its performance depends on the width of the population tuning curves and is maximal for width, which increases with the level of background activity. Although for narrowly tuned neurons the performance of the population vector is significantly inferior to that of maximum likelihood estimation, the difference between the two is small when the tuning is broad. For direction discrimination, we consider two models: a perceptron with fully adaptive weights and a network made by adding an adaptive second layer to the population vector network. We calculate the error rates of these networks after exhaustive training to a particular direction. By testing on the full range of possible directions, the extent of transfer of training to novel stimuli can be calculated. It is found that for threshold linear networks the transfer of perceptual learning is nonmonotonic. Although performance deteriorates away from the training stimulus, it peaks again at an intermediate angle. This nonmonotonicity provides an important psychophysical test of these models. PMID:8248166

  19. Photovoltaic 1-5 curve measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, C. H., III; Warner, T. H.

    1982-08-01

    Performance evaluation of photovoltaic (PV) arrays under actual field conditions provides important feedback to the module design process. One of the principal methods for assessing an array's performance is to plot its current, I, versus voltage, V, curve. Following a brief review of techniques for measuring the I-V curve, a new, capacitive-based approach is presented. It use a rapid sweep of the I-V curve that substantially reduced the average power transfer between array and load, and in turn, substantially reduced the size and weight of the curve tracer. Both theoretical and practical aspects of the approach are presented for a 10-kW unit. Performance is verified by comparison with I-V curves obtained by using a conventional load. The agreement is found to be excellent. Approximately an order of magnitude reduction in size, weight and power consumption over conventional units was realized with the experimental I-V curve tracer.

  20. Finite transformers for construction of fractal curves

    SciTech Connect

    Lisovik, L.P.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we continue the study of infinite R{sup n}-transformers that can be used to define real functions and three-dimensional curves. An R{sup n}-transformer A generates an output n-tuple A(x) = (Y{sub 1},...,Y{sub n}), consisting of output binary representations. We have previously shown that finite R{sup n}-transformers with n = 1, 2 can be used to define a continuous, nowhere differentiable function and a Peano curve. Curves of this kind are objects of fractal geometry. Here we show that some other fractal curves, which are analogs of the Koch curve and the Sierpinski napkin, can be defined by finite R{sup 2}-transformers. R{sup n}-transformers (and also finite R{sup n}-transformers) thus provide a convenient tool for definition of fractal curves.

  1. Neuronal Cell Cultures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    AD-A123 120 NEURONAL . CELL CULTURES( U) FEDERATION OF AMERICAN / SOCIETIES FOR EXPER IMENTAL B IOLOGY BETHES DA MD R BUNOF ET AL 01 0C 82 AFOSR-- a...REPRT NUM2. GOVT ACCESSION No. 3. RECIIENT’S CATALOG NUmBER 4. TITLE (end Subtitle) 5, TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Neuronal Cell Cultures FNLRPR...10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PRZjECT. TASK~ Federation of American Societies for Experi- AREA & WORK UNIT N.jVBERS mental Biology (FASEB), 9650 Rockville

  2. Orientation selectivity in inhibition-dominated networks of spiking neurons: effect of single neuron properties and network dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sadeh, Sadra; Rotter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying the emergence of orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex of mammals are still elusive. In rodents, visual neurons show highly selective responses to oriented stimuli, but neighboring neurons do not necessarily have similar preferences. Instead of a smooth map, one observes a salt-and-pepper organization of orientation selectivity. Modeling studies have recently confirmed that balanced random networks are indeed capable of amplifying weakly tuned inputs and generating highly selective output responses, even in absence of feature-selective recurrent connectivity. Here we seek to elucidate the neuronal mechanisms underlying this phenomenon by resorting to networks of integrate-and-fire neurons, which are amenable to analytic treatment. Specifically, in networks of perfect integrate-and-fire neurons, we observe that highly selective and contrast invariant output responses emerge, very similar to networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We then demonstrate that a theory based on mean firing rates and the detailed network topology predicts the output responses, and explains the mechanisms underlying the suppression of the common-mode, amplification of modulation, and contrast invariance. Increasing inhibition dominance in our networks makes the rectifying nonlinearity more prominent, which in turn adds some distortions to the otherwise essentially linear prediction. An extension of the linear theory can account for all the distortions, enabling us to compute the exact shape of every individual tuning curve in our networks. We show that this simple form of nonlinearity adds two important properties to orientation selectivity in the network, namely sharpening of tuning curves and extra suppression of the modulation. The theory can be further extended to account for the nonlinearity of the leaky model by replacing the rectifier by the appropriate smooth input-output transfer function. These results are robust and do not

  3. Orientation Selectivity in Inhibition-Dominated Networks of Spiking Neurons: Effect of Single Neuron Properties and Network Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sadeh, Sadra; Rotter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying the emergence of orientation selectivity in the primary visual cortex of mammals are still elusive. In rodents, visual neurons show highly selective responses to oriented stimuli, but neighboring neurons do not necessarily have similar preferences. Instead of a smooth map, one observes a salt-and-pepper organization of orientation selectivity. Modeling studies have recently confirmed that balanced random networks are indeed capable of amplifying weakly tuned inputs and generating highly selective output responses, even in absence of feature-selective recurrent connectivity. Here we seek to elucidate the neuronal mechanisms underlying this phenomenon by resorting to networks of integrate-and-fire neurons, which are amenable to analytic treatment. Specifically, in networks of perfect integrate-and-fire neurons, we observe that highly selective and contrast invariant output responses emerge, very similar to networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We then demonstrate that a theory based on mean firing rates and the detailed network topology predicts the output responses, and explains the mechanisms underlying the suppression of the common-mode, amplification of modulation, and contrast invariance. Increasing inhibition dominance in our networks makes the rectifying nonlinearity more prominent, which in turn adds some distortions to the otherwise essentially linear prediction. An extension of the linear theory can account for all the distortions, enabling us to compute the exact shape of every individual tuning curve in our networks. We show that this simple form of nonlinearity adds two important properties to orientation selectivity in the network, namely sharpening of tuning curves and extra suppression of the modulation. The theory can be further extended to account for the nonlinearity of the leaky model by replacing the rectifier by the appropriate smooth input-output transfer function. These results are robust and do not

  4. Dissociative Recombination without a Curve Crossing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    1994-01-01

    Ab initio calculations show that a curve crossing is not always needed for a high dissociative- recombination cross section. For HeH(+), in which no neutral states cross the ion potential curve, dissociative recombination is driven by the nuclear kinetic-energy operator on adiabatic potential curves. The kinetic-energy derivative operator allows for capture into repulsive curves that are outside of the classical turning points for the nuclear motion. The dominant dissociative route is the C (2)Sigma(+) state leading to H(n = 2) atoms. An analogous mechanism is proposed for the dissociative recombination of H3(+).

  5. Craniofacial Reconstruction Using Rational Cubic Ball Curves

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R. U.; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  6. Optimal strategies for adaptive curve lighting.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Michael; Schoettle, Brandon; Flannagan, Michael J; Minoda, Takako

    2005-01-01

    Conventional low beams headlamps do not provide sufficient illumination for nighttime visibility on curves. This analytical study evaluated the advantages and disadvantages of several curve-lighting strategies that involve moving one or both low beams by various amounts. Two curve radii were examined for both curve directions, using representative tungsten-halogen and high-intensity discharge low-beam patterns. The dependent variable was the maximum distance of 3-lux illumination (combined from both lamps) at a plane 0.25 m above the roadway for seven lateral positions. For short-radius, left and right curves, moving both lamps in parallel should substantially increase the visibility of objects in one's lane of travel, in several additional lanes of travel to the left and right, and off the road. Because of the lateral trade-offs of advantages and disadvantages for large-radius curves, additional research is needed to better understand the desirable approach for these types of curves. Moving both lamps in parallel into the curve is recommended for small-radius curves.

  7. A kill curve for Phanerozoic marine species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A kill curve for Phanerozoic species is developed from an analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of 17,621 genera, as compiled by Sepkoski. The kill curve shows that a typical species' risk of extinction varies greatly, with most time intervals being characterized by very low risk. The mean extinction rate of 0.25/m.y. is thus a mixture of long periods of negligible extinction and occasional pulses of much higher rate. Because the kill curve is merely a description of the fossil record, it does not speak directly to the causes of extinction. The kill curve may be useful, however, to li inverted question markmit choices of extinction mechanisms.

  8. A kill curve for Phanerozoic marine species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raup, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    A kill curve for Phanerozoic species is developed from an analysis of the stratigraphic ranges of 17,621 genera, as compiled by Sepkoski. The kill curve shows that a typical species' risk of extinction varies greatly, with most time intervals being characterized by very low risk. The mean extinction rate of 0.25/m.y. is thus a mixture of long periods of negligible extinction and occasional pulses of much higher rate. Because the kill curve is merely a description of the fossil record, it does not speak directly to the causes of extinction. The kill curve may be useful, however, to li inverted question markmit choices of extinction mechanisms.

  9. Perineuronal Nets Enhance the Excitability of Fast-Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are specialized complexes of extracellular matrix molecules that surround the somata of fast-spiking neurons throughout the vertebrate brain. PNNs are particularly prevalent throughout the auditory brainstem, which transmits signals with high speed and precision. It is unknown whether PNNs contribute to the fast-spiking ability of the neurons they surround. Whole-cell recordings were made from medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) principal neurons in acute brain slices from postnatal day 21 (P21) to P27 mice. PNNs were degraded by incubating slices in chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) and were compared to slices that were treated with a control enzyme (penicillinase). ChABC treatment did not affect the ability of MNTB neurons to fire at up to 1000 Hz when driven by current pulses. However, f–I (frequency–intensity) curves constructed by injecting Gaussian white noise currents superimposed on DC current steps showed that ChABC treatment reduced the gain of spike output. An increase in spike threshold may have contributed to this effect, which is consistent with the observation that spikes in ChABC-treated cells were delayed relative to control-treated cells. In addition, parvalbumin-expressing fast-spiking cortical neurons in >P70 slices that were treated with ChABC also had reduced excitability and gain. The development of PNNs around somata of fast-spiking neurons may be essential for fast and precise sensory transmission and synaptic inhibition in the brain. PMID:27570824

  10. The Reliability of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Theodore Holmes

    1970-01-01

    The prevalent probabilistic view is virtually untestable; it remains a plausible belief. The cases usually cited can not be taken as evidence for it. Several grounds for this conclusion are developed. Three issues are distinguished in an attempt to clarify a murky debate: (a) the utility of probabilistic methods in data reduction, (b) the value of models that assume indeterminacy, and (c) the validity of the inference that the nervous system is largely indeterministic at the neuronal level. No exception is taken to the first two; the second is a private heuristic question. The third is the issue to which the assertion in the first two sentences is addressed. Of the two kinds of uncertainty, statistical mechanical (= practical unpredictability) as in a gas, and Heisenbergian indeterminancy, the first certainly exists, the second is moot at the neuronal level. It would contribute to discussion to recognize that neurons perform with a degree of reliability. Although unreliability is difficult to establish, to say nothing of measure, evidence that some neurons have a high degree of reliability, in both connections and activity is increasing greatly. An example is given from sternarchine electric fish. PMID:5462670

  11. The neuron classification problem

    PubMed Central

    Bota, Mihail; Swanson, Larry W.

    2007-01-01

    A systematic account of neuron cell types is a basic prerequisite for determining the vertebrate nervous system global wiring diagram. With comprehensive lineage and phylogenetic information unavailable, a general ontology based on structure-function taxonomy is proposed and implemented in a knowledge management system, and a prototype analysis of select regions (including retina, cerebellum, and hypothalamus) presented. The supporting Brain Architecture Knowledge Management System (BAMS) Neuron ontology is online and its user interface allows queries about terms and their definitions, classification criteria based on the original literature and “Petilla Convention” guidelines, hierarchies, and relations—with annotations documenting each ontology entry. Combined with three BAMS modules for neural regions, connections between regions and neuron types, and molecules, the Neuron ontology provides a general framework for physical descriptions and computational modeling of neural systems. The knowledge management system interacts with other web resources, is accessible in both XML and RDF/OWL, is extendible to the whole body, and awaits large-scale data population requiring community participation for timely implementation. PMID:17582506

  12. Nanoresolution radiology of neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.R.; Chen, S.T.; Chu, Y.S.; Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Chien, C.C.; Chen, H.H.; Lin, C.H.; Tung, H.T.; Chen, Y.S.; Margaritondo, G.; Je, J.H.; Hwu, Y.

    2013-04-08

    We report recent advances in hard-x-ray optics - including record spatial resolution - and in staining techniques that enable synchrotron microradiology to produce neurobiology images of quality comparable to electron and visible microscopy. In addition, microradiology offers excellent penetration and effective three-dimensional detection as required for many neuron studies. Our tests include tomographic reconstruction based on projection image sets.

  13. Neuronal porosome lipidome.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kenneth T; Maddipati, Krishna R; Taatjes, Douglas J; Jena, Bhanu P

    2014-10-01

    Cup-shaped lipoprotein structures called porosomes are the universal secretory portals at the cell plasma membrane, where secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse to release intravesicular contents. In neurons, porosomes measure ~15 nm and are comprised of nearly 40 proteins, among them SNAREs, ion channels, the G(αo) G-protein and several structural proteins. Earlier studies report the interaction of specific lipids and their influence on SNAREs, ion channels and G-protein function. Our own studies demonstrate the requirement of cholesterol for the maintenance of neuronal porosome integrity, and the influence of lipids on SNARE complex assembly. In this study, to further understand the role of lipids on porosome structure-function, the lipid composition of isolated neuronal porosome was determined using mass spectrometry. Using lipid-binding assays, the affinity of porosome-associated syntaxin-1A to various lipids was determined. Our mass spectrometry results demonstrate the presence of phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIP's) and phosphatidic acid (PA) among other lipids, and the enriched presence of ceramide (Cer), lysophosphatidylinositol phosphates (LPIP) and diacylglycerol (DAG). Lipid binding assays demonstrate the binding of neuronal porosome to cardiolipin, and confirm its association with PIP's and PA. The ability of exogenous PA to alter protein-protein interaction and neurotransmitter release is further demonstrated from the study. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  14. Nanoresolution radiology of neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H. R.; Chen, S. T.; Chu, Y. S.; Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Chien, C. C.; Chen, H. H.; Lin, C. H.; Tung, H. T.; Chen, Y. S.; Margaritondo, G.; Je, J. H.; Hwu, Y.

    2012-05-29

    We report recent advances in hard-x-ray optics—including record spatial resolution—and in staining techniques that enable synchrotron microradiology to produce neurobiology images of quality comparable to electron and visible microscopy. In addition, microradiology offers excellent penetration and effective three-dimensional detection as required for many neuron studies. Our tests include tomographic reconstruction based on projection image sets.

  15. Nanoresolution radiology of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H. R.; Chen, S. T.; Chu, Y. S.; Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Chien, C. C.; Chen, H. H.; Lin, C. H.; Tung, H. T.; Chen, Y. S.; Margaritondo, G.; Je, J. H.; Hwu, Y.

    2012-06-01

    We report recent advances in hard-x-ray optics—including record spatial resolution—and in staining techniques that enable synchrotron microradiology to produce neurobiology images of quality comparable to electron and visible microscopy. In addition, microradiology offers excellent penetration and effective three-dimensional detection as required for many neuron studies. Our tests include tomographic reconstruction based on projection image sets.

  16. Clustered protocadherins and neuronal diversity.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Teruyoshi; Yagi, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal diversity is a fundamental requirement for complex neuronal networks and brain function. The clustered protocadherin (Pcdh) family possesses several characteristic features that are important for the molecular basis of neuronal diversity. Clustered Pcdhs are expressed predominantly in the central nervous system, in neurites, growth cones, and synapses. They consist of about 60 isoforms, and their expression is stochastically and combinatorially regulated in individual neurons. The multiple clustered Pcdhs expressed in individual neurons form heteromultimeric protein complexes that exhibit homophilic adhesion properties. Theoretically, the clustered Pcdhs could generate more than 3×10(10) possible variations in each neuron and 12,720 types of cis-tetramers per neuron. The clustered Pcdhs are important for normal neuronal development. The clustered Pcdh genes have also attracted attention as a target for epigenetic regulation.

  17. Exploring neuronal activity with photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdieu, Laurent; Léger, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Information coding * Optical recordings of neuronal activity * Functional organization of the cortex at the level of a cortical column * Microarchitecture of a cortical column * Dynamics of neuronal populations * Outlook * Bibliography

  18. The Effects of Guanfacine and Phenylephrine on a Spiking Neuron Model of Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Duggins, Peter; Stewart, Terrence C; Choo, Xuan; Eliasmith, Chris

    2017-01-01

    We use a spiking neural network model of working memory (WM) capable of performing the spatial delayed response task (DRT) to investigate two drugs that affect WM: guanfacine (GFC) and phenylephrine (PHE). In this model, the loss of information over time results from changes in the spiking neural activity through recurrent connections. We reproduce the standard forgetting curve and then show that this curve changes in the presence of GFC and PHE, whose application is simulated by manipulating functional, neural, and biophysical properties of the model. In particular, applying GFC causes increased activity in neurons that are sensitive to the information currently being remembered, while applying PHE leads to decreased activity in these same neurons. Interestingly, these differential effects emerge from network-level interactions because GFC and PHE affect all neurons equally. We compare our model to both electrophysiological data from neurons in monkey dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and to behavioral evidence from monkeys performing the DRT.

  19. Cholinergic Neurons Excite Cortically Projecting Basal Forebrain GABAergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; McKenna, James T.; Zant, Janneke C.; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in the control of cortical activation and attention. Understanding the modulation of BF neuronal activity is a prerequisite to treat disorders of cortical activation involving BF dysfunction, such as Alzheimer's disease. Here we reveal the interaction between cholinergic neurons and cortically projecting BF GABAergic neurons using immunohistochemistry and whole-cell recordings in vitro. In GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, BF cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase-positive) neurons were intermingled with GABAergic (GFP+) neurons. Immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter showed that cholinergic fibers apposed putative cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing parvalbumin (PV). In coronal BF slices from GAD67-GFP knock-in or PV-tdTomato mice, pharmacological activation of cholinergic receptors with bath application of carbachol increased the firing rate of large (>20 μm diameter) BF GFP+ and PV (tdTomato+) neurons, which exhibited the intrinsic membrane properties of cortically projecting neurons. The excitatory effect of carbachol was blocked by antagonists of M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors in two subpopulations of BF GABAergic neurons [large hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and small Ih, respectively]. Ion substitution experiments and reversal potential measurements suggested that the carbachol-induced inward current was mediated mainly by sodium-permeable cation channels. Carbachol also increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic neurons/fibers caused a mecamylamine- and atropine-sensitive inward current in putative GABAergic neurons. Thus, cortically projecting, BF GABAergic/PV neurons are excited by neighboring BF and/or brainstem cholinergic neurons. Loss of cholinergic neurons in Alzheimer's disease may impair cortical activation, in part, through disfacilitation of BF cortically

  20. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  1. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  2. Parallel Curves: Getting There and Getting Back

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agnew, A. F.; Mathews, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    This note takes up the issue of parallel curves while illustrating the utility of "Mathematica" in computations. This work complements results presented earlier. The presented treatment, considering the more general case of parametric curves, provides an analysis of the appearance of cusp singularities, and emphasizes the utility of symbolic…

  3. Electrical-Discharge Machining Of Curved Passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guirguis, Kamal S.

    1993-01-01

    Electrical-discharge machining (EDM) used to cut deep hole with bends. EDM process done with articulating segmented electrode. Originally straight, electrode curved as it penetrates part, forming long, smoothly curving hole. After hole cut, honed with slurry to remove thin layer of recast metal created by EDM. Breakage of tools, hand deburring, and drilling debris eliminated.

  4. Single curved fiber sedimentation under gravity

    Treesearch

    Xiaoying Rong; Dewei Qi; Guowei He; Jun Yong Zhu; Tim Scott

    2008-01-01

    Dynamics of single curved fiber sedimentation under gravity are simulated by using the lattice Boltzmann method. The results of migration and rotation of the curved fiber at different Reynolds numbers are reported. The results show that the rotation and migration processes are sensitive to the curvature of the fiber.

  5. Single curved fiber sedimentation under gravity

    Treesearch

    Xiaoying Rong; Dewei Qi; Junyong Zhu

    2005-01-01

    Dynamics of single curved fiber sedimentation under the gravity are simulated by using lattice Boltzmann method. The results of migration and rotation of the curved fiber at different Reynolds numbers are reported. The results show that the rotation and migration processes are sensitive to the curvature of the fiber.

  6. Mixture Modeling of Individual Learning Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streeter, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We show that student learning can be accurately modeled using a mixture of learning curves, each of which specifies error probability as a function of time. This approach generalizes Knowledge Tracing [7], which can be viewed as a mixture model in which the learning curves are step functions. We show that this generality yields order-of-magnitude…

  7. Forces in the complex octonion curved space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Zi-Hua

    2016-04-01

    The paper aims to extend major equations in the electromagnetic and gravitational theories from the flat space into the complex octonion curved space. Maxwell applied simultaneously the quaternion analysis and vector terminology to describe the electromagnetic theory. It inspires subsequent scholars to study the electromagnetic and gravitational theories with the complex quaternions/octonions. Furthermore Einstein was the first to depict the gravitational theory by means of tensor analysis and curved four-space-time. Nowadays some scholars investigate the electromagnetic and gravitational properties making use of the complex quaternion/octonion curved space. From the orthogonality of two complex quaternions, it is possible to define the covariant derivative of the complex quaternion curved space, describing the gravitational properties in the complex quaternion curved space. Further it is possible to define the covariant derivative of the complex octonion curved space by means of the orthogonality of two complex octonions, depicting simultaneously the electromagnetic and gravitational properties in the complex octonion curved space. The result reveals that the connection coefficient and curvature of the complex octonion curved space will exert an influence on the field strength and field source of the electromagnetic and gravitational fields, impacting the linear momentum, angular momentum, torque, energy, and force and so forth.

  8. Forgetting Curves: Implications for Connectionist Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikstrom, Sverker

    2002-01-01

    Forgetting in long-term memory, as measured in a recall or a recognition test, is faster for items encoded more recently than for items encoded earlier. Data on forgetting curves fit a power function well. In contrast, many connectionist models predict either exponential decay or completely flat forgetting curves. This paper suggests a…

  9. Parallel Curves: Getting There and Getting Back

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agnew, A. F.; Mathews, J. H.

    2006-01-01

    This note takes up the issue of parallel curves while illustrating the utility of "Mathematica" in computations. This work complements results presented earlier. The presented treatment, considering the more general case of parametric curves, provides an analysis of the appearance of cusp singularities, and emphasizes the utility of symbolic…

  10. Forgetting Curves: Implications for Connectionist Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikstrom, Sverker

    2002-01-01

    Forgetting in long-term memory, as measured in a recall or a recognition test, is faster for items encoded more recently than for items encoded earlier. Data on forgetting curves fit a power function well. In contrast, many connectionist models predict either exponential decay or completely flat forgetting curves. This paper suggests a…

  11. Cost Curves and How They Relate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mixon, J. Wilson; Tohemy, Soumaya M.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a Web site that contains Microsoft Excel workbooks that draft consistent short-run and long-run cost curves and the text describing them. Details a common error in representing the curves. Reports that the Web site also presents revenues and profits for a price taker and a price maker. (JEH)

  12. Electrical-Discharge Machining Of Curved Passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guirguis, Kamal S.

    1993-01-01

    Electrical-discharge machining (EDM) used to cut deep hole with bends. EDM process done with articulating segmented electrode. Originally straight, electrode curved as it penetrates part, forming long, smoothly curving hole. After hole cut, honed with slurry to remove thin layer of recast metal created by EDM. Breakage of tools, hand deburring, and drilling debris eliminated.

  13. Mixtures of Receiver Operating Characteristic Curves

    PubMed Central

    Gönen, Mithat

    2014-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives ROC curves are ubiquitous in the analysis of imaging metrics as markers of both diagnosis and prognosis. While empirical estimation of ROC curves remains the most popular method, there are several reasons to consider smooth estimates based on a parametric model. Materials and Methods A mixture model is considered for modeling the distribution of the marker in the diseased population motivated by the biological observation that there is more heterogeneity in the diseased population than there is in the normal one. It is shown that this model results in an analytically tractable ROC curve which is itself a mixture of ROC curves. Results The use of CK-BB isoenzyme in diagnosis of severe head trauma is used as an example. ROC curves are fit using the direct binormal method, ROCKIT and the Box-Cox transformation as well as the proposed mixture model. The mixture model generates an ROC curve that is much closer to the empirical one than the other methods considered. Conclusions Mixtures of ROC curves can be helpful in fitting smooth ROC curves in datasets where the diseased population has higher variability than can be explained by a single distribution. PMID:23643788

  14. Curved and conformal high-pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, Paul F.; Kuczek, Andrzej E.; Zhao, Wenping

    2016-10-25

    A high-pressure vessel is provided. The high-pressure vessel may comprise a first chamber defined at least partially by a first wall, and a second chamber defined at least partially by the first wall. The first chamber and the second chamber may form a curved contour of the high-pressure vessel. A modular tank assembly is also provided, and may comprise a first mid tube having a convex geometry. The first mid tube may be defined by a first inner wall, a curved wall extending from the first inner wall, and a second inner wall extending from the curved wall. The first inner wall may be disposed at an angle relative to the second inner wall. The first mid tube may further be defined by a short curved wall opposite the curved wall and extending from the second inner wall to the first inner wall.

  15. Remote sensing used for power curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Jørgensen, H. E.; Paulsen, U. S.; Larsen, T. J.; Antoniou, I.; Thesbjerg, L.

    2008-05-01

    : Power curve measurement for large wind turbines requires taking into account more parameters than only the wind speed at hub height. Based on results from aerodynamic simulations, an equivalent wind speed taking the wind shear into account was defined and found to reduce the power standard deviation in the power curve significantly. Two LiDARs and a SoDAR are used to measure the wind profile in front of a wind turbine. These profiles are used to calculate the equivalent wind speed. The comparison of the power curves obtained with the three instruments to the traditional power curve, obtained using a cup anemometer measurement, confirms the results obtained from the simulations. Using LiDAR profiles reduces the error in power curve measurement, when these are used as relative instrument together with a cup anemometer. Results from the SoDAR do not show such promising results, probably because of noisy measurements resulting in distorted profiles.

  16. Neuronal cell cycle: the neuron itself and its circumstances.

    PubMed

    Frade, José M; Ovejero-Benito, María C

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are usually regarded as postmitotic cells that undergo apoptosis in response to cell cycle reactivation. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates the existence of a defined developmental program that induces DNA replication in specific populations of neurons, which remain in a tetraploid state for the rest of their adult life. Similarly, de novo neuronal tetraploidization has also been described in the adult brain as an early hallmark of neurodegeneration. The aim of this review is to integrate these recent developments in the context of cell cycle regulation and apoptotic cell death in neurons. We conclude that a variety of mechanisms exists in neuronal cells for G1/S and G2/M checkpoint regulation. These mechanisms, which are connected with the apoptotic machinery, can be modulated by environmental signals and the neuronal phenotype itself, thus resulting in a variety of outcomes ranging from cell death at the G1/S checkpoint to full proliferation of differentiated neurons.

  17. Alterations in oxidant/antioxidant balance, high-mobility group box 1 protein and acute phase response in cross-bred suckling piglets suffering from rotaviral enteritis.

    PubMed

    Kumar De, Ujjwal; Mukherjee, Reena; Nandi, Sukdeb; Patel, Bhimnere Hanumatnagouda Manjunatha; Dimri, Umesh; Ravishankar, Chintu; Verma, Ashok Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Rotaviral enteritis has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in piglets during their post-natal life. The present study was carried out to examine high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, acute phase response and oxidative stress indices in the serum of suckling piglets suffering from enteritis with or without association of porcine group A rotavirus infection. The present investigation utilized 23 clinical cases with signs of acute enteritis and 12 more healthy piglets of a similar age group as control animals. Out of 23 enteritis cases, 12 cases were found to be positive for porcine group A rotavirus infection as confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using specific primers for group A rotavirus, and the rest were found negative. The acute enteritis cases in piglets were associated with an elevated level of HMGB1 protein and serum haptoglobin and ceruloplasmin suggestive of an acute phase response. Among the oxidative stress indices, the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) in serum were significantly increased. A pronounced drop of total antioxidant capacity and the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as catalase and superoxide dismutase in the serum of piglets suffering from acute enteritis compared to healthy ones were also noticed. The alterations in HMGB1 protein, acute phase response and oxidative stress indices were more pronounced in cases with the involvement of porcine rotavirus as compared to rotavirus-negative cases. It is concluded that HMGB1 protein, markers of oxidative stress and acute phase proteins might play an important role in the aetiopathogenesis of porcine diarrhoea caused by rotavirus and might be true markers in diagnosing the conditions leading to the extension of the prompt and effective therapeutic care.

  18. Investigating mechanically induced phase response of the tissue by using high-speed phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yuye; Hendon, Christine P.

    2017-02-01

    Phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT), a functional extension of OCT, provides depth-resolved phase information with extra contrast. In cardiology, changes in the mechanical properties have been associated with tissue remodeling and disease progression. Here we present the capability of profiling structural deformation of the sample in vivo by using a highly stable swept source OCT system The system, operating at 1300 nm, has an A-line acquisition rate of 200 kHz. We measured the phase noise floor to be 6.5 pm±3.2 pm by placing a cover slip in the sample arm, while blocking the reference arm. We then conducted a vibrational frequency test by measuring the phase response from a polymer membrane stimulated by a pure tone acoustic wave from 10 kHz to 80 kHz. The measured frequency response agreed with the known stimulation frequency with an error < 0.005%. We further measured the phase response of 7 fresh swine hearts obtained from Green Village Packing Company through a mechanical stretching test, within 24 hours of sacrifice. The heart tissue was cut into a 1 mm slices and fixed on two motorized stages. We acquired 100,000 consecutive M-scans, while the sample is stretched at a constant velocity of 10 um/s. The depth-resolved phase image presents linear phase response over time at each depth, but the slope varies among tissue types. Our future work includes refining our experiment protocol to quantitatively measured the elastic modulus of the tissue in vivo and building a tissue classifier based on depth-resolved phase information.

  19. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN LASER TECHNOLOGY: Influence of transitions between excited singlet and triplet states on the phase response of dye solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabanov, V. V.; Rubanov, A. S.; Tolstik, A. L.

    1988-08-01

    An investigation is made of the transitions between excited singlet and triplet states, and of the effects of stereoisomerism molecules on the light-induced change in the refractive index of a dye solution. It is shown that the contribution of the ground and excited channels to the total phase response varies within a wide range depending on the spectroscopic characteristics of the medium and the parameters of the exciting radiation. An estimate is obtained of the ratio of the contributions of the resonant and thermal nonlinearities to the total change in the refractive index.

  20. Dose-response curve for anaesthetics based on the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model.

    PubMed

    Iwai, T; Kihara, H; Imaiand, K; Uchida, M

    1996-10-01

    We have analysed the dose-response curve for halothane and isoflurane according to the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) model. This model describes the nature of the physiological data reported by Wakamori, Ikemoto and Akaike for inhibitory Cl currents induced by GABA or glycine in dissociated rat brain neurones and by Herrington and colleagues for Ca2+ currents in clonal pituitary cells. With some assumptions on the difference in response to anaesthetics between patients, the model is applicable in vivo, and it also describes well the human dose-response curve for isoflurane reported by Mather, Raftery and Prys-Roberts. However, the steeply sigmoidal dose-response curve in humans for halothane presented by deJong and Eger is difficult to understand with the same model, because it gives rise to unrealistic MWC variables.

  1. Neuronal synchrony: Peculiarity and generality

    PubMed Central

    Nowotny, Thomas; Huerta, Ramon; Rabinovich, Mikhail I.

    2008-01-01

    Synchronization in neuronal systems is a new and intriguing application of dynamical systems theory. Why are neuronal systems different as a subject for synchronization? (1) Neurons in themselves are multidimensional nonlinear systems that are able to exhibit a wide variety of different activity patterns. Their “dynamical repertoire” includes regular or chaotic spiking, regular or chaotic bursting, multistability, and complex transient regimes. (2) Usually, neuronal oscillations are the result of the cooperative activity of many synaptically connected neurons (a neuronal circuit). Thus, it is necessary to consider synchronization between different neuronal circuits as well. (3) The synapses that implement the coupling between neurons are also dynamical elements and their intrinsic dynamics influences the process of synchronization or entrainment significantly. In this review we will focus on four new problems: (i) the synchronization in minimal neuronal networks with plastic synapses (synchronization with activity dependent coupling), (ii) synchronization of bursts that are generated by a group of nonsymmetrically coupled inhibitory neurons (heteroclinic synchronization), (iii) the coordination of activities of two coupled neuronal networks (partial synchronization of small composite structures), and (iv) coarse grained synchronization in larger systems (synchronization on a mesoscopic scale). PMID:19045493

  2. Add neurons, subtract anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Kheirbek, Mazen A.; Hen, René

    2014-01-01

    IN BRIEF To keep memories from becoming jumbled, the brain must encode the distinct features of events and situations in a way that allows them to be distinguished from one another—a process called pattern separation. Pattern separation enables us to distinguish dangerous situations from similar ones that pose no risk. People with defects in this ability may be prone to anxiety disorders. The process occurs in one of the two regions of the brain that generate neurons throughout life. These fledgling cells seem to be critical to pattern separation. Interventions that specifically boost the ranks of rookie neurons could provide new ways to regulate mood and possibly treat conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:24974712

  3. Three-body choreographies in given curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Toshiaki

    2009-10-01

    As shown by Johannes Kepler in 1609, in the two-body problem, the shape of the orbit, a given ellipse, and a given non-vanishing constant angular momentum determine the motion of the planet completely. Even in the three-body problem, in some cases, the shape of the orbit, conservation of the center of mass and a constant of motion (the angular momentum or the total energy) determine the motion of the three bodies. We show, by a geometrical method, that choreographic motions, in which equal mass three bodies chase each other around the same curve, will be uniquely determined for the following two cases. (i) Convex curves that have point symmetry and non-vanishing angular momentum are given. (ii) Eight-shaped curves which are similar to the curve for the figure-eight solution and the energy constant are given. The reality of the motion should be tested whether the motion satisfies an equation of motion or not. Extensions of the method for generic curves are shown. The extended methods are applicable to generic curves which do not have point symmetry. Each body may have its own curve and its own non-vanishing masses.

  4. Investigation of learning and experience curves

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, F.; Thornton, J.; Edesess, M.

    1980-04-01

    The applicability of learning and experience curves for predicting future costs of solar technologies is assessed, and the major test case is the production economics of heliostats. Alternative methods for estimating cost reductions in systems manufacture are discussed, and procedures for using learning and experience curves to predict costs are outlined. Because adequate production data often do not exist, production histories of analogous products/processes are analyzed and learning and aggregated cost curves for these surrogates estimated. If the surrogate learning curves apply, they can be used to estimate solar technology costs. The steps involved in generating these cost estimates are given. Second-generation glass-steel and inflated-bubble heliostat design concepts, developed by MDAC and GE, respectively, are described; a costing scenario for 25,000 units/yr is detailed; surrogates for cost analysis are chosen; learning and aggregate cost curves are estimated; and aggregate cost curves for the GE and MDAC designs are estimated. However, an approach that combines a neoclassical production function with a learning-by-doing hypothesis is needed to yield a cost relation compatible with the historical learning curve and the traditional cost function of economic theory.

  5. Generating artificial light curves: revisited and updated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanoulopoulos, D.; McHardy, I. M.; Papadakis, I. E.

    2013-08-01

    The production of artificial light curves with known statistical and variability properties is of great importance in astrophysics. Consolidating the confidence levels during cross-correlation studies, understanding the artefacts induced by sampling irregularities, establishing detection limits for future observatories are just some of the applications of simulated data sets. Currently, the widely used methodology of amplitude and phase randomization is able to produce artificial light curves which have a given underlying power spectral density (PSD) but which are strictly Gaussian distributed. This restriction is a significant limitation, since the majority of the light curves, e.g. active galactic nuclei, X-ray binaries, gamma-ray bursts, show strong deviations from Gaussianity exhibiting `burst-like' events in their light curves yielding long-tailed probability density functions (PDFs). In this study, we propose a simple method which is able to precisely reproduce light curves which match both the PSD and the PDF of either an observed light curve or a theoretical model. The PDF can be representative of either the parent distribution or the actual distribution of the observed data, depending on the study to be conducted for a given source. The final artificial light curves contain all of the statistical and variability properties of the observed source or theoretical model, i.e. the same PDF and PSD, respectively. Within the framework of Reproducible Research, the code and the illustrative example used in this paper are both made publicly available in the form of an interactive MATHEMATICA notebook.

  6. Statistical aspects of modeling the labor curve.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Troendle, James; Grantz, Katherine L; Reddy, Uma M

    2015-06-01

    In a recent review by Cohen and Friedman, several statistical questions on modeling labor curves were raised. This article illustrates that asking data to fit a preconceived model or letting a sufficiently flexible model fit observed data is the main difference in principles of statistical modeling between the original Friedman curve and our average labor curve. An evidence-based approach to construct a labor curve and establish normal values should allow the statistical model to fit observed data. In addition, the presence of the deceleration phase in the active phase of an average labor curve was questioned. Forcing a deceleration phase to be part of the labor curve may have artificially raised the speed of progression in the active phase with a particularly large impact on earlier labor between 4 and 6 cm. Finally, any labor curve is illustrative and may not be instructive in managing labor because of variations in individual labor pattern and large errors in measuring cervical dilation. With the tools commonly available, it may be more productive to establish a new partogram that takes the physiology of labor and contemporary obstetric population into account. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Micropatterning neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Hardelauf, Heike; Waide, Sarah; Sisnaiske, Julia; Jacob, Peter; Hausherr, Vanessa; Schöbel, Nicole; Janasek, Dirk; van Thriel, Christoph; West, Jonathan

    2014-07-07

    Spatially organised neuronal networks have wide reaching applications, including fundamental research, toxicology testing, pharmaceutical screening and the realisation of neuronal implant interfaces. Despite the large number of methods catalogued in the literature there remains the need to identify a method that delivers high pattern compliance, long-term stability and is widely accessible to neuroscientists. In this comparative study, aminated (polylysine/polyornithine and aminosilanes) and cytophobic (poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and methylated) material contrasts were evaluated. Backfilling plasma stencilled PEGylated substrates with polylysine does not produce good material contrasts, whereas polylysine patterned on methylated substrates becomes mobilised by agents in the cell culture media which results in rapid pattern decay. Aminosilanes, polylysine substitutes, are prone to hydrolysis and the chemistries prove challenging to master. Instead, the stable coupling between polylysine and PLL-g-PEG can be exploited: Microcontact printing polylysine onto a PLL-g-PEG coated glass substrate provides a simple means to produce microstructured networks of primary neurons that have superior pattern compliance during long term (>1 month) culture.

  8. Intersection of Paschen's curves for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yangyang; Yang, Shuo; Zou, Xiaobing; Luo, Haiyun; Wang, Xinxin

    2016-09-01

    The intersection of Paschen's curves for argon with a same gap length but a different electrode radius was observed. While the breakdown voltage increases with the increase of the nonuniformity in the electric field of the gap at lower pressures, it decreases at higher pressures. The reason for the intersection of Paschen's curves was given based on the mean free path length of the electrons inversely proportional to the gas pressure and the electron impact ionization coefficient exponentially increasing with the electric field. The intersection of the Paschen's curves was qualitatively reproduced by a numerical simulation.

  9. Approximation of Dynamical System's Separatrix Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavoretto, Roberto; Chaudhuri, Sanjay; De Rossi, Alessandra; Menduni, Eleonora; Moretti, Francesca; Rodi, Maria Caterina; Venturino, Ezio

    2011-09-01

    In dynamical systems saddle points partition the domain into basins of attractions of the remaining locally stable equilibria. This problem is rather common especially in population dynamics models, like prey-predator or competition systems. In this paper we construct programs for the detection of points lying on the separatrix curve, i.e. the curve which partitions the domain. Finally, an efficient algorithm, which is based on the Partition of Unity method with local approximants given by Wendland's functions, is used for reconstructing the separatrix curve.

  10. Cosmic string lensing and closed timelike curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlaer, Benjamin; Tye, S.-H. Henry

    2005-08-01

    In an analysis of the gravitational lensing by two relativistic cosmic strings, we argue that the formation of closed timelike curves proposed by Gott is unstable in the presence of particles (e.g. the cosmic microwave background radiation). Because of the attractorlike behavior of the closed timelike curve, we argue that this instability is very generic. A single graviton or photon in the vicinity, no matter how soft, is sufficient to bend the strings and prevent the formation of closed timelike curves. We also show that the gravitational lensing due to a moving cosmic string is enhanced by its motion, not suppressed.

  11. Optoacoustic endoscopy in curved scanning mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hailong; Buehler, Andreas; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-01

    Optoacoustic technique has been shown to resolve anatomical, functional and molecular features at depths that go beyond the reach of epi-illumination optical microscopy offering new opportunities for endoscopic imaging. Herein, we interrogate the merits of optoacoustic endoscopy implemented by translating a sound detector in linear or curved geometries. The linear and curved detection geometries are achieved by employing an intravascular ultrasound transducer (IVUS) within a plastic guide shaped to a line or a curve. This concept could be used together with optical endoscopes to yield hybrid optical and optoacoustic imaging.

  12. Growth curves for twins in Slovenia.

    PubMed

    Bricelj, Katja; Blickstein, Isaac; Bržan-Šimenc, Gabrijela; Janša, Vid; Lučovnik, Miha; Verdenik, Ivan; Trojner-Bregar, Andreja; Tul, Nataša

    2017-02-01

    Abnormalities of fetal growth are more common in twins. We introduce the growth curves for monitoring fetal growth in twin pregnancies in Slovenia. Slovenian National Perinatal Information System for the period between 2002 and 2010 was used to calculate birth weight percentiles for all live born twins for each week from 22nd to 40th week. The calculated percentiles of birth weight for all live-born twins in Slovenia served as the basis for drawing 'growth' curves. The calculated growth curves for twins will help accurately diagnose small or large twin fetuses for their gestational age in the native central European population.

  13. Linear instability of curved free shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.

    1993-01-01

    The linear inviscid hydrodynamic stability of slightly curved free mixing layers is studied in this paper. The disturbance equation is solved numerically using a shooting technique. Two mean velocity profiles that represent stably and unstably curved free mixing layers are considered. Results are shown for cases of five curvature Richardson numbers. The stability characteristics of the shear layer are found to vary significantly with the introduction of the curvature effects. The results also indicate that, in a manner similar to the Goertler vortices observed in a boundary layer along a concave wall, instability modes of spatially developing streamwise vortex pairs may appear in centrifugally unstable curved mixing layers.

  14. 3He-melting-curve thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greywall, Dennis S.; Busch, Paul A.

    1982-03-01

    Precise measurements of the P-T relation along the melting curve of3He have been made for 8≲ T≲330 mK. The results are in excellent agreement with other precise data for temperatures near the extremes of this range. A best-fit relation is provided which describes the melting curve to within ±1 mbar between the superfluid A transition and the pressure minimum. Detailed descriptions of the melting curve and magnetic thermometers used for the calibration are also given.

  15. Shaped curve by blending two circular arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakaria, Wan Zafira Ezza Wan; Ali, Jamaludin Md

    2014-07-01

    Segments of two given circular arcs can be blended to produce a segment of a new curve. The new curve that been produced which also known as blending curve is form in a C-shape. That's mean the two circular arcs are blend at the same endpoints. Bezier Curve refer to [1] is the main application in this construction of blending curve. As the two circular arcs are create using the Rational Bezier Curve for the shape refer to [2]. First degree of Bezier Curve is use in blending function along with functionH(t). Blending can provide a smooth transition from one curve to another and can give various degrees of smoothness at the endpoints of the blend, where the smoothness is measured analogously to parametric continuity, Cn and geometric continuity, Gn. The accuracy of the approximation to a best blending curve obtained by different blending formulas is compared via analysis. Two types of blending formula introduced, which are Blend A and B. Blend A which involve only parametric continuity, C0, C1 and C2 Blend A. Next, new blending formula known as Blend B which actually a correction to the C0 Blend A. So, some correction term are added to the blending function in C0 Blend A for obtaining parametric continuity, C1 and C2 Blend B. Then, geometric continuity use for Blend B by increasing the smoothness of blending curve that result in parametric continuity. Some free parameter are added to the original blending function of C1 and C2 Blend B and secure to be G1 and G2 Blend B. Finally, the curvature which measures how quickly a tangent line turns on a curve is applied. So, appropriate result of blending curve can be obtained through the observation of the shape which lies within the convex hull of their control points and its curvature value at the start and end points equal to the curvature of the two circular arcs that are being blended.

  16. Are Driving and Overtaking on Right Curves More Dangerous than on Left Curves?

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Sarbaz; Thomson, Robert; Lannér, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that crashes on horizontal curves are a cause for concern in all countries due to the frequency and severity of crashes at curves compared to road tangents. A recent study of crashes in western Sweden reported a higher rate of crashes in right curves than left curves. To further understand this result, this paper reports the results of novel analyses of the responses of vehicles and drivers during negotiating and overtaking maneuvers on curves for right hand traffic. The overall objectives of the study were to find road parameters for curves that affect vehicle dynamic responses, to analyze these responses during overtaking maneuvers on curves, and to link the results with driver behavior for different curve directions. The studied road features were speed, super-elevation, radius and friction including their interactions, while the analyzed vehicle dynamic factors were lateral acceleration and yaw angular velocity. A simulation program, PC-Crash, has been used to simulate road parameters and vehicle response interaction in curves. Overtaking maneuvers have been simulated for all road feature combinations in a total of 108 runs. Analysis of variances (ANOVA) was performed, using two sided randomized block design, to find differences in vehicle responses for the curve parameters. To study driver response, a field test using an instrumented vehicle and 32 participants was reviewed as it contained longitudinal speed and acceleration data for analysis. The simulation results showed that road features affect overtaking performance in right and left curves differently. Overtaking on right curves was sensitive to radius and the interaction of radius with road condition; while overtaking on left curves was more sensitive to super-elevation. Comparisons of lateral acceleration and yaw angular velocity during these maneuvers showed different vehicle response configurations depending on curve direction and maneuver path. The field test experiments also showed

  17. Are driving and overtaking on right curves more dangerous than on left curves?

    PubMed

    Othman, Sarbaz; Thomson, Robert; Lannér, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that crashes on horizontal curves are a cause for concern in all countries due to the frequency and severity of crashes at curves compared to road tangents. A recent study of crashes in western Sweden reported a higher rate of crashes in right curves than left curves. To further understand this result, this paper reports the results of novel analyses of the responses of vehicles and drivers during negotiating and overtaking maneuvers on curves for right hand traffic. The overall objectives of the study were to find road parameters for curves that affect vehicle dynamic responses, to analyze these responses during overtaking maneuvers on curves, and to link the results with driver behavior for different curve directions. The studied road features were speed, super-elevation, radius and friction including their interactions, while the analyzed vehicle dynamic factors were lateral acceleration and yaw angular velocity. A simulation program, PC-Crash, has been used to simulate road parameters and vehicle response interaction in curves. Overtaking maneuvers have been simulated for all road feature combinations in a total of 108 runs. Analysis of variances (ANOVA) was performed, using two sided randomized block design, to find differences in vehicle responses for the curve parameters. To study driver response, a field test using an instrumented vehicle and 32 participants was reviewed as it contained longitudinal speed and acceleration data for analysis. The simulation results showed that road features affect overtaking performance in right and left curves differently. Overtaking on right curves was sensitive to radius and the interaction of radius with road condition; while overtaking on left curves was more sensitive to super-elevation. Comparisons of lateral acceleration and yaw angular velocity during these maneuvers showed different vehicle response configurations depending on curve direction and maneuver path. The field test experiments also showed

  18. Existence and stability criteria for phase-locked modes in ring neural networks based on the spike time resetting curve method.

    PubMed

    Oprisan, Sorinel Adrian

    2010-01-21

    We developed a systematic and consistent mathematical approach to predicting 1:1 phase-locked modes in ring neural networks of spiking neurons based on the open loop spike time resetting curve (STRC) and its almost equivalent counterpart-the phase resetting curve (PRC). The open loop STRCs/PRCs were obtained by injecting into an isolated model neuron a triangular shaped time-dependent stimulus current closely resembling an actual synaptic input. Among other advantages, the STRC eliminates the confusion regarding the undefined phase for stimuli driving the neuron outside of the unperturbed limit cycle. We derived both open loop PRC and STRC-based existence and stability criteria for 1:1 phase-locked modes developed in ring networks of spiking neurons. Our predictions were in good agreement with the closed loop numerical simulations. Intuitive graphical methods for predicting phase-locked modes were also developed both for half-centers and for larger ring networks.

  19. Consistent estimation of complete neuronal connectivity in large neuronal populations using sparse "shotgun" neuronal activity sampling.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, Yuriy

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the properties of recently proposed "shotgun" sampling approach for the common inputs problem in the functional estimation of neuronal connectivity. We study the asymptotic correctness, the speed of convergence, and the data size requirements of such an approach. We show that the shotgun approach can be expected to allow the inference of complete connectivity matrix in large neuronal populations under some rather general conditions. However, we find that the posterior error of the shotgun connectivity estimator grows quickly with the size of unobserved neuronal populations, the square of average connectivity strength, and the square of observation sparseness. This implies that the shotgun connectivity estimation will require significantly larger amounts of neuronal activity data whenever the number of neurons in observed neuronal populations remains small. We present a numerical approach for solving the shotgun estimation problem in general settings and use it to demonstrate the shotgun connectivity inference in the examples of simulated synfire and weakly coupled cortical neuronal networks.

  20. Solid-state curved focal plane arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael (Inventor); Jones, Todd (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to curved focal plane arrays. More specifically, the present invention relates to a system and method for making solid-state curved focal plane arrays from standard and high-purity devices that may be matched to a given optical system. There are two ways to make a curved focal plane arrays starting with the fully fabricated device. One way, is to thin the device and conform it to a curvature. A second way, is to back-illuminate a thick device without making a thinned membrane. The thick device is a special class of devices; for example devices fabricated with high purity silicon. One surface of the device (the non VLSI fabricated surface, also referred to as the back surface) can be polished to form a curved surface.

  1. Modeling Type IIn Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Rosa, Janie; Roming, Peter; Fryer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present near-by Type IIn supernovae observed with Swift's Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Based on the diversity of optical light curve properties, this Type II subclass is commonly referred to as heterogeneous. At the time of discovery, our IIn sample is ~ 2 magnitudes brighter at ultraviolet wavelengths than at optical wavelengths, and ultraviolet brightness decays faster than the optical brightness. We use a semi-analytical supernova (SN) model to better understand our IIn observations, and focus on matching specific observed light curves features, i.e peak luminosity and decay rate. The SN models are used to study the effects of initial SN conditions on early light curves, and to show the extent of the "uniqueness" problem in SN light curves. We gratefully acknowledge the contributions from members of the Swift UVOT team, the NASA astrophysics archival data analysis program, and the NASA Swift guest investigator program.

  2. Aluminized fiberglass insulation conforms to curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Layers of fiber glass with outer reflective films of vacuum-deposited aluminum or other reflective metal, provide thermal insulation which conforms to curved surfaces. This insulation has good potential for cryogenic systems.

  3. Classification of ASKAP Vast Radio Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbapragada, Umaa; Lo, Kitty; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Reed, Colorado; Murphy, Tara; Thompson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The VAST survey is a wide-field survey that observes with unprecedented instrument sensitivity (0.5 mJy or lower) and repeat cadence (a goal of 5 seconds) that will enable novel scientific discoveries related to known and unknown classes of radio transients and variables. Given the unprecedented observing characteristics of VAST, it is important to estimate source classification performance, and determine best practices prior to the launch of ASKAP's BETA in 2012. The goal of this study is to identify light curve characterization and classification algorithms that are best suited for archival VAST light curve classification. We perform our experiments on light curve simulations of eight source types and achieve best case performance of approximately 90% accuracy. We note that classification performance is most influenced by light curve characterization rather than classifier algorithm.

  4. Curve of calcium deoxidation of iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotel'nikov, G. I.; Zubarev, K. A.; Movenko, D. A.; Pavlov, A. V.; Semin, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    The experimental data reflecting the thermodynamic features of deoxidation of liquid iron with metallic calcium are analyzed. A correction technique is proposed for a metallic melt-deoxidizer deoxidation curve according to the standard state by Henry's law.

  5. Bounded Population Growth: A Curve Fitting Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, John H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents two mathematical methods for fitting the logistic curve to population data supplied by the U.S. Census Bureau utilizing computer algebra software to carry out the computations and plot graphs. (JKK)

  6. Classification of ASKAP Vast Radio Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebbapragada, Umaa; Lo, Kitty; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Reed, Colorado; Murphy, Tara; Thompson, David R.

    2012-01-01

    The VAST survey is a wide-field survey that observes with unprecedented instrument sensitivity (0.5 mJy or lower) and repeat cadence (a goal of 5 seconds) that will enable novel scientific discoveries related to known and unknown classes of radio transients and variables. Given the unprecedented observing characteristics of VAST, it is important to estimate source classification performance, and determine best practices prior to the launch of ASKAP's BETA in 2012. The goal of this study is to identify light curve characterization and classification algorithms that are best suited for archival VAST light curve classification. We perform our experiments on light curve simulations of eight source types and achieve best case performance of approximately 90% accuracy. We note that classification performance is most influenced by light curve characterization rather than classifier algorithm.

  7. Asymmetry Dependence of the Nuclear Caloric Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Bonasera, A.; Cammarata, P.; Hagel, K.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; May, L. W.; Marini, P.; Raphelt, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Wuenschel, S.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2013-03-01

    A basic feature of the nuclear equation of state is not yet understood: the dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on the neutron-proton asymmetry. Predictions of theoretical models differ on the magnitude and even the sign of this dependence. In this work, the nuclear caloric curve is examined for fully reconstructed quasi-projectiles around mass A = 50. Two independent thermometers, the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer and the Albergo yield ratio thermometer, are used to extract the caloric curve. For both methods, the caloric curve extracted shows that the temperature varies linearly with quasi-projectile asymmetry For the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer, an increase in asymmetry of 0.15 units corresponds to a decrease in temperature on the order of 1 MeV. These results also highlight the importance of a full quasi-projectile reconstruction in the study of thermodynamic properties of hot nuclei.

  8. Transmission of wave energy in curved ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostafinski, W.

    1973-01-01

    A formation of wave energy flow was developed for motion in curved ducts. A parametric study over a range of frequencies determined the ability of circular bends to transmit energy for the case of perfectly rigid walls.

  9. The frequency preference of neurons and synapses in a recurrent oscillatory network.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hua-an; Martinez, Diana; Nadim, Farzan

    2014-09-17

    A variety of neurons and synapses shows a maximal response at a preferred frequency, generally considered to be important in shaping network activity. We are interested in whether all neurons and synapses in a recurrent oscillatory network can have preferred frequencies and, if so, whether these frequencies are the same or correlated, and whether they influence the network activity. We address this question using identified neurons in the pyloric network of the crab Cancer borealis. Previous work has shown that the pyloric pacemaker neurons exhibit membrane potential resonance whose resonance frequency is correlated with the network frequency. The follower lateral pyloric (LP) neuron makes reciprocally inhibitory synapses with the pacemakers. We find that LP shows resonance at a higher frequency than the pacemakers and the network frequency falls between the two. We also find that the reciprocal synapses between the pacemakers and LP have preferred frequencies but at significantly lower values. The preferred frequency of the LP to pacemaker synapse is correlated with the presynaptic preferred frequency, which is most pronounced when the peak voltage of the LP waveform is within the dynamic range of the synaptic activation curve and a shift in the activation curve by the modulatory neuropeptide proctolin shifts the frequency preference. Proctolin also changes the power of the LP neuron resonance without significantly changing the resonance frequency. These results indicate that different neuron types and synapses in a network may have distinct preferred frequencies, which are subject to neuromodulation and may interact to shape network oscillations.

  10. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Vivian M.; Hegeman, Daniel J.; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A.; Fiske, Michael P.; Glajch, Kelly E.; Pitt, Jason E.; Huang, Tina Y.; Justice, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically, a more precise classification scheme is needed to better describe the fundamental biology and function of different GPe neuron classes. To this end, we generated a novel multicistronic BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line under the regulatory elements of the Npas1 gene. Using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach, we discovered that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons in the GPe represent two nonoverlapping cell classes, amounting to 55% and 27% of the total GPe neuron population, respectively. These two genetically identified cell classes projected primarily to the subthalamic nucleus and to the striatum, respectively. Additionally, parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons were distinct in their autonomous and driven firing characteristics, their expression of intrinsic ion conductances, and their responsiveness to chronic 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. In summary, our data argue that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons are two distinct functional classes of GPe neurons. This work revises our understanding of the GPe, and provides the foundation for future studies of its function and dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Until recently, the heterogeneity of the constituent neurons within the external globus pallidus (GPe) was not fully appreciated. We addressed this knowledge gap by discovering two principal GPe neuron classes, which were identified by their nonoverlapping

  11. Estimating power curves of flying vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Rayner, J M

    1999-12-01

    The power required for flight in any flying animal is a function of flight speed. The power curve that describes this function has become an icon of studies of flight mechanics and physiology because it encapsulates the accessible animal's flight performance. The mechanical or aerodynamic power curve, describing the increase in kinetic energy of the air due to the passage of the bird, is necessarily U-shaped, for aerodynamic reasons, and can be estimated adequately by lifting-line theory. Predictions from this and related models agree well with measured mechanical work in flight and with results from flow visualization experiments. The total or metabolic power curve also includes energy released by the animal as heat, and is more variable in shape. These curves may be J-shaped for smaller birds and bats, but are difficult to predict theoretically owing to uncertainty about internal physiological processes and the efficiency of the flight muscles. The limitations of some existing models aiming to predict metabolic power curves are considered. The metabolic power curve can be measured for birds or bats flying in wind tunnels at controlled speeds. Simultaneous determination in European starlings Sturnus vulgaris of oxygen uptake, total metabolic rate (using labelled isotopes), aerodynamic power output and heat released (using digital video thermography) enable power curves to be determined with confidence; flight muscle efficiency is surprisingly low (averaging 15-18 %) and increases moderately with flight speed, so that the metabolic power curve is shallower than predicted by models. Accurate knowledge of the power curve is essential since extensive predictions of flight behaviour have been based upon it. The hypothesis that the power curve may not in fact exist, in the sense that the cost of flight may not be perceived by a bird as a continuous smooth function of air speed, is advanced but has not yet formally been tested. This hypothesis is considered together with

  12. Topology of the Space of Nondegenerate Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, M. Z.

    1994-04-01

    A curve on a sphere or on a projective space is called nondegenerate if it has a nondegenerate moving frame at every point. The number of homotopy classes of closed nondegenerate curves immersed in the sphere or projective space is computed. In the case of the sphere Sn, this turns out to be 4 for odd n>=3 and 6 for even n>=2 in the case of the projective space Pn, 10 for odd n>=3 and 3 for even n>=2.

  13. TS - Dean interactions in curved channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Bart A.; Zang, Thomas A.; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1990-01-01

    A weakly nonlinear theory is developed to study the interaction of TS waves and Dean vortices in curved channel flow. The prediction obtained from the theory agree well with results obtained from direct numerical simulations of curved channel flow, especially for low amplitude disturbances. At low Reynolds numbers the wave interaction is generally stabilizing to both disturbances, though as the Reynolds number increases, many linearly unstable TS waves are further destabilized by the presence of Dean vortices.

  14. Anomalies in curved spacetime at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Boschi-Filho, H. Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus de Guaratingueta, 12500 Guaratingueta, Caixa Postal 205 Sao Paulo ); Natividade, C.P. )

    1992-12-15

    We discuss the problem of the breakdown of conformal and gauge symmetries at finite temperature in curved-spacetime background, when the changes in the background are gradual, in order to have a well-defined quantum field theory at finite temperature. We obtain the expressions for Seeley's coefficients and the heat-kernel expansion in this regime. As applications, we consider the self-interacting [lambda][phi][sup 4] and chiral Schwinger models in curved backgrounds at finite temperature.

  15. Meteor light curves: the relevant parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosch, N.; Helled, Ravit; Polishook, D.; Almoznino, E.; David, N.

    2004-11-01

    We investigate a uniform sample of 113 light curves of meteors collected at the Wise Observatory in 2002 November during a campaign to observe the Leonid meteor shower. We use previously defined descriptors, such as the classical skewness parameter F and a recently defined pointedness variable P, along with a number of other measurable or derived quantities, in order to explore the parameter space in search of meaningful light curve descriptors. In comparison with previous publications, we make extensive use of statistical techniques to reveal links among the various parameters and to understand their relative importance. In particular, we show that meteors with long-duration trails rise slowly to their maximal brightness and also decay slowly from the peak, while showing milder flaring than other meteors. Early skewed meteors, with their peak brightness in the first half of the light curve, show a fast rise to the peak. We show that the duration of the luminous phase of the meteor is the most important variable differentiating among the 2002 meteor trails. The skewness parameter F, which is widely used in meteor light curve analyses, appears only as the second or third in order of importance in explaining the variance among the observed light curves, with the most important parameter being related to the duration of the meteor light-producing phase. We suggest that the pointedness parameter P could possibly be useful in describing differences among meteor showers, perhaps by being related to the different compositions of meteoroids, and also in comparing observations to model light curves. We compare the derived characteristics of the 2002 meteors with model predictions and conclude that more work is required to define a consistent set of measurable and derived light-curve parameters that would characterize the light production from meteors. We suggest that meteor observers should consider publishing more characterizing parameters from the light curves they

  16. Isentropic fluid dynamics in a curved pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, Rinaldo M.; Holden, Helge

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we study isentropic flow in a curved pipe. We focus on the consequences of the geometry of the pipe on the dynamics of the flow. More precisely, we present the solution of the general Cauchy problem for isentropic fluid flow in an arbitrarily curved, piecewise smooth pipe. We consider initial data in the subsonic regime, with small total variation about a stationary solution. The proof relies on the front-tracking method and is based on [1].

  17. Deformability curve for K18 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Pospiech, J.

    1999-12-01

    The problem of the best utilization of plasticity in plastic working processes of metals, at low resistance to deformation and maximum utilization of capacity of installations has gained great importance, especially in recent years. Determination of plasticity of materials by the method of Kolmogorow is described. Variation of the stress factor for several plastic working processes is also described. Tests to plot the deformability curve (also referred to as reserve of plasticity curve) were selected and proved.

  18. On the Light Curves of AM CVn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smak, J.

    2017-03-01

    Light curves of AM CVn are analyzed by decomposing them into their Fourier components. The amplitudes of the fundamental mode and overtones of the three components: the superhumps, the negative superhumps and the orbital variations, are found to be variable. This implies that variations in the shape of the observed light curve of AM CVn are not only due to the interference between those components, but also due to the intrinsic variability within these components.

  19. Learning curves in health professions education.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Martin V; Boutis, Kathy; Hatala, Rose; Cook, David A

    2015-08-01

    Learning curves, which graphically show the relationship between learning effort and achievement, are common in published education research but are not often used in day-to-day educational activities. The purpose of this article is to describe the generation and analysis of learning curves and their applicability to health professions education. The authors argue that the time is right for a closer look at using learning curves-given their desirable properties-to inform both self-directed instruction by individuals and education management by instructors.A typical learning curve is made up of a measure of learning (y-axis), a measure of effort (x-axis), and a mathematical linking function. At the individual level, learning curves make manifest a single person's progress towards competence including his/her rate of learning, the inflection point where learning becomes more effortful, and the remaining distance to mastery attainment. At the group level, overlaid learning curves show the full variation of a group of learners' paths through a given learning domain. Specifically, they make overt the difference between time-based and competency-based approaches to instruction. Additionally, instructors can use learning curve information to more accurately target educational resources to those who most require them.The learning curve approach requires a fine-grained collection of data that will not be possible in all educational settings; however, the increased use of an assessment paradigm that explicitly includes effort and its link to individual achievement could result in increased learner engagement and more effective instructional design.

  20. Neutron cross sections: Book of curves

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Dunford, C.L.; Rose, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    Neuton Cross Sections: Book of Curves represents the fourth edition of what was previously known as BNL-325, Neutron Cross Sections, Volume 2, CURVES. Data is presented only for (i.e., intergrated) reaction cross sections (and related fission parameters) as a function of incident-neutron energy for the energy range 0.01 eV to 200 MeV. For the first time, isometric state production cross sections have been included. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Stimulus features coded by single neurons of a macaque body category selective patch.

    PubMed

    Popivanov, Ivo D; Schyns, Philippe G; Vogels, Rufin

    2016-04-26

    Body category-selective regions of the primate temporal cortex respond to images of bodies, but it is unclear which fragments of such images drive single neurons' responses in these regions. Here we applied the Bubbles technique to the responses of single macaque middle superior temporal sulcus (midSTS) body patch neurons to reveal the image fragments the neurons respond to. We found that local image fragments such as extremities (limbs), curved boundaries, and parts of the torso drove the large majority of neurons. Bubbles revealed the whole body in only a few neurons. Neurons coded the features in a manner that was tolerant to translation and scale changes. Most image fragments were excitatory but for a few neurons both inhibitory and excitatory fragments (opponent coding) were present in the same image. The fragments we reveal here in the body patch with Bubbles differ from those suggested in previous studies of face-selective neurons in face patches. Together, our data indicate that the majority of body patch neurons respond to local image fragments that occur frequently, but not exclusively, in bodies, with a coding that is tolerant to translation and scale. Overall, the data suggest that the body category selectivity of the midSTS body patch depends more on the feature statistics of bodies (e.g., extensions occur more frequently in bodies) than on semantics (bodies as an abstract category).

  2. Probing exoplanet clouds with optical phase curves.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Antonio García; Isaak, Kate G

    2015-11-03

    Kepler-7b is to date the only exoplanet for which clouds have been inferred from the optical phase curve--from visible-wavelength whole-disk brightness measurements as a function of orbital phase. Added to this, the fact that the phase curve appears dominated by reflected starlight makes this close-in giant planet a unique study case. Here we investigate the information on coverage and optical properties of the planet clouds contained in the measured phase curve. We generate cloud maps of Kepler-7b and use a multiple-scattering approach to create synthetic phase curves, thus connecting postulated clouds with measurements. We show that optical phase curves can help constrain the composition and size of the cloud particles. Indeed, model fitting for Kepler-7b requires poorly absorbing particles that scatter with low-to-moderate anisotropic efficiency, conclusions consistent with condensates of silicates, perovskite, and silica of submicron radii. We also show that we are limited in our ability to pin down the extent and location of the clouds. These considerations are relevant to the interpretation of optical phase curves with general circulation models. Finally, we estimate that the spherical albedo of Kepler-7b over the Kepler passband is in the range 0.4-0.5.

  3. Single-shot curved slice imaging.

    PubMed

    Jochimsen, Thies H; Norris, David G

    2002-03-01

    The feasibility of imaging a curved slice with a single-shot technique so that the reconstructed image shows an un-warping of the slice is examined. This could be of practical importance when the anatomical structures of interest can be more efficiently covered with curved slices than with a series of flat planes. One possible example of such a structure is the cortex of the human brain. Functional imaging would especially benefit from this technique because several planar images can be replaced by a few curved slice images. A method is introduced that is based on multidimensional pulses to excite the desired curved slice profile. A GRASE imaging sequence is then applied that is tailored to the k-space representation of the curved slice. This makes it possible to capture the in-plane information of the slice with a single-shot technique. The method presented is limited to slices that are straight along one axis and can be approximated by a polygon. Reconstruction is performed using a simple numeric Fourier integration along the curved slice. This leads to an image that shows the desired un-warped representation of the slice. Experimental results obtained with this method from healthy volunteers are presented and demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed technique.

  4. Effectivizing the geometry of the curve complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aougab, Tarik

    This thesis is devoted to understanding how the geometry of the curve complex of a surface S, the Teichmuller space of S, and of the mapping class group of S explicitly depend on the underlying topology of S. Moreover, this thesis demonstrates that the geometry of the mapping class group, and the tools used to study this geometry such as Masur and Minsky's celebrated distance formula, can be used to answer basic, but surprisingly challenging questions related to the combinatorial properties of curves on surfaces. In particular, we prove that all curve graphs are uniformly hyperbolic, independent of the topology of the underlying surface. We also give effective versions of several results regarding train track splitting sequences, and the subset of the curve graph corresponding to curves which bound disks in a handlebody. Finally, we study the local geometry of a family of curve graphs all related to the same surface, and specifically we give upper and lower bounds on the maximum size of a complete subgraph for these graphs.

  5. Tutorial: using confidence curves in medical research.

    PubMed

    Bender, Ralf; Berg, Gabriele; Zeeb, Hajo

    2005-04-01

    Confidence intervals represent a routinely used standard method to document the uncertainty of estimated effects. In most cases, for the calculation of confidence intervals the conventional fixed 95% confidence level is used. Confidence curves represent a graphical illustration of confidence intervals for confidence levels varying between 0 and 100%. Although such graphs have been repeatedly proposed under different names during the last 40 years, confidence curves are rarely used in medical research. In this paper, we introduce confidence curves and present a short historical review. We draw attention to the different interpretation of one- and two-sided statistical inference. It is shown that these two options also have influence on the plotting of appropriate confidence curves. We illustrate the use of one- and two-sided confidence curves and explain their correct interpretation. In medical research more emphasis on the choice between the one- and two-sided approaches should be given. One- and two-sided confidence curves are useful complements to the conventional methods of presenting study results.

  6. GPU accelerated curve fitting with IDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloy, M.

    2012-12-01

    Curve fitting is a common mathematical calculation done in all scientific areas. The Interactive Data Language (IDL) is also widely used in this community for data analysis and visualization. We are creating a general-purpose, GPU accelerated curve fitting library for use from within IDL. We have developed GPULib, a library of routines in IDL for accelerating common scientific operations including arithmetic, FFTs, interpolation, and others. These routines are accelerated using modern GPUs using NVIDIA's CUDA architecture. We will add curve fitting routines to the GPULib library suite, making curve fitting much faster. In addition, library routines required for efficient curve fitting will also be generally useful to other users of GPULib. In particular, a GPU accelerated LAPACK implementation such as MAGMA is required for the Levenberg-Marquardt curve fitting and is commonly used in many other scientific computations. Furthermore, the ability to evaluate custom expressions at runtime necessary for specifying a function model will be useful for users in all areas.

  7. Geometric Observers for Dynamically Evolving Curves

    PubMed Central

    Niethammer, Marc; Vela, Patricio A.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a deterministic observer design for visual tracking based on nonparametric implicit (level-set) curve descriptions. The observer is continuous discrete with continuous-time system dynamics and discrete-time measurements. Its state-space consists of an estimated curve position augmented by additional states (e.g., velocities) associated with every point on the estimated curve. Multiple simulation models are proposed for state prediction. Measurements are performed through standard static segmentation algorithms and optical-flow computations. Special emphasis is given to the geometric formulation of the overall dynamical system. The discrete-time measurements lead to the problem of geometric curve interpolation and the discrete-time filtering of quantities propagated along with the estimated curve. Interpolation and filtering are intimately linked to the correspondence problem between curves. Correspondences are established by a Laplace-equation approach. The proposed scheme is implemented completely implicitly (by Eulerian numerical solutions of transport equations) and thus naturally allows for topological changes and subpixel accuracy on the computational grid. PMID:18421113

  8. Piecewise power laws in individual learning curves.

    PubMed

    Donner, Yoni; Hardy, Joseph L

    2015-10-01

    The notion that human learning follows a smooth power law (PL) of diminishing gains is well-established in psychology. This characteristic is observed when multiple curves are averaged, potentially masking more complex dynamics underpinning the curves of individual learners. Here, we analyzed 25,280 individual learning curves, each comprising 500 measurements of cognitive performance taken from four cognitive tasks. A piecewise PL (PPL) model explained the individual learning curves significantly better than a single PL, controlling for model complexity. The PPL model allows for multiple PLs connected at different points in the learning process. We also explored the transition dynamics between PL curve component pieces. Performance in later pieces typically surpassed that in earlier pieces, after a brief drop in performance at the transition point. The transition rate was negatively associated with age, even after controlling for overall performance. Our results suggest at least two processes at work in individual learning curves: locally, a gradual, smooth improvement, with diminishing gains within a specific strategy, which is modeled well as a PL; and globally, a discrete sequence of strategy shifts, in which each strategy is better in the long term than the ones preceding it. The piecewise extension of the classic PL of practice has implications for both individual skill acquisition and theories of learning.

  9. Melatonin entrains free-running blind people according to a physiological dose-response curve.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Alfred J; Emens, Jonathan S; Lefler, Bryan J; Yuhas, Krista; Jackman, Angela R

    2005-01-01

    The specific circadian role proposed for endogenous melatonin production was based on a study of sighted people who took low pharmacological doses (500 microg) of this chemical signal for the "biological night": the magnitude and direction of the induced phase shifts were dependent on what time of day exogenous melatonin was administered and were described by a phase-response curve that turned out to be the opposite of that for light. We now report that lower (physiological) doses of up to 300 microg can entrain (synchronize) free-running circadian rhythms of 10 totally blind subjects that would otherwise drift later each day. The resulting log-linear dose-response curve in the physiological range adds support for a circadian function of endogenous melatonin in humans. Efficacy of exogenous doses in the physiological range are of clinical significance for totally blind people who will need to take melatonin daily over their entire lifetimes in order to remain entrained to the 24 h day. Left untreated, their free-running endocrine, metabolic, behavioral, and sleep/wake cycles can be almost as burdensome as not having vision.

  10. Heterogeneous Potassium Conductances Contribute to the Diverse Firing Properties of Postnatal Mouse Vestibular Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Risner, Jessica R.; Holt, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    How mechanical information is encoded in the vestibular periphery has not been clarified. To begin to address the issue we examined the intrinsic firing properties of postnatal mouse vestibular ganglion neurons using the whole cell, tight-seal technique in current-clamp mode. We categorized two populations of neurons based on the threshold required to evoke an action potential. Low-threshold neurons fired with an average minimum current injection of −43 pA, whereas high-threshold neurons required −176 pA. Using sine-wave stimuli, we found that the neurons were inherently tuned with best frequencies that ranged up to 40 Hz. To investigate the membrane properties that contributed to the variability in firing properties we examined the same neurons in voltage-clamp mode. High-threshold neurons had larger cell bodies and whole cell capacitances but a resting conductance density of 0.18 nS/pF, nearly identical to that of low-threshold neurons, suggesting that cell size was an important parameter determining threshold. We also found that vestibular ganglion neurons expressed a heterogeneous population of potassium conductances. TEA-sensitive conductances contributed to the position of the tuning curve in the frequency domain. A 4-AP–sensitive conductance was active at rest and hyperpolarized resting potential, limited spontaneous activity, raised threshold, and prevented repetitive firing. In response to sine-wave stimulation 4-AP–sensitive conductances prevented action potential generation at low frequencies and thus contributed to the high-pass corner of the tuning curve. The mean low-pass corner (about 29 Hz) was determined by the membrane time constant. Together these factors contributed to the sharply tuned, band-pass characteristics intrinsic to postnatal vestibular ganglion neurons. PMID:16855108

  11. Heterogeneous potassium conductances contribute to the diverse firing properties of postnatal mouse vestibular ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Risner, Jessica R; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2006-11-01

    How mechanical information is encoded in the vestibular periphery has not been clarified. To begin to address the issue we examined the intrinsic firing properties of postnatal mouse vestibular ganglion neurons using the whole cell, tight-seal technique in current-clamp mode. We categorized two populations of neurons based on the threshold required to evoke an action potential. Low-threshold neurons fired with an average minimum current injection of -43 pA, whereas high-threshold neurons required -176 pA. Using sine-wave stimuli, we found that the neurons were inherently tuned with best frequencies that ranged up to 40 Hz. To investigate the membrane properties that contributed to the variability in firing properties we examined the same neurons in voltage-clamp mode. High-threshold neurons had larger cell bodies and whole cell capacitances but a resting conductance density of 0.18 nS/pF, nearly identical to that of low-threshold neurons, suggesting that cell size was an important parameter determining threshold. We also found that vestibular ganglion neurons expressed a heterogeneous population of potassium conductances. TEA-sensitive conductances contributed to the position of the tuning curve in the frequency domain. A 4-AP-sensitive conductance was active at rest and hyperpolarized resting potential, limited spontaneous activity, raised threshold, and prevented repetitive firing. In response to sine-wave stimulation 4-AP-sensitive conductances prevented action potential generation at low frequencies and thus contributed to the high-pass corner of the tuning curve. The mean low-pass corner (about 29 Hz) was determined by the membrane time constant. Together these factors contributed to the sharply tuned, band-pass characteristics intrinsic to postnatal vestibular ganglion neurons.

  12. Nonlinear Modeling of Causal Interrelationships in Neuronal Ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Zanos, Theodoros P.; Courellis, Spiros H.; Berger, Theodore W.; Hampson, Robert E.; Deadwyler, Sam A.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.

    2009-01-01

    The increasing availability of multiunit recordings gives new urgency to the need for effective analysis of “multidimensional” time-series data that are derived from the recorded activity of neuronal ensembles in the form of multiple sequences of action potentials—treated mathematically as point-processes and computationally as spike-trains. Whether in conditions of spontaneous activity or under conditions of external stimulation, the objective is the identification and quantification of possible causal links among the neurons generating the observed binary signals. A multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) modeling methodology is presented that can be used to quantify the neuronal dynamics of causal interrelationships in neuronal ensembles using spike-train data recorded from individual neurons. These causal interrelationships are modeled as transformations of spike-trains recorded from a set of neurons designated as the “inputs” into spike-trains recorded from another set of neurons designated as the “outputs.” The MIMO model is composed of a set of multiinput/single-output (MISO) modules, one for each output. Each module is the cascade of a MISO Volterra model and a threshold operator generating the output spikes. The Laguerre expansion approach is used to estimate the Volterra kernels of each MISO module from the respective input–output data using the least-squares method. The predictive performance of the model is evaluated with the use of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, from which the optimum threshold is also selected. The Mann–Whitney statistic is used to select the significant inputs for each output by examining the statistical significance of improvements in the predictive accuracy of the model when the respective inputs is included. Illustrative examples are presented for a simulated system and for an actual application using multiunit data recordings from the hippocampus of a behaving rat. PMID:18701382

  13. Interactions of neurons with topographic nano cues affect branching morphology mimicking neuron-neuron interactions.

    PubMed

    Baranes, Koby; Kollmar, Davida; Chejanovsky, Nathan; Sharoni, Amos; Shefi, Orit

    2012-08-01

    We study the effect of topographic nano-cues on neuronal growth-morphology using invertebrate neurons in culture. We use photolithography to fabricate substrates with repeatable line-pattern ridges of nano-scale heights of 10-150 nm. We plate leech neurons atop the patterned-substrates and compare their growth pattern to neurons plated atop non-patterned substrates. The model system allows us the analysis of single neurite-single ridge interactions. The use of high resolution electron microscopy reveals small filopodia processes that attach to the line-pattern ridges. These fine processes, that cannot be detected in light microscopy, add anchoring sites onto the side of the ridges, thus additional physical support. These interactions of the neuronal process dominantly affect the neuronal growth direction. We analyze the response of the entire neuronal branching tree to the patterned substrates and find significant effect on the growth patterns compared to non-patterned substrates. Moreover, interactions with the nano-cues trigger a growth strategy similarly to interactions with other neuronal cells, as reflected in their morphometric parameters. The number of branches and the number of neurites originating from the soma decrease following the interaction demonstrating a tendency to a more simplified neuronal branching tree. The effect of the nano-cues on the neuronal function deserves further investigation and will strengthen our understanding of the interplay between function and form.

  14. Aging and Neuronal Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Mark P.; Magnus, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Everyone ages, but only some will acquire a neurodegenerative disorder in the process. Disease might occur when cells fail to respond adaptively to age-related increases in oxidative, metabolic and ionic stress resulting in excessive accumulation of damaged proteins, DNA and membranes. Determinants of neuronal vulnerability might include cell size and location, metabolism of disease-specific proteins, and repertoire of signal transduction pathways and stress resistance mechanisms. Emerging evidence on protein interaction networks that monitor and respond to the normal aging process suggests that successful neural aging is possible for most, but also cautions that cures for neurodegenerative disorders are unlikely in the near future. PMID:16552414

  15. Characterization of Ca(2+) channels in rat subthalamic nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Song, W J; Baba, Y; Otsuka, T; Murakami, F

    2000-11-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) plays a key role in motor control. Although previous studies have suggested that Ca(2+) conductances may be involved in regulating the activity of STN neurons, Ca(2+) channels in this region have not yet been characterized. We have therefore investigated the subtypes and functional characteristics of Ca(2+) conductances in STN neurons, in both acutely isolated and slice preparations. Acutely isolated STN cells were identified by retrograde filling with the fluorescent dye, Fluoro-Gold. In acutely isolated STN neurons, Cd(2+)-sensitive, depolarization-activated Ba(2+) currents were observed in all cells studied. The current-voltage relationship and current kinetics were characteristic of high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. The steady-state voltage-dependent activation curves and inactivation curves could both be fitted with a single Boltzmann function. Currents evoked with a prolonged pulse, however, inactivated with multiple time constants, suggesting either the presence of more than one Ca(2+) channel subtype or multiple inactivation processes with a single channel type in STN neurons. Experiments using organic Ca(2+) channel blockers revealed that on average, 21% of the current was nifedipine sensitive, 52% was sensitive to omega-conotoxin GVIA, 16% was blocked by a high concentration of omega-agatoxin IVA (200 nM), and the remainder of the current (9%) was resistant to the co-application of all blockers. These currents had similar voltage dependencies, but the nifedipine-sensitive current and the resistant current activated at slightly lower voltages. omega-Agatoxin IVA at 20 nM was ineffective in blocking the current. Together, the above results suggest that acutely isolated STN neurons have all subtypes of high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels except for P-type, but have no low-voltage-activated channels. Although acutely isolated neurons provide a good preparation for whole cell voltage-clamp study, dendritic processes are

  16. DNA Damage Induced Neuronal Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Experiments are proposed to examine the molecular mechanism by which mustard chemical warfare agents induce neuronal cell death . DNA damage is the...proposed underlying mechanism of mustard-induced neuronal cell death . We propose a novel research strategy to test this hypothesis by using mice with...perturbed DNA repair to explore the relationship between mustard-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death . Initial in vitro studies (Years 1, 2 & 3

  17. Development of the curve of Spee.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Steven D; Caspersen, Matthew; Hardinger, Rachel R; Franciscus, Robert G; Aquilino, Steven A; Southard, Thomas E

    2008-09-01

    Ferdinand Graf von Spee is credited with characterizing human occlusal curvature viewed in the sagittal plane. This naturally occurring phenomenon has clinical importance in orthodontics and restorative dentistry, yet we have little understanding of when, how, or why it develops. The purpose of this study was to expand our understanding by examining the development of the curve of Spee longitudinally in a sample of untreated subjects with normal occlusion from the deciduous dentition to adulthood. Records of 16 male and 17 female subjects from the Iowa Facial Growth Study were selected and examined. The depth of the curve of Spee was measured on their study models at 7 time points from ages 4 (deciduous dentition) to 26 (adult dentition) years. The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare changes in the curve of Spee depth between time points. For each subject, the relative eruption of the mandibular teeth was measured from corresponding cephalometric radiographs, and its contribution to the developing curve of Spee was ascertained. In the deciduous dentition, the curve of Spee is minimal. At mean ages of 4.05 and 5.27 years, the average curve of Spee depths are 0.24 and 0.25 mm, respectively. With change to the transitional dentition, corresponding to the eruption of the mandibular permanent first molars and central incisors (mean age, 6.91 years), the curve of Spee depth increases significantly (P < 0.0001) to a mean maximum depth of 1.32 mm. The curve of Spee then remains essentially unchanged until eruption of the second molars (mean age, 12.38 years), when the depth increases (P < 0.0001) to a mean maximum depth of 2.17 mm. In the adolescent dentition (mean age, 16.21 years), the depth decreases slightly (P = 0.0009) to a mean maximum depth of 1.98 mm, and, in the adult dentition (mean age 26.98 years), the curve remains unchanged (P = 0.66), with a mean maximum depth of 2.02 mm. No significant differences in curve of Spee development were found between

  18. The onset of the progression of acute phase response mechanisms induced by extreme impacts can be followed by the decrease in blood levels of positive acute phase proteins.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, Olga; Bekker, Anna

    Studies performed at space flights and earth-based simulation models detected the plasma indices of acute phase reaction (APR), i.e. the increase of APR cytokine mediators and alterations in the production of blood acute phase proteins (APP) at the initial stages of adaptation to altered gravity conditions. Acute phase response is the principal constituent of the functional activity of innate immunity system. Changes in plasma APPs contents are considered to serve the restoration of homeostasis state. According to trends of their concentration shifts at the evolving of acute phase reaction APPs are denoted as positive, neutral, or negative. Plasma concentrations of positive acute phase proteins α1-acid glycoprotein (α1-AGP), α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT), and neutral α2-macroglobulin (α2-M) were measured in human study at 12-hour antiorthostatic position (AOP) with 15° head down tilt and hypoxia experiments at 14% oxygen in pressure chamber. Both of these impacts were shown to produce alterations in the APP levels indicative for acute phase response. Nevertheless, in AOP experiment noticeable decrease in α1-AGP concentration occurred by hour 12, and even more pronounced decline of α1-AGP and α1-AT were found on hypoxia hours 12 and 36. Acute phase proteins α1-AGP and α2-M possess the features of proteinase inhibitors. This function is implemented by the formation of complexes with the molecules of proteolytic enzymes which subsequently are removed from the blood flow. Transient decrease in plasma concentrations of protease inhibitors on early phases of APR development was reported to result from the growth of plasma protease activity due to cathepsin release from activated leukocytes, which had not yet been compensated by enhanced APP synthesis. Being a carrier protein for positively charged and neutral substances, α1-AGP shows pronounced elevation in its blood content during APR development. As assumed, it is required for the transportation of the increased

  19. Relation between stimulus and response in frog olfactory receptor neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rospars, Jean-Pierre; Lánský, Petr; Duchamp, André; Duchamp-Viret, Patricia

    2003-09-01

    The spiking activity of receptor neurons was recorded extracellularly in the frog olfactory epithelium in response to four odourants applied at precisely controlled concentrations. A set of criteria was formulated to define the spikes in the response. Four variables - latency, duration, number of interspike intervals and frequency - were determined to quantify the responses. They were studied at the single neuron, neuron population and ciliary membrane levels. The dose-response curves were determined using specific functions and their characteristics were evaluated. The characteristic molar concentrations at threshold or at maximum duration and the characteristics of variables, e.g. minimum latency or maximum frequency, have asymmetric histograms with peaks close to the origin and long tails. Dynamic ranges have even more asymmetric histograms, so that a significant fraction of neurons presents a much wider range than their one-decade peak. From these histograms, response properties of the whole neuron population can be inferred. In general, location along the concentration axis (thresholds), width (dynamic ranges) and heights of dose-response curves are independent, which explains the diversity of curves, prevents their global categorization and supports the qualitative coding of odourants. No evidence for odourant-independent types of neurons was found. Finally, receptor activation and ciliary membrane conductance were reconstructed in the framework of a model based on firing data, known mucus biochemical and neuron morpho-electrical characteristics. It is in agreement with independent determinations of Kd of odourant-receptor interaction and of conductance characteristics, and describes their statistical distributions in the neuron population.

  20. STDP in Recurrent Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Gilson, Matthieu; Burkitt, Anthony; van Hemmen, J. Leo

    2010-01-01

    Recent results about spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) in recurrently connected neurons are reviewed, with a focus on the relationship between the weight dynamics and the emergence of network structure. In particular, the evolution of synaptic weights in the two cases of incoming connections for a single neuron and recurrent connections are compared and contrasted. A theoretical framework is used that is based upon Poisson neurons with a temporally inhomogeneous firing rate and the asymptotic distribution of weights generated by the learning dynamics. Different network configurations examined in recent studies are discussed and an overview of the current understanding of STDP in recurrently connected neuronal networks is presented. PMID:20890448

  1. The straintronic spin-neuron.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ayan K; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-07-17

    In artificial neural networks, neurons are usually implemented with highly dissipative CMOS-based operational amplifiers. A more energy-efficient implementation is a 'spin-neuron' realized with a magneto-tunneling junction (MTJ) that is switched with a spin-polarized current (representing weighted sum of input currents) that either delivers a spin transfer torque or induces domain wall motion in the soft layer of the MTJ to mimic neuron firing. Here, we propose and analyze a different type of spin-neuron in which the soft layer of the MTJ is switched with mechanical strain generated by a voltage (representing weighted sum of input voltages) and term it straintronic spin-neuron. It dissipates orders of magnitude less energy in threshold operations than the traditional current-driven spin neuron at 0 K temperature and may even be faster. We have also studied the room-temperature firing behaviors of both types of spin neurons and find that thermal noise degrades the performance of both types, but the current-driven type is degraded much more than the straintronic type if both are optimized for maximum energy-efficiency. On the other hand, if both are designed to have the same level of thermal degradation, then the current-driven version will dissipate orders of magnitude more energy than the straintronic version. Thus, the straintronic spin-neuron is superior to current-driven spin neurons.

  2. [Neuronal plasticity and gene expression].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, O O; Shtark, M B; Lisachev, P D

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity--a fundamental feature of brain--provides adequate interactions with dynamic environment. One of the most deeply investigated forms of the neuronal plasticity is a long-term potentiation (LTP)--a phenomenon underlying learning and memory. Signal paths activated during LTP converge into the nuclear of the neuron, giving rise to launch of the molecular-genetic programs, which mediate structural and functional remodeling of synapses. In the review data concerning involvement of multilevel gene expression into plastic change under neuronal activation are summarized.

  3. The biophysics of neuronal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franze, Kristian; Guck, Jochen

    2010-09-01

    For a long time, neuroscience has focused on biochemical, molecular biological and electrophysiological aspects of neuronal physiology and pathology. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating the importance of physical stimuli for neuronal growth and development. In this review we briefly summarize the historical background of neurobiophysics and give an overview over the current understanding of neuronal growth from a physics perspective. We show how biophysics has so far contributed to a better understanding of neuronal growth and discuss current inconsistencies. Finally, we speculate how biophysics may contribute to the successful treatment of lesions to the central nervous system, which have been considered incurable until very recently.

  4. Navigational choice between reversal and curve during acidic pH avoidance behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Tokumitsu; Sakata, Kazumi; Togashi, Takuya; Itoi, Hiroaki; Shinohe, Sayaka; Watanabe, Miwa; Shingai, Ryuzo

    2015-11-19

    Under experimental conditions, virtually all behaviors of Caenorhabditis elegans are achieved by combinations of simple locomotion, including forward, reversal movement, turning by deep body bending, and gradual shallow turning. To study how worms regulate these locomotion in response to sensory information, acidic pH avoidance behavior was analyzed by using worm tracking system. In the acidic pH avoidance, we characterized two types of behavioral maneuvers that have similar behavioral sequences in chemotaxis and thermotaxis. A stereotypic reversal-turn-forward sequence of reversal avoidance caused an abrupt random reorientation, and a shallow gradual turn in curve avoidance caused non-random reorientation in a less acidic direction to avoid the acidic pH. Our results suggest that these two maneuvers were each triggered by a distinct threshold pH. A simulation study using the two-distinct-threshold model reproduced the avoidance behavior of the real worm, supporting the presence of the threshold. Threshold pH for both reversal and curve avoidance was altered in mutants with reduced or enhanced glutamatergic signaling from acid-sensing neurons. C. elegans employ two behavioral maneuvers, reversal (klinokinesis) and curve (klinotaxis) to avoid acidic pH. Unlike the chemotaxis in C. elegans, reversal and curve avoidances were triggered by absolute pH rather than temporal derivative of stimulus concentration in this behavior. The pH threshold is different between reversal and curve avoidance. Mutant studies suggested that the difference results from a differential amount of glutamate released from ASH and ASK chemosensory neurons.

  5. Hippocampal neurons in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Heckers, S.; Konradi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The hippocampus is crucial for normal brain function, especially for the encoding and retrieval of multimodal sensory information. Neuropsychiatric disorders such as temporal lobe epilepsy, amnesia, and the dementias are associated with structural and functional abnormalities of specific hippocampal neurons. More recently we have also found evidence for a role of the hippocampus in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The most consistent finding is a subtle, yet significant volume difference in schizophrenia. Here we review the cellular and molecular basis of smaller hippocampal volume in schizophrenia. In contrast to neurodegenerative disorders, total hippocampal cell number is not markedly decreased in schizophrenia. However, the intriguing finding of a selective loss of hippocampal inter-neurons deserves further study. Two neurotransmitter receptors, the GABAA and AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors, appear to be abnormal, whereas changes of the NMDA glutamate receptor are less robust. The expression of several genes, including those related to the GABAergic system, neurodevelopment, and synaptic function, is decreased in schizophrenia. Taken together, recent studies of hippocampal cell number, protein expression, and gene regulation point towards an abnormality of hippocampal architecture in schizophrenia. PMID:12111476

  6. Vectorial moments of curves in Euclidean 3-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunçer, Yılmaz

    In this study, we introduced the vectorial moments as a new curves as w-dual curve, where w ∈{T(s),N(s),B(s)}, constructed by the Frenet vectors of a regular curve in Euclidean 3-space and we gave the Frenet apparatus of w-dual curves and also we applied to helices and curve pairs of constant breadth.

  7. Circadian Periods of Sensitivity for Ramelteon on the onset of Running-wheel Activity and the Peak of Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Neuronal Firing Rhythms in C3H/HeN Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rawashdeh, Oliver; Hudson, Randall L.; Stepien, Iwona; Dubocovich, Margarita L.

    2016-01-01

    Ramelteon, an MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor agonist, is used for the treatment of sleep-onset insomnia and circadian sleep disorders. Ramelteon phase shifts circadian rhythms in rodents and humans when given at the end of the subjective day; however, its efficacy at other circadian times is not known. Here, the authors determined in C3H/ HeN mice the maximal circadian sensitivity for ramelteon in vivo on the onset of circadian running-wheel activity rhythms, and in vitro on the peak of circadian rhythm of neuronal firing in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) brain slices. The phase response curve (PRC) for ramelteon (90 μg/mouse, subcutaneous [sc]) on circadian wheel-activity rhythms shows maximal sensitivity during the late mid to end of the subjective day, between CT8 and CT12 (phase advance), and late subjective night and early subjective day, between CT20 and CT2 (phase delay), using a 3-day-pulse treatment regimen in C3H/HeN mice. The PRC for ramelteon resembles that for melatonin in C3H/ HeN mice, showing the same magnitude of maximal shifts at CT10 and CT2, except that the range of sensitivity for ramelteon (CT8–CT12) during the subjective day is broader. Furthermore, in SCN brain slices in vitro, ramelteon (10 pM) administered at CT10 phase advances (5.6 ± 0.29 h, n = 3) and at CT2 phase delays (−3.2 ± 0.12 h, n = 6) the peak of circadian rhythm of neuronal firing, with the shifts being significantly larger than those induced by melatonin (10 pM) at the same circadian times (CT10: 2.7 ± 0.15 h, n = 4, p < .05; CT2: −1.13 ± 0.08 h, n = 6, p < .001, respectively). The phase shifts induced by both melatonin and ramelteon in the SCN brain slice at either CT10 or CT2 corresponded with the period of sensitivity observed in vivo. In conclusion, melatonin and ramelteon showed identical periods of circadian sensitivity at CT10 (advance) and CT2 (delay) to shift the onset of circadian activity rhythms in vivo and the peak of SCN neuronal firing rhythms in vitro

  8. Curved-region-based ridge frequency estimation and curved Gabor filters for fingerprint image enhancement.

    PubMed

    Gottschlich, Carsten

    2012-04-01

    Gabor filters (GFs) play an important role in many application areas for the enhancement of various types of images and the extraction of Gabor features. For the purpose of enhancing curved structures in noisy images, we introduce curved GFs that locally adapt their shape to the direction of flow. These curved GFs enable the choice of filter parameters that increase the smoothing power without creating artifacts in the enhanced image. In this paper, curved GFs are applied to the curved ridge and valley structures of low-quality fingerprint images. First, we combine two orientation-field estimation methods in order to obtain a more robust estimation for very noisy images. Next, curved regions are constructed by following the respective local orientation. Subsequently, these curved regions are used for estimating the local ridge frequency. Finally, curved GFs are defined based on curved regions, and they apply the previously estimated orientations and ridge frequencies for the enhancement of low-quality fingerprint images. Experimental results on the FVC2004 databases show improvements of this approach in comparison with state-of-the-art enhancement methods.

  9. Tracing personalized health curves during infections.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David S

    2011-09-01

    It is difficult to describe host-microbe interactions in a manner that deals well with both pathogens and mutualists. Perhaps a way can be found using an ecological definition of tolerance, where tolerance is defined as the dose response curve of health versus parasite load. To plot tolerance, individual infections are summarized by reporting the maximum parasite load and the minimum health for a population of infected individuals and the slope of the resulting curve defines the tolerance of the population. We can borrow this method of plotting health versus microbe load in a population and make it apply to individuals; instead of plotting just one point that summarizes an infection in an individual, we can plot the values at many time points over the course of an infection for one individual. This produces curves that trace the course of an infection through phase space rather than over a more typical timeline. These curves highlight relationships like recovery and point out bifurcations that are difficult to visualize with standard plotting techniques. Only nine archetypical curves are needed to describe most pathogenic and mutualistic host-microbe interactions. The technique holds promise as both a qualitative and quantitative approach to dissect host-microbe interactions of all kinds.

  10. Multiwavelength light curve parameters of Cepheid variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anupam; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Marconi, Marcella; Rejkuba, Marina; Singh, Harinder P.; Ngeow, Chow-Choong

    2017-09-01

    We present a comparative analysis of theoretical and observed light curves of Cepheid variables using Fourier decomposition. The theoretical light curves at multiple wavelengths are generated using stellar pulsation models for chemical compositions representative of Cepheids in the Galaxy and Magellanic Clouds. The observed light curves at optical (VI), near-infrared (JHKs) and mid-infrared (3.6 & 4.5-μm) bands are compiled from the literature. We discuss the variation of light curve parameters as a function of period, wavelength and metallicity. Theoretical and observed Fourier amplitude parameters decrease with increase in wavelength while the phase parameters increase with wavelength. We find that theoretical amplitude parameters obtained using canonical mass-luminosity levels exhibit a greater offset with respect to observations when compared to non-canonical relations. We also discuss the impact of variation in convective efficiency on the light curve structure of Cepheid variables. The increase in mixing length parameter results in a zero-point offset in bolometric mean magnitudes and reduces the systematic large difference in theoretical amplitudes with respect to observations.

  11. Tracing Personalized Health Curves during Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, David S.

    2011-01-01

    It is difficult to describe host–microbe interactions in a manner that deals well with both pathogens and mutualists. Perhaps a way can be found using an ecological definition of tolerance, where tolerance is defined as the dose response curve of health versus parasite load. To plot tolerance, individual infections are summarized by reporting the maximum parasite load and the minimum health for a population of infected individuals and the slope of the resulting curve defines the tolerance of the population. We can borrow this method of plotting health versus microbe load in a population and make it apply to individuals; instead of plotting just one point that summarizes an infection in an individual, we can plot the values at many time points over the course of an infection for one individual. This produces curves that trace the course of an infection through phase space rather than over a more typical timeline. These curves highlight relationships like recovery and point out bifurcations that are difficult to visualize with standard plotting techniques. Only nine archetypical curves are needed to describe most pathogenic and mutualistic host–microbe interactions. The technique holds promise as both a qualitative and quantitative approach to dissect host–microbe interactions of all kinds. PMID:21957398

  12. Probing exoplanet clouds with optical phase curves

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Antonio García; Isaak, Kate G.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler-7b is to date the only exoplanet for which clouds have been inferred from the optical phase curve—from visible-wavelength whole-disk brightness measurements as a function of orbital phase. Added to this, the fact that the phase curve appears dominated by reflected starlight makes this close-in giant planet a unique study case. Here we investigate the information on coverage and optical properties of the planet clouds contained in the measured phase curve. We generate cloud maps of Kepler-7b and use a multiple-scattering approach to create synthetic phase curves, thus connecting postulated clouds with measurements. We show that optical phase curves can help constrain the composition and size of the cloud particles. Indeed, model fitting for Kepler-7b requires poorly absorbing particles that scatter with low-to-moderate anisotropic efficiency, conclusions consistent with condensates of silicates, perovskite, and silica of submicron radii. We also show that we are limited in our ability to pin down the extent and location of the clouds. These considerations are relevant to the interpretation of optical phase curves with general circulation models. Finally, we estimate that the spherical albedo of Kepler-7b over the Kepler passband is in the range 0.4–0.5. PMID:26489652

  13. Updated U.S. Geothermal Supply Curve

    SciTech Connect

    Augustine, C.; Young, K. R.; Anderson, A.

    2010-02-01

    This paper documents the approach used to update the U.S. geothermal supply curve. The analysis undertaken in this study estimates the supply of electricity generation potential from geothermal resources in the United States and the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), capital costs, and operating and maintenance costs associated with developing these geothermal resources. Supply curves were developed for four categories of geothermal resources: identified hydrothermal (6.4 GWe), undiscovered hydrothermal (30.0 GWe), near-hydrothermal field enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) (7.0 GWe) and deep EGS (15,900 GWe). Two cases were considered: a base case and a target case. Supply curves were generated for each of the four geothermal resource categories for both cases. For both cases, hydrothermal resources dominate the lower cost range of the combined geothermal supply curve. The supply curves indicate that the reservoir performance improvements assumed in the target case could significantly lower EGS costs and greatly increase EGS deployment over the base case.

  14. Investigating the Stability and Accuracy of the Phase Response for NOx Sensing 5% Mg-modified LaCrO3 Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, E P; Novak, R F; Kubinski, D J; Soltis, R E; Visser, J H; Woo, L Y; Martin, L P; Glass, R S

    2007-06-14

    Impedance spectroscopy measurements were carried out on LaCr{sub 0.95}Mg{sub 0.05}O{sub 3} (LCM) asymmetric interdigitated electrodes supported on fully stabilized 8-mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ) electrolytes. Experiments were carried out using 0-50 ppm NO{sub x}, 5-15% O{sub 2} with N{sub 2} as the balance, over temperatures ranging from 600-700 C. AC measurements taken at a constant frequency between 1-100 Hz indicated the phase response of the sensor was less sensitive to fluctuations in the O{sub 2} concentration and the baseline drift was limited. Specific frequencies were observed where the sensor response was essentially temperature independent.

  15. Increased prevalence of poor sulphoxidation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: effect of changes in the acute phase response and second line drug treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Emery, P; Bradley, H; Gough, A; Arthur, V; Jubb, R; Waring, R

    1992-01-01

    A minority of normal subjects have an impaired ability to oxidise sulphur, which is associated with an increased risk of side effects when they receive sulphur containing drugs. In 114 patients with rheumatoid arthritis a greatly increased prevalence of poor sulphoxidation was found in 82 (72%) patients compared with 70/200 (35%) healthy controls, 45/121 (37%) controls matched for age, and 4/35 (11%) of the normal aged general population. In a longitudinal study of 37 patients there was no significant alteration in sulphoxidation status after the introduction of a second line drug or with marked changes in the acute phase response. It seems, therefore, that the poor sulphoxidation status in patients with RA is not an epiphenomenon and may be an important factor in determining the clinical features of rheumatoid disease. PMID:1575574

  16. Protein-energy malnutrition developing after global brain ischemia induces an atypical acute-phase response and hinders expression of GAP-43.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shari E; Figley, Sarah A; Schreyer, David J; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2014-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common post-stroke problem. PEM can independently induce a systemic acute-phase response, and pre-existing malnutrition can exacerbate neuroinflammation induced by brain ischemia. In contrast, the effects of PEM developing in the post-ischemic period have not been studied. Since excessive inflammation can impede brain remodeling, we investigated the effects of post-ischemic malnutrition on neuroinflammation, the acute-phase reaction, and neuroplasticity-related proteins. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to global forebrain ischemia using the 2-vessel occlusion model or sham surgery. The sham rats were assigned to control diet (18% protein) on day 3 after surgery, whereas the rats exposed to global ischemia were assigned to either control diet or a low protein (PEM, 2% protein) diet. Post-ischemic PEM decreased growth associated protein-43, synaptophysin and synaptosomal-associated protein-25 immunofluorescence within the hippocampal CA3 mossy fiber terminals on day 21, whereas the glial response in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subregions was unaltered by PEM. No systemic acute-phase reaction attributable to global ischemia was detected in control diet-fed rats, as reflected by serum concentrations of alpha-2-macroglobulin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, and albumin. Acute exposure to the PEM regimen after global brain ischemia caused an atypical acute-phase response. PEM decreased the serum concentrations of albumin and haptoglobin on day 5, with the decreases sustained to day 21. Serum alpha-2-macroglobulin concentrations were significantly higher in malnourished rats on day 21. This provides the first direct evidence that PEM developing after brain ischemia exerts wide-ranging effects on mechanisms important to stroke recovery.

  17. Protein-Energy Malnutrition Developing after Global Brain Ischemia Induces an Atypical Acute-Phase Response and Hinders Expression of GAP-43

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Shari E.; Figley, Sarah A.; Schreyer, David J.; Paterson, Phyllis G.

    2014-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common post-stroke problem. PEM can independently induce a systemic acute-phase response, and pre-existing malnutrition can exacerbate neuroinflammation induced by brain ischemia. In contrast, the effects of PEM developing in the post-ischemic period have not been studied. Since excessive inflammation can impede brain remodeling, we investigated the effects of post-ischemic malnutrition on neuroinflammation, the acute-phase reaction, and neuroplasticity-related proteins. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to global forebrain ischemia using the 2-vessel occlusion model or sham surgery. The sham rats were assigned to control diet (18% protein) on day 3 after surgery, whereas the rats exposed to global ischemia were assigned to either control diet or a low protein (PEM, 2% protein) diet. Post-ischemic PEM decreased growth associated protein-43, synaptophysin and synaptosomal-associated protein-25 immunofluorescence within the hippocampal CA3 mossy fiber terminals on day 21, whereas the glial response in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subregions was unaltered by PEM. No systemic acute-phase reaction attributable to global ischemia was detected in control diet-fed rats, as reflected by serum concentrations of alpha-2-macroglobulin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, and albumin. Acute exposure to the PEM regimen after global brain ischemia caused an atypical acute-phase response. PEM decreased the serum concentrations of albumin and haptoglobin on day 5, with the decreases sustained to day 21. Serum alpha-2-macroglobulin concentrations were significantly higher in malnourished rats on day 21. This provides the first direct evidence that PEM developing after brain ischemia exerts wide-ranging effects on mechanisms important to stroke recovery. PMID:25259609

  18. Statistics from dynamics in curved spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.; Wang, Y.

    1989-06-15

    We consider quantum fields of spin 0, 1/2, 1,3/2, and 2 with a nonzero mass in curved spacetime. We show thatthe dynamical Bogolubov transformations associated with gravitationally inducedparticle creation imply the connection between spin and statistics: Byembedding two flat regions in a curved spacetime, we find that only when oneimposes Bose-Einstein statistics for an integer-spin field and Fermi-Diracstatistics for a half-integer-spin field in the first flat region is the sametype of statistics propagated from the first to the second flat region. Thisderivation of the flat-spacetime spin-statistics theorem makes use ofcurved-spacetime dynamics and does not reduce to any proof given in flatspacetime. We also show in the same manner that parastatistics, up to thefourth order, are consistent with the dynamical evolution of curved spacetime.

  19. Energy dissipation in flows through curved spaces

    PubMed Central

    Debus, J.-D.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    Fluid dynamics in intrinsically curved geometries is encountered in many physical systems in nature, ranging from microscopic bio-membranes all the way up to general relativity at cosmological scales. Despite the diversity of applications, all of these systems share a common feature: the free motion of particles is affected by inertial forces originating from the curvature of the embedding space. Here we reveal a fundamental process underlying fluid dynamics in curved spaces: the free motion of fluids, in the complete absence of solid walls or obstacles, exhibits loss of energy due exclusively to the intrinsic curvature of space. We find that local sources of curvature generate viscous stresses as a result of the inertial forces. The curvature- induced viscous forces are shown to cause hitherto unnoticed and yet appreciable energy dissipation, which might play a significant role for a variety of physical systems involving fluid dynamics in curved spaces. PMID:28195148

  20. Mapping curved spacetimes into Dirac spinors

    PubMed Central

    Sabín, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    We show how to transform a Dirac equation in a curved static spacetime into a Dirac equation in flat spacetime. In particular, we show that any solution of the free massless Dirac equation in a 1 + 1 dimensional flat spacetime can be transformed via a local phase transformation into a solution of the corresponding Dirac equation in a curved static background, where the spacetime metric is encoded into the phase. In this way, the existing quantum simulators of the Dirac equation can naturally incorporate curved static spacetimes. As a first example we use our technique to obtain solutions of the Dirac equation in a particular family of interesting spacetimes in 1 + 1 dimensions. PMID:28074908

  1. Waveguide finite elements for curved structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnveden, Svante; Fraggstedt, Martin

    2008-05-01

    A waveguide finite element formulation for the analysis of curved structures is introduced. The formulation is valid for structures that along one axis have constant properties. It is based on a modified Hamilton's principle valid for general linear viscoelastic motion, which is derived here. Using this principle, material properties such as losses may be distributed in the system and may vary with frequency. Element formulations for isoparametric solid elements and deep shell elements are presented for curved waveguides as well as for straight waveguides. In earlier works, the curved elements have successfully been used to model a passenger car tyre. Here a simple validation example and convergence study is presented, which considers a finite length circular cylinder and all four elements presented are used, in turn, to model this structure. Calculated results compare favourably to those in the literature.

  2. The genus curve of the Abell clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Gott, J. Richard, III; Postman, Marc

    1994-01-01

    We study the topology of large-scale structure through a genus curve measurement of the recent Abell catalog redshift survey of Postman, Huchra, and Geller (1992). The structure is found to be spongelike near median density and to exhibit isolated superclusters and voids at high and low densities, respectively. The genus curve shows a slight shift toward 'meatball' topology, but remains consistent with the hypothesis of Gaussian random phase initial conditions. The amplitude of the genus curve corresponds to a power-law spectrum with index n = 0.21(sub -0.47 sup +0.43) on scales of 48/h Mpc or to a cold dark matter power spectrum with omega h = 0.36(sub -0.17 sup +0.46).

  3. Plasticity and rectangularity in survival curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2011-09-01

    Living systems inevitably undergo a progressive deterioration of physiological function with age and an increase of vulnerability to disease and death. To maintain health and survival, living systems should optimize survival strategies with adaptive interactions among molecules, cells, organs, individuals, and environments, which arises plasticity in survival curves of living systems. In general, survival dynamics in a population is mathematically depicted by a survival rate, which monotonically changes from 1 to 0 with age. It would be then useful to find an adequate function to describe complicated survival dynamics. Here we describe a flexible survival function, derived from the stretched exponential function by adopting an age-dependent shaping exponent. We note that the exponent is associated with the fractal-like scaling in cumulative mortality rate. The survival function well depicts general features in survival curves; healthy populations exhibit plasticity and evolve towards rectangular-like survival curves, as examples in humans or laboratory animals.

  4. Energy dissipation in flows through curved spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debus, J.-D.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2017-02-01

    Fluid dynamics in intrinsically curved geometries is encountered in many physical systems in nature, ranging from microscopic bio-membranes all the way up to general relativity at cosmological scales. Despite the diversity of applications, all of these systems share a common feature: the free motion of particles is affected by inertial forces originating from the curvature of the embedding space. Here we reveal a fundamental process underlying fluid dynamics in curved spaces: the free motion of fluids, in the complete absence of solid walls or obstacles, exhibits loss of energy due exclusively to the intrinsic curvature of space. We find that local sources of curvature generate viscous stresses as a result of the inertial forces. The curvature- induced viscous forces are shown to cause hitherto unnoticed and yet appreciable energy dissipation, which might play a significant role for a variety of physical systems involving fluid dynamics in curved spaces.

  5. Experimental simulation of closed timelike curves.

    PubMed

    Ringbauer, Martin; Broome, Matthew A; Myers, Casey R; White, Andrew G; Ralph, Timothy C

    2014-06-19

    Closed timelike curves are among the most controversial features of modern physics. As legitimate solutions to Einstein's field equations, they allow for time travel, which instinctively seems paradoxical. However, in the quantum regime these paradoxes can be resolved, leaving closed timelike curves consistent with relativity. The study of these systems therefore provides valuable insight into nonlinearities and the emergence of causal structures in quantum mechanics--essential for any formulation of a quantum theory of gravity. Here we experimentally simulate the nonlinear behaviour of a qubit interacting unitarily with an older version of itself, addressing some of the fascinating effects that arise in systems traversing a closed timelike curve. These include perfect discrimination of non-orthogonal states and, most intriguingly, the ability to distinguish nominally equivalent ways of preparing pure quantum states. Finally, we examine the dependence of these effects on the initial qubit state, the form of the unitary interaction and the influence of decoherence.

  6. Mapping curved spacetimes into Dirac spinors.

    PubMed

    Sabín, Carlos

    2017-01-11

    We show how to transform a Dirac equation in a curved static spacetime into a Dirac equation in flat spacetime. In particular, we show that any solution of the free massless Dirac equation in a 1 + 1 dimensional flat spacetime can be transformed via a local phase transformation into a solution of the corresponding Dirac equation in a curved static background, where the spacetime metric is encoded into the phase. In this way, the existing quantum simulators of the Dirac equation can naturally incorporate curved static spacetimes. As a first example we use our technique to obtain solutions of the Dirac equation in a particular family of interesting spacetimes in 1 + 1 dimensions.

  7. Age at onset curves of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Wada, Yuko; Sukegawa, Marie; Sawa, Miki; Gomi, Fumi; Nishida, Kohji; Tano, Yasuo

    2008-03-01

    To calculate age at onset curves of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) to resolve the difficulty in calculating the recurrence risk in a family. Retinitis pigmentosa is a common hereditary retinal disease that leads to blindness. It is a slow-onset disease, and family members of patients sometimes develop RP later. We studied 370 patients with typical RP. The age at onset was defined as when the patient's RP was diagnosed by an ophthalmologist. After confirmation that the age at onset came from normal distribution, we drew the age at onset curves. The average age when patients were diagnosed with RP was 35.1 years, and the median age was 36.5. The onset ratio straightly increased with age until 65 years, so the onset ratio was relatively low at young ages. The age at onset curves are quite simple and useful tools that facilitate counseling at an RP clinic. Without them, the recurrence risk would be misleading.

  8. Geometric Mechanics of Curved Crease Origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Dudte, Levi H.; Mahadevan, L.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2012-09-01

    Folding a sheet of paper along a curve can lead to structures seen in decorative art and utilitarian packing boxes. Here we present a theory for the simplest such structure: an annular circular strip that is folded along a central circular curve to form a three-dimensional buckled structure driven by geometrical frustration. We quantify this shape in terms of the radius of the circle, the dihedral angle of the fold, and the mechanical properties of the sheet of paper and the fold itself. When the sheet is isometrically deformed everywhere except along the fold itself, stiff folds result in creases with constant curvature and oscillatory torsion. However, relatively softer folds inherit the broken symmetry of the buckled shape with oscillatory curvature and torsion. Our asymptotic analysis of the isometrically deformed state is corroborated by numerical simulations that allow us to generalize our analysis to study structures with multiple curved creases.

  9. Geometric mechanics of curved crease origami.

    PubMed

    Dias, Marcelo A; Dudte, Levi H; Mahadevan, L; Santangelo, Christian D

    2012-09-14

    Folding a sheet of paper along a curve can lead to structures seen in decorative art and utilitarian packing boxes. Here we present a theory for the simplest such structure: an annular circular strip that is folded along a central circular curve to form a three-dimensional buckled structure driven by geometrical frustration. We quantify this shape in terms of the radius of the circle, the dihedral angle of the fold, and the mechanical properties of the sheet of paper and the fold itself. When the sheet is isometrically deformed everywhere except along the fold itself, stiff folds result in creases with constant curvature and oscillatory torsion. However, relatively softer folds inherit the broken symmetry of the buckled shape with oscillatory curvature and torsion. Our asymptotic analysis of the isometrically deformed state is corroborated by numerical simulations that allow us to generalize our analysis to study structures with multiple curved creases.

  10. Surface growth kinematics via local curve evolution.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Derek E; Goriely, Alain

    2014-01-01

    A mathematical framework is developed to model the kinematics of surface growth for objects that can be generated by evolving a curve in space, such as seashells and horns. Growth is dictated by a growth velocity vector field defined at every point on a generating curve. A local orthonormal basis is attached to each point of the generating curve and the velocity field is given in terms of the local coordinate directions, leading to a fully local and elegant mathematical structure. Several examples of increasing complexity are provided, and we demonstrate how biologically relevant structures such as logarithmic shells and horns emerge as analytical solutions of the kinematics equations with a small number of parameters that can be linked to the underlying growth process. Direct access to cell tracks and local orientation enables for connections to be made to the underlying growth process.

  11. Mathematical design of a highway exit curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakdemirli, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    A highway exit curve is designed under the assumption that the tangential and normal components of the acceleration of the vehicle remain constant throughout the path. Using fundamental principles of physics and calculus, the differential equation determining the curve function is derived. The equation and initial conditions are cast into a dimensionless form first for universality of the results. It is found that the curves are effected by only one dimensionless parameter which is the ratio of the tangential acceleration to the normal acceleration. For no tangential acceleration, the equation can be solved analytically yielding a circular arc solution as expected. For nonzero tangential acceleration, the function is complicated and no closed-form solutions exist for the differential equation. The equation is solved numerically for various acceleration ratios. Discussions for applications to highway exits are given.

  12. Plasticity and rectangularity in survival curves

    PubMed Central

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2011-01-01

    Living systems inevitably undergo a progressive deterioration of physiological function with age and an increase of vulnerability to disease and death. To maintain health and survival, living systems should optimize survival strategies with adaptive interactions among molecules, cells, organs, individuals, and environments, which arises plasticity in survival curves of living systems. In general, survival dynamics in a population is mathematically depicted by a survival rate, which monotonically changes from 1 to 0 with age. It would be then useful to find an adequate function to describe complicated survival dynamics. Here we describe a flexible survival function, derived from the stretched exponential function by adopting an age-dependent shaping exponent. We note that the exponent is associated with the fractal-like scaling in cumulative mortality rate. The survival function well depicts general features in survival curves; healthy populations exhibit plasticity and evolve towards rectangular-like survival curves, as examples in humans or laboratory animals. PMID:22355622

  13. Experimental simulation of closed timelike curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringbauer, Martin; Broome, Matthew A.; Myers, Casey R.; White, Andrew G.; Ralph, Timothy C.

    2014-06-01

    Closed timelike curves are among the most controversial features of modern physics. As legitimate solutions to Einstein’s field equations, they allow for time travel, which instinctively seems paradoxical. However, in the quantum regime these paradoxes can be resolved, leaving closed timelike curves consistent with relativity. The study of these systems therefore provides valuable insight into nonlinearities and the emergence of causal structures in quantum mechanics—essential for any formulation of a quantum theory of gravity. Here we experimentally simulate the nonlinear behaviour of a qubit interacting unitarily with an older version of itself, addressing some of the fascinating effects that arise in systems traversing a closed timelike curve. These include perfect discrimination of non-orthogonal states and, most intriguingly, the ability to distinguish nominally equivalent ways of preparing pure quantum states. Finally, we examine the dependence of these effects on the initial qubit state, the form of the unitary interaction and the influence of decoherence.

  14. Asymmetry dependence of the nuclear caloric curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. B.; Bonasera, A.; Cammarata, P.; Hagel, K.; Heilborn, L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; May, L. W.; Marini, P.; Raphelt, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Wuenschel, S.; Zarrella, A.; Yennello, S. J.

    2013-02-01

    A basic feature of the nuclear equation of state is not yet understood: the dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on the neutron-proton asymmetry. Predictions of theoretical models differ on the magnitude and even the sign of this dependence. In this work, the nuclear caloric curve is examined for fully reconstructed quasi-projectiles around mass A = 50. The caloric curve extracted with the momentum quadrupole fluctuation thermometer shows that the temperature varies linearly with quasi-projectile asymmetry N-Z/A. An increase in asymmetry of 0.15 units corresponds to a decrease in temperature on the order of 1 MeV. These results also highlight the importance of a full quasi-projectile reconstruction in the study of thermodynamic properties of hot nuclei.

  15. Linear Titration Curves of Acids and Bases.

    PubMed

    Joseph, N R

    1959-05-29

    The Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, by a simple transformation, becomes pH - pK = pA - pB, where pA and pB are the negative logarithms of acid and base concentrations. Sigmoid titration curves then reduce to straight lines; titration curves of polyelectrolytes, to families of straight lines. The method is applied to the titration of the dipeptide glycyl aminotricarballylic acid, with four titrable groups. Results are expressed as Cartesian and d'Ocagne nomograms. The latter is of a general form applicable to polyelectrolytes of any degree of complexity.

  16. Solitons in curved space of constant curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Batz, Sascha; Peschel, Ulf

    2010-05-15

    We consider spatial solitons as, for example, self-confined optical beams in spaces of constant curvature, which are a natural generalization of flat space. Due to the symmetries of these spaces we are able to define respective dynamical parameters, for example, velocity and position. For positively curved space we find stable multiple-hump solitons as a continuation from the linear modes. In the case of negatively curved space we show that no localized solution exists and a bright soliton will always decay through a nonlinear tunneling process.

  17. Timelike curves can increase entanglement with LOCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulick, Subhayan Roy; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-11-01

    We study the nature of entanglement in presence of Deutschian closed timelike curves (D-CTCs) and open timelike curves (OTCs) and find that existence of such physical systems in nature would allow us to increase entanglement using local operations and classical communication (LOCC). This is otherwise in direct contradiction with the fundamental definition of entanglement. We study this problem from the perspective of Bell state discrimination, and show how D-CTCs and OTCs can unambiguously distinguish between four Bell states with LOCC, that is otherwise known to be impossible.

  18. Multivariate curve-fitting in GAUSS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunck, C.M.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    Multivariate curve-fitting techniques for repeated measures have been developed and an interactive program has been written in GAUSS. The program implements not only the one-factor design described in Morrison (1967) but also includes pairwise comparisons of curves and rates, a two-factor design, and other options. Strategies for selecting the appropriate degree for the polynomial are provided. The methods and program are illustrated with data from studies of the effects of environmental contaminants on ducklings, nesting kestrels and quail.

  19. A PANOPLY OF CEPHEID LIGHT CURVE TEMPLATES

    SciTech Connect

    Yoachim, Peter; McCommas, Les P.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2009-06-15

    We have generated accurate V and I template light curves using a combination of Fourier decomposition and principal component analysis for a large sample of Cepheid light curves. Unlike previous studies, we include short-period Cepheids and stars pulsating in the first overtone mode in our analysis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations show that our templates can be used to precisely measure Cepheid magnitudes and periods, even in cases where there are few observational epochs. These templates are ideal for characterizing serendipitously discovered Cepheids and can be used in conjunction with surveys such as Pan-Starrs and LSST where the observational sampling may not be optimized for Cepheids.

  20. Computing Riemann matrices of algebraic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deconinck, Bernard; van Hoeij, Mark

    2001-05-01

    A black-box program for the explicit calculation of Riemann matrices of arbitrary compact connected Riemann surfaces is presented. All such Riemann surfaces are represented as plane algebraic curves. These algebraic curves are allowed to have arbitrary singularities. The method of calculation of the Riemann matrix is essentially its definition: we numerically integrate the holomorphic differentials of the Riemann surface over the cycles of a canonical basis of the homology of the Riemann surface. Both the holomorphic differentials and the canonical basis of the homology of the Riemann surface are obtained exactly through symbolic calculations. This program is included in Maple 6, as part of the algcurves package.

  1. Relativistic rotation curve for cosmological structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razbin, Mohammadhosein; Firouzjaee, Javad T.; Mansouri, Reza

    2014-08-01

    Using a general relativistic exact model for spherical structures in a cosmological background, we have put forward an algorithm to calculate the test particle geodesics within such cosmological structures in order to obtain the velocity profile of stars or galaxies. The rotation curve thus obtained is based on a density profile and is independent of any mass definition which is not unique in general relativity. It is then shown that this general relativistic rotation curves for a toy model and a NFW density profile are almost identical to the corresponding Newtonian one, although the general relativistic masses may be quite different.

  2. Timelike curves can increase entanglement with LOCC

    PubMed Central

    Moulick, Subhayan Roy; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-01-01

    We study the nature of entanglement in presence of Deutschian closed timelike curves (D-CTCs) and open timelike curves (OTCs) and find that existence of such physical systems in nature would allow us to increase entanglement using local operations and classical communication (LOCC). This is otherwise in direct contradiction with the fundamental definition of entanglement. We study this problem from the perspective of Bell state discrimination, and show how D-CTCs and OTCs can unambiguously distinguish between four Bell states with LOCC, that is otherwise known to be impossible. PMID:27897219

  3. More Unusual Light Curves from Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    Twenty-three new objects have been added to the growing collection of stars observed to have unusual dips in their light curves. A recent study examines these stars and the potential causes of their strange behavior.An Influx of DataThe primary Kepler mission provided light curves for over 100,000 stars, and its continuation K2 is observing another 20,000 stars every three months. As we enter an era where these enormous photometric data sets become commonplace Gaia will obtain photometry for millions of stars, and LSST billions its crucial that we understand the different categories of variability observed in these stars.The authors find three different types of light curves among their 23 unusual stars. Scallop-shell curves (top) show many undulations; persistent flux-dip class curves (middle) have discrete triangularly shaped flux dips; transient, narrow dip class curves (bottom) have only one dip that is variable in depth. The authors speculate a common cause for the scallop-shell and persistent flux-dip stars, and a different cause for the transient flux-dip stars. [Stauffer et al. 2017]After filtering out the stars with planets, those in binary systems, those with circumstellar disks, and those with starspots, a number of oddities remain: a menagerie of stars with periodic variability that cant be accounted for in these categories. Some of these stars are now famous (for instance, Boyajians star); some are lesser known. But by continuing to build up this sample of stars with unusual light curves, we have a better chance of understanding the sources of variability.Building the MenagerieTo this end, a team of scientists led by John Stauffer (Spitzer Science Center at Caltech) has recently hunted for more additions to this sample in the K2 data set. In particular, they searched through the light curves from stars in the Oph and Upper Scorpius star-forming region a data set that makes up the largest collection of high-quality light curves for low-mass, pre

  4. Cellinoid shape model for multiple light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Ping; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2015-04-01

    Extended from the ellipsoid shape, cellinoid shape model consists of eight octants from eight different ellipsoids with the constraint that the adjacent octants have the same semi-axes in common. With the asymmetric shape, cellinoid shape model could be adopted in simulating the irregular shapes of asteroids. In this article, we attempt to apply cellinoid shape model to multiple light curves observed in various geometries and present some techniques to make the whole inverse process more efficient. Finally numerical experiments confirm that cellinoid shape model could derive the physical parameters of asteroids from both of synthetic and real light curves.

  5. Pain in motor neuron disease.

    PubMed Central

    Newrick, P G; Langton-Hewer, R

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-seven of 42 patients with motor neuron disease had significant pain. The nature and duration of the pain are described along with an illustrative case-report. The aetiology and most effective treatment of this common complication of motor neuron disease remain unclear. PMID:4031936

  6. The Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Michael J.; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL's, Batten disease) represent a group of severe neurodegenerative diseases, which mostly present in childhood. The phenotypes are similar and include visual loss, seizures, loss of motor and cognitive function, and early death. At autopsy, there is massive neuronal loss with characteristic storage in…

  7. Neuronal avalanches and coherence potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plenz, D.

    2012-05-01

    The mammalian cortex consists of a vast network of weakly interacting excitable cells called neurons. Neurons must synchronize their activities in order to trigger activity in neighboring neurons. Moreover, interactions must be carefully regulated to remain weak (but not too weak) such that cascades of active neuronal groups avoid explosive growth yet allow for activity propagation over long-distances. Such a balance is robustly realized for neuronal avalanches, which are defined as cortical activity cascades that follow precise power laws. In experiments, scale-invariant neuronal avalanche dynamics have been observed during spontaneous cortical activity in isolated preparations in vitro as well as in the ongoing cortical activity of awake animals and in humans. Theory, models, and experiments suggest that neuronal avalanches are the signature of brain function near criticality at which the cortex optimally responds to inputs and maximizes its information capacity. Importantly, avalanche dynamics allow for the emergence of a subset of avalanches, the coherence potentials. They emerge when the synchronization of a local neuronal group exceeds a local threshold, at which the system spawns replicas of the local group activity at distant network sites. The functional importance of coherence potentials will be discussed in the context of propagating structures, such as gliders in balanced cellular automata. Gliders constitute local population dynamics that replicate in space after a finite number of generations and are thought to provide cellular automata with universal computation. Avalanches and coherence potentials are proposed to constitute a modern framework of cortical synchronization dynamics that underlies brain function.

  8. Synchronization by elastic neuronal latencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, Roni; Timor, Reut; Marom, Shimon; Abeles, Moshe; Kanter, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Psychological and physiological considerations entail that formation and functionality of neuronal cell assemblies depend upon synchronized repeated activation such as zero-lag synchronization. Several mechanisms for the emergence of this phenomenon have been suggested, including the global network quantity, the greatest common divisor of neuronal circuit delay loops. However, they require strict biological prerequisites such as precisely matched delays and connectivity, and synchronization is represented as a stationary mode of activity instead of a transient phenomenon. Here we show that the unavoidable increase in neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulation serves as a nonuniform gradual stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops. This apparent nuisance is revealed to be an essential mechanism in various types of neuronal time controllers, where synchronization emerges as a transient phenomenon and without predefined precisely matched synaptic delays. These findings are described in an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on a circuit of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro, and are corroborated and extended by simulations of circuits composed of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with time-dependent latencies. These findings announce a cortical time scale for time controllers based on tens of microseconds stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops per spike. They call for a reexamination of the role of the temporal periodic mode in brain functionality using advanced in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  9. The Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Michael J.; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL's, Batten disease) represent a group of severe neurodegenerative diseases, which mostly present in childhood. The phenotypes are similar and include visual loss, seizures, loss of motor and cognitive function, and early death. At autopsy, there is massive neuronal loss with characteristic storage in…

  10. Cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wu; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas; Chang, Eddie

    2006-07-31

    Neuronal networks have been widely used for neurophysiology, drug discovery and toxicity testing. An essential prerequisite for future widespread application of neuronal networks is the development of efficient cryopreservation protocols to facilitate their storage and transportation. Here is the first report on cryopreservation of mammalian adherent neuronal networks. Dissociated spinal cord cells were attached to a poly-d-lysine/laminin surface and allowed to form neuronal networks. Adherent neuronal networks were embedded in a thin film of collagen gel and loaded with trehalose prior to transfer to a freezing medium containing DMSO, FBS and culture medium. This was followed by a slow rate of cooling to -80 degrees C for 24 h and then storage for up to 2 months in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C. The three components: DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading combined provided the highest post-thaw viability, relative to individual or two component protocols. The post-thaw cells with this protocol demonstrated similar neuronal and astrocytic markers and morphological structure as those detected in unfrozen cells. Fluorescent dye FM1-43 staining revealed active recycling of synaptic vesicles upon depolarizing stimulation in the post-thaw neuronal networks. These results suggest that a combination of DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading can significantly improve conventional slow-cooling methods in cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

  11. A pipeline for neuron reconstruction based on spatial sliding volume filter seeding.

    PubMed

    Sui, Dong; Wang, Kuanquan; Chae, Jinseok; Zhang, Yue; Zhang, Henggui

    2014-01-01

    Neuron's shape and dendritic architecture are important for biosignal transduction in neuron networks. And the anatomy architecture reconstruction of neuron cell is one of the foremost challenges and important issues in neuroscience. Accurate reconstruction results can facilitate the subsequent neuron system simulation. With the development of confocal microscopy technology, researchers can scan neurons at submicron resolution for experiments. These make the reconstruction of complex dendritic trees become more feasible; however, it is still a tedious, time consuming, and labor intensity task. For decades, computer aided methods have been playing an important role in this task, but none of the prevalent algorithms can reconstruct full anatomy structure automatically. All of these make it essential for developing new method for reconstruction. This paper proposes a pipeline with a novel seeding method for reconstructing neuron structures from 3D microscopy images stacks. The pipeline is initialized with a set of seeds detected by sliding volume filter (SVF), and then the open curve snake is applied to the detected seeds for reconstructing the full structure of neuron cells. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed pipeline exhibits excellent performance in terms of accuracy compared with traditional method, which is clearly a benefit for 3D neuron detection and reconstruction.

  12. Stimulus features coded by single neurons of a macaque body category selective patch

    PubMed Central

    Popivanov, Ivo D.; Schyns, Philippe G.; Vogels, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    Body category-selective regions of the primate temporal cortex respond to images of bodies, but it is unclear which fragments of such images drive single neurons’ responses in these regions. Here we applied the Bubbles technique to the responses of single macaque middle superior temporal sulcus (midSTS) body patch neurons to reveal the image fragments the neurons respond to. We found that local image fragments such as extremities (limbs), curved boundaries, and parts of the torso drove the large majority of neurons. Bubbles revealed the whole body in only a few neurons. Neurons coded the features in a manner that was tolerant to translation and scale changes. Most image fragments were excitatory but for a few neurons both inhibitory and excitatory fragments (opponent coding) were present in the same image. The fragments we reveal here in the body patch with Bubbles differ from those suggested in previous studies of face-selective neurons in face patches. Together, our data indicate that the majority of body patch neurons respond to local image fragments that occur frequently, but not exclusively, in bodies, with a coding that is tolerant to translation and scale. Overall, the data suggest that the body category selectivity of the midSTS body patch depends more on the feature statistics of bodies (e.g., extensions occur more frequently in bodies) than on semantics (bodies as an abstract category). PMID:27071095

  13. Cell biology of neuronal endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Parton, R G; Dotti, C G

    1993-09-01

    Endocytosis is the process by which cells take in fluid and components of the plasma membrane. In this way cells obtain nutrients and trophic factors, retrieve membrane proteins for degradation, and sample their environment. In neuronal cells endocytosis is essential for the recycling of membrane after neurotransmitter release and plays a critical role during early developmental stages. Moreover, alterations of the endocytic pathway have been attributed a crucial role in the pathophysiology of certain neurological diseases. Although well characterized at the ultrastructural level, little is known of the dynamics and molecular organization of the neuronal endocytic pathways. In this respect most of our knowledge comes from studies of non-neuronal cells. In this review we will examine the endocytic pathways in neurons from a cell biological viewpoint by making comparisons with non-neuronal cells and in particular with another polarized cell, the epithelial cell.

  14. Phenotypic checkpoints regulate neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2010-11-01

    Nervous system development proceeds by sequential gene expression mediated by cascades of transcription factors in parallel with sequences of patterned network activity driven by receptors and ion channels. These sequences are cell type- and developmental stage-dependent and modulated by paracrine actions of substances released by neurons and glia. How and to what extent these sequences interact to enable neuronal network development is not understood. Recent evidence demonstrates that CNS development requires intermediate stages of differentiation providing functional feedback that influences gene expression. We suggest that embryonic neuronal functions constitute a series of phenotypic checkpoint signatures; neurons failing to express these functions are delayed or developmentally arrested. Such checkpoints are likely to be a general feature of neuronal development and constitute presymptomatic signatures of neurological disorders when they go awry.

  15. Oligodendroglia: metabolic supporters of neurons.

    PubMed

    Philips, Thomas; Rothstein, Jeffrey D

    2017-09-01

    Oligodendrocytes are glial cells that populate the entire CNS after they have differentiated from oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. From birth onward, oligodendrocytes initiate wrapping of neuronal axons with a multilamellar lipid structure called myelin. Apart from their well-established function in action potential propagation, more recent data indicate that oligodendrocytes are essential for providing metabolic support to neurons. Oligodendrocytes transfer energy metabolites to neurons through cytoplasmic "myelinic" channels and monocarboxylate transporters, which allow for the fast delivery of short-carbon-chain energy metabolites like pyruvate and lactate to neurons. These substrates are metabolized and contribute to ATP synthesis in neurons. This Review will discuss our current understanding of this metabolic supportive function of oligodendrocytes and its potential impact in human neurodegenerative disease and related animal models.

  16. Neuron's function revealed

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    There's a new way to explore biologys secrets. With a flash of light, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley zeroed in on the type of neural cell that controls swimming in larval zebrafish. Using innovative light-activated proteins and gene expression techniques, the scientists zapped several zebrafish with a pulse of light, and initiated a swimming action in a subset of fish that was traced back to the type of neuron that drives the side-to-side motion of their tail fins. The technique behind this needle-in-haystack search for the neural roots of a specific behavior could become a powerful way to learn how any biological system works. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/09/16/light-activated-protein/

  17. [Neurons and values].

    PubMed

    Camps, Victoria

    2013-09-01

    This article examines the advances made by neuroscience in the attempt to find an answer to the question regarding the origin and foundation of moral judgements and of human behaviour in compliance with them. The conception of the brain as something dynamic and capable of adapting to the social and cultural surroundings is seen to be an important point for philosophy. At the same time, the complexity of ethical issues that cannot be reduced to observations based strictly on neurons alone also becomes quite apparent. Nevertheless, scientists and philosophers should get together and communicate with one another so as to be able to pose their questions with greater rigour and take advantage of each other's respective knowledge.

  18. On Addition Formulae for Sigma Functions of Telescopic Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayano, Takanori; Nakayashiki, Atsushi

    2013-06-01

    A telescopic curve is a certain algebraic curve defined by m-1 equations in the affine space of dimension m, which can be a hyperelliptic curve and an (n,s) curve as a special case. We extend the addition formulae for sigma functions of (n,s) curves to those of telescopic curves. The expression of the prime form in terms of the derivative of the sigma function is also given.

  19. Convergent properties of vestibular-related brain stem neurons in the gerbil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, G. D.; Shinder, M. E.; Perachio, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    Three classes of vestibular-related neurons were found in and near the prepositus and medial vestibular nuclei of alert or decerebrate gerbils, those responding to: horizontal translational motion, horizontal head rotation, or both. Their distribution ratios were 1:2:2, respectively. Many cells responsive to translational motion exhibited spatiotemporal characteristics with both response gain and phase varying as a function of the stimulus vector angle. Rotationally sensitive neurons were distributed as Type I, II, or III responses (sensitive to ipsilateral, contralateral, or both directions, respectively) in the ratios of 4:6:1. Four tested factors shaped the response dynamics of the sampled neurons: canal-otolith convergence, oculomotor-related activity, rotational Type (I or II), and the phase of the maximum response. Type I nonconvergent cells displayed increasing gains with increasing rotational stimulus frequency (0.1-2.0 Hz, 60 degrees /s), whereas Type II neurons with convergent inputs had response gains that markedly decreased with increasing translational stimulus frequency (0.25-2.0 Hz, +/-0.1 g). Type I convergent and Type II nonconvergent neurons exhibited essentially flat gains across the stimulus frequency range. Oculomotor-related activity was noted in 30% of the cells across all functional types, appearing as burst/pause discharge patterns related to the fast phase of nystagmus during head rotation. Oculomotor-related activity was correlated with enhanced dynamic range compared with the same category that had no oculomotor-related response. Finally, responses that were in-phase with head velocity during rotation exhibited greater gains with stimulus frequency increments than neurons with out-of-phase responses. In contrast, for translational motion, neurons out of phase with head acceleration exhibited low-pass characteristics, whereas in-phase neurons did not. Data from decerebrate preparations revealed that although similar response types could

  20. Convergent properties of vestibular-related brain stem neurons in the gerbil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, G. D.; Shinder, M. E.; Perachio, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    Three classes of vestibular-related neurons were found in and near the prepositus and medial vestibular nuclei of alert or decerebrate gerbils, those responding to: horizontal translational motion, horizontal head rotation, or both. Their distribution ratios were 1:2:2, respectively. Many cells responsive to translational motion exhibited spatiotemporal characteristics with both response gain and phase varying as a function of the stimulus vector angle. Rotationally sensitive neurons were distributed as Type I, II, or III responses (sensitive to ipsilateral, contralateral, or both directions, respectively) in the ratios of 4:6:1. Four tested factors shaped the response dynamics of the sampled neurons: canal-otolith convergence, oculomotor-related activity, rotational Type (I or II), and the phase of the maximum response. Type I nonconvergent cells displayed increasing gains with increasing rotational stimulus frequency (0.1-2.0 Hz, 60 degrees /s), whereas Type II neurons with convergent inputs had response gains that markedly decreased with increasing translational stimulus frequency (0.25-2.0 Hz, +/-0.1 g). Type I convergent and Type II nonconvergent neurons exhibited essentially flat gains across the stimulus frequency range. Oculomotor-related activity was noted in 30% of the cells across all functional types, appearing as burst/pause discharge patterns related to the fast phase of nystagmus during head rotation. Oculomotor-related activity was correlated with enhanced dynamic range compared with the same category that had no oculomotor-related response. Finally, responses that were in-phase with head velocity during rotation exhibited greater gains with stimulus frequency increments than neurons with out-of-phase responses. In contrast, for translational motion, neurons out of phase with head acceleration exhibited low-pass characteristics, whereas in-phase neurons did not. Data from decerebrate preparations revealed that although similar response types could