Science.gov

Sample records for neuronavigation

  1. Neuronavigation. Principles. Surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Marcel; Ciurea, Alexandru Vlad

    2009-01-01

    Neuronavigation and stereotaxy are techniques designed to help neurosurgeons precisely localize different intracerebral pathological processes by using a set of preoperative images (CT, MRI, fMRI, PET, SPECT etc.). The development of computer assisted surgery was possible only after a significant technological progress, especially in the area of informatics and imagistics. The main indications of neuronavigation are represented by the targeting of small and deep intracerebral lesions and choosing the best way to treat them, in order to preserve the neurological function. Stereotaxis also allows lesioning or stimulation of basal ganglia for the treatment of movement disorders. These techniques can bring an important amount of confort both to the patient and to the neurosurgeon. Neuronavigation was introduced in Romania around 2003, in four neurosurgical centers. We present our five-years experience in neuronavigation and describe the main principles and surgical techniques.

  2. Neuronavigation. Principles. Surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Marcel; Ciurea, Alexandru Vlad

    2009-01-01

    Neuronavigation and stereotaxy are techniques designed to help neurosurgeons precisely localize different intracerebral pathological processes by using a set of preoperative images (CT, MRI, fMRI, PET, SPECT etc.). The development of computer assisted surgery was possible only after a significant technological progress, especially in the area of informatics and imagistics. The main indications of neuronavigation are represented by the targeting of small and deep intracerebral lesions and choosing the best way to treat them, in order to preserve the neurological function. Stereotaxis also allows lesioning or stimulation of basal ganglia for the treatment of movement disorders. These techniques can bring an important amount of confort both to the patient and to the neurosurgeon. Neuronavigation was introduced in Romania around 2003, in four neurosurgical centers. We present our five-years experience in neuronavigation and describe the main principles and surgical techniques. PMID:20108488

  3. First neuronavigation experiences in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Guillermo; Gomez, Alvaro; Pereyra, Gabriela; Lima, Ramiro; Preciozzi, Javier; Vazquez, Luis; Villar, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Neuronavigation is the application of image guidance to neurosurgery where the position of a surgical tool can be displayed on a preoperative image. Although this technique has been used worldwide in the last ten years, it was never applied in Uruguay due to its cost. In an ongoing project, the Engineering Faculty (Universidad de la República), the Hospital de Clínicas (Medicine Faculty - Universidad de la República) and the Regional Hospital of Tacuarembó are doing the first experimental trials in neuronavigation. In this project, a prototype based on optical tracking equipment and the open source software IGSTK (Image Guided Surgery Toolkit) is under development and testing.

  4. Development of fluoroscopic registration in spinal neuronavigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Hamid R.; Grzeszczuk, Robert; Chin, Shao; Holz, H.; Hariri, Sanaz; Badr, Rana; Kim, Daniel; Adler, John R.; Shahidi, Ramin

    2001-05-01

    We present a system involving a computer-instrumented fluoroscope for the purpose of 3D navigation and guidance using pre-operative diagnostic scans as a reference. The goal of the project is to devise a computer-assisted tool that will improve the accuracy, reduce risk, minimize the invasiveness, and shorten the time it takes to perform a variety of neurosurgical and orthopedic procedures of the spine. For this purpose we propose an apparatus that will track surgical tools and localize them with respect to the patient's 3D anatomy and pre-operative 3D diagnostic scans using intraoperative fluoroscopy for in situ registration and localization of embedded fiducials. Preliminary studies have found a fiducial registration error (FRE) of 1.41 mm and a Target Localization Error (TLE) of 0.48 mm. The resulting system leverages equipment already commonly available in the operating room (OR), providing an important new functionality that is free of many current limitations, such as the inadequacy of skin fiducials for spinal neuronavigation, while keeping costs contained.

  5. [The importance of neuronavigation in endoscopic operations in neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Schönherr, B; Gräwe, A; Bartels, P; Meier, U

    2001-11-01

    Intracranial endoscopy as minimal invasive surgery for the treatment of hydrocephalus and intracranial cysts cannot be disregarded after 10 years of clinical practicing. The advantages are low traumatization of brain tissue and good visual control of the operation field. Neuronavigation qualifies as a method of increased operation safety for lesions which are deep seated or difficult to access. A combination of both systems partially neutralizes the respective disadvantages. On the one hand, the neuronavigation ensures the endoscopic approach up to the intracranial caverns and especially supports the endoscopy in cases of bad vision or pathologic anatomy. Endoscopy, on the other hand, enables the surgeon to recognize discrepancies and mistakes of the neuronavigation due to optical control. Increased expenses and time and staff requirements are counterbalanced by the increased cumulated operation safety. An advantageous side-effect of the combination of neuronavigation and intracranial endoscopy is the high learning potential for assistants. For all these reasons the application of neuronavigation in intracranial endoscopy is considered very important and strongly recommended. PMID:11778326

  6. Intraoperative neuronavigation for transoral surgical approach: use of frameless stereotaxy with 3D rotational C-arm for image acquisition.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Garrett J; Sedney, Cara L; Fancy, Tanya; Rosen, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    The transoral route is a standard surgical approach to the anterior craniovertebral junction, where neuronavigation is difficult secondary to the mobility of the cervical spine in relation to the cranium. We describe the use of neuronavigation combined with intraoperative 3D C-arm to direct our approach and resection of two lesions of the craniovertebral junction. Neuronavigation was employed in planning of incision, bony resection, and assessment of lesion resection. Both patients underwent transoral approach without complication using this method. Frameless stereotaxy with BrainLab VectorVision and 3D C-arm is an effective method of neuronavigated approach to the anterior craniocervical junction, which may contribute to the safety of this approach.

  7. MRI Guided Brain Stimulation without the Use of a Neuronavigation System

    PubMed Central

    Vaghefi, Ehsan; Cai, Peng; Fang, Fang; Byblow, Winston D.; Stinear, Cathy M.; Thompson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    A key issue in the field of noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) is the accurate localization of scalp positions that correspond to targeted cortical areas. The current gold standard is to combine structural and functional brain imaging with a commercially available “neuronavigation” system. However, neuronavigation systems are not commonplace outside of specialized research environments. Here we describe a technique that allows for the use of participant-specific functional and structural MRI data to guide NIBS without a neuronavigation system. Surface mesh representations of the head were generated using Brain Voyager and vectors linking key anatomical landmarks were drawn on the mesh. Our technique was then used to calculate the precise distances on the scalp corresponding to these vectors. These calculations were verified using actual measurements of the head and the technique was used to identify a scalp position corresponding to a brain area localized using functional MRI. PMID:26413537

  8. A new system for neuronavigation and stereotactic biopsy pantograph stereotactic localization and guidance system.

    PubMed

    Abrishamkar, Saeid; Moin, Houshang; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Hajibabaie, Mahmood; Haghighi, Elham K; Abbasifard, Salman

    2011-07-01

    Everyday, neurosurgeons face the problem of orientation within the brain but the advent of stereotactic surgery and neuronavigation have solved this problem. Frame-based stereotactic systems (FBSS) and neuronavigation systems have their own strengths and priority and pitfalls, which were the main driving force for us to design a new system. This hybrid system comprises three main parts: main frame, monitoring system, and pantograph, which are connected to each other and to the operating table by particular attachments. For using this system, after performing CT SCAN or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) the axial view will be transferred to Liquid Cristal Display (LCD). In the operating room, the head of the patient fixes to the operating table and registration is completed by two arms of pantograph. We made a simulation operation with our system on an occipital cavernous angioma and a frontal oligodendroglioma. The software, which have been used for simulation were as follows; Poser (version-7), Catia (version 5- R18), and 3 Dimension Max (version 2008). The accuracy of this system is approximately two millimeter. The advantages of this system are: easy to use, much less expensive, and compatible with different devices, which may be needed during neurosurgical operation. For countries that do not have the opportunity to have sophisticated technology and neuronavigation system, we believe that our system is a one-stop solution.

  9. 5-aminolevulinic acid and neuronavigation in high-grade glioma surgery: results of a combined approach.

    PubMed

    Panciani, Pier Paolo; Fontanella, Marco; Garbossa, Diego; Agnoletti, Alessandro; Ducati, Alessandro; Lanotte, Michele

    2012-02-01

    In high-grade glioma surgery, several techniques are used to achieve the maximum cytoreductive treatment preserving neurological functions. However, the effectiveness of all the methods used alone is reduced by specific limitations of each. We assessed the reliability of a multimodal strategy based on 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) and neuronavigation. We prospectively studied 18 patients with suspected, non eloquent-area malignant gliomas amenable for complete resection. Conventional illumination was used until the excision appeared complete. The cavity was then systematically inspected in violet-blue light to identify any residual tumour. Multiple biopsies of both fluorescent and non-fluorescent tissue were performed in all cases. Each specimen was labelled according to the sampling location (inside or outside the boundary set by the neuronavigator). The samples were analysed by a neuropathologist blinded to the intraoperative classification. We reviewed the results of both methods, either singly or in combination. Individual analysis showed higher 5-ALA reliability compared to neuronavigation. However, several false-negative fluorescent specimens were detected. With the combined use of fluorescence and neuroimaging, only 1 sample (negative for both 5-ALA and navigation) was tumoral tissue. In our experience, the combined approach showed the best sensitivity and it is recommended in cases of lesions involving non-eloquent areas.

  10. Neuronavigation-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening: A preliminary study in swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Lu, Yu-Jen; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-11-01

    FUS-induced BBB opening is a promising technique for noninvasive and local delivery of drugs into the brain. Here we propose the novel use of a neuronavigation system to guide the FUS-induced BBB opening procedure, and investigate its feasibility in vivo in large animals. We developed an interface between the neuronavigator and FUS to allow guidance of the focal energy produced by the FUS transducer. The system was tested in 29 pigs by more than 40 sonication procedures and evaluated by MRI. Gd-DTPA concentration was quantitated in vivo by MRI R1 relaxometry and compared by ICP-OES assay. Brain histology after FUS exposure was investigated by HE and TUNEL staining. Neuronavigation could successfully guide the focal beam with comparable precision to neurosurgical stereotactic procedures (2.3 ± 0.9 mm). FUS pressure of 0.43 MPa resulted in consistent BBB-opening. Neuronavigation-guided BBB-opening increased Gd-DTPA deposition by up to 1.83 mM (140% increase). MR relaxometry demonstrated high correlation to ICP-OES measurements (r2 = 0.822), suggesting that Gd-DTPA deposition can be directly measured by imaging. Neuronavigation could provide sufficient precision for guiding FUS to temporally and locally open the BBB. Gd-DTPA deposition in the brain could be quantified by MR relaxometry, providing a potential tool for the in vivo quantification of therapeutic agents in CNS disease treatment.

  11. Integration of 3D 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy data into neuronavigation systems for tumor biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanberoglu, Berkay; Moore, Nina Z.; Frakes, David; Karam, Lina J.; Debbins, Josef P.; Preul, Mark C.

    2013-03-01

    Many important applications in clinical medicine can benefit from the fusion of spectroscopy data with anatomical images. For example, the correlation of metabolite profiles with specific regions of interest in anatomical tumor images can be useful in characterizing and treating heterogeneous tumors that appear structurally homogeneous. Such applications can build on the correlation of data from in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging (1HMRSI) with data from genetic and ex-vivo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. To establish that correlation, tissue samples must be neurosurgically extracted from specifically identified locations with high accuracy. Toward that end, this paper presents new neuronavigation technology that enhances current clinical capabilities in the context of neurosurgical planning and execution. The proposed methods improve upon the current state-of-the-art in neuronavigation through the use of detailed three dimensional (3D) 1H-MRSI data. MRSI spectra are processed and analyzed, and specific voxels are selected based on their chemical contents. 3D neuronavigation overlays are then generated and applied to anatomical image data in the operating room. Without such technology, neurosurgeons must rely on memory and other qualitative resources alone for guidance in accessing specific MRSI-identified voxels. In contrast, MRSI-based overlays provide quantitative visual cues and location information during neurosurgery. The proposed methods enable a progressive new form of online MRSI-guided neuronavigation that we demonstrate in this study through phantom validation and clinical application.

  12. Neuronavigation-assisted single transseptal catheter implantation and shunt in patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and accentuated lateral ventricles dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Carvi Nievas, Mario N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To assess the treatment of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus with accentuated lateral ventricles dilatation by employing a single biventricular neuronavigation-assisted transseptal-implanted catheter with programmable valve and distal peritoneal derivation. Methods: A neuronavigation-assisted single transseptal biventricular catheter implantation with distal peritoneal shunt system was performed in 11 patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and accentuated lateral ventricles dilatations between 2001 and 2010. Patients with concomitant third ventricle dilatation were excluded. Several sequential frustrated attempts of temporary drainage occlusion on both sides confirmed the isolation of the lateral ventricles. Neuronavigation was employed to accurately establish the catheter surgical corridor (trajectory) across the lateral ventricles and throughout the septum pellucidum. The neurological and radiological outcomes were assessed at least 6 months after the procedure. Results: Catheter implantation was successfully performed in all patients. Only one catheter was found to be monoventricular on delayed computer tomography controls. Procedure-related complications (bleeding of infections) were not observed. No additional neurological deficits were found after shunt surgery. Six months after procedure, none required additional ventricular catheter implantations or shunt revisions. Radiological and clinical controls confirmed the shunt function and the improved neurological status of all patients. Conclusion: Single neuronavigation-assisted transseptal-implanted biventricular catheter is a valid option for the treatment of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus with accentuated lateral ventricles dilatation. This technique reduces the number of catheters and minimizes the complexity and timing of the surgical procedure as well as potential infection's risks associated with the use of multiple shunting systems. PMID:21541201

  13. Percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation for trigeminal neuralgia using neuronavigation-guided puncture from a mandibular angle

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Weihua; Chen, Shuping; Wang, Rong; Cai, Jun; Cheng, Yuan; Yu, Liang; Li, Qinghua; Deng, Fang; Zhu, Shengmei; Yu, Wenhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFT) of the Gasserian ganglion is an effective treatment for primary trigeminal neuralgia (pTN). Currently Hartel anterior approach is the most commonly used method to access the Gasserian ganglion. However, this approach is associated with high recurrence rate and technical difficulties in certain patients with foramen ovale (FO) anatomical variations. In the present study, we assessed the feasibility of accessing the Gasserian ganglion through the FO from a mandibular angle under computed tomography (CT) and neuronavigation guidance. A total of 108 patients with TN were randomly divided into 2 groups (Group G and Group H) using a random number table. In Group H, Hartel anterior approach was used to puncture the FO; whereas in Group G, a percutaneous puncture through a mandibular angle was used to reach the FO. In both groups, procedures were guided by CT imaging and neuronavigation. The success rates, therapeutic effects, complications, and recurrence rates of the 2 groups were compared. The puncture success rates in Group H and Group G were 52/54 (96.30%) and 49/54 (90.74%), respectively (P = 0.24). The 2 procedural failures in Group H were rescued by using submandibular trajectory, and the 5 failures in Group G were successfully reapproached by Hartel method. Therapeutic effects as measured by Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain scale (P = 0.03) and quality of life (QOL) scores (P = 0.04) were significantly better in Group G than those in Group H at 36 months posttreatment. Hematoma developed in 1/54 (1.85%) cases in Group H, and no cases of hematoma were observed in Group G (P = 0.33). In Group H, RFT resulted in injury to the unintended trigeminal nerve branches and motor fibers in 27/52 (51.92%) cases; in Group G, it resulted in the same type of injury in 7/49 cases (14.29%) (P < 0.01). In Group H, the 24- and 36-month recurrence rates were 12/51 (23.53%) and 20/51 (39

  14. 3D-neuronavigation in vivo through a patient's brain during a spontaneous migraine headache.

    PubMed

    DaSilva, Alexandre F; Nascimento, Thiago D; Love, Tiffany; DosSantos, Marcos F; Martikainen, Ilkka K; Cummiford, Chelsea M; DeBoer, Misty; Lucas, Sarah R; Bender, MaryCatherine A; Koeppe, Robert A; Hall, Theodore; Petty, Sean; Maslowski, Eric; Smith, Yolanda R; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of research, generated primarily from MRI-based studies, shows that migraine appears to occur, and possibly endure, due to the alteration of specific neural processes in the central nervous system. However, information is lacking on the molecular impact of these changes, especially on the endogenous opioid system during migraine headaches, and neuronavigation through these changes has never been done. This study aimed to investigate, using a novel 3D immersive and interactive neuronavigation (3D-IIN) approach, the endogenous µ-opioid transmission in the brain during a migraine headache attack in vivo. This is arguably one of the most central neuromechanisms associated with pain regulation, affecting multiple elements of the pain experience and analgesia. A 36 year-old female, who has been suffering with migraine for 10 years, was scanned in the typical headache (ictal) and nonheadache (interictal) migraine phases using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) with the selective radiotracer [(11)C]carfentanil, which allowed us to measure µ-opioid receptor availability in the brain (non-displaceable binding potential - µOR BPND). The short-life radiotracer was produced by a cyclotron and chemical synthesis apparatus on campus located in close proximity to the imaging facility. Both PET scans, interictal and ictal, were scheduled during separate mid-late follicular phases of the patient's menstrual cycle. During the ictal PET session her spontaneous headache attack reached severe intensity levels; progressing to nausea and vomiting at the end of the scan session. There were reductions in µOR BPND in the pain-modulatory regions of the endogenous µ-opioid system during the ictal phase, including the cingulate cortex, nucleus accumbens (NAcc), thalamus (Thal), and periaqueductal gray matter (PAG); indicating that µORs were already occupied by endogenous opioids released in response to the ongoing pain. To our knowledge, this is the first time that changes

  15. Surgical management of epilepsy due to cerebral cavernomas using neuronavigation and intraoperative MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Bjoern; Kasper, Burkhard Sebastian; Coras, Roland; Blumcke, Ingmar; Hamer, Hajo Martinus; Buchfelder, Michael; Roessler1, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Cure from seizures due to cavernomas might be surgically achieved dependent on both, the complete removal of the cavernoma as well as its surrounding hemosiderin rim. High field intraoperative MRI imaging (iopMRI) and neuronavigation might play a crucial role to achieve both goals. We retrospectively investigated the long-term results and impact of intraoperative 1·5T MRI (iopMRI) and neuronavigation on the completeness of surgical removal of a cavernous malformation (CM) and its perilesional hemosiderin rim as well as reduction of surgical morbidity. Methods: 26 patients (14 female, 12 male, mean age 39·1 years, range: 17–63 years) with CM related epilepsy were identified. Eighteen patients suffered from drug resistant epilepsy (69·2%). Mean duration of epilepsy was 11·9 years in subjects with drug resistant epilepsy (n  =  18) and 0·3 years in subjects presenting with first-time seizures (n  =  8). We performed 24 lesionectomies and two lesionectomies combined with extended temporal resections. Seven lesions were located extratemporally. Results: Complete CM removal was documented by postsurgical MRI in all patients. As direct consequence of iopMRI, refined surgery was necessary in 11·5% of patients to achieve complete cavernoma removal and in another 11·5% for complete resection of additional adjacent epileptogenic cortex. Removal of the hemosiderin rim was confirmed by iopMRI in 92% of patients. Two patients suffered from mild (7·7%) and one from moderate (3·8%) visual field deficits. Complete seizure control (Engel class 1A) was achieved in 80·8% of patients with a mean follow-up period of 47·7 months. Discussion: We report excellent long-term seizure control with minimal surgical morbidity after complete resection of CM using our multimodal approach. PMID:24083819

  16. Resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation for functional mapping after aborted awake craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Prag; Bandt, S. Kathleen; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Awake craniotomy is currently the gold standard for aggressive tumor resections in eloquent cortex. However, a significant subset of patients is unable to tolerate this procedure, particularly the very young or old or those with psychiatric comorbidities, cardiopulmonary comorbidities, or obesity, among other conditions. In these cases, typical alternative procedures include biopsy alone or subtotal resection, both of which are associated with diminished surgical outcomes. Case Description: Here, we report the successful use of a preoperatively obtained resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software in order to perform functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy due to loss of airway. Conclusion: Resting state functional connectivity MRI integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software can provide an alternative option for functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy. PMID:26958419

  17. Comparative study of application accuracy of two frameless neuronavigation systems: experimental error assessment quantifying registration methods and clinically influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulos, Dimitrios; Unterberg, Andreas; Metzner, Roland; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Eggers, Georg; Wirtz, Christian Rainer

    2010-04-01

    This study aimed at comparing the accuracy of two commercial neuronavigation systems. Error assessment and quantification of clinical factors and surface registration, often resulting in decreased accuracy, were intended. Active (Stryker Navigation) and passive (VectorVision Sky, BrainLAB) neuronavigation systems were tested with an anthropomorphic phantom with a deformable layer, simulating skin and soft tissue. True coordinates measured by computer numerical control were compared with coordinates on image data and during navigation, to calculate software and system accuracy respectively. Comparison of image and navigation coordinates was used to evaluate navigation accuracy. Both systems achieved an overall accuracy of <1.5 mm. Stryker achieved better software accuracy, whereas BrainLAB better system and navigation accuracy. Factors with conspicuous influence (P<0.01) were imaging, instrument replacement, sterile cover drape and geometry of instruments. Precision data indicated by the systems did not reflect measured accuracy in general. Surface matching resulted in no improvement of accuracy, confirming former studies. Laser registration showed no differences compared to conventional pointers. Differences between the two systems were limited. Surface registration may improve inaccurate point-based registrations but does not in general affect overall accuracy. Accuracy feedback by the systems does not always match with true target accuracy and requires critical evaluation from the surgeon.

  18. Impact of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging and functional neuronavigation on surgical outcome in patients with gliomas involving language areas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiashu; Chen, Xiaolei; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Fei; Li, Fangye; Xu, Bainan

    2015-04-01

    Balancing the benefit of extensive tumor resection with the consequence of potential postoperative language deficits remains a challenge in glioma surgery involving language areas. This study is designed to evaluate the impact of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) and functional neuronavigation on surgical outcome in patients with gliomas involving language areas. Two hundred seventeen patients were prospectively enrolled, 124 in the study group underwent iMRI and functional neuronavigation-guided microsurgery and 93 in the control group underwent conventional navigation-guided microsurgery. Extent of tumor volume resection (EoR) and rate of gross total resection (rGTR) were calculated perioperatively. Aphasia quotient (AQ) was assessed to evaluate the change of language function perioperatively and at 6-month follow-up. Survival outcome for glioblastoma, including progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), were recorded. In 198 glioma patients (112 in the study group and 86 in the control group), EoR (95.50 versus 89.85%, p < 0.001) and rGTR (69.60 versus 47.70%, p = 0.002) were significantly higher in the study group, and language functions were also better at 6-month follow-up in the study group (87.47 versus 78.73, p = 0.001). Furthermore, postoperative new aphasia occurred in 34.8% of the control group, whereas it occurred only in 2.3% of the study group (p < 0.001). In addition, PFS (12.5 versus 6.6 m, p = 0.003) and OS (19.6 versus 13.0 m, p < 0.001) for patients with glioblastomas were dramatically prolonged in the study group than in the control group. These results indicated that iMRI and functional neuronavigation may help maximize tumor resection, minimize language deficits in patients with gliomas involving language areas, and improve survival time for patients with glioblastomas.

  19. Convergence of human brain mapping tools: neuronavigated TMS parameters and fMRI activity in the hand motor area.

    PubMed

    Sarfeld, Anna-Sophia; Diekhoff, Svenja; Wang, Ling E; Liuzzi, Gianpiero; Uludağ, Kamil; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fink, Gereon R; Grefkes, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are well-established tools for investigating the human motor system in-vivo. We here studied the relationship between movement-related fMRI signal changes in the primary motor cortex (M1) and electrophysiological properties of the hand motor area assessed with neuronavigated TMS in 17 healthy subjects. The voxel showing the highest task-related BOLD response in the left hand motor area during right hand movements was identified for each individual subject. This fMRI peak voxel in M1 served as spatial target for coil positioning during neuronavigated TMS. We performed correlation analyses between TMS parameters, BOLD signal estimates and effective connectivity parameters of M1 assessed with dynamic causal modeling (DCM). The results showed a negative correlation between the movement-related BOLD signal in left M1 and resting as well as active motor threshold (MT) obtained for left M1. The DCM analysis revealed that higher excitability of left M1 was associated with a stronger coupling between left supplementary motor area (SMA) and M1. Furthermore, BOLD activity in left M1 correlated with ipsilateral silent period (ISP), i.e. the stronger the task-related BOLD response in left M1, the higher interhemispheric inhibition effects targeting right M1. DCM analyses revealed a positive correlation between the coupling of left SMA with left M1 and the duration of ISP. The data show that TMS parameters assessed for the hand area of M1 do not only reflect the intrinsic properties at the stimulation site but also interactions with remote areas in the human motor system.

  20. Intraoperative high-field magnetic resonance imaging combined with neuronavigation-guided resection of intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma in Broca's area: a rare case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Cheng, Jingliang; Li, Hongwei; Liu, Xianzhi; Zheng, Yuan; Wang, Chaoyan; Luo, Wenzheng; Nie, Yunfei; Li, Zhengwei; Pang, Beibei; Yang, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Cranial Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (MC) and those that occurred in brain parenchymal were fairly rare aggressive neoplasm commonly affecting the bone of young adults. Here, we reported a case with intracranial MC, invading Broca's area, a rare site not previously reported, which was presumed to be a glioma. We performed a gross total resection guided by intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) combined with neuronavigation. Follow-up shows no language and other brain function loss. Furthermore, we present a review of literature. We emphasized the importance of gross total resection guiding by the combination of iMRI and neuronavigation, which was proved to be both reliable and effective in language preservation. PMID:26064406

  1. The "Laparoscopic Neuro-Navigation" -- LANN: from a functional cartography of the pelvic autonomous neurosystem to a new field of laparoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Possover; Rhiem; Chiantera

    2004-12-01

    It is the objective of this study to etablish the technique of laparoscopic exposure of all pelvic somatic and autonomous nerves. In all our patients who underwent a laparoscopic surgical approach of the retroperitoneum, exposure and assessment of the exposed nerves using laparoscopic neuro-navigation were performed. Laparoscopic surgery allows the surgical approach to all pelvic nerves, particularly to the sciatic nerve, the pudendal nerve and the splanchnic pelvic nerves. We describe a cartography of the functional anatomy of the pelvic plexus and elaborate on the concept of "laparoscopic pelvic functional surgery".

  2. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging versus standard neuronavigation for the neurosurgical treatment of glioblastoma: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kubben, Pieter L.; Scholtes, Felix; Schijns, Olaf E.M.G.; ter Laak-Poort, Mariël P.; Teernstra, Onno P.M.; Kessels, Alfons G. H.; van Overbeeke, Jacobus J.; Martin, Didier H.; van Santbrink, Henk

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although the added value of increasing extent of glioblastoma resection is still debated, multiple technologies can assist neurosurgeons in attempting to achieve this goal. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) might be helpful in this context, but to date only one randomized trial exists. Methods: We included 14 adults with a supratentorial tumor suspect for glioblastoma and an indication for gross total resection in this randomized controlled trial of which the interim analysis is presented here. Participants were assigned to either ultra-low-field strength iMRI-guided surgery (0.15 Tesla) or to conventional neuronavigation-guided surgery (cNN). Primary endpoint was residual tumor volume (RTV) percentage. Secondary endpoints were clinical performance, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and survival. Results: Median RTV in the cNN group is 6.5% with an interquartile range of 2.5-14.75%. Median RTV in the iMRI group is 13% with an interquartile range of 3.75-27.75%. A Mann-Whitney test showed no statistically significant difference between these groups (P =0.28). Median survival in the cNN group is 472 days, with an interquartile range of 244-619 days. Median survival in the iMRI group is 396 days, with an interquartile range of 191-599 days (P =0.81). Clinical performance did not differ either. For HRQOL only descriptive statistics were applied due to a limited sample size. Conclusion: This interim analysis of a randomized trial on iMRI-guided glioblastoma resection compared with cNN-guided glioblastoma resection does not show an advantage with respect to extent of resection, clinical performance, and survival for the iMRI group. Ultra-low-field strength iMRI does not seem to be cost-effective compared with cNN, although the lack of a valid endpoint for neurosurgical studies evaluating extent of glioblastoma resection is a limitation of our study and previous volumetry-based studies on this topic. PMID:24991473

  3. Neuronavigation Increases the Physiologic and Behavioral Effects of Low-Frequency rTMS of Primary Motor Cortex in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, S.; Edwards, D.

    2013-01-01

    Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can exert local and inter-hemispheric neuromodulatory effects on cortical excitability. These physiologic effects can translate into changes in motor behavior, and may offer valuable therapeutic interventions in recovery from stroke. Neuronavigated TMS can maximize accurate and consistent targeting of a given cortical region, but is a lot more involved that conventional TMS. We aimed to assess whether neuronavigation enhances the physiologic and behavioral effects of low-frequency rTMS. Ten healthy subjects underwent two experimental sessions during which they received 1600 pulses of either navigated or non-navigated 1 Hz rTMS at 90% of the resting motor threshold (RMT) intensity over the motor cortical representation for left first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. We compared the effects of navigated and non-navigated rTMS on motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) to single-pulse TMS, intracortical inhibition (ICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) by paired-pulse TMS, and performance in various behavioral tasks (index finger tapping, simple reaction time and grip strength tasks). Following navigated rTMS, the amplitude of MEPs elicited from the contralateral (unstimulated) motor cortex was significantly increased, and was associated with an increase in ICF and a trend to decrease in ICI. In contrast, non-navigated rTMS elicited nonsignificant changes, most prominently ipsilateral to rTMS. Behaviorally, navigated rTMS significantly improved reaction time RT and pinch force with the hand ipsilateral to stimulation. Non-navigated rTMS lead to similar behavioral trends, although the effects did not reach significance. In summary, navigated rTMS leads to more robust modulation of the contralateral (unstimulated) hemisphere resulting in physiologic and behavioral effects. Our findings highlight the spatial specificity of inter-hemispheric TMS effects, illustrate the superiority of navigated rTMS for certain

  4. Neuronavigation in interventional MR imaging. Frameless stereotaxy.

    PubMed

    Jolesz, F A; Kikinis, R; Talos, I F

    2001-11-01

    The main thrust of diagnostic MR imaging is to discern normal and pathologic patient morphology and function. Intraprocedural imaging, however, serves a different goal: to furnish the surgeon or interventionalist with updates on intraoperative changes and how they may modify preintervention data. Although researchers have not established whether MR image-guided therapy can improve clinical outcomes and reduce complication rates definitively, the intraoperative and preoperative data generated will improve the ability of every neurosurgeon to navigate in the surgical field more accurately.

  5. Transcranial magnetic stimulation assisted by neuronavigation of magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, N. Angeline; Alcauter, S. Sarael; Barrios, A. Fernando; González, O. Jorge J.; Márquez, F. Jorge A.

    2012-10-01

    Technological advance has improved the way scientists and doctors can learn about the brain and treat different disorders. A non-invasive method used for this is Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) based on neuron excitation by electromagnetic induction. Combining this method with functional Magnetic Resonance Images (fMRI), it is intended to improve the localization technique of cortical brain structures by designing an extracranial localization system, based on Alcauter et al. work.

  6. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Neuronavigated Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Jessica; Kekic, Maria; Bozhilova, Natali; Nestler, Steffen; Dew, Tracy; Van den Eynde, Frederique; David, Anthony S.; Rubia, Katya; Campbell, Iain C.; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Background Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with morbid fear of fatness, extreme food restriction and altered self-regulation. Neuroimaging data implicate fronto-striatal circuitry, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Methods In this double-blind parallel group study, we investigated the effects of one session of sham-controlled high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the left DLPFC (l-DLPFC) in 60 individuals with AN. A food exposure task was administered before and after the procedure to elicit AN-related symptoms. Outcomes The primary outcome measure was ‘core AN symptoms’, a variable which combined several subjective AN-related experiences. The effects of rTMS on other measures of psychopathology (e.g. mood), temporal discounting (TD; intertemporal choice behaviour) and on salivary cortisol concentrations were also investigated. Safety, tolerability and acceptability were assessed. Results Fourty-nine participants completed the study. Whilst there were no interaction effects of rTMS on core AN symptoms, there was a trend for group differences (p = 0.056): after controlling for pre-rTMS scores, individuals who received real rTMS had reduced symptoms post-rTMS and at 24-hour follow-up, relative to those who received sham stimulation. Other psychopathology was not altered differentially following real/sham rTMS. In relation to TD, there was an interaction trend (p = 0.060): real versus sham rTMS resulted in reduced rates of TD (more reflective choice behaviour). Salivary cortisol concentrations were unchanged by stimulation. rTMS was safe, well–tolerated and was considered an acceptable intervention. Conclusions This study provides modest evidence that rTMS to the l-DLPFC transiently reduces core symptoms of AN and encourages prudent decision making. Importantly, individuals with AN considered rTMS to be a viable treatment option. These findings require replication in multiple-session studies to evaluate therapeutic efficacy. Trial Registration www.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN22851337 PMID:27008620

  7. Augmented reality-assisted skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Cabrilo, I; Sarrafzadeh, A; Bijlenga, P; Landis, B N; Schaller, K

    2014-12-01

    Neuronavigation is widely considered as a valuable tool during skull base surgery. Advances in neuronavigation technology, with the integration of augmented reality, present advantages over traditional point-based neuronavigation. However, this development has not yet made its way into routine surgical practice, possibly due to a lack of acquaintance with these systems. In this report, we illustrate the usefulness and easy application of augmented reality-based neuronavigation through a case example of a patient with a clivus chordoma. We also demonstrate how augmented reality can help throughout all phases of a skull base procedure, from the verification of neuronavigation accuracy to intraoperative image-guidance.

  8. Surgical treatment of distal anterior cerebral artery aneurysms aided by electromagnetic navigation CT angiography.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Elvis J; Petrakakis, Ioannis; Götz, Friedrich; Lütjens, Götz; Lang, Josef; Nakamura, Makoto; Krauss, Joachim K

    2015-07-01

    The surgical treatment of distal anterior cerebral artery (DACA) aneurysms still presents a challenge for neurosurgeons because of their small size and their location in the depth of the narrow frontal interhemispheric fissure. This study aimed to investigate feasibility, safety, accuracy, and usefulness of electromagnetic (EM) navigation to aid clipping of DACA aneurysms. Eight patients (age between 2 and 68 years, mean age 49.8 years) with a DACA aneurysm underwent EM-guided neuronavigated microsurgery for clipping of the aneurysm. All patients underwent craniocervical 3D-CT angiography preoperatively. After planning the optimal approach and surgical trajectory avoiding opening of the frontal sinus, the head was fixed. Intraoperative screenshots were correlated with the microscopical view of the DACA aneurysms before clipping. EM-guided neuronavigation using CT angiography for DACA aneurysms enabled fast and accurate referencing of the patient and planning of a tailored craniotomy without opening of the frontal sinus. Intraoperative accuracy was highly reliable except in one instance due to dislocation of the dynamic reference frame (DRF). There was a good correlation between the 3D-CT angiography-based navigation data sets and the intraoperative vascular anatomy. In all patients, bridging veins were spared. The aid of EM neuronavigation was considered useful in all instances. EM-guided neuronavigation using CT angiography for surgery of DACA aneurysms is a useful tool optimizing the surgical approach directly to the aneurysm minimizing additional damage to the surrounding tissue during preparation of the aneurysm and the parent vessel. PMID:25666391

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid composition modifications after neuroendoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Salvador, L; Valero, R; Carrero, E; Caral, L; Fernández, S; Marín, J L; Ferrer, E; Fábregas, N

    2007-02-01

    Normal saline solution is currently used as the ventricular irrigation fluid during neuroendoscopic procedures. The aim of this study is to determine the alterations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition after neuroendoscopic interventions. Twenty nine patients who underwent a neuroendoscopic procedure under general anaesthesia were studied. Temperature inside the cerebral ventricle was measured and samples of CSF were taken to determinate oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures, pH, base excess, ionised calcium, standard bicarbonate, glucose, sodium, potassium, magnesium, total calcium, proteins, chlorine and osmolality before initiating the irrigation and after the neuronavigation. Patient demographics, neuronavigation time, total fluid volume used and temperature of the irrigation solution and complications that appeared in the first 24 hours were collected. Mean age of the patients was 42+/-18 years. The mean neuronavigation time was 21.5+/-15.4 minutes. The mean amount of saline solution used for irrigation was 919.6+/-994.7 mL. All the values studied in the CSF, except osmolality, showed significant variations. There was a significant correlation between the CSF variation of pH, oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures, base excess, standard bicarbonate, glucose and total calcium with respect to the total volume of irrigation solution, but not with respect to the neuronavigation time. A cut-off point of 500 mL of irrigation solution (sensitivity 0.7; specificity 0.87) was related with a CSF pH decrease greater than 0.2. The use of saline as irrigation solution during neuroendoscopic procedures produces important changes in CSF.

  10. Intraoperative C-arm fluoroscopy-based 3D navigation for intraventricular endoscopic intervention.

    PubMed

    Herbowski, L; Sagan, L; Szyłak, R; Sałapa, P; Harat, A

    2013-08-01

    The authors present the technique of retained ventricular catheter removal by means of fluoroscopy-guided neuronavigation. A disconnected free-floating intraventricular catheter is an unusual shunt complication, and in case of shunt infection it should be removed immediately. The operative procedure described here is the first such imaging technique and original approach to retained ventricular catheter endoscopic surgery. The real-time fluoroscopy-guided neuroendoscopy seems to make 3D intraoperative navigation possible.

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid composition modifications after neuroendoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Salvador, L; Valero, R; Carrero, E; Caral, L; Fernández, S; Marín, J L; Ferrer, E; Fábregas, N

    2007-02-01

    Normal saline solution is currently used as the ventricular irrigation fluid during neuroendoscopic procedures. The aim of this study is to determine the alterations in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) composition after neuroendoscopic interventions. Twenty nine patients who underwent a neuroendoscopic procedure under general anaesthesia were studied. Temperature inside the cerebral ventricle was measured and samples of CSF were taken to determinate oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures, pH, base excess, ionised calcium, standard bicarbonate, glucose, sodium, potassium, magnesium, total calcium, proteins, chlorine and osmolality before initiating the irrigation and after the neuronavigation. Patient demographics, neuronavigation time, total fluid volume used and temperature of the irrigation solution and complications that appeared in the first 24 hours were collected. Mean age of the patients was 42+/-18 years. The mean neuronavigation time was 21.5+/-15.4 minutes. The mean amount of saline solution used for irrigation was 919.6+/-994.7 mL. All the values studied in the CSF, except osmolality, showed significant variations. There was a significant correlation between the CSF variation of pH, oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures, base excess, standard bicarbonate, glucose and total calcium with respect to the total volume of irrigation solution, but not with respect to the neuronavigation time. A cut-off point of 500 mL of irrigation solution (sensitivity 0.7; specificity 0.87) was related with a CSF pH decrease greater than 0.2. The use of saline as irrigation solution during neuroendoscopic procedures produces important changes in CSF. PMID:17546545

  12. Fluorescence and image guided resection in high grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Panciani, Pier Paolo; Fontanella, Marco; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Garbossa, Diego; Agnoletti, Alessandro; Ducati, Alessandro; Lanotte, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The extent of resection in high grade glioma is increasingly been shown to positively effect survival. Nevertheless, heterogeneity and migratory behavior of glioma cells make gross total resection very challenging. Several techniques were used in order to improve the detection of residual tumor. Aim of this study was to analyze advantages and limitations of fluorescence and image guided resection. A multicentric prospective study was designed to evaluate the accuracy of each method. Furthermore, the role of 5-aminolevulinc acid and neuronavigation were reviewed. Twenty-three patients harboring suspected high grade glioma, amenable to complete resection, were enrolled. Fluorescence and image guides were used to perform surgery. Multiple samples were obtained from the resection cavity of each lesion according to 5-ALA staining positivity and boundaries as delineated by neuronavigation. All samples were analyzed by a pathologist blinded to the intra-operative labeling. Decision-making based on fluorescence showed a sensitivity of 91.1% and a specificity of 89.4% (p<0.001). On the other hand, the image-guided resection accuracy was low (sensitivity: 57.8%; specificity: 57.4%; p=0.346). We observed that the sensitivity of 5-ALA can be improved by the combined use of neuronavigation, but this leads to a significant reduction in specificity. Thus, the use of auxiliary techniques should always be subject to critical skills of the surgeon. We advocate a large-scale study to further improve the assessment of multimodal approaches.

  13. From the Idea to Its Realization: The Evolution of Minimally Invasive Techniques in Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Grunert, P.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive techniques in neurosurgery evolved in two steps. Many minimally invasive concepts like neuronavigation, endoscopy, or frame based stereotaxy were developed by the pioneers of neurosurgery, but it took decades till further technical developments made the realization and broad clinical application of these early ideas safe and possible. This thesis will be demonstrated by giving examples of the evolution of four minimally invasive techiques: neuronavigation, transsphenoidal pituitary surgery, neuroendoscopy and stereotaxy. The reasons for their early failure and also the crucial steps for the rediscovery of these minimally invasive techniques will be analysed. In the 80th of the 20th century endoscopy became increasingly applied in different surgical fields. The abdominal surgeons coined as first for their endoscopic procedures the term minimally invasive surgery in contrast to open surgery. In neurrosurgery the term minimally invasive surgery stood not in opposiotion to open procedures but was understood as a general concept and philosophy using the modern technology such as neuronavigation, endoscopy and planing computer workstations with the aim to make the procedures less traumatic. PMID:24455231

  14. Preliminary experience with an intraoperative MRI-compatible infant headholder: technical note.

    PubMed

    Boop, Frederick A; Bate, Berkeley; Choudhri, Asim F; Burkholder, Brian; Klimo, Paul

    2015-05-01

    The development of high-quality intraoperative MRI (iMRI) capability has offered a major advance in the care of patients with complex intracranial disease. To date, this technology has been limited by the need for pin fixation of the calvaria. The authors report their preliminary experience with an MRI-compatible horseshoe headrest that allows for the following: 1) iMRI in patients too young for pin fixation; 2) iMRI in patients with large calvarial defects; 3) the ability to move the head during iMRI surgery; and 4) the use of neuronavigation in such cases. The authors report 2 cases of infants in whom the Visius Surgical Theatre horseshoe headrest (IMRIS Inc.) was used. Image quality was equivalent to that of pin fixation. The infants suffered no skin issues. The use of neuronavigation with the system remained accurate and could be updated with the new iMRI information. The Visius horseshoe headrest offers a technical advance in iMRI technology for infants, for patients with cranial defects or prior craniotomies in whom pin fixation may not be safe, or for patients in whom the need to move the head during surgery is required. The image quality of the system remains excellent, and the ability to merge new images to the neuronavigation system is helpful. PMID:25679382

  15. The use of intraoperative computed tomography navigation in pituitary surgery promises a better intraoperative orientation in special cases

    PubMed Central

    Linsler, Stefan; Antes, Sebastian; Senger, Sebastian; Oertel, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The safety of endoscopic skull base surgery can be enhanced by accurate navigation in preoperative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we report our initial experience of real-time intraoperative CT-guided navigation surgery for pituitary tumors in childhood. Materials and Methods: We report the case of a 15-year-old girl with a huge growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma with supra- and perisellar extension. Furthermore, the skull base was infiltrated. In this case, we performed an endonasal transsphenoidal approach for debulking the adenoma and for chiasma decompression. We used an MRI neuronavigation (Medtronic Stealth Air System) which was registered via intraoperative CT scan (Siemens CT Somatom). Preexisting MRI studies (navigation protocol) were fused with the intraoperative CT scans to enable three-dimensional navigation based on MR and CT imaging data. Intraoperatively, we did a further CT scan for resection control. Results: The intraoperative accuracy of the neuronavigation was excellent. There was an adjustment of <1 mm. The navigation was very helpful for orientation on the destroyed skull base in the sphenoid sinus. After opening the sellar region and tumor debulking, we did a CT scan for resection control because the extent of resection was not credible evaluable in this huge infiltrating adenoma. Thereby, we were able to demonstrate a sufficient decompression of the chiasma and complete resection of the medial part of the adenoma in the intraoperative CT images. Conclusions: The use of intraoperative CT/MRI-guided neuronavigation for transsphenoidal surgery is a time-effective, safe, and technically beneficial technique for special cases.

  16. The use of intraoperative computed tomography navigation in pituitary surgery promises a better intraoperative orientation in special cases

    PubMed Central

    Linsler, Stefan; Antes, Sebastian; Senger, Sebastian; Oertel, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The safety of endoscopic skull base surgery can be enhanced by accurate navigation in preoperative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we report our initial experience of real-time intraoperative CT-guided navigation surgery for pituitary tumors in childhood. Materials and Methods: We report the case of a 15-year-old girl with a huge growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma with supra- and perisellar extension. Furthermore, the skull base was infiltrated. In this case, we performed an endonasal transsphenoidal approach for debulking the adenoma and for chiasma decompression. We used an MRI neuronavigation (Medtronic Stealth Air System) which was registered via intraoperative CT scan (Siemens CT Somatom). Preexisting MRI studies (navigation protocol) were fused with the intraoperative CT scans to enable three-dimensional navigation based on MR and CT imaging data. Intraoperatively, we did a further CT scan for resection control. Results: The intraoperative accuracy of the neuronavigation was excellent. There was an adjustment of <1 mm. The navigation was very helpful for orientation on the destroyed skull base in the sphenoid sinus. After opening the sellar region and tumor debulking, we did a CT scan for resection control because the extent of resection was not credible evaluable in this huge infiltrating adenoma. Thereby, we were able to demonstrate a sufficient decompression of the chiasma and complete resection of the medial part of the adenoma in the intraoperative CT images. Conclusions: The use of intraoperative CT/MRI-guided neuronavigation for transsphenoidal surgery is a time-effective, safe, and technically beneficial technique for special cases. PMID:27695249

  17. Computational Modeling for Enhancing Soft Tissue Image Guided Surgery: An Application in Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Miga, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    With the recent advances in computing, the opportunities to translate computational models to more integrated roles in patient treatment are expanding at an exciting rate. One area of considerable development has been directed towards correcting soft tissue deformation within image guided neurosurgery applications. This review captures the efforts that have been undertaken towards enhancing neuronavigation by the integration of soft tissue biomechanical models, imaging and sensing technologies, and algorithmic developments. In addition, the review speaks to the evolving role of modeling frameworks within surgery and concludes with some future directions beyond neurosurgical applications. PMID:26354118

  18. Intraoperative optical biopsy for brain tumors using spectro-lifetime properties of intrinsic fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; Kittle, David S.; Nie, Zhaojun; Falcone, Christina; Patil, Chirag G.; Chu, Ray M.; Mamelak, Adam N.; Black, Keith L.; Butte, Pramod V.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed and tested a system for real-time intra-operative optical identification and classification of brain tissues using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS). A supervised learning algorithm using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) employing selected intrinsic fluorescence decay temporal points in 6 spectral bands was employed to maximize statistical significance difference between training groups. The linear discriminant analysis on in vivo human tissues obtained by TRFS measurements (N = 35) were validated by histopathologic analysis and neuronavigation correlation to pre-operative MRI images. These results demonstrate that TRFS can differentiate between normal cortex, white matter and glioma.

  19. Quantitative validation of a method for correction of intraoperative brain shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Lisa M.; Goerss, Stephan J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-05-01

    Stereotactic neuronavigational systems have demonstrated significant clinical influence during the past decade, and are being used in an increasing number of neurosurgical procedures. Pre-operatively acquired 3D images are used for planning purposes, and also are employed in intraoperative navigations to help localize and resect brain lesions. However, as the operation progresses, multiple factors contribute the changes that limit the accuracy of the navigation based on pore-operative images alone. The opening of the dura with the associated loss of CSF and cortical swelling, the effect of gravity relative to the craniotomy location, tumor decompression, and collapse of neural tissue around the operative site are some of the factors that contribute to errors in navigation, particularly navigation based solely on pre-operatively acquired images. Neuronavigational system assume a one-to-one correlation between patient anatomy in the operating room and the pre- operatively acquired MRI images. Since the brain deforms in a non-linear manner, intraoperative brain shift can really only be corrected via intraoperative sensing methods that effectively update the pre-operatively acquired image data during surgery.

  20. Pre-surgical planning and MR-tractography utility in brain tumour resection.

    PubMed

    Romano, A; D'Andrea, G; Minniti, G; Mastronardi, L; Ferrante, L; Fantozzi, L M; Bozzao, A

    2009-12-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate the possible identification of trajectories of fibre tracts, (2) to examine the useful of a neuronavigation system for presurgical planning, (3) to assess pre- and post-surgery patients' clinical condition and (4) to evaluate the impact of this information on surgical planning and procedure. Twenty-eight right-handed patients were prospectively and consecutively studied. All the patients were clinically assessed by a neurologist in both pre- and postsurgical phases. Separately the pyramidal tract, optic radiation and arcuate fasciculus were reconstructed. The trajectories were considered suitable for surgical planning if there were no interruptions of any of the layers at the level of the lesion. Dedicated software 'merged' the acquired images with the tractographic processing, and the whole dataset was sent to the neuronavigation system. The assessment of the 37 visualised trajectories close to the tumour resulted in a modification of the surgical approach to corticotomy in six patients (21%); the impact on the definition of the resection margins during surgery was 64%(18 cases). The overall impact percentage on the surgical procedure was 82%. In 27 cases, the symptoms had not changed. MR-tractography provides the neurosurgeon with a new anatomical view that has an impact on the surgical resection planning for brain neoplasms. PMID:19533147

  1. Brain tumor resection guided by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Frederic; Fontaine, Kathryn M.; Valdes, Pablo; Ji, Songbai; Pogue, Brian W.; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2009-02-01

    We present the methods that are being used in the scope of an on-going clinical trial designed to assess the usefulness of ALA-PpIX fluorescence imaging when used in conjunction with pre-operative MRI. The overall objective is to develop imaging-based neuronavigation approaches to aid in maximizing the completeness of brain tumor resection, thereby improving patient survival rate. In this paper we present the imaging methods that are used, emphasizing technical aspects relating to the fluorescence optical microscope, including initial validation approaches based on phantom and small-animal experiments. The surgical workflow is then described in detail based on a high-grade glioma resection we performed.

  2. Successful Treatment of Phantom Limb Pain by 1 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over Affected Supplementary Motor Complex: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Hoo; Byun, Jeong-Hyun; Choe, Yu-Ri; Lim, Seung-Kyu; Lee, Ka-Young

    2015-01-01

    A 37-year-old man with a right transfemoral amputation suffered from severe phantom limb pain (PLP). After targeting the affected supplementary motor complex (SMC) or primary motor cortex (PMC) using a neuro-navigation system with 800 stimuli of 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at 85% of resting motor threshold, the 1 Hz rTMS over SMC dramatically reduced his visual analog scale (VAS) of PLP from 7 to 0. However, the 1 Hz rTMS over PMC failed to reduce pain. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a successfully treated severe PLP with a low frequency rTMS over SMC in affected hemisphere. PMID:26361601

  3. A single burr hole approach for direct transverse sinus cannulation for the treatment of a dural arteriovenous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Justin M; Kaminsky, Ian; Gailloud, Philippe; Huang, Judy

    2014-01-01

    A 55-year-old woman with a symptomatic Borden II/Cognard IIa+b transverse sinus dural arteriovenous fistula underwent an attempted percutaneous transvenous embolization which was ultimately not possible given the fistula anatomy. She then underwent a partial percutaneous transarterial embolization but the fistula recurred. Given the failed percutaneous interventions, the patient underwent a combined open surgical/transvenous embolization using neuronavigation and a single burr hole craniectomy. She has remained symptom free for 3 months. This case report illustrates the feasibility of combining minimally invasive open surgical access to allow for direct venous cannulation for endovascular embolization of a dural arteriovenous fistula when traditional percutaneous methods are not an option. PMID:24398868

  4. Intraoperative MRI and functional mapping.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Thomas; Szelenyi, Andrea; Senft, Christian; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Sandalcioglu, I Erol; Sure, Ulrich; Nimsky, Christopher; Seifert, Volker

    2011-01-01

    The integration of functional and anatomical data into neuronavigation is an established standard of care in many neurosurgical departments. Yet, this method has limitations as in most cases the data are acquired prior to surgery. Due to brain-shift the accurate presentation of functional as well as anatomical structures declines in the course of surgery. In consequence, the acquisition of information during surgery about the brain's current functional state is of specific interest. The advancement of imaging technologies (e.g. fMRI, MEG, Intraoperative Optical Intrinsic Signal Imaging--IOIS) and neurophysiological techniques and the advent of intraoperative MRI all had a major impact on neurosurgery. The combination of modalities such as neurophysiology and intraoperative MRI (ioMRI), as well as the acquisition of functional MRI during surgery (ifMRI) are in the focus of this work. Especially the technical aspects and safety issues are elucidated.

  5. Short-term restoration of facial sensory loss by motor cortex stimulation in peripheral post-traumatic neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Denys; Bruneto, Jean Louis; El Fakir, Hasna; Paquis, Philippe; Lanteri-Minet, Michel

    2009-06-01

    We report a case in which motor cortex stimulation (MCS) improved neuropathic facial pain due to peripheral nerve injury and restored tactile and thermal sensory loss. A 66-year-old man developed intractable trigeminal neuropathic pain after trauma of the supraorbital branch of the Vth nerve, associated with tactile and thermal sensory loss in the painful area. MCS was performed using neuronavigation and transdural electric stimulation to localize the upper facial area on the motor cortex. One month after surgery, pain was decreased from 80/100 to 20/100 on visual analogic scale, and sensory discrimination improved in the painful area. Two months after surgery, quantitative sensory testing confirmed the normalization of thermal detection thresholds. This case showed that MCS could restore tactile and thermal sensory loss, resulting from peripheral nerve injury. Although the mechanisms leading to this effect remain unclear, this observation enhanced the hypothesis that MCS acts through modulation of the sensory processing.

  6. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided insertion of ventriculo-atrial shunts.

    PubMed

    McCracken, James Albert; Bahl, Anuj; McMullan, John

    2016-08-01

    Ventriculo-atrial (VA) shunts have been in use for >60 years but less frequently so of late. This is due to a combination of the risk of cardiac complications, lack of expertise and a lengthy operation. We present our consecutive prospective series of 10 VA shunts inserted using a percutaneous method employing the Sonowand Invite™ neuronavigation system for both the distal and proximal catheters, over a 13-month period. We had two complications of cases needing revision, but our series highlights a safe and reproducible method of inserting a VA shunt. About 30% of the procedures were carried out by a trainee as the primary surgeon. This technique does not necessarily require the expertise of a complex hydrocephalus surgeon and is thus able to be in the armoury of any neurosurgeon needing to do a VA shunt procedure. The indications, operative data and outcomes of our patients are discussed.

  7. Successful Treatment of Phantom Limb Pain by 1 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over Affected Supplementary Motor Complex: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Hoo; Byun, Jeong-Hyun; Choe, Yu-Ri; Lim, Seung-Kyu; Lee, Ka-Young; Choi, In-Sung

    2015-08-01

    A 37-year-old man with a right transfemoral amputation suffered from severe phantom limb pain (PLP). After targeting the affected supplementary motor complex (SMC) or primary motor cortex (PMC) using a neuro-navigation system with 800 stimuli of 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at 85% of resting motor threshold, the 1 Hz rTMS over SMC dramatically reduced his visual analog scale (VAS) of PLP from 7 to 0. However, the 1 Hz rTMS over PMC failed to reduce pain. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a successfully treated severe PLP with a low frequency rTMS over SMC in affected hemisphere. PMID:26361601

  8. Indocyanine Green Fluorescence Endoscopy at Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for an Intracavernous Sinus Dermoid Cyst: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HIDE, Takuichiro; YANO, Shigetoshi; KURATSU, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The complete resection of intracavernous sinus dermoid cysts is very difficult due to tumor tissue adherence to important anatomical structures such as the internal carotid artery (ICA), cavernous sinus, and cranial nerves. As residual dermoid cyst tissue sometimes induces symptoms and repeat surgery may be required after cyst recurrence, minimal invasiveness is an important consideration when selecting the surgical approach to the lesion. We addressed a recurrent intracavernous sinus dermoid cyst by the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach assisted by neuronavigation and indocyanine green (ICG) endoscopy to confirm the ICA and patency of the cavernous sinus. The ICG endoscope detected the fluorescence signal from the ICA and cavernous sinus; its intensity changed with the passage of time. The ICG endoscope was very useful for real-time imaging, and its high spatial resolution facilitated the detection of the ICA and the patent cavernous sinus. We found it to be of great value for successful endonasal transsphenoidal surgery. PMID:25446381

  9. Estimation of intra-operative brain shift based on constrained Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Shakarami, M; Suratgar, A A; Talebi, H A

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the problem of estimation of brain shift is addressed by which the accuracy of neuronavigation systems can be improved. To this end, the actual brain shift is considered as a Gaussian random vector with a known mean and an unknown covariance. Then, brain surface imaging is employed together with solutions of linear elastic model and the best estimation is found using constrained Kalman filter (CKF). Moreover, a recursive method (RCKF) is presented, the computational cost of which in the operating room is significantly lower than CKF, because it is not required to compute inverse of any large matrix. Finally, the theory is verified by the simulation results, which show the superiority of the proposed method as compared to one existing method.

  10. How to include the variability of TMS responses in simulations: a speech mapping case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geeter, N.; Lioumis, P.; Laakso, A.; Crevecoeur, G.; Dupré, L.

    2016-11-01

    When delivered over a specific cortical site, TMS can temporarily disrupt the ongoing process in that area. This allows mapping of speech-related areas for preoperative evaluation purposes. We numerically explore the observed variability of TMS responses during a speech mapping experiment performed with a neuronavigation system. We selected four cases with very small perturbations in coil position and orientation. In one case (E) a naming error occurred, while in the other cases (NEA, B, C) the subject appointed the images as smoothly as without TMS. A realistic anisotropic head model was constructed of the subject from T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI. The induced electric field distributions were computed, associated to the coil parameters retrieved from the neuronavigation system. Finally, the membrane potentials along relevant white matter fibre tracts, extracted from DTI-based tractography, were computed using a compartmental cable equation. While only minor differences could be noticed between the induced electric field distributions of the four cases, computing the corresponding membrane potentials revealed different subsets of tracts were activated. A single tract was activated for all coil positions. Another tract was only triggered for case E. NEA induced action potentials in 13 tracts, while NEB stimulated 11 tracts and NEC one. The calculated results are certainly sensitive to the coil specifications, demonstrating the observed variability in this study. However, even though a tract connecting Broca’s with Wernicke’s area is only triggered for the error case, further research is needed on other study cases and on refining the neural model with synapses and network connections. Case- and subject-specific modelling that includes both electromagnetic fields and neuronal activity enables demonstration of the variability in TMS experiments and can capture the interaction with complex neural networks.

  11. Subcortical mapping of calculation processing in the right parietal lobe.

    PubMed

    Della Puppa, Alessandro; De Pellegrin, Serena; Lazzarini, Anna; Gioffrè, Giorgio; Rustemi, Oriela; Cagnin, Annachiara; Scienza, Renato; Semenza, Carlo

    2015-05-01

    Preservation of calculation processing in brain surgery is crucial for patients' quality of life. Over the last decade, surgical electrostimulation was used to identify and preserve the cortical areas involved in such processing. Conversely, subcortical connectivity among different areas implicated in this function remains unclear, and the role of surgery in this domain has not been explored so far. The authors present the first 2 cases in which the subcortical functional sites involved in calculation were identified during right parietal lobe surgery. Two patients affected by a glioma located in the right parietal lobe underwent surgery with the aid of MRI neuronavigation. No calculation deficits were detected during preoperative assessment. Cortical and subcortical mapping were performed using a bipolar stimulator. The current intensity was determined by progressively increasing the amplitude by 0.5-mA increments (from a baseline of 1 mA) until a sensorimotor response was elicited. Then, addition and multiplication calculation tasks were administered. Corticectomy was performed according to both the MRI neuronavigation data and the functional findings obtained through cortical mapping. Direct subcortical electrostimulation was repeatedly performed during tumor resection. Subcortical functional sites for multiplication and addition were detected in both patients. Electrostimulation interfered with calculation processing during cortical mapping as well. Functional sites were spared during tumor removal. The postoperative course was uneventful, and calculation processing was preserved. Postoperative MRI showed complete resection of the tumor. The present preliminary study shows for the first time how functional mapping can be a promising method to intraoperatively identify the subcortical functional sites involved in calculation processing. This report therefore supports direct electrical stimulation as a promising tool to improve the current knowledge on

  12. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in schizophrenia: the contribution of neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhong-de; Wang, R; Prakash, Ravi; Chaudhury, S; Dayananda, G

    2012-01-01

    At the most basic level, the Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation(TMS) is a neuro-scientific tool that exerts its action by influencing the neo-cortical functions. However, in-spite of so many well-evidenced roles of TMS in neuropsychiatric conditions, its exact mechanism of action remains to be known. More intriguing are its therapeutic effects in Schizophrenia at the Cerebral-level. In this review, we adopt a neuro-imaging approach for this exploration. We review the present literature for the studies in Schizophrenia which have used a combination of rTMS with 1) Electroenchephalogram (EEG) 2)The functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and the 3) Positron Emission Tomography (PET)/ Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography. The TMS-EEG combination provides direct effects of TMS on the electro- magnetic field (EMF) of brain. The TMS-fMRI/PET/SPECT combinations are very effective in exploring the functional connectivity in brains of Schizophrenia patients as well as in performing rTMS guided neuro-navigation. Our review suggests that TMS combined with other neuroimaging modalities are needed for a better clarification of its neural actions. PMID:23409741

  13. Glioma Surgery: Technological Advances to Achieve a Maximal Safe Resection.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Roberto; Zenga, Francesco; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Cofano, Fabio; Agnoletti, Alessandro; Spena, Giannantonio; Crobeddu, Emanuela; Fornaro, Riccardo; Ducati, Alessandro; Garbossa, Diego

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most frequent primary central nervous system (CNS) tumor. Despite the best treatment and advances in therapy, prognosis remains poor. One of the mainstays of therapy in GBM is surgical excision. Several studies have confirmed that the extent of resection (EOR) positively influences overall survival (OS) in patients with high-grade gliomas (HGGs). A literature search was performed using PubMed to assess the useful neurosurgical tools to achieve the best neurosurgical performance. In order to achieve the major extent of resection, preserving neurological function, many tools are now available, especially neuronavigation, intraoperative fluorescence, intraoperative ultrasound, and neuromonitoring. In addition to the maximal excision of tumor, the neurosurgeon can use photodynamic therapy (PTD) and local drug delivery (LDD) to improve the local control and bridge conventional radio and chemotherapy. EOR improves OS in patients with HGGs. There are technological possibilities for achieving a complete resection preserving neurological function, and it is not acceptable to perform only biopsy of these lesions.

  14. Transsphenoidal Approach in Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery for Skull Base Lesions: What Radiologists and Surgeons Need to Know.

    PubMed

    García-Garrigós, Elena; Arenas-Jiménez, Juan José; Monjas-Cánovas, Irene; Abarca-Olivas, Javier; Cortés-Vela, Jesús Julián; De La Hoz-Rosa, Javier; Guirau-Rubio, Maria Dolores

    2015-01-01

    In the last 2 decades, endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery has become the most popular choice of neurosurgeons and otolaryngologists to treat lesions of the skull base, with minimal invasiveness, lower incidence of complications, and lower morbidity and mortality rates compared with traditional approaches. The transsphenoidal route is the surgical approach of choice for most sellar tumors because of the relationship of the sphenoid bone to the nasal cavity below and the pituitary gland above. More recently, extended approaches have expanded the indications for transsphenoidal surgery by using different corridors leading to specific target areas, from the crista galli to the spinomedullary junction. Computer-assisted surgery is an evolving technology that allows real-time anatomic navigation during endoscopic surgery by linking preoperative triplanar radiologic images and intraoperative endoscopic views, thus helping the surgeon avoid damage to vital structures. Preoperative computed tomography is the preferred modality to show bone landmarks and vascular structures. Radiologists play an important role in surgical planning by reporting extension of sphenoid pneumatization, recesses and septations of the sinus, and other relevant anatomic variants. Radiologists should understand the relationships of the sphenoid bone and skull base structures, anatomic variants, and image-guided neuronavigation techniques to prevent surgical complications and allow effective treatment of skull base lesions with the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach.

  15. Repetition suppression in the cortical motor and auditory systems resemble each other--a combined TMS and evoked potential study.

    PubMed

    Löfberg, O; Julkunen, P; Tiihonen, P; Pääkkönen, A; Karhu, J

    2013-07-23

    Repetition suppression (RS) in cortical sensory systems optimizes the size of neuronal ensemble reacting to repetitive stimuli such as sounds. Recently RS has also been demonstrated to occur with mental imaging of movement. We studied the existence of RS in the motor system using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Six healthy subjects participated in this study. TMS was focused on the primary motor cortex with neuronavigation and RS was studied by measuring the motor-evoked potentials from the contralateral first dorsal interosseous muscle. At the same time, we measured TMS-induced cortical responses using electroencephalography (EEG). For a comparison baseline, we evaluated RS by recording EEG responses to sounds with the same stimulation protocol as with TMS. Each stimulus train included four identical stimuli repeated at 1-s intervals, and the stimulation trains were repeated at 20-s intervals. The response amplitude was reduced significantly (p<.01) after the first stimulus in all stimulus trains. This suggests that RS may be a general mechanism for adaptation of neuronal population responses in the human cortex.

  16. The right temporoparietal junction in attention and social interaction: A transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Krall, Sarah C; Volz, Lukas J; Oberwelland, Eileen; Grefkes, Christian; Fink, Gereon R; Konrad, Kerstin

    2016-02-01

    The right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) has been associated with the ability to reorient attention to unexpected stimuli and the capacity to understand others' mental states (theory of mind [ToM]/false belief). Using activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis we previously unraveled that the anterior rTPJ is involved in both, reorienting of attention and ToM, possibly indicating a more general role in attention shifting. Here, we used neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation to directly probe the role of the rTPJ across attentional reorienting and false belief. Task performance in a visual cueing paradigm and false belief cartoon task was investigated after application of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) over anterior rTPJ (versus vertex, for control). We found that attentional reorienting was significantly impaired after rTPJ cTBS compared with control. For the false belief task, error rates in trials demanding a shift in mental state significantly increased. Of note, a significant positive correlation indicated a close relation between the stimulation effect on attentional reorienting and false belief trials. Our findings extend previous neuroimaging evidence by indicating an essential overarching role of the anterior rTPJ for both cognitive functions, reorienting of attention and ToM. Hum Brain Mapp 37:796-807, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to Supplementary Motor Area in Refractory Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Treatment: a Sham-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Harika-Germaneau, Ghina; Rachid, Fady; Gaudeau-Bosma, Christian; Tanguy, Marie-Laure; BenAdhira, Rene; Bouaziz, Noomane; Popa, Traian; Wassouf, Issa; Saba, Ghassen; Januel, Dominique; Jaafari, Nematollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation has been explored in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, but with negative or conflicting results. This randomized double-blind study was designed to assess the efficacy of 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the presupplementary area. Methods: Forty medication-resistant patients were assigned to 4 weeks of either active or sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation targeting the presupplementary area with the help of a neuronavigation system. Results: According to the Yale-Brown obsessive-compulsive scale, the baseline-week 4 evolution showed no significant differences between groups. Responder rates at week 4 were not different between groups (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation 10.5% vs sham 20%; P=.63). Conclusion: Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied to the presupplementary area seems ineffective for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder patients, at least in severe and drug-refractory cases such as those included in this study. Further research is required to determine profiles of responder patients and appropriate repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation parameters for obsessive-compulsive disorder. PMID:27207923

  18. Design optimization of the sensor spatial arrangement in a direct magnetic field-based localization system for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Marechal, Luc; Shaohui Foong; Zhenglong Sun; Wood, Kristin L

    2015-08-01

    Motivated by the need for developing a neuronavigation system to improve efficacy of intracranial surgical procedures, a localization system using passive magnetic fields for real-time monitoring of the insertion process of an external ventricular drain (EVD) catheter is conceived and developed. This system operates on the principle of measuring the static magnetic field of a magnetic marker using an array of magnetic sensors. An artificial neural network (ANN) is directly used for solving the inverse problem of magnetic dipole localization for improved efficiency and precision. As the accuracy of localization system is highly dependent on the sensor spatial location, an optimization framework, based on understanding and classification of experimental sensor characteristics as well as prior knowledge of the general trajectory of the localization pathway, for design of such sensing assemblies is described and investigated in this paper. Both optimized and non-optimized sensor configurations were experimentally evaluated and results show superior performance from the optimized configuration. While the approach presented here utilizes ventriculostomy as an illustrative platform, it can be extended to other medical applications that require localization inside the body.

  19. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on mood in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Moulier, Virginie; Gaudeau-Bosma, Christian; Isaac, Clémence; Allard, Anne-Camille; Bouaziz, Noomane; Sidhoumi, Djedia; Braha-Zeitoun, Sonia; Benadhira, René; Thomas, Fanny; Januel, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background High frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has shown significant efficiency in the treatment of resistant depression. However in healthy subjects, the effects of rTMS remain unclear. Objective Our aim was to determine the impact of 10 sessions of rTMS applied to the DLPFC on mood and emotion recognition in healthy subjects. Design In a randomised double-blind study, 20 subjects received 10 daily sessions of active (10 Hz frequency) or sham rTMS. The TMS coil was positioned on the left DLPFC through neuronavigation. Several dimensions of mood and emotion processing were assessed at baseline and after rTMS with clinical scales, visual analogue scales (VASs), and the Ekman 60 faces test. Results The 10 rTMS sessions targeting the DLPFC were well tolerated. No significant difference was found between the active group and the control group for clinical scales and the Ekman 60 faces test. Compared to the control group, the active rTMS group presented a significant improvement in their adaptation to daily life, which was assessed through VAS. Conclusion This study did not show any deleterious effect on mood and emotion recognition of 10 sessions of rTMS applied on the DLPFC in healthy subjects. This study also suggested a positive effect of rTMS on quality of life. PMID:26993786

  20. Neural networks improve brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy in the presence of light artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Mercier, Jeanne; St-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    It is often difficult to identify cancer tissue during brain cancer (glioma) surgery. Gliomas invade into areas of normal brain, and this cancer invasion is frequently not detected using standard preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This results in enduring invasive cancer following surgery and leads to recurrence. A hand-held Raman spectroscopy is able to rapidly detect cancer invasion in patients with grade 2-4 gliomas. However, ambient light sources can produce spectral artifacts which inhibit the ability to distinguish between cancer and normal tissue using the spectral information available. To address this issue, we have demonstrated that artificial neural networks (ANN) can accurately classify invasive cancer versus normal brain tissue, even when including measurements with significant spectral artifacts from external light sources. The non-parametric and adaptive model used by ANN makes it suitable for detecting complex non-linear spectral characteristics associated with different tissues and the confounding presence of light artifacts. The use of ANN for brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy, in the presence of light artifacts, improves the robustness and clinical translation potential for intraoperative use. Integration with the neurosurgical workflow is facilitated by accounting for the effect of light artifacts which may occur, due to operating room lights, neuronavigation systems, windows, or other light sources. The ability to rapidly detect invasive brain cancer under these conditions may reduce residual cancer remaining after surgery, and thereby improve patient survival.

  1. Toward models of surgical procedures: analyzing a database of neurosurgical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimbault, Melanie; Morandi, Xavier; Jannin, Pierre

    2005-04-01

    Image-guided surgery systems can be improved by the knowledge of surgical expertise. The more the surgeon and the system know about the surgical procedure to perform beforehand, the easier it will be to plan and perform. The main objective of this paper is to introduce an approach for predicting surgical performance according to input variables related to the patient. This prediction is a first step towards the inclusion of surgical expertise in the image guided surgery systems. We previously proposed a generic model for describing surgical procedures in the specific context of multimodal neuronavigation. In this paper, we present the preliminary results of the analysis of a neurosurgical cases database built in accordance with the generic model and including 159 surgical cases concerning right-handed patients. We defined two queries on this surgical cases database to illustrate how it could be used to extract relevant and conclusive information about the surgical procedures: How does the anatomical localization of the target influence patient positioning? How does the anatomical localization of the target influence progress of the steps involved in the surgical procedure? The mid-term goal of our research is to semi automatically extract information, a priori models or scenarios of specific surgical procedures that can make easier the decision making process both for planning and surgery.

  2. Non-invasive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) of the Motor Cortex for Neuropathic Pain-At the Tipping Point?

    PubMed

    Treister, Roi; Lang, Magdalena; Klein, Max M; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2013-01-01

    The term "neuropathic pain" (NP) refers to chronic pain caused by illnesses or injuries that damage peripheral or central pain-sensing neural pathways to cause them to fire inappropriately and signal pain without cause. Neuropathic pain is common, complicating diabetes, shingles, HIV, and cancer. Medications are often ineffective or cause various adverse effects, so better approaches are needed. Half a century ago, electrical stimulation of specific brain regions (neuromodulation) was demonstrated to relieve refractory NP without distant effects, but the need for surgical electrode implantation limited use of deep brain stimulation. Next, electrodes applied to the dura outside the brain's surface to stimulate the motor cortex were shown to relieve NP less invasively. Now, electromagnetic induction permits cortical neurons to be stimulated entirely non-invasively using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Repeated sessions of many TMS pulses (rTMS) can trigger neuronal plasticity to produce long-lasting therapeutic benefit. Repeated TMS already has US and European regulatory approval for treating refractory depression, and multiple small studies report efficacy for neuropathic pain. Recent improvements include "frameless stereotactic" neuronavigation systems, in which patients' head MRIs allow TMS to be applied to precise underlying cortical targets, minimizing variability between sessions and patients, which may enhance efficacy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation appears poised for the larger trials necessary for regulatory approval of a NP indication. Since few clinicians are familiar with TMS, we review its theoretical basis and historical development, summarize the neuropathic pain trial results, and identify issues to resolve before large-scale clinical trials.

  3. Supra-complete surgery via dual intraoperative visualization approach (DiVA) prolongs patient survival in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y; Hore, Nirjhar; Merkel, Andreas; Buslei, Rolf; Buchfelder, Michael; Savaskan, Nicolai

    2016-05-01

    Safe and complete resection represents the first step in the treatment of glioblastomas and is mandatory in increasing the effectiveness of adjuvant therapy to prolong overall survival. With gross total resection currently limited in extent to MRI contrast enhancing areas, the extent to which supra-complete resection beyond obvious contrast enhancement could have impact on overall survival remains unclear. DiVA (dual intraoperative visualization approach) redefines gross total resection as currently accepted by enabling for the first time supra-complete surgery without compromising patient safety. This approach exploits the advantages of two already accepted surgical techniques combining intraoperative MRI with integrated functional neuronavigation and 5-ALA by integrating them into a single surgical approach. We investigated whether this technique has impact on overall outcome in GBM patients. 105 patients with GBM were included. We achieved complete resection with intraoperative MRI alone according to current best-practice in glioma surgery in 75 patients. 30 patients received surgery with supra-complete resection. The control arm showed a median life expectancy of 14 months, reflecting current standards-of-care and outcome. In contrast, patients receiving supra-complete surgery displayed significant increase in median survival time to 18.5 months with overall survival time correlating directly with extent of supra-complete resection. This extension of overall survival did not come at the cost of neurological deterioration. We show for the first time that supra-complete glioma surgery leads to significant prolongation of overall survival time in GBM patients.

  4. A Pipeline for 3D Multimodality Image Integration and Computer-assisted Planning in Epilepsy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Mark; Rodionov, Roman; Zombori, Gergely; Sparks, Rachel; Rizzi, Michele; Ourselin, Sebastien; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is challenging and the use of 3D multimodality image integration (3DMMI) to aid presurgical planning is well-established. Multimodality image integration can be technically demanding, and is underutilised in clinical practice. We have developed a single software platform for image integration, 3D visualization and surgical planning. Here, our pipeline is described in step-by-step fashion, starting with image acquisition, proceeding through image co-registration, manual segmentation, brain and vessel extraction, 3D visualization and manual planning of stereoEEG (SEEG) implantations. With dissemination of the software this pipeline can be reproduced in other centres, allowing other groups to benefit from 3DMMI. We also describe the use of an automated, multi-trajectory planner to generate stereoEEG implantation plans. Preliminary studies suggest this is a rapid, safe and efficacious adjunct for planning SEEG implantations. Finally, a simple solution for the export of plans and models to commercial neuronavigation systems for implementation of plans in the operating theater is described. This software is a valuable tool that can support clinical decision making throughout the epilepsy surgery pathway.

  5. Differentiation of motor cortical representation of hand muscles by navigated mapping of optimal TMS current directions in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Shahid; Perez, Jennifer; Horvath, Jared Cooney; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    The precision of navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to map the human primary motor cortex may be effected the direction of TMS-induced current in the brain as determined by the orientation of the stimulation coil. In this study, we investigated the effect of current directionality on motor output mapping using navigated brain stimulation (NBS). Our goal was to determine the optimal coil orientation (and, thus, induced brain current) to activate hand musculature representations relative to each subject’s unique neuroanatomical landmarks. We studied motor output maps for the first dorsal interosseous (FDI), abductor pollicis brevis (APB), and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles in 10 normal volunteers. Monopolar current pulses were delivered through a figure-of-eight shaped TMS coil and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded using electromyography (EMG). At each targeted brain region, we systematically rotated the TMS coil to determine the direction of induced current in the brain for induction of the largest MEPs. These optimal current directions were expressed as an angle relative to each subject’s central sulcus. Consistency of the optimal current direction was assessed by repeating the entire mapping procedure on two different occasions across subjects. We demonstrate that systematic optimization of current direction as guided by MRI based neuronavigation improves the resolution of cortical output motor mapping with TMS. PMID:23912579

  6. Awake craniotomy using electromagnetic navigation technology without rigid pin fixation.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Ahmed A; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2015-11-01

    We report our institutional experience using an electromagnetic navigation system, without rigid head fixation, for awake craniotomy patients. The StealthStation® S7 AxiEM™ navigation system (Medtronic, Inc.) was used for this technique. Detailed preoperative clinical and neuropsychological evaluations, patient education and contrast-enhanced MRI (thickness 1.5mm) were performed for each patient. The AxiEM Mobile Emitter was typically placed in a holder, which was mounted to the operating room table, and a non-invasive patient tracker was used as the patient reference device. A monitored conscious sedation technique was used in all awake craniotomy patients, and the AxiEM Navigation Pointer was used for navigation during the procedure. This offers the same accuracy as optical navigation, but without head pin fixation or interference with intraoperative neurophysiological techniques and surgical instruments. The application of the electromagnetic neuronavigation technology without rigid head fixation during an awake craniotomy is accurate, and offers superior patient comfort. It is recommended as an effective adjunctive technique for the conduct of awake surgery.

  7. Endoscopic pituitary surgery: Techniques, tips and tricks, nuances, and complication avoidance.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhawani Shanker; Sawarkar, Dattaraj Paramanand; Suri, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic pituitary surgery is useful in all micro- and macro-pituitary adenomas including those with suprasellar and cavernous sinus extension. The endoscope provides a panoramic close-up, a multi-angled view with excellent illumination and magnification, permitting complete excision of the tumor with preservation of normal pituitary. However, surgeons need to learn altogether different skills unique to endoscopy and the learning curve is steep. The learning curve can be shortened by proper selection of cases, gradual transition from the microscopic to the endoscopic approach, adequate sphenoethmoidal recess widening, identification of important landmarks during each stage of surgery, and use of neuronavigation. Results and long term outcomes can be improved with bimanual dynamic dissection and sequential tumor excision, preservation of normal pituitary, avoidance of arachnoidal tear and use of extended approach for tumors with large suprasellar extension. The gradual transition from microscopic to endoscopic approach, adherence to step by step technique and learning 'tips and tricks' of the endoscopic pituitary surgery reduce complications. PMID:27381121

  8. Computers and neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Shaikhouni, Ammar; Elder, J Bradley

    2012-11-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, the only computational device used in neurosurgical procedures was the brain of the surgeon. Today, most neurosurgical procedures rely at least in part on the use of a computer to help perform surgeries accurately and safely. The techniques that revolutionized neurosurgery were mostly developed after the 1950s. Just before that era, the transistor was invented in the late 1940s, and the integrated circuit was invented in the late 1950s. During this time, the first automated, programmable computational machines were introduced. The rapid progress in the field of neurosurgery not only occurred hand in hand with the development of modern computers, but one also can state that modern neurosurgery would not exist without computers. The focus of this article is the impact modern computers have had on the practice of neurosurgery. Neuroimaging, neuronavigation, and neuromodulation are examples of tools in the armamentarium of the modern neurosurgeon that owe each step in their evolution to progress made in computer technology. Advances in computer technology central to innovations in these fields are highlighted, with particular attention to neuroimaging. Developments over the last 10 years in areas of sensors and robotics that promise to transform the practice of neurosurgery further are discussed. Potential impacts of advances in computers related to neurosurgery in developing countries and underserved regions are also discussed. As this article illustrates, the computer, with its underlying and related technologies, is central to advances in neurosurgery over the last half century.

  9. Direct evidence from intraoperative electrocortical stimulation indicates shared and distinct speech production center between Chinese and English languages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinsong; Lu, Junfeng; Zhang, Han; Zhang, Jie; Yao, Chengjun; Zhuang, Dongxiao; Qiu, Tianming; Guo, Qihao; Hu, Xiaobing; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liangfu

    2015-12-01

    Chinese processing has been suggested involving distinct brain areas from English. However, current functional localization studies on Chinese speech processing use mostly "indirect" techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography, lacking direct evidence by means of electrocortical recording. In this study, awake craniotomies in 66 Chinese-speaking glioma patients provide a unique opportunity to directly map eloquent language areas. Intraoperative electrocortical stimulation was conducted and the positive sites for speech arrest, anomia, and alexia were identified separately. With help of stereotaxic neuronavigation system and computational modeling, all positive sites elicited by stimulation were integrated and a series of two- and three-dimension Chinese language probability maps were built. We performed statistical comparisons between the Chinese maps and previously derived English maps. While most Chinese speech arrest areas located at typical language production sites (i.e., 50% positive sites in ventral precentral gyrus, 28% in pars opercularis and pars triangularis), which also serve English production, an additional brain area, the left middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann's areas 6/9), was found to be unique in Chinese production (P < 0.05). Moreover, Chinese speakers' inferior ventral precentral gyrus (Brodmann's area 6) was used more than that in English speakers. Our finding suggests that Chinese involves more perisylvian region (extending to left middle frontal gyrus) than English. This is the first time that direct evidence supports cross-cultural neurolinguistics differences in human beings. The Chinese language atlas will also helpful in brain surgery planning for Chinese-speakers.

  10. A Pipeline for 3D Multimodality Image Integration and Computer-assisted Planning in Epilepsy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Mark; Rodionov, Roman; Zombori, Gergely; Sparks, Rachel; Rizzi, Michele; Ourselin, Sebastien; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is challenging and the use of 3D multimodality image integration (3DMMI) to aid presurgical planning is well-established. Multimodality image integration can be technically demanding, and is underutilised in clinical practice. We have developed a single software platform for image integration, 3D visualization and surgical planning. Here, our pipeline is described in step-by-step fashion, starting with image acquisition, proceeding through image co-registration, manual segmentation, brain and vessel extraction, 3D visualization and manual planning of stereoEEG (SEEG) implantations. With dissemination of the software this pipeline can be reproduced in other centres, allowing other groups to benefit from 3DMMI. We also describe the use of an automated, multi-trajectory planner to generate stereoEEG implantation plans. Preliminary studies suggest this is a rapid, safe and efficacious adjunct for planning SEEG implantations. Finally, a simple solution for the export of plans and models to commercial neuronavigation systems for implementation of plans in the operating theater is described. This software is a valuable tool that can support clinical decision making throughout the epilepsy surgery pathway. PMID:27286266

  11. Intraoperative Image Guidance in Neurosurgery: Development, Current Indications, and Future Trends

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Chris; Waldeck, Stephan; Mauer, Uwe Max

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. As minimally invasive surgery becomes the standard of care in neurosurgery, it is imperative that surgeons become skilled in the use of image-guided techniques. The development of image-guided neurosurgery represents a substantial improvement in the microsurgical treatment of tumors, vascular malformations, and other intracranial lesions. Objective. There have been numerous advances in neurosurgery which have aided the neurosurgeon to achieve accurate removal of pathological tissue with minimal disruption of surrounding healthy neuronal matter including the development of microsurgical, endoscopic, and endovascular techniques. Neuronavigation systems and intraoperative imaging should improve success in cranial neurosurgery. Additional functional imaging modalities such as PET, SPECT, DTI (for fiber tracking), and fMRI can now be used in order to reduce neurological deficits resulting from surgery; however the positive long-term effect remains questionable for many indications. Method. PubMed database search using the search term “image guided neurosurgery.” More than 1400 articles were published during the last 25 years. The abstracts were scanned for prospective comparative trials. Results and Conclusion. 14 comparative trials are published. To date significant data amount show advantages in intraoperative accuracy influencing the perioperative morbidity and long-term outcome only for cerebral glioma surgery. PMID:22655196

  12. A systematic pipeline for the objective comparison of whole-brain spectroscopic MRI with histology in biopsy specimens from grade III glioma

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, J. Scott; Gurbani, Saumya S.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Liang, Zhongxing; Cooper, Lee A. D.; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Neill, Stewart G.; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G.; Holder, Chad A.; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis, prognosis, and management of patients with gliomas are largely dictated by the pathological analysis of tissue biopsied from a selected region within the lesion. However, due to the heterogeneous and infiltrative nature of gliomas, identifying the optimal region for biopsy with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be quite difficult. This is especially true for low grade gliomas, which often are non-enhancing tumors. To improve the management of patients with these tumors, the field of neuro-oncology requires an imaging modality that can specifically identify a tumor’s most anaplastic/aggressive region(s) for biopsy targeting. The addition of metabolic mapping using spectroscopic MRI (sMRI) to supplement conventional MRI could improve biopsy targeting and, ultimately, diagnostic accuracy. Here, we describe a pipeline for the integration of state-of-the-art, high-resolution whole-brain 3D sMRI maps into a stereotactic neuronavigation system for guiding biopsies in gliomas with nonenhancing components. We also outline a machine-learning method for automated histology analysis that generates normalized, quantitative metrics describing tumor infiltration in immunohistochemically-stained tissue specimens. As a proof of concept, we describe the combination of these two techniques in a small cohort of grade III glioma patients. In this work, we aim to set forth a systematic pipeline to stimulate histopathology-image validation of advanced MRI techniques, such as sMRI. PMID:27489883

  13. Transcranial Clot Lysis Using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Thilo; Zadicario, Eyal; Fisher, David J.; Bradley, William G.

    2010-03-01

    Stroke is the third common cause of death worldwide. The majority of strokes are caused by sudden vessel occlusion, due to a blood clot. Vessel recanalization is the primary goal of all acute stroke treatment strategies. Initial data using ultrasound in combination with a therapeutic agent for clot lysis in stroke are promising. However, sound absorption and defocusing of the ultrasound beam occur during transskull insonation, limiting the efficiency of this approach to high extent. Using a transskull High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) head system we were able to lyse blood clots within seconds and in absence of further lytic agents. We could show that any correction for the distortion might be negligible to focus the ultrasound beam after transskull insonation. The use of transskull HIFU for immediate clot lysis in the human brain without the need of further drugs and disregarding individual skull bone characteristics could become a successful strategy in early stroke treatment. Using magnetic resonance tomography for neuronavigation MRI Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound has the potential to open new avenues for therapeutic applications in the brain including Stroke, Intracranial Hemorrhages, Braintumors, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Thalamic Pain, BBB opening, and local drug delivery. First results in transcranial clot lysis will be presented in this paper.

  14. Neuroimaging evaluation in refractory epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Granados, Ana M; Orejuela, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the application of neuroimaging analysis, compared to neuropsychological tests and video-electroencephalogram, for the evaluation of refractory epilepsy in a reference centre in Cali, Colombia. Methods Between March 2013 and November 2014, 29 patients, 19 men and 10 women, aged 9–65 years and with refractory epilepsy, were assessed by structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing tasks related to language, verbal and non-verbal memory. Also, volumetric evaluation was performed. A 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner was used in all cases. Results Neuroimaging evaluation identified 13 patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. The remaining patients were classified as: 10 patients with neoplastic masses, two patients with cortical atrophy, two patients with scarring lesions and two patients with non-structural aetiology. Among patients with mesial temporal sclerosis, comparison between techniques for lateralising the epileptogenic foci was made; the κ index between functional magnetic resonance imaging and hippocampi volumetry was κ = 1.00, agreement between neuroimaging and video-electroencephalogram was good (κ = 0.78) and comparison with a neuropsychological test was mild (κ = 0.24). Conclusions Neuroimaging studies allow the assessment of functional and structural damage related to epileptogenic lesions and foci, and are helpful to select surgical treatment, conduct intraoperative neuronavigation techniques, predict surgical deficits and evaluate patient recovery. PMID:26427897

  15. Design optimization of the sensor spatial arrangement in a direct magnetic field-based localization system for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Marechal, Luc; Shaohui Foong; Zhenglong Sun; Wood, Kristin L

    2015-08-01

    Motivated by the need for developing a neuronavigation system to improve efficacy of intracranial surgical procedures, a localization system using passive magnetic fields for real-time monitoring of the insertion process of an external ventricular drain (EVD) catheter is conceived and developed. This system operates on the principle of measuring the static magnetic field of a magnetic marker using an array of magnetic sensors. An artificial neural network (ANN) is directly used for solving the inverse problem of magnetic dipole localization for improved efficiency and precision. As the accuracy of localization system is highly dependent on the sensor spatial location, an optimization framework, based on understanding and classification of experimental sensor characteristics as well as prior knowledge of the general trajectory of the localization pathway, for design of such sensing assemblies is described and investigated in this paper. Both optimized and non-optimized sensor configurations were experimentally evaluated and results show superior performance from the optimized configuration. While the approach presented here utilizes ventriculostomy as an illustrative platform, it can be extended to other medical applications that require localization inside the body. PMID:26736407

  16. Direct evidence from intraoperative electrocortical stimulation indicates shared and distinct speech production center between Chinese and English languages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinsong; Lu, Junfeng; Zhang, Han; Zhang, Jie; Yao, Chengjun; Zhuang, Dongxiao; Qiu, Tianming; Guo, Qihao; Hu, Xiaobing; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liangfu

    2015-12-01

    Chinese processing has been suggested involving distinct brain areas from English. However, current functional localization studies on Chinese speech processing use mostly "indirect" techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography, lacking direct evidence by means of electrocortical recording. In this study, awake craniotomies in 66 Chinese-speaking glioma patients provide a unique opportunity to directly map eloquent language areas. Intraoperative electrocortical stimulation was conducted and the positive sites for speech arrest, anomia, and alexia were identified separately. With help of stereotaxic neuronavigation system and computational modeling, all positive sites elicited by stimulation were integrated and a series of two- and three-dimension Chinese language probability maps were built. We performed statistical comparisons between the Chinese maps and previously derived English maps. While most Chinese speech arrest areas located at typical language production sites (i.e., 50% positive sites in ventral precentral gyrus, 28% in pars opercularis and pars triangularis), which also serve English production, an additional brain area, the left middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann's areas 6/9), was found to be unique in Chinese production (P < 0.05). Moreover, Chinese speakers' inferior ventral precentral gyrus (Brodmann's area 6) was used more than that in English speakers. Our finding suggests that Chinese involves more perisylvian region (extending to left middle frontal gyrus) than English. This is the first time that direct evidence supports cross-cultural neurolinguistics differences in human beings. The Chinese language atlas will also helpful in brain surgery planning for Chinese-speakers. PMID:26351094

  17. Semi-automated Volumetric and Morphological Assessment of Glioblastoma Resection with Fluorescence-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, J. Scott; Gurbani, Saumya S.; Holder, Chad A.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Shi, Ran; Guo, Ying; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Shim, Hyunsuk; Hadjipanayis, Costas G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Glioblastoma (GBM) neurosurgical resection relies on contrast-enhanced MRI-based neuronavigation. However, it is well-known that infiltrating tumor extends beyond contrast enhancement. Fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) was evaluated to improve extent of resection (EOR) of GBMs. Pre-operative morphological tumor metrics were also assessed. Procedures Thirty patients from a Phase II trial evaluating 5-ALA FGS in newly diagnosed GBM were assessed. Tumors were segmented pre-operatively to assess morphological features as well as post-operatively to evaluate EOR and residual tumor volume (RTV). Results Median EOR and RTV were 94.3% and 0.821 cm3, respectively. Pre-operative surface area to volume ratio and RTV were significantly associated with overall survival, even when controlling for the known survival confounders. Conclusions This study supports claims that 5-ALA FGS is helpful at decreasing tumor burden and prolonging survival in GBM. Moreover, morphological indices are shown to impact both resection and patient survival. PMID:26463215

  18. A critical analysis of the current state of neurosurgery training in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, M. Shahzad; Tahir, M. Zubair; Godil, Saniya Siraj; Kumar, Rajesh; Siddiqui, Arshad Ali

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe interdepartmental variation in the availability of resources and academic activities within the various neurosurgery programs of Pakistan. Methods: This was a proforma-based survey of neurosurgery trainees and young neurosurgeons of Pakistan, looking at the academic infrastructure and output of their programs. The proforma was filled by 36 respondents from 11 neurosurgery centers of the country. All these centers were accredited for neurosurgery training in Pakistan. Results: Out of the 36 respondents, 30 were completing a Fellowship training (FCPS) and six were enrolled for a Master in Surgery (MS) program. About 80% of the participants used the Youman's Textbook of Neurosurgery as a reference book. Only 40% of the candidates had access to more than one indexed neurosurgery journal. Structured academic sessions (e.g., journal clubs and neuropathology meetings) were lacking in a majority of the training institutes, 95% of the trainees had no microsurgical laboratory experience, and modern neurosurgical tools (frameless neuronavigation system, neuroendoscopy) were in use at a few centers only. Conclusion: Neurosurgery training in Pakistan is not uniform and wide variations exist between the programs at the centers evaluated. We recommend exchange programs between centers at national and international levels, to allow trainees to gain first-hand exposure to training components not available in their own center. PMID:22276237

  19. [Magnetic resonance measuring and analitic methods in epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Barsi, Péter

    2011-09-30

    Neuroradiology and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as its leading tool play a basic role in the diagnostics of epilepsy. The result of the MRI examination is of utmost importance in patients with therapy resistent focal epilepsy possibly requiring neurosurgical intervention. Based on the continuously developing MRI techniques, we can use an optimal imaging protocol. Cerebral structures can be evaluated on a microanatomical level on high-resolution images with thin slices. The three-dimensional (3D) sequence has high spatial resolution, properly distinguishes cerebral grey and white matter, provides the possibility of surface rendering and volumetry, as well as an anatomical basis for other methods like tractography, functional MRI and neuronavigation. Diffusion weighted and diffusion tensor imaging (DWI, DTI) and tractography has an important role in differential diagnostics and tractography visualizes the main white matter tracts and their relation with brain pathologies. MR perfusion (MRP) provides help in differential diagnostics and may have a future role in the determination of the epileptogenic focus in multifocal pathologies. MR spectroscopy (MRS) is important in differential diagnostics, lateralization of focal epilepsy and in the confirmation of hippocampal sclerosis. Several of these methods need special hardware, software and expertise, but the basic MRI protocol for epilepsy can be implemented in all modern MR scanners of middle or high field strength.

  20. Evaluation of Language Function under Awake Craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    KANNO, Aya; MIKUNI, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is the only established way to assess patients’ language functions intraoperatively and to contribute to their preservation, if necessary. Recent guidelines have enabled the approach to be used widely, effectively, and safely. Non-invasive brain functional imaging techniques, including functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging, have been used preoperatively to identify brain functional regions corresponding to language, and their accuracy has increased year by year. In addition, the use of neuronavigation that incorporates this preoperative information has made it possible to identify the positional relationships between the lesion and functional regions involved in language, conduct functional brain mapping in the awake state with electrical stimulation, and intraoperatively assess nerve function in real time when resecting the lesion. This article outlines the history of awake craniotomy, the current state of pre- and intraoperative evaluation of language function, and the clinical usefulness of such functional evaluation. When evaluating patients’ language functions during awake craniotomy, given the various intraoperative stresses involved, it is necessary to carefully select the tasks to be undertaken, quickly perform all examinations, and promptly evaluate the results. As language functions involve both input and output, they are strongly affected by patients’ preoperative cognitive function, degree of intraoperative wakefulness and fatigue, the ability to produce verbal articulations and utterances, as well as perform synergic movement. Therefore, it is essential to appropriately assess the reproducibility of language function evaluation using awake craniotomy techniques. PMID:25925758

  1. Supra-complete surgery via dual intraoperative visualization approach (DiVA) prolongs patient survival in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y.; Hore, Nirjhar; Merkel, Andreas; Buslei, Rolf; Buchfelder, Michael; Savaskan, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    Safe and complete resection represents the first step in the treatment of glioblastomas and is mandatory in increasing the effectiveness of adjuvant therapy to prolong overall survival. With gross total resection currently limited in extent to MRI contrast enhancing areas, the extent to which supra-complete resection beyond obvious contrast enhancement could have impact on overall survival remains unclear. DiVA (dual intraoperative visualization approach) redefines gross total resection as currently accepted by enabling for the first time supra-complete surgery without compromising patient safety. This approach exploits the advantages of two already accepted surgical techniques combining intraoperative MRI with integrated functional neuronavigation and 5-ALA by integrating them into a single surgical approach. We investigated whether this technique has impact on overall outcome in GBM patients. 105 patients with GBM were included. We achieved complete resection with intraoperative MRI alone according to current best-practice in glioma surgery in 75 patients. 30 patients received surgery with supra-complete resection. The control arm showed a median life expectancy of 14 months, reflecting current standards-of-care and outcome. In contrast, patients receiving supra-complete surgery displayed significant increase in median survival time to 18.5 months with overall survival time correlating directly with extent of supra-complete resection. This extension of overall survival did not come at the cost of neurological deterioration. We show for the first time that supra-complete glioma surgery leads to significant prolongation of overall survival time in GBM patients. PMID:27036027

  2. Investigating occipito-temporal contributions to reading with TMS

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Keith J.; Pattamadilok, Chotiga; Devlin, Joseph T.

    2009-01-01

    The debate regarding the role of ventral occipito-temporal cortex (vOTC) in visual word recognition arises in part from difficulty delineating the functional contributions of vOTC as separate from other areas of the reading network. Here we investigated the feasibility of using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to interfere with vOTC processing in order to explore its specific contributions to visual word recognition. Three visual lexical decision experiments were conducted using neuro-navigated TMS. The first demonstrated that repetitive stimulation of vOTC successfully slowed word, but not non-word, responses. The second confirmed and extended these findings by demonstrating the effect was specific to vOTC and not present in the adjacent lateral occipital complex. The final experiment used paired-pulse TMS to investigate the time course of vOTC processing for words and revealed activation starting as early as 80-120msec post-stimulus onset - significantly earlier than that expected based on electrophysiological and magnetoencephalography studies. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that TMS can be successfully used to stimulate parts of vOTC previously believed to be inaccessible and provide a new tool for systematically investigating the information processing characteristics of vOTC. In addition, the findings provide strong evidence that lexical status and frequency significantly affect vOTC processing, findings difficult to reconcile with pre-lexical accounts of vOTC function. PMID:19302001

  3. A Pipeline for 3D Multimodality Image Integration and Computer-assisted Planning in Epilepsy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nowell, Mark; Rodionov, Roman; Zombori, Gergely; Sparks, Rachel; Rizzi, Michele; Ourselin, Sebastien; Miserocchi, Anna; McEvoy, Andrew; Duncan, John

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy surgery is challenging and the use of 3D multimodality image integration (3DMMI) to aid presurgical planning is well-established. Multimodality image integration can be technically demanding, and is underutilised in clinical practice. We have developed a single software platform for image integration, 3D visualization and surgical planning. Here, our pipeline is described in step-by-step fashion, starting with image acquisition, proceeding through image co-registration, manual segmentation, brain and vessel extraction, 3D visualization and manual planning of stereoEEG (SEEG) implantations. With dissemination of the software this pipeline can be reproduced in other centres, allowing other groups to benefit from 3DMMI. We also describe the use of an automated, multi-trajectory planner to generate stereoEEG implantation plans. Preliminary studies suggest this is a rapid, safe and efficacious adjunct for planning SEEG implantations. Finally, a simple solution for the export of plans and models to commercial neuronavigation systems for implementation of plans in the operating theater is described. This software is a valuable tool that can support clinical decision making throughout the epilepsy surgery pathway. PMID:27286266

  4. Correlation of the CT Compatible Stereotaxic Craniotomy with MRI Scans of the Patients for Removing Cranial Lesions Located Eloquent Areas and Deep Sites of Brain.

    PubMed

    Gulsen, Salih

    2015-03-15

    The first goal in neurosurgery is to protect neural function as long as it is possible. Moreover, while protecting the neural function, a neurosurgeon should extract the maximum amount of tumoral tissue from the tumour region of the brain. So neurosurgery and technological advancement go hand in hand to realize this goal. Using of CT compatible stereotaxy for removing a cranial tumour is to be commended as a cornerstone of these technological advancements. Following CT compatible stereotaxic system applications in neurosurgery, different techniques have taken place in neurosurgical practice. These techniques are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MRI compatible stereotaxis, frameless stereotaxy, volumetric stereotaxy, functional MRI, diffusion tensor (DT) imaging techniques (tractography of the white matter), intraoperative MRI and neuronavigation systems. However, to use all of this equipment having these technologies would be impossible because of economic reasons. However, when we correlated this technique with MRI scans of the patients with CT compatible stereotaxy scans, it is possible to provide gross total resection and protect and improve patients' neural functions.

  5. Computers and neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Shaikhouni, Ammar; Elder, J Bradley

    2012-11-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, the only computational device used in neurosurgical procedures was the brain of the surgeon. Today, most neurosurgical procedures rely at least in part on the use of a computer to help perform surgeries accurately and safely. The techniques that revolutionized neurosurgery were mostly developed after the 1950s. Just before that era, the transistor was invented in the late 1940s, and the integrated circuit was invented in the late 1950s. During this time, the first automated, programmable computational machines were introduced. The rapid progress in the field of neurosurgery not only occurred hand in hand with the development of modern computers, but one also can state that modern neurosurgery would not exist without computers. The focus of this article is the impact modern computers have had on the practice of neurosurgery. Neuroimaging, neuronavigation, and neuromodulation are examples of tools in the armamentarium of the modern neurosurgeon that owe each step in their evolution to progress made in computer technology. Advances in computer technology central to innovations in these fields are highlighted, with particular attention to neuroimaging. Developments over the last 10 years in areas of sensors and robotics that promise to transform the practice of neurosurgery further are discussed. Potential impacts of advances in computers related to neurosurgery in developing countries and underserved regions are also discussed. As this article illustrates, the computer, with its underlying and related technologies, is central to advances in neurosurgery over the last half century. PMID:22985531

  6. Susceptibility artefact correction using dynamic graph cuts: application to neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Daga, Pankaj; Pendse, Tejas; Modat, Marc; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Winston, Gavin P; McEvoy, Andrew W; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek; Drobnjak, Ivana; Duncan, John S; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2014-10-01

    Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is routinely used in diffusion and functional MR imaging due to its rapid acquisition time. However, the long readout period makes it prone to susceptibility artefacts which results in geometric and intensity distortions of the acquired image. The use of these distorted images for neuronavigation hampers the effectiveness of image-guided surgery systems as critical white matter tracts and functionally eloquent brain areas cannot be accurately localised. In this paper, we present a novel method for correction of distortions arising from susceptibility artefacts in EPI images. The proposed method combines fieldmap and image registration based correction techniques in a unified framework. A phase unwrapping algorithm is presented that can efficiently compute the B0 magnetic field inhomogeneity map as well as the uncertainty associated with the estimated solution through the use of dynamic graph cuts. This information is fed to a subsequent image registration step to further refine the results in areas with high uncertainty. This work has been integrated into the surgical workflow at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery and its effectiveness in correcting for geometric distortions due to susceptibility artefacts is demonstrated on EPI images acquired with an interventional MRI scanner during neurosurgery.

  7. The role of magnetoencephalography in epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Tovar-Spinoza, Zulma S; Ochi, Ayako; Rutka, James T; Go, Cristina; Otsubo, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    Epilepsy surgery requires the precise localization of the epileptogenic zone and the anatomical localization of eloquent cortex so that these areas can be preserved during cortical resection. Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a technique that maps interictal magnetic dipole sources onto MR imaging to produce a magnetic source image. Magneto-encephalographic spike sources can be used to localize the epileptogenic zone and be part of the workup of the patient for epilepsy surgery in conjunction with data derived from an analysis of seizure semiology, scalp video electroencephalography, PET, functional MR imaging, and neuropsychological testing. In addition, magnetoencephalographic spike sources can be linked to neuronavigation platforms for use in the neurosurgical field. Finally, paradigms have been developed so that MEG can be used to identify functional areas of the cerebral cortex including the somatosensory, motor, language, and visual evoked fields. The authors review the basic principles of MEG and the utility of MEG for presurgical planning as well as intra-operative mapping and discuss future applications of MEG technology.

  8. TMS reveals a direct influence of spinal projections from human SMAp on precise force production.

    PubMed

    Entakli, Jonathan; Bonnard, Mireille; Chen, Sophie; Berton, Eric; De Graaf, Jozina B

    2014-01-01

    The corticospinal (CS) system plays an important role in fine motor control, especially in precision grip tasks. Although the primary motor cortex (M1) is the main source of the CS projections, other projections have been found, especially from the supplementary motor area proper (SMAp). To study the characteristics of these CS projections from SMAp, we compared muscle responses of an intrinsic hand muscle (FDI) evoked by stimulation of human M1 and SMAp during an isometric static low-force control task. Subjects were instructed to maintain a small cursor on a target force curve by applying a pressure with their right precision grip on a force sensor. Neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to stimulate either left M1 or left SMAp with equal induced electric field values at the defined cortical targets. The results show that the SMAp stimulation evokes reproducible muscle responses with similar latencies and amplitudes as M1 stimulation, and with a clear and significant shorter silent period. These results suggest that (i) CS projections from human SMAp are as rapid and efficient as those from M1, (ii) CS projections from SMAp are directly involved in control of the excitability of spinal motoneurons and (iii) SMAp has a different intracortical inhibitory circuitry. We conclude that human SMAp and M1 both have direct influence on force production during fine manual motor tasks. PMID:24164635

  9. Awake craniotomy using electromagnetic navigation technology without rigid pin fixation.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Ahmed A; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2015-11-01

    We report our institutional experience using an electromagnetic navigation system, without rigid head fixation, for awake craniotomy patients. The StealthStation® S7 AxiEM™ navigation system (Medtronic, Inc.) was used for this technique. Detailed preoperative clinical and neuropsychological evaluations, patient education and contrast-enhanced MRI (thickness 1.5mm) were performed for each patient. The AxiEM Mobile Emitter was typically placed in a holder, which was mounted to the operating room table, and a non-invasive patient tracker was used as the patient reference device. A monitored conscious sedation technique was used in all awake craniotomy patients, and the AxiEM Navigation Pointer was used for navigation during the procedure. This offers the same accuracy as optical navigation, but without head pin fixation or interference with intraoperative neurophysiological techniques and surgical instruments. The application of the electromagnetic neuronavigation technology without rigid head fixation during an awake craniotomy is accurate, and offers superior patient comfort. It is recommended as an effective adjunctive technique for the conduct of awake surgery. PMID:26249245

  10. Trigone ventricular meningiomas: Is it possible to achieve good results even in the absence of high tech tools?

    PubMed Central

    Faquini, Igor; Fonseca, Ricardo Brandão; Vale de Melo, Sérgio Luís; Negri, Herika; Vieira, Eduardo; Saboia, Tammy; Azevedo-Filho, Hildo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intraventricular meningiomas constitute 2% of intracranial meningiomas, representing a challenging disease for neurosurgeons; we report our experience through a case series, emphasizing surgical approaches and results. Methods: Between 2009 and 2012, four patients underwent microsurgical resection in our department. Clinical and imaging findings, surgical approaches, outcomes, and follow-up were analyzed. Results: Four patients (three females and one male) were included and the signs of intracranial hypertension were the main clinical presentation in all cases. The parietal approach through intraparietal sulcus was performed in 3 cases and parieto-occipital interhemispheric surgical route in 1 case. Gross total resection was achieved in all the patients without additional deficits and without the aid of neuronavigation, intraoperative monitoring, and intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion: Gross total resection is the gold standard treatment for such tumors and the intraparietal sulcus approach is an excellent choice for most of the cases. Careful anatomical knowledge contributes to a safer procedure even in the absence of high tech equipment assistance. PMID:26674002

  11. ‘From the core to beyond the margin’: a genomic picture of glioblastoma intratumor heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Etcheverry, Amandine; Clavreul, Anne; Saikali, Stéphan; Menei, Philippe; Mosser, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GB) is a highly invasive primary brain tumor that almost systematically recurs despite aggressive therapies. One of the most challenging problems in therapy of GB is its extremely complex and heterogeneous molecular biology. To explore this heterogeneity, we performed a genome-wide integrative screening of three molecular levels: genome, transcriptome, and methylome. We analyzed tumor biopsies obtained by neuro-navigation in four distinct areas for 10 GB patients (necrotic zone, tumor zone, interface, and peripheral brain zone). We classified samples and deciphered a key genes signature of intratumor heterogeneity by Principal Component Analysis and Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis. At the genome level, we identified common GB copy number alterations and but a strong interindividual molecular heterogeneity. Transcriptome analysis highlighted a pronounced intratumor architecture reflecting the surgical sampling plan of the study and identified gene modules associated with hallmarks of cancer. We provide a signature of key cancer-heterogeneity genes highly associated with the intratumor spatial gradient and show that it is enriched in genes with correlation between methylation and expression levels. Our study confirms that GBs are molecularly highly diverse and that a single tumor can harbor different transcriptional GB subtypes depending on its spatial architecture. PMID:25940437

  12. Navigation-supported diagnosis of the substantia nigra by matching midbrain sonography and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salah, Zein; Weise, David; Preim, Bernhard; Classen, Joseph; Rose, Georg

    2012-03-01

    Transcranial sonography (TCS) is a well-established neuroimaging technique that allows for visualizing several brainstem structures, including the substantia nigra, and helps for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of various movement disorders, especially in Parkinsonian syndromes. However, proximate brainstem anatomy can hardly be recognized due to the limited image quality of B-scans. In this paper, a visualization system for the diagnosis of the substantia nigra is presented, which utilizes neuronavigated TCS to reconstruct tomographical slices from registered MRI datasets and visualizes them simultaneously with corresponding TCS planes in realtime. To generate MRI tomographical slices, the tracking data of the calibrated ultrasound probe are passed to an optimized slicing algorithm, which computes cross sections at arbitrary positions and orientations from the registered MRI dataset. The extracted MRI cross sections are finally fused with the region of interest from the ultrasound image. The system allows for the computation and visualization of slices at a near real-time rate. Primary tests of the system show an added value to the pure sonographic imaging. The system also allows for reconstructing volumetric (3D) ultrasonic data of the region of interest, and thus contributes to enhancing the diagnostic yield of midbrain sonography.

  13. Image guided surgery in the management of craniocerebral gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    Elserry, Tarek; Anwer, Hesham; Esene, Ignatius Ngene

    2013-01-01

    Background: A craniocerebral trauma caused by firearms is a complex injury with high morbidity and mortality. One of the most intriguing and controversial part in their management in salvageable patients is the decision to remove the bullet/pellet. A bullet is foreign to the brain and, in principle, should be removed. Surgical options for bullet extraction span from conventional craniotomy, through C-arm-guided surgery to minimally invasive frame or frameless stereotaxy. But what is the best surgical option? Methods: We prospectively followed up a cohort of 28 patients with cranio-cerebral gunshot injury (CCHSI) managed from January to December 2012 in our department of neurosurgery. The missiles were extracted via stereotaxy (frame or frameless), C-arm-guided, or free-hand-based surgery. Cases managed conservatively were excluded. The Glasgow Outcome Score was used to assess the functional outcome on discharge. Results: Five of the eight “stereotactic cases” had an excellent outcome after missile extraction while the initially planned stereotaxy missed locating the missile in three cases and were thus subjected to free hand craniotomy. Excellent outcome was obtained in five of the nine “neuronavigation cases, five of the eight cases for free hand surgery based on the bony landmarks, and five of the six C-arm-based surgery. Conclusion: Conventional craniotomy isn’t indicated in the extraction of isolated, retained, intracranial firearm missiles in civilian injury but could be useful when the missile is incorporated within a surgical lesion. Stereotactic surgery could be useful for bullet extraction, though with limited precision in identifying small pellets because of their small sizes, thus exposing patients to same risk of brain insult when retrieving a missile by conventional surgery. Because of its availability, C-arm-guided surgery continues to be of much benefit, especially in emergency situations. We recommend an extensive long-term study of these

  14. Treatment results of glioblastoma during the last 30 years in a single institute.

    PubMed

    Kumabe, Toshihiro; Saito, Ryuta; Kanamori, Masayuki; Chonan, Masashi; Mano, Yui; Shibahara, Ichiyo; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Kato, Hideaki; Yamashita, Yoji; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kawagishi, Jun; Jokura, Hidefumi; Watanabe, Mika; Katakura, Ryuichi; Kayama, Takamasa; Tominaga, Teiji

    2013-01-01

    Treatment results of glioblastoma (GB) during the last 30 years in Tohoku University were analyzed to identify any improvements in patient outcome in all 332 histologically proven cases of newly diagnosed GB treated consecutively in our department between 1982 and 2011. These 30 years was divided into 5 treatment eras, Group 1 (1982-1988, without preoperative evaluation by magnetic resonance [MR] imaging, n = 46), Group 2 (1989-1996, with preoperative MR imaging, n = 41), Group 3 (1997-1999, additionally underwent intraoperative functional brain mapping and neuronavigation system, n = 38), Group 4 (2000-August 2006, underwent 30 Gy of whole brain radiation followed by 30 Gy of extended local accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy, n = 96), and Group 5 (September 2006-2011, adjuvant usage of temozolomide [TMZ], n = 111). Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the date of surgery to the death from any cause. The median survival time/2-year OS/5-year OS of Groups 1 to 5 were 10.7 months/10.9%/0%, 17.3 months/26.2%/6.9%, 15.9 months/23.7%/5.3%, 20.1 months/34.8%/15.5%, and 20.9 months/45.5%/19.7%. The prognosis for patients with GB improved significantly after the introduction of MR imaging. Younger GB, defined as patients aged below 60 years, or total tumor resection with all ages in Group 5 had 5-year 0S of 31.0% and 30.1%, respectively. The prognosis of GB was improved significantly after the introduction of TMZ for elderly GB, recursive partitioning analysis class 5, or totally resected GB. Introduction of MR imaging and TMZ, and total resection of the tumor were important in the improvement of outcome for patients with GB.

  15. Treatment Results of Glioblastoma during the Last 30 Years in a Single Institute

    PubMed Central

    Kumabe, Toshihiro; Saito, Ryuta; Kanamori, Masayuki; Chonan, Masashi; Mano, Yui; Shibahara, Ichiyo; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Kato, Hideaki; Yamashita, Yoji; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kawagishi, Jun; Jokura, Hidefumi; Watanabe, Mika; Katakura, Ryuichi; Kayama, Takamasa; Tominaga, Teiji

    2013-01-01

    Treatment results of glioblastoma (GB) during the last 30 years in Tohoku University were analyzed to identify any improvements in patient outcome in all 332 histologically proven cases of newly diagnosed GB treated consecutively in our department between 1982 and 2011. These 30 years was divided into 5 treatment eras, Group 1 (1982–1988, without preoperative evaluation by magnetic resonance [MR] imaging, n = 46), Group 2 (1989–1996, with preoperative MR imaging, n = 41), Group 3 (1997–1999, additionally underwent intraoperative functional brain mapping and neuronavigation system, n = 38), Group 4 (2000–August 2006, underwent 30 Gy of whole brain radiation followed by 30 Gy of extended local accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy, n = 96), and Group 5 (September 2006–2011, adjuvant usage of temozolomide [TMZ], n = 111). Overall survival (OS) was calculated from the date of surgery to the death from any cause. The median survival time/2-year OS/5-year OS of Groups 1 to 5 were 10.7 months/10.9%/0%, 17.3 months/26.2%/6.9%, 15.9 months/23.7%/5.3%, 20.1 months/34.8%/15.5%, and 20.9 months/45.5%/19.7%. The prognosis for patients with GB improved significantly after the introduction of MR imaging. Younger GB, defined as patients aged below 60 years, or total tumor resection with all ages in Group 5 had 5-year 0S of 31.0% and 30.1%, respectively. The prognosis of GB was improved significantly after the introduction of TMZ for elderly GB, recursive partitioning analysis class 5, or totally resected GB. Introduction of MR imaging and TMZ, and total resection of the tumor were important in the improvement of outcome for patients with GB. PMID:24140783

  16. Role of endoscopic third ventriculostomy in tuberculous meningitis with hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay S.; Todorov, Mina; Kher, Yatin; Chaurasia, Ishwar D.; Pande, Sonjjay; Namdev, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocephalus is one of the commonest complications of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). It can be purely obstructive, purely communicating, or due to combinations of obstruction in addition to defective absorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) as an alternative to shunt procedures is an established treatment for obstructive hydrocephalus in TBM. ETV in TBM hydrocephalus can be technically very difficult, especially in acute stage of disease due to inflamed, thick, and opaque third ventricle floor. Water jet dissection can be helpful in thick and opaque ventricular floor patients, while simple blunt perforation is possible in thin and transparent floor. Lumbar peritoneal shunt is a better option for communicating hydrocephalus as compared to VP shunt or ETV. Intraoperative Doppler or neuronavigation can help in proper planning of the perforation to prevent neurovascular complications. Choroid plexus coagulation with ETV can improve success rate in infants. Results of ETV are better in good grade patients. Poor results are observed in cisternal exudates, thick and opaque third ventricle floor, acute phase, malnourished patients as compared to patients without cisternal exudates, thin and transparent third ventricle floor, chronic phase, well-nourished patients. Some of the patients, especially in poor grade, can show delayed recovery. Failure to improve after ETV can be due to blocked stoma, complex hydrocephalus, or vascular compromise. Repeated lumbar puncture can help faster normalization of the raised intracranial pressure after ETV in patients with temporary defect in CSF absorption, whereas lumbar peritoneal shunt is required in permanent defect. Repeat ETV is recommended if the stoma is blocked. ETV should be considered as treatment of choice in chronic phase of the disease in obstructive hydrocephalus. PMID:27695532

  17. An integrated model-based neurosurgical guidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2010-02-01

    Maximal tumor resection without damaging healthy tissue in open cranial surgeries is critical to the prognosis for patients with brain cancers. Preoperative images (e.g., preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR)) are typically used for surgical planning as well as for intraoperative image-guidance. However, brain shift even at the start of surgery significantly compromises the accuracy of neuronavigation, if the deformation is not compensated for. Compensating for brain shift during surgical operation is, therefore, critical for improving the accuracy of image-guidance and ultimately, the accuracy of surgery. To this end, we have developed an integrated neurosurgical guidance system that incorporates intraoperative three-dimensional (3D) tracking, acquisition of volumetric true 3D ultrasound (iUS), stereovision (iSV) and computational modeling to efficiently generate model-updated MR image volumes for neurosurgical guidance. The system is implemented with real-time Labview to provide high efficiency in data acquisition as well as with Matlab to offer computational convenience in data processing and development of graphical user interfaces related to computational modeling. In a typical patient case, the patient in the operating room (OR) is first registered to pMR image volume. Sparse displacement data extracted from coregistered intraoperative US and/or stereovision images are employed to guide a computational model that is based on consolidation theory. Computed whole-brain deformation is then used to generate a model-updated MR image volume for subsequent surgical guidance. In this paper, we present the key modular components of our integrated, model-based neurosurgical guidance system.

  18. Bringing transcranial mapping into shape: Sulcus-aligned mapping captures motor somatotopy in human primary motor hand area.

    PubMed

    Raffin, Estelle; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2015-10-15

    Motor representations express some degree of somatotopy in human primary motor hand area (M1HAND), but within-M1HAND corticomotor somatotopy has been difficult to study with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here we introduce a "linear" TMS mapping approach based on the individual shape of the central sulcus to obtain mediolateral corticomotor excitability profiles of the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) and first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscles. In thirteen young volunteers, we used stereotactic neuronavigation to stimulate the right M1HAND with a small eight-shaped coil at 120% of FDI resting motor threshold. We pseudorandomly stimulated six targets located on a straight mediolateral line corresponding to the overall orientation of the central sulcus with a fixed coil orientation of 45° to the mid-sagittal line (STRAIGHT-450FIX) or seven targets in the posterior part of the crown of the central sulcus following the bending of the central sulcus (CURVED). CURVED mapping employed a fixed (CURVED-450FIX) or flexible coil orientation producing always a current perpendicular to the sulcal wall (CURVED-900FLEX). During relaxation, CURVED but not STRAIGHT mapping revealed distinct corticomotor excitability peaks in M1HAND with the excitability maximum of ADM located medially to the FDI maximum. This mediolateral somatotopy was still present during tonic contraction of the ADM or FDI. During ADM contraction, cross-correlation between the spatial excitability profiles of ADM and FDI was lowest for CURVED-900FLEX. Together, the results show that within-M1HAND somatotopy can be readily probed with linear TMS mapping aligned to the sulcal shape. Sulcus-aligned linear mapping will benefit non-invasive studies of representational plasticity in human M1HAND.

  19. Mass Spectrometry Imaging as a Tool for Surgical Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Calligaris, David; Norton, Isaiah; Feldman, Daniel R.; Ide, Jennifer L.; Dunn, Ian F.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Cooks, R. Graham; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant advances in image-guided therapy, surgeons are still too often left with uncertainty when deciding to remove tissue. This binary decision between removing and leaving tissue during surgery implies that the surgeon should be able to distinguish tumor from healthy tissue. In neurosurgery, current image-guidance approaches such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with neuro-navigation offer a map as to where the tumor should be, but the only definitive method to characterize the tissue at stake is histopathology. While extremely valuable information is derived from this gold standard approach, it is limited to very few samples during surgery and is not practically used for the delineation of tumor margins. The development and implementation of faster, comprehensive and complementary approaches for tissue characterization are required to support surgical decision-making – an incremental and iterative process with tumor removed in multiple and often minute biopsies. The development of atmospheric pressure ionization sources makes it possible to analyze tissue specimens with little to no sample preparation. Here, we highlight the value of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) as one of many available approaches for the analysis of surgical tissue. Twelve surgical samples resected from a patient during surgery were analyzed and diagnosed as glioblastoma (GBM) tumor or necrotic tissue by standard histopathology, and mass spectrometry results were further correlated to histopathology for critical validation of the approach. The use of a robust statistical approach reiterated results from the qualitative detection of potential biomarkers of these tissue types. The correlation of the MS and histopathology results to magnetic resonance images brings significant insight into tumor presentation that could not only serve to guide tumor resection, but that is worthy of more detailed studies on our understanding of tumor presentation on MRI. PMID

  20. Bringing transcranial mapping into shape: Sulcus-aligned mapping captures motor somatotopy in human primary motor hand area.

    PubMed

    Raffin, Estelle; Pellegrino, Giovanni; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Thielscher, Axel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2015-10-15

    Motor representations express some degree of somatotopy in human primary motor hand area (M1HAND), but within-M1HAND corticomotor somatotopy has been difficult to study with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here we introduce a "linear" TMS mapping approach based on the individual shape of the central sulcus to obtain mediolateral corticomotor excitability profiles of the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) and first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscles. In thirteen young volunteers, we used stereotactic neuronavigation to stimulate the right M1HAND with a small eight-shaped coil at 120% of FDI resting motor threshold. We pseudorandomly stimulated six targets located on a straight mediolateral line corresponding to the overall orientation of the central sulcus with a fixed coil orientation of 45° to the mid-sagittal line (STRAIGHT-450FIX) or seven targets in the posterior part of the crown of the central sulcus following the bending of the central sulcus (CURVED). CURVED mapping employed a fixed (CURVED-450FIX) or flexible coil orientation producing always a current perpendicular to the sulcal wall (CURVED-900FLEX). During relaxation, CURVED but not STRAIGHT mapping revealed distinct corticomotor excitability peaks in M1HAND with the excitability maximum of ADM located medially to the FDI maximum. This mediolateral somatotopy was still present during tonic contraction of the ADM or FDI. During ADM contraction, cross-correlation between the spatial excitability profiles of ADM and FDI was lowest for CURVED-900FLEX. Together, the results show that within-M1HAND somatotopy can be readily probed with linear TMS mapping aligned to the sulcal shape. Sulcus-aligned linear mapping will benefit non-invasive studies of representational plasticity in human M1HAND. PMID:26188259

  1. Electrophysiological and Anatomical Correlates of Spinal Cord Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Giardini, Mario E; Zippo, Antonio G; Valente, Maurizio; Krstajic, Nikola; Biella, Gabriele E M

    2016-01-01

    Despite the continuous improvement in medical imaging technology, visualizing the spinal cord poses severe problems due to structural or incidental causes, such as small access space and motion artifacts. In addition, positional guidance on the spinal cord is not commonly available during surgery, with the exception of neuronavigation techniques based on static pre-surgical data and of radiation-based methods, such as fluoroscopy. A fast, bedside, intraoperative real-time imaging, particularly necessary during the positioning of endoscopic probes or tools, is an unsolved issue. The objective of our work, performed on experimental rats, is to demonstrate potential intraoperative spinal cord imaging and probe guidance by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Concurrently, we aimed to demonstrate that the electromagnetic OCT irradiation exerted no particular effect at the neuronal and synaptic levels. OCT is a user-friendly, low-cost and endoscopy-compatible photonics-based imaging technique. In particular, by using a Fourier-domain OCT imager, operating at 850 nm wavelength and scanning transversally with respect to the spinal cord, we have been able to: 1) accurately image tissue structures in an animal model (muscle, spine bone, cerebro-spinal fluid, dura mater and spinal cord), and 2) identify the position of a recording microelectrode approaching and inserting into the cord tissue 3) check that the infrared radiation has no actual effect on the electrophysiological activity of spinal neurons. The technique, potentially extendable to full three-dimensional image reconstruction, shows prospective further application not only in endoscopic intraoperative analyses and for probe insertion guidance, but also in emergency and adverse situations (e.g. after trauma) for damage recognition, diagnosis and fast image-guided intervention. PMID:27050096

  2. Posttraining transcranial magnetic stimulation of striate cortex disrupts consolidation early in visual skill learning.

    PubMed

    De Weerd, Peter; Reithler, Joel; van de Ven, Vincent; Been, Marin; Jacobs, Christianne; Sack, Alexander T

    2012-02-01

    Practice-induced improvements in skilled performance reflect "offline " consolidation processes extending beyond daily training sessions. According to visual learning theories, an early, fast learning phase driven by high-level areas is followed by a late, asymptotic learning phase driven by low-level, retinotopic areas when higher resolution is required. Thus, low-level areas would not contribute to learning and offline consolidation until late learning. Recent studies have challenged this notion, demonstrating modified responses to trained stimuli in primary visual cortex (V1) and offline activity after very limited training. However, the behavioral relevance of modified V1 activity for offline consolidation of visual skill memory in V1 after early training sessions remains unclear. Here, we used neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) directed to a trained retinotopic V1 location to test for behaviorally relevant consolidation in human low-level visual cortex. Applying TMS to the trained V1 location within 45 min of the first or second training session strongly interfered with learning, as measured by impaired performance the next day. The interference was conditional on task context and occurred only when training in the location targeted by TMS was followed by training in a second location before TMS. In this condition, high-level areas may become coupled to the second location and uncoupled from the previously trained low-level representation, thereby rendering consolidation vulnerable to interference. Our data show that, during the earliest phases of skill learning in the lowest-level visual areas, a behaviorally relevant form of consolidation exists of which the robustness is controlled by high-level, contextual factors.

  3. A Low-Cost iPhone-Assisted Augmented Reality Solution for the Localization of Intracranial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, RuYuan; Chen, XiaoLei; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Precise location of intracranial lesions before surgery is important, but occasionally difficult. Modern navigation systems are very helpful, but expensive. A low-cost solution that could locate brain lesions and their surface projections in augmented reality would be beneficial. We used an iPhone to partially achieve this goal, and evaluated its accuracy and feasibility in a clinical neurosurgery setting. Methodology/Principal Findings We located brain lesions in 35 patients, and using an iPhone, we depicted the lesion’s surface projection onto the skin of the head. To assess the accuracy of this method, we pasted computed tomography (CT) markers surrounding the depicted lesion boundaries on the skin onto 15 patients. CT scans were then performed with or without contrast enhancement. The deviations (D) between the CT markers and the actual lesion boundaries were measured. We found that 97.7% of the markers displayed a high accuracy level (D ≤ 5mm). In the remaining 20 patients, we compared our iPhone-based method with a frameless neuronavigation system. Four check points were chosen on the skin surrounding the depicted lesion boundaries, to assess the deviations between the two methods. The integrated offset was calculated according to the deviations at the four check points. We found that for the supratentorial lesions, the medial offset between these two methods was 2.90 mm and the maximum offset was 4.2 mm. Conclusions/Significance This low-cost, image-based, iPhone-assisted, augmented reality solution is technically feasible, and helpful for the localization of some intracranial lesions, especially shallow supratentorial intracranial lesions of moderate size. PMID:27454518

  4. Single slice US-MRI registration for neurosurgical MRI-guided US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardasani, Utsav; Baxter, John S. H.; Peters, Terry M.; Khan, Ali R.

    2016-03-01

    Image-based ultrasound to magnetic resonance image (US-MRI) registration can be an invaluable tool in image-guided neuronavigation systems. State-of-the-art commercial and research systems utilize image-based registration to assist in functions such as brain-shift correction, image fusion, and probe calibration. Since traditional US-MRI registration techniques use reconstructed US volumes or a series of tracked US slices, the functionality of this approach can be compromised by the limitations of optical or magnetic tracking systems in the neurosurgical operating room. These drawbacks include ergonomic issues, line-of-sight/magnetic interference, and maintenance of the sterile field. For those seeking a US vendor-agnostic system, these issues are compounded with the challenge of instrumenting the probe without permanent modification and calibrating the probe face to the tracking tool. To address these challenges, this paper explores the feasibility of a real-time US-MRI volume registration in a small virtual craniotomy site using a single slice. We employ the Linear Correlation of Linear Combination (LC2) similarity metric in its patch-based form on data from MNI's Brain Images for Tumour Evaluation (BITE) dataset as a PyCUDA enabled Python module in Slicer. By retaining the original orientation information, we are able to improve on the poses using this approach. To further assist the challenge of US-MRI registration, we also present the BOXLC2 metric which demonstrates a speed improvement to LC2, while retaining a similar accuracy in this context.

  5. Electrophysiological and Anatomical Correlates of Spinal Cord Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Maurizio; Krstajic, Nikola; Biella, Gabriele E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the continuous improvement in medical imaging technology, visualizing the spinal cord poses severe problems due to structural or incidental causes, such as small access space and motion artifacts. In addition, positional guidance on the spinal cord is not commonly available during surgery, with the exception of neuronavigation techniques based on static pre-surgical data and of radiation-based methods, such as fluoroscopy. A fast, bedside, intraoperative real-time imaging, particularly necessary during the positioning of endoscopic probes or tools, is an unsolved issue. The objective of our work, performed on experimental rats, is to demonstrate potential intraoperative spinal cord imaging and probe guidance by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Concurrently, we aimed to demonstrate that the electromagnetic OCT irradiation exerted no particular effect at the neuronal and synaptic levels. OCT is a user-friendly, low-cost and endoscopy-compatible photonics-based imaging technique. In particular, by using a Fourier-domain OCT imager, operating at 850 nm wavelength and scanning transversally with respect to the spinal cord, we have been able to: 1) accurately image tissue structures in an animal model (muscle, spine bone, cerebro-spinal fluid, dura mater and spinal cord), and 2) identify the position of a recording microelectrode approaching and inserting into the cord tissue 3) check that the infrared radiation has no actual effect on the electrophysiological activity of spinal neurons. The technique, potentially extendable to full three-dimensional image reconstruction, shows prospective further application not only in endoscopic intraoperative analyses and for probe insertion guidance, but also in emergency and adverse situations (e.g. after trauma) for damage recognition, diagnosis and fast image-guided intervention. PMID:27050096

  6. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation.

    PubMed

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favours the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi, flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis muscles as surround muscles, during rest and tonic activation of the FDI muscle in 21 subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under magnetic resonance imaging-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90-120% of the adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI muscle was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of the FDI muscle, CBI was significantly reduced only for the FDI muscle, and not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned motor evoked potential sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI muscle tonic activation as compared with rest, despite background electromyography activity increasing only for the FDI muscle. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle.

  7. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Montano, Nicola; Conforti, Giulio; Di Bonaventura, Rina; Meglio, Mario; Fernandez, Eduardo; Papacci, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Various drugs and surgical procedures have been utilized for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Despite numerous available approaches, the results are not completely satisfying. The need for more contemporaneous drugs to control the pain attacks is a common experience. Moreover, a number of patients become drug resistant, needing a surgical procedure to treat the neuralgia. Nonetheless, pain recurrence after one or more surgical operations is also frequently seen. These facts reflect the lack of the precise understanding of the TN pathogenesis. Classically, it has been related to a neurovascular compression at the trigeminal nerve root entry-zone in the prepontine cistern. However, it has been evidenced that in the pain onset and recurrence, various neurophysiological mechanisms other than the neurovascular conflict are involved. Recently, the introduction of new magnetic resonance techniques, such as voxel-based morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences, has provided new insight about the TN pathogenesis. Some of these new sequences have also been used to better preoperatively evidence the neurovascular conflict in the surgical planning of microvascular decompression. Moreover, the endoscopy (during microvascular decompression) and the intraoperative computed tomography with integrated neuronavigation (during percutaneous procedures) have been recently introduced in the challenging cases. In the last few years, efforts have been made in order to better define the optimal target when performing the gamma knife radiosurgery. Moreover, some authors have also evidenced that neurostimulation might represent an opportunity in TN refractory to other surgical treatments. The aim of this work was to review the recent literature about the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatments, and discuss the significant advances in all these fields

  8. Surgical leg rotation: cortical neuroplasticity assessed through brain mapping using transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Rota, Viviana; Manfrini, Marco; Perucca, Laura; Caronni, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Rotationplasty (Borggreve-Van Nes operation) is a rare limb salvage procedure, most often applied to children presenting with sarcoma of the distal femur. In type A1 operation, the distal thigh is removed and the proximal tibia is axially rotated by 180°, remodeled, grafted onto the femoral stump, and then prosthetized. The neurovascular bundle is spared. The rotated ankle then works as a knee. The foot plantar and dorsal flexors act as knee extensors and flexors, respectively. Functional results may be excellent. Cortical neuroplasticity was studied in three men (30–31 years) who were operated on the left lower limb at ages between 7 and 11 years and were fully autonomous with a custom-made prosthesis, as well as in three age–sex matched controls. The scalp stimulation coordinates, matching the patients’ brain MRI spots, were digitized through a ‘neuronavigation’ optoelectronic system, in order to guide the transcranial magnetic stimulation coil, thus ensuring spatial precision during the procedure. Through transcranial magnetic stimulation driven by neuronavigation, the cortical representations of the contralateral soleus and vastus medialis muscles were studied in terms of amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and centering and width of the cortical areas from which the potentials could be evoked. Map centering on either hemisphere did not differ substantially across muscles and participants. In the operated patients, MEP amplitudes, the area from which MEPs could be evoked, and their product (volume) were larger for the muscles of the unaffected side compared with both the rotated soleus muscle (average effect size 0.75) and the muscles of healthy controls (average effect size 0.89). In controls, right–left differences showed an effect size of 0.38. In no case did the comparisons reach statistical significance (P>0.25). Nevertheless, the results seem consistent with cortical plasticity reflecting strengthening of the unaffected leg and a

  9. Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hall, Walter A; Truwit, Charles L

    2011-01-01

    Neurosurgeons have become reliant on image-guidance to perform safe and successful surgery both time-efficiently and cost-effectively. Neuronavigation typically involves either rigid (frame-based) or skull-mounted (frameless) stereotactic guidance derived from computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that is obtained days or immediately before the planned surgical procedure. These systems do not accommodate for brain shift that is unavoidable once the cranium is opened and cerebrospinal fluid is lost. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) systems ranging in strength from 0.12 to 3 Tesla (T) have been developed in part because they afford neurosurgeons the opportunity to accommodate for brain shift during surgery. Other distinct advantages of ioMRI include the excellent soft tissue discrimination, the ability to view the surgical site in three dimensions, and the ability to "see" tumor beyond the surface visualization of the surgeon's eye, either with or without a surgical microscope. The enhanced ability to view the tumor being biopsied or resected allows the surgeon to choose a safe surgical corridor that avoids critical structures, maximizes the extent of the tumor resection, and confirms that an intraoperative hemorrhage has not resulted from surgery. Although all ioMRI systems allow for basic T1- and T2-weighted imaging, only high-field (>1.5 T) MRI systems are capable of MR spectroscopy (MRS), MR angiography (MRA), MR venography (MRV), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and brain activation studies. By identifying vascular structures with MRA and MRV, it may be possible to prevent their inadvertent injury during surgery. Biopsying those areas of elevated phosphocholine on MRS may improve the diagnostic yield for brain biopsy. Mapping out eloquent brain function may influence the surgical path to a tumor being resected or biopsied. The optimal field strength for an ioMRI-guided surgical system and the best configuration for that system are as yet

  10. Non-invasive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) of the Motor Cortex for Neuropathic Pain—At the Tipping Point?

    PubMed Central

    Treister, Roi; Lang, Magdalena; Klein, Max M.; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2013-01-01

    The term “neuropathic pain” (NP) refers to chronic pain caused by illnesses or injuries that damage peripheral or central pain-sensing neural pathways to cause them to fire inappropriately and signal pain without cause. Neuropathic pain is common, complicating diabetes, shingles, HIV, and cancer. Medications are often ineffective or cause various adverse effects, so better approaches are needed. Half a century ago, electrical stimulation of specific brain regions (neuromodulation) was demonstrated to relieve refractory NP without distant effects, but the need for surgical electrode implantation limited use of deep brain stimulation. Next, electrodes applied to the dura outside the brain’s surface to stimulate the motor cortex were shown to relieve NP less invasively. Now, electromagnetic induction permits cortical neurons to be stimulated entirely non-invasively using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Repeated sessions of many TMS pulses (rTMS) can trigger neuronal plasticity to produce long-lasting therapeutic benefit. Repeated TMS already has US and European regulatory approval for treating refractory depression, and multiple small studies report efficacy for neuropathic pain. Recent improvements include “frameless stereotactic” neuronavigation systems, in which patients’ head MRIs allow TMS to be applied to precise underlying cortical targets, minimizing variability between sessions and patients, which may enhance efficacy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation appears poised for the larger trials necessary for regulatory approval of a NP indication. Since few clinicians are familiar with TMS, we review its theoretical basis and historical development, summarize the neuropathic pain trial results, and identify issues to resolve before large-scale clinical trials. PMID:24228166

  11. Modeling transcranial magnetic stimulation from the induced electric fields to the membrane potentials along tractography-based white matter fiber tracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geeter, Nele; Dupré, Luc; Crevecoeur, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a promising non-invasive tool for modulating the brain activity. Despite the widespread therapeutic and diagnostic use of TMS in neurology and psychiatry, its observed response remains hard to predict, limiting its further development and applications. Although the stimulation intensity is always maximum at the cortical surface near the coil, experiments reveal that TMS can affect deeper brain regions as well. Approach. The explanation of this spread might be found in the white matter fiber tracts, connecting cortical and subcortical structures. When applying an electric field on neurons, their membrane potential is altered. If this change is significant, more likely near the TMS coil, action potentials might be initiated and propagated along the fiber tracts towards deeper regions. In order to understand and apply TMS more effectively, it is important to capture and account for this interaction as accurately as possible. Therefore, we compute, next to the induced electric fields in the brain, the spatial distribution of the membrane potentials along the fiber tracts and its temporal dynamics. Main results. This paper introduces a computational TMS model in which electromagnetism and neurophysiology are combined. Realistic geometry and tissue anisotropy are included using magnetic resonance imaging and targeted white matter fiber tracts are traced using tractography based on diffusion tensor imaging. The position and orientation of the coil can directly be retrieved from the neuronavigation system. Incorporating these features warrants both patient- and case-specific results. Significance. The presented model gives insight in the activity propagation through the brain and can therefore explain the observed clinical responses to TMS and their inter- and/or intra-subject variability. We aspire to advance towards an accurate, flexible and personalized TMS model that helps to understand stimulation in the connected

  12. Screw Placement Accuracy and Outcomes Following O-Arm-Navigated Atlantoaxial Fusion: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jacob D; Jack, Megan M; Harn, Nicholas R; Bertsch, Judson R; Arnold, Paul M

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Case series of seven patients. Objective C2 stabilization can be challenging due to the complex anatomy of the upper cervical vertebrae. We describe seven cases of C1-C2 fusion using intraoperative navigation to aid in the screw placement at the atlantoaxial (C1-C2) junction. Methods Between 2011 and 2014, seven patients underwent posterior atlantoaxial fusion using intraoperative frameless stereotactic O-arm Surgical Imaging and StealthStation Surgical Navigation System (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States). Outcome measures included screw accuracy, neurologic status, radiation dosing, and surgical complications. Results Four patients had fusion at C1-C2 only, and in the remaining three, fixation extended down to C3 due to anatomical considerations for screw placement recognized on intraoperative imaging. Out of 30 screws placed, all demonstrated minimal divergence from desired placement in either C1 lateral mass, C2 pedicle, or C3 lateral mass. No neurovascular compromise was seen following the use of intraoperative guided screw placement. The average radiation dosing due to intraoperative imaging was 39.0 mGy. All patients were followed for a minimum of 12 months. All patients went on to solid fusion. Conclusion C1-C2 fusion using computed tomography-guided navigation is a safe and effective way to treat atlantoaxial instability. Intraoperative neuronavigation allows for high accuracy of screw placement, limits complications by sparing injury to the critical structures in the upper cervical spine, and can help surgeons make intraoperative decisions regarding complex pathology. PMID:27190736

  13. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Nicola; Conforti, Giulio; Di Bonaventura, Rina; Meglio, Mario; Fernandez, Eduardo; Papacci, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Various drugs and surgical procedures have been utilized for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Despite numerous available approaches, the results are not completely satisfying. The need for more contemporaneous drugs to control the pain attacks is a common experience. Moreover, a number of patients become drug resistant, needing a surgical procedure to treat the neuralgia. Nonetheless, pain recurrence after one or more surgical operations is also frequently seen. These facts reflect the lack of the precise understanding of the TN pathogenesis. Classically, it has been related to a neurovascular compression at the trigeminal nerve root entry-zone in the prepontine cistern. However, it has been evidenced that in the pain onset and recurrence, various neurophysiological mechanisms other than the neurovascular conflict are involved. Recently, the introduction of new magnetic resonance techniques, such as voxel-based morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences, has provided new insight about the TN pathogenesis. Some of these new sequences have also been used to better preoperatively evidence the neurovascular conflict in the surgical planning of microvascular decompression. Moreover, the endoscopy (during microvascular decompression) and the intraoperative computed tomography with integrated neuronavigation (during percutaneous procedures) have been recently introduced in the challenging cases. In the last few years, efforts have been made in order to better define the optimal target when performing the gamma knife radiosurgery. Moreover, some authors have also evidenced that neurostimulation might represent an opportunity in TN refractory to other surgical treatments. The aim of this work was to review the recent literature about the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatments, and discuss the significant advances in all these fields

  14. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of left parietal cortex facilitates gesture processing in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Peter H; Achilles, Elisabeth I S; Moos, Katharina; Hesse, Maike D; Sparing, Roland; Fink, Gereon R

    2013-12-01

    Gesture processing deficits constitute a key symptom of apraxia, a disorder of motor cognition frequently observed after left-hemispheric stroke. The clinical relevance of apraxia stands in stark contrast to the paucity of therapeutic options available. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising tool for modulating disturbed network function after stroke. Here, we investigate the effect of parietal tDCS on gesture processing in healthy human subjects. Neuropsychological and imaging studies suggest that the imitation and matching of hand gestures involve the left inferior parietal lobe (IPL). Using neuronavigation based on cytoarchitectonically defined anatomical probability maps, tDCS was applied over left IPL-areas PF, PFm, or PG in healthy participants (n = 26). Before and after tDCS, subjects performed a gesture matching task and a person discrimination task for control. Changes in error rates and reaction times were analyzed for the effects of anodal and cathodal tDCS (compared with sham tDCS). Matching of hand gestures was specifically facilitated by anodal tDCS applied over the cytoarchitectonically defined IPL-area PFm, whereas tDCS over IPL-areas PF and PG did not elucidate significant effects. Taking into account tDCS electrode size and the central position of area PFm within IPL, it can be assumed that the observed effect is rather the result of a combined stimulation of the supramarginal and angular gyrus than an isolated PFm stimulation. Our data confirm the pivotal role of the left IPL in gesture processing. Furthermore, anatomically guided tDCS of the left IPL may constitute a promising approach to neurorehabilitation of apraxic patients with gesture processing deficits. PMID:24305816

  15. Indocyanine green as an adjunct for resection of insular gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Abhidha; Rangarajan, Vithal; Kaswa, Amol; Jain, Sonal; Goel, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Many controversies exist regarding the extent of resection for insular gliomas and the timing of resection. Several techniques and adjuncts are used to maximize safety during resection of these tumors. We describe the use of indocyanine green (ICG) to identify the branches of the middle cerebral artery and discuss its utility to increase safety for resection for insular gliomas. Materials and Methods: Five patients with insular gliomas were surgically treated by the authors from June 2013 to June 2014. The patients presented with complaints of either a headache or recurring episodes of convulsions. All the patients were operated with the aid of neuronavigation and tractography. The long perforating branches of the middle cerebral artery course through the insula and pass onward to supply the corona radiata. It is essential to preserve these vessels to prevent postoperative neurological deficits. ICG (Aurogreen) was used to identify and preserve the long perforating arteries of the middle cerebral artery. Results: ICG dye correctly identified the long perforating branches of the middle cerebral artery and easily distinguished these vessels from the short perforating branches. All the branches of the middle cerebral artery that coursed through the tumor and had an onward course were preserved in all the patients. Only one patient developed a transient right sided hemiparesis that had improved at follow-up. Conclusions: Surgery for insular gliomas is challenging due to its location adjacent to eloquent areas, important white fiber tracts and the course of the middle cerebral artery within it. ICG is useful to identify and preserve the long perforating branches of the middle cerebral artery that course through the tumor and traverse onward to supply the corona radiata. PMID:27366256

  16. Segregation of lexical and sub-lexical reading processes in the left perisylvian cortex.

    PubMed

    Roux, Franck-Emmanuel; Durand, Jean-Baptiste; Jucla, Mélanie; Réhault, Emilie; Reddy, Marion; Démonet, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental issue in cognitive neuroscience is the existence of two major, sub-lexical and lexical, reading processes and their possible segregation in the left posterior perisylvian cortex. Using cortical electrostimulation mapping, we identified the cortical areas involved on reading either orthographically irregular words (lexical, "direct" process) or pronounceable pseudowords (sublexical, "indirect" process) in 14 right-handed neurosurgical patients while video-recording behavioral effects. Intraoperative neuronavigation system and Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) stereotactic coordinates were used to identify the localization of stimulation sites. Fifty-one reading interference areas were found that affected either words (14 areas), or pseudo-words (11 areas), or both (26 areas). Forty-one (80%) corresponded to the impairment of the phonological level of reading processes. Reading processes involved discrete, highly localized perisylvian cortical areas with individual variability. MNI coordinates throughout the group exhibited a clear segregation according to the tested reading route; specific pseudo-word reading interferences were concentrated in a restricted inferior and anterior subpart of the left supramarginal gyrus (barycentre x = -68.1; y = -25.9; z = 30.2; Brodmann's area 40) while specific word reading areas were located almost exclusively alongside the left superior temporal gyrus. Although half of the reading interferences found were nonspecific, the finding of specific lexical or sublexical interferences is new evidence that lexical and sublexical processes of reading could be partially supported by distinct cortical sub-regions despite their anatomical proximity. These data are in line with many brain activation studies that showed that left superior temporal and inferior parietal regions had a crucial role respectively in word and pseudoword reading and were core regions for dyslexia.

  17. Role of endoscopic third ventriculostomy in tuberculous meningitis with hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay S.; Todorov, Mina; Kher, Yatin; Chaurasia, Ishwar D.; Pande, Sonjjay; Namdev, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocephalus is one of the commonest complications of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). It can be purely obstructive, purely communicating, or due to combinations of obstruction in addition to defective absorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) as an alternative to shunt procedures is an established treatment for obstructive hydrocephalus in TBM. ETV in TBM hydrocephalus can be technically very difficult, especially in acute stage of disease due to inflamed, thick, and opaque third ventricle floor. Water jet dissection can be helpful in thick and opaque ventricular floor patients, while simple blunt perforation is possible in thin and transparent floor. Lumbar peritoneal shunt is a better option for communicating hydrocephalus as compared to VP shunt or ETV. Intraoperative Doppler or neuronavigation can help in proper planning of the perforation to prevent neurovascular complications. Choroid plexus coagulation with ETV can improve success rate in infants. Results of ETV are better in good grade patients. Poor results are observed in cisternal exudates, thick and opaque third ventricle floor, acute phase, malnourished patients as compared to patients without cisternal exudates, thin and transparent third ventricle floor, chronic phase, well-nourished patients. Some of the patients, especially in poor grade, can show delayed recovery. Failure to improve after ETV can be due to blocked stoma, complex hydrocephalus, or vascular compromise. Repeated lumbar puncture can help faster normalization of the raised intracranial pressure after ETV in patients with temporary defect in CSF absorption, whereas lumbar peritoneal shunt is required in permanent defect. Repeat ETV is recommended if the stoma is blocked. ETV should be considered as treatment of choice in chronic phase of the disease in obstructive hydrocephalus.

  18. Imaging of pituitary pathology.

    PubMed

    Buchfelder, Michael; Schlaffer, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques play a vital role in the diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment monitoring of patients with pituitary disease. For its high soft tissue contrast, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging provides detailed information about the localization and extent of a lesion. It is thus, to date, the most important imaging technique for documenting or ruling out structural lesions. It is usually the first and only imaging procedure to be employed in pituitary pathology. While large pituitary adenomas are reliably depicted in standard T1-weighted sequences, small microadenomas, such as in Cushing's disease, may only become visible if repeat studies, sophisticated techniques and high-field scanners are employed. For monitoring treatment effects after surgical procedures, drug applications, or irradiation, follow-up studies with identical parameters should be employed, preferably at the same investigation site. Some space is devoted to intraoperative imaging, which not only allows assessment of how radical tumor resection needs to be during pituitary tumor surgery, but also provides extremely accurate structural data for neuronavigation. Less frequent lesions, such as craniopharyngiomas, meningiomas, germ cell tumors, gliomas, skull base tumors, hypothalamic hamartomas, vascular malformations, inflammatory and developmental lesions and other, even less frequent pathologies should be considered in the differential diagnosis. The particular strength of computed tomography (CT) is the direct depiction of calcification, a weakness of MRI, and the high resolution of bone structures at the skull base. This chapter presents the characteristics of both frequent and less commonly encountered tumoral lesions, with an emphasis on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25248586

  19. Magnetotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zyss, Tomasz

    2008-11-01

    Since antiquity, the phenomenon of magnetism has been known, and it has been tried for therapeutic purposes. Through history, people have made use of both natural sources of magnetic fields (magnetic iron ore) and artificial ones (magnets, electromagnets). It was as late as the 19th century that we started to produce time-varying magnetic fields, making numerous observations about its impact on humans, the nervous system included. A majority of these observations were cognitive in nature. There are, however, studies aimed at assessing the therapeutic results of the influence of magnetic fields, particularly of low frequencies. In terms of magnetotherapy with the use of a low-induction magnetic field, there are serious doubts concerning its effectiveness in general, including therapy for mental disorders. The year 1985 witnessed the introduction of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) into medical practice as a diagnostic tool in neurology as well as in basic neurophysiologic and neuropsychological investigations. The 1990s began the epoch of investigations into possible applications of TMS in therapy of mental disorders, particularly depression. This work presents critical remarks and limitations of TMS, such as findings that its effectiveness is not particularly high. The traditional fixed stimulation of a definite area of the patient's head may lead to irritation of structures that, in a specific patient, may not be responsible for the symptoms of depression. The effectiveness could be improved only with the use of neuronavigation and prestimulation via functional neuroimaging diagnostics of the brain, which, however, would make TMS expensive and less practical. PMID:19029874

  20. Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation Increases Reward Responsiveness in Individuals with Higher Hedonic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Duprat, Romain; De Raedt, Rudi; Wu, Guo-Rong; Baeken, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has been documented to influence striatal and orbitofrontal dopaminergic activity implicated in reward processing. However, the exact neuropsychological mechanisms of how DLPFC stimulation may affect the reward system and how trait hedonic capacity may interact with the effects remains to be elucidated. Objective: In this sham-controlled study in healthy individuals, we investigated the effects of a single session of neuronavigated intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) on reward responsiveness, as well as the influence of trait hedonic capacity. Methods: We used a randomized crossover single session iTBS design with an interval of 1 week. We assessed reward responsiveness using a rewarded probabilistic learning task and measured individual trait hedonic capacity (the ability to experience pleasure) with the temporal experience of pleasure scale questionnaire. Results: As expected, the participants developed a response bias toward the most rewarded stimulus (rich stimulus). Reaction time and accuracy for the rich stimulus were respectively shorter and higher as compared to the less rewarded stimulus (lean stimulus). Active or sham stimulation did not seem to influence the outcome. However, when taking into account individual trait hedonic capacity, we found an early significant increase in the response bias only after active iTBS. The higher the individual's trait hedonic capacity, the more the response bias toward the rich stimulus increased after the active stimulation. Conclusion: When taking into account trait hedonic capacity, one active iTBS session over the left DLPFC improved reward responsiveness in healthy male participants with higher hedonic capacity. This suggests that individual differences in hedonic capacity may influence the effects of iTBS on the reward system. PMID:27378888

  1. Conscious Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans Using Non-Invasive Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Carles; Ginhoux, Romuald; Riera, Alejandro; Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Chauvat, Hubert; Berg, Michel; Amengual, Julià L.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Ruffini, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Human sensory and motor systems provide the natural means for the exchange of information between individuals, and, hence, the basis for human civilization. The recent development of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) has provided an important element for the creation of brain-to-brain communication systems, and precise brain stimulation techniques are now available for the realization of non-invasive computer-brain interfaces (CBI). These technologies, BCI and CBI, can be combined to realize the vision of non-invasive, computer-mediated brain-to-brain (B2B) communication between subjects (hyperinteraction). Here we demonstrate the conscious transmission of information between human brains through the intact scalp and without intervention of motor or peripheral sensory systems. Pseudo-random binary streams encoding words were transmitted between the minds of emitter and receiver subjects separated by great distances, representing the realization of the first human brain-to-brain interface. In a series of experiments, we established internet-mediated B2B communication by combining a BCI based on voluntary motor imagery-controlled electroencephalographic (EEG) changes with a CBI inducing the conscious perception of phosphenes (light flashes) through neuronavigated, robotized transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), with special care taken to block sensory (tactile, visual or auditory) cues. Our results provide a critical proof-of-principle demonstration for the development of conscious B2B communication technologies. More fully developed, related implementations will open new research venues in cognitive, social and clinical neuroscience and the scientific study of consciousness. We envision that hyperinteraction technologies will eventually have a profound impact on the social structure of our civilization and raise important ethical issues. PMID:25137064

  2. Preventing visual field deficits from neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Daga, Pankaj; White, Mark J.; Micallef, Caroline; Miserocchi, Anna; Mancini, Laura; Modat, Marc; Stretton, Jason; Sidhu, Meneka K.; Symms, Mark R.; Lythgoe, David J.; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek A.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Duncan, John S.; McEvoy, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We assessed whether display of optic radiation tractography during anterior temporal lobe resection (ATLR) for refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) can reduce the severity of postoperative visual field deficits (VFD) and increase the proportion of patients who can drive and whether correction for brain shift using intraoperative MRI (iMRI) is beneficial. Methods: A cohort of 21 patients underwent ATLR in an iMRI suite. Preoperative tractography of the optic radiation was displayed on the navigation and operating microscope displays either without (9 patients) or with (12 patients) correction for brain shift. VFD were quantified using Goldmann perimetry and eligibility to drive was assessed by binocular Esterman perimetry 3 months after surgery. Secondary outcomes included seizure freedom and extent of hippocampal resection. The comparator was a cohort of 44 patients who underwent ATLR without iMRI. Results: The VFD in the contralateral superior quadrant were significantly less (p = 0.043) with iMRI guidance (0%–49.2%, median 14.5%) than without (0%–90.9%, median 24.0%). No patient in the iMRI cohort developed a VFD that precluded driving whereas 13% of the non-iMRI cohort failed to meet UK driving criteria. Outcome did not differ between iMRI guidance with and without brain shift correction. Seizure outcome and degree of hippocampal resection were unchanged. Conclusions: Display of the optic radiation with image guidance reduces the severity of VFD and did not affect seizure outcome or hippocampal resection. Correction for brain shift is possible but did not further improve outcome. Future work to incorporate tractography into conventional neuronavigation systems will make the work more widely applicable. PMID:25015363

  3. Phase reversal technique decreases cortical stimulation time during motor mapping.

    PubMed

    Simon, Mirela V; Sheth, Sameer A; Eckhardt, Christine A; Kilbride, Ronan D; Braver, Diana; Williams, Ziv; Curry, William; Cahill, Dan; Eskandar, Emad N

    2014-06-01

    Neurophysiologic mapping of the primary motor cortex (PMC) is commonly used in supratentorial surgery. Electrical cortical stimulation is guided by anatomic landmarks towards the precentral gyrus, with recording of the triggered primary motor responses (TPMR) in the contralateral hemibody. Thus, factors such as distortion of the pericentral anatomy, small surgical fields, brain shifts and miscalibrated neuronavigational systems may lengthen the process and result in unnecessary stimulations, increasing the probability of triggering seizures. We hypothesized that central sulcus localization via the median somatosensory evoked potentials phase reversal technique (MSSEP PRT) accurately guides the surgeon, resulting in prompt identification of the PMC with minimal electrical stimulation. Multivariate Cox regression was used to study the impact of MSSEP PRT on time spent performing electrical cortical stimulation to TPMR. The analysis was adjusted for presence of increased cortical excitability, high motor thresholds, lesions close to PMC and fMRI data, in 100 consecutive standardized motor mapping procedures for brain tumor resection and epilepsy surgery. Phase reversal and change morphology of the recorded somatosensory evoked potentials quadrupled (hazard ratio [HR] 4.13, p<0.0001) and doubled (HR 2.14, p=0.02) the rate of obtaining TPMR, respectively. A 1mA increase in motor threshold decreased the rate by 9% (HR 0.91, p=0.0002). Afterdischarges triggered before TPMR and lesions in close proximity to PMC decreased the rate of TPMR by 76% (HR 0.23, p<0.0001) and 48% (HR 0.52, p=0.04), respectively. Informative PRT decreases stimulation time. Afterdischarges triggered before TPMR, high motor thresholds and lesions close to the PMC increase it. PMID:24679940

  4. Parafalcine empyema, a tricky infectious cause of headache: a case report.

    PubMed

    van der Stel, Thirza; Treuniet, Frank E E; Hoffmann, Carel; Koppen, Hille

    2015-07-01

    Headache caused by subdural empyema is usually associated with fever and symptoms and/or clinical signs of meningeal irritation and increased intracranial pressure. We describe a patient with headache with absence of these signs or symptoms of meningeal irritation or intracranial pressure, who turned out to have a parafalcine subduralempyema. A 28-year-old man had headache for 2 weeks, which had started with visual symptoms with duration of 5 minutes. Two days later, he developed fever. During these 2 weeks, he had recurrence of visual symptoms for 4 times, with duration of several minutes.Neurologic examination at presentation on the emergency department showed no meningeal irritation or papilledema. However, on closer examination, a limited homonymous hemianopsia on the left side and a drift of the left leg were found. Magnetic resonance imaging showed parafalcine subdural empyema on the right side of the falx and a small brain abscess right occipitally. Neuronavigated craniotomy was performed, which confirmed the presence of empyema and allowed culture of the specimens. Streptococcus milleri group was cultured,which allowed narrowing of the antibiotic therapy to Benzylpenicillin12 million entities per 24 hours. Headache and subdural empyema diminished during treatment, and at follow-up 12 weeks after start of treatment, patient had no remaining complaints. Parafalcine-located subdural empyema can present without presence of clear localizing symptoms or signs like meningeal irritation and increased intracranial pressure. When headache is accompanied with fever, one should extensively question neurologic symptoms, and a thorough neurologic examination should be done. PMID:25618767

  5. Distinct contribution of the parietal and temporal cortex to hand configuration and contextual judgements about tools.

    PubMed

    Andres, Michael; Pelgrims, Barbara; Olivier, Etienne

    2013-09-01

    Neuropsychological studies showed that manipulatory and semantic knowledge can be independently impaired in patients with upper-limb apraxia, leading to different tool use disorders. The present study aimed to dissociate the brain regions involved in judging the hand configuration or the context associated to tool use. We focussed on the left supramarginalis gyrus (SMG) and left middle temporal gyrus (MTG), whose activation, as evidenced by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, suggests that they may play a critical role in tool use. The distinctive location of SMG in the dorsal visual stream led us to postulate that this parietal region could play a role in processing incoming information about tools to shape hand posture. In contrast, we hypothesized that MTG, because of its interconnections with several cortical areas involved in semantic memory, could contribute to retrieving semantic information necessary to create a contextual representation of tool use. To test these hypotheses, we used neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to interfere transiently with the function of either left SMG or left MTG in healthy participants performing judgement tasks about either hand configuration or context of tool use. We found that SMG virtual lesions impaired hand configuration but not contextual judgements, whereas MTG lesions selectively interfered with judgements about the context of tool use while leaving hand configuration judgements unaffected. This double dissociation demonstrates that the ability to infer a context of use or a hand posture from tool perception relies on distinct processes, performed in the temporal and parietal regions. The present findings suggest that tool use disorders caused by SMG lesions will be characterized by difficulties in selecting the appropriate hand posture for tool use, whereas MTG lesions will yield difficulties in using tools in the appropriate context.

  6. Intracerebroventricular Pain Treatment with Analgesic Mixtures including Ziconotide for Intractable Pain.

    PubMed

    Staquet, Héléne; Dupoiron, Denis; Nader, Edmond; Menei, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of opioids for control of intractable cancer pain has been used since 1982. We present here our experience of intracerebroventricular administration of pain treatments including ziconotide associated with morphine and ropivacaine for patients resistant to a conventional approach, with nociceptive, neuropathic, or mixed pain. These clinical cases were conducted with patients suffering from refractory pain, more than 6/10 on a numerical pain rating scale (NPRS) while on high-dose medical treatment and/or intolerance with significant side effects from oral medication. The baseline study visit included a physical examination and an assessment of pain intensity on a NPRS. Under general anesthesia, a neuronavigation device was used to place the catheter on the floor of the third ventricle, supported by an endoscope. Then, drugs were injected in the cerebroventricular system, through a pump (external or subcutaneous). The primary objective was to measure pain evaluation with ICV treatment after a complete withdrawal of other medications.Four patients were enrolled: 3 with intractable cancer pain and one with central neuropathic pain. The median NPRS at baseline was 9.5 [8.5; 19]. The mean NPRS after one month was 3.5 [3; 4.5]. Ziconotide was initiated at 0.48 µg/d and up to a median of 1.2 µg/d [1.0; 1.56]. The median dose of morphine and ropivacaine used initially was respectively 0.36 mg/d [0.24; 0.66] up to 0.6 mg/d [0.45; 4.63] and 1.2 mg/d [0; 2.4] up to 2.23 mg/d [1.2; 3.35]. Minor side effects were initially observed but transiently. One psychiatric agitation required discontinuation of ziconotide infusion. For intractable pain, using ziconotide by intracerebroventricular infusion seems safe and efficient, specifically for chronic neoplastic pain of cervicocephalic, thoracic, or diffuse origin and also for pain arising from a central neuropathic mechanism. PMID:27454282

  7. 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for Imaging of Chemokine Receptor 4 Expression in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Lückerath, Katharina; Kleinlein, Irene; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Linsenmann, Thomas; Kessler, Almuth F.; Rudelius, Martina; Kropf, Saskia; Buck, Andreas K.; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Löhr, Mario; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) has been reported to be overexpressed in glioblastoma (GBM) and to be associated with poor survival. This study investigated the feasibility of non-invasive CXCR4-directed imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using the radiolabelled chemokine receptor ligand 68Ga-Pentixafor. 15 patients with clinical suspicion on primary or recurrent glioblastoma (13 primary, 2 recurrent tumors) underwent 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for assessment of CXCR4 expression prior to surgery. O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (18F-FET) PET/CT images were available in 11/15 cases and were compared visually and semi-quantitatively (SUVmax, SUVmean). Tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated for both PET probes. 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT results were also compared to histological CXCR4 expression on neuronavigated surgical samples. 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT was visually positive in 13/15 cases with SUVmean and SUVmax of 3.0±1.5 and 3.9±2.0 respectively. Respective values for 18F-FET were 4.4±2.0 (SUVmean) and 5.3±2.3 (SUVmax). TBR for SUVmean and SUVmax were higher for 68Ga-Pentixafor than for 18F-FET (SUVmean 154.0±90.7 vs. 4.1±1.3; SUVmax 70.3±44.0 and 3.8±1.2, p<0.01), respectively. Histological analysis confirmed CXCR4 expression in tumor areas with high 68Ga-Pentixafor uptake; regions of the same tumor without apparent 68Ga-Pentixafor uptake showed no or low receptor expression. In this pilot study, 68Ga-Pentixafor retention has been observed in the vast majority of glioblastoma lesions and served as readout for non-invasive determination of CXCR4 expression. Given the paramount importance of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis in tumor biology, 68Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT might prove a useful tool for sensitive, non-invasive in-vivo quantification of CXCR4 as well as selection of patients who might benefit from CXCR4-directed therapy. PMID:26909116

  8. P17.27HIGH GRADE GLIOMAS IN ELDERLY PATIENTS: RESULTS OF SURGERY AND INFLUENCE ON KARNOFSKY'S PERFORMANCE STATUS

    PubMed Central

    Agnoletti, A.; Fornaro, R.; Specchia, F.M. Calamo; Garbossa, D.; Lanotte, M.; Ducati, A.

    2014-01-01

    The management of high grade gliomas (HGG) is complex and multidisciplinar. It has been demonstrated that the extent of resection, achieving gross total volume removal (GTR) has a relevant impact on progression free survival (PFS) and on overall survival (OS). Many strategies have been proven to be effective in achieving GTR such as neuronavigation, fluorescence and intra operative ultra sonography. It is remarkable to say that in multicentric trials, often elderly patients were excluded. Recently the interest in results of surgery in elderly patients has grown, and some studies proved the feasibility and advantages of a surgical resection of HGG in elderly patients. We retrospectively analyzed 73 elderly patients (age at diagnosis at least 70 years old) that were affected by HGG in non eloquent areas, therefore amenable to radical surgical excision, that underwent surgical resection in Our division from January 2008 to December 2012. KPS prior to surgery, post surgery and a month after was assessed. OBJECTIVE: Assess the role of surgery on variation of KPS in elderly patients. Materials and methods: we retrospectively analyzed 73 patients, 42 males (57%), 32 ( 43%) females, age range 70-84, mean age 73.87 years old, that underwent surgical excision of newly diagnosed HGG in Our division from January 2008 to December 2012. KPS assessment was performed prior to surgery, and a month after surgery, before adjuvant therapies administration. RESULTS: From data analysis, mean KPS pre-op was 82.5 (overall); mean KPS post operatory (1 month) was 84.5 (overall). 35/73 (47.9%) patients experienced no change in KPS. 24/73 (32%) improved their KPS score, 14/72 (19%) worsened their KPS score. Of the 14 patients which had a worsening in KPS, one month after surgery (before adjuvant treatment), 8 patients recovered, improving their KPS score, which was similar to pre operatory evaluation. The 35 patients that had stability of KPS after surgery, at 1 month after, did not worse

  9. The future of cerebral surgery: a kaleidoscope of opportunities.

    PubMed

    Elder, James B; Hoh, Daniel J; Oh, Bryan C; Heller, A Chris; Liu, Charles Y; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2008-06-01

    The emerging future of cerebral surgery will witness the refined evolution of current techniques, as well as the introduction of numerous novel concepts. Clinical practice and basic science research will benefit greatly from their application. The sum of these efforts will result in continued minimalism and improved accuracy and efficiency of neurosurgical diagnostic and therapeutic methodologies.Initially, the refinement of current technologies will further enhance various aspects of cerebral surgery. Advances in computing power and information technology will speed data acquisition, storage, and transfer. Miniaturization of current devices will impact diverse areas, such as modulation of endoscopy and endovascular techniques. The increased penetrance of surgical technologies such as stereotactic radiosurgery, neuronavigation, intraoperative imaging, and implantable electrodes for neurodegenerative disorders and epilepsy will enhance the knowledge and experience in these areas and facilitate refinements and advances in these technologies. Further into the future, technologies that are currently relatively remote to surgical events will fundamentally alter the complexity and scale at which a neurological disease may be treated or investigated. Seemingly futuristic concepts will become ubiquitous in the daily experience of the neurosurgeon. These include diverse fields such as nanotechnology, virtual reality, and robotics. Ultimately, combining advances in multiple fields will yield progress in diverse realms such as brain tumor therapy, neuromodulation for psychiatric diseases, and neuroprosthetics. Operating room equipment and design will benefit from each of the aforementioned advances. In this work, we discuss new developments in three parts. In Part I, concepts in minimalism important for future cerebral surgery are discussed. These include concrete and abstract ideas in miniaturization, as well as recent and future work in microelectromechanical systems and