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Sample records for neuronavigation

  1. First neuronavigation experiences in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, Guillermo; Gomez, Alvaro; Pereyra, Gabriela; Lima, Ramiro; Preciozzi, Javier; Vazquez, Luis; Villar, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Neuronavigation is the application of image guidance to neurosurgery where the position of a surgical tool can be displayed on a preoperative image. Although this technique has been used worldwide in the last ten years, it was never applied in Uruguay due to its cost. In an ongoing project, the Engineering Faculty (Universidad de la República), the Hospital de Clínicas (Medicine Faculty - Universidad de la República) and the Regional Hospital of Tacuarembó are doing the first experimental trials in neuronavigation. In this project, a prototype based on optical tracking equipment and the open source software IGSTK (Image Guided Surgery Toolkit) is under development and testing.

  2. Neuronavigation-assisted transoral-transpharyngeal approach for basilar invagination--two case reports.

    PubMed

    Ugur, Hasan Caglar; Kahilogullari, Gokmen; Attar, Ayhan; Caglar, Sukru; Savas, Ali; Egemen, Nihat

    2006-06-01

    Two patients presented with congenital basilar invagination manifesting as progressive myelopathy. Both patients underwent surgery using a neuronavigation-assisted transoral-transpharyngeal approach. The Brain-LAB Vector Vision navigation system was used for image guidance. The registration accuracies were 0.9 and 1.3 mm. After decompression, posterior stabilization was performed. Both patients had an uneventful postoperative course. The transoral-transpharyngeal approach with the neuronavigation system provides safe exposure and decompression for basilar invagination.

  3. An MRS- and PET-guided biopsy tool for intraoperative neuronavigational systems.

    PubMed

    Grech-Sollars, Matthew; Vaqas, Babar; Thompson, Gerard; Barwick, Tara; Honeyfield, Lesley; O'Neill, Kevin; Waldman, Adam D

    2017-03-17

    OBJECTIVE Glioma heterogeneity and the limitations of conventional structural MRI for identifying aggressive tumor components can limit the reliability of stereotactic biopsy and, hence, tumor characterization, which is a hurdle for developing and selecting effective treatment strategies. In vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS) and PET enable noninvasive imaging of cellular metabolism relevant to proliferation and can detect regions of more highly active tumor. Here, the authors integrated presurgical PET and MRS with intraoperative neuronavigation to guide surgical biopsy and tumor sampling of brain gliomas with the aim of improving intraoperative tumor-tissue characterization and imaging biomarker validation. METHODS A novel intraoperative neuronavigation tool was developed as part of a study that aimed to sample high-choline tumor components identified by multivoxel MRS and (18)F-methylcholine PET-CT. Spatially coregistered PET and MRS data were integrated into structural data sets and loaded onto an intraoperative neuronavigation system. High and low choline uptake/metabolite regions were represented as color-coded hollow spheres for targeted stereotactic biopsy and tumor sampling. RESULTS The neurosurgeons found the 3D spherical targets readily identifiable on the interactive neuronavigation system. In one case, areas of high mitotic activity were identified on the basis of high (18)F-methylcholine uptake and elevated choline ratios found with MRS in an otherwise low-grade tumor, which revealed the possible use of this technique for tumor characterization. CONCLUSIONS These PET and MRI data can be combined and represented usefully for the surgeon in neuronavigation systems. This method enables neurosurgeons to sample tumor regions based on physiological and molecular imaging markers. The technique was applied for characterizing choline metabolism using MRS and (18)F PET; however, this approach provides proof of principle for using different radionuclide tracers and

  4. An MRS- and PET-guided biopsy tool for intraoperative neuronavigational systems.

    PubMed

    Grech-Sollars, Matthew; Vaqas, Babar; Thompson, Gerard; Barwick, Tara; Honeyfield, Lesley; O'Neill, Kevin; Waldman, Adam D

    2016-11-11

    OBJECTIVE Glioma heterogeneity and the limitations of conventional structural MRI for identifying aggressive tumor components can limit the reliability of stereotactic biopsy and, hence, tumor characterization, which is a hurdle for developing and selecting effective treatment strategies. In vivo MR spectroscopy (MRS) and PET enable noninvasive imaging of cellular metabolism relevant to proliferation and can detect regions of more highly active tumor. Here, the authors integrated presurgical PET and MRS with intraoperative neuronavigation to guide surgical biopsy and tumor sampling of brain gliomas with the aim of improving intraoperative tumor-tissue characterization and imaging biomarker validation. METHODS A novel intraoperative neuronavigation tool was developed as part of a study that aimed to sample high-choline tumor components identified by multivoxel MRS and (18)F-methylcholine PET-CT. Spatially coregistered PET and MRS data were integrated into structural data sets and loaded onto an intraoperative neuronavigation system. High and low choline uptake/metabolite regions were represented as color-coded hollow spheres for targeted stereotactic biopsy and tumor sampling. RESULTS The neurosurgeons found the 3D spherical targets readily identifiable on the interactive neuronavigation system. In one case, areas of high mitotic activity were identified on the basis of high (18)F-methylcholine uptake and elevated choline ratios found with MRS in an otherwise low-grade tumor, which revealed the possible use of this technique for tumor characterization. CONCLUSIONS These PET and MRI data can be combined and represented usefully for the surgeon in neuronavigation systems. This method enables neurosurgeons to sample tumor regions based on physiological and molecular imaging markers. The technique was applied for characterizing choline metabolism using MRS and (18)F PET; however, this approach provides proof of principle for using different radionuclide tracers and

  5. Applications of neuronavigation system in cranial surgery: experience of a single center

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Mohsen; Pahlavani, Mehrdad; Amirjamshidi, Abbas; Shirani-Bidabadi, Mohammad; Ketabchi, Ebrahim; Karimi-Yarandi, Kourosh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Since the advent of navigational systems in neurosurgery, various implications have been introduced for them in spine and brain practices. Although, the range of surgeries in which these systems are being used is getting wider over time, their application is becoming more specific in certain situations. Methods: This means that defining specific indications for their usage is not as easy as it was previously thought. Brief reviewing of the available literature showed various navigation systems proposed and used in neurosurgery. Results: In this study, we review case selection criteria, techniques, and the results of neuronavigation applications in the patients underwent neurosurgical operations in the Sina hospital (Tehran, Iran) during 2011. Conclusions: The findings of our survey and experiences prove the efficacy and advantages of this technique that reduces the risk of neurovascular damage, neural tissue manipulation, operation time, and bleeding. Keywords: Neuronavigation, Cranial surgery, Navigational system

  6. Use of neuronavigation and electrophysiology in surgery of subcortically located lesions in the sensorimotor strip

    PubMed Central

    Eisner, W; Burtscher, J; Bale, R; Sweeney, R; Koppelstatter, F; Golaszewski, S; Kolbitsch, C; Twerdy, K

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Subcortical lesions in the sensorimotor strip are often considered to be inoperable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a combined approach for surgery in this region, aided by a robotic neuronavigation system under electrophysiological control. Methods: In a prospective study on 10 patients, space occupying lesions in the sensorimotor central area were removed using the Surgiscope® robotic navigation system and the Nicolet Viking IV® electrophysiological system. Results: Precise tumour localisation with the neuronavigation system and the information on the patient's cortical motor distribution obtained by bipolar cortical stimulation led to postoperative improvement in motor function in all but one patient. Seven of the patients had focal, defined pathology (four metastases; two cavernoma; one aspergilloma). Conclusion: Due to the implementation of two recent technologies, surgery of lesions in the subcortical sensorimotor region can be performed with greater confidence. PMID:11861700

  7. Biomechanical modeling provides more accurate data for neuronavigation than rigid registration

    PubMed Central

    Garlapati, Revanth Reddy; Roy, Aditi; Joldes, Grand Roman; Wittek, Adam; Mostayed, Ahmed; Doyle, Barry; Warfield, Simon Keith; Kikinis, Ron; Knuckey, Neville; Bunt, Stuart; Miller, Karol

    2015-01-01

    It is possible to improve neuronavigation during image-guided surgery by warping the high-quality preoperative brain images so that they correspond with the current intraoperative configuration of the brain. In this work, the accuracy of registration results obtained using comprehensive biomechanical models is compared to the accuracy of rigid registration, the technology currently available to patients. This comparison allows us to investigate whether biomechanical modeling provides good quality image data for neuronavigation for a larger proportion of patients than rigid registration. Preoperative images for 33 cases of neurosurgery were warped onto their respective intraoperative configurations using both biomechanics-based method and rigid registration. We used a Hausdorff distance-based evaluation process that measures the difference between images to quantify the performance of both methods of registration. A statistical test for difference in proportions was conducted to evaluate the null hypothesis that the proportion of patients for whom improved neuronavigation can be achieved, is the same for rigid and biomechanics-based registration. The null hypothesis was confidently rejected (p-value<10−4). Even the modified hypothesis that less than 25% of patients would benefit from the use of biomechanics-based registration was rejected at a significance level of 5% (p-value = 0.02). The biomechanics-based method proved particularly effective for cases experiencing large craniotomy-induced brain deformations. The outcome of this analysis suggests that our nonlinear biomechanics-based methods are beneficial to a large proportion of patients and can be considered for use in the operating theatre as one possible method of improving neuronavigation and surgical outcomes. PMID:24460486

  8. Frameless neuronavigation using the ISG-system in practice: from craniotomy to delineation of lesion.

    PubMed

    Kleinpeter, G; Lothaller, C

    2003-10-01

    The overall performance of a "pointer" neuronavigation system (the ISG ALLEGRO Viewing Wand) in everyday surgical use was evaluated by investigating the practical utility of the technical set-up for one particular surgical task. The basis of the analysis was the numerical evaluation of four areas of fundamental importance for most brain surgery: site and size of craniotomy, localisation of lesion, the trajectory through the brain, and the delineation of the lesion. In a protocol of 65 patients we based our examination on a subjective 4-point rating scale ranging from 0 (= no help) to 3 (= very helpful) for each of the four above categories. We investigated the potential influence of three factors: the lesions histology (4 groups), its size (3 categories) and the depth from the cortical surface (3 levels). Our experience is that the histology of the lesions has significant influence on the relative usefulness of neuronavigation for craniotomy (P < 0.017) and for delineation of the lesion (P < 0.003). We found neuronavigation most helpful for removing gliomas. Second, this system was found to be very helpful in locating small, hitherto hard-to-find, lesions (P < 0.01). Lesion's depth had no effect on the ratings (P > 0.2). Overall, the use of this system led to more precise skin incisions, better site and size of craniotomies tailored to the pathology, the trajectory through the brain, and to more precise delineation of the lesion.

  9. A new system for neuronavigation and stereotactic biopsy pantograph stereotactic localization and guidance system.

    PubMed

    Abrishamkar, Saeid; Moin, Houshang; Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Hajibabaie, Mahmood; Haghighi, Elham K; Abbasifard, Salman

    2011-07-01

    Everyday, neurosurgeons face the problem of orientation within the brain but the advent of stereotactic surgery and neuronavigation have solved this problem. Frame-based stereotactic systems (FBSS) and neuronavigation systems have their own strengths and priority and pitfalls, which were the main driving force for us to design a new system. This hybrid system comprises three main parts: main frame, monitoring system, and pantograph, which are connected to each other and to the operating table by particular attachments. For using this system, after performing CT SCAN or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) the axial view will be transferred to Liquid Cristal Display (LCD). In the operating room, the head of the patient fixes to the operating table and registration is completed by two arms of pantograph. We made a simulation operation with our system on an occipital cavernous angioma and a frontal oligodendroglioma. The software, which have been used for simulation were as follows; Poser (version-7), Catia (version 5- R18), and 3 Dimension Max (version 2008). The accuracy of this system is approximately two millimeter. The advantages of this system are: easy to use, much less expensive, and compatible with different devices, which may be needed during neurosurgical operation. For countries that do not have the opportunity to have sophisticated technology and neuronavigation system, we believe that our system is a one-stop solution.

  10. Neuronavigation-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening: A preliminary study in swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Lu, Yu-Jen; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-11-01

    FUS-induced BBB opening is a promising technique for noninvasive and local delivery of drugs into the brain. Here we propose the novel use of a neuronavigation system to guide the FUS-induced BBB opening procedure, and investigate its feasibility in vivo in large animals. We developed an interface between the neuronavigator and FUS to allow guidance of the focal energy produced by the FUS transducer. The system was tested in 29 pigs by more than 40 sonication procedures and evaluated by MRI. Gd-DTPA concentration was quantitated in vivo by MRI R1 relaxometry and compared by ICP-OES assay. Brain histology after FUS exposure was investigated by HE and TUNEL staining. Neuronavigation could successfully guide the focal beam with comparable precision to neurosurgical stereotactic procedures (2.3 ± 0.9 mm). FUS pressure of 0.43 MPa resulted in consistent BBB-opening. Neuronavigation-guided BBB-opening increased Gd-DTPA deposition by up to 1.83 mM (140% increase). MR relaxometry demonstrated high correlation to ICP-OES measurements (r2 = 0.822), suggesting that Gd-DTPA deposition can be directly measured by imaging. Neuronavigation could provide sufficient precision for guiding FUS to temporally and locally open the BBB. Gd-DTPA deposition in the brain could be quantified by MR relaxometry, providing a potential tool for the in vivo quantification of therapeutic agents in CNS disease treatment.

  11. Use of Frameless Stereotactic Neuronavigation and O-arm for Transoral Transpalatal Odontoidectomy to Treat a Very High Basilar Invagination

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Skanda; Raheja, Amol; Agrawal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Frameless stereotactic neuronavigation system has been in wide use since many years for precise localization of cranial tumors and navigation for spinal instrumentation. We present its usage in the localization of odontoid process in a very high basilar invagination for a transoral transpalatal resection of the same. We discuss the technical aspects of assembly of neuronavigation system, O-arm and Mayfield head frame on Allen spine system to achieve precise and accurate localization of high riding odontoid process through an extremely narrow operative corridor. PMID:28163511

  12. Neuronavigation-assisted single transseptal catheter implantation and shunt in patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and accentuated lateral ventricles dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Carvi Nievas, Mario N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: To assess the treatment of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus with accentuated lateral ventricles dilatation by employing a single biventricular neuronavigation-assisted transseptal-implanted catheter with programmable valve and distal peritoneal derivation. Methods: A neuronavigation-assisted single transseptal biventricular catheter implantation with distal peritoneal shunt system was performed in 11 patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and accentuated lateral ventricles dilatations between 2001 and 2010. Patients with concomitant third ventricle dilatation were excluded. Several sequential frustrated attempts of temporary drainage occlusion on both sides confirmed the isolation of the lateral ventricles. Neuronavigation was employed to accurately establish the catheter surgical corridor (trajectory) across the lateral ventricles and throughout the septum pellucidum. The neurological and radiological outcomes were assessed at least 6 months after the procedure. Results: Catheter implantation was successfully performed in all patients. Only one catheter was found to be monoventricular on delayed computer tomography controls. Procedure-related complications (bleeding of infections) were not observed. No additional neurological deficits were found after shunt surgery. Six months after procedure, none required additional ventricular catheter implantations or shunt revisions. Radiological and clinical controls confirmed the shunt function and the improved neurological status of all patients. Conclusion: Single neuronavigation-assisted transseptal-implanted biventricular catheter is a valid option for the treatment of posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus with accentuated lateral ventricles dilatation. This technique reduces the number of catheters and minimizes the complexity and timing of the surgical procedure as well as potential infection's risks associated with the use of multiple shunting systems. PMID:21541201

  13. Integration of 3D 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy data into neuronavigation systems for tumor biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanberoglu, Berkay; Moore, Nina Z.; Frakes, David; Karam, Lina J.; Debbins, Josef P.; Preul, Mark C.

    2013-03-01

    Many important applications in clinical medicine can benefit from the fusion of spectroscopy data with anatomical images. For example, the correlation of metabolite profiles with specific regions of interest in anatomical tumor images can be useful in characterizing and treating heterogeneous tumors that appear structurally homogeneous. Such applications can build on the correlation of data from in-vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Imaging (1HMRSI) with data from genetic and ex-vivo Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. To establish that correlation, tissue samples must be neurosurgically extracted from specifically identified locations with high accuracy. Toward that end, this paper presents new neuronavigation technology that enhances current clinical capabilities in the context of neurosurgical planning and execution. The proposed methods improve upon the current state-of-the-art in neuronavigation through the use of detailed three dimensional (3D) 1H-MRSI data. MRSI spectra are processed and analyzed, and specific voxels are selected based on their chemical contents. 3D neuronavigation overlays are then generated and applied to anatomical image data in the operating room. Without such technology, neurosurgeons must rely on memory and other qualitative resources alone for guidance in accessing specific MRSI-identified voxels. In contrast, MRSI-based overlays provide quantitative visual cues and location information during neurosurgery. The proposed methods enable a progressive new form of online MRSI-guided neuronavigation that we demonstrate in this study through phantom validation and clinical application.

  14. Percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation for trigeminal neuralgia using neuronavigation-guided puncture from a mandibular angle

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Weihua; Chen, Shuping; Wang, Rong; Cai, Jun; Cheng, Yuan; Yu, Liang; Li, Qinghua; Deng, Fang; Zhu, Shengmei; Yu, Wenhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFT) of the Gasserian ganglion is an effective treatment for primary trigeminal neuralgia (pTN). Currently Hartel anterior approach is the most commonly used method to access the Gasserian ganglion. However, this approach is associated with high recurrence rate and technical difficulties in certain patients with foramen ovale (FO) anatomical variations. In the present study, we assessed the feasibility of accessing the Gasserian ganglion through the FO from a mandibular angle under computed tomography (CT) and neuronavigation guidance. A total of 108 patients with TN were randomly divided into 2 groups (Group G and Group H) using a random number table. In Group H, Hartel anterior approach was used to puncture the FO; whereas in Group G, a percutaneous puncture through a mandibular angle was used to reach the FO. In both groups, procedures were guided by CT imaging and neuronavigation. The success rates, therapeutic effects, complications, and recurrence rates of the 2 groups were compared. The puncture success rates in Group H and Group G were 52/54 (96.30%) and 49/54 (90.74%), respectively (P = 0.24). The 2 procedural failures in Group H were rescued by using submandibular trajectory, and the 5 failures in Group G were successfully reapproached by Hartel method. Therapeutic effects as measured by Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain scale (P = 0.03) and quality of life (QOL) scores (P = 0.04) were significantly better in Group G than those in Group H at 36 months posttreatment. Hematoma developed in 1/54 (1.85%) cases in Group H, and no cases of hematoma were observed in Group G (P = 0.33). In Group H, RFT resulted in injury to the unintended trigeminal nerve branches and motor fibers in 27/52 (51.92%) cases; in Group G, it resulted in the same type of injury in 7/49 cases (14.29%) (P < 0.01). In Group H, the 24- and 36-month recurrence rates were 12/51 (23.53%) and 20/51 (39

  15. Cavernous sinus lesions biopsy with neuronavigation and tip-cut needle

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzetti, Martin; Carvalho, Herculano; Cattoni, Maria; Gonçalves-Ferreira, Antonio; Pimentel, José; Antuñes, Joao

    2014-01-01

    Background: Transoval biopsy of cavernous sinus (CS) lesions is the last non-invasive diagnostic option in those 15% of patients in whom etiology remains unclear in spite of extensive neuroradiological imaging, clinical assessment, and laboratory evaluation. However, there are no guidelines defining indications and the most appropriate technique for this procedure. Case Description: We present four patients in whom we performed X-ray and neuronavigation-assisted transoval CS biopsies using tip-cut needles. Conclusion: The technique described allows the operator to determine the optimal angle for entering the CS, avoiding the complications due to distorted anatomy, and facilitating orientation once inside the CS. It reduces both radiation exposure as well as general anesthesia duration. PMID:25593783

  16. Neuronavigation-guided endoscopy for intraventricular tumors in adult patients without hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Grzywna, Ewelina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intraventricular endoscopic operations are usually undertaken in patients with an enlarged ventricular system that provides good access to the ventricles, proper anatomic orientation and safety of maneuvers within the ventricles. Aim The preliminary assessment of the feasibility of endoscopic procedures in cases occurring without hydrocephalus. Material and methods Eleven patients with intraventricular tumor diagnosed in neuroimaging studies were included in the study. None of these cases was accompanied by hydrocephalus. Surgery was performed with a rigid neuroendoscope using a neuronavigation system. The purpose of the operation was tumor removal or histological verification. Results The colloid cyst of the third ventricle was removed in 5 patients. In 1 patient a glial-derived tumor adjacent to the interventricular foramen was partially resected. In 1 case a tumor of the lateral ventricle was totally removed, and in another case the resection of such a tumor was partial. In 2 cases, a biopsy of the tumor of the posterior portion of the third ventricle was undertaken, while in 1 case the biopsy was abandoned due to the risk of injury of structures surrounding interventricular foramen. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. None of the patients developed hydrocephalus in the long-term follow-up. The results of treatment in the study group did not differ from those obtained in patients operated on with hydrocephalus. Conclusions The presence of hydrocephalus is not necessary to perform endoscopic surgery. However, in each case it should be preceded by a thorough analysis of the feasibility of the endoscopic procedure and should be supported by a neuronavigation system. PMID:27829944

  17. Onset Latency of Motor Evoked Potentials in Motor Cortical Mapping with Neuronavigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kallioniemi, Elisa; Pitkänen, Minna; Säisänen, Laura; Julkunen, Petro

    2015-01-01

    Cortical motor mapping in pre-surgical applications can be performed using motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes evoked with neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation. The MEP latency, which is a more stable parameter than the MEP amplitude, has not so far been utilized in motor mapping. The latency, however, may provide information about the stress in damaged motor pathways, e.g. compression by tumors, which cannot be observed from the MEP amplitudes. Thus, inclusion of this parameter could add valuable information to the presently used technique of MEP amplitude mapping. In this study, the functional cortical representations of first dorsal interosseous (FDI), abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles were mapped in both hemispheres of ten healthy righthanded volunteers. The cortical muscle representations were evaluated by the area and centre of gravity (CoG) by using MEP amplitudes and latencies. As expected, the latency and amplitude CoGs were congruent and were located in the centre of the maps but in a few subjects, instead of a single centre, several loci with short latencies were observed. In conclusion, MEP latencies may be useful in distinguishing the cortical representation areas with the most direct pathways from those pathways with prolonged latencies. However, the potential of latency mapping to identify stressed motor tract connections at the subcortical level will need to be verified in future studies with patients.

  18. Clinical Use of Diffusion Tensor Image-Merged Functional Neuronavigation for Brain Tumor Surgeries: Review of Preoperative, Intraoperative, and Postoperative Data for 123 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin Mo; Kim, Eui Hyun; Kim, Jinna; Lee, Seung Koo; Kim, Sun Ho; Lee, Kyu Sung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To achieve maximal safe resection during brain tumor surgery, functional image-merged neuronavigation is widely used. We retrospectively reviewed our cases in which diffusion tensor image (DTI)-merged functional neuronavigation was performed during surgery. Materials and Methods Between November 2008 and May 2010, 123 patients underwent surgery utilizing DTI-merged neuronavigation. Anatomical magnetic resonance images (MRI) were obtained preoperatively and fused with DTI of major white matter tracts, such as the corticospinal tract, optic radiation, or arcuate fasciculus. We used this fused image for functional neuronavigation during brain tumor surgery of eloquent areas. We checked the DTI images together with postoperative MRI images and evaluated the integrity of white matter tracts. Results A single white matter tract was inspected in 78 patients, and two or more white matter tracts were checked in 45 patients. Among the 123 patients, a grossly total resection was achieved in 90 patients (73.2%), subtotal resection in 29 patients (23.6%), and partial resection in 4 patients (3.3%). Postoperative neurologic outcomes, compared with preoperative function, included the following: 100 patients (81.3%) displayed improvement of neurologic symptoms or no change, 7 patients (5.7%) experienced postoperative permanent neurologic deterioration (additional or aggravated neurologic symptoms), and 16 patients (13.0%) demonstrated transient worsening. Conclusion DTI-merged functional neuronavigation could be a useful tool in brain tumor surgery for maximal safe resection. However, there are still limitations, including white matter tract shift, during surgery and in DTI itself. Further studies should be conducted to overcome these limitations. PMID:25048489

  19. [Motor cortex stimulation for post-stroke pain using neuronavigation and evoked potentials: report of 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Ito, Masaki; Kuroda, Satoshi; Takano, Kazuya; Maruichi, Katsuhiko; Chiba, Yasuhiro; Morimoto, Yuji; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2006-09-01

    Although motor cortex stimulation (MCS) has been accepted as an effective therapeutic option for central pain, the efficacy of MCS widely varies among previous reports. In this report, we describe our recent trial for successful MCS in 3 patients with central pain due to cerebral stroke. Medical treatments were transiently effective, but gradually became ineffective in all of the cases. During surgery, the appropriate cortical target was determined by using neuronavigation, somatosensory evoked potential (SEP), and motor evoked potential (MEP). A flat, four-plate electrode was positioned on the dura mater parallel to the motor cortex. After surgery, pain almost resolved in 2 of 3 patients and markedly improved in another. The pain relief depended on their motor function. These findings strongly suggest that both patient selection and intraoperative monitoring for targeting the motor cortex are quite important for successful MCS, although further studies were essential.

  20. How does adding anatomical landmarks as fiducial points in the point-matching registration of neuronavigation influence registration accuracy?

    PubMed

    Wang, Manning; Song, Zhijian

    2016-12-01

    Skin markers (SMs) are usually used as fiducial points in registration of neuronavigation, but the areas in which they can be adhered to are restricted, which usually results in poor distribution of the SMs and a large registration error. In this research, we studied whether the registration accuracy can be improved by adding anatomical landmarks (ALs), which are thought to have a larger localization error than SMs. A series of random SM configurations were generated, and for each SM configuration, we generated a corresponding SM-AL configuration by adding several ALs. We then compared the accuracy of the point-matching registration of the SM configurations with that of the corresponding SM-AL configurations. Experiment results indicated that adding ALs always made the mean target registration error of the whole head fall into a lower and narrower range, which meant that the registration became more accurate and more stable. In addition, adding more ALs resulted in a better performance.

  1. Does the inferior frontal sulcus play a functional role in deception? A neuronavigated theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Verschuere, Bruno; Schuhmann, Teresa; Sack, Alexander T

    2012-01-01

    By definition, lying involves withholding the truth. Response inhibition may therefore be the cognitive function at the heart of deception. Neuroimaging research has shown that the same brain region that is activated during response inhibition tasks, namely the inferior frontal region, is also activated during deception paradigms. This led to the hypothesis that the inferior frontal region is the neural substrate critically involved in withholding the truth. In the present study, we critically examine the functional necessity of the inferior frontal region in withholding the truth during deception. We experimentally manipulated the neural activity level in right inferior frontal sulcus (IFS) by means of neuronavigated continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS). Individual structural magnetic resonance brain images (MRI) were used to allow precise stimulation in each participant. Twenty-six participants answered autobiographical questions truthfully or deceptively before and after sham and real cTBS. Deception was reliably associated with more errors, longer and more variable response times than truth telling. Despite the potential role of IFS in deception as suggested by neuroimaging data, the cTBS-induced disruption of right IFS did not affect response times or error rates, when compared to sham stimulation. The present findings do not support the hypothesis that the right IFS is critically involved in deception.

  2. Concordance Between BeamF3 and MRI-neuronavigated Target Sites for Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Mir-Moghtadaei, Arsalan; Caballero, Ruth; Fried, Peter; Fox, Michael D.; Lee, Katherine; Giacobbe, Peter; Daskalakis, Zafiris J.; Blumberger, Daniel M.; Downar, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is a common target for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in major depression, but the conventional “5 cm rule” misses DLPFC in > 1/3 cases. Another heuristic, BeamF3, locates the F3 EEG site from scalp measurements. MRI-guided neuronavigation is more onerous, but can target a specific DLPFC stereotaxic coordinate directly. The concordance between these two approaches has not previously been assessed. Objective To quantify the discrepancy in scalp site between BeamF3 versus MRI-guided neuronavigation for left DLPFC. Methods Using 100 pre-treatment MRIs from subjects undergoing left DLPFC-rTMS, we localized the scalp site at minimum Euclidean distance from a target MNI coordinate (X − 38 Y + 44 Z + 26) derived from our previous work. We performed nasion-inion, tragus–tragus, and head-circumference measurements on the same subjects’ MRIs, and applied the BeamF3 heuristic. We then compared the distance between BeamF3 and MRI-guided scalp sites. Results BeamF3-to-MRI-guided discrepancies were <0.65 cm in 50% of subjects, <0.99 cm in 75% of subjects, and <1.36 cm in 95% of subjects. The angle from midline to the scalp site did not differ significantly using MRI-guided versus BeamF3 methods. However, the length of the radial arc from vertex to target site was slightly but significantly longer (mean 0.35 cm) with MRI-guidance versus BeamF3. Conclusions The BeamF3 heuristic may provide a reasonable approximation to MRI-guided neuronavigation for locating left DLPFC in a majority of subjects. A minor optimization of the heuristic may yield additional concordance. PMID:26115776

  3. [High-Definition Exoscope System for Microneurosurgery:Use of an Exoscope in Combination with Tubular Retraction and Frameless Neuronavigation for Microsurgical Resection of Deep Brain Lesions].

    PubMed

    Nagatani, Kimihiro; Takeuchi, Satoru; Feng, Dongxia; Mori, Kentaro; Day, J Diaz

    2015-07-01

    The high-definition exoscope (VITOM®, Karl Storz GmbH & Co., Tuttlingen, Germany) is a new equipment that can be used as an alternative to the operating microscope in neurosurgery. Several neurosurgeons have recently reported that the exoscope allows for long working distances and great depth of field. Herein, we review reported cases of exoscope use in neurosurgery. We also describe the advantages of the exoscope compared to the operating microscope and endoscope. Furthermore, we introduce a novel technique for microsurgical resection of deep brain lesions, in which the exoscope is used along with tubular retraction and frameless neuronavigation. Before the operation, neuronavigation is registered and the surgical trajectory is planned to avoid damaging the functional cortex and eloquent white matter tracts. By using intraoperative neuronavigation, the tubular retractor (NICO BrainPath®, NICO Corporation, Indianapolis, US), which is designed to split the white matter when gently inserted, is inserted transcortically into the brain to reach the lesion, along the preplanned trajectory. After insertion, the tubular retractor is fixed in place using a self-retaining arm. This creates a narrow corridor that enables the use of the exoscope (for optimum visualization), bimanual dissection technique, and long bayoneted surgical instruments. The large focal distance of the exoscope allows it to be placed sufficiently further away from the surgical site, permitting the passage of long surgical instruments under the scope. Although obtaining surgical access to deep-seated brain lesions is challenging, we consider that this technique facilitates a safe surgical approach for lesions in deep locations.

  4. Neuronavigation Increases the Physiologic and Behavioral Effects of Low-Frequency rTMS of Primary Motor Cortex in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, S.; Edwards, D.

    2013-01-01

    Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can exert local and inter-hemispheric neuromodulatory effects on cortical excitability. These physiologic effects can translate into changes in motor behavior, and may offer valuable therapeutic interventions in recovery from stroke. Neuronavigated TMS can maximize accurate and consistent targeting of a given cortical region, but is a lot more involved that conventional TMS. We aimed to assess whether neuronavigation enhances the physiologic and behavioral effects of low-frequency rTMS. Ten healthy subjects underwent two experimental sessions during which they received 1600 pulses of either navigated or non-navigated 1 Hz rTMS at 90% of the resting motor threshold (RMT) intensity over the motor cortical representation for left first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. We compared the effects of navigated and non-navigated rTMS on motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) to single-pulse TMS, intracortical inhibition (ICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) by paired-pulse TMS, and performance in various behavioral tasks (index finger tapping, simple reaction time and grip strength tasks). Following navigated rTMS, the amplitude of MEPs elicited from the contralateral (unstimulated) motor cortex was significantly increased, and was associated with an increase in ICF and a trend to decrease in ICI. In contrast, non-navigated rTMS elicited nonsignificant changes, most prominently ipsilateral to rTMS. Behaviorally, navigated rTMS significantly improved reaction time RT and pinch force with the hand ipsilateral to stimulation. Non-navigated rTMS lead to similar behavioral trends, although the effects did not reach significance. In summary, navigated rTMS leads to more robust modulation of the contralateral (unstimulated) hemisphere resulting in physiologic and behavioral effects. Our findings highlight the spatial specificity of inter-hemispheric TMS effects, illustrate the superiority of navigated rTMS for certain

  5. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Neuronavigated Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    McClelland, Jessica; Kekic, Maria; Bozhilova, Natali; Nestler, Steffen; Dew, Tracy; Van den Eynde, Frederique; David, Anthony S.; Rubia, Katya; Campbell, Iain C.; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Background Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with morbid fear of fatness, extreme food restriction and altered self-regulation. Neuroimaging data implicate fronto-striatal circuitry, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Methods In this double-blind parallel group study, we investigated the effects of one session of sham-controlled high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the left DLPFC (l-DLPFC) in 60 individuals with AN. A food exposure task was administered before and after the procedure to elicit AN-related symptoms. Outcomes The primary outcome measure was ‘core AN symptoms’, a variable which combined several subjective AN-related experiences. The effects of rTMS on other measures of psychopathology (e.g. mood), temporal discounting (TD; intertemporal choice behaviour) and on salivary cortisol concentrations were also investigated. Safety, tolerability and acceptability were assessed. Results Fourty-nine participants completed the study. Whilst there were no interaction effects of rTMS on core AN symptoms, there was a trend for group differences (p = 0.056): after controlling for pre-rTMS scores, individuals who received real rTMS had reduced symptoms post-rTMS and at 24-hour follow-up, relative to those who received sham stimulation. Other psychopathology was not altered differentially following real/sham rTMS. In relation to TD, there was an interaction trend (p = 0.060): real versus sham rTMS resulted in reduced rates of TD (more reflective choice behaviour). Salivary cortisol concentrations were unchanged by stimulation. rTMS was safe, well–tolerated and was considered an acceptable intervention. Conclusions This study provides modest evidence that rTMS to the l-DLPFC transiently reduces core symptoms of AN and encourages prudent decision making. Importantly, individuals with AN considered rTMS to be a viable treatment option. These findings require replication in multiple-session studies to evaluate therapeutic efficacy. Trial Registration www.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN22851337 PMID:27008620

  6. The Hand Motor Hotspot is not Always Located in the Hand Knob: A Neuronavigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study.

    PubMed

    Ahdab, Rechdi; Ayache, Samar S; Brugières, Pierre; Farhat, Wassim H; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2016-07-01

    The hand motor hot spot (hMHS) is one of the most salient parameters in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) practice, notably used for targeting. It is commonly accepted that the hMHS corresponds to the hand representation within the primary motor cortex (M1). Anatomical and imaging studies locate this representation in a region of the central sulcus called the "hand knob". The aim of this study was to determine if the hMHS location corresponds to its expected location at the hand knob. Twelve healthy volunteers and eleven patients with chronic neuropathic pain of various origins, but not related to a brain lesion, were enrolled. Morphological magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was normal in all participants. Both hemispheres were studied in all participants except four (two patients and two healthy subjects). Cortical mapping of the hand motor area was conducted using a TMS-dedicated navigation system and recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the contralateral first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. We then determined the anatomical position of the hMHS, defined as the stimulation site providing the largest FDI-MEPs. In 45 % of hemispheres of normal subjects and 25 % of hemispheres of pain patients, the hMHS was located over the central sulcus, most frequently at the level of the hand knob. However, in the other cases, the hMHS was located outside M1, most frequently anteriorly over the precentral or middle frontal gyrus. This study shows that the hMHS does not always correspond to the hand knob and M1 location in healthy subjects or patients. Therefore, image-guided navigation is needed to improve the anatomical accuracy of TMS targeting, even for M1.

  7. Augmented reality-assisted skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Cabrilo, I; Sarrafzadeh, A; Bijlenga, P; Landis, B N; Schaller, K

    2014-12-01

    Neuronavigation is widely considered as a valuable tool during skull base surgery. Advances in neuronavigation technology, with the integration of augmented reality, present advantages over traditional point-based neuronavigation. However, this development has not yet made its way into routine surgical practice, possibly due to a lack of acquaintance with these systems. In this report, we illustrate the usefulness and easy application of augmented reality-based neuronavigation through a case example of a patient with a clivus chordoma. We also demonstrate how augmented reality can help throughout all phases of a skull base procedure, from the verification of neuronavigation accuracy to intraoperative image-guidance.

  8. [Application of navigation system ExacTrac in radiation therapy of a female patient with disseminated pineoblastoma].

    PubMed

    2010-01-01

    Neuronavigation is a modem and perspective technique widely applied not only in neurosurgery but in radiation treatment of neurosurgical diseases as well. Radiographic control of patient and target positioning during irradiation increases accuracy and improves treatment outcomes. Application of neuronavigation significantly expands the possibilities of radiation therapy allowing irradiation of extracranial lesions, application of mask fixation for radiation treatment, and hypofractionated radiotherapy of intracranial and spinal targets. We describe 1 illustrative case of a female patient with 2 metastases of pineoblastoma located in left cerebellar hemisphere and at the level of CVII vertebra. Both lesions were irradiated in hypofractionated mode using ExacTrac XRay 6D neuronavigation system. After 7 months these foci completely resolved.

  9. Transsphenoidal approach for pituitary adenomas in patients with McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dou, Wanchen; Di, Xiao; Wang, Renzhi; Zhu, Huijuan; Yao, Yong; Deng, Kan; Feng, Ming; Li, Guilin; Wei, Junji

    2013-06-01

    The feasibility of transsphenoidal approach under a guidance of neuronavigation was explored to remove pituitary adenomas for patients with McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS). From August, 2008 to July, 2010, there were 5 patients diagnosed with MAS associated with a pituitary adenoma in our department of Peking Union Medical College Hospital. All the patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery for the removal of pituitary adenomas with the assistant of neuronavigation and all the procedures went uneventfully. Four of the five patients have got cured radiologically by imaging and 3 of them have got cured based on endocrinological criteria. Transsphenoidal approach under the neuronavigational guidance is a safe and effective management for the MAS patients with pituitary adenomas.

  10. Transfrontal Transaqueductal, Transtrigonal, and Suboccipital Infratentorial Supracerebellar Endoscopic Fenestration of Posterior Fossa Arachnoid Cysts: Three Surgical Cases.

    PubMed

    Idris, Zamzuri; Tan, Yew Chin; Kandasamy, Regunath; Ghani, Rahman Izaini; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2017-03-01

    Symptomatic intracranial arachnoid cysts are commonly treated using neuroendoscopy. Cysts located within the posterior fossa may present a greater surgical challenge to the neurosurgeon due to the numerous vital neurovascular structures located within this confined space. Adding neuronavigation during endoscopy helps a neurosurgeon to visualize and utilize both anterior and posterior corridors safely to access and manage these lesions. We present three symptomatic posterior fossa arachnoid cysts that were treated successfully using minimally invasive neuronavigation-guided endoscopic neurosurgery utilizing the anterior transfrontal transaqueductal, anterior transfrontal transtrigonal, and posterior suboccipital infratentorial supracerebellar approaches.

  11. THE VALUE OF PRE- AND INTRA-OPERATIVE ADJUNCTS ON THE EXTENT OF RESECTION OF HEMISPHERIC LOW GRADE GLIOMAS; A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Incekara, Fatih; Olubiyi, Olutayo; Ozdemir, Aysegul; Lee, Tom; Rigolo, Laura; Golby, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Background To achieve maximal resection with minimal risk of postoperative neurological morbidity, different neurosurgical adjuncts are being used during low grade glioma (LGG) surgery. Objectives The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of pre- and intra-operative adjuncts on the extent of resection (EOR) of hemispheric LGGs. Methods Medical records were reviewed to identify patients of any sex, 18 years or older, who underwent LGG surgery at ‘X’ Hospital between January 2005 and July 2013. Patients were divided in 8 subgroups based on the use of neuronavigation system alone (NN), functional MRI-diffusion tensor imaging (fMRI-DTI) guided neuronavigation (FD), intra-operative MRI (MR) and direct electrical stimulation (DES). Initial and residual tumors were measured and mean EOR was compared between groups. Results Of all 128 patients, gross total resection was achieved in 23.4%. Overall mean EOR was 81.3% ± 20.5%. Using DES in combination with fMRI-DTI (mean EOR 86.7% ± 12.4%) on eloquent tumors improved mean EOR significantly after adjustment for potential confounders, when compared with neuronavigation alone (mean EOR 76.4% ± 25.5%, p = 0.001). Conclusions Using DES in combination with fMRI and DTI significantly improves EOR when LGGs are located in eloquent areas, compared with craniotomies were only neuronavigation was used. PMID:26216736

  12. Method for quantitative validation of image-based correction for intraoperative brain shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Lisa M.; Goerss, Stephan J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-04-01

    Stereotactic neuronavigational systems use pre-operatively acquired 3D images for procedural planning and also are employed in intraoperative navigations to help localize and resect brain lesions. Intraoperatively, multiple factors contribute to anatomic changes that limit the accuracy of navigation based solely on pre-operative images. Loss of CSF, cortical swelling, and the effect of gravity relative to the craniotomy locations are some of the factors that contribute to errors in navigation.

  13. Trigeminal Neuralgia Due to a Small Meckel's Cave Epidermoid Tumor: Surgery Using an Extradural Corridor.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Sunil V; Hegde, Alangar S

    2009-09-01

    Tumors at the petrous apex are associated with a variety of symptoms, which most often involve the trigeminal nerve. The authors present a rare case of a small epidermoid tumor in Meckel's cave that caused medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. The surgical challenge associated with approaches to such lesions is discussed. The skull base tumor was excised completely through a small temporal craniotomy. The practicality of neuronavigation in reaching the petrous apex using a small extradural window is presented.

  14. From the Idea to Its Realization: The Evolution of Minimally Invasive Techniques in Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Grunert, P.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive techniques in neurosurgery evolved in two steps. Many minimally invasive concepts like neuronavigation, endoscopy, or frame based stereotaxy were developed by the pioneers of neurosurgery, but it took decades till further technical developments made the realization and broad clinical application of these early ideas safe and possible. This thesis will be demonstrated by giving examples of the evolution of four minimally invasive techiques: neuronavigation, transsphenoidal pituitary surgery, neuroendoscopy and stereotaxy. The reasons for their early failure and also the crucial steps for the rediscovery of these minimally invasive techniques will be analysed. In the 80th of the 20th century endoscopy became increasingly applied in different surgical fields. The abdominal surgeons coined as first for their endoscopic procedures the term minimally invasive surgery in contrast to open surgery. In neurrosurgery the term minimally invasive surgery stood not in opposiotion to open procedures but was understood as a general concept and philosophy using the modern technology such as neuronavigation, endoscopy and planing computer workstations with the aim to make the procedures less traumatic. PMID:24455231

  15. The use of intraoperative computed tomography navigation in pituitary surgery promises a better intraoperative orientation in special cases

    PubMed Central

    Linsler, Stefan; Antes, Sebastian; Senger, Sebastian; Oertel, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The safety of endoscopic skull base surgery can be enhanced by accurate navigation in preoperative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here, we report our initial experience of real-time intraoperative CT-guided navigation surgery for pituitary tumors in childhood. Materials and Methods: We report the case of a 15-year-old girl with a huge growth hormone-secreting pituitary adenoma with supra- and perisellar extension. Furthermore, the skull base was infiltrated. In this case, we performed an endonasal transsphenoidal approach for debulking the adenoma and for chiasma decompression. We used an MRI neuronavigation (Medtronic Stealth Air System) which was registered via intraoperative CT scan (Siemens CT Somatom). Preexisting MRI studies (navigation protocol) were fused with the intraoperative CT scans to enable three-dimensional navigation based on MR and CT imaging data. Intraoperatively, we did a further CT scan for resection control. Results: The intraoperative accuracy of the neuronavigation was excellent. There was an adjustment of <1 mm. The navigation was very helpful for orientation on the destroyed skull base in the sphenoid sinus. After opening the sellar region and tumor debulking, we did a CT scan for resection control because the extent of resection was not credible evaluable in this huge infiltrating adenoma. Thereby, we were able to demonstrate a sufficient decompression of the chiasma and complete resection of the medial part of the adenoma in the intraoperative CT images. Conclusions: The use of intraoperative CT/MRI-guided neuronavigation for transsphenoidal surgery is a time-effective, safe, and technically beneficial technique for special cases. PMID:27695249

  16. Computational Modeling for Enhancing Soft Tissue Image Guided Surgery: An Application in Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Miga, Michael I.

    2016-01-01

    With the recent advances in computing, the opportunities to translate computational models to more integrated roles in patient treatment are expanding at an exciting rate. One area of considerable development has been directed towards correcting soft tissue deformation within image guided neurosurgery applications. This review captures the efforts that have been undertaken towards enhancing neuronavigation by the integration of soft tissue biomechanical models, imaging and sensing technologies, and algorithmic developments. In addition, the review speaks to the evolving role of modeling frameworks within surgery and concludes with some future directions beyond neurosurgical applications. PMID:26354118

  17. Transcranial brain stimulation: clinical applications and future directions.

    PubMed

    Najib, Umer; Bashir, Shahid; Edwards, Dylan; Rotenberg, Alexander; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2011-04-01

    Noninvasive brain stimulation is a valuable investigative tool and has potential therapeutic applications in cognitive neuroscience, neurophysiology, psychiatry, and neurology. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is particularly useful to establish and map causal brain-behavior relations in motor and nonmotor cortical areas. Neuronavigated TMS is able to provide precise information related to the individual's functional anatomy that can be visualized and used during surgical interventions and critically aid in presurgical planning, reducing the need for riskier and more cumbersome intraoperative or invasive mapping procedures. This article reviews methodological aspects, clinical applications, and future directions of TMS-based mapping.

  18. Intraoperative optical biopsy for brain tumors using spectro-lifetime properties of intrinsic fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; Kittle, David S.; Nie, Zhaojun; Falcone, Christina; Patil, Chirag G.; Chu, Ray M.; Mamelak, Adam N.; Black, Keith L.; Butte, Pramod V.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed and tested a system for real-time intra-operative optical identification and classification of brain tissues using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS). A supervised learning algorithm using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) employing selected intrinsic fluorescence decay temporal points in 6 spectral bands was employed to maximize statistical significance difference between training groups. The linear discriminant analysis on in vivo human tissues obtained by TRFS measurements (N = 35) were validated by histopathologic analysis and neuronavigation correlation to pre-operative MRI images. These results demonstrate that TRFS can differentiate between normal cortex, white matter and glioma.

  19. Localisation of the sensorimotor cortex during surgery for brain tumours: feasibility and waveform patterns of somatosensory evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Romstock, J; Fahlbusch, R; Ganslandt, O; Nimsky, C; Strauss, C

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Intraoperative localisation of the sensorimotor cortex using the phase reversal of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) is an essential tool for surgery in and around the perirolandic gyri, but unsuccessful and perplexing results have been reported. This study examines the effect of tumour masses on the waveform characteristics and feasibility of SEP compared with functional neuronavigation and electrical motor cortex mapping. Methods: In 230 patients with tumours of the sensorimotor region the SEP phase reversal of N20-P20 was recorded from the exposed cortex using a subdural grid or strip electrode. In one subgroup of 80 patients functional neuronavigation was performed with motor and sensory magnetic source imaging and in one subgroup of 40 patients the motor cortex hand area was localised by electrical stimulation mapping. Results: The intraoperative SEP method was successful in 92% of all patients, it could be shown that the success rate rather depended on the location of the lesion than on preoperative neurological deficits. In 13% of the patients with postcentral tumours no N20-P20 phase reversal was recorded but characteristic polyphasic and high amplitude waves at 25 ms and later made the identification of the postcentral gyrus possible nevertheless. Electrical mapping of the motor cortex took up to 30 minutes until a clear result was obtained. It was successful in 37 patients, but failed in three patients with precentral and central lesions. Functional neuronavigation indicating the tumour margins and the motor and sensory evoked fields was possible in all patients. Conclusion: The SEP phase reversal of N20-P20 is a simple and reliable technique, but the success rate is much lower in large central and postcentral tumours. With the use of polyphasic late waveforms the sensorimotor cortex may be localised. By contrast with motor electrical mapping it is less time consuming. Functional neuronavigation is a desirable tool for both preoperative

  20. Image-Guided Endoscopic Endonasal Transmaxillary Transpterygoid Approach to Meckel's Cave.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuejian; Zhang, Xiaobiao; Hu, Fan; Yu, Yong; Gu, Ye; Xie, Tao; Ge, Junqi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this report was to summarize our preliminary experience on the resection of tumors located in Meckel's cave via the endoscopic endonasal transmaxillary transpterygoid approach with image-guided system and to investigate the feasibility and efficacy of this approach. Two patients who had tumors in left Meckel's cave underwent surgical treatment using the image-guided endoscopic endonasal transmaxillary transpterygoid approach. This particular technique has advantages of no brain retraction, direct vision of tumor resection and protection of surrounding neurovascular structures. Neuronavigation increases the safety of the endoscopic approach.

  1. Strategies for brain shift evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hastreiter, Peter; Rezk-Salama, Christof; Soza, Grzegorz; Bauer, Michael; Greiner, Günther; Fahlbusch, Rudolf; Ganslandt, Oliver; Nimsky, Christopher

    2004-12-01

    For the analysis of the brain shift phenomenon different strategies were applied. In 32 glioma cases pre- and intraoperative MR datasets were acquired in order to evaluate the maximum displacement of the brain surface and the deep tumor margin. After rigid registration using the software of the neuronavigation system, a direct comparison was made with 2D- and 3D visualizations. As a result, a great variability of the brain shift was observed ranging up to 24 mm for cortical displacement and exceeding 3 mm for the deep tumor margin in 66% of all cases. Following intraoperative imaging the neuronavigation system was updated in eight cases providing reliable guidance. For a more comprehensive analysis a voxel-based nonlinear registration was applied. Aiming at improved speed of alignment we performed all interpolation operations with 3D texture mapping based on OpenGL functions supported in graphics hardware. Further acceleration was achieved with an adaptive refinement of the underlying control point grid focusing on the main deformation areas. For a quick overview the registered datasets were evaluated with different 3D visualization approaches. Finally, the results were compared to the initial measurements contributing to a better understanding of the brain shift phenomenon. Overall, the experiments clearly demonstrate that deformations of the brain surface and deeper brain structures are uncorrelated.

  2. Quantitative validation of a method for correction of intraoperative brain shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Lisa M.; Goerss, Stephan J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-05-01

    Stereotactic neuronavigational systems have demonstrated significant clinical influence during the past decade, and are being used in an increasing number of neurosurgical procedures. Pre-operatively acquired 3D images are used for planning purposes, and also are employed in intraoperative navigations to help localize and resect brain lesions. However, as the operation progresses, multiple factors contribute the changes that limit the accuracy of the navigation based on pore-operative images alone. The opening of the dura with the associated loss of CSF and cortical swelling, the effect of gravity relative to the craniotomy location, tumor decompression, and collapse of neural tissue around the operative site are some of the factors that contribute to errors in navigation, particularly navigation based solely on pre-operatively acquired images. Neuronavigational system assume a one-to-one correlation between patient anatomy in the operating room and the pre- operatively acquired MRI images. Since the brain deforms in a non-linear manner, intraoperative brain shift can really only be corrected via intraoperative sensing methods that effectively update the pre-operatively acquired image data during surgery.

  3. Preoperative functional MRI localization of language areas in Chinese patients with brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hechun; Huang, Wei; Wu, Liang; Ma, Hui; Wang, Xiaodong; Chen, Xuexin; Sun, Shengyu; Jia, Xiaoxiong

    2012-01-01

    Ten Chinese patients with brain tumors involving language regions were selected. Preoperative functional MRI was performed to locate Broca's or Wernicke's area, and the cortex that was essential for language function was determined by electrocortical mapping. A site-by-site comparison between functional MRI and electrocortical mapping was performed with the aid of a neuronavigation device. Results showed that the sensitivity and specificity of preoperative functional MRI were 80.0% and 85.0% in Broca's area and 66.6% and 85.2% in Wernicke's area, respectively. These experimental findings indicate that functional MRI is an accurate, reliable technique with which to identify the location of Wernicke's area or Broca's area in patients with brain tumors. PMID:25657694

  4. PubMed Central

    BATTAGLIA, P.; BIGNAMI, M.; FERRELI, F.; TURRI-ZANONI, M.; BERNARDINI, E.; LENZI, R.; DALLAN, I.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The surgical treatment of sinonasal malignancies is in continuous evolution. In selected patients, endoscopic resection has become a sound alternative to traditional external approaches. Further improvements are necessary to enhance the possibilities of endoscopic transnasal resection of sinonasal malignancies. We present a case of intestinal-type adenocarcinoma of the left nasal fossa eroding the skull base that affected a 56-year-old male. The patient was surgically-treated by means of a four-hand binarial endoscopic transnasal resection using a 3D endoscopic system and neuronavigation. Surgery was completed in 5 hours without significant complications. Surgeons were able to recognize and manage anatomical structures, and to control bleeding easily thanks to the bimanual technique and 3D visualization. The new 3D scopes and the bimanual technique under the guidance of a navigation system represent an interesting solution that can overcome the traditional limits of the traditional set up currently used. PMID:22767985

  5. Estimation of intra-operative brain shift based on constrained Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Shakarami, M; Suratgar, A A; Talebi, H A

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the problem of estimation of brain shift is addressed by which the accuracy of neuronavigation systems can be improved. To this end, the actual brain shift is considered as a Gaussian random vector with a known mean and an unknown covariance. Then, brain surface imaging is employed together with solutions of linear elastic model and the best estimation is found using constrained Kalman filter (CKF). Moreover, a recursive method (RCKF) is presented, the computational cost of which in the operating room is significantly lower than CKF, because it is not required to compute inverse of any large matrix. Finally, the theory is verified by the simulation results, which show the superiority of the proposed method as compared to one existing method.

  6. Framework for 2D-3D image fusion of infrared thermography with preoperative MRI.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Nico; Weidner, Florian; Urban, Peter; Meyer, Tobias; Schnabel, Christian; Radev, Yordan; Schackert, Gabriele; Petersohn, Uwe; Koch, Edmund; Gumhold, Stefan; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2017-01-23

    Multimodal medical image fusion combines information of one or more images in order to improve the diagnostic value. While previous applications mainly focus on merging images from computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonic and single-photon emission computed tomography, we propose a novel approach for the registration and fusion of preoperative 3D MRI with intraoperative 2D infrared thermography. Image-guided neurosurgeries are based on neuronavigation systems, which further allow us track the position and orientation of arbitrary cameras. Hereby, we are able to relate the 2D coordinate system of the infrared camera with the 3D MRI coordinate system. The registered image data are now combined by calibration-based image fusion in order to map our intraoperative 2D thermographic images onto the respective brain surface recovered from preoperative MRI. In extensive accuracy measurements, we found that the proposed framework achieves a mean accuracy of 2.46 mm.

  7. Occipital neuralgia secondary to unilateral atlantoaxial osteoarthritis: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Daipayan; Mohanty, Chandan; Tator, Charles H.; Shamji, Mohammed F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atlantoaxial osteoarthritis (AAOA), either in isolation or in the context of generalized peripheral or spinal arthritis, presents most commonly with neck pain and limitation of cervical rotational range of motion. Occipital neuralgia (ON) is only rarely attributed to AAOA, as fewer than 30 cases are described in the literature. Case Description: A 64-year-old female presented with progressive incapacitating cervicalgia and occipital headaches, refractory to medications, and local anesthetic blocks. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies documented advanced unilateral atlantoaxial arthrosis with osteophytic compression that dorsally displaced the associated C2 nerve root. Surgical decompression and atlantoaxial fusion achieved rapid and complete relief of neuralgia. Ultimately, postoperative spinal imaging revealed osseous union. Conclusions: Atlantoaxial arthrosis must be considered in the differential diagnosis of ON. Surgical treatment is effective for managing refractory cases. Intraoperative neuronavigation is also a useful adjunct to guide instrumentation and the intraoperative extent of bony decompression. PMID:26759731

  8. Symptomatic pineal cyst: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Costa, F; Fornari, M; Valla, P; Servello, D

    2008-08-01

    Asymptomatic cysts of the pineal region are common incidental findings in adults. In contrast, symptomatic pineal cysts are rare and their management is not well defined. We present the case of a 39-year-old woman suffering from intracranial hypertension, with visual disturbance and mild papilledema. The MR images showed a voluminous cyst of the pineal region responsible for an obstructive hydrocephalus. Endoscopic treatment with the aid of computerized neuronavigation consisting in third ventriculostomy and fenestration of the cyst was performed. Intracranial hypertension symptoms resolved in 24 hours. The one year follow-up cerebral MR images demonstrated the normalization of ventricular size with patency of the aqueduct of Sylvius. Reviewing the literature demonstrates that the endoscopic approach represents a minimally invasive and safe procedure in the treatment of symptomatic pineal cysts.

  9. Frontal lobe epilepsy with atypical seizure semiology resembling shuddering attacks or wet dog shake seizures.

    PubMed

    Jahodova, Alena; Krsek, Pavel; Komarek, Vladimir; Kudr, Martin; Kyncl, Martin; Zamecnik, Josef; Tichy, Michal

    2012-03-01

    We report a girl with a drug-resistant frontal lobe epilepsy caused by focal cortical dysplasia, who exhibited uncommon seizures. The seizures consisted of shoulder or whole body shuddering after a short psychic aura and face grimacing. Consciousness was fully preserved. The seizures resembled "wet dog shake" seizures described in rat models of epilepsy or shuddering attacks in infants. EEG findings were inconclusive, however, MRI showed a clear dysplastic lesion in the right frontal mesial and polar structures. The patient underwent an extended lesionectomy guided by neuronavigation and intraoperative electrocorticography. Focal cortical dysplasia type Ib was histologically confirmed and the patient has been seizure-free for the three years following resection. [Published with video sequences].

  10. High-resolution imaging of the central nervous system: how novel imaging methods combined with navigation strategies will advance patient care.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Hamza; Genis, Helen; Alarcon, Joseph; Vuong, Barry; Jivraj, Jamil; Yang, Victor X D; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Fehlings, Michael G; Cadotte, David W

    2015-01-01

    This narrative review captures a subset of recent advances in imaging of the central nervous system. First, we focus on improvements in the spatial and temporal profile afforded by optical coherence tomography, fluorescence-guided surgery, and Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy. Next, we highlight advances in the generation and uses of imaging-based atlases and discuss how this will be applied to specific clinical situations. To conclude, we discuss how these and other imaging tools will be combined with neuronavigation techniques to guide surgeons in the operating room. Collectively, this work aims to highlight emerging biomedical imaging strategies that hold potential to be a valuable tool for both clinicians and researchers in the years to come.

  11. How to include the variability of TMS responses in simulations: a speech mapping case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geeter, N.; Lioumis, P.; Laakso, A.; Crevecoeur, G.; Dupré, L.

    2016-11-01

    When delivered over a specific cortical site, TMS can temporarily disrupt the ongoing process in that area. This allows mapping of speech-related areas for preoperative evaluation purposes. We numerically explore the observed variability of TMS responses during a speech mapping experiment performed with a neuronavigation system. We selected four cases with very small perturbations in coil position and orientation. In one case (E) a naming error occurred, while in the other cases (NEA, B, C) the subject appointed the images as smoothly as without TMS. A realistic anisotropic head model was constructed of the subject from T1-weighted and diffusion-weighted MRI. The induced electric field distributions were computed, associated to the coil parameters retrieved from the neuronavigation system. Finally, the membrane potentials along relevant white matter fibre tracts, extracted from DTI-based tractography, were computed using a compartmental cable equation. While only minor differences could be noticed between the induced electric field distributions of the four cases, computing the corresponding membrane potentials revealed different subsets of tracts were activated. A single tract was activated for all coil positions. Another tract was only triggered for case E. NEA induced action potentials in 13 tracts, while NEB stimulated 11 tracts and NEC one. The calculated results are certainly sensitive to the coil specifications, demonstrating the observed variability in this study. However, even though a tract connecting Broca’s with Wernicke’s area is only triggered for the error case, further research is needed on other study cases and on refining the neural model with synapses and network connections. Case- and subject-specific modelling that includes both electromagnetic fields and neuronal activity enables demonstration of the variability in TMS experiments and can capture the interaction with complex neural networks.

  12. Multimodal navigated skull base tumor resection using image-based vascular and cranial nerve segmentation: A prospective pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Dolati, Parviz; Gokoglu, Abdulkerim; Eichberg, Daniel; Zamani, Amir; Golby, Alexandra; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-01-01

    Background: Skull base tumors frequently encase or invade adjacent normal neurovascular structures. For this reason, optimal tumor resection with incomplete knowledge of patient anatomy remains a challenge. Methods: To determine the accuracy and utility of image-based preoperative segmentation in skull base tumor resections, we performed a prospective study. Ten patients with skull base tumors underwent preoperative 3T magnetic resonance imaging, which included thin section three-dimensional (3D) space T2, 3D time of flight, and magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo sequences. Imaging sequences were loaded in the neuronavigation system for segmentation and preoperative planning. Five different neurovascular landmarks were identified in each case and measured for accuracy using the neuronavigation system. Each segmented neurovascular element was validated by manual placement of the navigation probe, and errors of localization were measured. Results: Strong correspondence between image-based segmentation and microscopic view was found at the surface of the tumor and tumor-normal brain interfaces in all cases. The accuracy of the measurements was 0.45 ± 0.21 mm (mean ± standard deviation). This information reassured the surgeon and prevented vascular injury intraoperatively. Preoperative segmentation of the related cranial nerves was possible in 80% of cases and helped the surgeon localize involved cranial nerves in all cases. Conclusion: Image-based preoperative vascular and neural element segmentation with 3D reconstruction is highly informative preoperatively and could increase the vigilance of neurosurgeons for preventing neurovascular injury during skull base surgeries. Additionally, the accuracy found in this study is superior to previously reported measurements. This novel preliminary study is encouraging for future validation with larger numbers of patients. PMID:26674155

  13. Surgical leg rotation: cortical neuroplasticity assessed through brain mapping using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tesio, Luigi; Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Rota, Viviana; Manfrini, Marco; Perucca, Laura; Caronni, Antonio

    2014-12-01

    Rotationplasty (Borggreve-Van Nes operation) is a rare limb salvage procedure, most often applied to children presenting with sarcoma of the distal femur. In type A1 operation, the distal thigh is removed and the proximal tibia is axially rotated by 180°, remodeled, grafted onto the femoral stump, and then prosthetized. The neurovascular bundle is spared. The rotated ankle then works as a knee. The foot plantar and dorsal flexors act as knee extensors and flexors, respectively. Functional results may be excellent. Cortical neuroplasticity was studied in three men (30-31 years) who were operated on the left lower limb at ages between 7 and 11 years and were fully autonomous with a custom-made prosthesis, as well as in three age-sex matched controls. The scalp stimulation coordinates, matching the patients' brain MRI spots, were digitized through a 'neuronavigation' optoelectronic system, in order to guide the transcranial magnetic stimulation coil, thus ensuring spatial precision during the procedure. Through transcranial magnetic stimulation driven by neuronavigation, the cortical representations of the contralateral soleus and vastus medialis muscles were studied in terms of amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and centering and width of the cortical areas from which the potentials could be evoked. Map centering on either hemisphere did not differ substantially across muscles and participants. In the operated patients, MEP amplitudes, the area from which MEPs could be evoked, and their product (volume) were larger for the muscles of the unaffected side compared with both the rotated soleus muscle (average effect size 0.75) and the muscles of healthy controls (average effect size 0.89). In controls, right-left differences showed an effect size of 0.38. In no case did the comparisons reach statistical significance (P>0.25). Nevertheless, the results seem consistent with cortical plasticity reflecting strengthening of the unaffected leg and a combination of

  14. Augmented reality in neurosurgery: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Meola, Antonio; Cutolo, Fabrizio; Carbone, Marina; Cagnazzo, Federico; Ferrari, Mauro; Ferrari, Vincenzo

    2016-05-07

    Neuronavigation has become an essential neurosurgical tool in pursuing minimal invasiveness and maximal safety, even though it has several technical limitations. Augmented reality (AR) neuronavigation is a significant advance, providing a real-time updated 3D virtual model of anatomical details, overlaid on the real surgical field. Currently, only a few AR systems have been tested in a clinical setting. The aim is to review such devices. We performed a PubMed search of reports restricted to human studies of in vivo applications of AR in any neurosurgical procedure using the search terms "Augmented reality" and "Neurosurgery." Eligibility assessment was performed independently by two reviewers in an unblinded standardized manner. The systems were qualitatively evaluated on the basis of the following: neurosurgical subspecialty of application, pathology of treated lesions and lesion locations, real data source, virtual data source, tracking modality, registration technique, visualization processing, display type, and perception location. Eighteen studies were included during the period 1996 to September 30, 2015. The AR systems were grouped by the real data source: microscope (8), hand- or head-held cameras (4), direct patient view (2), endoscope (1), and X-ray fluoroscopy (1) head-mounted display (1). A total of 195 lesions were treated: 75 (38.46 %) were neoplastic, 77 (39.48 %) neurovascular, and 1 (0.51 %) hydrocephalus, and 42 (21.53 %) were undetermined. Current literature confirms that AR is a reliable and versatile tool when performing minimally invasive approaches in a wide range of neurosurgical diseases, although prospective randomized studies are not yet available and technical improvements are needed.

  15. Subcortical mapping of calculation processing in the right parietal lobe.

    PubMed

    Della Puppa, Alessandro; De Pellegrin, Serena; Lazzarini, Anna; Gioffrè, Giorgio; Rustemi, Oriela; Cagnin, Annachiara; Scienza, Renato; Semenza, Carlo

    2015-05-01

    Preservation of calculation processing in brain surgery is crucial for patients' quality of life. Over the last decade, surgical electrostimulation was used to identify and preserve the cortical areas involved in such processing. Conversely, subcortical connectivity among different areas implicated in this function remains unclear, and the role of surgery in this domain has not been explored so far. The authors present the first 2 cases in which the subcortical functional sites involved in calculation were identified during right parietal lobe surgery. Two patients affected by a glioma located in the right parietal lobe underwent surgery with the aid of MRI neuronavigation. No calculation deficits were detected during preoperative assessment. Cortical and subcortical mapping were performed using a bipolar stimulator. The current intensity was determined by progressively increasing the amplitude by 0.5-mA increments (from a baseline of 1 mA) until a sensorimotor response was elicited. Then, addition and multiplication calculation tasks were administered. Corticectomy was performed according to both the MRI neuronavigation data and the functional findings obtained through cortical mapping. Direct subcortical electrostimulation was repeatedly performed during tumor resection. Subcortical functional sites for multiplication and addition were detected in both patients. Electrostimulation interfered with calculation processing during cortical mapping as well. Functional sites were spared during tumor removal. The postoperative course was uneventful, and calculation processing was preserved. Postoperative MRI showed complete resection of the tumor. The present preliminary study shows for the first time how functional mapping can be a promising method to intraoperatively identify the subcortical functional sites involved in calculation processing. This report therefore supports direct electrical stimulation as a promising tool to improve the current knowledge on

  16. P15.12SURVIVAL AND QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER SURGERY FOR BENIGN INTRACRANIAL TUMOURS: AGE MATTERS?

    PubMed Central

    Nocchi, N.; Iacoangeli, M.; Dobran, M.; Di Rienzo, A.; di Somma, L.; Alvaro, L.; Nasi, D.; Benigni, R.; Sessa, F.; Scerrati, M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Intracranial benign tumours are an increasingly common condition in the elderly population (>70 years) thanks to the prolonged life expectancy and the improvement of neuroradiological studies. Surgical resection in these patients, even if indicated, could be controversial due to patient's ageing physiology and eventual comorbidities, so it is difficult for surgeons to compare the advantages of a surgical removal against radiosurgery or a “wait and see” behaviour. We report our experience in dealing with patients (>70 years) surgically treated for benign intracranial neoplastic lesions (deep-seated and/or located in eloquent areas). We report how surgery in the elderly could be effective as in younger patients with no higher incidence of complications and reduction of the quality of life and/or survival. METHODS: From January 2010 to January 2014, 42 patients (12 male and 30 female with a mean age of 75 years) were submitted to a benign intracranial tumours surgical removal. The oldest patient was 86 years old. Neurological and physical conditions were assessed preoperatively and neuroradiological examination (MRI or, if it is contraindicated, a CT scan) revealed size and location of the lesions. Intraoperatively we used neuronavigation and neurophysiological monitoring. Outcome data included mortality, recurrence, complications and length of hospital stay (LoS). RESULTS: The patients' pathologies were: meningiomas in 32 patients, followed by 7 pituitary adenomas and 3 acoustic neuromas. In 35 pts a gross total removal was obtained whereas a sub total removal and partial removal were achieved in 5 and 2 pts respectively. Patients had a mean length of hospital stay of 9,7 days. Postoperative complications were observed in 6 patients, represented by CSF leaks (4 pts) and intracerebral haemorrhage (2 pts). There were better postoperative results in patients with few comorbidities and tumours of small dimensions and accessible location. The mortality

  17. Quantitative analysis of surgical exposure and surgical freedom to the anterosuperior pons: comparison of pterional transtentorial, orbitozygomatic, and anterior petrosal approaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Shun; Scerrati, Alba; Zhang, Jun; Ammirati, Mario

    2016-10-01

    Surgical approaches to the pons lump together different areas of the pons, such as the anterosuperior and the anteroinferior pons. These areas are topographically different, and different approaches may be best suited for one or the other area. We evaluated the exposure of the anterosuperior pons using different surgical approaches. We quantify the surgical exposure and surgical freedom to the anterosuperior pons afforded by the pterional transtentorial (PT), the orbitozygomatic with anterior clinoidectomy (OZ), and the anterior petrosal (AP) approaches. Five embalmed cadaver heads were used. The three approaches were executed on each side, for a total of 30 approaches. The area of maximal exposure of the anterosuperior pons was measured with the aid of neuronavigation. We also evaluated the feasible angles of approach in the vertical and horizontal planes. We were able to successfully expose the anterosuperior pons using all the selected approaches. In the PT and OZ approaches, mobilization of the sphenoparietal sinus can prevent over-retraction of the temporal bridging veins, while use of the endoscope can help in preserving the integrity of the fourth nerve while cutting the tentorium. The mean exposure area was largest for the AP and smallest for the PT; the surgical freedom was similar among all the approaches. However, there was no statistically significant difference among all the approaches in the exposure area or in the surgical freedom. There is no significant difference among the three evaluated approaches in exposure of the anterosuperior pons.

  18. Path to the Interpeduncular Fossa: Anatomical Comparison of Endoscopic-Assisted versus Standard Subtemporal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lamki, Tariq; Salma, Asem; Baidya, Nishanta; Ammirati, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess the assumed advantage of endoscopic assistance to the standard subtemporal approach. The idea was to measure qualitatively and quantitatively visibility versus operability. Design We performed eight subtemporal dissections on four cadaver heads. Our dissections integrated an operating microscope, endoscope, and neuronavigation. Comparison was made between visibility and operability afforded by the microscope alone or by the microscope–endoscope combination. Visibility was recorded as complete or incomplete and was quantified for key structures using linear measurements taken by the navigation system. Operability was determined by whichever maneuvers could be safely and comfortably accomplished in the space afforded. Results From our survey, the structures whose visibility most benefitted from the addition of the endoscope include: contralateral third nerve, posterior perforated substance, mammillary bodies, and contralateral superior cerebellar artery. With regard to quantitative evaluation, we found increased visibility of both basilar artery and posterior cerebral artery. With regard to the operability, no objective advantage was afforded by the addition of the endoscope. Subjectively, the maneuvers were easier to perform while using the endoscope. Conclusion Using the endoscope as an assistance tool during conducting classical subtemporal approach can help in overcome a lot of the classical subtemporal approach limitations. PMID:23905002

  19. Brain involvement by leprosy presenting as a frontal cystic lesion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Hwa; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Yun, Sook Jung; Won, Young Ho; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Min-Cheol; Jung, Shin

    2014-07-01

    Leprosy has a predilection for peripheral nerves and is not considered to involve the CNS. The idea that the CNS is exempt from Mycobacterium leprae bacilli has been suspected from a clinical perspective or CSF study in leprosy patients. However, there has been no direct evidence for CNS involvement by leprosy in a living patient. To the best of the authors' knowledge, the present case is the first report providing histopathological and molecular evidence for CNS involvement by leprosy in a living patient. Brain MRI revealed a 2-cm cystic lesion in the right frontal lobe of the patient. The medical history revealed that the patient had been receiving multidrug therapy for borderline lepromatous leprosy. Neuronavigation-guided craniotomy and lesion removal were performed due to a presumptive diagnosis of low-grade glioma. The brain specimen demonstrated variably thickened blood vessels and densely scattered foamy macrophages in the perivascular spaces and parenchymal stroma. Fite acid-fast stain displayed red granular inclusions that were suggestive for fragmented M. leprae. M. leprae-specific nested polymerase chain reaction amplification showed positive bands, and DNA sequencing also demonstrated homology with the M. leprae genome. This case supports the notion that M. leprae can involve the cerebral cortex regardless of cranial nerve engagement.

  20. Computers and neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Shaikhouni, Ammar; Elder, J Bradley

    2012-11-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, the only computational device used in neurosurgical procedures was the brain of the surgeon. Today, most neurosurgical procedures rely at least in part on the use of a computer to help perform surgeries accurately and safely. The techniques that revolutionized neurosurgery were mostly developed after the 1950s. Just before that era, the transistor was invented in the late 1940s, and the integrated circuit was invented in the late 1950s. During this time, the first automated, programmable computational machines were introduced. The rapid progress in the field of neurosurgery not only occurred hand in hand with the development of modern computers, but one also can state that modern neurosurgery would not exist without computers. The focus of this article is the impact modern computers have had on the practice of neurosurgery. Neuroimaging, neuronavigation, and neuromodulation are examples of tools in the armamentarium of the modern neurosurgeon that owe each step in their evolution to progress made in computer technology. Advances in computer technology central to innovations in these fields are highlighted, with particular attention to neuroimaging. Developments over the last 10 years in areas of sensors and robotics that promise to transform the practice of neurosurgery further are discussed. Potential impacts of advances in computers related to neurosurgery in developing countries and underserved regions are also discussed. As this article illustrates, the computer, with its underlying and related technologies, is central to advances in neurosurgery over the last half century.

  1. [Presurgical functional magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Stippich, C

    2010-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an important and novel neuroimaging modality for patients with brain tumors. By non-invasive measurement, localization and lateralization of brain activiation, most importantly of motor and speech function, fMRI facilitates the selection of the most appropriate and sparing treatment and function-preserving surgery. Prerequisites for the diagnostic use of fMRI are the application of dedicated clinical imaging protocols and standardization of the respective imaging procedures. The combination with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) also enables tracking and visualization of important fiber bundles such as the pyramidal tract and the arcuate fascicle. These multimodal MR data can be implemented in computer systems for functional neuronavigation or radiation treatment. The practicability, accuracy and reliability of presurgical fMRI have been validated by large numbers of published data. However, fMRI cannot be considered as a fully established modality of diagnostic neuroimaging due to the lack of guidelines of the responsible medical associations as well as the lack of medical certification of important hardware and software components. This article reviews the current research in the field and provides practical information relevant for presurgical fMRI.

  2. Preoperative or preembolization lesion targeting using rotational angiographic fiducial marking in the neuroendovascular suite.

    PubMed

    Lim, Siok Ping; Lesiuk, Howard; Sinclair, John; Lum, Cheemun

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional rotational digital subtraction (DS) angiography and DynaCT allow precise localization of intracranial arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) with fiducial markers that have helped in surgical planning. These techniques are particularly useful when the AVF is not evident on cross-sectional imaging. The authors demonstrate the utility of 3D DS angiography and DynaCT in the localization of intracranial AVFs in 3 cases. Their first case was a dural AVF with multiple arterial feeders from the left occipital artery that drained into the left transverse sinus. Blood flow to the left transverse sinus was first decreased by embolizing the branch arterial feeders with polyvinyl alcohol particles. Thereafter, 3D DS angiography enabled precise localization of the site for the bur hole creation with a fiducial to allow access for the transverse sinus in the second part of the procedure where definitive transvenous sinus embolization of the dural AVF with coils was performed. They also used 3D DS angiography and DynaCT with fiducials for precise localization of a superficial pial AVF (Case 2) and a tentorial AVF (Case 3) not visible on cross-sectional angiography. With the precise localization of the target lesion, the neurosurgeons were able to perform relatively small craniotomies, minimizing the cranial opening yet allowing the opening for full access to the lesion. By correlating 3D DS angiography/DynaCT with CT images, the neurosurgeon could use neuronavigation in cases of AVF not appreciated on cross-sectional imaging.

  3. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation

    PubMed Central

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favors the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi (ADM), flexor carpi radialis (FCR), and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) as surround muscles during rest and tonic activation of FDI in fourteen subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under MRI-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90% to 120% of adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of FDI, CBI was significantly reduced only for FDI but not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned MEP sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI tonic activation compared to rest, despite background EMG activity increasing only for the FDI. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle. PMID:26900871

  4. Computerized lateral endoscopic approach to invertebral bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Hamid R.; Hariri, Sanaz; Kim, Daniel; Shahidi, Ramin; Steinberg, Gary

    2001-05-01

    Spinal surgery is often necessary to ease back pain symptoms. Neuronavigation (NN) allows the surgeon to localize the position of his instruments in 3D using pre- operative CT scans registered to intra-operative marker positions in cranial surgeries. However, this tool is unavailable in spinal surgeries for a variety of reasons. For example, because of the spine's many degrees of freedom and flexibility, the geometric relationship of the skin to the internal spinal anatomy is not fixed. Guided by the currently available imperfect 2D images, it is difficult for the surgeon to correct a patient's spinal anomaly; thus surgical relief of back pain is often only temporary. The Image Guidance Laborator's (IGL) goal is to combine the direct optical control of traditional endoscopy with the 3D orientation of NN. This powerful tool requires registration of the patient's anatomy to the surgical navigation system using internal landmarks rather than skin markers. Pre- operative CT scans matched with intraoperative fluoroscopic images can overcome the problem of spinal movement in NN registration. The combination of endoscopy with fluoroscopic registration of vertebral bodies in a NN system provides a 3D intra-operative navigational system for spinal neurosurgery to visualize the internal surgical environment from any orientation in real time. The accuracy of this system integration is being evaluated by assessing the success of nucleotomies and marker implantations guided by NN-registered endoscopy.

  5. Attenuation of N2 amplitude of laser-evoked potentials by theta burst stimulation of primary somatosensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Antal, Andrea; Boros, Klára; Brepohl, Nadine; Csifcsák, Gábor; Paulus, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Theta burst stimulation (TBS) is a special repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) paradigm, where bursts of low-intensity stimuli are applied in the theta frequency. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of neuronavigated TBS over primary somatosensory cortex (SI) on laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) and acute pain perception induced with Tm : YAG laser stimulation. The amplitude changes of the N1, N2, and P2 components of LEPs and related subjective pain rating scores of 12 healthy subjects were analyzed prior to and following continuous TBS (cTBS), intermittent TBS (iTBS), intermediate TBS (imTBS), and sham stimulation. Our results demonstrate that all active TBS paradigms significantly diminished the amplitude of the N2 component, when the hand contralateral to the site of TBS was laser-stimulated. Sham stimulation condition had no significant effect. The subjective pain perception also decreased during the experimental sessions, but did not differ significantly from the sham stimulation condition. The main finding of our study is that TBS over SI diminished the amplitude of the N2 component evoked from the contralateral side without any significant analgesic effects. Furthermore, imTBS produced responses similar to those observed by other forms of TBS induced excitability changes in the SI. PMID:18043910

  6. Behavioural and neurofunctional impact of transcranial direct current stimulation on somatosensory learning.

    PubMed

    Hilgenstock, Raphael; Weiss, Thomas; Huonker, Ralph; Witte, Otto W

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the effect of repeated delivery of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on somatosensory performance and long-term learning. Over the course of five days, tDCS was applied to the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) by means of neuronavigation employing magnetencephalography (MEG). Compared to its sham application, tDCS promoted tactile learning by reducing the two-point discrimination threshold assessed by the grating orientation task (GOT) primarily by affecting intersessional changes in performance. These results were accompanied by alterations in the neurofunctional organization of the brain, as revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging conducted prior to the study, at the fifth day of tDCS delivery and four weeks after the last application of tDCS. A decrease in activation at the primary site of anodal tDCS delivery in the left S1 along retention of superior tactile acuity was observed at follow-up four weeks after the application of tDCS. Thus, we demonstrate long-term effects that repeated tDCS imposes on somatosensory functioning. This is the first study to provide insight into the mode of operation of tDCS on the brain's response to long-term perceptual learning, adding an important piece of evidence from the domain of non-invasive brain stimulation to show that functional changes detectable by fMRI in primary sensory cortices participate in perceptual learning.

  7. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on mood in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Moulier, Virginie; Gaudeau-Bosma, Christian; Isaac, Clémence; Allard, Anne-Camille; Bouaziz, Noomane; Sidhoumi, Djedia; Braha-Zeitoun, Sonia; Benadhira, René; Thomas, Fanny; Januel, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background High frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has shown significant efficiency in the treatment of resistant depression. However in healthy subjects, the effects of rTMS remain unclear. Objective Our aim was to determine the impact of 10 sessions of rTMS applied to the DLPFC on mood and emotion recognition in healthy subjects. Design In a randomised double-blind study, 20 subjects received 10 daily sessions of active (10 Hz frequency) or sham rTMS. The TMS coil was positioned on the left DLPFC through neuronavigation. Several dimensions of mood and emotion processing were assessed at baseline and after rTMS with clinical scales, visual analogue scales (VASs), and the Ekman 60 faces test. Results The 10 rTMS sessions targeting the DLPFC were well tolerated. No significant difference was found between the active group and the control group for clinical scales and the Ekman 60 faces test. Compared to the control group, the active rTMS group presented a significant improvement in their adaptation to daily life, which was assessed through VAS. Conclusion This study did not show any deleterious effect on mood and emotion recognition of 10 sessions of rTMS applied on the DLPFC in healthy subjects. This study also suggested a positive effect of rTMS on quality of life. PMID:26993786

  8. Design optimization of the sensor spatial arrangement in a direct magnetic field-based localization system for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Marechal, Luc; Shaohui Foong; Zhenglong Sun; Wood, Kristin L

    2015-08-01

    Motivated by the need for developing a neuronavigation system to improve efficacy of intracranial surgical procedures, a localization system using passive magnetic fields for real-time monitoring of the insertion process of an external ventricular drain (EVD) catheter is conceived and developed. This system operates on the principle of measuring the static magnetic field of a magnetic marker using an array of magnetic sensors. An artificial neural network (ANN) is directly used for solving the inverse problem of magnetic dipole localization for improved efficiency and precision. As the accuracy of localization system is highly dependent on the sensor spatial location, an optimization framework, based on understanding and classification of experimental sensor characteristics as well as prior knowledge of the general trajectory of the localization pathway, for design of such sensing assemblies is described and investigated in this paper. Both optimized and non-optimized sensor configurations were experimentally evaluated and results show superior performance from the optimized configuration. While the approach presented here utilizes ventriculostomy as an illustrative platform, it can be extended to other medical applications that require localization inside the body.

  9. [Interdisciplinary neuro-oncology: part 2: systemic therapy of primary brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, G; Hattingen, E; Schlegel, J; Stummer, W; Schlegel, U

    2014-08-01

    By combining the expertise of clinical neuroscience, the aim of neuro-oncology is to optimize diagnostic planning and therapy of primary brain tumors in an interdisciplinary setting together with radio-oncology and medical oncology. High-end imaging frequently allows brain tumors to be diagnosed preoperatively with respect to tumor entity and even tumor malignancy grade. Moreover, neuroimaging is indispensable for guidance of biopsy resection and monitoring of therapy. Surgical resection of intracranial lesions with preservation of neurological function has become dramatically more extensive. Tools to achieve this goal are, for example neuronavigation, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), tractography, intraoperative cortical stimulation and precise intraoperative definition of tumor margins by virtue of various techniques. In addition to classical histopathological diagnosis and tumor classification, modern neuropathology is supplemented by molecular characterization of brain tumors in order to provide clinicians with prognostic and predictive (of therapy) markers, such as codeletion of chromosomes 1p and 19q in anaplastic gliomas and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation in glioblastomas. Although this is not yet individualized tumor therapy, the increasingly more detailed analysis of the molecular pathogenesis of an individual glioma will eventually lead to specific pharmacological blockade of disturbed intracellular pathways in individual patients. This article gives an overview of the state of the art of interdisciplinary neuro-oncology whereby part 1 deals with the diagnostics and surgical therapy of primary brain tumors and part 2 describes the medical therapy of primary brain tumors.

  10. [Interdisciplinary neuro-oncology: part 1: diagnostics and operative therapy of primary brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Tabatabai, G; Hattingen, E; Schlegel, J; Stummer, W; Schlegel, U

    2014-08-01

    By combining the expertise of clinical neuroscience, the aim of neuro-oncology is to optimize diagnostic planning and therapy of primary brain tumors in an interdisciplinary setting together with radio-oncology and medical oncology. High-end imaging frequently allows brain tumors to be diagnosed preoperatively with respect to tumor entity and even tumor malignancy grade. Moreover, neuroimaging is indispensable for guidance of biopsy resection and monitoring of therapy. Surgical resection of intracranial lesions with preservation of neurological function is increasingly feasible. Tools to achieve this goal are, for example neuronavigation, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), tractography, intraoperative cortical stimulation and precise intraoperative definition of tumor margins by virtue of various techniques. In addition to classical histopathological diagnosis and tumor classification, modern neuropathology is supplemented by molecular characterization of brain tumors in order to provide clinicians with prognostic and predictive (of therapy) markers, such as codeletion of chromosomes 1p and 19q in anaplastic gliomas and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation in glioblastomas. Although this is not yet individualized tumor therapy, the increasingly more detailed analysis of the molecular pathogenesis of an individual glioma will eventually lead to specific pharmacological blockade of disturbed intracellular pathways in individual patients. This article gives an overview of the state of the art of interdisciplinary neuro-oncology whereby part 1 deals with the diagnostics and surgical therapy of primary brain tumors and part 2 describes the medical therapy of primary brain tumors.

  11. Transcranial Clot Lysis Using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Thilo; Zadicario, Eyal; Fisher, David J.; Bradley, William G.

    2010-03-01

    Stroke is the third common cause of death worldwide. The majority of strokes are caused by sudden vessel occlusion, due to a blood clot. Vessel recanalization is the primary goal of all acute stroke treatment strategies. Initial data using ultrasound in combination with a therapeutic agent for clot lysis in stroke are promising. However, sound absorption and defocusing of the ultrasound beam occur during transskull insonation, limiting the efficiency of this approach to high extent. Using a transskull High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) head system we were able to lyse blood clots within seconds and in absence of further lytic agents. We could show that any correction for the distortion might be negligible to focus the ultrasound beam after transskull insonation. The use of transskull HIFU for immediate clot lysis in the human brain without the need of further drugs and disregarding individual skull bone characteristics could become a successful strategy in early stroke treatment. Using magnetic resonance tomography for neuronavigation MRI Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound has the potential to open new avenues for therapeutic applications in the brain including Stroke, Intracranial Hemorrhages, Braintumors, Neurodegenerative Diseases, Thalamic Pain, BBB opening, and local drug delivery. First results in transcranial clot lysis will be presented in this paper.

  12. Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma: A Critical Review of the Role of Surgery for Resection

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jonathan; Iwamoto, Fabio M.; Sonabend, Adam M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL) are rare CNS tumors that carry a poor prognosis, with most patients suffering recurrence. Progress has been made in the treatment of this pathology, notably with the widespread use of systemic high dose methotrexate. However, unlike most other malignant CNS neoplasms, surgery for cytoreduction is not routinely performed for this disease, mainly as a result of negative experiences decades ago. Since these studies were published, the availability of intraoperative monitoring, MR imaging and neuro-navigation as well as surgical adjuncts such as fluorescence- guided resection have greatly improved the safety of intracranial procedures. More recent data is suggestive of a potential survival benefit for resection of single PCNSL lesions when patients are subsequently treated with modern regimen high-dose methotrexate, yet this evidence is limited, and should be interpreted conservatively. Methods and findings A systematic review of the literature was performed to identify trials evaluating surgical options for the treatment of PCNSL. Conclusion In this review, we provide a critical overview of the evidence favoring and discouraging resection for PCNSL. This literature suffers from several biases and limitations that must be considered in the context of the extrapolation of this literature into clinical decision-making. PMID:28239600

  13. Differentiation of motor cortical representation of hand muscles by navigated mapping of optimal TMS current directions in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Shahid; Perez, Jennifer; Horvath, Jared Cooney; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    The precision of navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to map the human primary motor cortex may be effected the direction of TMS-induced current in the brain as determined by the orientation of the stimulation coil. In this study, we investigated the effect of current directionality on motor output mapping using navigated brain stimulation (NBS). Our goal was to determine the optimal coil orientation (and, thus, induced brain current) to activate hand musculature representations relative to each subject’s unique neuroanatomical landmarks. We studied motor output maps for the first dorsal interosseous (FDI), abductor pollicis brevis (APB), and abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles in 10 normal volunteers. Monopolar current pulses were delivered through a figure-of-eight shaped TMS coil and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded using electromyography (EMG). At each targeted brain region, we systematically rotated the TMS coil to determine the direction of induced current in the brain for induction of the largest MEPs. These optimal current directions were expressed as an angle relative to each subject’s central sulcus. Consistency of the optimal current direction was assessed by repeating the entire mapping procedure on two different occasions across subjects. We demonstrate that systematic optimization of current direction as guided by MRI based neuronavigation improves the resolution of cortical output motor mapping with TMS. PMID:23912579

  14. Motor cortex stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    De Rose, Marisa; Guzzi, Giusy; Bosco, Domenico; Romano, Mary; Lavano, Serena Marianna; Plastino, Massimiliano; Volpentesta, Giorgio; Marotta, Rosa; Lavano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS) is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment was performed by total UPDRS, UPDRS III total, UPDRS III-items 27-31, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS II before implantation in off-medication and on-medication states and after surgery at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months in on-medication/on-stimulation and off-medication/on-stimulation states. We assessed changes of quality of life, throughout the Parkinson's disease quality of life scale (PDQoL-39), and the dose of anti-Parkinson's disease medications, throughout the Ldopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). During off-medication state, we observed moderate and transitory reduction of total UPDRS and UPDRS total scores and significant and long-lasting improvement in UPDRS III items 27-31 score for axial symptoms. There was marked reduction of UPDRS IV score and LEDD. PDQL-39 improvement was also significant. No important complications and adverse events occurred.

  15. Neuroimaging evaluation in refractory epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Granados, Ana M; Orejuela, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the application of neuroimaging analysis, compared to neuropsychological tests and video-electroencephalogram, for the evaluation of refractory epilepsy in a reference centre in Cali, Colombia. Methods Between March 2013 and November 2014, 29 patients, 19 men and 10 women, aged 9–65 years and with refractory epilepsy, were assessed by structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing tasks related to language, verbal and non-verbal memory. Also, volumetric evaluation was performed. A 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner was used in all cases. Results Neuroimaging evaluation identified 13 patients with mesial temporal sclerosis. The remaining patients were classified as: 10 patients with neoplastic masses, two patients with cortical atrophy, two patients with scarring lesions and two patients with non-structural aetiology. Among patients with mesial temporal sclerosis, comparison between techniques for lateralising the epileptogenic foci was made; the κ index between functional magnetic resonance imaging and hippocampi volumetry was κ = 1.00, agreement between neuroimaging and video-electroencephalogram was good (κ = 0.78) and comparison with a neuropsychological test was mild (κ = 0.24). Conclusions Neuroimaging studies allow the assessment of functional and structural damage related to epileptogenic lesions and foci, and are helpful to select surgical treatment, conduct intraoperative neuronavigation techniques, predict surgical deficits and evaluate patient recovery. PMID:26427897

  16. Semi-automated Volumetric and Morphological Assessment of Glioblastoma Resection with Fluorescence-Guided Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, J. Scott; Gurbani, Saumya S.; Holder, Chad A.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Shi, Ran; Guo, Ying; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Shim, Hyunsuk; Hadjipanayis, Costas G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Glioblastoma (GBM) neurosurgical resection relies on contrast-enhanced MRI-based neuronavigation. However, it is well-known that infiltrating tumor extends beyond contrast enhancement. Fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) was evaluated to improve extent of resection (EOR) of GBMs. Pre-operative morphological tumor metrics were also assessed. Procedures Thirty patients from a Phase II trial evaluating 5-ALA FGS in newly diagnosed GBM were assessed. Tumors were segmented pre-operatively to assess morphological features as well as post-operatively to evaluate EOR and residual tumor volume (RTV). Results Median EOR and RTV were 94.3% and 0.821 cm3, respectively. Pre-operative surface area to volume ratio and RTV were significantly associated with overall survival, even when controlling for the known survival confounders. Conclusions This study supports claims that 5-ALA FGS is helpful at decreasing tumor burden and prolonging survival in GBM. Moreover, morphological indices are shown to impact both resection and patient survival. PMID:26463215

  17. Disrupting pre-SMA activity impairs facial happiness recognition: an event-related TMS study.

    PubMed

    Rochas, Vincent; Gelmini, Lauriane; Krolak-Salmon, Pierre; Poulet, Emmanuel; Saoud, Mohamed; Brunelin, Jerome; Bediou, Benoit

    2013-07-01

    It has been suggested that the left pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) could be implicated in facial emotion expression and recognition, especially for laughter/happiness. To test this hypothesis, in a single-blind, randomized crossover study, we investigated the impact of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on performances of 18 healthy participants during a facial emotion recognition task. Using a neuronavigation system based on T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of each participant, TMS (5 pulses, 10 Hz) was delivered over the pre-SMA or the vertex (control condition) in an event-related fashion after the presentation of happy, fear, and angry faces. Compared with performances during vertex stimulation, we observed that TMS applied over the left pre-SMA specifically disrupted facial happiness recognition (FHR). No difference was observed between the 2 conditions neither for fear and anger recognition nor for reaction times (RT). Thus, interfering with pre-SMA activity with event-related TMS after stimulus presentation produced a selective impairment in the recognition of happy faces. These findings provide new insights into the functional implication of the pre-SMA in FHR, which may rely on the mirror properties of pre-SMA neurons.

  18. Vertebrobasilar junction giant aneurysm: Lessons learned from a neurosurgical audit and anatomical investigation.

    PubMed

    Graziano, Francesca; Ganau, Mario; Russo, Vittorio Maria; Iacopino, Domenico G; Ulm, Arthur John

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of vascular lesions of the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) remains a challenging task in the neurosurgical practice and the gold standard therapy is still under debate. In this article, the authors report a detailed postmortem study of a VBJ giant aneurysm (GA) previously endovascularly treated. Although the decision-making process for the vast majority of neurosurgical treatment can nowadays be accurately carried out during the preoperative planning (i.e., with the aid of neuroimaging fusion protocols, neuronavigation platforms, etc.) meant to maximize the anatomical understanding of the lesions and minimize possible intraprocedural challenges, this postmortem study represents the ultimate essence of neurosurgical audit as the laboratory investigations allowed to reevaluate the clinical history of VBJ GA, and reassess the multiple strategies available for its treatment with a straightforward anatomical perspective. Specifically, the lessons learned through this clinical and laboratory work uphold a great educational value regarding the complex management of those lesions, including the possible role of combined skull base surgical approaches.

  19. Ventrolateral prefrontal cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of depersonalization disorder: A consecutive case series.

    PubMed

    Jay, Emma-Louise; Nestler, Steffen; Sierra, Mauricio; McClelland, Jessica; Kekic, Maria; David, Anthony S

    2016-06-30

    Case reports and an open trial have reported promising responses to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to prefrontal and temporo-parietal sites in patients with depersonalization disorder (DPD). We recently showed that a single session of rTMS to the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) was associated with a reduction in symptoms and increase in physiological arousal. Seven patients with medication-resistant DSM-IV DPD received up to 20 sessions of right-sided rTMS to the VLPFC for 10 weeks. Stimulation was guided using neuronavigation software based on participants' individual structural MRIs, and delivered at 110% of resting motor threshold. A session consisted of 1Hz repetitive TMS for 15min. The primary outcome measure was reduction in depersonalization symptoms on the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS). Secondary outcomes included scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). 20 sessions of rTMS treatment to right VLPFC significantly reduced scores on the CDS by on average 44% (range 2-83.5%). Two patients could be classified as "full responders", four as "partial" and one a non-responder. Response usually occurred within the first 6 sessions. There were no significant adverse events. A randomized controlled clinical trial of VLPFC rTMS for DPD is warranted.

  20. Morphological Variations in the Transverse Venous Sinus Anatomy of Dogs and its Relationship to Skull Landmarks.

    PubMed

    Carreira, L Miguel; Ferreira, A

    2016-08-01

    We characterized the anatomical morphology of the transverse venous sinus (TVS) of 69 canine adult cadavers belonging to three groups: brachycephalic (B), dolichocephalic (D) and mesaticephalic (M). In addition, we outlined its path over the skull using five classic human craniometric points (CPs): the asterion (ast), the bregma (b), the glabella (g), the stephanion (st) and the pterion (pt). The study aimed to establish anatomical differences in the TVS between groups and in the relationship between the TVS and skull. We found that TVS anatomy and its relationships to skull landmarks vary markedly between the groups, with similar anatomical arrangements in B and M. The TVS length can be ranked as M < B < D (with D being the biggest), whereas the width can be ranked as M < D < B (with B being the widest) with the right side being smaller than the left. In the B and M groups, the TVS assumes a craniocaudal trajectory that is closer to the lateral skull wall than in D, where the TVS presents a caudocranial direction. By documenting the morphological characteristics of the TVS, we can create a set of anatomical references allowing construction of a basic framework to greatly decrease the probability of TVS injury during neuronavigation procedures when supported by a good knowledge of the skull, brain anatomies and their relationships.

  1. Neural networks improve brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy in the presence of light artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Mercier, Jeanne; St-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    It is often difficult to identify cancer tissue during brain cancer (glioma) surgery. Gliomas invade into areas of normal brain, and this cancer invasion is frequently not detected using standard preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This results in enduring invasive cancer following surgery and leads to recurrence. A hand-held Raman spectroscopy is able to rapidly detect cancer invasion in patients with grade 2-4 gliomas. However, ambient light sources can produce spectral artifacts which inhibit the ability to distinguish between cancer and normal tissue using the spectral information available. To address this issue, we have demonstrated that artificial neural networks (ANN) can accurately classify invasive cancer versus normal brain tissue, even when including measurements with significant spectral artifacts from external light sources. The non-parametric and adaptive model used by ANN makes it suitable for detecting complex non-linear spectral characteristics associated with different tissues and the confounding presence of light artifacts. The use of ANN for brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy, in the presence of light artifacts, improves the robustness and clinical translation potential for intraoperative use. Integration with the neurosurgical workflow is facilitated by accounting for the effect of light artifacts which may occur, due to operating room lights, neuronavigation systems, windows, or other light sources. The ability to rapidly detect invasive brain cancer under these conditions may reduce residual cancer remaining after surgery, and thereby improve patient survival.

  2. [Operating rooms during the second half of the 20th century and its change with surgical advances].

    PubMed

    Steimle, Raoul H

    2011-01-01

    With the rise of new specialities after the World War, the number of OP rooms increases. They became gathered on the basement of buildings near the central sterilisation. To enter the OP room, everyone passes through the dressing "sas". "Slippers", uniforms, gloves and many supplies are now for single-use. Electrified operating tables with their own accessories became very useful. Air conditioning is appreciated too in our countries. The operating microscope for ORL, ophthalmology and neurosurgery is used by every one. In cardiology the coronary revascularisation being common stuff, cardiac transplantation (1967) and open-heart surgery received special attention. Vascular surgeons are dedicated to arteritiden, implants, and aortic aneurysms. Urology is focused on renal transplants (since 1959), and more recently on lithotrity and coelioscopic prostatectomy. The coeliosurgery conquered the abdominal pathology and the endoscopic techniques became current. In neurosurgery, stereotaxy to treat parkinson's disease is not used so often since Levodopa exists. But it is still useful to implant brain-stimulating electrodes for refractory parkinson's cases, some other dyskinesias, mental troubles or epilepsies. The neuronavigation brought new possibilities. At century's end, ambulatory surgery reduces surgical costs. Bigger and multidisciplinary theatres are now preferred. The open-heart surgery assisted by computer and robotics is evolving. Finally, we recall OP room accidents, which are not directly dealing with the operation.

  3. The Shape of the Foramen Ovale: A Visualization Aid for Cannulation Procedures.

    PubMed

    Zdilla, Matthew J; Fijalkowski, Kristen M

    2017-03-01

    Several neurosurgical procedures, including rhizotomy for the management of trigeminal neuralgia, cannulate the foramen ovale (FO) to access intracranial structures. Cannulation procedures, including those utilizing neuronavigational technology, are occasionally complicated by anatomical variation of the FO, sometimes resulting in miscannulation and subsequent adverse events. The FO, while commonly thought of as oval-shaped, has also been described as "almond," "banana," "D shape," "pear," and "triangular." Because of the importance of the FO in neurosurgical procedures and the misunderstanding of FO shape, the aim of this study is to objectively describe the shape of the FO and its most likely shape variation. A total of 211 FO were evaluated by geometric morphometric analysis. A consensus shape is presented for the FO. No significant difference was found between the shapes of left- and right-sided FO. The most likely shape variation of the FO occurs as an inverse relationship between the anteromedial-posterolateral and anterolateral-posteromedial aspects of the foramen. The capacity to visualize the average FO shape and understand the most likely shape variance, as illustrated by this report, will aid neurosurgeons in their approach to procedures requiring cannulation of the FO.

  4. Motor Cortex Stimulation in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    De Rose, Marisa; Guzzi, Giusy; Bosco, Domenico; Romano, Mary; Lavano, Serena Marianna; Plastino, Massimiliano; Volpentesta, Giorgio; Marotta, Rosa; Lavano, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Motor Cortex Stimulation (MCS) is less efficacious than Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's disease. However, it might be proposed to patients excluded from DBS or unresponsive to DBS. Ten patients with advanced PD underwent unilateral MCS contralaterally to the worst clinical side. A plate electrode was positioned over the motor cortex in the epidural space through single burr hole after identification of the area with neuronavigation and neurophysiological tests. Clinical assessment was performed by total UPDRS, UPDRS III total, UPDRS III-items 27–31, UPDRS IV, and UPDRS II before implantation in off-medication and on-medication states and after surgery at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months in on-medication/on-stimulation and off-medication/on-stimulation states. We assessed changes of quality of life, throughout the Parkinson's disease quality of life scale (PDQoL-39), and the dose of anti-Parkinson's disease medications, throughout the Ldopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). During off-medication state, we observed moderate and transitory reduction of total UPDRS and UPDRS total scores and significant and long-lasting improvement in UPDRS III items 27–31 score for axial symptoms. There was marked reduction of UPDRS IV score and LEDD. PDQL-39 improvement was also significant. No important complications and adverse events occurred. PMID:23213520

  5. Direct evidence from intraoperative electrocortical stimulation indicates shared and distinct speech production center between Chinese and English languages.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jinsong; Lu, Junfeng; Zhang, Han; Zhang, Jie; Yao, Chengjun; Zhuang, Dongxiao; Qiu, Tianming; Guo, Qihao; Hu, Xiaobing; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liangfu

    2015-12-01

    Chinese processing has been suggested involving distinct brain areas from English. However, current functional localization studies on Chinese speech processing use mostly "indirect" techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography, lacking direct evidence by means of electrocortical recording. In this study, awake craniotomies in 66 Chinese-speaking glioma patients provide a unique opportunity to directly map eloquent language areas. Intraoperative electrocortical stimulation was conducted and the positive sites for speech arrest, anomia, and alexia were identified separately. With help of stereotaxic neuronavigation system and computational modeling, all positive sites elicited by stimulation were integrated and a series of two- and three-dimension Chinese language probability maps were built. We performed statistical comparisons between the Chinese maps and previously derived English maps. While most Chinese speech arrest areas located at typical language production sites (i.e., 50% positive sites in ventral precentral gyrus, 28% in pars opercularis and pars triangularis), which also serve English production, an additional brain area, the left middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann's areas 6/9), was found to be unique in Chinese production (P < 0.05). Moreover, Chinese speakers' inferior ventral precentral gyrus (Brodmann's area 6) was used more than that in English speakers. Our finding suggests that Chinese involves more perisylvian region (extending to left middle frontal gyrus) than English. This is the first time that direct evidence supports cross-cultural neurolinguistics differences in human beings. The Chinese language atlas will also helpful in brain surgery planning for Chinese-speakers.

  6. Magnetotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zyss, Tomasz

    2008-11-01

    Since antiquity, the phenomenon of magnetism has been known, and it has been tried for therapeutic purposes. Through history, people have made use of both natural sources of magnetic fields (magnetic iron ore) and artificial ones (magnets, electromagnets). It was as late as the 19th century that we started to produce time-varying magnetic fields, making numerous observations about its impact on humans, the nervous system included. A majority of these observations were cognitive in nature. There are, however, studies aimed at assessing the therapeutic results of the influence of magnetic fields, particularly of low frequencies. In terms of magnetotherapy with the use of a low-induction magnetic field, there are serious doubts concerning its effectiveness in general, including therapy for mental disorders. The year 1985 witnessed the introduction of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) into medical practice as a diagnostic tool in neurology as well as in basic neurophysiologic and neuropsychological investigations. The 1990s began the epoch of investigations into possible applications of TMS in therapy of mental disorders, particularly depression. This work presents critical remarks and limitations of TMS, such as findings that its effectiveness is not particularly high. The traditional fixed stimulation of a definite area of the patient's head may lead to irritation of structures that, in a specific patient, may not be responsible for the symptoms of depression. The effectiveness could be improved only with the use of neuronavigation and prestimulation via functional neuroimaging diagnostics of the brain, which, however, would make TMS expensive and less practical.

  7. Attenuation of N2 amplitude of laser-evoked potentials by theta burst stimulation of primary somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Poreisz, Csaba; Antal, Andrea; Boros, Klára; Brepohl, Nadine; Csifcsák, Gábor; Paulus, Walter

    2008-03-01

    Theta burst stimulation (TBS) is a special repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) paradigm, where bursts of low-intensity stimuli are applied in the theta frequency. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of neuronavigated TBS over primary somatosensory cortex (SI) on laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) and acute pain perception induced with Tm : YAG laser stimulation. The amplitude changes of the N1, N2, and P2 components of LEPs and related subjective pain rating scores of 12 healthy subjects were analyzed prior to and following continuous TBS (cTBS), intermittent TBS (iTBS), intermediate TBS (imTBS), and sham stimulation. Our results demonstrate that all active TBS paradigms significantly diminished the amplitude of the N2 component, when the hand contralateral to the site of TBS was laser-stimulated. Sham stimulation condition had no significant effect. The subjective pain perception also decreased during the experimental sessions, but did not differ significantly from the sham stimulation condition. The main finding of our study is that TBS over SI diminished the amplitude of the N2 component evoked from the contralateral side without any significant analgesic effects. Furthermore, imTBS produced responses similar to those observed by other forms of TBS induced excitability changes in the SI.

  8. Interactive navigation-guided ophthalmic plastic surgery: navigation enabling of telescopes and their use in endoscopic lacrimal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Mohammad Javed; Singh, Swati; Naik, Milind N; Kaliki, Swathi; Dave, Tarjani Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aims of this study were to report the preliminary experience of using telescopes, which were enabled for navigation guidance, and their utility in complex endoscopic lacrimal surgeries. Methods Navigation enabling of the telescope was achieved by using the AxiEM™ malleable neuronavigation shunt stylet. Image-guided dacryolocalization was performed in five patients using the intraoperative image-guided StealthStation™ system in the electromagnetic mode. The “look ahead” protocol software was used to assist the surgeon in assessing the intraoperative geometric location of the endoscope and what lies ahead in real time. All patients underwent navigation-guided powered endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy. The utility of uninterrupted navigation guidance throughout the surgery with the endoscope as the navigating tool was noted. Results Intraoperative geometric localization of the lacrimal sac and the nasolacrimal duct could be easily deciphered. Constant orientation of the lacrimal drainage system and the peri-lacrimal anatomy was possible without the need for repeated point localizations throughout the surgery. The “look ahead” features could accurately alert the surgeon of anatomical structures that exists at 5, 10 and 15 mm in front of the endoscope. Good securing of the shunt stylet with the telescope was found to be essential for constant and accurate navigation. Conclusion Navigation-enabled endoscopes provide the surgeon with the advantage of sustained stereotactic anatomical awareness at all times during the surgery. PMID:27920491

  9. Speaking of which: dissecting the neurocognitive network of language production in picture naming.

    PubMed

    Schuhmann, Teresa; Schiller, Niels O; Goebel, Rainer; Sack, Alexander Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The noninvasive methods of cognitive neuroscience offer new possibilities to study language. We used neuronavigated multisite transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to determine the functional relevance of 1) the posterior part of left superior temporal gyrus (Wernicke's area), 2) a midportion of Broca's area (slightly posterior/superior to apex of vertical ascending ramus), and 3) the midsection of the left middle temporal gyrus (MTG), during overt picture naming. Our chronometric TMS design enabled us to chart the time points at which neural activity in each of these regions functionally contributes to overt speech production. Our findings demonstrate that the midsection of left MTG becomes functionally relevant at 225 ms after picture onset, followed by Broca's area at 300 ms and Wernicke's area at 400 ms. Interestingly, during this late time window, the left MTG shows a second peak of functional relevance. Each area thus contributed during the speech production process at different stages, suggesting distinct underlying functional roles within this complex multicomponential skill. These findings are discussed and framed in the context of psycholinguistic models of speech production according to which successful speaking relies on intact, spatiotemporally specific feed forward and recurrent feedback loops within a left-hemispheric fronto-temporal brain connectivity network.

  10. Localization of neurosurgically implanted electrodes via photograph-MRI-radiograph coregistration.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Sarang S; Edwards, Erik; Kirsch, Heidi E; Barbaro, Nicholas M; Knight, Robert T; Nagarajan, Srikantan S

    2008-09-15

    Intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG) is clinically indicated for medically refractory epilepsy and is a promising approach for developing neural prosthetics. These recordings also provide valuable data for cognitive neuroscience research. Accurate localization of iEEG electrodes is essential for evaluating specific brain regions underlying the electrodes that indicate normal or pathological activity, as well as for relating research findings to neuroimaging and lesion studies. However, electrodes are frequently tucked underneath the edge of a craniotomy, inserted via a burr hole, or placed deep within the brain, where their locations cannot be verified visually or with neuronavigational systems. We show that one existing method, registration of postimplant computed tomography (CT) with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), can result in errors exceeding 1cm. We present a novel method for localizing iEEG electrodes using routinely acquired surgical photographs, X-ray radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging scans. Known control points are used to compute projective transforms that link the different image sets, ultimately allowing hidden electrodes to be localized, in addition to refining the location of manually registered visible electrodes. As the technique does not require any calibration between the different image modalities, it can be applied to existing image databases. The final result is a set of electrode positions on the patient's rendered MRI yielding locations relative to sulcal and gyral landmarks on individual anatomy, as well as MNI coordinates. We demonstrate the results of our method in eight epilepsy patients implanted with electrode grids spanning the left hemisphere.

  11. A systematic pipeline for the objective comparison of whole-brain spectroscopic MRI with histology in biopsy specimens from grade III glioma

    PubMed Central

    Cordova, J. Scott; Gurbani, Saumya S.; Olson, Jeffrey J.; Liang, Zhongxing; Cooper, Lee A. D.; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Schreibmann, Eduard; Neill, Stewart G.; Hadjipanayis, Constantinos G.; Holder, Chad A.; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis, prognosis, and management of patients with gliomas are largely dictated by the pathological analysis of tissue biopsied from a selected region within the lesion. However, due to the heterogeneous and infiltrative nature of gliomas, identifying the optimal region for biopsy with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be quite difficult. This is especially true for low grade gliomas, which often are non-enhancing tumors. To improve the management of patients with these tumors, the field of neuro-oncology requires an imaging modality that can specifically identify a tumor’s most anaplastic/aggressive region(s) for biopsy targeting. The addition of metabolic mapping using spectroscopic MRI (sMRI) to supplement conventional MRI could improve biopsy targeting and, ultimately, diagnostic accuracy. Here, we describe a pipeline for the integration of state-of-the-art, high-resolution whole-brain 3D sMRI maps into a stereotactic neuronavigation system for guiding biopsies in gliomas with nonenhancing components. We also outline a machine-learning method for automated histology analysis that generates normalized, quantitative metrics describing tumor infiltration in immunohistochemically-stained tissue specimens. As a proof of concept, we describe the combination of these two techniques in a small cohort of grade III glioma patients. In this work, we aim to set forth a systematic pipeline to stimulate histopathology-image validation of advanced MRI techniques, such as sMRI. PMID:27489883

  12. Initial experience of using high field strength intraoperative MRI for neurosurgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Raheja, Amol; Tandon, Vivek; Suri, Ashish; Sarat Chandra, P; Kale, Shashank S; Garg, Ajay; Pandey, Ravindra M; Kalaivani, Mani; Mahapatra, Ashok K; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2015-08-01

    We report our initial experience to optimize neurosurgical procedures using high field strength intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (IOMRI) in 300 consecutive patients as high field strength IOMRI rapidly becomes the standard of care for neurosurgical procedures. Three sequential groups (groups A, B, C; n=100 each) were compared with respect to time management, complications and technical difficulties to assess improvement in these parameters with experience. We observed a reduction in the number of technical difficulties (p<0.001), time to induction (p<0.001) and total anesthesia time (p=0.007) in sequential groups. IOMRI was performed for neuronavigation guidance (n=252) and intraoperative validation of extent of resection (EOR; n=67). Performing IOMRI increased the EOR over and beyond the primary surgical attempt in 20.5% (29/141) and 18% (11/61) of patients undergoing glioma and pituitary surgery, respectively. Overall, EOR improved in 59.7% of patients undergoing IOMRI (40/67). Intraoperative tractography and real time navigation using re-uploaded IOMRI images (accounting for brain shift) helps in intraoperative planning to reduce complications. IOMRI is an asset to neurosurgeons, helping to augment the EOR, especially in glioma and pituitary surgery, with no significant increase in morbidity to the patient.

  13. Supra-complete surgery via dual intraoperative visualization approach (DiVA) prolongs patient survival in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y; Hore, Nirjhar; Merkel, Andreas; Buslei, Rolf; Buchfelder, Michael; Savaskan, Nicolai

    2016-05-03

    Safe and complete resection represents the first step in the treatment of glioblastomas and is mandatory in increasing the effectiveness of adjuvant therapy to prolong overall survival. With gross total resection currently limited in extent to MRI contrast enhancing areas, the extent to which supra-complete resection beyond obvious contrast enhancement could have impact on overall survival remains unclear. DiVA (dual intraoperative visualization approach) redefines gross total resection as currently accepted by enabling for the first time supra-complete surgery without compromising patient safety. This approach exploits the advantages of two already accepted surgical techniques combining intraoperative MRI with integrated functional neuronavigation and 5-ALA by integrating them into a single surgical approach. We investigated whether this technique has impact on overall outcome in GBM patients. 105 patients with GBM were included. We achieved complete resection with intraoperative MRI alone according to current best-practice in glioma surgery in 75 patients. 30 patients received surgery with supra-complete resection. The control arm showed a median life expectancy of 14 months, reflecting current standards-of-care and outcome. In contrast, patients receiving supra-complete surgery displayed significant increase in median survival time to 18.5 months with overall survival time correlating directly with extent of supra-complete resection. This extension of overall survival did not come at the cost of neurological deterioration. We show for the first time that supra-complete glioma surgery leads to significant prolongation of overall survival time in GBM patients.

  14. Awake craniotomy using electromagnetic navigation technology without rigid pin fixation.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Ahmed A; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2015-11-01

    We report our institutional experience using an electromagnetic navigation system, without rigid head fixation, for awake craniotomy patients. The StealthStation® S7 AxiEM™ navigation system (Medtronic, Inc.) was used for this technique. Detailed preoperative clinical and neuropsychological evaluations, patient education and contrast-enhanced MRI (thickness 1.5mm) were performed for each patient. The AxiEM Mobile Emitter was typically placed in a holder, which was mounted to the operating room table, and a non-invasive patient tracker was used as the patient reference device. A monitored conscious sedation technique was used in all awake craniotomy patients, and the AxiEM Navigation Pointer was used for navigation during the procedure. This offers the same accuracy as optical navigation, but without head pin fixation or interference with intraoperative neurophysiological techniques and surgical instruments. The application of the electromagnetic neuronavigation technology without rigid head fixation during an awake craniotomy is accurate, and offers superior patient comfort. It is recommended as an effective adjunctive technique for the conduct of awake surgery.

  15. Mutual-information-corrected tumor displacement using intraoperative ultrasound for brain shift compensation in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2008-03-01

    Intraoperative ultrasound (iUS) has emerged as a practical neuronavigational tool for brain shift compensation in image-guided tumor resection surgeries. The use of iUS is optimized when coregistered with preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR) of the patient's head. However, the fiducial-based registration alone does not necessarily optimize the alignment of internal anatomical structures deep in the brain (e.g., tumor) between iUS and pMR. In this paper, we investigated and evaluated an image-based re-registration scheme to maximize the normalized mutual information (nMI) between iUS and pMR to improve tumor boundary alignment using the fiducial registration as a starting point for optimization. We show that this scheme significantly (p<<0.001) reduces tumor boundary misalignment pre-durotomy. The same technique was employed to measure tumor displacement post-durotomy, and the locally measured tumor displacement was assimilated into a biomechanical model to estimate whole-brain deformation. Our results demonstrate that the nMI re-registration pre-durotomy is critical for obtaining accurate measurement of tumor displacement, which significantly improved model response at the craniotomy when compared with stereopsis data acquired independently from the tumor registration. This automatic and computationally efficient (<2min) re-registration technique is feasible for routine clinical use in the operating room (OR).

  16. Glioblastoma: changing expectations?

    PubMed

    Arribas Alpuente, Leoncio; Menéndez López, Antonio; Yayá Tur, Ricardo

    2011-04-01

    Glioblastoma (GB) represents the most aggressive glioma in the adult population. Despite recent research efforts, the prognosis of patients with GB has remained dismal. Lately, the knowledge of genetic information about gliomagenesis has increased; we even have a classification of the genetic expression of the tumour. The main problem is that at the moment we do not have any therapeutical resources to help us better treat these tumours, as we can do, with others tumours like breast, lung and colorectal cancer. We have also improved on diagnostic imaging, especially with the new MRI sequences; we can now better define the characteristics of the tumour area and the surrounding brain structures, allowing us to adjust resections. Thanks to the most advanced surgery techniques, such as neuronavigation, intraoperative control of the nervous function and the tumour volume, the neurosurgeon is able to complete tumour exeresis with less morbidity. These imaging techniques allow the radiation oncologist to better contour the irradiation target volume, the structures and the organs at risk, to diminish the irradiation of apparently healthy tissue. Nowadays, knowledge of brain stem cells provides new expectations for future treatments. Novel targeted agents such as bevacizumab, imatinib, erlotinib, temsirolimus, immunotherapy, cilengitide, talampanel, etc. are helping classical chemotherapeutic agents, like temozolomide, to achieve an increase in overall survival. The main objective is to improve median overall survival, which is currently between 9 and 12 months, with a good quality of life, measured by the ability to carry out daily life activities.

  17. Integrative Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and Radiogenomic Network Analysis of Glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Heiland, Dieter Henrik; Simon-Gabriel, Carl Philipp; Demerath, Theo; Haaker, Gerrit; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Kellner, Elias; Kiselev, Valerij G.; Staszewski, Ori; Urbach, Horst; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Mader, Irina

    2017-01-01

    In the past, changes of the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient in glioblastoma multiforme have been shown to be related to specific genes and described as being associated with survival. The purpose of this study was to investigate diffusion imaging parameters in combination with genome-wide expression data in order to obtain a comprehensive characterisation of the transcriptomic changes indicated by diffusion imaging parameters. Diffusion-weighted imaging, molecular and clinical data were collected prospectively in 21 patients. Before surgery, MRI diffusion metrics such as axial (AD), radial (RD), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were assessed from the contrast enhancing tumour regions. Intraoperatively, tissue was sampled from the same areas using neuronavigation. Transcriptional data of the tissue samples was analysed by Weighted Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) thus classifying genes into modules based on their network-based affiliations. Subsequent Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) identified biological functions or pathways of the expression modules. Network analysis showed a strong association between FA and epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) pathway activation. Also, patients with high FA had a worse clinical outcome. MD correlated with neural function related genes and patients with high MD values had longer overall survival. In conclusion, FA and MD are associated with distinct molecular patterns and opposed clinical outcomes. PMID:28266556

  18. Computation of a high-resolution MRI 3D stereotaxic atlas of the sheep brain.

    PubMed

    Ella, Arsène; Delgadillo, José A; Chemineau, Philippe; Keller, Matthieu

    2017-02-15

    The sheep model was first used in the fields of animal reproduction and veterinary sciences and then was utilized in fundamental and preclinical studies. For more than a decade, magnetic resonance (MR) studies performed on this model have been increasingly reported, especially in the field of neuroscience. To contribute to MR translational neuroscience research, a brain template and an atlas are necessary. We have recently generated the first complete T1-weighted (T1W) and T2W MR population average images (or templates) of in vivo sheep brains. In this study, we 1) defined a 3D stereotaxic coordinate system for previously established in vivo population average templates; 2) used deformation fields obtained during optimized nonlinear registrations to compute nonlinear tissues or prior probability maps (nlTPMs) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), gray matter (GM), and white matter (WM) tissues; 3) delineated 25 external and 28 internal sheep brain structures by segmenting both templates and nlTPMs; and 4) annotated and labeled these structures using an existing histological atlas. We built a quality high-resolution 3D atlas of average in vivo sheep brains linked to a reference stereotaxic space. The atlas and nlTPMs, associated with previously computed T1W and T2W in vivo sheep brain templates and nlTPMs, provide a complete set of imaging space that are able to be imported into other imaging software programs and could be used as standardized tools for neuroimaging studies or other neuroscience methods, such as image registration, image segmentation, identification of brain structures, implementation of recording devices, or neuronavigation. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:676-692, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor--a major player in stimulation-induced homeostatic metaplasticity of human motor cortex?

    PubMed

    Mastroeni, Claudia; Bergmann, Til Ole; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Ritter, Christoph; Klein, Christine; Pohlmann, Ines; Brueggemann, Norbert; Quartarone, Angelo; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the human motor hand area (M1HAND) can induce lasting changes in corticospinal excitability as indexed by a change in amplitude of the motor-evoked potential. The plasticity-inducing effects of rTMS in M1HAND show substantial inter-individual variability which has been partially attributed to the val(66)met polymorphism in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene. Here we used theta burst stimulation (TBS) to examine whether the BDNF val(66)met genotype can be used to predict the expression of TBS-induced homeostatic metaplasticity in human M1HAND. TBS is a patterned rTMS protocol with intermittent TBS (iTBS) usually inducing a lasting increase and continuous TBS (cTBS) a lasting decrease in corticospinal excitability. In three separate sessions, healthy val(66)met (n = 12) and val(66)val (n = 17) carriers received neuronavigated cTBS followed by cTBS (n = 27), cTBS followed by iTBS (n = 29), and iTBS followed by iTBS (n = 28). Participants and examiner were blinded to the genotype at the time of examination. As expected, the first TBS intervention induced a decrease (cTBS) and increase (iTBS) in corticospinal excitability, respectively, at the same time priming the after effects caused by the second TBS intervention in a homeostatic fashion. Critically, val(66)met carriers and val(66)val carriers showed very similar response patterns to cTBS and iTBS regardless of the order of TBS interventions. Since none of the observed TBS effects was modulated by the BDNF val(66)met polymorphism, our results do not support the notion that the BDNF val(66)met genotype is a major player with regard to TBS-induced plasticity and metaplasticity in the human M1HAND.

  20. Anterior single odontoid screw placement for type II odontoid fractures: our modified surgical technique and initial results in a cohort study of 15 patients

    PubMed Central

    Munakomi, Sunil; Tamrakar, Karuna; Chaudhary, Pramod Kumar; Bhattarai, Binod

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Anterior odontoid screw fixation for type II odontoid fracture is the ideal management option. However in the context of unavailability of an O-arm or neuro-navigation and poor images from the available C-arm may be an obstacle to ideal trajectory and placement of the odontoid screw. We herein detail  our surgical technique so as to ensure a correct trajectory and subsequent good fusion in Type II odontoid fractures. This may be advantageous  in clinical set ups lacking state of the art facilities.  Methods and Results: In this cohort study we included 15 consecutive patients who underwent anterior odontoid screw placement. We routinely dissect the longus colli to completely visualize the entire width of C3 body. We then perform a median C2-C3 disectomy followed by creating a gutter in the superior end of C3 body. We then guide the Kirchsner (K) wire purchasing adequate anterior cortex of C2. Rest of the procedure follows the similar steps as described for odontoid screw placement. We achieved 100% correct trajectory and screw placement in our study. There were no instances of screw break out, pull out or nonunion. There was one patient mortality following myocardial infarction in our study. Conclusion: Preoperative imaging details, proper patient positioning, meticulous dissection, thorough anatomical knowledge and few added surgical nuances are the cornerstones in ideal odontoid screw placement. This may be pivotal in managing  patients in developing nations having rudimentary neurosurgical set up. PMID:27990259

  1. An integrated model-based neurosurgical guidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Fan, Xiaoyao; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2010-02-01

    Maximal tumor resection without damaging healthy tissue in open cranial surgeries is critical to the prognosis for patients with brain cancers. Preoperative images (e.g., preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR)) are typically used for surgical planning as well as for intraoperative image-guidance. However, brain shift even at the start of surgery significantly compromises the accuracy of neuronavigation, if the deformation is not compensated for. Compensating for brain shift during surgical operation is, therefore, critical for improving the accuracy of image-guidance and ultimately, the accuracy of surgery. To this end, we have developed an integrated neurosurgical guidance system that incorporates intraoperative three-dimensional (3D) tracking, acquisition of volumetric true 3D ultrasound (iUS), stereovision (iSV) and computational modeling to efficiently generate model-updated MR image volumes for neurosurgical guidance. The system is implemented with real-time Labview to provide high efficiency in data acquisition as well as with Matlab to offer computational convenience in data processing and development of graphical user interfaces related to computational modeling. In a typical patient case, the patient in the operating room (OR) is first registered to pMR image volume. Sparse displacement data extracted from coregistered intraoperative US and/or stereovision images are employed to guide a computational model that is based on consolidation theory. Computed whole-brain deformation is then used to generate a model-updated MR image volume for subsequent surgical guidance. In this paper, we present the key modular components of our integrated, model-based neurosurgical guidance system.

  2. Conscious Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans Using Non-Invasive Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Carles; Ginhoux, Romuald; Riera, Alejandro; Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Chauvat, Hubert; Berg, Michel; Amengual, Julià L.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Ruffini, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Human sensory and motor systems provide the natural means for the exchange of information between individuals, and, hence, the basis for human civilization. The recent development of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) has provided an important element for the creation of brain-to-brain communication systems, and precise brain stimulation techniques are now available for the realization of non-invasive computer-brain interfaces (CBI). These technologies, BCI and CBI, can be combined to realize the vision of non-invasive, computer-mediated brain-to-brain (B2B) communication between subjects (hyperinteraction). Here we demonstrate the conscious transmission of information between human brains through the intact scalp and without intervention of motor or peripheral sensory systems. Pseudo-random binary streams encoding words were transmitted between the minds of emitter and receiver subjects separated by great distances, representing the realization of the first human brain-to-brain interface. In a series of experiments, we established internet-mediated B2B communication by combining a BCI based on voluntary motor imagery-controlled electroencephalographic (EEG) changes with a CBI inducing the conscious perception of phosphenes (light flashes) through neuronavigated, robotized transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), with special care taken to block sensory (tactile, visual or auditory) cues. Our results provide a critical proof-of-principle demonstration for the development of conscious B2B communication technologies. More fully developed, related implementations will open new research venues in cognitive, social and clinical neuroscience and the scientific study of consciousness. We envision that hyperinteraction technologies will eventually have a profound impact on the social structure of our civilization and raise important ethical issues. PMID:25137064

  3. Intraoperative diffusion-weighted imaging for visualization of the pyramidal tracts. Part II: clinical study of usefulness and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, N; Muragaki, Y; Nakamura, R; Lseki, H

    2008-04-01

    Precise identification and preservation of the pyramidal tract during surgery for parenchymal brain tumors is of crucial importance for the avoidance of postoperative deterioration of the motor function. The technique of intraoperative diffusion-weighted imaging (iDWI) using an intraoperative MR scanner of low magnetic field strength (0.3 Tesla) has been developed. Its clinical usefulness and efficacy were evaluated in 10 surgically treated patients with gliomas (5 men and 5 women, mean age: 41.2+/-13.9 years). iDWI permitted visualization of the pyramidal tract on the non-affected side in all 10 cases, and on the affected side in 8 cases. Motion artifacts were observed in four patients, but were not an obstacle to identification of the pyramidal tract. Good correspondence of the anatomical landmarks localization on iDWI and T (1)-weighted imaging was found. All participating neurosurgeons agreed that, in the majority of cases, iDWI was very useful for localization of the pyramidal tract and for clarification of its spatial relationships with the tumor. In conclusion, image quality and accuracy of the iDWI obtained with an MR scanner of low magnetic field strength (0.3 Tesla) are sufficient for possible incorporation into an intraoperative neuronavigation system. The use of iDWI in addition to structural iMRl and subcortical functional mapping with electrical stimulation can potentially result in a reduction of the postoperative morbidity after aggressive surgical removal of lesions located in the vicinity to the motor white matter tracts.

  4. Single slice US-MRI registration for neurosurgical MRI-guided US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardasani, Utsav; Baxter, John S. H.; Peters, Terry M.; Khan, Ali R.

    2016-03-01

    Image-based ultrasound to magnetic resonance image (US-MRI) registration can be an invaluable tool in image-guided neuronavigation systems. State-of-the-art commercial and research systems utilize image-based registration to assist in functions such as brain-shift correction, image fusion, and probe calibration. Since traditional US-MRI registration techniques use reconstructed US volumes or a series of tracked US slices, the functionality of this approach can be compromised by the limitations of optical or magnetic tracking systems in the neurosurgical operating room. These drawbacks include ergonomic issues, line-of-sight/magnetic interference, and maintenance of the sterile field. For those seeking a US vendor-agnostic system, these issues are compounded with the challenge of instrumenting the probe without permanent modification and calibrating the probe face to the tracking tool. To address these challenges, this paper explores the feasibility of a real-time US-MRI volume registration in a small virtual craniotomy site using a single slice. We employ the Linear Correlation of Linear Combination (LC2) similarity metric in its patch-based form on data from MNI's Brain Images for Tumour Evaluation (BITE) dataset as a PyCUDA enabled Python module in Slicer. By retaining the original orientation information, we are able to improve on the poses using this approach. To further assist the challenge of US-MRI registration, we also present the BOXLC2 metric which demonstrates a speed improvement to LC2, while retaining a similar accuracy in this context.

  5. Effects of a common transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) protocol on motor evoked potentials found to be highly variable within individuals over 9 testing sessions.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Jared Cooney; Vogrin, Simon J; Carter, Olivia; Cook, Mark J; Forte, Jason D

    2016-09-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) uses a weak electric current to modulate neuronal activity. A neurophysiologic outcome measure to demonstrate reliable tDCS modulation at the group level is transcranial magnetic stimulation engendered motor evoked potentials (MEPs). Here, we conduct a study testing the reliability of individual MEP response patterns following a common tDCS protocol. Fourteen participants (7m/7f) each underwent nine randomized sessions of 1 mA, 10 min tDCS (3 anode; 3 cathode; 3 sham) delivered using an M1/orbito-frontal electrode montage (sessions separated by an average of ~5.5 days). Fifteen MEPs were obtained prior to, immediately following and in 5 min intervals for 30 min following tDCS. TMS was delivered at 130 % resting motor threshold using neuronavigation to ensure consistent coil localization. A number of non-experimental variables were collected during each session. At the individual level, considerable variability was seen among different testing sessions. No participant demonstrated an excitatory response ≥20 % to all three anodal sessions, and no participant demonstrated an inhibitory response ≥20 % to all three cathodal sessions. Intra-class correlation revealed poor anodal and cathodal test-retest reliability [anode: ICC(2,1) = 0.062; cathode: ICC(2,1) = 0.055] and moderate sham test-retest reliability [ICC(2,1) = 0.433]. Results also revealed no significant effect of tDCS at the group level. Using this common protocol, we found the effects of tDCS on MEP amplitudes to be highly variable at the individual level. In addition, no significant effects of tDCS on MEP amplitude were found at the group level. Future studies should consider utilizing a more strict experimental protocol to potentially account for intra-individual response variations.

  6. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Montano, Nicola; Conforti, Giulio; Di Bonaventura, Rina; Meglio, Mario; Fernandez, Eduardo; Papacci, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Various drugs and surgical procedures have been utilized for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Despite numerous available approaches, the results are not completely satisfying. The need for more contemporaneous drugs to control the pain attacks is a common experience. Moreover, a number of patients become drug resistant, needing a surgical procedure to treat the neuralgia. Nonetheless, pain recurrence after one or more surgical operations is also frequently seen. These facts reflect the lack of the precise understanding of the TN pathogenesis. Classically, it has been related to a neurovascular compression at the trigeminal nerve root entry-zone in the prepontine cistern. However, it has been evidenced that in the pain onset and recurrence, various neurophysiological mechanisms other than the neurovascular conflict are involved. Recently, the introduction of new magnetic resonance techniques, such as voxel-based morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiography, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery sequences, has provided new insight about the TN pathogenesis. Some of these new sequences have also been used to better preoperatively evidence the neurovascular conflict in the surgical planning of microvascular decompression. Moreover, the endoscopy (during microvascular decompression) and the intraoperative computed tomography with integrated neuronavigation (during percutaneous procedures) have been recently introduced in the challenging cases. In the last few years, efforts have been made in order to better define the optimal target when performing the gamma knife radiosurgery. Moreover, some authors have also evidenced that neurostimulation might represent an opportunity in TN refractory to other surgical treatments. The aim of this work was to review the recent literature about the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and medical and surgical treatments, and discuss the significant advances in all these fields

  7. Versatile utilization of real-time intraoperative contrast-enhanced ultrasound in cranial neurosurgery: technical note and retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Lekht, Ilya; Brauner, Noah; Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Chang, Ki-Eun; Gulati, Mittul; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Grant, Edward G.; Christian, Eisha; Zada, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Intraoperative contrast-enhanced ultrasound (iCEUS) offers dynamic imaging and provides functional data in real time. However, no standardized protocols or validated quantitative data exist to guide its routine use in neurosurgery. The authors aimed to provide further clinical data on the versatile application of iCEUS through a technical note and illustrative case series. METHODS Five patients undergoing craniotomies for suspected tumors were included. iCEUS was performed using a contrast agent composed of lipid shell microspheres enclosing perflutren (octafluoropropane) gas. Perfusion data were acquired through a time-intensity curve analysis protocol obtained using iCEUS prior to biopsy and/or resection of all lesions. RESULTS Three primary tumors (gemistocytic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, and meningioma), 1 metastatic lesion (melanoma), and 1 tumefactive demyelinating lesion (multiple sclerosis) were assessed using real-time iCEUS. No intraoperative complications occurred following multiple administrations of contrast agent in all cases. In all neoplastic cases, iCEUS replicated enhancement patterns observed on preoperative Gd-enhanced MRI, facilitated safe tumor de-bulking by differentiating neoplastic tissue from normal brain parenchyma, and helped identify arterial feeders and draining veins in and around the surgical cavity. Intraoperative CEUS was also useful in guiding a successful intraoperative needle biopsy of a cerebellar tumefactive demyelinating lesion obtained during real-time perfusion analysis. CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative CEUS has potential for safe, real-time, dynamic contrast-based imaging for routine use in neurooncological surgery and image-guided biopsy. Intraoperative CEUS eliminates the effect of anatomical distortions associated with standard neuronavigation and provides quantitative perfusion data in real time, which may hold major implications for intraoperative diagnosis, tissue differentiation, and quantification of

  8. Complex technical methodologies and their applications in the surgery of intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, T C; Rabb, C; Apuzzo, M L

    1994-04-01

    As neurosurgery moves into the twenty-first century, improved visualization/localization techniques, neuromonitoring, and advanced instrumentation will become standards of care for all intracranial procedures. This article has focused on current available technologies that can be used to facilitate operations on intracranial meningiomas. Preoperative anatomic localization with MR imaging, CT, MR angiography, and angiography are standard techniques. Preoperative functional assessments with MR imaging, magnetic source imaging, PET, and functional MR imaging are crucial to recognize and preserve eloquent adjacent cortex. Pathologic correlations with preoperative imaging (i.e., MR imaging) may help to predict the histopathology. Perioperative rehearsal of the operation can be performed. Intraoperative anatomic localization is important to minimize the craniotomy, dural opening, and passage through normal neural structures. An impressive array of new technologies are currently available, including real-time ultrasonography, frame-based stereotaxy (CT, MR imaging PET), frameless stereotaxy (acoustic localization, neuronavigators, real-time visualization), robotics, neuroendoscopy, and intraoperative dye administration. Increased understanding of the function and individual variability of the human cortex underscores the importance of intraoperative functional localization by electrocorticography and optical imaging. Continuous intraoperative neuromonitoring of sensory (SSEPs, BAERs, visual evoked potentials) and motor evoked potentials is now standard during many intracranial procedures. Complex adjunctive instrumentation, such as the ultrasonic aspirator and the laser, are part of the contemporary armamentarium for meningioma surgery. As we have stated in a previous article, "Developmental trends imply realization of three major directions of technical neurosurgery: (1) precise preoperative simulation, (2) minimization or avoidance of transcranial operative corridors

  9. Image guided surgery in the management of craniocerebral gunshot injuries

    PubMed Central

    Elserry, Tarek; Anwer, Hesham; Esene, Ignatius Ngene

    2013-01-01

    Background: A craniocerebral trauma caused by firearms is a complex injury with high morbidity and mortality. One of the most intriguing and controversial part in their management in salvageable patients is the decision to remove the bullet/pellet. A bullet is foreign to the brain and, in principle, should be removed. Surgical options for bullet extraction span from conventional craniotomy, through C-arm-guided surgery to minimally invasive frame or frameless stereotaxy. But what is the best surgical option? Methods: We prospectively followed up a cohort of 28 patients with cranio-cerebral gunshot injury (CCHSI) managed from January to December 2012 in our department of neurosurgery. The missiles were extracted via stereotaxy (frame or frameless), C-arm-guided, or free-hand-based surgery. Cases managed conservatively were excluded. The Glasgow Outcome Score was used to assess the functional outcome on discharge. Results: Five of the eight “stereotactic cases” had an excellent outcome after missile extraction while the initially planned stereotaxy missed locating the missile in three cases and were thus subjected to free hand craniotomy. Excellent outcome was obtained in five of the nine “neuronavigation cases, five of the eight cases for free hand surgery based on the bony landmarks, and five of the six C-arm-based surgery. Conclusion: Conventional craniotomy isn’t indicated in the extraction of isolated, retained, intracranial firearm missiles in civilian injury but could be useful when the missile is incorporated within a surgical lesion. Stereotactic surgery could be useful for bullet extraction, though with limited precision in identifying small pellets because of their small sizes, thus exposing patients to same risk of brain insult when retrieving a missile by conventional surgery. Because of its availability, C-arm-guided surgery continues to be of much benefit, especially in emergency situations. We recommend an extensive long-term study of these

  10. Minimally invasive percutaneous screw fixation of traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Avery Lee; Morgan, Steven L; Robinson, Leslie C; Frankel, Bruce M

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT Most cases of traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis (hangman's fracture) can be treated nonoperatively with reduction and subsequent immobilization in a rigid cervical collar or halo. However, in some instances, operative management is necessary and can be accomplished by using either anterior or posterior fusion techniques. Because open posterior procedures can result in significant blood loss, pain, and limited cervical range of motion, other less invasive options for posterior fixation are needed. The authors describe a minimally invasive, navigation-guided technique for surgical treatment of Levine-Edwards (L-E) Type II hangman's fractures. METHODS For 5 patients with L-E Type II hangman's fracture requiring operative reduction and internal fixation, percutaneous screw fixation directed through the fracture site was performed. This technique was facilitated by use of intraoperative 3D fluoroscopy and neuronavigation. RESULTS Of the 5 patients, 2 were women, 3 were men, and age range was 46-67 years. No intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred. All patients wore a rigid cervical collar, and flexion-extension radiographs were obtained at 6 months. For all patients, dynamic imaging demonstrated a stable construct. CONCLUSIONS L-E type II hangman's fractures can be safely repaired by using percutaneous minimally invasive surgical techniques. This technique may be appropriate, depending on circumstances, for all L-E Type I and II hangman's fractures; however, the degree of associated ligament injury and disc disruption must be accounted for. Percutaneous fixation is not appropriate for L-E Type III fractures because of significant displacement and ligament and disc disruption. This report is meant to serve as a feasibility study and is not meant to show superiority of this procedure over other surgical options.

  11. Acute triventricular hydrocephalus caused by choroid plexus cysts: a diagnostic and neurosurgical challenge.

    PubMed

    Spennato, Pietro; Chiaramonte, Carmela; Cicala, Domenico; Donofrio, Vittoria; Barbarisi, Manlio; Nastro, Anna; Mirone, Giuseppe; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Cinalli, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Intraventricular choroid plexus cysts are unusual causes of acute hydrocephalus in children. Radiological diagnosis of intraventricular choroid plexus cysts is difficult because they have very thin walls and fluid contents similar to CSF and can go undetected on routine CT studies. METHODS This study reports the authors' experience with 5 patients affected by intraventricular cysts originating from the choroid plexus. All patients experienced acute presentation with rapid neurological deterioration, sometimes associated with hypothalamic dysfunction, and required urgent surgery. In 2 cases the symptoms were intermittent, with spontaneous remission and sudden clinical deteriorations, reflecting an intermittent obstruction of the CSF pathway. RESULTS Radiological diagnosis was difficult in these cases because a nonenhanced CT scan revealed only triventricular hydrocephalus, with slight lateral ventricle asymmetry in all cases. MRI with driven-equilibrium sequences and CT ventriculography (in 1 case) allowed the authors to accurately diagnose the intraventricular cysts that typically occupied the posterior part of the third ventricle, occluding the aqueduct and at least 1 foramen of Monro. The patients were managed by urgent implantation of an external ventricular drain in 1 case (followed by endoscopic surgery, after completing a diagnostic workup) and by urgent endoscopic surgery in 4 cases. Endoscopic surgery allowed the shrinkage and near-complete removal of the cysts in all cases. Use of neuronavigation and a laser were indispensable. All procedures were uneventful, resulting in restoration of normal neurological conditions. Long-term follow-up (> 2 years) was available for 2 patients, and no complications or recurrences occurred. CONCLUSIONS This case series emphasizes the necessity of an accurate and precise identification of the possible causes of triventricular hydrocephalus. Endoscopic surgery can be considered the ideal treatment of choroid plexus

  12. Role of endoscopic third ventriculostomy in tuberculous meningitis with hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad R.; Parihar, Vijay S.; Todorov, Mina; Kher, Yatin; Chaurasia, Ishwar D.; Pande, Sonjjay; Namdev, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocephalus is one of the commonest complications of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). It can be purely obstructive, purely communicating, or due to combinations of obstruction in addition to defective absorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) as an alternative to shunt procedures is an established treatment for obstructive hydrocephalus in TBM. ETV in TBM hydrocephalus can be technically very difficult, especially in acute stage of disease due to inflamed, thick, and opaque third ventricle floor. Water jet dissection can be helpful in thick and opaque ventricular floor patients, while simple blunt perforation is possible in thin and transparent floor. Lumbar peritoneal shunt is a better option for communicating hydrocephalus as compared to VP shunt or ETV. Intraoperative Doppler or neuronavigation can help in proper planning of the perforation to prevent neurovascular complications. Choroid plexus coagulation with ETV can improve success rate in infants. Results of ETV are better in good grade patients. Poor results are observed in cisternal exudates, thick and opaque third ventricle floor, acute phase, malnourished patients as compared to patients without cisternal exudates, thin and transparent third ventricle floor, chronic phase, well-nourished patients. Some of the patients, especially in poor grade, can show delayed recovery. Failure to improve after ETV can be due to blocked stoma, complex hydrocephalus, or vascular compromise. Repeated lumbar puncture can help faster normalization of the raised intracranial pressure after ETV in patients with temporary defect in CSF absorption, whereas lumbar peritoneal shunt is required in permanent defect. Repeat ETV is recommended if the stoma is blocked. ETV should be considered as treatment of choice in chronic phase of the disease in obstructive hydrocephalus. PMID:27695532

  13. An experimental study on the mechanical properties of rat brain tissue using different stress-strain definitions.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi

    2014-07-01

    There are different stress-strain definitions to measure the mechanical properties of the brain tissue. However, there is no agreement as to which stress-strain definition should be employed to measure the mechanical properties of the brain tissue at both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. It is worth knowing that an optimize stress-strain definition of the brain tissue at different loading directions may have implications for neuronavigation and surgery simulation through haptic devices. This study is aimed to conduct a comparative study on different results are given by the various definitions of stress-strain and to recommend a specific definition when testing brain tissues. Prepared cylindrical samples are excised from the parietal lobes of rats' brains and experimentally tested by applying load on both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. Three stress definitions (second Piola-Kichhoff stress, engineering stress, and true stress) and four strain definitions (Almansi-Hamel strain, Green-St. Venant strain, engineering strain, and true strain) are used to determine the elastic modulus, maximum stress and strain. The highest non-linear stress-strain relation is observed for the Almansi-Hamel strain definition and it may overestimate the elastic modulus at different stress definitions at both the longitudinal and circumferential directions. The Green-St. Venant strain definition fails to address the non-linear stress-strain relation using different definitions of stress and triggers an underestimation of the elastic modulus. The results suggest the application of the true stress-true strain definition for characterization of the brain tissues mechanics since it gives more accurate measurements of the tissue's response using the instantaneous values.

  14. Modulation of N400 in chronic non-fluent aphasia using low frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS).

    PubMed

    Barwood, Caroline H S; Murdoch, Bruce E; Whelan, Brooke-Mai; Lloyd, David; Riek, Stephan; O'Sullivan, John D; Coulthard, Alan; Wong, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    Low frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) has previously been applied to language homologues in non-fluent populations of persons with aphasia yielding significant improvements in behavioral language function up to 43 months post stimulation. The present study aimed to investigate the electrophysiological correlates associated with the application of rTMS through measurement of the semantic based N400 Event-related brain potentials (ERP) component. Low frequency (1 Hz) rTMS was applied to the anterior portion of the homologue to Broca's area (pars triangularis), for 20 min per day for 10 days, using a stereotactic neuronavigational system. Twelve non-fluent persons with aphasia, 2-6 years post stroke were stimulated. Six participants were randomly assigned to receive real stimulation and six participants were randomly assigned to receive a blind sham control condition. ERP measures were recorded at baseline, 1 week and 2 months subsequent to stimulation. The findings demonstrate treatment related changes observed in the stimulation group when compared to the placebo control group at 2 months post stimulation indicating neuromodulation of N400 as a result of rTMS. No treatment related changes were identified in the stimulation group, when compared to the sham group from baseline to 1 week post stimulation. The electrophysiological results represent the capacity of rTMS to modulate neural language networks and measures of lexical-semantic function in participants with non-fluent aphasia and suggest that time may be an important factor in brain reorganization subsequent to rTMS.

  15. Surgical leg rotation: cortical neuroplasticity assessed through brain mapping using transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Rota, Viviana; Manfrini, Marco; Perucca, Laura; Caronni, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Rotationplasty (Borggreve-Van Nes operation) is a rare limb salvage procedure, most often applied to children presenting with sarcoma of the distal femur. In type A1 operation, the distal thigh is removed and the proximal tibia is axially rotated by 180°, remodeled, grafted onto the femoral stump, and then prosthetized. The neurovascular bundle is spared. The rotated ankle then works as a knee. The foot plantar and dorsal flexors act as knee extensors and flexors, respectively. Functional results may be excellent. Cortical neuroplasticity was studied in three men (30–31 years) who were operated on the left lower limb at ages between 7 and 11 years and were fully autonomous with a custom-made prosthesis, as well as in three age–sex matched controls. The scalp stimulation coordinates, matching the patients’ brain MRI spots, were digitized through a ‘neuronavigation’ optoelectronic system, in order to guide the transcranial magnetic stimulation coil, thus ensuring spatial precision during the procedure. Through transcranial magnetic stimulation driven by neuronavigation, the cortical representations of the contralateral soleus and vastus medialis muscles were studied in terms of amplitude of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and centering and width of the cortical areas from which the potentials could be evoked. Map centering on either hemisphere did not differ substantially across muscles and participants. In the operated patients, MEP amplitudes, the area from which MEPs could be evoked, and their product (volume) were larger for the muscles of the unaffected side compared with both the rotated soleus muscle (average effect size 0.75) and the muscles of healthy controls (average effect size 0.89). In controls, right–left differences showed an effect size of 0.38. In no case did the comparisons reach statistical significance (P>0.25). Nevertheless, the results seem consistent with cortical plasticity reflecting strengthening of the unaffected leg and a

  16. Pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus in Chinese: the differences from Caucasian and its application in the extended transsphenoidal approach.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuntao; Pan, Jun; Qi, Songtao; Shi, Jin; Zhang, Xi'an; Wu, Kuncheng

    2011-08-01

    approach, the use of stricter intraoperative technological devices such as neuronavigation and ultrasound Doppler is advisable.

  17. Mass Spectrometry Imaging as a Tool for Surgical Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Calligaris, David; Norton, Isaiah; Feldman, Daniel R.; Ide, Jennifer L.; Dunn, Ian F.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Cooks, R. Graham; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant advances in image-guided therapy, surgeons are still too often left with uncertainty when deciding to remove tissue. This binary decision between removing and leaving tissue during surgery implies that the surgeon should be able to distinguish tumor from healthy tissue. In neurosurgery, current image-guidance approaches such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with neuro-navigation offer a map as to where the tumor should be, but the only definitive method to characterize the tissue at stake is histopathology. While extremely valuable information is derived from this gold standard approach, it is limited to very few samples during surgery and is not practically used for the delineation of tumor margins. The development and implementation of faster, comprehensive and complementary approaches for tissue characterization are required to support surgical decision-making – an incremental and iterative process with tumor removed in multiple and often minute biopsies. The development of atmospheric pressure ionization sources makes it possible to analyze tissue specimens with little to no sample preparation. Here, we highlight the value of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) as one of many available approaches for the analysis of surgical tissue. Twelve surgical samples resected from a patient during surgery were analyzed and diagnosed as glioblastoma (GBM) tumor or necrotic tissue by standard histopathology, and mass spectrometry results were further correlated to histopathology for critical validation of the approach. The use of a robust statistical approach reiterated results from the qualitative detection of potential biomarkers of these tissue types. The correlation of the MS and histopathology results to magnetic resonance images brings significant insight into tumor presentation that could not only serve to guide tumor resection, but that is worthy of more detailed studies on our understanding of tumor presentation on MRI. PMID

  18. Qualitative and Quantitative Radio-Anatomical Variation of the Posterior Clinoid Process

    PubMed Central

    Salma, Asem; Baidya, Nishanta B.; Wendt, Benjamin; Aguila, Francisco; Sammet, Steffen; Ammirati, Mario

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the radiological anatomy of the posterior clinoid process (PCP) to highlight preoperative awareness of its variations and its relationships to other skull base landmarks. The PCPs of 36, three-dimensional computed tomographic cadaveric heads were evaluated by studying the gross anatomy of the PCP and by measuring the distances between the PCP and other skull base anatomical landmarks relevant to transnasal or transcranial skull base approaches. PCP variations were found in five specimens (14%): in two the dorsum sellae was absent, in one the PCP and the anterior clinoid process (ACP) were connected unilaterally and in two bilaterally. The mean distance between the right/left PCP and the crista galli was 45.14 ± 4.0 standard deviation (SD_/46.24 ± 4.5 SD, respectively, while the distance to the middle point of the basion at the level of the foramen magnum was 40.41 ± 5.1 SD/41.0 ± 5.2 SD, respectively. The mean distance between the PCP and the ACP was 12.03 ± 3.18 SD on the right side and 12.11 ± 2.77 SD on the left. The data provided highlights the importance of careful preoperative evaluation of the PCP and of its relationships to other commonly encountered skull base landmarks. This information may give an idea of the exposure achievable through different transcranial and transnasal approaches. This is especially relevant when neuronavigation is not available. PMID:22547963

  19. Qualitative and quantitative radio-anatomical variation of the posterior clinoid process.

    PubMed

    Salma, Asem; Baidya, Nishanta B; Wendt, Benjamin; Aguila, Francisco; Sammet, Steffen; Ammirati, Mario

    2011-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the radiological anatomy of the posterior clinoid process (PCP) to highlight preoperative awareness of its variations and its relationships to other skull base landmarks. The PCPs of 36, three-dimensional computed tomographic cadaveric heads were evaluated by studying the gross anatomy of the PCP and by measuring the distances between the PCP and other skull base anatomical landmarks relevant to transnasal or transcranial skull base approaches. PCP variations were found in five specimens (14%): in two the dorsum sellae was absent, in one the PCP and the anterior clinoid process (ACP) were connected unilaterally and in two bilaterally. The mean distance between the right/left PCP and the crista galli was 45.14 ± 4.0 standard deviation (SD_/46.24 ± 4.5 SD, respectively, while the distance to the middle point of the basion at the level of the foramen magnum was 40.41 ± 5.1 SD/41.0 ± 5.2 SD, respectively. The mean distance between the PCP and the ACP was 12.03 ± 3.18 SD on the right side and 12.11 ± 2.77 SD on the left. The data provided highlights the importance of careful preoperative evaluation of the PCP and of its relationships to other commonly encountered skull base landmarks. This information may give an idea of the exposure achievable through different transcranial and transnasal approaches. This is especially relevant when neuronavigation is not available.

  20. Guided Application of Ventricular Catheters (GAVCA) - multicentre study to compare the ventricular catheter position after use of a catheter guide versus freehand application: study protocol for a randomised trail

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The standard technique for the placement of ventricular catheters (VC) comprises a high proportion of malpositioning of the catheter (12.5 to 40%). Technical advances such as neuronavigation or ultrasound have been shown to increase the accuracy of the procedure. Since these means result in significant technical and time consuming efforts, they are used for selected cases only. In order to simplify the controlled placement of ventricular catheters a newly developed smartphone assisted guiding tool has been introduced. In this study the efficacy and safety of this guiding tool is determined. Methods/design This study is a multicentre, randomised, controlled trial. A total of 144 patients planned for an elective shunting procedure will be enrolled throughout 10 study centres within two years. The primary objective of the trial is to show the superiority of the guided placement in comparison to the standard freehand technique of ventricular catheter application. Patients will be followed up for 30 days after the operation in regard to image-based evaluation of the catheter position as well as possible shunt dysfunction and complications. Discussion The Guided Application of Ventricular Catheters (GAVCA) trial compares the guided catheter positioning with the standard freehand technique of catheter placement in hydrocephalic patients. If superiority is shown, the standard technique may be changed with the advantage of a more reliable and safer positioning of the ventricular catheter with just a slight effort in time and pre-operative planning. Trial registration The GAVCA trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under the number NCT01811589. PMID:24330776

  1. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation.

    PubMed

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favours the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi, flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis muscles as surround muscles, during rest and tonic activation of the FDI muscle in 21 subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under magnetic resonance imaging-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90-120% of the adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI muscle was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of the FDI muscle, CBI was significantly reduced only for the FDI muscle, and not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned motor evoked potential sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI muscle tonic activation as compared with rest, despite background electromyography activity increasing only for the FDI muscle. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle.

  2. Conscious brain-to-brain communication in humans using non-invasive technologies.

    PubMed

    Grau, Carles; Ginhoux, Romuald; Riera, Alejandro; Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Chauvat, Hubert; Berg, Michel; Amengual, Julià L; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Ruffini, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Human sensory and motor systems provide the natural means for the exchange of information between individuals, and, hence, the basis for human civilization. The recent development of brain-computer interfaces (BCI) has provided an important element for the creation of brain-to-brain communication systems, and precise brain stimulation techniques are now available for the realization of non-invasive computer-brain interfaces (CBI). These technologies, BCI and CBI, can be combined to realize the vision of non-invasive, computer-mediated brain-to-brain (B2B) communication between subjects (hyperinteraction). Here we demonstrate the conscious transmission of information between human brains through the intact scalp and without intervention of motor or peripheral sensory systems. Pseudo-random binary streams encoding words were transmitted between the minds of emitter and receiver subjects separated by great distances, representing the realization of the first human brain-to-brain interface. In a series of experiments, we established internet-mediated B2B communication by combining a BCI based on voluntary motor imagery-controlled electroencephalographic (EEG) changes with a CBI inducing the conscious perception of phosphenes (light flashes) through neuronavigated, robotized transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), with special care taken to block sensory (tactile, visual or auditory) cues. Our results provide a critical proof-of-principle demonstration for the development of conscious B2B communication technologies. More fully developed, related implementations will open new research venues in cognitive, social and clinical neuroscience and the scientific study of consciousness. We envision that hyperinteraction technologies will eventually have a profound impact on the social structure of our civilization and raise important ethical issues.

  3. Modeling transcranial magnetic stimulation from the induced electric fields to the membrane potentials along tractography-based white matter fiber tracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geeter, Nele; Dupré, Luc; Crevecoeur, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a promising non-invasive tool for modulating the brain activity. Despite the widespread therapeutic and diagnostic use of TMS in neurology and psychiatry, its observed response remains hard to predict, limiting its further development and applications. Although the stimulation intensity is always maximum at the cortical surface near the coil, experiments reveal that TMS can affect deeper brain regions as well. Approach. The explanation of this spread might be found in the white matter fiber tracts, connecting cortical and subcortical structures. When applying an electric field on neurons, their membrane potential is altered. If this change is significant, more likely near the TMS coil, action potentials might be initiated and propagated along the fiber tracts towards deeper regions. In order to understand and apply TMS more effectively, it is important to capture and account for this interaction as accurately as possible. Therefore, we compute, next to the induced electric fields in the brain, the spatial distribution of the membrane potentials along the fiber tracts and its temporal dynamics. Main results. This paper introduces a computational TMS model in which electromagnetism and neurophysiology are combined. Realistic geometry and tissue anisotropy are included using magnetic resonance imaging and targeted white matter fiber tracts are traced using tractography based on diffusion tensor imaging. The position and orientation of the coil can directly be retrieved from the neuronavigation system. Incorporating these features warrants both patient- and case-specific results. Significance. The presented model gives insight in the activity propagation through the brain and can therefore explain the observed clinical responses to TMS and their inter- and/or intra-subject variability. We aspire to advance towards an accurate, flexible and personalized TMS model that helps to understand stimulation in the connected

  4. Electrophysiological and Anatomical Correlates of Spinal Cord Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Maurizio; Krstajic, Nikola; Biella, Gabriele E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the continuous improvement in medical imaging technology, visualizing the spinal cord poses severe problems due to structural or incidental causes, such as small access space and motion artifacts. In addition, positional guidance on the spinal cord is not commonly available during surgery, with the exception of neuronavigation techniques based on static pre-surgical data and of radiation-based methods, such as fluoroscopy. A fast, bedside, intraoperative real-time imaging, particularly necessary during the positioning of endoscopic probes or tools, is an unsolved issue. The objective of our work, performed on experimental rats, is to demonstrate potential intraoperative spinal cord imaging and probe guidance by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Concurrently, we aimed to demonstrate that the electromagnetic OCT irradiation exerted no particular effect at the neuronal and synaptic levels. OCT is a user-friendly, low-cost and endoscopy-compatible photonics-based imaging technique. In particular, by using a Fourier-domain OCT imager, operating at 850 nm wavelength and scanning transversally with respect to the spinal cord, we have been able to: 1) accurately image tissue structures in an animal model (muscle, spine bone, cerebro-spinal fluid, dura mater and spinal cord), and 2) identify the position of a recording microelectrode approaching and inserting into the cord tissue 3) check that the infrared radiation has no actual effect on the electrophysiological activity of spinal neurons. The technique, potentially extendable to full three-dimensional image reconstruction, shows prospective further application not only in endoscopic intraoperative analyses and for probe insertion guidance, but also in emergency and adverse situations (e.g. after trauma) for damage recognition, diagnosis and fast image-guided intervention. PMID:27050096

  5. A Low-Cost iPhone-Assisted Augmented Reality Solution for the Localization of Intracranial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, RuYuan; Chen, XiaoLei; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Precise location of intracranial lesions before surgery is important, but occasionally difficult. Modern navigation systems are very helpful, but expensive. A low-cost solution that could locate brain lesions and their surface projections in augmented reality would be beneficial. We used an iPhone to partially achieve this goal, and evaluated its accuracy and feasibility in a clinical neurosurgery setting. Methodology/Principal Findings We located brain lesions in 35 patients, and using an iPhone, we depicted the lesion’s surface projection onto the skin of the head. To assess the accuracy of this method, we pasted computed tomography (CT) markers surrounding the depicted lesion boundaries on the skin onto 15 patients. CT scans were then performed with or without contrast enhancement. The deviations (D) between the CT markers and the actual lesion boundaries were measured. We found that 97.7% of the markers displayed a high accuracy level (D ≤ 5mm). In the remaining 20 patients, we compared our iPhone-based method with a frameless neuronavigation system. Four check points were chosen on the skin surrounding the depicted lesion boundaries, to assess the deviations between the two methods. The integrated offset was calculated according to the deviations at the four check points. We found that for the supratentorial lesions, the medial offset between these two methods was 2.90 mm and the maximum offset was 4.2 mm. Conclusions/Significance This low-cost, image-based, iPhone-assisted, augmented reality solution is technically feasible, and helpful for the localization of some intracranial lesions, especially shallow supratentorial intracranial lesions of moderate size. PMID:27454518

  6. Comparison of navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging for preoperative mapping in rolandic tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Coburger, Jan; Musahl, Christian; Henkes, Hans; Horvath-Rizea, Diana; Bittl, Markus; Weissbach, Claudia; Hopf, Nikolai

    2013-01-01

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is a novel tool for preoperative functional mapping. It detects eloquent cortical areas directly, comparable to intraoperative direct cortical stimulation (DCS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the advantage of nTMS in comparison with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the clinical setting. Special focus was placed on accuracy of motor cortex localization in patients with rolandic lesions. Thirty consecutive patients were enrolled in the study. All patients received an fMRI and nTMS examination preoperatively. Feasibility of the technique and spatial resolution of upper and lower extremity cortical mapping were compared with fMRI. Consistency of preoperative mapping with intraoperative DCS was assessed via the neuronavigation system. nTMS was feasible in all 30 patients. fMRI was impossible in 7 out of 30 patients with special clinical conditions, pediatric patients, central vascular lesions, or compliance issues. The mean accuracy to localize motor cortex of nTMS was higher than in fMRI. In the subgroup of intrinsic tumors, nTMS produced statistically significant higher accuracy scores of the lower extremity localization than fMRI. fMRI failed to localize hand or leg areas in 6 out of 23 cases. Using nTMS, a preoperative localization of the central sulcus was possible in all patients. Verification of nTMS motor cortex localization with DCS was achieved in all cases. The fMRI localization of the hand area proved to be postcentral in one case. nTMS has fewer restrictions for preoperative functional mapping than fMRI and requires only a limited level of compliance. nTMS scores higher on the accuracy scale than fMRI. nTMS represents a highly valuable supplement for the preoperative functional planning in the clinical routine.

  7. Testing a Neurobiological Model of Depersonalization Disorder Using Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation☆

    PubMed Central

    Jay, Emma-Louise; Sierra, Mauricio; Van den Eynde, Frederique; Rothwell, John C.; David, Anthony S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Depersonalization disorder (DPD) includes changes in subjective experiencing of self, encompassing emotional numbing. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has pointed to ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) inhibition of insula as a neurocognitive correlate of the disorder. Objective We hypothesized that inhibition to right VLPFC using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) would lead to increased arousal and reduced symptoms. Methods Patients with medication-resistant DSM-IV DPD (N = 17) and controls (N = 20) were randomized to receive one session of right-sided rTMS to VLPFC or temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). 1Hz rTMS was guided using neuronavigation and delivered for 15 min. Co-primary outcomes were: (a) maximum skin conductance capacity, and (b) reduction in depersonalization symptoms (Cambridge Depersonalisation Scale (CDS) [state version]). Secondary outcomes included spontaneous fluctuations (SFs) and event-related skin conductance responses. Results In patients with DPD, rTMS to VLPFC led to increased electrodermal capacity, namely maximum skin conductance deflections. Patients but not controls also showed increased SFs post rTMS. Patients who had either VLPFC or TPJ rTMS showed a similar significant reduction in symptoms. Event-related electrodermal activity did not change. Conclusions A single session of right-sided rTMS to VLPFC (but not TPJ) significantly increased physiological arousal capacity supporting our model regarding the relevance of increased VLPFC activity to emotional numbing in DPD. rTMS to both sites led to reduced depersonalization scores but since this was independent of physiological arousal, this may be a non-specific effect. TMS is a potential therapeutic option for DPD; modulation of VLPFC, if replicated, is a plausible mechanism. PMID:24439959

  8. Simulation of brain tumor resection in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2011-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance images are typically used for neuronavigation in image-guided neurosurgery. However, intraoperative brain deformation (e.g., as a result of gravitation, loss of cerebrospinal fluid, retraction, resection, etc.) significantly degrades the accuracy in image guidance, and must be compensated for in order to maintain sufficient accuracy for navigation. Biomechanical finite element models are effective techniques that assimilate intraoperative data and compute whole-brain deformation from which to generate model-updated MR images (uMR) to improve accuracy in intraoperative guidance. To date, most studies have focused on early surgical stages (i.e., after craniotomy and durotomy), whereas simulation of more complex events at later surgical stages has remained to be a challenge using biomechanical models. We have developed a method to simulate partial or complete tumor resection that incorporates intraoperative volumetric ultrasound (US) and stereovision (SV), and the resulting whole-brain deformation was used to generate uMR. The 3D ultrasound and stereovision systems are complimentary to each other because they capture features deeper in the brain beneath the craniotomy and at the exposed cortical surface, respectively. In this paper, we illustrate the application of the proposed method to simulate brain tumor resection at three temporally distinct surgical stages throughout a clinical surgery case using sparse displacement data obtained from both the US and SV systems. We demonstrate that our technique is feasible to produce uMR that agrees well with intraoperative US and SV images after dural opening, after partial tumor resection, and after complete tumor resection. Currently, the computational cost to simulate tumor resection can be up to 30 min because of the need for re-meshing and the trial-and-error approach to refine the amount of tissue resection. However, this approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow

  9. Retractor-induced brain shift compensation in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2013-03-01

    In image-guided neurosurgery, intraoperative brain shift significantly degrades the accuracy of neuronavigation that is solely based on preoperative magnetic resonance images (pMR). To compensate for brain deformation and to maintain the accuracy in image guidance achieved at the start of surgery, biomechanical models have been developed to simulate brain deformation and to produce model-updated MR images (uMR) to compensate for brain shift. To-date, most studies have focused on shift compensation at early stages of surgery (i.e., updated images are only produced after craniotomy and durotomy). Simulating surgical events at later stages such as retraction and tissue resection are, perhaps, clinically more relevant because of the typically much larger magnitudes of brain deformation. However, these surgical events are substantially more complex in nature, thereby posing significant challenges in model-based brain shift compensation strategies. In this study, we present results from an initial investigation to simulate retractor-induced brain deformation through a biomechanical finite element (FE) model where whole-brain deformation assimilated from intraoperative data was used produce uMR for improved accuracy in image guidance. Specifically, intensity-encoded 3D surface profiles at the exposed cortical area were reconstructed from intraoperative stereovision (iSV) images before and after tissue retraction. Retractor-induced surface displacements were then derived by coregistering the surfaces and served as sparse displacement data to drive the FE model. With one patient case, we show that our technique is able to produce uMR that agrees well with the reconstructed iSV surface after retraction. The computational cost to simulate retractor-induced brain deformation was approximately 10 min. In addition, our approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow, suggesting the potential for its clinical application.

  10. Non-invasive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) of the Motor Cortex for Neuropathic Pain—At the Tipping Point?

    PubMed Central

    Treister, Roi; Lang, Magdalena; Klein, Max M.; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2013-01-01

    The term “neuropathic pain” (NP) refers to chronic pain caused by illnesses or injuries that damage peripheral or central pain-sensing neural pathways to cause them to fire inappropriately and signal pain without cause. Neuropathic pain is common, complicating diabetes, shingles, HIV, and cancer. Medications are often ineffective or cause various adverse effects, so better approaches are needed. Half a century ago, electrical stimulation of specific brain regions (neuromodulation) was demonstrated to relieve refractory NP without distant effects, but the need for surgical electrode implantation limited use of deep brain stimulation. Next, electrodes applied to the dura outside the brain’s surface to stimulate the motor cortex were shown to relieve NP less invasively. Now, electromagnetic induction permits cortical neurons to be stimulated entirely non-invasively using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Repeated sessions of many TMS pulses (rTMS) can trigger neuronal plasticity to produce long-lasting therapeutic benefit. Repeated TMS already has US and European regulatory approval for treating refractory depression, and multiple small studies report efficacy for neuropathic pain. Recent improvements include “frameless stereotactic” neuronavigation systems, in which patients’ head MRIs allow TMS to be applied to precise underlying cortical targets, minimizing variability between sessions and patients, which may enhance efficacy. Transcranial magnetic stimulation appears poised for the larger trials necessary for regulatory approval of a NP indication. Since few clinicians are familiar with TMS, we review its theoretical basis and historical development, summarize the neuropathic pain trial results, and identify issues to resolve before large-scale clinical trials. PMID:24228166

  11. Probabilistic versus deterministic tractography for delineation of the cortico-subthalamic hyperdirect pathway in patients with Parkinson disease selected for deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Mikkel V; Lund, Torben E; Sunde, Niels; Frandsen, Jesper; Rosendal, Frederikke; Juul, Niels; Østergaard, Karen

    2016-07-08

    tensor-based method, which demonstrated a 1.9-2.4 times higher variation. CONCLUSIONS These data provide a strong impetus for the use of a robust probabilistic tractography framework based on constrained spherical deconvolution, or similar advanced DWI models, in clinical settings. The inherent limitations and demonstrated inaccuracy of the tensor-based method leave it questionable for use in high-precision stereotactic DBS surgery. The authors have also described a straightforward method for importing tractography-derived information into any clinical neuronavigation system, based on the generation of track-density images.

  12. Localizing ECoG electrodes on the cortical anatomy without post-implantation imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Disha; Hill, N. Jeremy; Adamo, Matthew A.; Ritaccio, Anthony; Schalk, Gerwin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Electrocorticographic (ECoG) grids are placed subdurally on the cortex in people undergoing cortical resection to delineate eloquent cortex. ECoG signals have high spatial and temporal resolution and thus can be valuable for neuroscientific research. The value of these data is highest when they can be related to the cortical anatomy. Existing methods that establish this relationship rely either on post-implantation imaging using computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or X-Rays, or on intra-operative photographs. For research purposes, it is desirable to localize ECoG electrodes on the brain anatomy even when post-operative imaging is not available or when intra-operative photographs do not readily identify anatomical landmarks. Methods We developed a method to co-register ECoG electrodes to the underlying cortical anatomy using only a pre-operative MRI, a clinical neuronavigation device (such as BrainLab VectorVision), and fiducial markers. To validate our technique, we compared our results to data collected from six subjects who also had post-grid implantation imaging available. We compared the electrode coordinates obtained by our fiducial-based method to those obtained using existing methods, which are based on co-registering pre- and post-grid implantation images. Results Our fiducial-based method agreed with the MRI–CT method to within an average of 8.24 mm (mean, median = 7.10 mm) across 6 subjects in 3 dimensions. It showed an average discrepancy of 2.7 mm when compared to the results of the intra-operative photograph method in a 2D coordinate system. As this method does not require post-operative imaging such as CTs, our technique should prove useful for research in intra-operative single-stage surgery scenarios. To demonstrate the use of our method, we applied our method during real-time mapping of eloquent cortex during a single-stage surgery. The results demonstrated that our method can be applied intra

  13. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for Imaging of Chemokine Receptor 4 Expression in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lapa, Constantin; Lückerath, Katharina; Kleinlein, Irene; Monoranu, Camelia Maria; Linsenmann, Thomas; Kessler, Almuth F; Rudelius, Martina; Kropf, Saskia; Buck, Andreas K; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Löhr, Mario; Herrmann, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) has been reported to be overexpressed in glioblastoma (GBM) and to be associated with poor survival. This study investigated the feasibility of non-invasive CXCR4-directed imaging with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using the radiolabelled chemokine receptor ligand (68)Ga-Pentixafor. 15 patients with clinical suspicion on primary or recurrent glioblastoma (13 primary, 2 recurrent tumors) underwent (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT for assessment of CXCR4 expression prior to surgery. O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET/CT images were available in 11/15 cases and were compared visually and semi-quantitatively (SUVmax, SUVmean). Tumor-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated for both PET probes. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT results were also compared to histological CXCR4 expression on neuronavigated surgical samples. (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT was visually positive in 13/15 cases with SUVmean and SUVmax of 3.0±1.5 and 3.9±2.0 respectively. Respective values for (18)F-FET were 4.4±2.0 (SUVmean) and 5.3±2.3 (SUVmax). TBR for SUVmean and SUVmax were higher for (68)Ga-Pentixafor than for (18)F-FET (SUVmean 154.0±90.7 vs. 4.1±1.3; SUVmax 70.3±44.0 and 3.8±1.2, p<0.01), respectively. Histological analysis confirmed CXCR4 expression in tumor areas with high (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake; regions of the same tumor without apparent (68)Ga-Pentixafor uptake showed no or low receptor expression. In this pilot study, (68)Ga-Pentixafor retention has been observed in the vast majority of glioblastoma lesions and served as readout for non-invasive determination of CXCR4 expression. Given the paramount importance of the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis in tumor biology, (68)Ga-Pentixafor-PET/CT might prove a useful tool for sensitive, non-invasive in-vivo quantification of CXCR4 as well as selection of patients who might benefit from CXCR4-directed therapy.

  14. Initial experience with endoscopic ultrasonic aspirator in purely neuroendoscopic removal of intraventricular tumors.

    PubMed

    Cinalli, Giuseppe; Imperato, Alessia; Mirone, Giuseppe; Di Martino, Giuliana; Nicosia, Giancarlo; Ruggiero, Claudio; Aliberti, Ferdinando; Spennato, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Neuroendoscopic removal of intraventricular tumors is difficult and time consuming because of the lack of an effective decompression system that can be used through the working channel of the endoscope. The authors report on the utilization of an endoscopic ultrasonic aspirator in the resection of intraventricular tumors. METHODS Twelve pediatric patients (10 male, 2 female), ages 1-15 years old, underwent surgery via a purely endoscopic approach using a Gaab rigid endoscope and endoscopic ultrasonic aspirator. Two patients presented with intraventricular metastases from high-grade tumors (medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor), 2 with subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (associated with tuberous sclerosis), 2 with low-grade intraparaventricular tumors, 4 with suprasellar tumors (2 craniopharyngiomas and 2 optic pathway gliomas), and 2 with pineal tumors (1 immature teratoma, 1 pineal anlage tumor). Hydrocephalus was present in 5 cases. In all patients, the endoscopic trajectory and ventricular access were guided by electromagnetic neuronavigation. Nine patients underwent surgery via a precoronal bur hole while supine. In 2 cases, surgery was performed through a frontal bur hole at the level of the hairline. One patient underwent surgery via a posterior parietal approach to the trigone while in a lateral position. The endoscopic technique consisted of visualization of the tumor, ventricular washing to dilate the ventricles and to control bleeding, obtaining a tumor specimen with biopsy forceps, and ultrasonic aspiration of the tumor. Bleeding was controlled with irrigation, monopolar coagulation, and a thulium laser. RESULTS In 7 cases, the resection was total or near total (more than 90% of lesion removed). In 5 cases, the resection was partial. Histological evaluation of the collected material (withdrawn using biopsy forceps and aspirated with an ultrasonic aspirator) was diagnostic in all cases. The duration of surgery ranged from 30 to

  15. Improvement of the insertion axis for cochlear implantation with a robot-based system.

    PubMed

    Torres, Renato; Kazmitcheff, Guillaume; De Seta, Daniele; Ferrary, Evelyne; Sterkers, Olivier; Nguyen, Yann

    2017-02-01

    It has previously reported that alignment of the insertion axis along the basal turn of the cochlea was depending on surgeon' experience. In this experimental study, we assessed technological assistances, such as navigation or a robot-based system, to improve the insertion axis during cochlear implantation. A preoperative cone beam CT and a mastoidectomy with a posterior tympanotomy were performed on four temporal bones. The optimal insertion axis was defined as the closest axis to the scala tympani centerline avoiding the facial nerve. A neuronavigation system, a robot assistance prototype, and software allowing a semi-automated alignment of the robot were used to align an insertion tool with an optimal insertion axis. Four procedures were performed and repeated three times in each temporal bone: manual, manual navigation-assisted, robot-based navigation-assisted, and robot-based semi-automated. The angle between the optimal and the insertion tool axis was measured in the four procedures. The error was 8.3° ± 2.82° for the manual procedure (n = 24), 8.6° ± 2.83° for the manual navigation-assisted procedure (n = 24), 5.4° ± 3.91° for the robot-based navigation-assisted procedure (n = 24), and 3.4° ± 1.56° for the robot-based semi-automated procedure (n = 12). A higher accuracy was observed with the semi-automated robot-based technique than manual and manual navigation-assisted (p < 0.01). Combination of a navigation system and a manual insertion does not improve the alignment accuracy due to the lack of friendly user interface. On the contrary, a semi-automated robot-based system reduces both the error and the variability of the alignment with a defined optimal axis.

  16. Intracerebroventricular Pain Treatment with Analgesic Mixtures including Ziconotide for Intractable Pain.

    PubMed

    Staquet, Héléne; Dupoiron, Denis; Nader, Edmond; Menei, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of opioids for control of intractable cancer pain has been used since 1982. We present here our experience of intracerebroventricular administration of pain treatments including ziconotide associated with morphine and ropivacaine for patients resistant to a conventional approach, with nociceptive, neuropathic, or mixed pain. These clinical cases were conducted with patients suffering from refractory pain, more than 6/10 on a numerical pain rating scale (NPRS) while on high-dose medical treatment and/or intolerance with significant side effects from oral medication. The baseline study visit included a physical examination and an assessment of pain intensity on a NPRS. Under general anesthesia, a neuronavigation device was used to place the catheter on the floor of the third ventricle, supported by an endoscope. Then, drugs were injected in the cerebroventricular system, through a pump (external or subcutaneous). The primary objective was to measure pain evaluation with ICV treatment after a complete withdrawal of other medications.Four patients were enrolled: 3 with intractable cancer pain and one with central neuropathic pain. The median NPRS at baseline was 9.5 [8.5; 19]. The mean NPRS after one month was 3.5 [3; 4.5]. Ziconotide was initiated at 0.48 µg/d and up to a median of 1.2 µg/d [1.0; 1.56]. The median dose of morphine and ropivacaine used initially was respectively 0.36 mg/d [0.24; 0.66] up to 0.6 mg/d [0.45; 4.63] and 1.2 mg/d [0; 2.4] up to 2.23 mg/d [1.2; 3.35]. Minor side effects were initially observed but transiently. One psychiatric agitation required discontinuation of ziconotide infusion. For intractable pain, using ziconotide by intracerebroventricular infusion seems safe and efficient, specifically for chronic neoplastic pain of cervicocephalic, thoracic, or diffuse origin and also for pain arising from a central neuropathic mechanism.

  17. Multivoxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy identifies enriched foci of cancer stem-like cells in high-grade gliomas

    PubMed Central

    He, Tao; Qiu, Tianming; Wang, Xiaodong; Gui, Hongxing; Wang, Xilong; Hu, Qikuan; Xia, Hechun; Qi, Gaoyang; Wu, Jinsong; Ma, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the correlation between choline/creatine (Cho/Cr) ratios determined by multivoxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and the distribution of cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs) in high-grade gliomas. Patients and methods Sixteen patients with high-grade gliomas were recruited and underwent 1H-MRS examination before surgery to identify distinct tumor regions with variable Cho/Cr ratios. Using intraoperative neuronavigation, tumor tissues were accurately sampled from regions with high and low Cho/Cr ratios within each tumor. The distribution of CSLCs in samples from glioma tissue regions with different Cho/Cr ratios was quantified by neurosphere culture, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot. Results The mean neurosphere formation rate in tissues with high Cho/Cr ratios was significantly increased compared with that in low Cho/Cr ratio tissues (13.94±5.94 per 100 cells vs 8.04±3.99 per 100 cells, P<0.001). Immunohistochemistry indicated that tissues with high Cho/Cr ratios had elevated expression of CD133, nestin, and CD15, relative to low Cho/Cr ratio tissue samples (23.6%±3.8% vs 18.3%±3.3%, 25.2%±4.5% vs 19.8%±2.8%, 24.5%±3.8% vs 17.8%±2.2%, respectively; all P<0.001). Western blot demonstrated that relative CD133 and nestin protein expression in high Cho/Cr ratio regions was significantly higher than that in low Cho/Cr ratio tissue samples (0.50±0.17 vs 0.30±0.08, 0.45±0.13 vs 0.27±0.07, respectively; both P<0.001). The protein expression levels of CD133 and nestin were highly correlated with Cho/Cr ratios (r=0.897 and r=0.861, respectively). Conclusion Cho/Cr ratios correlate with the distribution of CSLCs in high-grade gliomas, and this may assist in identifying foci enriched with CSLCs and thus improve the management of high-grade gliomas. PMID:28115854

  18. P12.09MALIGNANT TUMORS OF ANTERIOR SKULL BASE: IS THE ROLE OF SURGERY ENHANCED IN THE ENDOSCOPY ERA?

    PubMed Central

    Nasi, D.; Iacoangeli, M.; Dallari, S.; Salvinelli, F.; Dobran, M.; di Somma, L.; Colasanti, R.; Nocchi, N.; Vaira, C.; Scerrati, M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Malignant tumors of anterior skull base represent a surgical challenge because of their anatomical location, the necessity of achieving negative margins, and the often-cosmetically disfiguring transfacial approaches needed. Recently, expanded endonasal endoscopic approaches (EEEA) have been developed, either alone or combined with transcranial approaches for treatment of these malignant lesions. We report our experience to illustrate the relative safety and effectiveness of the EEEA for skull base malignancies alone or combined when possible with minimally invasive approaches or traditional surgery. METHODS: From June 2009, 13 patients harbouring malignant neoplastic lesions of anterior skull base were treated at our department. Four patients affected by sinonasal malignancies with extension in anterior cranial fossa underwent to combined open subfrontal or minimally invasive supra orbital approach and EEEA. In 2 patients with respectively esthesioneuroblastoma and maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma a combined supraorbital key-hole craniotomy and EEEA were perfomed. Seven clival metastases with VI cranial nerve palsy were approached by the EEEA supplemented by neuronavigation. RESULTS: Gross total removal was performed in 9 out of 13 patients. In the other cases partial resection, but with adequate decompression and diagnosis were achieved. There were no mortality, 1 patient had infection and 1 deep vein thrombosis. CONCLUSIONS: In our experience EEEA are an integral part of the neurosurgical armamentarium for the treatment of the skull base malignancies. In properly selected cases, it affords similar oncologic outcomes with lower morbidity than traditional open approaches. The major potential advantage of the EEEA approach is direct “natural” anatomical route to the lesion without traversing any major neurovascular structures, so obviating brain retraction. Many tumors grow in a medial-to-lateral direction, displacing structures laterally as

  19. P13.10SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME: OUTCOME AND ANALYSIS OF PROGNOSTIC FACTORS ESPECIALLY ORIENTED TO THE EXTENT OF SURGICAL RESECTION

    PubMed Central

    Di Somma, L.; Iacoangeli, M.; Alvaro, L.; Di Rienzo, A.; Liverotti, V.; Della Costanza, M.; Brunozzi, D.; Polonara, G.; Scarpelli, M.; Scerrati, M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The prognosis of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) remains poor despite recent therapeutic advances. The surgical treatment of GBM (supported by functional imaging, neuronavigation and electrophysiological monitoring) remains a fundamental step. The methylation of the enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransefrase (MGMT) seems to improve the effectiveness of alkylating agents on this tumour, but other factors can influence the survival. An evaluation of all prognostic factors is essential to individuate subgroups of patients for a better selection of different treatment modalities. Our study confirms the prognostic values of both new recognized factors (MGMT presence, IDH1, news schedule of TM2 etc.) and the well-recognized prognostic factors particularly to the extent of surgical removal with the help of new technologies and in the era where people is asking more and more a better quality of life. METHODS: We retrospectively analysed 172 operated patients (115 males and 57 females), 55 of which located in eloquent areas, between March 2008 and December 2012. For each patient age, sex, preoperative clinical evaluation (Karnofsky score, KPS), tumour location, extent of surgical removal, genetic and epigenetic profile (MGMT, IDH1,etc) and postoperative treatments were recorded. We used Kaplan Meier method for the univariate analysis and the Cox regression for the multivariate one. Surgical strategy was always planned for a total tumour resection, when allowed by the intrinsic characteristics of the tumour using the so called “extracapsular “ technique. RESULTS: Overall median survival time after surgery was 10 months. At univariate analysis the gross total removal (p<0,0001), a postoperative KPS>70 (p<0,0001) and radiotherapy (p<0,0001) improve survivals. Deep structures involved or multifocal lesions (p<0,0001) resulted as negative factors in term of the quod vitam prognosis, whereas lesions arising in insula, deep structures or in primary motor cortex

  20. Image guidance based on MRI for spinal interstitial laser thermotherapy: technical aspects and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Tatsui, Claudio E; Nascimento, Clarissa N G; Suki, Dima; Amini, Behrang; Li, Jing; Ghia, Amol J; Thomas, Jonathan G; Stafford, R Jason; Rhines, Laurence D; Cata, Juan P; Kumar, Ashok J; Rao, Ganesh

    2017-02-10

    OBJECTIVE Image guidance for spinal procedures is based on 3D-fluoroscopy or CT, which provide poor visualization of soft tissues, including the spinal cord. To overcome this limitation, the authors developed a method to register intraoperative MRI (iMRI) of the spine into a neuronavigation system, allowing excellent visualization of the spinal cord. This novel technique improved the accuracy in the deployment of laser interstitial thermal therapy probes for the treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression. METHODS Patients were positioned prone on the MRI table under general anesthesia. Fiducial markers were applied on the skin of the back, and a plastic cradle was used to support the MRI coil. T2-weighted MRI sequences of the region of interest were exported to a standard navigation system. A reference array was sutured to the skin, and surface matching of the fiducial markers was performed. A navigated Jamshidi needle was advanced until contact was made with the dorsal elements; its position was confirmed with intraoperative fluoroscopy prior to advancement into a target in the epidural space. A screenshot of its final position was saved, and then the Jamshidi needle was exchanged for an MRI-compatible access cannula. MRI of the exact axial plane of each access cannula was obtained and compared with the corresponding screenshot saved during positioning. The discrepancy in millimeters between the trajectories was measured to evaluate accuracy of the image guidance RESULTS Thirteen individuals underwent implantation of 47 laser probes. The median absolute value of the discrepancy between the location predicted by the navigation system and the actual position of the access cannulas was 0.7 mm (range 0-3.2 mm). No injury or adverse event occurred during the procedures. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates the feasibility of image guidance based on MRI to perform laser interstitial thermotherapy of spinal metastasis. The authors' method permits excellent

  1. Application of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MRI-based 3D reconstruction of the dural tail sign in meningioma resection.

    PubMed

    You, Binsheng; Cheng, Yanhao; Zhang, Jian; Song, Qimin; Dai, Chao; Heng, Xueyuan; Fei, Chang

    2016-07-01

    OBJECT The goal of this study was to investigate the significance of contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (T1W) MRI-based 3D reconstruction of dural tail sign (DTS) in meningioma resection. METHODS Between May 2013 and August 2014, 18 cases of convexity and parasagittal meningiomas showing DTS on contrast-enhanced T1W MRI were selected. Contrast-enhanced T1W MRI-based 3D reconstruction of DTS was conducted before surgical treatment. The vertical and anteroposterior diameters of DTS on the contrast-enhanced T1W MR images and 3D reconstruction images were measured and compared. Surgical incisions were designed by referring to the 3D reconstruction and MR images, and then the efficiency of the 2 methods was evaluated with assistance of neuronavigation. RESULTS Three-dimensional reconstruction of DTS can reveal its overall picture. In most cases, the DTS around the tumor is uneven, whereas the DTS around the dural vessels presents longer extensions. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) between the vertical and anteroposterior diameters of DTS measured on the contrast-enhanced T1W MR and 3D reconstruction images. The 3D images of DTS were more intuitive, and the overall picture of DTS could be revealed in 1 image, which made it easier to design the incision than by using the MR images. Meanwhile, assessment showed that the incisions designed using 3D images were more accurate than those designed using MR images (ridit analysis by SAS, F = 7.95; p = 0.008). Pathological examination showed that 34 dural specimens (except 2 specimens from 1 tumor) displayed tumor invasion. The distance of tumor cell invasion was 1.0-21.6 mm (5.4 ± 4.41 mm [mean ± SD]). Tumor cell invasion was not observed at the dural resection margin in all 36 specimens. CONCLUSIONS Contrast-enhanced T1W MRI-based 3D reconstruction can intuitively and accurately reveal the size and shape of DTS, and thus provides guidance for designing meningioma incisions.

  2. Comparative anatomical analysis of the transcallosal-transchoroidal and transcallosal-transforniceal-transchoroidal approaches to the third ventricle.

    PubMed

    Vitorino Araujo, João Luiz; Veiga, José C E; Wen, Hung Tzu; de Andrade, Almir F; Teixeira, Manoel J; Otoch, José P; Rhoton, Albert L; Preul, Mark C; Spetzler, Robert F; Figueiredo, Eberval G

    2016-11-04

    OBJECTIVE Access to the third ventricle is a veritable challenge to neurosurgeons. In this context, anatomical and morphometric studies are useful for establishing the limitations and advantages of a particular surgical approach. The transchoroidal approach is versatile and provides adequate exposure of the middle and posterior regions of the third ventricle. However, the fornix column limits the exposure of the anterior region of the third ventricle. There is evidence that the unilateral section of the fornix column has little effect on cognitive function. This study compared the anatomical exposure afforded by the transforniceal-transchoroidal approach with that of the transchoroidal approach. In addition, a morphometric evaluation of structures that are relevant to and common in the 2 approaches was performed. METHODS The anatomical exposure provided by the transcallosal-transchoroidal and transcallosal-transforniceal-transchoroidal approaches was compared in 8 fresh cadavers, using a neuronavigation system. The working area, microsurgical exposure area, and angular exposure on the longitudinal and transversal planes of 2 anatomical targets (tuber cinereum and cerebral aqueduct) were compared. Additionally, the thickness of the right frontal lobe parenchyma, thickness of the corpus callosum trunk, and longitudinal diameter of the interventricular foramen were measured. The values obtained were submitted to statistical analysis using the Wilcoxon test. RESULTS In the quantitative evaluation, compared with the transchoroidal approach, the transforniceal-transchoroidal approach provided a greater mean working area (transforniceal-transchoroidal 150 ± 11 mm(2); transchoroidal 121 ± 8 mm(2); p < 0.05), larger mean microsurgical exposure area (transforniceal-transchoroidal 101 ± 9 mm(2); transchoroidal 80 ± 5 mm(2); p < 0.05), larger mean angular exposure area on the longitudinal plane for the tuber cinereum (transforniceal-transchoroidal 71° ± 7