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Sample records for neurons conveying circadian

  1. Photoperiodic plasticity in circadian clock neurons in insects.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Sakiko

    2013-01-01

    Since Bünning's observation of circadian rhythms and photoperiodism in the runner bean Phaseolus multiflorus in 1936, many studies have shown that photoperiodism is based on the circadian clock system. In insects, involvement of circadian clock genes or neurons has been recently shown in the photoperiodic control of developmental arrests, diapause. Photoperiod sets peaks of period (per) or timeless (tim) mRNA abundance at lights-off in Sarcophaga crassipalpis, Chymomyza costata and Protophormia terraenovae. Abundance of per and Clock mRNA changes by photoperiod in Pyrrhocoris apterus. Subcellular Per distribution in circadian clock neurons changes with photoperiod in P. terraenovae. Although photoperiodism is not known in Leucophaea maderae, under longer day length, more stomata and longer commissural fibers of circadian clock neurons have been found. These plastic changes in the circadian clock neurons could be an important constituent for photoperiodic clock mechanisms to integrate repetitive photoperiodic information and produce different outputs based on day length.

  2. CGRP neurons mediate sleep-specific circadian output in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kunst, Michael; Hughes, Michael E.; Raccuglia, Davide; Felix, Mario; Li, Michael; Barnett, Gregory; Duah, Janelle; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Imbalances in amount and timing of sleep are harmful to physical and mental health. Therefore, the study of the underlying mechanisms is of great biological importance. Proper timing and amount of sleep is regulated by both the circadian clock and homeostatic sleep drive. However, very little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates sleep. In this study we describe a novel role for DIURETIC HORMONE 31 (DH31), the fly homologue of the vertebrate neuropeptide CALCITONIN GENE RELATED PEPTIDE (CGRP), as a circadian wake-promoting signal that awakens the fly in anticipation of dawn. Results Analysis of loss-of-function and gain-of-function Drosophila mutants demonstrates that DH31 suppresses sleep late at night. DH31 is expressed by a subset of dorsal circadian clock neurons that also express the receptor for the circadian neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF). PDF secreted by the ventral pacemaker subset of circadian clock neurons acts on PDF receptors in the DH31-expressing dorsal clock neurons to increase DH31 secretion before dawn. Activation of PDFR in DH31 positive DN1 specifically affects sleep and has no effect on circadian rhythms, thus constituting a dedicated locus for circadian regulation of sleep. Conclusions We identified a novel signaling molecule (DH31) as part of a neuropeptide relay mechanism for circadian control of sleep. Our results indicate that outputs of the clock controlling sleep and locomotor rhythms are mediated via distinct neuronal/cellular channels. PMID:25455031

  3. Circadian pacemaker neurons change synaptic contacts across the day

    PubMed Central

    Gorostiza, E. Axel; Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Frenkel, Lia; Pírez, Nicolás; Ceriani, María Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    Summary Daily cycles of rest and activity are a common example of circadian control of physiology. In Drosophila rhythmic locomotor cycles rely on the activity of 150-200 neurons grouped in seven clusters [1, 2]. Work from many laboratories points to the small Lateral Neurons ventral (sLNvs) as essential for circadian control of locomotor rhythmicity [3-7]. sLNv neurons undergo circadian remodeling of their axonal projections opening the possibility for a circadian control of connectivity of these relevant circadian pacemakers [8]. Here we show that circadian plasticity of the sLNv axonal projections has further implications than mere structural changes. First, we found that the degree of daily structural plasticity exceeds that originally described [8] underscoring that changes in the degree of fasciculation as well as extension or pruning of axonal terminals could be involved. Interestingly, the quantity of active zones changes along the day, lending support to the attractive hypothesis that new synapses are formed while others are dismantled between late night and the following morning. More remarkably, taking full advantage of the GFP Reconstitution Across Synaptic Partners (GRASP) technique [9] we showed that, in addition to new synapses being added or removed, sLNv neurons contact different synaptic partners at different times along the day. These results lead us to propose that the circadian network, and in particular the sLNv neurons, orchestrates some of the physiological and behavioral differences between day and night by changing the path through which information travels. PMID:25155512

  4. Circadian rhythms in neuronal activity propagate through output circuits.

    PubMed

    Cavey, Matthieu; Collins, Ben; Bertet, Claire; Blau, Justin

    2016-04-01

    Twenty-four hour rhythms in behavior are organized by a network of circadian pacemaker neurons. Rhythmic activity in this network is generated by intrinsic rhythms in clock neuron physiology and communication between clock neurons. However, it is poorly understood how the activity of a small number of pacemaker neurons is translated into rhythmic behavior of the whole animal. To understand this, we screened for signals that could identify circadian output circuits in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that leucokinin neuropeptide (LK) and its receptor (LK-R) were required for normal behavioral rhythms. This LK/LK-R circuit connects pacemaker neurons to brain areas that regulate locomotor activity and sleep. Our experiments revealed that pacemaker neurons impose rhythmic activity and excitability on LK- and LK-R-expressing neurons. We also found pacemaker neuron-dependent activity rhythms in a second circadian output pathway controlled by DH44 neuropeptide-expressing neurons. We conclude that rhythmic clock neuron activity propagates to multiple downstream circuits to orchestrate behavioral rhythms.

  5. Circadian pacemaker neurons change synaptic contacts across the day.

    PubMed

    Gorostiza, E Axel; Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Frenkel, Lia; Pírez, Nicolás; Ceriani, María Fernanda

    2014-09-22

    Daily cycles of rest and activity are a common example of circadian control of physiology. In Drosophila, rhythmic locomotor cycles rely on the activity of 150-200 neurons grouped in seven clusters [1, 2]. Work from many laboratories points to the small ventral lateral neurons (sLNvs) as essential for circadian control of locomotor rhythmicity [3-7]. sLNv neurons undergo circadian remodeling of their axonal projections, opening the possibility for a circadian control of connectivity of these relevant circadian pacemakers [8]. Here we show that circadian plasticity of the sLNv axonal projections has further implications than mere structural changes. First, we found that the degree of daily structural plasticity exceeds that originally described [8], underscoring that changes in the degree of fasciculation as well as extension or pruning of axonal terminals could be involved. Interestingly, the quantity of active zones changes along the day, lending support to the attractive hypothesis that new synapses are formed while others are dismantled between late night and the following morning. More remarkably, taking full advantage of the GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners (GRASP) technique [9], we showed that, in addition to new synapses being added or removed, sLNv neurons contact different synaptic partners at different times along the day. These results lead us to propose that the circadian network, and in particular the sLNv neurons, orchestrates some of the physiological and behavioral differences between day and night by changing the path through which information travels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Heterogeneity induces rhythms of weakly coupled circadian neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Changgui; Liang, Xiaoming; Yang, Huijie; Rohling, Jos H. T.

    2016-02-01

    The main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates circadian rhythms in mammals. The SCN is composed of approximately twenty thousand heterogeneous self-oscillating neurons, that have intrinsic periods varying from 22 h to 28 h. They are coupled through neurotransmitters and neuropeptides to form a network and output a uniform periodic rhythm. Previous studies found that the heterogeneity of the neurons leads to attenuation of the circadian rhythm with strong cellular coupling. In the present study, we investigate the heterogeneity of the neurons and of the network in the condition of constant darkness. Interestingly, we found that the heterogeneity of weakly coupled neurons enables them to oscillate and strengthen the circadian rhythm. In addition, we found that the period of the SCN network increases with the increase of the degree of heterogeneity. As the network heterogeneity does not change the dynamics of the rhythm, our study shows that the heterogeneity of the neurons is vitally important for rhythm generation in weakly coupled systems, such as the SCN, and it provides a new method to strengthen the circadian rhythm, as well as an alternative explanation for differences in free running periods between species in the absence of the daily cycle.

  7. Circadian Regulation of Olfactory Receptor Neurons in the Cockroach Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Saifullah, A.S.M.; Page, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    In the cockroach, olfactory sensitivity as measured by the amplitude of the electroantennogram (EAG) is regulated by the circadian system. We wished to determine how this rhythm in antennal response was reflected in the activity of individual olfactory receptor neurons. The amplitude of the electroantennogram (EAG) and the activity of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in single olfactory sensilla were recorded simultaneously for 3–5 days in constant darkness from an antenna of the cockroach Leucophaea maderae. Both EAG amplitude and the spike frequency of the ORNs exhibited circadian rhythms with peak amplitude/activity occurring in the subjective day. The phases of the rhythms were dependent on the phase of the prior light cycle and thus were entrainable by light. Ablation of the optic lobes abolished the rhythm in EAG amplitude as has been previously reported. In contrast, the rhythm in ORN response persisted following surgery. These results indicated that a circadian clock outside the optic lobes can regulate the responses of olfactory receptor neurons and further that this modulation of the ORN response is not dependent on the circadian rhythm in EAG amplitude. PMID:19346451

  8. Synergistic Interactions between the Molecular and Neuronal Circadian Networks Drive Robust Behavioral Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Ron; Bartok, Osnat; Mezan, Shaul; Malka, Yuval; Kadener, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Most organisms use 24-hr circadian clocks to keep temporal order and anticipate daily environmental changes. In Drosophila melanogaster CLOCK (CLK) and CYCLE (CYC) initiates the circadian system by promoting rhythmic transcription of hundreds of genes. However, it is still not clear whether high amplitude transcriptional oscillations are essential for circadian timekeeping. In order to address this issue, we generated flies in which the amplitude of CLK-driven transcription can be reduced partially (approx. 60%) or strongly (90%) without affecting the average levels of CLK-target genes. The impaired transcriptional oscillations lead to low amplitude protein oscillations that were not sufficient to drive outputs of peripheral oscillators. However, circadian rhythms in locomotor activity were resistant to partial reduction in transcriptional and protein oscillations. We found that the resilience of the brain oscillator is depending on the neuronal communication among circadian neurons in the brain. Indeed, the capacity of the brain oscillator to overcome low amplitude transcriptional oscillations depends on the action of the neuropeptide PDF and on the pdf-expressing cells having equal or higher amplitude of molecular rhythms than the rest of the circadian neuronal groups in the fly brain. Therefore, our work reveals the importance of high amplitude transcriptional oscillations for cell-autonomous circadian timekeeping. Moreover, we demonstrate that the circadian neuronal network is an essential buffering system that protects against changes in circadian transcription in the brain. PMID:24698952

  9. Dissecting differential gene expression within the circadian neuronal circuit of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Nagoshi, Emi; Sugino, Ken; Kula, Ela; Okazaki, Etsuko; Tachibana, Taro; Nelson, Sacha; Rosbash, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral circadian rhythms are controlled by a neuronal circuit consisting of diverse neuronal subgroups. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the roles of neuronal subgroups within the Drosophila circadian circuit, we used cell-type specific gene-expression profiling and identified a large number of genes specifically expressed in all clock neurons or in two important subgroups. Moreover, we identified and characterized two circadian genes, which are expressed specifically in subsets of clock cells and affect different aspects of rhythms. The transcription factor Fer2 is expressed in ventral lateral neurons; it is required for the specification of lateral neurons and therefore their ability to drive locomotor rhythms. The Drosophila melanogaster homolog of the vertebrate circadian gene nocturnin is expressed in a subset of dorsal neurons and mediates the circadian light response. The approach should also enable the molecular dissection of many different Drosophila neuronal circuits. PMID:19966839

  10. Reliability of neuronal information conveyed by unreliable neuristor-based leaky integrate-and-fire neurons: a model study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyungkwang; Kornijcuk, Vladimir; Seok, Jun Yeong; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Inho; Hwang, Cheol Seong; Jeong, Doo Seok

    2015-01-01

    We conducted simulations on the neuronal behavior of neuristor-based leaky integrate-and-fire (NLIF) neurons. The phase-plane analysis on the NLIF neuron highlights its spiking dynamics – determined by two nullclines conditional on the variables on the plane. Particular emphasis was placed on the operational noise arising from the variability of the threshold switching behavior in the neuron on each switching event. As a consequence, we found that the NLIF neuron exhibits a Poisson-like noise in spiking, delimiting the reliability of the information conveyed by individual NLIF neurons. To highlight neuronal information coding at a higher level, a population of noisy NLIF neurons was analyzed in regard to probability of successful information decoding given the Poisson-like noise of each neuron. The result demonstrates highly probable success in decoding in spite of large variability – due to the variability of the threshold switching behavior – of individual neurons. PMID:25966658

  11. Circadian Neuron Feedback Controls the Drosophila Sleep-Activity Profile

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang; Yu, Junwei; Jung, Hyung Jae; Abruzzi, Katharine C.; Luo, Weifei; Griffith, Leslie C.; Rosbash, Michael

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Little is known about the ability of Drosophila circadian neurons to promote sleep. We show here with optogenetic manipulations and video recording that a subset of dorsal clock neurons (DN1s) are potent sleep-promoting cells, releasing glutamate to directly inhibit key pacemaker neurons. These pacemakers promote morning arousal by activating these same DN1s, implying that there is a late-day feedback circuit to drive siesta and nighttime sleep. To address more plastic aspects of the sleep program, we used a novel calcium assay to monitor and compared the real-time DN1 activity of freely behaving males and females. It revealed a dramatic sexual dimorphism, which parallels the well-known difference in daytime sleep. DN1 activity is also enhanced by elevated temperature, consistent with its known effect on sleep. These new approaches indicate that the DN1s have a major impact on the fly sleep-wake profile and integrate environmental information with the circadian molecular program. PMID:27479324

  12. Circadian factor BMAL1 in histaminergic neurons regulates sleep architecture.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao; Zecharia, Anna; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Qianzi; Yustos, Raquel; Jager, Polona; Vyssotski, Alexei L; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Chesham, Johanna E; Ma, Ying; Brickley, Stephen G; Hastings, Michael H; Franks, Nicholas P; Wisden, William

    2014-12-01

    Circadian clocks allow anticipation of daily environmental changes. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) houses the master clock, but clocks are also widely expressed elsewhere in the body. Although some peripheral clocks have established roles, it is unclear what local brain clocks do. We tested the contribution of one putative local clock in mouse histaminergic neurons in the tuberomamillary nucleus to the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Histaminergic neurons are silent during sleep, and start firing after wake onset; the released histamine, made by the enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC), enhances wakefulness. We found that hdc gene expression varies with time of day. Selectively deleting the Bmal1 (also known as Arntl or Mop3) clock gene from histaminergic cells removes this variation, producing higher HDC expression and brain histamine levels during the day. The consequences include more fragmented sleep, prolonged wake at night, shallower sleep depth (lower nonrapid eye movement [NREM] δ power), increased NREM-to-REM transitions, hindered recovery sleep after sleep deprivation, and impaired memory. Removing BMAL1 from histaminergic neurons does not, however, affect circadian rhythms. We propose that for mammals with polyphasic/nonwake consolidating sleep, the local BMAL1-dependent clock directs appropriately timed declines and increases in histamine biosynthesis to produce an appropriate balance of wake and sleep within the overall daily cycle of rest and activity specified by the SCN.

  13. Circadian Factor BMAL1 in Histaminergic Neurons Regulates Sleep Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao; Zecharia, Anna; Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Qianzi; Yustos, Raquel; Jager, Polona; Vyssotski, Alexei L.; Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Chesham, Johanna E.; Ma, Ying; Brickley, Stephen G.; Hastings, Michael H.; Franks, Nicholas P.; Wisden, William

    2014-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks allow anticipation of daily environmental changes [1]. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) houses the master clock, but clocks are also widely expressed elsewhere in the body [1]. Although some peripheral clocks have established roles [1], it is unclear what local brain clocks do [2, 3]. We tested the contribution of one putative local clock in mouse histaminergic neurons in the tuberomamillary nucleus to the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Histaminergic neurons are silent during sleep, and start firing after wake onset [4–6]; the released histamine, made by the enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC), enhances wakefulness [7–11]. We found that hdc gene expression varies with time of day. Selectively deleting the Bmal1 (also known as Arntl or Mop3 [12]) clock gene from histaminergic cells removes this variation, producing higher HDC expression and brain histamine levels during the day. The consequences include more fragmented sleep, prolonged wake at night, shallower sleep depth (lower nonrapid eye movement [NREM] δ power), increased NREM-to-REM transitions, hindered recovery sleep after sleep deprivation, and impaired memory. Removing BMAL1 from histaminergic neurons does not, however, affect circadian rhythms. We propose that for mammals with polyphasic/nonwake consolidating sleep, the local BMAL1-dependent clock directs appropriately timed declines and increases in histamine biosynthesis to produce an appropriate balance of wake and sleep within the overall daily cycle of rest and activity specified by the SCN. PMID:25454592

  14. Cyclic AMP imaging sheds light on PDF signaling in circadian clock neurons.

    PubMed

    Tomchik, Seth M; Davis, Ronald L

    2008-04-24

    In Drosophila, the neuropeptide PDF is required for circadian rhythmicity, but it is unclear where PDF acts. In this issue of Neuron, Shafer et al. use a novel bioimaging methodology to demonstrate that PDF elevates cAMP in nearly all clock neurons. Thus, PDF apparently exerts more widespread effects on the circadian clock network than suggested by previous studies of PDF receptor expression.

  15. Circadian modulation of osmoregulated firing in rat supraoptic nucleus neurones.

    PubMed

    Trudel, E; Bourque, C W

    2012-04-01

    The antidiuretic hormone vasopressin (VP) promotes water reabsorption from the kidney and levels of circulating VP are normally related linearly to plasma osmolality, aiming to maintain the latter close to a predetermined set point. Interestingly, VP levels rise also in the absence of an increase in osmolality during late sleep in various mammals, including rats and humans. This circadian rhythm is functionally important because the absence of a late night VP surge results in polyuria and disrupts sleep in humans. Previous work has indicated that the VP surge may be caused by facilitation of the central processes mediating the osmotic control of VP release, and the mechanism by which this occurs was recently studied in angled slices of rat hypothalamus that preserve intact network interactions between the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN; the biological clock), the organum vasculosum lamina terminalis (OVLT; the central osmosensory nucleus) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON; which contains VP-releasing neurohypophysial neurones). These studies confirmed that the electrical activity of SCN clock neurones is higher during the middle sleep period (MSP) than during the late sleep period (LSP). Moreover, they revealed that the excitation of SON neurones caused by hyperosmotic stimulation of the OVLT was greater during the LSP than during the MSP. Activation of clock neurones by repetitive electrical stimulation, or by injection of glutamate into the SCN, caused a presynaptic inhibition of glutamatergic synapses made between the axon terminals of OVLT neurones and SON neurones. Consistent with this effect, activation of clock neurones with glutamate also reduced the excitation of SON neurones caused by hyperosmotic stimulation of the OVLT. These results suggest that clock neurones in the SCN can mediate an increase in VP release through a disinhibition of excitatory synapses between the OVLT and the SON during the LSP. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2012

  16. PDF neuron firing phase-shifts key circadian activity neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fang; Cerullo, Isadora; Chen, Xiao; Rosbash, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Our experiments address two long-standing models for the function of the Drosophila brain circadian network: a dual oscillator model, which emphasizes the primacy of PDF-containing neurons, and a cell-autonomous model for circadian phase adjustment. We identify five different circadian (E) neurons that are a major source of rhythmicity and locomotor activity. Brief firing of PDF cells at different times of day generates a phase response curve (PRC), which mimics a light-mediated PRC and requires PDF receptor expression in the five E neurons. Firing also resembles light by causing TIM degradation in downstream neurons. Unlike light however, firing-mediated phase-shifting is CRY-independent and exploits the E3 ligase component CUL-3 in the early night to degrade TIM. Our results suggest that PDF neurons integrate light information and then modulate the phase of E cell oscillations and behavioral rhythms. The results also explain how fly brain rhythms persist in constant darkness and without CRY. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02780.001 PMID:24939987

  17. PDF neuron firing phase-shifts key circadian activity neurons in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fang; Cerullo, Isadora; Chen, Xiao; Rosbash, Michael

    2014-06-17

    Our experiments address two long-standing models for the function of the Drosophila brain circadian network: a dual oscillator model, which emphasizes the primacy of PDF-containing neurons, and a cell-autonomous model for circadian phase adjustment. We identify five different circadian (E) neurons that are a major source of rhythmicity and locomotor activity. Brief firing of PDF cells at different times of day generates a phase response curve (PRC), which mimics a light-mediated PRC and requires PDF receptor expression in the five E neurons. Firing also resembles light by causing TIM degradation in downstream neurons. Unlike light however, firing-mediated phase-shifting is CRY-independent and exploits the E3 ligase component CUL-3 in the early night to degrade TIM. Our results suggest that PDF neurons integrate light information and then modulate the phase of E cell oscillations and behavioral rhythms. The results also explain how fly brain rhythms persist in constant darkness and without CRY.

  18. Central Control of Circadian Phase in Arousal-Promoting Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, Carrie E.; McKinley Brewer, Judy; Bittman, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Cells of the dorsomedial/lateral hypothalamus (DMH/LH) that produce hypocretin (HCRT) promote arousal in part by activation of cells of the locus coeruleus (LC) which express tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives endogenous daily rhythms, including those of sleep and wakefulness. These circadian oscillations are generated by a transcriptional-translational feedback loop in which the Period (Per) genes constitute critical components. This cell-autonomous molecular clock operates not only within the SCN but also in neurons of other brain regions. However, the phenotype of such neurons and the nature of the phase controlling signal from the pacemaker are largely unknown. We used dual fluorescent in situ hybridization to assess clock function in vasopressin, HCRT and TH cells of the SCN, DMH/LH and LC, respectively, of male Syrian hamsters. In the first experiment, we found that Per1 expression in HCRT and TH oscillated in animals held in constant darkness with a peak phase that lagged that in AVP cells of the SCN by several hours. In the second experiment, hamsters induced to split their locomotor rhythms by exposure to constant light had asymmetric Per1 expression within cells of the middle SCN at 6 h before activity onset (AO) and in HCRT cells 9 h before and at AO. We did not observe evidence of lateralization of Per1 expression in the LC. We conclude that the SCN communicates circadian phase to HCRT cells via lateralized neural projections, and suggests that Per1 expression in the LC may be regulated by signals of a global or bilateral nature. PMID:23826226

  19. Contribution of Drosophila TRPA1-expressing neurons to circadian locomotor activity patterns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngseok

    2013-01-01

    In both vertebrates and invertebrates, Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels are expressed in sensory neurons and mediate environmental stimuli such as light, sound, temperature, and taste. Some of these channels, however, are expressed only in the brain and their functions remain incompletely understood. Using the GAL4/UAS binary system with a line in which the GAL4 had been knocked into the trpA1 locus in Drosophila, we recently reported new insights into TRPA1 localization and function, including its expression in approximately 15% of all circadian neurons. TRPA1 is expressed in lateral posterior neurons (LPNs), which are known to be highly sensitive to entrainment by temperature cycles. Here, I used the bacterial sodium channel, NaChBac, to examine the effects of altering the electrical properties of trpA1 neurons on circadian rhythms. My results indicate that circadian activity of the flies in the morning, daytime, and evening was affected in a temperature-dependent manner following TRPA1 neuronal activation. Remarkably, TRPA1 neuron activation in flies kept at 18°C impacted the morning peak of circadian activity even though TRPA1 is not expressed in morning cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the activation of TRPA1-expressing neurons may differentially coordinate light/dark circadian entrainment, depending on the temperature.

  20. Circadian Activators Are Expressed Days before They Initiate Clock Function in Late Pacemaker Neurons from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianxin; Mahesh, Guruswamy; Houl, Jerry H; Hardin, Paul E

    2015-06-03

    Circadian pacemaker neurons in the Drosophila brain control daily rhythms in locomotor activity. These pacemaker neurons can be subdivided into early or late groups depending on whether rhythms in period (per) and timeless (tim) expression are initiated at the first instar (L1) larval stage or during metamorphosis, respectively. Because CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) heterodimers initiate circadian oscillator function by activating per and tim transcription, a Clk-GFP transgene was used to mark when late pacemaker neurons begin to develop. We were surprised to see that CLK-GFP was already expressed in four of five clusters of late pacemaker neurons during the third instar (L3) larval stage. CLK-GFP is only detected in postmitotic neurons from L3 larvae, suggesting that these four late pacemaker neuron clusters are formed before the L3 larval stage. A GFP-cyc transgene was used to show that CYC, like CLK, is also expressed exclusively in pacemaker neurons from L3 larval brains, demonstrating that CLK-CYC is not sufficient to activate per and tim in late pacemaker neurons at the L3 larval stage. These results suggest that most late pacemaker neurons develop days before novel factors activate circadian oscillator function during metamorphosis.

  1. Circadian neurons in the lateral habenula: Clocking motivated behaviors.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Jorge

    2017-06-28

    The main circadian clock in mammals is located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), however, central timing mechanisms are also present in other brain structures beyond the SCN. The lateral habenula (LHb), known for its important role in the regulation of the monoaminergic system, contains such a circadian clock whose molecular and cellular mechanisms as well as functional role are not well known. However, since monoaminergic systems show circadian activity, it is possible that the LHb-clock's role is to modulate the rhythmic activity of the dopamine, serotonin and norephinephrine systems, and associated behaviors. Moreover, the LHb is involved in different pathological states such as depression, addiction and schizophrenia, states in which sleep and circadian alterations have been reported. Thus, perturbations of circadian activity in the LHb might, in part, be a cause of these rhythmic alterations in psychiatric ailments. In this review the current state of the LHb clock and its possible implications in the control of monoaminergic systems rhythms, motivated behaviors (e.g., feeding, drug intake) and depression (with circadian disruptions and altered motivation) will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling the emergence of circadian rhythms in a clock neuron network.

    PubMed

    Diambra, Luis; Malta, Coraci P

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in pacemaker cells persist for weeks in constant darkness, while in other types of cells the molecular oscillations that underlie circadian rhythms damp rapidly under the same conditions. Although much progress has been made in understanding the biochemical and cellular basis of circadian rhythms, the mechanisms leading to damped or self-sustained oscillations remain largely unknown. There exist many mathematical models that reproduce the circadian rhythms in the case of a single cell of the Drosophila fly. However, not much is known about the mechanisms leading to coherent circadian oscillation in clock neuron networks. In this work we have implemented a model for a network of interacting clock neurons to describe the emergence (or damping) of circadian rhythms in Drosophila fly, in the absence of zeitgebers. Our model consists of an array of pacemakers that interact through the modulation of some parameters by a network feedback. The individual pacemakers are described by a well-known biochemical model for circadian oscillation, to which we have added degradation of PER protein by light and multiplicative noise. The network feedback is the PER protein level averaged over the whole network. In particular, we have investigated the effect of modulation of the parameters associated with (i) the control of net entrance of PER into the nucleus and (ii) the non-photic degradation of PER. Our results indicate that the modulation of PER entrance into the nucleus allows the synchronization of clock neurons, leading to coherent circadian oscillations under constant dark condition. On the other hand, the modulation of non-photic degradation cannot reset the phases of individual clocks subjected to intrinsic biochemical noise.

  3. Heterogeneous Expression of the Core Circadian Clock Proteins among Neuronal Cell Types in Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Zhijing; Ribelayga, Christophe P.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in metabolism, physiology, and behavior originate from cell-autonomous circadian clocks located in many organs and structures throughout the body and that share a common molecular mechanism based on the clock genes and their protein products. In the mammalian neural retina, despite evidence supporting the presence of several circadian clocks regulating many facets of retinal physiology and function, the exact cellular location and genetic signature of the retinal clock cells remain largely unknown. Here we examined the expression of the core circadian clock proteins CLOCK, BMAL1, NPAS2, PERIOD 1(PER1), PERIOD 2 (PER2), and CRYPTOCHROME2 (CRY2) in identified neurons of the mouse retina during daily and circadian cycles. We found concurrent clock protein expression in most retinal neurons, including cone photoreceptors, dopaminergic amacrine cells, and melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells. Remarkably, diurnal and circadian rhythms of expression of all clock proteins were observed in the cones whereas only CRY2 expression was found to be rhythmic in the dopaminergic amacrine cells. Only a low level of expression of the clock proteins was detected in the rods at any time of the daily or circadian cycle. Our observations provide evidence that cones and not rods are cell-autonomous circadian clocks and reveal an important disparity in the expression of the core clock components among neuronal cell types. We propose that the overall temporal architecture of the mammalian retina does not result from the synchronous activity of pervasive identical clocks but rather reflects the cellular and regional heterogeneity in clock function within retinal tissue. PMID:23189207

  4. The neuropeptide PDF acts directly on evening pacemaker neurons to regulate multiple features of circadian behavior.

    PubMed

    Lear, Bridget C; Zhang, Luoying; Allada, Ravi

    2009-07-01

    Discrete clusters of circadian clock neurons temporally organize daily behaviors such as sleep and wake. In Drosophila, a network of just 150 neurons drives two peaks of timed activity in the morning and evening. A subset of these neurons expresses the neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF), which is important for promoting morning behavior as well as maintaining robust free-running rhythmicity in constant conditions. Yet, how PDF acts on downstream circuits to mediate rhythmic behavior is unknown. Using circuit-directed rescue of PDF receptor mutants, we show that PDF targeting of just approximately 30 non-PDF evening circadian neurons is sufficient to drive morning behavior. This function is not accompanied by large changes in core molecular oscillators in light-dark, indicating that PDF RECEPTOR likely regulates the output of these cells under these conditions. We find that PDF also acts on this focused set of non-PDF neurons to regulate both evening activity phase and period length, consistent with modest resetting effects on core oscillators. PDF likely acts on more distributed pacemaker neuron targets, including the PDF neurons themselves, to regulate rhythmic strength. Here we reveal defining features of the circuit-diagram for PDF peptide function in circadian behavior, revealing the direct neuronal targets of PDF as well as its behavioral functions at those sites. These studies define a key direct output circuit sufficient for multiple PDF dependent behaviors.

  5. Neuromedin s-producing neurons act as essential pacemakers in the suprachiasmatic nucleus to couple clock neurons and dictate circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ivan T; Chang, Alexander S; Manandhar, Manabu; Shan, Yongli; Fan, Junmei; Izumo, Mariko; Ikeda, Yuichi; Motoike, Toshiyuki; Dixon, Shelley; Seinfeld, Jeffrey E; Takahashi, Joseph S; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2015-03-04

    Circadian behavior in mammals is orchestrated by neurons within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), yet the neuronal population necessary for the generation of timekeeping remains unknown. We show that a subset of SCN neurons expressing the neuropeptide neuromedin S (NMS) plays an essential role in the generation of daily rhythms in behavior. We demonstrate that lengthening period within Nms neurons is sufficient to lengthen period of the SCN and behavioral circadian rhythms. Conversely, mice without a functional molecular clock within Nms neurons lack synchronous molecular oscillations and coherent behavioral daily rhythms. Interestingly, we found that mice lacking Nms and its closely related paralog, Nmu, do not lose in vivo circadian rhythms. However, blocking vesicular transmission from Nms neurons with intact cell-autonomous clocks disrupts the timing mechanisms of the SCN, revealing that Nms neurons define a subpopulation of pacemakers that control SCN network synchrony and in vivo circadian rhythms through intercellular synaptic transmission.

  6. A mathematical model of communication between groups of circadian neurons in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Risau-Gusman, Sebastián; Gleiser, Pablo M

    2014-12-01

    In the fruit fly, circadian behavior is controlled by a small number of specialized neurons, whose molecular clocks are relatively well known. However, much less is known about how these neurons communicate among themselves. In particular, only 1 circadian neuropeptide, pigment-dispersing factor (PDF), has been identified, and most aspects of its interaction with the molecular clock remain to be elucidated. Furthermore, it is speculated that many other peptides should contribute to circadian communication. We have developed a relatively detailed model of the 2 main groups of circadian pacemaker neurons (sLNvs and LNds) to investigate these issues. We have proposed many possible mechanisms for the interaction between the synchronization factors and the molecular clock, and we have compared the outputs with the experimental results reported in the literature both for the wild-type and PDF-null mutant. We have studied how different the properties of each neuron should be to account for the observations reported for the sLNvs in the mutant. We have found that only a few mechanisms, mostly related to the slowing down of nuclear entry of a circadian protein, can synchronize neurons that present these differences. Detailed immunofluorescent recordings have suggested that, whereas in the mutant, LNd neurons are synchronized, in the wild-type, a subset of the LNds oscillate faster than the rest. With our model, we find that a more likely explanation for the same observations is that this subset is being driven outside its synchronization range and displays therefore a complex pattern of oscillation.

  7. Circadian modulation of dopamine levels and dopaminergic neuron development contributes to attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Zhong, Zhaomin; Wang, Mingyong; Chen, Xifeng; Tan, Yicheng; Zhang, Shuqing; He, Wei; He, Xiong; Huang, Guodong; Lu, Haiping; Wu, Ping; Che, Yi; Yan, Yi-Lin; Postlethwait, John H; Chen, Wenbiao; Wang, Han

    2015-02-11

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in children and adults. While ADHD patients often display circadian abnormalities, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we found that the zebrafish mutant for the circadian gene period1b (per1b) displays hyperactive, impulsive-like, and attention deficit-like behaviors and low levels of dopamine, reminiscent of human ADHD patients. We found that the circadian clock directly regulates dopamine-related genes monoamine oxidase and dopamine β hydroxylase, and acts via genes important for the development or maintenance of dopaminergic neurons to regulate their number and organization in the ventral diencephalic posterior tuberculum. We then found that Per1 knock-out mice also display ADHD-like symptoms and reduced levels of dopamine, thereby showing highly conserved roles of the circadian clock in ADHD. Our studies demonstrate that disruption of a circadian clock gene elicits ADHD-like syndrome. The circadian model for attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior sheds light on ADHD pathogenesis and opens avenues for exploring novel targets for diagnosis and therapy for this common psychiatric disorder.

  8. Circadian Modulation of Dopamine Levels and Dopaminergic Neuron Development Contributes to Attention Deficiency and Hyperactive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Zhong, Zhaomin; Wang, Mingyong; Chen, Xifeng; Tan, Yicheng; Zhang, Shuqing; He, Wei; He, Xiong; Huang, Guodong; Lu, Haiping; Wu, Ping; Che, Yi; Yan, Yi-Lin; Postlethwait, John H.; Chen, Wenbiao

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in children and adults. While ADHD patients often display circadian abnormalities, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we found that the zebrafish mutant for the circadian gene period1b (per1b) displays hyperactive, impulsive-like, and attention deficit-like behaviors and low levels of dopamine, reminiscent of human ADHD patients. We found that the circadian clock directly regulates dopamine-related genes monoamine oxidase and dopamine β hydroxylase, and acts via genes important for the development or maintenance of dopaminergic neurons to regulate their number and organization in the ventral diencephalic posterior tuberculum. We then found that Per1 knock-out mice also display ADHD-like symptoms and reduced levels of dopamine, thereby showing highly conserved roles of the circadian clock in ADHD. Our studies demonstrate that disruption of a circadian clock gene elicits ADHD-like syndrome. The circadian model for attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior sheds light on ADHD pathogenesis and opens avenues for exploring novel targets for diagnosis and therapy for this common psychiatric disorder. PMID:25673850

  9. Calcium responses of circadian pacemaker neurons of the cockroach Rhyparobia maderae to acetylcholine and histamine.

    PubMed

    Baz, El-Sayed; Wei, Hongying; Grosshans, Johannes; Stengl, Monika

    2013-05-01

    The accessory medulla (aMe) is the pacemaker that controls circadian activity rhythms in the cockroach Rhyparobia maderae. Not much is known about the classical neurotransmitters of input pathways to the cockroach circadian system. The circadian pacemaker center receives photic input from the compound eye, via unknown excitatory and GABAergic inhibitory entrainment pathways. In addition, neuropeptidergic inputs couple both pacemaker centers. A histamine-immunoreactive centrifugal neuron connects the ventral aMe with projection areas in the lateral protocerebrum and may provide non-photic inputs. To identify neurotransmitters of input pathways to the circadian clock with Fura-2-dependent Ca(2+) imaging, primary cell cultures of the adult aMe were stimulated with acetylcholine (ACh), as the most prominent excitatory, and histamine, as common inhibitory neurotransmitter. In most of aMe neurons, ACh application caused dose-dependent increases in intracellular Ca(2+) levels via ionotropic nicotinic ACh receptors. These ACh-dependent rises in Ca(2+) were mediated by mibefradil-sensitive voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels. In contrast, histamine application decreased intracellular Ca(2+) levels in only a subpopulation of aMe cells via H2-type histamine receptor chloride channels. Thus, our data suggest that ACh is part of the light entrainment pathway while histamine is involved in a non-photic input pathway to the ventral circadian clock of the Madeira cockroach.

  10. Electrical Hyperexcitation of Lateral Ventral Pacemaker Neurons Desynchronizes Downstream Circadian Oscillators in the Fly Circadian Circuit and Induces Multiple Behavioral Periods

    PubMed Central

    Nitabach, Michael N.; Wu, Ying; Sheeba, Vasu; Lemon, William C.; Strumbos, John; Zelensky, Paul K.; White, Benjamin H.; Holmes, Todd C.

    2008-01-01

    Coupling of autonomous cellular oscillators is an essential aspect of circadian clock function but little is known about its circuit requirements. Functional ablation of the pigment-dispersing factor-expressing lateral ventral subset (LNV ) of Drosophila clock neurons abolishes circadian rhythms of locomotor activity. The hypothesis that LNVs synchronize oscillations in downstream clock neurons was tested by rendering the LNVs hyperexcitable via transgenic expression of a low activation threshold voltage-gated sodium channel. When the LNVs are made hyperexcitable, free-running behavioral rhythms decompose into multiple independent superimposed oscillations and the clock protein oscillations in the dorsal neuron 1 and 2 subgroups of clock neurons are phase-shifted. Thus, regulated electrical activity of the LNVs synchronize multiple oscillators in the fly circadian pacemaker circuit. PMID:16407545

  11. Adult-specific electrical silencing of pacemaker neurons uncouples the molecular oscillator from circadian outputs

    PubMed Central

    Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Berni, Jimena; Aranovich, Ezequiel J.; Muraro, Nara I.; Beckwith, Esteban J.; Ceriani, María Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Circadian rhythms regulate physiology and behavior through transcriptional feedback loops of clock genes running within specific pacemaker cells. In Drosophila, molecular oscillations in the small ventral Lateral Neurons (sLNvs) command rhythmic behavior under free-running conditions releasing the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) in a circadian fashion. Electrical activity in the sLNvs is also required for behavioral rhythmicity. Yet, how temporal information is transduced into behavior remains unclear. Results Here we developed a new tool for temporal control of gene expression to obtain adult-restricted electrical silencing of the PDF circuit, which led to reversible behavioral arrhythmicity. Remarkably, PER oscillations during the silenced phase remained unaltered, indicating that arrhythmicity is a direct consequence of the silenced activity. Accordingly, circadian axonal remodeling and PDF accumulation were severely affected during the silenced phase. Conclusions Although electrical activity of the sLNvs is not a clock component it coordinates circuit outputs leading to rhythmic behavior. PMID:22018542

  12. KAYAK-α modulates circadian transcriptional feedback loops in Drosophila pacemaker neurons.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jinli; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Emery, Patrick

    2012-11-21

    Circadian rhythms are generated by well-conserved interlocked transcriptional feedback loops in animals. In Drosophila, the dimeric transcription factor CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC) promotes period (per), timeless (tim), vrille (vri), and PAR-domain protein 1 (Pdp1) transcription. PER and TIM negatively feed back on CLK/CYC transcriptional activity, whereas VRI and PDP1 negatively and positively regulate Clk transcription, respectively. Here, we show that the α isoform of the Drosophila FOS homolog KAYAK (KAY) is required for normal circadian behavior. KAY-α downregulation in circadian pacemaker neurons increases period length by 1.5 h. This behavioral phenotype is correlated with decreased expression of several circadian proteins. The strongest effects are on CLK and the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR, which are both under VRI and PDP1 control. Consistently, KAY-α can bind to VRI and inhibit its interaction with the Clk promoter. Interestingly, KAY-α can also repress CLK activity. Hence, in flies with low KAY-α levels, CLK derepression would partially compensate for increased VRI repression, thus attenuating the consequences of KAY-α downregulation on CLK targets. We propose that the double role of KAY-α in the two transcriptional loops controlling Drosophila circadian behavior brings precision and stability to their oscillations.

  13. Mmp1 Processing of the PDF Neuropeptide Regulates Circadian Structural Plasticity of Pacemaker Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Fernández-Gamba, Ágata; Gorostiza, E. Axel; Herrero, Anastasia; Castaño, Eduardo M.; Ceriani, M. Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    In the Drosophila brain, the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) is expressed in the small and large Lateral ventral neurons (LNvs) and regulates circadian locomotor behavior. Interestingly, PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals changes across the day as synaptic contacts do as a result of a remarkable remodeling of sLNv projections. Despite the relevance of this phenomenon to circuit plasticity and behavior, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work we provide evidence that PDF along with matrix metalloproteinases (Mmp1 and 2) are key in the control of circadian structural remodeling. Adult-specific downregulation of PDF levels per se hampers circadian axonal remodeling, as it does altering Mmp1 or Mmp2 levels within PDF neurons post-developmentally. However, only Mmp1 affects PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals and exerts a clear effect on overt behavior. In vitro analysis demonstrated that PDF is hydrolyzed by Mmp1, thereby suggesting that Mmp1 could directly terminate its biological activity. These data demonstrate that Mmp1 modulates PDF processing, which leads to daily structural remodeling and circadian behavior. PMID:25356918

  14. Mmp1 processing of the PDF neuropeptide regulates circadian structural plasticity of pacemaker neurons.

    PubMed

    Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Fernández-Gamba, Agata; Gorostiza, E Axel; Herrero, Anastasia; Castaño, Eduardo M; Ceriani, M Fernanda

    2014-10-01

    In the Drosophila brain, the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) is expressed in the small and large Lateral ventral neurons (LNvs) and regulates circadian locomotor behavior. Interestingly, PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals changes across the day as synaptic contacts do as a result of a remarkable remodeling of sLNv projections. Despite the relevance of this phenomenon to circuit plasticity and behavior, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work we provide evidence that PDF along with matrix metalloproteinases (Mmp1 and 2) are key in the control of circadian structural remodeling. Adult-specific downregulation of PDF levels per se hampers circadian axonal remodeling, as it does altering Mmp1 or Mmp2 levels within PDF neurons post-developmentally. However, only Mmp1 affects PDF immunoreactivity at the dorsal terminals and exerts a clear effect on overt behavior. In vitro analysis demonstrated that PDF is hydrolyzed by Mmp1, thereby suggesting that Mmp1 could directly terminate its biological activity. These data demonstrate that Mmp1 modulates PDF processing, which leads to daily structural remodeling and circadian behavior.

  15. Circadian and homeostatic regulation of structural synaptic plasticity in hypocretin neurons.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Lior; Wang, Gordon; Yokogawa, Tohei; Skariah, Gemini M; Smith, Stephen J; Mourrain, Philippe; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2010-10-06

    Neurons exhibit rhythmic activity that ultimately affects behavior such as sleep. In living zebrafish larvae, we used time-lapse two-photon imaging of the presynaptic marker synaptophysin in hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) neurons to determine the dynamics of synaptic modifications during the day and night. We observed circadian rhythmicity in synapse number in HCRT axons. This rhythm is regulated primarily by the circadian clock but is also affected by sleep deprivation. Furthermore, NPTX2, a protein implicated in AMPA receptor clustering, modulates circadian synaptic changes. In zebrafish, nptx2b is a rhythmic gene that is mostly expressed in hypothalamic and pineal gland cells. Arrhythmic transgenic nptx2b overexpression (hcrt:NPTX2b) increases synapse number and abolishes rhythmicity in HCRT axons. Finally, hcrt:NPTX2b fish are resistant to the sleep-promoting effects of melatonin. This behavioral effect is consistent with NPTX2b-mediated increased activity of HCRT circuitry. These data provide real-time in vivo evidence of circadian and homeostatic regulation of structural synaptic plasticity.

  16. Dynamic interactions mediated by nonredundant signaling mechanisms couple circadian clock neurons.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jennifer A; Leise, Tanya L; Castanon-Cervantes, Oscar; Davidson, Alec J

    2013-11-20

    Interactions among suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons are required for robust circadian rhythms entrained to local time. To investigate these signaling mechanisms, we developed a functional coupling assay that uniquely captures the dynamic process by which SCN neurons interact. As a population, SCN neurons typically display synchronized rhythms with similar peak times, but will peak 6-12 hr apart after in vivo exposure to long days. Once they are removed from these conditions, SCN neurons resynchronize through a phase-dependent coupling process mediated by both vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and GABAA signaling. Notably, GABAA signaling contributes to coupling when the SCN network is in an antiphase configuration, but opposes synchrony under steady-state conditions. Further, VIP acts together with GABAA signaling to couple the network in an antiphase configuration, but promotes synchrony under steady-state conditions by counteracting the actions of GABAA signaling. Thus, SCN neurons interact through nonredundant coupling mechanisms influenced by the state of the network.

  17. The Drosophila Circadian Clock Gates Sleep through Time-of-Day Dependent Modulation of Sleep-Promoting Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Daniel J.; Vigderman, Abigail S.; Dean, Terry; Garbe, David S.; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep is under the control of homeostatic and circadian processes, which interact to determine sleep timing and duration, but the mechanisms through which the circadian system modulates sleep are largely unknown. We therefore used adult-specific, temporally controlled neuronal activation and inhibition to identify an interaction between the circadian clock and a novel population of sleep-promoting neurons in Drosophila. Methods: Transgenic flies expressed either dTRPA1, a neuronal activator, or Shibirets1, an inhibitor of synaptic release, in small subsets of neurons. Sleep, as determined by activity monitoring and video tracking, was assessed before and after temperature-induced activation or inhibition using these effector molecules. We compared the effect of these manipulations in control flies and in mutant flies that lacked components of the molecular circadian clock. Results: Adult-specific activation or inhibition of a population of neurons that projects to the sleep-promoting dorsal Fan-Shaped Body resulted in bidirectional control over sleep. Interestingly, the magnitude of the sleep changes were time-of-day dependent. Activation of sleep-promoting neurons was maximally effective during the middle of the day and night, and was relatively ineffective during the day-to-night and night-to-day transitions. These time-ofday specific effects were absent in flies that lacked functional circadian clocks. Conclusions: We conclude that the circadian system functions to gate sleep through active inhibition at specific times of day. These data identify a mechanism through which the circadian system prevents premature sleep onset in the late evening, when homeostatic sleep drive is high. Citation: Cavanaugh DJ, Vigderman AS, Dean T, Garbe DS, Sehgal A. The Drosophila circadian clock gates sleep through time-of-day dependent modulation of sleep-promoting neurons. SLEEP 2016;39(2):345–356. PMID:26350473

  18. Reciprocal cholinergic and GABAergic modulation of the small ventrolateral pacemaker neurons of Drosophila's circadian clock neuron network.

    PubMed

    Lelito, Katherine R; Shafer, Orie T

    2012-04-01

    The relatively simple clock neuron network of Drosophila is a valuable model system for the neuronal basis of circadian timekeeping. Unfortunately, many key neuronal classes of this network are inaccessible to electrophysiological analysis. We have therefore adopted the use of genetically encoded sensors to address the physiology of the fly's circadian clock network. Using genetically encoded Ca(2+) and cAMP sensors, we have investigated the physiological responses of two specific classes of clock neuron, the large and small ventrolateral neurons (l- and s-LN(v)s), to two neurotransmitters implicated in their modulation: acetylcholine (ACh) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Live imaging of l-LN(v) cAMP and Ca(2+) dynamics in response to cholinergic agonist and GABA application were well aligned with published electrophysiological data, indicating that our sensors were capable of faithfully reporting acute physiological responses to these transmitters within single adult clock neuron soma. We extended these live imaging methods to s-LN(v)s, critical neuronal pacemakers whose physiological properties in the adult brain are largely unknown. Our s-LN(v) experiments revealed the predicted excitatory responses to bath-applied cholinergic agonists and the predicted inhibitory effects of GABA and established that the antagonism of ACh and GABA extends to their effects on cAMP signaling. These data support recently published but physiologically untested models of s-LN(v) modulation and lead to the prediction that cholinergic and GABAergic inputs to s-LN(v)s will have opposing effects on the phase and/or period of the molecular clock within these critical pacemaker neurons.

  19. Light Activates Output from Evening Neurons and Inhibits Output from Morning Neurons in the Drosophila Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Picot, Marie; Cusumano, Paola; Klarsfeld, André; Ueda, Ryu; Rouyer, François

    2007-01-01

    Animal circadian clocks are based on multiple oscillators whose interactions allow the daily control of complex behaviors. The Drosophila brain contains a circadian clock that controls rest–activity rhythms and relies upon different groups of PERIOD (PER)–expressing neurons. Two distinct oscillators have been functionally characterized under light-dark cycles. Lateral neurons (LNs) that express the pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) drive morning activity, whereas PDF-negative LNs are required for the evening activity. In constant darkness, several lines of evidence indicate that the LN morning oscillator (LN-MO) drives the activity rhythms, whereas the LN evening oscillator (LN-EO) does not. Since mutants devoid of functional CRYPTOCHROME (CRY), as opposed to wild-type flies, are rhythmic in constant light, we analyzed transgenic flies expressing PER or CRY in the LN-MO or LN-EO. We show that, under constant light conditions and reduced CRY function, the LN evening oscillator drives robust activity rhythms, whereas the LN morning oscillator does not. Remarkably, light acts by inhibiting the LN-MO behavioral output and activating the LN-EO behavioral output. Finally, we show that PDF signaling is not required for robust activity rhythms in constant light as opposed to its requirement in constant darkness, further supporting the minor contribution of the morning cells to the behavior in the presence of light. We therefore propose that day–night cycles alternatively activate behavioral outputs of the Drosophila evening and morning lateral neurons. PMID:18044989

  20. The Drosophila Circadian Clock Gates Sleep through Time-of-Day Dependent Modulation of Sleep-Promoting Neurons.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Daniel J; Vigderman, Abigail S; Dean, Terry; Garbe, David S; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-02-01

    Sleep is under the control of homeostatic and circadian processes, which interact to determine sleep timing and duration, but the mechanisms through which the circadian system modulates sleep are largely unknown. We therefore used adult-specific, temporally controlled neuronal activation and inhibition to identify an interaction between the circadian clock and a novel population of sleep-promoting neurons in Drosophila. Transgenic flies expressed either dTRPA1, a neuronal activator, or Shibire(ts1), an inhibitor of synaptic release, in small subsets of neurons. Sleep, as determined by activity monitoring and video tracking, was assessed before and after temperature-induced activation or inhibition using these effector molecules. We compared the effect of these manipulations in control flies and in mutant flies that lacked components of the molecular circadian clock. Adult-specific activation or inhibition of a population of neurons that projects to the sleep-promoting dorsal Fan-Shaped Body resulted in bidirectional control over sleep. Interestingly, the magnitude of the sleep changes were time-of-day dependent. Activation of sleep-promoting neurons was maximally effective during the middle of the day and night, and was relatively ineffective during the day-to-night and night-to-day transitions. These time-ofday specific effects were absent in flies that lacked functional circadian clocks. We conclude that the circadian system functions to gate sleep through active inhibition at specific times of day. These data identify a mechanism through which the circadian system prevents premature sleep onset in the late evening, when homeostatic sleep drive is high. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  1. Phase Shifting Capacity of the Circadian Pacemaker Determined by the SCN Neuronal Network Organization

    PubMed Central

    vanderLeest, Henk Tjebbe; Rohling, Jos H. T.; Michel, Stephan; Meijer, Johanna H.

    2009-01-01

    Background In mammals, a major circadian pacemaker that drives daily rhythms is located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), at the base of the hypothalamus. The SCN receive direct light input via the retino-hypothalamic tract. Light during the early night induces phase delays of circadian rhythms while during the late night it leads to phase advances. The effects of light on the circadian system are strongly dependent on the photoperiod to which animals are exposed. An explanation for this phenomenon is currently lacking. Methodology and Principal Findings We recorded running wheel activity in C57 mice and observed large amplitude phase shifts in short photoperiods and small shifts in long photoperiods. We investigated whether these different light responses under short and long days are expressed within the SCN by electrophysiological recordings of electrical impulse frequency in SCN slices. Application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) induced sustained increments in electrical activity that were not significantly different in the slices from long and short photoperiods. These responses led to large phase shifts in slices from short days and small phase shifts in slices from long days. An analysis of neuronal subpopulation activity revealed that in short days the amplitude of the rhythm was larger than in long days. Conclusions The data indicate that the photoperiodic dependent phase responses are intrinsic to the SCN. In contrast to earlier predictions from limit cycle theory, we observed large phase shifting responses in high amplitude rhythms in slices from short days, and small shifts in low amplitude rhythms in slices from long days. We conclude that the photoperiodic dependent phase responses are determined by the SCN and propose that synchronization among SCN neurons enhances the phase shifting capacity of the circadian system. PMID:19305510

  2. MicroRNA-92a is a circadian modulator of neuronal excitability in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao; Rosbash, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Many biological and behavioural processes of animals are governed by an endogenous circadian clock, which is dependent on transcriptional regulation. Here we address post-transcriptional regulation and the role of miRNAs in Drosophila circadian rhythms. At least six miRNAs show cycling expression levels within the pigment dispersing factor (PDF) cell-pacemaker neurons; only mir-92a peaks during the night. In vivo calcium monitoring, dynamics of PDF projections, ArcLight, GCaMP6 imaging and sleep assays indicate that mir-92a suppresses neuronal excitability. In addition, mir-92a levels within PDF cells respond to light pulses and also affect the phase shift response. Translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP) and in vitro luciferase reporter assay indicate that mir-92a suppresses expression of sirt2, which is homologous to human sir2 and sirt3. sirt2 RNAi also phenocopies mir-92a overexpression. These experiments indicate that sirt2 is a functional mir-92a target and that mir-92a modulates PDF neuronal excitability via suppressing SIRT2 levels in a rhythmic manner. PMID:28276426

  3. The Drosophila Clock Neuron Network Features Diverse Coupling Modes and Requires Network-wide Coherence for Robust Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zepeng; Bennett, Amelia J; Clem, Jenna L; Shafer, Orie T

    2016-12-13

    In animals, networks of clock neurons containing molecular clocks orchestrate daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. However, how various types of clock neurons communicate and coordinate with one another to produce coherent circadian rhythms is not well understood. Here, we investigate clock neuron coupling in the brain of Drosophila and demonstrate that the fly's various groups of clock neurons display unique and complex coupling relationships to core pacemaker neurons. Furthermore, we find that coordinated free-running rhythms require molecular clock synchrony not only within the well-characterized lateral clock neuron classes but also between lateral clock neurons and dorsal clock neurons. These results uncover unexpected patterns of coupling in the clock neuron network and reveal that robust free-running behavioral rhythms require a coherence of molecular oscillations across most of the fly's clock neuron network.

  4. A Multiscale Model to Investigate Circadian Rhythmicity of Pacemaker Neurons in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Vasalou, Christina; Henson, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is a multicellular system that drives daily rhythms in mammalian behavior and physiology. Although the gene regulatory network that produces daily oscillations within individual neurons is well characterized, less is known about the electrophysiology of the SCN cells and how firing rate correlates with circadian gene expression. We developed a firing rate code model to incorporate known electrophysiological properties of SCN pacemaker cells, including circadian dependent changes in membrane voltage and ion conductances. Calcium dynamics were included in the model as the putative link between electrical firing and gene expression. Individual ion currents exhibited oscillatory patterns matching experimental data both in current levels and phase relationships. VIP and GABA neurotransmitters, which encode synaptic signals across the SCN, were found to play critical roles in daily oscillations of membrane excitability and gene expression. Blocking various mechanisms of intracellular calcium accumulation by simulated pharmacological agents (nimodipine, IP3- and ryanodine-blockers) reproduced experimentally observed trends in firing rate dynamics and core-clock gene transcription. The intracellular calcium concentration was shown to regulate diverse circadian processes such as firing frequency, gene expression and system periodicity. The model predicted a direct relationship between firing frequency and gene expression amplitudes, demonstrated the importance of intracellular pathways for single cell behavior and provided a novel multiscale framework which captured characteristics of the SCN at both the electrophysiological and gene regulatory levels. PMID:20300645

  5. Posterior triangular thalamic neurons convey nociceptive messages to the secondary somatosensory and insular cortices in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gauriau, Caroline; Bernard, Jean-François

    2004-01-21

    This study investigated the responses of posterior triangular (PoT) thalamic neurons to tactile and noxious calibrated stimuli in anesthetized rats. We report here that 41% of PoT units responded to cutaneous stimulation, in most cases, by increasing strongly their firing. Forty-five percent of the responding units were nociceptive specific (NS), 19% were nociceptive nonspecific (NNS), and 36% were tactile. The NS units responded only to frankly noxious stimuli applied to relatively large receptive fields (several parts of the body). They encoded nociceptive temperatures chiefly in 46-50 degrees C ranges. The NNS units resembled NS units but also responded to innocuous stimuli. Tactile units responded chiefly to repeated innocuous stimuli applied to very small receptive fields (one to two fingers or vibrissae). A representative sample of PoT somatosensory neurons, characterized first by their response to innocuous and noxious cutaneous stimuli, were filled with juxtacellular injection of biotin-dextran that made it possible to label adequately the soma, the dendrites, and the entire axon of PoT neurons. We observed that the axons of NS neurons terminated only in secondary somatosensory (S2) cortex, whereas the axons of NNS and tactile neurons projected chiefly to the insular cortex and the amygdala. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a spinal-PoT-S2/insular cortices nociceptive pathway that conveys nociceptive messages arising from lamina I and spinal neurons of deep laminas. Furthermore, our results demonstrate for the first time that projections of PoT neurons are correlated to their physiological properties.

  6. Transmedulla Neurons in the Sky Compass Network of the Honeybee (Apis mellifera) Are a Possible Site of Circadian Input

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Maximilian; Held, Martina; Bender, Julia; Berz, Annuska; Heinloth, Tanja; Hellfritz, Timm; Pfeiffer, Keram

    2015-01-01

    Honeybees are known for their ability to use the sun’s azimuth and the sky’s polarization pattern for spatial orientation. Sky compass orientation in bees has been extensively studied at the behavioral level but our knowledge about the underlying neuronal systems and mechanisms is very limited. Electrophysiological studies in other insect species suggest that neurons of the sky compass system integrate information about the polarization pattern of the sky, its chromatic gradient, and the azimuth of the sun. In order to obtain a stable directional signal throughout the day, circadian changes between the sky polarization pattern and the solar azimuth must be compensated. Likewise, the system must be modulated in a context specific way to compensate for changes in intensity, polarization and chromatic properties of light caused by clouds, vegetation and landscape. The goal of this study was to identify neurons of the sky compass pathway in the honeybee brain and to find potential sites of circadian and neuromodulatory input into this pathway. To this end we first traced the sky compass pathway from the polarization-sensitive dorsal rim area of the compound eye via the medulla and the anterior optic tubercle to the lateral complex using dye injections. Neurons forming this pathway strongly resembled neurons of the sky compass pathway in other insect species. Next we combined tracer injections with immunocytochemistry against the circadian neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor and the neuromodulators serotonin, and γ-aminobutyric acid. We identified neurons, connecting the dorsal rim area of the medulla to the anterior optic tubercle, as a possible site of neuromodulation and interaction with the circadian system. These neurons have conspicuous spines in close proximity to pigment dispersing factor-, serotonin-, and GABA-immunoreactive neurons. Our data therefore show for the first time a potential interaction site between the sky compass pathway and the circadian

  7. Transmedulla Neurons in the Sky Compass Network of the Honeybee (Apis mellifera) Are a Possible Site of Circadian Input.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Maximilian; Held, Martina; Bender, Julia; Berz, Annuska; Heinloth, Tanja; Hellfritz, Timm; Pfeiffer, Keram

    2015-01-01

    Honeybees are known for their ability to use the sun's azimuth and the sky's polarization pattern for spatial orientation. Sky compass orientation in bees has been extensively studied at the behavioral level but our knowledge about the underlying neuronal systems and mechanisms is very limited. Electrophysiological studies in other insect species suggest that neurons of the sky compass system integrate information about the polarization pattern of the sky, its chromatic gradient, and the azimuth of the sun. In order to obtain a stable directional signal throughout the day, circadian changes between the sky polarization pattern and the solar azimuth must be compensated. Likewise, the system must be modulated in a context specific way to compensate for changes in intensity, polarization and chromatic properties of light caused by clouds, vegetation and landscape. The goal of this study was to identify neurons of the sky compass pathway in the honeybee brain and to find potential sites of circadian and neuromodulatory input into this pathway. To this end we first traced the sky compass pathway from the polarization-sensitive dorsal rim area of the compound eye via the medulla and the anterior optic tubercle to the lateral complex using dye injections. Neurons forming this pathway strongly resembled neurons of the sky compass pathway in other insect species. Next we combined tracer injections with immunocytochemistry against the circadian neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor and the neuromodulators serotonin, and γ-aminobutyric acid. We identified neurons, connecting the dorsal rim area of the medulla to the anterior optic tubercle, as a possible site of neuromodulation and interaction with the circadian system. These neurons have conspicuous spines in close proximity to pigment dispersing factor-, serotonin-, and GABA-immunoreactive neurons. Our data therefore show for the first time a potential interaction site between the sky compass pathway and the circadian

  8. Cellular clocks in AVP neurons of the SCN are critical for interneuronal coupling regulating circadian behavior rhythm.

    PubMed

    Mieda, Michihiro; Ono, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Emi; Okamoto, Hitoshi; Honma, Ken-Ichi; Honma, Sato; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2015-03-04

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the primary circadian pacemaker in mammals, is a network structure composed of multiple types of neurons. Here, we report that mice with a Bmal1 deletion specific to arginine vasopressin (AVP)-producing neurons showed marked lengthening in the free-running period and activity time of behavior rhythms. When exposed to an abrupt 8-hr advance of the light/dark cycle, these mice reentrained faster than control mice did. In these mice, the circadian expression of genes involved in intercellular communications, including Avp, Prokineticin 2, and Rgs16, was drastically reduced in the dorsal SCN, where AVP neurons predominate. In slices, dorsal SCN cells showed attenuated PER2::LUC oscillation with highly variable and lengthened periods. Thus, Bmal1-dependent oscillators of AVP neurons may modulate the coupling of the SCN network, eventually coupling morning and evening behavioral rhythms, by regulating expression of multiple factors important for the network property of these neurons.

  9. Synchronization of Biological Clock Neurons by Light and Peripheral Feedback Systems Promotes Circadian Rhythms and Health

    PubMed Central

    Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Meijer, Johanna H.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) functions as a circadian clock that drives 24-h rhythms in both physiology and behavior. The SCN is a multicellular oscillator in which individual neurons function as cell-autonomous oscillators. The production of a coherent output rhythm is dependent upon mutual synchronization among single cells and requires both synaptic communication and gap junctions. Changes in phase-synchronization between individual cells have consequences on the amplitude of the SCN’s electrical activity rhythm, and these changes play a major role in the ability to adapt to seasonal changes. Both aging and sleep deprivation negatively affect the circadian amplitude of the SCN, whereas behavioral activity (i.e., exercise) has a positive effect on amplitude. Given that the amplitude of the SCN’s electrical activity rhythm is essential for achieving robust rhythmicity in physiology and behavior, the mechanisms that underlie neuronal synchronization warrant further study. A growing body of evidence suggests that the functional integrity of the SCN contributes to health, well-being, cognitive performance, and alertness; in contrast, deterioration of the 24-h rhythm is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disease, cancer, depression, and sleep disorders. PMID:26097465

  10. Circadian Rhythm of Neuron R15 of Aplysia californica: In Vivo Photoentrainment.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Strumwasser, F

    1975-06-01

    (1) The neuron R15 in the parietovisceral ganglion of Aplysia has a circadian rhythm of spiking activity when recorded in the isolated ganglion. The rhythm is entrained in vivo by light-dark cycles. (2) The phase of the R15 rhythm is a function not only of the entraining light schedule, but also of the time of dissection. Changes in the dissection time during the light portion of the light-dark cycle yield little change in the subsequent R15 peak time. Dissections during the dark portion produce peak times that vary with dissection time with a slope that is approximately one. (3) The circadian rhythm of R15 can be phase-shifted in vivo by changes in the phase of the entraining light-dark cycle in one to two weeks. R15 neurons of blinded Aplysia, however, show little or no phase shift in this time. (4) It is concluded that the eyes are important as receptors for the photoentrainment of the R15 rhythm in vivo, but that neural connections from the eyes to R15 are not required.

  11. Circadian Rhythm of Neuron R15 of Aplysia californica: In Vivo Photoentrainment

    PubMed Central

    Audesirk, Gerald; Strumwasser, Felix

    1975-01-01

    (1) The neuron R15 in the parietovisceral ganglion of Aplysia has a circadian rhythm of spiking activity when recorded in the isolated ganglion. The rhythm is entrained in vivo by light-dark cycles. (2) The phase of the R15 rhythm is a function not only of the entraining light schedule, but also of the time of dissection. Changes in the dissection time during the light portion of the light-dark cycle yield little change in the subsequent R15 peak time. Dissections during the dark portion produce peak times that vary with dissection time with a slope that is approximately one. (3) The circadian rhythm of R15 can be phase-shifted in vivo by changes in the phase of the entraining light-dark cycle in one to two weeks. R15 neurons of blinded Aplysia, however, show little or no phase shift in this time. (4) It is concluded that the eyes are important as receptors for the photoentrainment of the R15 rhythm in vivo, but that neural connections from the eyes to R15 are not required. PMID:16592252

  12. Information conveyed by inferior colliculus neurons about stimuli with aligned and misaligned sound localization cues

    PubMed Central

    Young, Eric D.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that single neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) are sensitive to multiple sound localization cues. We investigated the hypothesis that ICC neurons are specialized to encode multiple sound localization cues that are aligned in space (as would naturally occur from a single broadband sound source). Sound localization cues including interaural time differences (ITDs), interaural level differences (ILDs), and spectral shapes (SSs) were measured in a marmoset monkey. Virtual space methods were used to generate stimuli with aligned and misaligned combinations of cues while recording in the ICC of the same monkey. Mutual information (MI) between spike rates and stimuli for aligned versus misaligned cues were compared. Neurons with best frequencies (BFs) less than ∼11 kHz mostly encoded information about a single sound localization cue, ITD or ILD depending on frequency, consistent with the dominance of ear acoustics by either ITD or ILD at those frequencies. Most neurons with BFs >11 kHz encoded information about multiple sound localization cues, usually ILD and SS, and were sensitive to their alignment. In some neurons MI between stimuli and spike responses was greater for aligned cues, while in others it was greater for misaligned cues. If SS cues were shifted to lower frequencies in the virtual space stimuli, a similar result was found for neurons with BFs <11 kHz, showing that the cue interaction reflects the spectra of the stimuli and not a specialization for representing SS cues. In general the results show that ICC neurons are sensitive to multiple localization cues if they are simultaneously present in the frequency response area of the neuron. However, the representation is diffuse in that there is not a specialization in the ICC for encoding aligned sound localization cues. PMID:21653729

  13. Information conveyed by onset transients in responses of striate cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Müller, J R; Metha, A B; Krauskopf, J; Lennie, P

    2001-09-01

    Normal eye movements ensure that the visual world is seen episodically, as a series of often stationary images. In this paper we characterize the responses of neurons in striate cortex to stationary grating patterns presented with abrupt onset. These responses are distinctive. In most neurons the onset of a grating gives rise to a transient discharge that decays with a time constant of 100 msec or less. The early stages of response have higher contrast gain and higher response gain than later stages. Moreover, the variability of discharge during the onset transient is disproportionately low. These factors together make the onset transient an information-rich component of response, such that the detectability and discriminability of stationary gratings grows rapidly to an early peak, within 150 msec of the onset of the response in most neurons. The orientation selectivity of neurons estimated from the first 150 msec of discharge to a stationary grating is indistinguishable from the orientation selectivity estimated from longer segments of discharge to moving gratings. Moving gratings are ultimately more detectable than stationary ones, because responses to the former are continuously renewed. The principal characteristics of the response of a neuron to a stationary grating-the initial high discharge rate, which decays rapidly, and the change of contrast gain with time-are well captured by a model in which each excitatory synaptic event leads to an immediate reduction in synaptic gain, from which recovery is slow.

  14. Strong attachment of circadian pacemaker neurons on modified ultrananocrystalline diamond surfaces.

    PubMed

    Voss, Alexandra; Wei, HongYing; Zhang, Yi; Turner, Stuart; Ceccone, Giacomo; Reithmaier, Johann Peter; Stengl, Monika; Popov, Cyril

    2016-07-01

    Diamond is a promising material for a number of bio-applications, including the fabrication of platforms for attachment and investigation of neurons and of neuroprostheses, such as retinal implants. In the current work ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films were deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition, modified by UV/O3 treatment or NH3 plasma, and comprehensively characterized with respect to their bulk and surface properties, such as crystallinity, topography, composition and chemical bonding nature. The interactions of insect circadian pacemaker neurons with UNCD surfaces with H-, O- and NH2-terminations were investigated with respect to cell density and viability. The fast and strong attachment achieved without application of adhesion proteins allowed for advantageous modification of dispersion protocols for the preparation of primary cell cultures. Centrifugation steps, which are employed for pelletizing dispersed cells to separate them from dispersing enzymes, easily damage neurons. Now centrifugation can be avoided since dispersed neurons quickly and strongly attach to the UNCD surfaces. Enzyme solutions can be easily washed off without losing many of the dispersed cells. No adverse effects on the cell viability and physiological responses were observed as revealed by calcium imaging. Furthermore, the enhanced attachment of the neurons, especially on the modified UNCD surfaces, was especially advantageous for the immunocytochemical procedures with the cell cultures. The cell losses during washing steps were significantly reduced by one order of magnitude in comparison to controls. In addition, the integration of a titanium grid structure under the UNCD films allowed for individual assignment of physiologically characterized neurons to immunocytochemically stained cells. Thus, employing UNCD surfaces free of foreign proteins improves cell culture protocols and immunocytochemistry with cultured cells. The fast and strong attachment of

  15. Circadian Rhythms in Rho1 Activity Regulate Neuronal Plasticity and Network Hierarchy.

    PubMed

    Petsakou, Afroditi; Sapsis, Themistoklis P; Blau, Justin

    2015-08-13

    Neuronal plasticity helps animals learn from their environment. However, it is challenging to link specific changes in defined neurons to altered behavior. Here, we focus on circadian rhythms in the structure of the principal s-LNv clock neurons in Drosophila. By quantifying neuronal architecture, we observed that s-LNv structural plasticity changes the amount of axonal material in addition to cycles of fasciculation and defasciculation. We found that this is controlled by rhythmic Rho1 activity that retracts s-LNv axonal termini by increasing myosin phosphorylation and simultaneously changes the balance of pre-synaptic and dendritic markers. This plasticity is required to change clock network hierarchy and allow seasonal adaptation. Rhythms in Rho1 activity are controlled by clock-regulated transcription of Puratrophin-1-like (Pura), a Rho1 GEF. Since spinocerebellar ataxia is associated with mutations in human Puratrophin-1, our data support the idea that defective actin-related plasticity underlies this ataxia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The core clock gene Per1 phases molecular and electrical circadian rhythms in SCN neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeff R.

    2016-01-01

    The brain’s biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), exhibits endogenous 24-hour rhythms in gene expression and spontaneous firing rate; however, the functional relationship between these neuronal rhythms is not fully understood. Here, we used a Per1::GFP transgenic mouse line that allows for the simultaneous quantification of molecular clock state and firing rate in SCN neurons to examine the relationship between these key components of the circadian clock. We find that there is a stable, phased relationship between E-box-driven clock gene expression and spontaneous firing rate in SCN neurons and that these relationships are independent of light input onto the system or of GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic activity. Importantly, the concordant phasing of gene and neural rhythms is disrupted in the absence of the homologous clock gene Per1, but persists in the absence of the core clock gene Per2. These results suggest that Per1 plays a unique, non-redundant role in phasing gene expression and firing rate rhythms in SCN neurons to increase the robustness of cellular timekeeping. PMID:27602274

  17. Participation of the prolactin-releasing peptide-containing neurones in caudal medulla in conveying haemorrhagic stress-induced signals to the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Kobayashi, D; Das, G; Onaka, T; Inoue, K; Itoi, K

    2010-01-01

    The prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP) has been proposed to be a co-transmitter or modulator of noradrenaline (NA) because it colocalises with NA in the A1 (in the ventrolateral reticular formation) and A2 (in the nucleus of the solitary tract; NTS) cell groups in the caudal medulla. The baroreceptor signals, originating from the great vessels, are transmitted primarily to the NTS, and then part of the signals is conveyed to the hypothalamic neuroendocrine neurones via the ascending NA neurones. The hypotensive haemorrhagic paradigm was employed to examine whether the PrRP-containing neurones in the caudal medulla participate in conveying signals to the hypothalamic neuroendocrine neurones. Among the caudal medullary A1 or A2 neurones, the majority of the PrRP-immunoreactive (-ir) neurones became c-Fos-ir at 2 h after hypotensive haemorrhage. Hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone-ir neurones and vasopressin-ir neurones became c-Fos positive in parallel with the activation of medullary PrRP-ir neurones. After delivery of retrograde tracer fluorogold (FG) to the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), part of the PrRP/FG double-labelled neurones in the A1 and A2 became c-Fos-ir after haemorrhage, demonstrating that PrRP-ir neurones participate in conveying the haemorrhagic stress-induced signals from the medulla to the PVN. PrRP and/or NA were microinjected directly to the PVN of conscious rats, and they presented a synergistic action on arginine vasopressin release, whereas an additive action was observed for adrenocorticotrophin release. These results suggest that the PrRP-containing NA neurones in the caudal medulla may relay the haemorrhagic stress-induced medullary inputs to the hypothalamic neuroendocrine neurones.

  18. A riot of rhythms: neuronal and glial circadian oscillators in the mediobasal hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Guilding, Clare; Hughes, Alun TL; Brown, Timothy M; Namvar, Sara; Piggins, Hugh D

    2009-01-01

    Background In mammals, the synchronized activity of cell autonomous clocks in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) enables this structure to function as the master circadian clock, coordinating daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. However, the dominance of this clock has been challenged by the observations that metabolic duress can over-ride SCN controlled rhythms, and that clock genes are expressed in many brain areas, including those implicated in the regulation of appetite and feeding. The recent development of mice in which clock gene/protein activity is reported by bioluminescent constructs (luciferase or luc) now enables us to track molecular oscillations in numerous tissues ex vivo. Consequently we determined both clock activities and responsiveness to metabolic perturbations of cells and tissues within the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH), a site pivotal for optimal internal homeostatic regulation. Results Here we demonstrate endogenous circadian rhythms of PER2::LUC expression in discrete subdivisions of the arcuate (Arc) and dorsomedial nuclei (DMH). Rhythms resolved to single cells did not maintain long-term synchrony with one-another, leading to a damping of oscillations at both cell and tissue levels. Complementary electrophysiology recordings revealed rhythms in neuronal activity in the Arc and DMH. Further, PER2::LUC rhythms were detected in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle and in the median eminence/pars tuberalis (ME/PT). A high-fat diet had no effect on the molecular oscillations in the MBH, whereas food deprivation resulted in an altered phase in the ME/PT. Conclusion Our results provide the first single cell resolution of endogenous circadian rhythms in clock gene expression in any intact tissue outside the SCN, reveal the cellular basis for tissue level damping in extra-SCN oscillators and demonstrate that an oscillator in the ME/PT is responsive to changes in metabolism. PMID:19712475

  19. Secondary taste neurons that convey sweet taste and starvation in the Drosophila brain.

    PubMed

    Kain, Pinky; Dahanukar, Anupama

    2015-02-18

    The gustatory system provides vital sensory information to determine feeding and appetitive learning behaviors. Very little is known, however, about higher-order gustatory circuits in the highly tractable model for neurobiology, Drosophila melanogaster. Here we report second-order sweet gustatory projection neurons (sGPNs) in the Drosophila brain using a powerful behavioral screen. Silencing neuronal activity reduces appetitive behaviors, whereas inducible activation results in food acceptance via proboscis extensions. sGPNs show functional connectivity with Gr5a(+) sweet taste neurons and are activated upon sucrose application to the labellum. By tracing sGPN axons, we identify the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC) as an immediate higher-order processing center for sweet taste. Interestingly, starvation increases sucrose sensitivity of the sGPNs in the AMMC, suggesting that hunger modulates the responsiveness of the secondary sweet taste relay. Together, our results provide a foundation for studying gustatory processing and its modulation by the internal nutrient state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Visual motion-sensitive neurons in the bumblebee brain convey information about landmarks during a navigational task

    PubMed Central

    Mertes, Marcel; Dittmar, Laura; Egelhaaf, Martin; Boeddeker, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Bees use visual memories to find the spatial location of previously learnt food sites. Characteristic learning flights help acquiring these memories at newly discovered foraging locations where landmarks—salient objects in the vicinity of the goal location—can play an important role in guiding the animal's homing behavior. Although behavioral experiments have shown that bees can use a variety of visual cues to distinguish objects as landmarks, the question of how landmark features are encoded by the visual system is still open. Recently, it could be shown that motion cues are sufficient to allow bees localizing their goal using landmarks that can hardly be discriminated from the background texture. Here, we tested the hypothesis that motion sensitive neurons in the bee's visual pathway provide information about such landmarks during a learning flight and might, thus, play a role for goal localization. We tracked learning flights of free-flying bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) in an arena with distinct visual landmarks, reconstructed the visual input during these flights, and replayed ego-perspective movies to tethered bumblebees while recording the activity of direction-selective wide-field neurons in their optic lobe. By comparing neuronal responses during a typical learning flight and targeted modifications of landmark properties in this movie we demonstrate that these objects are indeed represented in the bee's visual motion pathway. We find that object-induced responses vary little with object texture, which is in agreement with behavioral evidence. These neurons thus convey information about landmark properties that are useful for view-based homing. PMID:25309374

  1. Autoreceptor control of peptide/neurotransmitter corelease from PDF neurons determines allocation of circadian activity in drosophila.

    PubMed

    Choi, Charles; Cao, Guan; Tanenhaus, Anne K; McCarthy, Ellena V; Jung, Misun; Schleyer, William; Shang, Yuhua; Rosbash, Michael; Yin, Jerry C P; Nitabach, Michael N

    2012-08-30

    Drosophila melanogaster flies concentrate behavioral activity around dawn and dusk. This organization of daily activity is controlled by central circadian clock neurons, including the lateral-ventral pacemaker neurons (LN(v)s) that secrete the neuropeptide PDF (pigment dispersing factor). Previous studies have demonstrated the requirement for PDF signaling to PDF receptor (PDFR)-expressing dorsal clock neurons in organizing circadian activity. Although LN(v)s also express functional PDFR, the role of these autoreceptors has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that (1) PDFR activation in LN(v)s shifts the balance of circadian activity from evening to morning, similar to behavioral responses to summer-like environmental conditions, and (2) this shift is mediated by stimulation of the Gα,s-cAMP pathway and a consequent change in PDF/neurotransmitter corelease from the LN(v)s. These results suggest another mechanism for environmental control of the allocation of circadian activity and provide new general insight into the role of neuropeptide autoreceptors in behavioral control circuits. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Autoreceptor Modulation of Peptide/Neurotransmitter Co-release from PDF Neurons Determines Allocation of Circadian Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Charles; Cao, Guan; Tanenhaus, Anne K.; McCarthy, Ellena v.; Jung, Misun; Schleyer, William; Shang, Yuhua; Rosbash, Michael; Yin, Jerry C.P.; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster flies concentrate behavioral activity around dawn and dusk. This organization of daily activity is controlled by central circadian clock neurons, including the lateral ventral pacemaker neurons (LNvs) that secrete the neuropeptide PDF (Pigment Dispersing Factor). Previous studies have demonstrated the requirement for PDF signaling to PDF receptor (PDFR)-expressing dorsal clock neurons in organizing circadian activity. While LNvs also express functional PDFR, the role of these autoreceptors has remained enigmatic. Here we show that (1) PDFR activation in LNvs shifts the balance of circadian activity from evening to morning, similar to behavioral responses to summer-like environmental conditions and (2) this shift is mediated by stimulation of the Ga,s-cAMP pathway and a consequent change in PDF/neurotransmitter co-release from the LNvs. These results suggest a novel mechanism for environmental control of the allocation of circadian activity and provide new general insight into the role of neuropeptide autoreceptors in behavioral control circuits. PMID:22938867

  3. Activation of glycine receptor phase-shifts the circadian rhythm in neuronal activity in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Mordel, Jérôme; Karnas, Diana; Inyushkin, Alexey; Challet, Etienne; Pévet, Paul; Meissl, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In mammals, the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is composed of numerous synchronized oscillating cells that drive daily behavioural and physiological processes. Several entrainment pathways, afferent inputs to the SCN with their neurotransmitter and neuromodulator systems, can reset the circadian system regularly and also modulate neuronal activity within the SCN. In the present study, we investigated the function of the inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine on neuronal activity in the mouse SCN and on resetting of the circadian clock. The effects of glycine on the electrical activity of SCN cells from C57Bl/6 mice were studied either by patch-clamp recordings from acute brain slices or by long-term recordings from organotypic brain slices using multi-microelectrode arrays (MEA). Voltage-clamp recordings confirmed the existence of glycine-induced, chloride-selective currents in SCN neurons. These currents were reversibly suppressed by strychnine, phenylbenzene ω-phosphono-α-amino acid (PMBA) or ginkgolide B, selective blockers of glycine receptors (GlyRs). Long-term recordings of the spontaneous activity of SCN neurons revealed that glycine application induces a phase advance during the subjective day and a phase delay during the early subjective night. Both effects were suppressed by strychnine or by PMBA. These results suggest that glycine is able to modulate circadian activity by acting directly on its specific receptors in SCN neurons. PMID:21486797

  4. Single-Cell Transcriptional Analysis Reveals Novel Neuronal Phenotypes and Interaction Networks Involved in the Central Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Park, James; Zhu, Haisun; O'Sullivan, Sean; Ogunnaike, Babatunde A.; Weaver, David R.; Schwaber, James S.; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell heterogeneity confounds efforts to understand how a population of cells organizes into cellular networks that underlie tissue-level function. This complexity is prominent in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Here, individual neurons exhibit a remarkable amount of asynchronous behavior and transcriptional heterogeneity. However, SCN neurons are able to generate precisely coordinated synaptic and molecular outputs that synchronize the body to a common circadian cycle by organizing into cellular networks. To understand this emergent cellular network property, it is important to reconcile single-neuron heterogeneity with network organization. In light of recent studies suggesting that transcriptionally heterogeneous cells organize into distinct cellular phenotypes, we characterized the transcriptional, spatial, and functional organization of 352 SCN neurons from mice experiencing phase-shifts in their circadian cycle. Using the community structure detection method and multivariate analytical techniques, we identified previously undescribed neuronal phenotypes that are likely to participate in regulatory networks with known SCN cell types. Based on the newly discovered neuronal phenotypes, we developed a data-driven neuronal network structure in which multiple cell types interact through known synaptic and paracrine signaling mechanisms. These results provide a basis from which to interpret the functional variability of SCN neurons and describe methodologies toward understanding how a population of heterogeneous single cells organizes into cellular networks that underlie tissue-level function. PMID:27826225

  5. Dual PDF signaling pathways reset clocks via TIMELESS and acutely excite target neurons to control circadian behavior.

    PubMed

    Seluzicki, Adam; Flourakis, Matthieu; Kula-Eversole, Elzbieta; Zhang, Luoying; Kilman, Valerie; Allada, Ravi

    2014-03-01

    Molecular circadian clocks are interconnected via neural networks. In Drosophila, PIGMENT-DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) acts as a master network regulator with dual functions in synchronizing molecular oscillations between disparate PDF(+) and PDF(-) circadian pacemaker neurons and controlling pacemaker neuron output. Yet the mechanisms by which PDF functions are not clear. We demonstrate that genetic inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) in PDF(-) clock neurons can phenocopy PDF mutants while activated PKA can partially rescue PDF receptor mutants. PKA subunit transcripts are also under clock control in non-PDF DN1p neurons. To address the core clock target of PDF, we rescued per in PDF neurons of arrhythmic per⁰¹ mutants. PDF neuron rescue induced high amplitude rhythms in the clock component TIMELESS (TIM) in per-less DN1p neurons. Complete loss of PDF or PKA inhibition also results in reduced TIM levels in non-PDF neurons of per⁰¹ flies. To address how PDF impacts pacemaker neuron output, we focally applied PDF to DN1p neurons and found that it acutely depolarizes and increases firing rates of DN1p neurons. Surprisingly, these effects are reduced in the presence of an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, yet persist in the presence of PKA inhibition. We have provided evidence for a signaling mechanism (PKA) and a molecular target (TIM) by which PDF resets and synchronizes clocks and demonstrates an acute direct excitatory effect of PDF on target neurons to control neuronal output. The identification of TIM as a target of PDF signaling suggests it is a multimodal integrator of cell autonomous clock, environmental light, and neural network signaling. Moreover, these data reveal a bifurcation of PKA-dependent clock effects and PKA-independent output effects. Taken together, our results provide a molecular and cellular basis for the dual functions of PDF in clock resetting and pacemaker output.

  6. Dual PDF Signaling Pathways Reset Clocks Via TIMELESS and Acutely Excite Target Neurons to Control Circadian Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Seluzicki, Adam; Flourakis, Matthieu; Kula-Eversole, Elzbieta; Zhang, Luoying; Kilman, Valerie; Allada, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Molecular circadian clocks are interconnected via neural networks. In Drosophila, PIGMENT-DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) acts as a master network regulator with dual functions in synchronizing molecular oscillations between disparate PDF(+) and PDF(−) circadian pacemaker neurons and controlling pacemaker neuron output. Yet the mechanisms by which PDF functions are not clear. We demonstrate that genetic inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) in PDF(−) clock neurons can phenocopy PDF mutants while activated PKA can partially rescue PDF receptor mutants. PKA subunit transcripts are also under clock control in non-PDF DN1p neurons. To address the core clock target of PDF, we rescued per in PDF neurons of arrhythmic per01 mutants. PDF neuron rescue induced high amplitude rhythms in the clock component TIMELESS (TIM) in per-less DN1p neurons. Complete loss of PDF or PKA inhibition also results in reduced TIM levels in non-PDF neurons of per01 flies. To address how PDF impacts pacemaker neuron output, we focally applied PDF to DN1p neurons and found that it acutely depolarizes and increases firing rates of DN1p neurons. Surprisingly, these effects are reduced in the presence of an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, yet persist in the presence of PKA inhibition. We have provided evidence for a signaling mechanism (PKA) and a molecular target (TIM) by which PDF resets and synchronizes clocks and demonstrates an acute direct excitatory effect of PDF on target neurons to control neuronal output. The identification of TIM as a target of PDF signaling suggests it is a multimodal integrator of cell autonomous clock, environmental light, and neural network signaling. Moreover, these data reveal a bifurcation of PKA-dependent clock effects and PKA-independent output effects. Taken together, our results provide a molecular and cellular basis for the dual functions of PDF in clock resetting and pacemaker output. PMID:24643294

  7. Drosophila Clock Is Required in Brain Pacemaker Neurons to Prevent Premature Locomotor Aging Independently of Its Circadian Function

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Abdul-Raouf; Seugnet, Laurent; Klarsfeld, André

    2017-01-01

    Circadian clocks control many self-sustained rhythms in physiology and behavior with approximately 24-hour periodicity. In many organisms, oxidative stress and aging negatively impact the circadian system and sleep. Conversely, loss of the clock decreases resistance to oxidative stress, and may reduce lifespan and speed up brain aging and neurodegeneration. Here we examined the effects of clock disruptions on locomotor aging and longevity in Drosophila. We found that lifespan was similarly reduced in three arrhythmic mutants (ClkAR, cyc0 and tim0) and in wild-type flies under constant light, which stops the clock. In contrast, ClkAR mutants showed significantly faster age-related locomotor deficits (as monitored by startle-induced climbing) than cyc0 and tim0, or than control flies under constant light. Reactive oxygen species accumulated more with age in ClkAR mutant brains, but this did not appear to contribute to the accelerated locomotor decline of the mutant. Clk, but not Cyc, inactivation by RNA interference in the pigment-dispersing factor (PDF)-expressing central pacemaker neurons led to similar loss of climbing performance as ClkAR. Conversely, restoring Clk function in these cells was sufficient to rescue the ClkAR locomotor phenotype, independently of behavioral rhythmicity. Accelerated locomotor decline of the ClkAR mutant required expression of the PDF receptor and correlated to an apparent loss of dopaminergic neurons in the posterior protocerebral lateral 1 (PPL1) clusters. This neuronal loss was rescued when the ClkAR mutation was placed in an apoptosis-deficient background. Impairing dopamine synthesis in a single pair of PPL1 neurons that innervate the mushroom bodies accelerated locomotor decline in otherwise wild-type flies. Our results therefore reveal a novel circadian-independent requirement for Clk in brain circadian neurons to maintain a subset of dopaminergic cells and avoid premature locomotor aging in Drosophila. PMID:28072817

  8. Drosophila Clock Is Required in Brain Pacemaker Neurons to Prevent Premature Locomotor Aging Independently of Its Circadian Function.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Alexandra; Issa, Abdul-Raouf; Seugnet, Laurent; Birman, Serge; Klarsfeld, André

    2017-01-01

    Circadian clocks control many self-sustained rhythms in physiology and behavior with approximately 24-hour periodicity. In many organisms, oxidative stress and aging negatively impact the circadian system and sleep. Conversely, loss of the clock decreases resistance to oxidative stress, and may reduce lifespan and speed up brain aging and neurodegeneration. Here we examined the effects of clock disruptions on locomotor aging and longevity in Drosophila. We found that lifespan was similarly reduced in three arrhythmic mutants (ClkAR, cyc0 and tim0) and in wild-type flies under constant light, which stops the clock. In contrast, ClkAR mutants showed significantly faster age-related locomotor deficits (as monitored by startle-induced climbing) than cyc0 and tim0, or than control flies under constant light. Reactive oxygen species accumulated more with age in ClkAR mutant brains, but this did not appear to contribute to the accelerated locomotor decline of the mutant. Clk, but not Cyc, inactivation by RNA interference in the pigment-dispersing factor (PDF)-expressing central pacemaker neurons led to similar loss of climbing performance as ClkAR. Conversely, restoring Clk function in these cells was sufficient to rescue the ClkAR locomotor phenotype, independently of behavioral rhythmicity. Accelerated locomotor decline of the ClkAR mutant required expression of the PDF receptor and correlated to an apparent loss of dopaminergic neurons in the posterior protocerebral lateral 1 (PPL1) clusters. This neuronal loss was rescued when the ClkAR mutation was placed in an apoptosis-deficient background. Impairing dopamine synthesis in a single pair of PPL1 neurons that innervate the mushroom bodies accelerated locomotor decline in otherwise wild-type flies. Our results therefore reveal a novel circadian-independent requirement for Clk in brain circadian neurons to maintain a subset of dopaminergic cells and avoid premature locomotor aging in Drosophila.

  9. DN1(p) circadian neurons coordinate acute light and PDF inputs to produce robust daily behavior in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Luoying; Chung, Brian Y; Lear, Bridget C; Kilman, Valerie L; Liu, Yixiao; Mahesh, Guruswamy; Meissner, Rose-Anne; Hardin, Paul E; Allada, Ravi

    2010-04-13

    Daily behaviors in animals are determined by the interplay between internal timing signals from circadian clocks and environmental stimuli such as light. How these signals are integrated to produce timely and adaptive behavior is unclear. The fruit fly Drosophila exhibits clock-driven activity increases that anticipate dawn and dusk and free-running rhythms under constant conditions. Flies also respond to the onset of light and dark with acute increases in activity. Mutants of a novel ion channel, narrow abdomen (na), lack a robust increase in activity in response to light and show reduced anticipatory behavior and free-running rhythms, providing a genetic link between photic responses and circadian clock function. We used tissue-specific rescue of na to demonstrate a role for approximately 16-20 circadian pacemaker neurons, a subset of the posterior dorsal neurons 1 (DN1(p)s), in mediating the acute response to the onset of light as well as morning anticipatory behavior. Circadian pacemaker neurons expressing the neuropeptide PIGMENT-DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) are especially important for morning anticipation and free-running rhythms and send projections to the DN1(p)s. We also demonstrate that DN1(p)Pdfr expression is sufficient to rescue, at least partially, Pdfr morning anticipation defects as well as defects in free-running rhythms, including those in DN1 molecular clocks. Additionally, these DN1 clocks in wild-type flies are more strongly reset to timing changes in PDF clocks than other pacemaker neurons, suggesting that they are direct targets. Taking these results together, we demonstrate that the DN1(p)s lie at the nexus of PDF and photic signaling to produce appropriate daily behavior.

  10. Circadian integration of sleep-wake and feeding requires NPY receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, S.; Li, A.-J.; Dinh, T. T.; Rooney, E. M.; Simasko, S. M.; Ritter, S.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep and feeding rhythms are highly coordinated across the circadian cycle, but the brain sites responsible for this coordination are unknown. We examined the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) in this process by injecting the targeted toxin, NPY-saporin (NPY-SAP), into the arcuate nucleus (Arc). NPY-SAP-lesioned rats were initially hyperphagic, became obese, exhibited sustained disruption of circadian feeding patterns, and had abnormal circadian distribution of sleep-wake patterns. Total amounts of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) were not altered by NPY-SAP lesions, but a peak amount of REMS was permanently displaced to the dark period, and circadian variation in NREMS was eliminated. The phase reversal of REMS to the dark period by the lesion suggests that REMS timing is independently linked to the function of MBH NPY receptor-expressing neurons and is not dependent on NREMS pattern, which was altered but not phase reversed by the lesion. Sleep-wake patterns were altered in controls by restricting feeding to the light period, but were not altered in NPY-SAP rats by restricting feeding to either the light or dark period, indicating that disturbed sleep-wake patterns in lesioned rats were not secondary to changes in food intake. Sleep abnormalities persisted even after hyperphagia abated during the static phase of the lesion. Results suggest that the MBH is required for the essential task of integrating sleep-wake and feeding rhythms, a function that allows animals to accommodate changeable patterns of food availability. NPY receptor-expressing neurons are key components of this integrative function. PMID:21880863

  11. Circadian integration of sleep-wake and feeding requires NPY receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Wiater, M F; Mukherjee, S; Li, A-J; Dinh, T T; Rooney, E M; Simasko, S M; Ritter, S

    2011-11-01

    Sleep and feeding rhythms are highly coordinated across the circadian cycle, but the brain sites responsible for this coordination are unknown. We examined the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) in this process by injecting the targeted toxin, NPY-saporin (NPY-SAP), into the arcuate nucleus (Arc). NPY-SAP-lesioned rats were initially hyperphagic, became obese, exhibited sustained disruption of circadian feeding patterns, and had abnormal circadian distribution of sleep-wake patterns. Total amounts of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) were not altered by NPY-SAP lesions, but a peak amount of REMS was permanently displaced to the dark period, and circadian variation in NREMS was eliminated. The phase reversal of REMS to the dark period by the lesion suggests that REMS timing is independently linked to the function of MBH NPY receptor-expressing neurons and is not dependent on NREMS pattern, which was altered but not phase reversed by the lesion. Sleep-wake patterns were altered in controls by restricting feeding to the light period, but were not altered in NPY-SAP rats by restricting feeding to either the light or dark period, indicating that disturbed sleep-wake patterns in lesioned rats were not secondary to changes in food intake. Sleep abnormalities persisted even after hyperphagia abated during the static phase of the lesion. Results suggest that the MBH is required for the essential task of integrating sleep-wake and feeding rhythms, a function that allows animals to accommodate changeable patterns of food availability. NPY receptor-expressing neurons are key components of this integrative function.

  12. Dopamine receptor 1 neurons in the dorsal striatum regulate food anticipatory circadian activity rhythms in mice

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Christian M; Darvas, Martin; Oviatt, Mia; Chang, Chris H; Michalik, Mateusz; Huddy, Timothy F; Meyer, Emily E; Shuster, Scott A; Aguayo, Antonio; Hill, Elizabeth M; Kiani, Karun; Ikpeazu, Jonathan; Martinez, Johan S; Purpura, Mari; Smit, Andrea N; Patton, Danica F; Mistlberger, Ralph E; Palmiter, Richard D; Steele, Andrew D

    2014-01-01

    Daily rhythms of food anticipatory activity (FAA) are regulated independently of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, which mediates entrainment of rhythms to light, but the neural circuits that establish FAA remain elusive. In this study, we show that mice lacking the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R KO mice) manifest greatly reduced FAA, whereas mice lacking the dopamine D2 receptor have normal FAA. To determine where dopamine exerts its effect, we limited expression of dopamine signaling to the dorsal striatum of dopamine-deficient mice; these mice developed FAA. Within the dorsal striatum, the daily rhythm of clock gene period2 expression was markedly suppressed in D1R KO mice. Pharmacological activation of D1R at the same time daily was sufficient to establish anticipatory activity in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that dopamine signaling to D1R-expressing neurons in the dorsal striatum plays an important role in manifestation of FAA, possibly by synchronizing circadian oscillators that modulate motivational processes and behavioral output. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03781.001 PMID:25217530

  13. Pigment-dispersing hormone in Daphnia interneurons, one type homologous to insect clock neurons displaying circadian rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Johannes; Zhang, Qian; Verleyen, Peter; Huybrechts, Jurgen; Neupert, Susanne; Predel, Reinhard; Pauwels, Kevin; Dircksen, Heinrich

    2011-10-01

    We report identification of a beta-type pigment-dispersing hormone (PDH) identical in two water flea species, Daphnia magna and Daphnia pulex. It has been identified by cloning of precursors, chromatographic isolation from tissue extracts followed by immunoassays and de novo-mass spectrometric sequencing. The peptide is restricted to a complex system of distinct interneurons in the brain and visual ganglia, but does not occur in neurosecretory cells projecting to neurohemal organs as in decapod crustaceans. Thirteen neuron types individually identified and reconstructed by immunohistochemistry were almost identical in terms of positions and projection patterns in both species. Several neurons invade and form plexuses in visual ganglia and major brain neuropils including the central body. Five neuron types show contralateral pathways and form plexuses in the lateral, dorsal, or postlateral brain neuropils. Others are local interneurons, and a tritocerebral neuron connects the protocerebrum with the neuropil of the locomotory second antenna. Two visual ganglia neuron types lateral to the medulla closely resemble insect medulla lateral circadian clock neurons containing pigment-dispersing factor based upon positional and projectional criteria. Experiments under 12:12 h light/dark cycles and constant light or darkness conditions showed significant circadian changes in numbers and activities of one type of medulla lateral PDH neuron with an acrophase in the evening. This simple PDH system shows striking homologies to PDH systems in decapod crustaceans and well-known clock neurons in several insects, which suggests evolutionary conservation of an ancient peptidergic interneuronal system that is part of biological clocks.

  14. A G protein-coupled receptor, groom-of-PDF, is required for PDF neuron action in circadian behavior.

    PubMed

    Lear, Bridget C; Merrill, C Elaine; Lin, Jui-Ming; Schroeder, Analyne; Zhang, Luoying; Allada, Ravi

    2005-10-20

    The neuropeptide Pigment-Dispersing Factor (PDF) plays a critical role in mediating circadian control of behavior in Drosophila. Here we identify mutants (groom-of-PDF; gop) that display phase-advanced evening activity and poor free-running rhythmicity, phenocopying pdf mutants. In gop mutants, a spontaneous retrotransposon disrupts a coding exon of a G protein-coupled receptor, CG13758. Disruption of the receptor is accompanied by phase-advanced oscillations of the core clock protein PERIOD. Moreover, effects on circadian timing induced by perturbation of PDF neurons require gop. Yet PDF oscillations themselves remain robust in gop mutants, suggesting that GOP acts downstream of PDF. gop is expressed most strongly in the dorsal brain in regions that lie in proximity to PDF-containing nerve terminals. Taken together, these studies implicate GOP as a PDF receptor in Drosophila.

  15. E and M circadian pacemaker neurons use different PDF receptor signalosome components in drosophila.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Laura B; Taghert, Paul H

    2013-08-01

    We used real-time imaging to detect cAMP levels in neurons of intact fly brains to study the mechanisms of circadian pacemaker synchronization by the neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF) in Drosophila. PDF receptor (PDF-R) is expressed by both M (sLNv) and E (LNd) pacemaker subclasses and is coupled to G(sα) in both cases. We previously reported that PDF-R in M pacemakers elevates cAMP levels by activating the ortholog of mammalian adenylate cyclase 3 (AC3) but that AC3 disruptions had no effect on E pacemaker sensitivity to PDF. Here, we show that PDF-R in E pacemakers activates a different AC isoform, AC78C, an ortholog of mammalian AC8. Knockdown of AC78C by transgenic RNAi substantially reduces, but does not completely abrogate, PDF responses in these E pacemakers. The knockdown effect is intact when restricted to mature stages, suggesting a physiological and not a development role for AC78C in E pacemakers. The AC78C phenotype is rescued by the overexpression of AC78C but not by overexpression of the rutabaga AC. AC78C overexpression does not disrupt PDF responses in these E pacemakers, and neither AC78C knockdown nor its overexpression disrupted locomotor rhythms. Finally, knockdown of 2 AKAPs, nervy and AKAP200, partially reduces LNd PDF responses. These findings begin to identify the components of E pacemaker PDF-R signalosomes and indicate that they are distinct from PDF-R signalosomes in M pacemakers: we propose they contain AC78C and at least 1 other AC.

  16. E AND M CIRCADIAN PACEMAKER NEURONS USE DIFFERENT PDF RECEPTOR SIGNALOSOME COMPONENTS IN DROSOPHILA

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, Laura B.

    2014-01-01

    We used real-time imaging to detect cAMP levels in neurons of intact fly brains to study mechanisms of circadian pacemaker synchronization by the neuropeptide PDF in Drosophila. PDF receptor (PDF-R) is expressed by both M (sLNv) and E (LNd) pacemaker sub-classes and is coupled to Gsα in both cases. We previously reported that PDF-R in M pacemakers elevates cAMP levels by activating the ortholog of mammalian Adenylate Cyclase 3 (AC3), but that AC3 disruptions had no effect on E pacemaker sensitivity to PDF. Here we show that PDF-R in E pacemakers activates a different AC isoform, AC78C, an ortholog of mammalian AC8. Knockdown of AC78C by transgenic RNAi substantially reduces, but does not completely abrogate, PDF responses in these E pacemakers. The knockdown effect is intact when restricted to mature stages, suggesting a physiological and not a development role for AC78C in E pacemakers. The AC78C phenotype is rescued by over-expression of AC78C, but not by over-expression of the rutabaga AC. AC78C over-expression does not disrupt PDF responses in these E pacemakers, and neither AC78C knockdown nor its over-expression disrupted locomotor rhythms. Finally, knockdown of two AKAPs, nervy and AKAP 200 partially reduces LNd PDF responses. These findings begin to identify the components of E pacemaker PDF-R signalosomes and indicate they are distinct from PDF-R signalosomes in M pacemakers: we propose they contain AC78C and at least one other AC. PMID:23929551

  17. Blocking endocytosis in Drosophila's circadian pacemaker neurons interferes with the endogenous clock in a PDF-dependent way.

    PubMed

    Wülbeck, Corinna; Grieshaber, Eva; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2009-10-01

    The neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) plays an essential role in the circadian clock of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, but many details of PDF signaling in the clock network are still unknown. We tried to interfere with PDF signaling by blocking the GTPase Shibire in PDF neurons. Shibire is an ortholog of the mammalian Dynamins and is essential for endocytosis of clathrin-coated vesicles at the plasma membrane. Such endocytosis is used for neurotransmitter reuptake by presynaptic neurons, which is a prerequisite of synaptic vesicle recycling, and receptor-mediated endocytosis in the postsynaptic neuron, which leads to signal termination. By blocking Shibire function via overexpression of a dominant negative mutant form of Shibire in PDF neurons, we slowed down the behavioral rhythm by 3 h. This effect was absent in PDF receptor null mutants, indicating that we interfered with PDF receptor-mediated endocytosis. Because we obtained similar behavioral phenotypes by increasing the PDF level in regions close to PDF neurons, we conclude that blocking Shibire did prolong PDF signaling in the neurons that respond to PDF. Obviously, terminating the PDF signaling via receptor-mediated endocytosis is a crucial step in determining the period of behavioral rhythms.

  18. Neuronal circadian clock protein oscillations are similar in behaviourally rhythmic forager honeybees and in arrhythmic nurses

    PubMed Central

    Beer, K.; Ben-David, R.; Kotowoy, A.; Tsang, V. W. K.; Warman, G. R.

    2017-01-01

    Internal clocks driving rhythms of about a day (circadian) are ubiquitous in animals, allowing them to anticipate environmental changes. Genetic or environmental disturbances to circadian clocks or the rhythms they produce are commonly associated with illness, compromised performance or reduced survival. Nevertheless, some animals including Arctic mammals, open sea fish and social insects such as honeybees are active around-the-clock with no apparent ill effects. The mechanisms allowing this remarkable natural plasticity are unknown. We generated and validated a new and specific antibody against the clock protein PERIOD of the honeybee Apis mellifera (amPER) and used it to characterize the circadian network in the honeybee brain. We found many similarities to Drosophila melanogaster and other insects, suggesting common anatomical organization principles in the insect clock that have not been appreciated before. Time course analyses revealed strong daily oscillations in amPER levels in foragers, which show circadian rhythms, and also in nurses that do not, although the latter have attenuated oscillations in brain mRNA clock gene levels. The oscillations in nurses show that activity can be uncoupled from the circadian network and support the hypothesis that a ticking circadian clock is essential even in around-the-clock active animals in a constant physical environment. PMID:28615472

  19. Decreased Numbers of Somatostatin-Expressing Neurons in the Amygdala of Subjects With Bipolar Disorder or Schizophrenia: Relationship to Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Pantazopoulos, Harry; Wiseman, Jason T; Markota, Matej; Ehrenfeld, Lucy; Berretta, Sabina

    2017-03-15

    Growing evidence points to a key role for somatostatin (SST) in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). In the amygdala, neurons expressing SST play an important role in the regulation of anxiety, which is often comorbid in these disorders. We tested the hypothesis that SST-immunoreactive (IR) neurons are decreased in the amygdala of subjects with SZ and BD. Evidence for circadian SST expression in the amygdala and disrupted circadian rhythms and rhythmic peaks of anxiety in BD suggest a disruption of rhythmic expression of SST in this disorder. Amygdala sections from 12 SZ, 15 BD, and 15 control subjects were processed for immunocytochemistry for SST and neuropeptide Y, a neuropeptide partially coexpressed in SST-IR neurons. Total numbers (Nt) of IR neurons were measured. Time of death was used to test associations with circadian rhythms. SST-IR neurons were decreased in the lateral amygdala nucleus in BD (Nt, p = .003) and SZ (Nt, p = .02). In normal control subjects, Nt of SST-IR neurons varied according to time of death. This pattern was altered in BD subjects, characterized by decreases of SST-IR neurons selectively in subjects with time of death corresponding to the day (6:00 am to 5:59 pm). Numbers of neuropeptide Y-IR neurons were not affected. Decreased SST-IR neurons in the amygdala of patients with SZ and BD, interpreted here as decreased SST expression, may disrupt responses to fear and anxiety regulation in these individuals. In BD, our findings raise the possibility that morning peaks of anxiety depend on a disruption of circadian regulation of SST expression in the amygdala. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sensitivity to Interaural Time Differences Conveyed in the Stimulus Envelope: Estimating Inputs of Binaural Neurons Through the Temporal Analysis of Spike Trains.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Mathias; Wang, Le; Greenberg, David; McAlpine, David

    2016-08-01

    Sound-source localization in the horizontal plane relies on detecting small differences in the timing and level of the sound at the two ears, including differences in the timing of the modulated envelopes of high-frequency sounds (envelope interaural time differences (ITDs)). We investigated responses of single neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) to a wide range of envelope ITDs and stimulus envelope shapes. By a novel means of visualizing neural activity relative to different portions of the periodic stimulus envelope at each ear, we demonstrate the role of neuron-specific excitatory and inhibitory inputs in creating ITD sensitivity (or the lack of it) depending on the specific shape of the stimulus envelope. The underlying binaural brain circuitry and synaptic parameters were modeled individually for each neuron to account for neuron-specific activity patterns. The model explains the effects of envelope shapes on sensitivity to envelope ITDs observed in both normal-hearing listeners and in neural data, and has consequences for understanding how ITD information in stimulus envelopes might be maximized in users of bilateral cochlear implants-for whom ITDs conveyed in the stimulus envelope are the only ITD cues available.

  1. Oscillating PDF in termini of circadian pacemaker neurons and synchronous molecular clocks in downstream neurons are not sufficient for sustenance of activity rhythms in constant darkness

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Pavitra; Nambiar, Aishwarya; Sheeba, Vasu

    2017-01-01

    In Drosophila, neuropeptide Pigment Dispersing Factor (PDF) is expressed in small and large ventral Lateral Neurons (sLNv and lLNv), among which sLNv are critical for activity rhythms in constant darkness. Studies show that this is mediated by rhythmic accumulation and likely secretion of PDF from sLNv dorsal projections, which in turn synchronises molecular oscillations in downstream circadian neurons. Using targeted expression of a neurodegenerative protein Huntingtin in LNv, we evoke a selective loss of neuropeptide PDF and clock protein PERIOD from sLNv soma. However, PDF is not lost from sLNv dorsal projections and lLNv. These flies are behaviourally arrhythmic in constant darkness despite persistence of PDF oscillations in sLNv dorsal projections and synchronous PERIOD oscillations in downstream circadian neurons. We find that PDF oscillations in sLNv dorsal projections are not sufficient for sustenance of activity rhythms in constant darkness and this is suggestive of an additional component that is possibly dependent on sLNv molecular clock and PDF in sLNv soma. Additionally, despite loss of PERIOD in sLNv, their activity rhythms entrain to light/dark cycles indicating that sLNv molecular clocks are not necessary for entrainment. Under constant light, these flies lack PDF from both soma and dorsal projections of sLNv, and when subjected to light/dark cycles, show morning and evening anticipation and accurately phased morning and evening peaks. Thus, under light/dark cycles, PDF in sLNv is not necessary for morning anticipation. PMID:28558035

  2. Oscillating PDF in termini of circadian pacemaker neurons and synchronous molecular clocks in downstream neurons are not sufficient for sustenance of activity rhythms in constant darkness.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Pavitra; Nambiar, Aishwarya; Sheeba, Vasu

    2017-01-01

    In Drosophila, neuropeptide Pigment Dispersing Factor (PDF) is expressed in small and large ventral Lateral Neurons (sLNv and lLNv), among which sLNv are critical for activity rhythms in constant darkness. Studies show that this is mediated by rhythmic accumulation and likely secretion of PDF from sLNv dorsal projections, which in turn synchronises molecular oscillations in downstream circadian neurons. Using targeted expression of a neurodegenerative protein Huntingtin in LNv, we evoke a selective loss of neuropeptide PDF and clock protein PERIOD from sLNv soma. However, PDF is not lost from sLNv dorsal projections and lLNv. These flies are behaviourally arrhythmic in constant darkness despite persistence of PDF oscillations in sLNv dorsal projections and synchronous PERIOD oscillations in downstream circadian neurons. We find that PDF oscillations in sLNv dorsal projections are not sufficient for sustenance of activity rhythms in constant darkness and this is suggestive of an additional component that is possibly dependent on sLNv molecular clock and PDF in sLNv soma. Additionally, despite loss of PERIOD in sLNv, their activity rhythms entrain to light/dark cycles indicating that sLNv molecular clocks are not necessary for entrainment. Under constant light, these flies lack PDF from both soma and dorsal projections of sLNv, and when subjected to light/dark cycles, show morning and evening anticipation and accurately phased morning and evening peaks. Thus, under light/dark cycles, PDF in sLNv is not necessary for morning anticipation.

  3. Blocking synaptic transmission with tetanus toxin light chain reveals modes of neurotransmission in the PDF-positive circadian clock neurons of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Umezaki, Yujiro; Yasuyama, Kouji; Nakagoshi, Hideki; Tomioka, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    Circadian locomotor rhythms of Drosophila melanogaster are controlled by a neuronal circuit composed of approximately 150 clock neurons that are roughly classified into seven groups. In the circuit, a group of neurons expressing pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) play an important role in organizing the pacemaking system. Recent studies imply that unknown chemical neurotransmitter(s) (UNT) other than PDF is also expressed in the PDF-positive neurons. To explore its role in the circadian pacemaker, we examined the circadian locomotor rhythms of pdf-Gal4/UAS-TNT transgenic flies in which chemical synaptic transmission in PDF-positive neurons was blocked by expressed tetanus toxin light chain (TNT). In constant darkness (DD), the flies showed a free-running rhythm, which was similar to that of wild-type flies but significantly different from pdf null mutants. Under constant light conditions (LL), however, they often showed complex rhythms with a short period and a long period component. The UNT is thus likely involved in the synaptic transmission in the clock network and its release caused by LL leads to arrhythmicity. Immunocytochemistry revealed that LL induced phase separation in TIMELESS (TIM) cycling among some of the PDF-positive and PDF-negative clock neurons in the transgenic flies. These results suggest that both PDF and UNT play important roles in the Drosophila circadian clock, and activation of PDF pathway alone by LL leads to the complex locomotor rhythm through desynchronized oscillation among some of the clock neurons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. GABA-mediated repulsive coupling between circadian clock neurons in the SCN encodes seasonal time

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jihwan; Hong, Sungho; DeWoskin, Daniel; De Schutter, Erik; Forger, Daniel B.; Takumi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) forms not only the master circadian clock but also a seasonal clock. This neural network of ∼10,000 circadian oscillators encodes season-dependent day-length changes through a largely unknown mechanism. We show that region-intrinsic changes in the SCN fine-tune the degree of network synchrony and reorganize the phase relationship among circadian oscillators to represent day length. We measure oscillations of the clock gene Bmal1, at single-cell and regional levels in cultured SCN explanted from animals raised under short or long days. Coupling estimation using the Kuramoto framework reveals that the network has couplings that can be both phase-attractive (synchronizing) and -repulsive (desynchronizing). The phase gap between the dorsal and ventral regions increases and the overall period of the SCN shortens with longer day length. We find that one of the underlying physiological mechanisms is the modulation of the intracellular chloride concentration, which can adjust the strength and polarity of the ionotropic GABAA-mediated synaptic input. We show that increasing day-length changes the pattern of chloride transporter expression, yielding more excitatory GABA synaptic input, and that blocking GABAA signaling or the chloride transporter disrupts the unique phase and period organization induced by the day length. We test the consequences of this tunable GABA coupling in the context of excitation–inhibition balance through detailed realistic modeling. These results indicate that the network encoding of seasonal time is controlled by modulation of intracellular chloride, which determines the phase relationship among and period difference between the dorsal and ventral SCN. PMID:26130804

  5. Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide (VIP)-Expressing Neurons in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Provide Sparse GABAergic Outputs to Local Neurons with Circadian Regulation Occurring Distal to the Opening of Postsynaptic GABAA Ionotropic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Junmei; Zeng, Hongkui; Olson, David P.; Huber, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic synaptic transmission plays an important role in resetting and synchronizing circadian rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Although the circadian modulation of intrinsic membrane currents and biochemical signaling have been examined in the SCN, the modulation of specific synaptic pathways within the SCN is unexplored. In addition, little is known about the functional properties of these pathways, including which ones involve GABAA receptors (GABAA-Rs). In brain slices obtained from mice, we examined synaptic responses originating from the SCN neurons expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP+ neurons). Focusing on the local projection within the ventromedial SCN, we found that VIP+ afferents provided input onto 49% of neurons with a preference for VIP-negative (VIP−) neurons. Responses were mediated by GABAA-Rs. The projection was sparsely connected and preferentially targeted a subset of SCN neurons unrelated to postsynaptic VIP expression. For most aspects of VIP+ network output, there was no circadian regulation. Excitability and spontaneous firing of the presynaptic VIP+ neurons were unchanged between day and night, and their network connectivity and synaptic function up through the evoked synaptic conductance were also unchanged. On the other hand, VIP+ input onto VIP− neurons became less inhibitory at night suggesting a postsynaptic alteration in the coupling of GABAA-R conductances to action potential firing. These data suggest that components of the VIP network and its synaptic output up through GABAA-R opening are invariant during the circadian cycle, but the effect on action potential firing is modulated by postsynaptic processes occurring after GABAA-R channel opening. PMID:25653351

  6. Parent-of-origin genetic background affects the transcriptional levels of circadian and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep loss.

    PubMed

    Tinarelli, Federico; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Nicassio, Francesco; Tucci, Valter

    2014-03-05

    Sleep homoeostasis refers to a process in which the propensity to sleep increases as wakefulness progresses and decreases as sleep progresses. Sleep is tightly organized around the circadian clock and is regulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The homoeostatic response of sleep, which is classically triggered by sleep deprivation, is generally measured as a rebound effect of electrophysiological measures, for example delta sleep. However, more recently, gene expression changes following sleep loss have been investigated as biomarkers of sleep homoeostasis. The genetic background of an individual may affect this sleep-dependent gene expression phenotype. In this study, we investigated whether parental genetic background differentially modulates the expression of genes following sleep loss. We tested the progeny of reciprocal crosses of AKR/J and DBA/2J mouse strains and we show a parent-of-origin effect on the expression of circadian, sleep and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep deprivation. Thus, we further explored, by in silico, specific functions or upstream mechanisms of regulation and we observed that several upstream mechanisms involving signalling pathways (i.e. DICER1, PKA), growth factors (CSF3 and BDNF) and transcriptional regulators (EGR2 and ELK4) may be differentially modulated by parental effects. This is the first report showing that a behavioural manipulation (e.g. sleep deprivation) in adult animals triggers specific gene expression responses according to parent-of-origin genomic mechanisms. Our study suggests that the same mechanism may be extended to other behavioural domains and that the investigation of gene expression following experimental manipulations should take seriously into account parent-of-origin effects.

  7. Parent-of-origin genetic background affects the transcriptional levels of circadian and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Tinarelli, Federico; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Nicassio, Francesco; Tucci, Valter

    2014-01-01

    Sleep homoeostasis refers to a process in which the propensity to sleep increases as wakefulness progresses and decreases as sleep progresses. Sleep is tightly organized around the circadian clock and is regulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The homoeostatic response of sleep, which is classically triggered by sleep deprivation, is generally measured as a rebound effect of electrophysiological measures, for example delta sleep. However, more recently, gene expression changes following sleep loss have been investigated as biomarkers of sleep homoeostasis. The genetic background of an individual may affect this sleep-dependent gene expression phenotype. In this study, we investigated whether parental genetic background differentially modulates the expression of genes following sleep loss. We tested the progeny of reciprocal crosses of AKR/J and DBA/2J mouse strains and we show a parent-of-origin effect on the expression of circadian, sleep and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep deprivation. Thus, we further explored, by in silico, specific functions or upstream mechanisms of regulation and we observed that several upstream mechanisms involving signalling pathways (i.e. DICER1, PKA), growth factors (CSF3 and BDNF) and transcriptional regulators (EGR2 and ELK4) may be differentially modulated by parental effects. This is the first report showing that a behavioural manipulation (e.g. sleep deprivation) in adult animals triggers specific gene expression responses according to parent-of-origin genomic mechanisms. Our study suggests that the same mechanism may be extended to other behavioural domains and that the investigation of gene expression following experimental manipulations should take seriously into account parent-of-origin effects. PMID:24446504

  8. Suprachiasmatic nuclei and Circadian rhythms. The role of suprachiasmatic nuclei on rhythmic activity of neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, ventromedian nuclei and pineal gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishino, H.

    1977-01-01

    Unit activity of lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) and Ventromedian nuclei (VMN) was recorded in urethane anesthetized male rats. A 5 to 10 sec. a 3-5 min and a circadian rhythmicity were observed. In about 15% of all neurons, spontaneous activity of LHA and VMN showed reciprocal relationships. Subthreshold stimuli applied at a slow rate in the septum and the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) suppressed the rhythms without changing firing rates. On the other hand, stimulation of the optic nerve at a rate of 5 to 10/sec increased firing rates in 1/3 of neurons of SCN. Iontophoretically applied acetylcholine increased 80% of tested neurons of SCN, whereas norepinephrine, dopamine and 5 HT inhibited 64, 60 and 75% of SCN neurons respectively. These inhibitions were much stronger in neurons, the activity of which was increased by optic nerve stimulation. Stimulation of the SCN inhibited the tonic activity in cervical sympathetic nerves.

  9. mTORC1 signaling in Agrp neurons mediates circadian expression of Agrp and NPY but is dispensable for regulation of feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Albert, Verena; Cornu, Marion; Hall, Michael N

    2015-08-21

    Orexigenic agouti-related protein/neuropeptide Y (Agrp/NPY) neurons and an orexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons of the hypothalamus regulate feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. An understanding of the molecular signaling pathways that regulate Agrp/NPY and POMC function could lead to novel treatments for metabolic disorders. Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (TORC1) is a nutrient-activated protein kinase and central controller of growth and metabolism. We therefore investigated the role of mammalian TORC1 (mTORC1) in Agrp neurons. We generated and characterized Agrp neuron-specific raptor knockout (Agrp-raptor KO) mice. Agrp-raptor KO mice displayed reduced, non-circadian expression of Agrp and NPY but normal feeding behavior and energy homeostasis on both normal and high fat diet. Thus, mTORC1 in Agrp neurons controls circadian expression of orexigenic neuropeptides but is dispensable for the regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Adaptation of Circadian Neuronal Network to Photoperiod in High-Latitude European Drosophilids.

    PubMed

    Menegazzi, Pamela; Dalla Benetta, Elena; Beauchamp, Marta; Schlichting, Matthias; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2017-03-20

    The genus Drosophila contains over 2,000 species that, stemming from a common ancestor in the Old World Tropics, populate today very different environments [1, 2] (reviewed in [3]). We found significant differences in the activity pattern of Drosophila species belonging to the holarctic virilis group, i.e., D. ezoana and D. littoralis, collected in Northern Europe, compared to that of the cosmopolitan D. melanogaster, collected close to the equator. These behavioral differences might have been of adaptive significance for colonizing high-latitude habitats and hence adjust to long photoperiods. Most interestingly, the flies' locomotor activity correlates with the neurochemistry of their circadian clock network, which differs between low and high latitude for the expression pattern of the blue light photopigment cryptochrome (CRY) and the neuropeptide Pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) [4-6]. In D. melanogaster, CRY and PDF are known to modulate the timing of activity and to maintain robust rhythmicity under constant conditions [7-11]. We could partly simulate the rhythmic behavior of the high-latitude virilis group species by mimicking their CRY/PDF expression patterns in a laboratory strain of D. melanogaster. We therefore suggest that these alterations in the CRY/PDF clock neurochemistry might have allowed the virilis group species to colonize high-latitude environments.

  11. CREB influences timing and entrainment of the SCN circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boyoung; Li, Aiqing; Hansen, Katelin F; Cao, Ruifeng; Yoon, Jae Hwa; Obrietan, Karl

    2010-12-01

    The transcriptional feedback circuit, which is at the core of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian (i.e., 24 h) clock, is tightly coupled to both external entrainment cues, such as light, as well as rhythmic cues that arise on a system-wide level within the SCN. One potential signaling pathway by which these cues are conveyed to the molecular clock is the CREB/CRE transcriptional cascade. In this study, we employed a tetracycline-inducible CREB repressor mouse strain, in which approximately 60% of the SCN neurons express the transgene, to test CREB functionality in the clock and its effects on overt rhythmicity. We show that attenuated CREB signaling in the SCN led to a significant reduction in light-evoked clock entrainment. An examination of circadian timing revealed that CREB repressor mice exhibited normal free-running rhythms in the absence of external lighting cues. However, under conditions of constant light, which typically leads to a lengthening of the circadian period, CREB repressor mice exhibited a dramatic arrhythmic phenotype, which could be reversed with doxycycline. At a cellular level, the repression of CREB led to a significant reduction in both the expression of the circadian clock proteins PERIOD1 and PERIOD2 and the clock output hormones AVP and VIP. Together, these data support the idea that the CRE transcriptional pathway orchestrates transcriptional events that are essential for both the maintenance of SCN timing and light entrainment of the circadian clock.

  12. Circadian nursing induces PER1 protein in neuroendocrine tyrosine hydroxylase neurones in the rabbit doe.

    PubMed

    Meza, E; Waliszewski, S M; Caba, M

    2011-06-01

    Rabbit does nurse their pups once a day with circadian periodicity and pups ingest up to 35% of their body weight in milk in < 5 min. In the doe, there is a massive release of prolactin. We hypothesised that periodic suckling synchronises dopaminergic populations that control prolactin secretion. We explored this by immunohistochemical colocalisation of PER1 protein, the product of the clock gene Per1 on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) cells in three dopaminergic populations: tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA), periventricular hypophyseal dopaminergic (PHDA) and incertohypothalamic dopaminergic (IHDA) cells. PER1/TH colocalisation was explored every 4 h through a complete 24-h cycle at postpartum day 7 in does that nursed their pups either at 10.00 h (ZT03) or at 02.00 h (ZT19; ZT0 = 07.00 h, time of lights on). Nonpregnant, nonlactating females were used as controls. In control females, there was a rhythm of PER1 that peaks at ZT15. By contrast, in nursed does, the PER1 peak shifted in parallel to scheduled nursing in TIDA and PHDA cells but not in IHDA cells, which are not related to the control of prolactin. Next, we determined that the absence of suckling for 48 h significantly decreases the number of PER1/TH colocalised cells in PHDA but not TIDA cells. Locomotor behaviour in control subjects was maximal at around the time of lights on but, in nursed females, shifted at around the time of scheduled nursing. Finally, in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, there is a maximal expression of PER1 at ZT11 in the three groups. However, this maximal expression was significantly lower in the nursed groups in relation to the control group and in the groups deprived of nursing for 48 h. We conclude that suckling synchronises dopaminergic cells related to the control of prolactin and appears to be a nonphotic stimulus for the suprachiasmatic nucleus. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Folate deprivation modulates the expression of autophagy- and circadian-related genes in HT-22 hippocampal neuron cells through GR-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qinwei; Yang, Yang; Li, Xi; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Zhang, Nana; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-08-01

    Folic acid (FA) is an extremely important nutrient for brain formation and development. FA deficiency is highly linked to brain degeneration and age-related diseases, which are also associated with autophagic activities and circadian rhythm in hippocampal neurons. However, little is known how autophagy- and circadian-related genes in hippocampal neurons are regulated under FA deficiency. Here, hippocampal neuroncells (HT-22) were employed to determine the effect of FA deprivation (FD) on the expression of relevant genes and to reveal the potential role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR). FD increased autophagic activities in HT-22 cells, associated with significantly (P<0.05) enhanced GR activation indicated by higher ratio of GR phosphorylation. Out of 17 autophagy-related genes determined, 8 was significantly (P<0.05) up-regulated in FD group, which includes ATG2b, ATG3, ATG4c, ATG5, ATG10, ATG12, ATG13 and ATG14. Meanwhile, 4 out of 7 circadian-related genes detected, Clock, Cry1, Cry2 and Per2, were significantly (P<0.05) up-regulated. The protein content of autophagy markers, LC3A and LC3B, was also increased significantly (P<0.05). ChIP assay showed that FD promoted (P<0.05) GR binding to the promoter sequence of ATG3 and Per2. Moreover, MeDIP analysis demonstrated significant (P<0.05) hypomethylation in the promoter sequence of ATG12, ATG13 and Per2 genes. Together, we speculate that FD increases the transcription of autophagy- and circadian-related genes through, at least partly, GR-mediated pathway. Our results provide a basis for future investigations into the intracellular regulatory network in response to folate deficiency.

  14. Circadian Rhythms

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronobiology. Are circadian rhythms the same thing as biological clocks? No, but they are related. Our biological clocks drive our circadian rhythms. What are biological clocks? The biological clocks that control circadian rhythms ...

  15. Widespread receptivity to neuropeptide PDF throughout the neuronal circadian clock network of Drosophila revealed by real-time cyclic AMP imaging.

    PubMed

    Shafer, Orie T; Kim, Dong Jo; Dunbar-Yaffe, Richard; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Lohse, Martin J; Taghert, Paul H

    2008-04-24

    The neuropeptide PDF is released by sixteen clock neurons in Drosophila and helps maintain circadian activity rhythms by coordinating a network of approximately 150 neuronal clocks. Whether PDF acts directly on elements of this neural network remains unknown. We address this question by adapting Epac1-camps, a genetically encoded cAMP FRET sensor, for use in the living brain. We find that a subset of the PDF-expressing neurons respond to PDF with long-lasting cAMP increases and confirm that such responses require the PDF receptor. In contrast, an unrelated Drosophila neuropeptide, DH31, stimulates large cAMP increases in all PDF-expressing clock neurons. Thus, the network of approximately 150 clock neurons displays widespread, though not uniform, PDF receptivity. This work introduces a sensitive means of measuring cAMP changes in a living brain with subcellular resolution. Specifically, it experimentally confirms the longstanding hypothesis that PDF is a direct modulator of most neurons in the Drosophila clock network.

  16. Widespread receptivity to neuropeptide PDF throughout the neuronal circadian clock network of Drosophila revealed by real-time cyclic AMP imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Orie T.; Kim, Dong Jo; Dunbar-Yaffe, Richard; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Lohse, Martin J.; Taghert, Paul H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The neuropeptide PDF is released by sixteen clock neurons in Drosophila and helps maintain circadian activity rhythms by coordinating a network of ~150 neuronal clocks. Whether PDF acts directly on elements of this neural network remains unknown. We address this question by adapting Epac1-camps, a genetically encoded cAMP FRET sensor, for use in the living brain. We find that a subset of the PDF-expressing neurons respond to PDF with long-lasting cAMP increases, and confirm that such responses require the PDF receptor. In contrast, an unrelated Drosophila neuropeptide, DH 31, stimulates large cAMP increases in all PDF-expressing clock neurons. Thus the network of ~150 clock neurons displays widespread, though not uniform, PDF receptivity. This work introduces a sensitive means of measuring cAMP changes in a living brain with sub-cellular resolution. Specifically, it experimentally confirms the longstanding hypothesis that PDF is a direct modulator of most neurons in the Drosophila clock network. PMID:18439407

  17. Circadian Rhythm Neuropeptides in Drosophila: Signals for Normal Circadian Function and Circadian Neurodegenerative Disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Qiankun; Wu, Binbin; Price, Jeffrey L.; Zhao, Zhangwu

    2017-01-01

    Circadian rhythm is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many organisms ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. During more than four decades, the intrinsic and exogenous regulations of circadian rhythm have been studied. This review summarizes the core endogenous oscillation in Drosophila and then focuses on the neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and hormones that mediate its outputs and integration in Drosophila and the links between several of these (pigment dispersing factor (PDF) and insulin-like peptides) and neurodegenerative disease. These signaling molecules convey important network connectivity and signaling information for normal circadian function, but PDF and insulin-like peptides can also convey signals that lead to apoptosis, enhanced neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in flies carrying circadian mutations or in a senescent state. PMID:28430154

  18. Circadian Rhythm Neuropeptides in Drosophila: Signals for Normal Circadian Function and Circadian Neurodegenerative Disease.

    PubMed

    He, Qiankun; Wu, Binbin; Price, Jeffrey L; Zhao, Zhangwu

    2017-04-21

    Circadian rhythm is a ubiquitous phenomenon in many organisms ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. During more than four decades, the intrinsic and exogenous regulations of circadian rhythm have been studied. This review summarizes the core endogenous oscillation in Drosophila and then focuses on the neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and hormones that mediate its outputs and integration in Drosophila and the links between several of these (pigment dispersing factor (PDF) and insulin-like peptides) and neurodegenerative disease. These signaling molecules convey important network connectivity and signaling information for normal circadian function, but PDF and insulin-like peptides can also convey signals that lead to apoptosis, enhanced neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in flies carrying circadian mutations or in a senescent state.

  19. A Multi-Oscillatory Circadian System Times Female Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Simonneaux, Valérie; Bahougne, Thibault

    2015-01-01

    Rhythms in female reproduction are critical to insure that timing of ovulation coincides with oocyte maturation and optimal sexual arousal. This fine tuning of female reproduction involves both the estradiol feedback as an indicator of oocyte maturation, and the master circadian clock of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) as an indicator of the time of the day. Herein, we are providing an overview of the state of knowledge regarding the differential inhibitory and stimulatory effects of estradiol at different stages of the reproductive axis, and the mechanisms through which the two main neurotransmitters of the SCN, arginine vasopressin, and vasoactive intestinal peptide, convey daily time cues to the reproductive axis. In addition, we will report the most recent findings on the putative functions of peripheral clocks located throughout the reproductive axis [kisspeptin (Kp) neurons, gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons, gonadotropic cells, the ovary, and the uterus]. This review will point to the critical position of the Kp neurons of the anteroventral periventricular nucleus, which integrate both the stimulatory estradiol signal, and the daily arginine vasopressinergic signal, while displaying a circadian clock. Finally, given the critical role of the light/dark cycle in the synchronization of female reproduction, we will discuss the impact of circadian disruptions observed during shift-work conditions on female reproductive performance and fertility in both animal model and humans.

  20. A Multi-Oscillatory Circadian System Times Female Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Simonneaux, Valérie; Bahougne, Thibault

    2015-01-01

    Rhythms in female reproduction are critical to insure that timing of ovulation coincides with oocyte maturation and optimal sexual arousal. This fine tuning of female reproduction involves both the estradiol feedback as an indicator of oocyte maturation, and the master circadian clock of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) as an indicator of the time of the day. Herein, we are providing an overview of the state of knowledge regarding the differential inhibitory and stimulatory effects of estradiol at different stages of the reproductive axis, and the mechanisms through which the two main neurotransmitters of the SCN, arginine vasopressin, and vasoactive intestinal peptide, convey daily time cues to the reproductive axis. In addition, we will report the most recent findings on the putative functions of peripheral clocks located throughout the reproductive axis [kisspeptin (Kp) neurons, gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons, gonadotropic cells, the ovary, and the uterus]. This review will point to the critical position of the Kp neurons of the anteroventral periventricular nucleus, which integrate both the stimulatory estradiol signal, and the daily arginine vasopressinergic signal, while displaying a circadian clock. Finally, given the critical role of the light/dark cycle in the synchronization of female reproduction, we will discuss the impact of circadian disruptions observed during shift-work conditions on female reproductive performance and fertility in both animal model and humans. PMID:26539161

  1. Circadian Periods of Sensitivity for Ramelteon on the onset of Running-wheel Activity and the Peak of Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Neuronal Firing Rhythms in C3H/HeN Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rawashdeh, Oliver; Hudson, Randall L.; Stepien, Iwona; Dubocovich, Margarita L.

    2016-01-01

    Ramelteon, an MT1/MT2 melatonin receptor agonist, is used for the treatment of sleep-onset insomnia and circadian sleep disorders. Ramelteon phase shifts circadian rhythms in rodents and humans when given at the end of the subjective day; however, its efficacy at other circadian times is not known. Here, the authors determined in C3H/ HeN mice the maximal circadian sensitivity for ramelteon in vivo on the onset of circadian running-wheel activity rhythms, and in vitro on the peak of circadian rhythm of neuronal firing in suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) brain slices. The phase response curve (PRC) for ramelteon (90 μg/mouse, subcutaneous [sc]) on circadian wheel-activity rhythms shows maximal sensitivity during the late mid to end of the subjective day, between CT8 and CT12 (phase advance), and late subjective night and early subjective day, between CT20 and CT2 (phase delay), using a 3-day-pulse treatment regimen in C3H/HeN mice. The PRC for ramelteon resembles that for melatonin in C3H/ HeN mice, showing the same magnitude of maximal shifts at CT10 and CT2, except that the range of sensitivity for ramelteon (CT8–CT12) during the subjective day is broader. Furthermore, in SCN brain slices in vitro, ramelteon (10 pM) administered at CT10 phase advances (5.6 ± 0.29 h, n = 3) and at CT2 phase delays (−3.2 ± 0.12 h, n = 6) the peak of circadian rhythm of neuronal firing, with the shifts being significantly larger than those induced by melatonin (10 pM) at the same circadian times (CT10: 2.7 ± 0.15 h, n = 4, p < .05; CT2: −1.13 ± 0.08 h, n = 6, p < .001, respectively). The phase shifts induced by both melatonin and ramelteon in the SCN brain slice at either CT10 or CT2 corresponded with the period of sensitivity observed in vivo. In conclusion, melatonin and ramelteon showed identical periods of circadian sensitivity at CT10 (advance) and CT2 (delay) to shift the onset of circadian activity rhythms in vivo and the peak of SCN neuronal firing rhythms in vitro

  2. Circadian Plasticity of Mammalian Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons participate in all neuronal circuits in the mammalian brain, including the circadian clock system, and are indispensable for their effective function. Although the clock neurons have different molecular and electrical properties, their main function is the generation of circadian oscillations. Here we review the circadian plasticity of GABAergic interneurons in several areas of the mammalian brain, suprachiasmatic nucleus, neocortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, cerebellum, striatum, and in the retina. PMID:28367335

  3. Leptin-sensitive neurons in the arcuate nucleus integrate activity and temperature circadian rhythms and anticipatory responses to food restriction.

    PubMed

    Wiater, Michael F; Li, Ai-Jun; Dinh, Thu T; Jansen, Heiko T; Ritter, Sue

    2013-10-15

    Previously, we investigated the role of neuropeptide Y and leptin-sensitive networks in the mediobasal hypothalamus in sleep and feeding and found profound homeostatic and circadian deficits with an intact suprachiasmatic nucleus. We propose that the arcuate nuclei (Arc) are required for the integration of homeostatic circadian systems, including temperature and activity. We tested this hypothesis using saporin toxin conjugated to leptin (Lep-SAP) injected into Arc in rats. Lep-SAP rats became obese and hyperphagic and progressed through a dynamic phase to a static phase of growth. Circadian rhythms were examined over 49 days during the static phase. Rats were maintained on a 12:12-h light-dark (LD) schedule for 13 days and, thereafter, maintained in continuous dark (DD). After the first 13 days of DD, food was restricted to 4 h/day for 10 days. We found that the activity of Lep-SAP rats was arrhythmic in DD, but that food anticipatory activity was, nevertheless, entrainable to the restricted feeding schedule, and the entrained rhythm persisted during the subsequent 3-day fast in DD. Thus, for activity, the circuitry for the light-entrainable oscillator, but not for the food-entrainable oscillator, was disabled by the Arc lesion. In contrast, temperature remained rhythmic in DD in the Lep-SAP rats and did not entrain to restricted feeding. We conclude that the leptin-sensitive network that includes the Arc is required for entrainment of activity by photic cues and entrainment of temperature by food, but is not required for entrainment of activity by food or temperature by photic cues.

  4. Circadian light

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The present paper reflects a work in progress toward a definition of circadian light, one that should be informed by the thoughtful, century-old evolution of our present definition of light as a stimulus for the human visual system. This work in progress is based upon the functional relationship between optical radiation and its effects on nocturnal melatonin suppression, in large part because the basic data are available in the literature. Discussed here are the fundamental differences between responses by the visual and circadian systems to optical radiation. Brief reviews of photometry, colorimetry, and brightness perception are presented as a foundation for the discussion of circadian light. Finally, circadian light (CLA) and circadian stimulus (CS) calculation procedures based on a published mathematical model of human circadian phototransduction are presented with an example. PMID:20377841

  5. Immunity's fourth dimension: approaching the circadian-immune connection.

    PubMed

    Arjona, Alvaro; Silver, Adam C; Walker, Wendy E; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-12-01

    The circadian system ensures the generation and maintenance of self-sustained ~24-h rhythms in physiology that are linked to internal and environmental changes. In mammals, daily variations in light intensity and other cues are integrated by a hypothalamic master clock that conveys circadian information to peripheral molecular clocks that orchestrate physiology. Multiple immune parameters also vary throughout the day and disruption of circadian homeostasis is associated with immune-related disease. Here, we discuss the molecular links between the circadian and immune systems and examine their outputs and disease implications. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie circadian-immune crosstalk may prove valuable for devising novel prophylactic and therapeutic interventions.

  6. Hypothesis: A perfect day conveys internal time.

    PubMed

    Groß, J V; Fritschi, L; Erren, T C

    2017-04-01

    In 2007 the International Agency for Research on Cancer [IARC] concluded "shift work that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans" (Group 2A). To investigate the "probable" causal link, information on individual chronobiology is needed to specify exposures to circadian disruption associated with shift work. In epidemiological studies this information is usually assessed by questionnaire. The most widely used Morningness-Eveningness-Questionnaire (MEQ) and MunichChronoTypeQuestionnaire (MCTQ) reveal information on circadian type (MEQ) and actual sleep behaviour (MCTQ). As a further option we suggest to obtain preferred sleep times by using what we call the perfect day (PD) approach. We hypothesize that a PD - as a day of completely preferred sleep behaviour - captures pristine internal time. We argue that the PD approach may measure internal time more accurately than the MEQ and MCTQ which convey influences by work and social time pressures. The PD approach may therefore reduce misclassifications of internal time and reveal circadian disruption caused by different shift systems.

  7. Circadian regulation of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gooley, Joshua J

    2016-11-01

    The circadian system temporally coordinates daily rhythms in feeding behaviour and energy metabolism. The objective of the present paper is to review the mechanisms that underlie circadian regulation of lipid metabolic pathways. Circadian rhythms in behaviour and physiology are generated by master clock neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN and its efferent targets in the hypothalamus integrate light and feeding signals to entrain behavioural rhythms as well as clock cells located in peripheral tissues, including the liver, adipose tissue and muscle. Circadian rhythms in gene expression are regulated at the cellular level by a molecular clock comprising a core set of clock genes/proteins. In peripheral tissues, hundreds of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and fatty acid oxidation are rhythmically activated and repressed by clock proteins, hence providing a direct mechanism for circadian regulation of lipids. Disruption of clock gene function results in abnormal metabolic phenotypes and impaired lipid absorption, demonstrating that the circadian system is essential for normal energy metabolism. The composition and timing of meals influence diurnal regulation of metabolic pathways, with food intake during the usual rest phase associated with dysregulation of lipid metabolism. Recent studies using metabolomics and lipidomics platforms have shown that hundreds of lipid species are circadian-regulated in human plasma, including but not limited to fatty acids, TAG, glycerophospholipids, sterol lipids and sphingolipids. In future work, these lipid profiling approaches can be used to understand better the interaction between diet, mealtimes and circadian rhythms on lipid metabolism and risk for obesity and metabolic diseases.

  8. On conveying and not conveying expertise.

    PubMed

    Rappert, Brian; Coopmans, Catelijne

    2015-08-01

    This article attends to the movement between disclosing and non-disclosing in accounts of expertise. While referencing discussions about tacit knowledge ('experts know more than they can say') and the politics of non-disclosure ('withholding can help as well as harm the credibility of experts'), in the main it considers how experts move between conveying and not conveying in order to make their proficiencies recognized and accessible to others. The article examines this movement through a form that partakes in it, thus drawing attention to conventions and tensions in how authors make themselves accountable, and their subject matter available, to audiences. It thereby proposes to explore the possibilities of careful, and generative, non-disclosure as part of expert writing practices.

  9. PEGylated rhFGF-2 conveys long-term neuroprotection and improves neuronal function in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guanghui; Chen, Ganping; Shi, Lu; Feng, Jenny; Wang, Yan; Ye, Chaohui; Feng, Wenke; Niu, Jianlou; Huang, Zhifeng

    2015-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) has a neurotrophic effect on dopaminergic neurons in vitro and in vivo, and exhibits beneficial effects in animal models of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). The poor stability and short half-life of FGF-2, however, have hampered its clinical use for neurological diseases. In the present study, we modified native recombinant human FGF-2 (rhFGF-2) by covalently attaching polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, named PEGylation, to enhance its neuroprotection efficacy in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced model of PD. In vitro, PEG-rhFGF-2 performed better biostability in 6-OHDA-induced PC-12 cells than native rhFGF-2. The in vivo data showed that, compared with native rhFGF-2, PEGylated rhFGF-2 was more efficacious in preventing 6-OHDA-induced lesion upon tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the substantia nigra (SN), improving the apomorphine-induced rotational behavior and the 6-OHDA-induced decline in tissue concentration of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites. Importantly, our data showed that the superior pharmacological activity of PEGylated rhFGF-2 is probably due to its greater permeability through the blood-brain barrier and better in vivo stability compared to native rhFGF-2. The enhanced stability and bioavailability of PEGylated rhFGF-2 make this molecule a great therapeutic candidate for neurodegenerative diseases such as PD and mood disorders.

  10. [Multilayered control of the Mammalian circadian system].

    PubMed

    Ode, Koji L; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2014-06-01

    All mammals show daily rhythms in their physiological activity, for example, sleep-wake cycles. This rhythmicity is endogenously generated by a system called the circadian clock, and is composed of reactions occurring in several neural/cellular layers of multicellular organisms. Inter-cellular and inter-organ communication is important for the synchronous action of circadian rhythmicity across the whole body. The heart of the circadian system lies in the rhythmic neuronal activity of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the brain. The oscillation emerges as cell-autonomous rhythmic gene expression observed in individual SCN neurons. Inter-neuronal communication synchronizes the circadian phase of each neuron within the SCN. The integrated rhythmic SCN activity works as a pacemaker for the circadian clocks of non-SCN cells, each of which also rhythmically express clock genes. The -24-h period length of the circadian rhythm is predominantly determined by reactions at the molecular level. Cell-autonomous circadian oscillation is driven by a negative feedback loop of transcription regulation, where CRY/PER heterodimers act as the transcriptional repressors of their own genes. One of the rate limiting steps of circadian cycling is a phosphorylation of CRY and PER proteins followed by proteasome-mediated degradation of those proteins. Pharmacological and genetic perturbation of the phosphorylation or degradation pathways alters the circadian period length. This review provides a hierarchical view of the circadian system, which is important to uncover the different effects of medical or social perturbations on circadian regulation of inter-cellular synchronization, or cell-autonomous oscillation.

  11. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice.

    PubMed

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of 24 hr, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the "central pacemaker" of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hr as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark or "free-running" conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free-running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their homecage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are presented here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free-running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (e.g., jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-24-hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of environmental surroundings.

  12. Circadian Regulation of Cellular Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Peek, C.B; Ramsey, K.M; Levine, D.C; Marcheva, B; Perelis, M; Bass, J

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock synchronizes behavioral and physiological processes on a daily basis in anticipation of the light–dark cycle. In mammals, molecular clocks are present in both the central pacemaker neurons and in nearly all peripheral tissues. Clock transcription factors in metabolic tissues coordinate metabolic fuel utilization and storage with alternating periods of feeding and fasting corresponding to the rest–activity cycle. In vitro and in vivo biochemical approaches have led to the discovery of mechanisms underlying the interplay between the molecular clock and the metabolic networks. For example, recent studies have demonstrated that the circadian clock controls rhythmic synthesis of the cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) and activity of NAD+-dependent sirtuin deacetylase enzymes to regulate mitochondrial function across the circadian cycle. In this chapter, we review current state-of-the-art methods to analyze circadian cycles in mitochondrial bioenergetics, glycolysis, and nucleotide metabolism in both cell-based and animal models. PMID:25707277

  13. Pennington Symposium Supplement: The role of melanocortin neuronal pathways in circadian biology - a new homeostatic output involving melanocortin-3 receptors?

    PubMed Central

    Begriche, Karima; Sutton, Gregory M.; Fang, Jidong; Butler, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance and increased propensity for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease result from an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. The cloning of genes involved in energy homeostasis produced a simple feedback model for the homeostatic regulation of adipose mass. Serum leptin secreted from adipocytes signals nutrient sufficiency, curbing appetite and supporting energy expenditure. A rapid decline in leptin during nutrient scarcity instigates adaptive mechanisms, including increased appetite and reduced energy expenditure. Hypothalamic melanocortin neurons are important mediators of this response, integrating inputs of energy status from leptin with other peripheral signals. While this feedback response prolongs survival during fasting, other mechanisms allowing the prediction of nutrient availability also confer a selective advantage. This adaptation has been commonly studied in rodents using restricted feeding (RF) paradigms constraining food intake to limited periods at 24h intervals. RF rapidly elicits rhythmic bouts of activity and wakefulness anticipating food presentation. While the response exhibits features suggesting a clock-like mechanism, the neuromolecular mechanisms governing expression of food anticipatory behaviors are poorly understood. Here we discuss a model whereby melanocortin neurons regulating the homeostatic adaptation to variable caloric availability also regulate inputs into neural networks governing anticipatory rhythms in wakefulness, activity and metabolism. PMID:19849798

  14. The role of melanocortin neuronal pathways in circadian biology: a new homeostatic output involving melanocortin-3 receptors?

    PubMed

    Begriche, K; Sutton, G M; Fang, J; Butler, A A

    2009-11-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance and increased propensity for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease result from an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. The cloning of genes involved in energy homeostasis produced a simple feedback model for the homeostatic regulation of adipose mass. Serum leptin secreted from adipocytes signals nutrient sufficiency, curbing appetite and supporting energy expenditure. A rapid decline in leptin during nutrient scarcity instigates adaptive mechanisms, including increased appetite and reduced energy expenditure. Hypothalamic melanocortin neurons are important mediators of this response, integrating inputs of energy status from leptin with other peripheral signals. While this feedback response prolongs survival during fasting, other mechanisms allowing the prediction of nutrient availability also confer a selective advantage. This adaptation has been commonly studied in rodents using restricted feeding paradigms constraining food intake to limited periods at 24-h intervals. Restricted feeding rapidly elicits rhythmic bouts of activity and wakefulness anticipating food presentation. While the response exhibits features suggesting a clock-like mechanism, the neuromolecular mechanisms governing expression of food anticipatory behaviours are poorly understood. Here we discuss a model whereby melanocortin neurons regulating the homeostatic adaptation to variable caloric availability also regulate inputs into neural networks governing anticipatory rhythms in wakefulness, activity and metabolism.

  15. The Logic of Circadian Organization in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Dissel, Stephane; Hansen, Celia N.; Özkaya, Özge; Hemsley, Matthew; Kyriacou, Charalambos P.; Rosato, Ezio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, interlocked negative transcription/translation feedback loops provide the core of the circadian clock that generates rhythmic phenotypes. Although the current molecular model portrays the oscillator as cell autonomous, cross-talk among clock neurons is essential for robust cycling behavior. Nevertheless, the functional organization of the neuronal network remains obscure. Results Here we show that shortening or lengthening of the circadian period of locomotor activity can be obtained either by targeting different groups of clock cells with the same genetic manipulation or by challenging the same group of cells with activators and repressors of neuronal excitability. Conclusions Based on these observations we interpret circadian rhythmicity as an emerging property of the circadian network and we propose an initial model for its architectural design. PMID:25220056

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  17. The Drosophila Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase LAR Is Required for Development of Circadian Pacemaker Neuron Processes That Support Rhythmic Activity in Constant Darkness But Not during Light/Dark Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Parul

    2016-01-01

    In Drosophila, a transcriptional feedback loop that is activated by CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) complexes and repressed by PERIOD-TIMELESS (PER-TIM) complexes keeps circadian time. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated post-translationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Although kinases that control PER, TIM, and CLK levels, activity, and/or subcellular localization have been identified, less is known about phosphatases that control clock protein dephosphorylation. To identify clock-relevant phosphatases, clock-cell-specific RNAi knockdowns of Drosophila phosphatases were screened for altered activity rhythms. One phosphatase that was identified, the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase leukocyte-antigen-related (LAR), abolished activity rhythms in constant darkness (DD) without disrupting the timekeeping mechanism in brain pacemaker neurons. However, expression of the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF), which mediates pacemaker neuron synchrony and output, is eliminated in the dorsal projections from small ventral lateral (sLNv) pacemaker neurons when Lar expression is knocked down during development, but not in adults. Loss of Lar function eliminates sLNv dorsal projections, but PDF expression persists in sLNv and large ventral lateral neuron cell bodies and their remaining projections. In contrast to the defects in lights-on and lights-off anticipatory activity seen in flies that lack PDF, Lar RNAi knockdown flies anticipate the lights-on and lights-off transition normally. Our results demonstrate that Lar is required for sLNv dorsal projection development and suggest that PDF expression in LNv cell bodies and their remaining projections mediate anticipation of the lights-on and lights-off transitions during a light/dark cycle. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In animals, circadian clocks drive daily rhythms in physiology, metabolism, and behavior via transcriptional feedback loops. Because key circadian

  18. The Drosophila Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase LAR Is Required for Development of Circadian Pacemaker Neuron Processes That Support Rhythmic Activity in Constant Darkness But Not during Light/Dark Cycles.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Parul; Hardin, Paul E

    2016-03-30

    InDrosophila, a transcriptional feedback loop that is activated by CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) complexes and repressed by PERIOD-TIMELESS (PER-TIM) complexes keeps circadian time. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated post-translationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Although kinases that control PER, TIM, and CLK levels, activity, and/or subcellular localization have been identified, less is known about phosphatases that control clock protein dephosphorylation. To identify clock-relevant phosphatases, clock-cell-specific RNAi knockdowns ofDrosophilaphosphatases were screened for altered activity rhythms. One phosphatase that was identified, the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase leukocyte-antigen-related (LAR), abolished activity rhythms in constant darkness (DD) without disrupting the timekeeping mechanism in brain pacemaker neurons. However, expression of the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF), which mediates pacemaker neuron synchrony and output, is eliminated in the dorsal projections from small ventral lateral (sLNv) pacemaker neurons whenLarexpression is knocked down during development, but not in adults. Loss ofLarfunction eliminates sLNvdorsal projections, but PDF expression persists in sLNvand large ventral lateral neuron cell bodies and their remaining projections. In contrast to the defects in lights-on and lights-off anticipatory activity seen in flies that lack PDF,LarRNAi knockdown flies anticipate the lights-on and lights-off transition normally. Our results demonstrate thatLaris required for sLNvdorsal projection development and suggest that PDF expression in LNvcell bodies and their remaining projections mediate anticipation of the lights-on and lights-off transitions during a light/dark cycle. In animals, circadian clocks drive daily rhythms in physiology, metabolism, and behavior via transcriptional feedback loops. Because key circadian transcriptional activators and

  19. Coordination between Differentially Regulated Circadian Clocks Generates Rhythmic Behavior.

    PubMed

    Top, Deniz; Young, Michael W

    2017-09-11

    Specialized groups of neurons in the brain are key mediators of circadian rhythms, receiving daily environmental cues and communicating those signals to other tissues in the organism for entrainment and to organize circadian physiology. In Drosophila, the "circadian clock" is housed in seven neuronal clusters, which are defined by their expression of the main circadian proteins, Period, Timeless, Clock, and Cycle. These clusters are distributed across the fly brain and are thereby subject to the respective environments associated with their anatomical locations. While these core components are universally expressed in all neurons of the circadian network, additional regulatory proteins that act on these components are differentially expressed, giving rise to "local clocks" within the network that nonetheless converge to regulate coherent behavioral rhythms. In this review, we describe the communication between the neurons of the circadian network and the molecular differences within neurons of this network. We focus on differences in protein-expression patterns and discuss how such variation can impart functional differences in each local clock. Finally, we summarize our current understanding of how communication within the circadian network intersects with intracellular biochemical mechanisms to ultimately specify behavioral rhythms. We propose that additional efforts are required to identify regulatory mechanisms within each neuronal cluster to understand the molecular basis of circadian behavior. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. Central and peripheral circadian clocks in mammals.

    PubMed

    Mohawk, Jennifer A; Green, Carla B; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2012-01-01

    The circadian system of mammals is composed of a hierarchy of oscillators that function at the cellular, tissue, and systems levels. A common molecular mechanism underlies the cell-autonomous circadian oscillator throughout the body, yet this clock system is adapted to different functional contexts. In the central suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, a coupled population of neuronal circadian oscillators acts as a master pacemaker for the organism to drive rhythms in activity and rest, feeding, body temperature, and hormones. Coupling within the SCN network confers robustness to the SCN pacemaker, which in turn provides stability to the overall temporal architecture of the organism. Throughout the majority of the cells in the body, cell-autonomous circadian clocks are intimately enmeshed within metabolic pathways. Thus, an emerging view for the adaptive significance of circadian clocks is their fundamental role in orchestrating metabolism.

  1. Circadian Rhythms in Diet-Induced Obesity.

    PubMed

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    The biological clocks of the circadian timing system coordinate cellular and physiological processes and synchronizes these with daily cycles, feeding patterns also regulates circadian clocks. The clock genes and adipocytokines show circadian rhythmicity. Dysfunction of these genes are involved in the alteration of these adipokines during the development of obesity. Food availability promotes the stimuli associated with food intake which is a circadian oscillator outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Its circadian rhythm is arranged with the predictable daily mealtimes. Food anticipatory activity is mediated by a self-sustained circadian timing and its principal component is food entrained oscillator. However, the hypothalamus has a crucial role in the regulation of energy balance rather than food intake. Fatty acids or their metabolites can modulate neuronal activity by brain nutrient-sensing neurons involved in the regulation of energy and glucose homeostasis. The timing of three-meal schedules indicates close association with the plasma levels of insulin and preceding food availability. Desynchronization between the central and peripheral clocks by altered timing of food intake and diet composition can lead to uncoupling of peripheral clocks from the central pacemaker and to the development of metabolic disorders. Metabolic dysfunction is associated with circadian disturbances at both central and peripheral levels and, eventual disruption of circadian clock functioning can lead to obesity. While CLOCK expression levels are increased with high fat diet-induced obesity, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha increases the transcriptional level of brain and muscle ARNT-like 1 (BMAL1) in obese subjects. Consequently, disruption of clock genes results in dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and obesity. Modifying the time of feeding alone can greatly affect body weight. Changes in the circadian clock are associated with temporal alterations in

  2. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of twenty-four hours, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the “central pacemaker” of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hours as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark- or “free running”- conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their home cage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are outlined here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (i.e. jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-twenty-four hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of one's environmental surroundings. PMID:26331760

  3. Implications of Circadian Rhythm in Dopamine and Mood Regulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongah; Jang, Sangwon; Choe, Han Kyoung; Chung, Sooyoung; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2017-07-31

    Mammalian physiology and behavior are regulated by an internal time-keeping system, referred to as circadian rhythm. The circadian timing system has a hierarchical organization composed of the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and local clocks in extra-SCN brain regions and peripheral organs. The circadian clock molecular mechanism involves a network of transcription-translation feedback loops. In addition to the clinical association between circadian rhythm disruption and mood disorders, recent studies have suggested a molecular link between mood regulation and circadian rhythm. Specifically, genetic deletion of the circadian nuclear receptor Rev-erbα induces mania-like behavior caused by increased midbrain dopaminergic (DAergic) tone at dusk. The association between circadian rhythm and emotion-related behaviors can be applied to pathological conditions, including neurodegenerative diseases. In Parkinson's disease (PD), DAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta progressively degenerate leading to motor dysfunction. Patients with PD also exhibit non-motor symptoms, including sleep disorder and neuropsychiatric disorders. Thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms that link the molecular circadian clock and brain machinery in the regulation of emotional behaviors and related midbrain DAergic neuronal circuits in healthy and pathological states. This review summarizes the current literature regarding the association between circadian rhythm and mood regulation from a chronobiological perspective, and may provide insight into therapeutic approaches to target psychiatric symptoms in neurodegenerative diseases involving circadian rhythm dysfunction.

  4. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A; Hoegger, Dominik C; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A

    2013-01-29

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization.

  5. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A.; Hoegger, Dominik C.; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization. PMID:23267082

  6. Circadian Dysfunction Induces Leptin Resistance in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kettner, Nicole M; Mayo, Sara A; Hua, Jack; Lee, Choogon; Moore, David D; Fu, Loning

    2015-09-01

    Circadian disruption is associated with obesity, implicating the central clock in body weight control. Our comprehensive screen of wild-type and three circadian mutant mouse models, with or without chronic jet lag, shows that distinct genetic and physiologic interventions differentially disrupt overall energy homeostasis and Leptin signaling. We found that BMAL1/CLOCK generates circadian rhythm of C/EBPα-mediated leptin transcription in adipose. Per and Cry mutant mice show similar disruption of peripheral clock and deregulation of leptin in fat, but opposite body weight and composition phenotypes that correlate with their distinct patterns of POMC neuron deregulation in the arcuate nucleus. Chronic jet lag is sufficient to disrupt the endogenous adipose clock and also induce central Leptin resistance in wild-type mice. Thus, coupling of the central and peripheral clocks controls Leptin endocrine feedback homeostasis. We propose that Leptin resistance, a hallmark of obesity in humans, plays a key role in circadian dysfunction-induced obesity and metabolic syndromes.

  7. Circadian System, Sleep and Endocrinology

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Christopher J.; Aeschbach, Daniel; Scheer, Frank A.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Levels of numerous hormones vary across the day and night. Such fluctuations are not only attributable to changes in sleep/wakefulness and other behaviors but also to a biological timing system governed by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Sleep has a strong effect on levels of some hormones such as growth hormone but little effect on others which are more strongly regulated by the biological timing system (e.g., melatonin). Whereas the exact mechanisms through which sleep affects circulating hormonal levels are poorly understood, more is known about how the biological timing system influences the secretion of hormones. The suprachiasmatic nucleus exerts its influence on hormones via neuronal and humoral signals but it is also now apparent that peripheral cells can rhythmically secrete hormones independent of signals from the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Under normal circumstances, behaviors and the biological timing system are synchronized and consequently hormonal systems are exquisitely regulated. However, many individuals (e.g., shift-workers) frequently undergo circadian misalignment by desynchronizing their sleep/wake cycle from the biological timing system. Recent experiments indicate that circadian misalignment has an adverse effect on metabolic and hormonal factors such as glucose and insulin. Further research is needed to determine the underlying mechanisms that cause the negative effects induced by circadian misalignment. Such research could aid the development of countermeasures for circadian misalignment. PMID:21939733

  8. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Modelling of intercellular synchronization in the Drosophila circadian clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Wei; Chen, Ai-Min; Zhang, Jia-Jun; Yuan, Zhan-Jiang; Zhou, Tian-Shou

    2009-03-01

    In circadian rhythm generation, intercellular signaling factors are shown to play a crucial role in both sustaining intrinsic cellular rhythmicity and acquiring collective behaviours across a population of circadian neurons. However, the physical mechanism behind their role remains to be fully understood. In this paper, we propose an indirectly coupled multicellular model for the synchronization of Drosophila circadian oscillators combining both intracellular and intercellular dynamics. By simulating different experimental conditions, we find that such an indirect coupling way can synchronize both heterogeneous self-sustained circadian neurons and heterogeneous mutational damped circadian neurons. Moreover, they can also be entrained to ambient light-dark (LD) cycles depending on intercellular signaling.

  9. Network Dynamics Mediate Circadian Clock Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Azzi, Abdelhalim; Evans, Jennifer A; Leise, Tanya; Myung, Jihwan; Takumi, Toru; Davidson, Alec J; Brown, Steven A

    2017-01-18

    A circadian clock governs most aspects of mammalian behavior. Although its properties are in part genetically determined, altered light-dark environment can change circadian period length through a mechanism requiring de novo DNA methylation. We show here that this mechanism is mediated not via cell-autonomous clock properties, but rather through altered networking within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the circadian "master clock," which is DNA methylated in region-specific manner. DNA methylation is necessary to temporally reorganize circadian phasing among SCN neurons, which in turn changes the period length of the network as a whole. Interruption of neural communication by inhibiting neuronal firing or by physical cutting suppresses both SCN reorganization and period changes. Mathematical modeling suggests, and experiments confirm, that this SCN reorganization depends upon GABAergic signaling. Our results therefore show that basic circadian clock properties are governed by dynamic interactions among SCN neurons, with neuroadaptations in network function driven by the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lirong; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2012-01-01

    There have been remarkable advances in our understanding of the molecular, cellular and physiological mechanisms underlying the regulation of circadian rhythms, as well as the impact of circadian dysfunction on health and disease. This information has transformed our understanding of the effect of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) on health, performance and safety. CRSDs are caused by alterations of the central circadian time-keeping system, or a misalignment of the endogenous circadian rhythm and the external environment. In this section, we provide a review of circadian biology and discuss the pathophysiology, clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of the most commonly encountered CRSDs in clinical practice. PMID:23099133

  11. Quantification of Circadian Rhythms in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Westermark, Pål O.; Welsh, David K.; Okamura, Hitoshi; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2009-01-01

    Bioluminescence techniques allow accurate monitoring of the circadian clock in single cells. We have analyzed bioluminescence data of Per gene expression in mouse SCN neurons and fibroblasts. From these data, we extracted parameters such as damping rate and noise intensity using two simple mathematical models, one describing a damped oscillator driven by noise, and one describing a self-sustained noisy oscillator. Both models describe the data well and enabled us to quantitatively characterize both wild-type cells and several mutants. It has been suggested that the circadian clock is self-sustained at the single cell level, but we conclude that present data are not sufficient to determine whether the circadian clock of single SCN neurons and fibroblasts is a damped or a self-sustained oscillator. We show how to settle this question, however, by testing the models' predictions of different phases and amplitudes in response to a periodic entrainment signal (zeitgeber). PMID:19956762

  12. Disorders of the circadian clock: etiology and possible therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Wisor, J P

    2002-12-01

    The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus conveys 24-hr rhythmicity to sleep-wake cycles, temperature, locomotor activity and virtually all other behavioral and physiological processes. In order for these cycles to be adaptive, they must be synchronized, or entrained, to the 24-hr light/dark cycle produced by the rotation of the Earth. The timing of circadian variables relative to the light/dark cycle, i.e., the phase angle of entrainment, is influenced by intrinsic circadian clock properties that are to an extent genetically determined, and thus varies between individuals. In extreme cases (advanced or delayed sleep phase syndrome) or during shift work or jet lag, the phase angle of entrainment may be incompatible with work requirements or other social demands, resulting in negative consequences to health and productivity. This review describes the etiology of circadian disorders within the context of formal circadian clock properties and summarizes studies in humans and in other species which link specific genetic loci to circadian clock function and malfunction. The proteins encoded by these genetic loci play key roles in the intracellular feedback loop that generates circadian rhythms, and thus represent therapeutic targets for the treatment of both endogenous and exogenous circadian disorders.

  13. Circadian regulation of ion channels and their functions

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Gladys Y.-P.; Shi, Liheng; Ko, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Ion channels are the gatekeepers to neuronal excitability. Retinal neurons of vertebrates and invertebrates, neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of vertebrates, and pinealocytes of non-mammalian vertebrates display daily rhythms in their activities. The interlocking transcription–translation feedback loops with specific post-translational modulations within individual cells form the molecular clock, the basic mechanism that maintains the autonomic ~24-h rhythm. The molecular clock regulates downstream output signaling pathways that further modulate activities of various ion channels. Ultimately, it is the circadian regulation of ion channel properties that govern excitability and behavior output of these neurons. In this review, we focus on the recent development of research in circadian neurobiology mainly from 1980 forward. We will emphasize the circadian regulation of various ion channels, including cGMP-gated cation channels, various voltage-gated calcium and potassium channels, Na+/K+-ATPase, and a long-opening cation channel. The cellular mechanisms underlying the circadian regulation of these ion channels and their functions in various tissues and organisms will also be discussed. Despite the magnitude of chronobiological studies in recent years, the circadian regulation of ion channels still remains largely unexplored. Through more investigation and understanding of the circadian regulation of ion channels, the future development of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of sleep disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and other illnesses linked to circadian misalignment will benefit. PMID:19549279

  14. Organization of Circadian Behavior Relies on Glycinergic Transmission.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Lia; Muraro, Nara I; Beltrán González, Andrea N; Marcora, María S; Bernabó, Guillermo; Hermann-Luibl, Christiane; Romero, Juan I; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Castaño, Eduardo M; Marino-Busjle, Cristina; Calvo, Daniel J; Ceriani, M Fernanda

    2017-04-04

    The small ventral lateral neurons (sLNvs) constitute a central circadian pacemaker in the Drosophila brain. They organize daily locomotor activity, partly through the release of the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF), coordinating the action of the remaining clusters required for network synchronization. Despite extensive efforts, the basic principles underlying communication among circadian clusters remain obscure. We identified classical neurotransmitters released by sLNvs through disruption of specific transporters. Adult-specific RNAi-mediated downregulation of the glycine transporter or impairment of glycine synthesis in LNv neurons increased period length by nearly an hour without affecting rhythmicity of locomotor activity. Electrophysiological recordings showed that glycine reduces spiking frequency in circadian neurons. Interestingly, downregulation of glycine receptor subunits in specific sLNv targets impaired rhythmicity, revealing involvement of glycine in information processing within the network. These data identify glycinergic inhibition of specific targets as a cue that contributes to the synchronization of the circadian network.

  15. Circadian Period Integrates Network Information Through Activation of the BMP Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Esteban J.; Gorostiza, E. Axel; Berni, Jimena; Rezával, Carolina; Pérez-Santángelo, Agustín; Nadra, Alejandro D.; Ceriani, María Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    Living organisms use biological clocks to maintain their internal temporal order and anticipate daily environmental changes. In Drosophila, circadian regulation of locomotor behavior is controlled by ∼150 neurons; among them, neurons expressing the PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) set the period of locomotor behavior under free-running conditions. To date, it remains unclear how individual circadian clusters integrate their activity to assemble a distinctive behavioral output. Here we show that the BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN (BMP) signaling pathway plays a crucial role in setting the circadian period in PDF neurons in the adult brain. Acute deregulation of BMP signaling causes period lengthening through regulation of dClock transcription, providing evidence for a novel function of this pathway in the adult brain. We propose that coherence in the circadian network arises from integration in PDF neurons of both the pace of the cell-autonomous molecular clock and information derived from circadian-relevant neurons through release of BMP ligands. PMID:24339749

  16. Circadian period integrates network information through activation of the BMP signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, Esteban J; Gorostiza, E Axel; Berni, Jimena; Rezával, Carolina; Pérez-Santángelo, Agustín; Nadra, Alejandro D; Ceriani, María Fernanda

    2013-12-01

    Living organisms use biological clocks to maintain their internal temporal order and anticipate daily environmental changes. In Drosophila, circadian regulation of locomotor behavior is controlled by ∼150 neurons; among them, neurons expressing the PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) set the period of locomotor behavior under free-running conditions. To date, it remains unclear how individual circadian clusters integrate their activity to assemble a distinctive behavioral output. Here we show that the BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN (BMP) signaling pathway plays a crucial role in setting the circadian period in PDF neurons in the adult brain. Acute deregulation of BMP signaling causes period lengthening through regulation of dClock transcription, providing evidence for a novel function of this pathway in the adult brain. We propose that coherence in the circadian network arises from integration in PDF neurons of both the pace of the cell-autonomous molecular clock and information derived from circadian-relevant neurons through release of BMP ligands.

  17. CRYPTOCHROME is a blue-light sensor that regulates neuronal firing rate.

    PubMed

    Fogle, Keri J; Parson, Kelly G; Dahm, Nicole A; Holmes, Todd C

    2011-03-18

    Light-responsive neural activity in central brain neurons is generally conveyed through opsin-based signaling from external photoreceptors. Large lateral ventral arousal neurons (lLNvs) in Drosophila melanogaster increase action potential firing within seconds in response to light in the absence of all opsin-based photoreceptors. Light-evoked changes in membrane resting potential occur in about 100 milliseconds. The light response is selective for blue wavelengths corresponding to the spectral sensitivity of CRYPTOCHROME (CRY). cry-null lines are light-unresponsive, but restored CRY expression in the lLNv rescues responsiveness. Furthermore, expression of CRY in neurons that are normally unresponsive to light confers responsiveness. The CRY-mediated light response requires a flavin redox-based mechanism and depends on potassium channel conductance, but is independent of the classical circadian CRY-TIMELESS interaction.

  18. Cellular circadian clocks in mood disorders.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Michael J; Welsh, David K

    2012-10-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are heritable neuropsychiatric disorders associated with disrupted circadian rhythms. The hypothesis that circadian clock dysfunction plays a causal role in these disorders has endured for decades but has been difficult to test and remains controversial. In the meantime, the discovery of clock genes and cellular clocks has revolutionized our understanding of circadian timing. Cellular circadian clocks are located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the brain's primary circadian pacemaker, but also throughout the brain and peripheral tissues. In BD and MDD patients, defects have been found in SCN-dependent rhythms of body temperature and melatonin release. However, these are imperfect and indirect indicators of SCN function. Moreover, the SCN may not be particularly relevant to mood regulation, whereas the lateral habenula, ventral tegmentum, and hippocampus, which also contain cellular clocks, have established roles in this regard. Dysfunction in these non-SCN clocks could contribute directly to the pathophysiology of BD/MDD. We hypothesize that circadian clock dysfunction in non-SCN clocks is a trait marker of mood disorders, encoded by pathological genetic variants. Because network features of the SCN render it uniquely resistant to perturbation, previous studies of SCN outputs in mood disorders patients may have failed to detect genetic defects affecting non-SCN clocks, which include not only mood-regulating neurons in the brain but also peripheral cells accessible in human subjects. Therefore, reporters of rhythmic clock gene expression in cells from patients or mouse models could provide a direct assay of the molecular gears of the clock, in cellular clocks that are likely to be more representative than the SCN of mood-regulating neurons in patients. This approach, informed by the new insights and tools of modern chronobiology, will allow a more definitive test of the role of cellular circadian clocks

  19. Circadian behaviour in neuroglobin deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Hundahl, Christian A; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Georg, Birgitte; Faltoft, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1) and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP) and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night.

  20. Circadian Behaviour in Neuroglobin Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hundahl, Christian A.; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Georg, Birgitte; Faltoft, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1) and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP) and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night. PMID:22496809

  1. Multiple excitatory actions of orexins upon thalamo-cortical neurons in dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus - implications for vision modulation by arousal.

    PubMed

    Chrobok, Lukasz; Palus-Chramiec, Katarzyna; Chrzanowska, Anna; Kepczynski, Mariusz; Lewandowski, Marian Henryk

    2017-08-09

    The orexinergic system of the lateral hypothalamus plays a crucial role in maintaining wakefulness and mediating arousal in a circadian time-dependent manner. Due to the extensive connections of orexinergic neurons, both orexins (OXA and OXB) exert mainly excitatory effects upon remote brain areas, including the thalamus. The dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (DLG) is a relay thalamic centre for the visual system. Its thalamo-cortical (TC) neurons convey photic information from the retina to the primary visual cortex. The present study shows that orexins are powerful modulators of neuronal activity in the DLG. OXA directly depolarised the majority of neurons tested, acting predominately on postsynaptic OX2 receptors. Moreover, OXA was found to increase excitability and enhance neuronal responses to both glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Mechanistic studies showed the involvement of voltage-gated calcium currents and GIRK channels in the observed depolarisations. Immunohistochemical staining showed sparse orexinergic innervation of the DLG during the light phase, with increased density at night. We hypothesise that the depolarising effects of orexins upon DLG neurons may facilitate signal transmission through the visual thalamo-cortical pathway during behavioural arousal. Thus, the action of orexin on DLG TC neurons may underlie the circadian/behavioural modulation of vision.

  2. Circadian organization in hemimetabolous insects.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Kenji; Abdelsalam, Salaheldin

    2004-12-01

    The circadian system of hemimetabolous insects is reviewed in respect to the locus of the circadian clock and multioscillatory organization. Because of relatively easy access to the nervous system, the neuronal organization of the clock system in hemimetabolous insects has been studied, yielding identification of the compound eye as the major photoreceptor for entrainment and the optic lobe for the circadian clock locus. The clock site within the optic lobe is inconsistent among reported species; in cockroaches the lobula was previously thought to be a most likely clock locus but accessory medulla is recently stressed to be a clock center, while more distal part of the optic lobe including the lamina and the outer medulla area for the cricket. Identification of the clock cells needs further critical studies. Although each optic lobe clock seems functionally identical, in respect to photic entrainment and generation of the rhythm, the bilaterally paired clocks form a functional unit. They interact to produce a stable time structure within individual insects by exchanging photic and temporal information through neural pathways, in which serotonin and pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) are involved as chemical messengers. The mutual interaction also plays an important role in seasonal adaptation of the rhythm.

  3. 36 CFR 17.8 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... protect the natural, historic, cultural or other values present on the lands. All conveyances shall be... FREEHOLD AND LEASEHOLD INTERESTS ON LANDS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 17.8 Conveyance. Conveyance of a... less than fair market value. All conveyance of leasehold or freehold interests shall contain such...

  4. 36 CFR 17.8 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... protect the natural, historic, cultural or other values present on the lands. All conveyances shall be... FREEHOLD AND LEASEHOLD INTERESTS ON LANDS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 17.8 Conveyance. Conveyance of a... less than fair market value. All conveyance of leasehold or freehold interests shall contain such...

  5. Communication between circadian clusters: The key to a plastic network.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, Esteban J; Ceriani, M Fernanda

    2015-11-14

    Drosophila melanogaster is a model organism that has been instrumental in understanding the circadian clock at different levels. A range of studies on the anatomical and neurochemical properties of clock neurons in the fly led to a model of interacting neural circuits that control circadian behavior. Here we focus on recent research on the dynamics of the multiple communication pathways between clock neurons, and, particularly, on how the circadian timekeeping system responds to changes in environmental conditions. It is increasingly clear that the fly clock employs multiple signalling cues, such as neuropeptides, fast neurotransmitters, and other signalling molecules, in the dynamic interplay between neuronal clusters. These neuronal groups seem to interact in a plastic fashion, e.g., rearranging their hierarchy in response to changing environmental conditions. A picture is emerging supporting that these dynamic mechanisms are in place to provide an optimal balance between flexibility and an extraordinary accuracy.

  6. Mammalian circadian signaling networks and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Andrew C; Lewis, Warren G; Kay, Steve A

    2007-10-01

    Virtually all cells in the body have an intracellular clockwork based on a negative feedback mechanism. The circadian timekeeping system in mammals is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) acting as the central pacemaker. The SCN synchronizes to daily light-dark cycles and coordinates rhythmic physiology and behavior. Synchronization in the SCN and at the organismal level is a key feature of the circadian clock system. In particular, intercellular coupling in the SCN synchronizes neuron oscillators and confers robustness against perturbations. Recent advances in our knowledge of and ability to manipulate circadian rhythms make available cell-based clock models, which lack strong coupling and are ideal for target discovery and chemical biology.

  7. Cell Autonomy and Synchrony of Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Circadian Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Mohawk, Jennifer A.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the site of the master circadian pacemaker in mammals. The individual cells of the SCN are capable of functioning independently from one another and therefore must form a cohesive circadian network through intercellular coupling. The network properties of the SCN lead to coordination of circadian rhythms among its neurons and neuronal subpopulations. There is increasing evidence for multiple interconnected oscillators within the SCN, and in this Review, we will highlight recent advances in our understanding of the complex organization and function of the cellular and network-level SCN clock. Understanding the way in which synchrony is achieved between cells in the SCN will provide insight into the means by which this important nucleus orchestrates circadian rhythms throughout the organism. PMID:21665298

  8. The cell adhesion molecule EphA4 is involved in circadian clock functions.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, S; O'Callaghan, E K; Freyburger, M; Cermakian, N; Mongrain, V

    2017-04-20

    Circadian (∼24 h) rhythms of cellular network plasticity in the central circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), have been described. The neuronal network in the SCN regulates photic resetting of the circadian clock as well as stability of the circadian system during both entrained and constant conditions. EphA4, a cell adhesion molecule regulating synaptic plasticity by controlling connections of neurons and astrocytes, is expressed in the SCN. To address whether EphA4 plays a role in circadian photoreception and influences the neuronal network of the SCN, we have analyzed circadian wheel-running behavior of EphA4 knockout (EphA4(-/-) ) mice under different light conditions and upon photic resetting, as well as their light-induced protein response in the SCN. EphA4(-/-) mice exhibited reduced wheel-running activity, longer endogenous periods under constant darkness and shorter periods under constant light conditions, suggesting an effect of EphA4 on SCN function. Moreover, EphA4(-/-) mice exhibited suppressed phase delays of their wheel-running activity following a light pulse during the beginning of the subjective night (CT15). Accordingly, light-induced c-FOS (FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog) expression was diminished. Our results suggest a circadian role for EphA4 in the SCN neuronal network, affecting the circadian system and contributing to the circadian response to light. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  9. Aging and Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Jeanne F.; Zitting, Kirsi-Marja; Chinoy, Evan D.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with numerous changes, including changes in sleep timing, duration, and quality. The circadian timing system interacts with a sleep-wake homeostatic system to regulate human sleep, including sleep timing and structure. Here, we review key features of the human circadian timing system, age-related changes in the circadian timing system, and how those changes may contribute to the observed alterations in sleep. PMID:26568120

  10. Weakly Circadian Cells Improve Resynchrony

    PubMed Central

    Thoroughman, Kurt A.; Doyle, Francis J.; Herzog, Erik D.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) contain thousands of neurons capable of generating near 24-h rhythms. When isolated from their network, SCN neurons exhibit a range of oscillatory phenotypes: sustained or damping oscillations, or arrhythmic patterns. The implications of this variability are unknown. Experimentally, we found that cells within SCN explants recover from pharmacologically-induced desynchrony by re-establishing rhythmicity and synchrony in waves, independent of their intrinsic circadian period We therefore hypothesized that a cell's location within the network may also critically determine its resynchronization. To test this, we employed a deterministic, mechanistic model of circadian oscillators where we could independently control cell-intrinsic and network-connectivity parameters. We found that small changes in key parameters produced the full range of oscillatory phenotypes seen in biological cells, including similar distributions of period, amplitude and ability to cycle. The model also predicted that weaker oscillators could adjust their phase more readily than stronger oscillators. Using these model cells we explored potential biological consequences of their number and placement within the network. We found that the population synchronized to a higher degree when weak oscillators were at highly connected nodes within the network. A mathematically independent phase-amplitude model reproduced these findings. Thus, small differences in cell-intrinsic parameters contribute to large changes in the oscillatory ability of a cell, but the location of weak oscillators within the network also critically shapes the degree of synchronization for the population. PMID:23209395

  11. p38 MAP kinase regulates circadian rhythms in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Vrailas-Mortimer, Alysia D; Ryan, Sarah M; Avey, Matthew J; Mortimer, Nathan T; Dowse, Harold; Sanyal, Subhabrata

    2014-12-01

    The large repertoire of circadian rhythms in diverse organisms depends on oscillating central clock genes, input pathways for entrainment, and output pathways for controlling rhythmic behaviors. Stress-activated p38 MAP Kinases (p38K), although sparsely investigated in this context, show circadian rhythmicity in mammalian brains and are considered part of the circadian output machinery in Neurospora. We find that Drosophila p38Kb is expressed in clock neurons, and mutants in p38Kb either are arrhythmic or have a longer free-running periodicity, especially as they age. Paradoxically, similar phenotypes are observed through either transgenic inhibition or activation of p38Kb in clock neurons, suggesting a requirement for optimal p38Kb function for normal free-running circadian rhythms. We also find that p38Kb genetically interacts with multiple downstream targets to regulate circadian locomotor rhythms. More specifically, p38Kb interacts with the period gene to regulate period length and the strength of rhythmicity. In addition, we show that p38Kb suppresses the arrhythmic behavior associated with inhibition of a second p38Kb target, the transcription factor Mef2. Finally, we find that manipulating p38K signaling in free-running conditions alters the expression of another downstream target, MNK/Lk6, which has been shown to cycle with the clock and to play a role in regulating circadian rhythms. These data suggest that p38Kb may affect circadian locomotor rhythms through the regulation of multiple downstream pathways.

  12. Circadian Clocks and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Marcheva, Biliana; Ramsey, Kathryn M.; Peek, Clara B.; Affinati, Alison; Maury, Eleonore; Bass, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks maintain periodicity in internal cycles of behavior, physiology, and metabolism, enabling organisms to anticipate the 24-h rotation of the Earth. In mammals, circadian integration of metabolic systems optimizes energy harvesting and utilization across the light/dark cycle. Disruption of clock genes has recently been linked to sleep disorders and to the development of cardiometabolic disease. Conversely, aberrant nutrient signaling affects circadian rhythms of behavior. This chapter reviews the emerging relationship between the molecular clock and metabolic systems and examines evidence that circadian disruption exerts deleterious consequences on human health. PMID:23604478

  13. Phase shifting the circadian rhythm of neuronal activity in the isolated Aplysia eye with puromycin and cycloheximide. Electrophysiological and biochemical studies

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    The effects of pulse application of puromycin (PURO) or cycloheximide (CHX) were tested on the circadian rhythm (CR) of spontaneous compound action potential (CAP) activity in the isolated Aplysia eye. CAP activity was recorded from the optic nerve in constant darkness at 15degreesC. PURO pulses (6, 12 h; 12--134 mug/ml) and CHX pulses (12 h, 500--2,000 mug/ml) caused dose-dependent phase delays in the CR when administered during projected night. PURO pulses (6 h, 125 mug/ml) caused phase advances when given during projected day and caused phase delays when given during projected night. In biochemical experiments PURO (12 h, 20 mug/ml) and CHX (12 h, 500 mug/ml) inhibited leucine incorporation into the eye by about 50%. PURO (12 h; 50, 125 mug/ml) also changed the molecular weight distribution of proteins synthesized by the eye during the pulse. The effect of PURO (12 h, 125 mug/ml) on the level of incorporation was almost completely reversible within the next 12 h but the phase-shifted eye showed an latered spectrum of proteins for up to 28 h after the pulse. In electrophysiological experiments spontaneous CAP activity and responses to light were measured before, during, and after drug treatments. In all, eight parameters in three periods were analyzed quantitatively. Of these 24 indices, only 3 showed significant changes. PURO increased spontaneous CAP frequency by 67% 0-7 h after the drug pulse and increased the CAP amplitude of the tonic light response by 23% greater than 7 h after the pulse. CHX increased the intraburst spontaneous CAP frequency by 33% during the pulse and CAP frequency of the tonic light response by 32% 0- 7 h after the pulse. The above data indicate that phase-shifting doses of PURO and CHX inhibit protein synthesis in the eye without causing adverse electrophysiological effects, and suggest that protein synthesis is involved in the production of the CR of the isolated Aplysia eye. PMID:993764

  14. Conveying International Space Station Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goza, Sharon P.

    2017-01-01

    Over 1,000 experiments have been completed, and others are being conducted and planed on the International Space Station (ISS). In order to make the information on these experiments accessible, the IGOAL develops mobile applications to easily access this content and video products to convey high level concepts. This presentation will feature the Space Station Research Explorer as well as several publicly available video examples.

  15. Circadian physiology of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-11-25

    A majority of mammalian genes exhibit daily fluctuations in expression levels, making circadian expression rhythms the largest known regulatory network in normal physiology. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks interact with daily light-dark and feeding-fasting cycles to generate approximately 24-hour oscillations in the function of thousands of genes. Circadian expression of secreted molecules and signaling components transmits timing information between cells and tissues. Such intra- and intercellular daily rhythms optimize physiology both by managing energy use and by temporally segregating incompatible processes. Experimental animal models and epidemiological data indicate that chronic circadian rhythm disruption increases the risk of metabolic diseases. Conversely, time-restricted feeding, which imposes daily cycles of feeding and fasting without caloric reduction, sustains robust diurnal rhythms and can alleviate metabolic diseases. These findings highlight an integrative role of circadian rhythms in physiology and offer a new perspective for treating chronic diseases in which metabolic disruption is a hallmark.

  16. [Circadian rhythm and stroke].

    PubMed

    Terayama, Yasuo

    2013-12-01

    Studies on the relationship between stroke incidence and alterations of circadian rhythm are scarce, while pathologically reduced or abolished circadian variation has been described to cause stroke since a long time ago. Although ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are different entities and are characterized by different pathophysiological mechanisms, they share an identical pattern. A constellation of endogenous circadian rhythms and exogenous cyclic factors are involved. The staging of the circadian rhythms in vascular tone, coagulation balance including platelet function, and blood pressure plus temporal patterns in posture, physical activity, emotional stress, autonomic function, and medication effects play central and/or triggering roles. Features of the circadian rhythm of blood pressure, in terms of their chronic and acute effects on cerebral vessels, and of coagulation are especially important.

  17. The Arabidopsis Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C. Robertson; Salomé, Patrice A.; Michael, Todd P.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythms with periods of approximately 24 hr are widespread in nature. Those that persist in constant conditions are termed circadian rhythms and reflect the activity of an endogenous biological clock. Plants, including Arabidopsis, are richly rhythmic. Expression analysis, most recently on a genomic scale, indicates that the Arabidopsis circadian clock regulates a number of key metabolic pathways and stress responses. A number of sensitive and high-throughput assays have been developed to monitor the Arabidopsis clock. These assays have facilitated the identification of components of plant circadian systems through genetic and molecular biological studies. Although much remains to be learned, the framework of the Arabidopsis circadian system is coming into focus. Dedication This review is dedicated to the memory of DeLill Nasser, a wonderful mentor and an unwavering advocate of both Arabidopsis and circadian rhythms research. PMID:22303209

  18. 47 CFR 13.8 - Authority conveyed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... License conveys all of the operating authority of the Marine Radio Operator Permit. (e) A GMDSS Radio Operator's License conveys all of the operating authority of the Marine Radio Operator Permit. (f) A GMDSS...

  19. 47 CFR 13.8 - Authority conveyed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... License conveys all of the operating authority of the Marine Radio Operator Permit. (e) A GMDSS Radio Operator's License conveys all of the operating authority of the Marine Radio Operator Permit. (f) A GMDSS...

  20. Circadian rhythm abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Zee, Phyllis C; Attarian, Hrayr; Videnovic, Aleksandar

    2013-02-01

    This article reviews the recent advances in understanding of the fundamental properties of circadian rhythms and discusses the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs). Recent evidence strongly points to the ubiquitous influence of circadian timing in nearly all physiologic functions. Thus, in addition to the prominent sleep and wake disturbances, circadian rhythm disorders are associated with cognitive impairment, mood disturbances, and increased risk of cardiometabolic disorders. The recent availability of biomarkers of circadian timing in clinical practice has improved our ability to identify and treat these CRSDs. Circadian rhythms are endogenous rhythms with a periodicity of approximately 24 hours. These rhythms are synchronized to the physical environment by social and work schedules by various photic and nonphotic stimuli. CRSDs result from a misalignment between the timing of the circadian rhythm and the external environment (eg, jet lag and shift work) or a dysfunction of the circadian clock or its afferent and efferent pathways (eg, delayed sleep-phase, advanced sleep-phase, non-24-hour, and irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorders). The most common symptoms of these disorders are difficulties with sleep onset and/or sleep maintenance and excessive sleepiness that are associated with impaired social and occupational functioning. Effective treatment for most of the CRSDs requires a multimodal approach to accelerate circadian realignment with timed exposure to light, avoidance of bright light at inappropriate times, and adherence to scheduled sleep and wake times. In addition, pharmacologic agents are recommended for some of the CRSDs. For delayed sleep-phase, non-24-hour, and shift work disorders, timed low-dose melatonin can help advance or entrain circadian rhythms; and for shift work disorder, wake-enhancing agents such as caffeine, modafinil, and armodafinil are options for the management of excessive

  1. Circadian Timing in the Lung; A Specific Role for Bronchiolar Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, J. E.; Beesley, S.; Plumb, J.; Singh, D.; Farrow, S.; Ray, D. W.; Loudon, A. S. I.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the core circadian oscillator, located within the suprachiasmatic nucleus, numerous peripheral tissues possess self-sustaining circadian timers. In vivo these are entrained and temporally synchronized by signals conveyed from the core oscillator. In the present study, we examine circadian timing in the lung, determine the cellular localization of core clock proteins in both mouse and human lung tissue, and establish the effects of glucocorticoids (widely used in the treatment of asthma) on the pulmonary clock. Using organotypic lung slices prepared from transgenic mPER2::Luc mice, luciferase levels, which report PER2 expression, were measured over a number of days. We demonstrate a robust circadian rhythm in the mouse lung that is responsive to glucocorticoids. Immunohistochemical techniques were used to localize specific expression of core clock proteins, and the glucocorticoid receptor, to the epithelial cells lining the bronchioles in both mouse and human lung. In the mouse, these were established to be Clara cells. Murine Clara cells retained circadian rhythmicity when grown as a pure population in culture. Furthermore, selective ablation of Clara cells resulted in the loss of circadian rhythm in lung slices, demonstrating the importance of this cell type in maintaining overall pulmonary circadian rhythmicity. In summary, we demonstrate that Clara cells are critical for maintaining coherent circadian oscillations in lung tissue. Their coexpression of the glucocorticoid receptor and core clock components establishes them as a likely interface between humoral suprachiasmatic nucleus output and circadian lung physiology. PMID:18787022

  2. Crosstalk between components of circadian and metabolic cycles in mammals.

    PubMed

    Asher, Gad; Schibler, Ueli

    2011-02-02

    In mammals, most metabolic processes are influenced by biological clocks and feeding rhythms. The mechanisms that couple metabolism to circadian oscillators are just emerging. NAD-dependent enzymes (e.g., Sirtuins and poly[ADP-ribose] polymerases), redox- and/or temperature-dependent transcription factors (e.g., CLOCK, NPAS2, and HSF1), nutrient-sensing transcriptional regulatory proteins (e.g., CREB-CBP-CRCT2, FOXO-p300, nuclear receptors, PGC-1, and SP1 family members) and protein kinases (e.g., AMPK), are plausible candidates for conveying a cell's metabolic state to the core clock circuitry. The intertwining between these acute regulators and circadian clock components is so tight that the discrimination between metabolic and circadian oscillations may be somewhat arbitrary.

  3. 36 CFR 254.24 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conveyance. 254.24 Section 254.24 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS National Forest Townsites § 254.24 Conveyance. (a) Conveyance of the approved tract(s) may be made...

  4. 36 CFR 254.24 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conveyance. 254.24 Section 254.24 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS National Forest Townsites § 254.24 Conveyance. (a) Conveyance of the approved tract(s) may be made...

  5. 36 CFR 254.24 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conveyance. 254.24 Section 254.24 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS National Forest Townsites § 254.24 Conveyance. (a) Conveyance of the approved tract(s) may be made...

  6. 36 CFR 254.24 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conveyance. 254.24 Section 254.24 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS National Forest Townsites § 254.24 Conveyance. (a) Conveyance of the approved tract(s) may be made...

  7. 36 CFR 254.24 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveyance. 254.24 Section 254.24 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LANDOWNERSHIP ADJUSTMENTS National Forest Townsites § 254.24 Conveyance. (a) Conveyance of the approved tract(s) may be made...

  8. 43 CFR 2711.5 - Conveyance documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SALES: FEDERAL LAND POLICY AND MANAGEMENT ACT Sales: Procedures § 2711.5 Conveyance documents. Patents and other conveyance documents issued under... may withhold issuance of a patent or other document of conveyance on lands sold under this part...

  9. 43 CFR 2711.5 - Conveyance documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) SALES: FEDERAL LAND POLICY AND MANAGEMENT ACT Sales: Procedures § 2711.5 Conveyance documents. Patents and other conveyance documents issued under... may withhold issuance of a patent or other document of conveyance on lands sold under this part...

  10. 36 CFR 17.8 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conveyance. 17.8 Section 17.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONVEYANCE OF... protect the natural, historic, cultural or other values present on the lands. All conveyances shall...

  11. 36 CFR 17.8 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conveyance. 17.8 Section 17.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONVEYANCE OF... protect the natural, historic, cultural or other values present on the lands. All conveyances shall...

  12. miR-124 Regulates the Phase of Drosophila Circadian Locomotor Behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Lamba, Pallavi; Guo, Peiyi; Emery, Patrick

    2016-02-10

    Animals use circadian rhythms to anticipate daily environmental changes. Circadian clocks have a profound effect on behavior. In Drosophila, for example, brain pacemaker neurons dictate that flies are mostly active at dawn and dusk. miRNAs are small, regulatory RNAs (≈22 nt) that play important roles in posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we identify miR-124 as an important regulator of Drosophila circadian locomotor rhythms. Under constant darkness, flies lacking miR-124 (miR-124(KO)) have a dramatically advanced circadian behavior phase. However, whereas a phase defect is usually caused by a change in the period of the circadian pacemaker, this is not the case in miR-124(KO) flies. Moreover, the phase of the circadian pacemaker in the clock neurons that control rhythmic locomotion is not altered either. Therefore, miR-124 modulates the output of circadian clock neurons rather than controlling their molecular pacemaker. Circadian phase is also advanced under temperature cycles, but a light/dark cycle partially corrects the defects in miR-124(KO) flies. Indeed, miR-124(KO) shows a normal evening phase under the latter conditions, but morning behavioral activity is suppressed. In summary, miR-124 controls diurnal activity and determines the phase of circadian locomotor behavior without affecting circadian pacemaker function. It thus provides a potent entry point to elucidate the mechanisms by which the phase of circadian behavior is determined. In animals, molecular circadian clocks control the timing of behavioral activities to optimize them with the day/night cycle. This is critical for their fitness and survival. The mechanisms by which the phase of circadian behaviors is determined downstream of the molecular pacemakers are not yet well understood. Recent studies indicate that miRNAs are important regulators of circadian outputs. We found that miR-124 shapes diurnal behavioral activity and has a striking impact on the phase of circadian locomotor behavior

  13. Circadian Misalignment and Health

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Kelly Glazer; Reid, Kathryn J

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are near 24-hour patterns of physiology and behavior that are present independent of external cues including hormones, body temperature, mood, and sleep propensity. The term “circadian misalignment” describes a variety of circumstances, such as inappropriately timed sleep and wake, misalignment of sleep/wake with feeding rhythms, or misaligned central and peripheral rhythms. The predominance of early research focused on misalignment of sleep to the biological night. However, discovery of clock genes and the presence of peripheral circadian oscillators have expanded the definitions of misalignment. Experimental studies conducted in animal models and humans have provided evidence of potential mechanisms that link misalignment to negative outcomes. These include dysregulation of feeding behaviors, changes in appetite stimulating hormones, glucose metabolism and mood. This review has two foci: 1. To describe how circadian misalignment has been defined and evaluated in laboratory and field experiments, 2. To describe evidence linking different types of circadian misalignment to increased risk for physical (cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, cancer) and psychiatric (depression, bipolar, schizophrenia, attention deficit) disorders. This review will describe the role of circadian misalignment as a risk factor for disease in the general population and in clinical populations, including circadian rhythm sleep disorders and psychiatric disorders. PMID:24892891

  14. Circadian rhythm disruption in a mouse model of Rett syndrome circadian disruption in RTT.

    PubMed

    Li, Quan; Loh, Dawn H; Kudo, Takashi; Truong, Danny; Derakhshesh, Matthew; Kaswan, Zoë MacDowell; Ghiani, Cristina A; Tsoa, Rosemarie; Cheng, Yin; Sun, Yi E; Colwell, Christopher S

    2015-05-01

    Disturbances in the sleep/wake cycle are prevalent in patients with Rett syndrome (RTT). We sought to determine whether the circadian system is disrupted in a RTT model, Mecp2(-/y) mice. We found that MeCP2 mutants showed decreased strength and precision of daily rhythms of activity coupled with extremely fragmented sleep. The central circadian clock (suprachiasmatic nucleus) exhibited significant reduction in the number of neurons expressing vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) as well as compromised spontaneous neural activity. The molecular clockwork was disrupted both centrally in the SCN and in peripheral organs, indicating a general disorganization of the circadian system. Disruption of the molecular clockwork was observed in fibroblasts of RTT patients. Finally, MeCP2 mutant mice were vulnerable to circadian disruption as chronic jet lag accelerated mortality. Our finds suggest an integral role of MeCP2 in the circadian timing system and provides a possible mechanistic explanation for the sleep/wake distrubances observed in RTT patients. The work raises the possibility that RTT patients may benefit from a temporally structured environment.

  15. Circadian Rhythms and Sleep in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Dubowy, Christine; Sehgal, Amita

    2017-04-01

    The advantages of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster, including low genetic redundancy, functional simplicity, and the ability to conduct large-scale genetic screens, have been essential for understanding the molecular nature of circadian (∼24 hr) rhythms, and continue to be valuable in discovering novel regulators of circadian rhythms and sleep. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of these interrelated biological processes in Drosophila and the wider implications of this research. Clock genes period and timeless were first discovered in large-scale Drosophila genetic screens developed in the 1970s. Feedback of period and timeless on their own transcription forms the core of the molecular clock, and accurately timed expression, localization, post-transcriptional modification, and function of these genes is thought to be critical for maintaining the circadian cycle. Regulators, including several phosphatases and kinases, act on different steps of this feedback loop to ensure strong and accurately timed rhythms. Approximately 150 neurons in the fly brain that contain the core components of the molecular clock act together to translate this intracellular cycling into rhythmic behavior. We discuss how different groups of clock neurons serve different functions in allowing clocks to entrain to environmental cues, driving behavioral outputs at different times of day, and allowing flexible behavioral responses in different environmental conditions. The neuropeptide PDF provides an important signal thought to synchronize clock neurons, although the details of how PDF accomplishes this function are still being explored. Secreted signals from clock neurons also influence rhythms in other tissues. SLEEP is, in part, regulated by the circadian clock, which ensures appropriate timing of sleep, but the amount and quality of sleep are also determined by other mechanisms that ensure a homeostatic balance between sleep and wake. Flies have been useful

  16. Circadian Dysfunction Induces Leptin Resistance in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Nicole M.; Mayo, Sara A.; Hua, Jack; Lee, Choogon; Moore, David D.; Fu, Loning

    2015-01-01

    Summary Circadian disruption is associated with obesity, implicating the central clock in body weight control. Our comprehensive screen of wild-type and three circadian mutant mouse models, with or without chronic jet-lag, shows that distinct genetic and physiologic interventions differentially disrupt overall energy homeostasis and Leptin signaling. We found that BMAL1/CLOCK generates circadian rhythm of C/EBPα-mediated leptin transcription in adipose. Per- and Cry-mutant mice show similar disruption of peripheral clock and deregulation of leptin in fat, but opposite body weight and composition phenotypes that correlate with their distinct patterns of POMC neuron deregulation in the arcuate nucleus. Chronic jet-lag is sufficient to disrupt the endogenous adipose clock and also induce central Leptin resistance in wild-type mice. Thus, coupling of the central and peripheral clocks controls Leptin endocrine feedback homeostasis. We propose that Leptin resistance, a hallmark of obesity in humans, plays a key role in circadian dysfunction-induced obesity and metabolic syndromes. PMID:26166747

  17. Suprachiasmatic nucleus function and circadian entrainment are modulated by G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying (GIRK) channels.

    PubMed

    Hablitz, L M; Molzof, H E; Paul, J R; Johnson, R L; Gamble, K L

    2014-11-15

    G protein signalling within the central circadian oscillator, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is essential for conveying time-of-day information. We sought to determine whether G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs) modulate SCN physiology and circadian behaviour. We show that GIRK current and GIRK2 protein expression are greater during the day. Pharmacological inhibition of GIRKs and genetic loss of GIRK2 depolarized the day-time resting membrane potential of SCN neurons compared to controls. Behaviourally, GIRK2 knockout (KO) mice failed to shorten free running period in response to wheel access in constant darkness and entrained more rapidly to a 6 h advance of a 12 h:12 h light-dark (LD) cycle than wild-type (WT) littermate controls. We next examined whether these effects were due to disrupted signalling of neuropeptide Y (NPY), which is known to mediate non-photic phase shifts, attenuate photic phase shifts and activate GIRKs. Indeed, GIRK2 KO SCN slices had significantly fewer silent cells in response to NPY, likely contributing to the absence of NPY-induced phase advances of PER2::LUC rhythms in organotypic SCN cultures from GIRK2 KO mice. Finally, GIRK channel activation is sufficient to cause a non-photic-like phase advance of PER2::LUC rhythms on a Per2(Luc+/-) background. These results suggest that rhythmic regulation of GIRK2 protein and channel function in the SCN contributes to day-time resting membrane potential, providing a mechanism for the fine tuning responses to non-photic and photic stimuli. Further investigation could provide insight into disorders with circadian disruption comorbidities such as epilepsy and addiction, in which GIRK channels have been implicated.

  18. Suprachiasmatic nucleus function and circadian entrainment are modulated by G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying (GIRK) channels

    PubMed Central

    Hablitz, L M; Molzof, H E; Paul, J R; Johnson, R L; Gamble, K L

    2014-01-01

    Abstract G protein signalling within the central circadian oscillator, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), is essential for conveying time-of-day information. We sought to determine whether G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs) modulate SCN physiology and circadian behaviour. We show that GIRK current and GIRK2 protein expression are greater during the day. Pharmacological inhibition of GIRKs and genetic loss of GIRK2 depolarized the day-time resting membrane potential of SCN neurons compared to controls. Behaviourally, GIRK2 knockout (KO) mice failed to shorten free running period in response to wheel access in constant darkness and entrained more rapidly to a 6 h advance of a 12 h:12 h light–dark (LD) cycle than wild-type (WT) littermate controls. We next examined whether these effects were due to disrupted signalling of neuropeptide Y (NPY), which is known to mediate non-photic phase shifts, attenuate photic phase shifts and activate GIRKs. Indeed, GIRK2 KO SCN slices had significantly fewer silent cells in response to NPY, likely contributing to the absence of NPY-induced phase advances of PER2::LUC rhythms in organotypic SCN cultures from GIRK2 KO mice. Finally, GIRK channel activation is sufficient to cause a non-photic-like phase advance of PER2::LUC rhythms on a Per2Luc+/− background. These results suggest that rhythmic regulation of GIRK2 protein and channel function in the SCN contributes to day-time resting membrane potential, providing a mechanism for the fine tuning responses to non-photic and photic stimuli. Further investigation could provide insight into disorders with circadian disruption comorbidities such as epilepsy and addiction, in which GIRK channels have been implicated. PMID:25217379

  19. Circadian Rhythms in Urinary Functions: Possible Roles of Circadian Clocks?

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jong-Yun; Han, Dong-Hee; Yoon, Ji-Ae; Kim, Mi-Hee; Kim, Sung-Eun; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Khae-Hawn; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2011-01-01

    Circadian clocks are the endogenous oscillators that harmonize a variety of physiological processes within the body. Although many urinary functions exhibit clear daily or circadian variation in diurnal humans and nocturnal rodents, the precise mechanisms of these variations are as yet unclear. In this review, we briefly introduce circadian clocks and their organization in mammals. We then summarize known daily or circadian variations in urinary function. Importantly, recent findings by others as well as results obtained by us suggest an active role of circadian clock genes in various urinary functions. Finally, we discuss possible research avenues for the circadian control of urinary function. PMID:21811695

  20. Circadian rhythm and menopause.

    PubMed

    Pines, A

    2016-12-01

    Circadian rhythm is an internal biological clock which initiates and monitors various physiological processes with a fixed time-related schedule. The master circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the hypothalamus. The circadian clock undergoes significant changes throughout the life span, at both the physiological and molecular levels. This cyclical physiological process, which is very complex and multifactorial, may be associated with metabolic alterations, atherosclerosis, impaired cognition, mood disturbances and even development of cancer. Sex differences do exist, and the well-known sleep disturbances associated with menopause are a good example. Circadian rhythm was detected in the daily pattern of hot flushes, with a peak in the afternoons. Endogenous secretion of melatonin decreases with aging across genders, and, among women, menopause is associated with a significant reduction of melatonin levels, affecting sleep. Although it might seem that hot flushes and melatonin secretion are likely related, there are not enough data to support such a hypothesis.

  1. When clocks go bad: neurobehavioural consequences of disrupted circadian timing.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Alun R; Nolan, Patrick M

    2008-05-30

    Progress in unravelling the cellular and molecular basis of mammalian circadian regulation over the past decade has provided us with new avenues through which we can explore central nervous system disease. Deteriorations in measurable circadian output parameters, such as sleep/wake deficits and dysregulation of circulating hormone levels, are common features of most central nervous system disorders. At the core of the mammalian circadian system is a complex of molecular oscillations within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. These oscillations are modifiable by afferent signals from the environment, and integrated signals are subsequently conveyed to remote central neural circuits where specific output rhythms are regulated. Mutations in circadian genes in mice can disturb both molecular oscillations and measurable output rhythms. Moreover, systematic analysis of these mutants indicates that they can express an array of abnormal behavioural phenotypes that are intermediate signatures of central nervous system disorders. Furthermore, the response of these mutants to psychoactive drugs suggests that clock genes can modify a number of the brain's critical neurotransmitter systems. This evidence has led to promising investigations into clock gene polymorphisms in psychiatric disease. Preliminary indications favour the systematic investigation of the contribution of circadian genes to central nervous system disease.

  2. Alteration of circadian rhythm during epileptogenesis: implications for the suprachiasmatic nucleus circuits.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yan; Li, Zhi-Xiao; Zhang, Ding-Yu; He, Zhi-Gang; Hu, Ji; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2017-01-01

    It is important to realize that characterization of the circadian rhythm patterns of seizure occurrence can implicate in diagnosis and treatment of selected types of epilepsy. Evidence suggests a role for the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circuits in overall circadian rhythm and seizure susceptibility both in animals and humans. Thus, we conclude that SCN circuits may exert modifying effects on circadian rhythmicity and neuronal excitability during epileptogenesis. SCN circuits will be studied in our brain centre and collaborating centres to explore further the interaction between the circadian rhythm and epileptic seizures. More and thorough research is warranted to provide insight into epileptic seizures with circadian disruption comorbidities such as disorders of cardiovascular parameters and core body temperature circadian rhythms.

  3. Circadian rhythms and memory: not so simple as cogs and gears

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin L; Storm, Daniel R

    2009-01-01

    The influence of circadian rhythms on memory has long been studied; however, the molecular prerequisites for their interaction remain elusive. The hippocampus, which is a region of the brain important for long-term memory formation and temporary maintenance, shows circadian rhythmicity in pathways central to the memory-consolidation process. As neuronal plasticity is the translation of numerous inputs, illuminating the direct molecular links between circadian rhythms and memory consolidation remains a daunting task. However, the elucidation of how clock genes contribute to synaptic plasticity could provide such a link. Furthermore, the idea that memory training could actually function as a zeitgeber for hippocampal neurons is worth consideration, based on our knowledge of the entrainment of the circadian clock system. The integration of many inputs in the hippocampus affects memory consolidation at both the cellular and the systems level, leaving the molecular connections between circadian rhythmicity and memory relatively obscure but ripe for investigation. PMID:19465890

  4. Circadian rhythms and memory: not so simple as cogs and gears.

    PubMed

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin L; Storm, Daniel R

    2009-06-01

    The influence of circadian rhythms on memory has long been studied; however, the molecular prerequisites for their interaction remain elusive. The hippocampus, which is a region of the brain important for long-term memory formation and temporary maintenance, shows circadian rhythmicity in pathways central to the memory-consolidation process. As neuronal plasticity is the translation of numerous inputs, illuminating the direct molecular links between circadian rhythms and memory consolidation remains a daunting task. However, the elucidation of how clock genes contribute to synaptic plasticity could provide such a link. Furthermore, the idea that memory training could actually function as a zeitgeber for hippocampal neurons is worth consideration, based on our knowledge of the entrainment of the circadian clock system. The integration of many inputs in the hippocampus affects memory consolidation at both the cellular and the systems level, leaving the molecular connections between circadian rhythmicity and memory relatively obscure but ripe for investigation.

  5. Fast Delayed Rectifier Potassium Current Required for Circadian Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    JN, Itri; S, Michel; MJ, Vansteensel; JH, Meijer; CS, Colwell

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, the precise circadian timing of many biological processes depends on the generation of oscillations in neural activity of pacemaker cells in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The ionic mechanisms underlying these rhythms are largely unknown. Using the mouse brain slice preparation, we demonstrate that the magnitude of fast delayed rectifier potassium currents exhibits a diurnal rhythm that peaks during the day. Importantly, this rhythm continues in constant darkness, providing the first demonstration of the circadian regulation of an intrinsic voltage–gated current in mammalian cells. Blocking this current prevented the daily rhythm in firing rate in SCN neurons. Kv3.1b and Kv3.2 potassium channels were found to be widely distributed within the SCN with higher expression during the day. We conclude that the fast delayed rectifier is necessary for the circadian modulation of electrical activity in SCN neurons, and represents an important part of the ionic basis for the generation of rhythmic output. PMID:15852012

  6. Settlement Documents: Anadarko Fraudulent Conveyance Litigation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Settlement agreement to resolve adversary proceedings related to the fraudulent conveyance litigation with Kerr-McGee and Anadarko Petroleum Corporation associated with the Tronox bankruptcy proceedings

  7. Integrating Beneficiation into Regolith Conveyance Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Mantovani, James H.; Townsend, I. I.; Mueller, Robert P.

    2010-01-01

    Regolith conveyance includes hauler/dumpers, hoppers, augers, pneumatic transport subsystems, and other elements. The features of the conveyance and the time the material stream spend in conveyance may be used synergistically to perform beneficiation, pre-processing (such as heating), and other tasks, thus reducing the mass and complexity of the overall ISRU system. Since the cost of spaceflight is largely driven by the cost of launching mass out of Earth's gravity well, the conveyance system should be leveraged in this way to the maximum extent.

  8. 43 CFR 2651.5 - Conveyance reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) ALASKA NATIVE SELECTIONS Village... chapter, conveyances issued to village corporations shall provide for the transfer of the surface...

  9. 43 CFR 2651.5 - Conveyance reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) ALASKA NATIVE SELECTIONS Village... chapter, conveyances issued to village corporations shall provide for the transfer of the surface...

  10. 43 CFR 2651.5 - Conveyance reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) ALASKA NATIVE SELECTIONS Village... chapter, conveyances issued to village corporations shall provide for the transfer of the surface...

  11. 43 CFR 2651.5 - Conveyance reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (2000) ALASKA NATIVE SELECTIONS Village... chapter, conveyances issued to village corporations shall provide for the transfer of the surface...

  12. Circadian clock signals in the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ota, Takumi; Fustin, Jean-Michel; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Doi, Masao; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2012-02-05

    Circadian secretion of steroid hormones by the adrenal cortex is required to maintain whole body homeostasis and to adequately respond to or anticipate environmental changes. The richly vascularized zona glomerulosa (ZG) cells in the pericapsular region regulate osmotic balance of body fluid by secreting mineralocorticoids responding to circulating bioactive substances, and more medially located zona fasciculata (ZF) cells regulate energy supply and consumption by secreting glucocorticoids under neuronal and hormonal regulation. The circadian clock regulates both steroidogenic pathways: the clock within the ZG regulates mineralocorticoid production via controlling rate-limiting synthetic enzymes, and the ZF secretes glucocorticoid hormones into the systemic circulation under the control of central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. A functional biological clock at the systemic and cellular levels is therefore necessary for steroid synthesis and secretion.

  13. Metabolic regulation of circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Haydon, Michael J; Hearn, Timothy J; Bell, Laura J; Hannah, Matthew A; Webb, Alex A R

    2013-05-01

    Circadian clocks are 24-h timekeeping mechanisms, which have evolved in plants, animals, fungi and bacteria to anticipate changes in light and temperature associated with the rotation of the Earth. The current paradigm to explain how biological clocks provide timing information is based on multiple interlocking transcription-translation negative feedback loops (TTFL), which drive rhythmic gene expression and circadian behaviour of growth and physiology. Metabolism is an important circadian output, which in plants includes photosynthesis, starch metabolism, nutrient assimilation and redox homeostasis. There is increasing evidence in a range of organisms that these metabolic outputs can also contribute to circadian timing and might also comprise independent circadian oscillators. In this review, we summarise the mechanisms of circadian regulation of metabolism by TTFL and consider increasing evidence that rhythmic metabolism contributes to the circadian network. We highlight how this might be relevant to plant circadian clock function.

  14. A Neural Network Underlying Circadian Entrainment and Photoperiodic Adjustment of Sleep and Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Schlichting, Matthias; Menegazzi, Pamela; Lelito, Katharine R.; Yao, Zepeng; Buhl, Edgar; Dalla Benetta, Elena; Bahle, Andrew; Denike, Jennifer; Hodge, James John

    2016-01-01

    A sensitivity of the circadian clock to light/dark cycles ensures that biological rhythms maintain optimal phase relationships with the external day. In animals, the circadian clock neuron network (CCNN) driving sleep/activity rhythms receives light input from multiple photoreceptors, but how these photoreceptors modulate CCNN components is not well understood. Here we show that the Hofbauer-Buchner eyelets differentially modulate two classes of ventral lateral neurons (LNvs) within the Drosophila CCNN. The eyelets antagonize Cryptochrome (CRY)- and compound-eye-based photoreception in the large LNvs while synergizing CRY-mediated photoreception in the small LNvs. Furthermore, we show that the large LNvs interact with subsets of “evening cells” to adjust the timing of the evening peak of activity in a day length-dependent manner. Our work identifies a peptidergic connection between the large LNvs and a group of evening cells that is critical for the seasonal adjustment of circadian rhythms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In animals, circadian clocks have evolved to orchestrate the timing of behavior and metabolism. Consistent timing requires the entrainment these clocks to the solar day, a process that is critical for an organism's health. Light cycles are the most important external cue for the entrainment of circadian clocks, and the circadian system uses multiple photoreceptors to link timekeeping to the light/dark cycle. How light information from these photorecptors is integrated into the circadian clock neuron network to support entrainment is not understood. Our results establish that input from the HB eyelets differentially impacts the physiology of neuronal subgroups. This input pathway, together with input from the compound eyes, precisely times the activity of flies under long summer days. Our results provide a mechanistic model of light transduction and integration into the circadian system, identifying new and unexpected network motifs within the circadian

  15. Circadian Rhythms in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Life on earth is subject to daily and predictable fluctuations in light intensity, temperature, and humidity created by rotation of the earth. Circadian rhythms, generated by a circadian clock, control temporal programs of cellular physiology to facilitate adaptation to daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms are nearly ubiquitous and are found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we introduce the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We review the current understanding of the cyanobacterial clock, emphasizing recent work that has generated a more comprehensive understanding of how the circadian oscillator becomes synchronized with the external environment and how information from the oscillator is transmitted to generate rhythms of biological activity. These results have changed how we think about the clock, shifting away from a linear model to one in which the clock is viewed as an interactive network of multifunctional components that are integrated into the context of the cell in order to pace and reset the oscillator. We conclude with a discussion of how this basic timekeeping mechanism differs in other cyanobacterial species and how information gleaned from work in cyanobacteria can be translated to understanding rhythmic phenomena in other prokaryotic systems. PMID:26335718

  16. Socially synchronized circadian oscillators.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Guy; Herzog, Erik D; Levine, Joel D; Schwartz, William J

    2013-08-22

    Daily rhythms of physiology and behaviour are governed by an endogenous timekeeping mechanism (a circadian 'clock'). The alternation of environmental light and darkness synchronizes (entrains) these rhythms to the natural day-night cycle, and underlying mechanisms have been investigated using singly housed animals in the laboratory. But, most species ordinarily would not live out their lives in such seclusion; in their natural habitats, they interact with other individuals, and some live in colonies with highly developed social structures requiring temporal synchronization. Social cues may thus be critical to the adaptive function of the circadian system, but elucidating their role and the responsible mechanisms has proven elusive. Here, we highlight three model systems that are now being applied to understanding the biology of socially synchronized circadian oscillators: the fruitfly, with its powerful array of molecular genetic tools; the honeybee, with its complex natural society and clear division of labour; and, at a different level of biological organization, the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus, site of the brain's circadian clock, with its network of mutually coupled single-cell oscillators. Analyses at the 'group' level of circadian organization will likely generate a more complex, but ultimately more comprehensive, view of clocks and rhythms and their contribution to fitness in nature.

  17. Circadian organization of the mammalian retina: from gene regulation to physiology and diseases.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Douglas G; Iuvone, P Michael; Tosini, Gianluca

    2014-03-01

    The retinal circadian system represents a unique structure. It contains a complete circadian system and thus the retina represents an ideal model to study fundamental questions of how neural circadian systems are organized and what signaling pathways are used to maintain synchrony of the different structures in the system. In addition, several studies have shown that multiple sites within the retina are capable of generating circadian oscillations. The strength of circadian clock gene expression and the emphasis of rhythmic expression are divergent across vertebrate retinas, with photoreceptors as the primary locus of rhythm generation in amphibians, while in mammals clock activity is most robust in the inner nuclear layer. Melatonin and dopamine serve as signaling molecules to entrain circadian rhythms in the retina and also in other ocular structures. Recent studies have also suggested GABA as an important component of the system that regulates retinal circadian rhythms. These transmitter-driven influences on clock molecules apparently reinforce the autonomous transcription-translation cycling of clock genes. The molecular organization of the retinal clock is similar to what has been reported for the SCN although inter-neural communication among retinal neurons that form the circadian network is apparently weaker than those present in the SCN, and it is more sensitive to genetic disruption than the central brain clock. The melatonin-dopamine system is the signaling pathway that allows the retinal circadian clock to reconfigure retinal circuits to enhance light-adapted cone-mediated visual function during the day and dark-adapted rod-mediated visual signaling at night. Additionally, the retinal circadian clock also controls circadian rhythms in disk shedding and phagocytosis, and possibly intraocular pressure. Emerging experimental data also indicate that circadian clock is also implicated in the pathogenesis of eye disease and compelling experimental data

  18. Sundowning and circadian rhythm disorders in dementia.

    PubMed

    Klaffke, S; Staedt, J

    2006-12-01

    Sleep disorders and disruptive nocturnal behaviours are commonly reported in people with senile dementia and present both a significant clinical problem and a cause of increased stress for caregivers. Neuronal degeneration of cholinergic Nucleus basalis Meynert (NBM) neurons promote rest-activity disturbance and Sundowning in Alzheimer's disease. NBM neurons modulate the activity of the mainly cholinergic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the induction of NONREM sleep. Sundowning might be explained as a syndrome occurring when arousal is to be processed while the neocortex is already turned "off" to (NONREM) sleep. The therapeutic measures should thus primarily be aimed at the stimulation of the circadian system and enforcing "external Zeitgebers". Pharmacologically, application of cholinergic enhancers i.e. cholinesterase inhibitors and melatonin supports and should stabilize the weakened structures.

  19. Circadian clocks and inflammation: reciprocal regulation and shared mediators.

    PubMed

    Cermakian, Nicolas; Westfall, Susan; Kiessling, Silke

    2014-08-01

    The immune system is deeply interconnected with the endogenous 24-h oscillators of the circadian system. Indeed, the connection between these two physiological systems occurs at multiple levels and in both directions. On one hand, various aspects of the immune system show daily rhythms, which appear to be essential for healthy immune maintenance and proper immune response. On the other hand, immune responses cause changes in circadian rhythms, disrupting their delicate balance and manifesting in disease. Indeed, immune challenges cause various time-, gene-, and tissue-specific effects on circadian-regulated factors. This article reviews the possible mediators of the cross talk between the circadian clock and the immune system, in particular the inflammatory pathways. The rhythmic expression of cytokines and their receptors, as well as other rhythmically regulated humoral factors such as glucocorticoids, melatonin, leptin, or prostaglandins, could gate the effects of the immune response on the circadian system. In addition, systemic cues such as body temperature and neuronal connections between the brain and peripheral tissues may underlie the immune-circadian communication.

  20. 14 CFR 49.17 - Conveyances recorded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conveyances recorded. 49.17 Section 49.17 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.17 Conveyances recorded. (a)(1) Each...

  1. Effects of sleep and circadian rhythm on the human immune system.

    PubMed

    Lange, Tanja; Dimitrov, Stoyan; Born, Jan

    2010-04-01

    Many immune parameters show systematic fluctuations over the 24-h day in human blood. Circulating naive T-cells and production of proinflammatory cytokines, like interleukin-12 (IL-12), peak during nighttime, whereas cytotoxic effector leukocytes and production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 peak during daytime. These temporal changes originate from a combined influence of the circadian system and sleep. Both brain functions act synergistically and share neuroendocrine effector mechanisms to convey control over immune functions. Sympathetic tone and cortisol levels show a circadian nadir during nighttime and are further suppressed by sleep, whereas growth hormone and prolactin show a circadian peak during nighttime and are further enhanced by sleep. Thus, the circadian system and sleep jointly evoke a unique endocrine constellation that is extremely effective in inducing changes in leukocyte traffic and a shift toward proinflammatory type 1-cytokines during the nocturnal period of sleep, that is, an action with strong clinical implications.

  2. Rod photoreceptors drive circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities

    PubMed Central

    Altimus, C.M.; Güler, A.D.; Alam, N.M.; Arman, A.C.; Prusky, G.T.; Sampath, A.P.; Hattar, S

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, synchronization of the circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamus is achieved through direct input from the eyes conveyed by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). Circadian photoentrainment can be maintained by rod and cone photoreceptors, but their functional contributions and their retinal circuits that impinge on ipRGCs are not well understood. We demonstrate in genetic mouse models lacking functional rods, or where rods are the only functional photoreceptors, that rods are solely responsible for photoentrainment at scotopic light intensities. Surprisingly, rods were also capable of driving circadian photoentrainment at photopic intensities where they were incapable of supporting a visually–guided behavior. Using animals in which cone photoreceptors were ablated, we demonstrate that rods signal through cones at high light intensities, but not low light intensities. Thus two distinct retinal circuits drive ipRGC function to support circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities. PMID:20711184

  3. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jung Hie; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including underlying causes, diagnostic considerations, and typical treatments. Methods Literature review and discussion of specific cases. Results Survey studies 1,2 suggest that up to 3% of the adult population suffers from a circadian rhythm sleep disorder (CRSD). However, these sleep disorders are often confused with insomnia, and an estimated 10% of adult and 16% of adolescent sleep disorders patients may have a CRSD 3-6. While some CRSD (such as jet lag) can be self-limiting, others when untreated can lead to adverse medical, psychological, and social consequences. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders classifies CRSD as dyssomnias, with six subtypes: Advanced Sleep Phase Type, Delayed Sleep Phase Type, Irregular Sleep Wake Type, Free Running Type, Jet Lag Type, and Shift Work Type. The primary clinical characteristic of all CRSD is an inability to fall asleep and wake at the desired time. It is believed that CRSD arise from a problem with the internal biological clock (circadian timing system) and/or misalignment between the circadian timing system and the external 24-hour environment. This misalignment can be the result of biological and/or behavioral factors. CRSD can be confused with other sleep or medical disorders. Conclusions Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are a distinct class of sleep disorders characterized by a mismatch between the desired timing of sleep and the ability to fall asleep and remain asleep. If untreated, CRSD can lead to insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness, with negative medical, psychological, and social consequences. It is important for physicians to recognize potential circadian rhythm sleep disorders so that appropriate diagnosis, treatment, and referral can be made. PMID:25368503

  4. NAT1/DAP5/p97 and Atypical Translational Control in the Drosophila Circadian Oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Sean; Narayanan, Siddhartha; Rosbash, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are driven by gene expression feedback loops in metazoans. Based on the success of genetic screens for circadian mutants in Drosophila melanogaster, we undertook a targeted RNAi screen to study the impact of translation control genes on circadian locomotor activity rhythms in flies. Knockdown of vital translation factors in timeless protein-positive circadian neurons caused a range of effects including lethality. Knockdown of the atypical translation factor NAT1 had the strongest effect and lengthened circadian period. It also dramatically reduced PER protein levels in pigment dispersing factor (PDF) neurons. BELLE (BEL) protein was also reduced by the NAT1 knockdown, presumably reflecting a role of NAT1 in belle mRNA translation. belle and NAT1 are also targets of the key circadian transcription factor Clock (CLK). Further evidence for a role of NAT1 is that inhibition of the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase increased oscillator activity in cultured wings, which is absent under conditions of NAT1 knockdown. Moreover, the per 5′- and 3′-UTRs may function together to facilitate cap-independent translation under conditions of TOR inhibition. We suggest that NAT1 and cap-independent translation are important for per mRNA translation, which is also important for the circadian oscillator. A circadian translation program may be especially important in fly pacemaker cells. PMID:22904033

  5. Circadian regulation of slow waves in human sleep: Topographical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Alpar S.; Lazar, Zsolt I.; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Slow waves (SWs, 0.5–4 Hz) in field potentials during sleep reflect synchronized alternations between bursts of action potentials and periods of membrane hyperpolarization of cortical neurons. SWs decline during sleep and this is thought to be related to a reduction of synaptic strength in cortical networks and to be central to sleep's role in maintaining brain function. A central assumption in current concepts of sleep function is that SWs during sleep, and associated recovery processes, are independent of circadian rhythmicity. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying all SWs from 12 EEG derivations in 34 participants in whom 231 sleep periods were scheduled across the circadian cycle in a 10-day forced-desynchrony protocol which allowed estimation of the separate circadian and sleep-dependent modulation of SWs. Circadian rhythmicity significantly modulated the incidence, amplitude, frequency and the slope of the SWs such that the peaks of the circadian rhythms in these slow-wave parameters were located during the biological day. Topographical analyses demonstrated that the sleep-dependent modulation of SW characteristics was most prominent in frontal brain areas whereas the circadian effect was similar to or greater than the sleep-dependent modulation over the central and posterior brain regions. The data demonstrate that circadian rhythmicity directly modulates characteristics of SWs thought to be related to synaptic plasticity and that this modulation depends on topography. These findings have implications for the understanding of local sleep regulation and conditions such as ageing, depression, and neurodegeneration which are associated with changes in SWs, neural plasticity and circadian rhythmicity. PMID:25979664

  6. Circadian regulation of slow waves in human sleep: Topographical aspects.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Alpar S; Lazar, Zsolt I; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2015-08-01

    Slow waves (SWs, 0.5-4Hz) in field potentials during sleep reflect synchronized alternations between bursts of action potentials and periods of membrane hyperpolarization of cortical neurons. SWs decline during sleep and this is thought to be related to a reduction of synaptic strength in cortical networks and to be central to sleep's role in maintaining brain function. A central assumption in current concepts of sleep function is that SWs during sleep, and associated recovery processes, are independent of circadian rhythmicity. We tested this hypothesis by quantifying all SWs from 12 EEG derivations in 34 participants in whom 231 sleep periods were scheduled across the circadian cycle in a 10-day forced-desynchrony protocol which allowed estimation of the separate circadian and sleep-dependent modulation of SWs. Circadian rhythmicity significantly modulated the incidence, amplitude, frequency and the slope of the SWs such that the peaks of the circadian rhythms in these slow-wave parameters were located during the biological day. Topographical analyses demonstrated that the sleep-dependent modulation of SW characteristics was most prominent in frontal brain areas whereas the circadian effect was similar to or greater than the sleep-dependent modulation over the central and posterior brain regions. The data demonstrate that circadian rhythmicity directly modulates characteristics of SWs thought to be related to synaptic plasticity and that this modulation depends on topography. These findings have implications for the understanding of local sleep regulation and conditions such as ageing, depression, and neurodegeneration which are associated with changes in SWs, neural plasticity and circadian rhythmicity. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Measuring stem cell circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Hrushesky, William; Rich, Ivan N

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are biological rhythms that occur within a 24-h time cycle. Sleep is a prime example of a circadian rhythm and with it melatonin production. Stem cell systems also demonstrate circadian rhythms. This is particularly the case for the proliferating cells within the system. In fact, all proliferating cell populations exhibit their own circadian rhythm, which has important implications for disease and the treatment of disease. Stem cell chronobiology is particularly important because the treatment of cancer can be significantly affected by the time of day a drug is administered. This protocol provides a basis for measuring hematopoietic stem cell circadian rhythm for future stem cell chronotherapeutic applications.

  8. PDF Signaling Is an Integral Part of the Drosophila Circadian Molecular Oscillator.

    PubMed

    Mezan, Shaul; Feuz, Jean Daniel; Deplancke, Bart; Kadener, Sebastian

    2016-10-11

    Circadian clocks generate 24-hr rhythms in physiology and behavior. Despite numerous studies, it is still uncertain how circadian rhythms emerge from their molecular and neural constituents. Here, we demonstrate a tight connection between the molecular and neuronal circadian networks. Using fluorescent transcriptional reporters in a Drosophila ex vivo brain culture system, we identified a reciprocal negative regulation between the master circadian regulator CLK and expression of pdf, the main circadian neuropeptide. We show that PDF feedback is required for maintaining normal oscillation pattern in CLK-driven transcription. Interestingly, we found that CLK and neuronal firing suppresses pdf transcription, likely through a common pathway involving the transcription factors DHR38 and SR, establishing a direct link between electric activity and the circadian system. In sum, our work provides evidence for the existence of an uncharacterized CLK-PDF feedback loop that tightly wraps together the molecular oscillator with the circadian neuronal network in Drosophila. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. RNA-seq analysis of Drosophila clock and non-clock neurons reveals neuron-specific cycling and novel candidate neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Weifei; Wiyanto, Evelyn; Rahman, Reazur; Guo, Fang; Shafer, Orie

    2017-01-01

    Locomotor activity rhythms are controlled by a network of ~150 circadian neurons within the adult Drosophila brain. They are subdivided based on their anatomical locations and properties. We profiled transcripts “around the clock” from three key groups of circadian neurons with different functions. We also profiled a non-circadian outgroup, dopaminergic (TH) neurons. They have cycling transcripts but fewer than clock neurons as well as low expression and poor cycling of clock gene transcripts. This suggests that TH neurons do not have a canonical circadian clock and that their gene expression cycling is driven by brain systemic cues. The three circadian groups are surprisingly diverse in their cycling transcripts and overall gene expression patterns, which include known and putative novel neuropeptides. Even the overall phase distributions of cycling transcripts are distinct, indicating that different regulatory principles govern transcript oscillations. This surprising cell-type diversity parallels the functional heterogeneity of the different neurons. PMID:28182648

  10. RNA-seq analysis of Drosophila clock and non-clock neurons reveals neuron-specific cycling and novel candidate neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Abruzzi, Katharine C; Zadina, Abigail; Luo, Weifei; Wiyanto, Evelyn; Rahman, Reazur; Guo, Fang; Shafer, Orie; Rosbash, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Locomotor activity rhythms are controlled by a network of ~150 circadian neurons within the adult Drosophila brain. They are subdivided based on their anatomical locations and properties. We profiled transcripts "around the clock" from three key groups of circadian neurons with different functions. We also profiled a non-circadian outgroup, dopaminergic (TH) neurons. They have cycling transcripts but fewer than clock neurons as well as low expression and poor cycling of clock gene transcripts. This suggests that TH neurons do not have a canonical circadian clock and that their gene expression cycling is driven by brain systemic cues. The three circadian groups are surprisingly diverse in their cycling transcripts and overall gene expression patterns, which include known and putative novel neuropeptides. Even the overall phase distributions of cycling transcripts are distinct, indicating that different regulatory principles govern transcript oscillations. This surprising cell-type diversity parallels the functional heterogeneity of the different neurons.

  11. Depression-like behaviour in mice is associated with disrupted circadian rhythms in nucleus accumbens and periaqueductal grey.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Dominic; Long, Jaimie E; Welsh, David K

    2016-05-01

    An association between circadian rhythms and mood regulation is well established, and disturbed circadian clocks are believed to contribute to the development of mood disorders, including major depressive disorder. The circadian system is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master pacemaker in the hypothalamus that receives light input from the retina and synchronizes circadian oscillators in other brain regions and peripheral tissues. Lacking the tight neuronal network that couples single-cell oscillators in the SCN, circadian clocks outside the SCN may be less stable and more susceptible to disturbances, for example by clock gene mutations or uncontrollable stress. However, non-SCN circadian clocks have not been studied extensively in rodent models of mood disorders. In the present study, it was hypothesized that disturbances of local circadian clocks in mood-regulating brain areas are associated with depression-like behaviour in mice. Using the learned helplessness procedure, depression-like behaviour was evoked in mice bearing the PER2::LUC circadian reporter, and then circadian rhythms of PER2 expression were examined in brain slices from these mice using luminometry and bioluminescence imaging. It was found that helplessness is associated with absence of circadian rhythms in the nucleus accumbens and the periaqueductal grey, two of the most critical brain regions within the reward circuit. The current study provides evidence that susceptibility of mice to depression-like behaviour is associated with disturbed local circadian clocks in a subset of mood-regulating brain areas, but the direction of causality remains to be determined.

  12. Light evokes rapid circadian network oscillator desynchrony followed by gradual phase retuning of synchrony.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Logan; Leise, Tanya L; Noguchi, Takako; Galschiodt, Alexis M; Houl, Jerry H; Welsh, David K; Holmes, Todd C

    2015-03-30

    Circadian neural circuits generate near 24-hr physiological rhythms that can be entrained by light to coordinate animal physiology with daily solar cycles. To examine how a circadian circuit reorganizes its activity in response to light, we imaged period (per) clock gene cycling for up to 6 days at single-neuron resolution in whole-brain explant cultures prepared from per-luciferase transgenic flies. We compared cultures subjected to a phase-advancing light pulse (LP) to cultures maintained in darkness (DD). In DD, individual neuronal oscillators in all circadian subgroups are initially well synchronized but then show monotonic decrease in oscillator rhythm amplitude and synchrony with time. The small ventral lateral neurons (s-LNvs) and dorsal lateral neurons (LNds) exhibit this decrease at a slower relative rate. In contrast, the LP evokes a rapid loss of oscillator synchrony between and within most circadian neuronal subgroups, followed by gradual phase retuning of whole-circuit oscillator synchrony. The LNds maintain high rhythmic amplitude and synchrony following the LP along with the most rapid coherent phase advance. Immunocytochemical analysis of PER shows that these dynamics in DD and LP are recapitulated in vivo. Anatomically distinct circadian neuronal subgroups vary in their response to the LP, showing differences in the degree and kinetics of their loss, recovery and/or strengthening of synchrony, and rhythmicity. Transient desynchrony appears to be an integral feature of light response of the Drosophila multicellular circadian clock. Individual oscillators in different neuronal subgroups of the circadian circuit show distinct kinetic signatures of light response and phase retuning.

  13. Neurobiology of circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V

    1997-09-01

    Adaptation in the temporal environment is key to survival. This is achieved by the manifestation of periodicity in occurrence of vital behavioural and physiological processes at regular intervals--the biological rhythms. Biological rhythms (= biological clocks) are ubiquitous, can be demonstrated persisting at any level of organization in the living world, and are generated and controlled by some central pacemaker(s), mostly located in the brain. In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus is the principal site of the endogenous circadian pacemaker, regulating many daily physiological and behavioural functions, although other neural structures could also be contributing to the circadian timekeeping system. In other vertebrates, the neural site(s) of the circadian pacemaker is(are) still unclear. An organism without brain can have the biological clock, as well, for fully functional 24-hour temporal organization has been identified in several invertebrates, including unicellular Paramecium and Gonyaulax as well as filamentous fungus, Neurospora. This article attempts to provide an update of the informations which have accumulated over the past decade about understanding of the neurophysiological and molecular bases of circadian rhythms in animals.

  14. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  15. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  16. Circadian Rhythms in Adipose Tissue Physiology.

    PubMed

    Kiehn, Jana-Thabea; Tsang, Anthony H; Heyde, Isabel; Leinweber, Brinja; Kolbe, Isa; Leliavski, Alexei; Oster, Henrik

    2017-03-16

    The different types of adipose tissues fulfill a wide range of biological functions-from energy storage to hormone secretion and thermogenesis-many of which show pronounced variations over the course of the day. Such 24-h rhythms in physiology and behavior are coordinated by endogenous circadian clocks found in all tissues and cells, including adipocytes. At the molecular level, these clocks are based on interlocked transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprised of a set of clock genes/proteins. Tissue-specific clock-controlled transcriptional programs translate time-of-day information into physiologically relevant signals. In adipose tissues, clock gene control has been documented for adipocyte proliferation and differentiation, lipid metabolism as well as endocrine function and other adipose oscillations are under control of systemic signals tied to endocrine, neuronal, or behavioral rhythms. Circadian rhythm disruption, for example, by night shift work or through genetic alterations, is associated with changes in adipocyte metabolism and hormone secretion. At the same time, adipose metabolic state feeds back to central and peripheral clocks, adjusting behavioral and physiological rhythms. In this overview article, we summarize our current knowledge about the crosstalk between circadian clocks and energy metabolism with a focus on adipose physiology. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:383-427, 2017.

  17. The neuroarchitecture of the circadian clock in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte

    2003-10-01

    Neuroethologists try to assign behavioral functions to certain brain centers, if possible down to individual neurons and to the expression of specific genes. This approach has been successfully applied for the control of circadian rhythmic behavior in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Several so-called "clock genes" are expressed in specific neurons in the lateral and dorsal brain where they generate cell-autonomous molecular circadian oscillations. These clusters are connected with each other and contribute differentially to the control of behavioral rhythmicity. This report reviews the latest work on characterizing individual circadian pacemaker neurons in the fruit fly's brain that control activity and pupal eclosion, leading to the questions by which neuronal pathways they are synchronized to the external light-dark cycle, and how they impose periodicity on behavior.

  18. 43 CFR 2652.4 - Conveyance reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... been conveyed to village corporations shall provide that the right to explore, develop, or remove minerals from the subsurface estate in the lands within the boundaries of any Native village shall be subject to the consent of the village corporation....

  19. 47 CFR 13.8 - Authority conveyed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Operator Permit and the Restricted Radiotelephone Operator Permit. (e) A GMDSS Radio Operator's License... Radiotelephone Operator Permit. (f) A GMDSS Radio Maintainer's License conveys all of the operating authority of...

  20. 47 CFR 13.8 - Authority conveyed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Operator Permit and the Restricted Radiotelephone Operator Permit. (e) A GMDSS Radio Operator's License... Radiotelephone Operator Permit. (f) A GMDSS Radio Maintainer's License conveys all of the operating authority of...

  1. Impact of circadian nuclear receptor REV-ERBα on midbrain dopamine production and mood regulation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sooyoung; Lee, Eun Jeong; Yun, Seongsik; Choe, Han Kyoung; Park, Seong-Beom; Son, Hyo Jin; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Dluzen, Dean E; Lee, Inah; Hwang, Onyou; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin

    2014-05-08

    The circadian nature of mood and its dysfunction in affective disorders is well recognized, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we show that the circadian nuclear receptor REV-ERBα, which is associated with bipolar disorder, impacts midbrain dopamine production and mood-related behavior in mice. Genetic deletion of the Rev-erbα gene or pharmacological inhibition of REV-ERBα activity in the ventral midbrain induced mania-like behavior in association with a central hyperdopaminergic state. Also, REV-ERBα repressed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene transcription via competition with nuclear receptor-related 1 protein (NURR1), another nuclear receptor crucial for dopaminergic neuronal function, thereby driving circadian TH expression through a target-dependent antagonistic mechanism. In conclusion, we identified a molecular connection between the circadian timing system and mood regulation, suggesting that REV-ERBα could be targeting in the treatment of circadian rhythm-related affective disorders.

  2. SCOP/PHLPP1β mediates circadian regulation of long-term recognition memory

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kimiko; Kobayashi, Yodai; Nakatsuji, Erika; Yamazaki, Maya; Shimba, Shigeki; Sakimura, Kenji; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Learning and memory depend on the time of day in various organisms, but it is not clear whether and how the circadian clock regulates memory performance. Here we show that consolidation of long-term recognition memory is a circadian-regulated process, which is blunted by disruption of the hippocampal clock. We focused on SCOP, a key molecule regulating hippocampus-dependent long-term memory for objects. The amounts of SCOP and its binding partner K-Ras in the hippocampal membrane rafts exhibit robust circadian changes, and SCOP knockdown in the hippocampal CA1 impairs long-term memory at night. Circadian changes in stimulus-dependent activation of ERK in the hippocampal neurons are dependent on the SCOP levels in the membrane rafts, while Scop knockout abrogates the activation rhythm. We conclude that long-term memory formation is regulated by the circadian clock through SCOP dynamics in the membrane rafts of the hippocampal CA1. PMID:27686624

  3. Mine shaft conveyance load-monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Beus, M.J.; McCoy, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    Technology to enhance safety features for mine shafts and elevators is being investigated by researchers at the US Bureau of Mines. The objective of this research is to prevent injuries and fatalities related to hoist and elevator operations. Mine Safety and Health Administration statistics indicate that several factors contribute to hoisting accidents. A significant number of these factors are related to lack of adequate information on the position of the conveyance coupled with slack or overloaded rope resulting from obstructions or misalignments in the hoistway. Typically, this information is determined from sensors located in the hoist room. Subsequently, hoist and elevator control may be compromised and accidents result. This paper describes development of a slack rope sensor and data-transmission and collection hardware to sense conditions and acquire data directly from the hoisting conveyance. A new type of load cell senses wire rope tension at the conveyance. A new type of load cell senses wire rope tension at the conveyance. A multichannel signal processing board has been designed and fabricated and is undergoing both static testing to evaluate long-term stability and dynamic testing under simulated hoisting conditions. Analog signals from the sensors are sampled at 100-ms intervals. Data transmission between the moving conveyance and the hoistroom is accomplished via a 2,400-baud FM radio modem. Data are acquired at the conveyance or in the hoistroom through a serial communications port on a laptop computer. Software has been written to acquire, analyze, and process the data. The resulting system will allow operating personnel to determine conveyance load, and thus rope tension and slack or overload rope conditions, in relation to conveyance position in the hoistway.

  4. How coupling determines the entrainment of circadian clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordyugov, G.; Granada, A. E.; Herzel, H.

    2011-08-01

    Autonomous circadian clocks drive daily rhythms in physiology and behaviour. A network of coupled neurons, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), serves as a robust self-sustained circadian pacemaker. Synchronization of this timer to the environmental light-dark cycle is crucial for an organism's fitness. In a recent theoretical and experimental study it was shown that coupling governs the entrainment range of circadian clocks. We apply the theory of coupled oscillators to analyse how diffusive and mean-field coupling affects the entrainment range of interacting cells. Mean-field coupling leads to amplitude expansion of weak oscillators and, as a result, reduces the entrainment range. We also show that coupling determines the rigidity of the synchronized SCN network, i.e. the relaxation rates upon perturbation. Our simulations and analytical calculations using generic oscillator models help to elucidate how coupling determines the entrainment of the SCN. Our theoretical framework helps to interpret experimental data.

  5. Melatonin Signaling Controls Circadian Swimming Behavior in Marine Zooplankton

    PubMed Central

    Tosches, Maria Antonietta; Bucher, Daniel; Vopalensky, Pavel; Arendt, Detlev

    2014-01-01

    Summary Melatonin, the “hormone of darkness,” is a key regulator of vertebrate circadian physiology and behavior. Despite its ubiquitous presence in Metazoa, the function of melatonin signaling outside vertebrates is poorly understood. Here, we investigate the effect of melatonin signaling on circadian swimming behavior in a zooplankton model, the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii. We find that melatonin is produced in brain photoreceptors with a vertebrate-type opsin-based phototransduction cascade and a light-entrained clock. Melatonin released at night induces rhythmic burst firing of cholinergic neurons that innervate locomotor-ciliated cells. This establishes a nocturnal behavioral state by modulating the length and the frequency of ciliary arrests. Based on our findings, we propose that melatonin signaling plays a role in the circadian control of ciliary swimming to adjust the vertical position of zooplankton in response to ambient light. PMID:25259919

  6. The Organization of the Suprachiasmatic Circadian Pacemaker of the Rat and Its Regulation by Neurotransmitters and Modulators.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-28

    CIRCADIAN PACEMAKER OF THE RAT AND ITS REGULATION BY NEUROTRANSMIITERS AND MODULATORS Martha U. Gillette Department of Cell & Structural Biology...can affect the SCN through inputs from the retina, intergeniculate leaflet or the raphe. However, little is known about the way in which the neuronal...Whole cell recording in slice of single SCN neurons was performed over the circadian cycle to assess the range of electrophysiological characteristics in

  7. Drosophila GPCR Han is a receptor for the circadian clock neuropeptide PDF.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seogang; Lee, Youngseok; Hong, Sung-Tae; Bang, Sunhoe; Paik, Donggi; Kang, Jongkyun; Shin, Jinwhan; Lee, Jaejung; Jeon, Keunhye; Hwang, Seungyoon; Bae, Eunkyung; Kim, Jaeseob

    2005-10-20

    The pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) is a neuropeptide controlling circadian behavioral rhythms in Drosophila, but its receptor is not yet known. From a large-scale temperature preference behavior screen in Drosophila, we isolated a P insertion mutant that preferred different temperatures during the day and night. This mutation, which we named han, reduced the transcript level of CG13758. We found that Han was expressed specifically in 13 pairs of circadian clock neurons in the adult brain. han null flies showed arrhythmic circadian behavior in constant darkness. The behavioral characteristics of han null mutants were similar to those of pdf null mutants. We also found that PDF binds specifically to S2 cells expressing Han, which results in the elevation of cAMP synthesis. Therefore, we herein propose that Han is a PDF receptor regulating circadian behavioral rhythm through coordination of activities of clock neurons.

  8. Circadian Rhythms and Psychiatric Illness

    PubMed Central

    Asarnow, Lauren D.; Soehner, Adriane M.; Harvey, Allison G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The present review provides a conceptual introduction to sleep and circadian research in psychiatric illness, and discusses recent experimental and intervention findings in this area. Recent Findings In this review, studies published since January 2011 on circadian disturbance and psychiatric illness have been summarized. Summary Exciting new results have increasingly utilized objective and validated instruments to measure the circadian system in experimental studies. Since 2011, treatment research has still predominantly utilized self-report measures as outcome variables. However, research in the treatment domain for sleep/circadian disturbances comorbid with psychiatric illness has advanced the field in its work to broaden the validation of existing sleep treatments to additional patient populations with comorbid sleep/circadian disruptions, address how to increase access to and affordability of treatment for sleep and circadian dysfunction for patients with psychiatric disorders, and how to combine psychosocial treatments with psychopharmacology to optimize treatment outcomes. PMID:24060916

  9. Sensitivity and integration in a visual pathway for circadian entrainment in the hamster (Mesocricetus auratus).

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, D E; Takahashi, J S

    1991-01-01

    1. Light-induced phase shifts of the circadian rhythm of wheel-running activity were used to measure the photic sensitivity of a circadian pacemaker and the visual pathway that conveys light information to it in the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). The sensitivity to stimulus irradiance and duration was assessed by measuring the magnitude of phase-shift responses to photic stimuli of different irradiance and duration. The visual sensitivity was also measured at three different phases of the circadian rhythm. 2. The stimulus-response curves measured at different circadian phases suggest that the maximum phase-shift is the only aspect of visual responsivity to change as a function of the circadian day. The half-saturation constants (sigma) for the stimulus-response curves are not significantly different over the three circadian phases tested. The photic sensitivity to irradiance (1/sigma) appears to remain constant over the circadian day. 3. The hamster circadian pacemaker and the photoreceptive system that subserves it are more sensitive to the irradiance of longer-duration stimuli than to irradiance of briefer stimuli. The system is maximally sensitive to the irradiance of stimuli of 300 s and longer in duration. A quantitative model is presented to explain the changes that occur in the stimulus-response curves as a function of photic stimulus duration. 4. The threshold for photic stimulation of the hamster circadian pacemaker is also quite high. The threshold irradiance (the minimum irradiance necessary to induce statistically significant responses) is approximately 10(11) photons cm-2 s-1 for optimal stimulus durations. This threshold is equivalent to a luminance at the cornea of 0.1 cd m-2. 5. We also measured the sensitivity of this visual pathway to the total number of photons in a stimulus. This system is maximally sensitive to photons in stimuli between 30 and 3600 s in duration. The maximum quantum efficiency of photic integration occurs in 300 s

  10. Ryanodine-sensitive intracellular Ca(2+) channels are involved in the output from the SCN circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Roblero, Raúl; Quinto, Daniel; Báez-Ruíz, Adrian; Chávez, José Luis; Belin, Andrea Carmine; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; Michel, Stephan; Lundkvist, Gabriella

    2016-10-01

    The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) contain the major circadian clock responsible for generation of circadian rhythms in mammals. The time measured by the molecular circadian clock must eventually be translated into a neuronal firing rate pattern to transmit a meaningful signal to other tissues and organs in the animal. Previous observations suggest that circadian modulation of ryanodine receptors (RyR) is a key element of the output pathway from the molecular circadian clock. To directly test this hypothesis, we studied the effects of RyR activation and inhibition on real time expression of PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE, intracellular calcium levels and spontaneous firing frequency in mouse SCN neurons. Furthermore, we determined whether the RyR-2 mRNA is expressed with a daily variation in SCN neurons. We provide evidence that pharmacological manipulation of RyR in mice SCN neurons alters the free [Ca(2+) ]i in the cytoplasm and the spontaneous firing without affecting the molecular clock mechanism. Our data also show a daily variation in RyR-2 mRNA from single mouse SCN neurons with highest levels during the day. Together, these results confirm the hypothesis that RyR-2 is a key element of the circadian clock output from SCN neurons. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Sleep and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Three interacting processes are involved in the preservation of circadian rhythms: (1) endogenous rhythm generation mechanisms, (2) entrainment mechanisms to keep these rhythms 'on track', and (3) exogenous masking processes stemming from changes in environment and bahavior. These processes, particularly the latter two, can be dramatically affected in individuals of advanced age and in space travelers, with a consequent disruption in sleep and daytime functioning. This paper presents results of a phase-shift experiment investigating the age-related effects of the exogeneous component of circadian rhythms in various physiological and psychological functions by comparing these functions in middle aged and old subjects. Dramatic differences were found between the two age groups in measures of sleep, mood, activation, and performance efficiency.

  12. CIRCADIAN REGULATION OF METABOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Shannon M.; Udoh, Uduak S.; Young, Martin E.

    2014-01-01

    In association with sleep/wake and fasting/feeding cycles, organisms experience dramatic oscillations in energetic demands and nutrient supply. It is therefore not surprising that various metabolic parameters, ranging from the activity status of molecular energy sensors to circulating nutrient levels, oscillate in time-of-day-dependent manners. It has become increasingly clear that rhythms in metabolic processes are not simply in response to daily environmental/behavioral influences, but are driven in part by cell autonomous circadian clocks. By synchronizing the cell with its environment, clocks modulate a host of metabolic processes in a temporally appropriate manner. The purpose of this article is to review current understanding of the interplay between circadian clocks and metabolism, in addition to the pathophysiologic consequences of disruption of this molecular mechanism, in terms of cardiometabolic disease development. PMID:24928941

  13. Coupling Circadian Rhythms of Metabolism and Chromatin Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Masri, Selma; Orozco-Solis, Ricardo; Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Cervantes, Marlene; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock controls a large variety of neuronal, endocrine, behavioral and physiological responses in mammals. This control is exerted in large part at the transcriptional level on genes expressed in a cyclic manner. A highly specialized transcriptional machinery based on clock regulatory factors organized in feedback autoregulatory loops governs a significant portion of the genome. These oscillations in gene expression are paralleled by critical events of chromatin remodeling that appear to provide plasticity to circadian regulation. Specifically, the NAD+-dependent deacetylases SIRT1 and SIRT6 have been linked to circadian control of gene expression. This, and additional accumulating evidence, shows that the circadian epigenome appears to share intimate links with cellular metabolic processes and has remarkable plasticity showing reprogramming in response to nutritional challenges. In addition to SIRT1 and SIRT6, a number of chromatin remodelers have been implicated in clock control, including the histone H3K4 tri-methyltransferase MLL1. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms that link metabolism, epigenetic control and circadian responses will provide valauble insights towards innovative strategies of therapeutic intervention. PMID:26332964

  14. N-nitrosomelatonin enhances photic synchronization of mammalian circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Baidanoff, Fernando M; Plano, Santiago A; Doctorovich, Fabio; Suárez, Sebastián A; Golombek, Diego A; Chiesa, Juan J

    2014-04-01

    Most physiological processes in mammals are synchronized to the daily light:dark cycle by a circadian clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Signal transduction of light-induced phase advances of the clock is mediated through a neuronal nitric oxide synthase-guanilyl cyclase pathway. We have employed a novel nitric oxide-donor, N-nitrosomelatonin, to enhance the photic synchronization of circadian rhythms in hamsters. The intraperitoneal administration of this drug before a sub-saturating light pulse at circadian time 18 generated a twofold increase of locomotor rhythm phase-advances, having no effect over saturating light pulses. This potentiation was also obtained even when inhibiting suprachiasmatic nitric oxide synthase activity. However, N-nitrosomelatonin had no effect on light-induced phase delays at circadian time 14. The photic-enhancing effects were correlated with an increased suprachiasmatic immunoreactivity of FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene and period1. Moreover, in vivo nitric oxide release by N-nitrosomelatonin was verified by measuring nitrate and nitrite levels in suprachiasmatic nuclei homogenates. The compound also accelerated resynchronization to an abrupt 6-h advance in the light:dark cycle (but not resynchronization to a 6-h delay). Here, we demonstrate the chronobiotic properties of N-nitrosomelatonin, emphasizing the importance of nitric oxide-mediated transduction for circadian phase advances. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  15. N-NITROSOMELATONIN ENHANCES PHOTIC SYNCHRONIZATION OF MAMMALIAN CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS

    PubMed Central

    Baidanoff, Fernando M.; Plano, Santiago A.; Doctorovich, Fabio; Suárez, Sebastián A.; Golombek, Diego A.; Chiesa, Juan J.

    2014-01-01

    Most physiological processes in mammals are synchronized to the daily light:dark cycle by a circadian clock located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. Signal transduction of light-induced phase advances of the clock is mediated through a neuronal nitric oxide synthase-guanilyl cyclase pathway. We have employed a novel nitric oxide-donor, N-nitrosomelatonin, to enhance the photic synchronization of circadian rhythms in hamsters. The intraperitoneal administration of this drug before a sub-saturating light pulse at circadian time 18 generated a two-fold increase of locomotor rhythm phase-advances, having no effect over saturating light pulses. This potentiation was also obtained even when inhibiting suprachiasmatic nitric oxide synthase activity. However, N-nitrosomelatonin had no effect on light-induced phase delays at circadian time 14. The photic-enhancing effects were correlated with an increased suprachiasmatic immunoreactivity of cFOS and PER1. Moreover, in vivo nitric oxide release by N-nitrosomelatonin was verified by measuring nitrate and nitrite levels in suprachiasmatic nuclei homogenates. The compound also accelerated resynchronization to an abrupt 6-h advance in the light:dark cycle (but not resynchronization to a 6-hour delay). Here we demonstrate the chronobiotic properties of N-nitrosomelatonin, emphasizing the importance of nitric oxide-mediated transduction for circadian phase advances. PMID:24261470

  16. Coupling circadian rhythms of metabolism and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Masri, S; Orozco-Solis, R; Aguilar-Arnal, L; Cervantes, M; Sassone-Corsi, P

    2015-09-01

    The circadian clock controls a large variety of neuronal, endocrine, behavioural and physiological responses in mammals. This control is exerted in large part at the transcriptional level on genes expressed in a cyclic manner. A highly specialized transcriptional machinery based on clock regulatory factors organized in feedback autoregulatory loops governs a significant portion of the genome. These oscillations in gene expression are paralleled by critical events of chromatin remodelling that appear to provide plasticity to circadian regulation. Specifically, the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)(+) -dependent deacetylases SIRT1 and SIRT6 have been linked to circadian control of gene expression. This, and additional accumulating evidence, shows that the circadian epigenome appears to share intimate links with cellular metabolic processes and has remarkable plasticity showing reprogramming in response to nutritional challenges. In addition to SIRT1 and SIRT6, a number of chromatin remodellers have been implicated in clock control, including the histone H3K4 tri-methyltransferase MLL1. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms that link metabolism, epigenetic control and circadian responses will provide valuable insights towards innovative strategies of therapeutic intervention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Emergence of Noise-Induced Oscillations in the Central Circadian Pacemaker

    PubMed Central

    Buhr, Ethan D.; Liu, Andrew C.; Zhang, Eric E.; Ralph, Martin R.; Kay, Steve A.; Forger, Daniel B.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    Bmal1 is an essential transcriptional activator within the mammalian circadian clock. We report here that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of Bmal1-null mutant mice, unexpectedly, generates stochastic oscillations with periods that overlap the circadian range. Dissociated SCN neurons expressed fluctuating levels of PER2 detected by bioluminescence imaging but could not generate circadian oscillations intrinsically. Inhibition of intercellular communication or cyclic-AMP signaling in SCN slices, which provide a positive feed-forward signal to drive the intracellular negative feedback loop, abolished the stochastic oscillations. Propagation of this feed-forward signal between SCN neurons then promotes quasi-circadian oscillations that arise as an emergent property of the SCN network. Experimental analysis and mathematical modeling argue that both intercellular coupling and molecular noise are required for the stochastic rhythms, providing a novel biological example of noise-induced oscillations. The emergence of stochastic circadian oscillations from the SCN network in the absence of cell-autonomous circadian oscillatory function highlights a previously unrecognized level of circadian organization. PMID:20967239

  18. NPAS2 Compensates for Loss of CLOCK in Peripheral Circadian Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, Dominic; Wang, Lexie L.; Diemer, Tanja; Welsh, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1 are the major transcriptional activators of the mammalian circadian clock. Because the paralog NPAS2 can substitute for CLOCK in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian pacemaker, CLOCK-deficient mice maintain circadian rhythms in behavior and in tissues in vivo. However, when isolated from the SCN, CLOCK-deficient peripheral tissues are reportedly arrhythmic, suggesting a fundamental difference in circadian clock function between SCN and peripheral tissues. Surprisingly, however, using luminometry and single-cell bioluminescence imaging of PER2 expression, we now find that CLOCK-deficient dispersed SCN neurons and peripheral cells exhibit similarly stable, autonomous circadian rhythms in vitro. In CLOCK-deficient fibroblasts, knockdown of Npas2 leads to arrhythmicity, suggesting that NPAS2 can compensate for loss of CLOCK in peripheral cells as well as in SCN. Our data overturn the notion of an SCN-specific role for NPAS2 in the molecular circadian clock, and instead indicate that, at the cellular level, the core loops of SCN neuron and peripheral cell circadian clocks are fundamentally similar. PMID:26895328

  19. Ube3a imprinting impairs circadian robustness in Angelman syndrome models.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shu-qun; Bichell, Terry Jo; Ihrie, Rebecca A; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2015-03-02

    The paternal allele of Ube3a is silenced by imprinting in neurons, and Angelman syndrome (AS) is a disorder arising from a deletion or mutation of the maternal Ube3a allele, which thereby eliminates Ube3a neuronal expression. Sleep disorders such as short sleep duration and increased sleep onset latency are very common in AS. We found a unique link between neuronal imprinting of Ube3a and circadian rhythms in two mouse models of AS, including enfeebled circadian activity behavior and slowed molecular rhythms in ex vivo brain tissues. As a consequence of compromised circadian behavior, metabolic homeostasis is also disrupted in AS mice. Unsilencing the paternal Ube3a allele restores functional circadian periodicity in neurons deficient in maternal Ube3a but does not affect periodicity in peripheral tissues that are not imprinted for uniparental Ube3a expression. The ubiquitin ligase encoded by Ube3a interacts with the central clock components BMAL1 and BMAL2. Moreover, inactivation of Ube3a expression elevates BMAL1 levels in brain regions that control circadian behavior of AS-model mice, indicating an important role for Ube3a in modulating BMAL1 turnover. Ube3a expression constitutes a direct mechanistic connection between symptoms of a human neurological disorder and the central circadian clock mechanism. The lengthened circadian period leads to delayed phase, which could explain the short sleep duration and increased sleep onset latency of AS subjects. Moreover, we report the pharmacological rescue of an AS phenotype, in this case, altered circadian period. These findings reveal potential treatments for sleep disorders in AS patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Marcos G.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity. PMID:27420105

  1. The Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Sollars, Patricia J; Pickard, Gary E

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing recognition that the coordinated timing of behavioral, physiologic, and metabolic circadian rhythms is a requirement for a healthy body and mind. In mammals, the primary circadian oscillator is the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which is responsible for circadian coordination throughout the organism. Temporal homeostasis is recognized as a complex interplay between rhythmic clock gene expression in brain regions outside the SCN and in peripheral organs. Abnormalities in this intricate circadian orchestration may alter sleep patterns and contribute to the pathophysiology of affective disorders.

  2. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marcos G

    2016-07-13

    Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity.

  3. Dual origins of the intracellular circadian calcium rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Enoki, Ryosuke; Ono, Daisuke; Kuroda, Shigeru; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, the master circadian clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), where most neurons show circadian rhythms of intracellular Ca2+ levels. However, the origin of these Ca2+ rhythms remains largely unknown. In this study, we successfully monitored the intracellular circadian Ca2+ rhythms together with the circadian PER2 and firing rhythms in a single SCN slice ex vivo, which enabled us to explore the origins. The phase relation between the circadian PER2 and Ca2+ rhythms, but not between the circadian PER2 and firing rhythms, was significantly altered in Cry1/Cry2 double knockout mice, which display a loss of intercellular synchronization in the SCN. In addition, in Cry1/Cry2 double knockout mice, circadian Ca2+ rhythms were abolished in the dorsolateral SCN, but were maintained in the majority of the ventromedial SCN. These findings indicate that intracellular circadian Ca2+ rhythms are composed of an exogenous and endogenous component involving PER2 expression. PMID:28155916

  4. Seizure occurrence and the circadian rhythm of cortisol: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    van Campen, Jolien S; Valentijn, Floris A; Jansen, Floor E; Joëls, Marian; Braun, Kees P J

    2015-06-01

    Stress is the seizure precipitant most often reported by patients with epilepsy or their caregivers. The relation between stress and seizures is presumably mediated by stress hormones such as cortisol, affecting neuronal excitability. Endogenous cortisol is released in a circadian pattern. To gain insight into the relation between the circadian rhythm of cortisol and seizure occurrence, we systematically reviewed studies on the diurnal distribution of epileptic seizures in children and adults and linked the results to the circadian rhythm of cortisol. A structured literature search was conducted to identify relevant articles, combining the terms 'epilepsy' and 'circadian seizure distribution', plus synonyms. Articles were screened using predefined selection criteria. Data on 24-hour seizure occurrence were extracted, combined, and related to a standard circadian rhythm of cortisol. Fifteen relevant articles were identified of which twelve could be used for data aggregation. Overall, seizure occurrence showed a sharp rise in the early morning, followed by a gradual decline, similar to cortisol rhythmicity. The occurrence of generalized seizures and focal seizures originating from the parietal lobe in particular followed the circadian rhythm of cortisol. The diurnal occurrence of epileptic seizures shows similarities to the circadian rhythm of cortisol. These results support the hypothesis that circadian fluctuations in stress hormone level influence the occurrence of epileptic seizures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Interactions of the serotonin and circadian systems: nature and nurture in rhythms and blues.

    PubMed

    Ciarleglio, C M; Resuehr, H E S; McMahon, D G

    2011-12-01

    The serotonin and circadian systems are principal regulatory networks of the brain. Each consists of a unique set of neurons that make widespread neural connections and a defined gene network of transcriptional regulators and signaling genes that subserve serotonergic and circadian function at the genetic level. These master regulatory networks of the brain are extensively intertwined, with reciprocal circuit connections, expression of key genetic elements for serotonin signaling in clock neurons and expression of key clock genes in serotonergic neurons. The reciprocal connections of the serotonin and circadian systems likely have importance for neurobehavioral disorders, as suggested by their convergent contribution to a similar range of mood disorders including seasonal affective disorder (SAD), bipolar disorder, and major depression, and as suggested by their overlapping relationship with the developmental disorder, autism spectrum disorder. Here we review the neuroanatomical and genetic basis for serotonin-circadian interactions in the brain, their potential relationship with neurobehavioral disorders, and recent work examining the effects on the circadian system of genetic perturbation of the serotonergic system as well as the molecular and behavioral effects of developmental imprinting of the circadian system with perinatal seasonal light cycles. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Light Evokes Rapid Circadian Network Oscillator Desynchrony Followed by Gradual Phase Retuning of Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Logan; Leise, Tanya L.; Noguchi, Takako; Galschiodt, Alexis M.; Houl, Jerry H.; Welsh, David K.; Holmes, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Circadian neural circuits generate near 24 hr physiological rhythms that can be entrained by light to coordinate animal physiology with daily solar cycles. To examine how a circadian circuit reorganizes its activity in response to light, we imaged period (per) clock gene cycling for up to 6 days at single neuron resolution in whole brain explant cultures prepared from per-luciferase transgenic flies. We compared cultures subjected to a phase-advancing light pulse (LP) to cultures maintained in darkness (DD). Results In DD, individual neuronal oscillators in all circadian subgroups are initially well synchronized, then show monotonic decrease in oscillator rhythm amplitude and synchrony with time. The s-LNvs and LNds exhibit this decrease at a slower relative rate. In contrast, the LP evokes a rapid loss of oscillator synchrony between and within most circadian neuronal subgroups followed by gradual phase retuning of whole circuit oscillator synchrony. The LNds maintain high rhythmic amplitude and synchrony following the LP along with the most rapid coherent phase advance. Immunocytochemical analysis of PER show these dynamics in DD and LP are recapitulated in vivo. Anatomically distinct circadian neuronal subgroups vary in their response to the LP, showing differences in the degree and kinetics of their loss, recovery and/or strengthening of synchrony and rhythmicity. Conclusions Transient desynchrony appears to be an integral feature of light response of the Drosophila multicellular circadian clock. Individual oscillators in different neuronal subgroups of the circadian circuit show distinct kinetic signatures of light response and phase retuning. PMID:25754644

  7. [Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (circadian rhythm sleep disorder)].

    PubMed

    Tagaya, Hirokuni; Murayama, Norio; Fukase, Yuko

    2015-06-01

    The role of the circadian system is forecasting the daily and yearly change of environment. Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder (CRSWD) is defined as physical and social impairment caused by misalignment between circadian rhythm and desirable social schedule. CRSWDs are induced by medical or environmental factors as well as dysfunctions of circadian system. Clinicians should be aware that sleep-inducing medications, restless legs syndrome, delirium and less obedience to social schedule are frequent cause of CRSWD among elderly. Bright light therapy and orally administered small dose of melatonin or melatonin agonist at proper circadian phase are recommended treatments. Sleep-inducing medications should not be considered as CRSWD treatments, especially to elderly.

  8. Electrochemical Detection of Circadian Redox Rhythm in Cyanobacterial Cells via Extracellular Electron Transfer.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Koichi; Pornpitra, Tunanunkul; Izawa, Seiichiro; Nishiwaki-Ohkawa, Taeko; Kato, Souichiro; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2015-06-01

    Recent research on cellular circadian rhythms suggests that the coupling of transcription-translation feedback loops and intracellular redox oscillations is essential for robust circadian timekeeping. For clarification of the molecular mechanism underlying the circadian rhythm, methods that allow for the dynamic and simultaneous detection of transcription/translation and redox oscillations in living cells are needed. Herein, we report that the cyanobacterial circadian redox rhythm can be electrochemically detected based on extracellular electron transfer (EET), a process in which intracellular electrons are exchanged with an extracellular electrode. As the EET-based method is non-destructive, concurrent detection with transcription/translation rhythm using bioluminescent reporter strains becomes possible. An EET pathway that electrochemically connected the intracellular region of cyanobacterial cells with an extracellular electrode was constructed via a newly synthesized electron mediator with cell membrane permeability. In the presence of the mediator, the open circuit potential of the culture medium exhibited temperature-compensated rhythm with approximately 24 h periodicity. Importantly, such circadian rhythm of the open circuit potential was not observed in the absence of the electron mediator, indicating that the EET process conveys the dynamic information regarding the intracellular redox state to the extracellular electrode. These findings represent the first direct demonstration of the intracellular circadian redox rhythm of cyanobacterial cells.

  9. 24 CFR 203.401 - Amount of payment-conveyed and non-conveyed properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Amount of payment-conveyed and non-conveyed properties. 203.401 Section 203.401 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to...

  10. 24 CFR 203.401 - Amount of payment-conveyed and non-conveyed properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Amount of payment-conveyed and non-conveyed properties. 203.401 Section 203.401 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to...

  11. 24 CFR 203.401 - Amount of payment-conveyed and non-conveyed properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Amount of payment-conveyed and non-conveyed properties. 203.401 Section 203.401 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to...

  12. 24 CFR 203.401 - Amount of payment-conveyed and non-conveyed properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Amount of payment-conveyed and non-conveyed properties. 203.401 Section 203.401 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to...

  13. 24 CFR 203.401 - Amount of payment-conveyed and non-conveyed properties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Amount of payment-conveyed and non-conveyed properties. 203.401 Section 203.401 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to...

  14. Circadian gene variants in cancer

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostas...

  15. Circadian Disorganization Alters Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Green, Stefan J.; Mutlu, Ece; Engen, Phillip; Vitaterna, Martha H.; Turek, Fred W.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal dysbiosis and circadian rhythm disruption are associated with similar diseases including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and inflammatory bowel disease. Despite the overlap, the potential relationship between circadian disorganization and dysbiosis is unknown; thus, in the present study, a model of chronic circadian disruption was used to determine the impact on the intestinal microbiome. Male C57BL/6J mice underwent once weekly phase reversals of the light:dark cycle (i.e., circadian rhythm disrupted mice) to determine the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on the intestinal microbiome and were fed either standard chow or a high-fat, high-sugar diet to determine how diet influences circadian disruption-induced effects on the microbiome. Weekly phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle did not alter the microbiome in mice fed standard chow; however, mice fed a high-fat, high-sugar diet in conjunction with phase shifts in the light:dark cycle had significantly altered microbiota. While it is yet to be established if some of the adverse effects associated with circadian disorganization in humans (e.g., shift workers, travelers moving across time zones, and in individuals with social jet lag) are mediated by dysbiosis, the current study demonstrates that circadian disorganization can impact the intestinal microbiota which may have implications for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24848969

  16. Circadian systems biology in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Ling; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2015-11-01

    Systems biology, which can be defined as integrative biology, comprises multistage processes that can be used to understand components of complex biological systems of living organisms and provides hierarchical information to decoding life. Using systems biology approaches such as genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics, it is now possible to delineate more complicated interactions between circadian control systems and diseases. The circadian rhythm is a multiscale phenomenon existing within the body that influences numerous physiological activities such as changes in gene expression, protein turnover, metabolism and human behavior. In this review, we describe the relationships between the circadian control system and its related genes or proteins, and circadian rhythm disorders in systems biology studies. To maintain and modulate circadian oscillation, cells possess elaborative feedback loops composed of circadian core proteins that regulate the expression of other genes through their transcriptional activities. The disruption of these rhythms has been reported to be associated with diseases such as arrhythmia, obesity, insulin resistance, carcinogenesis and disruptions in natural oscillations in the control of cell growth. This review demonstrates that lifestyle is considered as a fundamental factor that modifies circadian rhythm, and the development of dysfunctions and diseases could be regulated by an underlying expression network with multiple circadian-associated signals.

  17. DEVICE FOR CONVEYING AND ROTATING OBJECTS

    DOEpatents

    Frantz, C.E.; Roslund, J.

    1958-01-21

    A device is described for conveying cylindrical material with a combined rotary and axial motion. The material rides on a series of balls which are retained in a guide plate and rotated by bearing against a rotating drum. The drum has a series of conical sections or grooves cut in its outer surface on which the balls ride. The grooves and balls match in such a way that all the balls are caused to rotate about an axis at an angle to the drum axis. This skewed rotation of the ball imparts a longitudinal as well as a rotary motion to the cylinders being conveyed.

  18. 30 CFR 56.19081 - Conveyances not in use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveyances not in use. 56.19081 Section 56... Hoisting Procedures § 56.19081 Conveyances not in use. When conveyances controlled by a hoist operator are not in use, they shall be released and the conveyances shall be raised or lowered a suitable...

  19. 30 CFR 57.19081 - Conveyances not in use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveyances not in use. 57.19081 Section 57... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19081 Conveyances not in use. When conveyances controlled by a hoist operator are not in use, they shall be released and the conveyances shall be raised or lowered a...

  20. Circadian temperature variation and ageing.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper, an attempt is made to summarize current knowledge concerning the daily body temperature rhythm and its age-dependent alterations. Homeostatic and circadian control mechanisms are considered. Special attention is paid to the circadian system, as the mechanisms of autonomic control are the topic of another contribution to this special issue. Also, the interactions of the core body temperature rhythm with other circadian functions are discussed in detail as they constitute an essential part of the internal temporal order of living systems and thus guarantee their optimal functioning. In the second part of the paper, age-dependent changes in the circadian body temperature rhythm and their putative causes, considering circadian and homeostatic components, are described. Consequences for health and fitness and some possibilities to prevent adverse effect are mentioned in the final section.

  1. Melatonin, Circadian Rhythms, and Sleep.

    PubMed

    Zhdanova, Irina V.; Tucci, Valter

    2003-05-01

    Experimental data show a close relationship among melatonin, circadian rhythms, and sleep. Low-dose melatonin treatment, increasing circulating melatonin levels to those normally observed at night, promotes sleep onset and sleep maintenance without changing sleep architecture. Melatonin treatment can also advance or delay the phase of the circadian clock if administered in the evening or in the morning, respectively. If used in physiologic doses and at appropriate times, melatonin can be helpful for those suffering from insomnia or circadian rhythm disorders. This may be especially beneficial for individuals with low melatonin production, which is established by measuring individual blood or saliva melatonin levels. However, high melatonin doses (over 0.3 mg) may cause side effects and disrupt the delicate mechanism of the circadian system, dissociating mutually dependent circadian body rhythms. A misleading labeling of the hormone melatonin as a "food supplement" and lack of quality control over melatonin preparations on the market continue to be of serious concern.

  2. Caffeine increases light responsiveness of the mouse circadian pacemaker.

    PubMed

    van Diepen, Hester C; Lucassen, Eliane A; Yasenkov, Roman; Groenen, Inske; Ijzerman, Adriaan P; Meijer, Johanna H; Deboer, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used psychoactive stimulant worldwide. It reduces sleep and sleepiness by blocking access to the adenosine receptor. The level of adenosine increases during sleep deprivation, and is thought to induce sleepiness and initiate sleep. Light-induced phase shifts of the rest-activity circadian rhythms are mediated by light-responsive neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, where the circadian clock of mammals resides. Previous studies have shown that sleep deprivation reduces circadian clock phase-shifting capacity and decreases SCN neuronal activity. In addition, application of adenosine agonists and antagonists mimics and blocks, respectively, the effect of sleep deprivation on light-induced phase shifts in behaviour, suggesting a role for adenosine. In the present study, we examined the role of sleep deprivation in and the effect of caffeine on light responsiveness of the SCN. We performed in vivo electrical activity recordings of the SCN in freely moving mice, and showed that the sustained response to light of SCN neuronal activity was attenuated after 6 h of sleep deprivation prior to light exposure. Subsequent intraperitoneal application of caffeine was able to restore the response to light. Finally, we performed behavioural recordings in constant conditions, and found enhanced period lengthening during chronic treatment with caffeine in drinking water in constant light conditions. The data suggest that increased homeostatic sleep pressure changes circadian pacemaker functioning by reducing SCN neuronal responsiveness to light. The electrophysiological and behavioural data together provide evidence that caffeine enhances clock sensitivity to light. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Drosophila Spaghetti and Doubletime Link the Circadian Clock and Light to Caspases, Apoptosis and Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Means, John C.; Venkatesan, Anandakrishnan; Gerdes, Bryan; Fan, Jin-Yuan; Bjes, Edward S.; Price, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    While circadian dysfunction and neurodegeneration are correlated, the mechanism for this is not understood. It is not known if age-dependent circadian dysfunction leads to neurodegeneration or vice-versa, and the proteins that mediate the effect remain unidentified. Here, we show that the knock-down of a regulator (spag) of the circadian kinase Dbt in circadian cells lowers Dbt levels abnormally, lengthens circadian rhythms and causes expression of activated initiator caspase (Dronc) in the optic lobes during the middle of the day or after light pulses at night. Likewise, reduced Dbt activity lengthens circadian period and causes expression of activated Dronc, and a loss-of-function mutation in Clk also leads to expression of activated Dronc in a light-dependent manner. Genetic epistasis experiments place Dbt downstream of Spag in the pathway, and Spag-dependent reductions of Dbt are shown to require the proteasome. Importantly, activated Dronc expression due to reduced Spag or Dbt activity occurs in cells that do not express the spag RNAi or dominant negative Dbt and requires PDF neuropeptide signaling from the same neurons that support behavioral rhythms. Furthermore, reduction of Dbt or Spag activity leads to Dronc-dependent Drosophila Tau cleavage and enhanced neurodegeneration produced by human Tau in a fly eye model for tauopathy. Aging flies with lowered Dbt or Spag function show markers of cell death as well as behavioral deficits and shortened lifespans, and even old wild type flies exhibit Dbt modification and activated caspase at particular times of day. These results suggest that Dbt suppresses expression of activated Dronc to prevent Tau cleavage, and that the circadian clock defects confer sensitivity to expression of activated Dronc in response to prolonged light. They establish a link between the circadian clock factors, light, cell death pathways and Tau toxicity, potentially via dysregulation of circadian neuronal remodeling in the optic lobes

  4. Circadian rhythms and cognition.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Like all circadian (near-24-h) rhythms, those of cognition have endogenous and exogenous components. The origins of these components, together with effects of time awake upon cognitive performance, are described in subjects living conventionally (sleeping at night and active during the daytime). Based on these considerations, predictions can be made about changes that might be expected in the days after a time-zone transition and during night work. The relevant literature on these circumstances is then reviewed. The last section of the chapter deals with sleep-wake schedules where both regular and irregular sleeps are taken (anchor sleep). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pneumatic conveying of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R.

    1984-11-06

    A method for pneumatically conveying solvent refined coal to a burner under conditions of dilute phase pneumatic flow so as to prevent saltation of the solvent refined coal in the transport line by maintaining the transport fluid velocity above approximately 95 ft/sec.

  6. 33 CFR 211.110 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS PROJECTS Reconveyance... Reservoir Projects in Texas and Also for the Verdigris River Portion of the Mcclellan-Kerr Navigation Project in Oklahoma, to Former Owners § 211.110 Conveyance. Reconveyance of the land will be by quitclaim...

  7. 33 CFR 211.80 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conveyance. 211.80 Section 211.80 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS PROJECTS Sale of Lands in Reservoir...

  8. 33 CFR 211.80 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conveyance. 211.80 Section 211.80 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS PROJECTS Sale of Lands in Reservoir...

  9. 33 CFR 211.80 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveyance. 211.80 Section 211.80 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS PROJECTS Sale of Lands in Reservoir...

  10. 33 CFR 211.80 - Conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conveyance. 211.80 Section 211.80 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS PROJECTS Sale of Lands in Reservoir...

  11. Ontogenetic development of the mammalian circadian system.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Dietmar

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes the current knowledge about the ontogenetic development of the circadian system in mammals. The developmental changes of overt rhythms are discussed, although the main focus of the review is the underlying neuronal and molecular mechanisms. In addition, the review describes ontogenetic development, not only as a process of morpho-functional maturation. The need of repeated adaptations and readaptations due to changing developmental stage and environmental conditions is also considered. The review analyzes mainly rodent data, obtained from the literature and from the author's own studies. Results from other species, including humans, are presented to demonstrate common features and species-dependent differences. The review first describes the development of the suprachiasmatic nuclei as the central pacemaker system and shows that intrinsic circadian rhythms are already generated in the mammalian fetus. As in adult organisms, the period length is different from 24 h and needs continuous correction by environmental periodicities, or zeitgebers. The investigation of the ontogenetic development of the mechanisms of entrainment reveals that, at prenatal and early postnatal stages, non-photic cues deriving from the mother are effective. Light-dark entrainment develops later. At a certain age, both photic and non-photic zeitgebers may act in parallel, even though the respective time information is 12 h out of phase. That leads to a temporary internal desynchronization. Because rhythmic information needs to be transferred to effector organs, the corresponding neural and humoral signalling pathways are also briefly described. Finally, to be able to transform a rhythmic signal into an overt rhythm, the corresponding effector organs must be functionally mature. As many of these organs are able to generate their own intrinsic rhythms, another aspect of the review is dedicated to the development of peripheral oscillators and mechanisms of their entrainment

  12. Circadian rhythms and molecular noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonze, Didier; Goldbeter, Albert

    2006-06-01

    Circadian rhythms, characterized by a period of about 24h, are the most widespread biological rhythms generated autonomously at the molecular level. The core molecular mechanism responsible for circadian oscillations relies on the negative regulation exerted by a protein on the expression of its own gene. Deterministic models account for the occurrence of autonomous circadian oscillations, for their entrainment by light-dark cycles, and for their phase shifting by light pulses. Stochastic versions of these models take into consideration the molecular fluctuations that arise when the number of molecules involved in the regulatory mechanism is low. Numerical simulations of the stochastic models show that robust circadian oscillations can already occur with a limited number of mRNA and protein molecules, in the range of a few tens and hundreds, respectively. Various factors affect the robustness of circadian oscillations with respect to molecular noise. Besides an increase in the number of molecules, entrainment by light-dark cycles, and cooperativity in repression enhance robustness, whereas the proximity of a bifurcation point leads to less robust oscillations. Another parameter that appears to be crucial for the coherence of circadian rhythms is the binding/unbinding rate of the inhibitory protein to the promoter of the clock gene. Intercellular coupling further increases the robustness of circadian oscillations.

  13. Circadian gene variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kettner, Nicole M.; Katchy, Chinenye A.; Fu, Loning

    2014-01-01

    Humans as diurnal beings are active during the day and rest at night. This daily oscillation of behavior and physiology is driven by an endogenous circadian clock not environmental cues. In modern societies, changes in lifestyle have led to a frequent disruption of the endogenous circadian homeostasis leading to increased risk of various diseases including cancer. The clock is operated by the feedback loops of circadian genes and controls daily physiology by coupling cell proliferation and metabolism, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis in peripheral tissues with physical activity, energy homeostasis, immune and neuroendocrine functions at the organismal level. Recent studies have revealed that defects in circadian genes due to targeted gene ablation in animal models or single nucleotide polymorphism, deletion, deregulation and/or epigenetic silencing in humans are closely associated with increased risk of cancer. In addition, disruption of circadian rhythm can disrupt the molecular clock in peripheral tissues in the absence of circadian gene mutations. Circadian disruption has recently been recognized as an independent cancer risk factor. Further study of the mechanism of clock-controlled tumor suppression will have a significant impact on human health by improving the efficiencies of cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:24901356

  14. Acute melatonin treatment alters dendritic morphology and circadian clock gene expression in the hippocampus of Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Nelson, Randy J

    2015-02-01

    In the hippocampus of Siberian hamsters, dendritic length and dendritic complexity increase in the CA1 region whereas dendritic spine density decreases in the dentate gyrus region at night. However, the underlying mechanism of the diurnal rhythmicity in hippocampal neuronal remodeling is unknown. In mammals, most daily rhythms in physiology and behaviors are regulated by a network of circadian clocks. The central clock, located in the hypothalamus, controls melatonin secretion at night and melatonin modifies peripheral clocks by altering expression of circadian clock genes. In this study, we examined the effects of acute melatonin treatment on the circadian clock system as well as on morphological changes of hippocampal neurons. Male Siberian hamsters were injected with melatonin in the afternoon; 4 h later, mRNA levels of hypothalamic and hippocampal circadian clock genes and hippocampal neuron dendritic morphology were assessed. In the hypothalamus, melatonin treatment did not alter Period1 and Bmal1 expression. However, melatonin treatment increased both Period1 and Bmal1 expression in the hippocampus, suggesting that melatonin affected molecular oscillations in the hippocampus. Melatonin treatment also induced rapid remodeling of hippocampal neurons; melatonin increased apical dendritic length and dendritic complexity in the CA1 region and reduced the dendritic spine density in the dentate gyrus region. These data suggest that structural changes in hippocampal neurons are regulated by a circadian clock and that melatonin functions as a nighttime signal to coordinate the diurnal rhythm in neuronal remodeling. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. GW182 controls Drosophila circadian behavior and PDF-receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Emery, Patrick

    2013-04-10

    The neuropeptide PDF is crucial for Drosophila circadian behavior: it keeps circadian neurons synchronized. Here, we identify GW182 as a key regulator of PDF signaling. Indeed, GW182 downregulation results in phenotypes similar to those of Pdf and Pdf-receptor (Pdfr) mutants. gw182 genetically interacts with Pdfr and cAMP signaling, which is essential for PDFR function. GW182 mediates miRNA-dependent gene silencing through its interaction with AGO1. Consistently, GW182's AGO1 interaction domain is required for GW182's circadian function. Moreover, our results indicate that GW182 modulates PDFR signaling by silencing the expression of the cAMP phosphodiesterase DUNCE. Importantly, this repression is under photic control, and GW182 activity level--which is limiting in circadian neurons--influences the responses of the circadian neural network to light. We propose that GW182's gene silencing activity functions as a rheostat for PDFR signaling and thus profoundly impacts the circadian neural network and its response to environmental inputs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Disrupted reproduction, estrous cycle, and circadian rhythms in female mice deficient in vasoactive intestinal peptide.

    PubMed

    Loh, D H; Kuljis, D A; Azuma, L; Wu, Y; Truong, D; Wang, H B; Colwell, C S

    2014-10-01

    The female reproductive cycle is gated by the circadian timing system and may be vulnerable to disruptions in the circadian system. Prior work suggests that vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-expressing neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are one pathway by which the circadian clock can influence the estrous cycle, but the impact of the loss of this peptide on reproduction has not been assessed. In the present study, we first examine the impact of the genetic loss of the neuropeptide VIP on the reproductive success of female mice. Significantly, mutant females produce about half the offspring of their wild-type sisters even when mated to the same males. We also find that VIP-deficient females exhibit a disrupted estrous cycle; that is, ovulation occurs less frequently and results in the release of fewer oocytes compared with controls. Circadian rhythms of wheel-running activity are disrupted in the female mutant mice, as is the spontaneous electrical activity of dorsal SCN neurons. On a molecular level, the VIP-deficient SCN tissue exhibits lower amplitude oscillations with altered phase relationships between the SCN and peripheral oscillators as measured by PER2-driven bioluminescence. The simplest explanation of our data is that the loss of VIP results in a weakened SCN oscillator, which reduces the synchronization of the female circadian system. These results clarify one of the mechanisms by which disruption of the circadian system reduces female reproductive success. © 2014 The Author(s).

  17. Endocrine Effects of Circadian Disruption.

    PubMed

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Nelson, Randy J

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms, provoked by artificial lighting at night, inconsistent sleep-wake schedules, and transmeridian air travel, is increasingly prevalent in modern society. Desynchrony of biological rhythms from environmental light cycles has dramatic consequences for human health. In particular, disrupting homeostatic oscillations in endocrine tissues and the hormones that these tissues regulate can have cascading effects on physiology and behavior. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic disruption of circadian organization of endocrine function may lead to metabolic, reproductive, sleep, and mood disorders. This review discusses circadian control of endocrine systems and the consequences of distorting rhythmicity of these systems.

  18. Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythm Regulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Turek, Fred W

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, multilevel research has elucidated the basic neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The circadian timing system is composed of a large number of cellular oscillators located in the SCN, in non-SCN brain structures, and throughout the body. Cellular-level oscillations are generated by a molecular feedback loop in which circadian clock genes rhythmically regulate their own transcription, as well as that of hundreds of clock-controlled genes. The maintenance of proper coordination within this network of cellular- and tissue-level clocks is essential for health and well-being.

  19. Nocturia: The circadian voiding disorder

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Tae; Kim, Kyung Do

    2016-01-01

    Nocturia is a prevalent condition of waking to void during the night. The concept of nocturia has evolved from being a symptomatic aspect of disease associated with the prostate or bladder to a form of lower urinary tract disorder. However, recent advances in circadian biology and sleep science suggest that it might be important to consider nocturia as a form of circadian dysfunction. In the current review, nocturia is reexamined with an introduction to sleep disorders and recent findings in circadian biology in an attempt to highlight the importance of rediscovering nocturia as a problem of chronobiology. PMID:27195315

  20. A constant light-genetic screen identifies KISMET as a regulator of circadian photoresponses.

    PubMed

    Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Murad, Alejandro; Rosbash, Michael; Emery, Patrick

    2009-12-01

    Circadian pacemakers are essential to synchronize animal physiology and behavior with the dayrationight cycle. They are self-sustained, but the phase of their oscillations is determined by environmental cues, particularly light intensity and temperature cycles. In Drosophila, light is primarily detected by a dedicated blue-light photoreceptor: CRYPTOCHROME (CRY). Upon light activation, CRY binds to the pacemaker protein TIMELESS (TIM) and triggers its proteasomal degradation, thus resetting the circadian pacemaker. To understand further the CRY input pathway, we conducted a misexpression screen under constant light based on the observation that flies with a disruption in the CRY input pathway remain robustly rhythmic instead of becoming behaviorally arrhythmic. We report the identification of more than 20 potential regulators of CRY-dependent light responses. We demonstrate that one of them, the chromatin-remodeling enzyme KISMET (KIS), is necessary for normal circadian photoresponses, but does not affect the circadian pacemaker. KIS genetically interacts with CRY and functions in PDF-negative circadian neurons, which play an important role in circadian light responses. It also affects daily CRY-dependent TIM oscillations in a peripheral tissue: the eyes. We therefore conclude that KIS is a key transcriptional regulator of genes that function in the CRY signaling cascade, and thus it plays an important role in the synchronization of circadian rhythms with the dayrationight cycle.

  1. Genetics of Circadian Rhythms in Mammalian Model Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Lowrey, Phillip L.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian circadian system is a complex hierarchical temporal network which is organized around an ensemble of uniquely coupled cells comprising the principal circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. This central pacemaker is entrained each day by the environmental light/dark cycle and transmits synchronizing cues to cell-autonomous oscillators in tissues throughout the body. Within cells of the central pacemaker and the peripheral tissues, the underlying molecular mechanism by which oscillations in gene expression occur involves interconnected feedback loops of transcription and translation. Over the past 10 years we have learned much regarding the genetics of this system, including how it is particularly resilient when challenged by single-gene mutations, how accessory transcriptional loops enhance the robustness of oscillations, how epigenetic mechanisms contribute to the control of circadian gene expression, and how, from coupled neuronal networks, emergent clock properties arise. Here we will explore the genetics of the mammalian circadian system from cell-autonomous molecular oscillations, to interactions among central and peripheral oscillators and ultimately, to the daily rhythms of behavior observed in the animal. PMID:21924978

  2. Translational Profiling of Clock Cells Reveals Circadianly Synchronized Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanmei; Ainsley, Joshua A.; Reijmers, Leon G.; Jackson, F. Rob

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Genome-wide studies of circadian transcription or mRNA translation have been hindered by the presence of heterogeneous cell populations in complex tissues such as the nervous system. We describe here the use of a Drosophila cell-specific translational profiling approach to document the rhythmic “translatome” of neural clock cells for the first time in any organism. Unexpectedly, translation of most clock-regulated transcripts—as assayed by mRNA ribosome association—occurs at one of two predominant circadian phases, midday or mid-night, times of behavioral quiescence; mRNAs encoding similar cellular functions are translated at the same time of day. Our analysis also indicates that fundamental cellular processes—metabolism, energy production, redox state (e.g., the thioredoxin system), cell growth, signaling and others—are rhythmically modulated within clock cells via synchronized protein synthesis. Our approach is validated by the identification of mRNAs known to exhibit circadian changes in abundance and the discovery of hundreds of novel mRNAs that show translational rhythms. This includes Tdc2, encoding a neurotransmitter synthetic enzyme, which we demonstrate is required within clock neurons for normal circadian locomotor activity. PMID:24348200

  3. Requirement of mammalian Timeless for circadian rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Jessica W; Tischkau, Shelley A; Barnes, Jeffrey A; Mitchell, Jennifer W; Burgoon, Penny W; Hickok, Jason R; Gillette, Martha U

    2003-10-17

    Despite a central circadian role in Drosophila for the transcriptional regulator Timeless (dTim), the relevance of mammalian Timeless (mTim) remains equivocal. Conditional knockdown of mTim protein expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) disrupted SCN neuronal activity rhythms, and altered levels of known core clock elements. Full-length mTim protein (mTIM-fl) exhibited a 24-hour oscillation, where as a truncated isoform (mTIM-s) was constitutively expressed. mTIM-fl associated with the mammalian clock Period proteins (mPERs) in oscillating SCN cells. These data suggest that mTim is required for rhythmicity and is a functional homolog of dTim on the negative-feedback arm of the mammalian molecular clockwork.

  4. Role of cardiomyocyte circadian clock in myocardial metabolic adaptation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marked circadian rhythmicities in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology exist. The cardiomyocyte circadian clock has recently been linked to circadian rhythms in myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function. For instance, the cardiomyocyte circadian clock is essential f...

  5. Serotonergic integration of circadian clock and ultradian sleep-wake cycles.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Hiroyuki; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Hamada, Kozo; Hensch, Takao K

    2012-10-17

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus generates a 24 h rhythm of sleep and arousal. While neuronal spiking activity in the SCN provides a functional circadian oscillator that propagates throughout the brain, the ultradian sleep-wake state is regulated by the basal forebrain/preoptic area (BF/POA). How this SCN circadian oscillation is integrated into the shorter sleep-wake cycles remains unclear. We examined the temporal patterns of neuronal activity in these key brain regions in freely behaving rats. Neuronal activity in various brain regions presented diurnal rhythmicity and/or sleep-wake state dependence. We identified a diurnal rhythm in the BF/POA that was selectively degraded when diurnal arousal patterns were disrupted by acute brain serotonin depletion despite robust circadian spiking activity in the SCN. Local blockade of serotonergic transmission in the BF/POA was sufficient to disrupt the diurnal sleep-wake rhythm of mice. These results suggest that the serotonergic system enables the BF/POA to couple the SCN circadian signal to ultradian sleep-wake cycles, thereby providing a potential link between circadian rhythms and psychiatric disorders.

  6. Circadian preference in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Giglio, Larriany Maria Falsin; Magalhães, Pedro V S; Andersen, Mônica Levy; Walz, Julio Cesar; Jakobson, Lourenço; Kapczinski, Flávio

    2010-06-01

    A role for circadian rhythm abnormalities in the pathogenesis of bipolar disorder (BD) has been suggested. The present study assessed circadian preference, a subjective preference for activities in the morning or evening related to chronotype. The sample was comprised of 81 outpatients with BD in remission and 79 control subjects. Circadian preference was derived from an interview evaluating biological rhythms and sleep pattern from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Patients were significantly more likely to have an evening preference than control subjects. Circadian preference was also associated with sleep latency. The association of evening preference and longer sleep latency may be related to the frequent clinical observation of a sleep/wake cycle reversal in bipolar disorder.

  7. The circadian clock goes genomic.

    PubMed

    Staiger, Dorothee; Shin, Jieun; Johansson, Mikael; Davis, Seth J

    2013-06-24

    Large-scale biology among plant species, as well as comparative genomics of circadian clock architecture and clock-regulated output processes, have greatly advanced our understanding of the endogenous timing system in plants.

  8. Optimizing pneumatic conveying of biomass materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCianni, Matthew Edward Michael

    2011-12-01

    Biomass is a readily available but underutilized energy resource. One of the main challenges is the inability of biomass feed stocks like corn stover or wood chips to flow freely without intermittent jamming. This research integrated an automated pneumatic conveying system to efficiently transport biomass into a biomass reactor. Material was held in a storage container until an end effector attached to a 3-axis controller engaged the material to flow through pneumatic vacuum in the carrier fluid of air. The material was disengaged from the carrier fluid through centripetal forces induced by a cyclone separator. As the air was pulled out of the cyclone, the biomass drops out the bottom due to gravitational forces and fell into a secondary storage hopper. The second storage container was for testing purposes only, where the actual apparatus would use a vertically oriented lock hopper to feed material into the biomass reactor. In the experimental test apparatus, sensors measured the storage hopper weight (mass-flow rate), pressure drop from the blower, and input power consumption of the motor. Parameters that were adjusted during testing include pipe diameter, material type, and motor speed. Testing indicated that decreasing the motor speed below its maximum still allows for conveyance of the material without blockage forming in the piping. The data shows that the power consumption of the system can be reduced based on the size and weight of the material introduced to the conveying pipe. Also, conveying certain materials proved to be problematic with particular duct diameters. Ultimately, an optimal duct diameter that can perform efficiently for a broad range of materials was chosen for the given system. Through these improvements, the energy return on investment will be improved for biomass feed stocks, which is taking a step in the right direction to secure the nation's energy independence.

  9. Daily variation in the electrophysiological activity of mouse medial habenula neurones.

    PubMed

    Sakhi, Kanwal; Belle, Mino D C; Gossan, Nicole; Delagrange, Philippe; Piggins, Hugh D

    2014-02-15

    Intrinsic daily or circadian rhythms arise through the outputs of the master circadian clock in the brain's suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) as well as circadian oscillators in other brain sites and peripheral tissues. SCN neurones contain an intracellular molecular clock that drives these neurones to exhibit pronounced day-night differences in their electrical properties. The epithalamic medial habenula (MHb) expresses clock genes, but little is known about the bioelectric properties of mouse MHb neurones and their potential circadian characteristics. Therefore, in this study we used a brain slice preparation containing the MHb to determine the basic electrical properties of mouse MHb neurones with whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology, and investigated whether these vary across the day-night cycle. MHb neurones (n = 230) showed heterogeneity in electrophysiological state, ranging from highly depolarised cells (∼ -25 to -30 mV) that are silent with no membrane activity or display depolarised low-amplitude membrane oscillations, to neurones that were moderately hyperpolarised (∼40 mV) and spontaneously discharging action potentials. These electrical states were largely intrinsically regulated and were influenced by the activation of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. When considered as one population, MHb neurones showed significant circadian variation in their spontaneous firing rate and resting membrane potential. However, in recordings of MHb neurones from mice lacking the core molecular circadian clock, these temporal differences in MHb activity were absent, indicating that circadian clock signals actively regulate the timing of MHb neuronal states. These observations add to the extracellularly recorded rhythms seen in other brain areas and establish that circadian mechanisms can influence the membrane properties of neurones in extra-SCN sites. Collectively, the results of this study indicate that the MHb may function as an intrinsic

  10. Daily variation in the electrophysiological activity of mouse medial habenula neurones

    PubMed Central

    Sakhi, Kanwal; Belle, Mino D C; Gossan, Nicole; Delagrange, Philippe; Piggins, Hugh D

    2014-01-01

    AbstractIntrinsic daily or circadian rhythms arise through the outputs of the master circadian clock in the brain's suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) as well as circadian oscillators in other brain sites and peripheral tissues. SCN neurones contain an intracellular molecular clock that drives these neurones to exhibit pronounced day–night differences in their electrical properties. The epithalamic medial habenula (MHb) expresses clock genes, but little is known about the bioelectric properties of mouse MHb neurones and their potential circadian characteristics. Therefore, in this study we used a brain slice preparation containing the MHb to determine the basic electrical properties of mouse MHb neurones with whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology, and investigated whether these vary across the day–night cycle. MHb neurones (n = 230) showed heterogeneity in electrophysiological state, ranging from highly depolarised cells (∼ −25 to −30 mV) that are silent with no membrane activity or display depolarised low-amplitude membrane oscillations, to neurones that were moderately hyperpolarised (∼40 mV) and spontaneously discharging action potentials. These electrical states were largely intrinsically regulated and were influenced by the activation of small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels. When considered as one population, MHb neurones showed significant circadian variation in their spontaneous firing rate and resting membrane potential. However, in recordings of MHb neurones from mice lacking the core molecular circadian clock, these temporal differences in MHb activity were absent, indicating that circadian clock signals actively regulate the timing of MHb neuronal states. These observations add to the extracellularly recorded rhythms seen in other brain areas and establish that circadian mechanisms can influence the membrane properties of neurones in extra-SCN sites. Collectively, the results of this study indicate that the MHb may

  11. Aircrew fatigue and circadian rhythmicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graeber, R. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    Recent statistical and experimental studies on the role of circadian rhythms in aircrew fatigue and aviation accidents are reviewed from a human-factors perspective, and typical data are presented in extensive graphs. Consideration is given to the biological clock and the limits of endurance, circadian desynchronization, sleep and sleepiness, short-haul and long-haul operational studies, and the potential advantages of cockpit automation.

  12. The circadian visual system, 2005.

    PubMed

    Morin, L P; Allen, C N

    2006-06-01

    The primary mammalian circadian clock resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a recipient of dense retinohypothalamic innervation. In its most basic form, the circadian rhythm system is part of the greater visual system. A secondary component of the circadian visual system is the retinorecipient intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) which has connections to many parts of the brain, including efferents converging on targets of the SCN. The IGL also provides a major input to the SCN, with a third major SCN afferent projection arriving from the median raphe nucleus. The last decade has seen a blossoming of research into the anatomy and function of the visual, geniculohypothalamic and midbrain serotonergic systems modulating circadian rhythmicity in a variety of species. There has also been a substantial and simultaneous elaboration of knowledge about the intrinsic structure of the SCN. Many of the developments have been driven by molecular biological investigation of the circadian clock and the molecular tools are enabling novel understanding of regional function within the SCN. The present discussion is an extension of the material covered by the 1994 review, "The Circadian Visual System."

  13. Consequences of Circadian Disruption on Neurologic Health

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Phyllis C.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms have a major role in physiology and behavior. Circadian disruption has negative consequences for physiological homeostasis at molecular, cellular, organ–system and whole-organism levels. The onset of many cerebrovascular insults exhibit circadian temporal trends. Impaired sleep-wake cycle, the most robust output rhythms of the circadian system is significantly affected by neurodegenerative disorders, may precede them by decades, and may also impact their progression. Emerging evidence suggest that circadian disruption may be a risk factor for these neurological disorders. In this review, we discuss the implications of circadian rhythms in brain disorders, with an emphasis on cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26568123

  14. Consequences of Circadian Disruption on Neurologic Health.

    PubMed

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    Circadian rhythms have a major role in physiology and behavior. Circadian disruption has negative consequences for physiologic homeostasis at molecular, cellular, organ-system, and whole-organism levels. The onset of many cerebrovascular insults shows circadian temporal trends. Impaired sleep-wake cycle, the most robust output rhythms of the circadian system, is significantly affected by neurodegenerative disorders, may precede them by decades, and may also affect their progression. Emerging evidence suggests that circadian disruption may be a risk factor for these neurologic disorders. This article discusses the implications of circadian rhythms in brain disorders, with an emphasis on cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Colour as a signal for entraining the mammalian circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Lauren; Hanna, Lydia; Mouland, Josh; Martial, Franck; West, Alexander; Smedley, Andrew R; Bechtold, David A; Webb, Ann R; Lucas, Robert J; Brown, Timothy M

    2015-04-01

    Twilight is characterised by changes in both quantity ("irradiance") and quality ("colour") of light. Animals use the variation in irradiance to adjust their internal circadian clocks, aligning their behaviour and physiology with the solar cycle. However, it is currently unknown whether changes in colour also contribute to this entrainment process. Using environmental measurements, we show here that mammalian blue-yellow colour discrimination provides a more reliable method of tracking twilight progression than simply measuring irradiance. We next use electrophysiological recordings to demonstrate that neurons in the mouse suprachiasmatic circadian clock display the cone-dependent spectral opponency required to make use of this information. Thus, our data show that some clock neurons are highly sensitive to changes in spectral composition occurring over twilight and that this input dictates their response to changes in irradiance. Finally, using mice housed under photoperiods with simulated dawn/dusk transitions, we confirm that spectral changes occurring during twilight are required for appropriate circadian alignment under natural conditions. Together, these data reveal a new sensory mechanism for telling time of day that would be available to any mammalian species capable of chromatic vision.

  16. Colour As a Signal for Entraining the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, Lauren; Hanna, Lydia; Mouland, Josh; Martial, Franck; West, Alexander; Smedley, Andrew R.; Bechtold, David A.; Webb, Ann R.; Lucas, Robert J.; Brown, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Twilight is characterised by changes in both quantity (“irradiance”) and quality (“colour”) of light. Animals use the variation in irradiance to adjust their internal circadian clocks, aligning their behaviour and physiology with the solar cycle. However, it is currently unknown whether changes in colour also contribute to this entrainment process. Using environmental measurements, we show here that mammalian blue–yellow colour discrimination provides a more reliable method of tracking twilight progression than simply measuring irradiance. We next use electrophysiological recordings to demonstrate that neurons in the mouse suprachiasmatic circadian clock display the cone-dependent spectral opponency required to make use of this information. Thus, our data show that some clock neurons are highly sensitive to changes in spectral composition occurring over twilight and that this input dictates their response to changes in irradiance. Finally, using mice housed under photoperiods with simulated dawn/dusk transitions, we confirm that spectral changes occurring during twilight are required for appropriate circadian alignment under natural conditions. Together, these data reveal a new sensory mechanism for telling time of day that would be available to any mammalian species capable of chromatic vision. PMID:25884537

  17. Embryonic development of circadian clocks in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Dominic; Koch, Christiane E; Oster, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    In most species, self-sustained molecular clocks regulate 24-h rhythms of behavior and physiology. In mammals, a circadian pacemaker residing in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) receives photic signals from the retina and synchronizes subordinate clocks in non-SCN tissues. The emergence of circadian rhythmicity during development has been extensively studied for many years. In mice, neuronal development in the presumptive SCN region of the embryonic hypothalamus occurs on days 12-15 of gestation. Intra-SCN circuits differentiate during the following days and retinal projections reach the SCN, and thus mediate photic entrainment, only after birth. In contrast the genetic components of the clock gene machinery are expressed much earlier and during midgestation SCN explants and isolated neurons are capable of generating molecular oscillations in culture. In vivo metabolic rhythms in the SCN, however, are observed not earlier than the 19th day of rat gestation, and rhythmic expression of clock genes is hardly detectable until after birth. Together these data indicate that cellular coupling and, thus, tissue-wide synchronization of single-cell rhythms, may only develop very late during embryogenesis. In this mini-review we describe the developmental origin of the SCN structure and summarize our current knowledge about the functional initiation and entrainment of the circadian pacemaker during embryonic development.

  18. Phosphoproteome Profiling Reveals Circadian Clock Regulation of Posttranslational Modifications in the Murine Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Xu, Bo; Mehta, Neel; Mayne, Janice; Sun, Warren Y L; Cheng, Kai; Ning, Zhibin; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa; Cheng, Hai-Ying Mary; Figeys, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous oscillator that drives daily rhythms in physiology, behavior, and gene expression. The underlying mechanisms of circadian timekeeping are cell-autonomous and involve oscillatory expression of core clock genes that is driven by interconnecting transcription-translation feedback loops (TTFLs). Circadian clock TTFLs are further regulated by posttranslational modifications, in particular, phosphorylation. The hippocampus plays an important role in spatial memory and the conversion of short- to long-term memory. Several studies have reported the presence of a peripheral oscillator in the hippocampus and have highlighted the importance of circadian regulation in memory formation. Given the general importance of phosphorylation in circadian clock regulation, we performed global quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome analyses of the murine hippocampus across the circadian cycle, applying spiked-in labeled reference and high accuracy mass spectrometry (MS). Of the 3,052 proteins and 2,868 phosphosites on 1,368 proteins that were accurately quantified, 1.7% of proteins and 5.2% of phosphorylation events exhibited time-of-day-dependent expression profiles. The majority of circadian phosphopeptides displayed abrupt fluctuations at mid-to-late day without underlying rhythms of protein abundance. Bioinformatic analysis of cyclic phosphorylation events revealed their diverse distribution in different biological pathways, most notably, cytoskeletal organization and neuronal morphogenesis. This study provides the first large-scale, quantitative MS analysis of the circadian phosphoproteome and proteome of the murine hippocampus and highlights the significance of rhythmic regulation at the posttranslational level in this peripheral oscillator. In addition to providing molecular insights into the hippocampal circadian clock, our results will assist in the understanding of genetic factors that underlie rhythms-associated pathological states of

  19. Phosphoproteome Profiling Reveals Circadian Clock Regulation of Posttranslational Modifications in the Murine Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Xu, Bo; Mehta, Neel; Mayne, Janice; Sun, Warren Y. L.; Cheng, Kai; Ning, Zhibin; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa; Cheng, Hai-Ying Mary; Figeys, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous oscillator that drives daily rhythms in physiology, behavior, and gene expression. The underlying mechanisms of circadian timekeeping are cell-autonomous and involve oscillatory expression of core clock genes that is driven by interconnecting transcription–translation feedback loops (TTFLs). Circadian clock TTFLs are further regulated by posttranslational modifications, in particular, phosphorylation. The hippocampus plays an important role in spatial memory and the conversion of short- to long-term memory. Several studies have reported the presence of a peripheral oscillator in the hippocampus and have highlighted the importance of circadian regulation in memory formation. Given the general importance of phosphorylation in circadian clock regulation, we performed global quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome analyses of the murine hippocampus across the circadian cycle, applying spiked-in labeled reference and high accuracy mass spectrometry (MS). Of the 3,052 proteins and 2,868 phosphosites on 1,368 proteins that were accurately quantified, 1.7% of proteins and 5.2% of phosphorylation events exhibited time-of-day-dependent expression profiles. The majority of circadian phosphopeptides displayed abrupt fluctuations at mid-to-late day without underlying rhythms of protein abundance. Bioinformatic analysis of cyclic phosphorylation events revealed their diverse distribution in different biological pathways, most notably, cytoskeletal organization and neuronal morphogenesis. This study provides the first large-scale, quantitative MS analysis of the circadian phosphoproteome and proteome of the murine hippocampus and highlights the significance of rhythmic regulation at the posttranslational level in this peripheral oscillator. In addition to providing molecular insights into the hippocampal circadian clock, our results will assist in the understanding of genetic factors that underlie rhythms-associated pathological states of

  20. 30 CFR 57.19066 - Maximum riders in a conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19066 Maximum riders in a conveyance. In shafts inclined over 45 degrees, the operator shall determine and post in the conveyance or at each shaft station the maximum number...

  1. 30 CFR 56.19066 - Maximum riders in a conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19066 Maximum riders in a conveyance. In shafts inclined over 45 degrees, the operator shall determine and post in the conveyance or at each shaft station the maximum number...

  2. Circadian rhythm of temperature preference and its neural control in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Haruna; Head, Lauren M.; Ling, Jinli; Tang, Xin; Liu, Yilin; Hardin, Paul E.; Emery, Patrick; Hamada, Fumika N.

    2012-01-01

    A daily body temperature rhythm (BTR) is critical for the maintenance of homeostasis in mammals. While mammals use internal energy to regulate body temperature, ectotherms typically regulate body temperature behaviorally [1]. Some ectotherms maintain homeostasis via a daily temperature preference rhythm (TPR) [2], but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we show that Drosophila exhibit a daily circadian clock dependent TPR that resembles mammalian BTR. Pacemaker neurons critical for locomotor activity are not necessary for TPR; instead, the dorsal neuron 2s (DN2s), whose function was previously unknown, is sufficient. This indicates that TPR, like BTR, is controlled independently from locomotor activity. Therefore, the mechanisms controlling temperature fluctuations in fly TPR and mammalian BTR may share parallel features. Taken together, our results reveal the existence of a novel DN2- based circadian neural circuit that specifically regulates TPR; thus, understanding the mechanisms of TPR will shed new light on the function and neural control of circadian rhythms. PMID:22981774

  3. Direct Midbrain Dopamine Input to the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Accelerates Circadian Entrainment.

    PubMed

    Grippo, Ryan M; Purohit, Aarti M; Zhang, Qi; Zweifel, Larry S; Güler, Ali D

    2017-08-21

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission controls behaviors important for survival, including voluntary movement, reward processing, and detection of salient events, such as food or mate availability. Dopaminergic tone also influences circadian physiology and behavior. Although the evolutionary significance of this input is appreciated, its precise neurophysiological architecture remains unknown. Here, we identify a novel, direct connection between the DA neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). We demonstrate that D1 dopamine receptor (Drd1) signaling within the SCN is necessary for properly timed resynchronization of activity rhythms to phase-shifted light:dark cycles and that elevation of DA tone through selective activation of VTA DA neurons accelerates photoentrainment. Our findings demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for direct DA input to the master circadian clock and highlight the importance of an evolutionarily significant relationship between the circadian system and the neuromodulatory circuits that govern motivational behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 30 CFR 57.19068 - Orderly conduct in conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Orderly conduct in conveyances. 57.19068... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 57.19068 Orderly conduct in conveyances. Persons shall enter, ride, and leave conveyances in an orderly manner....

  5. 30 CFR 56.19068 - Orderly conduct in conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Orderly conduct in conveyances. 56.19068... Hoisting Hoisting Procedures § 56.19068 Orderly conduct in conveyances. Persons shall enter, ride, and leave conveyances in an orderly manner....

  6. 32 CFR 174.9 - Economic development conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Economic development conveyances. 174.9 Section... Economic development conveyances. (a) The Secretary concerned may transfer real property and personal... Economic Development Conveyance (EDC). (b) An LRA is the only entity eligible to receive property under an...

  7. 32 CFR 174.9 - Economic development conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Economic development conveyances. 174.9 Section... Economic development conveyances. (a) The Secretary concerned may transfer real property and personal... Economic Development Conveyance (EDC). (b) An LRA is the only entity eligible to receive property under an...

  8. 32 CFR 174.9 - Economic development conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Economic development conveyances. 174.9 Section... Economic development conveyances. (a) The Secretary concerned may transfer real property and personal... Development Conveyance (EDC). (b) For installations having a date of approval for closure after January 1...

  9. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a) General applicability. If it shall appear to any officer authorized to board conveyances and make seizures that there...

  10. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a) General applicability. If it shall appear to any officer authorized to board conveyances and make seizures that there...

  11. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a) General applicability. If it shall appear to any officer authorized to board conveyances and make seizures that there...

  12. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a) General applicability. If it shall appear to any officer authorized to board conveyances and make seizures that there...

  13. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a) General applicability. If it shall appear to any officer authorized to board conveyances and make seizures that there...

  14. Circadian molecular clocks and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Fergal C; Rao, Aparna; Maguire, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Physiological processes such as the sleep-wake cycle, metabolism and hormone secretion are controlled by a circadian rhythm adapted to 24h day-night periodicity. This circadian synchronisation is in part controlled by ambient light decreasing melatonin secretion by the pineal gland and co-ordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Peripheral cell autonomous circadian clocks controlled by the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the master regulator, exist within every cell of the body and are comprised of at least twelve genes. These include the basic helix-loop-helix/PAS domain containing transcription factors; Clock, BMal1 and Npas2 which activate transcription of the periodic genes (Per1 and Per2) and cryptochrome genes (Cry1 and Cry2). Points of coupling exist between the cellular clock and the cell cycle. Cell cycle genes which are affected by the molecular circadian clock include c-Myc, Wee1, cyclin D and p21. Therefore the rhythm of the circadian clock and cancer are interlinked. Molecular examples exist including activation of Per2 leads to c-myc overexpression and an increased tumor incidence. Mice with mutations in Cryptochrome 1 and 2 are arrhythmic (lack a circadian rhythm) and arrhythmic mice have a faster rate of growth of implanted tumors. Epidemiological finding of relevance include 'The Nurses' Health Study' where it was established that women working rotational night shifts have an increased incidence of breast cancer. Compounds that affect circadian rhythm exist with attendant future therapeutic possibilities. These include casein kinase I inhibitors and a candidate small molecule KL001 that affects the degradation of cryptochrome. Theoretically the cell cycle and malignant disease may be targeted vicariously by selective alteration of the cellular molecular clock.

  15. Mitogen-activated protein kinase is a functional component of the autonomous circadian system in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Makoto; Hayasaka, Naoto; Yamazaki, Shin; Node, Koichi

    2008-04-30

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master circadian pacemaker driving behavioral and physiological rhythms in mammals. Circadian activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase [MAPK; also known as ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase)] is observed in vivo in the SCN under constant darkness, although the biological significance of this remains unclear. To elucidate this question, we first examined whether MAPK was autonomously activated in ex vivo SCN slices. Moreover, we investigated the effect of MAPK inhibition on circadian clock gene expression and neuronal firing rhythms using SCN-slice culture systems. We show herein that MAPK is autonomously activated in the SCN, and our data demonstrate that inhibition of the MAPK activity results in dampened rhythms and reduced basal levels in circadian clock gene expression at the SCN single-neuron level. Furthermore, MAPK inhibition attenuates autonomous circadian neuronal firing rhythms in the SCN. Thus, our data suggest that light-independent MAPK activity contributes to the robustness of the SCN autonomous circadian system.

  16. Fluorescence circadian imaging reveals a PDF-dependent transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila molecular clock.

    PubMed

    Sabado, Virginie; Vienne, Ludovic; Nunes, José Manuel; Rosbash, Michael; Nagoshi, Emi

    2017-01-30

    Circadian locomotor behaviour is controlled by a pacemaker circuit composed of clock-containing neurons. To interrogate the mechanistic relationship between the molecular clockwork and network communication critical to the operation of the Drosophila circadian pacemaker circuit, we established new fluorescent circadian reporters that permit single-cell recording of transcriptional and post-transcriptional rhythms in brain explants and cultured neurons. Live-imaging experiments combined with pharmacological and genetic manipulations demonstrate that the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) amplifies the molecular rhythms via time-of-day- and activity-dependent upregulation of transcription from E-box-containing clock gene promoters within key pacemaker neurons. The effect of PDF on clock gene transcription and the known role of PDF in enhancing PER/TIM stability occur via independent pathways downstream of the PDF receptor, the former through a cAMP-independent mechanism and the latter through a cAMP-PKA dependent mechanism. These results confirm and extend the mechanistic understanding of the role of PDF in controlling the synchrony of the pacemaker neurons. More broadly, our results establish the utility of the new live-imaging tools for the study of molecular-neural interactions important for the operation of the circadian pacemaker circuit.

  17. Fluorescence circadian imaging reveals a PDF-dependent transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila molecular clock

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Virginie; Vienne, Ludovic; Nunes, José Manuel; Rosbash, Michael; Nagoshi, Emi

    2017-01-01

    Circadian locomotor behaviour is controlled by a pacemaker circuit composed of clock-containing neurons. To interrogate the mechanistic relationship between the molecular clockwork and network communication critical to the operation of the Drosophila circadian pacemaker circuit, we established new fluorescent circadian reporters that permit single-cell recording of transcriptional and post-transcriptional rhythms in brain explants and cultured neurons. Live-imaging experiments combined with pharmacological and genetic manipulations demonstrate that the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) amplifies the molecular rhythms via time-of-day- and activity-dependent upregulation of transcription from E-box-containing clock gene promoters within key pacemaker neurons. The effect of PDF on clock gene transcription and the known role of PDF in enhancing PER/TIM stability occur via independent pathways downstream of the PDF receptor, the former through a cAMP-independent mechanism and the latter through a cAMP-PKA dependent mechanism. These results confirm and extend the mechanistic understanding of the role of PDF in controlling the synchrony of the pacemaker neurons. More broadly, our results establish the utility of the new live-imaging tools for the study of molecular-neural interactions important for the operation of the circadian pacemaker circuit. PMID:28134281

  18. Circadian Rhythm Dysregulation in Bipolar Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Alloy, Lauren B; Ng, Tommy H; Titone, Madison K; Boland, Elaine M

    2017-04-01

    We review recent evidence for circadian rhythm dysregulation in bipolar spectrum disorders (BSDs). We examine evidence for endogenous abnormalities in the biological clock and disruptions in the external entrainment of circadian rhythms in BSDs. We also address whether circadian dysregulation provides vulnerability to onset of BSD and evidence for a new integration of reward and circadian dysregulation in BSD. Relative circadian phase delay (e.g., later melatonin peak, evening chronotype) is associated with BSD, particularly in the depressive phase. More consistent evidence supports irregularity of social rhythms, sleep/wake and activity patterns, and disruptions of social rhythms by life events, as stable trait markers of BSD and potential vulnerabilities for BSD onset. Growing research supports an integrative reward/circadian model. Both endogenous abnormalities in the biological clock pacemaking function and disruptions in the external entrainment of circadian rhythms by physical and social cues are involved in BSDs. Circadian dysregulation may provide vulnerability to BSD onset.

  19. Theory of unidirectional spin heat conveyer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Hiroto; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2015-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the unidirectional spin heat conveyer effect recently reported in the literature that emerges from the Damon-Eshbach spin wave on the surface of a magnetic material. We develop a simple phenomenological theory for heat transfer dynamics in a coupled system of phonons and the Damon-Eshbach spin wave, and demonstrate that there arises a direction-selective heat flow as a result of the competition between an isotropic heat diffusion by phonons and a unidirectional heat drift by the spin wave. The phenomenological approach can account for the asymmetric local temperature distribution observed in the experiment.

  20. Vertical-Screw-Auger Conveyer Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis (Inventor); Vollmer, Hubert J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A conical feeder is attached to a vertically conveying screw auger. The feeder is equipped with scoops and rotated from the surface to force-feed regolith the auger. Additional scoops are possible by adding a cylindrical section above the conical funnel section. Such then allows the unit to collect material from swaths larger in diameter than the enclosing casing pipe of the screw auger. A third element includes a flexible screw auger. All three can be used in combination in microgravity and zero atmosphere environments to drill and recover a wide area of subsurface regolith and entrained volatiles through a single access point on the surface.

  1. Erosion resistant elbow for solids conveyance

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    An elvow and process for fabrication for use in particulate material conveying comprising a curved outer pipe, a curved inner pipe having the same radius of curvature as the outer pipe, concentric with and internal to the outer pipe, comprising an outer layer comprised of a first material and an inner layer comprised of a second material wherein said first material is characterized by high erosion resistance when impinged by particulate material and wherein said second material is characterized by high tensile strength and flexibility, and an inner pipe supporting means for providing support to said inner pipe, disposed between said inner pipe and said outer pipe. 4 figures.

  2. Theory of unidirectional spin heat conveyer

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Hiroto Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the unidirectional spin heat conveyer effect recently reported in the literature that emerges from the Damon-Eshbach spin wave on the surface of a magnetic material. We develop a simple phenomenological theory for heat transfer dynamics in a coupled system of phonons and the Damon-Eshbach spin wave, and demonstrate that there arises a direction-selective heat flow as a result of the competition between an isotropic heat diffusion by phonons and a unidirectional heat drift by the spin wave. The phenomenological approach can account for the asymmetric local temperature distribution observed in the experiment.

  3. Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    W81XWH-08-2-0171 TITLE: Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ann Hsing, Ph.D...COVERED (From - To) 1 September 2008-31 October 2012 October22012012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Circadian Genes and Risk for...genetic susceptibility to prostate cancer may be in part due to variations in the core circadian genes that regulate circadian rhythms and that serum sex

  4. Nutrition and the circadian system.

    PubMed

    Potter, Gregory D M; Cade, Janet E; Grant, Peter J; Hardie, Laura J

    2016-08-01

    The human circadian system anticipates and adapts to daily environmental changes to optimise behaviour according to time of day and temporally partitions incompatible physiological processes. At the helm of this system is a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN are primarily synchronised to the 24-h day by the light/dark cycle; however, feeding/fasting cycles are the primary time cues for clocks in peripheral tissues. Aligning feeding/fasting cycles with clock-regulated metabolic changes optimises metabolism, and studies of other animals suggest that feeding at inappropriate times disrupts circadian system organisation, and thereby contributes to adverse metabolic consequences and chronic disease development. 'High-fat diets' (HFD) produce particularly deleterious effects on circadian system organisation in rodents by blunting feeding/fasting cycles. Time-of-day-restricted feeding, where food availability is restricted to a period of several hours, offsets many adverse consequences of HFD in these animals; however, further evidence is required to assess whether the same is true in humans. Several nutritional compounds have robust effects on the circadian system. Caffeine, for example, can speed synchronisation to new time zones after jetlag. An appreciation of the circadian system has many implications for nutritional science and may ultimately help reduce the burden of chronic diseases.

  5. Circadian regulation of renal function.

    PubMed

    Firsov, Dmitri; Bonny, Olivier

    2010-10-01

    Urinary excretion of water and all major electrolytes exhibit robust circadian oscillations. The 24-h periodicity has been well documented for several important determinants of urine formation, including renal blood flow, glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption, and tubular secretion. Disturbance of the renal circadian rhythms is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for hypertension, polyuria, and other diseases and may contribute to renal fibrosis. The origin of these rhythms has been attributed to the reactive response of the kidney to circadian changes in volume and/or in the composition of extracellular fluids that are entrained by rest/activity and feeding/fasting cycles. However, numerous studies have shown that most of the renal excretory rhythms persist for long periods of time, even in the absence of periodic environmental cues. These observations led to the hypothesis of the existence of a self-sustained mechanism, enabling the kidney to anticipate various predictable circadian challenges to homeostasis. The molecular basis of this mechanism remained unknown until the recent discovery of the mammalian circadian clock made of a system of autoregulatory transcriptional/translational feedback loops, which have been found in all tissues studied, including the kidney. Here, we present a review of the growing evidence showing the involvement of the molecular clock in the generation of renal excretory rhythms.

  6. Making circadian cancer therapy practical.

    PubMed

    Block, Keith I; Block, Penny B; Fox, Susan Reynolds; Birris, Jamie Stouffer; Feng, April Y; de la Torre, Michael; Nathan, Deva; Tothy, Peter; Maki, Amanda K; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte

    2009-12-01

    Practical circadian therapy for the cancer patient involves 3 spheres of intervention-improving lifestyle, optimizing internal biochemical milieu, and adjusting treatment times. The potential value of improving overall circadian functioning is shown in the work of Mormont et al in which pronounced rest-activity rhythms were associated with better survival in colorectal cancer patients receiving chronomodulated chemotherapy. Lifestyle interventions that may improve circadian functioning involve diet, physical activity, and mind-body therapies. A diet that is anti-inflammatory and has appropriate carbohydrate intake, as well as regular meal timing, encourages normal circadian cycles. Adequate daytime physical activity encourages restful sleep, and morning light exposure during exercise may entrain melatonin rhythms. Meditation and other mind-body therapies can reduce anxiety and depression that may disrupt sleep. Aspects of the biochemical milieu that specifically disrupt circadian functioning are inflammation and stress hormones. Inflammation and cytokine disruption can be addressed with diet, herbs, and other natural substances. Chronomodulation of chemotherapy in a US clinical setting will be discussed. A series of 12 cases will be presented of patients who experienced grade 3 to 4 toxicities with various chemotherapy regimens for colorectal cancer. When rechallenged with the same regimens administered chronotherapeutically, none of the patients experienced grade 3 to 4 toxicity. Integrating all the above treatment modalities has the potential to improve both the quality of life and disease outcomes in cancer patients.

  7. Nutrition and the Circadian System

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Gregory D M; Cade, Janet E; Grant, Peter J; Hardie, Laura J

    2016-01-01

    The human circadian system anticipates and adapts to daily environmental changes to optimise behaviour according to time of day and temporally partition incompatible physiological processes. At the helm of this system is a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN are primarily synchronised to the 24 hour day by the light/dark cycle; however, feeding/fasting cycles are the primary time cues for clocks in peripheral tissues. Aligning feeding/fasting cycles with clock-regulated metabolic changes optimises metabolism, and studies of other animals suggest that feeding at inappropriate times disrupts circadian system organisation and thereby contributes to adverse metabolic consequences and chronic disease development. ‘High-fat diets’ (HFDs) produce particularly deleterious effects on circadian system organisation in rodents by blunting feeding/fasting cycles. Time-of-day-restricted feeding, where food availability is restricted to a period of several hours, offsets many adverse consequences of HFDs in these animals; however, further evidence is required to assess whether the same is true in humans. Several nutritional compounds have robust effects on the circadian system. Caffeine, for example, can speed synchronisation to new time zones after jetlag. An appreciation of the circadian system has many implications for nutritional science and may ultimately help reduce the burden of chronic diseases. PMID:27221157

  8. Conveying movement in music and prosody.

    PubMed

    Hedger, Stephen C; Nusbaum, Howard C; Hoeckner, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether acoustic variation of musical properties can analogically convey descriptive information about an object. Specifically, we tested whether information from the temporal structure in music interacts with perception of a visual image to form an analog perceptual representation as a natural part of music perception. In Experiment 1, listeners heard music with an accelerating or decelerating temporal pattern, and then saw a picture of a still or moving object and decided whether it was animate or inanimate--a task unrelated to the patterning of the music. Object classification was faster when musical motion matched visually depicted motion. In Experiment 2, participants heard spoken sentences that were accompanied by accelerating or decelerating music, and then were presented with a picture of a still or moving object. When motion information in the music matched motion information in the picture, participants were similarly faster to respond. Fast and slow temporal patterns without acceleration and deceleration, however, did not make participants faster when they saw a picture depicting congruent motion information (Experiment 3), suggesting that understanding temporal structure information in music may depend on specific metaphors about motion in music. Taken together, these results suggest that visuo-spatial referential information can be analogically conveyed and represented by music and can be integrated with speech or influence the understanding of speech.

  9. Conveying Movement in Music and Prosody

    PubMed Central

    Hedger, Stephen C.; Nusbaum, Howard C.; Hoeckner, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether acoustic variation of musical properties can analogically convey descriptive information about an object. Specifically, we tested whether information from the temporal structure in music interacts with perception of a visual image to form an analog perceptual representation as a natural part of music perception. In Experiment 1, listeners heard music with an accelerating or decelerating temporal pattern, and then saw a picture of a still or moving object and decided whether it was animate or inanimate – a task unrelated to the patterning of the music. Object classification was faster when musical motion matched visually depicted motion. In Experiment 2, participants heard spoken sentences that were accompanied by accelerating or decelerating music, and then were presented with a picture of a still or moving object. When motion information in the music matched motion information in the picture, participants were similarly faster to respond. Fast and slow temporal patterns without acceleration and deceleration, however, did not make participants faster when they saw a picture depicting congruent motion information (Experiment 3), suggesting that understanding temporal structure information in music may depend on specific metaphors about motion in music. Taken together, these results suggest that visuo-spatial referential information can be analogically conveyed and represented by music and can be integrated with speech or influence the understanding of speech. PMID:24146920

  10. An ecdysone-responsive nuclear receptor regulates circadian rhythms in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailesh; Chen, Dechun; Jang, Christopher; Nall, Alexandra; Zheng, Xiangzhong; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-12-16

    Little is known about molecular links between circadian clocks and steroid hormone signalling, although both are important for normal physiology. Here we report a circadian function for a nuclear receptor, ecdysone-induced protein 75 (Eip75/E75), which we identified through a gain-of-function screen for circadian genes in Drosophila melanogaster. Overexpression or knockdown of E75 in clock neurons disrupts rest:activity rhythms and dampens molecular oscillations. E75 represses expression of the gene encoding the transcriptional activator, CLOCK (CLK), and may also affect circadian output. PER inhibits the activity of E75 on the Clk promoter, thereby providing a mechanism for a previously proposed de-repressor effect of PER on Clk transcription. The ecdysone receptor is also expressed in central clock cells and manipulations of its expression produce effects similar to those of E75 on circadian rhythms. We find that E75 protects rhythms under stressful conditions, suggesting a function for steroid signalling in the maintenance of circadian rhythms in Drosophila.

  11. Circadian and feeding cues integrate to drive rhythms of physiology in Drosophila insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Barber, Annika F; Erion, Renske; Holmes, Todd C; Sehgal, Amita

    2016-12-01

    Circadian clocks regulate much of behavior and physiology, but the mechanisms by which they do so remain poorly understood. While cyclic gene expression is thought to underlie metabolic rhythms, little is known about cycles in cellular physiology. We found that Drosophila insulin-producing cells (IPCs), which are located in the pars intercerebralis and lack an autonomous circadian clock, are functionally connected to the central circadian clock circuit via DN1 neurons. Insulin mediates circadian output by regulating the rhythmic expression of a metabolic gene (sxe2) in the fat body. Patch clamp electrophysiology reveals that IPCs display circadian clock-regulated daily rhythms in firing event frequency and bursting proportion under light:dark conditions. The activity of IPCs and the rhythmic expression of sxe2 are additionally regulated by feeding, as demonstrated by night feeding-induced changes in IPC firing characteristics and sxe2 levels in the fat body. These findings indicate circuit-level regulation of metabolism by clock cells in Drosophila and support a role for the pars intercerebralis in integrating circadian control of behavior and physiology.

  12. Role of circadian activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase in chick pineal clock oscillation.

    PubMed

    Sanada, K; Hayashi, Y; Harada, Y; Okano, T; Fukada, Y

    2000-02-01

    A circadian pacemaker generates a rhythm with a period of approximately 24 hr even in the absence of environmental time cues. Several photosensitive neuronal tissues such as the retina and pineal gland contain the autonomous circadian pacemaker together with the photic-input pathway responsible for entrainment of the pacemaker to the daily light/dark cycle. We show here that, in constant darkness, chick pineal mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) exhibited an in vivo circadian rhythm in tyrosine phosphorylation and in enzymatic activity with a peak during subjective night. Phosphorylated and hence activated MAPK was rapidly dephosphorylated after light illumination during the nighttime when light induces a phase-shift of the pacemaker. The circadian rhythmicity in MAPK phosphorylation was also observed in the cultured pineal gland, and importantly, MAPK kinase inhibitor treatment during subjective night not only shifted the time-of-peak of MAPK phosphorylation but also induced a remarkable phase-delay of the circadian pacemaker. These results indicate an important role of MAPK for time keeping in circadian clock systems.

  13. Design and Analysis of Temperature Preference Behavior and its Circadian Rhythm in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Tadahiro; Leslie, Jennifer R.; Hamada, Fumika N.

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates many aspects of life, including sleep, locomotor activity, and body temperature (BTR) rhythms1,2. We recently identified a novel Drosophila circadian output, called the temperature preference rhythm (TPR), in which the preferred temperature in flies rises during the day and falls during the night 3. Surprisingly, the TPR and locomotor activity are controlled through distinct circadian neurons3. Drosophila locomotor activity is a well known circadian behavioral output and has provided strong contributions to the discovery of many conserved mammalian circadian clock genes and mechanisms4. Therefore, understanding TPR will lead to the identification of hitherto unknown molecular and cellular circadian mechanisms. Here, we describe how to perform and analyze the TPR assay. This technique not only allows for dissecting the molecular and neural mechanisms of TPR, but also provides new insights into the fundamental mechanisms of the brain functions that integrate different environmental signals and regulate animal behaviors. Furthermore, our recently published data suggest that the fly TPR shares features with the mammalian BTR3. Drosophila are ectotherms, in which the body temperature is typically behaviorally regulated. Therefore, TPR is a strategy used to generate a rhythmic body temperature in these flies5-8. We believe that further exploration of Drosophila TPR will facilitate the characterization of the mechanisms underlying body temperature control in animals. PMID:24457268

  14. The circadian timing system: making sense of day/night gene expression.

    PubMed

    Richter, Hans G; Torres-Farfán, Claudia; Rojas-García, Pedro P; Campino, Carmen; Torrealba, Fernando; Serón-Ferré, María

    2004-01-01

    The circadian time-keeping system ensures predictive adaptation of individuals to the reproducible 24-h day/night alternations of our planet by generating the 24-h (circadian) rhythms found in hormone release and cardiovascular, biophysical and behavioral functions, and others. In mammals, the master clock resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. The molecular events determining the functional oscillation of the SCN neurons with a period of 24-h involve recurrent expression of several clock proteins that interact in complex transcription/translation feedback loops. In mammals, a glutamatergic monosynaptic pathway originating from the retina regulaltes the clock gene expression pattern in the SCN neurons, synchronizing them to the light:dark cycle. The emerging concept is that neural/humoral output signals from the SCN impinge upon peripheral clocks located in other areas of the brain, heart, lung, gastrointestinal tract, liver, kidney, fibroblasts, and most of the cell phenotypes, resulting in overt circadian rhythms in integrated physiological functions. Here we review the impact of day/night alternation on integrated physiology; the molecular mechanisms and input/output signaling pathways involved in SCN circadian function; the current concept of peripheral clocks; and the potential role of melatonin as a circadian neuroendocrine transducer.

  15. CRTC Potentiates Light-independent timeless Transcription to Sustain Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Hoyeon; Hur, Jin-Hoe; Choe, Joonho; Lim, Chunghun

    2016-08-31

    Light is one of the strongest environmental time cues for entraining endogenous circadian rhythms. Emerging evidence indicates that CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 1 (CRTC1) is a key player in this pathway, stimulating light-induced Period1 (Per1) transcription in mammalian clocks. Here, we demonstrate a light-independent role of Drosophila CRTC in sustaining circadian behaviors. Genomic deletion of the crtc locus causes long but poor locomotor rhythms in constant darkness. Overexpression or RNA interference-mediated depletion of CRTC in circadian pacemaker neurons similarly impairs the free-running behavioral rhythms, implying that Drosophila clocks are sensitive to the dosage of CRTC. The crtc null mutation delays the overall phase of circadian gene expression yet it remarkably dampens light-independent oscillations of TIMELESS (TIM) proteins in the clock neurons. In fact, CRTC overexpression enhances CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC)-activated transcription from tim but not per promoter in clock-less S2 cells whereas CRTC depletion suppresses it. Consistently, TIM overexpression partially but significantly rescues the behavioral rhythms in crtc mutants. Taken together, our data suggest that CRTC is a novel co-activator for the CLK/CYC-activated tim transcription to coordinate molecular rhythms with circadian behaviors over a 24-hour time-scale. We thus propose that CRTC-dependent clock mechanisms have co-evolved with selective clock genes among different species.

  16. CRTC Potentiates Light-independent timeless Transcription to Sustain Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Hoyeon; Hur, Jin-Hoe; Choe, Joonho; Lim, Chunghun

    2016-01-01

    Light is one of the strongest environmental time cues for entraining endogenous circadian rhythms. Emerging evidence indicates that CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 1 (CRTC1) is a key player in this pathway, stimulating light-induced Period1 (Per1) transcription in mammalian clocks. Here, we demonstrate a light-independent role of Drosophila CRTC in sustaining circadian behaviors. Genomic deletion of the crtc locus causes long but poor locomotor rhythms in constant darkness. Overexpression or RNA interference-mediated depletion of CRTC in circadian pacemaker neurons similarly impairs the free-running behavioral rhythms, implying that Drosophila clocks are sensitive to the dosage of CRTC. The crtc null mutation delays the overall phase of circadian gene expression yet it remarkably dampens light-independent oscillations of TIMELESS (TIM) proteins in the clock neurons. In fact, CRTC overexpression enhances CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC)-activated transcription from tim but not per promoter in clock-less S2 cells whereas CRTC depletion suppresses it. Consistently, TIM overexpression partially but significantly rescues the behavioral rhythms in crtc mutants. Taken together, our data suggest that CRTC is a novel co-activator for the CLK/CYC-activated tim transcription to coordinate molecular rhythms with circadian behaviors over a 24-hour time-scale. We thus propose that CRTC-dependent clock mechanisms have co-evolved with selective clock genes among different species. PMID:27577611

  17. Clk post-transcriptional control denoises circadian transcription in time and space

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, Victoria; Menet, Jerome S; Weissbein, Uri; Afik, Shaked; Haimovich, Daniel; Gafni, Chen; Friedman, Nir; Rosbash, Michael; Kadener, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor CLOCK (CLK) is essential for the development and maintenance of circadian rhythms in Drosophila. However, little is known about how CLK levels are controlled. Here, we show that Clk mRNA is strongly regulated post-transcriptionally through its 3’UTR. Flies expressing Clk transgenes missing their normal 3’UTR, exhibited variable CLK-driven transcription and circadian behavior, as well as ectopic expression of CLK-target genes in the brain. Surprisingly, in these flies, the numbers of the key circadian neurons differs stochastically between individuals and within the two hemispheres of the same brain. In addition, flies carrying Clk transgenes with deletions in the binding sites for the miRNA bantam have stochastic number of pacemaker neurons, suggesting that this miRNA mediates the deterministic expression of CLK. Overall our results demonstrate a key role of Clk post-transcriptional control in stabilizing circadian transcription, which is essential for proper development and maintenance of circadian rhythms in Drosophila. PMID:25952406

  18. Activation of MT(2) melatonin receptors in rat suprachiasmatic nucleus phase advances the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Hunt, A E; Al-Ghoul, W M; Gillette, M U; Dubocovich, M L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the melatonin receptor type(s) (MT(1) or MT(2)) mediating circadian clock resetting by melatonin in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Quantitative receptor autoradiography with 2-[(125)I]iodomelatonin and in situ hybridization histochemistry, with either (33)P- or digoxigenin-labeled antisense MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptor mRNA oligonucleotide probes, revealed specific expression of both melatonin receptor types in the SCN of inbred Long-Evans rats. The melatonin receptor type mediating phase advances of the circadian rhythm of neuronal firing rate in the SCN slice was assessed using competitive melatonin receptor antagonists, the MT(1)/MT(2) nonselective luzindole and the MT(2)-selective 4-phenyl-2-propionamidotetraline (4P-PDOT). Luzindole and 4P-PDOT (1 nM-1 microM) did not affect circadian phase on their own; however, they blocked both the phase advances (approximately 4 h) in the neuronal firing rate induced by melatonin (3 pM) at temporally distinct times of day [i.e., subjective dusk, circadian time (CT) 10; and dawn, CT 23], as well as the associated increases in protein kinase C activity. We conclude that melatonin mediates phase advances of the SCN circadian clock at both dusk and dawn via activation of MT(2) melatonin receptor signaling.

  19. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenyu; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Marcheva, Biliana; Bass, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    The discovery of the genetic basis for circadian rhythms has expanded our knowledge of the temporal organization of behavior and physiology. The observations that the circadian gene network is present in most living organisms from eubacteria to humans, that most cells and tissues express autonomous clocks, and that disruption of clock genes results in metabolic dysregulation have revealed interactions between metabolism and circadian rhythms at neural, molecular, and cellular levels. A major challenge remains in understanding the interplay between brain and peripheral clocks and in determining how these interactions promote energy homeostasis across the sleep-wake cycle. In this Review, we evaluate how investigation of molecular timing may create new opportunities to understand and develop therapies for obesity and diabetes.

  20. Circadian Clock, Cancer, and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock is a global regulatory system that interfaces with most other regulatory systems and pathways in mammalian organisms. Investigations of the circadian clock–DNA damage response connections have revealed that nucleotide excision repair, DNA damage checkpoints, and apoptosis are appreciably influenced by the clock. Although several epidemiological studies in humans and a limited number of genetic studies in mouse model systems have indicated that clock disruption may predispose mammals to cancer, well-controlled genetic studies in mice have not supported the commonly held view that circadian clock disruption is a cancer risk factor. In fact, in the appropriate genetic background, clock disruption may instead aid in cancer regression by promoting intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the clock may affect the efficacy of cancer treatment (chronochemotherapy) by modulating the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of chemotherapeutic drugs as well as the activity of the DNA repair enzymes that repair the DNA damage caused by anticancer drugs. PMID:25302769

  1. [Circadian rhythm in myocardial infarct].

    PubMed

    Enciso, R; Ramos, M A; Badui, E; Hurtado, R

    1988-01-01

    In order to determine if the beginning of the Myocardial Infarction (MI) is at random along the day or if it follows a circadian rhythm, we analyzed the clinical charts of 819 patients admitted to the Coronary Care Unite. Among them, 645 were male and 174 female. It was established that the beginning of the MI follows a circadian rhythm with maximal frequency between 8 and 9 a.m. and minimal at 0 hours (p greater than 0.01). This rhythm is sex independent. In patients younger than 45 years as well as those who received beta-block agents in less than 24 hours previous the MI no circadian rhythm was observed.

  2. Manipulations of Amyloid Precursor Protein Cleavage Disrupt the Circadian Clock in Aging Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Matthew R.; Holbrook, Scott D.; Kotwica-Rolinska, Joanna; Chow, Eileen; Kretzschmar, Doris; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by severe cognitive deterioration. While causes of AD pathology are debated, a large body of evidence suggests that increased cleavage of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) producing the neurotoxic Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide plays a fundamental role in AD pathogenesis. One of the detrimental behavioral symptoms commonly associated with AD is the fragmentation of sleep-activity cycles with increased nighttime activity and daytime naps in humans. Sleep-activity cycles, as well as physiological and cellular rhythms, which may be important for neuronal homeostasis, are generated by a molecular system known as the circadian clock. Links between AD and the circadian system are increasingly evident but not well understood. Here we examined whether genetic manipulations of APP-like (APPL) protein cleavage in Drosophila melanogaster affect rest-activity rhythms and core circadian clock function in this model organism. We show that the increased β-cleavage of endogenous APPL by the β-secretase (dBACE) severely disrupts circadian behavior and leads to reduced expression of clock protein PER in central clock neurons of aging flies. Our data suggest that behavioral rhythm disruption is not a product of APPL-derived Aβ production but rather may be caused by a mechanism common to both α and β-cleavage pathways. Specifically, we show that increased production of the endogenous Drosophila Amyloid Intracellular Domain (dAICD) caused disruption of circadian rest-activity rhythms, while flies overexpressing endogenous APPL maintained stronger circadian rhythms during aging. In summary, our study offers a novel entry point toward understanding the mechanism of circadian rhythm disruption in Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:25766673

  3. Calretinin Neurons in the Rat Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert Y

    2016-08-01

    The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a circadian pacemaker, is present in all mammalian brains. It has a complex organization of peptide-containing neurons that is similar among species, but calcium-binding proteins are expressed variably. Neurons containing calretinin have been described in the SCN in a number of species but not with association to circadian function. The objective of the present study is to characterize a calretinin neuron (CAR) group in the rat anterior hypothalamus anatomically and functionally with a detailed description of its location and a quantitative analysis of neuronal calretinin immunoreactivity at 3 times of day, 0600, 1400, and 1900 h, from animals in either light-dark or constant dark conditions. CAR neurons occupy a region in the dorsal and lateral SCN with a circadian rhythm in CAR immunoreactivity with a peak at 0600 h and a rhythm in cytoplasmic CAR distribution with a peak at 1400 h. CAR neurons should be viewed as an anatomical and functional component of the rat SCN that expands the definition from observations with cell stains. CAR neurons are likely to modulate temporal regulation of calcium in synaptic transmission.

  4. Genetic Disruption of Circadian Rhythms in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Causes Helplessness, Behavioral Despair, and Anxiety-like Behavior in Mice.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Dominic; Long, Jaimie E; Proulx, Christophe D; Barandas, Rita; Malinow, Roberto; Welsh, David K

    2016-12-01

    Major depressive disorder is associated with disturbed circadian rhythms. To investigate the causal relationship between mood disorders and circadian clock disruption, previous studies in animal models have employed light/dark manipulations, global mutations of clock genes, or brain area lesions. However, light can impact mood by noncircadian mechanisms; clock genes have pleiotropic, clock-independent functions; and brain lesions not only disrupt cellular circadian rhythms but also destroy cells and eliminate important neuronal connections, including light reception pathways. Thus, a definitive causal role for functioning circadian clocks in mood regulation has not been established. We stereotactically injected viral vectors encoding short hairpin RNA to knock down expression of the essential clock gene Bmal1 into the brain's master circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In these SCN-specific Bmal1-knockdown (SCN-Bmal1-KD) mice, circadian rhythms were greatly attenuated in the SCN, while the mice were maintained in a standard light/dark cycle, SCN neurons remained intact, and neuronal connections were undisturbed, including photic inputs. In the learned helplessness paradigm, the SCN-Bmal1-KD mice were slower to escape, even before exposure to inescapable stress. They also spent more time immobile in the tail suspension test and less time in the lighted section of a light/dark box. The SCN-Bmal1-KD mice also showed greater weight gain, an abnormal circadian pattern of corticosterone, and an attenuated increase of corticosterone in response to stress. Disrupting SCN circadian rhythms is sufficient to cause helplessness, behavioral despair, and anxiety-like behavior in mice, establishing SCN-Bmal1-KD mice as a new animal model of depression. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  5. [Circadian changes of the density of melatonin receptors 1A in the neurons of the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the rat hypothalamus under conditions of diverse functional activiity of the pineal gland].

    PubMed

    Pishak, V P; Bulyk, R Ie

    2008-01-01

    An immunohistochemical study of the density of melatonin receptors 1A in the neurons of the rat suprachiasmatic nuclei with diverse functional activity of the pineal gland has been carried out. The density of melatonin receptors 1A under conditions of the physiological function of the pineal gland was characterized by clear-cut diurnal variations. Simultaneously, a dysfunction of the gland results in their marked disturbance. In case of a hypofunction of the pineal body the density of the structures was reliably lower than in case of hyperfunction. It has been demonstrated that in case of a suppressed activity of the pineal body the maximum number of melatonin receptors 1A in the neurons of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei shifts from 02.00 a.m. to 02.00 p.m. and constitutes 0.35+/-0.012 conventional units (c.u.) of density, whereas a larger index is noticed at 20 hours making up 0.43+/-0.015 c.u. of density when the gland is activated.

  6. Sleep, Wakefulness and Circadian Rhythm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    sleep, wakefulness and circadian rhythms and the psychological correlates including performance relevant to personnel in.olved in skilld activity. The...HEALTHY ADULTS par A.Reinbeig I CIRCADIAN RHYTHMS OF HUMAN PERFORMANCE AND RESISTANCE: OPERATIONAL ASPECTS by K.E.Klein and H-M.Wegmann 2 SLEEP STAGE...ISOLATION FROM TIME CUES by E.D.Weitzman. C.A.Czeiser and M.C.Moore Ede 7 SLEEP DISTURBANCE AND PERFORMANCE by L.C.Iohnson 8 TOLERANCE DU TRAVAIL POSTE

  7. The Circadian Clock Is a Key Driver of Steroid Hormone Production in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Di Cara, Francesca; King-Jones, Kirst

    2016-09-26

    Biological clocks allow organisms to anticipate daily environmental changes such as temperature fluctuations, abundance of daylight, and nutrient availability. Many circadian-controlled physiological states are coordinated by the release of systemically acting hormones, including steroids and insulin [1-7]. Thus, hormones relay circadian outputs to target tissues, and disrupting these endocrine rhythms impairs human health by affecting sleep patterns, energy homeostasis, and immune functions [8-10]. It is largely unclear, however, whether circadian circuits control hormone levels indirectly via central timekeeping neurons or whether peripheral endocrine clocks can modulate hormone synthesis directly. We show here that perturbing the circadian clock, specifically in the major steroid hormone-producing gland of Drosophila, the prothoracic gland (PG), unexpectedly blocks larval development due to an inability to produce sufficient steroids. This is surprising, because classic circadian null mutants are viable and result in arrhythmic adults [4, 11-14]. We found that Timeless and Period, both core components of the insect clock [15], are required for transcriptional upregulation of steroid hormone-producing enzymes. Timeless couples the circadian machinery directly to the two canonical pathways that regulate steroid synthesis in insects, insulin and PTTH signaling [16], respectively. Activating insulin signaling directly modulates Timeless function, suggesting that the local clock in the PG is normally synced with systemic insulin cues. Because both PTTH and systemic insulin signaling are themselves under circadian control, we conclude that de-synchronization of a local endocrine clock with external circadian cues is the primary cause for steroid production to fail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tissue-specific circadian clocks in plants.

    PubMed

    Endo, Motomu

    2016-02-01

    Circadian clocks affect a large proportion of differentially expressed genes in many organisms. Tissue-specific hierarchies in circadian networks in mammals have been contentiously debated, whereas little attention has been devoted to the concept in plants, owing to technical difficulties. Recently, several studies have demonstrated tissue-specific circadian clocks and their coupling in plants, suggesting that plants possess a hierarchical network of circadian clocks. The following review summarizes recent studies describing the tissue-specific functions and properties of these circadian clocks and discusses the network structure and potential messengers that might share temporal information on such a network.

  9. Neurotransmitter-mediated collective rhythms in grouped Drosophila circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Junwei Wang; Jiajun Zhang; Zhanjiang Yuan; Aimin Chen; Tianshou Zhou

    2008-12-01

    Over the past decades, fly Drosophila melanogaster has being used as a premier model organism to study molecular and genetic bases of circadian rhythms. Here the authors propose a multicellular heterogeneous model for which the network of Drosophila circadian oscillators consists of two groups, the self-sustained lateral neurons (LNs) communicating to each other and the damped dorsal neurons (DNs) receiving neurotransmitters only from the LNs without interaction within this group. By simulating different experimental conditions, the authors find that the proposed model, except for being capable of reproducing some known experimental results well, also can predict some interesting phenomena: 1) The DNs need neuronal projections from the LNs to be rhythmic and to synchronize; 2) the effect of communication on mean amplitude and mean period of two oscillatory groups is different; 3) communication delay can facilitate the network synchronization of the LNs; and 4) only the LNs lose rhythmicity under constant light conditions. These results reveal the mechanism of an integrated pacemaker that would govern behavioral and physiological rhythmicity of the model organism.

  10. A Novel Quantitative Trait Locus on Mouse Chromosome 18, “era1,” Modifies the Entrainment of Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Wisor, Jonathan P.; Striz, Martin; DeVoss, Jason; Murphy, Greer M.; Edgar, Dale M.; O'Hara, Bruce F.

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus conveys 24-h rhythmicity to sleep-wake cycles, locomotor activity, and other behavioral and physiological processes. The timing of rhythms relative to the light/dark (LD12:12) cycle is influenced in part by the endogenous circadian period and the time of day specific sensitivity of the clock to light. We now describe a novel circadian rhythm phenotype, and a locus influencing that phenotype, in a segregating population of mice. Methods: By crossbreeding 2 genetically distinct nocturnal strains of mice (Cast/Ei and C57BL/6J) and backcrossing the resulting progeny to Cast/Ei, we have produced a novel circadian phenotype, called early runner mice. Results: Early runner mice entrain to a light/dark cycle at an advanced phase, up to 9 hours before dark onset. This phenotype is not significantly correlated with circadian period in constant darkness and is not associated with disruption of molecular circadian rhythms in the SCN, as assessed by analysis of period gene expression. We have identified a genomic region that regulates this phenotype—a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 18 (near D18Mit184) that we have named era1 for Early Runner Activity locus one. Phase delays caused by light exposure early in the subjective night were of smaller magnitude in backcross offspring that were homozygous Cast/Ei at D18Mit184 than in those that were heterozygous at this locus. Conclusion: Genetic variability in the circadian response to light may, in part, explain the variance in phase angle of entrainment in this segregating mouse population. Citation: Wisor JP; Striz M; DeVoss J; Murphy GM; Edgar DM; O'Hara BF. A novel quantitative trait locus on mouse chromosome 18, “era1,” modifies the entrainment of circadian rhythms. SLEEP 2007;30(10):1255-1263. PMID:17969459

  11. Pneumatic conveying of materials at partial gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.; Koenig, Elissa; Knudsen, Christian W.; Gibson, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of pneumatic transfer for the movement of regolith at a lunar base is evaluated. Operation of pneumatic conveying systems at partial (lunar and Mars) gravity on NASA's KC-135 aircraft allowed the determination of some key parameters necessary for the design of an operable system. Both horizontal and vertical transfer is studied. In the vertical experiment, the choking velocity for 150-micron glass spheres was determined to be 1/2 to 1/3 the velocity required at 1 g. Pressure drops were reduced by roughly the same amount. Determination of the saltation velocity in the horizontal run was problematic, but qualitatively similar results were obtained. Comparison of the partial g results to 1-g behavior and theoretical analysis is made.

  12. Pneumatic conveying of materials at partial gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.; Koenig, Elissa; Knudsen, Christian W.; Gibson, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of pneumatic transfer for the movement of regolith at a lunar base is evaluated. Operation of pneumatic conveying systems at partial (lunar and Mars) gravity on NASA's KC-135 aircraft allowed the determination of some key parameters necessary for the design of an operable system. Both horizontal and vertical transfer is studied. In the vertical experiment, the choking velocity for 150-micron glass spheres was determined to be 1/2 to 1/3 the velocity required at 1 g. Pressure drops were reduced by roughly the same amount. Determination of the saltation velocity in the horizontal run was problematic, but qualitatively similar results were obtained. Comparison of the partial g results to 1-g behavior and theoretical analysis is made.

  13. Circadian Rhythm and the Gut Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Voigt, R M; Forsyth, C B; Green, S J; Engen, P A; Keshavarzian, A

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-h patterns regulating behavior, organs, and cells in living organisms. These rhythms align biological functions with regular and predictable environmental patterns to optimize function and health. Disruption of these rhythms can be detrimental resulting in metabolic syndrome, cancer, or cardiovascular disease, just to name a few. It is now becoming clear that the intestinal microbiome is also regulated by circadian rhythms via intrinsic circadian clocks as well as via the host organism. Microbiota rhythms are regulated by diet and time of feeding which can alter both microbial community structure and metabolic activity which can significantly impact host immune and metabolic function. In this review, we will cover how host circadian rhythms are generated and maintained, how host circadian rhythms can be disrupted, as well as the consequences of circadian rhythm disruption. We will further highlight the newly emerging literature indicating the importance of circadian rhythms of the intestinal microbiota. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolism and the Circadian Clock Converge

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms occur in almost all species and control vital aspects of our physiology, from sleeping and waking to neurotransmitter secretion and cellular metabolism. Epidemiological studies from recent decades have supported a unique role for circadian rhythm in metabolism. As evidenced by individuals working night or rotating shifts, but also by rodent models of circadian arrhythmia, disruption of the circadian cycle is strongly associated with metabolic imbalance. Some genetically engineered mouse models of circadian rhythmicity are obese and show hallmark signs of the metabolic syndrome. Whether these phenotypes are due to the loss of distinct circadian clock genes within a specific tissue versus the disruption of rhythmic physiological activities (such as eating and sleeping) remains a cynosure within the fields of chronobiology and metabolism. Becoming more apparent is that from metabolites to transcription factors, the circadian clock interfaces with metabolism in numerous ways that are essential for maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:23303907

  15. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-09

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression.

  16. Circadian rhythm dissociation in an environment with conflicting temporal information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Fuller, C. A.; Hiles, L. G.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    The relative contributions of light-dark (LD) cycles and eating-fasting (EF) cycles in providing temporal information to the circadian time-keeping system were examined in chair-acclimatized squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). The circadian rhythms of drinking, colonic temperature, urine volume, and urinary potassium excretion were measured with the LD and EF cycles providing either conflicting phases or periods. In conflicting phase experiments, animals were exposed to 24-hr LD cycles consisting of 12 hr of 600 lx followed by 12 hr of less than 1 lx and concurrent 24-hr EF cycles in which the animals ate for 3 hr and then fasted for 21 hr. One group had food available at the beginning and a second group at the end of the light period. In conflicting period experiments, monkeys were exposed to 23-hr LD cycles and 24-hr EF cycles. Analysis of the rhythms showed that both phase and period information were conveyed to the drinking and urinary rhythms by the EF cycle, and to the temperature rhythm by the LD cycle.

  17. Circadian rhythm dissociation in an environment with conflicting temporal information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Fuller, C. A.; Hiles, L. G.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1978-01-01

    The relative contributions of light-dark (LD) cycles and eating-fasting (EF) cycles in providing temporal information to the circadian time-keeping system were examined in chair-acclimatized squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). The circadian rhythms of drinking, colonic temperature, urine volume, and urinary potassium excretion were measured with the LD and EF cycles providing either conflicting phases or periods. In conflicting phase experiments, animals were exposed to 24-hr LD cycles consisting of 12 hr of 600 lx followed by 12 hr of less than 1 lx and concurrent 24-hr EF cycles in which the animals ate for 3 hr and then fasted for 21 hr. One group had food available at the beginning and a second group at the end of the light period. In conflicting period experiments, monkeys were exposed to 23-hr LD cycles and 24-hr EF cycles. Analysis of the rhythms showed that both phase and period information were conveyed to the drinking and urinary rhythms by the EF cycle, and to the temperature rhythm by the LD cycle.

  18. The neurochemical basis of photic entrainment of the circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rea, Michael A.; Buckley, Becky; Lutton, Lewis M.

    1992-01-01

    Circadian rhythmicity in mammals is controlled by the action of a light-entrainable hypothalamus, in association with two cell clusters known as the supra chiasmatic nuclei (SCN). In the absence of temporal environmental clues, this pacemaker continues to measure time by an endogenous mechanism (clock), driving biochemical, physiological, and behavioral rhythms that reflect the natural period of the pacemaker oscillation. This endogenous period usually differs slightly from 24 hours (i.e., circadian). When mammals are maintained under a 24 hour light-dark (LD) cycle, the pacemaker becomes entrained such that the period of the pacemaker oscillation matches that of the LD cycle. Potentially entraining photic information is conveyed to the SCN via a direct retinal projection, the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). RHT neurotransmission is thought to be mediated by the release of excitatory amino acids (EAA) in the SCN. In support of this hypothesis, recent experiments using nocturnal rodents have shown that EAA antagonists block the effects of light on pacemaker-driven behavioral rhythms, and attenuate light induced gene expression in SCN cells. An understanding of the neurochemical basis of the photic entrainment process would facilitate the development of pharmacological strategies for maintaining synchrony among shift workers in environments, such as the Space Station, which provide unreliable or conflicting temporal photic clues.

  19. Time to flower: interplay between photoperiod and the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Mikael; Staiger, Dorothee

    2015-02-01

    Plants precisely time the onset of flowering to ensure reproductive success. A major factor in seasonal control of flowering time is the photoperiod. The length of the daily light period is measured by the circadian clock in leaves, and a signal is conveyed to the shoot apex to initiate floral transition accordingly. In the last two decades, the molecular players in the photoperiodic pathway have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. Moreover, the intricate connections between the circadian clockwork and components of the photoperiodic pathway have been unravelled. In particular, the molecular basis of time-of-day-dependent sensitivity to floral stimuli, as predicted by Bünning and Pittendrigh, has been elucidated. This review covers recent insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying clock regulation of photoperiodic responses and the integration of the photoperiodic pathway into the flowering time network in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, examples of conservation and divergence in photoperiodic flower induction in other plant species are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Circadian variations in expression of the trkB receptor in adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Dolci, Claudia; Montaruli, Angela; Roveda, Eliana; Barajon, Isabella; Vizzotto, Laura; Grassi Zucconi, Gigliola; Carandente, Franca

    2003-12-19

    The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the central nervous system (CNS) and the expression of its high-affinity trkB receptor on neuron surfaces are known to depend on neuron activity. The expression of BDNF (mRNA and protein) and trkB mRNA shows circadian oscillations in rat hippocampal homogenates. We investigated circadian variations in trkB expression in specific areas of the adult rat hippocampal formation by immunohistochemistry. In sets of two experiments performed in the spring, 39 2-month-old male Wistar rats were accustomed to a 12-h light-12-h dark cycle for 2 weeks. Three animals were then sacrificed every 4 h. Forty-micrometer-thick coronal sections of hippocampal formation were obtained and processed for trkB immunohistochemistry. Cell staining intensity was assessed by image analysis of different hippocampal areas on five sections per animal. Circadian rhythmicity was evaluated by the cosinor method. Statistically significant circadian variations in trkB expression were found in dentate gyrus, entorhinal cortex, and the CA3 and hilar regions of the hippocampus, with highest expression during the first half of the dark (activity) period. These findings suggest a relationship between trkB expression and the physiological neuronal activation of wakefulness. TrkB receptor expression in the hippocampal regions studied was continuous and changes were gradual over the 24-h cycle, suggesting that more complex regulatory mechanisms also intervened.

  1. TrkB-mediated protection against circadian sensitivity to noise trauma in the murine cochlea.

    PubMed

    Meltser, Inna; Cederroth, Christopher R; Basinou, Vasiliki; Savelyev, Sergey; Lundkvist, Gabriella S; Canlon, Barbara

    2014-03-17

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a debilitating sensory impairment affecting 10%-15% of the population, caused primarily through damage to the sensory hair cells or to the auditory neurons. Once lost, these never regenerate [1], and no effective drugs are available [2, 3]. Emerging evidence points toward an important contribution of synaptic ribbons in the long-term coupling of the inner hair cell and afferent neuron synapse to maintain hearing [4]. Here we show in nocturnal mice that night noise overexposure triggers permanent hearing loss, whereas mice overexposed during the day recover to normal auditory thresholds. In view of this time-dependent sensitivity, we identified a self-sustained circadian rhythm in the isolated cochlea, as evidenced by circadian expression of clock genes and ample PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE oscillations, originating mainly from the primary auditory neurons and hair cells. The transcripts of the otoprotecting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) showed higher levels in response to day noise versus night noise, suggesting that BDNF-mediated signaling regulates noise sensitivity throughout the day. Administration of a selective BDNF receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase type B (TrkB), in the night protected the inner hair cell's synaptic ribbons and subsequent full recovery of hearing thresholds after night noise overexposure. The TrkB agonist shifted the phase and boosted the amplitude of circadian rhythms in the isolated cochlea. These findings highlight the coupling of circadian rhythmicity and the TrkB receptor for the successful prevention and treatment of NIHL.

  2. Monitoring cell-autonomous circadian clock rhythms of gene expression using luciferase bioluminescence reporters.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Khan, Sanjoy K; Kathale, Nimish D; Xu, Haiyan; Liu, Andrew C

    2012-09-27

    In mammals, many aspects of behavior and physiology such as sleep-wake cycles and liver metabolism are regulated by endogenous circadian clocks (reviewed). The circadian time-keeping system is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizing and coordinating extra-SCN and peripheral clocks elsewhere. Individual cells are the functional units for generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms, and these oscillators of different tissue types in the organism share a remarkably similar biochemical negative feedback mechanism. However, due to interactions at the neuronal network level in the SCN and through rhythmic, systemic cues at the organismal level, circadian rhythms at the organismal level are not necessarily cell-autonomous. Compared to traditional studies of locomotor activity in vivo and SCN explants ex vivo, cell-based in vitro assays allow for discovery of cell-autonomous circadian defects. Strategically, cell-based models are more experimentally tractable for phenotypic characterization and rapid discovery of basic clock mechanisms. Because circadian rhythms are dynamic, longitudinal measurements with high temporal resolution are needed to assess clock function. In recent years, real-time bioluminescence recording using firefly luciferase as a reporter has become a common technique for studying circadian rhythms in mammals, as it allows for examination of the persistence and dynamics of molecular rhythms. To monitor cell-autonomous circadian rhythms of gene expression, luciferase reporters can be introduced into cells via transient transfection or stable transduction. Here we describe a stable transduction protocol using lentivirus-mediated gene delivery. The lentiviral vector system is superior to traditional methods such as transient transfection and germline transmission because of its efficiency and versatility: it permits efficient delivery and stable integration into the host

  3. Synchronous circadian voltage rhythms with asynchronous calcium rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Enoki, Ryosuke; Oda, Yoshiaki; Mieda, Michihiro; Ono, Daisuke; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock, contains a network composed of multiple types of neurons which are thought to form a hierarchical and multioscillator system. The molecular clock machinery in SCN neurons drives membrane excitability and sends time cue signals to various brain regions and peripheral organs. However, how and at what time of the day these neurons transmit output signals remain largely unknown. Here, we successfully visualized circadian voltage rhythms optically for many days using a genetically encoded voltage sensor, ArcLightD. Unexpectedly, the voltage rhythms are synchronized across the entire SCN network of cultured slices, whereas simultaneously recorded Ca2+ rhythms are topologically specific to the dorsal and ventral regions. We further found that the temporal order of these two rhythms is cell-type specific: The Ca2+ rhythms phase-lead the voltage rhythms in AVP neurons but Ca2+ and voltage rhythms are nearly in phase in VIP neurons. We confirmed that circadian firing rhythms are also synchronous and are coupled with the voltage rhythms. These results indicate that SCN networks with asynchronous Ca2+ rhythms produce coherent voltage rhythms. PMID:28270612

  4. Synchronous circadian voltage rhythms with asynchronous calcium rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Ryosuke; Oda, Yoshiaki; Mieda, Michihiro; Ono, Daisuke; Honma, Sato; Honma, Ken-Ichi

    2017-03-21

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock, contains a network composed of multiple types of neurons which are thought to form a hierarchical and multioscillator system. The molecular clock machinery in SCN neurons drives membrane excitability and sends time cue signals to various brain regions and peripheral organs. However, how and at what time of the day these neurons transmit output signals remain largely unknown. Here, we successfully visualized circadian voltage rhythms optically for many days using a genetically encoded voltage sensor, ArcLightD. Unexpectedly, the voltage rhythms are synchronized across the entire SCN network of cultured slices, whereas simultaneously recorded Ca(2+) rhythms are topologically specific to the dorsal and ventral regions. We further found that the temporal order of these two rhythms is cell-type specific: The Ca(2+) rhythms phase-lead the voltage rhythms in AVP neurons but Ca(2+) and voltage rhythms are nearly in phase in VIP neurons. We confirmed that circadian firing rhythms are also synchronous and are coupled with the voltage rhythms. These results indicate that SCN networks with asynchronous Ca(2+) rhythms produce coherent voltage rhythms.

  5. Melatonin, Light and Circadian Cycles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-25

    bifida occulta, and sarcoidosis, all show loss of the melatonin circadian rhythm, with psoriasis vulgaris, spina bifida occulta, and sarcoidosis...autonomic neuro- pathy show decreased nocturnal melatonin (Checkley and Palazidou, 1988). Klinefelter’s syndrome, Turners syndrome, psoriasis vulgaris, spina

  6. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide entrains circadian rhythms in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Marpegan, Luciano; Krall, Thomas J.; Herzog, Erik D.

    2009-01-01

    Many mammalian cell types show daily rhythms in gene expression driven by a circadian pacemaker. For example, cultured astrocytes display circadian rhythms in Period1 and Period2 expression. It is not known, however, how or which intercellular factors synchronize and sustain rhythmicity in astrocytes. Because astrocytes are highly sensitive to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a neuropeptide released by neurons and important for the coordination of daily cycling, we hypothesized that VIP entrains circadian rhythms in astrocytes. We used astrocyte cultures derived from knock-in mice containing a bioluminescent reporter of PERIOD2 (PER2) protein, to assess the effects of VIP on the rhythmic properties of astrocytes. VIP induced a dose-dependent increase in the peak-to-trough amplitude of the ensemble rhythms of PER2 expression with maximal effects near 100nM VIP and threshold values between 0.1 and 1 nM. VIP also induced dose- and phase-dependent shifts in PER2 rhythms and daily VIP administration entrained bioluminescence rhythms of astrocytes to a predicted phase angle. This is the first demonstration that a neuropeptide can entrain glial cells to a phase predicted by a phase response curve. We conclude that VIP potently entrains astrocytes in vitro and is a candidate for coordinating daily rhythms among glia in the brain. PMID:19346450

  7. Class IIa Histone Deacetylases Are Conserved Regulators of Circadian Function*

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Paul C. M.; O'Neill, John S.; Dobrzycki, Tomasz; Calvert, Shaun; Lord, Emma C.; McIntosh, Rebecca L. L.; Elliott, Christopher J. H.; Sweeney, Sean T.; Hastings, Michael H.; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2014-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs) regulate the activity of many transcription factors to influence liver gluconeogenesis and the development of specialized cells, including muscle, neurons, and lymphocytes. Here, we describe a conserved role for class IIa HDACs in sustaining robust circadian behavioral rhythms in Drosophila and cellular rhythms in mammalian cells. In mouse fibroblasts, overexpression of HDAC5 severely disrupts transcriptional rhythms of core clock genes. HDAC5 overexpression decreases BMAL1 acetylation on Lys-537 and pharmacological inhibition of class IIa HDACs increases BMAL1 acetylation. Furthermore, we observe cyclical nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC5 in mouse fibroblasts that is characteristically circadian. Mutation of the Drosophila homolog HDAC4 impairs locomotor activity rhythms of flies and decreases period mRNA levels. RNAi-mediated knockdown of HDAC4 in Drosophila clock cells also dampens circadian function. Given that the localization of class IIa HDACs is signal-regulated and influenced by Ca2+ and cAMP signals, our findings offer a mechanism by which extracellular stimuli that generate these signals can feed into the molecular clock machinery. PMID:25271152

  8. Environmental Circadian Disruption Worsens Neurologic Impairment and Inhibits Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Adult Rats After Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongpeng; Ma, Shanshan; Guo, Dewei; Cheng, Tian; Li, Hongwei; Tian, Yi; Li, Jianbin; Guan, Fangxia; Yang, Bo; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms modulate many physiologic processes and behaviors. Therefore, their disruption causes a variety of potential adverse effects in humans and animals. Circadian disruption induced by constant light exposure has been discovered to produce pathophysiologic consequences after brain injury. However, the underlying mechanisms that lead to more severe impairment and disruption of neurophysiologic processes are not well understood. Here, we evaluated the effect of constant light exposure on the neurobehavioral impairment and survival of neurons in rats after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to a weight-drop model of TBI and then exposed to either a standard 12-/12-h light/dark cycle or a constant 24-h light/light cycle for 14 days. Our results showed that 14 days of constant light exposure after TBI significantly worsened the sensorimotor and cognitive deficits, which were associated with decreased body weight, impaired water and food intake, increased cortical lesion volume, and decreased neuronal survival. Furthermore, environmental circadian disruption inhibited cell proliferation and newborn cell survival and decreased immature cell production in rats subjected to the TBI model. We conclude that circadian disruption induced by constant light exposure worsens histologic and neurobehavioral impairment and inhibits neurogenesis in adult TBI rats. Our novel findings suggest that light exposure should be decreased and circadian rhythm reestablished in hospitalized TBI patients and that drugs and strategies that maintain circadian rhythm would offer a novel therapeutic option. PMID:26886755

  9. Using light to tell the time of day: sensory coding in the mammalian circadian visual network

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Circadian clocks are a near-ubiquitous feature of biology, allowing organisms to optimise their physiology to make the most efficient use of resources and adjust behaviour to maximise survival over the solar day. To fulfil this role, circadian clocks require information about time in the external world. This is most reliably obtained by measuring the pronounced changes in illumination associated with the earth's rotation. In mammals, these changes are exclusively detected in the retina and are relayed by direct and indirect neural pathways to the master circadian clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei. Recent work reveals a surprising level of complexity in this sensory control of the circadian system, including the participation of multiple photoreceptive pathways conveying distinct aspects of visual and/or time-of-day information. In this Review, I summarise these important recent advances, present hypotheses as to the functions and neural origins of these sensory signals, highlight key challenges for future research and discuss the implications of our current knowledge for animals and humans in the modern world. PMID:27307539

  10. A Screening of UNF Targets Identifies Rnb, a Novel Regulator of Drosophila Circadian Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Anatoly; Jaumouillé, Edouard; Machado Almeida, Pedro; Koch, Rafael; Rodriguez, Joseph; Abruzzi, Katharine C; Nagoshi, Emi

    2017-07-12

    Behavioral circadian rhythms are controlled by multioscillator networks comprising functionally different subgroups of clock neurons. Studies have demonstrated that molecular clocks in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster are regulated differently in clock neuron subclasses to support their specific functions (Lee et al., 2016; Top et al., 2016). The nuclear receptor unfulfilled (unf) represents a regulatory node that provides the small ventral lateral neurons (s-LNvs) unique characteristics as the master pacemaker (Beuchle et al., 2012). We previously showed that UNF interacts with the s-LNv molecular clocks by regulating transcription of the core clock gene period (per) (Jaumouillé et al., 2015). To gain more insight into the mechanisms by which UNF contributes to the functioning of the circadian master pacemaker, we identified UNF target genes using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Our data demonstrate that a previously uncharacterized gene CG7837, which we termed R and B (Rnb), acts downstream of UNF to regulate the function of the s-LNvs as the master circadian pacemaker. Mutations and LNv-targeted adult-restricted knockdown of Rnb impair locomotor rhythms. RNB localizes to the nucleus, and its loss-of-function blunts the molecular rhythms and output rhythms of the s-LNvs, particularly the circadian rhythms in PDF accumulation and axonal arbor remodeling. These results establish a second pathway by which UNF interacts with the molecular clocks in the s-LNvs and highlight the mechanistic differences in the molecular clockwork within the pacemaker circuit.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Circadian behavior is generated by a pacemaker circuit comprising diverse classes of pacemaker neurons, each of which contains a molecular clock. In addition to the anatomical and functional diversity, recent studies have shown the mechanistic differences in the molecular clockwork among the pacemaker neurons in Drosophila Here, we identified the molecular characteristics distinguishing

  11. The circadian rhythm induced by the heterogeneous network structure of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Changgui; Yang, Huijie

    2016-05-01

    In mammals, the master clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), which is composed of about 20 000 nonidentical neuronal oscillators expressing different intrinsic periods. These neurons are coupled through neurotransmitters to form a network consisting of two subgroups, i.e., a ventrolateral (VL) subgroup and a dorsomedial (DM) subgroup. The VL contains about 25% SCN neurons that receive photic input from the retina, and the DM comprises the remaining 75% SCN neurons which are coupled to the VL. The synapses from the VL to the DM are evidently denser than that from the DM to the VL, in which the VL dominates the DM. Therefore, the SCN is a heterogeneous network where the neurons of the VL are linked with a large number of SCN neurons. In the present study, we mimicked the SCN network based on Goodwin model considering four types of networks including an all-to-all network, a Newman-Watts (NW) small world network, an Erdös-Rényi (ER) random network, and a Barabási-Albert (BA) scale free network. We found that the circadian rhythm was induced in the BA, ER, and NW networks, while the circadian rhythm was absent in the all-to-all network with weak cellular coupling, where the amplitude of the circadian rhythm is largest in the BA network which is most heterogeneous in the network structure. Our finding provides an alternative explanation for the induction or enhancement of circadian rhythm by the heterogeneity of the network structure.

  12. Gpr176 is a Gz-linked orphan G-protein-coupled receptor that sets the pace of circadian behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Masao; Murai, Iori; Kunisue, Sumihiro; Setsu, Genzui; Uchio, Naohiro; Tanaka, Rina; Kobayashi, Sakurako; Shimatani, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Hida; Chao, Hsu-Wen; Nakagawa, Yuuki; Takahashi, Yukari; Hotta, Yunhong; Yasunaga, Jun-ichirou; Matsuoka, Masao; Hastings, Michael H.; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) participate in a broad range of physiological functions. A priority for fundamental and clinical research, therefore, is to decipher the function of over 140 remaining orphan GPCRs. The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the brain's circadian pacemaker, governs daily rhythms in behaviour and physiology. Here we launch the SCN orphan GPCR project to (i) search for murine orphan GPCRs with enriched expression in the SCN, (ii) generate mutant animals deficient in candidate GPCRs, and (iii) analyse the impact on circadian rhythms. We thereby identify Gpr176 as an SCN-enriched orphan GPCR that sets the pace of circadian behaviour. Gpr176 is expressed in a circadian manner by SCN neurons, and molecular characterization reveals that it represses cAMP signalling in an agonist-independent manner. Gpr176 acts independently of, and in parallel to, the Vipr2 GPCR, not through the canonical Gi, but via the unique G-protein subclass Gz. PMID:26882873

  13. Differential effects of light and feeding on circadian organization of peripheral clocks in a forebrain Bmal1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Izumo, Mariko; Pejchal, Martina; Schook, Andrew C; Lange, Ryan P; Walisser, Jacqueline A; Sato, Takashi R; Wang, Xiaozhong; Bradfield, Christopher A; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2014-12-19

    In order to assess the contribution of a central clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) to circadian behavior and the organization of peripheral clocks, we generated forebrain/SCN-specific Bmal1 knockout mice by using floxed Bmal1 and pan-neuronal Cre lines. The forebrain knockout mice showed >90% deletion of BMAL1 in the SCN and exhibited an immediate and complete loss of circadian behavior in constant conditions. Circadian rhythms in peripheral tissues persisted but became desynchronized and damped in constant darkness. The loss of synchrony was rescued by light/dark cycles and partially by restricted feeding (only in the liver and kidney but not in the other tissues) in a distinct manner. These results suggest that the forebrain/SCN is essential for internal temporal order of robust circadian programs in peripheral clocks, and that individual peripheral clocks are affected differently by light and feeding in the absence of a functional oscillator in the forebrain.

  14. Therapeutics for Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Ehren R.; Zee, Phyllis C

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis The sleep-wake cycle is regulated by the interaction of endogenous circadian and homeostatic processes. The circadian system provides timing information for most physiological rhythms, including the sleep and wake cycle. In addition, the central circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus has been shown to promote alertness during the day. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders arise when there is a misalignment between the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythms and the external environment or when there is dysfunction of the circadian clock or its entrainment pathways. The primary synchronizing agents of the circadian system are light and melatonin. Light is the strongest entraining agent of circadian rhythms and timed exposure to bright light is often used in the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders. In addition, timed administration of melatonin, either alone or in combination with light therapy has been shown to be useful in the treatment of the following circadian rhythm sleep disorders: delayed sleep phase, advanced sleep phase, free-running, irregular sleep wake, jet lag and shift work. PMID:21243069

  15. Molecular genetic analysis of circadian timekeeping in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Paul E

    2011-01-01

    A genetic screen for mutants that alter circadian rhythms in Drosophila identified the first clock gene-the period (per) gene. The per gene is a central player within a transcriptional feedback loop that represents the core mechanism for keeping circadian time in Drosophila and other animals. The per feedback loop, or core loop, is interlocked with the Clock (Clk) feedback loop, but whether the Clk feedback loop contributes to circadian timekeeping is not known. A series of distinct molecular events are thought to control transcriptional feedback in the core loop. The time it takes to complete these events should take much less than 24h, thus delays must be imposed at different steps within the core loop. As new clock genes are identified, the molecular mechanisms responsible for these delays have been revealed in ever-increasing detail and provide an in-depth accounting of how transcriptional feedback loops keep circadian time. The phase of these feedback loops shifts to maintain synchrony with environmental cycles, the most reliable of which is light. Although a great deal is known about cell-autonomous mechanisms of light-induced phase shifting by CRYPTOCHROME (CRY), much less is known about non-cell autonomous mechanisms. CRY mediates phase shifts through an uncharacterized mechanism in certain brain oscillator neurons and carries out a dual role as a photoreceptor and transcription factor in other tissues. Here, I review how transcriptional feedback loops function to keep time in Drosophila, how they impose delays to maintain a 24-h cycle, and how they maintain synchrony with environmental light:dark cycles. The transcriptional feedback loops that keep time in Drosophila are well conserved in other animals, thus what we learn about these loops in Drosophila should continue to provide insight into the operation of analogous transcriptional feedback loops in other animals.

  16. The dynamics of GABA signaling: Revelations from the circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Albers, H Elliott; Walton, James C; Gamble, Karen L; McNeill, John K; Hummer, Daniel L

    2017-01-01

    Virtually every neuron within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) communicates via GABAergic signaling. The extracellular levels of GABA within the SCN are determined by a complex interaction of synthesis and transport, as well as synaptic and non-synaptic release. The response to GABA is mediated by GABAA receptors that respond to both phasic and tonic GABA release and that can produce excitatory as well as inhibitory cellular responses. GABA also influences circadian control through the exclusively inhibitory effects of GABAB receptors. Both GABA and neuropeptide signaling occur within the SCN, although the functional consequences of the interactions of these signals are not well understood. This review considers the role of GABA in the circadian pacemaker, in the mechanisms responsible for the generation of circadian rhythms, in the ability of non-photic stimuli to reset the phase of the pacemaker, and in the ability of the day-night cycle to entrain the pacemaker.

  17. Circadian Cycle-Dependent MeCP2 and Brain Chromatin Changes

    PubMed Central

    Samitier-Martí, Mireia; Petazzi, Paolo; Sáez, Mauricio; Szczesna, Karolina; Huertas, Dori; Esteller, Manel; Ausió, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a chromosomal protein of the brain, very abundant especially in neurons, where it plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. Hence it has the potential to be affected by the mammalian circadian cycle. We performed expression analyses of mice brain frontal cortices obtained at different time points and we found that the levels of MeCP2 are altered circadianly, affecting overall organization of brain chromatin and resulting in a circadian-dependent regulation of well-stablished MeCP2 target genes. Furthermore, this data suggests that alterations of MeCP2 can be responsible for the sleeping disorders arising from pathological stages, such as in autism and Rett syndrome. PMID:25875630

  18. Intelligent systems for conveyance and storage infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliano, Thomas M.; Meegoda, Jay N.

    2002-02-01

    The objectives of this research project are to identify, demonstrate, and validate intelligent systems for conveyance and storage infrastructure that will enable effective, affordable, real-time, remote measurement, analysis, and reporting of their structural health. Specifically, the project involves testing and validating smart pipes, which could indicate locations of structurally weak areas, i.e., where leaks are likely to occur, and the location of existing leaks for corrective action. During the initial phase of this project an extensive literature search was conducted to identify technologies that could potentially be used in intelligent systems. Although the search was primarily focused on new emerging smart technologies, consideration was also given to innovative uses of established structural monitoring or testing technologies. Four emerging technologies that can potentially locate structurally weak areas and predict incipient leaks were identified: electrically conducting composite pipes, electrochemistry-based corrosion sensors, instrumented cathodic protection, and distributed piezoelectric sensors. Also identified was an innovative use of acoustic emission techniques to track deterioration in pre-stressed concrete pipes by monitoring energy releases from breaking corroded pre-stressing wires. A review of each of these technologies is presented. During the next phase of the program one or more of these technologies will be tested and evaluated further.

  19. Role of Circadian Rhythms in Potassium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gumz, Michelle L.; Rabinowitz, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for decades that urinary potassium excretion varies with a circadian pattern. In this review, we consider the historical evidence for this phenomenon and present an overview of recent developments in the field. Extensive evidence from the latter part of the last century clearly demonstrates that circadian potassium excretion does not depend on endogenous aldosterone. Of note is the recent discovery that the expression of several renal potassium transporters varies with a circadian pattern that appears to be consistent with substantial clinical data regarding daily fluctuations in urinary potassium levels. We propose the circadian clock mechanism as a key regulator of renal potassium transporters, and consequently renal potassium excretion. Further investigation into the mechanism of regulation of renal potassium transport by the circadian clock is warranted in order to increase our understanding of the clinical relevance of circadian rhythms to potassium homeostasis. PMID:23953800

  20. The Circadian Nature of Mitochondrial Biology.

    PubMed

    Manella, Gal; Asher, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks orchestrate the daily changes in physiology and behavior of light-sensitive organisms. These clocks measure about 24 h and tick in a self-sustained and cell-autonomous manner. Mounting evidence points toward a tight intertwining between circadian clocks and metabolism. Although various aspects of circadian control of metabolic functions have been extensively studied, our knowledge regarding circadian mitochondrial function is rudimentary. In this review, we will survey the current literature related to the circadian nature of mitochondrial biology: from mitochondrial omics studies (e.g., proteome, acetylome, and lipidome), through dissection of mitochondrial morphology, to analyses of mitochondrial processes such as nutrient utilization and respiration. We will describe potential mechanisms that are implicated in circadian regulation of mitochondrial functions in mammals and discuss the possibility of a mitochondrial-autonomous oscillator.

  1. [Circadian rhythms in body temperature and sleep].

    PubMed

    Honma, Ken-ichi

    2013-12-01

    A 24 hour variation of core body temperature in humans is primarily regulated by the endogenous circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. And the expression of circadian rhythm is modified by the thermoregulatory mechanism controlling heat production and heat loss, which also show circadian rhythms. On the other hand, circadian rhythms in sleep-wakefulness are expressed by two independent but mutually coupled oscillators, the circadian pacemaker and the oscillator specific to sleep-wakefulness. However, neither the mechanism nor the site of oscillation of the latter is known. The time cues for these two oscillators are different. They are usually but frequently uncoupled under free-running conditions. Body temperature and sleep-wakefulness influence the counterpart in various extents, exerting masking effects on either circadian rhythm.

  2. Circadian aspects of mammalian parturition: a review.

    PubMed

    Olcese, James

    2012-02-05

    The identification of circadian clocks in endocrine tissues has added considerable depth and complexity to our understanding of their physiology. A growing body of research reveals circadian clock gene expression in the uterus of non-pregnant and pregnant rodents. This review will focus on the mammalian uterus and its rhythmicity, particularly as it pertains to the circadian timing of parturition. This key event in the reproductive axis shows dramatic species-specific differences in its circadian phase. It is proposed here that these differences in the phasing of mammalian parturition are likely a function of opposite uterine cell responses to humoral cues. The argument will be made that melatonin fulfills many of the criteria to serve as a circadian signal in the initiation of human parturition, including specific actions on uterine smooth muscle cells that are consistent with a role for this hormone in the circadian timing of parturition.

  3. CIRCADIAN RHYTHM REPROGRAMMING DURING LUNG INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Jeffrey A.; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S.; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A.; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G. Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A.; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here, we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian program exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared to the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex reorganization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury. PMID:25208554

  4. [Biology and genetics of circadian rhythm].

    PubMed

    Bellivier, F

    2009-01-01

    In recent decades our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of biological clocks has grown expontentially. This has helped to guide the choice of genes studied to explain inter-individual variations seen in circadian rhythms. In recent years analysis of circadian rhythms has advanced considerably into the study of pathological circadian rhythms in human beings. These findings, combined with those obtained from studying mice whose circadian genes have been rendered incapable, have revealed the role of genetic factors in circadian rhythms. This literature review presents an overview of these findings. Beyond our understanding of the functioning of these biological clocks, this knowledge will be extremely useful to analyse genetic factors involved in morbid conditions involving circadian rhythm abnormalities.

  5. Ribonucleoprotein complexes that control circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongni; Liang, Xiaodi; Chen, Xianyun; Guo, Jinhu

    2013-04-25

    Circadian clocks are internal molecular time-keeping mechanisms that enable organisms to adjust their physiology and behavior to the daily surroundings. Misalignment of circadian clocks leads to both physiological and health impairment. Post-transcriptional regulation and translational regulation of circadian clocks have been extensively investigated. In addition, accumulating evidence has shed new light on the involvement of ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) in the post-transcriptional regulation of circadian clocks. Numerous RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and RNPs have been implicated in the post-transcriptional modification of circadian clock proteins in different model organisms. Herein, we summarize the advances in the current knowledge on the role of RNP complexes in circadian clock regulation.

  6. Mechanism of the circadian clock in physiology

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    It has been well established that the circadian clock plays a crucial role in the regulation of almost every physiological process. It also plays a critical role in pathophysiological states including those of obesity and diabetes. Recent evidence has highlighted the potential for targeting the circadian clock as a potential drug target. New studies have also demonstrated the existence of “clock-independent effects” of the circadian proteins, leading to exciting new avenues of research in the circadian clock field in physiology. The goal of this review is to provide an introduction to and overview of the circadian clock in physiology, including mechanisms, targets, and role in disease states. The role of the circadian clocks in the regulation of the cardiovascular system, renal function, metabolism, the endocrine system, immune, and reproductive systems will be discussed. PMID:23576606

  7. Metabolic and Nontranscriptional Circadian Clocks: Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Akhilesh B.; Rey, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks are cellular timekeeping mechanisms that coordinate behavior and physiology around the 24-h day in most living organisms. Misalignment of an organism’s clock with its environment is associated with long-term adverse fitness consequences, as exemplified by the link between circadian disruption and various age-related diseases in humans. Current eukaryotic models of the circadian oscillator rely on transcription/translation feedback loop mechanisms, supplemented with accessory cytosolic loops that connect them to cellular physiology. However, there is mounting evidence questioning the absolute necessity of transcription-based oscillators for circadian rhythmicity, supported by the recent discovery of oxidation-reduction cycles of peroxiredoxin proteins, which persist even in the absence of transcription. A more fundamental mechanism based on metabolic cycles could thus underlie circadian transcriptional and cytosolic rhythms, thereby promoting circadian oscillations to integral properties of cellular metabolism. PMID:24606143

  8. Unraveling the circadian clock in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Ma, Ligeng

    2013-02-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timing system responsible for coordinating an organism's biological processes with its environment. Interlocked transcriptional feedback loops constitute the fundamental architecture of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, three feedback loops, the core loop, morning loop and evening loop, comprise a network that is the basis of the circadian clock. The components of these three loops are regulated in distinct ways, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. The discovery of the DNA-binding and repressive activities of TOC1 has overturned our initial concept of its function in the circadian clock. The alternative splicing of circadian clock-related genes plays an essential role in normal functioning of the clock and enables organisms to sense environmental changes. In this review, we describe the regulatory mechanisms of the circadian clock that have been identified in Arabidopsis.

  9. The Circadian Nature of Mitochondrial Biology

    PubMed Central

    Manella, Gal; Asher, Gad

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks orchestrate the daily changes in physiology and behavior of light-sensitive organisms. These clocks measure about 24 h and tick in a self-sustained and cell-autonomous manner. Mounting evidence points toward a tight intertwining between circadian clocks and metabolism. Although various aspects of circadian control of metabolic functions have been extensively studied, our knowledge regarding circadian mitochondrial function is rudimentary. In this review, we will survey the current literature related to the circadian nature of mitochondrial biology: from mitochondrial omics studies (e.g., proteome, acetylome, and lipidome), through dissection of mitochondrial morphology, to analyses of mitochondrial processes such as nutrient utilization and respiration. We will describe potential mechanisms that are implicated in circadian regulation of mitochondrial functions in mammals and discuss the possibility of a mitochondrial-autonomous oscillator. PMID:28066327

  10. Circadian rhythm reprogramming during lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Haspel, Jeffrey A; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E; Choi, Augustine M K

    2014-09-11

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian programme exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared with the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level, endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex re-organization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury.

  11. Circadian oscillators in the mouse brain: molecular clock components in the neocortex and cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Rath, Martin F; Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-09-01

    The circadian timekeeper of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SCN), and is characterized by rhythmic expression of a set of clock genes with specific 24-h daily profiles. An increasing amount of data suggests that additional circadian oscillators residing outside the SCN have the capacity to generate peripheral circadian rhythms. We have recently shown the presence of SCN-controlled oscillators in the neocortex and cerebellum of the rat. The function of these peripheral brain clocks is unknown, and elucidating this could involve mice with conditional cell-specific clock gene deletions. This prompted us to analyze the molecular clockwork of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum in detail. Here, by use of in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that clock genes are expressed in all six layers of the neocortex and the Purkinje and granular cell layers of the cerebellar cortex of the mouse brain. Among these, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Arntl, and Nr1d1 exhibit circadian rhythms suggesting that local running circadian oscillators reside within neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellar cortex. The temporal expression profiles of clock genes are similar in the neocortex and cerebellum, but they are delayed by 5 h as compared to the SCN, suggestively reflecting a master-slave relationship between the SCN and extra-hypothalamic oscillators. Furthermore, ARNTL protein products are detectable in neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum, as revealed by immunohistochemistry. These findings give reason to further pursue the physiological significance of circadian oscillators in the mouse neocortex and cerebellum.

  12. 21 CFR 1250.51 - Railroad conveyances; discharge of wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... spread of communicable diseases may be discharged from such conveyances, except at stations. For the..., waste water, or other polluting materials that have been suitably treated to prevent the spread of communicable diseases may be discharged from such conveyances, except at stations. The terms “waste water or...

  13. 21 CFR 1250.51 - Railroad conveyances; discharge of wastes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... spread of communicable diseases may be discharged from such conveyances, except at stations. For the..., waste water, or other polluting materials that have been suitably treated to prevent the spread of communicable diseases may be discharged from such conveyances, except at stations. The terms “waste water or...

  14. Pneumatic Conveying of Seed Cotton: Minimum Velocity and Pressure Drop

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electricity is a major cost for cotton gins, representing approximately 20% of variable costs. Fans used for pneumatic conveying consume the majority of electricity at cotton gins. Development of control systems to reduce the air velocity used for conveying seed cotton could significantly decrease e...

  15. Pneumatic Conveying of Seed Cotton: Minimum Velocity and Pressure Drop

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electricity is major cost for cotton gins, representing approximately 20% of the industry’s variable costs. Fans used for pneumatic conveying consume the majority of electricity at cotton gins. Development of control systems to reduce the air velocity used for conveying seed cotton could significant...

  16. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if... produce, potable water. (b) The Commissioner of Food and Drugs may base his approval or disapproval of the... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. 1240.90...

  17. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if... produce, potable water. (b) The Commissioner of Food and Drugs may base his approval or disapproval of...

  18. 30 CFR 56.19130 - Conveyance shaft test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveyance shaft test. 56.19130 Section 56... Inspection and Maintenance § 56.19130 Conveyance shaft test. Before hoisting persons and to assure that the... round trip after: (a) Any hoist or shaft repairs or related equipment repairs that might restrict...

  19. 30 CFR 57.19130 - Conveyance shaft test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveyance shaft test. 57.19130 Section 57... Hoisting Inspection and Maintenance § 57.19130 Conveyance shaft test. Before hoisting persons and to assure... least one round trip after— (a) Any hoist or shaft repairs or related equipment repairs that...

  20. 9 CFR 88.3 - Standards for conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF EQUINES FOR SLAUGHTER § 88.3 Standards for conveyances. (a) The animal cargo space of... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Standards for conveyances. 88.3 Section 88.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT...

  1. 30 CFR 57.6205 - Conveying explosives by hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conveying explosives by hand. 57.6205 Section 57.6205 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6205 Conveying explosives by hand. Closed, nonconductive...

  2. 30 CFR 56.6205 - Conveying explosives by hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conveying explosives by hand. 56.6205 Section 56.6205 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Transportation § 56.6205 Conveying explosives by hand. Closed, nonconductive containers shall be used to...

  3. 30 CFR 56.6205 - Conveying explosives by hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveying explosives by hand. 56.6205 Section 56.6205 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Transportation § 56.6205 Conveying explosives by hand. Closed, nonconductive containers shall be used to...

  4. 30 CFR 57.6205 - Conveying explosives by hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conveying explosives by hand. 57.6205 Section 57.6205 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6205 Conveying explosives by hand. Closed, nonconductive...

  5. 30 CFR 56.6205 - Conveying explosives by hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conveying explosives by hand. 56.6205 Section 56.6205 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Transportation § 56.6205 Conveying explosives by hand. Closed, nonconductive containers shall be used to...

  6. 30 CFR 57.6205 - Conveying explosives by hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conveying explosives by hand. 57.6205 Section 57.6205 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6205 Conveying explosives by hand. Closed, nonconductive...

  7. 30 CFR 57.6205 - Conveying explosives by hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conveying explosives by hand. 57.6205 Section 57.6205 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6205 Conveying explosives by hand. Closed, nonconductive...

  8. 30 CFR 57.6205 - Conveying explosives by hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conveying explosives by hand. 57.6205 Section 57.6205 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6205 Conveying explosives by hand. Closed, nonconductive...

  9. 30 CFR 56.6205 - Conveying explosives by hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conveying explosives by hand. 56.6205 Section 56.6205 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Transportation § 56.6205 Conveying explosives by hand. Closed, nonconductive containers shall be used to...

  10. 30 CFR 56.6205 - Conveying explosives by hand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conveying explosives by hand. 56.6205 Section 56.6205 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND... Transportation § 56.6205 Conveying explosives by hand. Closed, nonconductive containers shall be used to...

  11. 21 CFR 1240.90 - Approval of treatment aboard conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Source and Use of Potable Water § 1240.90 Approval of treatment aboard conveyances. (a) The treatment of water aboard conveyances shall be approved by the Commissioner of Food and Drugs if the apparatus used is of such design and is so operated as to be capable of producing and in fact...

  12. 21 CFR 1250.49 - Cleanliness of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cleanliness of conveyances. 1250.49 Section 1250.49 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... SANITATION Equipment and Operation of Land and Air Conveyances § 1250.49 Cleanliness of...

  13. 21 CFR 1250.49 - Cleanliness of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cleanliness of conveyances. 1250.49 Section 1250.49 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... SANITATION Equipment and Operation of Land and Air Conveyances § 1250.49 Cleanliness of...

  14. 21 CFR 1250.49 - Cleanliness of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cleanliness of conveyances. 1250.49 Section 1250.49 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... SANITATION Equipment and Operation of Land and Air Conveyances § 1250.49 Cleanliness of...

  15. 21 CFR 1250.49 - Cleanliness of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cleanliness of conveyances. 1250.49 Section 1250.49 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... SANITATION Equipment and Operation of Land and Air Conveyances § 1250.49 Cleanliness of...

  16. 14 CFR 49.21 - Return of original conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Return of original conveyance. 49.21 Section 49.21 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT RECORDING OF AIRCRAFT TITLES AND SECURITY DOCUMENTS General § 49.21 Return of original conveyance. If...

  17. 43 CFR 2631.3 - Surveying and conveyance fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Surveying and conveyance fees. 2631.3... by Railroad Carriers (Transportation Act of 1940) § 2631.3 Surveying and conveyance fees. The carrier must pay the cost of the survey of the land, paying also one-half the cost of any segregation survey...

  18. 43 CFR 2631.3 - Surveying and conveyance fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Surveying and conveyance fees. 2631.3... by Railroad Carriers (Transportation Act of 1940) § 2631.3 Surveying and conveyance fees. The carrier must pay the cost of the survey of the land, paying also one-half the cost of any segregation survey...

  19. 43 CFR 2631.3 - Surveying and conveyance fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Surveying and conveyance fees. 2631.3... by Railroad Carriers (Transportation Act of 1940) § 2631.3 Surveying and conveyance fees. The carrier must pay the cost of the survey of the land, paying also one-half the cost of any segregation survey...

  20. 43 CFR 2631.3 - Surveying and conveyance fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Surveying and conveyance fees. 2631.3... by Railroad Carriers (Transportation Act of 1940) § 2631.3 Surveying and conveyance fees. The carrier must pay the cost of the survey of the land, paying also one-half the cost of any segregation survey...

  1. 32 CFR 644.439 - Sale and conveyance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Sale and conveyance. 644.439 Section 644.439... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.439 Sale and conveyance. Sales procedure, including advertising, will be in accordance with §§ 644.540 through...

  2. 21 CFR 1250.49 - Cleanliness of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cleanliness of conveyances. 1250.49 Section 1250.49 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS UNDER CERTAIN OTHER ACTS ADMINISTERED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION INTERSTATE CONVEYANCE...

  3. 9 CFR 88.3 - Standards for conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF EQUINES FOR SLAUGHTER § 88.3 Standards for conveyances. (a) The animal cargo space of conveyances used for the commercial transportation of equines to slaughtering facilities must: (1) Be designed, constructed, and maintained in a manner that at all times protects the health and well-being of the equines...

  4. 19 CFR 148.45 - Vehicles and other conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vehicles and other conveyances. 148.45 Section 148.45 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... Vehicles and other conveyances. Nonresidents are entitled to entry free of duty and internal revenue...

  5. 19 CFR 148.45 - Vehicles and other conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vehicles and other conveyances. 148.45 Section 148.45 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... Vehicles and other conveyances. Nonresidents are entitled to entry free of duty and internal revenue...

  6. 19 CFR 148.45 - Vehicles and other conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vehicles and other conveyances. 148.45 Section 148.45 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... Vehicles and other conveyances. Nonresidents are entitled to entry free of duty and internal revenue...

  7. 9 CFR 88.3 - Standards for conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION OF EQUINES FOR SLAUGHTER § 88.3 Standards for conveyances. (a) The animal cargo space of conveyances used for the commercial transportation of equines to slaughtering facilities must: (1) Be designed, constructed, and maintained in a manner that at all times protects the health and well-being of the equines...

  8. A Dual-Color Luciferase Assay System Reveals Circadian Resetting of Cultured Fibroblasts by Co-Cultured Adrenal Glands

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Takako; Ikeda, Masaaki; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms of various organs and tissues are synchronized by pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal glands can synchronize circadian rhythms in other tissues. Many hormones show circadian rhythms in their plasma concentrations; however, whether organs outside the SCN can serve as master synchronizers to entrain circadian rhythms in target tissues is not well understood. To further delineate the function of the adrenal glands and the interactions of circadian rhythms in putative master synchronizing organs and their target tissues, here we report a simple co-culture system using a dual-color luciferase assay to monitor circadian rhythms separately in various explanted tissues and fibroblasts. In this system, circadian rhythms of organs and target cells were simultaneously tracked by the green-emitting beetle luciferase from Pyrearinus termitilluminans (ELuc) and the red-emitting beetle luciferase from Phrixothrix hirtus (SLR), respectively. We obtained tissues from the adrenal glands, thyroid glands, and lungs of transgenic mice that expressed ELuc under control of the promoter from a canonical clock gene, mBmal1. The tissues were co-cultured with Rat-1 fibroblasts as representative target cells expressing SLR under control of the mBmal1 promoter. Amplitudes of the circadian rhythms of Rat-1 fibroblasts were potentiated when the fibroblasts were co-cultured with adrenal gland tissue, but not when co-cultured with thyroid gland or lung tissue. The phases of Rat-1 fibroblasts were reset by application of adrenal gland tissue, whereas the phases of adrenal gland tissue were not influenced by Rat-1 fibroblasts. Furthermore, the effect of the adrenal gland tissue on the fibroblasts was blocked by application of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist. These results demonstrate that glucocorticoids are strong circadian synchronizers for fibroblasts and that this co

  9. A dual-color luciferase assay system reveals circadian resetting of cultured fibroblasts by co-cultured adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Takako; Ikeda, Masaaki; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Nakajima, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms of various organs and tissues are synchronized by pacemaker neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal glands can synchronize circadian rhythms in other tissues. Many hormones show circadian rhythms in their plasma concentrations; however, whether organs outside the SCN can serve as master synchronizers to entrain circadian rhythms in target tissues is not well understood. To further delineate the function of the adrenal glands and the interactions of circadian rhythms in putative master synchronizing organs and their target tissues, here we report a simple co-culture system using a dual-color luciferase assay to monitor circadian rhythms separately in various explanted tissues and fibroblasts. In this system, circadian rhythms of organs and target cells were simultaneously tracked by the green-emitting beetle luciferase from Pyrearinus termitilluminans (ELuc) and the red-emitting beetle luciferase from Phrixothrix hirtus (SLR), respectively. We obtained tissues from the adrenal glands, thyroid glands, and lungs of transgenic mice that expressed ELuc under control of the promoter from a canonical clock gene, mBmal1. The tissues were co-cultured with Rat-1 fibroblasts as representative target cells expressing SLR under control of the mBmal1 promoter. Amplitudes of the circadian rhythms of Rat-1 fibroblasts were potentiated when the fibroblasts were co-cultured with adrenal gland tissue, but not when co-cultured with thyroid gland or lung tissue. The phases of Rat-1 fibroblasts were reset by application of adrenal gland tissue, whereas the phases of adrenal gland tissue were not influenced by Rat-1 fibroblasts. Furthermore, the effect of the adrenal gland tissue on the fibroblasts was blocked by application of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist. These results demonstrate that glucocorticoids are strong circadian synchronizers for fibroblasts and that this co

  10. Aging and Circadian Disruption: Causes and Effects

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Steven A.; Schmitt, Karen; Eckert, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between aging and daily “circadian” behavior in humans is bidirectional: on the one hand, dysfunction of circadian clocks promotes age-related maladies; on the other, aging per se leads to changes and disruption in circadian behavior and physiology. For the latter case, recent research suggests that changes to both homeostatic and circadian sleep regulatory mechanisms may play a role. Could hormonal changes be in part responsible? PMID:21869460

  11. The intrinsic circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte.

    PubMed

    Durgan, David J; Hotze, Margaret A; Tomlin, Tara M; Egbejimi, Oluwaseun; Graveleau, Christophe; Abel, E Dale; Shaw, Chad A; Bray, Molly S; Hardin, Paul E; Young, Martin E

    2005-10-01

    Circadian clocks are intracellular molecular mechanisms that allow the cell to anticipate the time of day. We have previously reported that the intact rat heart expresses the major components of the circadian clock, of which its rhythmic expression in vivo is consistent with the operation of a fully functional clock mechanism. The present study exposes oscillations of circadian clock genes [brain and arylhydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like protein 1 (bmal1), reverse strand of the c-erbaalpha gene (rev-erbaalpha), period 2 (per2), albumin D-element binding protein (dbp)] for isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes in culture. Acute (2 h) and/or chronic (continuous) treatment of cardiomyocytes with FCS (50% and 2.5%, respectively) results in rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes with periodicities of 20-24 h. In contrast, cardiomyocytes cultured in the absence of serum exhibit dramatically dampened oscillations in bmal1 and dbp only. Zeitgebers (timekeepers) are factors that influence the timing of the circadian clock. Glucose, which has been previously shown to reactivate circadian clock gene oscillations in fibroblasts, has no effect on the expression of circadian clock genes in adult rat cardiomyocytes, either in the absence or presence of serum. Exposure of adult rat cardiomyocytes to the sympathetic neurotransmitter norephinephrine (10 microM) for 2 h reinitiates rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes in a serum-independent manner. Oscillations in circadian clock genes were associated with 24-h oscillations in the metabolic genes pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (pdk4) and uncoupling protein 3 (ucp3). In conclusion, these data suggest that the circadian clock operates within the myocytes of the heart and that this molecular mechanism persists under standard cell culture conditions (i.e., 2.5% serum). Furthermore, our data suggest that norepinephrine, unlike glucose, influences the timing of the circadian clock within the heart and that the

  12. Identification of a Circadian Clock in the Inferior Colliculus and Its Dysregulation by Noise Exposure.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung-Sub; Cederroth, Christopher R; Basinou, Vasiliki; Meltser, Inna; Lundkvist, Gabriella; Canlon, Barbara

    2016-05-18

    Circadian rhythms regulate bodily functions within 24 h and long-term disruptions in these rhythms can cause various diseases. Recently, the peripheral auditory organ, the cochlea, has been shown to contain a self-sustained circadian clock that regulates differential sensitivity to noise exposure throughout the day. Animals exposed to noise during the night are more vulnerable than when exposed during the day. However, whether other structures throughout the auditory pathway also possess a circadian clock remains unknown. Here, we focus on the inferior colliculus (IC), which plays an important role in noise-induced pathologies such as tinnitus, hyperacusis, and audiogenic seizures. Using PER2::LUC transgenic mice and real-time bioluminescence recordings, we revealed circadian oscillations of Period 2 protein in IC explants for up to 1 week. Clock genes (Cry1, Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Rev-erbα, and Dbp) displayed circadian molecular oscillations in the IC. Averaged expression levels of early-induced genes and clock genes during 24 h revealed differential responses to day or night noise exposure. Rev-erbα and Dbp genes were affected only by day noise exposure, whereas Per1 and Per2 were affected only by night noise exposure. However, the expression of Bdnf was affected by both day and night noise exposure, suggesting that plastic changes are unlikely to be involved in the differences in day or night noise sensitivity in the IC. These novel findings highlight the importance of circadian responses in the IC and emphasize the importance of circadian mechanisms for understanding central auditory function and disorders. Recent findings identified the presence of a circadian clock in the inner ear. Here, we present novel findings that neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC), a central auditory relay structure involved in sound processing, express a circadian clock as evidenced at both the mRNA and protein levels. Using a reporter mouse that expresses a luciferase protein

  13. Identification of a Circadian Clock in the Inferior Colliculus and Its Dysregulation by Noise Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-sub; Cederroth, Christopher R.; Basinou, Vasiliki; Meltser, Inna; Lundkvist, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms regulate bodily functions within 24 h and long-term disruptions in these rhythms can cause various diseases. Recently, the peripheral auditory organ, the cochlea, has been shown to contain a self-sustained circadian clock that regulates differential sensitivity to noise exposure throughout the day. Animals exposed to noise during the night are more vulnerable than when exposed during the day. However, whether other structures throughout the auditory pathway also possess a circadian clock remains unknown. Here, we focus on the inferior colliculus (IC), which plays an important role in noise-induced pathologies such as tinnitus, hyperacusis, and audiogenic seizures. Using PER2::LUC transgenic mice and real-time bioluminescence recordings, we revealed circadian oscillations of Period 2 protein in IC explants for up to 1 week. Clock genes (Cry1, Bmal1, Per1, Per2, Rev-erbα, and Dbp) displayed circadian molecular oscillations in the IC. Averaged expression levels of early-induced genes and clock genes during 24 h revealed differential responses to day or night noise exposure. Rev-erbα and Dbp genes were affected only by day noise exposure, whereas Per1 and Per2 were affected only by night noise exposure. However, the expression of Bdnf was affected by both day and night noise exposure, suggesting that plastic changes are unlikely to be involved in the differences in day or night noise sensitivity in the IC. These novel findings highlight the importance of circadian responses in the IC and emphasize the importance of circadian mechanisms for understanding central auditory function and disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Recent findings identified the presence of a circadian clock in the inner ear. Here, we present novel findings that neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC), a central auditory relay structure involved in sound processing, express a circadian clock as evidenced at both the mRNA and protein levels. Using a reporter mouse that expresses a

  14. Methods of conveying fluids and methods of sublimating solid particles

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

    2013-10-01

    A heat exchanger and associated methods for sublimating solid particles therein, for conveying fluids therethrough, or both. The heat exchanger includes a chamber and a porous member having a porous wall having pores in communication with the chamber and with an interior of the porous member. A first fluid is conveyed into the porous member while a second fluid is conveyed into the porous member through the porous wall. The second fluid may form a positive flow boundary layer along the porous wall to reduce or eliminate substantial contact between the first fluid and the interior of the porous wall. The combined first and second fluids are conveyed out of the porous member. Additionally, the first fluid and the second fluid may each be conveyed into the porous member at different temperatures and may exit the porous member at substantially the same temperature.

  15. Distinct visual pathways mediate Drosophila larval light avoidance and circadian clock entrainment.

    PubMed

    Keene, Alex C; Mazzoni, Esteban O; Zhen, Jamie; Younger, Meg A; Yamaguchi, Satoko; Blau, Justin; Desplan, Claude; Sprecher, Simon G

    2011-04-27

    Visual organs perceive environmental stimuli required for rapid initiation of behaviors and can also entrain the circadian clock. The larval eye of Drosophila is capable of both functions. Each eye contains only 12 photoreceptors (PRs), which can be subdivided into two subtypes. Four PRs express blue-sensitive rhodopsin5 (rh5) and eight express green-sensitive rhodopsin6 (rh6). We found that either PR-subtype is sufficient to entrain the molecular clock by light, while only the Rh5-PR subtype is essential for light avoidance. Acetylcholine released from PRs confers both functions. Both subtypes of larval PRs innervate the main circadian pacemaker neurons of the larva, the neuropeptide PDF (pigment-dispersing factor)-expressing lateral neurons (LNs), providing sensory input to control circadian rhythms. However, we show that PDF-expressing LNs are dispensable for light avoidance, and a distinct set of three clock neurons is required. Thus we have identified distinct sensory and central circuitry regulating light avoidance behavior and clock entrainment. Our findings provide insights into the coding of sensory information for distinct behavioral functions and the underlying molecular and neuronal circuitry.

  16. Neurotoxic protein expression reveals connections between the circadian clock and mating behavior in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kadener, Sebastian; Villella, Adriana; Kula, Elzbieta; Palm, Kristyna; Pyza, Elzbieta; Botas, Juan; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Rosbash, Michael

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the functions of circadian neurons, we added two strategies to the standard Drosophila behavioral genetics repertoire. The first was to express a polyglutamine-expanded neurotoxic protein (MJDtr78Q; MJD, Machado–Joseph disease) in the major timeless (tim)-expressing cells of the adult brain. These Tim-MJD flies were viable, in contrast to the use of cell-death gene expression for tim neuron inactivation. Moreover, they were more arrhythmic than flies expressing other neurotoxins and had low but detectable tim mRNA levels. The second extended standard microarray technology from fly heads to dissected fly brains. By combining the two approaches, we identified a population of Tim-MJD-affected mRNAs. Some had been previously identified as sex-specific and relevant to courtship, including mRNAs localized to brain-proximal fat-body tissue and brain courtship centers. Finally, we found a decrease in the number of neurons that expressed male-specific forms of the fruitless protein in the laterodorsal region of the brain. The decrease was not a consequence of toxic protein expression within these specialized cells but a likely effect of communication with neighboring TIM-expressing neurons. The data suggest a functional interaction between adjacent circadian and mating circuits within the fly brain, as well as an interaction between circadian circuits and brain-proximal fat body. PMID:16938865

  17. Distinct visual pathways mediate Drosophila larval light avoidance and circadian clock entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Keene, Alex C.; Mazzoni, Esteban O.; Zhen, Jamie; Younger, Meg A.; Yamaguchi, Satoko; Blau, Justin; Desplan, Claude; Sprecher, Simon G.

    2011-01-01

    Visual organs perceive environmental stimuli required for rapid initiation of behaviors and can also entrain the circadian clock. The larval eye of Drosophila is capable of both functions. Each eye contains only 12 photoreceptors (PRs), which can be subdivided into two subtypes. Four PRs express blue-sensitive rhodopsin5 (rh5) and eight express green-sensitive rhodopsin6 (rh6). We found that either PR-subtype is sufficient to entrain the molecular clock by light, while only the Rh5-PR subtype is essential for light avoidance. Acetylcholine (ACh) released from PRs confers both functions. Both subtypes of larval PRs innervate the main circadian pacemaker neurons of the larva, the PDF-expressing lateral neurons (LNs), providing sensory input to control circadian rhythms. However, we show that PDF-expressing LNs are dispensable for light avoidance, and a distinct set of three clock neurons is required. Thus we have identified distinct sensory and central circuitry regulating light avoidance behavior and clock entrainment. Our findings provide insights into the coding of sensory information for distinct behavioral functions and the underlying molecular and neuronal circuitry. PMID:21525293

  18. Circadian rhythmometry of mammalian radiosensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, E.; Halberg, F.; Loken, M. K.; Kim, Y. S.

    1974-01-01

    In the case of human bone marrow, the largest number of mitoses is seen in the evening in diurnally active men, mitotic activity being at a minimum in the morning. The opposite pattern is observed for nocturnal animals such as rats and mice on a regimen of light during the daytime alternating with darkness during the night hours. The entirety of these rhythms plays an important role in the organism's responses to environmental stimuli, including its resistance to potentially harmful agents. Conditions under which circadian rhythms can be observed and validated by inferential statistical means are discussed while emphasizing how artifacts of the laboratory environment can be shown to obscure circadian periodic variations in radiosensitivity.

  19. Circadian Rhythm Control: Neurophysiological Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glotzbach, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) was implicated as a primary component in central nervous system mechanisms governing circadian rhythms. Disruption of the normal synchronization of temperature, activity, and other rhythms is detrimental to health. Sleep wake disorders, decreases in vigilance and performance, and certain affective disorders may result from or be exacerbated by such desynchronization. To study the basic neurophysiological mechanisms involved in entrainment of circadian systems by the environment, Parylene-coated, etched microwire electrode bundles were used to record extracellular action potentials from the small somata of the SCN and neighboring hypothalamic nuclei in unanesthetized, behaving animals. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized and chronically prepared with EEG ane EMG electrodes in addition to a moveable microdrive assembly. The majority of cells had firing rates 10 Hz and distinct populations of cells which had either the highest firing rate or lowest firing rate during sleep were seen.

  20. Circadian rhythmometry of mammalian radiosensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, E.; Halberg, F.; Loken, M. K.; Kim, Y. S.

    1974-01-01

    In the case of human bone marrow, the largest number of mitoses is seen in the evening in diurnally active men, mitotic activity being at a minimum in the morning. The opposite pattern is observed for nocturnal animals such as rats and mice on a regimen of light during the daytime alternating with darkness during the night hours. The entirety of these rhythms plays an important role in the organism's responses to environmental stimuli, including its resistance to potentially harmful agents. Conditions under which circadian rhythms can be observed and validated by inferential statistical means are discussed while emphasizing how artifacts of the laboratory environment can be shown to obscure circadian periodic variations in radiosensitivity.

  1. Circadian clocks: lessons from fish.

    PubMed

    Idda, M Laura; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Vallone, Daniela; Gothilf, Yoav; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Foulkes, Nicholas S

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular and cellular organization of the circadian timing system in vertebrates has increased enormously over the past decade. In large part, progress has been based on genetic studies in the mouse as well as on fundamental similarities between vertebrate and Drosophila clocks. The zebrafish was initially considered as a potentially attractive genetic model for identifying vertebrate clock genes. However, instead, fish have ultimately proven to be valuable complementary models for studying various aspects of clock biology. For example, many fish can shift from diurnal to nocturnal activity implying specific flexibility in their clock function. We have learned much about the function of light input pathways, and the ontogeny and function of the pineal organ, the fish central pacemaker. Finally, blind cavefish have also provided new insight into the evolution of the circadian clock under extreme environmental conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Circadian rhythms of crawling and swimming in the nudibranch mollusc Melibe leonina.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, James M; Kirouac, Lauren E; Naimie, Amanda A; Bixby, Kimberly A; Lee, Colin; Malanga, Stephanie; Raubach, Maureen; Watson, Winsor H

    2014-12-01

    Daily rhythms of activity driven by circadian clocks are expressed by many organisms, including molluscs. We initiated this study, with the nudibranch Melibe leonina, with four goals in mind: (1) determine which behaviors are expressed with a daily rhythm; (2) investigate which of these rhythmic behaviors are controlled by a circadian clock; (3) determine if a circadian clock is associated with the eyes or optic ganglia of Melibe, as it is in several other gastropods; and (4) test the hypothesis that Melibe can use extraocular photoreceptors to synchronize its daily rhythms to natural light-dark cycles. To address these goals, we analyzed the behavior of 55 animals exposed to either artificial or natural light-dark cycles, followed by constant darkness. We also repeated this experiment using 10 animals that had their eyes removed. Individuals did not express daily rhythms of feeding, but they swam and crawled more at night. This pattern of locomotion persisted in constant darkness, indicating the presence of a circadian clock. Eyeless animals also expressed a daily rhythm of locomotion, with more locomotion at night. The fact that eyeless animals synchronized their locomotion to the light-dark cycle suggests that they can detect light using extraocular photoreceptors. However, in constant darkness, these rhythms deteriorated, suggesting that the clock neurons that influence locomotion may be located in, or near, the eyes. Thus, locomotion in Melibe appears to be influenced by both ocular and extraocular photoreceptors, although the former appear to have a greater influence on the expression of circadian rhythms.

  3. Dose-Dependent Effects of Androgens on the Circadian Timing System and Its Response to Light

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Matthew P.; Karatsoreos, Ilia N.; LeSauter, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the locus of a master clock that regulates circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior. Gonadectomy in male mice lengthens the period of circadian rhythms and increases the day-to-day variability of activity onset time. Both of these responses are rescued by the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone. Androgen receptors (AR) are localized in SCN neurons that receive direct retinal input. To explore how androgens affect circadian clock function and its responsiveness to photic cues, we measured wheel-running behavior and SCN AR expression in intact, gonadectomized, and testosterone-replaced mice, held under various photic conditions. Gonadectomy lengthened circadian period in constant dim light but not in constant darkness. Increasing intensities of constant light parametrically increased circadian period, and this was potentiated at all intensities by gonadectomy. In contrast, gonadectomy did not alter light-induced pupil constriction, suggesting a nonretinal locus of hormone action. In hormone-replaced animals housed in constant darkness, T concentration was positively correlated with precision of activity onset and with SCN AR expression and negatively correlated with duration of activity. We infer the existence of two androgenic mechanisms: one modulates SCN responsiveness to light, and the second modulates SCN timekeeping and locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, the effects of androgens on period are a result of hormonal modulation of the SCN's response to photic input rather than to a change in the inherent period of oscillators in the absence of light. PMID:22492303

  4. Putative pacemakers in the eyestalk and brain of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii show circadian oscillations in levels of mRNA for crustacean hyperglycemic hormone.

    PubMed

    Nelson-Mora, Janikua; Prieto-Sagredo, Julio; Loredo-Ranjel, Rosaura; Fanjul-Moles, María Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) synthesizing cells in the optic lobe, one of the pacemakers of the circadian system, have been shown to be present in crayfish. However, the presence of CHH in the central brain, another putative pacemaker of the multi-oscillatory circadian system, of this decapod and its circadian transcription in the optic lobe and brain have yet to be explored. Therefore, using qualitative and quantitative PCR, we isolated and cloned a CHH mRNA fragment from two putative pacemakers of the multi-oscillatory circadian system of Procambarus clarkii, the optic lobe and the central brain. This CHH transcript synchronized to daily light-dark cycles and oscillated under dark, constant conditions demonstrating statistically significant daily and circadian rhythms in both structures. Furthermore, to investigate the presence of the peptide in the central brain of this decapod, we used immunohistochemical methods. Confocal microscopy revealed the presence of CHH-IR in fibers and cells of the protocerebral and tritocerebal clusters and neuropiles, particularly in some neurons located in clusters 6, 14, 15 and 17. The presence of CHH positive neurons in structures of P. clarkii where clock proteins have been reported suggests a relationship between the circadian clockwork and CHH. This work provides new insights into the circadian regulation of CHH, a pleiotropic hormone that regulates many physiological processes such as glucose metabolism and osmoregulatory responses to stress.

  5. Putative Pacemakers in the Eyestalk and Brain of the Crayfish Procambarus clarkii Show Circadian Oscillations in Levels of mRNA for Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Nelson-Mora, Janikua; Prieto-Sagredo, Julio; Loredo-Ranjel, Rosaura; Fanjul-Moles, María Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) synthesizing cells in the optic lobe, one of the pacemakers of the circadian system, have been shown to be present in crayfish. However, the presence of CHH in the central brain, another putative pacemaker of the multi-oscillatory circadian system, of this decapod and its circadian transcription in the optic lobe and brain have yet to be explored. Therefore, using qualitative and quantitative PCR, we isolated and cloned a CHH mRNA fragment from two putative pacemakers of the multi-oscillatory circadian system of Procambarus clarkii, the optic lobe and the central brain. This CHH transcript synchronized to daily light-dark cycles and oscillated under dark, constant conditions demonstrating statistically significant daily and circadian rhythms in both structures. Furthermore, to investigate the presence of the peptide in the central brain of this decapod, we used immunohistochemical methods. Confocal microscopy revealed the presence of CHH-IR in fibers and cells of the protocerebral and tritocerebal clusters and neuropiles, particularly in some neurons located in clusters 6, 14, 15 and 17. The presence of CHH positive neurons in structures of P. clarkii where clock proteins have been reported suggests a relationship between the circadian clockwork and CHH. This work provides new insights into the circadian regulation of CHH, a pleiotropic hormone that regulates many physiological processes such as glucose metabolism and osmoregulatory responses to stress. PMID:24391849

  6. Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Reid, Kathryn J; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    The circadian system regulates the timing and expression of nearly all biological processes, most notably, the sleep-wake cycle, and disruption of this system can result in adverse effects on both physical and mental health. The circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWDs) consist of 5 disorders that are due primarily to pathology of the circadian clock or to a misalignment of the timing of the endogenous circadian rhythm with the environment. This article outlines the nature of these disorders, the association of many of these disorders with psychiatric illness, and available treatment options.

  7. Conveying Global Circulation Patterns in HDTV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, N.; Janowiak, J.; Kinzler, R.; Trakinski, V.

    2006-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History has partnered with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) to educate general audiences about weather and climate using high definition video broadcasts built from half-hourly global mosaics of infrared (IR) data from five geostationary satellites. The dataset being featured was developed by NCEP to improve precipitation estimates from microwave data that have finer spatial resolution but poorer temporal coverage. The IR data span +/-60 degrees latitude and show circulation patterns at sufficient resolution to teach informal science center visitors about both weather and climate events and concepts. Design and editorial principles for this media program have been guided by lessons learned from production and annual updates of visualizations that cover eight themes in both biological and Earth system sciences. Two formative evaluations on two dates, including interviews and written surveys of 480 museum visitors ranging in age from 13 to over 60, helped refine the design and implementation of the weather and climate program and demonstrated that viewers understood the program's initial literacy objectives, including: (1) conveying the passage of time and currency of visualized data; (2) geographic relationships inherent to atmospheric circulation patterns; and (3) the authenticity of visualized data, i.e., their origin from earth-orbiting satellites. Surveys also indicated an interest and willingness to learn more about weather and climate principles and events. Expanded literacy goals guide ongoing, biweekly production and distribution of global cloud visualization pieces that reach combined audiences of approximately 10 million. Two more rounds of evaluation are planned over the next two years to assess the effectiveness of the media program in addressing these expanded literacy goals.

  8. Select spinal lesions reveal multiple ascending pathways in the rat conveying input from the male genitalia

    PubMed Central

    Hubscher, C H; Reed, W R; Kaddumi, E G; Armstrong, J E; Johnson, R D

    2010-01-01

    The specific white matter location of all the spinal pathways conveying penile input to the rostral medulla is not known. Our previous studies using rats demonstrated the loss of low but not high threshold penile inputs to medullary reticular formation (MRF) neurons after acute and chronic dorsal column (DC) lesions of the T8 spinal cord and loss of all penile inputs after lesioning the dorsal three-fifths of the cord. In the present study, select T8 lesions were made and terminal electrophysiological recordings were performed 45–60 days later in a limited portion of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (Gi) and Gi pars alpha. Lesions included subtotal dorsal hemisections that spared only the lateral half of the dorsal portion of the lateral funiculus on one side, dorsal and over-dorsal hemisections, and subtotal transections that spared predominantly just the ventromedial white matter. Electrophysiological data for 448 single unit recordings obtained from 32 urethane-anaesthetized rats, when analysed in groups based upon histological lesion reconstructions, revealed (1) ascending bilateral projections in the dorsal, dorsolateral and ventrolateral white matter of the spinal cord conveying information from the male external genitalia to MRF, and (2) ascending bilateral projections in the ventrolateral white matter conveying information from the pelvic visceral organs (bladder, descending colon, urethra) to MRF. Multiple spinal pathways from the penis to the MRF may correspond to different functions, including those processing affective/pleasure/motivational, nociception, and mating-specific (such as for erection and ejaculation) inputs. PMID:20142271

  9. Intrinsic and extrinsic cues regulate the daily profile of mouse lateral habenula neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Sakhi, Kanwal; Wegner, Sven; Belle, Mino D C; Howarth, Michael; Delagrange, Philippe; Brown, Timothy M; Piggins, Hugh D

    2014-01-01

    The epithalamic lateral habenula (LHb) is implicated as part of the mammalian brain's circadian system. Anatomical evidence suggests that the LHb receives extrinsic circadian timing cues from retinal ganglion cells and the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Intriguingly, some LHb neurones contain the molecular circadian clock, but it is unclear if and how intrinsic and extrinsic circadian processes influence neuronal activity in the mouse LHb. Here, using an in vitro brain slice preparation isolating the LHb from the SCN, we show through whole-cell patch-clamp recordings that LHb neurones exhibit heterogeneity in their resting state, but the majority spontaneously fire action potentials (APs). Discharge rate of APs varied from low firing in the early day to higher firing later in the day and was absent in LHb brain slices prepared from Cry1−/−Cry2−/− mice that lack a functional molecular clock. Low amplitude circadian oscillations in the molecular circadian clock were also monitored in LHb brain slices, but were absent in Cry1−/−Cry2−/− LHb brain tissue. A putative neurochemical output signal of the SCN, prokineticin 2 (PK2), inhibited some LHb neurones by elevating the frequency of GABA release in the LHb. Using multi-electrode recordings in vivo, we found that LHb neurones sluggishly respond to retinal illumination, suggesting that they receive such information through polysynaptic processes. In summary, our results show for the first time that intrinsic circadian signals are important for regulating LHb neuronal state, while the SCN-derived signal PK2 is less influential. Moreover, we demonstrate that mouse LHb neurones have access to and can respond to visual input, but such signals are unlikely to be directly communicated to the LHb. Broadly, these findings raise the possibility that intrinsic circadian signals are likely to be influential in shaping LHb contributions to cognition and emotionality. PMID:25194046

  10. Intrinsic and extrinsic cues regulate the daily profile of mouse lateral habenula neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Sakhi, Kanwal; Wegner, Sven; Belle, Mino D C; Howarth, Michael; Delagrange, Philippe; Brown, Timothy M; Piggins, Hugh D

    2014-11-15

    The epithalamic lateral habenula (LHb) is implicated as part of the mammalian brain's circadian system. Anatomical evidence suggests that the LHb receives extrinsic circadian timing cues from retinal ganglion cells and the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN). Intriguingly, some LHb neurones contain the molecular circadian clock, but it is unclear if and how intrinsic and extrinsic circadian processes influence neuronal activity in the mouse LHb. Here, using an in vitro brain slice preparation isolating the LHb from the SCN, we show through whole-cell patch-clamp recordings that LHb neurones exhibit heterogeneity in their resting state, but the majority spontaneously fire action potentials (APs). Discharge rate of APs varied from low firing in the early day to higher firing later in the day and was absent in LHb brain slices prepared from Cry1(-/-)Cry2(-/-) mice that lack a functional molecular clock. Low amplitude circadian oscillations in the molecular circadian clock were also monitored in LHb brain slices, but were absent in Cry1(-/-)Cry2(-/-) LHb brain tissue. A putative neurochemical output signal of the SCN, prokineticin 2 (PK2), inhibited some LHb neurones by elevating the frequency of GABA release in the LHb. Using multi-electrode recordings in vivo, we found that LHb neurones sluggishly respond to retinal illumination, suggesting that they receive such information through polysynaptic processes. In summary, our results show for the first time that intrinsic circadian signals are important for regulating LHb neuronal state, while the SCN-derived signal PK2 is less influential. Moreover, we demonstrate that mouse LHb neurones have access to and can respond to visual input, but such signals are unlikely to be directly communicated to the LHb. Broadly, these findings raise the possibility that intrinsic circadian signals are likely to be influential in shaping LHb contributions to cognition and emotionality. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of

  11. Diurnal regulation of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor in the mouse circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Karatsoreos, Ilia N; Romeo, Russell D; McEwen, Bruce S; Silver, Rae

    2006-02-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms are generated by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus. SCN neurons are heterogeneous and can be classified according to their function, anatomical connections, morphology and/or peptidergic identity. We focus here on gastrin-releasing peptide- (GRP) and on GRP receptor- (GRPr) expressing cells of the SCN. Pharmacological application of GRP in vivo or in vitro can shift the phase of circadian rhythms, and GRPr-deficient mice show blunted photic phase shifting. Given the in vivo and in vitro effects of GRP on circadian behavior and on SCN neuronal activity, we investigated whether the GRPr might be under circadian and/or diurnal control. Using in situ hybridization and autoradiographic receptor binding, we localized the GRPr in the mouse SCN and determined that GRP binding varies with time of day in animals housed in a light-dark cycle but not in conditions of constant darkness. The latter results were confirmed with Western blots of SCN tissue. Together, the present findings reveal that changes in GRPr are light driven and not endogenously organized. Diurnal variation in GRPr activity probably underlies intra-SCN signaling important for entrainment and phase shifting.

  12. Circadian phase-dependent effect of nitric oxide on L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in avian cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Michael L.; Shi, Liheng; Huang, Cathy Chia-Yu; Grushin, Kirill; Park, So-Young; Ko, Gladys Y.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in phase-shifting of circadian neuronal activities in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and circadian behavior activity rhythms. In the retina, NO production is increased in a light-dependent manner. While endogenous circadian oscillators in retinal photoreceptors regulate their physiological states, it is not clear whether NO also participates in the circadian regulation of photoreceptors. In the present study, we demonstrate that NO is involved in the circadian phase-dependent regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs). In chick cone photoreceptors, the L-VGCCα1 subunit expression and the maximal L-VGCC currents are higher at night, and both Ras-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)-Erk (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) and Ras-phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt) are part of the circadian output pathways regulating L-VGCCs. The NO-cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG) pathway decreases L-VGCCα1 subunit expression and L-VGCC currents at night, but not during the day, and exogenous NO donor or cGMP decreases the phosphorylation of Erk and Akt at night. The protein expression of neural NO synthase (nNOS) is also under circadian control, with both nNOS and NO production being higher during the day. Taken together, NO/cGMP/PKG signaling is involved as part of the circadian output pathway to regulate L-VGCCs in cone photoreceptors. PMID:23895452

  13. Conveying Environmental Issues with and through Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeles, K. V.

    2016-12-01

    Art has the ability to convey serious environmental issues, inspiring people to respond personally Kim Abeles is an artist who crosses disciplines and media to explore and map urban and global environments. She has exhibited with a unique range of collaborators including smog control agencies, science and natural history museums, and educational and healthcare professionals. Her work has been exhibited across the world. Since 1985, her art projects have explored topics including air and water pollution, refuse and recycling, and consumption. This presentation will discuss three unconventional art projects from inspiration to impact including results. Most can be replicated in any educational or community setting to increase understanding of environmental issues. Abeles's Smog Collector series makes images from polluted air, helping viewers to see the air they breathe in an accessible, engaging, and visceral way. In addition to exhibitions of this work in art museums and galleries, it has been displayed in vehicle emissions testing booths to increase awareness and behavior change, and the process has been taught as curriculum in schools. Abeles sees consumption as a primary problem that leads to environmental decay. Her Paper Person was made from the California Science Center's paper trash that was generated on a single day by their visitors (Earth Day 2009). The 40' x 48' sculpture is in the permanent collection of the CSC, and the text accompanying the artwork prompts visitors to consider bringing their lunches next time instead of buying fast food. Similarly, Paper Person (Harvard Westlake School) is a figurative sculpture made of one week of students' paper trash. Exhibited in the school's gallery, students were able to identify their own scraps, and to see how their consumption and trash adds up. When the artwork was exhibited, the school decided to change the way they handled their lunch preparation, bottled water, and trash. gallery-of-solutions was a recent

  14. A Conserved Bicycle Model for Circadian Clock Control of Membrane Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Flourakis, Matthieu; Kula-Eversole, Elzbieta; Hutchison, Alan L.; Han, Tae Hee; Aranda, Kimberly; Moose, Devon L.; White, Kevin P.; Dinner, Aaron R.; Lear, Bridget C.; Ren, Dejian; Diekman, Casey O.; Raman, Indira M.; Allada, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks regulate membrane excitability in master pacemaker neurons to control daily rhythms of sleep and wake. Here we find that two distinctly timed electrical drives collaborate to impose rhythmicity on Drosophila clock neurons. In the morning, a voltage-independent sodium conductance via the NA/NALCN ion channel depolarizes these neurons. This current is driven by the rhythmic expression of NCA localization factor-1, linking the molecular clock to ion channel function. In the evening, basal potassium currents peak to silence clock neurons. Remarkably, daily antiphase cycles of sodium and potassium currents also drive mouse clock neuron rhythms. Thus, we reveal an evolutionarily ancient strategy for the neural mechanisms that govern daily sleep and wake. PMID:26276633

  15. Comparative analysis of Pdf-mediated circadian behaviors between Drosophila melanogaster and D. virilis.

    PubMed

    Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lee, Gyunghee; Park, Jae H

    2009-03-01

    A group of small ventrolateral neurons (s-LN(v)'s) are the principal pacemaker for circadian locomotor rhythmicity of Drosophila melanogaster, and the pigment-dispersing factor (Pdf) neuropeptide plays an essential role as a clock messenger within these neurons. In our comparative studies on Pdf-associated circadian rhythms, we found that daily locomotor activity patterns of D. virilis were significantly different from those of D. melanogaster. Activities of D. virilis adults were mainly restricted to the photophase under light:dark cycles and subsequently became arrhythmic or weakly rhythmic in constant conditions. Such activity patterns resemble those of Pdf(01) mutant of D. melanogaster. Intriguingly, endogenous D. virilis Pdf (DvPdf) expression was not detected in the s-LN(v)-like neurons in the adult brains, implying that the Pdf(01)-like behavioral phenotypes of D. virilis are attributed in part to the lack of DvPdf in the s-LN(v)-like neurons. Heterologous transgenic analysis showed that cis-regulatory elements of the DvPdf transgene are capable of directing their expression in all endogenous Pdf neurons including s-LN(v)'s, as well as in non-Pdf clock neurons (LN(d)'s and fifth s-LN(v)) in a D. melanogaster host. Together these findings suggest a significant difference in the regulatory mechanisms of Pdf transcription between the two species and such a difference is causally associated with species-specific establishment of daily locomotor activity patterns.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Pdf-Mediated Circadian Behaviors Between Drosophila melanogaster and D. virilis

    PubMed Central

    Bahn, Jae Hoon; Lee, Gyunghee; Park, Jae H.

    2009-01-01

    A group of small ventrolateral neurons (s-LNv's) are the principal pacemaker for circadian locomotor rhythmicity of Drosophila melanogaster, and the pigment-dispersing factor (Pdf) neuropeptide plays an essential role as a clock messenger within these neurons. In our comparative studies on Pdf-associated circadian rhythms, we found that daily locomotor activity patterns of D. virilis were significantly different from those of D. melanogaster. Activities of D. virilis adults were mainly restricted to the photophase under light:dark cycles and subsequently became arrhythmic or weakly rhythmic in constant conditions. Such activity patterns resemble those of Pdf01 mutant of D. melanogaster. Intriguingly, endogenous D. virilis Pdf (DvPdf) expression was not detected in the s-LNv-like neurons in the adult brains, implying that the Pdf01-like behavioral phenotypes of D. virilis are attributed in part to the lack of DvPdf in the s-LNv-like neurons. Heterologous transgenic analysis showed that cis-regulatory elements of the DvPdf transgene are capable of directing their expression in all endogenous Pdf neurons including s-LNv's, as well as in non-Pdf clock neurons (LNd's and fifth s-LNv) in a D. melanogaster host. Together these findings suggest a significant difference in the regulatory mechanisms of Pdf transcription between the two species and such a difference is causally associated with species-specific establishment of daily locomotor activity patterns. PMID:19153257

  17. Circadian dysfunction induces leptin resistance in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Circadian disruption is associated with obesity, implicating the central clock in body weight control. Our comprehensive screen of wild-type and three circadian mutant mouse models, with or without chronic jet lag, shows that distinct genetic and physiologic interventions differentially disrupt over...

  18. Circadian dysregulation disrupts bile acid homeostasis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bile acids are potentially toxic compounds and their levels of hepatic production, uptake, and export are tightly regulated by many inputs, including circadian rhythm. We tested the impact of disrupting the peripheral circadian clock on integral steps of bile acid homeostasis. Both restricted feedi...

  19. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Bromundt, Vivien

    2014-11-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are prevalent among psychiatric patients. This is most probable due to a close relationship between functional disturbances of the internal clock, sleep regulation and mental health. Mechanisms on molecular level of the circadian clock and neurotransmitter signalling are involved in the development of both disorders. Moreover, circadian disorders and psychiatric diseases favour each other by accessory symptoms such as stress or social isolation. Actimetry to objectively quantify the rest-activity cycle and salivary melatonin profiles as marker for the circadian phase help to diagnose circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric patients. Chronotherapeutics such as bright light therapy, dark therapy, melatonin administration, and wake therapy are used to synchronise and consolidate circadian rhythms and help in the treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders, but are still neglected in medicine. More molecular to behavioural research is needed for the understanding of the development of circadian disorders and their relationship to psychiatric illnesses. This will help to boost the awareness and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatry.

  20. Molecular orchestration of the hepatic circadian symphony.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Urs

    2006-01-01

    The circadian clock determines the rhythmic expression of many different genes throughout a 24-hour period. A recent study investigating the circadian regulation of liver proteins reveals multiple levels of regulation, including transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms.

  1. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  2. Identifying Novel Transcriptional Regulators with Circadian Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Sandra; Thakurela, Sudhir; Fournier, David; Hampel, Mareike Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    Organisms adapt their physiology and behavior to the 24-h day-night cycle to which they are exposed. On a cellular level, this is regulated by intrinsic transcriptional-translational feedback loops that are important for maintaining the circadian rhythm. These loops are organized by members of the core clock network, which further regulate transcription of downstream genes, resulting in their circadian expression. Despite progress in understanding circadian gene expression, only a few players involved in circadian transcriptional regulation, including transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long noncoding RNAs, are known. Aiming to discover such genes, we performed a high-coverage transcriptome analysis of a circadian time course in murine fibroblast cells. In combination with a newly developed algorithm, we identified many transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long intergenic noncoding RNAs that are cyclically expressed. In addition, a number of these genes also showed circadian expression in mouse tissues. Furthermore, the knockdown of one such factor, Zfp28, influenced the core clock network. Mathematical modeling was able to predict putative regulator-effector interactions between the identified circadian genes and may help for investigations into the gene regulatory networks underlying circadian rhythms. PMID:26644408

  3. Running for time: circadian rhythms and melanoma.

    PubMed

    Markova-Car, Elitza P; Jurišić, Davor; Ilić, Nataša; Kraljević Pavelić, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Circadian timing system includes an input pathway transmitting environmental signals to a core oscillator that generates circadian signals responsible for the peripheral physiological or behavioural events. Circadian 24-h rhythms regulate diverse physiologic processes. Deregulation of these rhythms is associated with a number of pathogenic conditions including depression, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cancer. Melanoma is a less common type of skin cancer yet more aggressive often with a lethal ending. However, little is known about circadian control in melanoma and exact functional associations between core clock genes and development of melanoma skin cancer. This paper, therefore, comprehensively analyses current literature data on the involvement of circadian clock components in melanoma development. In particular, the role of circadian rhythm deregulation is discussed in the context of DNA repair mechanisms and influence of UV radiation and artificial light exposure on cancer development. The role of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme and impact of melatonin, as a major output factor of circadian rhythm, and its protective role in melanoma are discussed in details. We hypothesise that further understanding of clock genes' involvement and circadian regulation might foster discoveries in the field of melanoma diagnostics and treatment.

  4. Circadian clocks, brain function, and development.

    PubMed

    Frank, Ellen; Sidor, Michelle M; Gamble, Karen L; Cirelli, Chiara; Sharkey, Katherine M; Hoyle, Nathaniel; Tikotzky, Liat; Talbot, Lisa S; McCarthy, Michael J; Hasler, Brant P

    2013-12-01

    Circadian clocks are temporal interfaces that organize biological systems and behavior to dynamic external environments. Components of the molecular clock are expressed throughout the brain and are centrally poised to play an important role in brain function. This paper focuses on key issues concerning the relationship among circadian clocks, brain function, and development, and discusses three topic areas: (1) sleep and its relationship to the circadian system; (2) systems development and psychopathology (spanning the prenatal period through late life); and (3) circadian factors and their application to neuropsychiatric disorders. We also explore circadian genetics and psychopathology and the selective pressures on the evolution of clocks. Last, a lively debate is presented on whether circadian factors are central to mood disorders. Emerging from research on circadian rhythms is a model of the interaction among genes, sleep, and the environment that converges on the circadian clock to influence susceptibility to developing psychopathology. This model may lend insight into effective treatments for mood disorders and inform development of new interventions.

  5. [Circadian clocks and energy metabolism in rodents].

    PubMed

    Challet, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythmicity is an important component of physiological processes which provides them with a 24-hour temporal organization and adjustment to cyclical changes in the environment. Circadian rhythms are controlled by a network of endogenous clocks, comprising the main clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus and many secondary clocks in the brain and peripheral tissues. All aspects of energy metabolism, from food intake to intracellular signaling pathways, are strongly influenced by circadian rhythmicity. In turn, meal timing is an efficient synchronizer (time-giver) to set the phase of the peripheral clocks, while the suprachiasmatic clock is synchronized by ambient light. In certain nutritional conditions (i.e., low- or high-calory diets), metabolic factors remaining to be identified modulate the functioning of the suprachiasmatic clock. Animal models of obesity and diabetes show circadian alterations. Conversely, when circadian rhythmicity is disturbed, either due to genetically defective circadian clocks, or to circadian desynchronization (chronic light exposure or repeated meals at odd times of the cycle), lipid and glucose metabolism is deregulated. The metabolic impact of circadian desynchronization justifies the development of preventive or therapeutic strategies that could rely, among others, on dietary interventions combining timed meals and specific composition.

  6. [Relation between dementia and circadian rhythm disturbance].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kei; Meguro, Kenichi

    2014-03-01

    Dementia and circadian rhythm disturbance are closely linked. First, dementia patient shows circadian rhythm disorders (e.g. insomnia, night wandering, daytime sleep). These symptoms are a burden for caregivers. Circadian rhythm disturbance of dementia relates ADL and cognitive impairment, and diurnal rhythm disorder of blood pressure and body temperature. Some study shows that circadian rhythm disorders in dementia are a disturbance of neural network between suprachiasmatic nucleus and cerebral white matter, and involvement of both frontal lobes, left parietal and occipital cortex, left temporoparietal region. The first-line treatment of circadian rhythm disturbance should be non-drug therapy (e.g. exercise, bright light exposure, reduce caffeine intake, etc.). If physician prescribe drugs, keep the rule of low-dose and short-term and avoid benzodiazepines. Atypical antipsychotic drugs like risperidone and some antidepressants are useful for treatment of insomnia in dementia. But this usage is off-label. So we must well inform to patient and caregiver, and get consent about treatment. Second, some study shows circadian rhythm disorder is a risk factor of dementia. However, we should discuss that circadian rhythm disturbance is "risk factor of dementia" or "prodromal symptom of dementia". If a clinician finds circadian rhythm disorder in elderly people, should be examined cognitive and ADL function, and careful about that patients have dementia or will develop dementia.

  7. Circadian rhythms of clock gene expression in the cerebellum of serotonin-deficient Pet-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Erin V; Mintz, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin plays an important role in the central regulation of circadian clock function. Serotonin levels are generally higher in the brain during periods of high activity, and these periods are in turn heavily regulated by the circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. However, the role of serotonin as a regulator of circadian rhythms elsewhere in the brain has not been extensively examined. In this study, we examined circadian rhythms of clock gene expression in the cerebellum in mice lacking the Pet-1 transcription factor, which results in a developed brain that is deficient in serotonin neurons. If serotonin helps to synchronize rhythms in brain regions other than the suprachiasmatic nucleus, we would expect to see differences in clock gene expression in these serotonin deficient mice. We found minor differences in the expression of Per1 and Per2 in the knockout mice as compared to wild type, but these differences were small and of questionable functional importance. We also measured the response of cerebellar clocks to injections of the serotonin agonist 8-OH-DPAT during the early part of the night. No effect on clock genes was observed, though the immediate-early gene Fos showed increased expression in wild type mice but not the knockouts. These results suggest that serotonin is not an important mediator of circadian rhythms in the cerebellum in a way that parallels its regulation of the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

  8. The circadian clock of Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher L.; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks organize our inner physiology with respect to the external world providing life with the ability to anticipate and thereby better prepare for major fluctuations in its environment. Circadian systems are widely represented in nearly all major branches of life except archaebacteria, and within the eukaryotes the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa has served for nearly half a century as a durable model organism for uncovering the basic circadian physiology and molecular biology. Studies using Neurospora have clarified our fundamental understanding of the clock as nested positive and negative feedback loops regulated through transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes. These feedback loops are centered on a limited number of proteins that form molecular complexes, and their regulation provides a physical explanation for nearly all clock properties. This review will introduce the basics of circadian rhythms, the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, and provide an overview of the molecular components and regulation of the circadian clock. PMID:21707668

  9. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Julien Q. M.; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L.; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N.; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  10. Circadian rhythms and treatment implications in depression.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Palmiero; Martiadis, Vassilis; Maj, Mario

    2011-08-15

    In humans almost all physiological and behavioural functions occur on a rhythmic basis. Therefore the possibility that delays, advances or desynchronizations of circadian rhythms may play a role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders is an interesting field of research. In particular mood disorders such as seasonal affective disorder and major depression have been linked to circadian rhythms alterations. Furthermore, the antidepressant efficacy of both pharmacological and non-pharmacological strategies affecting endogenous circadian rhythms, such as new antidepressant medications, light-therapy and sleep deprivation, is consistent with the idea that circadian alterations may represent a core component of depression, at least in a subgroup of depressed patients. This paper briefly describes the molecular and genetic mechanisms regulating the endogenous clock system, and reviews the literature supporting the relationships between depression, antidepressant treatments and changes in circadian rhythms.

  11. Genetic basis of human circadian rhythm disorders.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher R; Huang, Angela L; Ptáček, Louis J; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2013-05-01

    Circadian rhythm disorders constitute a group of phenotypes that usually present as altered sleep-wake schedules. Until a human genetics approach was applied to investigate these traits, the genetic components regulating human circadian rhythm and sleep behaviors remained mysterious. Steady advances in the last decade have dramatically improved our understanding of the genes involved in circadian rhythmicity and sleep regulation. Finding these genes presents new opportunities to use a wide range of approaches, including in vitro molecular studies and in vivo animal modeling, to elevate our understanding of how sleep and circadian rhythms are regulated and maintained. Ultimately, this knowledge will reveal how circadian and sleep disruption contribute to various ailments and shed light on how best to maintain and recover good health.

  12. The Circadian Clock Coordinates Ribosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Symul, Laura; Martin, Eva; Atger, Florian; Naef, Felix; Gachon, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Biological rhythms play a fundamental role in the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. Rhythmic circadian expression of clock-controlled genes is orchestrated by a molecular clock that relies on interconnected negative feedback loops of transcription regulators. Here we show that the circadian clock exerts its function also through the regulation of mRNA translation. Namely, the circadian clock influences the temporal translation of a subset of mRNAs involved in ribosome biogenesis by controlling the transcription of translation initiation factors as well as the clock-dependent rhythmic activation of signaling pathways involved in their regulation. Moreover, the circadian oscillator directly regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs. Thus the circadian clock exerts a major role in coordinating transcription and translation steps underlying ribosome biogenesis. PMID:23300384

  13. The sweet tooth of the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Fu, Minnie; Yang, Xiaoyong

    2017-08-15

    The endogenous circadian clock is a key regulator of daily metabolic processes. On the other hand, circadian clocks in a broad range of tissues can be tuned by extrinsic and intrinsic metabolic cues. The bidirectional interaction between circadian clocks and metabolism involves both transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Nuclear receptors exemplify the transcriptional programs that couple molecular clocks to metabolism. The post-translational modifications of the core clock machinery are known to play a key role in metabolic entrainment of circadian clocks. O-linked N-acetylglucosamine modification (O-GlcNAcylation) of intracellular proteins is a key mediator of metabolic response to nutrient availability. This review highlights our current understanding of the role of protein O-GlcNAcylation in mediating metabolic input and output of the circadian clock. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. Stem cells and the circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Weger, Meltem; Diotel, Nicolas; Dorsemans, Anne-Claire; Dickmeis, Thomas; Weger, Benjamin D

    2017-09-09

    The circadian timing system is a complex biological network of interacting circadian clocks that regulates 24h rhythms of behavioral and physiological processes. One intriguing observation is that stem cell homeostasis is subject to circadian clock regulation. Rhythmic oscillations have been observed in a variety of embryonic and adult stem cell dependent processes, such as hematopoietic progenitor cell migration, the hair follicle cycle, bone remodeling, regenerative myogenesis and neurogenesis. This review aims to discuss the nature of the circadian clock in embryonic stem cells and how it changes during differentiation. Furthermore, it will examine how the circadian clock contributes to adult stem cell function in different tissues of the body with an emphasis on the brain and adult neurogenesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Circadian rhythms in cardiac gene expression.

    PubMed

    Young, Martin E

    2003-12-01

    Circadian rhythms in blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output have been intensely studied, largely due to the well-documented phenomenon of increased cardiovascular death in the early hours of the morning. Circadian rhythmicity in both cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology has been attributed primarily to diurnal variations in neurohumoral factors, such as sympathetic activity. It has become increasingly apparent that the intrinsic properties of the heart (seen at the level of gene and protein expression, energy metabolism, and contractile function) show significant fluctuations during the course of the day. These changes might be due to extracardiac (eg, neurohumoral factors) and/or intracardiac (eg, circadian clocks) influences. Circadian clocks are transcriptionally based, molecular mechanisms that enable the cell to anticipate diurnal variations in environmental stimuli. The cardiac circadian clock synchronizes responsiveness of the heart to diurnal variations in its environment, and impairment of this mechanism might contribute to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease.

  16. [Circadian clocks and lifestyle-related diseases].

    PubMed

    Ando, Hitoshi

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated relationships between the disturbance of circadian rhythm and the development of lifestyle-related diseases. First, epidemiological studies showed that rotating shift workers are more likely to develop obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, and cancers than day shift employees. In addition, mice with their circadian rhythm chronically impaired by alteration of the light-dark cycle also develop such diseases. Furthermore, both the genotypes and genetic modifications of the clock genes are associated with the development of lifestyle-related diseases in humans and mice, respectively. Finally, circadian clocks in peripheral tissues are impaired in both patients with type 2 diabetes and obese diabetic mice, probably not due to metabolic abnormalities, but to the lifestyle, aging, and/or genetic factors. Thus, disturbance of the circadian rhythm is an important cause of lifestyle-related diseases, and therefore the circadian clocks are attractive therapeutic targets for preventing and treating these conditions.

  17. Metabolic consequences of sleep and circadian disorders

    PubMed Central

    Depner, Christopher M.; Stothard, Ellen R.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms modulate or control daily physiological patterns with importance for normal metabolic health. Sleep deficiencies associated with insufficient sleep schedules, insomnia with short-sleep duration, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, circadian misalignment, shift work, night eating syndrome and sleep-related eating disorder may all contribute to metabolic dysregulation. Sleep deficiencies and circadian disruption associated with metabolic dysregulation may contribute to weight gain, obesity, and type 2 diabetes potentially by altering timing and amount of food intake, disrupting energy balance, inflammation, impairing glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Given the rapidly increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases, it is important to recognize the role of sleep and circadian disruption in the development, progression, and morbidity of metabolic disease. Some findings indicate sleep treatments and countermeasures improve metabolic health, but future clinical research investigating prevention and treatment of chronic metabolic disorders through treatment of sleep and circadian disruption is needed. PMID:24816752

  18. The Dorsomedial Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Times Circadian Expression of Kiss1 and the Luteinizing Hormone Surge

    PubMed Central

    Smarr, Benjamin L.; Morris, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Ovulation in mammals is gated by a master circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). GnRH neurons represent the converging pathway through which the brain triggers ovulation, but precisely how the SCN times GnRH neurons is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that neurons expressing kisspeptin, a neuropeptide coded by the Kiss1 gene and necessary for the activation of GnRH cells during ovulation, represent a relay station for circadian information that times ovulation. We first show that the circadian increase of Kiss1 expression, as well as the activation of GnRH cells, relies on intact ipsilateral neural input from the SCN. Second, by desynchronizing the dorsomedial (dm) and ventrolateral (vl) subregions of the SCN, we show that a clock residing in the dmSCN acts independently of the light-dark cycle, and the vlSCN, to time Kiss1 expression in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and that this rhythm is always in phase with the LH surge. In addition, we show that although the timing of the LH surge is governed by the dmSCN, its amplitude likely depends on the phase coherence between the vlSCN and dmSCN. Our results suggest that whereas dmSCN neuronal oscillators are sufficient to time the LH surge through input to kisspeptin cells in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, the phase coherence among dmSCN, vlSCN, and extra-SCN oscillators is critical for shaping it. They also suggest that female reproductive disorders associated with nocturnal shift work could emerge from the desynchronization between subregional oscillators within the master circadian clock. PMID:22454148

  19. The dorsomedial suprachiasmatic nucleus times circadian expression of Kiss1 and the luteinizing hormone surge.

    PubMed

    Smarr, Benjamin L; Morris, Emma; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2012-06-01

    Ovulation in mammals is gated by a master circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). GnRH neurons represent the converging pathway through which the brain triggers ovulation, but precisely how the SCN times GnRH neurons is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that neurons expressing kisspeptin, a neuropeptide coded by the Kiss1 gene and necessary for the activation of GnRH cells during ovulation, represent a relay station for circadian information that times ovulation. We first show that the circadian increase of Kiss1 expression, as well as the activation of GnRH cells, relies on intact ipsilateral neural input from the SCN. Second, by desynchronizing the dorsomedial (dm) and ventrolateral (vl) subregions of the SCN, we show that a clock residing in the dmSCN acts independently of the light-dark cycle, and the vlSCN, to time Kiss1 expression in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and that this rhythm is always in phase with the LH surge. In addition, we show that although the timing of the LH surge is governed by the dmSCN, its amplitude likely depends on the phase coherence between the vlSCN and dmSCN. Our results suggest that whereas dmSCN neuronal oscillators are sufficient to time the LH surge through input to kisspeptin cells in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, the phase coherence among dmSCN, vlSCN, and extra-SCN oscillators is critical for shaping it. They also suggest that female reproductive disorders associated with nocturnal shift work could emerge from the desynchronization between subregional oscillators within the master circadian clock.

  20. Neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment counteracts circadian arrhythmicity induced by phase shifts of the light-dark cycle in female and male Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Brian J; Onishi, Kenneth G; Zucker, Irving

    2013-07-12

    Studies of rats and voles suggest that distinct pathways emanating from the anterior hypothalamic-retrochiasmatic area and the mediobasal hypothalamic arcuate nucleus independently generate ultradian rhythms (URs) in hormone secretion and behavior. We evaluated the hypothesis that destruction of arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons, in concert with dampening of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) circadian rhythmicity, would compromize the generation of ultradian rhythms (URs) of locomotor activity. Siberian hamsters retain-->of both sexes treated neonatally with monosodium glutamate (MSG) that destroys ARC neurons were subjected in adulthood to a circadian disrupting phase-shift protocol (DPS) that produces SCN arrhythmia. MSG treatments induced hypogonadism and obesity, retain-->and markedly reduced the size of the optic chiasm and optic nerves. MSG-treated hamsters exhibited normal entrainment to the light-dark cycle, but MSG treatretain-->ment counteracted the circadian arrhythmicity induced by the DPS protocol: only 6% of retain-->MSG-treated hamsters exhibited circadian arrhythmia, whereas 50% of control hamsters were circadian disrupted. In MSG-treated hamsters that retained circadian rhythmicity after DPS treatment, quantitative parameters of URs appeared normal, but in the two MSG-treated hamsters that became circadian arrhythmic after DPS, both dark-phase and light-phase URs were abolished. Although preliminary, these data are consistent with reports in voles suggesting that the combined disruption of SCN and ARC function impairs the expression of behavioral URs. The data also suggest that light thresholds for entrainment of circadian rhythms may be lower than those required to disrupt circadian organization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The Dorsal Medial Habenula Minimally Impacts Circadian Regulation of Locomotor Activity and Sleep.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yun-Wei A; Gile, Jennifer J; Perez, Jazmine G; Morton, Glenn; Ben-Hamo, Miriam; Turner, Eric E; de la Iglesia, Horacio O

    2017-09-01

    In nocturnal rodents, voluntary wheel-running activity (WRA) represents a self-reinforcing behavior. We have previously demonstrated that WRA is markedly reduced in mice with a region-specific deletion of the transcription factor Pou4f1 (Brn3a), which leads to an ablation of the dorsal medial habenula (dMHb). The decrease in WRA in these dMHb-lesioned (dMHb(CKO)) mice suggests that the dMHb constitutes a critical center for conveying reinforcement by exercise. However, WRA also represents a prominent output of the circadian system, and the possibility remains that the dMHb is a source of input to the master circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the integrity of the circadian system in dMHb(CKO) mice. Here we show that the developmental lesion of the dMHb reduces WRA under both a light-dark cycle and constant darkness, increases the circadian period of WRA, but has no effect on the circadian amplitude or period of home cage activity or the daily amplitude of sleep stages, suggesting that the lengthening of period is a result of the decreased WRA in the mutant mice. Polysomnographic sleep recordings show that dMHb(CKO) mice have an overall unaltered daily amplitude of sleep stages but have fragmented sleep and an overall increase in total rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Photoresponsiveness is intact in dMHb(CKO) mice, but compared with control animals, they reentrain faster to a 6-h abrupt phase delay protocol. Circadian changes in WRA of dMHb(CKO) mice do not appear to emerge within the central pacemaker, as circadian expression of the clock genes Per1 and Per2 within the SCN is normal. We do find some evidence for fragmented sleep and an overall increase in total REM sleep, supporting a model in which the dMHb is part of the neural circuitry encoding motivation and involved in the manifestation of some of the symptoms of depression.

  2. Astronaut Charles Conrad uses lunar equipment conveyer at Lunar Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, uses the lunar equipment conveyer (LEC) at the Lunar Module during the Apollo 12 extravehicular activity on the lunar surface. This photograph was taken by Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot.

  3. 19 CFR 123.24 - Sealing of conveyances or compartments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS RELATIONS WITH CANADA AND MEXICO Shipments in Transit Through Canada or Mexico § 123.24 Sealing of conveyances or compartments. (a) Sealing required. Merchandise in transit...

  4. 45. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING CONVEYOR BELT SYSTEM WHICH CONVEY THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. INTERIOR VIEW SHOWING CONVEYOR BELT SYSTEM WHICH CONVEY THE HARDENED NAILS TO THE DRAWBACK TUBE FOR TEMPERING; MOTIONED STOPPED - LaBelle Iron Works, Thirtieth & Wood Streets, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  5. 9 CFR 88.3 - Standards for conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... conveyances used for the commercial transportation of equines for slaughter must: (1) Be designed, constructed... transported (e.g., provides adequate ventilation, contains no sharp protrusions, etc.); (2) Include means...

  6. 9 CFR 88.3 - Standards for conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... conveyances used for the commercial transportation of equines for slaughter must: (1) Be designed, constructed... transported (e.g., provides adequate ventilation, contains no sharp protrusions, etc.); (2) Include means...

  7. Endogenous circadian rhythm in human motor activity uncoupled from circadian influences on cardiac dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Hu, Kun; Hilton, Michael F; Shea, Steven A; Stanley, H Eugene

    2007-12-26

    The endogenous circadian pacemaker influences key physiologic functions, such as body temperature and heart rate, and is normally synchronized with the sleep/wake cycle. Epidemiological studies demonstrate a 24-h pattern in adverse cardiovascular events with a peak at approximately 10 a.m. It is unknown whether this pattern in cardiac risk is caused by a day/night pattern of behaviors, including activity level and/or influences from the internal circadian pacemaker. We recently found that a scaling index of cardiac vulnerability has an endogenous circadian peak at the circadian phase corresponding to approximately 10 a.m., which conceivably could contribute to the morning peak in cardiac risk. Here, we test whether this endogenous circadian influence on cardiac dynamics is caused by circadian-mediated changes in motor activity or whether activity and heart rate dynamics are decoupled across the circadian cycle. We analyze high-frequency recordings of motion from young healthy subjects during two complementary protocols that decouple the sleep/wake cycle from the circadian cycle while controlling scheduled behaviors. We find that static activity properties (mean and standard deviation) exhibit significant circadian rhythms with a peak at the circadian phase corresponding to 5-9 p.m. ( approximately 9 h later than the peak in the scale-invariant index of heartbeat fluctuations). In contrast, dynamic characteristics of the temporal scale-invariant organization of activity fluctuations (long-range correlations) do not exhibit a circadian rhythm. These findings suggest that endogenous circadian-mediated activity variations are not responsible for the endogenous circadian rhythm in the scale-invariant structure of heartbeat fluctuations and likely do not contribute to the increase in cardiac risk at approximately 10 a.m.

  8. Endogenous circadian rhythm in human motor activity uncoupled from circadian influences on cardiac dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Hu, Kun; Hilton, Michael F.; Shea, Steven A.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2007-01-01

    The endogenous circadian pacemaker influences key physiologic functions, such as body temperature and heart rate, and is normally synchronized with the sleep/wake cycle. Epidemiological studies demonstrate a 24-h pattern in adverse cardiovascular events with a peak at ≈10 a.m. It is unknown whether this pattern in cardiac risk is caused by a day/night pattern of behaviors, including activity level and/or influences from the internal circadian pacemaker. We recently found that a scaling index of cardiac vulnerability has an endogenous circadian peak at the circadian phase corresponding to ≈10 a.m., which conceivably could contribute to the morning peak in cardiac risk. Here, we test whether this endogenous circadian influence on cardiac dynamics is caused by circadian-mediated changes in motor activity or whether activity and heart rate dynamics are decoupled across the circadian cycle. We analyze high-frequency recordings of motion from young healthy subjects during two complementary protocols that decouple the sleep/wake cycle from the circadian cycle while controlling scheduled behaviors. We find that static activity properties (mean and standard deviation) exhibit significant circadian rhythms with a peak at the circadian phase corresponding to 5–9 p.m. (≈9 h later than the peak in the scale-invariant index of heartbeat fluctuations). In contrast, dynamic characteristics of the temporal scale-invariant organization of activity fluctuations (long-range correlations) do not exhibit a circadian rhythm. These findings suggest that endogenous circadian-mediated activity variations are not responsible for the endogenous circadian rhythm in the scale-invariant structure of heartbeat fluctuations and likely do not contribute to the increase in cardiac risk at ≈10 a.m. PMID:18093917

  9. Waste dislodging and conveyance testing summary and conclusions to date

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker, M.W.; Hatchell, B.K.; Mullen, O.D.

    1994-09-01

    This document summarizes recent work performed by the Waste Dislodging and Conveyance technology development program to provide assistance with the retrieval of wastes from the Hanford single-shell tanks (SSTs). This work is sponsored by the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) Office with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. A baseline technology of high-pressure water-jet dislodging and pneumatic conveyance integrated as a scarifier is proposed as a means of retrieval. The tests and studies described were performed to demonstrate that at least one robust technology exists that could be effectively used with low water-addition arm-based systems. These results are preliminary and do not represent an optimized baseline. The Waste Dislodging and Conveyance work thus far has demonstrated that waterjet mobilization and air conveyance can mobilize and convey SST waste simulants at the target rates while operating within the space envelope and the dynamic loading constraints of deployment devices. The recommended technologies are well proven in industrial applications and are quite robust, yet lightweight and relatively benign to the retrieval environment. The baseline approach has versatility to continuously dislodge and convey a broad range of waste forms, from hard wastes to soft sludge wastes. The approach also has the major advantage of being noncontact with the waste surface under normal operation.

  10. Characterisation, analysis of expression and localisation of circadian clock genes from the perspective of photoperiodism in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum.

    PubMed

    Barberà, Miquel; Collantes-Alegre, Jorge Mariano; Martínez-Torres, David

    2017-04-01

    Aphids are typical photoperiodic insects that switch from viviparous parthenogenetic reproduction typical of long day seasons to oviparous sexual reproduction triggered by the shortening of photoperiod in autumn yielding an overwintering egg in which an embryonic diapause takes place. While the involvement of the circadian clock genes in photoperiodism in mammals is well established, there is still some controversy on their participation in insects. The availability of the genome of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum places this species as an excellent model to investigate the involvement of the circadian system in the aphid seasonal response. In the present report, we have advanced in the characterisation of the circadian clock genes and showed that these genes display extensive alternative splicing. Moreover, the expression of circadian clock genes, analysed at different moments of the day, showed a robust cycling of central clock genes period and timeless. Furthermore, the rhythmic expression of these genes was shown to be rapidly dampened under DD (continuous darkness conditions), thus supporting the model of a seasonal response based on a heavily dampened circadian oscillator. Additionally, increased expression of some of the circadian clock genes under short-day conditions suggest their involvement in the induction of the aphid seasonal response. Finally, in situ localisation of transcripts of genes period and timeless in the aphid brain revealed the site of clock neurons for the first time in aphids. Two groups of clock cells were identified: the Dorsal Neurons (DN) and the Lateral Neurons (LN), both in the protocerebrum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The cholinergic system, circadian rhythmicity, and time memory.

    PubMed

    Hut, R A; Van der Zee, E A

    2011-08-10

    This review provides an overview of the interaction between the mammalian cholinergic system and circadian system, and its possible role in time memory. Several studies made clear that circadian (daily) fluctuations in acetylcholine (ACh) release, cholinergic enzyme activity and cholinergic receptor expression varies remarkably between species and even strains. Apparently, cholinergic features can be flexibly adjusted to the needs of a species or strain. Nevertheless, it can be generalized that circadian rhythmicity in the cholinergic system is characterized by high ACh release during the active phase of an individual. During the active phase, the activity of the ACh synthesizing enzyme Choline Acetyltransferase (ChAT) is enhanced, and the activity of the ACh degrading enzyme Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is reduced. The number of free, unbound and thus available muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) is highest when ACh release is lowest. The cholinergic innervation of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the hypothalamic circadian master clock, arises from the cholinergic forebrain and brain stem nuclei. The density of cholinergic fibers and terminals is modest as compared to other hypothalamic nuclei. This is the case for rat, hamster and mouse, three chronobiological model rodent species studied by us. A new finding is that the rat SCN contains some local cholinergic neurons. Hamster SCN contains less cholinergic neurons, whereas the mouse SCN is devoid of such cells. ACh has an excitatory effect on SCN cells (at least in vivo), and functions in close interaction with other neurotransmitters. Originally it was thought that ACh transferred retinal light information to the SCN. This turned out to be wrong. Thereafter, the phase shifting effects of ACh prompted researches to view ACh as an agent for nocturnal clock resetting. It is still not clear, however, what the function consequence is of SCN cholinergic neurotransmission. Here, we postulate the hypothesis

  12. Understanding What is Meant from What is Said: A Study in Conversationally Conveyed Requests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Herbert H.; Lucy, Peter

    1975-01-01

    Twenty-three subjects drew deductions from ten different pairs of conversationally conveyed requests, of which the first conveyed a positive request, the second, a negative. Some evidence shows the listener constructs the literal meaning before the conveyed meaning. (CK)

  13. [Circadian markers and genes in bipolar disorder].

    PubMed

    Yeim, S; Boudebesse, C; Etain, B; Belliviera, F

    2015-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is a severe and complex multifactorial disease, characterized by alternance of acute episodes of depression and mania/hypomania, interspaced by euthymic periods. The etiological determinants of bipolar disorder yet, are still poorly understood. For the last 30 years, chronobiology is an important field of investigation to better understand the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. We conducted a review using Medline, ISI Database, EMBase, PsyInfo up to January 2015, using the following keywords combinations: "mood disorder", "bipolar disorder", "depression", "unipolar disorder", "major depressive disorder", "affective disorder", for psychiatric conditions; and "circadian rhythms", "circadian markers", "circadian gene", "clock gene", "melatonin" for circadian rhythms. The search critera was presence of word in any field of the article. Quantitative and qualitative circadian abnormalities are associated with bipolar disorders both during acute episodes and euthymic periods, suggesting that these altered circadian rhythms may represent biological trait markers of the disorder. These circadian dysfunctions were assessed by various validated tools including polysomnography, actigraphy, sleep diaries, chronotype assessments and blood melatonin/cortisol measures. Other altered endogenous circadian activities have also been reported in bipolar patients, such as hormones secretion, core body temperature or fibroblasts activity. Moreover, these markers were also altered in healthy relatives of bipolar patients, suggesting a degree of heritability. Several genetic association studies have also showed associations between multiple circadian genes and bipolar disorder, such as CLOCK, ARTNL1, GSK3β, PER3, NPAS2, NR1D1, TIMELESS, RORA, RORB, and CSNK1ε. Thus, these circadian gene variants may contribute to the genetic susceptibility of the disease. Furthermore, the study of the clock system may help to better understand some phenotypic aspects like the

  14. Circadian Forced Desynchrony of the Master Clock Leads to Phenotypic Manifestation of Depression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sikkema, Carl

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, a master circadian clock within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus maintains the phase coherence among a wide array of behavioral and physiological circadian rhythms. Affective disorders are typically associated with disruption of this fine-tuned “internal synchronization,” but whether this internal misalignment is part of the physiopathology of mood disorders is not clear. To date, depressive-like behavior in animal models has been induced by methods that fail to specifically target the SCN regulation of internal synchronization as the mode to generate depression. In the rat, exposure to a 22-h light-dark cycle (LD22) leads to the uncoupling of two distinct populations of neuronal oscillators within the SCN. This genetically, neurally, and pharmacologically intact animal model represents a unique opportunity to assess the effect of a systematic challenge to the central circadian pacemaker on phenotypic manifestations of mood disorders. We show that LD22 circadian forced desynchrony in rats induces depressive-like phenotypes including anhedonia, sexual dysfunction, and increased immobility in the forced swim test (FST), as well as changes in the levels and turnover rates of monoamines within the prefrontal cortex. Desynchronized rats show increased FST immobility during the dark (active) phase but decreased immobility during the light (rest) phase, suggesting a decrease in the amplitude of the normal daily oscillation in this behavioral manifestation of depression. Our results support the notion that the prolonged internal misalignment of circadian rhythms induced by environmental challenge to the central circadian pacemaker may constitute part of the etiology of depression. PMID:28090585

  15. Causes and Consequences of Hyperexcitation in Central Clock Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Diekman, Casey O.; Belle, Mino D. C.; Irwin, Robert P.; Allen, Charles N.; Piggins, Hugh D.; Forger, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperexcited states, including depolarization block and depolarized low amplitude membrane oscillations (DLAMOs), have been observed in neurons of the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the site of the central mammalian circadian (∼24-hour) clock. The causes and consequences of this hyperexcitation have not yet been determined. Here, we explore how individual ionic currents contribute to these hyperexcited states, and how hyperexcitation can then influence molecular circadian timekeeping within SCN neurons. We developed a mathematical model of the electrical activity of SCN neurons, and experimentally verified its prediction that DLAMOs depend on post-synaptic L-type calcium current. The model predicts that hyperexcited states cause high intracellular calcium concentrations, which could trigger transcription of clock genes. The model also predicts that circadian control of certain ionic currents can induce hyperexcited states. Putting it all together into an integrative model, we show how membrane potential and calcium concentration provide a fast feedback that can enhance rhythmicity of the intracellular circadian clock. This work puts forward a novel role for electrical activity in circadian timekeeping, and suggests that hyperexcited states provide a general mechanism for linking membrane electrical dynamics to transcription activation in the nucleus. PMID:23990770

  16. Loss of dopamine disrupts circadian rhythms in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fifel, Karim; Cooper, Howard M

    2014-11-01

    Although a wide range of physiological functions regulated by dopamine (DA) display circadian variations, the role of DA in the generation and/or modulation of these rhythms is unknown. In Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, in addition to the classical motor symptoms, disturbances of the pattern of daily rest/wake cycles are common non-motor symptoms. We investigated daily and circadian rhythms of rest/activity behaviors in a transgenic MitoPark mouse model with selective inactivation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) resulting in a slow and progressive degeneration of DA neurons in midbrain structures. Correlated with this, MitoPark mice show a gradual reduction in locomotor activity beginning at about 20weeks of age. In a light-dark cycle, MitoPark mice exhibit a daily pattern of rest/activity rhythms that shows an age-dependent decline in both the amplitude and the stability of the rhythm, coupled with an increased fragmentation of day/night activities. When the circadian system is challenged by exposure to constant darkness or constant light conditions, control littermates retain a robust free-running circadian locomotor rhythm, whereas in MitoPark mice, locomotor rhythms are severely disturbed or completely abolished. Re-exposure to a light/dark cycle completely restores daily locomotor rhythms. MitoPark mice and control littermates express similar masking behaviors under a 1h light/1h dark regime, suggesting that the maintenance of a daily pattern of rest/activity in arrhythmic MitoPark mice can be attributed to the acute inhibitory and stimulatory effects of light and darkness. These results imply that, in addition to the classical motor abnormalities observed in PD, the loss of the midbrain DA neurons leads to impairments of the circadian control of rest/activity rhythms.

  17. Circadian Consequence of Socio-Sexual Interactions in Fruit Flies Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Shahnaz Rahman; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2011-01-01

    In fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster, courtship is an elaborate ritual comprising chasing, dancing and singing by males to lure females for mating. Courtship interactions peak in the night and heterosexual couples display enhanced nighttime activity. What we do not know is if such socio-sexual interactions (SSI) leave long-lasting after-effects on circadian clock(s). Here we report the results of our study aimed at examining the after-effects of SSI (as a result of co-habitation of males and females in groups) between males and females on their circadian locomotor activity rhythm. Males undergo reduction in the evening activity peak and lengthening of circadian period, while females show a decrease in overall activity. Such after-effects, at least in males, require functional circadian clocks during SSI as loss-of-function clock mutants and wild type flies interacting under continuous light (LL), do not display them. Interestingly, males with electrically silenced Pigment Dispersing Factor (PDF)-positive ventral lateral (LNv) clock neurons continue to show SSI mediated reduction in evening activity peak, suggesting that the LNv clock neurons are dispensable for SSI mediated after-effects on locomotor activity rhythm. Such after-effects in females may not be clock-dependent because clock manipulated females with prior exposure to males show decrease in overall activity, more or less similar to rhythmic wild type females. The expression of SSI mediated after-effects requires a functional olfactory system in males because males with compromised olfactory ability do not display them. These results suggest that SSI causes male-specific, long-lasting changes in the circadian clocks of Drosophila, which requires the presence of functional clocks and intact olfactory ability in males. PMID:22194827

  18. Temporally chimeric mice reveal flexibility of circadian period-setting in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Smyllie, Nicola J.; Chesham, Johanna E.; Hamnett, Ryan; Maywood, Elizabeth S.; Hastings, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master circadian clock controlling daily behavior in mammals. It consists of a heterogeneous network of neurons, in which cell-autonomous molecular feedback loops determine the period and amplitude of circadian oscillations of individual cells. In contrast, circuit-level properties of coherence, synchrony, and ensemble period are determined by intercellular signals and are embodied in a circadian wave of gene expression that progresses daily across the SCN. How cell-autonomous and circuit-level mechanisms interact in timekeeping is poorly understood. To explore this interaction, we used intersectional genetics to create temporally chimeric mice with SCN containing dopamine 1a receptor (Drd1a) cells with an intrinsic period of 24 h alongside non-Drd1a cells with 20-h clocks. Recording of circadian behavior in vivo alongside cellular molecular pacemaking in SCN slices in vitro demonstrated that such chimeric circuits form robust and resilient circadian clocks. It also showed that the computation of ensemble period is nonlinear. Moreover, the chimeric circuit sustained a wave of gene expression comparable to that of nonchimeric SCN, demonstrating that this circuit-level property is independent of differences in cell-intrinsic periods. The relative dominance of 24-h Drd1a and 20-h non-Drd1a neurons in setting ensemble period could be switched by exposure to resonant or nonresonant 24-h or 20-h lighting cycles. The chimeric circuit therefore reveals unanticipated principles of circuit-level operation underlying the emergent plasticity, resilience, and robustness of the SCN clock. The spontaneous and light-driven flexibility of period observed in chimeric mice provides a new perspective on the concept of SCN pacemaker cells. PMID:26966234

  19. Circadian consequence of socio-sexual interactions in fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lone, Shahnaz Rahman; Sharma, Vijay Kumar

    2011-01-01

    In fruit flies Drosophila melanogaster, courtship is an elaborate ritual comprising chasing, dancing and singing by males to lure females for mating. Courtship interactions peak in the night and heterosexual couples display enhanced nighttime activity. What we do not know is if such socio-sexual interactions (SSI) leave long-lasting after-effects on circadian clock(s). Here we report the results of our study aimed at examining the after-effects of SSI (as a result of co-habitation of males and females in groups) between males and females on their circadian locomotor activity rhythm. Males undergo reduction in the evening activity peak and lengthening of circadian period, while females show a decrease in overall activity. Such after-effects, at least in males, require functional circadian clocks during SSI as loss-of-function clock mutants and wild type flies interacting under continuous light (LL), do not display them. Interestingly, males with electrically silenced Pigment Dispersing Factor (PDF)-positive ventral lateral (LNv) clock neurons continue to show SSI mediated reduction in evening activity peak, suggesting that the LNv clock neurons are dispensable for SSI mediated after-effects on locomotor activity rhythm. Such after-effects in females may not be clock-dependent because clock manipulated females with prior exposure to males show decrease in overall activity, more or less similar to rhythmic wild type females. The expression of SSI mediated after-effects requires a functional olfactory system in males because males with compromised olfactory ability do not display them. These results suggest that SSI causes male-specific, long-lasting changes in the circadian clocks of Drosophila, which requires the presence of functional clocks and intact olfactory ability in males.

  20. Inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis by sleep deprivation is independent of circadian disruption and melatonin suppression.

    PubMed

    Mueller, A D; Mear, R J; Mistlberger, R E

    2011-10-13

    Procedures that restrict or fragment sleep can inhibit neurogenesis in the hippocampus of adult rodents, although the underlying mechanism is unknown. We showed that rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation (RSD) by the platform-over-water method inhibits hippocampal cell proliferation in adrenalectomized rats with low-dose corticosterone clamp. This procedure also greatly disrupts daily behavioral rhythms. Given recent evidence for circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation, we asked whether disruption of circadian rhythms might play a role in the anti-neurogenic effects of sleep loss. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a 4-day RSD procedure or were exposed to constant bright light (LL) for 4 days or 10 weeks, a non-invasive procedure for eliminating circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology in this species. Proliferating cells in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus were identified by immunolabeling for the thymidine analogue 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine. Consistent with our previous results, the RSD procedure suppressed cell proliferation by ∼50%. By contrast, although LL attenuated or eliminated daily rhythms of activity and sleep-wake without affecting daily amounts of REM sleep, cell proliferation was not affected. Melatonin, a nocturnally secreted neurohormone that is inhibited by light, has been shown to promote survival of new neurons. We found that 3-weeks of LL eliminated daily rhythms and decreased plasma melatonin by 88% but did not significantly affect either total cell survival or survival of new neurons (doublecortin+). Finally, we measured cell proliferation rates at the beginning and near the end of the daily light period in rats entrained to a 12:12 light/lark (LD) cycle, but did not detect a daily rhythm. These results indicate that the antineurogenic effect of RSD is not secondary to disruption of circadian rhythms, and provide no evidence that hippocampal cell proliferation and survival are regulated by the circadian