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Sample records for neurons exert temporally

  1. Distinct inhibitory neurons exert temporally specific control over activity of a motoneuron receiving concurrent excitation and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kosei; Brezina, Vladimir; Weiss, Klaudiusz R; Jing, Jian

    2009-09-23

    Recent work suggests that concurrent excitation and inhibition originating in central pattern generators (CPGs) may be used to control rhythmic motoneuronal activity. The specific roles that the inhibition plays in such cases are not well understood, however, in part because of the lack of identification of presynaptic inhibitory neurons. Here we demonstrate that, in the Aplysia feeding CPG, inhibitory inputs may be critical for flexible control of the activity of motoneurons in different forms of behavior. The feeding CPG generates ingestive and egestive motor programs, differing in the high and low activity, respectively, of the motoneuron B8 during the retraction phase of the programs. We show that, during retraction, B8 receives concurrent excitation and inhibition that produces a high-conductance state. The inhibition originates in two types of CPG neurons, B4/5 and B70, that are more active in egestion than ingestion and play a role in suppressing B8 activity during egestion. In turn, the activities of both B4/5 and B70 are suppressed by the ingestion-promoting descending interneuron CBI-3 (for cerebral-buccal interneuron 3). Thus, concurrent excitation and inhibition may be an effective means of controlling motoneuronal activity in a behavior-dependent manner. More detailed analyses reveal, furthermore, that B4/5 and B70 exert complementary actions by acting preferentially in the early and late part of retraction, respectively. Thus, the use of multiple neurons to generate inhibitory inputs to motoneurons that receive concurrent excitation and inhibition brings an additional level of flexibility that allows a temporally specific control of motoneuronal activity within a single phase of motor programs.

  2. Temporal oscillations in neuronal nets.

    PubMed

    Ermentrout, G B; Cowan, J D

    1979-04-18

    A model for the interactions of cortical neurons is derived and analyzed. It is shown that small amplitude spatially inhomogeneous standing oscillations can bifurcate from the rest state. In a periodic domain, traveling wave trains exist. Stability of these patterns is discussed in terms of biological parameters. Homoclinic and heteroclinic orbits are demonstrated for the space-clamped system.

  3. Behavioral Sensitivity of Temporally Modulated Striatal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, George S.; Wilson, A. George; Matell, Matthew S.

    2011-01-01

    Recent investigations into the neural mechanisms that underlie temporal perception have revealed that the striatum is an important contributor to interval timing processes, and electrophysiological recording studies have shown that the firing rates of striatal neurons are modulated by the time in a trial at which an operant response is made. However, it remains unclear whether striatal firing rate modulations are related to the passage of time alone (i.e., whether temporal information is represented in an “abstract” manner independent of other attributes of biological importance), or whether this temporal information is embedded within striatal activity related to co-occurring contextual information, such as motor behaviors. This study evaluated these two hypotheses by recording from striatal neurons while rats performed a temporal production task. Rats were trained to respond at different nosepoke apertures for food reward under two simultaneously active reinforcement schedules: a variable-interval (VI-15 s) schedule and a fixed-interval (FI-15 s) schedule of reinforcement. Responding during a trial occurred in a sequential manner composing three phases; VI responding, FI responding, VI responding. The vast majority of task-sensitive striatal neurons (95%) varied their firing rates associated with equivalent behaviors (e.g., periods in which their snout was held within the nosepoke) across these behavioral phases, and 96% of cells varied their firing rates for the same behavior within a phase, thereby demonstrating their sensitivity to time. However, in a direct test of the abstract timing hypothesis, 91% of temporally modulated “hold” cells were further modulated by the overt motor behaviors associated with transitioning between nosepokes. As such, these data are inconsistent with the striatum representing time in an “abstract’ manner, but support the hypothesis that temporal information is embedded within contextual and motor functions of the

  4. Temporal correlations in neuronal avalanche occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, F.; Herrmann, H. J.; Plenz, D.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing cortical activity consists of sequences of synchronized bursts, named neuronal avalanches, whose size and duration are power law distributed. These features have been observed in a variety of systems and conditions, at all spatial scales, supporting scale invariance, universality and therefore criticality. However, the mechanisms leading to burst triggering, as well as the relationship between bursts and quiescence, are still unclear. The analysis of temporal correlations constitutes a major step towards a deeper understanding of burst dynamics. Here, we investigate the relation between avalanche sizes and quiet times, as well as between sizes of consecutive avalanches recorded in cortex slice cultures. We show that quiet times depend on the size of preceding avalanches and, at the same time, influence the size of the following one. Moreover we evidence that sizes of consecutive avalanches are correlated. In particular, we show that an avalanche tends to be larger or smaller than the following one for short or long time separation, respectively. Our analysis represents the first attempt to provide a quantitative estimate of correlations between activity and quiescence in the framework of neuronal avalanches and will help to enlighten the mechanisms underlying spontaneous activity.

  5. Temporal correlations in neuronal avalanche occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, F.; Herrmann, H. J.; Plenz, D.; de Arcangelis, L.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing cortical activity consists of sequences of synchronized bursts, named neuronal avalanches, whose size and duration are power law distributed. These features have been observed in a variety of systems and conditions, at all spatial scales, supporting scale invariance, universality and therefore criticality. However, the mechanisms leading to burst triggering, as well as the relationship between bursts and quiescence, are still unclear. The analysis of temporal correlations constitutes a major step towards a deeper understanding of burst dynamics. Here, we investigate the relation between avalanche sizes and quiet times, as well as between sizes of consecutive avalanches recorded in cortex slice cultures. We show that quiet times depend on the size of preceding avalanches and, at the same time, influence the size of the following one. Moreover we evidence that sizes of consecutive avalanches are correlated. In particular, we show that an avalanche tends to be larger or smaller than the following one for short or long time separation, respectively. Our analysis represents the first attempt to provide a quantitative estimate of correlations between activity and quiescence in the framework of neuronal avalanches and will help to enlighten the mechanisms underlying spontaneous activity. PMID:27094323

  6. Temporal correlations in neuronal avalanche occurrence.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, F; Herrmann, H J; Plenz, D; de Arcangelis, L

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing cortical activity consists of sequences of synchronized bursts, named neuronal avalanches, whose size and duration are power law distributed. These features have been observed in a variety of systems and conditions, at all spatial scales, supporting scale invariance, universality and therefore criticality. However, the mechanisms leading to burst triggering, as well as the relationship between bursts and quiescence, are still unclear. The analysis of temporal correlations constitutes a major step towards a deeper understanding of burst dynamics. Here, we investigate the relation between avalanche sizes and quiet times, as well as between sizes of consecutive avalanches recorded in cortex slice cultures. We show that quiet times depend on the size of preceding avalanches and, at the same time, influence the size of the following one. Moreover we evidence that sizes of consecutive avalanches are correlated. In particular, we show that an avalanche tends to be larger or smaller than the following one for short or long time separation, respectively. Our analysis represents the first attempt to provide a quantitative estimate of correlations between activity and quiescence in the framework of neuronal avalanches and will help to enlighten the mechanisms underlying spontaneous activity. PMID:27094323

  7. On the temporal organization of neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Fabrizio; Herrmann, Hans J; Plenz, Dietmar; De Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous activity of cortex in vitro and in vivo has been shown to organize as neuronal avalanches. Avalanches are cascades of neuronal activity that exhibit a power law in their size and duration distribution, typical features of balanced systems in a critical state. Recently it has been shown that the distribution of quiet times between consecutive avalanches in rat cortex slice cultures displays a non-monotonic behavior with a power law decay at short time scales. This behavior has been attributed to the slow alternation between up and down-states. Here we further characterize the avalanche process and investigate how the functional behavior of the quiet time distribution depends on the fine structure of avalanche sequences. By systematically removing smaller avalanches from the experimental time series we show that size and quiet times are correlated and highlight that avalanche occurrence exhibits the characteristic periodicity of θ and β/γ oscillations, which jointly emerge in most of the analyzed samples. Furthermore, our analysis indicates that smaller avalanches tend to be associated with faster β/γ oscillations, whereas larger ones are associated with slower θ and 1-2 Hz oscillations. In particular, large avalanches corresponding to θ cycles trigger cascades of smaller ones, which occur at β/γ frequency. This temporal structure follows closely the one of nested θ - β/γ oscillations. Finally we demonstrate that, because of the multiple time scales characterizing avalanche dynamics, the distributions of quiet times between avalanches larger than a certain size do not collapse onto a unique function when rescaled by the average occurrence rate. However, when considered separately in the up-state and in the down-state, these distributions are solely controlled by the respective average rate and two different unique function can be identified.

  8. On the temporal organization of neuronal avalanches

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Fabrizio; Herrmann, Hans J.; Plenz, Dietmar; De Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous activity of cortex in vitro and in vivo has been shown to organize as neuronal avalanches. Avalanches are cascades of neuronal activity that exhibit a power law in their size and duration distribution, typical features of balanced systems in a critical state. Recently it has been shown that the distribution of quiet times between consecutive avalanches in rat cortex slice cultures displays a non-monotonic behavior with a power law decay at short time scales. This behavior has been attributed to the slow alternation between up and down-states. Here we further characterize the avalanche process and investigate how the functional behavior of the quiet time distribution depends on the fine structure of avalanche sequences. By systematically removing smaller avalanches from the experimental time series we show that size and quiet times are correlated and highlight that avalanche occurrence exhibits the characteristic periodicity of θ and β/γ oscillations, which jointly emerge in most of the analyzed samples. Furthermore, our analysis indicates that smaller avalanches tend to be associated with faster β/γ oscillations, whereas larger ones are associated with slower θ and 1–2 Hz oscillations. In particular, large avalanches corresponding to θ cycles trigger cascades of smaller ones, which occur at β/γ frequency. This temporal structure follows closely the one of nested θ − β/γ oscillations. Finally we demonstrate that, because of the multiple time scales characterizing avalanche dynamics, the distributions of quiet times between avalanches larger than a certain size do not collapse onto a unique function when rescaled by the average occurrence rate. However, when considered separately in the up-state and in the down-state, these distributions are solely controlled by the respective average rate and two different unique function can be identified. PMID:25389393

  9. Ih-mediated depolarization enhances the temporal precision of neuronal integration

    PubMed Central

    Pavlov, Ivan; Scimemi, Annalisa; Savtchenko, Leonid; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Walker, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Feed-forward inhibition mediated by ionotropic GABAA receptors contributes to the temporal precision of neuronal signal integration. These receptors exert their inhibitory effect by shunting excitatory currents and by hyperpolarizing neurons. The relative roles of these mechanisms in neuronal computations are, however, incompletely understood. In this study, we show that by depolarizing the resting membrane potential relative to the reversal potential for GABAA receptors, the hyperpolarization-activated mixed cation current (Ih) maintains a voltage gradient for fast synaptic inhibition in hippocampal pyramidal cells. Pharmacological or genetic ablation of Ih broadens the depolarizing phase of afferent synaptic waveforms by hyperpolarizing the resting membrane potential. This increases the integration time window for action potential generation. These results indicate that the hyperpolarizing component of GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition has an important role in maintaining the temporal fidelity of coincidence detection and suggest a previously unrecognized mechanism by which Ih modulates information processing in the hippocampus. PMID:21326231

  10. Prefrontal neuronal assemblies temporally control fear behaviour.

    PubMed

    Dejean, Cyril; Courtin, Julien; Karalis, Nikolaos; Chaudun, Fabrice; Wurtz, Hélène; Bienvenu, Thomas C M; Herry, Cyril

    2016-07-21

    Precise spike timing through the coordination and synchronization of neuronal assemblies is an efficient and flexible coding mechanism for sensory and cognitive processing. In cortical and subcortical areas, the formation of cell assemblies critically depends on neuronal oscillations, which can precisely control the timing of spiking activity. Whereas this form of coding has been described for sensory processing and spatial learning, its role in encoding emotional behaviour remains unknown. Fear behaviour relies on the activation of distributed structures, among which the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) is known to be critical for fear memory expression. In the dmPFC, the phasic activation of neurons to threat-predicting cues, a spike-rate coding mechanism, correlates with conditioned fear responses and supports the discrimination between aversive and neutral stimuli. However, this mechanism does not account for freezing observed outside stimuli presentations, and the contribution of a general spike-time coding mechanism for freezing in the dmPFC remains to be established. Here we use a combination of single-unit and local field potential recordings along with optogenetic manipulations to show that, in the dmPFC, expression of conditioned fear is causally related to the organization of neurons into functional assemblies. During fear behaviour, the development of 4 Hz oscillations coincides with the activation of assemblies nested in the ascending phase of the oscillation. The selective optogenetic inhibition of dmPFC neurons during the ascending or descending phases of this oscillation blocks and promotes conditioned fear responses, respectively. These results identify a novel phase-specific coding mechanism, which dynamically regulates the development of dmPFC assemblies to control the precise timing of fear responses. PMID:27409809

  11. Prefrontal neuronal assemblies temporally control fear behaviour.

    PubMed

    Dejean, Cyril; Courtin, Julien; Karalis, Nikolaos; Chaudun, Fabrice; Wurtz, Hélène; Bienvenu, Thomas C M; Herry, Cyril

    2016-07-21

    Precise spike timing through the coordination and synchronization of neuronal assemblies is an efficient and flexible coding mechanism for sensory and cognitive processing. In cortical and subcortical areas, the formation of cell assemblies critically depends on neuronal oscillations, which can precisely control the timing of spiking activity. Whereas this form of coding has been described for sensory processing and spatial learning, its role in encoding emotional behaviour remains unknown. Fear behaviour relies on the activation of distributed structures, among which the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) is known to be critical for fear memory expression. In the dmPFC, the phasic activation of neurons to threat-predicting cues, a spike-rate coding mechanism, correlates with conditioned fear responses and supports the discrimination between aversive and neutral stimuli. However, this mechanism does not account for freezing observed outside stimuli presentations, and the contribution of a general spike-time coding mechanism for freezing in the dmPFC remains to be established. Here we use a combination of single-unit and local field potential recordings along with optogenetic manipulations to show that, in the dmPFC, expression of conditioned fear is causally related to the organization of neurons into functional assemblies. During fear behaviour, the development of 4 Hz oscillations coincides with the activation of assemblies nested in the ascending phase of the oscillation. The selective optogenetic inhibition of dmPFC neurons during the ascending or descending phases of this oscillation blocks and promotes conditioned fear responses, respectively. These results identify a novel phase-specific coding mechanism, which dynamically regulates the development of dmPFC assemblies to control the precise timing of fear responses.

  12. Neuronal oscillations as a mechanistic substrate of auditory temporal prediction

    PubMed Central

    Morillon, Benjamin; Schroeder, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations are comprised of rhythmic fluctuations of excitability that are synchronized in ensembles of neurons and thus function as temporal filters that dynamically organize sensory processing. When perception relies on anticipatory mechanisms, ongoing oscillations also provide a neurophysiological substrate for temporal prediction. In this article we review evidence for this account with a focus on auditory perception. We argue that such “oscillatory temporal predictions” can selectively amplify neuronal sensitivity to inputs that occur in a predicted, task-relevant rhythm and optimize temporal selection. We elaborate this argument for a prototypic example, speech processing, where information is present at multiple time scales, with delta, theta, and low-gamma oscillations being specifically and simultaneously engaged, enabling multiplexing. We then consider the origin of temporal predictions, specifically the idea that the motor system is involved in the generation of such prior information. Finally, we place temporal predictions in the general context of internal models, discussing how they interact with feature-based or spatial predictions. We propose that complementary predictions interact synergistically according to a dominance hierarchy, shaping perception in the form of a multidimensional filter mechanism. PMID:25773613

  13. Temporal coding by populations of auditory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Patrick; Pollack, Gerald S

    2010-03-01

    Auditory receptor neurons of crickets are most sensitive to either low or high sound frequencies. Earlier work showed that the temporal coding properties of first-order auditory interneurons are matched to the temporal characteristics of natural low- and high-frequency stimuli (cricket songs and bat echolocation calls, respectively). We studied the temporal coding properties of receptor neurons and used modeling to investigate how activity within populations of low- and high-frequency receptors might contribute to the coding properties of interneurons. We confirm earlier findings that individual low-frequency-tuned receptors code stimulus temporal pattern poorly, but show that coding performance of a receptor population increases markedly with population size, due in part to low redundancy among the spike trains of different receptors. By contrast, individual high-frequency-tuned receptors code a stimulus temporal pattern fairly well and, because their spike trains are redundant, there is only a slight increase in coding performance with population size. The coding properties of low- and high-frequency receptor populations resemble those of interneurons in response to low- and high-frequency stimuli, suggesting that coding at the interneuron level is partly determined by the nature and organization of afferent input. Consistent with this, the sound-frequency-specific coding properties of an interneuron, previously demonstrated by analyzing its spike train, are also apparent in the subthreshold fluctuations in membrane potential that are generated by synaptic input from receptor neurons.

  14. Temporal characteristics of gustatory responses in rat parabrachial neurons vary by stimulus and chemosensitive neuron type.

    PubMed

    Geran, Laura; Travers, Susan

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that temporal features of spike trains can increase the amount of information available for gustatory processing. However, the nature of these temporal characteristics and their relationship to different taste qualities and neuron types are not well-defined. The present study analyzed the time course of taste responses from parabrachial (PBN) neurons elicited by multiple applications of "sweet" (sucrose), "salty" (NaCl), "sour" (citric acid), and "bitter" (quinine and cycloheximide) stimuli in an acute preparation. Time course varied significantly by taste stimulus and best-stimulus classification. Across neurons, the ensemble code for the three electrolytes was similar initially but quinine diverged from NaCl and acid during the second 500 ms of stimulation and all four qualities became distinct just after 1s. This temporal evolution was reflected in significantly broader tuning during the initial response. Metric space analyses of quality discrimination by individual neurons showed that increases in information (H) afforded by temporal factors was usually explained by differences in rate envelope, which had a greater impact during the initial 2s (22.5% increase in H) compared to the later response (9.5%). Moreover, timing had a differential impact according to cell type, with between-quality discrimination in neurons activated maximally by NaCl or citric acid most affected. Timing was also found to dramatically improve within-quality discrimination (80% increase in H) in neurons that responded optimally to bitter stimuli (B-best). Spikes from B-best neurons were also more likely to occur in bursts. These findings suggest that among PBN taste neurons, time-dependent increases in mutual information can arise from stimulus- and neuron-specific differences in response envelope during the initial dynamic period. A stable rate code predominates in later epochs.

  15. Temporally selective processing of communication signals by auditory midbrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Kelley, Darcy B.

    2011-01-01

    Perception of the temporal structure of acoustic signals contributes critically to vocal signaling. In the aquatic clawed frog Xenopus laevis, calls differ primarily in the temporal parameter of click rate, which conveys sexual identity and reproductive state. We show here that an ensemble of auditory neurons in the laminar nucleus of the torus semicircularis (TS) of X. laevis specializes in encoding vocalization click rates. We recorded single TS units while pure tones, natural calls, and synthetic clicks were presented directly to the tympanum via a vibration-stimulation probe. Synthesized click rates ranged from 4 to 50 Hz, the rate at which the clicks begin to overlap. Frequency selectivity and temporal processing were characterized using response-intensity curves, temporal-discharge patterns, and autocorrelations of reduplicated responses to click trains. Characteristic frequencies ranged from 140 to 3,250 Hz, with minimum thresholds of −90 dB re 1 mm/s at 500 Hz and −76 dB at 1,100 Hz near the dominant frequency of female clicks. Unlike units in the auditory nerve and dorsal medullary nucleus, most toral units respond selectively to the behaviorally relevant temporal feature of the rate of clicks in calls. The majority of neurons (85%) were selective for click rates, and this selectivity remained unchanged over sound levels 10 to 20 dB above threshold. Selective neurons give phasic, tonic, or adapting responses to tone bursts and click trains. Some algorithms that could compute temporally selective receptive fields are described. PMID:21289132

  16. α-MSH exerts direct postsynaptic excitatory effects on NTS neurons and enhances GABAergic signaling in the NTS.

    PubMed

    Mimee, A; Kuksis, M; Ferguson, A V

    2014-03-14

    The central melanocortin system plays an essential role in the regulation of energy balance. While anorexigenic effects of α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) acting in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), a critical medullary autonomic control center, have been established, the cellular events underlying these effects are less well characterized. In this study, we used whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to examine firstly whether α-MSH exerts direct postsynaptic effects on the membrane potential of rat NTS neurons in slice preparation, and secondly whether α-MSH influences GABAergic signaling in the NTS. In normal artificial cerebrospinal fluid, perfusion of α-MSH (500 nM) resulted in a depolarization in 39% of cells (n=16, mean 6.14±0.54 mV), and a hyperpolarization in 22% of cells (n=9, -6.79±1.02 mV). Studies using tetrodotoxin to block neuronal communication revealed α-MSH exerts direct depolarizing effects on some NTS neurons, and indirect inhibitory effects on others. A third subset of neurons is simultaneously directly depolarized and indirectly hyperpolarized by α-MSH, resulting in a net lack of effect on membrane potential. The inhibitory inputs influenced by α-MSH were identified as GABAergic, as α-MSH increased the frequency, but not amplitude, of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in 50% of NTS neurons. α-MSH had no effect on the frequency or amplitude of miniature IPSCs. Furthermore, pharmacological blockade of GABAA and GABAB receptors, and physical removal of all synaptic inputs via cellular dissociation, abolished hyperpolarizations induced by α-MSH. We conclude α-MSH exerts direct, postsynaptic excitatory effects on a subset of NTS neurons. By exciting GABAergic NTS neurons and presynaptically enhancing GABAergic signaling, α-MSH also indirectly inhibits other NTS cells. These findings provide critical insight into the cellular events underlying medullary melanocortin anorexigenic effects, and expand the

  17. Subjective neuronal coding of reward: temporal value discounting and risk.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2010-06-01

    A key question in the neurobiology of reward relates to the nature of coding. Rewards are objects that are advantageous or necessary for the survival of individuals in a variety of environmental situations. Thus reward appears to depend on the individual and its environment. The question arises whether neuronal systems in humans and monkeys code reward in subjective terms, objective terms or both. The present review addresses this issue by dealing with two important reward processes, namely the individual discounting of reward value across temporal delays, and the processing of information about risky rewards that depends on individual risk attitudes. The subjective value of rewards decreases with the temporal distance to the reward. In experiments using neurophysiology and brain imaging, dopamine neurons and striatal systems discount reward value across temporal delays of a few seconds, despite unchanged objective reward value, suggesting subjective value coding. The subjective values of risky outcomes depend on the risk attitude of individual decision makers; these values decrease for risk-avoiders and increase for risk-seekers. The signal for risk and the signal for the value of risky reward covary with individual risk attitudes in regions of the human prefrontal cortex, suggesting subjective rather than objective coding of risk and risky value. These data demonstrate that important parameters of reward are coded in a subjective manner in key reward structures of the brain. However, these data do not rule out that other neurons or brain structures may code reward according to its objective value and risk. PMID:20497474

  18. Human temporal cortical single neuron activity during working memory maintenance.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Leona; Corina, David; Ojemann, George

    2016-06-01

    The Working Memory model of human memory, first introduced by Baddeley and Hitch (1974), has been one of the most influential psychological constructs in cognitive psychology and human neuroscience. However the neuronal correlates of core components of this model have yet to be fully elucidated. Here we present data from two studies where human temporal cortical single neuron activity was recorded during tasks differentially affecting the maintenance component of verbal working memory. In Study One we vary the presence or absence of distracting items for the entire period of memory storage. In Study Two we vary the duration of storage so that distractors filled all, or only one-third of the time the memory was stored. Extracellular single neuron recordings were obtained from 36 subjects undergoing awake temporal lobe resections for epilepsy, 25 in Study one, 11 in Study two. Recordings were obtained from a total of 166 lateral temporal cortex neurons during performance of one of these two tasks, 86 study one, 80 study two. Significant changes in activity with distractor manipulation were present in 74 of these neurons (45%), 38 Study one, 36 Study two. In 48 (65%) of those there was increased activity during the period when distracting items were absent, 26 Study One, 22 Study Two. The magnitude of this increase was greater for Study One, 47.6%, than Study Two, 8.1%, paralleling the reduction in memory errors in the absence of distracters, for Study One of 70.3%, Study Two 26.3% These findings establish that human lateral temporal cortex is part of the neural system for working memory, with activity during maintenance of that memory that parallels performance, suggesting it represents active rehearsal. In 31 of these neurons (65%) this activity was an extension of that during working memory encoding that differed significantly from the neural processes recorded during overt and silent language tasks without a recent memory component, 17 Study one, 14 Study two

  19. Human temporal cortical single neuron activity during working memory maintenance.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Leona; Corina, David; Ojemann, George

    2016-06-01

    The Working Memory model of human memory, first introduced by Baddeley and Hitch (1974), has been one of the most influential psychological constructs in cognitive psychology and human neuroscience. However the neuronal correlates of core components of this model have yet to be fully elucidated. Here we present data from two studies where human temporal cortical single neuron activity was recorded during tasks differentially affecting the maintenance component of verbal working memory. In Study One we vary the presence or absence of distracting items for the entire period of memory storage. In Study Two we vary the duration of storage so that distractors filled all, or only one-third of the time the memory was stored. Extracellular single neuron recordings were obtained from 36 subjects undergoing awake temporal lobe resections for epilepsy, 25 in Study one, 11 in Study two. Recordings were obtained from a total of 166 lateral temporal cortex neurons during performance of one of these two tasks, 86 study one, 80 study two. Significant changes in activity with distractor manipulation were present in 74 of these neurons (45%), 38 Study one, 36 Study two. In 48 (65%) of those there was increased activity during the period when distracting items were absent, 26 Study One, 22 Study Two. The magnitude of this increase was greater for Study One, 47.6%, than Study Two, 8.1%, paralleling the reduction in memory errors in the absence of distracters, for Study One of 70.3%, Study Two 26.3% These findings establish that human lateral temporal cortex is part of the neural system for working memory, with activity during maintenance of that memory that parallels performance, suggesting it represents active rehearsal. In 31 of these neurons (65%) this activity was an extension of that during working memory encoding that differed significantly from the neural processes recorded during overt and silent language tasks without a recent memory component, 17 Study one, 14 Study two

  20. On-line, voluntary control of human temporal lobe neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cerf, Moran; Thiruvengadam, Nikhil; Mormann, Florian; Kraskov, Alexander; Quiroga, Rodrigo Quian; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak

    2010-01-01

    Daily life continually confronts us with an exuberance of external, sensory stimuli competing with a rich stream of internal deliberations, plans and ruminations. The brain must select one or more of these for further processing. How this competition is resolved across multiple sensory and cognitive regions is not known; nor is it clear how internal thoughts and attention regulate this competition1–4. Recording from single neurons in patients implanted with intracranial electrodes for clinical reasons5–9, here we demonstrate that humans can regulate the activity of their neurons in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) to alter the outcome of the contest between external images and their internal representation. Subjects looked at a hybrid superposition of two images representing familiar individuals, landmarks, objects or animals and had to enhance one image at the expense of the other, competing one. Simultaneously, the spiking activity of their MTL neurons in different subregions and hemispheres was decoded in real time to control the content of the hybrid. Subjects reliably regulated, often on the first trial, the firing rate of their neurons, increasing the rate of some while simultaneously decreasing the rate of others. They did so by focusing onto one image, which gradually became clearer on the computer screen in front of their eyes, and thereby overriding sensory input. On the basis of the firing of these MTL neurons, the dynamics of the competition between visual images in the subject's mind was visualized on an external display. PMID:20981100

  1. A neuronal learning rule for sub-millisecond temporal coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerstner, Wulfram; Kempter, Richard; van Hemmen, J. Leo; Wagner, Hermann

    1996-09-01

    A PARADOX that exists in auditory and electrosensory neural systems1,2 is that they encode behaviourally relevant signals in the range of a few microseconds with neurons that are at least one order of magnitude slower. The importance of temporal coding in neural information processing is not clear yet3-8. A central question is whether neuronal firing can be more precise than the time constants of the neuronal processes involved9. Here we address this problem using the auditory system of the barn owl as an example. We present a modelling study based on computer simulations of a neuron in the laminar nucleus. Three observations explain the paradox. First, spiking of an 'integrate-and-fire' neuron driven by excitatory postsynaptic potentials with a width at half-maximum height of 250 μs, has an accuracy of 25 μs if the presynaptic signals arrive coherently. Second, the necessary degree of coherence in the signal arrival times can be attained during ontogenetic development by virtue of an unsupervised hebbian learning rule. Learning selects connections with matching delays from a broad distribution of axons with random delays. Third, the learning rule also selects the correct delays from two independent groups of inputs, for example, from the left and right ear.

  2. Spatio-Temporal Credit Assignment in Neuronal Population Learning

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Johannes; Urbanczik, Robert; Senn, Walter

    2011-01-01

    In learning from trial and error, animals need to relate behavioral decisions to environmental reinforcement even though it may be difficult to assign credit to a particular decision when outcomes are uncertain or subject to delays. When considering the biophysical basis of learning, the credit-assignment problem is compounded because the behavioral decisions themselves result from the spatio-temporal aggregation of many synaptic releases. We present a model of plasticity induction for reinforcement learning in a population of leaky integrate and fire neurons which is based on a cascade of synaptic memory traces. Each synaptic cascade correlates presynaptic input first with postsynaptic events, next with the behavioral decisions and finally with external reinforcement. For operant conditioning, learning succeeds even when reinforcement is delivered with a delay so large that temporal contiguity between decision and pertinent reward is lost due to intervening decisions which are themselves subject to delayed reinforcement. This shows that the model provides a viable mechanism for temporal credit assignment. Further, learning speeds up with increasing population size, so the plasticity cascade simultaneously addresses the spatial problem of assigning credit to synapses in different population neurons. Simulations on other tasks, such as sequential decision making, serve to contrast the performance of the proposed scheme to that of temporal difference-based learning. We argue that, due to their comparative robustness, synaptic plasticity cascades are attractive basic models of reinforcement learning in the brain. PMID:21738460

  3. Temporal coding of odor mixtures in an olfactory receptor neuron

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chih-Ying; Martelli, Carlotta; Emonet, Thierry; Carlson, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Most natural odors are mixtures and often elicit percepts distinct from those elicited by their constituents. This emergence of a unique odor quality has long been attributed to central processing. Here we show that sophisticated integration of olfactory information begins in olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) in Drosophila. Odor mixtures are encoded in the temporal dynamics as well as in the magnitudes of ORN responses. ORNs can respond to an inhibitory odorant with different durations depending on the level of background excitation. ORNs respond to mixtures with distinctive temporal dynamics that reflect the physicochemical properties of the constituent odorants. The insect repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide), which attenuates odor responses of multiple ORNs, differs from an ORN-specific inhibitor in its effects on temporal dynamics. Our analysis reveals a means by which integration of information from odor mixtures begins in ORNs and provides insight into the contribution of inhibitory stimuli to sensory coding. PMID:21383179

  4. Optophysiological Approach to Resolve Neuronal Action Potentials with High Spatial and Temporal Resolution in Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Stéphane; Côté, Daniel; De Koninck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Cell to cell communication in the central nervous system is encoded into transient and local membrane potential changes (ΔVm). Deciphering the rules that govern synaptic transmission and plasticity entails to be able to perform Vm recordings throughout the entire neuronal arborization. Classical electrophysiology is, in most cases, not able to do so within small and fragile neuronal subcompartments. Thus, optical techniques based on the use of fluorescent voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs) have been developed. However, reporting spontaneous or small ΔVm from neuronal ramifications has been challenging, in part due to the limited sensitivity and phototoxicity of VSD-based optical measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of water soluble VSD, ANNINE-6plus, with laser-scanning microscopy to optically record ΔVm in cultured neurons. We show that the sensitivity (>10% of fluorescence change for 100 mV depolarization) and time response (sub millisecond) of the dye allows the robust detection of action potentials (APs) even without averaging, allowing the measurement of spontaneous neuronal firing patterns. In addition, we show that back-propagating APs can be recorded, along distinct dendritic sites and within dendritic spines. Importantly, our approach does not induce any detectable phototoxic effect on cultured neurons. This optophysiological approach provides a simple, minimally invasive, and versatile optical method to measure electrical activity in cultured neurons with high temporal (ms) resolution and high spatial (μm) resolution. PMID:22016723

  5. Frontal neurons modulate memory retrieval across widely varying temporal scales.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Hua; Williams, Ziv M

    2015-06-01

    Once a memory has formed, it is thought to undergo a gradual transition within the brain from short- to long-term storage. This putative process, however, also poses a unique problem to the memory system in that the same learned items must also be retrieved across broadly varying time scales. Here, we find that neurons in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) of monkeys, an area interconnected with both temporal and frontal associative neocortical regions, signaled the need to alter between retrieval of memories formed at different times. These signals were most closely related to the time interval between initial learning and later retrieval, and did not correlate with task switch demands, novelty, or behavioral response. Consistent with these physiological findings, focal inactivation of the VLPFC led to a marked degradation in retrieval performance. These findings suggest that the VLPFC plays a necessary regulatory role in retrieving memories over different temporal scales. PMID:25979992

  6. Supraphysiological doses of performance enhancing anabolic-androgenic steroids exert direct toxic effects on neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Basile, John R; Binmadi, Nada O; Zhou, Hua; Yang, Ying-Hua; Paoli, Antonio; Proia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are lipophilic hormones often taken in excessive quantities by athletes and bodybuilders to enhance performance and increase muscle mass. AAS exert well known toxic effects on specific cell and tissue types and organ systems. The attention that androgen abuse has received lately should be used as an opportunity to educate both athletes and the general population regarding their adverse effects. Among numerous commercially available steroid hormones, very few have been specifically tested for direct neurotoxicity. We evaluated the effects of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone on sympathetic-like neuron cells. Vitality and apoptotic effects were analyzed, and immunofluorescence staining and western blot performed. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone are toxic to the neuron-like differentiated pheochromocytoma cell line PC12, as confirmed by toxicity on neurite networks responding to nerve growth factor and the modulation of the survival and apoptosis-related proteins ERK, caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and heat-shock protein 90. We observe, in contrast to some previous reports but in accordance with others, expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in neuron-like cells, which when inhibited mitigated the toxic effects of AAS tested, suggesting that the AR could be binding these steroid hormones to induce genomic effects. We also note elevated transcription of neuritin in treated cells, a neurotropic factor likely expressed in an attempt to resist neurotoxicity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that supraphysiological exposure to the AAS methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone exert neurotoxic effects by an increase in the activity of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and alterations in neurite networks. PMID:23675320

  7. Supraphysiological doses of performance enhancing anabolic-androgenic steroids exert direct toxic effects on neuron-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Basile, John R.; Binmadi, Nada O.; Zhou, Hua; Yang, Ying-Hua; Paoli, Antonio; Proia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are lipophilic hormones often taken in excessive quantities by athletes and bodybuilders to enhance performance and increase muscle mass. AAS exert well known toxic effects on specific cell and tissue types and organ systems. The attention that androgen abuse has received lately should be used as an opportunity to educate both athletes and the general population regarding their adverse effects. Among numerous commercially available steroid hormones, very few have been specifically tested for direct neurotoxicity. We evaluated the effects of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone on sympathetic-like neuron cells. Vitality and apoptotic effects were analyzed, and immunofluorescence staining and western blot performed. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone are toxic to the neuron-like differentiated pheochromocytoma cell line PC12, as confirmed by toxicity on neurite networks responding to nerve growth factor and the modulation of the survival and apoptosis-related proteins ERK, caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and heat-shock protein 90. We observe, in contrast to some previous reports but in accordance with others, expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in neuron-like cells, which when inhibited mitigated the toxic effects of AAS tested, suggesting that the AR could be binding these steroid hormones to induce genomic effects. We also note elevated transcription of neuritin in treated cells, a neurotropic factor likely expressed in an attempt to resist neurotoxicity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that supraphysiological exposure to the AAS methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone exert neurotoxic effects by an increase in the activity of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and alterations in neurite networks. PMID:23675320

  8. Supraphysiological doses of performance enhancing anabolic-androgenic steroids exert direct toxic effects on neuron-like cells.

    PubMed

    Basile, John R; Binmadi, Nada O; Zhou, Hua; Yang, Ying-Hua; Paoli, Antonio; Proia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are lipophilic hormones often taken in excessive quantities by athletes and bodybuilders to enhance performance and increase muscle mass. AAS exert well known toxic effects on specific cell and tissue types and organ systems. The attention that androgen abuse has received lately should be used as an opportunity to educate both athletes and the general population regarding their adverse effects. Among numerous commercially available steroid hormones, very few have been specifically tested for direct neurotoxicity. We evaluated the effects of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone on sympathetic-like neuron cells. Vitality and apoptotic effects were analyzed, and immunofluorescence staining and western blot performed. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure of supraphysiological doses of methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone are toxic to the neuron-like differentiated pheochromocytoma cell line PC12, as confirmed by toxicity on neurite networks responding to nerve growth factor and the modulation of the survival and apoptosis-related proteins ERK, caspase-3, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and heat-shock protein 90. We observe, in contrast to some previous reports but in accordance with others, expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in neuron-like cells, which when inhibited mitigated the toxic effects of AAS tested, suggesting that the AR could be binding these steroid hormones to induce genomic effects. We also note elevated transcription of neuritin in treated cells, a neurotropic factor likely expressed in an attempt to resist neurotoxicity. Taken together, these results demonstrate that supraphysiological exposure to the AAS methandienone and 17-α-methyltestosterone exert neurotoxic effects by an increase in the activity of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and alterations in neurite networks.

  9. Intranasally Administered Neuropeptide S (NPS) Exerts Anxiolytic Effects Following Internalization Into NPS Receptor-Expressing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Irina A; Dine, Julien; Yen, Yi-Chun; Buell, Dominik R; Herrmann, Leonie; Holsboer, Florian; Eder, Matthias; Landgraf, Rainer; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Experiments in rodents revealed neuropeptide S (NPS) to constitute a potential novel treatment option for anxiety diseases such as panic and post-traumatic stress disorder. However, both its cerebral target sites and the molecular underpinnings of NPS-mediated effects still remain elusive. By administration of fluorophore-conjugated NPS, we pinpointed NPS target neurons in distinct regions throughout the entire brain. We demonstrated their functional relevance in the hippocampus. In the CA1 region, NPS modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. NPS is taken up into NPS receptor-expressing neurons by internalization of the receptor–ligand complex as we confirmed by subsequent cell culture studies. Furthermore, we tracked internalization of intranasally applied NPS at the single-neuron level and additionally demonstrate that it is delivered into the mouse brain without losing its anxiolytic properties. Finally, we show that NPS differentially modulates the expression of proteins of the glutamatergic system involved inter alia in synaptic plasticity. These results not only enlighten the path of NPS in the brain, but also establish a non-invasive method for NPS administration in mice, thus strongly encouraging translation into a novel therapeutic approach for pathological anxiety in humans. PMID:22278093

  10. Rosiglitazone exerts neuroprotective effects via the suppression of neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the cortex following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junchao; Zheng, Kebin; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in adults and children worldwide. Recent studies have demonstrated that both apoptosis and autophagy participate in TBI‑induced neuronal cell death and functional loss. The peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor‑γ (PPAR‑γ) agonist rosiglitazone (RSG) is a well‑known anti‑inflammatory, which carries out its effects via the activation of PPAR‑γ. Previous studies have suggested that RSG may exert neuroprotective effects in animal models of both chronic and acute brain injury; however, whether RSG is involved in autophagic neuronal death following TBI remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to determine whether RSG carries out its neuroprotective properties via the attenuation of neuronal apoptosis and autophagy, following TBI in a rat model. Furthermore, the role of RSG was investigated with regards to the modulation of inflammation and glutamate excitotoxicity, and the impact of RSG on functional recovery following TBI was determined. The rats were subjected to controlled cortical impact injury, prior to being randomly divided into three groups: A sham‑operated group, a TBI group, and an RSG treatment group. The RSG treatment group was intraperitoneally treated with 2 mg/kg RSG immediately after TBI. The results of the present study demonstrated that RSG treatment following TBI significantly reduced neuronal apoptosis and autophagy, and increased functional recovery. These effects were correlated with a decrease in the protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin‑6. However, no significant changes were observed in the protein expression levels of glutamate transporter‑1 in the brain cortex. The results of the present study provide in vivo evidence that RSG may exert neuroprotective effects via the inhibition of neuronal apoptosis and autophagy following experimental TBI in rats, and the mechanism underlying these effects

  11. Rosiglitazone exerts neuroprotective effects via the suppression of neuronal autophagy and apoptosis in the cortex following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junchao; Zheng, Kebin; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in adults and children worldwide. Recent studies have demonstrated that both apoptosis and autophagy participate in TBI‑induced neuronal cell death and functional loss. The peroxisome proliferator‑activated receptor‑γ (PPAR‑γ) agonist rosiglitazone (RSG) is a well‑known anti‑inflammatory, which carries out its effects via the activation of PPAR‑γ. Previous studies have suggested that RSG may exert neuroprotective effects in animal models of both chronic and acute brain injury; however, whether RSG is involved in autophagic neuronal death following TBI remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to determine whether RSG carries out its neuroprotective properties via the attenuation of neuronal apoptosis and autophagy, following TBI in a rat model. Furthermore, the role of RSG was investigated with regards to the modulation of inflammation and glutamate excitotoxicity, and the impact of RSG on functional recovery following TBI was determined. The rats were subjected to controlled cortical impact injury, prior to being randomly divided into three groups: A sham‑operated group, a TBI group, and an RSG treatment group. The RSG treatment group was intraperitoneally treated with 2 mg/kg RSG immediately after TBI. The results of the present study demonstrated that RSG treatment following TBI significantly reduced neuronal apoptosis and autophagy, and increased functional recovery. These effects were correlated with a decrease in the protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin‑6. However, no significant changes were observed in the protein expression levels of glutamate transporter‑1 in the brain cortex. The results of the present study provide in vivo evidence that RSG may exert neuroprotective effects via the inhibition of neuronal apoptosis and autophagy following experimental TBI in rats, and the mechanism underlying these effects

  12. The endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyldopamine (NADA) exerts neuroprotective effects after excitotoxic neuronal damage via cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB(1)).

    PubMed

    Grabiec, Urszula; Koch, Marco; Kallendrusch, Sonja; Kraft, Robert; Hill, Kerstin; Merkwitz, Claudia; Ghadban, Chalid; Lutz, Beat; Straiker, Alex; Dehghani, Faramarz

    2012-03-01

    Endocannabinoids exert numerous effects in the CNS under physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyldopamine (NADA) may protect neurons in excitotoxically lesioned organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSC). OHSC were excitotoxically lesioned by application of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA, 50 μM) for 4 h and subsequently treated with different NADA concentrations (0.1 pM-50 μM) alone or in combination with cannabinoid receptor antagonists. NADA protected dentate gyrus granule cells and caused a slight reduction in the number of microglial cells. The number of degenerated neurons significantly decreased between 100 pM and 10 μM NADA (p < 0.05). To identify the responsive receptor type of NADA mediated neuroprotection, we applied the cannabinoid (CB) receptor 1 (CB(1)) inverse agonist/antagonist AM251, CB(2) inverse agonist/antagonist AM630, abnormal-cannabidiol (abn-CBD)-sensitive receptor antagonist O-1918, transient receptor potential channel V1 (TRPV1) antagonist 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin and A1 (TRPA1) antagonist HC-030031. Neuroprotective properties of low (1 nM) but not high (10 μM) NADA concentrations were solely blocked by AM251 and were absent in CB(1)(-/-) mice. AM630, O-1918, 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin and HC-030031 showed no effects at all NADA concentrations applied. Our findings demonstrate that NADA protects dentate gyrus granule cells by acting via CB(1). NADA reduced the number of microglial cells at distinct concentrations. TRPV1 and TRPA1 were not involved in NADA mediated neuroprotection. Thus, our data implicate that NADA mediated activation of neuronal CB(1) may serve as a novel pharmacological target to mitigate symptoms of neuronal damage.

  13. Tryptamine-derived alkaloids from Annonaceae exerting neurotrophin-like properties on primary dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Fanny; Le Douaron, Gael; Champy, Pierre; Amar, Majid; Séon-Méniel, Blandine; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Figadère, Bruno

    2010-07-15

    N-fatty acyl tryptamines constitute a scarce group of natural compounds mainly encountered in Annonaceous plants. No biological activity was reported so far for these rare molecules. This study investigated the neurotrophic properties of these natural tryptaminic derivatives on dopaminergic (DA) neurons in primary mesencephalic cultures. A structure-activity relationships study led us to precise the role of a nitrogen atom into the aliphatic chain conferring to the compounds a combined neuroprotective and neuritogenic activity in the nanomolar range. The potent antioxidant activity of these natural products seems to be involved in part of their mechanism of action. This study provides the first description of natural neurotrophin mimetics present in Annonaceae extracts, and led to the biological characterization of compounds, which present a potential interest in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease.

  14. Temporally Unpredictable Sounds Exert a Context-Dependent Influence on Evaluation of Unrelated Images

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Dominik R.; Seifritz, Erich; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Temporally unpredictable stimuli influence murine and human behaviour, as previously demonstrated for sequences of simple sounds with regular or irregular onset. It is unknown whether this influence is mediated by an evaluation of the unpredictable sound sequences themselves, or by an interaction with task context. Here, we find that humans evaluate unrelated neutral pictures as more negative when these are presented together with a temporally unpredictable sound sequence, compared to a predictable sequence. The same is observed for evaluation of neutral, angry and fearful face photographs. Control experiments suggest this effect is specific to interspersed presentation of negative and neutral visual stimuli. Unpredictable sounds presented on their own were evaluated as more activating, but not more aversive, and were preferred over predictable sounds. When presented alone, these sound sequences also did not elicit tonic autonomic arousal or negative mood change. We discuss how these findings might account for previous data on the effects of unpredictable sounds, in humans and rodents. PMID:26098105

  15. Treadmill exercise exerts ameliorating effect on isolation-induced depression via neuronal activation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joon-Ki; Lee, Sam-Jun; Oh, Chang-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Maternal isolation has been used as a valid animal model of early life stress, and it induces depression to offspring. Exercise ameliorates the incidence and severity of stress-related mood disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Here in this study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on brain neuronal excitation in the rat pups with maternal isolation-induced depression. Forced swimming test and immunohistochemistry for glucocorticoid receptor and c-Fos in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus were conducted. Maternal isolation lasted for 6 hours per day and was continued from postnatal day 1 to postnatal day 30. The rat pups in the exercise group were forced to run on a treadmill for 30 min once a day for 10 consecutive days, starting from the postnatal day 21 until the postnatal day 30. In the present results, treadmill exercise alleviated depressive state in the maternal separated rat pups, as potently as fluoxetine treatment. Treadmill exercise also restored the expressions of glucocorticoid receptor and c-Fos in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the maternal separated rat pups near to the control level, as fluoxetine treatment. The present study suggests the possibility that treadmill exercise can be used as the therapeutic strategy for the childhood depression induced by disturbed mother-child relationship. PMID:24278866

  16. Functional differentiation of macaque visual temporal cortical neurons using a parametric action space.

    PubMed

    Vangeneugden, Joris; Pollick, Frank; Vogels, Rufin

    2009-03-01

    Neurons in the rostral superior temporal sulcus (STS) are responsive to displays of body movements. We employed a parametric action space to determine how similarities among actions are represented by visual temporal neurons and how form and motion information contributes to their responses. The stimulus space consisted of a stick-plus-point-light figure performing arm actions and their blends. Multidimensional scaling showed that the responses of temporal neurons represented the ordinal similarity between these actions. Further tests distinguished neurons responding equally strongly to static presentations and to actions ("snapshot" neurons), from those responding much less strongly to static presentations, but responding well when motion was present ("motion" neurons). The "motion" neurons were predominantly found in the upper bank/fundus of the STS, and "snapshot" neurons in the lower bank of the STS and inferior temporal convexity. Most "motion" neurons showed strong response modulation during the course of an action, thus responding to action kinematics. "Motion" neurons displayed a greater average selectivity for these simple arm actions than did "snapshot" neurons. We suggest that the "motion" neurons code for visual kinematics, whereas the "snapshot" neurons code for form/posture, and that both can contribute to action recognition, in agreement with computation models of action recognition.

  17. Selenoprotein T Exerts an Essential Oxidoreductase Activity That Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boukhzar, Loubna; Hamieh, Abdallah; Cartier, Dorthe; Tanguy, Yannick; Alsharif, Ifat; Castex, Matthieu; Arabo, Arnaud; Hajji, Sana El; Bonnet, Jean-Jacques; Errami, Mohammed; Falluel-Morel, Anthony; Chagraoui, Abdeslam; Lihrmann, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Oxidative stress is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the mechanisms involved in the control of this stress in dopaminergic cells are not fully understood. There is increasing evidence that selenoproteins play a central role in the control of redox homeostasis and cell defense, but the precise contribution of members of this family of proteins during the course of neurodegenerative diseases is still elusive. Results: We demonstrated first that selenoprotein T (SelT) whose gene disruption is lethal during embryogenesis, exerts a potent oxidoreductase activity. In the SH-SY5Y cell model of dopaminergic neurons, both silencing and overexpression of SelT affected oxidative stress and cell survival. Treatment with PD-inducing neurotoxins such as 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) or rotenone triggered SelT expression in the nigrostriatal pathway of wild-type mice, but provoked rapid and severe parkinsonian-like motor defects in conditional brain SelT-deficient mice. This motor impairment was associated with marked oxidative stress and neurodegeneration and decreased tyrosine hydroxylase activity and dopamine levels in the nigrostriatal system. Finally, in PD patients, we report that SelT is tremendously increased in the caudate putamen tissue. Innovation: These results reveal the activity of a novel selenoprotein enzyme that protects dopaminergic neurons against oxidative stress and prevents early and severe movement impairment in animal models of PD. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that selenoproteins such as SelT play a crucial role in the protection of dopaminergic neurons against oxidative stress and cell death, providing insight into the molecular underpinnings of this stress in PD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 557–574. PMID:26866473

  18. Adaptive Spike Threshold Enables Robust and Temporally Precise Neuronal Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, Andrey; Celikel, Tansu; Englitz, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Neural processing rests on the intracellular transformation of information as synaptic inputs are translated into action potentials. This transformation is governed by the spike threshold, which depends on the history of the membrane potential on many temporal scales. While the adaptation of the threshold after spiking activity has been addressed before both theoretically and experimentally, it has only recently been demonstrated that the subthreshold membrane state also influences the effective spike threshold. The consequences for neural computation are not well understood yet. We address this question here using neural simulations and whole cell intracellular recordings in combination with information theoretic analysis. We show that an adaptive spike threshold leads to better stimulus discrimination for tight input correlations than would be achieved otherwise, independent from whether the stimulus is encoded in the rate or pattern of action potentials. The time scales of input selectivity are jointly governed by membrane and threshold dynamics. Encoding information using adaptive thresholds further ensures robust information transmission across cortical states i.e. decoding from different states is less state dependent in the adaptive threshold case, if the decoding is performed in reference to the timing of the population response. Results from in vitro neural recordings were consistent with simulations from adaptive threshold neurons. In summary, the adaptive spike threshold reduces information loss during intracellular information transfer, improves stimulus discriminability and ensures robust decoding across membrane states in a regime of highly correlated inputs, similar to those seen in sensory nuclei during the encoding of sensory information. PMID:27304526

  19. Aprotinin, but not epsilon aminocaproic acid and tranexamic acid, exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxic injury in an in vitro neuronal cell culture model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaohui; Korotcova, Ludmila; Murata, Akira; Ishibashi, Nobuyuki; Jonas, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Lack of availability of aprotinin has resulted in increased clinical use of the alternative antifibrinolytic agents epsilon aminocaproic acid (EACA) and tranexamic acid (TXA) which are known to be associated with an increased risk of seizures. In contrast aprotinin has previously been demonstrated to be neuroprotective through suppression of excitotoxicity-mediated neuronal degeneration via the extracellular plasminogen/plasmin system. We compared the impact of antifibrinolytic agents on neuronal and mixed glial/neuronal cell cultures. Methods Mixed cortical cultures containing neuronal and glial cells were prepared from fetal mice and plated on a layer of confluent astrocytes from postnatal pups. Primary neuronal culture was obtained from the same gestational stage and plated in multiwall vessels. Slowly triggered excitotoxicity was induced by 24-hour exposure to 12.5 mM N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Apoptotic neuronal cell death was induced by exposure of primary neural cultures to 24 hours of serum deprivation. Results Compared to NMDA alone, no significant changes in cell death were observed for any dose of TXA or EACA in mixed cultures. Conversely, a clinical dose of aprotinin significantly reduced cell death by -31% on average. Aprotinin reduced apoptotic neuronal cell death from 75% to 37.3%, and 34.1% at concentrations of 100 and 200 KIU/mL, and significantly decreased neuronal nuclear damage. These concentrations of aprotinin significantly inhibited caspase 9 and 3/7 activations. 250 KIU/ml aprotinin exerted maximal protection on primary cortical neurons. Conclusions In contrast to aprotinin, EACA and TXA exert no protective effect against excitotoxic neuronal injury that can occur during cardiac surgery. PMID:24237885

  20. Reconstruction of firing rate changes across neuronal populations by temporally deconvolved Ca2+ imaging.

    PubMed

    Yaksi, Emre; Friedrich, Rainer W

    2006-05-01

    Methods to record action potential (AP) firing in many individual neurons are essential to unravel the function of complex neuronal circuits in the brain. A promising approach is bolus loading of Ca(2+) indicators combined with multiphoton microscopy. Currently, however, this technique lacks cell-type specificity, has low temporal resolution and cannot resolve complex temporal firing patterns. Here we present simple solutions to these problems. We identified neuron types by colocalizing Ca(2+) signals of a red-fluorescing indicator with genetically encoded markers. We reconstructed firing rate changes from Ca(2+) signals by temporal deconvolution. This technique is efficient, dramatically enhances temporal resolution, facilitates data interpretation and permits analysis of odor-response patterns across thousands of neurons in the zebrafish olfactory bulb. Hence, temporally deconvolved Ca(2+) imaging (TDCa imaging) resolves limitations of current optical recording techniques and is likely to be widely applicable because of its simplicity, robustness and generic principle.

  1. Pre-learning stress that is temporally removed from acquisition exerts sex-specific effects on long-term memory.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, Phillip R; Warnecke, Ashlee J; Woelke, Sarah A; Burke, Hanna M; Frigo, Rachael M; Pisansky, Julia M; Lyle, Sarah M; Talbot, Jeffery N

    2013-02-01

    We have examined the influence of sex and the perceived emotional nature of learned information on pre-learning stress-induced alterations of long-term memory. Participants submerged their dominant hand in ice cold (stress) or warm (no stress) water for 3 min. Thirty minutes later, they studied 30 words, rated the words for their levels of emotional valence and arousal and were then given an immediate free recall test. Twenty-four hours later, participants' memory for the word list was assessed via delayed free recall and recognition assessments. The resulting memory data were analyzed after categorizing the studied words (i.e., distributing them to "positive-arousing", "positive-non-arousing", "negative-arousing", etc. categories) according to participants' valence and arousal ratings of the words. The results revealed that participants exhibiting a robust cortisol response to stress exhibited significantly impaired recognition memory for neutral words. More interestingly, however, males displaying a robust cortisol response to stress demonstrated significantly impaired recall, overall, and a marginally significant impairment of overall recognition memory, while females exhibiting a blunted cortisol response to stress demonstrated a marginally significant impairment of overall recognition memory. These findings support the notion that a brief stressor that is temporally separated from learning can exert deleterious effects on long-term memory. However, they also suggest that such effects depend on the sex of the organism, the emotional salience of the learned information and the degree to which stress increases corticosteroid levels.

  2. Temporal properties of inferior colliculus neurons to photonic stimulation in the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaodong; Young, Hunter; Matic, Agnella Izzo; Zirkle, Whitney; Rajguru, Suhrud; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-08-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) may be beneficial in auditory prostheses because of its spatially selective activation of spiral ganglion neurons. However, the response properties of single auditory neurons to INS and the possible contributions of its optoacoustic effects are yet to be examined. In this study, the temporal properties of auditory neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) of guinea pigs in response to INS were characterized. Spatial selectivity of INS was observed along the tonotopically organized ICC. Trains of laser pulses and trains of acoustic clicks were used to evoke single unit responses in ICC of normal hearing animals. In response to INS, ICC neurons showed lower limiting rates, longer latencies, and lower firing efficiencies. In deaf animals, ICC neurons could still be stimulated by INS while unresponsive to acoustic stimulation. The site and spatial selectivity of INS both likely shaped the temporal properties of ICC neurons.

  3. Temporal properties of inferior colliculus neurons to photonic stimulation in the cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaodong; Young, Hunter; Matic, Agnella Izzo; Zirkle, Whitney; Rajguru, Suhrud; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) may be beneficial in auditory prostheses because of its spatially selective activation of spiral ganglion neurons. However, the response properties of single auditory neurons to INS and the possible contributions of its optoacoustic effects are yet to be examined. In this study, the temporal properties of auditory neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) of guinea pigs in response to INS were characterized. Spatial selectivity of INS was observed along the tonotopically organized ICC. Trains of laser pulses and trains of acoustic clicks were used to evoke single unit responses in ICC of normal hearing animals. In response to INS, ICC neurons showed lower limiting rates, longer latencies, and lower firing efficiencies. In deaf animals, ICC neurons could still be stimulated by INS while unresponsive to acoustic stimulation. The site and spatial selectivity of INS both likely shaped the temporal properties of ICC neurons. PMID:26311831

  4. Chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fiala, Milan; Avagyan, Hripsime; Merino, Jose Joaquin; Bernas, Michael; Valdivia, Juan; Espinosa-Jeffrey, Araceli; Witte, Marlys; Weinand, Martin

    2012-01-01

    To identify the upstream signals of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), we evaluated by immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy brain tissues of 13 TLE patients and 5 control patients regarding expression of chemokines and cell-cycle proteins. The chemokine RANTES (CCR5) and other CC-chemokines and apoptotic markers (caspase-3, -8, -9) were expressed in lateral temporal cortical and hippocampal neurons of TLE patients, but not in neurons of control cases. The chemokine RANTES is usually found in cytoplasmic and extracellular locations. However, in TLE neurons, RANTES was displayed in an unusual location, the neuronal nuclei. In addition, the cell-cycle regulatory transcription factor E2F1 was found in an abnormal location in neuronal cytoplasm. The pro-inflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 and cytokine interleukin-1β were expressed both in neurons of patients suffering from temporal lobe epilepsy and from cerebral trauma. The vessels showed fibrin leakage, perivascular macrophages and expression of IL-6 on endothelial cells. In conclusion, the cytoplasmic effects of E2F1 and nuclear effects of RANTES might have novel roles in neuronal apoptosis of TLE neurons and indicate a need to develop new medical and/or surgical neuroprotective strategies against apoptotic signaling by these molecules. Both RANTES and E2F1 signaling are upstream from caspase activation, thus the antagonists of RANTES and/or E2F1 blockade might be neuroprotective for patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The results have implications for the development of new medical and surgical therapies based on inhibition of chemotactic and mitogenic stimuli of neuronal apoptosis in patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:22444245

  5. Serotonin acts through 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors to exert biphasic actions on GnRH neuron excitability in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Janardhan P; Roa, Juan; Herbison, Allan E; Han, Seong Kyu

    2014-02-01

    The effect of serotonin (5-HT) on the electrical excitability of GnRH neurons was examined using gramicidin perforated-patch electrophysiology in transgenic GnRH-green fluorescent protein mice. In diestrous female, the predominant effect of 5-HT was inhibition (70%) with 50% of these cells also exhibiting a late-onset excitation. Responses were dose dependent (EC(50) = 1.2μM) and persisted in the presence of amino acid receptor antagonists and tetrodotoxin, indicating a predominant postsynaptic action of 5-HT. Studies in neonatal, juvenile, peripubertal, and adult mice revealed that 5-HT exerted less potent responses from GnRH neurons with advancing postnatal age in both sexes. In adult male mice, 5-HT exerted less potent hyperpolarizing responses with more excitations compared with females. In addition, adult proestrous female GnRH neurons exhibited reduced inhibition and a complete absence of biphasic hyperpolarization-excitation responses. Studies using 5-HT receptor antagonists demonstrated that the activation of 5-HT(1A) receptors mediated the inhibitory responses, whereas the excitation was mediated by the activation of 5-HT(2A) receptors. The 5-HT-mediated hyperpolarization involved both potassium channels and adenylate cyclase activation, whereas the 5-HT excitation was dependent on protein kinase C. The effects of exogenous 5-HT were replicated using fluoxetine, which enhances endogenous 5-HT levels. These studies demonstrate that 5-HT exerts a biphasic action on most GnRH neurons whereby a fast 5HT(1A)-mediated inhibition occurs alongside a slow 5-HT(2A) excitation. The balance of 5-HT-evoked inhibition vs excitation is developmentally regulated, sexually differentiated, and variable across the estrous cycle and may play a role in regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis throughout postnatal development.

  6. Temporal coding in a silicon network of integrate-and-fire neurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shih-Chii; Douglas, Rodney

    2004-09-01

    Spatio-temporal processing of spike trains by neuronal networks depends on a variety of mechanisms distributed across synapses, dendrites, and somata. In natural systems, the spike trains and the processing mechanisms cohere though their common physical instantiation. This coherence is lost when the natural system is encoded for simulation on a general purpose computer. By contrast, analog VLSI circuits are, like neurons, inherently related by their real-time physics, and so, could provide a useful substrate for exploring neuronlike event-based processing. Here, we describe a hybrid analog-digital VLSI chip comprising a set of integrate-and-fire neurons and short-term dynamical synapses that can be configured into simple network architectures with some properties of neocortical neuronal circuits. We show that, despite considerable fabrication variance in the properties of individual neurons, the chip offers a viable substrate for exploring real-time spike-based processing in networks of neurons.

  7. Neuronal long-range temporal correlations and avalanche dynamics are correlated with behavioral scaling laws.

    PubMed

    Palva, J Matias; Zhigalov, Alexander; Hirvonen, Jonni; Korhonen, Onerva; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus; Palva, Satu

    2013-02-26

    Scale-free fluctuations are ubiquitous in behavioral performance and neuronal activity. In time scales from seconds to hundreds of seconds, psychophysical dynamics and the amplitude fluctuations of neuronal oscillations are governed by power-law-form long-range temporal correlations (LRTCs). In millisecond time scales, neuronal activity comprises cascade-like neuronal avalanches that exhibit power-law size and lifetime distributions. However, it remains unknown whether these neuronal scaling laws are correlated with those characterizing behavioral performance or whether neuronal LRTCs and avalanches are related. Here, we show that the neuronal scaling laws are strongly correlated both with each other and with behavioral scaling laws. We used source reconstructed magneto- and electroencephalographic recordings to characterize the dynamics of ongoing cortical activity. We found robust power-law scaling in neuronal LRTCs and avalanches in resting-state data and during the performance of audiovisual threshold stimulus detection tasks. The LRTC scaling exponents of the behavioral performance fluctuations were correlated with those of concurrent neuronal avalanches and LRTCs in anatomically identified brain systems. The behavioral exponents also were correlated with neuronal scaling laws derived from a resting-state condition and with a similar anatomical topography. Finally, despite the difference in time scales, the scaling exponents of neuronal LRTCs and avalanches were strongly correlated during both rest and task performance. Thus, long and short time-scale neuronal dynamics are related and functionally significant at the behavioral level. These data suggest that the temporal structures of human cognitive fluctuations and behavioral variability stem from the scaling laws of individual and intrinsic brain dynamics. PMID:23401536

  8. Calling song recognition in female crickets: temporal tuning of identified brain neurons matches behavior.

    PubMed

    Kostarakos, Konstantinos; Hedwig, Berthold

    2012-07-11

    Phonotactic orientation of female crickets is tuned to the temporal pattern of the male calling song. We analyzed the phonotactic selectivity of female crickets to varying temporal features of calling song patterns and compared it with the auditory response properties of the ascending interneuron AN1 (herein referred to as TH1-AC1) and four newly identified local brain neurons. The neurites of all brain neurons formed a ring-like branching pattern in the anterior protocerebrum that overlapped with the axonal arborizations of TH1-AC1. All brain neurons responded phasically to the sound pulses of a species-specific chirp. The spike activity of TH1-AC1 and the local interneuron, B-LI2, copied different auditory patterns regardless of their temporal structure. Two other neurons, B-LI3 and B-LC3, matched the temporal selectivity of the phonotactic responses but also responded to some nonattractive patterns. Neuron B-LC3 linked the bilateral auditory areas in the protocerebrum. One local brain neuron, B-LI4, received inhibitory as well as excitatory synaptic inputs. Inhibition was particularly pronounced for nonattractive pulse patterns, reducing its spike activity. When tested with different temporal patterns, B-LI4 exhibited bandpass response properties; its different auditory response functions significantly matched the tuning of phonotaxis. Temporal selectivity was established already for the second of two sound pulses separated by one species-specific pulse interval. Temporal pattern recognition in the cricket brain occurs within the anterior protocerebrum at the first stage of auditory processing. It is crucially linked to a change in auditory responsiveness during pulse intervals and based on fast interactions of inhibition and excitation.

  9. Frontal Neurons Modulate Memory Retrieval across Widely Varying Temporal Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wen-Hua; Williams, Ziv M.

    2015-01-01

    Once a memory has formed, it is thought to undergo a gradual transition within the brain from short- to long-term storage. This putative process, however, also poses a unique problem to the memory system in that the same learned items must also be retrieved across broadly varying time scales. Here, we find that neurons in the ventrolateral…

  10. How Does the Sparse Memory "Engram" Neurons Encode the Memory of a Spatial-Temporal Event?

    PubMed

    Guan, Ji-Song; Jiang, Jun; Xie, Hong; Liu, Kai-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Episodic memory in human brain is not a fixed 2-D picture but a highly dynamic movie serial, integrating information at both the temporal and the spatial domains. Recent studies in neuroscience reveal that memory storage and recall are closely related to the activities in discrete memory engram (trace) neurons within the dentate gyrus region of hippocampus and the layer 2/3 of neocortex. More strikingly, optogenetic reactivation of those memory trace neurons is able to trigger the recall of naturally encoded memory. It is still unknown how the discrete memory traces encode and reactivate the memory. Considering a particular memory normally represents a natural event, which consists of information at both the temporal and spatial domains, it is unknown how the discrete trace neurons could reconstitute such enriched information in the brain. Furthermore, as the optogenetic-stimuli induced recall of memory did not depend on firing pattern of the memory traces, it is most likely that the spatial activation pattern, but not the temporal activation pattern of the discrete memory trace neurons encodes the memory in the brain. How does the neural circuit convert the activities in the spatial domain into the temporal domain to reconstitute memory of a natural event? By reviewing the literature, here we present how the memory engram (trace) neurons are selected and consolidated in the brain. Then, we will discuss the main challenges in the memory trace theory. In the end, we will provide a plausible model of memory trace cell network, underlying the conversion of neural activities between the spatial domain and the temporal domain. We will also discuss on how the activation of sparse memory trace neurons might trigger the replay of neural activities in specific temporal patterns. PMID:27601979

  11. Entorhinal-Hippocampal Neuronal Circuits Bridge Temporally Discontiguous Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitamura, Takashi; Macdonald, Christopher J.; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    The entorhinal cortex (EC)-hippocampal (HPC) network plays an essential role for episodic memory, which preserves spatial and temporal information about the occurrence of past events. Although there has been significant progress toward understanding the neural circuits underlying the spatial dimension of episodic memory, the relevant circuits…

  12. Learning of anticipatory responses in single neurons of the human medial temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Leila; Poncet, Marlene; Self, Matthew W.; Peters, Judith C.; Douw, Linda; van Dellen, Edwin; Claus, Steven; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Baayen, Johannes C.; Roelfsema, Pieter R.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal processes underlying the formation of new associations in the human brain are not yet well understood. Here human participants, implanted with depth electrodes in the brain, learned arbitrary associations between images presented in an ordered, predictable sequence. During learning we recorded from medial temporal lobe (MTL) neurons that responded to at least one of the pictures in the sequence (the preferred stimulus). We report that as a result of learning, single MTL neurons show asymmetric shifts in activity and start firing earlier in the sequence in anticipation of their preferred stimulus. These effects appear relatively early in learning, after only 11 exposures to the stimulus sequence. The anticipatory neuronal responses emerge while the subjects became faster in reporting the next item in the sequence. These results demonstrate flexible representations that could support learning of new associations between stimuli in a sequence, in single neurons in the human MTL. PMID:26449885

  13. The Roles of Human Lateral Temporal Cortical Neuronal Activity in Recent Verbal Memory Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfield-McNeill, Julie; Corina, David

    2009-01-01

    Activity of 98 single neurons in human lateral temporal cortex was measured during memory encoding for auditory words, text, or pictures and compared with identification of material of the same modality in extracellular recordings during awake neurosurgery for epilepsy. Frequency of activity was divided into early or late epochs or activity sustained throughout both; 44 neurons had significant changes in one or more categories. Polymodal and sustained changes lateralized to dominant hemisphere and late changes to nondominant. The majority of polymodal neurons shifted categories for different modalities. In dominant hemisphere, the timing and nature of changes in activity provide the basis for a model of the roles of temporal cortex in encoding. Superior temporal gyrus excitatory activity was related to the early epoch, when perception and processing occur, and middle gyrus to the late epoch, when semantic labeling occurs. The superior two-thirds of middle gyrus also demonstrated sustained inhibition. In a subset of lateral temporal neurons, memory-encoding activity reflected simultaneous convergence of sustained attentional and early perceptual inputs. PMID:18469317

  14. Mnemonic firing of neurons in the monkey temporal pole during a visual recognition memory task.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Kubota, K

    1995-07-01

    1. We examined single-neuronal activity in the temporal pole of monkeys, including the anterior ventromedial temporal (VMT) cortex (the temporopolar cortex, area 36, area 35, and the entorhinal cortex) and the anterior inferotemporal (IT) cortex, during a visual recognition memory task. In the task, a trial began when the monkey pressed a lever. After a waiting period, a visual sample stimulus (S) was presented one to four times on a monitor with an interstimulus delay. Thereafter, a new stimulus (R) was presented. The monkeys were trained to remember S during the delay period and to release the lever in response to R. Colored photographs of natural objects were used as visual stimuli. 2. About 70% of the recorded neurons (225 of 311) responded to at least one of the Ss tested. Thirty percent of these neurons (68 of 225) continued to fire during the subsequent delay periods. In 75% of these neurons (51 of 68), the firing during the delay period strongly correlated with the response to S. 3. The discharge rate during the delay period did not correlate with the monkey's eye movements, pressing or releasing of the lever, or the reaction time. 4. If the monkey erroneously released the lever in response to S or during the delay period, the firing disappeared after the erroneous lever release. If the monkey failed to release the lever in response to R, the firing persisted even after R was withdrawn. The discharge rate in incorrect trials was comparable with that in correct trials. The neurons were considered to fire for as long as the memory of S was necessary. 5. Firing persisted even when an achromatic version or half (even a portion) of S was presented, indicating that the color, a particular portion, or the entire shape of S was not always necessary to elicit firing. 6. An S that elicited firing during the delay period invariably elicited a visual response. Neurons that fired during the delay period showed a higher stimulus selectivity than other visually responsive

  15. Optical recording of neuronal spiking activity from unbiased populations of neurons with high spike detection efficiency and high temporal precision.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Gayathri N; Koester, Helmut J

    2010-09-01

    Activity in populations of neurons is essential for cortical function including signaling of information and signal transport. Previous methods have made advances in recording activity from many neurons but have both technical and analytical limitations. Here we present an optical method, dithered random-access functional calcium imaging, to record somatic calcium signals from up to 100 neurons, in vitro and in vivo. We further developed a maximum-likelihood deconvolution algorithm to detect spikes and precise spike timings from the recorded calcium fluorescence signals. Spike detection efficiency and spike timing detection was determined in acute slices of juvenile mice. The results indicate that the combination of the two methods detected precise spiking activity from unbiased and spatially distributed populations of neurons in acute slices with high efficiency of spike detection (>97%), low rate of false positives (0.0023 spikes/s), and high temporal precision. The results further indicate that there is only a small window of excitation intensities where high spike detection can be achieved consistently.

  16. Spatio-temporal regulations and functions of neuronal alternative RNA splicing in developing and adult brains.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Hidaka, Chiharu; Iijima, Yoko

    2016-08-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a fundamental mechanism that generates molecular diversity from a single gene. In the central nervous system (CNS), key neural developmental steps are thought to be controlled by alternative splicing decisions, including the molecular diversity underlying synaptic wiring, plasticity, and remodeling. Significant progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms and functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in neurons through studies in invertebrate systems; however, recent studies have begun to uncover the potential role of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS. This article provides an overview of recent findings regarding the regulation and function of neuronal alternative splicing. In particular, we focus on the spatio-temporal regulation of neurexin, a synaptic adhesion molecule, by neuronal cell type-specific factors and neuronal activity, which are thought to be especially important for characterizing neural development and function within the mammalian CNS. Notably, there is increasing evidence that implicates the dysregulation of neuronal splicing events in several neurological disorders. Therefore, understanding the detailed mechanisms of neuronal alternative splicing in the mammalian CNS may provide plausible treatment strategies for these diseases.

  17. The impact of orientation filtering on face-selective neurons in monkey inferior temporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Taubert, Jessica; Goffaux, Valerie; Van Belle, Goedele; Vanduffel, Wim; Vogels, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    Faces convey complex social signals to primates. These signals are tolerant of some image transformations (e.g. changes in size) but not others (e.g. picture-plane rotation). By filtering face stimuli for orientation content, studies of human behavior and brain responses have shown that face processing is tuned to selective orientation ranges. In the present study, for the first time, we recorded the responses of face-selective neurons in monkey inferior temporal (IT) cortex to intact and scrambled faces that were filtered to selectively preserve horizontal or vertical information. Guided by functional maps, we recorded neurons in the lateral middle patch (ML), the lateral anterior patch (AL), and an additional region located outside of the functionally defined face-patches (CONTROL). We found that neurons in ML preferred horizontal-passed faces over their vertical-passed counterparts. Neurons in AL, however, had a preference for vertical-passed faces, while neurons in CONTROL had no systematic preference. Importantly, orientation filtering did not modulate the firing rate of neurons to phase-scrambled face stimuli in any recording region. Together these results suggest that face-selective neurons found in the face-selective patches are differentially tuned to orientation content, with horizontal tuning in area ML and vertical tuning in area AL. PMID:26879148

  18. Neuronal correlate of pictorial short-term memory in the primate temporal cortexYasushi Miyashita

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Yasushi; Chang, Han Soo

    1988-01-01

    It has been proposed that visual-memory traces are located in the temporal lobes of the cerebral cortex, as electric stimulation of this area in humans results in recall of imagery1. Lesions in this area also affect recognition of an object after a delay in both humans2,3 and monkeys4-7 indicating a role in short-term memory of images8. Single-unit recordings from the temporal cortex have shown that some neurons continue to fire when one of two or four colours are to be remembered temporarily9. But neuronal responses selective to specific complex objects10-18 , including hands10,13 and faces13,16,17, cease soon after the offset of stimulus presentation10-18. These results led to the question of whether any of these neurons could serve the memory of complex objects. We report here a group of shape-selective neurons in an anterior ventral part of the temporal cortex of monkeys that exhibited sustained activity during the delay period of a visual short-term memory task. The activity was highly selective for the pictorial information to be memorized and was independent of the physical attributes such as size, orientation, colour or position of the object. These observations show that the delay activity represents the short-term memory of the categorized percept of a picture.

  19. Global and fine information coded by single neurons in the temporal visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugase, Yasuko; Yamane, Shigeru; Ueno, Shoogo; Kawano, Kenji

    1999-08-01

    When we see a person's face, we can easily recognize their species, individual identity and emotional state. How does the brain represent such complex information? A substantial number of neurons in the macaque temporal cortex respond to faces. However, the neuronal mechanisms underlying the processing ofcomplex information are not yet clear. Here we recorded the activity of single neurons in the temporal cortex of macaque monkeys while presenting visual stimuli consisting of geometric shapes, and monkey and human faces with various expressions. Information theory was used to investigate how well the neuronal responses could categorize the stimuli. We found that single neurons conveyed two different scales of facial information intheir firing patterns, starting at different latencies. Global information, categorizing stimuli as monkey faces, human faces or shapes, was conveyed in the earliest part of the responses. Fineinformation about identity or expression was conveyed later,beginning on average 51ms after global information. We speculate that global information could be used as a `header' to prepare destination areas for receiving more detailed information.

  20. Spatio-temporal characterization imaging of Ca2+ oscillations in rat hippocampal neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhihong; Lu, Jinling; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Rengang; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2001-08-01

    Ca2+ is the most common signal transduction element in cells and plays critical rolls in neuronal development and plasticity. Ca2+ signals encode information in their oscillation frequency or amplitude and response time to regular cellular function. In this study, in order to reveal the spatio-temporal characterization of Ca2+ oscillations in rat hippocampal neurons, two kinds of Ca2+ fluorescent probes, yellow cameleons 2.1 (YC2.1) and Fluo-3, were used to monitor the change of the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration (]Ca2+[i). Spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations and glutamate elicited Ca2+ oscillations were observed with multi-photon excitation laser scan microscope (MPELSM) and confocal laser scan microscope (CLSM). The observation showed that the spatio- temporal characterization of either spontaneous or glutamate provoked Ca2+ oscillations had difference between the neurites and somata in individual nerons, especially in some distal end of neurites. The result indicated that Ca2+ oscillations were most important signal transduction pattern in neuronal development and activation. The spatio-temporal characterization of difference of Ca2+ signals between the distal endo of neurites and the somata might be associated with the distribution of ionotropic receptor and metabotropic glutamate receptors, and Ca2+ response mechanism mediated by two kinds of glutamate receptor. Ca2+ signal elicited by glutamate in the distal end of neurites appeared more complex and generated faster than that in the somata. It was suggested that Ca2+ signal in glutamate stimulated hippacamal neurons first generated from the distal end of neurites and then transduted to the somata. The complicated Ca2+ signal characterization in the distal end of neurites might be associated with neuronal activitation, neurotransmitter releasing, and other functions of neurons.

  1. Balance between excitation and inhibition controls the temporal organization of neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, F; Herrmann, H J; Perrone-Capano, C; Plenz, D; de Arcangelis, L

    2012-06-01

    Neuronal avalanches, measured in vitro and in vivo, exhibit a robust critical behavior. Their temporal organization hides the presence of correlations. Here we present experimental measurements of the waiting time distribution between successive avalanches in the rat cortex in vitro. This exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior not usually found in other natural processes. Numerical simulations provide evidence that this behavior is a consequence of the alternation between states of high and low activity, named up and down states, leading to a balance between excitation and inhibition controlled by a single parameter. During these periods, both the single neuron state and the network excitability level, keeping memory of past activity, are tuned by homeostatic mechanisms.

  2. Two-population model for medial temporal lobe neurons: The vast majority are almost silent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magyar, Andrew; Collins, John

    2015-07-01

    Recordings in the human medial temporal lobe have found many neurons that respond to pictures (and related stimuli) of just one particular person of those presented. It has been proposed that these are concept cells, responding to just a single concept. However, a direct experimental test of the concept cell idea appears impossible, because it would need the measurement of the response of each cell to enormous numbers of other stimuli. Here we propose a new statistical method for analysis of the data that gives a more powerful way to analyze how close data are to the concept-cell idea. Central to the model is the neuronal sparsity, defined as the total fraction of stimuli that elicit an above-threshold response in the neuron. The model exploits the large number of sampled neurons to give sensitivity to situations where the average response sparsity is much less than one response for the number of presented stimuli. We show that a conventional model where a single sparsity is postulated for all neurons gives an extremely poor fit to the data. In contrast, a model with two dramatically different populations gives an excellent fit to data from the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. In the hippocampus, one population has 7% of the cells with a 2.6% sparsity. But a much larger fraction (93%) respond to only 0.1% of the stimuli. This can result in an extreme bias in the responsiveness of reported neurons compared with a typical neuron. Finally, we show how to allow for the fact that some identified units correspond to multiple neurons and find that our conclusions at the neural level are quantitatively changed but strengthened, with an even stronger difference between the two populations.

  3. Neuronal correlate of visual associative long-term memory in the primate temporal cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    1988-10-01

    In human long-term memory, ideas and concepts become associated in the learning process1. No neuronal correlate for this cognitive function has so far been described, except that memory traces are thought to be localized in the cerebral cortex; the temporal lobe has been assigned as the site for visual experience because electric stimulation of this area results in imagery recall,2 and lesions produce deficits in visual recognition of objects3-9. We previously reported that in the anterior ventral temporal cortex of monkeys, individual neurons have a sustained activity that is highly selective for a few of the 100 coloured fractal patterns used in a visual working-memory task10. Here I report the development of this selectivity through repeated trials involving the working memory. The few patterns for which a neuron was conjointly selective were frequently related to each other through stimulus-stimulus association imposed during training. The results indicate that the selectivity acquired by these cells represents a neuronal correlate of the associative long-term memory of pictures.

  4. Temporal selectivity by single neurons in the torus semicircularis of Batrachyla antartandica (Amphibia: Leptodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Penna, M; Lin, W Y; Feng, A S

    2001-12-01

    We investigated the response selectivities of single auditory neurons in the torus semicircularis of Batrachyla antartandica (a leptodactylid from southern Chile) to synthetic stimuli having diverse temporal structures. The advertisement call for this species is characterized by a long sequence of brief sound pulses having a dominant frequency of about 2000 Hz. We constructed five different series of synthetic stimuli in which the following acoustic parameters were systematically modified, one at a time: pulse rate, pulse duration, pulse rise time, pulse fall time, and train duration. The carrier frequency of these stimuli was fixed at the characteristic frequency of the units under study (n=44). Response patterns of TS units to these synthetic call variants revealed different degrees of selectivity for each of the temporal variables. A substantial number of neurons showed preference for pulse rates below 2 pulses s(-1), approximating the values found in natural advertisement calls. Tonic neurons generally showed preferences for long pulse durations, long rise and fall times, and long train durations. In contrast, phasic and phasic-burst neurons preferred stimuli with short duration, short rise and fall times and short train durations.

  5. Auditory and visual modulation of temporal lobe neurons in voice-sensitive and association cortices.

    PubMed

    Perrodin, Catherine; Kayser, Christoph; Logothetis, Nikos K; Petkov, Christopher I

    2014-02-12

    Effective interactions between conspecific individuals can depend upon the receiver forming a coherent multisensory representation of communication signals, such as merging voice and face content. Neuroimaging studies have identified face- or voice-sensitive areas (Belin et al., 2000; Petkov et al., 2008; Tsao et al., 2008), some of which have been proposed as candidate regions for face and voice integration (von Kriegstein et al., 2005). However, it was unclear how multisensory influences occur at the neuronal level within voice- or face-sensitive regions, especially compared with classically defined multisensory regions in temporal association cortex (Stein and Stanford, 2008). Here, we characterize auditory (voice) and visual (face) influences on neuronal responses in a right-hemisphere voice-sensitive region in the anterior supratemporal plane (STP) of Rhesus macaques. These results were compared with those in the neighboring superior temporal sulcus (STS). Within the STP, our results show auditory sensitivity to several vocal features, which was not evident in STS units. We also newly identify a functionally distinct neuronal subpopulation in the STP that appears to carry the area's sensitivity to voice identity related features. Audiovisual interactions were prominent in both the STP and STS. However, visual influences modulated the responses of STS neurons with greater specificity and were more often associated with congruent voice-face stimulus pairings than STP neurons. Together, the results reveal the neuronal processes subserving voice-sensitive fMRI activity patterns in primates, generate hypotheses for testing in the visual modality, and clarify the position of voice-sensitive areas within the unisensory and multisensory processing hierarchies. PMID:24523543

  6. Temporal lobar predominance of TDP-43 neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, William T; Josephs, Keith A; Knopman, David S; Boeve, Bradley F; Dickson, Dennis W; Petersen, Ronald C; Parisi, Joseph E

    2008-08-01

    TAR DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43) immunoreactive neuronal inclusions are detected in 20-30% of Alzheimer disease (AD) brains, but the distribution of this pathology has not been rigorously studied. In this report, we describe region-specific distribution and density of TDP-43 positive neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) in clinically demented individuals with high probability AD pathology, all with Braak neurofibrillary tangle stages of V or VI. Sections of hippocampus, amygdala, as well as temporal, frontal, and parietal neocortex, were analyzed with TDP-43 immunohistochemistry, and the density of NCIs was assessed using a semiquantitative scoring method. Of the 29 cases, six had TDP-43 positive NCIs in the amygdala only and seven had TDP-43 inclusions restricted to amygdala and hippocampus. In 16 cases, TDP-43 immunoreactivity was more widespread, affecting temporal, frontal or parietal neocortex. These findings indicate that medial temporal lobe limbic structures are vulnerable to TDP-43 pathology in advanced AD, and that the amygdala appears to be the most susceptible region. The distribution of the lesions in this cross-sectional analysis may suggest a progression of TDP-43 pathology in AD, with limbic structures in the medial temporal lobe affected first, followed by higher order association cortices. PMID:18592255

  7. Neuronal activity in dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum under the requirement for temporal credit assignment

    PubMed Central

    Her, Eun Sil; Huh, Namjung; Kim, Jieun; Jung, Min Whan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate neural processes underlying temporal credit assignment in the striatum, we recorded neuronal activity in the dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum (DMS and DLS, respectively) of rats performing a dynamic foraging task in which a choice has to be remembered until its outcome is revealed for correct credit assignment. Choice signals appeared sequentially, initially in the DMS and then in the DLS, and they were combined with action value and reward signals in the DLS when choice outcome was revealed. Unlike in conventional dynamic foraging tasks, neural signals for chosen value were elevated in neither brain structure. These results suggest that dynamics of striatal neural signals related to evaluating choice outcome might differ drastically depending on the requirement for temporal credit assignment. In a behavioral context requiring temporal credit assignment, the DLS, but not the DMS, might be in charge of updating the value of chosen action by integrating choice, action value, and reward signals together. PMID:27245401

  8. Neuronal activity in dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum under the requirement for temporal credit assignment.

    PubMed

    Her, Eun Sil; Huh, Namjung; Kim, Jieun; Jung, Min Whan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate neural processes underlying temporal credit assignment in the striatum, we recorded neuronal activity in the dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum (DMS and DLS, respectively) of rats performing a dynamic foraging task in which a choice has to be remembered until its outcome is revealed for correct credit assignment. Choice signals appeared sequentially, initially in the DMS and then in the DLS, and they were combined with action value and reward signals in the DLS when choice outcome was revealed. Unlike in conventional dynamic foraging tasks, neural signals for chosen value were elevated in neither brain structure. These results suggest that dynamics of striatal neural signals related to evaluating choice outcome might differ drastically depending on the requirement for temporal credit assignment. In a behavioral context requiring temporal credit assignment, the DLS, but not the DMS, might be in charge of updating the value of chosen action by integrating choice, action value, and reward signals together. PMID:27245401

  9. Converging Neuronal Activity in Inferior Temporal Cortex during the Classification of Morphed Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Akrami, Athena; Liu, Yan; Treves, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    How does the brain dynamically convert incoming sensory data into a representation useful for classification? Neurons in inferior temporal (IT) cortex are selective for complex visual stimuli, but their response dynamics during perceptual classification is not well understood. We studied IT dynamics in monkeys performing a classification task. The monkeys were shown visual stimuli that were morphed (interpolated) between pairs of familiar images. Their ability to classify the morphed images depended systematically on the degree of morph. IT neurons were selected that responded more strongly to one of the 2 familiar images (the effective image). The responses tended to peak ∼120 ms following stimulus onset with an amplitude that depended almost linearly on the degree of morph. The responses then declined, but remained above baseline for several hundred ms. This sustained component remained linearly dependent on morph level for stimuli more similar to the ineffective image but progressively converged to a single response profile, independent of morph level, for stimuli more similar to the effective image. Thus, these neurons represented the dynamic conversion of graded sensory information into a task-relevant classification. Computational models suggest that these dynamics could be produced by attractor states and firing rate adaptation within the population of IT neurons. PMID:18669590

  10. Spectral-temporal receptive fields of nonlinear auditory neurons obtained using natural sounds.

    PubMed

    Theunissen, F E; Sen, K; Doupe, A J

    2000-03-15

    The stimulus-response function of many visual and auditory neurons has been described by a spatial-temporal receptive field (STRF), a linear model that for mathematical reasons has until recently been estimated with the reverse correlation method, using simple stimulus ensembles such as white noise. Such stimuli, however, often do not effectively activate high-level sensory neurons, which may be optimized to analyze natural sounds and images. We show that it is possible to overcome the simple-stimulus limitation and then use this approach to calculate the STRFs of avian auditory forebrain neurons from an ensemble of birdsongs. We find that in many cases the STRFs derived using natural sounds are strikingly different from the STRFs that we obtained using an ensemble of random tone pips. When we compare these two models by assessing their predictions of neural response to the actual data, we find that the STRFs obtained from natural sounds are superior. Our results show that the STRF model is an incomplete description of response properties of nonlinear auditory neurons, but that linear receptive fields are still useful models for understanding higher level sensory processing, as long as the STRFs are estimated from the responses to relevant complex stimuli.

  11. Spectral-temporal receptive fields of nonlinear auditory neurons obtained using natural sounds.

    PubMed

    Theunissen, F E; Sen, K; Doupe, A J

    2000-03-15

    The stimulus-response function of many visual and auditory neurons has been described by a spatial-temporal receptive field (STRF), a linear model that for mathematical reasons has until recently been estimated with the reverse correlation method, using simple stimulus ensembles such as white noise. Such stimuli, however, often do not effectively activate high-level sensory neurons, which may be optimized to analyze natural sounds and images. We show that it is possible to overcome the simple-stimulus limitation and then use this approach to calculate the STRFs of avian auditory forebrain neurons from an ensemble of birdsongs. We find that in many cases the STRFs derived using natural sounds are strikingly different from the STRFs that we obtained using an ensemble of random tone pips. When we compare these two models by assessing their predictions of neural response to the actual data, we find that the STRFs obtained from natural sounds are superior. Our results show that the STRF model is an incomplete description of response properties of nonlinear auditory neurons, but that linear receptive fields are still useful models for understanding higher level sensory processing, as long as the STRFs are estimated from the responses to relevant complex stimuli. PMID:10704507

  12. Neuronal oscillations and speech perception: critical-band temporal envelopes are the essence

    PubMed Central

    Ghitza, Oded; Giraud, Anne-Lise; Poeppel, David

    2013-01-01

    A recent opinion article (Neural oscillations in speech: do not be enslaved by the envelope. Obleser et al., 2012) questions the validity of a class of speech perception models inspired by the possible role of neuronal oscillations in decoding speech (e.g., Ghitza, 2011; Giraud and Poeppel, 2012). The authors criticize, in particular, what they see as an over-emphasis of the role of temporal speech envelope information, and an over-emphasis of entrainment to the input rhythm while neglecting the role of top-down processes in modulating the entrainment of neuronal oscillations. Here we respond to these arguments, referring to the phenomenological model of Ghitza (2011), taken as a representative of the criticized approach. PMID:23316150

  13. [Neuronal death in the neocortex of drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy patients].

    PubMed

    Lorigados Pedre, L; Orozco Suárez, S; Morales Chacón, L; García Maeso, I; Estupiñán Diaz, B; Bender del Busto, J E; Pavón Fuentes, N; Paula Piñero, B; Rocha Arrieta, L

    2008-11-01

    Introduction. Participation of apoptotic death mechanisms in drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (DRTLE) is currently under great debate. We have investigated if there is neuronal loss and the immunodetection to different markers in neocortical tissue death in eigth patients with DRTLE. The neocortexes of five patients deceased due to non-neurological causes, paired in age and gender were evaluated as control tissue. Methods. The evaluation of neuronal loss was made by means of a stereological study and with immunohistochemical techniques with the synaptophysin marker. Immunopositivity to different apoptotic markers (annexin V, caspase 3 and 8, bcl-2 and p53) and detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation (TUNEL) were analyzed and double labeling with synaptophysin was performed in every case. The results were evaluated with confocal microscope and analyzed with the Zeiss LSM 5 Image Browser Program, 2.80.1113 (Germany). Results. A statistically significant decrease in the total number of cells (p < 0.05) and the synaptophysin cells+ (p<0.01) in the neocortex (layer IV) of the patients with DRTLE when compared with the control tissue was found. No significant differences were found in the apoptotic markers bcl-2, p53, caspase 3 and 8 for any of the neocortex layers while there was a statistically significant increase in the number of TUNEL cells+ (p<0.05) and annexin V+ (p<0.05) in the neocortical layer IV of the patients. Conclusions. This group of evidence speaks in favor of the existence of an effect on the neuronal number in the neocortex layer IV that may be associated with noncaspase dependent apoptotic death process, without being able to rule out death by necrosis. Key words: Drug resistant temporal lobe epilepsy. Apoptosis. Necrosis. Neuronal loss. Neurología 2008;23(9):555-565.

  14. Adaptive temporal integration of motion in direction-selective neurons in macaque visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Bair, Wyeth; Movshon, J Anthony

    2004-08-18

    Direction-selective neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) and the extrastriate motion area MT/V5 constitute a critical channel that links early cortical mechanisms of spatiotemporal integration to downstream signals that underlie motion perception. We studied how temporal integration in direction-selective cells depends on speed, spatial frequency (SF), and contrast using randomly moving sinusoidal gratings and spike-triggered average (STA) analysis. The window of temporal integration revealed by the STAs varied substantially with stimulus parameters, extending farther back in time for slow motion, high SF, and low contrast. At low speeds and high SF, STA peaks were larger, indicating that a single spike often conveyed more information about the stimulus under conditions in which the mean firing rate was very low. The observed trends were similar in V1 and MT and offer a physiological correlate for a large body of psychophysical data on temporal integration. We applied the same visual stimuli to a model of motion detection based on oriented linear filters (a motion energy model) that incorporated an integrate-and-fire mechanism and found that it did not account for the neuronal data. Our results show that cortical motion processing in V1 and in MT is highly nonlinear and stimulus dependent. They cast considerable doubt on the ability of simple oriented filter models to account for the output of direction-selective neurons in a general manner. Finally, they suggest that spike rate tuning functions may miss important aspects of the neural coding of motion for stimulus conditions that evoke low firing rates. PMID:15317857

  15. Increased densities of nitric oxide synthase expressing neurons in the temporal cortex and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of polytoxicomanic heroin overdose victims: possible implications for heroin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Trübner, Kurt; Krebs, Philipp; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Bielau, Hendrik; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Heroin is one of the most dangerous drugs of abuse, which may exert various neurotoxic actions on the brain (such as gray matter loss, neuronal apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, synaptic defects, depression of adult neurogenensis, as well as development of spongiform leucoencephalopathy). Some of these toxic effects are probably mediated by the gas nitric oxide (NO). We studied by morphometric analysis the numerical density of neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in cortical and hypothalamic areas of eight heroin overdose victims and nine matched controls. Heroin addicts showed significantly increased numerical densities of nNOS immunoreactive cells in the right temporal cortex and the left paraventricular nucleus. Remarkably, in heroin abusers, but not in controls, we observed not only immunostained interneurons, but also cortical pyramidal cells. Given that increased cellular expression of nNOS was accompanied by elevated NO generation in brains of heroin addicts, these elevated levels of NO might have contributed to some of the known toxic effects of heroin (for example, reduced adult neurogenesis, mitochondrial pathology or disturbances in synaptic functioning).

  16. Improved two-photon imaging of living neurons in brain tissue through temporal gating.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Vini; Drury, Jack; Choy, Julian M C; Stricker, Christian; Bachor, Hans-A; Daria, Vincent R

    2015-10-01

    We optimize two-photon imaging of living neurons in brain tissue by temporally gating an incident laser to reduce the photon flux while optimizing the maximum fluorescence signal from the acquired images. Temporal gating produces a bunch of ~10 femtosecond pulses and the fluorescence signal is improved by increasing the bunch-pulse energy. Gating is achieved using an acousto-optic modulator with a variable gating frequency determined as integral multiples of the imaging sampling frequency. We hypothesize that reducing the photon flux minimizes the photo-damage to the cells. Our results, however, show that despite producing a high fluorescence signal, cell viability is compromised when the gating and sampling frequencies are equal (or effectively one bunch-pulse per pixel). We found an optimum gating frequency range that maintains the viability of the cells while preserving a pre-set fluorescence signal of the acquired two-photon images. The neurons are imaged while under whole-cell patch, and the cell viability is monitored as a change in the membrane's input resistance. PMID:26504651

  17. Improved two-photon imaging of living neurons in brain tissue through temporal gating

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Vini; Drury, Jack; Choy, Julian M. C.; Stricker, Christian; Bachor, Hans-A.; Daria, Vincent R.

    2015-01-01

    We optimize two-photon imaging of living neurons in brain tissue by temporally gating an incident laser to reduce the photon flux while optimizing the maximum fluorescence signal from the acquired images. Temporal gating produces a bunch of ~10 femtosecond pulses and the fluorescence signal is improved by increasing the bunch-pulse energy. Gating is achieved using an acousto-optic modulator with a variable gating frequency determined as integral multiples of the imaging sampling frequency. We hypothesize that reducing the photon flux minimizes the photo-damage to the cells. Our results, however, show that despite producing a high fluorescence signal, cell viability is compromised when the gating and sampling frequencies are equal (or effectively one bunch-pulse per pixel). We found an optimum gating frequency range that maintains the viability of the cells while preserving a pre-set fluorescence signal of the acquired two-photon images. The neurons are imaged while under whole-cell patch, and the cell viability is monitored as a change in the membrane’s input resistance. PMID:26504651

  18. Multiphasic temporal dynamics in responses of midbrain dopamine neurons to appetitive and aversive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Fiorillo, Christopher D; Song, Minryung R; Yun, Sora R

    2013-03-13

    The transient response of dopamine neurons has been described as reward prediction error (RPE), with activation or suppression by events that are better or worse than expected, respectively. However, at least a minority of neurons are activated by aversive or high-intensity stimuli, casting doubt on the generality of RPE in describing the dopamine signal. To overcome limitations of previous studies, we studied neuronal responses to a wider variety of high-intensity and aversive stimuli, and we quantified and controlled aversiveness through a choice task in which macaques sacrificed juice to avoid aversive stimuli. Whereas most previous work has portrayed the RPE as a single impulse or "phase," here we demonstrate its multiphasic temporal dynamics. Aversive or high-intensity stimuli evoked a triphasic sequence of activation-suppression-activation extending over a period of 40-700 ms. The initial activation at short latencies (40-120 ms) reflected sensory intensity. The influence of motivational value became dominant between 150 and 250 ms, with activation in the case of appetitive stimuli, and suppression in the case of aversive and neutral stimuli. The previously unreported late activation appeared to be a modest "rebound" after strong suppression. Similarly, strong activation by reward was often followed by suppression. We suggest that these "rebounds" may result from overcompensation by homeostatic mechanisms in some cells. Our results are consistent with a realistic RPE, which evolves over time through a dynamic balance of excitation and inhibition.

  19. Neuronal Injury, Gliosis, and Glial Proliferation in Two Models of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Loewen, Jaycie L; Barker-Haliski, Melissa L; Dahle, E Jill; White, H Steve; Wilcox, Karen S

    2016-04-01

    It is estimated that 30%-40% of epilepsy patients are refractory to therapy and animal models are useful for the identification of more efficacious therapeutic agents. Various well-characterized syndrome-specific models are needed to assess their relevance to human seizure disorders and their validity for testing potential therapies. The corneal kindled mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) allows for the rapid screening of investigational compounds, but there is a lack of information as to the specific inflammatory pathology in this model. Similarly, the Theiler murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) model of TLE may prove to be useful for screening, but quantitative assessment of hippocampal pathology is also lacking. We used immunohistochemistry to characterize and quantitate acute neuronal injury and inflammatory features in dorsal CA1 and dentate gyrus regions and in the directly overlying posterior parietal cortex at 2 time points in each of these TLE models. Corneal kindled mice were observed to have astrogliosis, but not microgliosis or neuron cell death. In contrast, TMEV-injected mice had astrogliosis, microgliosis, neuron death, and astrocyte and microglial proliferation. Our results suggest that these 2 animal models might be appropriate for evaluation of distinct therapies for TLE. PMID:26945036

  20. Major Components of Energy Drinks (Caffeine, Taurine, and Guarana) Exert Cytotoxic Effects on Human Neuronal SH-SY5Y Cells by Decreasing Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Kolling, Eduardo Antônio; Rybarczyk-Filho, José Luiz; Ambrosi, Priscilla; Resende Terra, Silvia; Pires, André Simões; da Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Antônio Behr, Guilherme; Fonseca Moreira, José Cláudio

    2013-01-01

    Scope. To elucidate the morphological and biochemical in vitro effects exerted by caffeine, taurine, and guarana, alone or in combination, since they are major components in energy drinks (EDs). Methods and Results. On human neuronal SH-SY5Y cells, caffeine (0.125–2 mg/mL), taurine (1–16 mg/mL), and guarana (3.125–50 mg/mL) showed concentration-dependent nonenzymatic antioxidant potential, decreased the basal levels of free radical generation, and reduced both superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities, especially when combined together. However, guarana-treated cells developed signs of neurite degeneration in the form of swellings at various segments in a beaded or pearl chain-like appearance and fragmentation of such neurites at concentrations ranging from 12.5 to 50 mg/mL. Swellings, but not neuritic fragmentation, were detected when cells were treated with 0.5 mg/mL (or higher doses) of caffeine, concentrations that are present in EDs. Cells treated with guarana also showed qualitative signs of apoptosis, including membrane blebbing, cell shrinkage, and cleaved caspase-3 positivity. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed that cells treated with 12.5–50 mg/mL of guarana and its combinations with caffeine and/or taurine underwent apoptosis. Conclusion. Excessive removal of intracellular reactive oxygen species, to nonphysiological levels (or “antioxidative stress”), could be a cause of in vitro toxicity induced by these drugs. PMID:23766861

  1. High spatial and temporal resolution wide-field imaging of neuron activity using quantum NV-diamond

    PubMed Central

    Hall, L. T.; Beart, G. C. G.; Thomas, E. A.; Simpson, D. A.; McGuinness, L. P.; Cole, J. H.; Manton, J. H.; Scholten, R. E.; Jelezko, F.; Wrachtrup, Jörg; Petrou, S.; Hollenberg, L. C. L.

    2012-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of the dynamics of biological neural networks is fundamental to gaining insight into information processing in the brain. While techniques exist to measure spatial or temporal properties of these networks, it remains a significant challenge to resolve the neural dynamics with subcellular spatial resolution. In this work we consider a fundamentally new form of wide-field imaging for neuronal networks based on the nanoscale magnetic field sensing properties of optically active spins in a diamond substrate. We analyse the sensitivity of the system to the magnetic field generated by an axon transmembrane potential and confirm these predictions experimentally using electronically-generated neuron signals. By numerical simulation of the time dependent transmembrane potential of a morphologically reconstructed hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron, we show that the imaging system is capable of imaging planar neuron activity non-invasively at millisecond temporal resolution and micron spatial resolution over wide-fields. PMID:22574249

  2. How Does the Sparse Memory “Engram” Neurons Encode the Memory of a Spatial–Temporal Event?

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ji-Song; Jiang, Jun; Xie, Hong; Liu, Kai-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Episodic memory in human brain is not a fixed 2-D picture but a highly dynamic movie serial, integrating information at both the temporal and the spatial domains. Recent studies in neuroscience reveal that memory storage and recall are closely related to the activities in discrete memory engram (trace) neurons within the dentate gyrus region of hippocampus and the layer 2/3 of neocortex. More strikingly, optogenetic reactivation of those memory trace neurons is able to trigger the recall of naturally encoded memory. It is still unknown how the discrete memory traces encode and reactivate the memory. Considering a particular memory normally represents a natural event, which consists of information at both the temporal and spatial domains, it is unknown how the discrete trace neurons could reconstitute such enriched information in the brain. Furthermore, as the optogenetic-stimuli induced recall of memory did not depend on firing pattern of the memory traces, it is most likely that the spatial activation pattern, but not the temporal activation pattern of the discrete memory trace neurons encodes the memory in the brain. How does the neural circuit convert the activities in the spatial domain into the temporal domain to reconstitute memory of a natural event? By reviewing the literature, here we present how the memory engram (trace) neurons are selected and consolidated in the brain. Then, we will discuss the main challenges in the memory trace theory. In the end, we will provide a plausible model of memory trace cell network, underlying the conversion of neural activities between the spatial domain and the temporal domain. We will also discuss on how the activation of sparse memory trace neurons might trigger the replay of neural activities in specific temporal patterns.

  3. How Does the Sparse Memory “Engram” Neurons Encode the Memory of a Spatial–Temporal Event?

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Ji-Song; Jiang, Jun; Xie, Hong; Liu, Kai-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Episodic memory in human brain is not a fixed 2-D picture but a highly dynamic movie serial, integrating information at both the temporal and the spatial domains. Recent studies in neuroscience reveal that memory storage and recall are closely related to the activities in discrete memory engram (trace) neurons within the dentate gyrus region of hippocampus and the layer 2/3 of neocortex. More strikingly, optogenetic reactivation of those memory trace neurons is able to trigger the recall of naturally encoded memory. It is still unknown how the discrete memory traces encode and reactivate the memory. Considering a particular memory normally represents a natural event, which consists of information at both the temporal and spatial domains, it is unknown how the discrete trace neurons could reconstitute such enriched information in the brain. Furthermore, as the optogenetic-stimuli induced recall of memory did not depend on firing pattern of the memory traces, it is most likely that the spatial activation pattern, but not the temporal activation pattern of the discrete memory trace neurons encodes the memory in the brain. How does the neural circuit convert the activities in the spatial domain into the temporal domain to reconstitute memory of a natural event? By reviewing the literature, here we present how the memory engram (trace) neurons are selected and consolidated in the brain. Then, we will discuss the main challenges in the memory trace theory. In the end, we will provide a plausible model of memory trace cell network, underlying the conversion of neural activities between the spatial domain and the temporal domain. We will also discuss on how the activation of sparse memory trace neurons might trigger the replay of neural activities in specific temporal patterns. PMID:27601979

  4. Temporal sequence learning in winner-take-all networks of spiking neurons demonstrated in a brain-based device

    PubMed Central

    McKinstry, Jeffrey L.; Edelman, Gerald M.

    2013-01-01

    Animal behavior often involves a temporally ordered sequence of actions learned from experience. Here we describe simulations of interconnected networks of spiking neurons that learn to generate patterns of activity in correct temporal order. The simulation consists of large-scale networks of thousands of excitatory and inhibitory neurons that exhibit short-term synaptic plasticity and spike-timing dependent synaptic plasticity. The neural architecture within each area is arranged to evoke winner-take-all (WTA) patterns of neural activity that persist for tens of milliseconds. In order to generate and switch between consecutive firing patterns in correct temporal order, a reentrant exchange of signals between these areas was necessary. To demonstrate the capacity of this arrangement, we used the simulation to train a brain-based device responding to visual input by autonomously generating temporal sequences of motor actions. PMID:23760804

  5. Synaptic diversity enables temporal coding of coincident multi-sensory inputs in single neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chabrol, François P.; Arenz, Alexander; Wiechert, Martin T.; Margrie, Troy W.; DiGregorio, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of the brain to rapidly process information from multiple pathways is critical for reliable execution of complex sensory-motor behaviors, yet the cellular mechanisms underlying a neuronal representation of multimodal stimuli are poorly understood. Here we explored the possibility that the physiological diversity of mossy fiber (MF) to granule cell (GC) synapses within the mouse vestibulocerebellum may contribute to the processing of coincident multisensory information at the level of individual GCs. We found that the strength and short-term dynamics of individual MF-GC synapses can act as biophysical signatures for primary vestibular, secondary vestibular and visual input pathways. The majority of GCs receive inputs from different modalities, which when co-activated, produced enhanced GC firing rates and distinct first spike latencies. Thus, pathway-specific synaptic response properties permit temporal coding of correlated multisensory input by single GCs, thereby enriching sensory representation and facilitating pattern separation. PMID:25821914

  6. Responses of Neurons in Primary and Inferior Temporal Visual Cortices to Natural Scenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baddeley, Roland; Abbott, L. F.; Booth, Michael C. A.; Sengpiel, Frank; Freeman, Tobe; Wakeman, Edward A.; Rolls, Edmund T.

    1997-12-01

    The primary visual cortex (V1) is the first cortical area to receive visual input, and inferior temporal (IT) areas are among the last along the ventral visual pathway. We recorded, in area V1 of anaesthetized cats and area IT of awake macaque monkeys, responses of neurons to videos of natural scenes. Responses were analysed to test various hypotheses concerning the nature of neural coding in these two regions. A variety of spike-train statistics were measured including spike-count distributions, interspike interval distributions, coefficients of variation, power spectra, Fano factors and different sparseness measures. All statistics showed non-Poisson characteristics and several revealed self-similarity of the spike trains. Spike-count distributions were approximately exponential in both visual areas for eight different videos and for counting windows ranging from 50 ms to 5 seconds. The results suggest that the neurons maximize their information carrying capacity while maintaining a fixed long-term-average firing rate, or equivalently, minimize their average firing rate for a fixed information carrying capacity.

  7. Spatial Attention and Temporal Expectation Under Timed Uncertainty Predictably Modulate Neuronal Responses in Monkey V1.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jitendra; Sugihara, Hiroki; Katz, Yarden; Schummers, James; Tenenbaum, Joshua; Sur, Mriganka

    2015-09-01

    The brain uses attention and expectation as flexible devices for optimizing behavioral responses associated with expected but unpredictably timed events. The neural bases of attention and expectation are thought to engage higher cognitive loci; however, their influence at the level of primary visual cortex (V1) remains unknown. Here, we asked whether single-neuron responses in monkey V1 were influenced by an attention task of unpredictable duration. Monkeys covertly attended to a spot that remained unchanged for a fixed period and then abruptly disappeared at variable times, prompting a lever release for reward. We show that monkeys responded progressively faster and performed better as the trial duration increased. Neural responses also followed monkey's task engagement-there was an early, but short duration, response facilitation, followed by a late but sustained increase during the time monkeys expected the attention spot to disappear. This late attentional modulation was significantly and negatively correlated with the reaction time and was well explained by a modified hazard function. Such bimodal, time-dependent changes were, however, absent in a task that did not require explicit attentional engagement. Thus, V1 neurons carry reliable signals of attention and temporal expectation that correlate with predictable influences on monkeys' behavioral responses. PMID:24836689

  8. The study of the Bithorax-complex genes in patterning CCAP neurons reveals a temporal control of neuronal differentiation by Abd-B

    PubMed Central

    Moris-Sanz, M.; Estacio-Gómez, A.; Sánchez-Herrero, E.; Díaz-Benjumea, F. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During development, HOX genes play critical roles in the establishment of segmental differences. In the Drosophila central nervous system, these differences are manifested in the number and type of neurons generated by each neuroblast in each segment. HOX genes can act either in neuroblasts or in postmitotic cells, and either early or late in a lineage. Additionally, they can be continuously required during development or just at a specific stage. Moreover, these features are generally segment-specific. Lately, it has been shown that contrary to what happens in other tissues, where HOX genes define domains of expression, these genes are expressed in individual cells as part of the combinatorial codes involved in cell type specification. In this report we analyse the role of the Bithorax-complex genes – Ultrabithorax, abdominal-A and Abdominal-B – in sculpting the pattern of crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP)-expressing neurons. These neurons are widespread in invertebrates, express CCAP, Bursicon and MIP neuropeptides and play major roles in controlling ecdysis. There are two types of CCAP neuron: interneurons and efferent neurons. Our results indicate that Ultrabithorax and Abdominal-A are not necessary for specification of the CCAP-interneurons, but are absolutely required to prevent the death by apoptosis of the CCAP-efferent neurons. Furthermore, Abdominal-B controls by repression the temporal onset of neuropeptide expression in a subset of CCAP-efferent neurons, and a peak of ecdysone hormone at the end of larval life counteracts this repression. Thus, Bithorax complex genes control the developmental appearance of these neuropeptides both temporally and spatially. PMID:26276099

  9. Temporal profiles of neuronal degeneration, glial proliferation, and cell death in hNFL(+/+) and NFL(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    McLean, Jesse R; Sanelli, Teresa R; Leystra-Lantz, Cheryl; He, Bei Ping; Strong, Michael J

    2005-10-01

    Neurofilament (NF) aggregate formation within motor neurons is a pathological hallmark of both the sporadic and familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The relationship between aggregate formation and both microglial and astrocytic proliferation, as well as additional neuropathological features of ALS, is unknown. To examine this, we have used transgenic mice that develop NF aggregates, through either a lack of the low-molecular-weight NF subunit [NFL (-/-)] or the overexpression of human NFL [hNFL (+/+)]. Transgenic and wild-type C57bl/6 mice were examined from 1 month to 18 months of age, and the temporal pattern of motor neuron degeneration, microglial and astrocytic proliferation, and heat shock protein-70 (HSP-70) expression characterized. We observed three overlapping phases in both transgenic mice, including transient aggregate formation, reactive microgliosis, and progressive motor neuron loss. However, only NFL (-/-) mice demonstrated significant astrogliosis and HSP-70 upregulation in both motor neurons and astrocytes. These in vivo models suggest that the development of NF aggregates in motor neurons leads to motor neuron death, but that the interaction between the degenerating motor neurons and the adjacent non-neuronal cells may differ significantly depending on the etiology of the NF aggregate itself.

  10. Pyramidal neurons in the septal and temporal CA1 field of the human and hedgehog tenrec hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Liagkouras, Ioannis; Michaloudi, Helen; Batzios, Christos; Psaroulis, Dimitrios; Georgiadis, Marios; Künzle, Heinz; Papadopoulos, Georgios C

    2008-07-01

    The present study examines comparatively the cellular density of disector-counted/Nissl-stained CA1 pyramidal neurons and the morphometric characteristics (dendritic number/length, spine number/density and Sholl-counted dendritic branch points/20 microm) of the basal and apical dendritic systems of Golgi-impregnated CA1 neurons, in the septal and temporal hippocampus of the human and hedgehog tenrec brain. The obtained results indicate that in both hippocampal parts the cellular density of the CA1 pyramidal neurons is lower in human than in tenrec. However, while the human pyramidal cell density is higher in the septal hippocampal part than in the temporal one, in the tenrec the density of these cells is higher in the temporal part. The dendritic tree of the CA1 pyramidal cells, more developed in the septal than in temporal hippocampus in both species studied, is in general more complex in the human hippocampus. The basal and the apical dendritic systems exhibit species related morphometric differences, while dendrites of different orders exhibit differences in their number and length, and in their spine density. Finally, in both species, as well as hippocampal parts and dendritic systems, changes of dendritic morphometric features along ascending dendritic orders fluctuate in a similar way, as do the number of dendritic branch points in relation to the distance from the neuron soma.

  11. Multiple regulatory elements with spatially and temporally distinct activities control neurogenin1 expression in primary neurons of the zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Blader, Patrick; Plessy, Charles; Strähle, Uwe

    2003-02-01

    The basic Helix-Loop-Helix gene neurogenin1 (ngn1) is expressed in a complex pattern in the neural plate of zebrafish embryos, demarcating the sites of primary neurogenesis. We have dissected the ngn1 locus to identify cis-regulatory regions that control this expression. We have isolated two upstream elements that drive expression in precursors of Rohon-Beard sensory neurons and hindbrain interneurons and in clusters of neuronal precursors in the anterior neural plate, respectively. A third regulatory region mediates later expression. Thus, regulatory sequences with temporally and spatially distinct activities control ngn1 expression in primary neurons of the zebrafish embryo. These regions are highly similar to 5' sequences in the mouse and human ngn1 gene, suggesting that amniote embryos, despite lacking primary neurons, utilize related mechanism to control ngn1 expression. PMID:12559493

  12. Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Induces Intrinsic Alterations in Na Channel Gating in Layer II Medial Entorhinal Cortex Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hargus, Nicholas J.; Merrick, Ellen C.; Nigam, Aradhya; Kalmar, Christopher L.; Baheti, Aparna R.; Bertram, Edward H.; Patel, Manoj K.

    2010-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common form of adult epilepsy involving the limbic structures of the temporal lobe. Layer II neurons of the entorhinal cortex (EC) form the major excitatory input into the hippocampus via the perforant path and consist of non-stellate and stellate neurons. These neurons are spared and hyper-excitable in TLE. The basis for the hyper-excitability is likely multifactorial and may include alterations in intrinsic properties. In a rat model of TLE, medial EC (mEC) non-stellate and stellate neurons had significantly higher action potential (AP) firing frequencies than in control. The increase remained in the presence of synaptic blockers, suggesting intrinsic mechanisms. Since sodium (Na) channels play a critical role in AP generation and conduction we sought to determine if Na channel gating parameters and expression levels were altered in TLE. Na channel currents recorded from isolated mEC TLE neurons revealed increased Na channel conductances, depolarizing shifts in inactivation parameters and larger persistent (INaP) and resurgent (INaR) Na currents. Immunofluorescence experiments revealed increased staining of Nav1.6 within the axon initial segment and Nav1.2 within the cell bodies of mEC TLE neurons. These studies provide support for additional intrinsic alterations within mEC layer II neurons in TLE and implicate alterations in Na channel activity and expression, in part, for establishing the profound increase in intrinsic membrane excitability of mEC layer II neurons in TLE. These intrinsic changes, together with changes in the synaptic network, could support seizure activity in TLE. PMID:20946956

  13. Temporal selectivity for complex signals by single neurons in the torus semicircularis of Pleurodema thaul (Amphibia:Leptodactylidae).

    PubMed

    Penna, M; Lin, W Y; Feng, A S

    1997-04-01

    Responses of auditory neurons in the torus semicircularis (TS) of Pleurodema thaul, a leptodactylid from Chile, to synthetic stimuli having diverse temporal patterns and to digitized advertisement calls of P. thaul and three sympatric species, were recorded to investigate their temporal response selectivities. The advertisement call of this species consists of a long sequence of sound pulses (a pulse-amplitude-modulated, or PAM, signal) having a dominant frequency of about 2000 Hz. Each of the sound pulses contains intra-pulse sinusoidal-amplitude-modulations (SAMs). Synthetic stimuli consisted of six series in which the following acoustic parameters were systematically modified, one at a time: PAM rate, pulse duration, number of pulses, and intra-pulse SAM rate. The carrier frequency of these stimuli was set at the characteristic frequency (CF) of the isolated units (n = 47). Response patterns of TS units to synthetic call variants reveal different degrees of selectivities for each of the temporal variables, with populations of neurons responding maximally to specific values found in the advertisement call of this species. These selectivities are mainly shaped by neuronal responsiveness to the overall sound energy of the stimulus and by the inability of neurons to discharge to short inter-pulse gaps.

  14. Atoh1-dependent rhombic lip neurons are required for temporal delay between independent respiratory oscillators in embryonic mice.

    PubMed

    Tupal, Srinivasan; Huang, Wei-Hsiang; Picardo, Maria Cristina D; Ling, Guang-Yi; Del Negro, Christopher A; Zoghbi, Huda Y; Gray, Paul A

    2014-05-14

    All motor behaviors require precise temporal coordination of different muscle groups. Breathing, for example, involves the sequential activation of numerous muscles hypothesized to be driven by a primary respiratory oscillator, the preBötzinger Complex, and at least one other as-yet unidentified rhythmogenic population. We tested the roles of Atoh1-, Phox2b-, and Dbx1-derived neurons (three groups that have known roles in respiration) in the generation and coordination of respiratory output. We found that Dbx1-derived neurons are necessary for all respiratory behaviors, whereas independent but coupled respiratory rhythms persist from at least three different motor pools after eliminating or silencing Phox2b- or Atoh1-expressing hindbrain neurons. Without Atoh1 neurons, however, the motor pools become temporally disorganized and coupling between independent respiratory oscillators decreases. We propose Atoh1 neurons tune the sequential activation of independent oscillators essential for the fine control of different muscles during breathing.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02265.001.

  15. Temporal encoding precision of bat auditory neurons tuned to target distance deteriorates on the way to the cortex.

    PubMed

    Macías, Silvio; Hechavarría, Julio C; Kössl, Manfred

    2016-03-01

    During echolocation, bats estimate distance to avoid obstacles and capture moving prey. The primary distance cue is the delay between the bat's emitted echolocation pulse and the return of an echo. In the bat's auditory system, echo delay-tuned neurons that only respond to pulse-echo pairs having a specific echo delay serve target distance calculation. Accurate prey localization should benefit from the spike precision in such neurons. Here we show that delay-tuned neurons in the inferior colliculus of the mustached bat respond with higher temporal precision, shorter latency and shorter response duration than those of the auditory cortex. Based on these characteristics, we suggest that collicular neurons are best suited for a fast and accurate response that could lead to fast behavioral reactions while cortical neurons, with coarser temporal precision and longer latencies and response durations could be more appropriate for integrating acoustic information over time. The latter could be important for the formation of biosonar images. PMID:26785850

  16. Temporal coupling between neuronal activity and blood flow in rat cerebellar cortex as indicated by field potential analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mathiesen, Claus; Caesar, Kirsten; Lauritzen, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Laser-Doppler flowmetry and extracellular recordings of field potentials were used to examine the temporal coupling between neuronal activity and increases in cerebellar blood flow (CeBF). Climbing fibre-evoked increases in CeBF were dependent on stimulus duration, indicating that increases in CeBF reflected a time integral in neuronal activity. The simplest way to represent neuronal activity over time was to obtain a running summation of evoked field potential amplitudes (runΣFP). RunΣFP was calculated for each stimulus protocol and compared with the time course of the CeBF responses to demonstrate coupling between nerve cell activity and CeBF. In the climbing fibre system, the amplitude and time course of CeBF were in agreement with the calculated postsynaptic runΣFP (2–20 Hz for 60 s). This suggested coupling between CeBF and neuronal activity in this excitatory, monosynaptic, afferent-input system under these conditions. There was no correlation between runΣFP and CeBF during prolonged stimulation. Parallel fibre-evoked increases in CeBF correlated with runΣFP of pre- and postsynaptic potentials (2–15 Hz for 60 s). At higher stimulation frequencies and during longer-lasting stimulation the time course and amplitudes of CeBF responses correlated with runΣFP of presynaptic, but not postsynaptic potentials. This suggested a more complex relationship in this mixed inhibitory-excitatory, disynaptic, afferent-input system. This study has demonstrated temporal coupling between neuronal activity and CeBF in the monosynaptic, excitatory climbing-fibre system. In the mixed mono- and disynaptic parallel fibre system, temporal coupling was most clearly observed at low stimulation frequencies. We propose that appropriate modelling of electrophysiological data is needed to document functional coupling of neuronal activity and blood flow. PMID:10673558

  17. Role of inferior temporal neurons in visual memory. I. Temporal encoding of information about visual images, recalled images, and behavioral context.

    PubMed

    Eskandar, E N; Richmond, B J; Optican, L M

    1992-10-01

    1. Lesions of the inferior temporal (IT) cortex selectively hamper monkeys in tasks requiring visual memory. A system that recognizes images must be able to encode a current stimulus, recall the code of a previous stimulus, compare the codes of the two stimuli, and make a decision on the basis of the outcome of the comparison. Therefore, IT neurons must be involved in at least one of these processes. To determine the specific role of IT neurons in visual memory, we measured the information conveyed in the neuronal responses about current patterns, recalled patterns, and behavioral context. 2. Two monkeys were trained to perform a sequential matching task using a set of 32 black and white Walsh patterns. In the course of an experiment, each pattern was presented repeatedly in sample, match, and nonmatch behavioral contexts. While the monkeys were performing the task, we recorded the activity of 76 neurons from area TE of IT. The neuronal responses to the stimuli were converted to spike density functions, and the resultant waveforms were quantified using their principal components. The relationships between the responses and the stimuli were studied using analysis of variance and information theory. 3. The analysis of variance was applied to the neuronal response waveforms using the context (sample, match, or nonmatch) and the patterns of the stimuli as independent variables and the spike count or the coefficients of the principal components as the dependent variables. We found that the waveforms of most neurons were significantly modulated by both the pattern and the context of the stimulus presentation. 4. We also analyzed the stimulus-response relationships using information theory. The input codes were based on the pattern and context of the stimuli, and the output codes were based on the spike count or the principal components of the responses. The neuronal response waveforms were found to convey significant amounts of information about both the pattern and

  18. Presynaptic GABA Receptors Mediate Temporal Contrast Enhancement in Drosophila Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Modulate Odor-Driven Behavioral Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Mahmut; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Kunst, Michael; Nitabach, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Contrast enhancement mediated by lateral inhibition within the nervous system enhances the detection of salient features of visual and auditory stimuli, such as spatial and temporal edges. However, it remains unclear how mechanisms for temporal contrast enhancement in the olfactory system can enhance the detection of odor plume edges during navigation. To address this question, we delivered to Drosophila melanogaster flies pulses of high odor intensity that induce sustained peripheral responses in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We use optical electrophysiology to directly measure electrical responses in presynaptic terminals and demonstrate that sustained peripheral responses are temporally sharpened by the combined activity of two types of inhibitory GABA receptors to generate contrast-enhanced voltage responses in central OSN axon terminals. Furthermore, we show how these GABA receptors modulate the time course of innate behavioral responses after odor pulse termination, demonstrating an important role for temporal contrast enhancement in odor-guided navigation. PMID:27588305

  19. Presynaptic GABA Receptors Mediate Temporal Contrast Enhancement in Drosophila Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Modulate Odor-Driven Behavioral Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Raccuglia, Davide; Yan McCurdy, Li; Demir, Mahmut; Gorur-Shandilya, Srinivas; Kunst, Michael; Emonet, Thierry; Nitabach, Michael N

    2016-01-01

    Contrast enhancement mediated by lateral inhibition within the nervous system enhances the detection of salient features of visual and auditory stimuli, such as spatial and temporal edges. However, it remains unclear how mechanisms for temporal contrast enhancement in the olfactory system can enhance the detection of odor plume edges during navigation. To address this question, we delivered to Drosophila melanogaster flies pulses of high odor intensity that induce sustained peripheral responses in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). We use optical electrophysiology to directly measure electrical responses in presynaptic terminals and demonstrate that sustained peripheral responses are temporally sharpened by the combined activity of two types of inhibitory GABA receptors to generate contrast-enhanced voltage responses in central OSN axon terminals. Furthermore, we show how these GABA receptors modulate the time course of innate behavioral responses after odor pulse termination, demonstrating an important role for temporal contrast enhancement in odor-guided navigation. PMID:27588305

  20. Analysis and classification of delay-sensitive cortical neurons based on response to temporal parameters in echolocation signals.

    PubMed

    Chittajallu, S K; Palakal, M J; Wong, D

    1995-04-01

    Echolocating bats generate an acoustic image of their target by processing target-reflected echoes of their emitted biosonar pulses. Efforts in building computational models of auditory processing in the bat auditory system, using extensive neurophysiological data from cortical studies are challenged by the intrinsic complexity and the significant variability in neural response to stimuli. In this paper, we use a computerized method for the analysis and classification of delay-sensitive neurons to classify neurons from the auditory cortex of Myotis lucifugus, a species that echolocates with FM signals. The coefficients of the bi-linear fit to the best delay response surfaces (mean R2 = 0.01) were used in classifying the neurons. Six classes were derived that corresponded to the four previously characterized neurophysiologically. The first class corresponded to delay-tuned neurons which exhibited a constant best delay at different pulse repetition rates and pulse durations. Three other classes corresponded to the different subtypes of tracking neurons which changed their best delay to one or both of these stimulus temporal parameters. Two additional classes were differentiated although their best-delay response were similar to either the delay-tuned or the duration and pulse-repetition rate sensitive class. Artificial delay-sensitive neurons built from the parameters of the centroid of each class, will serve a key role in the FM bat auditory system model that we are building. PMID:7642448

  1. Representation of retrieval confidence by single neurons in the human medial temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Rutishauser, Ueli; Ye, Shengxuan; Koroma, Matthieu; Tudusciuc, Oana; Ross, Ian B.; Chung, Jeffrey M.; Mamelak, Adam N.

    2015-01-01

    Memory-based decisions are often accompanied by an assessment of choice certainty, but the mechanisms of such confidence judgments remain unknown. We studied the response of 1065 individual neurons in the human hippocampus and amygdala while neurosurgical patients made memory retrieval decisions together with a confidence judgment. Combining behavioral, neuronal and computational analysis, we identified a population of memory-selective (MS) neurons whose activity signaled stimulus familiarity and confidence as assessed by subjective report. In contrast, the activity of visually selective (VS) neurons was not sensitive to memory strength. The groups further differed in response latency, tuning, and extracellular waveforms. The information provided by MS neurons was sufficient for a race model to decide stimulus familiarity and retrieval confidence. Together, this demonstrates a trial-by-trial relationship between a specific group of neurons and declared memory strength in humans. We suggest that VS and MS neurons are a substrate for declarative memories. PMID:26053402

  2. Temporal response dynamics of Drosophila olfactory sensory neurons depends on receptor type and response polarity

    PubMed Central

    Getahun, Merid N.; Wicher, Dieter; Hansson, Bill S.; Olsson, Shannon B.

    2012-01-01

    Insect olfactory sensory neurons (OSN) express a diverse array of receptors from different protein families, i.e. ionotropic receptors (IR), gustatory receptors (GR) and odorant receptors (OR). It is well known that insects are exposed to a plethora of odor molecules that vary widely in both space and time under turbulent natural conditions. In addition to divergent ligand specificities, these different receptors might also provide an increased range of temporal dynamics and sensitivities for the olfactory system. To test this, we challenged different Drosophila OSNs with both varying stimulus durations (10–2000 ms), and repeated stimulus pulses of key ligands at various frequencies (1–10 Hz). Our results show that OR-expressing OSNs responded faster and with higher sensitivity to short stimulations as compared to IR- and Gr21a-expressing OSNs. In addition, OR-expressing OSNs could respond to repeated stimulations of excitatory ligands up to 5 Hz, while IR-expressing OSNs required ~5x longer stimulations and/or higher concentrations to respond to similar stimulus durations and frequencies. Nevertheless, IR-expressing OSNs did not exhibit adaptation to longer stimulations, unlike OR- and Gr21a-OSNs. Both OR- and IR-expressing OSNs were also unable to resolve repeated pulses of inhibitory ligands as fast as excitatory ligands. These differences were independent of the peri-receptor environment in which the receptors were expressed and suggest that the receptor expressed by a given OSN affects both its sensitivity and its response to transient, intermittent chemical stimuli. OR-expressing OSNs are better at resolving low dose, intermittent stimuli, while IR-expressing OSNs respond more accurately to long-lasting odor pulses. This diversity increases the capacity of the insect olfactory system to respond to the diverse spatiotemporal signals in the natural environment. PMID:23162431

  3. Responses of neurons in the medial temporal lobe during encoding and recognition of face-scene pairs.

    PubMed

    Viskontas, Indre V; Knowlton, Barbara J; Fried, Itzhak

    2016-09-01

    Associations between co-occurring stimuli are formed in the medial temporal lobe (MTL). Here, we recorded from 508 single and multi-units in the MTL while participants learned and retrieved associations between unfamiliar faces and unfamiliar scenes. Participant's memories for the face-scene pairs were later tested using cued recall and recognition tests. The results show that neurons in the parahippocampal cortex are most likely to respond with changes from baseline firing to these stimuli during both encoding and recognition, and this region showed the greatest proportion of cells showing differential responses depending on the phase of the task. Furthermore, we found that cells in the parahippocampal cortex that responded during both encoding and recognition were more likely to show decreases from baseline firing than cells that were only recruited during recognition, which were more likely to show increases in firing. Since all stimuli shown during recognition were familiar to the patients, these findings suggest that with familiarity, cell responses become more sharply tuned. No neurons in this region, however, were found to be affected by recombining face/scene pairs. Neurons in other MTL regions, particularly the hippocampus, were sensitive to stimulus configurations. Thus, the results support the idea that neurons in the parahippocampal cortex code for features of stimuli and neurons in the hippocampus are more likely to represent their specific configurations.

  4. Simple Learned Weighted Sums of Inferior Temporal Neuronal Firing Rates Accurately Predict Human Core Object Recognition Performance.

    PubMed

    Majaj, Najib J; Hong, Ha; Solomon, Ethan A; DiCarlo, James J

    2015-09-30

    To go beyond qualitative models of the biological substrate of object recognition, we ask: can a single ventral stream neuronal linking hypothesis quantitatively account for core object recognition performance over a broad range of tasks? We measured human performance in 64 object recognition tests using thousands of challenging images that explore shape similarity and identity preserving object variation. We then used multielectrode arrays to measure neuronal population responses to those same images in visual areas V4 and inferior temporal (IT) cortex of monkeys and simulated V1 population responses. We tested leading candidate linking hypotheses and control hypotheses, each postulating how ventral stream neuronal responses underlie object recognition behavior. Specifically, for each hypothesis, we computed the predicted performance on the 64 tests and compared it with the measured pattern of human performance. All tested hypotheses based on low- and mid-level visually evoked activity (pixels, V1, and V4) were very poor predictors of the human behavioral pattern. However, simple learned weighted sums of distributed average IT firing rates exactly predicted the behavioral pattern. More elaborate linking hypotheses relying on IT trial-by-trial correlational structure, finer IT temporal codes, or ones that strictly respect the known spatial substructures of IT ("face patches") did not improve predictive power. Although these results do not reject those more elaborate hypotheses, they suggest a simple, sufficient quantitative model: each object recognition task is learned from the spatially distributed mean firing rates (100 ms) of ∼60,000 IT neurons and is executed as a simple weighted sum of those firing rates. Significance statement: We sought to go beyond qualitative models of visual object recognition and determine whether a single neuronal linking hypothesis can quantitatively account for core object recognition behavior. To achieve this, we designed a

  5. Simple Learned Weighted Sums of Inferior Temporal Neuronal Firing Rates Accurately Predict Human Core Object Recognition Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ha; Solomon, Ethan A.; DiCarlo, James J.

    2015-01-01

    To go beyond qualitative models of the biological substrate of object recognition, we ask: can a single ventral stream neuronal linking hypothesis quantitatively account for core object recognition performance over a broad range of tasks? We measured human performance in 64 object recognition tests using thousands of challenging images that explore shape similarity and identity preserving object variation. We then used multielectrode arrays to measure neuronal population responses to those same images in visual areas V4 and inferior temporal (IT) cortex of monkeys and simulated V1 population responses. We tested leading candidate linking hypotheses and control hypotheses, each postulating how ventral stream neuronal responses underlie object recognition behavior. Specifically, for each hypothesis, we computed the predicted performance on the 64 tests and compared it with the measured pattern of human performance. All tested hypotheses based on low- and mid-level visually evoked activity (pixels, V1, and V4) were very poor predictors of the human behavioral pattern. However, simple learned weighted sums of distributed average IT firing rates exactly predicted the behavioral pattern. More elaborate linking hypotheses relying on IT trial-by-trial correlational structure, finer IT temporal codes, or ones that strictly respect the known spatial substructures of IT (“face patches”) did not improve predictive power. Although these results do not reject those more elaborate hypotheses, they suggest a simple, sufficient quantitative model: each object recognition task is learned from the spatially distributed mean firing rates (100 ms) of ∼60,000 IT neurons and is executed as a simple weighted sum of those firing rates. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We sought to go beyond qualitative models of visual object recognition and determine whether a single neuronal linking hypothesis can quantitatively account for core object recognition behavior. To achieve this, we designed a

  6. Simple Learned Weighted Sums of Inferior Temporal Neuronal Firing Rates Accurately Predict Human Core Object Recognition Performance.

    PubMed

    Majaj, Najib J; Hong, Ha; Solomon, Ethan A; DiCarlo, James J

    2015-09-30

    To go beyond qualitative models of the biological substrate of object recognition, we ask: can a single ventral stream neuronal linking hypothesis quantitatively account for core object recognition performance over a broad range of tasks? We measured human performance in 64 object recognition tests using thousands of challenging images that explore shape similarity and identity preserving object variation. We then used multielectrode arrays to measure neuronal population responses to those same images in visual areas V4 and inferior temporal (IT) cortex of monkeys and simulated V1 population responses. We tested leading candidate linking hypotheses and control hypotheses, each postulating how ventral stream neuronal responses underlie object recognition behavior. Specifically, for each hypothesis, we computed the predicted performance on the 64 tests and compared it with the measured pattern of human performance. All tested hypotheses based on low- and mid-level visually evoked activity (pixels, V1, and V4) were very poor predictors of the human behavioral pattern. However, simple learned weighted sums of distributed average IT firing rates exactly predicted the behavioral pattern. More elaborate linking hypotheses relying on IT trial-by-trial correlational structure, finer IT temporal codes, or ones that strictly respect the known spatial substructures of IT ("face patches") did not improve predictive power. Although these results do not reject those more elaborate hypotheses, they suggest a simple, sufficient quantitative model: each object recognition task is learned from the spatially distributed mean firing rates (100 ms) of ∼60,000 IT neurons and is executed as a simple weighted sum of those firing rates. Significance statement: We sought to go beyond qualitative models of visual object recognition and determine whether a single neuronal linking hypothesis can quantitatively account for core object recognition behavior. To achieve this, we designed a

  7. Temporally matched subpopulations of selectively interconnected principal neurons in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Yuichi; Donato, Flavio; Galimberti, Ivan; Cabuy, Erik; Caroni, Pico

    2011-04-01

    The extent to which individual neurons are interconnected selectively within brain circuits is an unresolved problem in neuroscience. Neurons can be organized into preferentially interconnected microcircuits, but whether this reflects genetically defined subpopulations is unclear. We found that the principal neurons in the main subdivisions of the hippocampus consist of distinct subpopulations that are generated during distinct time windows and that interconnect selectively across subdivisions. In two mouse lines in which transgene expression was driven by the neuron-specific Thy1 promoter, transgene expression allowed us to visualize distinct populations of principal neurons with unique and matched patterns of gene expression, shared distinct neurogenesis and synaptogenesis time windows, and selective connectivity at dentate gyrus-CA3 and CA3-CA1 synapses. Matched subpopulation marker genes and neuronal subtype markers mapped near clusters of olfactory receptor genes. The nonoverlapping matched timings of synaptogenesis accounted for the selective connectivities of these neurons in CA3. Therefore, the hippocampus contains parallel connectivity channels assembled from distinct principal neuron subpopulations through matched schedules of synaptogenesis.

  8. Theta oscillation and neuronal activity in rat hippocampus are involved in temporal discrimination of time in seconds

    PubMed Central

    Nakazono, Tomoaki; Sano, Tomomi; Takahashi, Susumu; Sakurai, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of time cells revealed that the rodent hippocampus has information regarding time. Previous studies have suggested that the role of hippocampal time cells is to integrate temporally segregated events into a sequence using working memory with time perception. However, it is unclear whether hippocampal cells contribute to time perception itself because most previous studies employed delayed matching-to-sample tasks that did not separately evaluate time perception from working memory processes. Here, we investigated the function of the rat hippocampus in time perception using a temporal discrimination task. In the task, rats had to discriminate between durations of 1 and 3 s to get a reward, and maintaining task-related information as working memory was not required. We found that some hippocampal neurons showed firing rate modulation similar to that of time cells. Moreover, theta oscillation of local field potentials (LFPs) showed a transient enhancement of power during time discrimination periods. However, there were little relationships between the neuronal activities and theta oscillations. These results suggest that both the individual neuronal activities and theta oscillations of LFPs in the hippocampus have a possibility to be engaged in seconds order time perception; however, they participate in different ways. PMID:26157367

  9. Inter-trial neuronal activity in inferior temporal cortex: a putative vehicle to generate long-term visual associations.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, V; Fusi, S; Berman, E; Zohary, E

    1998-08-01

    When monkeys perform a delayed match-to-sample task, some neurons in the anterior inferotemporal cortex show sustained activity following the presentation of specific visual stimuli, typically only those that are shown repeatedly. When sample stimuli are shown in a fixed temporal order, the few images that evoke delay activity in a given neuron are often neighboring stimuli in the sequence, suggesting that this delay activity may be the neural correlate of associative long-term memory. Here we report that stimulus-selective sustained activity is also evident following the presentation of the test stimulus in the same task. We use a neural network model to demonstrate that persistent stimulus-selective activity across the intertrial interval can lead to similar mnemonic representations (distributions of delay activity across the neural population) for neighboring visual stimuli. Thus, inferotemporal cortex may contain neural machinery for generating long-term stimulus-stimulus associations.

  10. Primate striate and prestriate cortical neurons during discrimination. I. simultaneous temporal encoding of information about color and pattern.

    PubMed

    McClurkin, J W; Optican, L M

    1996-01-01

    1. We recorded the responses of neurons in cortical areas V1, V2, and V4 to a set of 36 colored patterns while monkeys discriminated among the stimuli on the basis of their color or their pattern. In the discrimination task a colored square or a black and white pattern was presented foveally as a cue stimulus. The monkey was required to choose, by making a saccade, which of three peripheral targets had the same property as the cue. One of the peripheral targets was centered on the receptive field of the neuron, and the other two were positioned at equally distant points around the circumference of an imaginary circle centered on the cue and passing through the receptive field. 2. An examination of the responses to the stimuli showed that there was a complex interaction between the effects of color and of pattern on the neuronal responses. Because of these interactions, we tested sensitivity to color and pattern by sorting the responses to all stimuli according to the color or pattern of the stimulus. We found that the number of spikes in the responses was affected by only one or the other of the stimulus parameters, but that the temporal distribution of spikes was affected by both stimulus parameters. We quantified the relative sensitivities of each neuron to color and pattern by dividing the amount of information the neuron transmitted about color by the amount of information the neuron transmitted about pattern. The distributions of information ratios assuming a spike count code were broad, indicating that many neurons were sensitive to only one stimulus parameter or the other. In contrast, the distributions of information ratios assuming a wave-form code were narrow and centered near 1.0, indicating nearly equal sensitivities to both stimulus parameters. 3. In our initial experiments, it appeared that the color or pattern used as the cue for the discrimination task affected the responses of many neurons to stimuli on the receptive field. To determine whether the

  11. Neuronal cell fate diversification controlled by sub-temporal action of Kruppel

    PubMed Central

    Stratmann, Johannes; Gabilondo, Hugo; Benito-Sipos, Jonathan; Thor, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    During Drosophila embryonic nervous system development, neuroblasts express a programmed cascade of five temporal transcription factors that govern the identity of cells generated at different time-points. However, these five temporal genes fall short of accounting for the many distinct cell types generated in large lineages. Here, we find that the late temporal gene castor sub-divides its large window in neuroblast 5–6 by simultaneously activating two cell fate determination cascades and a sub-temporal regulatory program. The sub-temporal program acts both upon itself and upon the determination cascades to diversify the castor window. Surprisingly, the early temporal gene Kruppel acts as one of the sub-temporal genes within the late castor window. Intriguingly, while the temporal gene castor activates the two determination cascades and the sub-temporal program, spatial cues controlling cell fate in the latter part of the 5–6 lineage exclusively act upon the determination cascades. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19311.001 PMID:27740908

  12. Selectivity of inferior temporal neurons for realistic pictures predicted by algorithms for image database navigation.

    PubMed

    Allred, Sarah; Liu, Yan; Jagadeesh, Bharathi

    2005-12-01

    Primates have a remarkable ability to perceive, recognize, and discriminate among the plethora of people, places, and things that they see, and neural selectivity in the primate inferotemporal (IT) cortex is thought to underlie this ability. Here we investigated the relationship between neural response and perception by recording from IT neurons in monkeys while they viewed realistic images. We then compared the similarity of neural responses elicited by images to the quantitative similarity of the images. Image similarity was approximated using several algorithms, two of which were designed to search image databases for perceptually similar images. Some algorithms for image similarity correlated well with human perception, and these algorithms explained part of the stimulus selectivity of IT neurons. Images that elicited similar neural responses were ranked as more similar by these algorithms than images that elicited different neural responses, and images ranked as similar by the algorithms elicited similar responses from neurons. Neural selectivity was predicted more accurately when the reference images for algorithm similarity elicited either very strong or very weak responses from the neuron. The degree to which algorithms for image similarity were correlated with human perception was related to the degree to which algorithms explained the selectivity of IT neurons, providing support for the proposal that the selectivity of IT neurons is related to perceptual similarity of images.

  13. Optogenetic manipulation of activity and temporally controlled cell-specific ablation reveal a role for MCH neurons in sleep/wake regulation.

    PubMed

    Tsunematsu, Tomomi; Ueno, Takafumi; Tabuchi, Sawako; Inutsuka, Ayumu; Tanaka, Kenji F; Hasuwa, Hidetoshi; Kilduff, Thomas S; Terao, Akira; Yamanaka, Akihiro

    2014-05-14

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a neuropeptide produced in neurons sparsely distributed in the lateral hypothalamic area. Recent studies have reported that MCH neurons are active during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, but their physiological role in the regulation of sleep/wakefulness is not fully understood. To determine the physiological role of MCH neurons, newly developed transgenic mouse strains that enable manipulation of the activity and fate of MCH neurons in vivo were generated using the recently developed knockin-mediated enhanced gene expression by improved tetracycline-controlled gene induction system. The activity of these cells was controlled by optogenetics by expressing channelrhodopsin2 (E123T/T159C) or archaerhodopsin-T in MCH neurons. Acute optogenetic activation of MCH neurons at 10 Hz induced transitions from non-REM (NREM) to REM sleep and increased REM sleep time in conjunction with decreased NREM sleep. Activation of MCH neurons while mice were in NREM sleep induced REM sleep, but activation during wakefulness was ineffective. Acute optogenetic silencing of MCH neurons using archaerhodopsin-T had no effect on any vigilance states. Temporally controlled ablation of MCH neurons by cell-specific expression of diphtheria toxin A increased wakefulness and decreased NREM sleep duration without affecting REM sleep. Together, these results indicate that acute activation of MCH neurons is sufficient, but not necessary, to trigger the transition from NREM to REM sleep and that MCH neurons also play a role in the initiation and maintenance of NREM sleep.

  14. Environmental enrichment rescues the degraded auditory temporal resolution of cortical neurons induced by early noise exposure.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Cuiping; Xu, Xiaoxiao; Yu, Liping; Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Jiping

    2015-09-01

    The accurate processing of sound temporal information is crucial to human speech perception and other species-specific communication. During postnatal development, the auditory cortex shows environmental and experience-dependent plasticity. However, how the postnatal environment affects cortical processing of sound temporal information is not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to determine whether postnatal noise exposure impairs neural temporal resolution in the auditory cortex, and, if so, whether environmental enrichment can rescue this degraded neural temporal acuity. Using the neural gap detection threshold determined in anesthetized rats as an index of temporal acuity, we found that exposure of juvenile rats to moderate-level noise induced much higher neural gap detection thresholds in adulthood than exposure of adult rats to the same noise. Environmental enrichment did not affect cortical neural gap detection thresholds in normally developing rats. However, rearing of rats with early noise exposure in an enriched environment promoted recovery from the noise-induced degraded neural temporal resolution. In addition, the tonal stimuli in the enriched environment contributed to only a portion of the recovery. These results provide evidence for noise-induced developmental impairment in neural gap detection thresholds in the auditory cortex, and suggest a therapeutic potential for environmental enrichment as a non-invasive approach to rescue developmentally degraded auditory temporal processing.

  15. Brain stimulation used as biofeedback in neuronal activation of the temporal lobe area in autistic children.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vernon Furtado da; Calomeni, Mauricio Rocha; Nunes, Rodolfo Alkmim Moreira; Pimentel, Carlos Elias; Martins, Gabriela Paes; Oliveira, Patrícia da Cruz Araruna; Silva, Patrícia Bagno; Silva, Alair Pedro Ribeiro de Souza E

    2016-08-01

    This study focused upon the functional capacity of mirror neurons in autistic children. 30 individuals, 10 carriers of the autistic syndrome (GCA), 10 with intellectual impairments (GDI), and 10 non-autistics (GCN) had registered eletroencephalogram from the brain area theoretically related to mirror neurons. Data collection procedure occurred prior to brain stimulation and after the stimulation session. During the second session, participants had to alternately process figures evoking neutral, happy, and/or sorrowful feelings. Results proved that, for all groups, the stimulation process in fact produced additional activation in the neural area under study. The level of activation was related to the format of emotional stimuli and the likelihood of boosting such stimuli. Since the increase of activation occurred in a model similar to the one observed for the control group, we may suggest that the difficulty people with autism have at expressing emotions is not due to nonexistence of mirror neurons. PMID:27556374

  16. Drosophila Neuronal Injury Follows a Temporal Sequence of Cellular Events Leading to Degeneration at the Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, Barron L.; Alabsi, Sahar H.; Frendo, Nicholas; Freund, Robert; Keller, Lani C.

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases affect millions of people worldwide, and as the global population ages, there is a critical need to improve our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that drive neurodegeneration. At the molecular level, neurodegeneration involves the activation of complex signaling pathways that drive the active destruction of neurons and their intracellular components. Here, we use an in vivo motor neuron injury assay to acutely induce neurodegeneration in order to follow the temporal order of events that occur following injury in Drosophila melanogaster. We find that sites of injury can be rapidly identified based on structural defects to the neuronal cytoskeleton that result in disrupted axonal transport. Additionally, the neuromuscular junction accumulates ubiquitinated proteins prior to the neurodegenerative events, occurring at 24 hours post injury. Our data provide insights into the early molecular events that occur during axonal and neuromuscular degeneration in a genetically tractable model organism. Importantly, the mechanisms that mediate neurodegeneration in flies are conserved in humans. Thus, these studies have implications for our understanding of the cellular and molecular events that occur in humans and will facilitate the identification of biomedically relevant targets for future treatments. PMID:26512206

  17. RANK-ORDER-SELECTIVE NEURONS FORM A TEMPORAL BASIS SET FOR THE GENERATION OF MOTOR SEQUENCES

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    Many behaviors are composed of a series of elementary motor actions that must occur in a specific order, but the neuronal mechanisms by which such motor sequences are generated are poorly understood. In particular, if a sequence consists of a few motor actions, a primate can learn to replicate it from memory after practicing it for just a few trials. How do the motor and premotor areas of the brain assemble motor sequences so fast? The network model presented here reveals part of the solution to this problem. The model is based on experiments showing that, during the performance of motor sequences, some cortical neurons are always activated at specific times, regardless of which motor action is being executed. In the model, a population of such rank-order-selective (ROS) cells drives a layer of downstream motor neurons so that these generate specific movements at different times in different sequences. A key ingredient of the model is that the amplitude of the ROS responses must be modulated by sequence identity. Because of this modulation, which is consistent with experimental reports, the network is able not only to produce multiple sequences accurately but also to learn a new sequence with minimal changes in connectivity. The ROS neurons modulated by sequence identity thus serve as a basis set for constructing arbitrary sequences of motor responses downstream. The underlying mechanism is analogous to the mechanism described in parietal areas for generating coordinate transformations in the spatial domain. PMID:19357265

  18. Temporal migration of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone-1 neurones is modified in GAD67 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, J M; Tiong, J; Maddox, D M; Condie, B G; Wray, S

    2008-01-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH-1) neurones reside in the forebrain and regulate gonadal function via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Disruption of this axis results in reproductive dysfunction. During embryonic development, GnRH-1 neurones migrate from the nasal pit through the nasal/forebrain junction (NFJ) into the developing brain. Prenatally gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is excitatory and has been shown to play a role in nervous system development. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments suggest that GABA inhibits migration of GnRH-1 neurones. The present study examines the migration of GnRH-1 neurones in GAD67 knockout (KO) mice to further elucidate the role of GABA on GnRH-1 neuronal development. Three stages were examined, embryonic day (E)12.5, E14.5 and E17.5. GnRH-1 cell number and location were analysed by immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridisation histochemistry. The total number of GnRH-1 immunopositive cells was similar between wild-type (WT) and KO mice. However, significant differences were found in the overall distribution of GnRH-1 immunopositive cells in GAD67 KO compared to WT mice at all stages. Subsequent analysis by area revealed differences occurred at the NFJ with an increase in GnRH-1 cells in GAD67 KO at E14.5 and a decrease in GnRH-1 cells in GAD67 KO at E17.5. Comparable counts for cells expressing GnRH-1 transcript and protein were obtained. These data indicate that attenuated levels of GABA accelerate GnRH-1 cell migration in nasal areas as well as movement of GnRH-1 cells into the central nervous system at the NFJ.

  19. Two-photon imaging of spatially extended neuronal network dynamics with high temporal resolution

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Kyle P.; Eng, Alfred; White, John A.; Mertz, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple two-photon fluorescence imaging strategy, called targeted path scanning (TPS), to monitor the dynamics of spatially extended neuronal networks with high spatiotemporal resolution. Our strategy combines the advantages of mirror-based scanning, minimized dead time, ease of implementation, and compatibility with high-resolution low-magnification objectives. To demonstrate the performance of TPS, we monitor the calcium dynamics distributed across an entire juvenile rat hippocampus (>1.5mm), at scan rates of 100Hz, with single cell resolution and single action potential sensitivity. Our strategy for fast, efficient two-photon microscopy over spatially extended regions provides a particularly attractive solution for monitoring neuronal population activity in thick tissue, without sacrificing the signal to noise ratio or high spatial resolution associated with standard two-photon microscopy. Finally, we provide the code to make our technique generally available. PMID:18539336

  20. Neuronal beacon.

    PubMed

    Black, B; Mondal, A; Kim, Y; Mohanty, S K

    2013-07-01

    The controlled navigation of the axonal growth cone of a neuron toward the dendrite of its synaptic partner neuron is the fundamental process in forming neuronal circuitry. While a number of technologies have been pursued for axonal guidance over the past decades, they are either invasive or not controllable with high spatial and temporal resolution and are often limited by low guidance efficacy. Here, we report a neuronal beacon based on light for highly efficient and controlled guidance of cortical primary neurons.

  1. Rapid feedforward computation by temporal encoding and learning with spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiang; Tang, Huajin; Tan, Kay Chen; Li, Haizhou

    2013-10-01

    Primates perform remarkably well in cognitive tasks such as pattern recognition. Motivated by recent findings in biological systems, a unified and consistent feedforward system network with a proper encoding scheme and supervised temporal rules is built for solving the pattern recognition task. The temporal rules used for processing precise spiking patterns have recently emerged as ways of emulating the brain's computation from its anatomy and physiology. Most of these rules could be used for recognizing different spatiotemporal patterns. However, there arises the question of whether these temporal rules could be used to recognize real-world stimuli such as images. Furthermore, how the information is represented in the brain still remains unclear. To tackle these problems, a proper encoding method and a unified computational model with consistent and efficient learning rule are proposed. Through encoding, external stimuli are converted into sparse representations, which also have properties of invariance. These temporal patterns are then learned through biologically derived algorithms in the learning layer, followed by the final decision presented through the readout layer. The performance of the model with images of digits from the MNIST database is presented. The results show that the proposed model is capable of recognizing images correctly with a performance comparable to that of current benchmark algorithms. The results also suggest a plausibility proof for a class of feedforward models of rapid and robust recognition in the brain. PMID:24808592

  2. Effects of Category Learning on the Stimulus Selectivity of Macaque Inferior Temporal Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Baene, Wouter; Ons, Bart; Wagemans, Johan; Vogels, Rufin

    2008-01-01

    Primates can learn to categorize complex shapes, but as yet it is unclear how this categorization learning affects the representation of shape in visual cortex. Previous studies that have examined the effect of categorization learning on shape representation in the macaque inferior temporal (IT) cortex have produced diverse and conflicting results…

  3. Flicker Adaptation of Low-Level Cortical Visual Neurons Contributes to Temporal Dilation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortega, Laura; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2012-01-01

    Several seconds of adaptation to a flickered stimulus causes a subsequent brief static stimulus to appear longer in duration. Nonsensory factors, such as increased arousal and attention, have been thought to mediate this flicker-based temporal-dilation aftereffect. In this study, we provide evidence that adaptation of low-level cortical visual…

  4. The Role of Short Term Synaptic Plasticity in Temporal Coding of Neuronal Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekaran, Lakshmi

    2008-01-01

    Short term synaptic plasticity is a phenomenon which is commonly found in the central nervous system. It could contribute to functions of signal processing namely, temporal integration and coincidence detection by modulating the input synaptic strength. This dissertation has two parts. First, we study the effects of short term synaptic plasticity…

  5. The spatio-temporal characteristics of action potential initiation in layer 5 pyramidal neurons: a voltage imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Marko A; Foust, Amanda J; McCormick, David A; Zecevic, Dejan

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The spatial pattern of Na+ channel clustering in the axon initial segment (AIS) plays a critical role in tuning neuronal computations, and changes in Na+ channel distribution have been shown to mediate novel forms of neuronal plasticity in the axon. However, immunocytochemical data on channel distribution may not directly predict spatio-temporal characteristics of action potential initiation, and prior electrophysiological measures are either indirect (extracellular) or lack sufficient spatial resolution (intracellular) to directly characterize the spike trigger zone (TZ). We took advantage of a critical methodological improvement in the high sensitivity membrane potential imaging (Vm imaging) technique to directly determine the location and length of the spike TZ as defined in functional terms. The results show that in mature axons of mouse cortical layer 5 pyramidal cells, action potentials initiate in a region ∼20 μm in length centred between 20 and 40 μm from the soma. From this region, the AP depolarizing wave invades initial nodes of Ranvier within a fraction of a millisecond and propagates in a saltatory fashion into axonal collaterals without failure at all physiologically relevant frequencies. We further demonstrate that, in contrast to the saltatory conduction in mature axons, AP propagation is non-saltatory (monotonic) in immature axons prior to myelination. PMID:21669974

  6. Parameter-sweeping techniques for temporal dynamics of neuronal systems: case study of Hindmarsh-Rose model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Development of effective and plausible numerical tools is an imperative task for thorough studies of nonlinear dynamics in life science applications. Results We have developed a complementary suite of computational tools for two-parameter screening of dynamics in neuronal models. We test a ‘brute-force’ effectiveness of neuroscience plausible techniques specifically tailored for the examination of temporal characteristics, such duty cycle of bursting, interspike interval, spike number deviation in the phenomenological Hindmarsh-Rose model of a bursting neuron and compare the results obtained by calculus-based tools for evaluations of an entire spectrum of Lyapunov exponents broadly employed in studies of nonlinear systems. Conclusions We have found that the results obtained either way agree exceptionally well, and can identify and differentiate between various fine structures of complex dynamics and underlying global bifurcations in this exemplary model. Our future planes are to enhance the applicability of this computational suite for understanding of polyrhythmic bursting patterns and their functional transformations in small networks. PMID:22656867

  7. Treatment with melatonin after status epilepticus attenuates seizure activity and neuronal damage but does not prevent the disturbance in diurnal rhythms and behavioral alterations in spontaneously hypertensive rats in kainate model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Petkova, Zlatina; Tchekalarova, Jana; Pechlivanova, Daniela; Moyanova, Slavianka; Kortenska, Lidia; Mitreva, Rumiana; Popov, Deyan; Markova, Petya; Lozanov, Valentin; Atanasova, Dimitrina; Lazarov, Nikolai; Stoynev, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Melatonin is involved in the control of circadian and seasonal rhythmicity, possesses potent antioxidant activity, and exerts a neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effect. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) are widely accepted as an experimental model of essential hypertension with hyperactivity, deficient sustained attention, and alterations in circadian autonomic profiles. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether melatonin treatment during epileptogenesis can prevent the deleterious consequences of status epilepticus (SE) in SHRs in the kainate (KA) model of temporal lobe of epilepsy (TLE). Spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs) were EEG- and video-recorded during and after the treatment protocol. Melatonin (10mg/kg diluted in drinking water, 8weeks) increased the seizure-latent period, decreased the frequency of SRSs, and attenuated the circadian rhythm of seizure activity in SHRs. However, melatonin was unable to affect the disturbed diurnal rhythms and behavioral changes associated with epilepsy, including the decreased anxiety level, depression, and impaired spatial memory. Melatonin reduced neuronal damage specifically in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and piriform cortex and decreased hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) levels both in control and epileptic SHRs. Although long-term melatonin treatment after SE shows a potential to attenuate seizure activity and neuronal loss, it is unable to restore epilepsy-associated behavioral abnormalities in SHRs. PMID:24440891

  8. Treatment with melatonin after status epilepticus attenuates seizure activity and neuronal damage but does not prevent the disturbance in diurnal rhythms and behavioral alterations in spontaneously hypertensive rats in kainate model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Petkova, Zlatina; Tchekalarova, Jana; Pechlivanova, Daniela; Moyanova, Slavianka; Kortenska, Lidia; Mitreva, Rumiana; Popov, Deyan; Markova, Petya; Lozanov, Valentin; Atanasova, Dimitrina; Lazarov, Nikolai; Stoynev, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    Melatonin is involved in the control of circadian and seasonal rhythmicity, possesses potent antioxidant activity, and exerts a neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effect. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) are widely accepted as an experimental model of essential hypertension with hyperactivity, deficient sustained attention, and alterations in circadian autonomic profiles. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether melatonin treatment during epileptogenesis can prevent the deleterious consequences of status epilepticus (SE) in SHRs in the kainate (KA) model of temporal lobe of epilepsy (TLE). Spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs) were EEG- and video-recorded during and after the treatment protocol. Melatonin (10mg/kg diluted in drinking water, 8weeks) increased the seizure-latent period, decreased the frequency of SRSs, and attenuated the circadian rhythm of seizure activity in SHRs. However, melatonin was unable to affect the disturbed diurnal rhythms and behavioral changes associated with epilepsy, including the decreased anxiety level, depression, and impaired spatial memory. Melatonin reduced neuronal damage specifically in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and piriform cortex and decreased hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) levels both in control and epileptic SHRs. Although long-term melatonin treatment after SE shows a potential to attenuate seizure activity and neuronal loss, it is unable to restore epilepsy-associated behavioral abnormalities in SHRs.

  9. Maximum decoding abilities of temporal patterns and synchronized firings: application to auditory neurons responding to click trains and amplitude modulated white noise.

    PubMed

    Gourévitch, Boris; Eggermont, Jos J

    2010-08-01

    Simultaneous recordings of an increasing number of neurons have recently become available, but few methods have been proposed to handle this activity. Here, we extract and investigate all the possible temporal neural activity patterns based on synchronized firings of neurons recorded on multiple electrodes, or based on bursts of single-electrode activity in cat primary auditory cortex. We apply this to responses to periodic click trains or sinusoïdal amplitude modulated noise by obtaining for each pattern its temporal modulation transfer function. An algorithm that maximizes the mutual information between all patterns and stimuli subsequently leads to the identification of patterns that optimally decode modulation frequency (MF). We show that stimulus information contained in multi-electrode synchronized firing is not redundant with single-electrode firings and leads to improved efficiency of MF decoding. We also show that the combined use of firing rate and temporal codes leads to a better discrimination of the MF.

  10. A Temporal Association between Accumulated Petrol (Gasoline) Lead Emissions and Motor Neuron Disease in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Mark A. S.; Rowe, Dominic B.; Ball, Andrew S.; Mielke, Howard W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The age standardised death rate from motor neuron disease (MND) has increased from 1.29 to 2.74 per 100,000, an increase of 112.4% between 1959 and 2013. It is clear that genetics could not have played a causal role in the increased rate of MND deaths over such a short time span. We postulate that environmental factors are responsible for this rate increase. We focus on lead additives in Australian petrol as a possible contributing environmental factor. Methods: The associations between historical petrol lead emissions and MND death trends in Australia between 1962 and 2013 were examined using linear regressions. Results: Regression results indicate best fit correlations between a 20 year lag of petrol lead emissions and age-standardised female death rate (R2 = 0.86, p = 4.88 × 10−23), male age standardised death rate (R2 = 0.86, p = 9.4 × 10−23) and percent all cause death attributed to MND (R2 = 0.98, p = 2.6 × 10−44). Conclusion: Legacy petrol lead emissions are associated with increased MND death trends in Australia. Further examination of the 20 year lag between exposure to petrol lead and the onset of MND is warranted. PMID:26703636

  11. Neurochemical phenotype of corticocortical connections in the macaque monkey: quantitative analysis of a subset of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive projection neurons in frontal, parietal, temporal, and cingulate cortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Nimchinsky, E. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The neurochemical characteristics of the neuronal subsets that furnish different types of corticocortical connections have been only partially determined. In recent years, several cytoskeletal proteins have emerged as reliable markers to distinguish subsets of pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex of primates. In particular, previous studies using an antibody to nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI-32) have revealed a consistent degree of regional and laminar specificity in the distribution of a subpopulation of pyramidal cells in the primate cerebral cortex. The density of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons was shown to vary across corticocortical pathways in macaque monkeys. In the present study, we have used the antibody SMI-32 to examine further and to quantify the distribution of a subset of corticocortically projecting neurons in a series of long ipsilateral corticocortical pathways in comparison to short corticocortical, commissural, and limbic connections. The results demonstrate that the long association pathways interconnecting the frontal, parietal, and temporal neocortex have a high representation of neurofilament protein-enriched pyramidal neurons (45-90%), whereas short corticocortical, callosal, and limbic pathways are characterized by much lower numbers of such neurons (4-35%). These data suggest that different types of corticocortical connections have differential representation of highly specific neuronal subsets that share common neurochemical characteristics, thereby determining regional and laminar cortical patterns of morphological and molecular heterogeneity. These differences in neuronal neurochemical phenotype among corticocortical circuits may have considerable influence on cortical processing and may be directly related to the type of integrative function subserved by each cortical pathway. Finally, it is worth noting that neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons are dramatically affected in the course of

  12. The influence of temporal pattern of stimulation on delay tuning of neurons in the auditory cortex of the FM bat, Myotis lucifugus.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Wong, D

    1993-03-01

    In echolocating bats, delay-sensitive neurons show facilitative responses to simulated pulse-echo pairs at particular echo delays. Three experiments examined how the temporal pattern of stimulation affected the delay tuning of neurons in the auditory cortex of the awake FM bat, Myotis lucifugus. First, delay tuning was compared using a series of pulse-echo pairs fixed in echo delay ('standard' stimuli), and a series of pulse-echo pairs in which successive sound pairs decreased by a fixed echo-delay step ('approach' stimuli). Similar best delays were measured with both stimulation patterns presented at repetition rates in which the neuron was delay-sensitive. At the higher delay-sensitive pulse repetition rates, approach stimuli evoked larger delay-dependent responses. Second, approach stimuli were fixed at different intertrial intervals. The best delay was unaffected by intertrial interval, although some neurons showed larger responses for longer intertrial intervals (0.5, 1.0 s), especially at the higher delay-sensitive pulse repetition rates. Third, approach stimuli were fixed at different echo-delay steps to simulate target velocity. The majority of neurons showed some sensitivity to echo-delay step, with clear preference for target velocity mainly between 1.8-7.0 m/s. This suggests that delay-sensitive neurons compute target velocity by rate of change of echo delay over successive echoes. Thus, response properties of cortical neurons are influenced by dynamic acoustic conditions found in target-directed flight. PMID:8473246

  13. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Impulse Responses to Figure Motion in Optic Flow Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Jen; Jönsson, H. Olof; Nordström, Karin

    2015-01-01

    White noise techniques have been used widely to investigate sensory systems in both vertebrates and invertebrates. White noise stimuli are powerful in their ability to rapidly generate data that help the experimenter decipher the spatio-temporal dynamics of neural and behavioral responses. One type of white noise stimuli, maximal length shift register sequences (m-sequences), have recently become particularly popular for extracting response kernels in insect motion vision. We here use such m-sequences to extract the impulse responses to figure motion in hoverfly lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs). Figure motion is behaviorally important and many visually guided animals orient towards salient features in the surround. We show that LPTCs respond robustly to figure motion in the receptive field. The impulse response is scaled down in amplitude when the figure size is reduced, but its time course remains unaltered. However, a low contrast stimulus generates a slower response with a significantly longer time-to-peak and half-width. Impulse responses in females have a slower time-to-peak than males, but are otherwise similar. Finally we show that the shapes of the impulse response to a figure and a widefield stimulus are very similar, suggesting that the figure response could be coded by the same input as the widefield response. PMID:25955416

  14. Identified auditory neurons in the cricket Gryllus rubens: temporal processing in calling song sensitive units.

    PubMed

    Farris, Hamilton E; Mason, Andrew C; Hoy, Ronald R

    2004-07-01

    This study characterizes aspects of the anatomy and physiology of auditory receptors and certain interneurons in the cricket Gryllus rubens. We identified an 'L'-shaped ascending interneuron tuned to frequencies > 15 kHz (57 dB SPL threshold at 20 kHz). Also identified were two intrasegmental 'omega'-shaped interneurons that were broadly tuned to 3-65 kHz, with best sensitivity to frequencies of the male calling song (5 kHz, 52 dB SPL). The temporal sensitivity of units excited by calling song frequencies were measured using sinusoidally amplitude modulated stimuli that varied in both modulation rate and depth, parameters that vary with song propagation distance and the number of singing males. Omega cells responded like low-pass filters with a time constant of 42 ms. In contrast, receptors significantly coded modulation rates up to the maximum rate presented (85 Hz). Whereas omegas required approximately 65% modulation depth at 45 Hz (calling song AM) to elicit significant synchrony coding, receptors tolerated a approximately 50% reduction in modulation depth up to 85 Hz. These results suggest that omega cells in G. rubens might not play a role in detecting song modulation per se at increased distances from a singing male.

  15. Abnormalities of Neuronal Oscillations and Temporal Integration to Low and High Frequency Auditory Stimulation in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Jordan P.; Gilmore, Casey S.; Picchetti, Natalie A.M.; Sponheim, Scott R.; Clementz, Brett A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Electro- and magneto-encephalography (E/MEG) studies indicate among schizophrenia patients (SZ) abnormal, often reduced, entrained (steady-state; aSSR) and transient (N100/M100) neural responses to auditory stimuli. We complement this literature by focusing analyses on auditory cortices, assessing a wide range of stimulation frequencies with long driving periods, and evaluating relationships between aSSR and M100 reductions in SZ. Method Seventeen SZ and 17 healthy subjects (H) participated. Stimuli were 1500ms binaural broadband noise sequences modulated at 5, 20, 40, 80 or 160-Hz. MEG data were collected and co-registered with structural magnetic resonance images. aSSRs and M100s projected into brain space were analyzed as a function of hemisphere, stimulus density, and time. Results aSSR: At low (5-Hz) and high (80-Hz) modulation frequencies, SZ displayed weaker entrainment bilaterally. To 40-Hz stimuli, SZ showed weaker entrainment only in right auditory cortex. M100: While responses for H increased linearly with stimulus density, this effect was weaker or absent in SZ. Relationship: A principal components analysis of SZ deficits identified low (5-Hz entrainment and M100) and high (40–80-Hz entrainment) frequency components. Discriminant analysis indicated that the low frequency component uniquely differentiated SZ from H. The high frequency component correlated with negative symptoms among SZ. Conclusions SZ auditory cortices were unable to (i) generate healthy levels of theta- and high gamma-band (80Hz) entrainment (aSSR) and (ii) augment transient responses (M100s) to rapidly presented auditory information (an index of temporal integration). Only the latter was most apparent in left hemisphere, and may reflect a prominent neurophysiological deficit in schizophrenia. PMID:21216392

  16. Targeting deficiencies in mitochondrial respiratory complex I and functional uncoupling exerts anti-seizure effects in a genetic model of temporal lobe epilepsy and in a model of acute temporal lobe seizures.

    PubMed

    Simeone, Kristina A; Matthews, Stephanie A; Samson, Kaeli K; Simeone, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria actively participate in neurotransmission by providing energy (ATP) and maintaining normative concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both presynaptic and postsynaptic elements. In human and animal epilepsies, ATP-producing respiratory rates driven by mitochondrial respiratory complex (MRC) I are reduced, antioxidant systems are attenuated and oxidative damage is increased. We report that MRCI-driven respiration and functional uncoupling (an inducible antioxidant mechanism) are reduced and levels of H2O2 are elevated in mitochondria isolated from KO mice. Experimental impairment of MRCI in WT hippocampal slices via rotenone reduces paired-pulse ratios (PPRs) at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses (resembling KO PPRs), and exacerbates seizure-like events in vitro. Daily treatment with AATP [a combination therapy composed of ascorbic acid (AA), alpha-tocopherol (T), sodium pyruvate (P) designed to synergistically target mitochondrial impairments] improved mitochondrial functions, mossy fiber PPRs, and reduced seizure burden index (SBI) scores and seizure incidence in KO mice. AATP pretreatment reduced severity of KA-induced seizures resulting in 100% protection from the severe tonic-clonic seizures in WT mice. These data suggest that restoration of bioenergetic homeostasis in the brain may represent a viable anti-seizure target for temporal lobe epilepsy.

  17. Adult newborn neurons are involved in learning acquisition and long-term memory formation: the distinct demands on temporal neurogenesis of different cognitive tasks.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pereira, Irene; Canals, Santiago; Carrión, Angel M

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that adult hippocampal neurogenesis influences hippocampal function, although the role these neurons fulfill in learning and consolidation processes remains unclear. Using a novel fast X-ray ablation protocol to deplete neurogenic cells, we demonstrate that immature adult hippocampal neurons are required for hippocampal learning and long-term memory formation. Moreover, we found that long-term memory formation in the object recognition and passive avoidance tests, two paradigms that involve circuits with distinct emotional components, had different temporal demands on hippocampal neurogenesis. These results reveal new and unexpected aspects of neurogenesis in cognitive processes.

  18. Preictal Activity of Subicular, CA1, and Dentate Gyrus Principal Neurons in the Dorsal Hippocampus before Spontaneous Seizures in a Rat Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Satoshi; Toyoda, Izumi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that spontaneous seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy might be preceded by increased action potential firing of hippocampal neurons. Preictal activity is potentially important because it might provide new opportunities for predicting when a seizure is about to occur and insight into how spontaneous seizures are generated. We evaluated local field potentials and unit activity of single, putative excitatory neurons in the subiculum, CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus in epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Average action potential firing rates of neurons in the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, increased significantly and progressively beginning 2–4 min before locally recorded spontaneous seizures. In the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, 41–57% of neurons displayed increased preictal activity with significant consistency across multiple seizures. Much of the increased preictal firing of neurons in the subiculum and CA1 correlated with preictal theta activity, whereas preictal firing of neurons in the dentate gyrus was independent of theta. In addition, some CA1 and dentate gyrus neurons displayed reduced firing rates preictally. These results reveal that different hippocampal subregions exhibit differences in the extent and potential underlying mechanisms of preictal activity. The finding of robust and significantly consistent preictal activity of subicular, CA1, and dentate neurons in the dorsal hippocampus, despite the likelihood that many seizures initiated in other brain regions, suggests the existence of a broader neuronal network whose activity changes minutes before spontaneous seizures initiate. PMID:25505320

  19. Abnormal expression and spatiotemporal change of Slit2 in neurons and astrocytes in temporal lobe epileptic foci: A study of epileptic patients and experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Fang, Min; Liu, Guang-Wei; Pan, Yu-Min; Shen, Lan; Li, Cheng-Shan; Xi, Zhi-Qin; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Liang; Chen, Dan; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2010-04-01

    Repellent guidance molecules provide targeting information to outgrowing axons along predetermined pathways during development. These molecules may also play a role in synaptic reorganization in the adult brain and thereby promote epileptogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the expression of Slit2, one of repellent guidance molecules, in temporal lobe epileptic foci from epileptic patients and experimental animals. Thirty-five temporal neocortex tissue samples from patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and fifteen histological normal temporal lobes from controls were selected. Fifty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into six groups, including five groups with epilepsy induced by lithium-pilocarpine administration and one control group. Temporal lobe tissue samples were taken from rats at 1, 7, 14, 30, and 60 days post-seizure and from controls. Expression of Slit2 was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis. Slit2 was mainly expressed in neurons in human controls and in both neurons and astrocytes in TLE patients. Slit2 expression was significantly higher in TLE patients as compared with the controls. Slit2-positive cells were mainly neurons in the rat temporal lobe tissues of the control group, the acute period group, and the latent period group, while the Slit2-positive cells were mainly astrocytes in chronic phase. Compared with controls, Slit2 expression in animals in the TLE group gradually decreased from days 1 to 14 post-seizure, but then increased over the levels seen in controls, to peak levels at days 30 and 60. These results suggest that Slit2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of TLE.

  20. Multineuronal vectorization is more efficient than time-segmental vectorization for information extraction from neuronal activities in the inferior temporal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Hidekazu; Tamura, Hiroshi; Tate, Shunta; Kawashima, Takahiro; Suzuki, Shinya S; Fujita, Ichiro

    2010-08-01

    In order for patients with disabilities to control assistive devices with their own neural activity, multineuronal spike trains must be efficiently decoded because only limited computational resources can be used to generate prosthetic control signals in portable real-time applications. In this study, we compare the abilities of two vectorizing procedures (multineuronal and time-segmental) to extract information from spike trains during the same total neuron-seconds. In the multineuronal vectorizing procedure, we defined a response vector whose components represented the spike counts of one to five neurons. In the time-segmental vectorizing procedure, a response vector consisted of components representing a neuron's spike counts for one to five time-segment(s) of a response period of 1 s. Spike trains were recorded from neurons in the inferior temporal cortex of monkeys presented with visual stimuli. We examined whether the amount of information of the visual stimuli carried by these neurons differed between the two vectorizing procedures. The amount of information calculated with the multineuronal vectorizing procedure, but not the time-segmental vectorizing procedure, significantly increased with the dimensions of the response vector. We conclude that the multineuronal vectorizing procedure is superior to the time-segmental vectorizing procedure in efficiently extracting information from neuronal signals.

  1. Morphology and kainate-receptor immunoreactivity of identified neurons within the entorhinal cortex projecting to superior temporal sulcus in the cynomolgus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, P. F.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Projections of the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampus are well known from the classical studies of Cajal (Ramon y Cajal, 1904) and Lorente de No (1933). Projections from the entorhinal cortex to neocortical areas are less well understood. Such connectivity is likely to underlie the consolidation of long-term declarative memory in neocortical sites. In the present study, a projection arising in layer V of the entorhinal cortex and terminating in a polymodal association area of the superior temporal gyrus has been identified with the use of retrograde tracing. The dendritic arbors of neurons giving rise to this projection were further investigated by cell filling and confocal microscopy with computer reconstruction. This analysis demonstrated that the dendritic arbor of identified projection neurons was largely confined to layer V, with the exception of a solitary, simple apical dendrite occasionally ascending to superficial laminae but often confined to the lamina dissecans (layer IV). Finally, immunoreactivity for glutamate-receptor subunit proteins GluR 5/6/7 of the dendritic arbor of identified entorhinal projection neurons was examined. The solitary apical dendrite of identified entorhinal projection neurons was prominently immunolabeled for GluR 5/6/7, as was the dendritic arbor of basilar dendrites of these neurons. The restriction of the large bulk of the dendritic arbor of identified entorhinal projection neurons to layer V implies that these neurons are likely to be heavily influenced by hippocampal output arriving in the deep layers of the entorhinal cortex. Immunoreactivity for GluR 5/6/7 throughout the dendritic arbor of such neurons indicates that this class of glutamate receptor is in a position to play a prominent role in mediating excitatory neurotransmission within hippocampal-entorhinal circuits.

  2. Organization and trade-off of spectro-temporal tuning properties of duration-tuned neurons in the mammalian inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Morrison, James A; Farzan, Faranak; Fremouw, Thane; Sayegh, Riziq; Covey, Ellen; Faure, Paul A

    2014-05-01

    Neurons throughout the mammalian central auditory pathway respond selectively to stimulus frequency and amplitude, and some are also selective for stimulus duration. First found in the auditory midbrain or inferior colliculus (IC), these duration-tuned neurons (DTNs) provide a potential neural mechanism for encoding temporal features of sound. In this study, we investigated how having an additional neural response filter, one selective to the duration of an auditory stimulus, influences frequency tuning and neural organization by recording single-unit responses and measuring the dorsal-ventral position and spectral-temporal tuning properties of auditory DTNs from the IC of the awake big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus). Like other IC neurons, DTNs were tonotopically organized and had either V-shaped, U-shaped, or O-shaped frequency tuning curves (excitatory frequency response areas). We hypothesized there would be an interaction between frequency and duration tuning in DTNs, as electrical engineering theory for resonant filters dictates a trade-off in spectral-temporal resolution: sharp tuning in the frequency domain results in poorer resolution in the time domain and vice versa. While the IC is a more complex signal analyzer than an electrical filter, a similar operational trade-off could exist in the responses of DTNs. Our data revealed two patterns of spectro-temporal sensitivity and spatial organization within the IC: DTNs with sharp frequency tuning and broad duration tuning were located in the dorsal IC, whereas cells with wide spectral tuning and narrow temporal tuning were found in the ventral IC.

  3. In vivo imaging identifies temporal signature of D1 and D2 medium spiny neurons in cocaine reward.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Bagot, Rosemary C; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Davidson, Thomas J; Yorgason, Jordan T; Peña, Catherine J; Walker, Deena M; Pirpinias, Stephen T; Guise, Kevin G; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Deisseroth, Karl; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    The reinforcing and rewarding properties of cocaine are attributed to its ability to increase dopaminergic transmission in nucleus accumbens (NAc). This action reinforces drug taking and seeking and leads to potent and long-lasting associations between the rewarding effects of the drug and the cues associated with its availability. The inability to extinguish these associations is a key factor contributing to relapse. Dopamine produces these effects by controlling the activity of two subpopulations of NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that are defined by their predominant expression of either dopamine D1 or D2 receptors. Previous work has demonstrated that optogenetically stimulating D1 MSNs promotes reward, whereas stimulating D2 MSNs produces aversion. However, we still lack a clear understanding of how the endogenous activity of these cell types is affected by cocaine and encodes information that drives drug-associated behaviors. Using fiber photometry calcium imaging we define D1 MSNs as the specific population of cells in NAc that encodes information about drug associations and elucidate the temporal profile with which D1 activity is increased to drive drug seeking in response to contextual cues. Chronic cocaine exposure dysregulates these D1 signals to both prevent extinction and facilitate reinstatement of drug seeking to drive relapse. Directly manipulating these D1 signals using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs prevents contextual associations. Together, these data elucidate the responses of D1- and D2-type MSNs in NAc to acute cocaine and during the formation of context-reward associations and define how prior cocaine exposure selectively dysregulates D1 signaling to drive relapse. PMID:26831103

  4. In vivo imaging identifies temporal signature of D1 and D2 medium spiny neurons in cocaine reward.

    PubMed

    Calipari, Erin S; Bagot, Rosemary C; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Davidson, Thomas J; Yorgason, Jordan T; Peña, Catherine J; Walker, Deena M; Pirpinias, Stephen T; Guise, Kevin G; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Deisseroth, Karl; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-03-01

    The reinforcing and rewarding properties of cocaine are attributed to its ability to increase dopaminergic transmission in nucleus accumbens (NAc). This action reinforces drug taking and seeking and leads to potent and long-lasting associations between the rewarding effects of the drug and the cues associated with its availability. The inability to extinguish these associations is a key factor contributing to relapse. Dopamine produces these effects by controlling the activity of two subpopulations of NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that are defined by their predominant expression of either dopamine D1 or D2 receptors. Previous work has demonstrated that optogenetically stimulating D1 MSNs promotes reward, whereas stimulating D2 MSNs produces aversion. However, we still lack a clear understanding of how the endogenous activity of these cell types is affected by cocaine and encodes information that drives drug-associated behaviors. Using fiber photometry calcium imaging we define D1 MSNs as the specific population of cells in NAc that encodes information about drug associations and elucidate the temporal profile with which D1 activity is increased to drive drug seeking in response to contextual cues. Chronic cocaine exposure dysregulates these D1 signals to both prevent extinction and facilitate reinstatement of drug seeking to drive relapse. Directly manipulating these D1 signals using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs prevents contextual associations. Together, these data elucidate the responses of D1- and D2-type MSNs in NAc to acute cocaine and during the formation of context-reward associations and define how prior cocaine exposure selectively dysregulates D1 signaling to drive relapse.

  5. In vivo imaging identifies temporal signature of D1 and D2 medium spiny neurons in cocaine reward

    PubMed Central

    Calipari, Erin S.; Bagot, Rosemary C.; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Davidson, Thomas J.; Yorgason, Jordan T.; Peña, Catherine J.; Walker, Deena M.; Pirpinias, Stephen T.; Guise, Kevin G.; Ramakrishnan, Charu; Deisseroth, Karl; Nestler, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    The reinforcing and rewarding properties of cocaine are attributed to its ability to increase dopaminergic transmission in nucleus accumbens (NAc). This action reinforces drug taking and seeking and leads to potent and long-lasting associations between the rewarding effects of the drug and the cues associated with its availability. The inability to extinguish these associations is a key factor contributing to relapse. Dopamine produces these effects by controlling the activity of two subpopulations of NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) that are defined by their predominant expression of either dopamine D1 or D2 receptors. Previous work has demonstrated that optogenetically stimulating D1 MSNs promotes reward, whereas stimulating D2 MSNs produces aversion. However, we still lack a clear understanding of how the endogenous activity of these cell types is affected by cocaine and encodes information that drives drug-associated behaviors. Using fiber photometry calcium imaging we define D1 MSNs as the specific population of cells in NAc that encodes information about drug associations and elucidate the temporal profile with which D1 activity is increased to drive drug seeking in response to contextual cues. Chronic cocaine exposure dysregulates these D1 signals to both prevent extinction and facilitate reinstatement of drug seeking to drive relapse. Directly manipulating these D1 signals using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs prevents contextual associations. Together, these data elucidate the responses of D1- and D2-type MSNs in NAc to acute cocaine and during the formation of context–reward associations and define how prior cocaine exposure selectively dysregulates D1 signaling to drive relapse. PMID:26831103

  6. Doubly stochastic coherence in complex neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Jianjun

    2012-11-01

    A system composed of coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons with various topological structures is investigated under the co-presence of two independently additive and multiplicative Gaussian white noises, in which particular attention is paid to the neuronal networks spiking regularity. As the additive noise intensity and the multiplicative noise intensity are simultaneously adjusted to optimal values, the temporal periodicity of the output of the system reaches the maximum, indicating the occurrence of doubly stochastic coherence. The network topology randomness exerts different influences on the temporal coherence of the spiking oscillation for dissimilar coupling strength regimes. At a small coupling strength, the spiking regularity shows nearly no difference in the regular, small-world, and completely random networks. At an intermediate coupling strength, the temporal periodicity in a small-world neuronal network can be improved slightly by adding a small fraction of long-range connections. At a large coupling strength, the dynamical behavior of the neurons completely loses the resonance property with regard to the additive noise intensity or the multiplicative noise intensity, and the spiking regularity decreases considerably with the increase of the network topology randomness. The network topology randomness plays more of a depressed role than a favorable role in improving the temporal coherence of the spiking oscillation in the neuronal network research study.

  7. Exertional Leg Pain.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Finnoff, Jonathan T

    2016-02-01

    Exertional leg pain is a common condition seen in runners and the general population. Given the broad differential diagnosis of this complaint, this article focuses on the incidence, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of common causes that include medial tibial stress syndrome, tibial bone stress injury, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, arterial endofibrosis, popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, and entrapment of the common peroneal, superficial peroneal, and saphenous nerves. Successful diagnosis of these conditions hinges on performing a thorough history and physical examination followed by proper diagnostic testing and appropriate management. PMID:26616179

  8. Temporal Resolution of Misfolded Prion Protein Transport, Accumulation, Glial Activation, and Neuronal Death in the Retinas of Mice Inoculated with Scrapie.

    PubMed

    West Greenlee, M Heather; Lind, Melissa; Kokemuller, Robyn; Mammadova, Najiba; Kondru, Naveen; Manne, Sireesha; Smith, Jodi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Greenlee, Justin

    2016-09-01

    Currently, there is a lack of pathological landmarks to describe the progression of prion disease in vivo. Our goal was to use an experimental model to determine the temporal relationship between the transport of misfolded prion protein (PrP(Sc)) from the brain to the retina, the accumulation of PrP(Sc) in the retina, the response of the surrounding retinal tissue, and loss of neurons. Retinal samples from mice inoculated with RML scrapie were collected at 30, 60, 90, 105, and 120 days post inoculation (dpi) or at the onset of clinical signs of disease (153 dpi). Retinal homogenates were tested for prion seeding activity. Antibody staining was used to assess accumulation of PrP(Sc) and the resulting response of retinal tissue. Loss of photoreceptors was used as a measure of neuronal death. PrP(Sc) seeding activity was first detected in all samples at 60 dpi. Accumulation of PrP(Sc) and coincident activation of retinal glia were first detected at 90 dpi. Activation of microglia was first detected at 105 dpi, but neuronal death was not detectable until 120 dpi. Our results demonstrate that by using the retina we can resolve the temporal separation between several key events in the pathogenesis of prion disease. PMID:27521336

  9. The Role of Gastrodin on Hippocampal Neurons after N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Excitotoxicity and Experimental Temporal Lobe Seizures.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shi-Bing; Hung, Wei-Chen; Min, Ming-Yuan

    2016-06-30

    Tian ma (Gastrodia elata, GE) is an ancient Chinese herbal medicine that has been suggested to be effective as an anticonvulsant and analgesic, and to have sedative effects against vertigo, general paralysis, epilepsy and tetanus. The primary active ingredient isolated from GE is termed gastrodin, which is the glucoside of 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (4-HBA). Gastrodin can abolish hypoxia-, glutamate- and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-induced toxicity in primary culture of rat cortical neurons, and reduces seizure severity in seizure-sensitive gerbils. We evaluated the effect of gastrodin on NMDA excitotoxicity in hippocampal slice cultures (HSCs) with propidium iodide (PI) fluorescence measurement. We also evaluated the effects of gastrodin for treating active in vivo temporal lobe seizures induced by lithium/pilocarpine. Seizure severity, time span to seizure onset, mortality rate and hippocampal histology for survivors were compared. The effect of gastrodin was evaluated for treating in vitro seizures induced by Mg²⁺-free medium in hippocampal slices. Frequencies and amplitudes of epileptiform discharges were compared. The effect of gastrodin on synaptic transmission was evaluated on hippocampal CA1 Schaffer collaterals. Application of 25 μM gastrodin significantly suppressed NMDA excitotoxicity in CA3 but not in CA1 hippocampus and dentate gyrus. Intraventricular gastrodin accelerated seizure onset for 12 min after intraperitoneal pilocarpine injection (P = 0.051). Three of five rats (60%) in the gastrodin group, and three of four (75%) in the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) group died within 3 days after status epilepticus (SE). Gastrodin also failed to inhibit epileptiform discharges in hippocampal slices induced by Mg²⁺-free medium, believed to be NMDA receptor-mediated spontaneous activity. The frequencies of the spontaneous epileptiform discharges were similar under treatments with 25 μM gastrodin, 200 μM gastrodin and DMSO. For the evaluation of

  10. RELN-expressing Neuron Density in Layer I of the Superior Temporal Lobe is Similar in Human Brains with Autism and in Age-Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Jasmin; Ejaz, Ehsan; Ariza, Jeanelle; Noctor, Stephen C.; Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Reelin protein (RELN) level is reduced in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of subjects with autism. RELN is synthesized and secreted by a subpopulation of neurons in the developing cerebral cortex termed Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells. These cells are abundant in the marginal zone during cortical development, many die after development is complete, but a small population persists into adulthood. In adult brains, RELN is secreted by the surviving CR cells, by a subset of GABAergic interneurons in layer I, and by pyramidal cells and GABAergic interneurons in deeper cortical layers. It is widely believed that decreased RELN in layer I of the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism may result from a decrease in the density of RELN expressing neurons in layer I; however, this hypothesis has not been tested. We examined RELN expression in layer I of the adult human cortex and found that 70% of cells express RELN in both control and autistic subjects. We quantified the density of neurons in layer I of the superior temporal cortex of subjects with autism and age-matched control subjects. Our data show that there is no change in the density of neurons in layer I of the cortex of subjects with autism, and therefore suggest that reduced RELN expression in the cerebral cortex of subjects with autism is not a consequence of decreased numbers of RELN-expressing neurons in layer I. Instead reduced RELN may result from abnormal RELN processing, or a decrease in the number of other RELN-expressing neuronal cell types. PMID:25067827

  11. Shotgun Lipidomics Reveals the Temporally Dependent, Highly Diversified Cardiolipin Profile in the Mammalian Brain: Temporally Coordinated Postnatal Diversification of Cardiolipin Molecular Species with Neuronal Remodeling†

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hua; Mancuso, David J.; Jiang, Xuntian; Guan, Shaoping; Yang, Jingyue; Yang, Kui; Sun, Gang; Gross, Richard W.; Han, Xianlin

    2008-01-01

    Large-scale neuronal remodeling through apoptosis occurs shortly after birth in all known mammalian species. Apoptosis, in large part, depends upon critical interactions between mitochondrial membranes and cytochrome c. Herein, we examined the hypothesis that the large-scale reorganization of neuronal circuitry after birth is accompanied by profound alterations in cardiolipin (CL) content and molecular species distribution. During embryonic development, over 100 CL molecular species were identified and quantitated in murine neuronal tissues. The embryonic CL profile was notable for the presence of abundant amounts of relatively short aliphatic chains (e.g., palmitoleic and oleic acids). In sharp contrast, after birth, the CL profile contained a remarkably complex repertoire of CL molecular species, in which the signaling fatty acids (i.e., arachidonic and docosahexaenoic acids) were markedly increased. These results identify the rapid remodeling of CL in the perinatal period with resultant alterations in the physical properties of the mitochondrial membrane. The complex distribution of aliphatic chains in the neuronal CL pool is separate and distinct from that in other organs (e.g., heart, liver, etc.), where CL molecular species contain predominantly only one major type of aliphatic chain (e.g., linoleic acid). Analyses of mRNA levels by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reactions suggested that the alterations in CL content were due to the combined effects of both attenuation of de novo CL biosynthesis and decreased remodeling of CL. Collectively, these results provide a new perspective on the complexity of CL in neuronal signaling, mitochondrial bioenergetics, and apoptosis. PMID:18454555

  12. Functional profile of the giant metacerebral neuron of Helix aspersa: temporal and spatial dynamics of electrical activity in situ

    PubMed Central

    Antic, Srdjan; Wuskell, Joseph P; Loew, Leslie; Zecevic, Dejan

    2000-01-01

    Understanding the biophysical properties of single neurons and how they process information is fundamental to understanding how the brain works. However, action potential initiation and the preceding integration of the synaptic signals in neuronal processes of individual cells are complex and difficult to understand in the absence of detailed, spatially resolved measurements. Multi-site optical recording with voltage-sensitive dyes from individual neurons in situ was used to provide these kinds of measurements. We analysed in detail the pattern of initiation and propagation of spikes evoked synaptically in an identified snail (Helix aspersa) neuron in situ. Two main spike trigger zones were identified. The trigger zones were activated selectively by different sets of synaptic inputs which also produced different spike propagation patterns. Synaptically evoked action potentials did not always invade all parts of the neuron. The conduction of the axonal spike was regularly blocked at particular locations on neuronal processes. The propagating spikes in some axonal branches consistently reversed direction at certain branch points, a phenomenon known as reflection. These experimental results, when linked to a computer model, could allow a new level of analysis of the electrical structure of single neurons. PMID:10944170

  13. Pulse-Density Modulation with an Ensemble of Single-Electron Circuits Employing Neuronal Heterogeneity to Achieve High Temporal Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikombo, Andrew Kilinga; Asai, Tetsuya; Amemiya, Yoshihito

    We investigated the implications of static noises in a pulse-density modulator based on Vestibulo-ocular Reflex model. We constructed a simple neuromorphic circuit consisting of an ensemble of single-electron devices and confirmed that static noises (heterogeneity in circuit parameters) introduced into the network indeed played an important role in improving the fidelity with which neurons could encode signals whose input frequencies are higher than the intrinsic response frequencies of single neurons. Through Monte-Carlo based computer simulations, we demonstrated that the heterogeneous network could corectly encode signals with input frequencies as high as 1 GHz, twice the range for single (or a network of homogeneous) neurons.

  14. Temporal lobe epilepsy is a disease of faulty neuronal resonators rather than oscillators, and all seizures are provoked, usually by stress.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Arnold E

    2007-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common cause of intractable adult epilepsy. It is proposed that different kinds of epilepsy be classified into one of two categories, which correspond to the two basic kinds of neurons in the brain, that is, as diseases of oscillators or as diseases of resonators. Oscillator (or pacemacker) neurons are endowed with intrinsic conductances that permit periodic spontaneous generation of action potentials; in contrast, resonators are neurons which process information coming from sensory stimuli or from other neurons. A literature review supports the idea that TLE is a disease of faulty resonators. This means that seizures do not arise de novo in the seizure focus. The seizure focus responds to normal input with an abnormally large discharge that causes seizures. The most frequent trigger for TLE is psychological stress. A previously published theory of stress is reviewed. The stress circuit runs from the hippocampus to the amygdala to the dorsal raphe nucleus to the entorhinal cortex and back to the hippocampus. Cell loss in the dentate is central to the pathophysiology of both chronic stress and TLE, which establish a "vicious circle" relationship with one another. Once it is grasped that TLE is a disease of resonators and that all seizures in TLE are triggered, then it makes sense to address the major recognized trigger, which is stress. New therapeutic ideas for decreasing seizure frequency in TLE include the use of anti-depressants, ethosuximide (which blocks firing in the dorsal raphe nucleus), and mood-stabilizers (which block firing in the entorhinal cortex). The latter category includes several recognized anti-epileptic drugs. Drugs from all three categories should be used simultaneously and on an empirical basis in each patient.

  15. Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Braver, Richard T

    2016-04-01

    Increased tissue pressure within a fascial compartment may be the result from any increase in volume within its contents, or any decrease in size of the fascial covering or its distensibility. This may lead to symptoms of leg tightness, pain or numbness brought about by exercise. There are multiple differential diagnoses of exercise induced leg pain and the proper diagnoses of chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is made by a careful history and by exclusion of other maladies and confirmed by compartment syndrome testing as detailed in this text. Surgical fasciotomies for the anterior, lateral, superficial and deep posterior compartments are described in detail along with ancillary procedures for chronic shin splints that should allow the athlete to return to competitive activity.

  16. A novel function for Wnt signaling modulating neuronal firing activity and the temporal structure of spontaneous oscillation in the entorhinal-hippocampal circuit.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Carolina A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-07-01

    circuital activity has dominated. In summary, the amount of Wnt that is being released can exert a fine tuning of the physiological output, modulating firing activity, improving reliability of communication between neurons, and maintaining a continuous self-regulatory cycle of synaptic structure-function that can be present during all postnatal life. PMID:25857536

  17. A novel function for Wnt signaling modulating neuronal firing activity and the temporal structure of spontaneous oscillation in the entorhinal-hippocampal circuit.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Carolina A; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2015-07-01

    circuital activity has dominated. In summary, the amount of Wnt that is being released can exert a fine tuning of the physiological output, modulating firing activity, improving reliability of communication between neurons, and maintaining a continuous self-regulatory cycle of synaptic structure-function that can be present during all postnatal life.

  18. Ginsenoside Rg1 exerts a protective effect against Aβ₂₅₋₃₅-induced toxicity in primary cultured rat cortical neurons through the NF-κB/NO pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaying; Yang, Hongyu; Zhao, Qingwei; Zhang, Xingguo; Lou, Yijia

    2016-03-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1) is a multipotent triterpene saponin extracted from ginseng, and has been proven to act as a nootropic agent against various types of neurological damage. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect and the underlying mechanisms of Rg1 on apoptosis induced by β-amyloid peptide 25-35 (Aβ25-35) in primary cultured cortical neurons. The primary neurons were preincubated with 20 µM Rg1 for 24 h and exposed to 10 µM Aβ25-35 for 72 h. In the present study, we found that Rg1 prevented nuclear factor κ-light-chain‑enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) nuclear translocation and IκB-α phosphorylation in primary cultured cortical neurons after Aβ25-35 exposure by scavenging excess reactive oxygen species (ROS); ROS was measured using DCFDA and examined using a fluorescence microscope. In addition, Rg1 successfully suppressed Aβ25‑35-inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production in a NF-κB-dependent manner; the suppression of NO was clearly illustrated by the NO production assay. Pretreatment of the cells with Rg1 elevated the proportion of Bcl-2/Bax, lessened the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into cytoplasm and then blocked mitochondrial apoptotic cascades after Aβ25-35 insult by lowering NO generation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Rg1 rescues primary cultured cortical neurons from Aβ25-35-induced cell apoptosis through the downregulation of the NF-κB/NO signaling pathway. PMID:26865401

  19. Postsynaptic Odorant Concentration Dependent Inhibition Controls Temporal Properties of Spike Responses of Projection Neurons in the Moth Antennal Lobe

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Terufumi; Kazawa, Tomoki; Haupt, Stephan Shuichi; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    Although odorant concentration-response characteristics of olfactory neurons have been widely investigated in a variety of animal species, the effect of odorant concentration on neural processing at circuit level is still poorly understood. Using calcium imaging in the silkmoth (Bombyx mori) pheromone processing circuit of the antennal lobe (AL), we studied the effect of odorant concentration on second-order projection neuron (PN) responses. While PN calcium responses of dendrites showed monotonic increases with odorant concentration, calcium responses of somata showed decreased responses at higher odorant concentrations due to postsynaptic inhibition. Simultaneous calcium imaging and electrophysiology revealed that calcium responses of PN somata but not dendrites reflect spiking activity. Inhibition shortened spike response duration rather than decreasing peak instantaneous spike frequency (ISF). Local interneurons (LNs) that were specifically activated at high odorant concentrations at which PN responses were suppressed are the putative source of inhibition. Our results imply the existence of an intraglomerular mechanism that preserves time resolution in olfactory processing over a wide odorant concentration range. PMID:24586546

  20. Repeating Spatial-Temporal Motifs of CA3 Activity Dependent on Engineered Inputs from Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Live Hippocampal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Aparajita; Desai, Harsh; DeMarse, Thomas B.; Wheeler, Bruce C.; Brewer, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical and behavioral studies, and in vivo and slice electrophysiology of the hippocampus suggest specific functions of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the CA3 subregions, but the underlying activity dynamics and repeatability of information processing remains poorly understood. To approach this problem, we engineered separate living networks of the DG and CA3 neurons that develop connections through 51 tunnels for axonal communication. Growing these networks on top of an electrode array enabled us to determine whether the subregion dynamics were separable and repeatable. We found spontaneous development of polarized propagation of 80% of the activity in the native direction from DG to CA3 and different spike and burst dynamics for these subregions. Spatial-temporal differences emerged when the relationships of target CA3 activity were categorized with to the number and timing of inputs from the apposing network. Compared to times of CA3 activity when there was no recorded tunnel input, DG input led to CA3 activity bursts that were 7× more frequent, increased in amplitude and extended in temporal envelope. Logistic regression indicated that a high number of tunnel inputs predict CA3 activity with 90% sensitivity and 70% specificity. Compared to no tunnel input, patterns of >80% tunnel inputs from DG specified different patterns of first-to-fire neurons in the CA3 target well. Clustering dendrograms revealed repeating motifs of three or more patterns at up to 17 sites in CA3 that were importantly associated with specific spatial-temporal patterns of tunnel activity. The number of these motifs recorded in 3 min was significantly higher than shuffled spike activity and not seen above chance in control networks in which CA3 was apposed to CA3 or DG to DG. Together, these results demonstrate spontaneous input-dependent repeatable coding of distributed activity in CA3 networks driven by engineered inputs from DG networks. These functional configurations at measured times

  1. Repeating Spatial-Temporal Motifs of CA3 Activity Dependent on Engineered Inputs from Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Live Hippocampal Networks.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Aparajita; Desai, Harsh; DeMarse, Thomas B; Wheeler, Bruce C; Brewer, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical and behavioral studies, and in vivo and slice electrophysiology of the hippocampus suggest specific functions of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the CA3 subregions, but the underlying activity dynamics and repeatability of information processing remains poorly understood. To approach this problem, we engineered separate living networks of the DG and CA3 neurons that develop connections through 51 tunnels for axonal communication. Growing these networks on top of an electrode array enabled us to determine whether the subregion dynamics were separable and repeatable. We found spontaneous development of polarized propagation of 80% of the activity in the native direction from DG to CA3 and different spike and burst dynamics for these subregions. Spatial-temporal differences emerged when the relationships of target CA3 activity were categorized with to the number and timing of inputs from the apposing network. Compared to times of CA3 activity when there was no recorded tunnel input, DG input led to CA3 activity bursts that were 7× more frequent, increased in amplitude and extended in temporal envelope. Logistic regression indicated that a high number of tunnel inputs predict CA3 activity with 90% sensitivity and 70% specificity. Compared to no tunnel input, patterns of >80% tunnel inputs from DG specified different patterns of first-to-fire neurons in the CA3 target well. Clustering dendrograms revealed repeating motifs of three or more patterns at up to 17 sites in CA3 that were importantly associated with specific spatial-temporal patterns of tunnel activity. The number of these motifs recorded in 3 min was significantly higher than shuffled spike activity and not seen above chance in control networks in which CA3 was apposed to CA3 or DG to DG. Together, these results demonstrate spontaneous input-dependent repeatable coding of distributed activity in CA3 networks driven by engineered inputs from DG networks. These functional configurations at measured times

  2. Gene Regulatory Mechanisms Underlying the Spatial and Temporal Regulation of Target-Dependent Gene Expression in Drosophila Neurons.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Anthony J E; Tang, Jonathan C Y; Ridyard, Marc S; Lian, Tianshun; Keatings, Kathleen; Allan, Douglas W

    2015-12-01

    Neuronal differentiation often requires target-derived signals from the cells they innervate. These signals typically activate neural subtype-specific genes, but the gene regulatory mechanisms remain largely unknown. Highly restricted expression of the FMRFa neuropeptide in Drosophila Tv4 neurons requires target-derived BMP signaling and a transcription factor code that includes Apterous. Using integrase transgenesis of enhancer reporters, we functionally dissected the Tv4-enhancer of FMRFa within its native cellular context. We identified two essential but discrete cis-elements, a BMP-response element (BMP-RE) that binds BMP-activated pMad, and a homeodomain-response element (HD-RE) that binds Apterous. These cis-elements have low activity and must be combined for Tv4-enhancer activity. Such combinatorial activity is often a mechanism for restricting expression to the intersection of cis-element spatiotemporal activities. However, concatemers of the HD-RE and BMP-RE cis-elements were found to independently generate the same spatiotemporal expression as the Tv4-enhancer. Thus, the Tv4-enhancer atypically combines two low-activity cis-elements that confer the same output from distinct inputs. The activation of target-dependent genes is assumed to 'wait' for target contact. We tested this directly, and unexpectedly found that premature BMP activity could not induce early FMRFa expression; also, we show that the BMP-insensitive HD-RE cis-element is activated at the time of target contact. This led us to uncover a role for the nuclear receptor, seven up (svp), as a repressor of FMRFa induction prior to target contact. Svp is normally downregulated immediately prior to target contact, and we found that maintaining Svp expression prevents cis-element activation, whereas reducing svp gene dosage prematurely activates cis-element activity. We conclude that the target-dependent FMRFa gene is repressed prior to target contact, and that target-derived BMP signaling directly

  3. Gene Regulatory Mechanisms Underlying the Spatial and Temporal Regulation of Target-Dependent Gene Expression in Drosophila Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ridyard, Marc S.; Lian, Tianshun; Keatings, Kathleen; Allan, Douglas W.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal differentiation often requires target-derived signals from the cells they innervate. These signals typically activate neural subtype-specific genes, but the gene regulatory mechanisms remain largely unknown. Highly restricted expression of the FMRFa neuropeptide in Drosophila Tv4 neurons requires target-derived BMP signaling and a transcription factor code that includes Apterous. Using integrase transgenesis of enhancer reporters, we functionally dissected the Tv4-enhancer of FMRFa within its native cellular context. We identified two essential but discrete cis-elements, a BMP-response element (BMP-RE) that binds BMP-activated pMad, and a homeodomain-response element (HD-RE) that binds Apterous. These cis-elements have low activity and must be combined for Tv4-enhancer activity. Such combinatorial activity is often a mechanism for restricting expression to the intersection of cis-element spatiotemporal activities. However, concatemers of the HD-RE and BMP-RE cis-elements were found to independently generate the same spatiotemporal expression as the Tv4-enhancer. Thus, the Tv4-enhancer atypically combines two low-activity cis-elements that confer the same output from distinct inputs. The activation of target-dependent genes is assumed to 'wait' for target contact. We tested this directly, and unexpectedly found that premature BMP activity could not induce early FMRFa expression; also, we show that the BMP-insensitive HD-RE cis-element is activated at the time of target contact. This led us to uncover a role for the nuclear receptor, seven up (svp), as a repressor of FMRFa induction prior to target contact. Svp is normally downregulated immediately prior to target contact, and we found that maintaining Svp expression prevents cis-element activation, whereas reducing svp gene dosage prematurely activates cis-element activity. We conclude that the target-dependent FMRFa gene is repressed prior to target contact, and that target-derived BMP signaling directly

  4. Responses of neurons in the middle temporal visual area after long-standing lesions of the primary visual cortex in adult new world monkeys.

    PubMed

    Collins, Christine E; Lyon, David C; Kaas, Jon H

    2003-03-15

    The retinotopic organization of the middle temporal visual area (MT) was determined in six adult owl monkeys and one adult marmoset 69 d to 10 months after lesions of the dorsolateral primary visual cortex (V1). The lesions removed were limited to extensive parts of the representation of the lower visual quadrant in V1. Microelectrodes were used to record from neurons at numerous sites in MT to determine whether parts of MT normally devoted to the lower visual quadrant (1) were unresponsive to visual stimuli, (2) acquired responsiveness to inputs from intact portions of V1, or (3) became responsive to some other visually driven input such as a relay from the superior colliculus via the pulvinar to MT. All monkeys (n = 6) with moderate to moderately large lesions had unresponsive portions of MT even after 10 months of recovery. These unresponsive regions were retinotopically equivalent to the removed parts of V1 in normal animals. Thus, there was no evidence for an alternative source of activation. In addition, these results indicate that any retinotopic reorganization of MT based on inputs from intact portions of V1 was not extensive, yet neurons near the margins of responsive cortex may have acquired new receptive fields, and the smallest 5 degrees lesion of V1 failed to produce an unresponsive zone. Deprived portions of MT were not remarkably changed in histological appearance in cytochrome oxidase, Nissl, and Wisteria floribunda agglutinin preparations. Nevertheless, some reduction in myelin staining and other histological changes were suggested. We conclude that MT is highly dependent on V1 for activation in these monkeys, and alternative sources do not become effective over months when normal activation is absent. Additionally, remaining V1 inputs have only a limited capacity to expand their activation territory into deprived portions of MT.

  5. Temporally structured impulse activity in spontaneously discharging somatosensory cortical neurons in the awake cat: recognition and quantitative description of four different patterns of bursts, post-recording GFAP immunohistology and computer reconstruction of the studied cortical surface.

    PubMed

    Miasnikov, A A; Webster, H H; Dykes, R W

    1999-04-01

    We elaborated two methods used in two previous publications [J. Martinson, H.H. Webster, A.A. Myasnikov, R.W. Dykes, Recognition of temporally structured activity in spontaneously discharging neurons in the somatosensory cortex in waking cats, Brain Res. 750 (1997) 129-140 [16]; H.H. Webster, I. Salimi, A.A. Myasnikov, R.W. Dykes. The effects of peripheral deafferentation on spontaneously bursting neurons in the somatosensory cortex of waking cats, Brain Res. 750 (1997) 109-121 [21

  6. Silencing miR-181a produces neuroprotection against hippocampus neuron cell apoptosis post-status epilepticus in a rat model and in children with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ren, L; Zhu, R; Li, X

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most frequent neurological disorders. Recently, the regulation of microRNAs was found to be associated with epilepsy, but the molecular mechanism by which microRNA influences epilepsy process remains to be unveiled and the development of microRNA-based therapy requires more intensive research. In this study, five microRNAs with potential relevance to epilepsy were initially chosen: miR-132, miR-146a, miR-181a, miR-34a, and miR-124. Twenty-five children who were patients with epilepsy were selected as subjects to obtain tissue samples for the study. The miRNA-181a, which represented the most increased fold-changes in clinical samples, were then selected for further function study in mouse model. The temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) model, along with lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE), was established in Sprague-Dawley rats. The antagomir of miR-181a was used to determine the role of miR-181a in cell apoptosis. Analyses were conducted to determine the expression levels of miR-181a, neuronal apoptosis in post-SE, and activated caspase-3. We found evidence of significant time dependent up-regulation of miR-181a amongst post-SE rats and TLE on 24 h (4.47 ± 0.35), 7 days (4.85 ± 0.53), and 2 weeks (5.66 ± 0.64). Experiments with the miR-181a antagomir showed that this particular miRNA led to the inhibition of the protein expression of caspase-3, and was up-regulated in the course of seizure-induced neuronal apoptosis. This study provided evidence that targeting miR-181a leads to a neuroprotective response and is linked to an increase in the activation of the caspase-3 protein. These findings suggest that miR-181a may serve as a promising therapeutic target for epilepsy. PMID:26910006

  7. Inter-observer reliability of forceful exertion analysis based on video-recordings.

    PubMed

    Bao, S; Howard, N; Spielholz, P; Silverstein, B

    2010-09-01

    The objectives were to examine inter-observer reliability of job-level forceful exertion analyses and temporal agreement of detailed time study results. Three observers performed the analyses on 12 different jobs. Continuous duration, frequency and % time of lifting, pushing/pulling, power and pinch gripping exertions and estimated level of the exertions were obtained. Intraclass correlation coefficient and variance components were computed. Temporal agreement analyses of raw time study data were performed. The inter-observer reliability was good for most job-level exposure parameters (continuous duration, frequency and % time of forceful exertions), but only fair to moderate for the estimated level of forceful exertions. The finding that the between-observer variability was less than the between-exertion variability confirmed that the forceful exertion analysis method used in the present study can detect job exertion differences.Using three observers to perform detailed time studies on task activities and getting consensus of the majority can increase the between-observer agreement up to 97%. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The results inform researchers that inter-observer reliability for job-level exposure measurement of forceful exertion analysis obtained from detailed time studies is generally good, but the observers' ability in the estimation of forceful exertion level can be poor. It also provides information on the temporal agreement of detailed forceful exertion analysis and guidelines on achieving better agreement for studies where accurate synchronisation of task activities and direct physiological/biomechanical measurements is crucial. PMID:20737338

  8. Exertional Rhabdomyolysis in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Tietze, David C.; Borchers, James

    2014-01-01

    Context: Exertional rhabdomyolysis is a relatively uncommon but potentially fatal condition affecting athletes that requires prompt recognition and appropriate management. Evidence Acquisition: A search of the PubMed database from 2003 to 2013 using the term exertional rhabdomyolysis was performed. Further evaluation of the bibliographies of articles expanded the evidence. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER) is a relatively uncommon condition with an incidence of approximately 29.9 per 100,000 patient years but can have very serious consequences of muscle ischemia, cardiac arrhythmia, and death. The athlete will have pain, weakness, and swelling in the muscles affected as well as significantly elevated levels of creatine kinase (CK). Hydration is the foundation for any athlete with ER; management can also include dialysis or surgery. Stratifying the athlete into high- or low-risk categories can determine if further workup is warranted. Conclusion: Exertional rhabdomyolysis evaluation requires a history, physical examination, and serology for definitive diagnosis. Treatment modalities should include rest and hydration. Return to play and future workup should be determined by the risk stratification of the athlete. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): C. PMID:24982707

  9. Does mental exertion alter maximal muscle activation?

    PubMed Central

    Rozand, Vianney; Pageaux, Benjamin; Marcora, Samuele M.; Papaxanthis, Charalambos; Lepers, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    Mental exertion is known to impair endurance performance, but its effects on neuromuscular function remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mental exertion reduces torque and muscle activation during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. Ten subjects performed in a randomized order three separate mental exertion conditions lasting 27 min each: (i) high mental exertion (incongruent Stroop task), (ii) moderate mental exertion (congruent Stroop task), (iii) low mental exertion (watching a movie). In each condition, mental exertion was combined with 10 intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensor muscles (one maximal voluntary contraction every 3 min). Neuromuscular function was assessed using electrical nerve stimulation. Maximal voluntary torque, maximal muscle activation and other neuromuscular parameters were similar across mental exertion conditions and did not change over time. These findings suggest that mental exertion does not affect neuromuscular function during intermittent maximal voluntary contractions of the knee extensors. PMID:25309404

  10. Passive Synaptic Normalization and Input Synchrony-Dependent Amplification of Cortical Feedback in Thalamocortical Neuron Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, William M.; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    significantly increase the influence of corticothalamic feedback on sensory information transfer. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in first-order thalamic nuclei transmit sensory information from the periphery to the cortex. However, the numerically dominant synaptic input to thalamocortical neurons comes from the cortex, which provides a strong, activity-dependent modulatory feedback influence on information flow through the thalamus. Here, we reveal how individual quantal-sized corticothalamic EPSPs propagate within thalamocortical neuron dendrites and how different spatial and temporal input patterns are integrated by these cells. We find that thalamocortical neurons have voltage- and synchrony-dependent postsynaptic mechanisms, involving NMDA receptors and T-type Ca2+ channels that allow nonlinear amplification of integrated corticothalamic EPSPs. These mechanisms significantly increase the responsiveness of thalamocortical neurons to cortical excitatory input and broaden the “modulatory” influence exerted by corticothalamic synapses. PMID:27030759

  11. Structural and Temporal Requirements of Wnt/PCP Protein Vangl2 Function for Convergence and Extension Movements and Facial Branchiomotor Neuron Migration in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiufang; Sittaramane, Vinoth; Gurung, Suman; Chandrasekhar, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Van gogh-like 2 (Vangl2), a core component of the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling pathway, is a four-pass transmembrane protein with N-terminal and C-terminal domains located in the cytosol, and is structurally conserved from flies to mammals. In vertebrates, Vangl2 plays an essential role in convergence and extension (CE) movements during gastrulation and in facial branchiomotor (FBM) neuron migration in the hindbrain. However, the roles of specific Vangl2 domains, of membrane association, and of specific extracellular and intracellular motifs have not been examined, especially in the context of FBM neuron migration. Through heat shock-inducible expression of various Vangl2 transgenes, we found that membrane associated functions of the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of Vangl2 are involved in regulating FBM neuron migration. Importantly, through temperature shift experiments, we found that the critical period for Vangl2 function coincides with the initial stages of FBM neuron migration out of rhombomere 4. Intriguingly, we have also uncovered a putative nuclear localization motif in the C-terminal domain that may play a role in regulating CE movements. PMID:24333599

  12. Temporal resolution of misfolded prion protein transport, accumulation, glial activation, and neuronal death in the retinas of mice inoculated with scrapie

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, there is a lack of pathologic landmarks to describe the progression of prion disease in vivo. The goal of this work was to determine the temporal relationship between the transport of misfolded prion protein from the brain to the retina, the accumulation of PrPSc in the retina, the respon...

  13. Exertional compartment syndromes of the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Schepsis, A A; Lynch, G

    1996-03-01

    Compartment syndromes may be acute or chronic secondary to exertion or exercise. The chronic or exertional type most commonly involves the lower extremity, particularly the anterior compartment of the lower leg, and is the subject of this review. Rarely, an exertional compartment syndrome may become acute. The diagnosis is based on history, physical examination, and compartment pressure measurements. The differential diagnosis of exertional leg pain includes stress fractures, stress reaction, periostitis, claudication, popliteal artery entrapment, and peripheral nerve entrapment. Unusual causes, such as a ganglion of the proximal tibiofibular joint causing an anterior compartment syndrome, have recently been reported.

  14. Excitatory projections from the amygdala to neurons in the nucleus pontis oralis in the rat: an intracellular study.

    PubMed

    Xi, M; Fung, S J; Sampogna, S; Chase, M H

    2011-12-01

    There is a consensus that active (REM) sleep (AS) is controlled by cholinergic projections from the laterodorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei (LDT/PPT) to neurons in the nucleus pontis oralis (NPO) that generate AS (i.e. AS-Generator neurons). The present study was designed to provide evidence that other projections to the NPO, such as those from the amygdala, are also capable of inducing AS. Accordingly, the responses of neurons, recorded intracellularly in the NPO, were examined following stimulation of the ipsilateral central nucleus of the amygdala (CNA) in urethane-anesthetized rats. Single pulse stimulation in the CNA produced an early, fast depolarizing potential (EPSP) in neurons within the NPO. The mean latency to the onset of these excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) was 3.6±0.2 ms. A late, small-amplitude inhibitory synaptic potential (IPSP) was present following EPSPs in a portion of the NPO neurons. Following stimulation of the CNA with a train of 8-10 pulses, NPO neurons exhibited a sustained depolarization (5-10 mV) of their resting membrane potential. When single subthreshold intracellular depolarizing current pulses were delivered to NPO neurons, CNA-induced EPSPs were sufficient to promote the discharge of these cells. Stimulation of the CNA with a short train of stimuli induced potent temporal facilitation of EPSPs in NPO neurons. Two forms of synaptic plasticity were revealed by the patterns of response of NPO neurons following stimulation of the CNA: paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) and post-tetanic potentiation (PTP). Six of recorded NPO neurons were identified morphologically with neurobiotin. They were medium to large, multipolar cells with diameters >20 μM, which resemble AS-on cells in the NPO. The present results demonstrate that amygdalar projections are capable of exerting a powerful excitatory postsynaptic drive that activates NPO neurons. Therefore, we suggest that the amygdala is capable of inducing AS via direct

  15. Modulation of axonal sprouting along rostro-caudal axis of dorsal hippocampus and no neuronal survival in parahippocampal cortices by long-term post-lesion melatonin administration in lithium-pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ganjkhani, Mahin; Ali, Rostami; Iraj, Jafari Anarkooli

    2016-01-01

    Feature outcome of hippocampus and extra-hippocampal cortices was evaluated in melatonin treated lithium-pilocarpine epileptic rats during early and chronic phases of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). After status epilepticus (SE) induction, 5 and 20 mg/kg melatonin were administered for 14 days or 60 days. All animals were killed 60 days post SE induction and the histological features of the rosrto-caudal axis of the dorsal hippocampus, piriform and entorhinal cortices were evaluated utilizing Nissl, Timm, and synapsin I immunoflorescent staining. Melatonin (20 mg/kg) effect on CA1 and CA3 neurons showed a region-specific pattern along the rostro-caudal axis of the dorsal hippocampus. The number of counted granular cells by melatonin (20 mg/kg) treatment increased along the rostro-caudal axis of the dorsal hippocampus in comparison to the untreated epileptic group. The density of Timm granules in the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus decreased significantly in all melatonin treated groups in comparison to the untreated epileptic animals. The increased density of synapsin I immunoreactivity in the outer molecular layer of the dentate gyrus of untreated epileptic rats showed a profound decrease following melatonin treatment. There was no neuronal protection in the piriform and entorhinal cortices whatever the melatonin treatment. Long-term melatonin administration as a co-adjuvant probably could reduce the post-lesion histological consequences of TLE in a region-specific pattern along the rostro-caudal axis of the dorsal hippocampus. PMID:27051565

  16. Vestibular Neuronitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevent Painful Swimmer's Ear Additional Content Medical News Vestibular Neuronitis By Lawrence R. Lustig, MD NOTE: This ... Drugs Herpes Zoster Oticus Meniere Disease Purulent Labyrinthitis Vestibular Neuronitis Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder characterized by ...

  17. Online stimulus optimization rapidly reveals multidimensional selectivity in auditory cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Anna R; Hancock, Kenneth E; Sen, Kamal; Polley, Daniel B

    2014-07-01

    Neurons in sensory brain regions shape our perception of the surrounding environment through two parallel operations: decomposition and integration. For example, auditory neurons decompose sounds by separately encoding their frequency, temporal modulation, intensity, and spatial location. Neurons also integrate across these various features to support a unified perceptual gestalt of an auditory object. At higher levels of a sensory pathway, neurons may select for a restricted region of feature space defined by the intersection of multiple, independent stimulus dimensions. To further characterize how auditory cortical neurons decompose and integrate multiple facets of an isolated sound, we developed an automated procedure that manipulated five fundamental acoustic properties in real time based on single-unit feedback in awake mice. Within several minutes, the online approach converged on regions of the multidimensional stimulus manifold that reliably drove neurons at significantly higher rates than predefined stimuli. Optimized stimuli were cross-validated against pure tone receptive fields and spectrotemporal receptive field estimates in the inferior colliculus and primary auditory cortex. We observed, from midbrain to cortex, increases in both level invariance and frequency selectivity, which may underlie equivalent sparseness of responses in the two areas. We found that onset and steady-state spike rates increased proportionately as the stimulus was tailored to the multidimensional receptive field. By separately evaluating the amount of leverage each sound feature exerted on the overall firing rate, these findings reveal interdependencies between stimulus features as well as hierarchical shifts in selectivity and invariance that may go unnoticed with traditional approaches. PMID:24990917

  18. Neuronal correlates of decisions to speak and act: Spontaneous emergence and dynamic topographies in a computational model of frontal and temporal areas.

    PubMed

    Garagnani, Max; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2013-10-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying the spontaneous, stimulus-independent emergence of intentions and decisions to act are poorly understood. Using a neurobiologically realistic model of frontal and temporal areas of the brain, we simulated the learning of perception-action circuits for speech and hand-related actions and subsequently observed their spontaneous behaviour. Noise-driven accumulation of reverberant activity in these circuits leads to their spontaneous ignition and partial-to-full activation, which we interpret, respectively, as model correlates of action intention emergence and action decision-and-execution. Importantly, activity emerged first in higher-association prefrontal and temporal cortices, subsequently spreading to secondary and finally primary sensorimotor model-areas, hence reproducing the dynamics of cortical correlates of voluntary action revealed by readiness-potential and verb-generation experiments. This model for the first time explains the cortical origins and topography of endogenous action decisions, and the natural emergence of functional specialisation in the cortex, as mechanistic consequences of neurobiological principles, anatomical structure and sensorimotor experience. PMID:23489583

  19. Reflections on the Design of Exertion Games.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Florian Floyd; Altimira, David; Khot, Rohit Ashot

    2015-02-01

    The design of exertion games (i.e., digital games that require physical effort from players) is a difficult intertwined challenge of combining digital games and physical effort. To aid designers in facing this challenge, we describe our experiences of designing exertion games. We outline personal reflections on our design processes and articulate analyses of players' experiences. These reflections and analyses serve to highlight the unique opportunities of combining digital games and physical effort. The insights we seek aim to enhance the understanding of exertion game design, contributing to the advancement of the field, and ultimately resulting in better games and associated player experiences.

  20. Prophylactic treatment with melatonin after status epilepticus: effects on epileptogenesis, neuronal damage, and behavioral changes in a kainate model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Petkova, Zlatina; Pechlivanova, Daniela; Moyanova, Slavianka; Kortenska, Lidia; Mitreva, Rumiana; Lozanov, Valentin; Atanasova, Dimitrina; Lazarov, Nikolai; Stoynev, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Melatonin is a potent antioxidant which showed anticonvulsant activities both in experimental and clinical studies. In the present study, we examined the effect of melatonin treatment (10mg/kg/day, diluted in drinking water, 8 weeks) during epileptogenesis on the consequences of a kainate (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE) in rats. Melatonin increased the latency in the appearance of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs) and decreased their frequency only during the treatment period. The behavioral alterations associated with hyperactivity, depression-like behavior during the light phase, and deficits in hippocampus-dependent working memory were positively affected by melatonin treatment in rats with epilepsy. Melatonin reduced the neuronal damage in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and piriform cortex and recovered the decrease of hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) level in rats with epilepsy. Taken together, long-term melatonin treatment after SE was unable to suppress the development of epileptogenesis. However, it showed a potential in reducing some of the deleterious alterations that develop during the chronic epileptic state in a diurnal phase-dependent mode. PMID:23435277

  1. Prophylactic treatment with melatonin after status epilepticus: effects on epileptogenesis, neuronal damage, and behavioral changes in a kainate model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Petkova, Zlatina; Pechlivanova, Daniela; Moyanova, Slavianka; Kortenska, Lidia; Mitreva, Rumiana; Lozanov, Valentin; Atanasova, Dimitrina; Lazarov, Nikolai; Stoynev, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Melatonin is a potent antioxidant which showed anticonvulsant activities both in experimental and clinical studies. In the present study, we examined the effect of melatonin treatment (10mg/kg/day, diluted in drinking water, 8 weeks) during epileptogenesis on the consequences of a kainate (KA)-induced status epilepticus (SE) in rats. Melatonin increased the latency in the appearance of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRSs) and decreased their frequency only during the treatment period. The behavioral alterations associated with hyperactivity, depression-like behavior during the light phase, and deficits in hippocampus-dependent working memory were positively affected by melatonin treatment in rats with epilepsy. Melatonin reduced the neuronal damage in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and piriform cortex and recovered the decrease of hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) level in rats with epilepsy. Taken together, long-term melatonin treatment after SE was unable to suppress the development of epileptogenesis. However, it showed a potential in reducing some of the deleterious alterations that develop during the chronic epileptic state in a diurnal phase-dependent mode.

  2. Gender and contraction mode on perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, D M; Polen, R R; Byrd, B N

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine perceived exertion responses during concentric and eccentric elbow flexor contractions between young adult men and women. Thirty healthy young adults participated in two experimental sessions. During the first session, subjects performed five concentric isokinetic maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) of elbow flexion, followed by nine, randomly-ordered sub-maximal contractions (10-90% MVC). The same procedures were repeated during the second session, with the exception that eccentric contractions were performed. Subjects rated their perceived exertion following the sub-maximal contractions with the Borg category-ratio scale. Perceived exertion was significantly (p<0.05) less than equivalent values on the CR-10 scale at intensities greater than, and equal to, 30% MVC. A three-factor interaction between 30-40% MVC indicated that perceived exertion increased more during the eccentric, than concentric, contractions in women, while the opposite pattern was evident for the men. There were no significant contraction mode or gender differences. Power function modeling revealed that perceived exertion increased in a negatively accelerating manner, except for the men performing eccentric exercise. Perceived exertion increases in a similar non-linear manner between men and women during concentric contractions, while men exhibited a statistically linear pattern during eccentric contractions. PMID:20148376

  3. Evaluation of Immortalized AVPV- and Arcuate-Specific Neuronal Kisspeptin Cell Lines to Elucidate Potential Mechanisms of Estrogen Responsiveness and Temporal Gene Expression in Females.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Dakota C; Veitch, Rebecca E; Chappell, Patrick E

    2016-09-01

    In females, ovarian estradiol modulates kisspeptin (Kiss-1) synthesis to act as an obligatory regulator of downstream gonadotropin release in vivo, via stimulation of GnRH neurons. Changes in the ovarian condition are relayed to the neuroendocrine hypothalamus via two sexually dimorphic Kiss-1 populations, located in the anteroventral periventricular (AVPV) and arcuate nuclei, conveying estradiol-positive and -negative feedback, respectively. To elucidate how differential responsiveness to estradiol is mediated in these populations, we generated two kisspeptin-secreting cell lines from an adult kiss1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) female mouse. These lines recapitulate in vivo responsiveness to estradiol, with KTaV-3 (AVPV) cells demonstrating significantly increased kiss1 expression under high physiological estradiol exposure, whereas KTaR-1 (arcuate) cells exhibit kiss1 suppression after lower estradiol exposure. Baseline expression of estrogen receptor-α (esr1) differs significantly between KTaV-3 and KTaR-1 cells, with KTaR-1 cells demonstrating higher basal expression of esr1. Estradiol stimulation of kiss1 expression in KTaV-3 cells is modulated in a dose-dependent manner up to 25.0 pM, with less responsiveness observed at higher doses (>50.0 pM). In contrast, KTaR-1 kiss1 attenuates at lower estradiol doses (2.0-5.0 pM), returning to baseline levels at 25.0 pM and greater. Furthermore, the expression of the core clock genes bmal1 and per2 show normal rhythms in KTaV-3 cells, regardless of estradiol treatment. Conversely, KTaR-1 antiphasic transcription of bmal1 and per2 is phase delayed by low estradiol treatment. Strikingly, estradiol induces circadian rhythms of kiss1 expression only in KTaV-3 cells. Further exploration into estradiol responsiveness will reveal mechanisms responsible for the differential expression pattern demonstrated in vivo between these cell types. PMID:27409645

  4. Methylprednisolone exerts neuroprotective effects by regulating autophagy and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Chen, Shu-rui; Wu, Meng-yao; Gao, Kai; Li, Yuan-long; Wang, Hong-yu; Li, Chen-yuan; Li, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Methylprednisolone markedly reduces autophagy and apoptosis after secondary spinal cord injury. Here, we investigated whether pretreatment of cells with methylprednisolone would protect neuron-like cells from subsequent oxidative damage via suppression of autophagy and apoptosis. Cultured N2a cells were pretreated with 10 µM methylprednisolone for 30 minutes, then exposed to 100 µM H2O2 for 24 hours. Inverted phase contrast microscope images, MTT assay, flow cytometry and western blot results showed that, compared to cells exposed to 100 µM H2O2 alone, cells pretreated with methylprednisolone had a significantly lower percentage of apoptotic cells, maintained a healthy morphology, and showed downregulation of autophagic protein light chain 3B and Beclin-1 protein expression. These findings indicate that methylprednisolone exerted neuroprotective effects against oxidative damage by suppressing autophagy and apoptosis. PMID:27335569

  5. 3D Visualization of the Temporal and Spatial Spread of Tau Pathology Reveals Extensive Sites of Tau Accumulation Associated with Neuronal Loss and Recognition Memory Deficit in Aged Tau Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongjun; Hussaini, S. Abid; Wegmann, Susanne; Profaci, Caterina; Daniels, Jacob D.; Herman, Mathieu; Emrani, Sheina; Figueroa, Helen Y.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Davies, Peter; Duff, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    3D volume imaging using iDISCO+ was applied to observe the spatial and temporal progression of tau pathology in deep structures of the brain of a mouse model that recapitulates the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tau pathology was compared at four timepoints, up to 34 months as it spread through the hippocampal formation and out into the neocortex along an anatomically connected route. Tau pathology was associated with significant gliosis. No evidence for uptake and accumulation of tau by glia was observed. Neuronal cells did appear to have internalized tau, including in extrahippocampal areas as a small proportion of cells that had accumulated human tau protein did not express detectible levels of human tau mRNA. At the oldest timepoint, mature tau pathology in the entorhinal cortex (EC) was associated with significant cell loss. As in human AD, mature tau pathology in the EC and the presence of tau pathology in the neocortex correlated with cognitive impairment. 3D volume imaging is an ideal technique to easily monitor the spread of pathology over time in models of disease progression. PMID:27466814

  6. The Critical Role of Golgi Cells in Regulating Spatio-Temporal Integration and Plasticity at the Cerebellum Input Stage

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Egidio

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of the Golgi cell is bound to the foundation of the Neuron Doctrine. Recently, the excitable mechanisms of this inhibitory interneuron have been investigated with modern experimental and computational techniques raising renewed interest for the implications it might have for cerebellar circuit functions. Golgi cells are pacemakers with preferential response frequency and phase-reset in the theta-frequency band and can therefore impose specific temporal dynamics to granule cell responses. Moreover, through their connectivity, Golgi cells determine the spatio-temporal organization of cerebellar activity. Finally, Golgi cells, by controlling granule cell depolarization and NMDA channel unblock, regulate the induction of long-term synaptic plasticity at the mossy fiber – granule cell synapse. Thus, the Golgi cells can exert an extensive control on spatio-temporal signal organization and information storage in the granular layer playing a critical role for cerebellar computation. PMID:18982105

  7. Copper enhances cellular and network excitabilities, and improves temporal processing in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Maureira, Carlos; Letelier, Juan Carlos; Alvarez, Osvaldo; Delgado, Ricardo; Vergara, Cecilia

    2015-12-01

    Copper, an ion with many important metabolic functions, has also been proposed to have a role as modulator on neuronal function, mostly based on its effects on voltage- and neurotransmitter-gated conductance as well as on neurological symptoms of patients with altered copper homeostasis. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which copper exerts its neuromodulatory effects have not been clearly established in a functional neuronal network. Using rat hippocampus slices as a neuronal network model, the effects of copper in the range of 10-100 nm were tested on the intrinsic, synaptic and network properties of the CA1 region. Most of the previously described effects of this cation were in the micromolar range of copper concentrations. The current results indicate that copper is a multifaceted neuromodulator, having effects that may be grouped into two categories: (i) activity enhancement, by modulating synaptic communication and action potential (AP) conductances; and (ii) temporal processing and correlation extraction, by improving reliability and depressing inhibition. Specifically it was found that copper hyperpolarizes AP firing threshold, enhances neuronal and network excitability, modifies CA3-CA1 pathway gain, enhances the frequency of spontaneous synaptic events, decreases inhibitory network activity, and improves AP timing reliability. Moreover, copper chelation by bathocuproine decreases spontaneous network spiking activity. These results allow the proposal that copper affects the network activity from cellular to circuit levels on a moment-by-moment basis, and should be considered a crucial functional component of hippocampal neuronal circuitry.

  8. Vicarious perception of postural discomfort and exertion.

    PubMed

    Drury, Colin G; Atiles, Moises; Chaitanya, Mohan; Lin, Jui-Feng; Marin, Clara; Nasarwanji, Mahiyar; Paluszak, Doug; Russell, Casey; Stone, Richard; Sunm, Michelle

    2006-11-15

    Perceived exertion and discomfort have been used extensively in ergonomics practice. Job incumbents typically rate their exertion on scales such as Borg's rated perceived effort (RPE) and their discomfort on scales such as Corlett and Bishop's body part discomfort scales (BPD). This study asks whether exertion and discomfort can be perceived by an external observer, i.e. is vicarious perception possible? Four participants (targets) performed 20 postural holding tasks selected from Ovako Working Posture Analysing System postures and gave RPE and BPD scores for each posture. Video clips of each target in each posture were shown to four expert ergonomists and 23 novices, who also gave RPE and BPD scores. Correlations between targets and observers scores were high, with significance exceeding p = 0.01. Observers were generally conservative, rating easy postures too high and difficult postures too low. All observers rated female targets higher than male targets. Female observers rated all targets higher then male observers. Vicarious perception of discomfort and exertion was possible, but there was not a one-to-one correspondence to ratings given by those experiencing the posture.

  9. Exertion and acute coronary artery injury.

    PubMed

    Black, A; Black, M M; Gensini, G

    1975-12-01

    Twelve cases of myocardial infarction as related to strenuous exertion are presented with the pathological findings in several of these cases. Three cases with coronary arteriography are also presented. The pathology of coronary arteriosclerotic plaques and the vulnerability to acute injury is reviewed and discussed. It is concluded that strenuous exertion can cause acute injury to coronary artery plaques due to the unusual stressful whip-like action to which coronary arteries are subject. These injuries may initiate as cracks in the plaques or subintimal hemorrhages and proceed to coronary occlusion and ultimate myocardial infarction. With this concept in mind we use the term of "crack in the plaque" (Black's Crack in the Plaque) to account for the sudden appearance of clinical coronary artery disease appearing during or shortly after exertion, or other stressful situations in patients without previous existing evidence of clinical coronary artery disease. This could also account for exacerbation of symptoms or death occurring after exertion in previously quiescent asymptomatic known coronary artery disease subjects. This concept may explain some of the puzzling features of coronary disease.

  10. Physical exertion may cause high troponin levels.

    PubMed

    Agewall, Stefan; Tjora, Solve

    2011-11-15

    It is important to measure troponin levels when acute myocardial infarct is suspected. Many other factors that affect the heart can cause an increase in troponin levels, for example extreme physical exertion. Recent studies have shown that more normal physical activity can also lead to increase in troponin levels in healthy individuals.

  11. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the leg

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) is an underdiagnosed cause of chronic exertional leg pain. The syndrome most commonly occurs in young adult recreational runners, elite athletes, and military recruits. CECS is caused by increased intracompartmental pressure within a fascial space; however, the mechanism of why pain occurs is unknown. Symptoms are classically pain in the affected compartment at the same time, distance, or intensity of exercise. CECS is a clinical diagnosis; however, it is confirmed by intracompartmental pressure testing. Fasciotomy is the treatment of choice for athletes who would like to maintain the same level of activity. Athletes who have a release of the anterior and lateral compartments have a high success rate. PMID:21063498

  12. The force exerted by a fireball

    SciTech Connect

    Makrinich, G.; Fruchtman, A.

    2014-02-15

    The force exerted by a fireball was deduced both from the change of the equilibrium position of a pendulum and from the change in the pendulum oscillation period. That measured force was found to be several times larger than the force exerted by the ions accelerated across the double layer that is assumed to surround the fireball. The force enhancement that is expected by ion-neutral collisions in the fireball is evaluated to be too small to explain the measured enhanced force. Gas pressure increase, due to gas heating through electron-neutral collisions, as recently suggested [Stenzel et al., J. Appl. Phys. 109, 113305 (2011)], is examined as the source for the force enhancement.

  13. The force exerted by a fireball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrinich, G.; Fruchtman, A.

    2014-02-01

    The force exerted by a fireball was deduced both from the change of the equilibrium position of a pendulum and from the change in the pendulum oscillation period. That measured force was found to be several times larger than the force exerted by the ions accelerated across the double layer that is assumed to surround the fireball. The force enhancement that is expected by ion-neutral collisions in the fireball is evaluated to be too small to explain the measured enhanced force. Gas pressure increase, due to gas heating through electron-neutral collisions, as recently suggested [Stenzel et al., J. Appl. Phys. 109, 113305 (2011)], is examined as the source for the force enhancement.

  14. Neuronal polarization.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tetsuya; Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-06-15

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with structurally and functionally distinct processes called axons and dendrites. This polarization underlies the directional flow of information in the central nervous system, so the establishment and maintenance of neuronal polarization is crucial for correct development and function. Great progress in our understanding of how neurons establish their polarity has been made through the use of cultured hippocampal neurons, while recent technological advances have enabled in vivo analysis of axon specification and elongation. This short review and accompanying poster highlight recent advances in this fascinating field, with an emphasis on the signaling mechanisms underlying axon and dendrite specification in vitro and in vivo.

  15. The neuronal and actin commitment: Why do neurons need rings?

    PubMed

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-09-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons has been extensively studied in actin-enriched compartments such as the growth cone and dendritic spines. The recent discovery of actin rings in the axon shaft and in dendrites, together with the identification of axon actin trails, has advanced our understanding on actin organization and dynamics in neurons. However, specifically in the case of actin rings, the mechanisms regulating their nucleation and assembly, and the functions that they may exert in axons and dendrites remain largely unexplored. Here we discuss the possible structural, mechanistic and functional properties of the subcortical neuronal cytoskeleton putting the current knowledge in perspective with the information available on actin rings formed in other biological contexts, and with the organization of actin-spectrin lattices in other cell types. The detailed analysis of these novel neuronal actin ring structures, together with the elucidation of the function of actin-binding proteins in neuron biology, has a large potential to uncover new mechanisms of neuronal function under normal conditions that may have impact in our understanding of axon degeneration and regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The neuronal and actin commitment: Why do neurons need rings?

    PubMed

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-09-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons has been extensively studied in actin-enriched compartments such as the growth cone and dendritic spines. The recent discovery of actin rings in the axon shaft and in dendrites, together with the identification of axon actin trails, has advanced our understanding on actin organization and dynamics in neurons. However, specifically in the case of actin rings, the mechanisms regulating their nucleation and assembly, and the functions that they may exert in axons and dendrites remain largely unexplored. Here we discuss the possible structural, mechanistic and functional properties of the subcortical neuronal cytoskeleton putting the current knowledge in perspective with the information available on actin rings formed in other biological contexts, and with the organization of actin-spectrin lattices in other cell types. The detailed analysis of these novel neuronal actin ring structures, together with the elucidation of the function of actin-binding proteins in neuron biology, has a large potential to uncover new mechanisms of neuronal function under normal conditions that may have impact in our understanding of axon degeneration and regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26784007

  17. Activities of visual cortical and hippocampal neurons co-fluctuate in freely moving rats during spatial behavior

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Daniel Christopher; Ji, Daoyun

    2015-01-01

    Visual cues exert a powerful control over hippocampal place cell activities that encode external spaces. The functional interaction of visual cortical neurons and hippocampal place cells during spatial navigation behavior has yet to be elucidated. Here we show that, like hippocampal place cells, many neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) of freely moving rats selectively fire at specific locations as animals run repeatedly on a track. The V1 location-specific activity leads hippocampal place cell activity both spatially and temporally. The precise activities of individual V1 neurons fluctuate every time the animal travels through the track, in a correlated fashion with those of hippocampal place cells firing at overlapping locations. The results suggest the existence of visual cortical neurons that are functionally coupled with hippocampal place cells for spatial processing during natural behavior. These visual neurons may also participate in the formation and storage of hippocampal-dependent memories. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08902.001 PMID:26349031

  18. Synchronization by elastic neuronal latencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, Roni; Timor, Reut; Marom, Shimon; Abeles, Moshe; Kanter, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Psychological and physiological considerations entail that formation and functionality of neuronal cell assemblies depend upon synchronized repeated activation such as zero-lag synchronization. Several mechanisms for the emergence of this phenomenon have been suggested, including the global network quantity, the greatest common divisor of neuronal circuit delay loops. However, they require strict biological prerequisites such as precisely matched delays and connectivity, and synchronization is represented as a stationary mode of activity instead of a transient phenomenon. Here we show that the unavoidable increase in neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulation serves as a nonuniform gradual stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops. This apparent nuisance is revealed to be an essential mechanism in various types of neuronal time controllers, where synchronization emerges as a transient phenomenon and without predefined precisely matched synaptic delays. These findings are described in an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on a circuit of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro, and are corroborated and extended by simulations of circuits composed of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with time-dependent latencies. These findings announce a cortical time scale for time controllers based on tens of microseconds stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops per spike. They call for a reexamination of the role of the temporal periodic mode in brain functionality using advanced in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  19. A short upstream promoter region mediates transcriptional regulation of the mouse doublecortin gene in differentiating neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Doublecortin (Dcx), a MAP (Microtubule-Associated Protein), is transiently expressed in migrating and differentiating neurons and thereby characterizes neuronal precursors and neurogenesis in developing and adult neurogenesis. In addition, reduced Dcx expression during development has been related to appearance of brain pathologies. Here, we attempt to unveil the molecular mechanisms controlling Dcx gene expression by studying its transcriptional regulation during neuronal differentiation. Results To determine and analyze important regulatory sequences of the Dcx promoter, we studied a putative regulatory region upstream from the mouse Dcx coding region (pdcx2kb) and several deletions thereof. These different fragments were used in vitro and in vivo to drive reporter gene expression. We demonstrated, using transient expression experiments, that pdcx2kb is sufficient to control specific reporter gene expression in cerebellar cells and in the developing brain (E14.5). We determined the temporal profile of Dcx promoter activity during neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) and found that transcriptional activation of the Dcx gene varies along with neuronal differentiation of mESC. Deletion experiments and sequence comparison of Dcx promoters across rodents, human and chicken revealed the importance of a highly conserved sequence in the proximal region of the promoter required for specific and strong expression in neuronal precursors and young neuronal cells. Further analyses revealed the presence in this short sequence of several conserved, putative transcription factor binding sites: LEF/TCF (Lymphoid Enhancer Factor/T-Cell Factor) which are effectors of the canonical Wnt pathway; HNF6/OC2 (Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-6/Oncecut-2) members of the ONECUT family and NF-Y/CAAT (Nuclear Factor-Y). Conclusions Studies of Dcx gene regulatory sequences using native, deleted and mutated constructs suggest that fragments located upstream of the

  20. [Impact of opiates on dopaminergic neurons].

    PubMed

    Kaufling, Jennifer; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Since the work of Johnson and North, it is known that opiates increase the activity of dopaminergic neurons by a GABA neuron-mediated desinhibition. This model should however be updated based on recent advances. Thus, the neuroanatomical location of the GABA neurons responsible for this desinhibition has been recently detailed: they belong to a brain structure in continuity with the posterior part of the ventral tegmental area and discovered this past decade. Other data also highlighted the critical role played by glutamatergic transmission in the opioid regulation of dopaminergic neuron activity. During protracted opiate withdrawal, the inhibitory/excitatory balance exerted on dopaminergic neurons is altered. These results are now leading to propose an original hypothesis for explaining the impact of protracted opiate withdrawal on mood. PMID:27406773

  1. Anger, Heavy Exertion: Fast Track to A Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Anger, Heavy Exertion: Fast Track to a Heart Attack? But researchers suggest that artery-clogging plaque has ... physical exertion may be triggers for a first heart attack in some people, new research suggests. In the ...

  2. Exertional compartment syndrome of the upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Botte, M J; Fronek, J; Pedowitz, R A; Hoenecke, H R; Abrams, R A; Hamer, M L

    1998-08-01

    Exertional compartment syndrome is characterized by intracompartmental pressures that rise transiently following repetitive motion or exercise, thereby producing temporary, reversible ischemia, pain, weakness, and, occasionally, neurologic deficits. The exact cause or pathogenesis remains unclear; a disturbance of microvascular flow caused by elevated intramuscular pressure leads to tissue ischemia, depletion of high-energy phosphate stores, and cellular acidosis. Anatomic contributing factors may include a limited compartment size, increased intracompartmental volume, constricted fascia, loss of compartment elasticity, poor venous return, or increased muscle bulk. The diagnosis is suspected based on history and confirmed with physical examination and intramuscular pressure evaluation before and after exercise (stress test). Differential diagnosis includes claudication or other vascular abnormalities, myositis, tendinitis, periostitis, chronic strains or sprains, stress fracture, other compression or systemic neuropathies, and cardiac abnormalities with angina or referred extremity pain. Initial treatment includes activity modification; refractory symptoms can be managed with elective fasciotomy.

  3. Prolactin receptor in regulation of neuronal excitability and channels.

    PubMed

    Patil, Mayur J; Henry, Michael A; Akopian, Armen N

    2014-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) activates PRL receptor isoforms to exert regulation of specific neuronal circuitries, and to control numerous physiological and clinically-relevant functions including; maternal behavior, energy balance and food intake, stress and trauma responses, anxiety, neurogenesis, migraine and pain. PRL controls these critical functions by regulating receptor potential thresholds, neuronal excitability and/or neurotransmission efficiency. PRL also influences neuronal functions via activation of certain neurons, resulting in Ca(2+) influx and/or electrical firing with subsequent release of neurotransmitters. Although PRL was identified almost a century ago, very little specific information is known about how PRL regulates neuronal functions. Nevertheless, important initial steps have recently been made including the identification of PRL-induced transient signaling pathways in neurons and the modulation of neuronal transient receptor potential (TRP) and Ca(2+) -dependent K(+) channels by PRL. In this review, we summarize current knowledge and recent progress in understanding the regulation of neuronal excitability and channels by PRL.

  4. Perceived Exertion of the PACER in High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, John D.; Holmes, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore high school students' perceived exertion after participating in the Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run (PACER). Immediately after completing the PACER, students (N = 792) indicated their perceived exertion on the OMNI rating of perceived exertion (RPE) for children (1-10 scale). All students,…

  5. Stochastic phase-change neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuma, Tomas; Pantazi, Angeliki; Le Gallo, Manuel; Sebastian, Abu; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2016-08-01

    Artificial neuromorphic systems based on populations of spiking neurons are an indispensable tool in understanding the human brain and in constructing neuromimetic computational systems. To reach areal and power efficiencies comparable to those seen in biological systems, electroionics-based and phase-change-based memristive devices have been explored as nanoscale counterparts of synapses. However, progress on scalable realizations of neurons has so far been limited. Here, we show that chalcogenide-based phase-change materials can be used to create an artificial neuron in which the membrane potential is represented by the phase configuration of the nanoscale phase-change device. By exploiting the physics of reversible amorphous-to-crystal phase transitions, we show that the temporal integration of postsynaptic potentials can be achieved on a nanosecond timescale. Moreover, we show that this is inherently stochastic because of the melt-quench-induced reconfiguration of the atomic structure occurring when the neuron is reset. We demonstrate the use of these phase-change neurons, and their populations, in the detection of temporal correlations in parallel data streams and in sub-Nyquist representation of high-bandwidth signals.

  6. The definition of exertion-related cardiac events.

    PubMed

    Rai, M; Thompson, P D

    2011-02-01

    Vigorous physical activity increases the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) but there is no standard definition as to what constitutes an exertion-related cardiac event, specifically the time interval between physical exertion and cardiac event. A systematic review of studies related to exertion-related cardiac events was performed and the time interval between exertion and the event or the symptoms leading to the event was looked for in all the articles selected for inclusion. A total of 12 of 26 articles "suggested" or "defined" exertion-related events as those events whose symptoms started during or within 1 h of exertion. Others used definitions of 0.5 h, 2 h, "during exertion", "during or immediately post exertion" and "during or within several hours after exertion". It is suggested, therefore, that the definition of an exertion-related cardiac event be established as a cardiac event in which symptoms started during or within 1 h of physical exertion.

  7. [Mirror neurons].

    PubMed

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  8. Epinephrine exerts anticoagulant effects during human endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    van der Poll, T; Levi, M; Dentener, M; Jansen, P M; Coyle, S M; Braxton, C C; Buurman, W A; Hack, C E; ten Cate, J W; Lowry, S F

    1997-03-17

    To determine the effect of a physiologically relevant elevation in the plasma concentrations of epinephrine on the activation of the hemostatic mechanism during endotoxemia, 17 healthy men were studied after intravenous injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 2 ng/kg), while receiving a continuous infusion of epinephrine (30 ng/kg/min) started either 3 h (n = 5) or 24 h (n = 6) before LPS injection, or an infusion of normal saline (n = 6). Activation of the coagulation system (plasma concentrations of thrombin-antithrombin III complexes and prothrombin fragment F1+2) was significantly attenuated in the groups treated with epinephrine when compared with subjects injected with LPS only (P <0.05). Epinephrine enhanced LPS-induced activation of fibrinolysis (plasma levels of tissue-type plasminogen activator and plasmin-alpha2-antiplasmin complexes; P <0.05), but did not influence inhibition of fibrinolysis (plasminogen activator inhibitor type I). In subjects infused with epinephrine, the ratio of maximal activation of coagulation and maximal activation of fibrinolysis was reduced by >50%. Hence, epinephrine exerts antithrombotic effects during endotoxemia by concurrent inhibition of coagulation, and stimulation of fibrinolysis. Epinephrine, whether endogenously produced or administered as a component of treatment, may limit the development of disseminated intravascular coagulation during systemic infection.

  9. Negative radiation pressure exerted on kinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgács, Péter; Lukács, Árpád; Romańczukiewicz, Tomasz

    2008-06-01

    The interaction of a kink and a monochromatic plane wave in one dimensional scalar field theories is studied. It is shown that in a large class of models the radiation pressure exerted on the kink is negative, i.e. the kink is pulled towards the source of the radiation. This effect has been observed by numerical simulations in the ϕ4 model, and it is explained by a perturbative calculation assuming that the amplitude of the incoming wave is small. Quite importantly the effect is shown to be robust against small perturbations of the ϕ4 model. In the sine-Gordon (SG) model the time-averaged radiation pressure acting on the kink turns out to be zero. The results of the perturbative computations in the SG model are shown to be in full agreement with an analytical solution corresponding to the superposition of a SG kink with a cnoidal wave. It is also demonstrated that the acceleration of the kink satisfies Newton’s law.

  10. Mechanisms of exertional fatigue in muscle glycogenoses.

    PubMed

    Vissing, John; Haller, Ronald G

    2012-12-01

    Exertional fatigue early in exercise is a clinical hallmark of muscle glycogenoses, which is often coupled with painful muscle contractures and episodes of myoglobinuria. A fundamental biochemical problem in these conditions is the impaired generation of ATP to fuel muscle contractions, which relates directly to the metabolic defect, but also to substrate-limited energy deficiency, as exemplified by the "second wind" phenomenon in McArdle disease. A number of secondary events may also play a role in inducing premature fatigue in glycogenoses, including (1) absent or blunted muscle acidosis, which may be important for maintaining muscle membrane excitability by decreasing chloride permeability, (2) loss of the osmotic effect related to lactate accumulation, which may account for absence of the normal increase in water content of exercised muscle, and thus promote higher than normal concentrations of extracellular potassium in exercising muscle and (3) exaggerated accumulation of ADP during exercise that may inhibit sodium-potassium and calcium-ATPases. Disorders of muscle glycogenolysis and glycolysis reveal the crucial role of these metabolic processes for supplying both anaerobic and aerobic energy for muscle contraction; and the pathological fatigue that occurs when glycogenolysis and/or glycolysis is blocked imply an important role for theses metabolic pathways in normal muscle fatigue. PMID:23182633

  11. Negative radiation pressure exerted on kinks

    SciTech Connect

    Forgacs, Peter; Lukacs, Arpad; Romanczukiewicz, Tomasz

    2008-06-15

    The interaction of a kink and a monochromatic plane wave in one dimensional scalar field theories is studied. It is shown that in a large class of models the radiation pressure exerted on the kink is negative, i.e. the kink is pulled towards the source of the radiation. This effect has been observed by numerical simulations in the {phi}{sup 4} model, and it is explained by a perturbative calculation assuming that the amplitude of the incoming wave is small. Quite importantly the effect is shown to be robust against small perturbations of the {phi}{sup 4} model. In the sine-Gordon (SG) model the time-averaged radiation pressure acting on the kink turns out to be zero. The results of the perturbative computations in the SG model are shown to be in full agreement with an analytical solution corresponding to the superposition of a SG kink with a cnoidal wave. It is also demonstrated that the acceleration of the kink satisfies Newton's law.

  12. Exercise Device Would Exert Selectable Constant Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Damon C.

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus called the resistive exercise device (RED) has been proposed to satisfy a requirement for exercise equipment aboard the International Space Station (ISS) that could passively exert a selectable constant load on both the outward and return strokes. The RED could be used alone; alternatively, the RED could be used in combination with another apparatus called the treadmill with vibration isolation and stabilization (TVIS), in which case the combination would be called the subject load device (SLD). The basic RED would be a passive device, but it could incorporate an electric motor to provide eccentric augmentation (augmentation to make the load during inward movement greater than the load during outward movement). The RED concept represents a unique approach to providing a constant but selectable resistive load for exercise for the maintenance and development of muscles. Going beyond the original ISS application, the RED could be used on Earth as resistive weight training equipment. The advantage of the RED over conventional weight-lifting equipment is that it could be made portable and lightweight.

  13. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    PubMed

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness. PMID:7488645

  14. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    PubMed

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  15. Entrainment of neocortical neurons and gamma oscillations by the hippocampal theta rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Sirota, Anton; Montgomery, Sean; Fujisawa, Shigeyoshi; Isomura, Yoshikazu; Zugaro, Michael; Buzsáki, György

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Although it has been tacitly assumed that the hippocampus exerts an influence on neocortical networks, the mechanisms of this process are not well understood. We examined whether and how hippocampal theta oscillations affect neocortical assembly patterns by recording populations of single cells and transient gamma oscillations in multiple cortical regions, including the somatosensory area and prefrontal cortex in behaving rats and mice. Laminar analysis of neocortical gamma bursts revealed multiple gamma oscillators of varying frequency and location, which were spatially confined and synchronized local groups of neurons. A significant fraction of putative pyramidal cells and interneurons as well as localized gamma oscillations in all recorded neocortical areas were phase-biased by the hippocampal theta rhythm. We hypothesize that temporal coordination of neocortical gamma oscillators by hippocampal theta is a mechanism by which information contained in spatially widespread neocortical assemblies can be synchronously transferred to the associative networks of the hippocampus. PMID:19038224

  16. Validity and reliability of rating perceived exertion in women with fibromyalgia: exertion-pain discrimination.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Álvarez-Gallardo, Inmaculada C; Segura-Jiménez, Víctor; Santalla, Alfredo; Munguía-Izquierdo, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed (1) to assess the validity and reliability of the Borg category-ratio (CR-10) scale for monitoring exercise intensity in women with fibromyalgia (FM) and (2) to examine whether women with FM can discriminate between perceived exertion and exercise-induced pain. Thirty-three women with FM performed two incremental treadmill tests (1 week separated). Heart rate, oxygen uptake, minute ventilation and respiratory quotient were measured. The ratings of perceived exertion (RPE: CR-10 scale) and exercise-induced pain were obtained at each workload. The Spearman's correlation of RPE with the physiological responses ranged from 0.69 to 0.79. The regression models explained ~50% of the variability of the studied physiological responses. We found "perfect acceptable" agreement in 69% of the observations. Weighted Kappa was 0.66 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.59-0.72). There were differences between RPE and pain at workloads 3 (1.50; 95% CI: 0.85-2.16), 4 (2.10; 95% CI: 1.23-2.96), 5 (3.40; 95% CI: 1.29-5.51) and 6 (3.97; 95% CI: 1.61-6.33). The main findings of the present study suggest that the Borg CR-10 scale is valid and moderately reliable for monitoring exercise intensity in women with FM, and these patients were able to discriminate between exertion and exercise-induced pain. PMID:25537003

  17. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... called upper motor neurons ) are transmitted to nerve cells in the brain stem and spinal cord (called lower motor neurons ) and from them to particular muscles. Upper motor neurons direct the lower motor neurons ...

  18. Motor Neuron Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Motor Neuron Diseases Information Page Condensed from Motor Neuron Diseases ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Motor Neuron Diseases? The motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a ...

  19. The Effect of Exertion on Heart Rate and Rating of Perceived Exertion in Acutely Concussed Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Hinds, Andrea; Leddy, John; Freitas, Michael; Czuczman, Natalie; Willer, Barry

    2016-01-01

    Objective Research suggests that one physiological effect of concussion is a disruption in regulation of autonomic nervous system control that affects the balance between parasympathetic and sympathetic output. While changes in heart rate after concussion have been observed, the nature of the heart rate change during progressive exercise has not been well evaluated in acutely symptomatic patients. Additionally, little is known about the relationship between HR and RPE in this population. Methods We compared changes in heart rate and perceived effort during graded treadmill exertion in recently concussed patients to elucidate the effect of brain injury on cardiovascular response to exercise. Resting HR, HR on exercise initiation, and changes in HR and RPE during the Buffalo Concussion Treadmill Test (BCTT) were compared on two test visits: When patients were symptomatic (acute) and after recovery. Results were compared with the test-retest results obtained from a control group consisting of healthy, non-concussed individuals. Results Patients had a significantly lower HR at onset of exercise when acutely concussed as compared to when recovered and reported greater perceived exertion at every exercise intensity level when symptomatic, despite exercising at lower workloads, than when recovered. Sympathetic response to increased exertion was not affected by concussion - HR increased in response to exercise at a comparable rate in both tests. These differences observed in response to exercise between the first BCTT and follow-up evaluation in initially concussed patients were not present in non-concussed individuals. Conclusion Our results suggest that during the acute phase after concussion, acutely concussed patients demonstrated an impaired ability to shift from parasympathetic to sympathetic control over heart rate at the onset of exercise. Changes in the autonomic nervous system after concussion may be more complex than previously reported. Continued evaluation of

  20. Prospective Coding by Spiking Neurons.

    PubMed

    Brea, Johanni; Gaál, Alexisz Tamás; Urbanczik, Robert; Senn, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Animals learn to make predictions, such as associating the sound of a bell with upcoming feeding or predicting a movement that a motor command is eliciting. How predictions are realized on the neuronal level and what plasticity rule underlies their learning is not well understood. Here we propose a biologically plausible synaptic plasticity rule to learn predictions on a single neuron level on a timescale of seconds. The learning rule allows a spiking two-compartment neuron to match its current firing rate to its own expected future discounted firing rate. For instance, if an originally neutral event is repeatedly followed by an event that elevates the firing rate of a neuron, the originally neutral event will eventually also elevate the neuron's firing rate. The plasticity rule is a form of spike timing dependent plasticity in which a presynaptic spike followed by a postsynaptic spike leads to potentiation. Even if the plasticity window has a width of 20 milliseconds, associations on the time scale of seconds can be learned. We illustrate prospective coding with three examples: learning to predict a time varying input, learning to predict the next stimulus in a delayed paired-associate task and learning with a recurrent network to reproduce a temporally compressed version of a sequence. We discuss the potential role of the learning mechanism in classical trace conditioning. In the special case that the signal to be predicted encodes reward, the neuron learns to predict the discounted future reward and learning is closely related to the temporal difference learning algorithm TD(λ). PMID:27341100

  1. Dietary polyphenols exert neuroprotective effects by attenuating neuronal and astrocytic damage in cerebral ischemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyphenols are natural substances with variable phenolic structures and are found in vegetables, fruits, grains, bark, roots, tea, and wine. There are over 8000 polyphenolic structures identified in plants, but edible plants contain only several hundred polyphenolic structures. Recent interest in...

  2. Force Exertion Capacity Measurements in Haptic Virtual Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munih, Marko; Bardorfer, Ales; Ceru, Bojan; Bajd, Tadej; Zupan, Anton

    2010-01-01

    An objective test for evaluating functional status of the upper limbs (ULs) in patients with muscular distrophy (MD) is presented. The method allows for quantitative assessment of the UL functional state with an emphasis on force exertion capacity. The experimental measurement setup and the methodology for the assessment of maximal exertable force…

  3. 20 CFR 220.135 - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... limitations. (a) General. The claimant's impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, may cause... as pain, are exertional, nonexertional, or a combination of both. (b) Exertional limitations. When... pain, affect only the claimant's ability to meet the strength demands of jobs (sitting,...

  4. Using Ratings of Perceived Exertion in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagally, Kristen M.

    2013-01-01

    Ratings of perceived exertion have been shown to be a valid method of monitoring physical activity intensity for both adults and children. As such, this subjective method may serve as an alternative to objective measurements for assessing students' performance on national standards 2 and 4. The OMNI-Child perceived exertion scales were…

  5. 20 CFR 220.135 - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... limitations. (a) General. The claimant's impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, may cause... as pain, are exertional, nonexertional, or a combination of both. (b) Exertional limitations. When... pain, affect only the claimant's ability to meet the strength demands of jobs (sitting,...

  6. 20 CFR 220.135 - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... limitations. (a) General. The claimant's impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, may cause... as pain, are exertional, nonexertional, or a combination of both. (b) Exertional limitations. When... pain, affect only the claimant's ability to meet the strength demands of jobs (sitting,...

  7. 20 CFR 220.135 - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... limitations. (a) General. The claimant's impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, may cause... as pain, are exertional, nonexertional, or a combination of both. (b) Exertional limitations. When... pain, affect only the claimant's ability to meet the strength demands of jobs (sitting,...

  8. Exertional Rhabdomyolysis: What Is It and Why Should We Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David Q.; Carlson, Kelli A.; Marzano, Amy; Garrahy, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Exertional rhabdomyolysis gained increased attention recently when 13 football players from the University of Iowa developed this condition after an especially demanding practice session and were hospitalized. Exertional rhabdomyolysis may lead to severe kidney stress, kidney failure, and even sudden death. Anyone who does physical exercise at a…

  9. 20 CFR 220.135 - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... limitations. (a) General. The claimant's impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, may cause... classification of a limitation as exertional is related to the United States Department of Labor's classification... Department of Labor, to determine the exertional requirements of work which exists in the national...

  10. Unrecognized acute exertional compartment syndrome of the leg and treatment.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Nebojsa; Bottoni, Craig; Cassidy, Charles

    2011-04-01

    Acute-on-chronic exertional compartment syndrome is rare and may be easily missed without a high degree of awareness and clinical suspicion. We report a case of unrecognized acute-on-chronic exertional compartment syndrome in a recreational soccer player. The late sequela of this condition, foot drop, was successfully treated with transfer of the peroneus longus tendon.

  11. Selective extracellular stimulation of individual neurons in ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hui; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Shaw, Kendrick M.; Chiel, Hillel J.

    2008-09-01

    Selective control of individual neurons could clarify neural functions and aid disease treatments. To target specific neurons, it may be useful to focus on ganglionic neuron clusters, which are found in the peripheral nervous system in vertebrates. Because neuron cell bodies are found primarily near the surface of invertebrate ganglia, and often found near the surface of vertebrate ganglia, we developed a technique for controlling individual neurons extracellularly using the buccal ganglia of the marine mollusc Aplysia californica as a model system. We experimentally demonstrated that anodic currents can selectively activate an individual neuron and cathodic currents can selectively inhibit an individual neuron using this technique. To define spatial specificity, we studied the minimum currents required for stimulation, and to define temporal specificity, we controlled firing frequencies up to 45 Hz. To understand the mechanisms of spatial and temporal specificity, we created models using the NEURON software package. To broadly predict the spatial specificity of arbitrary neurons in any ganglion sharing similar geometry, we created a steady-state analytical model. A NEURON model based on cat spinal motor neurons showed responses to extracellular stimulation qualitatively similar to those of the Aplysia NEURON model, suggesting that this technique could be widely applicable to vertebrate and human peripheral ganglia having similar geometry.

  12. Exertional myopathy in whooping cranes (Grus americana) with prognostic guidlelines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanley, C.S.; Thomas, N.J.; Paul-Murphy, P.; Hartup, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    Exertional myopathy developed in three whooping cranes (Grus americana) secondary to routine capture, handling, and trauma. Presumptive diagnosis of exertional myopathy was based on history of recent capture or trauma, clinical signs, and elevation of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and serum potassium. Treatments were attempted in each case, but ultimately were not successful. Gross and microscopic lesions at necropsy confirmed the diagnosis in each case, with the leg musculature most severely affected. Guidelines for determining prognosis of exertional myopathy in cranes have been included based on the analysis of these cases and others in the literature. As treatment is largely unrewarding, prevention remains the key in controlling exertional myopathy. Identification of predisposing factors and proper handling, immobilization, and transportation techniques can help prevent development of exertional myopathy in cranes.

  13. Temporal resolution of PrPSc transport, PrPSc accumulation, activation of glia and neuronal death in retinas from C57Bl/6 mice inoculated with RML scrapie: Relevance to biomarkers of prion disease progression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, there is a lack of pathologic landmarks to objectively evaluate the progression of prion disease in vivo. The goal of this work was to determine the temporal relationship between transport of misfolded prion protein to the retina from the brain, accumulation of PrPSc in the retina, the re...

  14. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  15. A hybrid bioorganic interface for neuronal photoactivation.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, Diego; Antognazza, Maria Rosa; Dal Maschio, Marco; Lanzarini, Erica; Benfenati, Fabio; Lanzani, Guglielmo

    2011-01-25

    A key issue in the realization of retinal prosthetic devices is reliable transduction of information carried by light into specific patterns of electrical activity in visual information processing networks. Soft organic materials can be used to couple artificial sensors with neuronal tissues. Here, we interface a network of primary neurons with an organic blend. We show that primary neurons can be successfully grown onto the polymer layer without affecting the optoelectronic properties of the active material or the biological functionality of neuronal network. Moreover, action potentials can be triggered in a temporally reliable and spatially selective manner with short pulses of visible light. Our results may lead to new neuronal communication and photo manipulation techniques, thus paving way to the development of artificial retinas and other neuroprosthetic interfaces based on organic photodetectors.

  16. Direct conversion of human fibroblasts to induced serotonergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Jiang, H; Zhong, P; Yan, Z; Chen, S; Feng, J

    2016-01-01

    Serotonergic (5HT) neurons exert diverse and widespread functions in the brain. Dysfunction of the serotonergic system gives rise to a variety of mental illnesses including depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, autism and eating disorders. Here we show that human primary fibroblasts were directly converted to induced serotonergic (i5HT) neurons by the expression of Ascl1, Foxa2, Lmx1b and FEV. The transdifferentiation was enhanced by p53 knockdown and appropriate culture conditions including hypoxia. The i5HT neurons expressed markers for mature serotonergic neurons, had Ca(2+)-dependent 5HT release and selective 5HT uptake, exhibited spontaneous action potentials and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents. Application of serotonin significantly increased the firing rate of spontaneous action potentials, demonstrating the functional utility of i5HT neurons for studying serotonergic neurotransmission. The availability of human i5HT neurons will be very useful for research and drug discovery on many serotonin-related mental disorders. PMID:26216300

  17. Temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter; Saramäki, Jari

    2012-10-01

    A great variety of systems in nature, society and technology-from the web of sexual contacts to the Internet, from the nervous system to power grids-can be modeled as graphs of vertices coupled by edges. The network structure, describing how the graph is wired, helps us understand, predict and optimize the behavior of dynamical systems. In many cases, however, the edges are not continuously active. As an example, in networks of communication via e-mail, text messages, or phone calls, edges represent sequences of instantaneous or practically instantaneous contacts. In some cases, edges are active for non-negligible periods of time: e.g., the proximity patterns of inpatients at hospitals can be represented by a graph where an edge between two individuals is on throughout the time they are at the same ward. Like network topology, the temporal structure of edge activations can affect dynamics of systems interacting through the network, from disease contagion on the network of patients to information diffusion over an e-mail network. In this review, we present the emergent field of temporal networks, and discuss methods for analyzing topological and temporal structure and models for elucidating their relation to the behavior of dynamical systems. In the light of traditional network theory, one can see this framework as moving the information of when things happen from the dynamical system on the network, to the network itself. Since fundamental properties, such as the transitivity of edges, do not necessarily hold in temporal networks, many of these methods need to be quite different from those for static networks. The study of temporal networks is very interdisciplinary in nature. Reflecting this, even the object of study has many names-temporal graphs, evolving graphs, time-varying graphs, time-aggregated graphs, time-stamped graphs, dynamic networks, dynamic graphs, dynamical graphs, and so on. This review covers different fields where temporal graphs are considered

  18. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations

    PubMed Central

    Timme, Nicholas M.; Ito, Shinya; Shimono, Masanori; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Litke, Alan M.; Beggs, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series) and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts) to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron

  19. Dopamine modulates excitability of basolateral amygdala neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kröner, Sven; Rosenkranz, J Amiel; Grace, Anthony A; Barrionuevo, German

    2005-03-01

    The amygdala plays a role in affective behaviors, which are modulated by the dopamine (DA) innervation of the basolateral amygdala complex (BLA). Although in vivo studies indicate that activation of DA receptors alters BLA neuronal activity, it is unclear whether DA exerts direct effects on BLA neurons or whether it acts via indirect effects on BLA afferents. Using whole cell patch-clamp recordings in rat brain slices, we investigated the site and mechanisms through which DA regulates the excitability of BLA neurons. Dopamine enhanced the excitability of BLA projection neurons in response to somatic current injections via a postsynaptic effect. Dopamine D1 receptor activation increased excitability and evoked firing, whereas D2 receptor activation increased input resistance. Current- and voltage-clamp experiments in projection neurons showed that D1 receptor activation enhanced excitability by modulating a 4-aminopyridine- and alpha-dendrotoxin-sensitive, slowly inactivating K+ current. Furthermore, DA and D1 receptor activation increased evoked firing in fast-spiking BLA interneurons. Consistent with a postsynaptic modulation of interneuron excitability, DA also increased the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents recorded in projection neurons without changing release of GABA. These data demonstrate that DA exerts direct effects on BLA projection neurons and indirect actions via modulation of interneurons that may work in concert to enhance the neuronal response to large, suprathreshold inputs, while suppressing weaker inputs. PMID:15537813

  20. Prospective Coding by Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brea, Johanni; Gaál, Alexisz Tamás; Senn, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Animals learn to make predictions, such as associating the sound of a bell with upcoming feeding or predicting a movement that a motor command is eliciting. How predictions are realized on the neuronal level and what plasticity rule underlies their learning is not well understood. Here we propose a biologically plausible synaptic plasticity rule to learn predictions on a single neuron level on a timescale of seconds. The learning rule allows a spiking two-compartment neuron to match its current firing rate to its own expected future discounted firing rate. For instance, if an originally neutral event is repeatedly followed by an event that elevates the firing rate of a neuron, the originally neutral event will eventually also elevate the neuron’s firing rate. The plasticity rule is a form of spike timing dependent plasticity in which a presynaptic spike followed by a postsynaptic spike leads to potentiation. Even if the plasticity window has a width of 20 milliseconds, associations on the time scale of seconds can be learned. We illustrate prospective coding with three examples: learning to predict a time varying input, learning to predict the next stimulus in a delayed paired-associate task and learning with a recurrent network to reproduce a temporally compressed version of a sequence. We discuss the potential role of the learning mechanism in classical trace conditioning. In the special case that the signal to be predicted encodes reward, the neuron learns to predict the discounted future reward and learning is closely related to the temporal difference learning algorithm TD(λ). PMID:27341100

  1. Neuronal uptake of serum albumin is associated with neuron damage during the development of epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zanhua; Liu, Jinjie; Wang, Suping; Liu, Sibo; Zhao, Yongbo

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that brain blood barrier dysfunction following the onset of seizures may lead to serum albumin extravasation into the brain. However, the effect of albumin extravasation on the development of epilepsy is yet to be fully elucidated. Previous studies have predominantly focused on the effect of albumin absorption by astrocytes; however, the present study investigated the effects of neuronal uptake of albumin in vitro and in kainic acid-induced Sprague-Dawley rat models of temporal lobe epilepsy. In the present study, electroencephalogram recordings were conducted to record seizure onset, Nissl and Evans blue staining were used to detect neuronal damage and albumin extravasation, respectively, and double immunofluorescence was used to explore neuronal absorption of albumin. Cell counting was also conducted in vitro to determine whether albumin contributes to neuronal death. The results of the present study indicated that extravasated serum albumin was absorbed by neurons, and the neurons that had absorbed albumin died and were dissolved 28 days after seizure onset in vivo. Furthermore, significant neuronal death was detected after albumin absorption in vitro in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These results suggested that albumin may be absorbed by neurons following the onset of seizures. Furthermore, the results indicated that neuronal albumin uptake may be associated with neuronal damage and death in epileptic seizures. Therefore, attenuating albumin extravasation following epileptic seizures may reduce brain damage and slow the development of epilepsy. PMID:27446263

  2. Neuronal Mechanisms and Transformations Encoding Time-Varying Signals.

    PubMed

    Petkov, Christopher I; Bendor, Daniel

    2016-08-17

    Sensation in natural environments requires the analysis of time-varying signals. While previous work has uncovered how a signal's temporal rate is represented by neurons in sensory cortex, in this issue of Neuron, new evidence from Gao et al. (2016) provides insights on the underlying mechanisms. PMID:27537481

  3. Fast sigmoidal networks via spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Maass, W

    1997-02-15

    We show that networks of relatively realistic mathematical models for biological neurons in principle can simulate arbitrary feedforward sigmoidal neural nets in a way that has previously not been considered. This new approach is based on temporal coding by single spikes (respectively by the timing of synchronous firing in pools of neurons) rather than on the traditional interpretation of analog variables in terms of firing rates. The resulting new simulation is substantially faster and hence more consistent with experimental results about the maximal speed of information processing in cortical neural systems. As a consequence we can show that networks of noisy spiking neurons are "universal approximators" in the sense that they can approximate with regard to temporal coding any given continuous function of several variables. This result holds for a fairly large class of schemes for coding analog variables by firing times of spiking neurons. This new proposal for the possible organization of computations in networks of spiking neurons systems has some interesting consequences for the type of learning rules that would be needed to explain the self-organization of such networks. Finally, the fast and noise-robust implementation of sigmoidal neural nets by temporal coding points to possible new ways of implementing feedforward and recurrent sigmoidal neural nets with pulse stream VLSI.

  4. Temporal naturalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-11-01

    Two people may claim both to be naturalists, but have divergent conceptions of basic elements of the natural world which lead them to mean different things when they talk about laws of nature, or states, or the role of mathematics in physics. These disagreements do not much affect the ordinary practice of science which is about small subsystems of the universe, described or explained against a background, idealized to be fixed. But these issues become crucial when we consider including the whole universe within our system, for then there is no fixed background to reference observables to. I argue here that the key issue responsible for divergent versions of naturalism and divergent approaches to cosmology is the conception of time. One version, which I call temporal naturalism, holds that time, in the sense of the succession of present moments, is real, and that laws of nature evolve in that time. This is contrasted with timeless naturalism, which holds that laws are immutable and the present moment and its passage are illusions. I argue that temporal naturalism is empirically more adequate than the alternatives, because it offers testable explanations for puzzles its rivals cannot address, and is likely a better basis for solving major puzzles that presently face cosmology and physics. This essay also addresses the problem of qualia and experience within naturalism and argues that only temporal naturalism can make a place for qualia as intrinsic qualities of matter.

  5. Musical agency reduces perceived exertion during strenuous physical performance

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Thomas Hans; Hardikar, Samyogita; Demoucron, Matthias; Niessen, Margot; Demey, Michiel; Giot, Olivier; Li, Yongming; Haynes, John-Dylan; Villringer, Arno; Leman, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Music is known to be capable of reducing perceived exertion during strenuous physical activity. The current interpretation of this modulating effect of music is that music may be perceived as a diversion from unpleasant proprioceptive sensations that go along with exhaustion. Here we investigated the effects of music on perceived exertion during a physically strenuous task, varying musical agency, a task that relies on the experience of body proprioception, rather than simply diverting from it. For this we measured psychologically indicated exertion during physical workout with and without musical agency while simultaneously acquiring metabolic values with spirometry. Results showed that musical agency significantly decreased perceived exertion during workout, indicating that musical agency may actually facilitate physically strenuous activities. This indicates that the positive effect of music on perceived exertion cannot always be explained by an effect of diversion from proprioceptive feedback. Furthermore, this finding suggests that the down-modulating effect of musical agency on perceived exertion may be a previously unacknowledged driving force for the development of music in humans: making music makes strenuous physical activities less exhausting. PMID:24127588

  6. Temporal profiling of changes in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol allows comprehensive analysis of phospholipase C-initiated signalling in single neurons1

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Carl P; Nahorski, Stefan R; Challiss, R A John

    2008-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) fulfils vital signalling roles in an array of cellular processes, yet until recently it has not been possible selectively to visualize real-time changes in PIP2 levels within living cells. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labelled Tubby protein (GFP-Tubby) enriches to the plasma membrane at rest and translocates to the cytosol following activation of endogenous Gαq/11-coupled muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in both SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and primary rat hippocampal neurons. GFP-Tubby translocation is independent of changes in cytosolic inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and instead reports dynamic changes in levels of plasma membrane PIP2. In contrast, enhanced GFP (eGFP)-tagged pleckstrin homology domain of phospholipase C (PLCδ1) (eGFP-PH) translocation reports increases in cytosolic inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. Comparison of GFP-Tubby, eGFP-PH and the eGFP-tagged C12 domain of protein kinase C-γ [eGFP-C1(2); to detect diacylglycerol] allowed a selective and comprehensive analysis of PLC-initiated signalling in living cells. Manipulating intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in the nanomolar range established that GFP-Tubby responses to a muscarinic agonist were sensitive to intracellular Ca2+ up to 100–200 nM in SH-SY5Y cells, demonstrating the exquisite sensitivity of agonist-mediated PLC activity within the range of physiological resting Ca2+ concentrations. We have also exploited GFP-Tubby selectively to visualize, for the first time, real-time changes in PIP2 in hippocampal neurons. PMID:18665913

  7. Selective attention in an insect auditory neuron.

    PubMed

    Pollack, G S

    1988-07-01

    Previous work (Pollack, 1986) showed that an identified auditory neuron of crickets, the omega neuron, selectively encodes the temporal structure of an ipsilateral sound stimulus when a contralateral stimulus is presented simultaneously, even though the contralateral stimulus is clearly encoded when it is presented alone. The present paper investigates the physiological basis for this selective response. The selectivity for the ipsilateral stimulus is a result of the apparent intensity difference of ipsi- and contralateral stimuli, which is imposed by auditory directionality; when simultaneous presentation of stimuli from the 2 sides is mimicked by presenting low- and high-intensity stimuli simultaneously from the ipsilateral side, the neuron responds selectively to the high-intensity stimulus, even though the low-intensity stimulus is effective when it is presented alone. The selective encoding of the more intense (= ipsilateral) stimulus is due to intensity-dependent inhibition, which is superimposed on the cell's excitatory response to sound. Because of the inhibition, the stimulus with lower intensity (i.e., the contralateral stimulus) is rendered subthreshold, while the stimulus with higher intensity (the ipsilateral stimulus) remains above threshold. Consequently, the temporal structure of the low-intensity stimulus is filtered out of the neuron's spike train. The source of the inhibition is not known. It is not a consequence of activation of the omega neuron. Its characteristics are not consistent with those of known inhibitory inputs to the omega neuron.

  8. Neuronal models of cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Changeux, J P; Dehaene, S

    1989-11-01

    Understanding the neural bases of cognition has become a scientifically tractable problem, and neurally plausible models are proposed to establish a causal link between biological structure and cognitive function. To this end, levels of organization have to be defined within the functional architecture of neuronal systems. Transitions from any one of these interacting levels to the next are viewed in an evolutionary perspective. They are assumed to involve: (1) the production of multiple transient variations and (2) the selection of some of them by higher levels via the interaction with the outside world. The time-scale of these "evolutions" is expected to differ from one level to the other. In the course of development and in the adult this internal evolution is epigenetic and does not require alteration of the structure of the genome. A selective stabilization (and elimination) of synaptic connections by spontaneous and/or evoked activity in developing neuronal networks is postulated to contribute to the shaping of the adult connectivity within an envelope of genetically encoded forms. At a higher level, models of mental representations, as states of activity of defined populations of neurons, are discussed in terms of statistical physics, and their storage is viewed as a process of selection among variable and transient pre-representations. Theoretical models illustrate that cognitive functions such as short-term memory and handling of temporal sequences may be constrained by "microscopic" physical parameters. Finally, speculations are offered about plausible neuronal models and selectionist implementations of intentions. PMID:2691185

  9. Coping with variability in small neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Ronald L; Norris, Brian J; Wenning, Angela; Wright, Terrence M

    2011-12-01

    Experimental and corresponding modeling studies indicate that there is a 2- to 5-fold variation of intrinsic and synaptic parameters across animals while functional output is maintained. Here, we review experiments, using the heartbeat central pattern generator (CPG) in medicinal leeches, which explore the consequences of animal-to-animal variation in synaptic strength for coordinated motor output. We focus on a set of segmental heart motor neurons that all receive inhibitory synaptic input from the same four premotor interneurons. These four premotor inputs fire in a phase progression and the motor neurons also fire in a phase progression because of differences in synaptic strength profiles of the four inputs among segments. Our work tested the hypothesis that functional output is maintained in the face of animal-to-animal variation in the absolute strength of connections because relative strengths of the four inputs onto particular motor neurons is maintained across animals. Our experiments showed that relative strength is not strictly maintained across animals even as functional output is maintained, and animal-to-animal variations in strength of particular inputs do not correlate strongly with output phase. Further experiments measured the precise temporal pattern of the premotor inputs, the segmental synaptic strength profiles of their connections onto motor neurons, and the temporal pattern (phase progression) of those motor neurons all in the same animal for a series of 12 animals. The analysis of input and output in this sample of 12 individuals suggests that the number (four) of inputs to each motor neuron and the variability of the temporal pattern of input from the CPG across individuals weaken the influence of the strength of individual inputs. Moreover, the temporal pattern of the output varies as much across individuals as that of the input. Essentially, each animal arrives at a unique solution for how the network produces functional output. PMID

  10. The neuronal code(s) of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Heck, Detlef H; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Jaeger, Dieter; Khodakhah, Kamran; Person, Abigail L

    2013-11-01

    Understanding how neurons encode information in sequences of action potentials is of fundamental importance to neuroscience. The cerebellum is widely recognized for its involvement in the coordination of movements, which requires muscle activation patterns to be controlled with millisecond precision. Understanding how cerebellar neurons accomplish such high temporal precision is critical to understanding cerebellar function. Inhibitory Purkinje cells, the only output neurons of the cerebellar cortex, and their postsynaptic target neurons in the cerebellar nuclei, fire action potentials at high, sustained frequencies, suggesting spike rate modulation as a possible code. Yet, millisecond precise spatiotemporal spike activity patterns in Purkinje cells and inferior olivary neurons have also been observed. These results and ongoing studies suggest that the neuronal code used by cerebellar neurons may span a wide time scale from millisecond precision to slow rate modulations, likely depending on the behavioral context. PMID:24198351

  11. [Neuronal network].

    PubMed

    Langmeier, M; Maresová, D

    2005-01-01

    Function of the central nervous system is based on mutual relations among the nerve cells. Description of nerve cells and their processes, including their contacts was enabled by improvement of optical features of the microscope and by the development of impregnation techniques. It is associated with the name of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723), J. Ev. Purkyne (1787-1869), Camillo Golgi (1843-1926), and Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934). Principal units of the neuronal network are the synapses. The term synapse was introduced into neurophysiology by Charles Scott Sherrington (1857-1952). Majority of the interactions between nerve cells is mediated by neurotransmitters acting at the receptors of the postsynaptic membrane or at the autoreceptors of the presynaptic part of the synapse. Attachment of the vesicles to the presynaptic membrane and the release of the neurotransmitter into the synaptic cleft depend on the intracellular calcium concentration and on the presence of several proteins in the presynaptic element.

  12. Irregular spiking of pyramidal neurons organizes as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches in the awake state.

    PubMed

    Bellay, Timothy; Klaus, Andreas; Seshadri, Saurav; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-07-07

    Spontaneous fluctuations in neuronal activity emerge at many spatial and temporal scales in cortex. Population measures found these fluctuations to organize as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches, suggesting cortical dynamics to be critical. Macroscopic dynamics, though, depend on physiological states and are ambiguous as to their cellular composition, spatiotemporal origin, and contributions from synaptic input or action potential (AP) output. Here, we study spontaneous firing in pyramidal neurons (PNs) from rat superficial cortical layers in vivo and in vitro using 2-photon imaging. As the animal transitions from the anesthetized to awake state, spontaneous single neuron firing increases in irregularity and assembles into scale-invariant avalanches at the group level. In vitro spike avalanches emerged naturally yet required balanced excitation and inhibition. This demonstrates that neuronal avalanches are linked to the global physiological state of wakefulness and that cortical resting activity organizes as avalanches from firing of local PN groups to global population activity.

  13. Irregular spiking of pyramidal neurons organizes as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches in the awake state.

    PubMed

    Bellay, Timothy; Klaus, Andreas; Seshadri, Saurav; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous fluctuations in neuronal activity emerge at many spatial and temporal scales in cortex. Population measures found these fluctuations to organize as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches, suggesting cortical dynamics to be critical. Macroscopic dynamics, though, depend on physiological states and are ambiguous as to their cellular composition, spatiotemporal origin, and contributions from synaptic input or action potential (AP) output. Here, we study spontaneous firing in pyramidal neurons (PNs) from rat superficial cortical layers in vivo and in vitro using 2-photon imaging. As the animal transitions from the anesthetized to awake state, spontaneous single neuron firing increases in irregularity and assembles into scale-invariant avalanches at the group level. In vitro spike avalanches emerged naturally yet required balanced excitation and inhibition. This demonstrates that neuronal avalanches are linked to the global physiological state of wakefulness and that cortical resting activity organizes as avalanches from firing of local PN groups to global population activity. PMID:26151674

  14. Temporal contingency.

    PubMed

    Gallistel, C R; Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Contingency, and more particularly temporal contingency, has often figured in thinking about the nature of learning. However, it has never been formally defined in such a way as to make it a measure that can be applied to most animal learning protocols. We use elementary information theory to define contingency in such a way as to make it a measurable property of almost any conditioning protocol. We discuss how making it a measurable construct enables the exploration of the role of different contingencies in the acquisition and performance of classically and operantly conditioned behavior.

  15. Temporal contingency.

    PubMed

    Gallistel, C R; Craig, Andrew R; Shahan, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    Contingency, and more particularly temporal contingency, has often figured in thinking about the nature of learning. However, it has never been formally defined in such a way as to make it a measure that can be applied to most animal learning protocols. We use elementary information theory to define contingency in such a way as to make it a measurable property of almost any conditioning protocol. We discuss how making it a measurable construct enables the exploration of the role of different contingencies in the acquisition and performance of classically and operantly conditioned behavior. PMID:23994260

  16. Persulfate activation during exertion of total oxidant demand.

    PubMed

    Teel, Amy L; Elloy, Farah C; Watts, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Total oxidant demand (TOD) is a parameter that is often measured during in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) treatability studies. The importance of TOD is based on the concept that the oxidant demand created by soil organic matter and other reduced species must be overcome before contaminant oxidation can proceed. TOD testing was originally designed for permanganate ISCO, but has also recently been applied to activated persulfate ISCO. Recent studies have documented that phenoxides activate persulfate; because soil organic matter is rich in phenolic moieties, it may activate persulfate rather than simply exerting TOD. Therefore, the generation of reactive oxygen species was investigated in three soil horizons of varied soil organic carbon content over 5-day TOD testing. Hydroxyl radical may have been generated during TOD exertion, but was likely scavenged by soil organic matter. A high flux of reductants + nucleophiles (e.g. alkyl radicals + superoxide) was generated as TOD was exerted, resulting in the rapid destruction of the probe compound hexachloroethane and the common groundwater contaminant trichloroethylene (TCE). The results of this research document that, unlike permanganate TOD, contaminant destruction does occur as TOD is exerted in persulfate ISCO systems and is promoted by the activation of persulfate by soil organic matter. Future treatability studies for persulfate ISCO should consider contaminant destruction as TOD is exerted, and the potential for persulfate activation by soil organic matter. PMID:27269993

  17. Resonant neurons and bushcricket behaviour.

    PubMed

    Webb, Barbara; Wessnitzer, Jan; Bush, Sarah; Schul, Johannes; Buchli, Jonas; Ijspeert, Auke

    2007-02-01

    The resonant properties of the intrinsic dynamics of single neurons could play a direct role in behaviour. One plausible role is in the recognition of temporal patterns, such as that seen in the auditory communication systems of Orthoptera. Recent behavioural data from bushcrickets suggests that this behaviour has interesting resonance properties, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show that a very simple and general model for neural resonance could directly account for the different behavioural responses of bushcrickets to different song patterns.

  18. Dynamic proximity of spatio-temporal sequences.

    PubMed

    Horn, David; Dror, Gideon; Quenet, Brigitte

    2004-09-01

    Recurrent networks can generate spatio-temporal neural sequences of very large cycles, having an apparent random behavior. Nonetheless a proximity measure between these sequences may be defined through comparison of the synaptic weight matrices that generate them. Following the dynamic neural filter (DNF) formalism we demonstrate this concept by comparing teacher and student recurrent networks of binary neurons. We show that large sequences, providing a training set well exceeding the Cover limit, allow for good determination of the synaptic matrices. Alternatively, assuming the matrices to be known, very fast determination of the biases can be achieved. Thus, a spatio-temporal sequence may be regarded as spatio-temporal encoding of the bias vector. We introduce a linear support vector machine (SVM) variant of the DNF in order to specify an optimal weight matrix. This approach allows us to deal with noise. Spatio-temporal sequences generated by different DNFs with the same number of neurons may be compared by calculating correlations of the synaptic matrices of the reconstructed DNFs. Other types of spatio-temporal sequences need the introduction of hidden neurons, and/or the use of a kernel variant of the SVM approach. The latter is being defined as a recurrent support vector network (RSVN).

  19. Calretinin Neurons in the Rat Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Moore, Robert Y

    2016-08-01

    The hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a circadian pacemaker, is present in all mammalian brains. It has a complex organization of peptide-containing neurons that is similar among species, but calcium-binding proteins are expressed variably. Neurons containing calretinin have been described in the SCN in a number of species but not with association to circadian function. The objective of the present study is to characterize a calretinin neuron (CAR) group in the rat anterior hypothalamus anatomically and functionally with a detailed description of its location and a quantitative analysis of neuronal calretinin immunoreactivity at 3 times of day, 0600, 1400, and 1900 h, from animals in either light-dark or constant dark conditions. CAR neurons occupy a region in the dorsal and lateral SCN with a circadian rhythm in CAR immunoreactivity with a peak at 0600 h and a rhythm in cytoplasmic CAR distribution with a peak at 1400 h. CAR neurons should be viewed as an anatomical and functional component of the rat SCN that expands the definition from observations with cell stains. CAR neurons are likely to modulate temporal regulation of calcium in synaptic transmission.

  20. Gain, noise, and contrast sensitivity of linear visual neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    Contrast sensitivity is a measure of the ability of an observer to detect contrast signals of particular spatial and temporal frequencies. A formal definition of contrast sensitivity that can be applied to individual linear visual neurons is derived. A neuron is modeled by a contrast transfer function and its modulus, contrast gain, and by a noise power spectrum. The distributions of neural responses to signal and blank presentations are derived, and from these, a definition of contrast sensitivity is obtained. This formal definition may be used to relate the sensitivities of various populations of neurons, and to relate the sensitivities of neurons to that of the behaving animal.

  1. A case of mitochondrial cytopathy with exertion induced dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal dystonias are a group of relatively benign hyperkinetic childhood movement disorders of varied etiology. Mitochondrial diseases are well known to produce persistent dystonias as sequelae, but paroxysmal exertion induced dystonia has been reported in only one case to the best of our knowledge. Two siblings born to consanguineous parents presented with early-onset exertion induced dystonia, which was unresponsive to diphenylhydantoin and carbamazepine. A trial with valproate in one of the siblings turned fatal within 24 h. Based on this clue, the second child was investigated and found to suffer from complex I deficiency with a paternally inherited dominant nuclear DNA mutation, which is responsive to the mitochondrial cocktail. Exertion induced dystonia can be a rare manifestation of complex I deficiency. PMID:26557169

  2. Identifying local and descending inputs for primary sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shengli; Rodriguez, Erica; Takatoh, Jun; Han, Bao-Xia; Zhou, Xiang; Wang, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Primary pain and touch sensory neurons not only detect internal and external sensory stimuli, but also receive inputs from other neurons. However, the neuronal derived inputs for primary neurons have not been systematically identified. Using a monosynaptic rabies viruses–based transneuronal tracing method combined with sensory-specific Cre-drivers, we found that sensory neurons receive intraganglion, intraspinal, and supraspinal inputs, the latter of which are mainly derived from the rostroventral medulla (RVM). The viral-traced central neurons were largely inhibitory but also consisted of some glutamatergic neurons in the spinal cord and serotonergic neurons in the RVM. The majority of RVM-derived descending inputs were dual GABAergic and enkephalinergic (opioidergic). These inputs projected through the dorsolateral funiculus and primarily innervated layers I, II, and V of the dorsal horn, where pain-sensory afferents terminate. Silencing or activation of the dual GABA/enkephalinergic RVM neurons in adult animals substantially increased or decreased behavioral sensitivity, respectively, to heat and mechanical stimuli. These results are consistent with the fact that both GABA and enkephalin can exert presynaptic inhibition of the sensory afferents. Taken together, this work provides a systematic view of and a set of tools for examining peri- and extrasynaptic regulations of pain-afferent transmission. PMID:26426077

  3. Temporal integration at consecutive processing stages in the auditory pathway of the grasshopper

    PubMed Central

    Ronacher, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Temporal integration in the auditory system of locusts was quantified by presenting single clicks and click pairs while performing intracellular recordings. Auditory neurons were studied at three processing stages, which form a feed-forward network in the metathoracic ganglion. Receptor neurons and most first-order interneurons (“local neurons”) encode the signal envelope, while second-order interneurons (“ascending neurons”) tend to extract more complex, behaviorally relevant sound features. In different neuron types of the auditory pathway we found three response types: no significant temporal integration (some ascending neurons), leaky energy integration (receptor neurons and some local neurons), and facilitatory processes (some local and ascending neurons). The receptor neurons integrated input over very short time windows (<2 ms). Temporal integration on longer time scales was found at subsequent processing stages, indicative of within-neuron computations and network activity. These different strategies, realized at separate processing stages and in parallel neuronal pathways within one processing stage, could enable the grasshopper's auditory system to evaluate longer time windows and thus to implement temporal filters, while at the same time maintaining a high temporal resolution. PMID:25609104

  4. Temporal pattern processing in songbirds.

    PubMed

    Comins, Jordan A; Gentner, Timothy Q

    2014-10-01

    Understanding how the brain perceives, organizes and uses patterned information is directly related to the neurobiology of language. Given the present limitations, such knowledge at the scale of neurons, neural circuits and neural populations can only come from non-human models, focusing on shared capacities that are relevant to language processing. Here we review recent advances in the behavioral and neural basis of temporal pattern processing of natural auditory communication signals in songbirds, focusing on European starlings. We suggest a general inhibitory circuit for contextual modulation that can act to control sensory representations based on patterning rules. PMID:25201176

  5. Atrophy and neuron loss: effects of a protein-deficient diet on sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Silvio Pires; Nyengaard, Jens Randel; Misawa, Rúbia; Girotti, Priscila Azevedo; Castelucci, Patrìcia; Blazquez, Francisco Hernandez Javier; de Melo, Mariana Pereira; Ribeiro, Antonio Augusto Coppi

    2009-12-01

    Protein deficiency is one of the biggest public health problems in the world, accounting for about 30-40% of hospital admissions in developing countries. Nutritional deficiencies lead to alterations in the peripheral nervous system and in the digestive system. Most studies have focused on the effects of protein-deficient diets on the enteric neurons, but not on sympathetic ganglia, which supply extrinsic sympathetic input to the digestive system. Hence, in this study, we investigated whether a protein-restricted diet would affect the quantitative structure of rat coeliac ganglion neurons. Five male Wistar rats (undernourished group) were given a pre- and postnatal hypoproteinic diet receiving 5% casein, whereas the nourished group (n = 5) was fed with 20% casein (normoproteinic diet). Blood tests were carried out on the animals, e.g., glucose, leptin, and triglyceride plasma concentrations. The main structural findings in this study were that a protein-deficient diet (5% casein) caused coeliac ganglion (78%) and coeliac ganglion neurons (24%) to atrophy and led to neuron loss (63%). Therefore, the fall in the total number of coeliac ganglion neurons in protein-restricted rats contrasts strongly with no neuron losses previously described for the enteric neurons of animals subjected to similar protein-restriction diets. Discrepancies between our figures and the data for enteric neurons (using very similar protein-restriction protocols) may be attributable to the counting method used. In light of this, further systematic investigations comparing 2-D and 3-D quantitative methods are warranted to provide even more advanced data on the effects that a protein-deficient diet may exert on sympathetic neurons. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. [Are we all on the same temporal page? The moderating effects of temporal team cognition on the polychronicity diversity–team performance relationship].

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Susan; Nadkarni, Sucheta

    2014-05-01

    Integrating research on polychronicity, team diversity, and team cognition, we hypothesized that shared temporal cognition (overlapping knowledge) and temporal transactive memory systems (differentiated knowledge) would moderate the effects of polychronicity diversity on team performance. Results from 71 teams in an Indian organization revealed opposing moderating effects in that shared temporal cognition attenuated, but temporal transactive memory systems amplified, the negative effects of polychronicity diversity on team performance. Shared temporal cognition also exerted a strong, positive effect on team performance. Study results provide support for the continued examination of polychronicity diversity and temporal team cognition.

  7. MetaNeuron: A Free Neuron Simulation Program for Teaching Cellular Neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Newman, Mark H; Newman, Eric A

    2013-01-01

    MetaNeuron, a neuron simulation program, is an effective interactive tool for teaching cellular neurophysiology. The computer program simulates a wide range of neuronal behavior in its six lessons: i) Resting Membrane Potential, ii) Membrane Time Constant, iii) Membrane Length Constant, iv) Axon Action Potential, v) Axon Voltage Clamp, and vi) Synaptic Potential. The program is designed foremost as a platform for conducting neurophysiology experiments in silico. Neuronal parameters are easily modified and a virtual stimulator injects single or double current pulses into the neuron. Phenomena such as temporal summation of synaptic potentials, passive spread of a synaptic potential from the dendrite to the soma, the refractory period, families of voltage-clamp traces, and the reversal potential of synaptic responses, are easily illustrated in MetaNeuron. Responses are displayed graphically and can be measured with a cursor. Families of traces can be generated and viewed in rotatable 3D plots. Mac and Windows versions of the program can be downloaded, free of charge, onto individual student computers from the website www.MetaNeuron.org. A manual containing operating instructions, a description of the lessons, and exercises conducted on MetaNeuron, can also be downloaded for free.

  8. Cholinergic Signaling Exerts Protective Effects in Models of Sympathetic Hyperactivity-Induced Cardiac Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gavioli, Mariana; Lara, Aline; Almeida, Pedro W. M.; Lima, Augusto Martins; Damasceno, Denis D.; Rocha-Resende, Cibele; Ladeira, Marina; Resende, Rodrigo R.; Martinelli, Patricia M.; Melo, Marcos Barrouin; Brum, Patricia C.; Fontes, Marco Antonio Peliky; Souza Santos, Robson A.; Prado, Marco A. M.; Guatimosim, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic control of the heart is exerted by two distinct branches; the autonomic component represented by the parasympathetic nervous system, and the recently described non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery. Previous evidence has shown that reduced cholinergic function leads to deleterious effects on the myocardium. Yet, whether conditions of increased cholinergic signaling can offset the pathological remodeling induced by sympathetic hyperactivity, and its consequences for these two cholinergic axes are unknown. Here, we investigated two models of sympathetic hyperactivity: i) the chronic beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation evoked by isoproterenol (ISO), and ii) the α2A/α2C-adrenergic receptor knockout (KO) mice that lack pre-synaptic adrenergic receptors. In both models, cholinergic signaling was increased by administration of the cholinesterase inhibitor, pyridostigmine. First, we observed that isoproterenol produces an autonomic imbalance characterized by increased sympathetic and reduced parasympathetic tone. Under this condition transcripts for cholinergic proteins were upregulated in ventricular myocytes, indicating that non-neuronal cholinergic machinery is activated during adrenergic overdrive. Pyridostigmine treatment prevented the effects of ISO on autonomic function and on the ventricular cholinergic machinery, and inhibited cardiac remodeling. α2A/α2C-KO mice presented reduced ventricular contraction when compared to wild-type mice, and this dysfunction was also reversed by cholinesterase inhibition. Thus, the cardiac parasympathetic system and non-neuronal cardiomyocyte cholinergic machinery are modulated in opposite directions under conditions of increased sympathetic drive or ACh availability. Moreover, our data support the idea that pyridostigmine by restoring ACh availability is beneficial in heart disease. PMID:24992197

  9. Control of Phasic Firing by a Background Leak Current in Avian Forebrain Auditory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Dagostin, André A.; Lovell, Peter V.; Hilscher, Markus M.; Mello, Claudio V.; Leão, Ricardo M.

    2015-01-01

    Central neurons express a variety of neuronal types and ion channels that promote firing heterogeneity among their distinct neuronal populations. Action potential (AP) phasic firing, produced by low-threshold voltage-activated potassium currents (VAKCs), is commonly observed in mammalian brainstem neurons involved in the processing of temporal properties of the acoustic information. The avian caudomedial nidopallium (NCM) is an auditory area analogous to portions of the mammalian auditory cortex that is involved in the perceptual discrimination and memorization of birdsong and shows complex responses to auditory stimuli We performed in vitro whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in brain slices from adult zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) and observed that half of NCM neurons fire APs phasically in response to membrane depolarizations, while the rest fire transiently or tonically. Phasic neurons fired APs faster and with more temporal precision than tonic and transient neurons. These neurons had similar membrane resting potentials, but phasic neurons had lower membrane input resistance and time constant. Surprisingly phasic neurons did not express low-threshold VAKCs, which curtailed firing in phasic mammalian brainstem neurons, having similar VAKCs to other NCM neurons. The phasic firing was determined not by VAKCs, but by the potassium background leak conductances, which was more prominently expressed in phasic neurons, a result corroborated by pharmacological, dynamic-clamp, and modeling experiments. These results reveal a new role for leak currents in generating firing diversity in central neurons. PMID:26696830

  10. Perceived Exertion: An Old Exercise Tool Finds New Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monahan, Terry

    1988-01-01

    Perceived exertion scales, based on subjective perception of energy output, are gaining respect as prescribing and monitoring tools for individual exercise programs. A review of recent literature indicates growing research interest in applications for individuals who are elderly, inactive, or subject to medical conditions such as angina. (IAH)

  11. Exertional heat illness: emerging concepts and advances in prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Riana R; Roth, Ronald N; Suyama, Joe; Hostler, David

    2015-06-01

    Exertional heat illness is a classification of disease with clinical presentations that are not always diagnosed easily. Exertional heat stroke is a significant cause of death in competitive sports, and the increasing popularity of marathons races and ultra-endurance competitions will make treating many heat illnesses more common for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers. Although evidence is available primarily from case series and healthy volunteer studies, the consensus for treating exertional heat illness, coupled with altered mental status, is whole body rapid cooling. Cold or ice water immersion remains the most effective treatment to achieve this goal. External thermometry is unreliable in the context of heat stress and direct internal temperature measurement by rectal or esophageal probes must be used when diagnosing heat illness and during cooling. With rapid recognition and implementation of effective cooling, most patients suffering from exertional heat stroke will recover quickly and can be discharged home with instructions to rest and to avoid heat stress and exercise for a minimum of 48 hours; although, further research pertaining to return to activity is warranted.

  12. Are the Measurements of Attention Allocation and Perceived Exertion Trustworthy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meir, Gily; Hutchinson, Jasmin C.; Habeeb, Christine M.; Boiangin, Nataniel M.; Shaffer, Cory; Basevitch, Itay; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    Two studies examined the trustworthiness of commonly used measurement scales for ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) and state attentional focus (SAF) during exercise. In Study 1, participants (N = 24, 14 female) performed a treadmill graded-exercise test. The order of scale presentation during the task was manipulated (i.e., RPE followed by SAF…

  13. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome in adductor pollicis muscle: case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Hun; Lee, Kwang-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Hun; Kim, Yee-Suk; Chung, Ung-Seo

    2012-11-01

    We report a case of chronic exertional compartment syndrome in the adductor pollicis that was confirmed by measuring elevated compartment pressure. Specific finding of magnetic resonance imaging, increased T2 signal intensity in the involved compartment, was also useful for the diagnosis. Pain was relieved by fasciotomy through a volar approach. PMID:23040640

  14. Perception of Forces Exerted by Objects in Collision Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Impressions of force are commonplace in the visual perception of objects interacting. It is proposed that these impressions have their source in haptically mediated experiences of exertion of force in actions on objects. Visual impressions of force in interactions between objects occur by a kind of generalization of the proprioceptive impression…

  15. 20 CFR 416.969a - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., such as pain, may cause limitations of function or restrictions which limit your ability to meet... or restrictions imposed by your impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, are exertional... imposed by your impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, affect only your ability to meet...

  16. 20 CFR 416.969a - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., such as pain, may cause limitations of function or restrictions which limit your ability to meet... or restrictions imposed by your impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, are exertional... imposed by your impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, affect only your ability to meet...

  17. 20 CFR 404.1569a - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., such as pain, may cause limitations of function or restrictions which limit your ability to meet... impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, are exertional, nonexertional, or a combination of both. (b... symptoms, such as pain, affect only your ability to meet the strength demands of jobs (sitting,...

  18. 20 CFR 404.1569a - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., such as pain, may cause limitations of function or restrictions which limit your ability to meet... impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, are exertional, nonexertional, or a combination of both. (b... symptoms, such as pain, affect only your ability to meet the strength demands of jobs (sitting,...

  19. 20 CFR 416.969a - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., such as pain, may cause limitations of function or restrictions which limit your ability to meet... or restrictions imposed by your impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, are exertional... imposed by your impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, affect only your ability to meet...

  20. 20 CFR 404.1569a - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., such as pain, may cause limitations of function or restrictions which limit your ability to meet... impairment(s) and related symptoms, such as pain, are exertional, nonexertional, or a combination of both. (b... symptoms, such as pain, affect only your ability to meet the strength demands of jobs (sitting,...

  1. Exertional heat illness: emerging concepts and advances in prehospital care.

    PubMed

    Pryor, Riana R; Roth, Ronald N; Suyama, Joe; Hostler, David

    2015-06-01

    Exertional heat illness is a classification of disease with clinical presentations that are not always diagnosed easily. Exertional heat stroke is a significant cause of death in competitive sports, and the increasing popularity of marathons races and ultra-endurance competitions will make treating many heat illnesses more common for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers. Although evidence is available primarily from case series and healthy volunteer studies, the consensus for treating exertional heat illness, coupled with altered mental status, is whole body rapid cooling. Cold or ice water immersion remains the most effective treatment to achieve this goal. External thermometry is unreliable in the context of heat stress and direct internal temperature measurement by rectal or esophageal probes must be used when diagnosing heat illness and during cooling. With rapid recognition and implementation of effective cooling, most patients suffering from exertional heat stroke will recover quickly and can be discharged home with instructions to rest and to avoid heat stress and exercise for a minimum of 48 hours; although, further research pertaining to return to activity is warranted. PMID:25860637

  2. 20 CFR 416.969a - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., such as pain, may cause limitations of function or restrictions which limit your ability to meet... classification of a limitation as exertional is related to the United States Department of Labor's classification... demands) which is contained in the Dictionary of Occupational Titles published by the Department of...

  3. 20 CFR 416.969a - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., such as pain, may cause limitations of function or restrictions which limit your ability to meet... classification of a limitation as exertional is related to the United States Department of Labor's classification... demands) which is contained in the Dictionary of Occupational Titles published by the Department of...

  4. 20 CFR 404.1569a - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exertional and nonexertional limitations. 404.1569a Section 404.1569a Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational Considerations §...

  5. 20 CFR 404.1567 - Physical exertion requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Physical exertion requirements. 404.1567 Section 404.1567 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational Considerations §...

  6. 20 CFR 404.1567 - Physical exertion requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Physical exertion requirements. 404.1567 Section 404.1567 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational Considerations §...

  7. 20 CFR 404.1569a - Exertional and nonexertional limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exertional and nonexertional limitations. 404.1569a Section 404.1569a Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational Considerations §...

  8. 20 CFR 404.1567 - Physical exertion requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Physical exertion requirements. 404.1567 Section 404.1567 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational Considerations §...

  9. 20 CFR 404.1567 - Physical exertion requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Physical exertion requirements. 404.1567 Section 404.1567 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determining Disability and Blindness Vocational Considerations §...

  10. Do obese children perceive submaximal and maximal exertion differently?

    PubMed

    Belanger, Kevin; Breithaupt, Peter; Ferraro, Zachary M; Barrowman, Nick; Rutherford, Jane; Hadjiyannakis, Stasia; Colley, Rachel C; Adamo, Kristi B

    2013-01-01

    We examined how obese children perceive a maximal cardiorespiratory fitness test compared with a submaximal cardiorespiratory fitness test. Twenty-one obese children (body mass index ≥95th percentile, ages 10-17 years) completed maximal and submaximal cardiorespiratory fitness tests on 2 separate occasions. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and overall perceived exertion (Borg 15-category scale) were measured in both fitness tests. At comparable workloads, perceived exertion was rated significantly higher (P < 0.001) in the submaximal cardiorespiratory fitness test compared with the maximal cardiorespiratory fitness test. The submaximal cardiorespiratory fitness test was significantly longer than the maximal test (14:21 ± 04:04 seconds vs. 12:48 ± 03:27 seconds, P < 0.001). Our data indicate that at the same relative intensity, obese children report comparable or even higher perceived exertion during submaximal fitness testing than during maximal fitness testing. Perceived exertion in a sample of children and youth with obesity may be influenced by test duration and protocol design.

  11. Acute exertional compartment syndrome of the medial foot.

    PubMed

    Blacklidge, D K; Kurek, J B; Soto, A D; Kissel, C G

    1996-01-01

    A review of compartment syndrome, both acute and chronic, is presented. The pathophysiology, anatomy, diagnosis, and treatment are presented in relation to a unique case report. The case is one of acute exertional compartment syndrome of the medial foot treated by fasciotomy. This condition is uncommon in both its nature and location.

  12. Pre-semantically defined temporal windows for cognitive processing

    PubMed Central

    Pöppel, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations of different frequencies are hypothesized to be basic for temporal perception; this theoretical concept provides the frame to discuss two temporal mechanisms that are thought to be essential for cognitive processing. One such mechanism operates with periods of oscillations in the range of some tens of milliseconds, and is used for complexity reduction of temporally and spatially distributed neuronal activities. Experimental evidence comes from studies on temporal-order threshold, choice reaction time, single-cell activities, evoked responses in neuronal populations or latency distributions of oculomotor responses. The other mechanism refers to pre-semantic integration in the temporal range of approximately 2–3 s. Experimental evidence comes from studies on temporal reproduction, sensorimotor synchronization, intentional movements, speech segmentation, the shift rate of ambiguous stimuli in the visual or auditory modality or the temporal modulation of the mismatch negativity. These different observations indicate the existence of a universal process of temporal integration underlying the mental machinery. This process is believed to be basic for maintenance and change of perceptual identity. Owing to the omnipresence of this kind of temporal segmentation, it is suggested to use this process for a pragmatic definition of the states of being conscious or the ‘subjective presence’. PMID:19487191

  13. Temporal reproduction.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, M D; Hoyert, M S

    1989-09-01

    A signal appeared for a certain time period. After the period elapsed, pigeons had to begin and complete a sequence of 15 responses in a time window ranging from the signal duration to 50% longer. Sessions involved as many as 10 different signal durations occurring in a random sequence. The times produced by pigeons often were in the same ranges as those that have been found with adult human subjects. The average times were described equally well as linear or power functions of signal duration. However, instead of the overestimation of durations usually found when animals have timed the duration of antecedent stimuli, the linear functions suggested that the pigeons underestimated the durations of their own behavior. The birds showing the strongest control when the conditions involved eight or 10 different duration requirements revealed the constant coefficients of variation that support Weber's law and scalar timing theory. Scalar timing in temporal differentiation appears to depend on non-ambiguous information about the duration required for reinforcement and on a high degree of sensitivity to the duration requirement.

  14. The usefulness of session rating of perceived exertion for monitoring training load despite several influences on perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Monoem; Padulo, Johnny; Chamari, Karim

    2014-09-01

    Despite various contributing factors, session rating of perceived exertion has the potential to affect a large proportion of the global sporting and clinical communities since it is an inexpensive and simple tool that is highly practical and accurately measures an athlete's outcome of training or competition. Its simplicity can help optimize performance and reduce negative outcomes of hard training in elite athletes.

  15. Temporal generalization.

    PubMed

    Church, R M; Gibbon, J

    1982-04-01

    Responses of 26 rats were reinforced following a signal of a certain duration, but not following signals of shorter or longer durations. This led to a positive temporal generalization gradient with a maximum at the reinforced duration in six experiments. Spacing of the nonreinforced signals did not influence the gradient, but the location of the maximum and breadth of the gradient increased with the duration of the reinforced signal. Reduction of reinforcement, either by partial reinforcement or reduction in the probability of a positive signal, led to a decrease in the height of the generalization gradient. There were large, reliable individual differences in the height and breadth of the generalization gradient. When the conditions of reinforcement were reversed (responses reinforced following all signals longer or shorter than a single nonreinforced duration), eight additional rats had a negative generalization gradient with a minimum at a signal duration shorter than the single nonreinforced duration. A scalar timing theory is described that provided a quantitative fit of the data. This theory involved a clock that times in linear units with an accurate mean and a negligible variance, a distribution of memory times that is normally distributed with an accurate mean and a scalar standard deviation, and a rule to respond if the clock is "close enough" to a sample of the memory time distribution. This decision is based on a ratio of the discrepancy between the clock time and the remembered time, to the remembered time. When this ratio is below a (variable) threshold, subjects respond. When three timing parameters--coefficient of variation of the memory time, the mean and the standard deviation of the threshold--were set at their median values, a theory with two free parameters accounted for 96% of the variance. The two parameters reflect the probability of attention to time and the probability of a response given inattention. These parameters were not influenced

  16. Oscillatorylike behavior in feedforward neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payeur, Alexandre; Maler, Leonard; Longtin, André

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate how rhythmic activity can arise in neural networks from feedforward rather than recurrent circuitry and, in so doing, we provide a mechanism capable of explaining the temporal decorrelation of γ -band oscillations. We compare the spiking activity of a delayed recurrent network of inhibitory neurons with that of a feedforward network with the same neural properties and axonal delays. Paradoxically, these very different connectivities can yield very similar spike-train statistics in response to correlated input. This happens when neurons are noisy and axonal delays are short. A Taylor expansion of the feedback network's susceptibility—or frequency-dependent gain function—can then be stopped at first order to a good approximation, thus matching the feedforward net's susceptibility. The feedback network is known to display oscillations; these oscillations imply that the spiking activity of the population is felt by all neurons within the network, leading to direct spike correlations in a given neuron. On the other hand, in the output layer of the feedforward net, the interaction between the external drive and the delayed feedforward projection of this drive by the input layer causes indirect spike correlations: spikes fired by a given output layer neuron are correlated only through the activity of the input layer neurons. High noise and short delays partially bridge the gap between these two types of correlation, yielding similar spike-train statistics for both networks. This similarity is even stronger when the delay is distributed, as confirmed by linear response theory.

  17. Role of protein kinase C in the response of an isolated neuron to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragin, D. E.; Kolosov, M. S.; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2002-07-01

    The role of protein kinase C (PKC) in response of neuronal and glial cells to photosensitization with low concentration of sulphonated aluminium phthalocianine Photosens was investigated. Changes in neuron firing and in the structure of chromatin morphology of neuron and glial nuclei were studied using PKC activator 12-0-Tetradecanoylphorbol 13- acetate (TPA) or PKC inhibitors staurosporine, hypercinin or cheleythrine. Protein kinase C is shown to be involved in the neuronal and glial cell responses. Its activation by TPA decreased neuron lifetime, caused nucleus swelling characteristic for necrosis, strongly suppressed apoptotic death of glial cells, and induced gliosis. These effects were probably associated with PKC-induced Ca2+ entry into cytosol. The possible cell death mechanism in this case was nectosis. Inhibition of PK, oppositely, increased neuron lifetime and caused a moderate nucleus swelling. Cheleythrine exerted pro-apoptotic effect on the glial cells surrounding the neuron, whereas other PKC inhibitors, staurosporine and hypercini, suppressed apoptosis.

  18. Coherent neuronal ensembles are rapidly recruited when making a look-reach decision

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Yan T.; Fabiszak, Margaret M.; Novikov, Yevgeny; Daw, Nathaniel D.; Pesaran, Bijan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Selecting and planning actions recruits neurons across many areas of the brain but how ensembles of neurons work together to make decisions is unknown. Temporally-coherent neural activity may provide a mechanism by which neurons coordinate their activity in order to make decisions. If so, neurons that are part of coherent ensembles may predict movement choices before other ensembles of neurons. We recorded neuronal activity in the lateral and medial banks of the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) of the posterior parietal cortex, while monkeys made choices about where to look and reach and decoded the activity to predict the choices. Ensembles of neurons that displayed coherent patterns of spiking activity extending across the IPS, “dual coherent” ensembles, predicted movement choices substantially earlier than other neuronal ensembles. We propose that dual-coherent spike timing reflects interactions between groups of neurons that play an important role in how we make decisions. PMID:26752158

  19. Time-warp invariant pattern detection with bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollisch, Tim

    2008-01-01

    Sound patterns are defined by the temporal relations of their constituents, individual acoustic cues. Auditory systems need to extract these temporal relations to detect or classify sounds. In various cases, ranging from human speech to communication signals of grasshoppers, this pattern detection has been found to display invariance to temporal stretching or compression of the sound signal ('linear time-warp invariance'). In this work, a four-neuron network model is introduced, designed to solve such a detection task for the example of grasshopper courtship songs. As an essential ingredient, the network contains neurons with intrinsic bursting dynamics, which allow them to encode durations between acoustic events in short, rapid sequences of spikes. As shown by analytical calculations and computer simulations, these neuronal dynamics result in a powerful mechanism for temporal integration. Finally, the network reads out the encoded temporal information by detecting equal activity of two such bursting neurons. This leads to the recognition of rhythmic patterns independent of temporal stretching or compression.

  20. Influence of pressure exerted on the sclera during transscleral cyclophotocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rol, Pascal O.; Fankhauser, Franz, Jr.; Niederer, Peter F.

    1993-06-01

    Since its introduction in 1973 by Beckmann et al., transscleral cyclophotocoagulation with the Nd:YAG laser has developed into a successful method in glaucoma therapy. It was initially performed with the aid of non-contact systems, whereby the laser beam was focused by means of a slit lamp. With the introduction of contact systems, for which purpose a number of different probes were employed, the treatment efficiency was found to be improved by a factor between 2 to 6. The transparency of the sclera increases as a function of the pressure exerted. Therefore, the pressure exerted by the contact probe is a critical factor in determining the transmission of laser radiation across the sclera and may in part explain the large differences which are reported in the literature with respect to the effectiveness of this treatment method.

  1. A network of tufted layer 5 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Markram, H

    1997-09-01

    Tufted layer 5 (TL5) pyramidal neurons are important projection neurons from the cerebral cortex to subcortical areas. Recent and ongoing experiments aimed at understanding the computational analysis performed by a network of synaptically connected TL5 neurons are reviewed here. The experiments employed dual and triple whole-cell patch clamp recordings from visually identified and preselected neurons in brain slices of somatosensory cortex of young (14- to 16-day-old) rats. These studies suggest that a local network of TL5 neurons within a cortical module of diameter 300 microns consists of a few hundred neurons that are extensively inter-connected with reciprocal feedback from at least first-, second- and third-order target neurons. A statistical analysis of synaptic innervation suggests that this recurrent network is not randomly arranged and hence each neuron could be functionally unique. Synaptic transmission between these neurons is characterized by use-dependent synaptic depression which confers novel properties to this recurrent network of neurons. First, a range of rates of depression for different synaptic connections enable each TL5 neuron to receive a unique mixture of information about the average firing rates and the temporally correlated action potential (AP) activity in the population of presynaptic TL5 neurons. Second, each AP generated by any neuron in the network induces a change (defined as an iteration step) in the functional coupling of the neurons in the network (defined as network configuration). It is proposed that the network configuration is iterated during a stimulus to achieve an optimally orchestrated network response. Hebbian, anti-Hebbian and neuromodulatory-induced modifications of neurotransmitter release probability change the rates of synaptic depression and thereby alter the iteration step size. These data may be important to understand the dynamics of electrical activity within the network.

  2. Neurons Controlling Voluntary Vocalization in the Macaque Ventral Premotor Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Coudé, Gino; Ferrari, Pier Francesco; Rodà, Francesca; Maranesi, Monica; Borelli, Eleonora; Veroni, Vania; Monti, Fabio; Rozzi, Stefano; Fogassi, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    The voluntary control of phonation is a crucial achievement in the evolution of speech. In humans, ventral premotor cortex (PMv) and Broca's area are known to be involved in voluntary phonation. In contrast, no neurophysiological data are available about the role of the oro-facial sector of nonhuman primates PMv in this function. In order to address this issue, we recorded PMv neurons from two monkeys trained to emit coo-calls. Results showed that a population of motor neurons specifically fire during vocalization. About two thirds of them discharged before sound onset, while the remaining were time-locked with it. The response of vocalization-selective neurons was present only during conditioned (voluntary) but not spontaneous (emotional) sound emission. These data suggest that the control of vocal production exerted by PMv neurons constitutes a newly emerging property in the monkey lineage, shedding light on the evolution of phonation-based communication from a nonhuman primate species. PMID:22073201

  3. The concept of temporal 'plus' epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kahane, P; Barba, C; Rheims, S; Job-Chapron, A S; Minotti, L; Ryvlin, P

    2015-03-01

    The concept of temporal 'plus' epilepsy (T+E) is not new, and a number of observations made by means of intracerebral electrodes have illustrated the complexity of neuronal circuits that involve the temporal lobe. The term T+E was used to unify and better individualize these specific forms of multilobar epilepsies, which are characterized by electroclinical features primarily suggestive of temporal lobe epilepsy, MRI findings that are either unremarkable or show signs of hippocampal sclerosis, and intracranial recordings which demonstrate that seizures arise from a complex epileptogenic network including a combination of brain regions located within the temporal lobe and over closed neighbouring structures such as the orbitofrontal cortex, the insulo-opercular region, and the temporo-parieto-occipital junction. We will review here how the term of T+E has emerged, what it means, and which practical consideration it raises.

  4. Multifaceted effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neurons: impact on neuronal firing rate, signal transduction and gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Dominik; Kuo, Wen Ping; Frühbeis, Carsten; Sun, Jyh-Jang; Zehendner, Christoph M.; Luhmann, Heiko J.; Pinto, Sheena; Toedling, Joern; Trotter, Jacqueline; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes are small membranous vesicles of endocytic origin that are released by almost every cell type. They exert versatile functions in intercellular communication important for many physiological and pathological processes. Recently, exosomes attracted interest with regard to their role in cell–cell communication in the nervous system. We have shown that exosomes released from oligodendrocytes upon stimulation with the neurotransmitter glutamate are internalized by neurons and enhance the neuronal stress tolerance. Here, we demonstrate that oligodendroglial exosomes also promote neuronal survival during oxygen–glucose deprivation, a model of cerebral ischaemia. We show the transfer from oligodendrocytes to neurons of superoxide dismutase and catalase, enzymes which are known to help cells to resist oxidative stress. Additionally, we identify various effects of oligodendroglial exosomes on neuronal physiology. Electrophysiological analysis using in vitro multi-electrode arrays revealed an increased firing rate of neurons exposed to oligodendroglial exosomes. Moreover, gene expression analysis and phosphorylation arrays uncovered differentially expressed genes and altered signal transduction pathways in neurons after exosome treatment. Our study thus provides new insight into the broad spectrum of action of oligodendroglial exosomes and their effects on neuronal physiology. The exchange of extracellular vesicles between neural cells may exhibit remarkable potential to impact brain performance. PMID:25135971

  5. Nonspatial Sequence Coding in CA1 Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Timothy A.; Salz, Daniel M.; McKenzie, Sam

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical to the memory for sequences of events, a defining feature of episodic memory. However, the fundamental neuronal mechanisms underlying this capacity remain elusive. While considerable research indicates hippocampal neurons can represent sequences of locations, direct evidence of coding for the memory of sequential relationships among nonspatial events remains lacking. To address this important issue, we recorded neural activity in CA1 as rats performed a hippocampus-dependent sequence-memory task. Briefly, the task involves the presentation of repeated sequences of odors at a single port and requires rats to identify each item as “in sequence” or “out of sequence”. We report that, while the animals' location and behavior remained constant, hippocampal activity differed depending on the temporal context of items—in this case, whether they were presented in or out of sequence. Some neurons showed this effect across items or sequence positions (general sequence cells), while others exhibited selectivity for specific conjunctions of item and sequence position information (conjunctive sequence cells) or for specific probe types (probe-specific sequence cells). We also found that the temporal context of individual trials could be accurately decoded from the activity of neuronal ensembles, that sequence coding at the single-cell and ensemble level was linked to sequence memory performance, and that slow-gamma oscillations (20–40 Hz) were more strongly modulated by temporal context and performance than theta oscillations (4–12 Hz). These findings provide compelling evidence that sequence coding extends beyond the domain of spatial trajectories and is thus a fundamental function of the hippocampus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The ability to remember the order of life events depends on the hippocampus, but the underlying neural mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we addressed this issue by recording neural activity in hippocampal

  6. Exercise, physical activity, and exertion over the business cycle.

    PubMed

    Colman, Gregory; Dave, Dhaval

    2013-09-01

    Shifts in time and income constraints over economic expansions and contractions would be expected to affect individuals' behaviors. We explore the impact of the business cycle on individuals' exercise, time use, and total physical exertion, utilizing information on 112,000 individual records from the 2003-2010 American Time Use Surveys. In doing so, we test a key causal link that has been hypothesized in the relation between unemployment and health, but not heretofore assessed. Using more precise measures of exercise (and other activities) than previous studies, we find that as work-time decreases during a recession, recreational exercise, TV-watching, sleeping, childcare, and housework increase. This, however, does not compensate for the decrease in work-related exertion due to job-loss, and total physical exertion declines. These effects are strongest among low-educated men, which is validating given that employment in the Great Recession has declined most within manufacturing, mining, and construction. We also find evidence of intra-household spillover effects, wherein individuals respond to shifts in spousal employment conditional on their own labor supply. The decrease in total physical activity during recessions is especially problematic for vulnerable populations concentrated in boom-and-bust industries, and may have longer-term effects on obesity and related health outcomes.

  7. Exercise, physical activity, and exertion over the business cycle.

    PubMed

    Colman, Gregory; Dave, Dhaval

    2013-09-01

    Shifts in time and income constraints over economic expansions and contractions would be expected to affect individuals' behaviors. We explore the impact of the business cycle on individuals' exercise, time use, and total physical exertion, utilizing information on 112,000 individual records from the 2003-2010 American Time Use Surveys. In doing so, we test a key causal link that has been hypothesized in the relation between unemployment and health, but not heretofore assessed. Using more precise measures of exercise (and other activities) than previous studies, we find that as work-time decreases during a recession, recreational exercise, TV-watching, sleeping, childcare, and housework increase. This, however, does not compensate for the decrease in work-related exertion due to job-loss, and total physical exertion declines. These effects are strongest among low-educated men, which is validating given that employment in the Great Recession has declined most within manufacturing, mining, and construction. We also find evidence of intra-household spillover effects, wherein individuals respond to shifts in spousal employment conditional on their own labor supply. The decrease in total physical activity during recessions is especially problematic for vulnerable populations concentrated in boom-and-bust industries, and may have longer-term effects on obesity and related health outcomes. PMID:23906116

  8. Modeling Molecular Pathways of Neuronal Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Taxin, Zachary H.; Neymotin, Samuel A.; Mohan, Ashutosh; Lipton, Peter; Lytton, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal ischemia, the consequence of a stroke (cerebrovascular accident), is a condition of reduced delivery of nutrients to brain neurons. The brain consumes more energy per gram of tissue than any other organ, making continuous blood flow critical. Loss of nutrients, most critically glucose and O2, triggers a large number of interacting molecular pathways in neurons and astrocytes. The dynamics of these pathways take place over multiple temporal scales and occur in multiple interacting cytosolic and organelle compartments: in mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and nucleus. The complexity of these relationships suggests the use of computer simulation to understand the interplay between pathways leading to reversible or irreversible damage, the forms of damage, and interventions that could reduce damage at different stages of stroke. We describe a number of models and simulation methods that can be used to further our understanding of ischemia. PMID:24560148

  9. Awake hippocampal reactivations project onto orthogonal neuronal assemblies.

    PubMed

    Malvache, Arnaud; Reichinnek, Susanne; Villette, Vincent; Haimerl, Caroline; Cossart, Rosa

    2016-09-16

    The chained activation of neuronal assemblies is thought to support major cognitive processes, including memory. In the hippocampus, this is observed during population bursts often associated with sharp-wave ripples, in the form of an ordered reactivation of neurons. However, the organization and lifetime of these assemblies remain unknown. We used calcium imaging to map patterns of synchronous neuronal activation in the CA1 region of awake mice during runs on a treadmill. The patterns were composed of the recurring activation of anatomically intermingled, but functionally orthogonal, assemblies. These assemblies reactivated discrete temporal segments of neuronal sequences observed during runs and could be stable across consecutive days. A binding of these assemblies into longer chains revealed temporally ordered replay. These modules may represent the default building blocks for encoding or retrieving experience. PMID:27634534

  10. Awake hippocampal reactivations project onto orthogonal neuronal assemblies.

    PubMed

    Malvache, Arnaud; Reichinnek, Susanne; Villette, Vincent; Haimerl, Caroline; Cossart, Rosa

    2016-09-16

    The chained activation of neuronal assemblies is thought to support major cognitive processes, including memory. In the hippocampus, this is observed during population bursts often associated with sharp-wave ripples, in the form of an ordered reactivation of neurons. However, the organization and lifetime of these assemblies remain unknown. We used calcium imaging to map patterns of synchronous neuronal activation in the CA1 region of awake mice during runs on a treadmill. The patterns were composed of the recurring activation of anatomically intermingled, but functionally orthogonal, assemblies. These assemblies reactivated discrete temporal segments of neuronal sequences observed during runs and could be stable across consecutive days. A binding of these assemblies into longer chains revealed temporally ordered replay. These modules may represent the default building blocks for encoding or retrieving experience.

  11. Valproic acid protects neurons and promotes neuronal regeneration after brachial plexus avulsion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Wu, Dianxiu; Li, Rui; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Cui, Shusen

    2013-01-01

    Valproic acid has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects and promote neurite outgrowth in several peripheral nerve injury models. However, whether valproic acid can exert its beneficial effect on neurons after brachial plexus avulsion injury is currently unknown. In this study, brachial plexus root avulsion models, established in Wistar rats, were administered daily with valproic acid dissolved in drinking water (300 mg/kg) or normal water. On days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 28 after avulsion injury, tissues of the C5–T1 spinal cord segments of the avulsion injured side were harvested to investigate the expression of Bcl-2, c-Jun and growth associated protein 43 by real-time PCR and western blot assay. Results showed that valproic acid significantly increased the expression of Bcl-2 and growth associated protein 43, and reduced the c-Jun expression after brachial plexus avulsion. Our findings indicate that valproic acid can protect neurons in the spinal cord and enhance neuronal regeneration following brachial plexus root avulsion. PMID:25206605

  12. Target cell-specific modulation of neuronal activity by astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. S.; Angulo, M. C.; Audinat, E.; Charpak, S.

    2006-06-01

    Interaction between astrocytes and neurons enriches the behavior of brain circuits. By releasing glutamate and ATP, astrocytes can directly excite neurons and modulate synaptic transmission. In the rat olfactory bulb, we demonstrate that the release of GABA by astrocytes causes long-lasting and synchronous inhibition of mitral and granule cells. In addition, astrocytes release glutamate, leading to a selective activation of granule-cell NMDA receptors. Thus, by releasing excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, astrocytes exert a complex modulatory control on the olfactory network. glutamate | GABA | inhibition | olfactory bulb | synchronization

  13. Fuzzy branching temporal logic.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seong-ick; Lee, Kwang H; Lee, Doheon

    2004-04-01

    Intelligent systems require a systematic way to represent and handle temporal information containing uncertainty. In particular, a logical framework is needed that can represent uncertain temporal information and its relationships with logical formulae. Fuzzy linear temporal logic (FLTL), a generalization of propositional linear temporal logic (PLTL) with fuzzy temporal events and fuzzy temporal states defined on a linear time model, was previously proposed for this purpose. However, many systems are best represented by branching time models in which each state can have more than one possible future path. In this paper, fuzzy branching temporal logic (FBTL) is proposed to address this problem. FBTL adopts and generalizes concurrent tree logic (CTL*), which is a classical branching temporal logic. The temporal model of FBTL is capable of representing fuzzy temporal events and fuzzy temporal states, and the order relation among them is represented as a directed graph. The utility of FBTL is demonstrated using a fuzzy job shop scheduling problem as an example. PMID:15376850

  14. Neuron adhesion and strengthening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, Aracely; Jian, Kuihuan; Ko, Gladys; Liang, Hong

    2010-07-01

    Understanding the neuron/material adhesion is important for neuron stimulation and growth. The current challenges remain in the lack of precision of measuring techniques and understanding the behavior of neuron. Here, we report a fluid shear method to investigate adhesion at the neuron/poly-D-lysine interface. In this study, the adhesion of 12-day-old chick embryo-retina neurons cultured on poly-D-lysine coated glass coverslips was measured via parallel disk rotational flow. The shear stress experienced by the cells increases with the disk radius. There is a critical point along the radius (Rc) where the stress experienced by the neurons equals their adhesion. The measured Rc can be used to calculate the neuron adhesion. Our results demonstrate that neurons adhered to the poly-D-lysine had a strain hardening effect. The adhesive shear stress of the neuron-material increased with applied shear (τa). When the τa reached or exceeded the value of 40 dyn/cm2, the adhesion remained constant at approximately 30 dyn/cm2. The present work allowed us not only to quantify the adhesive strength and force but also to evaluate the value of strain hardening at the neuron/poly-D-lysine interface.

  15. Asymmetry and modulation of spike timing in electrically coupled neurons.

    PubMed

    Sevetson, Jessica; Haas, Julie S

    2015-03-15

    Electrical coupling mediates interactions between neurons of the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), which play a critical role in regulating thalamocortical and corticothalamic communication by inhibiting thalamic relay cells. Accumulating evidence has shown that asymmetry of electrical synapses is a fundamental and dynamic property, but the effect of asymmetry on coupled networks is unexplored. Recording from patched pairs in rat brain slices, we investigate asymmetry in the subthreshold regime and show that electrical synapses can exert powerful effects on the spike times of coupled neighbors. Electrical synaptic signaling modulates spike timing by 10-20 ms, in an effect that also exhibits asymmetry. Furthermore, we show through modeling that coupling asymmetry expands the set of outputs for pairs of coupled neurons through enhanced regions of synchrony and reversals of spike order. These results highlight the power and specificity of signaling exerted by electrical synapses, which contribute to information flow across the brain.

  16. Senegenin inhibits neuronal apoptosis after spinal cord contusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shu-quan; Wu, Min-fei; Gu, Rui; Liu, Jia-bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-san; Jiang, Jin-lan

    2016-01-01

    Senegenin has been shown to inhibit neuronal apoptosis, thereby exerting a neuroprotective effect. In the present study, we established a rat model of spinal cord contusion injury using the modified Allen's method. Three hours after injury, senegenin (30 mg/g) was injected into the tail vein for 3 consecutive days. Senegenin reduced the size of syringomyelic cavities, and it substantially reduced the number of apoptotic cells in the spinal cord. At the site of injury, Bax and Caspase-3 mRNA and protein levels were decreased by senegenin, while Bcl-2 mRNA and protein levels were increased. Nerve fiber density was increased in the spinal cord proximal to the brain, and hindlimb motor function and electrophysiological properties of rat hindlimb were improved. Taken together, our results suggest that senegenin exerts a neuroprotective effect by suppressing neuronal apoptosis at the site of spinal cord injury. PMID:27212931

  17. Combination treatment with ethyl pyruvate and IGF-I exerts neuroprotective effects against brain injury in a rat model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    RONG, ZHIHUI; PAN, RUI; CHANG, LIWEN; LEE, WEIHUA

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury causes severe brain damage in newborns. Following HI injury, rapidly accumulating oxidants injure neurons and interrupt ongoing developmental processes. The antioxidant, sodium pyruvate, has been shown to reduce neuronal injury in neonatal rats under conditions of oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) and HI injury. In this study, we evaluated the effects of ethyl pyruvate (EP) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) alone or in combination in a similar setting. For this purpose, we used an in vitro model involving primary neonatal rat cortical neurons subjected to OGD for 2.5 h and an in vivo model involving unilateral carotid ligation in rats on post-natal day 7 with exposure to 8% hypoxia for 2.5 h. The cultured neurons were examined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and cell viability assays. For the in vivo experiments, behavioral development was evaluated by the foot fault test at 4 weeks of recovery. 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride monohydrate and cresyl violet staining were used to evaluate HI injury. The injured neurons were Fluoro-Jade B-labeled, new neuroprecursors were double labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and doublecortin, new mature neurons were BrdU-labeled and neuronal nuclei were labeled by immunofluorescence. Under conditions of OGD, the LDH levels increased and neuronal viability decreased. Treatment with 0.5 mM EP or 25 ng/ml IGF-I protected the neurons (P<0.05), exerting additive effects. Similarly, either the early administration of EP or delayed treatment with IGF-I protected the neonatal rat brains against HI injury and improved neurological performance and these effects were also additive. This effect may be the result of reduced neuronal injury, and enhanced neurogenesis and maturation. On the whole, our findings demonstrate that the combination of the early administration of EP with delayed treatment with IGF-I exerts neuroprotective effects against HI injury in neonatal rat brains. PMID

  18. Minocycline fails to exert antiepileptogenic effects in a rat status epilepticus model.

    PubMed

    Russmann, Vera; Goc, Joanna; Boes, Katharina; Ongerth, Tanja; Salvamoser, Josephine D; Siegl, Claudia; Potschka, Heidrun

    2016-01-15

    The tetracycline antibiotic minocycline can exert strong anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antiapoptotic effects. There is cumulating evidence that epileptogenic brain insults trigger neuroinflammation and anti-inflammatory concepts can modulate the process of epileptogenesis. Based on the mechanisms of action discussed for minocycline, the compound is of interest for intervention studies as it can prevent the polarization of microglia into a pro-inflammatory state. Here, we assessed the efficacy of sub-chronic minocycline administration initiated immediately following an electrically-induced status epilepticus in rats. The treatment did not affect the development of spontaneous seizures. However, minocycline attenuated behavioral long-term consequences of status epilepticus with a reduction in hyperactivity and hyperlocomotion. Furthermore, the compound limited the spatial learning deficits observed in the post-status epilepticus model. The typical status epilepticus-induced neuronal cell loss was evident in the hippocampus and the piriform cortex. Minocycline exposure selectively protected neurons in the piriform cortex and the hilus, but not in the hippocampal pyramidal layer. In conclusion, the data argue against an antiepileptogenic effect of minocycline in adult rats. However, the findings suggest a disease-modifying impact of the tetracycline affecting the development of behavioral co-morbidities, as well as long-term consequences on spatial learning. In addition, minocycline administration resulted in a selective neuroprotective effect. Although strong anti-inflammatory effects have been proposed for minocycline, we could not verify these effects in our experimental model. Considering the multitude of mechanisms claimed to contribute to minocycline's effects, it is of interest to further explore the exact mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects in future studies.

  19. Temporal Encoding in a Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Aldworth, Zane N.; Dimitrov, Alexander G.; Cummins, Graham I.; Gedeon, Tomáš; Miller, John P.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the extent to which temporal encoding may be implemented by single neurons in the cercal sensory system of the house cricket Acheta domesticus. We found that these neurons exhibit a greater-than-expected coding capacity, due in part to an increased precision in brief patterns of action potentials. We developed linear and non-linear models for decoding the activity of these neurons. We found that the stimuli associated with short-interval patterns of spikes (ISIs of 8 ms or less) could be predicted better by second-order models as compared to linear models. Finally, we characterized the difference between these linear and second-order models in a low-dimensional subspace, and showed that modification of the linear models along only a few dimensions improved their predictive power to parity with the second order models. Together these results show that single neurons are capable of using temporal patterns of spikes as fundamental symbols in their neural code, and that they communicate specific stimulus distributions to subsequent neural structures. PMID:21573206

  20. Temporal encoding in a nervous system.

    PubMed

    Aldworth, Zane N; Dimitrov, Alexander G; Cummins, Graham I; Gedeon, Tomáš; Miller, John P

    2011-05-01

    We examined the extent to which temporal encoding may be implemented by single neurons in the cercal sensory system of the house cricket Acheta domesticus. We found that these neurons exhibit a greater-than-expected coding capacity, due in part to an increased precision in brief patterns of action potentials. We developed linear and non-linear models for decoding the activity of these neurons. We found that the stimuli associated with short-interval patterns of spikes (ISIs of 8 ms or less) could be predicted better by second-order models as compared to linear models. Finally, we characterized the difference between these linear and second-order models in a low-dimensional subspace, and showed that modification of the linear models along only a few dimensions improved their predictive power to parity with the second order models. Together these results show that single neurons are capable of using temporal patterns of spikes as fundamental symbols in their neural code, and that they communicate specific stimulus distributions to subsequent neural structures.

  1. A virtual rat for simulating environmental and exertional heat stress.

    PubMed

    Rakesh, Vineet; Stallings, Jonathan D; Reifman, Jaques

    2014-12-01

    Severe cases of environmental or exertional heat stress can lead to varying degrees of organ dysfunction. To understand heat-injury progression and develop efficient management and mitigation strategies, it is critical to determine the thermal response in susceptible organs under different heat-stress conditions. To this end, we used our previously published virtual rat, which is capable of computing the spatiotemporal temperature distribution in the animal, and extended it to simulate various heat-stress scenarios, including 1) different environmental conditions, 2) exertional heat stress, 3) circadian rhythm effect on the thermal response, and 4) whole body cooling. Our predictions were consistent with published in vivo temperature measurements for all cases, validating our simulations. We observed a differential thermal response in the organs, with the liver experiencing the highest temperatures for all environmental and exertional heat-stress cases. For every 3°C rise in the external temperature from 40 to 46°C, core and organ temperatures increased by ∼0.8°C. Core temperatures increased by 2.6 and 4.1°C for increases in exercise intensity from rest to 75 and 100% of maximal O2 consumption, respectively. We also found differences as large as 0.8°C in organ temperatures for the same heat stress induced at different times during the day. Even after whole body cooling at a relatively low external temperature (1°C for 20 min), average organ temperatures were still elevated by 2.3 to 2.5°C compared with normothermia. These results can be used to optimize experimental protocol designs, reduce the amount of animal experimentation, and design and test improved heat-stress prevention and management strategies.

  2. Glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Shigetomo; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Maejima, Yuko; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, acting against metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggest that adiponectin acts on the brain including hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), where proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play key roles in feeding regulation. Several studies have examined intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of adiponectin and reported opposite effects, increase or decrease of food intake. These reports used different nutritional states. The present study aimed to clarify whether adiponectin exerts distinct effects on food intake and ARC POMC neurons depending on the glucose concentration. Adiponectin was ICV injected with or without glucose for feeding experiments and administered to ARC slices with high or low glucose for patch clamp experiments. We found that adiponectin at high glucose inhibited POMC neurons and increased food intake while at low glucose it exerted opposite effects. The results demonstrate that glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding. PMID:27503800

  3. Glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding

    PubMed Central

    Suyama, Shigetomo; Maekawa, Fumihiko; Maejima, Yuko; Kubota, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Yada, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, acting against metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggest that adiponectin acts on the brain including hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), where proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play key roles in feeding regulation. Several studies have examined intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of adiponectin and reported opposite effects, increase or decrease of food intake. These reports used different nutritional states. The present study aimed to clarify whether adiponectin exerts distinct effects on food intake and ARC POMC neurons depending on the glucose concentration. Adiponectin was ICV injected with or without glucose for feeding experiments and administered to ARC slices with high or low glucose for patch clamp experiments. We found that adiponectin at high glucose inhibited POMC neurons and increased food intake while at low glucose it exerted opposite effects. The results demonstrate that glucose level determines excitatory or inhibitory effects of adiponectin on arcuate POMC neuron activity and feeding. PMID:27503800

  4. Temporal mapping and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, Charles G. (Inventor); Shrestha, Bijay (Inventor); Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan (Inventor); Mali, Preeti (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A compositing process for selecting spatial data collected over a period of time, creating temporal data cubes from the spatial data, and processing and/or analyzing the data using temporal mapping algebra functions. In some embodiments, the temporal data cube is creating a masked cube using the data cubes, and computing a composite from the masked cube by using temporal mapping algebra.

  5. Pressure exerted on stationary enclosing structures by expansive soil

    SciTech Connect

    Sorochan, E.A.; Kim, M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The influence exerted by expansive soil on a rigid stationary enclosing structure is addressed. Using numerical modeling, it is established that the wetting of a portion of the soil mass adjacent to the enclosing structure manifests itself unfavorably on the latter`s performance. Two cases of wetting should be examined as computational cases: uniform wetting from above and from a point source alongside the enclosure. The possibility of the swelling of that part of the soil mass not immediately adjacent to the structure should also be brought to attention.

  6. Liver Transplantation after Exertional Heatstroke-Induced Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Exertional heatstroke (EHS) is a life-threatening disease characterized clinically by central nervous system dysfunction and severe hyperthermia. It frequently occurs among athletes, soldiers, and laborers. While cardiopulmonary symptoms are common in patients undergoing EHS, irreversible acute liver failure is a rarely described phenomenon. When managing cases of EHS complicated by acute liver failure, it is crucial to act promptly with aggressive total body cooling in order to prevent progression of the clinical syndrome. However, an urgent liver transplantation can be a therapeutic strategy when patients fail to improve with supportive measures. PMID:27738568

  7. Asynchronous spiking photonic neuron for lightwave neuromorphic signal processing.

    PubMed

    Fok, Mable P; Tian, Yue; Rosenbluth, David; Prucnal, Paul R

    2012-08-15

    We developed an asynchronous spiking photonic neuron that forms the basic building block for hybrid analog/digital lightwave neuromorphic processing. Our approach enables completely asynchronous spiking in response to input signals while maximizing the throughput relative to synchronous approaches. Asynchronous operation is achieved by generating the spike source for the photonic neuron through four-wave mixing. This hybrid analog/digital photonic neuron has an electro-absorption modulator as the temporal integration unit for analog processing, while the digital processing portion employs optical thresholding in a highly Ge-doped nonlinear loop mirror.

  8. Correlated transition between two activity states of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Go; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Tanifuji, Manabu

    2006-03-01

    In order to understand the dynamical properties of a neural network, it is important to characterize the relation between spike trains of two neurons in the network. In this study, we show that in some neuron pairs in inferior temporal cortices of macaque monkeys, spike trains of a pair are described by a two-dimensional Poisson process whose means are modulated by a common two-state Markov process. The common two-state Markov process describes a correlated state transition between firing and nonfiring states of the constituent neurons of the pair.

  9. Novel interfaces for light directed neuronal stimulation: advances and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Bareket-Keren, Lilach; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Light activation of neurons is a growing field with applications ranging from basic investigation of neuronal systems to the development of new therapeutic methods such as artificial retina. Many recent studies currently explore novel methods for optical stimulation with temporal and spatial precision. Novel materials in particular provide an opportunity to enhance contemporary approaches. Here we review recent advances towards light directed interfaces for neuronal stimulation, focusing on state-of-the-art nanoengineered devices. In particular, we highlight challenges and prospects towards improved retinal prostheses. PMID:24872704

  10. Interhemispheric Synchronization of Oscillatory Neuronal Responses in Cat Visual Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Andreas K.; Konig, Peter; Kreiter, Andreas K.; Singer, Wolf

    1991-05-01

    Neurons in area 17 of cat visual cortex display oscillatory responses that can synchronize across spatially separate columns in a stimulus-specific way. Response synchronization has now been shown to occur also between neurons in area 17 of the right and left cerebral hemispheres. This synchronization was abolished by section of the corpus callosum. Thus, the response synchronization is mediated by corticocortical connections. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that temporal synchrony of neuronal discharges serves to bind features within and between the visual hemifields.

  11. Monitoring Spiking Activity of Many Individual Neurons in Invertebrate Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, C.J.; Bruno, A.M.; Humphries, M.D.; Moore-Kochlacs, C.; Sejnowski, T.J.; Wang, J.; Hill, E.S.

    2015-01-01

    Optical recording with fast voltage sensitive dyes makes it possible, in suitable preparations, to simultaneously monitor the action potentials of large numbers of individual neurons. Here we describe methods for doing this, including considerations of different dyes and imaging systems, methods for correlating the optical signals with their source neurons, procedures for getting good signals, and the use of Independent Component Analysis for spike-sorting raw optical data into single neuron traces. These combined tools represent a powerful approach for large-scale recording of neural networks with high temporal and spatial resolution. PMID:26238051

  12. Interplay activity-connectivity: Dynamics in patterned neuronal cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibau, E.; Bendiksen, Ch.; Teller, S.; Amigó, N.; Soriano, J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of a neuronal tissue to efficiently process and transmit information depends on both the intrinsic dynamical properties of the neurons and the connectivity between them. One of the few experimental systems where one can vary the connectivity of a neuronal network in a control manner are neuronal cultures. Here we show that, by combining neuronal cultures with different pattering techniques, we can control and dictate the connectivity of neuronal networks. The emerging cultures are characterized by a rich spontaneous activity, but with some dynamical traits that can be ascribed to the underlying, engineered wiring architecture. Simple patterned cultures can be obtained by plating neurons onto predefined topographical molds, which guide neurons and connections through complex paths. In contrast to homogeneous cultures, characterized by an on/off behavior where all neurons fire in a short time window, patterned cultures show more complex spatio-temporal dynamics, and with varying propagation paths and velocities. Patterned cultures provide a valuable tool to understand not only the interplay activity-connectivity, but also aspects such as the emergence and maintenance of spontaneous activity, synchronization, or the presence of specific dynamic motifs.

  13. Generating neuronal diversity in the Drosophila central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Suewei; Lee, Tzumin

    2012-01-01

    Generating diverse neurons in the central nervous system involves three major steps. First, heterogeneous neural progenitors are specified by positional cues at early embryonic stages. Second, neural progenitors sequentially produce neurons or intermediate precursors that acquire different temporal identities based on their birth-order. Third, sister neurons produced during asymmetrical terminal mitoses are given distinct fates. Determining the molecular mechanisms underlying each of these three steps of cellular diversification will unravel brain development and evolution. Drosophila has a relatively simple and tractable CNS, and previous studies on Drosophila CNS development have greatly advanced our understanding of neuron fate specification. Here we review those studies and discuss how the lessons we have learned from fly teach us the process of neuronal diversification in general.

  14. Noise and neuronal populations conspire to encode simple waveforms reliably

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parnas, B. R.

    1996-01-01

    Sensory systems rely on populations of neurons to encode information transduced at the periphery into meaningful patterns of neuronal population activity. This transduction occurs in the presence of intrinsic neuronal noise. This is fortunate. The presence of noise allows more reliable encoding of the temporal structure present in the stimulus than would be possible in a noise-free environment. Simulations with a parallel model of signal processing at the auditory periphery have been used to explore the effects of noise and a neuronal population on the encoding of signal information. The results show that, for a given set of neuronal modeling parameters and stimulus amplitude, there is an optimal amount of noise for stimulus encoding with maximum fidelity.

  15. Optogenetic pharmacology for control of native neuronal signaling proteins.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Richard H; Mourot, Alexandre; Adesnik, Hillel

    2013-07-01

    The optical neuroscience revolution is transforming how we study neural circuits. By providing a precise way to manipulate endogenous neuronal signaling proteins, it also has the potential to transform our understanding of molecular neuroscience. Recent advances in chemical biology have produced light-sensitive compounds that photoregulate a wide variety of proteins underlying signaling between and within neurons. Chemical tools for optopharmacology include caged agonists and antagonists and reversibly photoswitchable ligands. These reagents act on voltage-gated ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors, enabling control of neuronal signaling with a high degree of spatial and temporal precision. By covalently attaching photoswitch molecules to genetically tagged proteins, the newly emerging methodology of optogenetic pharmacology allows biochemically precise control in targeted subsets of neurons. Now that the tools for manipulating endogenous neuronal signaling proteins are available, they can be implemented in vivo to enhance our understanding of the molecular bases of brain function and dysfunctions. PMID:23799474

  16. A causal link between prediction errors, dopamine neurons and learning.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Elizabeth E; Keiflin, Ronald; Boivin, Josiah R; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Janak, Patricia H

    2013-07-01

    Situations in which rewards are unexpectedly obtained or withheld represent opportunities for new learning. Often, this learning includes identifying cues that predict reward availability. Unexpected rewards strongly activate midbrain dopamine neurons. This phasic signal is proposed to support learning about antecedent cues by signaling discrepancies between actual and expected outcomes, termed a reward prediction error. However, it is unknown whether dopamine neuron prediction error signaling and cue-reward learning are causally linked. To test this hypothesis, we manipulated dopamine neuron activity in rats in two behavioral procedures, associative blocking and extinction, that illustrate the essential function of prediction errors in learning. We observed that optogenetic activation of dopamine neurons concurrent with reward delivery, mimicking a prediction error, was sufficient to cause long-lasting increases in cue-elicited reward-seeking behavior. Our findings establish a causal role for temporally precise dopamine neuron signaling in cue-reward learning, bridging a critical gap between experimental evidence and influential theoretical frameworks.

  17. Ultra-sensitive fluorescent proteins for imaging neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsai-Wen; Wardill, Trevor J.; Sun, Yi; Pulver, Stefan R.; Renninger, Sabine L.; Baohan, Amy; Schreiter, Eric R.; Kerr, Rex A.; Orger, Michael B.; Jayaraman, Vivek; Looger, Loren L.; Svoboda, Karel; Kim, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fluorescent calcium sensors are widely used to image neural activity. Using structure-based mutagenesis and neuron-based screening, we developed a family of ultra-sensitive protein calcium sensors (GCaMP6) that outperformed other sensors in cultured neurons and in zebrafish, flies, and mice in vivo. In layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons of the mouse visual cortex, GCaMP6 reliably detected single action potentials in neuronal somata and orientation-tuned synaptic calcium transients in individual dendritic spines. The orientation tuning of structurally persistent spines was largely stable over timescales of weeks. Orientation tuning averaged across spine populations predicted the tuning of their parent cell. Although the somata of GABAergic neurons showed little orientation tuning, their dendrites included highly tuned dendritic segments (5 - 40 micrometers long). GCaMP6 sensors thus provide new windows into the organization and dynamics of neural circuits over multiple spatial and temporal scales. PMID:23868258

  18. Motor Neurons that Multitask

    PubMed Central

    Goulding, Martyn

    2013-01-01

    Animals use a form of sensory feedback termed proprioception to monitor their body position and modify the motor programs that control movement. In this issue of Neuron, Wen et al. (2012) provide evidence that a subset of motor neurons function as proprioceptors in C. elegans, where B-type motor neurons sense body curvature to control the bending movements that drive forward locomotion. PMID:23177952

  19. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition.

  20. Diversity of intersegmental auditory neurons in a bush cricket.

    PubMed

    Stumpner, Andreas; Molina, Jorge

    2006-12-01

    Various auditory interneurons of the duetting bush cricket Ancistrura nigrovittata with axons ascending to the brain are presented. In this species, more intersegmental sound-activated neurons have been identified than in any other bush cricket so far, among them a new type of ascending neuron with posterior soma in the prothoracic ganglion (AN4). These interneurons show not only morphological differences in the prothoracic ganglion and the brain, but also respond differently to carrier frequencies, intensity and direction. As a set of neurons, they show graded differences for all of these parameters. A response type not described among intersegmental neurons of crickets and other bush crickets so far is found in the AN3 neuron with a tonic response, broad frequency tuning and little directional dependence. All neurons, with the exception of AN3, respond in a relatively similar manner to the temporal patterns of the male song: phasically to high syllable repetitions and rhythmically to low syllable repetitions. The strongest coupling to the temporal pattern is found in TN1. In contrast to behavior the neuronal responses depend little on syllable duration. AN4, AN5 and TN1 respond well to the female song. AN4 (at higher intensities) and TN1 respond well to a complete duet.

  1. Steroids as external temporal codes act via microRNAs and cooperate with cytokines in differential neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kucherenko, Mariya M; Shcherbata, Halyna R

    2013-01-01

    The generation of neuronal cell diversity is controlled by interdependent mechanisms, including cell intrinsic programs and environmental cues. During development, the astonishing variety of neurons is originated according to a precise timetable that is managed by a complex network of genes specifying individual types of neurons. Different neurons express specific sets of transcription factors, and they can be recognized by morphological characteristics and spatial localization, but, most importantly, they connect to each other and form functional units in a stereotyped fashion. This connectivity depends, mostly, on selective cell adhesion that is strictly regulated. While intrinsic factors specifying neuronal temporal identity have been extensively studied, an extrinsic temporal factor controlling neuronal temporal identity switch has not been shown. Our data demonstrate that pulses of steroid hormone act as a temporal cue to fine-tune neuronal cell differentiation. Here we also provide evidence that extrinsic JAK/STAT cytokine signaling acts as a spatial code in the process. Particularly, in Drosophila mushroom bodies, neuronal identity transition is controlled by steroid-dependent microRNAs that regulate spatially distributed cytokine-dependent signaling factors that in turn modulate cell adhesion. A new era of neuronal plasticity assessment via managing external temporal cues such as hormones and cytokines that specify individual types of neurons might open new possibilities for brain regenerative therapeutics. PMID:23839338

  2. Temporal Map Formation in the Barn Owl's Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibold, Christian; Kempter, Richard; van Hemmen, J. Leo

    2001-12-01

    Barn owls provide an experimentally well-specified example of a temporal map, a neuronal representation of the outside world in the brain by means of time. Their laminar nucleus exhibits a place code of interaural time differences, a cue which is used to determine the azimuthal location of a sound stimulus, e.g., prey. We analyze a model of synaptic plasticity that explains the formation of such a representation in the young bird and show how in a large parameter regime a combination of local and nonlocal synaptic plasticity yields the temporal map as found experimentally. Our analysis includes the effect of nonlinearities as well as the influence of neuronal noise.

  3. The Significance of Causally Coupled, Stable Neuronal Assemblies for the Psychological Time Arrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmanspacher, Harald; Filk, Thomas; Scheingraber, Herbert

    2005-10-01

    Stable neuronal assemblies are generally regarded as neural correlates of mental representations. Their temporal sequence corresponds to the experience of a direction of time, sometimes called the psychological time arrow. We show that the stability of particular, biophysically motivated models of neuronal assemblies, called coupled map lattices, is supported by causal interactions among neurons and obstructed by non-causal or anti-causal interactions among neurons. This surprising relation between causality and stability suggests that those neuronal assemblies that are stable due to causal neuronal interactions, and thus correlated with mental representations, generate a psychological time arrow. Yet this impact of causal interactions among neurons on the directed sequence of mental representations does not rule out the possibility of mentally less efficacious non-causal or anti-causal interactions among neurons.

  4. Neuronal response impedance mechanism implementing cooperative networks with low firing rates and μs precision.

    PubMed

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Marmari, Hagar; Brama, Haya; Stern, Edward A; Sardi, Shira; Sabo, Pinhas; Kanter, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Realizations of low firing rates in neural networks usually require globally balanced distributions among excitatory and inhibitory links, while feasibility of temporal coding is limited by neuronal millisecond precision. We show that cooperation, governing global network features, emerges through nodal properties, as opposed to link distributions. Using in vitro and in vivo experiments we demonstrate microsecond precision of neuronal response timings under low stimulation frequencies, whereas moderate frequencies result in a chaotic neuronal phase characterized by degraded precision. Above a critical stimulation frequency, which varies among neurons, response failures were found to emerge stochastically such that the neuron functions as a low pass filter, saturating the average inter-spike-interval. This intrinsic neuronal response impedance mechanism leads to cooperation on a network level, such that firing rates are suppressed toward the lowest neuronal critical frequency simultaneously with neuronal microsecond precision. Our findings open up opportunities of controlling global features of network dynamics through few nodes with extreme properties.

  5. Neuronal response impedance mechanism implementing cooperative networks with low firing rates and μs precision

    PubMed Central

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Marmari, Hagar; Brama, Haya; Stern, Edward A.; Sardi, Shira; Sabo, Pinhas; Kanter, Ido

    2015-01-01

    Realizations of low firing rates in neural networks usually require globally balanced distributions among excitatory and inhibitory links, while feasibility of temporal coding is limited by neuronal millisecond precision. We show that cooperation, governing global network features, emerges through nodal properties, as opposed to link distributions. Using in vitro and in vivo experiments we demonstrate microsecond precision of neuronal response timings under low stimulation frequencies, whereas moderate frequencies result in a chaotic neuronal phase characterized by degraded precision. Above a critical stimulation frequency, which varies among neurons, response failures were found to emerge stochastically such that the neuron functions as a low pass filter, saturating the average inter-spike-interval. This intrinsic neuronal response impedance mechanism leads to cooperation on a network level, such that firing rates are suppressed toward the lowest neuronal critical frequency simultaneously with neuronal microsecond precision. Our findings open up opportunities of controlling global features of network dynamics through few nodes with extreme properties. PMID:26124707

  6. Observed network dynamics from altering the balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurons in cultured networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Dzakpasu, Rhonda

    2010-09-01

    Complexity in the temporal organization of neural systems may be a reflection of the diversity of their neural constituents. These constituents, excitatory and inhibitory neurons, comprise a well-defined ratio in vivo and form the substrate for rhythmic oscillatory activity. To begin to elucidate the dynamical implications that underlie this balance, we construct neural circuits not ordinarily found in nature and study the resulting temporal patterns. We culture several networks of neurons composed of varying fractions of excitatory and inhibitory cells and use a multielectrode array to study their temporal dynamics as this balance is modulated. We use the electrode burst as the temporal imprimatur to signify the presence of network activity. Burst durations, interburst intervals, and the number of spikes participating within a burst are used to illustrate the vivid differences in the temporal organization between the various cultured networks. When the network consists largely of excitatory neurons, no network temporal structure is apparent. However, the addition of inhibitory neurons evokes a temporal order. Calculation of the temporal autocorrelation shows that when the number of inhibitory neurons is a major fraction of the network, a striking network pattern materializes when none was previously present.

  7. Calibrating Borg scale ratings of hand force exertion.

    PubMed

    Spielholz, Peregrin

    2006-09-01

    A study was conducted to assess the efficacy of calibrating subjective worker ratings of hand exertions to reduce error in estimates of applied force. Twenty volunteer subjects applied pinch and power grip forces corresponding to their perceptions of different Borg CR-10 scale levels using both "grip-to-scale" and "guided-grip" procedures. These data were used separately to define relationships between scale ratings and actual force application. Two gripping tasks were performed and corresponding subjective hand force ratings were calibrated using the grip-to-scale calibration data. Results showed that the mean estimation error for a 44.5 N (10 lb) power grip task was significantly reduced from 142.8 (+/-69.0) to 62.3 (+/-58.3) N. The guided-grip calibration method also significantly reduced rating error for the power grip task, however the estimates were biased toward zero. Neither calibration procedure improved rating accuracy of an 8.9 N (2 lb) pinch grip task. The study results indicate that calibration of hand force ratings using the grip-to-scale procedure may improve the accuracy of hand exertion measurements using the Borg CR-10 scale.

  8. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Exertional Heat Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Casa, Douglas J.; DeMartini, Julie K.; Bergeron, Michael F.; Csillan, Dave; Eichner, E. Randy; Lopez, Rebecca M.; Ferrara, Michael S.; Miller, Kevin C.; O'Connor, Francis; Sawka, Michael N.; Yeargin, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective  To present best-practice recommendations for the prevention, recognition, and treatment of exertional heat illnesses (EHIs) and to describe the relevant physiology of thermoregulation. Background  Certified athletic trainers recognize and treat athletes with EHIs, often in high-risk environments. Although the proper recognition and successful treatment strategies are well documented, EHIs continue to plague athletes, and exertional heat stroke remains one of the leading causes of sudden death during sport. The recommendations presented in this document provide athletic trainers and allied health providers with an integrated scientific and clinically applicable approach to the prevention, recognition, treatment of, and return-to-activity guidelines for EHIs. These recommendations are given so that proper recognition and treatment can be accomplished in order to maximize the safety and performance of athletes. Recommendations  Athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals should use these recommendations to establish onsite emergency action plans for their venues and athletes. The primary goal of athlete safety is addressed through the appropriate prevention strategies, proper recognition tactics, and effective treatment plans for EHIs. Athletic trainers and other allied health care professionals must be properly educated and prepared to respond in an expedient manner to alleviate symptoms and minimize the morbidity and mortality associated with these illnesses. PMID:26381473

  9. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Promotes Process Outgrowth in Neural Cells and Exerts Protective Effects against Tropodithietic Acid.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Heidi; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment harbors a plethora of bioactive substances, including drug candidates of potential value in the field of neuroscience. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), produced by several algae, corals and higher plants, on cells of the mammalian nervous system, i.e., neuronal N2a and OLN-93 cells as model system for nerve cells and glia, respectively. Additionally, the protective capabilities of DMSP were assessed in cells treated with tropodithietic acid (TDA), a marine metabolite produced by several Roseobacter clade bacteria. Both cell lines, N2a and OLN-93, have previously been shown to be a sensitive target for the action of TDA, and cytotoxic effects of TDA have been connected to the induction of oxidative stress. Our data shows that DMSP promotes process outgrowth and microtubule reorganization and bundling, accompanied by an increase in alpha-tubulin acetylation. Furthermore, DMSP was able to prevent the cytotoxic effects exerted by TDA, including the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of heat shock protein Hsp32 and activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Our study points to the conclusion that DMSP provides an antioxidant defense, not only in algae but also in mammalian neural cells. PMID:27164116

  10. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Promotes Process Outgrowth in Neural Cells and Exerts Protective Effects against Tropodithietic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wichmann, Heidi; Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Simon, Meinhard; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment harbors a plethora of bioactive substances, including drug candidates of potential value in the field of neuroscience. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), produced by several algae, corals and higher plants, on cells of the mammalian nervous system, i.e., neuronal N2a and OLN-93 cells as model system for nerve cells and glia, respectively. Additionally, the protective capabilities of DMSP were assessed in cells treated with tropodithietic acid (TDA), a marine metabolite produced by several Roseobacter clade bacteria. Both cell lines, N2a and OLN-93, have previously been shown to be a sensitive target for the action of TDA, and cytotoxic effects of TDA have been connected to the induction of oxidative stress. Our data shows that DMSP promotes process outgrowth and microtubule reorganization and bundling, accompanied by an increase in alpha-tubulin acetylation. Furthermore, DMSP was able to prevent the cytotoxic effects exerted by TDA, including the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of heat shock protein Hsp32 and activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). Our study points to the conclusion that DMSP provides an antioxidant defense, not only in algae but also in mammalian neural cells. PMID:27164116

  11. Acteoside Binds to Caspase-3 and Exerts Neuroprotection in the Rotenone Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; He, Xiao; Zhao, Yuwu

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by the progressive degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) region. Acteoside has displayed multiple biological functions. Its potential role against PD and the underlying signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we showed that oral administration of acteoside significantly attenuated parkinsonism symptoms in rotenone-induced PD rats. Further, acteoside inhibited rotenone-induced α-synuclein, caspase-3 upregulation and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) downregulation in PD rats. The molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results indicated that acteoside may directly bind to and inhibit caspase-3. Acteoside formed hydrogen bonds with at least six residues of caspase-3: ThrA177, SerA178, GlyA238, SerB339, ArgB341 and TrpB348. In addition, a pi-pi interaction was formed between acteoside and caspase-3’s HisA237, which might further stabilize the complex. MD simulation results demonstrated that the binding affinity of the caspase-3-acteoside complex was higher than that of caspase-3 and its native ligand inhibitor. Together, we show that acteoside binds to caspase-3 and exerts neuroprotection in the rotenone rat model of PD. PMID:27632381

  12. Acteoside Binds to Caspase-3 and Exerts Neuroprotection in the Rotenone Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jiawen; Ren, Jinpeng; Wang, Ying; He, Xiao; Zhao, Yuwu

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the progressive degeneration of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) region. Acteoside has displayed multiple biological functions. Its potential role against PD and the underlying signaling mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we showed that oral administration of acteoside significantly attenuated parkinsonism symptoms in rotenone-induced PD rats. Further, acteoside inhibited rotenone-induced α-synuclein, caspase-3 upregulation and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) downregulation in PD rats. The molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results indicated that acteoside may directly bind to and inhibit caspase-3. Acteoside formed hydrogen bonds with at least six residues of caspase-3: ThrA177, SerA178, GlyA238, SerB339, ArgB341 and TrpB348. In addition, a pi-pi interaction was formed between acteoside and caspase-3's HisA237, which might further stabilize the complex. MD simulation results demonstrated that the binding affinity of the caspase-3-acteoside complex was higher than that of caspase-3 and its native ligand inhibitor. Together, we show that acteoside binds to caspase-3 and exerts neuroprotection in the rotenone rat model of PD. PMID:27632381

  13. 3-Hydroxykynurenine: an intriguing molecule exerting dual actions in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Colín-González, Ana Laura; Maldonado, Perla D; Santamaría, Abel

    2013-01-01

    Kynurenine pathway is gaining attention due to the many metabolic processes in which it has been involved. The tryptophan conversion into several other metabolites through this pathway provides neuronal and redox modulators useful for maintenance of major functions in the brain. However, when physiopathological conditions prevail - i.e. oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and inflammation - preferential formation and accumulation of toxic metabolites could trigger factors for degeneration in neurological disorders. 3-Hydroxykynurenine has been largely described as one of these toxic metabolites capable of inducing oxidative damage and cell death; consequently, this metabolite has been hypothesized to play a pivotal role in different neurological and psychiatric disorders. Supporting evidence has shown altered 3-hydroxykynurenine levels in samples of patients from several disorders. In contrast, some experimental studies have provided evidence of antioxidant and scavenging properties inherent to this molecule. In this review, we explored most of literature favoring one or the other concept, in order to provide an accurate vision on the real participation of this tryptophan metabolite in both experimental paradigms and human brain pathologies. Through this collected evidence, we provide an integrative hypothesis on how 3-hydroxykynurenine is exerting its dual actions in the central nervous system and what will be the course of investigations in this field for the next years.

  14. Innervation by a GABAergic neuron depresses spontaneous release in glutamatergic neurons and unveils the clamping phenotype of synaptotagmin-1.

    PubMed

    Wierda, Keimpe D B; Sørensen, Jakob B

    2014-02-01

    The role of spontaneously occurring release events in glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and their regulation is intensely debated. To study the interdependence of glutamatergic and GABAergic spontaneous release, we compared reciprocally connected "mixed" glutamatergic/GABAergic neuronal pairs from mice cultured on astrocyte islands with "homotypic" glutamatergic or GABAergic pairs and autaptic neurons. We measured mEPSC and mIPSC frequencies simultaneously from both neurons. Neuronal pairs formed both interneuronal synaptic and autaptic connections indiscriminately. We find that whereas mEPSC and mIPSC frequencies did not deviate between autaptic and synaptic connections, the frequency of mEPSCs in mixed pairs was strongly depressed compared with either autaptic neurons or glutamatergic pairs. Simultaneous imaging of synapses, or comparison to evoked release amplitudes, showed that this decrease was not caused by fewer active synapses. The mEPSC frequency was negatively correlated with the mIPSC frequency, indicating interdependence. Moreover, the reduction in mEPSC frequency was abolished when established pairs were exposed to bicuculline for 3 d, but not by long-term incubation with tetrodotoxin, indicating that spontaneous GABA release downregulates mEPSC frequency. Further investigations showed that knockout of synaptotagmin-1 did not affect mEPSC frequencies in either glutamatergic autaptic neurons or in glutamatergic pairs. However, in mixed glutamatergic/GABAergic pairs, mEPSC frequencies were increased by a factor of four in the synaptotagmin-1-null neurons, which is in line with data obtained from mixed cultures. The effect persisted after incubation with BAPTA-AM. We conclude that spontaneous GABA release exerts control over mEPSC release, and GABAergic innervation of glutamatergic neurons unveils the unclamping phenotype of the synaptotagmin-1-null neurons.

  15. Spectral and temporal processing in rat posterior auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Pritesh K; Rathbun, Daniel L; Moucha, Raluca; Engineer, Navzer D; Kilgard, Michael P

    2008-02-01

    The rat auditory cortex is divided anatomically into several areas, but little is known about the functional differences in information processing between these areas. To determine the filter properties of rat posterior auditory field (PAF) neurons, we compared neurophysiological responses to simple tones, frequency modulated (FM) sweeps, and amplitude modulated noise and tones with responses of primary auditory cortex (A1) neurons. PAF neurons have excitatory receptive fields that are on average 65% broader than A1 neurons. The broader receptive fields of PAF neurons result in responses to narrow and broadband inputs that are stronger than A1. In contrast to A1, we found little evidence for an orderly topographic gradient in PAF based on frequency. These neurons exhibit latencies that are twice as long as A1. In response to modulated tones and noise, PAF neurons adapt to repeated stimuli at significantly slower rates. Unlike A1, neurons in PAF rarely exhibit facilitation to rapidly repeated sounds. Neurons in PAF do not exhibit strong selectivity for rate or direction of narrowband one octave FM sweeps. These results indicate that PAF, like nonprimary visual fields, processes sensory information on larger spectral and longer temporal scales than primary cortex.

  16. Spectral and Temporal Processing in Rat Posterior Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Pritesh K.; Rathbun, Daniel L.; Moucha, Raluca; Engineer, Navzer D.; Kilgard, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    The rat auditory cortex is divided anatomically into several areas, but little is known about the functional differences in information processing between these areas. To determine the filter properties of rat posterior auditory field (PAF) neurons, we compared neurophysiological responses to simple tones, frequency modulated (FM) sweeps, and amplitude modulated noise and tones with responses of primary auditory cortex (A1) neurons. PAF neurons have excitatory receptive fields that are on average 65% broader than A1 neurons. The broader receptive fields of PAF neurons result in responses to narrow and broadband inputs that are stronger than A1. In contrast to A1, we found little evidence for an orderly topographic gradient in PAF based on frequency. These neurons exhibit latencies that are twice as long as A1. In response to modulated tones and noise, PAF neurons adapt to repeated stimuli at significantly slower rates. Unlike A1, neurons in PAF rarely exhibit facilitation to rapidly repeated sounds. Neurons in PAF do not exhibit strong selectivity for rate or direction of narrowband one octave FM sweeps. These results indicate that PAF, like nonprimary visual fields, processes sensory information on larger spectral and longer temporal scales than primary cortex. PMID:17615251

  17. Behavioural correlates of combinatorial versus temporal features of odour codes

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Debajit; Li, Chao; Peterson, Steven; Padovano, William; Katta, Nalin; Raman, Baranidharan

    2015-01-01

    Most sensory stimuli evoke spiking responses that are distributed across neurons and are temporally structured. Whether the temporal structure of ensemble activity is modulated to facilitate different neural computations is not known. Here, we investigated this issue in the insect olfactory system. We found that an odourant can generate synchronous or asynchronous spiking activity across a neural ensemble in the antennal lobe circuit depending on its relative novelty with respect to a preceding stimulus. Regardless of variations in temporal spiking patterns, the activated combinations of neurons robustly represented stimulus identity. Consistent with this interpretation, locusts reliably recognized both solitary and sequential introductions of trained odourants in a quantitative behavioural assay. However, predictable behavioural responses across locusts were observed only to novel stimuli that evoked synchronized spiking patterns across neural ensembles. Hence, our results indicate that the combinatorial ensemble response encodes for stimulus identity, whereas the temporal structure of the ensemble response selectively emphasizes novel stimuli. PMID:25912016

  18. Parallel Midbrain Microcircuits Perform Independent Temporal Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Huguenard, John; Knudsen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to select the most important information and suppress distracting information is crucial for survival. The midbrain contains a network critical for the selection of the strongest stimulus for gaze and attention. In avians, the optic tectum (OT; called the superior colliculus in mammals) and the GABAergic nucleus isthmi pars magnocellularis (Imc) cooperate in the selection process. In the chicken, OT layer 10, located in intermediate layers, responds to afferent input with gamma periodicity (25–75 Hz), measured at the level of individual neurons and the local field potential. In contrast, Imc neurons, which receive excitatory input from layer 10 neurons, respond with tonic, unusually high discharge rates (>150 spikes/s). In this study, we reveal the source of this high-rate inhibitory activity: layer 10 neurons that project to the Imc possess specialized biophysical properties that enable them to transform afferent drive into high firing rates (∼130 spikes/s), whereas neighboring layer 10 neurons, which project elsewhere, transform afferent drive into lower-frequency, periodic discharge patterns. Thus, the intermediate layers of the OT contain parallel, intercalated microcircuits that generate different temporal patterns of activity linked to the functions of their respective downstream targets. PMID:24920618

  19. Insulin suppresses ghrelin-induced calcium signaling in neuropeptide Y neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Maejima, Yuko; Kohno, Daisuke; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Yada, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) play an important role in feeding regulation. Plasma levels of ghrelin and insulin show reciprocal dynamics before and after meals. We hypothesized that ghrelin and insulin also exert reciprocal effects on ARC NPY neurons. Cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was measured by fura-2 microfluorometry in single neurons isolated from ARC of adult rats, followed by immunocytochemical identification of NPY neurons. Ghrelin at 10−10 M increased [Ca2+]i in isolated ARC neurons, and co-administration of insulin concentration-dependently suppressed the ghrelin-induced [Ca2+]i increases. Insulin at 10−16 M, 10−14 M, 10−12 M and 10−10 M counteracted ghrelin action in 26%, 41%, 61% and 53% of ghrelin-responsive neurons, respectively, showing a maximal effect at 10−12 M, the estimated postprandial concentration of insulin in the brain. The majority (>70%) of the ghrelin-activated insulin-inhibited neurons were shown to contain NPY. Double-immunohistochemistry revealed that 85% of NPY neurons in ARC express insulin receptors. These data demonstrate that insulin directly interacts with ARC NPY neurons and counteracts ghrelin action. Our results suggest that postprandial increase in plasma insulin/ghrelin ratio and insulin inhibition of ghrelin action on ARC NPY neurons cooperate to effectively inhibit the neuron activity and terminate feeding. PMID:22081645

  20. Temporal Non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filk, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    In this article I investigate several possibilities to define the concept of "temporal non-locality" within the standard framework of quantum theory. In particular, I analyze the notions of "temporally non-local states", "temporally non-local events" and "temporally non-local observables". The idea of temporally non-local events is already inherent in the standard formalism of quantum mechanics, and Basil Hiley recently defined an operator in order to measure the degree of such a temporal non-locality. The concept of temporally non-local states enters as soon as "clock-representing states" are introduced in the context of special and general relativity. It is discussed in which way temporally non-local measurements may find an interesting application for experiments which test temporal versions of Bell inequalities.

  1. Temporal Ventriloquism in a Purely Temporal Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartcher-O'Brien, Jessica; Alais, David

    2011-01-01

    This study examines how audiovisual signals are combined in time for a temporal analogue of the ventriloquist effect in a purely temporal context, that is, no spatial grounding of signals or other spatial facilitation. Observers were presented with two successive intervals, each defined by a 1250-ms tone, and indicated in which interval a brief…

  2. Corticospinal mirror neurons.

    PubMed

    Kraskov, A; Philipp, R; Waldert, S; Vigneswaran, G; Quallo, M M; Lemon, R N

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited 'classical' mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation ('suppression mirror-neurons'). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others.

  3. Dendritic and Axonal Architecture of Individual Pyramidal Neurons across Layers of Adult Human Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Hemanth; Verhoog, Matthijs B.; Doreswamy, Keerthi K.; Eyal, Guy; Aardse, Romy; Lodder, Brendan N.; Goriounova, Natalia A.; Asamoah, Boateng; B. Brakspear, A.B. Clementine; Groot, Colin; van der Sluis, Sophie; Testa-Silva, Guilherme; Obermayer, Joshua; Boudewijns, Zimbo S.R.M.; Narayanan, Rajeevan T.; Baayen, Johannes C.; Segev, Idan; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; de Kock, Christiaan P.J.

    2015-01-01

    The size and shape of dendrites and axons are strong determinants of neuronal information processing. Our knowledge on neuronal structure and function is primarily based on brains of laboratory animals. Whether it translates to human is not known since quantitative data on “full” human neuronal morphologies are lacking. Here, we obtained human brain tissue during resection surgery and reconstructed basal and apical dendrites and axons of individual neurons across all cortical layers in temporal cortex (Brodmann area 21). Importantly, morphologies did not correlate to etiology, disease severity, or disease duration. Next, we show that human L(ayer) 2 and L3 pyramidal neurons have 3-fold larger dendritic length and increased branch complexity with longer segments compared with temporal cortex neurons from macaque and mouse. Unsupervised cluster analysis classified 88% of human L2 and L3 neurons into human-specific clusters distinct from mouse and macaque neurons. Computational modeling of passive electrical properties to assess the functional impact of large dendrites indicates stronger signal attenuation of electrical inputs compared with mouse. We thus provide a quantitative analysis of “full” human neuron morphologies and present direct evidence that human neurons are not “scaled-up” versions of rodent or macaque neurons, but have unique structural and functional properties. PMID:26318661

  4. NEURON and Python.

    PubMed

    Hines, Michael L; Davison, Andrew P; Muller, Eilif

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  5. Necrostatin-1 protection of dopaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing-ru; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Sheng-kui; Yang, Long; Yin, Jia-le; Cao, Jun-ping; Cheng, Yan-bo

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is characterized by programmed necrotic cell death and autophagic activation and might be involved in the death process of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that necrostatin-1 could block necroptosis and give protection to dopaminergic neurons. There is likely to be crosstalk between necroptosis and other cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and autophagy. PC12 cells were pretreated with necroststin-1 1 hour before exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine. We examined cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression patterns of apoptotic and necroptotic death signaling proteins. The results showed that the autophagy/lysosomal pathway is involved in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced death process of PC12 cells. Mitochondrial disability induced overactive autophagy, increased cathepsin B expression, and diminished Bcl-2 expression. Necrostatin-1 within a certain concentration range (5–30 μM) elevated the viability of PC12 cells, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited excessive autophagy, reduced the expression of LC3-II and cathepsin B, and increased Bcl-2 expression. These findings suggest that necrostatin-1 exerted a protective effect against injury on dopaminergic neurons. Necrostatin-1 interacts with the apoptosis signaling pathway during this process. This pathway could be a new neuroprotective and therapeutic target in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26330837

  6. Anticipation selectively enhances interference exerted by pictures of negative valence.

    PubMed

    Kleinsorge, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that anticipation of negatively valenced pictures strongly increases interference exerted by the actual presentation of these pictures, while anticipation of positively valenced pictures leaves the impact of the actual presentation of positive pictures unaffected. However, there is some ambiguity as to whether anticipation of negative valence generally increases the impact of all emotional stimuli, or whether the effect of anticipation is specific for stimuli of negative valence. In the present experiments, different anticipation conditions were contrasted that differed with respect to the specificity of the information on which anticipations could be based. The data show that all anticipation conditions that entailed the possibility of the presentation of unpleasant stimuli selectively enhanced the impact of negatively valenced stimuli without affecting the impact of positively valenced stimuli.

  7. DCP-LA Exerts an Antiaging Action on the Skin.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the possibility for the linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) as an antiaging compound for the skin by assaying senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal), a biomarker of senescence and cell viability. The nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) increased in SA-β-Gal-positive cells in cultured human fibroblasts and mouse keratinocytes, and DCP-LA significantly inhibited the effect of SNP. Moreover, SNP induced cell death in cultured mouse keratinocytes, and DCP-LA significantly prevented NO stress-induced death of keratinocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that DCP-LA exerts an antiaging action on the skin. PMID:27310436

  8. Estimation of the exertion requirements of coal mining work

    SciTech Connect

    Harber, P.; Tamimie, J.; Emory, J.

    1984-02-01

    The work requirements of coal mining work were estimated by studying a group of 12 underground coal miners. A two level (rest, 300 kg X m/min) test was performed to estimate the linear relationship between each subject's heart rate and oxygen consumption. Then, heart rates were recorded during coal mining work with a Holter type recorder. From these data, the distributions of oxygen consumptions during work were estimated, allowing characterization of the range of exertion throughout the work day. The average median estimated oxygen consumption was 3.3 METS, the average 70th percentile was 4.3 METS, and the average 90th percentile was 6.3 METS. These results should be considered when assessing an individual's occupational fitness.

  9. DCP-LA Exerts an Antiaging Action on the Skin.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the possibility for the linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) as an antiaging compound for the skin by assaying senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal), a biomarker of senescence and cell viability. The nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) increased in SA-β-Gal-positive cells in cultured human fibroblasts and mouse keratinocytes, and DCP-LA significantly inhibited the effect of SNP. Moreover, SNP induced cell death in cultured mouse keratinocytes, and DCP-LA significantly prevented NO stress-induced death of keratinocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that DCP-LA exerts an antiaging action on the skin.

  10. Exertional heat stroke and acute liver failure: a late dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Rodeia, Simão C; Silvestre, Joana; Póvoa, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Heat stroke (HS) is defined as a severe elevation of core body temperature along with central nervous system dysfunction. Exertional heat stroke (EHS) with acute liver failure (ALF) is a rare condition. The authors report the case of a 25-year-old man with a history of cognitive enhancers' intake who developed hyperthermia and neurological impairment while running an outdoor marathon. The patient was cooled and returned to normal body temperature after 6 h. He subsequently developed ALF and was transferred to the intensive care unit. Over-the-counter drug intake may have been related to heat intolerance and contributed to the event. The patient was successfully treated with conservative measures. In the presence of EHS, it is crucial to act promptly with aggressive total body cooling, in order to prevent progression of the clinical syndrome. Liver function must also be monitored, since it can be a late organ dysfunction. PMID:26969359

  11. Exertional heat stroke: new concepts regarding cause and care.

    PubMed

    Casa, Douglas J; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Kenny, Glen P; O'Connor, Francis G; Huggins, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    When athletes, warfighters, and laborers perform intense exercise in the heat, the risk of exertional heat stroke (EHS) is ever present. The recent data regarding the fatalities due to EHS within the confines of organized American sport are not promising: during the past 35 years, the highest number of deaths in a 5-year period occurred from 2005 to 2009. This reminds us that, regardless of the advancements of knowledge in the area of EHS prevention, recognition, and treatment, knowledge has not been translated into practice. This article addresses important issues related to EHS cause and care. We focus on the predisposing factors, errors in care, physiology of cold water immersion, and return-to-play or duty considerations.

  12. EEG, temporal correlations, and avalanches.

    PubMed

    Benayoun, Marc; Kohrman, Michael; Cowan, Jack; van Drongelen, Wim

    2010-12-01

    Epileptiform activity in the EEG is frequently characterized by rhythmic, correlated patterns or synchronized bursts. Long-range temporal correlations (LRTC) are described by power law scaling of the autocorrelation function and have been observed in scalp and intracranial EEG recordings. Synchronous large-amplitude bursts (also called neuronal avalanches) have been observed in local field potentials both in vitro and in vivo. This article explores the presence of neuronal avalanches in scalp and intracranial EEG in the context of LRTC. Results indicate that both scalp and intracranial EEG show LRTC, with larger scaling exponents in scalp recordings than intracranial. A subset of analyzed recordings also show avalanche behavior, indicating that avalanches may be associated with LRTC. Artificial test signals reveal a linear relationship between the scaling exponent measured by detrended fluctuation analysis and the exponent of the avalanche size distribution. Analysis and evaluation of simulated data reveal that preprocessing of EEG (squaring the signal or applying a filter) affect the ability of detrended fluctuation analysis to reliably measure LRTC.

  13. Physiological responses and perceived exertion during cycling with superimposed electromyostimulation.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Patrick; Schaerk, Jonas; Achtzehn, Silvia; Kleinöder, Heinz; Bloch, Wilhelm; Mester, Joachim

    2012-09-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate and to quantify the effects of local electromyostimulation (EMS) during cycling on the cardiorespiratory system, muscle metabolism, and perceived exertion compared with cycling with no EMS. Ten healthy men (age: 24.6 ± 3.2 years, V[Combining Dot Above]O2max: 54.1 ± 6.0 ml·min·kg) performed 3 incremental cycle ergometer step tests, 1 without and 2 with EMS (30 and 85 Hz) until volitional exhaustion. Lactate values and respiratory exchange ratio were significantly higher at intensities ≥75% peak power output (PPO) when EMS was applied. Bicarbonate concentration, base excess (BE), and Pco2 were significantly lower when EMS was applied compared with the control at intensities ≥75% PPO. Saliva cortisol levels increased because of the exercise but were unaffected by EMS. Furthermore, EMS showed greater effects on CK levels 24 hours postexercise than normal cycling did. Rating of perceived exertion was significantly higher at 100% PPO with EMS. No statistical differences were found for heart rate, pH, and Po2 between the tested cycling modes. The main findings of this study are greater metabolic changes (lactate, respiratory exchange ratio, BE, (Equation is included in full-text article.), Pco2) during cycling with EMS compared with normal cycling independent of frequency, mainly visible at higher work rates. Because metabolic alterations are important for the induction of cellular signaling cascades and adaptations, these results lead to the hypothesis that applied EMS stimulations during cycling exercise might be an enhancing stimulus for skeletal muscle metabolism and related adaptations. Thus, superimposed EMS application during cycling could be beneficial to aerobic performance enhancements in athletes and in patients who cannot perform high workloads. However, the higher demand on skeletal muscles involved must be considered. PMID:22067251

  14. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome versus Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; Sunnquist, Madison; Brown, Abigail; Newton, Julia L.; Strand, Elin Bolle; Vernon, Suzanne D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine has recommended a change in the name and criteria for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), renaming the illness Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease (SEID). The new SEID case definition requires substantial reductions or impairments in the ability to engage in pre-illness activities, unrefreshing sleep, post-exertional malaise, and either cognitive impairment or orthostatic intolerance. Purpose In the current study, samples were generated through several different methods and were used to compare this new case definition to previous case definitions for CFS, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME-ICC), Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS), as well as a case definition developed through empirical methods. Methods We used a cross-sectional design with samples from tertiary care settings, a biobank sample, and other forums. 796 patients from the US, Great Britain, and Norway completed the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire. Results Findings indicated that the SEID criteria identified 88% of participants in the samples analyzed, which is comparable to the 92% that met the Fukuda criteria. The SEID case definition was compared to a four item empiric criteria, and findings indicated that the four item empiric criteria identified a smaller, more functionally limited and symptomatic group of patients. Conclusion The recently developed SEID criteria appears to identify a group comparable in size to the Fukuda et al. criteria, but a larger group of patients than the Canadian ME/CFS and ME criteria, and selects more patients who have less impairment and fewer symptoms than a four item empiric criteria. PMID:26345409

  15. Estimating nonstationary input signals from a single neuronal spike train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hideaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-11-01

    Neurons temporally integrate input signals, translating them into timed output spikes. Because neurons nonperiodically emit spikes, examining spike timing can reveal information about input signals, which are determined by activities in the populations of excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic neurons. Although a number of mathematical methods have been developed to estimate such input parameters as the mean and fluctuation of the input current, these techniques are based on the unrealistic assumption that presynaptic activity is constant over time. Here, we propose tracking temporal variations in input parameters with a two-step analysis method. First, nonstationary firing characteristics comprising the firing rate and non-Poisson irregularity are estimated from a spike train using a computationally feasible state-space algorithm. Then, information about the firing characteristics is converted into likely input parameters over time using a transformation formula, which was constructed by inverting the neuronal forward transformation of the input current to output spikes. By analyzing spike trains recorded in vivo, we found that neuronal input parameters are similar in the primary visual cortex V1 and middle temporal area, whereas parameters in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus were markedly different.

  16. Estimating nonstationary input signals from a single neuronal spike train.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hideaki; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2012-11-01

    Neurons temporally integrate input signals, translating them into timed output spikes. Because neurons nonperiodically emit spikes, examining spike timing can reveal information about input signals, which are determined by activities in the populations of excitatory and inhibitory presynaptic neurons. Although a number of mathematical methods have been developed to estimate such input parameters as the mean and fluctuation of the input current, these techniques are based on the unrealistic assumption that presynaptic activity is constant over time. Here, we propose tracking temporal variations in input parameters with a two-step analysis method. First, nonstationary firing characteristics comprising the firing rate and non-Poisson irregularity are estimated from a spike train using a computationally feasible state-space algorithm. Then, information about the firing characteristics is converted into likely input parameters over time using a transformation formula, which was constructed by inverting the neuronal forward transformation of the input current to output spikes. By analyzing spike trains recorded in vivo, we found that neuronal input parameters are similar in the primary visual cortex V1 and middle temporal area, whereas parameters in the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus were markedly different.

  17. Rational modulation of neuronal processing with applied electric fields.

    PubMed

    Bikson, Marom; Radman, Thomas; Datta, Abhishek

    2006-01-01

    Traditional approaches to electrical stimulation, using trains of supra-threshold pulses to trigger action potentials, may be replaced or augmented by using 'rational' sub-threshold stimulation protocols that incorporate knowledge of single neuron geometry, inhomogeneous tissue properties, and nervous system information coding. Sub-threshold stimulation, at intensities (well) below those sufficient to trigger action potentials, may none-the-less exert a profound effect on brain function through modulation of concomitant neuronal activity. For example, small DC fields may coherently polarize a network of neurons and thus modulate the simultaneous processing of afferent synaptic input as well as resulting changes in synaptic plasticity. Through 'activity-dependent plasticity', sub-threshold fields may allow specific targeting of pathological networks and are thus particularly suitable to overcome the poor anatomical focus of noninvasive (transcranial) electrical stimulation. Additional approaches to improve targeting in transcranial stimulation using novel electrode configurations are also introduced.

  18. The Representation of Information about Faces in the Temporal and Frontal Lobes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolls, Edmund T.

    2007-01-01

    Neurophysiological evidence is described showing that some neurons in the macaque inferior temporal visual cortex have responses that are invariant with respect to the position, size and view of faces and objects, and that these neurons show rapid processing and rapid learning. Which face or object is present is encoded using a distributed…

  19. Spike sorting of synchronous spikes from local neuron ensembles.

    PubMed

    Franke, Felix; Pröpper, Robert; Alle, Henrik; Meier, Philipp; Geiger, Jörg R P; Obermayer, Klaus; Munk, Matthias H J

    2015-10-01

    Synchronous spike discharge of cortical neurons is thought to be a fingerprint of neuronal cooperativity. Because neighboring neurons are more densely connected to one another than neurons that are located further apart, near-synchronous spike discharge can be expected to be prevalent and it might provide an important basis for cortical computations. Using microelectrodes to record local groups of neurons does not allow for the reliable separation of synchronous spikes from different cells, because available spike sorting algorithms cannot correctly resolve the temporally overlapping waveforms. We show that high spike sorting performance of in vivo recordings, including overlapping spikes, can be achieved with a recently developed filter-based template matching procedure. Using tetrodes with a three-dimensional structure, we demonstrate with simulated data and ground truth in vitro data, obtained by dual intracellular recording of two neurons located next to a tetrode, that the spike sorting of synchronous spikes can be as successful as the spike sorting of nonoverlapping spikes and that the spatial information provided by multielectrodes greatly reduces the error rates. We apply the method to tetrode recordings from the prefrontal cortex of behaving primates, and we show that overlapping spikes can be identified and assigned to individual neurons to study synchronous activity in local groups of neurons. PMID:26289473

  20. Spike sorting of synchronous spikes from local neuron ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Pröpper, Robert; Alle, Henrik; Meier, Philipp; Geiger, Jörg R. P.; Obermayer, Klaus; Munk, Matthias H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous spike discharge of cortical neurons is thought to be a fingerprint of neuronal cooperativity. Because neighboring neurons are more densely connected to one another than neurons that are located further apart, near-synchronous spike discharge can be expected to be prevalent and it might provide an important basis for cortical computations. Using microelectrodes to record local groups of neurons does not allow for the reliable separation of synchronous spikes from different cells, because available spike sorting algorithms cannot correctly resolve the temporally overlapping waveforms. We show that high spike sorting performance of in vivo recordings, including overlapping spikes, can be achieved with a recently developed filter-based template matching procedure. Using tetrodes with a three-dimensional structure, we demonstrate with simulated data and ground truth in vitro data, obtained by dual intracellular recording of two neurons located next to a tetrode, that the spike sorting of synchronous spikes can be as successful as the spike sorting of nonoverlapping spikes and that the spatial information provided by multielectrodes greatly reduces the error rates. We apply the method to tetrode recordings from the prefrontal cortex of behaving primates, and we show that overlapping spikes can be identified and assigned to individual neurons to study synchronous activity in local groups of neurons. PMID:26289473

  1. Diverse precerebellar neurons share similar intrinsic excitability.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, Kristine E; McElvain, Lauren E; du Lac, Sascha

    2011-11-16

    The cerebellum dedicates a majority of the brain's neurons to processing a wide range of sensory, motor, and cognitive signals. Stereotyped circuitry within the cerebellar cortex suggests that similar computations are performed throughout the cerebellum, but little is known about whether diverse precerebellar neurons are specialized for the nature of the information they convey. In vivo recordings indicate that firing responses to sensory or motor stimuli vary dramatically across different precerebellar nuclei, but whether this reflects diverse synaptic inputs or differentially tuned intrinsic excitability has not been determined. We targeted whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to neurons in eight precerebellar nuclei which were retrogradely labeled from different regions of the cerebellum in mice. Intrinsic physiology was compared across neurons in the medial vestibular, external cuneate, lateral reticular, prepositus hypoglossi, supragenual, Roller/intercalatus, reticularis tegmenti pontis, and pontine nuclei. Within the firing domain, precerebellar neurons were remarkably similar. Firing faithfully followed temporally modulated inputs, could be sustained at high rates, and was a linear function of input current over a wide range of inputs and firing rates. Pharmacological analyses revealed common expression of Kv3 currents, which were essential for a wide linear firing range, and of SK (small-conductance calcium-activated potassium) currents, which were essential for a wide linear input range. In contrast, membrane properties below spike threshold varied considerably within and across precerebellar nuclei, as evidenced by variability in postinhibitory rebound firing. Our findings indicate that diverse precerebellar neurons perform similar scaling computations on their inputs but may be differentially tuned to synaptic inhibition. PMID:22090493

  2. Transporting mitochondria in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Course, Meredith M.; Wang, Xinnan

    2016-01-01

    Neurons demand vast and vacillating supplies of energy. As the key contributors of this energy, as well as primary pools of calcium and signaling molecules, mitochondria must be where the neuron needs them, when the neuron needs them. The unique architecture and length of neurons, however, make them a complex system for mitochondria to navigate. To add to this difficulty, mitochondria are synthesized mainly in the soma, but must be transported as far as the distant terminals of the neuron. Similarly, damaged mitochondria—which can cause oxidative stress to the neuron—must fuse with healthy mitochondria to repair the damage, return all the way back to the soma for disposal, or be eliminated at the terminals. Increasing evidence suggests that the improper distribution of mitochondria in neurons can lead to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we will discuss the machinery and regulatory systems used to properly distribute mitochondria in neurons, and how this knowledge has been leveraged to better understand neurological dysfunction. PMID:27508065

  3. How microglia kill neurons.

    PubMed

    Brown, Guy C; Vilalta, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are resident brain macrophages that become inflammatory activated in most brain pathologies. Microglia normally protect neurons, but may accidentally kill neurons when attempting to limit infections or damage, and this may be more common with degenerative disease as there was no significant selection pressure on the aged brain in the past. A number of mechanisms by which activated microglia kill neurons have been identified, including: (i) stimulation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX) to produce superoxide and derivative oxidants, (ii) expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) producing NO and derivative oxidants, (iii) release of glutamate and glutaminase, (iv) release of TNFα, (v) release of cathepsin B, (vi) phagocytosis of stressed neurons, and (vii) decreased release of nutritive BDNF and IGF-1. PHOX stimulation contributes to microglial activation, but is not directly neurotoxic unless NO is present. NO is normally neuroprotective, but can react with superoxide to produce neurotoxic peroxynitrite, or in the presence of hypoxia inhibit mitochondrial respiration. Glutamate can be released by glia or neurons, but is neurotoxic only if the neurons are depolarised, for example as a result of mitochondrial inhibition. TNFα is normally neuroprotective, but can become toxic if caspase-8 or NF-κB activation are inhibited. If the above mechanisms do not kill neurons, they may still stress the neurons sufficiently to make them susceptible to phagocytosis by activated microglia. We review here whether microglial killing of neurons is an artefact, makes evolutionary sense or contributes in common neuropathologies and by what mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection.

  4. Neuron-derived IgG protects dopaminergic neurons from insult by 6-OHDA and activates microglia through the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Niu, Na; Wang, Mingyu; McNutt, Michael A; Zhang, Donghong; Zhang, Baogang; Lu, Shijun; Liu, Yuqing; Liu, Zhihui

    2013-08-01

    Oxidative and immune attacks from the environment or microglia have been implicated in the loss of dopaminergic neurons of Parkinson's disease. The role of IgG which is an important immunologic molecule in the process of Parkinson's disease has been unclear. Evidence suggests that IgG can be produced by neurons in addition to its traditionally recognized source B lymphocytes, but its function in neurons is poorly understood. In this study, extensive expression of neuron-derived IgG was demonstrated in dopaminergic neurons of human and rat mesencephalon. With an in vitro Parkinson's disease model, we found that neuron-derived IgG can improve the survival and reduce apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons induced by 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity, and also depress the release of NO from microglia triggered by 6-hydroxydopamine. Expression of TNF-α and IL-10 in microglia was elevated to protective levels by neuron-derived IgG at a physiologic level via the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways and microglial activation could be attenuated by IgG blocking. All these data suggested that neuron-derived IgG may exert a self-protective function by activating microglia properly, and IgG may be involved in maintaining immunity homeostasis in the central nervous system and serve as an active factor under pathological conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

  5. An autopsy case of neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease with regard to immunophenotypic and topographical analysis of the neuronal inclusions.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kimiko; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Ueda, Kayo; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Kyoko; Sakoda, Saburo

    2015-12-01

    We report an autopsy case of neuronal intermediate filament inclusion disease (NIFID), in which pyramidal motor dysfunction preceded cognitive disturbance for 3 years from the onset. A 41-year-old Japanese man presented progressive spastic tetraparesis followed by cognitive impairment. His neurological symptoms gradually deteriorated and he died of pneumonia 16 years from the onset. His brain showed severe generalized atrophy with enlargement of ventricles. The microscopic examination revealed severe neuronal loss with gliosis and sponginess predominantly in the fronto-temporal cortices, caudate and putamen. Many hyaline conglomerate inclusions (HC) without immunoreactivity for 'fused in sarcoma' protein (FUS) and some granular and small round FUS-immunoreactive (FUS-ir) neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCI) were observed in the remaining neurons. Some neurons with HC had small basophilic inclusions which showed positive FUS-ir, attached to HC in the cytoplasm. Otherwise, FUS-ir large compact inclusions (so-called Pick-like) were also observed but were scarce. In the cerebral cortex and the neostriatum, frequency of the inclusions was well correlated with neuronal loss. In the brainstem, neuronal loss was mild and FUS-ir inclusions dominated. In the subthalamic nucleus and red nucleus, there was no HC but there were many FUS-ir inclusions without neuronal loss. The above findings suggest that cytoplasmic mislocalization and aggregation of FUS appear at the early stage of the disease, and the FUS aggregate process may not be a direct precedent structure of HC.

  6. Emergence of Slow-Switching Assemblies in Structured Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Michael T.; Billeh, Yazan N.; Anastassiou, Costas A.; Koch, Christof; Barahona, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Unraveling the interplay between connectivity and spatio-temporal dynamics in neuronal networks is a key step to advance our understanding of neuronal information processing. Here we investigate how particular features of network connectivity underpin the propensity of neural networks to generate slow-switching assembly (SSA) dynamics, i.e., sustained epochs of increased firing within assemblies of neurons which transition slowly between different assemblies throughout the network. We show that the emergence of SSA activity is linked to spectral properties of the asymmetric synaptic weight matrix. In particular, the leading eigenvalues that dictate the slow dynamics exhibit a gap with respect to the bulk of the spectrum, and the associated Schur vectors exhibit a measure of block-localization on groups of neurons, thus resulting in coherent dynamical activity on those groups. Through simple rate models, we gain analytical understanding of the origin and importance of the spectral gap, and use these insights to develop new network topologies with alternative connectivity paradigms which also display SSA activity. Specifically, SSA dynamics involving excitatory and inhibitory neurons can be achieved by modifying the connectivity patterns between both types of neurons. We also show that SSA activity can occur at multiple timescales reflecting a hierarchy in the connectivity, and demonstrate the emergence of SSA in small-world like networks. Our work provides a step towards understanding how network structure (uncovered through advancements in neuroanatomy and connectomics) can impact on spatio-temporal neural activity and constrain the resulting dynamics. PMID:26176664

  7. Emergence of Slow-Switching Assemblies in Structured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Michael T; Billeh, Yazan N; Anastassiou, Costas A; Koch, Christof; Barahona, Mauricio

    2015-07-01

    Unraveling the interplay between connectivity and spatio-temporal dynamics in neuronal networks is a key step to advance our understanding of neuronal information processing. Here we investigate how particular features of network connectivity underpin the propensity of neural networks to generate slow-switching assembly (SSA) dynamics, i.e., sustained epochs of increased firing within assemblies of neurons which transition slowly between different assemblies throughout the network. We show that the emergence of SSA activity is linked to spectral properties of the asymmetric synaptic weight matrix. In particular, the leading eigenvalues that dictate the slow dynamics exhibit a gap with respect to the bulk of the spectrum, and the associated Schur vectors exhibit a measure of block-localization on groups of neurons, thus resulting in coherent dynamical activity on those groups. Through simple rate models, we gain analytical understanding of the origin and importance of the spectral gap, and use these insights to develop new network topologies with alternative connectivity paradigms which also display SSA activity. Specifically, SSA dynamics involving excitatory and inhibitory neurons can be achieved by modifying the connectivity patterns between both types of neurons. We also show that SSA activity can occur at multiple timescales reflecting a hierarchy in the connectivity, and demonstrate the emergence of SSA in small-world like networks. Our work provides a step towards understanding how network structure (uncovered through advancements in neuroanatomy and connectomics) can impact on spatio-temporal neural activity and constrain the resulting dynamics.

  8. Neurobehavioral Mechanisms of Temporal Processing Deficits in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Deborah L.; Castillo, Gabriel N.; Greenberg, Paul A.; Song, David D.; Lessig, Stephanie; Lee, Roland R.; Rao, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Parkinson's disease (PD) disrupts temporal processing, but the neuronal sources of deficits and their response to dopamine (DA) therapy are not understood. Though the striatum and DA transmission are thought to be essential for timekeeping, potential working memory (WM) and executive problems could also disrupt timing. Methodology/Findings The present study addressed these issues by testing controls and PD volunteers ‘on’ and ‘off’ DA therapy as they underwent fMRI while performing a time-perception task. To distinguish systems associated with abnormalities in temporal and non-temporal processes, we separated brain activity during encoding and decision-making phases of a trial. Whereas both phases involved timekeeping, the encoding and decision phases emphasized WM and executive processes, respectively. The methods enabled exploration of both the amplitude and temporal dynamics of neural activity. First, we found that time-perception deficits were associated with striatal, cortical, and cerebellar dysfunction. Unlike studies of timed movement, our results could not be attributed to traditional roles of the striatum and cerebellum in movement. Second, for the first time we identified temporal and non-temporal sources of impaired time perception. Striatal dysfunction was found during both phases consistent with its role in timekeeping. Activation was also abnormal in a WM network (middle-frontal and parietal cortex, lateral cerebellum) during encoding and a network that modulates executive and memory functions (parahippocampus, posterior cingulate) during decision making. Third, hypoactivation typified neuronal dysfunction in PD, but was sometimes characterized by abnormal temporal dynamics (e.g., lagged, prolonged) that were not due to longer response times. Finally, DA therapy did not alleviate timing deficits. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that impaired timing in PD arises from nigrostriatal and mesocortical dysfunction in

  9. Pharmacologic activation of mitochondrial biogenesis exerts widespread beneficial effects in a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Johri, Ashu; Calingasan, Noel Y; Hennessey, Thomas M; Sharma, Abhijeet; Yang, Lichuan; Wille, Elizabeth; Chandra, Abhishek; Beal, M Flint

    2012-03-01

    There is substantial evidence that impairment of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ-coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) levels and activity play an important role in Huntington's disease (HD) pathogenesis. We tested whether pharmacologic treatment with the pan-PPAR agonist bezafibrate would correct a deficiency of PGC-1α and exert beneficial effects in a transgenic mouse model of HD. We found that administration of bezafibrate in the diet restored levels of PGC-1α, PPARs and downstream genes to levels which occur in wild-type mice. There were significant improvements in phenotype and survival. In the striatum, astrogliosis and neuronal atrophy were attenuated and numbers of mitochondria were increased. Bezafibrate treatment prevented conversion of type I oxidative to type II glycolytic muscle fibers and increased the numbers of muscle mitochondria. Finally, bezafibrate rescued lipid accumulation and apparent vacuolization of brown adipose tissue in the HD mice. These findings provide strong evidence that treatment with bezafibrate exerts neuroprotective effects which may be beneficial in the treatment of HD. PMID:22095692

  10. A model of the temporal dynamics of multisensory enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Benjamin A.; Stein, Barry E.

    2014-01-01

    The senses transduce different forms of environmental energy, and the brain synthesizes information across them to enhance responses to salient biological events. We hypothesize that the potency of multisensory integration is attributable to the convergence of independent and temporally aligned signals derived from cross-modal stimulus configurations onto multisensory neurons. The temporal profile of multisensory integration in neurons of the deep superior colliculus (SC) is consistent with this hypothesis. The responses of these neurons to visual, auditory, and combinations of visual–auditory stimuli reveal that multisensory integration takes place in real-time; that is, the input signals are integrated as soon as they arrive at the target neuron. Interactions between cross-modal signals may appear to reflect linear or nonlinear computations on a moment-by-moment basis, the aggregate of which determines the net product of multisensory integration. Modeling observations presented here suggest that the early nonlinear components of the temporal profile of multisensory integration can be explained with a simple spiking neuron model, and do not require more sophisticated assumptions about the underlying biology. A transition from nonlinear “super-additive” computation to linear, additive computation can be accomplished via scaled inhibition. The findings provide a set of design constraints for artificial implementations seeking to exploit the basic principles and potency of biological multisensory integration in contexts of sensory substitution or augmentation. PMID:24374382

  11. Visualizing the spinal neuronal dynamics of locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kalpathi R.; Bashor, D. P.; Miller, M. T.; Foster, J. A.

    2004-06-01

    Modern imaging and simulation techniques have enhanced system-level understanding of neural function. In this article, we present an application of interactive visualization to understanding neuronal dynamics causing locomotion of a single hip joint, based on pattern generator output of the spinal cord. Our earlier work visualized cell-level responses of multiple neuronal populations. However, the spatial relationships were abstract, making communication with colleagues difficult. We propose two approaches to overcome this: (1) building a 3D anatomical model of the spinal cord with neurons distributed inside, animated by the simulation and (2) adding limb movements predicted by neuronal activity. The new system was tested using a cat walking central pattern generator driving a pair of opposed spinal motoneuron pools. Output of opposing motoneuron pools was combined into a single metric, called "Net Neural Drive", which generated angular limb movement in proportion to its magnitude. Net neural drive constitutes a new description of limb movement control. The combination of spatial and temporal information in the visualizations elegantly conveys the neural activity of the output elements (motoneurons), as well as the resulting movement. The new system encompasses five biological levels of organization from ion channels to observed behavior. The system is easily scalable, and provides an efficient interactive platform for rapid hypothesis testing.

  12. Asynchronous Rate Chaos in Spiking Neuronal Circuits.

    PubMed

    Harish, Omri; Hansel, David

    2015-07-01

    The brain exhibits temporally complex patterns of activity with features similar to those of chaotic systems. Theoretical studies over the last twenty years have described various computational advantages for such regimes in neuronal systems. Nevertheless, it still remains unclear whether chaos requires specific cellular properties or network architectures, or whether it is a generic property of neuronal circuits. We investigate the dynamics of networks of excitatory-inhibitory (EI) spiking neurons with random sparse connectivity operating in the regime of balance of excitation and inhibition. Combining Dynamical Mean-Field Theory with numerical simulations, we show that chaotic, asynchronous firing rate fluctuations emerge generically for sufficiently strong synapses. Two different mechanisms can lead to these chaotic fluctuations. One mechanism relies on slow I-I inhibition which gives rise to slow subthreshold voltage and rate fluctuations. The decorrelation time of these fluctuations is proportional to the time constant of the inhibition. The second mechanism relies on the recurrent E-I-E feedback loop. It requires slow excitation but the inhibition can be fast. In the corresponding dynamical regime all neurons exhibit rate fluctuations on the time scale of the excitation. Another feature of this regime is that the population-averaged firing rate is substantially smaller in the excitatory population than in the inhibitory population. This is not necessarily the case in the I-I mechanism. Finally, we discuss the neurophysiological and computational significance of our results. PMID:26230679

  13. Lower motor neuron dysfunction in ALS.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Mamede; Swash, Michael

    2016-07-01

    In the motor system there is a complex interplay between cortical structures and spinal cord lower motor neurons (LMN). In this system both inhibitory and excitatory neurons have relevant roles. LMN loss is a marker of motor neuron disease/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (MND/ALS). Conventional needle electromyography (EMG) does not allow LMN loss to be quantified. Measurement of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude or area, and the neurophysiological index, provide a surrogate estimate of the number of functional motor units. Increased motor neuronal excitability is a neurophysiological marker of ALS in the context of a suspected clinical and electrophysiological diagnosis. In the LMN system, fasciculation potentials (FPs) are the earliest changes observed in affected muscles, a feature of LMN hyperexcitability. Reinnervation is best investigated by needle EMG although other methods can be explored. Moreover needle EMG give information about the temporal profile of the reinnervation process, important ancillary data. Quantitative motor unit potential analysis is a valuable method of evaluating reinnervation. The importance of FPs has been recognized in the Awaji criteria for the electrodiagnosis of ALS, criteria that are a sensitive adjunct to the revised El Escorial criteria. Finally, functionality of LMN's, and perhaps excitability studies in motor nerves, aids understanding of the disease process, allowing measurement of potential treatment effects in clinical trials. Other investigational techniques, such as electrical impedance myography, muscle and nerve ultrasound, and spinal cord imaging methods may prove useful in future. PMID:27117334

  14. Neuronal avalanches in spontaneous activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Gerald; Petermann, Thomas; Havenith, Martha N; Yu, Shan; Singer, Wolf; Plenz, Dietmar; Nikolic, Danko

    2010-12-01

    Many complex systems give rise to events that are clustered in space and time, thereby establishing a correlation structure that is governed by power law statistics. In the cortex, such clusters of activity, called "neuronal avalanches," were recently found in local field potentials (LFPs) of spontaneous activity in acute cortex slices, slice cultures, the developing cortex of the anesthetized rat, and premotor and motor cortex of awake monkeys. At present, it is unclear whether neuronal avalanches also exist in the spontaneous LFPs and spike activity in vivo in sensory areas of the mature brain. To address this question, we recorded spontaneous LFPs and extracellular spiking activity with multiple 4 × 4 microelectrode arrays (Michigan Probes) in area 17 of adult cats under anesthesia. A cluster of events was defined as a consecutive sequence of time bins Δt (1-32 ms), each containing at least one LFP event or spike anywhere on the array. LFP cluster sizes consistently distributed according to a power law with a slope largely above -1.5. In two thirds of the corresponding experiments, spike clusters also displayed a power law that displayed a slightly steeper slope of -1.8 and was destroyed by subsampling operations. The power law in spike clusters was accompanied with stronger temporal correlations between spiking activities of neurons that spanned longer time periods compared with spike clusters lacking power law statistics. The results suggest that spontaneous activity of the visual cortex under anesthesia has the properties of neuronal avalanches.

  15. Asynchronous Rate Chaos in Spiking Neuronal Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Harish, Omri; Hansel, David

    2015-01-01

    The brain exhibits temporally complex patterns of activity with features similar to those of chaotic systems. Theoretical studies over the last twenty years have described various computational advantages for such regimes in neuronal systems. Nevertheless, it still remains unclear whether chaos requires specific cellular properties or network architectures, or whether it is a generic property of neuronal circuits. We investigate the dynamics of networks of excitatory-inhibitory (EI) spiking neurons with random sparse connectivity operating in the regime of balance of excitation and inhibition. Combining Dynamical Mean-Field Theory with numerical simulations, we show that chaotic, asynchronous firing rate fluctuations emerge generically for sufficiently strong synapses. Two different mechanisms can lead to these chaotic fluctuations. One mechanism relies on slow I-I inhibition which gives rise to slow subthreshold voltage and rate fluctuations. The decorrelation time of these fluctuations is proportional to the time constant of the inhibition. The second mechanism relies on the recurrent E-I-E feedback loop. It requires slow excitation but the inhibition can be fast. In the corresponding dynamical regime all neurons exhibit rate fluctuations on the time scale of the excitation. Another feature of this regime is that the population-averaged firing rate is substantially smaller in the excitatory population than in the inhibitory population. This is not necessarily the case in the I-I mechanism. Finally, we discuss the neurophysiological and computational significance of our results. PMID:26230679

  16. Multiscale fingerprinting of neuronal functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gang; Tin, Chung; Poon, Chi-Sang

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Current cellular-based connectomics approaches aim to delineate the functional or structural organizations of mammalian brain circuits through neuronal activity mapping and/or axonal tracing. To discern possible connectivity between functionally identified neurons in widely distributed brain circuits, reliable and efficient network-based approaches of cross-registering or cross-correlating such functional-structural data are essential. Here, a novel cross-correlation approach that exploits multiple timing-specific, response-specific and cell-specific neuronal characteristics as coincident fingerprint markers at the systems, network and cellular levels is proposed. Application of this multiscale temporal-cellular coincident fingerprinting assay to the respiratory central pattern generator network in rats revealed a descending excitatory pathway with characteristic activity pattern and projecting from a distinct neuronal population in pons to its counterparts in medulla that control the post-inspiratory phase of the respiratory rhythm important for normal breathing, airway protection and respiratory-vocalization coordination. This enabling neurotracing approach may prove valuable for functional connectivity mapping of other brain circuits. PMID:25056933

  17. Temporal-spatial correlation between angiogenesis and corticogenesis in the developing chick optic tectum.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Celin, Alejandra; Rapacioli, Melina; Gonzalez, Mariela Azul; Ballarin, Virginia Laura; Fiszer de Plazas, Sara; López-Costa, Juan José; Flores, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The developing chick optic tectum is a widely used model of corticogenesis and angiogenesis. Cell behaviors involved in corticogenesis and angiogenesis share several regulatory mechanisms. In this way the 3D organizations of both systems adapt to each other. The consensus about the temporally and spatially organized progression of the optic tectum corticogenesis contrasts with the discrepancies about the spatial organization of its vascular bed as a function of the time. In order to find out spatial and temporal correlations between corticogenesis and angiogenesis, several methodological approaches were applied to analyze the dynamic of angiogenesis in the developing chick optic tectum. The present paper shows that a typical sequence of developmental events characterizes the optic tectum angiogenesis. The first phase, formation of the primitive vascular bed, takes place during the early stages of the tectal corticogenesis along which the large efferent neurons appear and begin their early differentiation. The second phase, remodeling and elaboration of the definitive vascular bed, occurs during the increase in complexity associated to the elaboration of the local circuit networks. The present results show that, apart from the well-known influence of the dorsal-ventral and radial axes as reference systems for the spatial organization of optic tectum angiogenesis, the cephalic-caudal axis also exerts a significant asymmetric influence. The term cortico-angiogenesis to describe the entire process is justified by the fact that tight correlations are found between specific corticogenic and angiogenic events and they take place simultaneously at the same position along the cephalic-caudal and radial axes.

  18. Medial temporal N-acetyl aspartate in pediatric major depression

    PubMed Central

    MacMaster, Frank P.; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S. Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD-case control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  19. Medial temporal N-acetyl-aspartate in pediatric major depression.

    PubMed

    MacMaster, Frank P; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R

    2008-10-30

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD case-control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in the left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  20. Artificial hair cell integrated with an artificial neuron: Interplay between criticality and excitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woo Seok; Jeong, Wonhee; Ahn, Kang-Hun

    2014-12-01

    We provide a simple dynamical model of a hair cell with an afferent neuron where the spectral and the temporal responses are controlled by the hair bundle's criticality and the neuron's excitability. To demonstrate that these parameters, indeed, specify the resolution of the sound encoding, we fabricate a neuromorphic device that models the hair cell bundle and its afferent neuron. Then, we show that the neural response of the biomimetic system encodes sounds with either high temporal or spectral resolution or with a combination of both resolutions. Our results suggest that the hair cells may easily specialize to fulfil various roles in spite of their similar physiological structures.

  1. Spiking irregularity and frequency modulate the behavioral report of single-neuron stimulation.

    PubMed

    Doron, Guy; von Heimendahl, Moritz; Schlattmann, Peter; Houweling, Arthur R; Brecht, Michael

    2014-02-01

    The action potential activity of single cortical neurons can evoke measurable sensory effects, but it is not known how spiking parameters and neuronal subtypes affect the evoked sensations. Here, we examined the effects of spike train irregularity, spike frequency, and spike number on the detectability of single-neuron stimulation in rat somatosensory cortex. For regular-spiking, putative excitatory neurons, detectability increased with spike train irregularity and decreasing spike frequencies but was not affected by spike number. Stimulation of single, fast-spiking, putative inhibitory neurons led to a larger sensory effect compared to regular-spiking neurons, and the effect size depended only on spike irregularity. An ideal-observer analysis suggests that, under our experimental conditions, rats were using integration windows of a few hundred milliseconds or more. Our data imply that the behaving animal is sensitive to single neurons' spikes and even to their temporal patterning.

  2. Irregular spiking of pyramidal neurons organizes as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches in the awake state

    PubMed Central

    Bellay, Timothy; Klaus, Andreas; Seshadri, Saurav; Plenz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous fluctuations in neuronal activity emerge at many spatial and temporal scales in cortex. Population measures found these fluctuations to organize as scale-invariant neuronal avalanches, suggesting cortical dynamics to be critical. Macroscopic dynamics, though, depend on physiological states and are ambiguous as to their cellular composition, spatiotemporal origin, and contributions from synaptic input or action potential (AP) output. Here, we study spontaneous firing in pyramidal neurons (PNs) from rat superficial cortical layers in vivo and in vitro using 2-photon imaging. As the animal transitions from the anesthetized to awake state, spontaneous single neuron firing increases in irregularity and assembles into scale-invariant avalanches at the group level. In vitro spike avalanches emerged naturally yet required balanced excitation and inhibition. This demonstrates that neuronal avalanches are linked to the global physiological state of wakefulness and that cortical resting activity organizes as avalanches from firing of local PN groups to global population activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07224.001 PMID:26151674

  3. Efficiency under record performance demands: exertion control--an individual difference variable?

    PubMed

    Heckhausen, H; Strang, H

    1988-09-01

    Semiprofessional players ran basketball circuits under either normal or record performance demands. Lactate concentration and heart rate were measured as indexes of exertion. Number of dribbling errors, attempted shots, hits, and hit rate served as measures of performance and efficiency. Several individual difference measures were taken in order to identify those athletes who were capable of moderating the extent of exertion and of preserving their performance from impairment. The indexes of exertion rose sharply from normal to record trials. Correspondingly, the numbers of dribbling errors and of shots increased while the hit rate declined. However, there were considerable individual differences in restraining exertion and preserving efficiency--both indexes of exertion control. Neither achievement motive scores nor questionnaire items that ask for self-knowledge about exertion control could account for these differences. However, individuals capable of exertion control could be discriminated by an action-control scale that asks about postdecisional implementation of action steps (Kuhl, 1985).

  4. The Rhythm Aftereffect: Support for Time Sensitive Neurons with Broad Overlapping Tuning Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Mark W.; Rasmussen, Ian P.

    2007-01-01

    Ivry [Ivry, R. B. (1996). The representation of temporal information in perception and motor control. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 6, 851-857.] proposed that explicit coding of brief time intervals is accomplished by neurons that are tuned to a preferred temporal interval and have broad overlapping tuning curves. This proposal is analogous to…

  5. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  6. Neuronal ubiquitin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hallengren, Jada; Chen, Ping-Chung; Wilson, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons have highly specialized intracellular compartments that facilitate the development and activity of the nervous system. Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification that controls many aspects of neuronal function by regulating protein abundance. Disruption of this signaling pathway has been demonstrated in neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Angleman Syndrome. Since many neurological disorders exhibit ubiquitinated protein aggregates, the loss of neuronal ubiquitin homeostasis may be an important contributor of disease. This review discusses the mechanisms utilized by neurons to control the free pool of ubiquitin necessary for normal nervous system development and function as well as new roles of protein ubiquitination in regulating synaptic activity. PMID:23686613

  7. Enhancement and Distortion in the Temporal Representation of Sounds in the Ventral Cochlear Nucleus of Chinchillas and Cats

    PubMed Central

    Recio-Spinoso, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    A subset of neurons in the cochlear nucleus (CN) of the auditory brainstem has the ability to enhance the auditory nerve's temporal representation of stimulating sounds. These neurons reside in the ventral region of the CN (VCN) and are usually known as highly synchronized, or high-sync, neurons. Most published reports about the existence and properties of high-sync neurons are based on recordings performed on a VCN output tract—not the VCN itself—of cats. In other species, comprehensive studies detailing the properties of high-sync neurons, or even acknowledging their existence, are missing. Examination of the responses of a population of VCN neurons in chinchillas revealed that a subset of those neurons have temporal properties similar to high-sync neurons in the cat. Phase locking and entrainment—the ability of a neuron to fire action potentials at a certain stimulus phase and at almost every stimulus period, respectively—have similar maximum values in cats and chinchillas. Ranges of characteristic frequencies for high-sync neurons in chinchillas and cats extend up to 600 and 1000 Hz, respectively. Enhancement of temporal processing relative to auditory nerve fibers (ANFs), which has been shown previously in cats using tonal and white-noise stimuli, is also demonstrated here in the responses of VCN neurons to synthetic and spoken vowel sounds. Along with the large amount of phase locking displayed by some VCN neurons there occurs a deterioration in the spectral representation of the stimuli (tones or vowels). High-sync neurons exhibit a greater distortion in their responses to tones or vowels than do other types of VCN neurons and auditory nerve fibers. Standard deviations of first-spike latency measured in responses of high-sync neurons are lower than similar values measured in ANFs' responses. This might indicate a role of high-sync neurons in other tasks beyond sound localization. PMID:23028514

  8. Enhancement and distortion in the temporal representation of sounds in the ventral cochlear nucleus of chinchillas and cats.

    PubMed

    Recio-Spinoso, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    A subset of neurons in the cochlear nucleus (CN) of the auditory brainstem has the ability to enhance the auditory nerve's temporal representation of stimulating sounds. These neurons reside in the ventral region of the CN (VCN) and are usually known as highly synchronized, or high-sync, neurons. Most published reports about the existence and properties of high-sync neurons are based on recordings performed on a VCN output tract--not the VCN itself--of cats. In other species, comprehensive studies detailing the properties of high-sync neurons, or even acknowledging their existence, are missing.Examination of the responses of a population of VCN neurons in chinchillas revealed that a subset of those neurons have temporal properties similar to high-sync neurons in the cat. Phase locking and entrainment--the ability of a neuron to fire action potentials at a certain stimulus phase and at almost every stimulus period, respectively--have similar maximum values in cats and chinchillas. Ranges of characteristic frequencies for high-sync neurons in chinchillas and cats extend up to 600 and 1000 Hz, respectively. Enhancement of temporal processing relative to auditory nerve fibers (ANFs), which has been shown previously in cats using tonal and white-noise stimuli, is also demonstrated here in the responses of VCN neurons to synthetic and spoken vowel sounds.Along with the large amount of phase locking displayed by some VCN neurons there occurs a deterioration in the spectral representation of the stimuli (tones or vowels). High-sync neurons exhibit a greater distortion in their responses to tones or vowels than do other types of VCN neurons and auditory nerve fibers.Standard deviations of first-spike latency measured in responses of high-sync neurons are lower than similar values measured in ANFs' responses. This might indicate a role of high-sync neurons in other tasks beyond sound localization. PMID:23028514

  9. Temporal patterns of gene expression during calyx of held development.

    PubMed

    Kolson, Douglas R; Wan, Jun; Wu, Jonathan; Dehoff, Marlin; Brandebura, Ashley N; Qian, Jiang; Mathers, Peter H; Spirou, George A

    2016-02-01

    Relating changes in gene expression to discrete developmental events remains an elusive challenge in neuroscience, in part because most neural territories are comprised of multiple cell types that mature over extended periods of time. The medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) is an attractive vertebrate model system that contains a nearly homogeneous population of neurons, which are innervated by large glutamatergic nerve terminals called calyces of Held (CH). Key steps in maturation of CHs and MNTB neurons, including CH growth and competition, occur very quickly for most cells between postnatal days (P)2 and P6. Therefore, we characterized genome-wide changes in this system, with dense temporal sampling during the first postnatal week. We identified 541 genes whose expression changed significantly between P0-6 and clustered them into eight groups based on temporal expression profiles. Candidate genes from each of the eight profile groups were validated in separate samples by qPCR. Our tissue sample permitted comparison of known glial and neuronal transcripts and revealed that monotonically increasing or decreasing expression profiles tended to be associated with glia and neurons, respectively. Gene ontology revealed enrichment of genes involved in axon pathfinding, cell differentiation, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix. The latter category included elements of perineuronal nets, a prominent feature of MNTB neurons that is morphologically distinct by P6, when CH growth and competition are resolved onto nearly all MNTB neurons. These results provide a genetic framework for investigation of general mechanisms responsible for nerve terminal growth and maturation.

  10. Cannabidiol exerts sebostatic and antiinflammatory effects on human sebocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Attila; Tóth, Balázs I.; Borbíró, István; Sugawara, Koji; Szöllõsi, Attila G.; Czifra, Gabriella; Pál, Balázs; Ambrus, Lídia; Kloepper, Jennifer; Camera, Emanuela; Ludovici, Matteo; Picardo, Mauro; Voets, Thomas; Zouboulis, Christos C.; Paus, Ralf; Bíró, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) regulates multiple physiological processes, including cutaneous cell growth and differentiation. Here, we explored the effects of the major nonpsychotropic phytocannabinoid of Cannabis sativa, (-)-cannabidiol (CBD), on human sebaceous gland function and determined that CBD behaves as a highly effective sebostatic agent. Administration of CBD to cultured human sebocytes and human skin organ culture inhibited the lipogenic actions of various compounds, including arachidonic acid and a combination of linoleic acid and testosterone, and suppressed sebocyte proliferation via the activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-4 (TRPV4) ion channels. Activation of TRPV4 interfered with the prolipogenic ERK1/2 MAPK pathway and resulted in the downregulation of nuclear receptor interacting protein-1 (NRIP1), which influences glucose and lipid metabolism, thereby inhibiting sebocyte lipogenesis. CBD also exerted complex antiinflammatory actions that were coupled to A2a adenosine receptor-dependent upregulation of tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3) and inhibition of the NF-κB signaling. Collectively, our findings suggest that, due to the combined lipostatic, antiproliferative, and antiinflammatory effects, CBD has potential as a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of acne vulgaris. PMID:25061872

  11. Formwork pressure exerted by self-consolidating concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omran, Ahmed Fathy

    Self-consolidating concrete (SCC) is an emerging technology that utilizes flowable concrete that eliminates the need for consolidation. The advantages of SCC lie in a remarkable reduction of the casting time, facilitating the casting of congested and complex structural elements, possibility to reduce labor demand, elimination of mechanical vibrations and noise, improvement of surface appearance, producing a better and premium concrete product. The research focussed on capturing existing knowledge and making recommendations for current practice. An experimental program was undertaken at the Universite de Sherbrooke to evaluate the lateral pressure developed by SCC mixtures. A portable devise (UofS2 pressure column) for measuring and predicting lateral pressure and its rate of decay of SCC was developed and validated. The UofS2 pressure column is cast with 0.5 m high fresh concrete and air pressure is introduced from the top to simulate casting depth up to 13 m. Then, develop and implement test method for field evaluation of relevant plastic and thixotropic properties of SCC that affect formwork pressure were done. Portable vane (PV) test based on the hand-held vane test method used to determine the undrained shear strength property of clay soil was the first setup as well as the inclined plane (IP) test. The IP device involves slumping a small concrete cylinder on a horizontal plate and then lifting up the plate at different durations of rest until the slumped sample starts to move. Identifying role of material constituents, mix design, concrete placement characteristics (casting rate, waiting periods between lifts, and casting depth), temperature, and formwork characteristics that have major influence on formwork pressure exerted by SCC were evaluated in laboratory and validated by actual field measurements. Relating the maximum lateral pressure and its rate of decay to the plastic properties of SCC were established. In the analytical part of the research

  12. Respiratory and leg muscles perceived exertion during exercise at altitude.

    PubMed

    Aliverti, A; Kayser, B; Lo Mauro, A; Quaranta, M; Pompilio, P; Dellacà, R L; Ora, J; Biasco, L; Cavalleri, L; Pomidori, L; Cogo, A; Pellegrino, R; Miserocchi, G

    2011-07-31

    We compared the rate of perceived exertion for respiratory (RPE,resp) and leg (RPE,legs) muscles, using a 10-point Borg scale, to their specific power outputs in 10 healthy male subjects during incremental cycle exercise at sea level (SL) and high altitude (HA, 4559 m). Respiratory power output was calculated from breath-by-breath esophageal pressure and chest wall volume changes. At HA ventilation was increased at any leg power output by ∼ 54%. However, for any given ventilation, breathing pattern was unchanged in terms of tidal volume, respiratory rate and operational volumes of the different chest wall compartments. RPE,resp scaled uniquely with total respiratory power output, irrespectively of SL or HA, while RPE,legs for any leg power output was exacerbated at HA. With increasing respective power outputs, the rate of change of RPE,resp exponentially decreased, while that of RPE,legs increased. We conclude that RPE,resp uniquely relates to respiratory power output, while RPE,legs varies depending on muscle metabolic conditions.

  13. The biomolecule ubiquinone exerts a variety of biological functions.

    PubMed

    Nohl, Hans; Staniek, Katrin; Kozlov, Andrey V; Gille, Lars

    2003-01-01

    The chemistry of ubiquinone allows reversible addition of single electrons and protons. This unique property is used in nature for aerobic energy gain, for unilateral proton accumulation, for the generation of reactive oxygen species involved in physiological signaling and a variety of pathophysiological events. Since several years ubiquinone is also considered to play a major role in the control of lipid peroxidation, since this lipophilic biomolecule was recognized to recycle alpha-tocopherol radicals back to the chain-breaking form, vitamin E. Ubiquinone is therefore a biomolecule which has increasingly focused the interest of many research groups due to its alternative pro- and antioxidant activity. We have intensively investigated the role of ubiquinone as prooxidant in mitochondria and will present experimental evidences on conditions required for this function, we will also show that lysosomal ubiquinone has a double function as proton translocator and radical source under certain metabolic conditions. Furthermore, we have addressed the antioxidant role of ubiquinone and found that the efficiency of this activity is widely dependent on the type of biomembrane where ubiquinone exerts its chain-breaking activity. PMID:14695917

  14. Multiple Mechanisms of Anti-Cancer Effects Exerted by Astaxanthin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Handong

    2015-01-01

    Astaxanthin (ATX) is a xanthophyll carotenoid which has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) as food colorant in animal and fish feed. It is widely found in algae and aquatic animals and has powerful anti-oxidative activity. Previous studies have revealed that ATX, with its anti-oxidative property, is beneficial as a therapeutic agent for various diseases without any side effects or toxicity. In addition, ATX also shows preclinical anti-tumor efficacy both in vivo and in vitro in various cancer models. Several researches have deciphered that ATX exerts its anti-proliferative, anti-apoptosis and anti-invasion influence via different molecules and pathways including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Hence, ATX shows great promise as chemotherapeutic agents in cancer. Here, we review the rapidly advancing field of ATX in cancer therapy as well as some molecular targets of ATX. PMID:26184238

  15. MDMX exerts its oncogenic activity via suppression of retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Hu, L; Qiu, W; Deng, T; Zhang, Y; Bergholz, J; Xiao, Z-X

    2015-10-29

    Inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein (RB) has a major role in the development of human malignancies. We have previously shown that MDM2, an ubiquitin E3 ligase and major negative regulator of p53, binds to and promotes proteasome-mediated degradation of RB. MDMX, a homolog of MDM2, also binds to and inhibits p53 transactivation activity, yet it does not possess intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity. Here, we show that MDMX binds to and promotes RB degradation in an MDM2-dependent manner. Specifically, the MDMX C-terminal ring domain binds to the RB C-pocket and enhances MDM2-RB interaction. Silencing MDMX induces RB accumulation, cell cycle arrest and senescence-like phenotypes, which are reverted by simultaneous RB knockdown. Furthermore, MDMX ablation leads to significant retardation of xenograft tumor growth, concomitant with RB accumulation. These results demonstrate that MDMX exerts oncogenic activity via suppression of RB, and suggest that both MDM2 and MDMX could be chemotherapeutic targets. PMID:25703327

  16. Effects of caffeine on the rate of perceived exertion.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, L O; Russo, A K; Silva, A C; Piçarro, I C; Silva, F R; Zogaib, P S; Soares, D D

    1990-01-01

    The role of caffeine in improving performance in endurance exercises is controversial and its mechanism of action is not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on the rate of perceived exertion (RPE) by exercising athletes. Six male non-smoking runners, aged 26.8 +/- 4.9 years (mean +/- SD), who had been in training continuously for at least two years before the experiment were studied. Mean maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) was 61.21 +/- 5.36 ml kg-1 min-1. The subjects were asked to exercise on a bicycle ergometer for 3 min each at 300 and 600 kg m min-1, after which the work load was elevated to 1200 kg m min-1 and they exercised until exhaustion. In order to evaluate the effects of caffeine, the exercise was performed twice following the ingestion of 200 ml decaffeinated coffee with and without caffeine (5 mg/kg body weight). Caffeine had no significant effect on exercise time, pulmonary ventilation, oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide extraction or exchange respiratory ratio, but the RPE was significantly lower (P less than 0.05) at the work load of 1200 kg m min-1 after the ingestion of caffeine for both trials I and II. The present results suggest that metabolic acidosis and glycogen depletion were not the main causes of exhaustion. PMID:2101061

  17. NeuronBank: A Tool for Cataloging Neuronal Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Paul S.; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Dhawan, Akshaye; Frederick, Chad; Guo, Shuman; Dissanayaka, Rasanjalee; Hiremath, Naveen; Ma, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuyn; Wang, Hsui C.; Yang, Hong; Prasad, Sushil; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Zhu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models. PMID:20428500

  18. Prefrontal D1 dopamine signaling is required for temporal control.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Nandakumar S; Land, Benjamin B; Solder, John E; Deisseroth, Karl; DiLeone, Ralph J

    2012-12-11

    Temporal control, or how organisms guide movements in time to achieve behavioral goals, depends on dopamine signaling. The medial prefrontal cortex controls many goal-directed behaviors and receives dopaminergic input primarily from the midbrain ventral tegmental area. However, this system has never been linked with temporal control. Here, we test the hypothesis that dopaminergic projections from the ventral tegmental area to the prefrontal cortex influence temporal control. Rodents were trained to perform a fixed-interval timing task with an interval of 20 s. We report several results: first, that decreasing dopaminergic neurotransmission using virally mediated RNA interference of tyrosine hydroxylase impaired temporal control, and second that pharmacological disruption of prefrontal D1 dopamine receptors, but not D2 dopamine receptors, impaired temporal control. We then used optogenetics to specifically and selectively manipulate prefrontal neurons expressing D1 dopamine receptors during fixed-interval timing performance. Selective inhibition of D1-expressing prefrontal neurons impaired fixed-interval timing, whereas stimulation made animals more efficient during task performance. These data provide evidence that ventral tegmental dopaminergic projections to the prefrontal cortex influence temporal control via D1 receptors. The results identify a critical circuit for temporal control of behavior that could serve as a target for the treatment of dopaminergic diseases.

  19. Prolactin mediates neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons via its receptor.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Castañeda, E; Grattan, D R; Pasantes-Morales, H; Pérez-Domínguez, M; Cabrera-Reyes, E A; Morales, T; Cerbón, M

    2016-04-01

    Recently it has been reported that prolactin (PRL) exerts a neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in hippocampus in the rat in vivo models. However, the exact mechanism by which PRL mediates this effect is not completely understood. The aim of our study was to assess whether prolactin exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in an in vitro model using primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons, and to determine whether this effect is mediated via the prolactin receptor (PRLR). Primary cell cultures of rat hippocampal neurons were used in all experiments, gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. The results demonstrated that PRL treatment of neurons from primary cultures did not modify cell viability, but that it exerted a neuroprotective effect, with cells treated with PRL showing a significant increase of viability after glutamate (Glu)--induced excitotoxicity as compared with neurons treated with Glu alone. Cultured neurons expressed mRNA for both PRL and its receptor (PRLR), and both PRL and PRLR expression levels changed after the excitotoxic insult. Interestingly, the PRLR protein was detected as two main isoforms of 100 and 40 kDa as compared with that expressed in hypothalamic cells, which was present only as a 30 kDa variant. On the other hand, PRL was not detected in neuron cultures, either by western blot or by immunohistochemistry. Neuroprotection induced by PRL was significantly blocked by specific oligonucleotides against PRLR, thus suggesting that the PRL role is mediated by its receptor expressed in these neurons. The overall results indicated that PRL induces neuroprotection in neurons from primary cell cultures. PMID:26874070

  20. Prolactin mediates neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons via its receptor.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Castañeda, E; Grattan, D R; Pasantes-Morales, H; Pérez-Domínguez, M; Cabrera-Reyes, E A; Morales, T; Cerbón, M

    2016-04-01

    Recently it has been reported that prolactin (PRL) exerts a neuroprotective effect against excitotoxicity in hippocampus in the rat in vivo models. However, the exact mechanism by which PRL mediates this effect is not completely understood. The aim of our study was to assess whether prolactin exerts neuroprotection against excitotoxicity in an in vitro model using primary cell cultures of hippocampal neurons, and to determine whether this effect is mediated via the prolactin receptor (PRLR). Primary cell cultures of rat hippocampal neurons were used in all experiments, gene expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, and protein expression was assessed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Cell viability was assessed by using the MTT method. The results demonstrated that PRL treatment of neurons from primary cultures did not modify cell viability, but that it exerted a neuroprotective effect, with cells treated with PRL showing a significant increase of viability after glutamate (Glu)--induced excitotoxicity as compared with neurons treated with Glu alone. Cultured neurons expressed mRNA for both PRL and its receptor (PRLR), and both PRL and PRLR expression levels changed after the excitotoxic insult. Interestingly, the PRLR protein was detected as two main isoforms of 100 and 40 kDa as compared with that expressed in hypothalamic cells, which was present only as a 30 kDa variant. On the other hand, PRL was not detected in neuron cultures, either by western blot or by immunohistochemistry. Neuroprotection induced by PRL was significantly blocked by specific oligonucleotides against PRLR, thus suggesting that the PRL role is mediated by its receptor expressed in these neurons. The overall results indicated that PRL induces neuroprotection in neurons from primary cell cultures.

  1. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

    PubMed Central

    Celada, Pau; Puig, M. Victoria; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively) are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT), acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by (1) modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and (2) varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3) and inhibitory (5-HT1A) receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the frontal lobe

  2. Fluorescence imaging of glutamate release in neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ziqiang; Yeung, Edward S.

    1999-12-01

    A noninvasive detection scheme based on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymatic assay combined with microscopy was developed to measure the glutamate release in cultured cells from the central nervous system (CNS). The enzyme reaction is very specific and sensitive. The detection limit with charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging is down to {mu}M levels of glutamate with reasonable response time ({approx}30 s). The standard glutamate test shows a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude, from {mu}M to 0.1 mM range. The in vitro monitoring of glutamate release from cultured neuron cells demonstrated excellent spatial and temporal resolution. (c) 1999 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  3. Navigational path integration by cortical neurons: origins in higher-order direction selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Page, William K.; Sato, Nobuya; Froehler, Michael T.; Vaughn, William

    2015-01-01

    Navigation relies on the neural processing of sensory cues about observer self-movement and spatial location. Neurons in macaque dorsal medial superior temporal cortex (MSTd) respond to visual and vestibular self-movement cues, potentially contributing to navigation and orientation. We moved monkeys on circular paths around a room while recording the activity of MSTd neurons. MSTd neurons show a variety of sensitivities to the monkey's heading direction, circular path through the room, and place in the room. Changing visual cues alters the relative prevalence of those response properties. Disrupting the continuity of self-movement paths through the environment disrupts path selectivity in a manner linked to the time course of single neuron responses. We hypothesize that sensory cues interact with the spatial and temporal integrative properties of MSTd neurons to derive path selectivity for navigational path integration supporting spatial orientation. PMID:25589586

  4. Sub-millisecond closed-loop feedback stimulation between arbitrary sets of individual neurons

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jan; Bakkum, Douglas J.; Hierlemann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    We present a system to artificially correlate the spike timing between sets of arbitrary neurons that were interfaced to a complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) high-density microelectrode array (MEA). The system features a novel reprogrammable and flexible event engine unit to detect arbitrary spatio-temporal patterns of recorded action potentials and is capable of delivering sub-millisecond closed-loop feedback of electrical stimulation upon trigger events in real-time. The relative timing between action potentials of individual neurons as well as the temporal pattern among multiple neurons, or neuronal assemblies, is considered an important factor governing memory and learning in the brain. Artificially changing timings between arbitrary sets of spiking neurons with our system could provide a “knob” to tune information processing in the network. PMID:23335887

  5. Relationships between one-handed force exertions in all directions and their associated postures.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, A T; Pinder, A D J; Grieve, D W

    1995-01-01

    Photographs were taken of subjects exerting in specified directions with one hand on the handle of a triaxial force measurement system. The applied forces were recorded and posture analysis was undertaken to investigate relationships between three-dimensional force exertion and posture. The postural stability diagram, which in previous studies has been applied to fore-and-aft exertions, was applied to the vertical plane containing the manual force vector and to the horizontal plane. The vertical plane analysis provided an insight into postures associated with weak and strong exertion. The horizontal plane analysis emphasized the importance of developing torque as well as thrust at the foot base in order to exert laterally directed forces. Exertions involving a right or left component were associated with a horizontal moment at the feet of the order of 50 Nm. This moment is an important factor in the demands made upon the body during asymmetrical exertion, and the mechanisms for achieving it deserve further investigation. RELEVANCE: Exertion is not normally restricted to the sagittal plane. The approach adopted in this paper gives an insight into how body deployment relates to the direction and magnitude of exertion. Biomechanical models of asymmetric exertion should reflect the principles that have emerged. PMID:11415527

  6. Mirror Neurons in a New World Monkey, Common Marmoset.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Wataru; Banno, Taku; Miyakawa, Naohisa; Abe, Hiroshi; Goda, Naokazu; Ichinohe, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    Mirror neurons respond when executing a motor act and when observing others' similar act. So far, mirror neurons have been found only in macaques, humans, and songbirds. To investigate the degree of phylogenetic specialization of mirror neurons during the course of their evolution, we determined whether mirror neurons with similar properties to macaques occur in a New World monkey, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). The ventral premotor cortex (PMv), where mirror neurons have been reported in macaques, is difficult to identify in marmosets, since no sulcal landmarks exist in the frontal cortex. We addressed this problem using "in vivo" connection imaging methods. That is, we first identified cells responsive to others' grasping action in a clear landmark, the superior temporal sulcus (STS), under anesthesia, and injected fluorescent tracers into the region. By fluorescence stereomicroscopy, we identified clusters of labeled cells in the ventrolateral frontal cortex, which were confirmed to be within the ventrolateral frontal cortex including PMv after sacrifice. We next implanted electrodes into the ventrolateral frontal cortex and STS and recorded single/multi-units under an awake condition. As a result, we found neurons in the ventrolateral frontal cortex with characteristic "mirror" properties quite similar to those in macaques. This finding suggests that mirror neurons occur in a common ancestor of New and Old World monkeys and its common properties are preserved during the course of primate evolution.

  7. Mirror Neurons in a New World Monkey, Common Marmoset

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Wataru; Banno, Taku; Miyakawa, Naohisa; Abe, Hiroshi; Goda, Naokazu; Ichinohe, Noritaka

    2015-01-01

    Mirror neurons respond when executing a motor act and when observing others' similar act. So far, mirror neurons have been found only in macaques, humans, and songbirds. To investigate the degree of phylogenetic specialization of mirror neurons during the course of their evolution, we determined whether mirror neurons with similar properties to macaques occur in a New World monkey, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). The ventral premotor cortex (PMv), where mirror neurons have been reported in macaques, is difficult to identify in marmosets, since no sulcal landmarks exist in the frontal cortex. We addressed this problem using “in vivo” connection imaging methods. That is, we first identified cells responsive to others' grasping action in a clear landmark, the superior temporal sulcus (STS), under anesthesia, and injected fluorescent tracers into the region. By fluorescence stereomicroscopy, we identified clusters of labeled cells in the ventrolateral frontal cortex, which were confirmed to be within the ventrolateral frontal cortex including PMv after sacrifice. We next implanted electrodes into the ventrolateral frontal cortex and STS and recorded single/multi-units under an awake condition. As a result, we found neurons in the ventrolateral frontal cortex with characteristic “mirror” properties quite similar to those in macaques. This finding suggests that mirror neurons occur in a common ancestor of New and Old World monkeys and its common properties are preserved during the course of primate evolution. PMID:26696817

  8. On the Dynamics of the Spontaneous Activity in Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bonifazi, Paolo; Ruaro, Maria Elisabetta; Torre, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Most neuronal networks, even in the absence of external stimuli, produce spontaneous bursts of spikes separated by periods of reduced activity. The origin and functional role of these neuronal events are still unclear. The present work shows that the spontaneous activity of two very different networks, intact leech ganglia and dissociated cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, share several features. Indeed, in both networks: i) the inter-spike intervals distribution of the spontaneous firing of single neurons is either regular or periodic or bursting, with the fraction of bursting neurons depending on the network activity; ii) bursts of spontaneous spikes have the same broad distributions of size and duration; iii) the degree of correlated activity increases with the bin width, and the power spectrum of the network firing rate has a 1/f behavior at low frequencies, indicating the existence of long-range temporal correlations; iv) the activity of excitatory synaptic pathways mediated by NMDA receptors is necessary for the onset of the long-range correlations and for the presence of large bursts; v) blockage of inhibitory synaptic pathways mediated by GABAA receptors causes instead an increase in the correlation among neurons and leads to a burst distribution composed only of very small and very large bursts. These results suggest that the spontaneous electrical activity in neuronal networks with different architectures and functions can have very similar properties and common dynamics. PMID:17502919

  9. Neuronal migration disorders: Focus on the cytoskeleton and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Melissa A; Golden, Jeffrey A; Francis, Fiona

    2016-08-01

    A wide spectrum of focal, regional, or diffuse structural brain abnormalities, collectively known as malformations of cortical development (MCDs), frequently manifest with intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy, and/or autistic spectrum disorder (ASD). As the acronym suggests, MCDs are perturbations of the normal architecture of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. The pathogenesis of these disorders remains incompletely understood; however, one area that has provided important insights has been the study of neuronal migration. The amalgamation of human genetics and experimental studies in animal models has led to the recognition that common genetic causes of neurodevelopmental disorders, including many severe epilepsy syndromes, are due to mutations in genes regulating the migration of newly born post-mitotic neurons. Neuronal migration genes often, though not exclusively, code for proteins involved in the function of the cytoskeleton. Other cellular processes, such as cell division and axon/dendrite formation, which similarly depend on cytoskeletal functions, may also be affected. We focus here on how the susceptibility of the highly organized neocortex and hippocampus may be due to their laminar organization, which involves the tight regulation, both temporally and spatially, of gene expression, specialized progenitor cells, the migration of neurons over large distances and a birthdate-specific layering of neurons. Perturbations in neuronal migration result in abnormal lamination, neuronal differentiation defects, abnormal cellular morphology and circuit formation. Ultimately this results in disorganized excitatory and inhibitory activity leading to the symptoms observed in individuals with these disorders.

  10. Entrainment of the intrinsic dynamics of single isolated neurons by natural-like input.

    PubMed

    Gal, Asaf; Marom, Shimon

    2013-05-01

    Neuronal dynamics is intrinsically unstable, producing activity fluctuations that are essentially scale free. Here we study single cortical neurons of newborn rats in vitro, and show that while these scale-free fluctuations are independent of temporal input statistics, they can be entrained by input variation. Joint input-output statistics and spike train reproducibility in synaptically isolated cortical neurons were measured in response to various input regimes over extended timescales (many minutes). Response entrainment was found to be maximal when the input itself possesses natural-like, scale-free statistics. We conclude that preference for natural stimuli, often observed at the system level, exists already at the elementary, single neuron level.

  11. Temporal Hebbian plasticity designed for efficient competitive learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Myoung Won

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the functional roles of temporal Hebbian plasticity has been of growing interest since several experiments revealed that the change in synaptic efficacy was determined by the precise temporal relation between post- and presynaptic spikes. We here investigate the learning properties of the typical synaptic modification forms. We explain how the peculiar characteristics in synaptic modification, such as asymmetry, decay rate, and oscillatory behavior, exert effects on the direction and the performance of network formation. Also, we argue that the aforementioned characteristics help to achieve proper network adaptation, such as activity-dependent columnar organization, through an efficient competitive learning process.

  12. Isolated Chronic Exertional Compartment Syndrome of the Lateral Lower Leg

    PubMed Central

    van Zantvoort, Aniek P.M.; de Bruijn, Johan A.; Winkes, Michiel B.; Dielemans, Jeanne P.; van der Cruijsen-Raaijmakers, Marike; Hoogeveen, Adwin R.; Scheltinga, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Exercise-induced lower leg pain may be caused by chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS). The anterior (ant-CECS) or deep posterior compartment (dp-CECS) is usually affected. Knowledge regarding CECS of the lateral compartment (lat-CECS) is limited. Purpose: To describe demographic characteristics and symptoms in a consecutive series of patients with isolated CECS of the lateral compartment of the leg. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Since 2001, patients undergoing dynamic intracompartmental pressure (ICP) measurements for suspected CECS in a single institution were prospectively monitored. Individuals with a history possibly associated with lat-CECS and elevated ICP measurements (Pedowitz criteria) were identified. Exclusion criteria were concomitant ipsilateral ant-CECS/dp-CECS, acute compartment syndrome, recent significant trauma, peroneal nerve entrapment, or vascular claudication. Results: During an 11-year time period, a total of 26 patients with isolated lat-CECS fulfilled study criteria (15 females; median age, 21 years; range, 14-48 years). Frequently identified provocative sports were running (n = 4), walking (n = 4), field hockey (n = 3), soccer (n = 3), and volleyball (n = 2). Exercise-induced lateral lower leg pain (92%) and tightness (42%) were often reported. The syndrome was bilateral in almost two-thirds (62%, n = 16). Delay in diagnosis averaged 24 months (range, 2 months to 10 years). Conclusion: Young patients with exercise-induced pain in the lateral portions of the lower leg may suffer from isolated CECS of the lateral compartment. ICP measurements in the lateral compartment in these patients are recommended. PMID:26740955

  13. Exertion-induced fatigue and thermoregulation in the cold.

    PubMed

    Young, A J; Castellani, J W

    2001-04-01

    impairments in thermoregulatory responses to cold associated with exertional fatigue are mediated by blunted sympathetic nervous responsiveness to cold is suggested by some experimental observations and merits further study. PMID:11282320

  14. Mechanisms of exertional dyspnoea in symptomatic smokers without COPD.

    PubMed

    Elbehairy, Amany F; Guenette, Jordan A; Faisal, Azmy; Ciavaglia, Casey E; Webb, Katherine A; Jensen, Dennis; Ramsook, Andrew H; Neder, J Alberto; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2016-09-01

    Dyspnoea and activity limitation can occur in smokers who do not meet spirometric criteria for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but the underlying mechanisms are unknown.Detailed pulmonary function tests and sensory-mechanical relationships during incremental exercise with respiratory pressure measurements and diaphragmatic electromyography (EMGdi) were compared in 20 smokers without spirometric COPD and 20 age-matched healthy controls.Smokers (mean±sd post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced vital capacity 75±4%, mean±sd FEV1 104±14% predicted) had greater activity-related dyspnoea, poorer health status and lower physical activity than controls. Smokers had peripheral airway dysfunction: higher phase-III nitrogen slopes (3.8±1.8 versus 2.6±1.1%·L(-1)) and airway resistance (difference between airway resistance measured at 5 Hz and 20 Hz 19±11 versus 12±7% at 5 Hz) than controls (p<0.05). Smokers had significantly (p<0.05) lower peak oxygen uptake (78±40 versus 107±45% predicted) and ventilation (61±26 versus 97±29 L·min(-1)). Exercise ventilatory requirements, operating lung volumes and cardio-circulatory responses were similar. However, submaximal dyspnoea ratings, resistive and total work of breathing were increased in smokers compared with controls (p<0.05); diaphragmatic effort (transdiaphragmatic pressure/maximumal transdiaphragmatic pressure) and fractional inspiratory neural drive to the diaphragm (EMGdi/maximal EMGdi) were also increased (p<0.05) mainly reflecting the reduced denominator.Symptomatic smokers at risk for COPD had greater exertional dyspnoea and lower exercise tolerance compared with healthy controls in association with greater airways resistance, contractile diaphragmatic effort and fractional inspiratory neural drive to the diaphragm. PMID:27492828

  15. A fast BK-type KCa current acts as a postsynaptic modulator of temporal selectivity for communication signals.

    PubMed

    Kohashi, Tsunehiko; Carlson, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    Temporal patterns of spiking often convey behaviorally relevant information. Various synaptic mechanisms and intrinsic membrane properties can influence neuronal selectivity to temporal patterns of input. However, little is known about how synaptic mechanisms and intrinsic properties together determine the temporal selectivity of neuronal output. We tackled this question by recording from midbrain electrosensory neurons in mormyrid fish, in which the processing of temporal intervals between communication signals can be studied in a reduced in vitro preparation. Mormyrids communicate by varying interpulse intervals (IPIs) between electric pulses. Within the midbrain posterior exterolateral nucleus (ELp), the temporal patterns of afferent spike trains are filtered to establish single-neuron IPI tuning. We performed whole-cell recording from ELp neurons in a whole-brain preparation and examined the relationship between intrinsic excitability and IPI tuning. We found that spike frequency adaptation of ELp neurons was highly variable. Postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) of strongly adapting (phasic) neurons were more sharply tuned to IPIs than weakly adapting (tonic) neurons. Further, the synaptic filtering of IPIs by tonic neurons was more faithfully converted into variation in spiking output, particularly at short IPIs. Pharmacological manipulation under current- and voltage-clamp revealed that tonic firing is mediated by a fast, large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (KCa) current (BK) that speeds up action potential repolarization. These results suggest that BK currents can shape the temporal filtering of sensory inputs by modifying both synaptic responses and PSP-to-spike conversion. Slow SK-type KCa currents have previously been implicated in temporal processing. Thus, both fast and slow KCa currents can fine-tune temporal selectivity.

  16. Neuronal avalanches and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2011-05-01

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behaviour of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behaviour is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. Spontaneous neuronal activity has recently shown features in common to other complex systems. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. These avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behaviour. In this contribution we discuss a statistical mechanical model for the complex activity in a neuronal network. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. Then, we discuss the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules, in particular the exclusive OR (XOR) and a random rule with three inputs. The learning dynamics exhibits universal features as function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  17. Dynamics of temporal discrimination.

    PubMed

    Guilhardi, Paulo; Church, Russell M

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe and explain the acquisition of temporal discriminations, transitions from one temporal interval to another, and asymptotic performance of stimulus and temporal discriminations. Rats were trained on a multiple cued interval (MCI) procedure with a head entry response on three signaled fixed-interval schedules of reinforcement (30, 60, and 120 sec). They readily learned the three temporal discriminations, whether they were presented simultaneously or successively, and they rapidly adjusted their performance to new intervals when the intermediate interval was varied daily. Although exponential functions provided good descriptions of many measures of temporal discrimination, different parameter values were required for each measure. The addition of a linear operator to a packet theory of timing with a single set of parameters provided a quantitative process model that fit many measures of the dynamics of temporal discrimination.

  18. Synapse-to-neuron ratio is inversely related to neuronal density in mature neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Cullen, D Kacy; Gilroy, Meghan E; Irons, Hillary R; Laplaca, Michelle C

    2010-11-01

    Synapse formation is a fundamental process in neurons that occurs throughout development, maturity, and aging. Although these stages contain disparate and fluctuating numbers of mature neurons, tactics employed by neuronal networks to modulate synapse number as a function of neuronal density are not well understood. The goal of this study was to utilize an in vitro model to assess the influence of cell density and neuronal maturity on synapse number and distribution. Specifically, cerebral cortical neurons were plated in planar culture at densities ranging from 10 to 5000 neurons/mm², and synapse number and distribution were evaluated via immunocytochemistry over 21 days in vitro (DIV). High-resolution confocal microscopy revealed an elaborate three-dimensional distribution of neurites and synapses across the heights of high-density neuronal networks by 21 DIV, which were up to 18 μm thick, demonstrating the complex degree of spatial interactions even in planar high-density cultures. At 7 DIV, the mean number of synapses per neuron was less than 5, and this did not vary as a function of neuronal density. However, by 21 DIV, the number of synapses per neuron had jumped 30- to 80-fold, and the synapse-to-neuron ratio was greatest at lower neuronal densities (< 500 neurons/mm²; mean approximately 400 synapses/neuron) compared to mid and higher neuronal densities (500-4500 neurons/mm²; mean of approximately 150 synapses/neuron) (p<0.05). These results suggest a relationship between neuronal density and synapse number that may have implications in the neurobiology of developing neuronal networks as well as processes of cell death and regeneration.

  19. Local inputs to aldosterone-sensitive neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, S M; Geerling, J C; Loewy, A D

    2006-09-15

    Aldosterone-sensitive neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) become activated during sodium depletion and could be key neural elements regulating sodium intake. The afferent inputs to these neurons have not yet been defined, but one source may be neurons in the area postrema, a neighboring circumventricular organ that innervates the NTS and exerts a powerful inhibitory influence on sodium appetite [Contreras RJ, Stetson PW (1981) Changes in salt intake after lesions of the area postrema and the nucleus of the solitary tract in rats. Brain Res 211:355-366]. After an anterograde axonal tracer was injected into the area postrema in rats, sections through the NTS were immunolabeled for the enzyme 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (HSD2), a marker for aldosterone-sensitive neurons, and examined by confocal microscopy. We found that some of the aldosterone-sensitive neurons received close appositions from processes originating in the area postrema, suggesting that input to the HSD2 neurons could be involved in the inhibition of sodium appetite by this site. Axonal varicosities originating from the area postrema also made close appositions with other neurons in the medial NTS, including the neurotensin-immunoreactive neurons in the dorsomedial NTS. Besides these projections, a dense field of neurotensinergic axon terminals overlapped the distribution of the HSD2 neurons. Neurotensin-immunoreactive axon terminals were identified in close apposition to the dendrites and cell bodies of some HSD2 neurons, as well as unlabeled neurons lying in the same zone within the medial NTS. A local microcircuit involving the area postrema, HSD2 neurons, and neurotensinergic neurons may play a major role in the regulation of sodium appetite.

  20. Neuronal Activity Promotes Glioma Growth through Neuroligin-3 Secretion.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Humsa S; Johung, Tessa B; Caretti, Viola; Noll, Alyssa; Tang, Yujie; Nagaraja, Surya; Gibson, Erin M; Mount, Christopher W; Polepalli, Jai; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Woo, Pamelyn J; Malenka, Robert C; Vogel, Hannes; Bredel, Markus; Mallick, Parag; Monje, Michelle

    2015-05-01

    Active neurons exert a mitogenic effect on normal neural precursor and oligodendroglial precursor cells, the putative cellular origins of high-grade glioma (HGG). By using optogenetic control of cortical neuronal activity in a patient-derived pediatric glioblastoma xenograft model, we demonstrate that active neurons similarly promote HGG proliferation and growth in vivo. Conditioned medium from optogenetically stimulated cortical slices promoted proliferation of pediatric and adult patient-derived HGG cultures, indicating secretion of activity-regulated mitogen(s). The synaptic protein neuroligin-3 (NLGN3) was identified as the leading candidate mitogen, and soluble NLGN3 was sufficient and necessary to promote robust HGG cell proliferation. NLGN3 induced PI3K-mTOR pathway activity and feedforward expression of NLGN3 in glioma cells. NLGN3 expression levels in human HGG negatively correlated with patient overall survival. These findings indicate the important role of active neurons in the brain tumor microenvironment and identify secreted NLGN3 as an unexpected mechanism promoting neuronal activity-regulated cancer growth.

  1. BDNF heightens the sensitivity of motor neurons to excitotoxic insults through activation of TrkB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Peter; Kalb, Robert G.; Walton, K. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The survival promoting and neuroprotective actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are well known but under certain circumstances this growth factor can also exacerbate excitotoxic insults to neurons. Prior exploration of the receptor through which BDNF exerts this action on motor neurons deflects attention away from p75. Here we investigated the possibility that BDNF acts through the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkB, to confer on motor neurons sensitivity to excitotoxic challenge. We blocked BDNF activation of TrkB using a dominant negative TrkB mutant or a TrkB function blocking antibody, and found that this protected motor neurons against excitotoxic insult in cultures of mixed spinal cord neurons. Addition of a function blocking antibody to BDNF to mixed spinal cord neuron cultures is also neuroprotective indicating that endogenously produced BDNF participates in vulnerability to excitotoxicity. We next examined the intracellular signaling cascades that are engaged upon TrkB activation. Previously we found that inhibition of the phosphatidylinositide-3'-kinase (PI3'K) pathway blocks BDNF-induced excitotoxic sensitivity. Here we show that expression of a constitutively active catalytic subunit of PI3'K, p110, confers excitotoxic sensitivity (ES) upon motor neurons not incubated with BDNF. Parallel studies with purified motor neurons confirm that these events are likely to be occuring specifically within motor neurons. The abrogation of BDNF's capacity to accentuate excitotoxic insults may make it a more attractive neuroprotective agent.

  2. GABA regulates synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Shaoyu; Goh, Eyleen L. K.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Kitabatake, Yasuji; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2006-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis, the birth and integration of new neurons from adult neural stem cells, is a striking form of structural plasticity and highlights the regenerative capacity of the adult mammalian brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that neuronal activity regulates adult neurogenesis and that new neurons contribute to specific brain functions. The mechanism that regulates the integration of newly generated neurons into the pre-existing functional circuitry in the adult brain is unknown. Here we show that newborn granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus are tonically activated by ambient GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) before being sequentially innervated by GABA- and glutamate-mediated synaptic inputs. GABA, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, initially exerts an excitatory action on newborn neurons owing to their high cytoplasmic chloride ion content. Conversion of GABA-induced depolarization (excitation) into hyperpolarization (inhibition) in newborn neurons leads to marked defects in their synapse formation and dendritic development in vivo. Our study identifies an essential role for GABA in the synaptic integration of newly generated neurons in the adult brain, and suggests an unexpected mechanism for activity-dependent regulation of adult neurogenesis, in which newborn neurons may sense neuronal network activity through tonic and phasic GABA activation.

  3. Changes in the selection differential exerted on a marine snail during the ontogeny of a predatory shore crab.

    PubMed

    Pakes, D; Boulding, E G

    2010-08-01

    Empirical estimates of selection gradients caused by predators are common, yet no one has quantified how these estimates vary with predator ontogeny. We used logistic regression to investigate how selection on gastropod shell thickness changed with predator size. Only small and medium purple shore crabs (Hemigrapsus nudus) exerted a linear selection gradient for increased shell-thickness within a single population of the intertidal snail (Littorina subrotundata). The shape of the fitness function for shell thickness was confirmed to be linear for small and medium crabs but was humped for large male crabs, suggesting no directional selection. A second experiment using two prey species to amplify shell thickness differences established that the selection differential on adult snails decreased linearly as crab size increased. We observed differences in size distribution and sex ratios among three natural shore crab populations that may cause spatial and temporal variation in predator-mediated selection on local snail populations. PMID:20524948

  4. Neuronal migration illuminated

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Niraj

    2011-01-01

    During vertebrate brain development, migration of neurons from the germinal zones to their final laminar positions is essential to establish functional neural circuits.1–3 Whereas key insights into neuronal migration initially came from landmark studies identifying the genes mutated in human cortical malformations,4 cell biology has recently greatly advanced our understanding of how cytoskeletal proteins and molecular motors drive the morphogenic cell movements that build the developing brain. This Commentary & View reviews recent studies examining the role of the molecular motors during neuronal migration and critically examines current models of acto-myosin function in the two-step neuronal migration cycle. Given the apparent emerging diversity of neuronal sub-type cytoskeletal organizations, we propose that two approaches must be taken to resolve differences between the current migration models: the mechanisms of radial and tangential migration must be compared, and the loci of tension generation, migration substrates and sites of adhesion dynamics must be precisely examined in an integrated manner. PMID:20935494

  5. VALIDATION OF ADULT OMNI PERCEIVED EXERTION SCALES FOR ELLIPTICAL ERGOMETRY12

    PubMed Central

    MAYS, RYAN J.; GOSS, FREDRIC L.; SCHAFER, MARK A.; KIM, KEVIN H.; NAGLE-STILLEY, ELIZABETH F.; ROBERTSON, ROBERT J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This investigation examined the validity of newly developed Adult OMNI Elliptical Ergometer Ratings of Perceived Exertion Scales. Sixty men and women performed a graded exercise test on an elliptical ergometer. Oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rate (HR) and ratings of perceived exertion were recorded each stage from the Borg 15 Category Scale and two different OMNI scales. One scale employed an elliptical ergometer format of the OMNI Picture System of Perceived Exertion. The second scale modified verbal, numerical, and pictorial descriptors at the low end of the response range. Concurrent and construct validity were established by the positive relation between ratings of perceived exertion from each OMNI scale with VO2, HR and Borg Scale ratings of perceived exertion (men, r = .94–.97; women, r = .93–.98). Validity was established for both OMNI scales, indicating either metric can be used to estimate ratings of perceived exertion during partial weight bearing exercise. PMID:21319623

  6. Representation of interval timing by temporally scalable firing patterns in rat prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Min; Zhang, Si-yu; Dan, Yang; Poo, Mu-ming

    2014-01-01

    Perception of time interval on the order of seconds is an essential component of cognition, but the underlying neural mechanism remains largely unknown. In rats trained to estimate time intervals, we found that many neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) exhibited sustained spiking activity with diverse temporal profiles of firing-rate modulation during the time-estimation period. Interestingly, in tasks involving different intervals, each neuron exhibited firing-rate modulation with the same profile that was temporally scaled by a factor linearly proportional to the instructed intervals. The behavioral variability across trials within each task also correlated with the intertrial variability of the temporal scaling factor. Local cooling of the medial PFC, which affects neural circuit dynamics, significantly delayed behavioral responses. Thus, PFC neuronal activity contributes to time perception, and temporally scalable firing-rate modulation may reflect a general mechanism for neural representation of interval timing. PMID:24367075

  7. Midline thalamic neurons are differentially engaged during hippocampus network oscillations.

    PubMed

    Lara-Vásquez, Ariel; Espinosa, Nelson; Durán, Ernesto; Stockle, Marcelo; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The midline thalamus is reciprocally connected with the medial temporal lobe, where neural circuitry essential for spatial navigation and memory formation resides. Yet, little information is available on the dynamic relationship between activity patterns in the midline thalamus and medial temporal lobe. Here, we report on the functional heterogeneity of anatomically-identified thalamic neurons and the differential modulation of their activity with respect to dorsal hippocampal rhythms in the anesthetized mouse. Midline thalamic neurons expressing the calcium-binding protein calretinin, irrespective of their selective co-expression of calbindin, discharged at overall low levels, did not increase their activity during hippocampal theta oscillations, and their firing rates were inhibited during hippocampal sharp wave-ripples. Conversely, thalamic neurons lacking calretinin discharged at higher rates, increased their activity during hippocampal theta waves, but remained unaffected during sharp wave-ripples. Our results indicate that the midline thalamic system comprises at least two different classes of thalamic projection neuron, which can be partly defined by their differential engagement by hippocampal pathways during specific network oscillations that accompany distinct behavioral contexts. Thus, different midline thalamic neuronal populations might be selectively recruited to support distinct stages of memory processing, consistent with the thalamus being pivotal in the dialogue of cortical circuits. PMID:27411890

  8. Midline thalamic neurons are differentially engaged during hippocampus network oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Vásquez, Ariel; Espinosa, Nelson; Durán, Ernesto; Stockle, Marcelo; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The midline thalamus is reciprocally connected with the medial temporal lobe, where neural circuitry essential for spatial navigation and memory formation resides. Yet, little information is available on the dynamic relationship between activity patterns in the midline thalamus and medial temporal lobe. Here, we report on the functional heterogeneity of anatomically-identified thalamic neurons and the differential modulation of their activity with respect to dorsal hippocampal rhythms in the anesthetized mouse. Midline thalamic neurons expressing the calcium-binding protein calretinin, irrespective of their selective co-expression of calbindin, discharged at overall low levels, did not increase their activity during hippocampal theta oscillations, and their firing rates were inhibited during hippocampal sharp wave-ripples. Conversely, thalamic neurons lacking calretinin discharged at higher rates, increased their activity during hippocampal theta waves, but remained unaffected during sharp wave-ripples. Our results indicate that the midline thalamic system comprises at least two different classes of thalamic projection neuron, which can be partly defined by their differential engagement by hippocampal pathways during specific network oscillations that accompany distinct behavioral contexts. Thus, different midline thalamic neuronal populations might be selectively recruited to support distinct stages of memory processing, consistent with the thalamus being pivotal in the dialogue of cortical circuits. PMID:27411890

  9. Behaviorally relevant burst coding in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Sabourin, Patrick; Pollack, Gerald S

    2009-08-01

    Bursts of action potentials in sensory interneurons are believed to signal the occurrence of particularly salient stimulus features. Previous work showed that bursts in an identified, ultrasound-tuned interneuron (AN2) of the cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus code for conspicuous increases in amplitude of an ultrasound stimulus, resulting in behavioral responses that are interpreted as avoidance of echolocating bats. We show that the primary sensory neurons that inform AN2 about high-frequency acoustic stimuli also produce bursts. As is the case for AN2, bursts in sensory neurons perform better as feature detectors than isolated, nonburst, spikes. Bursting is temporally correlated between sensory neurons, suggesting that on occurrence of a salient stimulus feature, AN2 will receive strong synaptic input in the form of coincident bursts, from several sensory neurons, and that this might result in bursting in AN2. Our results show that an important feature of the temporal structure of interneuron spike trains can be established at the earliest possible level of sensory processing, i.e., that of the primary sensory neuron.

  10. Relationship between inter-stimulus-intervals and intervals of autonomous activities in a neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidekatsu; Minoshima, Wataru; Kudoh, Suguru N

    2015-08-01

    To investigate relationships between neuronal network activity and electrical stimulus, we analyzed autonomous activity before and after electrical stimulus. Recordings of autonomous activity were performed using dissociated culture of rat hippocampal neurons on a multi-electrodes array (MEA) dish. Single stimulus and pared stimuli were applied to a cultured neuronal network. Single stimulus was applied every 1 min, and paired stimuli was performed by two sequential stimuli every 1 min. As a result, the patterns of synchronized activities of a neuronal network were changed after stimulus. Especially, long range synchronous activities were induced by paired stimuli. When 1 s inter-stimulus-intervals (ISI) and 1.5 s ISI paired stimuli are applied to a neuronal network, relatively long range synchronous activities expressed in case of 1.5 s ISI. Temporal synchronous activity of neuronal network is changed according to inter-stimulus-intervals (ISI) of electrical stimulus. In other words, dissociated neuronal network can maintain given information in temporal pattern and a certain type of an information maintenance mechanism was considered to be implemented in a semi-artificial dissociated neuronal network. The result is useful toward manipulation technology of neuronal activity in a brain system.

  11. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-02-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.

  12. Imaging voltage in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Peterka, Darcy S.; Takahashi, Hiroto; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, imaging membrane potential has become a fruitful approach to study neural circuits, especially in invertebrate preparations with large, resilient neurons. At the same time, particularly in mammalian preparations, voltage imaging methods suffer from poor signal to noise and secondary side effects, and they fall short of providing single-cell resolution when imaging of the activity of neuronal populations. As an introduction to these techniques, we briefly review different voltage imaging methods (including organic fluorophores, SHG chromophores, genetic indicators, hybrid, nanoparticles and intrinsic approaches), and illustrate some of their applications to neuronal biophysics and mammalian circuit analysis. We discuss their mechanisms of voltage sensitivity, from reorientation, electrochromic or electro-optical phenomena, to interaction among chromophores or membrane scattering, and highlight their advantages and shortcomings, commenting on the outlook for development of novel voltage imaging methods. PMID:21220095

  13. Transcriptional induction of the heat shock protein B8 mediates the clearance of misfolded proteins responsible for motor neuron diseases

    PubMed Central

    Crippa, Valeria; D’Agostino, Vito G.; Cristofani, Riccardo; Rusmini, Paola; Cicardi, Maria E.; Messi, Elio; Loffredo, Rosa; Pancher, Michael; Piccolella, Margherita; Galbiati, Mariarita; Meroni, Marco; Cereda, Cristina; Carra, Serena; Provenzani, Alessandro; Poletti, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs) are often associated with the presence of misfolded protein inclusions. The chaperone HSPB8 is upregulated in mice, the human brain and muscle structures affected during NDs progression. HSPB8 exerts a potent pro-degradative activity on several misfolded proteins responsible for familial NDs forms. Here, we demonstrated that HSPB8 also counteracts accumulation of aberrantly localized misfolded forms of TDP-43 and its 25 KDa fragment involved in most sporadic cases of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (sALS) and of Fronto Lateral Temporal Dementia (FLTD). HSPB8 acts with BAG3 and the HSP70/HSC70-CHIP complex enhancing the autophagic removal of misfolded proteins. We performed a high-through put screening (HTS) to find small molecules capable of inducing HSPB8 in neurons for therapeutic purposes. We identified two compounds, colchicine and doxorubicin, that robustly up-regulated HSPB8 expression. Both colchicine and doxorubicin increased the expression of the master regulator of autophagy TFEB, the autophagy linker p62/SQSTM1 and the autophagosome component LC3. In line, both drugs counteracted the accumulation of TDP-43 and TDP-25 misfolded species responsible for motoneuronal death in sALS. Thus, analogs of colchicine and doxorubicin able to induce HSPB8 and with better safety and tolerability may result beneficial in NDs models. PMID:26961006

  14. Nonexocytotic serotonin release tonically suppresses serotonergic neuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Montalbano, Alberto; Baccini, Gilda; Tatini, Francesca; Palmini, Rolando Berlinguer; Corradetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    The firing activity of serotonergic neurons in raphe nuclei is regulated by negative feedback exerted by extracellular serotonin (5-HT)o acting through somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors. The steady-state [5-HT]o, sensed by 5-HT1A autoreceptors, is determined by the balance between the rates of 5-HT release and reuptake. Although it is well established that reuptake of 5-HTo is mediated by 5-HT transporters (SERT), the release mechanism has remained unclear. It is also unclear how selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants increase the [5-HT]o in raphe nuclei and suppress serotonergic neuron activity, thereby potentially diminishing their own therapeutic effect. Using an electrophysiological approach in a slice preparation, we show that, in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), continuous nonexocytotic 5-HT release is responsible for suppression of phenylephrine-facilitated serotonergic neuron firing under basal conditions as well as for autoinhibition induced by SSRI application. By using 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated G protein–gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels of patched serotonergic neurons as 5-HTo sensors, we show substantial nonexocytotic 5-HT release under conditions of abolished firing activity, Ca2+ influx, vesicular monoamine transporter 2–mediated vesicular accumulation of 5-HT, and SERT-mediated 5-HT transport. Our results reveal a cytosolic origin of 5-HTo in the DRN and suggest that 5-HTo may be supplied by simple diffusion across the plasma membrane, primarily from the dense network of neurites of serotonergic neurons surrounding the cell bodies. These findings indicate that the serotonergic system does not function as a sum of independently acting neurons but as a highly interdependent neuronal network, characterized by a shared neurotransmitter pool and the regulation of firing activity by an interneuronal, yet activity-independent, nonexocytotic mechanism. PMID:25712017

  15. On learning time delays between the spikes from different input neurons in a biophysical model of a pyramidal neuron.

    PubMed

    Koutsou, Achilleas; Bugmann, Guido; Christodoulou, Chris

    2015-10-01

    Biological systems are able to recognise temporal sequences of stimuli or compute in the temporal domain. In this paper we are exploring whether a biophysical model of a pyramidal neuron can detect and learn systematic time delays between the spikes from different input neurons. In particular, we investigate whether it is possible to reinforce pairs of synapses separated by a dendritic propagation time delay corresponding to the arrival time difference of two spikes from two different input neurons. We examine two subthreshold learning approaches where the first relies on the backpropagation of EPSPs (excitatory postsynaptic potentials) and the second on the backpropagation of a somatic action potential, whose production is supported by a learning-enabling background current. The first approach does not provide a learning signal that sufficiently differentiates between synapses at different locations, while in the second approach, somatic spikes do not provide a reliable signal distinguishing arrival time differences of the order of the dendritic propagation time. It appears that the firing of pyramidal neurons shows little sensitivity to heterosynaptic spike arrival time differences of several milliseconds. This neuron is therefore unlikely to be able to learn to detect such differences.

  16. Temporal Organization in Prose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulhavy, Raymond W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    High school students read textual passages organized around a semantic, temporal, or random theme. Free recall, semantically, and temporally-cued tests measured recall. During free recall, the organized passages yielded greater recall. For the cued tests, more words were remembered when the passage organization matched the type of test cue.…

  17. Chronic lithium treatment increased intracellular S100ß levels in rat primary neuronal culture.

    PubMed

    Emamghoreishi, Masoumeh; Keshavarz, Mojtaba; Nekooeian, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    S100ß a neurotrophic factor mainly released by astrocytes, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bipolar disorder. Thus, lithium may exert its neuroprotective effects to some extent through S100ß. Furthermore, the possible effects of lithium on astrocytes as well as on interactions between neurons and astrocytes as a part of its mechanisms of actions are unknown. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of lithium on S100β in neurons, astrocytes and a mixture of neurons and astrocytes. Rat primary astrocyte, neuronal and mixed neuro-astroglia cultures were prepared from cortices of 18-day's embryos. Cell cultures were exposed to lithium (1mM) or vehicle for 1day (acute) or 7 days (chronic). RT-PCR and ELISA determined S100β mRNA and intra- and extracellular protein levels. Chronic lithium treatment significantly increased intracellular S100β in neuronal and neuro-astroglia cultures in comparison to control cultures (P<0.05). Acute and chronic lithium treatments exerted no significant effects on intracellular S100β protein levels in astrocytes, and extracellular S100β protein levels in three studied cultures as compared to control cultures. Acute and chronic lithium treatments did not significantly alter S100β mRNA levels in three studied cultures, compared to control cultures. Chronic lithium treatment increased intracellular S100ß protein levels in a cell-type specific manner which may favor its neuroprotective action. The findings of this study suggest that lithium may exert its neuroprotective action, at least partly, by increasing neuronal S100ß level, with no effect on astrocytes or interaction between neurons and astrocytes.

  18. Supramolecular nanoparticles that target phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase overcome insulin resistance and exert pronounced antitumor efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ashish A.; Roy, Bhaskar; Rao, Poornima S.; Wyant, Gregory A.; Mahmoud, Ayaat; Ramachandran, Madhumitha; Sengupta, Poulomi; Goldman, Aaron; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Basu, Sudipta; Mashelkar, Raghunath A; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Dinulescu, Daniela M.; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2013-01-01

    The centrality of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) in cancer etiology is well established, but clinical translation of PI3K inhibitors has been limited by feedback signaling, suboptimal intra-tumoral concentration and an insulin resistance ‘class effect’. The current study was designed to explore the use of supramolecular nanochemistry for targeting PI3K to enhance antitumor efficacy and potentially overcome these limitations. PI3K inhibitor structures were rationally modified using a cholesterol-based derivative, facilitating supramolecular nanoassembly with L-α-phosphatidylcholine and DSPE-PEG. The supramolecular nanoparticles that were assembled were physicochemically characterized and functionally evaluated in vitro. Antitumor efficacy was quantified in vivo using 4T1 breast cancer and K-RasLSL/+/Ptenfl/fl ovarian cancer models, with effects on glucose homeostasis evaluated using an insulin sensitivity test. The use of PI103 and PI828 as surrogate molecules to engineer the supramolecular nanoparticles highlighted the need to keep design principles in perspective; specifically, potency of the active molecule and the linker chemistry were critical principles for efficacy, similar to antibody-drug conjugates. We found that the supramolecular nanoparticles exerted a temporally-sustained inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, S6K and 4EBP in vivo. These effects were associated with increased antitumor efficacy and survival as compared with PI103 and PI828. Efficacy was further increased by decorating the nanoparticle surface with tumor-homing peptides. Notably, the use of supramolecular nanoparticles abrogated the insulin resistance that has been associated widely with other PI3K inhibitors. This study provides a preclinical foundation for the use of supramolecular nanochemistry to overcome current challenges associated with PI3K inhibitors, offering a paradigm for extension to other molecularly targeted therapeutics being explored for cancer treatment

  19. Supramolecular nanoparticles that target phosphoinositide-3-kinase overcome insulin resistance and exert pronounced antitumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashish A; Roy, Bhaskar; Rao, Poornima S; Wyant, Gregory A; Mahmoud, Ayaat; Ramachandran, Madhumitha; Sengupta, Poulomi; Goldman, Aaron; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Basu, Sudipta; Mashelkar, Raghunath A; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Dinulescu, Daniela M; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2013-12-01

    The centrality of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cancer etiology is well established, but clinical translation of PI3K inhibitors has been limited by feedback signaling, suboptimal intratumoral concentration, and an insulin resistance "class effect." This study was designed to explore the use of supramolecular nanochemistry for targeting PI3K to enhance antitumor efficacy and potentially overcome these limitations. PI3K inhibitor structures were rationally modified using a cholesterol-based derivative, facilitating supramolecular nanoassembly with L-α-phosphatidylcholine and DSPE-PEG [1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[amino(polythylene glycol)]. The supramolecular nanoparticles (SNP) that were assembled were physicochemically characterized and functionally evaluated in vitro. Antitumor efficacy was quantified in vivo using 4T1 breast cancer and K-Ras(LSL/+)/Pten(fl/fl) ovarian cancer models, with effects on glucose homeostasis evaluated using an insulin sensitivity test. The use of PI103 and PI828 as surrogate molecules to engineer the SNPs highlighted the need to keep design principles in perspective; specifically, potency of the active molecule and the linker chemistry were critical principles for efficacy, similar to antibody-drug conjugates. We found that the SNPs exerted a temporally sustained inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, S6K, and 4EBP in vivo. These effects were associated with increased antitumor efficacy and survival as compared with PI103 and PI828. Efficacy was further increased by decorating the nanoparticle surface with tumor-homing peptides. Notably, the use of SNPs abrogated the insulin resistance that has been associated widely with other PI3K inhibitors. This study provides a preclinical foundation for the use of supramolecular nanochemistry to overcome current challenges associated with PI3K inhibitors, offering a paradigm for extension to other molecularly targeted therapeutics being explored for cancer

  20. Control of Granule Cell Dispersion by Natural Materials Such as Eugenol and Naringin: A Potential Therapeutic Strategy Against Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-08-01

    The hippocampus is an important brain area where abnormal morphological characteristics are often observed in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), typically showing the loss of the principal neurons in the CA1 and CA3 areas of the hippocampus. TLE is frequently associated with widening of the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus (DG), termed granule cell dispersion (GCD), in the hippocampus, suggesting that the control of GCD with protection of hippocampal neurons may be useful for preventing and inhibiting epileptic seizures. We previously reported that eugenol (EUG), which is an essential component of medicinal herbs and has anticonvulsant activity, is beneficial for treating epilepsy through its ability to inhibit GCD via suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation in the hippocampal DG in a kainic acid (KA)-treated mouse model of epilepsy in vivo. In addition, we reported that naringin, a bioflavonoid in citrus fruits, could exert beneficial effects, such as antiautophagic stress and antineuroinflammation, in the KA mouse model of epilepsy, even though it was unclear whether naringin might also attenuate the seizure-induced morphological changes of GCD in the DG. Similar to the effects of EUG, we recently observed that naringin treatment significantly reduced KA-induced GCD and mTORC1 activation, which are both involved in epileptic seizures, in the hippocampus of mouse brain. Therefore, these observations suggest that the utilization of natural materials, which have beneficial properties such as inhibition of GCD formation and protection of hippocampal neurons, may be useful in developing a novel therapeutic agent against TLE.

  1. Amitriptyline Activates TrkA to Aid Neuronal Growth and Attenuate Anesthesia-Induced Neurodegeneration in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaochun; Chen, Feng; Zheng, Ting; Huang, Fengyi; Chen, Jianghu; Tu, Wenshao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (AM) has been shown to exert neurotrophic activity on neurons. We thus explored whether AM may aid the neuronal development and protect anesthesia-induced neuro-injury in young spinal cord dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The DRG explants were prepared from 1-day-old rats. The effect of AM on aiding DRG neural development was examined by immunohistochemistry at dose-dependent manner. AM-induced changes in gene and protein expressions, and also phosphorylation states of tyrosine kinases receptor A (TrkA) and B (TrkB) in DRG, were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The effect of AM on attenuating lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration was examined by immunohistochemistry, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated TrkA/B down-regulation. Amitriptyline stimulated DRG neuronal development in dose-dependent manner, but exerted toxic effect at concentrations higher than 10 M. AM activated TrkA in DRG through phosphorylation, whereas it had little effect on TrkB-signaling pathway. AM reduced lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration by regenerating neurites and growth cones. Moreover, the neuroprotection of AM on lidocaine-injured neurodegeneration was blocked by siRNA-mediated TrkA down-regulation, but not by TrkB down-regulation. Amitriptyline facilitated neuronal development and had protective effect on lidocaine-induced neurodegeneration, very likely through the activation of TrkA-signaling pathway in DRG. PMID:27149473

  2. Differential involvement of excitatory and inhibitory neurons of cat motor cortex in coincident spike activity related to behavioral context.

    PubMed

    Putrino, David; Brown, Emery N; Mastaglia, Frank L; Ghosh, Soumya

    2010-06-01

    To assess temporal associations in spike activity between pairs of neurons in the primary motor cortex (MI) related to different behaviors, we compared the incidence of coincident spiking activity of task-related (TR) and non-task-related (NTR) neurons during a skilled motor task and sitting quietly in adult cats (Felis domestica). Chronically implanted microwires were used to record spike activity of MI neurons in four animals (two male and two female) trained to perform a skilled reaching task or sit quietly. Neurons were identified as TR if spike activity was modulated during the task (and NTR if not). Based on spike characteristics, they were also classified as either regular-spiking (RS, putatively excitatory) or fast-spiking (FS, putatively inhibitory) neurons. Temporal associations in the activities of simultaneously recorded neurons were evaluated using shuffle-corrected cross-correlograms. Pairs of NTR and TR neurons showed associations in their firing patterns over wide areas of MI (representing forelimb and hindlimb movements) during quiet sitting, more commonly involving RS neurons. During skilled task performance, however, significantly coincident firing was seen almost exclusively between TR neurons in a smaller part of MI (representing forelimb movements), involving mainly FS neurons. The findings of this study show evidence for widespread interactions in MI when the animal sits quietly, which changes to a more specific and restricted pattern of interactions during task performance. Different populations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons appear to be synchronized during skilled movement and quiet sitting.

  3. Autapse-induced multiple coherence resonance in single neurons and neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ergin; Ozer, Mahmut; Baysal, Veli; Perc, Matjaž

    2016-01-01

    We study the effects of electrical and chemical autapse on the temporal coherence or firing regularity of single stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons and scale-free neuronal networks. Also, we study the effects of chemical autapse on the occurrence of spatial synchronization in scale-free neuronal networks. Irrespective of the type of autapse, we observe autaptic time delay induced multiple coherence resonance for appropriately tuned autaptic conductance levels in single neurons. More precisely, we show that in the presence of an electrical autapse, there is an optimal intensity of channel noise inducing the multiple coherence resonance, whereas in the presence of chemical autapse the occurrence of multiple coherence resonance is less sensitive to the channel noise intensity. At the network level, we find autaptic time delay induced multiple coherence resonance and synchronization transitions, occurring at approximately the same delay lengths. We show that these two phenomena can arise only at a specific range of the coupling strength, and that they can be observed independently of the average degree of the network. PMID:27480120

  4. Autapse-induced multiple coherence resonance in single neurons and neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ergin; Ozer, Mahmut; Baysal, Veli; Perc, Matjaž

    2016-08-02

    We study the effects of electrical and chemical autapse on the temporal coherence or firing regularity of single stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons and scale-free neuronal networks. Also, we study the effects of chemical autapse on the occurrence of spatial synchronization in scale-free neuronal networks. Irrespective of the type of autapse, we observe autaptic time delay induced multiple coherence resonance for appropriately tuned autaptic conductance levels in single neurons. More precisely, we show that in the presence of an electrical autapse, there is an optimal intensity of channel noise inducing the multiple coherence resonance, whereas in the presence of chemical autapse the occurrence of multiple coherence resonance is less sensitive to the channel noise intensity. At the network level, we find autaptic time delay induced multiple coherence resonance and synchronization transitions, occurring at approximately the same delay lengths. We show that these two phenomena can arise only at a specific range of the coupling strength, and that they can be observed independently of the average degree of the network.

  5. Sequential transcriptional waves direct the differentiation of newborn neurons in the mouse neocortex.

    PubMed

    Telley, Ludovic; Govindan, Subashika; Prados, Julien; Stevant, Isabelle; Nef, Serge; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; Dayer, Alexandre; Jabaudon, Denis

    2016-03-25

    During corticogenesis, excitatory neurons are born from progenitors located in the ventricular zone (VZ), from where they migrate to assemble into circuits. How neuronal identity is dynamically specified upon progenitor division is unknown. Here, we study this process using a high-temporal-resolution technology allowing fluorescent tagging of isochronic cohorts of newborn VZ cells. By combining this in vivo approach with single-cell transcriptomics in mice, we identify and functionally characterize neuron-specific primordial transcriptional programs as they dynamically unfold. Our results reveal early transcriptional waves that instruct the sequence and pace of neuronal differentiation events, guiding newborn neurons toward their final fate, and contribute to a road map for the reverse engineering of specific classes of cortical neurons from undifferentiated cells. PMID:26940868

  6. Causal Interrogation of Neuronal Networks and Behavior through Virally Transduced Ivermectin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Obenhaus, Horst A.; Rozov, Andrei; Bertocchi, Ilaria; Tang, Wannan; Kirsch, Joachim; Betz, Heinrich; Sprengel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The causal interrogation of neuronal networks involved in specific behaviors requires the spatially and temporally controlled modulation of neuronal activity. For long-term manipulation of neuronal activity, chemogenetic tools provide a reasonable alternative to short-term optogenetic approaches. Here we show that virus mediated gene transfer of the ivermectin (IVM) activated glycine receptor mutant GlyRα1AG can be used for the selective and reversible silencing of specific neuronal networks in mice. In the striatum, dorsal hippocampus, and olfactory bulb, GlyRα1AG promoted IVM dependent effects in representative behavioral assays. Moreover, GlyRα1AG mediated silencing had a strong and reversible impact on neuronal ensemble activity and c-Fos activation in the olfactory bulb. Together our results demonstrate that long-term, reversible and re-inducible neuronal silencing via GlyRα1AG is a promising tool for the interrogation of network mechanisms underlying the control of behavior and memory formation.

  7. Specification of excitatory neurons in the developing cerebral cortex: progenitor diversity and environmental influences

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marcos R.; Müller, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    The mature cerebral cortex harbors a heterogeneous population of glutamatergic neurons, organized into a highly intricate histological architecture. Classically, this mixed population of neurons was thought to be generated sequentially from a seemingly homogenous group of progenitors under the influence of external cues. This view, however, has been challenged in the last decade by evidences pointing to the existence of fate-restricted neuronal progenitors in the developing neocortex. Here, we review classical studies using cell transplantation, retroviral labeling and cell culture, as well as new data from genetic fate-mapping analysis, to discuss the lineage relationships between neocortical progenitors and subclasses of excitatory neurons. We also propose a temporal model to conciliate the existence of fate-restricted progenitors alongside multipotent progenitors in the neocortex. Finally, we discuss evidences for a critical period of plasticity among post mitotic excitatory cortical neurons when environmental influences could change neuronal cell fate. PMID:25628534

  8. Causal Interrogation of Neuronal Networks and Behavior through Virally Transduced Ivermectin Receptors.

    PubMed

    Obenhaus, Horst A; Rozov, Andrei; Bertocchi, Ilaria; Tang, Wannan; Kirsch, Joachim; Betz, Heinrich; Sprengel, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The causal interrogation of neuronal networks involved in specific behaviors requires the spatially and temporally controlled modulation of neuronal activity. For long-term manipulation of neuronal activity, chemogenetic tools provide a reasonable alternative to short-term optogenetic approaches. Here we show that virus mediated gene transfer of the ivermectin (IVM) activated glycine receptor mutant GlyRα1 (AG) can be used for the selective and reversible silencing of specific neuronal networks in mice. In the striatum, dorsal hippocampus, and olfactory bulb, GlyRα1 (AG) promoted IVM dependent effects in representative behavioral assays. Moreover, GlyRα1 (AG) mediated silencing had a strong and reversible impact on neuronal ensemble activity and c-Fos activation in the olfactory bulb. Together our results demonstrate that long-term, reversible and re-inducible neuronal silencing via GlyRα1 (AG) is a promising tool for the interrogation of network mechanisms underlying the control of behavior and memory formation.

  9. Decoding Neuronal Ensembles in the Human Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Hassabis, Demis; Chu, Carlton; Rees, Geraint; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Molyneux, Peter D.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background The hippocampus underpins our ability to navigate, to form and recollect memories, and to imagine future experiences. How activity across millions of hippocampal neurons supports these functions is a fundamental question in neuroscience, wherein the size, sparseness, and organization of the hippocampal neural code are debated. Results Here, by using multivariate pattern classification and high spatial resolution functional MRI, we decoded activity across the population of neurons in the human medial temporal lobe while participants navigated in a virtual reality environment. Remarkably, we could accurately predict the position of an individual within this environment solely from the pattern of activity in his hippocampus even when visual input and task were held constant. Moreover, we observed a dissociation between responses in the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus, suggesting that they play differing roles in navigation. Conclusions These results show that highly abstracted representations of space are expressed in the human hippocampus. Furthermore, our findings have implications for understanding the hippocampal population code and suggest that, contrary to current consensus, neuronal ensembles representing place memories must be large and have an anisotropic structure. PMID:19285400

  10. The utility of cerebral blood flow imaging in patients with the unique syndrome of progressive dementia with motor neuron disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, T.; Hoshi, H.; Jinnouchi, S.; Nagamachi, S.; Watanabe, K.; Mituyama, Y. )

    1990-05-01

    Two patients presenting with progressive dementia coupled with motor neuron disease underwent brain SPECT using N-isopropyl-p iodine-123-iodoamphetamine (({sup 123}I)IMP). The characteristic clinical features of progressive dementia and motor neuron disease were noted. IMP SPECT also revealed reduced uptake in the bilateral frontal and temporal regions, with no reduction of uptake in the parietal, parietal-occipital regions. We conclude that IMP SPECT has potential for the evaluation of progressive dementia with motor neuron disease.

  11. The Effect of Exertion and Sex on Vertical Ground Reaction Force Variables and Landing Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bell, David R; Pennuto, Anthony P; Trigsted, Stephanie M

    2016-06-01

    Bell, DR, Pennuto, AP, and Trigsted, SM. The effect of exertion and sex on vertical ground reaction force variables and landing mechanics. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1661-1669, 2016-The purpose of this investigation was to determine how exertion and sex affected a variety of vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) parameters during a jump-landing task, including peak VGRF, peak VGRF asymmetry, loading rate, and loading rate asymmetry. Additionally, we wanted to determine whether landing mechanics changed after exertion as measured by the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS). Forty recreationally active participants (20 men and 20 women) completed jump landings from a 30-cm-high box onto force plates before and after repeated bouts of an exercise circuit until a specific rating of perceived exertion was achieved. Three-way (sex × time × limb) analyses of variance were used to analyze variables pre-exertion to postexertion. No significant 3-way interactions were observed for peak VGRF (p = 0.31) or loading rate (p = 0.14). Time by sex interactions were observed for peak VGRF (p = 0.02) and loading rate (p = 0.008). Post hoc analysis revealed that men increased landing force and loading rate after exertion while women did not. Landing mechanics, as assessed by total LESS score, were worse after exertion (p < 0.001) with increased frequency of errors for knee flexion <30° at initial contact, lateral trunk flexion, and not flexing the hip during landing. Women may be more resistant to exertion compared with men and use different joint controls' strategies to cope with VGRF after exertion. However, VGRF asymmetry is not affected by sex and exertion. Limiting peak VGRF and addressing landing postures, especially after exertion, should be components of injury prevention strategies. PMID:26562710

  12. The Effect of Exertion and Sex on Vertical Ground Reaction Force Variables and Landing Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Bell, David R; Pennuto, Anthony P; Trigsted, Stephanie M

    2016-06-01

    Bell, DR, Pennuto, AP, and Trigsted, SM. The effect of exertion and sex on vertical ground reaction force variables and landing mechanics. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1661-1669, 2016-The purpose of this investigation was to determine how exertion and sex affected a variety of vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) parameters during a jump-landing task, including peak VGRF, peak VGRF asymmetry, loading rate, and loading rate asymmetry. Additionally, we wanted to determine whether landing mechanics changed after exertion as measured by the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS). Forty recreationally active participants (20 men and 20 women) completed jump landings from a 30-cm-high box onto force plates before and after repeated bouts of an exercise circuit until a specific rating of perceived exertion was achieved. Three-way (sex × time × limb) analyses of variance were used to analyze variables pre-exertion to postexertion. No significant 3-way interactions were observed for peak VGRF (p = 0.31) or loading rate (p = 0.14). Time by sex interactions were observed for peak VGRF (p = 0.02) and loading rate (p = 0.008). Post hoc analysis revealed that men increased landing force and loading rate after exertion while women did not. Landing mechanics, as assessed by total LESS score, were worse after exertion (p < 0.001) with increased frequency of errors for knee flexion <30° at initial contact, lateral trunk flexion, and not flexing the hip during landing. Women may be more resistant to exertion compared with men and use different joint controls' strategies to cope with VGRF after exertion. However, VGRF asymmetry is not affected by sex and exertion. Limiting peak VGRF and addressing landing postures, especially after exertion, should be components of injury prevention strategies.

  13. Microbial light-activatable proton pumps as neuronal inhibitors to functionally dissect neuronal networks in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Husson, Steven J; Liewald, Jana F; Schultheis, Christian; Stirman, Jeffrey N; Lu, Hang; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Essentially any behavior in simple and complex animals depends on neuronal network function. Currently, the best-defined system to study neuronal circuits is the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, as the connectivity of its 302 neurons is exactly known. Individual neurons can be activated by photostimulation of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) using blue light, allowing to directly probe the importance of a particular neuron for the respective behavioral output of the network under study. In analogy, other excitable cells can be inhibited by expressing Halorhodopsin from Natronomonas pharaonis (NpHR) and subsequent illumination with yellow light. However, inhibiting C. elegans neurons using NpHR is difficult. Recently, proton pumps from various sources were established as valuable alternative hyperpolarizers. Here we show that archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) from Halorubrum sodomense and a proton pump from the fungus Leptosphaeria maculans (Mac) can be utilized to effectively inhibit excitable cells in C. elegans. Arch is the most powerful hyperpolarizer when illuminated with yellow or green light while the action spectrum of Mac is more blue-shifted, as analyzed by light-evoked behaviors and electrophysiology. This allows these tools to be combined in various ways with ChR2 to analyze different subsets of neurons within a circuit. We exemplify this by means of the polymodal aversive sensory ASH neurons, and the downstream command interneurons to which ASH neurons signal to trigger a reversal followed by a directional turn. Photostimulating ASH and subsequently inhibiting command interneurons using two-color illumination of different body segments, allows investigating temporal aspects of signaling downstream of ASH. PMID:22815873

  14. Inhibition of propofol on single neuron and neuronal ensemble activity in prefrontal cortex of rats during working memory task.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinyu; Tian, Yu; Wang, Guolin; Tian, Xin

    2014-08-15

    Working memory (WM) refers to the temporary storage and manipulation of information necessary for performance of complex cognitive tasks. There is a growing interest in whether and how propofol anesthesia inhibits WM function. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible inhibition mechanism of propofol anesthesia from the view of single neuron and neuronal ensemble activities. Adult SD rats were randomly divided into two groups: propofol group (0.9 mg kg(-1)min(-1), 2h via a tail vein catheter) and control group. All the rats were tested for working memory performances in a Y-maze-rewarded alternation task (a task of delayed non-matched-to-sample) at 24, 48, 72 h after propofol anesthesia, and the behavior results of WM tasks were recorded at the same time. Spatio-temporal trains of action potentials were obtained from the original signals. Single neuron activity was characterized by peri-event time histograms analysis and neuron ensemble activities were characterized by Granger causality to describe the interactions within the neuron ensemble. The results show that: comparing with the control group, the percentage of neurons excited and related to WM was significantly decreased (p<0.01 in 24h, p<0.05 in 48 h); the interactions within neuron ensemble were significantly weakened (p<0.01 in 24h, p<0.05 in 48 h), whereas no significant difference in 72 h (p>0.05), which were consistent with the behavior results. These findings could lead to improved understanding of the mechanism of anesthesia inhibition on WM functions from the view of single neuron activity and neuron ensemble interactions.

  15. Complex Network Analysis of CA3 Transcriptome Reveals Pathogenic and Compensatory Pathways in Refractory Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bando, Silvia Yumi; Silva, Filipi Nascimento; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Silva, Alexandre V.; Pimentel-Silva, Luciana R.; Castro, Luiz HM.; Wen, Hung-Tzu; Amaro, Edson; Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    We previously described – studying transcriptional signatures of hippocampal CA3 explants – that febrile (FS) and afebrile (NFS) forms of refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy constitute two distinct genomic phenotypes. That network analysis was based on a limited number (hundreds) of differentially expressed genes (DE networks) among a large set of valid transcripts (close to two tens of thousands). Here we developed a methodology for complex network visualization (3D) and analysis that allows the categorization of network nodes according to distinct hierarchical levels of gene-gene connections (node degree) and of interconnection between node neighbors (concentric node degree). Hubs are highly connected nodes, VIPs have low node degree but connect only with hubs, and high-hubs have VIP status and high overall number of connections. Studying the whole set of CA3 valid transcripts we: i) obtained complete transcriptional networks (CO) for FS and NFS phenotypic groups; ii) examined how CO and DE networks are related; iii) characterized genomic and molecular mechanisms underlying FS and NFS phenotypes, identifying potential novel targets for therapeutic interventions. We found that: i) DE hubs and VIPs are evenly distributed inside the CO networks; ii) most DE hubs and VIPs are related to synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability whereas most CO hubs, VIPs and high hubs are related to neuronal differentiation, homeostasis and neuroprotection, indicating compensatory mechanisms. Complex network visualization and analysis is a useful tool for systems biology approaches to multifactorial diseases. Network centrality observed for hubs, VIPs and high hubs of CO networks, is consistent with the network disease model, where a group of nodes whose perturbation leads to a disease phenotype occupies a central position in the network. Conceivably, the chance for exerting therapeutic effects through the modulation of particular genes will be higher if these genes

  16. Exploring neuronal activity with photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdieu, Laurent; Léger, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Information coding * Optical recordings of neuronal activity * Functional organization of the cortex at the level of a cortical column * Microarchitecture of a cortical column * Dynamics of neuronal populations * Outlook * Bibliography

  17. The neuron classification problem

    PubMed Central

    Bota, Mihail; Swanson, Larry W.

    2007-01-01

    A systematic account of neuron cell types is a basic prerequisite for determining the vertebrate nervous system global wiring diagram. With comprehensive lineage and phylogenetic information unavailable, a general ontology based on structure-function taxonomy is proposed and implemented in a knowledge management system, and a prototype analysis of select regions (including retina, cerebellum, and hypothalamus) presented. The supporting Brain Architecture Knowledge Management System (BAMS) Neuron ontology is online and its user interface allows queries about terms and their definitions, classification criteria based on the original literature and “Petilla Convention” guidelines, hierarchies, and relations—with annotations documenting each ontology entry. Combined with three BAMS modules for neural regions, connections between regions and neuron types, and molecules, the Neuron ontology provides a general framework for physical descriptions and computational modeling of neural systems. The knowledge management system interacts with other web resources, is accessible in both XML and RDF/OWL, is extendible to the whole body, and awaits large-scale data population requiring community participation for timely implementation. PMID:17582506

  18. Nanoresolution radiology of neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H. R.; Chen, S. T.; Chu, Y. S.; Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Chien, C. C.; Chen, H. H.; Lin, C. H.; Tung, H. T.; Chen, Y. S.; Margaritondo, G.; Je, J. H.; Hwu, Y.

    2012-05-29

    We report recent advances in hard-x-ray optics—including record spatial resolution—and in staining techniques that enable synchrotron microradiology to produce neurobiology images of quality comparable to electron and visible microscopy. In addition, microradiology offers excellent penetration and effective three-dimensional detection as required for many neuron studies. Our tests include tomographic reconstruction based on projection image sets.

  19. Nanoresolution radiology of neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.R.; Chen, S.T.; Chu, Y.S.; Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Chien, C.C.; Chen, H.H.; Lin, C.H.; Tung, H.T.; Chen, Y.S.; Margaritondo, G.; Je, J.H.; Hwu, Y.

    2013-04-08

    We report recent advances in hard-x-ray optics - including record spatial resolution - and in staining techniques that enable synchrotron microradiology to produce neurobiology images of quality comparable to electron and visible microscopy. In addition, microradiology offers excellent penetration and effective three-dimensional detection as required for many neuron studies. Our tests include tomographic reconstruction based on projection image sets.

  20. Saccade suppression exerts global effects on the motor system.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jan R; Reynoso, H Sequoyah; Aron, Adam R

    2013-08-01

    Stopping inappropriate eye movements is a cognitive control function that allows humans to perform well in situations that demand attentional focus. The stop-signal task is an experimental model for this behavior. Participants initiate a saccade toward a target and occasionally have to try to stop the impending saccade if a stop signal occurs. Prior research using a version of this paradigm for limb movements (hand, leg) as well as for speech has shown that rapidly stopping action leads to apparently global suppression of the motor system, as indexed by the corticospinal excitability (CSE) of task-unrelated effectors in studies with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of M1. Here we measured CSE from the hand with high temporal precision while participants made saccades and while they successfully and unsuccessfully stopped these saccades in response to a stop signal. We showed that 50 ms before the estimated time at which a saccade is successfully stopped there was reduced CSE for the hand, which was task irrelevant. This shows that rapidly stopping eye movements also has global motor effects. We speculate that this arises because rapidly stopping eye movements, like skeleto-motor movements, is possibly achieved via input to the subthalamic nucleus of the basal ganglia, with a putatively broad suppressive effect on thalamocortical drive. Since recent studies suggest that this suppressive effect could also impact nonmotor representations, the present finding points to a possible mechanistic basis for some kinds of distractibility: abrupt-onset stimuli will interrupt ongoing processing by generating global motor and nonmotor effects.

  1. Different cortical projections from three subdivisions of the rat lateral posterior thalamic nucleus: a single-neuron tracing study with viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hisashi; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Furuta, Takahiro; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2015-05-01

    The lateral posterior thalamic nucleus (LP) is one of the components of the extrageniculate pathway in the rat visual system, and is cytoarchitecturally divided into three subdivisions--lateral (LPl), rostromedial (LPrm), and caudomedial (LPcm) portions. To clarify the differences in the dendritic fields and axonal arborisations among the three subdivisions, we applied a single-neuron labeling technique with viral vectors to LP neurons. The proximal dendrites of LPl neurons were more numerous than those of LPrm and LPcm neurons, and LPrm neurons tended to have wider dendritic fields than LPl neurons. We then analysed the axonal arborisations of LP neurons by reconstructing the axon fibers in the cortex. The LPl, LPrm and LPcm were different from one another in terms of the projection targets--the main target cortical regions of LPl and LPrm neurons were the secondary and primary visual areas, whereas those of LPcm neurons were the postrhinal and temporal association areas. Furthermore, the principal target cortical layers of LPl neurons in the visual areas were middle layers, but that of LPrm neurons was layer 1. This indicates that LPl and LPrm neurons can be categorised into the core and matrix types of thalamic neurons, respectively, in the visual areas. In addition, LPl neurons formed multiple axonal clusters within the visual areas, whereas the fibers of LPrm neurons were widely and diffusely distributed. It is therefore presumed that these two types of neurons play different roles in visual information processing by dual thalamocortical innervation of the visual areas.

  2. Juvenile temporal arteritis revisited.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, F H; Lie, J T; Nienhuis, B J; Konzen, K M; Groover, R V

    1994-05-01

    We describe a case of arteritis involving the superficial temporal artery in an 8-year-old boy. After a 2-week prodrome of headache in the right temporal region, a painful pulsatile 6-mm nodule developed. No history of trauma or systemic disease was noted. The differential diagnosis included vasculitis or thrombosis of a vascular malformation of the temporal artery. The lesion was surgically excised for both diagnostic and cosmetic reasons. Histologic features of the nodule were diagnostic of juvenile temporal arteritis and characterized by non-giant cell granulomatous inflammation of the temporal artery, occlusive fibrous intimal proliferation, and microaneurysmal disruption of the media. At 12-month follow-up, the patient was well; no recurrent lesions or systemic disease was noted. Although rare, this disease should be recognized as arteritis that affects the external carotid circulation and should not be confused with classic giant cell temporal arteritis. If physicians are aware of this benign inflammatory disease of the temporal artery in children and young adults, unnecessary treatment will not be administered.

  3. ERK1/2 signaling is essential for the chemoattraction exerted by human FGF2 and human anosmin-1 on newborn rat and mouse OPCs via FGFR1.

    PubMed

    Murcia-Belmonte, Verónica; Medina-Rodríguez, Eva M; Bribián, Ana; de Castro, Fernando; Esteban, Pedro F

    2014-03-01

    Signaling through fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) is essential for many cellular processes including proliferation and migration, as well as differentiation events such as myelination. Anosmin-1 is an extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoprotein that interacts with the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) to exert its biological actions through this receptor, although the intracellular pathways underlying anosmin-1 signaling remain largely unknown. This protein is defective in the X-linked form of Kallmann syndrome (KS) and has a prominent role in the migration of neuronal and oligodendroglial precursors. We have shown that anosmin-1 exerts a chemotactic effect via FGFR1 on neuronal precursors from the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the essential role of the ERK1/2 signaling. We report here the positive chemotactic effect of FGF2 and anosmin-1 on rat and mouse postnatal OPCs via FGFR1. The same effect was observed with the truncated N-terminal region of anosmin-1 (A1Nt). The introduction in anosmin-1 of the missense mutation F517L found in patients suffering from KS annulled the chemotactic activity; however, the mutant form carrying the disease-causing mutation E514K also found in KS patients, behaved as the wild-type protein. The chemoattraction exhibited by FGF2 and anosmin-1 on OPCs was blocked by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor U0126, suggesting that the activation of the ERK1/2 MAPK signaling pathway following interaction with the FGFR1 is necessary for FGF2 and anosmin-1 to exert their chemotactic effect. In fact, both proteins were able to induce the phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 kinases after the activation of the FGFR1 receptor.

  4. Self-Regulating Cycling Using the Children's OMNI Scale of Perceived Exertion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Robert J.; Goss, Fredric L.; Bell, Jill A.; Dixon, Curt B.; Gallagher, Kara I.; Lagally, Kristen M.; Timmer, Jeffrey M.; Abt, Kristie L.; Gallagher, Jere D.; Thompkins, Taylor

    2002-01-01

    Investigated whether normal children could self-regulate intermittent cycle ergometer exercise using a prescribed target rating of perceived exertion (RPE), discriminate between target RPEs, and produce intermittent target RPEs in ascending and descending sequences. RPE was estimated using the Children's OMNI Scale of Perceived Exertion. Overall,…

  5. Dynamics of Perceived Exertion in Constant-Power Cycling: Time- and Workload-Dependent Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balagué, Natàlia; Hristovski, Robert; García, Sergi; Aguirre, Cecilia; Vázquez, Pablo; Razon, Selen; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the dynamics of perceived exertion shifts (PES) as a function of time and workload during constant-power cycling. Method: Fifty-two participants assigned to 4 groups performed a cycling task at 4 different constant workloads corresponding to their individual rates of perceived exertion (RPEs = 13, 15,…

  6. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome of the superficial posterior compartment: Soleus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christopher E; Parekh, Bela J; Adams, Samuel B; Parekh, Selene G

    2015-01-01

    Chronic exertional compartment syndrome (CECS) represents the second most-common cause of exertional leg pain with incidence of 27-33%. CECS of the superficial posterior compartment, or soleus syndrome, is rare and has only been discussed briefly in the literature. We discuss the management of two patients with bilateral soleus syndrome or CECS of the superficial posterior compartment. PMID:26538766

  7. Spontaneous cortical activity in awake monkeys composed of neuronal avalanches.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Thomas; Thiagarajan, Tara C; Lebedev, Mikhail A; Nicolelis, Miguel A L; Chialvo, Dante R; Plenz, Dietmar

    2009-09-15

    Spontaneous neuronal activity is an important property of the cerebral cortex but its spatiotemporal organization and dynamical framework remain poorly understood. Studies in reduced systems--tissue cultures, acute slices, and anesthetized rats--show that spontaneous activity forms characteristic clusters in space and time, called neuronal avalanches. Modeling studies suggest that networks with this property are poised at a critical state that optimizes input processing, information storage, and transfer, but the relevance of avalanches for fully functional cerebral systems has been controversial. Here we show that ongoing cortical synchronization in awake rhesus monkeys carries the signature of neuronal avalanches. Negative LFP deflections (nLFPs) correlate with neuronal spiking and increase in amplitude with increases in local population spike rate and synchrony. These nLFPs form neuronal avalanches that are scale-invariant in space and time and with respect to the threshold of nLFP detection. This dimension, threshold invariance, describes a fractal organization: smaller nLFPs are embedded in clusters of larger ones without destroying the spatial and temporal scale-invariance of the dynamics. These findings suggest an organization of ongoing cortical synchronization that is scale-invariant in its three fundamental dimensions--time, space, and local neuronal group size. Such scale-invariance has ontogenetic and phylogenetic implications because it allows large increases in network capacity without a fundamental reorganization of the system.

  8. Epileptic neuronal networks: methods of identification and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Hermann; Lopes da Silva, Fernando H

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to examine evidence for the concept that epileptic activity should be envisaged in terms of functional connectivity and dynamics of neuronal networks. Basic concepts regarding structure and dynamics of neuronal networks are briefly described. Particular attention is given to approaches that are derived, or related, to the concept of causality, as formulated by Granger. Linear and non-linear methodologies aiming at characterizing the dynamics of neuronal networks applied to EEG/MEG and combined EEG/fMRI signals in epilepsy are critically reviewed. The relevance of functional dynamical analysis of neuronal networks with respect to clinical queries in focal cortical dysplasias, temporal lobe epilepsies, and "generalized" epilepsies is emphasized. In the light of the concepts of epileptic neuronal networks, and recent experimental findings, the dichotomic classification in focal and generalized epilepsy is re-evaluated. It is proposed that so-called "generalized epilepsies," such as absence seizures, are actually fast spreading epilepsies, the onset of which can be tracked down to particular neuronal networks using appropriate network analysis. Finally new approaches to delineate epileptogenic networks are discussed.

  9. Multisynaptic activity in a pyramidal neuron model and neural code.

    PubMed

    Ventriglia, Francesco; Di Maio, Vito

    2006-01-01

    The highly irregular firing of mammalian cortical pyramidal neurons is one of the most striking observation of the brain activity. This result affects greatly the discussion on the neural code, i.e. how the brain codes information transmitted along the different cortical stages. In fact it seems to be in favor of one of the two main hypotheses about this issue, named the rate code. But the supporters of the contrasting hypothesis, the temporal code, consider this evidence inconclusive. We discuss here a leaky integrate-and-fire model of a hippocampal pyramidal neuron intended to be biologically sound to investigate the genesis of the irregular pyramidal firing and to give useful information about the coding problem. To this aim, the complete set of excitatory and inhibitory synapses impinging on such a neuron has been taken into account. The firing activity of the neuron model has been studied by computer simulation both in basic conditions and allowing brief periods of over-stimulation in specific regions of its synaptic constellation. Our results show neuronal firing conditions similar to those observed in experimental investigations on pyramidal cortical neurons. In particular, the variation coefficient (CV) computed from the inter-spike intervals (ISIs) in our simulations for basic conditions is close to the unity as that computed from experimental data. Our simulation shows also different behaviors in firing sequences for different frequencies of stimulation. PMID:16870323

  10. [Duration and temporality].

    PubMed

    Fouks, L; Guibert, S; Cardon; Montot

    1990-01-01

    The notion of temporality in living is in perpetual motion between passive temporality and creative conscience. Human existence is not purely immanent, a flow of transcedence continually runs through it. Melancholia is a lose of creativity accompanied by a feeling that time as lived has stopped, time being lived as a new mode of space. Maniac temporality is an improductive and unsociable furious flight toward. The melancholic feeling out of time is crushed by the problematic of alterity, sin and eternity. The maniac lives an imaginary and deceptive problematic. The ambivalent ideal of the schizophrenic is both a return to biological life as well as a fascination by formal thought.

  11. The P7C3 class of neuroprotective compounds exerts antidepressant efficacy in mice by increasing hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Walker, A K; Rivera, P D; Wang, Q; Chuang, J-C; Tran, S; Osborne-Lawrence, S; Estill, S J; Starwalt, R; Huntington, P; Morlock, L; Naidoo, J; Williams, N S; Ready, J M; Eisch, A J; Pieper, A A; Zigman, J M

    2015-04-01

    Augmenting hippocampal neurogenesis represents a potential new strategy for treating depression. Here we test this possibility by comparing hippocampal neurogenesis in depression-prone ghrelin receptor (Ghsr)-null mice to that in wild-type littermates and by determining the antidepressant efficacy of the P7C3 class of neuroprotective compounds. Exposure of Ghsr-null mice to chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) elicits more severe depressive-like behavior than in CSDS-exposed wild-type littermates, and exposure of Ghsr-null mice to 60% caloric restriction fails to elicit antidepressant-like behavior. CSDS resulted in more severely reduced cell proliferation and survival in the ventral dentate gyrus (DG) subgranular zone of Ghsr-null mice than in that of wild-type littermates. Also, caloric restriction increased apoptosis of DG subgranular zone cells in Ghsr-null mice, although it had the opposite effect in wild-type littermates. Systemic treatment with P7C3 during CSDS increased survival of proliferating DG cells, which ultimately developed into mature (NeuN+) neurons. Notably, P7C3 exerted a potent antidepressant-like effect in Ghsr-null mice exposed to either CSDS or caloric restriction, while the more highly active analog P7C3-A20 also exerted an antidepressant-like effect in wild-type littermates. Focal ablation of hippocampal stem cells with radiation eliminated this antidepressant effect, further attributing the P7C3 class antidepressant effect to its neuroprotective properties and resultant augmentation of hippocampal neurogenesis. Finally, P7C3-A20 demonstrated greater proneurogenic efficacy than a wide spectrum of currently marketed antidepressant drugs. Taken together, our data confirm the role of aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis in the etiology of depression and suggest that the neuroprotective P7C3-compounds represent a novel strategy for treating patients with this disease.

  12. The P7C3 class of neuroprotective compounds exerts antidepressant efficacy in mice by increasing hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Walker, AK; Rivera, PD; Wang, Q; Chuang, J-C; Tran, S; Osborne-Lawrence, S; Estill, SJ; Starwalt, R; Huntington, P; Morlock, L; Naidoo, J; Williams, NS; Ready, JM; Eisch, AJ; Pieper, AA; Zigman, JM

    2014-01-01

    Augmenting hippocampal neurogenesis represents a potential new strategy for treating depression. Here we test this possibility by comparing hippocampal neurogenesis in depression-prone ghrelin receptor (Ghsr)-null mice to that in wild-type littermates and by determining the antidepressant efficacy of the P7C3 class of neuroprotective compounds. Exposure of Ghsr-null mice to chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) elicits more severe depressive-like behavior than in CSDS-exposed wild-type littermates, and exposure of Ghsr-null mice to 60% caloric restriction fails to elicit antidepressant-like behavior. CSDS resulted in more severely reduced cell proliferation and survival in the ventral dentate gyrus (DG) subgranular zone of Ghsr-null mice than in that of wild-type littermates. Also, caloric restriction increased apoptosis of DG subgranular zone cells in Ghsr-null mice, although it had the opposite effect in wild-type littermates. Systemic treatment with P7C3 during CSDS increased survival of proliferating DG cells, which ultimately developed into mature (NeuN+) neurons. Notably, P7C3 exerted a potent antidepressant-like effect in Ghsr-null mice exposed to either CSDS or caloric restriction, while the more highly active analog P7C3-A20 also exerted an antidepressant-like effect in wild-type littermates. Focal ablation of hippocampal stem cells with radiation eliminated this antidepressant effect, further attributing the P7C3 class antidepressant effect to its neuroprotective properties and resultant augmentation of hippocampal neurogenesis. Finally, P7C3-A20 demonstrated greater proneurogenic efficacy than a wide spectrum of currently marketed antidepressant drugs. Taken together, our data confirm the role of aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis in the etiology of depression and suggest that the neuroprotective P7C3-compounds represent a novel strategy for treating patients with this disease. PMID:24751964

  13. Brainstem reticulospinal neurons are targets for corticotropin-releasing factor-Induced locomotion in roughskin newts.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Catherine S; Dolence, E Kurt; Rose, James D

    2010-02-01

    Stress-induced release or central administration of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) enhances locomotion in a wide range of vertebrates, including the roughskin newt, Taricha granulosa. Although CRF's stimulatory actions on locomotor behavior are well established, the target neurons through which CRF exerts this effect remain unknown. To identify these target neurons, we utilized a fluorescent conjugate of CRF (CRF-TAMRA 1) to track this peptide's internalization into reticulospinal and other neurons in the medullary reticular formation (MRF), a region critically involved in regulating locomotion. Epifluorescent and confocal microscopy revealed that CRF-TAMRA 1 was internalized by diverse MRF neurons, including reticulospinal neurons retrogradely labeled with Cascade Blue dextran. In addition, we immunohistochemically identified a distinct subset of serotonin-containing neurons, located throughout the medullary raphé, that also internalized the fluorescent CRF-TAMRA 1 conjugate. Chronic single-unit recordings obtained from microwire electrodes in behaving newts revealed that intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of CRF-TAMRA 1 increased medullary neuronal firing and that appearance of this firing was associated with, and strongly predictive of, episodes of CRF-induced locomotion. Furthermore, icv administered CRF-TAMRA 1 produced behavioral and neurophysiological effects identical to equimolar doses of unlabeled CRF. Collectively, these findings provide the first evidence that CRF directly targets reticulospinal and serotonergic neurons in the MRF and indicate that CRF may enhance locomotion via direct effects on the hindbrain, including the reticulospinal system.

  14. Structure-activity relationship of sulfated hetero/galactofucan polysaccharides on dopaminergic neuron.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Huaide; Jin, Weihua; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Quanbin

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and more-widespread neuronal changes that cause complex symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationship of sulfated hetero-polysaccharides (DF1) and sulfated galactofucan polysaccharides (DF2) on dopaminergic neuron in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with samples significantly ameliorated the depletion of both DA and TH-, Bcl-2- and Bax-positive neurons in MPTP-induced PD mice, DF1 showed the highest activity. The in vitro results found that DF1 and DF2 could reverse the decreased mitochondrial activity and the increased LDL release induced by MPP(+) (P<0.01 or P<0.001) which provides further evidence that DF1 and DF2 also exerts a direct protection against the neuronal injury caused by MPP(+). Furthermore, the administration of samples effectively decreased lipid peroxidation and increased the level/activities of GSH, GSH-PX, MDA and CAT in MPTP mice. Thus, the neuron protective effect may be mediated, in part, through antioxidant activity and the prevention of cell apoptosis. The chemical composition of DF1, DF2 and DF differed markedly, the DF1 fraction had the most complex chemical composition and showed the highest neuron protective activity. These results suggest that diverse monosaccharides and uronic acid might contribute to neuron protective activity.

  15. Acute and Session Ratings of Perceived Exertion in a Physical Education Setting.

    PubMed

    Lagally, Kristen M; Walker-Smith, Kimberly; Henninger, Mary L; Williams, Skip M; Coleman, Margo

    2016-02-01

    A commonly stated rationale for examining the use of ratings of perceived exertion with youth is its potential value as an assessment of intensity in physical education settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between ratings of perceived exertion and heart rate in a natural physical education setting. Sixth through eighth grade students performed cardiovascular and muscle endurance circuits and then recorded ratings and heart rate. It was hypothesized that, similar to laboratory studies, strong positive correlations would be seen between heart rate and ratings of perceived exertion, which would provide additional support for the use of ratings of perceived exertion in physical education. However, only low to moderate correlations were found. When data collection occurs in a natural physical education setting, there are challenges that may result in poor correlational results between variables such as heart rate and perceived exertion that demonstrate strong relationships when examined in laboratory settings. PMID:27420307

  16. Rich-Club Organization in Effective Connectivity among Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Sunny; Shimono, Masanori; Ito, Shinya; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Timme, Nicholas; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Lapish, Christopher C; Tosi, Zachary; Hottowy, Pawel; Smith, Wesley C; Masmanidis, Sotiris C; Litke, Alan M; Sporns, Olaf; Beggs, John M

    2016-01-20

    The performance of complex networks, like the brain, depends on how effectively their elements communicate. Despite the importance of communication, it is virtually unknown how information is transferred in local cortical networks, consisting of hundreds of closely spaced neurons. To address this, it is important to record simultaneously from hundreds of neurons at a spacing that matches typical axonal connection distances, and at a temporal resolution that matches synaptic delays. We used a 512-electrode array (60 μm spacing) to record spontaneous activity at 20 kHz from up to 500 neurons simultaneously in slice cultures of mouse somatosensory cortex for 1 h at a time. We applied a previously validated version of transfer entropy to quantify information transfer. Similar to in vivo reports, we found an approximately lognormal distribution of firing rates. Pairwise information transfer strengths also were nearly lognormally distributed, similar to reports of synaptic strengths. Some neurons transferred and received much more information than others, which is consistent with previous predictions. Neurons with the highest outgoing and incoming information transfer were more strongly connected to each other than chance, thus forming a "rich club." We found similar results in networks recorded in vivo from rodent cortex, suggesting the generality of these findings. A rich-club structure has been found previously in large-scale human brain networks and is thought to facilitate communication between cortical regions. The discovery of a small, but information-rich, subset of neurons within cortical regions suggests that this population will play a vital role in communication, learning, and memory. Significance statement: Many studies have focused on communication networks between cortical brain regions. In contrast, very few studies have examined communication networks within a cortical region. This is the first study to combine such a large number of neurons (several

  17. Rich-Club Organization in Effective Connectivity among Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shimono, Masanori; Ito, Shinya; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Timme, Nicholas; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Lapish, Christopher C.; Tosi, Zachary; Hottowy, Pawel; Smith, Wesley C.; Masmanidis, Sotiris C.; Litke, Alan M.; Sporns, Olaf; Beggs, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The performance of complex networks, like the brain, depends on how effectively their elements communicate. Despite the importance of communication, it is virtually unknown how information is transferred in local cortical networks, consisting of hundreds of closely spaced neurons. To address this, it is important to record simultaneously from hundreds of neurons at a spacing that matches typical axonal connection distances, and at a temporal resolution that matches synaptic delays. We used a 512-electrode array (60 μm spacing) to record spontaneous activity at 20 kHz from up to 500 neurons simultaneously in slice cultures of mouse somatosensory cortex for 1 h at a time. We applied a previously validated version of transfer entropy to quantify information transfer. Similar to in vivo reports, we found an approximately lognormal distribution of firing rates. Pairwise information transfer strengths also were nearly lognormally distributed, similar to reports of synaptic strengths. Some neurons transferred and received much more information than others, which is consistent with previous predictions. Neurons with the highest outgoing and incoming information transfer were more strongly connected to each other than chance, thus forming a “rich club.” We found similar results in networks recorded in vivo from rodent cortex, suggesting the generality of these findings. A rich-club structure has been found previously in large-scale human brain networks and is thought to facilitate communication between cortical regions. The discovery of a small, but information-rich, subset of neurons within cortical regions suggests that this population will play a vital role in communication, learning, and memory. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many studies have focused on communication networks between cortical brain regions. In contrast, very few studies have examined communication networks within a cortical region. This is the first study to combine such a large number of neurons (several

  18. Neuronal Avalanches in Spontaneous Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Gerald; Petermann, Thomas; Havenith, Martha N.; Yu, Shan; Singer, Wolf; Plenz, Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Many complex systems give rise to events that are clustered in space and time, thereby establishing a correlation structure that is governed by power law statistics. In the cortex, such clusters of activity, called “neuronal avalanches,” were recently found in local field potentials (LFPs) of spontaneous activity in acute cortex slices, slice cultures, the developing cortex of the anesthetized rat, and premotor and motor cortex of awake monkeys. At present, it is unclear whether neuronal avalanches also exist in the spontaneous LFPs and spike activity in vivo in sensory areas of the mature brain. To address this question, we recorded spontaneous LFPs and extracellular spiking activity with multiple 4 × 4 microelectrode arrays (Michigan Probes) in area 17 of adult cats under anesthesia. A cluster of events was defined as a consecutive sequence of time bins Δt (1–32 ms), each containin