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Sample records for neurotrophic factor determined

  1. Optimizing neurotrophic factor combinations for neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deister, C.; Schmidt, C. E.

    2006-06-01

    Most neurotrophic factors are members of one of three families: the neurotrophins, the glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor family ligands (GFLs) and the neuropoietic cytokines. Each family activates distinct but overlapping cellular pathways. Several studies have shown additive or synergistic interactions between neurotrophic factors from different families, though generally only a single combination has been studied. Because of possible interactions between the neurotrophic factors, the optimum concentration of a factor in a mixture may differ from the optimum when applied individually. Additionally, the effect of combinations of neurotrophic factors from each of the three families on neurite extension is unclear. This study examines the effects of several combinations of the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF), the GFL glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and the neuropoietic cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on neurite outgrowth from young rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants. The combination of 50 ng ml-1 NGF and 10 ng ml-1 of each GDNF and CNTF induced the highest level of neurite outgrowth at a 752 ± 53% increase over untreated DRGs and increased the longest neurite length to 2031 ± 97 µm compared to 916 ± 64 µm for untreated DRGs. The optimum concentrations of the three factors applied in combination corresponded to the optimum concentration of each factor when applied individually. These results indicate that the efficacy of future therapies for nerve repair would be enhanced by the controlled release of a combination of neurotrophins, GFLs and neuropoietic cytokines at higher concentrations than used in previous conduit designs.

  2. Peripheral nerve regeneration and neurotrophic factors

    PubMed Central

    TERENGHI, GIORGIO

    1999-01-01

    The role of neurotrophic factors in the maintenance and survival of peripheral neuronal cells has been the subject of numerous studies. Administration of exogenous neurotrophic factors after nerve injury has been shown to mimic the effect of target organ-derived trophic factors on neuronal cells. After axotomy and during peripheral nerve regeneration, the neurotrophins NGF, NT-3 and BDNF show a well defined and selective beneficial effect on the survival and phenotypic expression of primary sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia and of motoneurons in spinal cord. Other neurotrophic factors such as CNTF, GDNF and LIF also exert a variety of actions on neuronal cells, which appear to overlap and complement those of the neurotrophins. In addition, there is an indirect contribution of GGF to nerve regeneration. GGF is produced by neurons and stimulates proliferation of Schwann cells, underlining the close interaction between neuronal and glial cells during peripheral nerve regeneration. Different possibilities have been investigated for the delivery of growth factors to the injured neurons, in search of a suitable system for clinical applications. The studies reviewed in this article show the therapeutic potential of neurotrophic factors for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury and for neuropathies. PMID:10227662

  3. [Neurotrophic factors and their importance in attention deficit hyperactivity disorde].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Quiroga, Josep A; Sánchez-Mora, Cristina; Corominas, Margarida; Martínez, Iris; Barrau, Víctor; Prats, Laura; Casas, Miguel; Ribasés, Marta

    2014-02-24

    The existing literature that reports findings linked with the involvement of neurotrophic factors in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is reviewed. Neurotrophins, a family of neurotrophic factors, are a kind of proteins that are specific to the nervous system and play an essential role in neuron survival, differentiation and proliferation during the development of the central and peripheral nervous system. These molecules stimulate axonal growth and exert an influence on the connections with the target tissue in order to establish the synaptic connections. The study of neurotrophins in ADHD, a neurodevelopmental disorder, is of interest mainly due to the functions that these proteins perform in the central nervous system. Studies on animal, pharmacological and molecular genetic models yield evidence that relates neurotrophins with the disorder. This work reviews the results from the studies conducted to date on ADHD and neurotrophic factors, especially brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Thus, although pharmacological studies suggest that the response to atomoxetine in adults with ADHD is not directly mediated by the effect on the BDNF, reductions in BDNF levels in the plasma of adult patients with ADHD have been reported. Further studies with broader samples and greater control of environmental factors that can regulate neurotrophin expression, such as diet, physical exercise and situations of social risk, are needed to be able to determine the role they play in the aetiology of ADHD. PMID:25252662

  4. [Neurotrophic factors and their importance in attention deficit hyperactivity disorde].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Quiroga, Josep A; Sánchez-Mora, Cristina; Corominas, Margarida; Martínez, Iris; Barrau, Víctor; Prats, Laura; Casas, Miguel; Ribasés, Marta

    2014-02-24

    The existing literature that reports findings linked with the involvement of neurotrophic factors in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is reviewed. Neurotrophins, a family of neurotrophic factors, are a kind of proteins that are specific to the nervous system and play an essential role in neuron survival, differentiation and proliferation during the development of the central and peripheral nervous system. These molecules stimulate axonal growth and exert an influence on the connections with the target tissue in order to establish the synaptic connections. The study of neurotrophins in ADHD, a neurodevelopmental disorder, is of interest mainly due to the functions that these proteins perform in the central nervous system. Studies on animal, pharmacological and molecular genetic models yield evidence that relates neurotrophins with the disorder. This work reviews the results from the studies conducted to date on ADHD and neurotrophic factors, especially brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Thus, although pharmacological studies suggest that the response to atomoxetine in adults with ADHD is not directly mediated by the effect on the BDNF, reductions in BDNF levels in the plasma of adult patients with ADHD have been reported. Further studies with broader samples and greater control of environmental factors that can regulate neurotrophin expression, such as diet, physical exercise and situations of social risk, are needed to be able to determine the role they play in the aetiology of ADHD.

  5. Ciliary neurotrophic factor protects striatal output neurons in an animal model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, K D; Panayotatos, N; Corcoran, T L; Lindsay, R M; Wiegand, S J

    1996-01-01

    Huntington disease is a dominantly inherited, untreatable neurological disorder featuring a progressive loss of striatal output neurons that results in dyskinesia, cognitive decline, and, ultimately, death. Neurotrophic factors have recently been shown to be protective in several animal models of neurodegenerative disease, raising the possibility that such substances might also sustain the survival of compromised striatal output neurons. We determined whether intracerebral administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3, or ciliary neurotrophic factor could protect striatal output neurons in a rodent model of Huntington disease. Whereas treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, or neurotrophin-3 provided no protection of striatal output neurons from death induced by intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid, an N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor agonist, treatment with ciliary neurotrophic factor afforded marked protection against this neurodegenerative insult. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8692996

  6. Comparing brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor secretion of induced neurotrophic factor secreting cells from human adipose and bone marrow-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Razavi, Mohamad Reza; Zarkesh Esfahani, Hamid; Kazemi, Mohammad; Mostafavi, Fatemeh Sadat

    2013-08-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) may be equally beneficial in treating neurodegenerative diseases. However, ADSCs have practical advantages. In this study, we aimed to induce neurotrophic factors secreting cells in human ADSCs. Then, we compared the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) secretion in neurotrophic factors secreting cells from human adipose and bone marrow-derived stem cells. Isolated human ADSCs and BMSCs were induced to neurotrophic factor (NTF)-secreting cells. The levels of expression and secretion of BDNF and CTNF of induced cells were assessed using immunocytochemical, Real-Time polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The level of BDNF significantly increased in both the induced mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) relative to ADSCs and the BMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, ELISA analysis showed that the release of BDNF in the induced BMSCs was almost twofold more than the induced ADSCs. Overall, NTF-secreting factor cells derived BMSCs and ADSCs could secret a range of different growth factors. Therefore, the variation in neurotrophic factors of different induced MSC populations suggest the possible beneficial effect of each specific kind of neurotrophic factor secreting cells for the treatment of a particular neurodegenerative disease. PMID:23944834

  7. Neurotrophic factor - Characterization and partial purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popiela, H.; Ellis, S.

    1981-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that neurotrophic activity is required for the normal proliferation and development of muscle cells. The present paper reports a study of the purification and characterization of a neurotrophic factor (NTF) from adult chicken ischiatic-peroneal nerves using two independent quantitative in vitro assay systems. The assays were performed by the measurement of the incorporation of tritiated thymidine or the sizes of single-cell clones by chick muscle cells grown in culture. The greatest amount of neutrotrophic activity is found to be extracted at a pH of 8; aqueous suspensions of the activity are stable to long-term storage at room temperature. The specific activity of the substance is doubled upon precipitation with ammonium sulfate or after gel filtration, and increase 4 to 5 fold after salt gradient elution from DEAE cellulose columns. The active fraction obtained after gel filtration and rechromatography on DEAE cellulose exhibits a 7 to 10-fold increase in specific activity. Electrophoresis of the most highly purified material yields a greatly concentrated band at around 80,000 daltons. Although NTF is purified almost 10-fold as indicated by the increase in specific activity, the maximum activity of the partially purified material is greatly reduced, possibly due to a requirement for a cofactor for the expression of maximum activity.

  8. Neurotrophic Factors and Their Potential Applications in Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Le, Quynh-Thu

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors are growth factors that can nourish neurons and promote neuron survival and regeneration. They have been studied as potential drug candidates for treating neurodegenerative diseases. Since their identification, there are more and more evidences to indicate that neurotrophic factors are also expressed in non-neuronal tissues and regulate the survival, anti-inflammation, proliferation and differentiation in these tissues. This mini review summarizes the characteristics of the neurotrophic factors and their potential clinical applications in the regeneration of neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. PMID:26611762

  9. Neurotrophic factor intervention restores auditory function in deafened animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Takayuki; Bredberg, Göran; Ulfendahl, Mats; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Petri Olivius, N.; Kaksonen, Risto; Lindström, Bo; Altschuler, Richard; Miller, Josef M.

    2002-02-01

    A primary cause of deafness is damage of receptor cells in the inner ear. Clinically, it has been demonstrated that effective functionality can be provided by electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve, thus bypassing damaged receptor cells. However, subsequent to sensory cell loss there is a secondary degeneration of the afferent nerve fibers, resulting in reduced effectiveness of such cochlear prostheses. The effects of neurotrophic factors were tested in a guinea pig cochlear prosthesis model. After chemical deafening to mimic the clinical situation, the neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor and an analogue of ciliary neurotrophic factor were infused directly into the cochlea of the inner ear for 26 days by using an osmotic pump system. An electrode introduced into the cochlea was used to elicit auditory responses just as in patients implanted with cochlear prostheses. Intervention with brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the ciliary neurotrophic factor analogue not only increased the survival of auditory spiral ganglion neurons, but significantly enhanced the functional responsiveness of the auditory system as measured by using electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses. This demonstration that neurotrophin intervention enhances threshold sensitivity within the auditory system will have great clinical importance for the treatment of deaf patients with cochlear prostheses. The findings have direct implications for the enhancement of responsiveness in deafferented peripheral nerves.

  10. Neurotrophic factors and the pathophysiology of schizophrenic psychoses.

    PubMed

    Durany, Nuria; Thome, Johannes

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the present state of findings on altered neurotrophic factor levels in schizophrenic psychoses, on variations in genes coding for neurotrophic factors, and on the effect of antipsychotic drugs on the expression level of neurotrophic factors. This is a conceptual paper that aims to establish the link between the neuromaldevelopment theory of schizophrenia and neurotrophic factors. An extensive literature review has been done using the Pub Med database, a service of the National Library of Medicine, which includes over 14 million citations for biomedical articles back to the 1950s. The majority of studies discussed in this review support the notion of alterations of neurotrophic factors at the protein and gene level, respectively, and support the hypothesis that these alterations could, at least partially, explain some of the morphological, cytoarchitectural and neurobiochemical abnormalities found in the brain of schizophrenic patients. However, the results are not always conclusive and the clinical significance of these alterations is not fully understood. It is, thus, important to further neurotrophic factor research in order to better understand the etiopathogenesis of schizophrenic psychoses and, thus, potentially develop new treatment strategies urgently needed for patients suffering from these devastating disorders.

  11. Glutamate and neurotrophic factors in neuronal plasticity and disease.

    PubMed

    Mattson, Mark P

    2008-11-01

    Glutamate's role as a neurotransmitter at synapses has been known for 40 years, but glutamate has since been shown to regulate neurogenesis, neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and neuron survival in the developing and adult mammalian nervous system. Cell-surface glutamate receptors are coupled to Ca(2+) influx and release from endoplasmic reticulum stores, which causes rapid (kinase- and protease-mediated) and delayed (transcription-dependent) responses that change the structure and function of neurons. Neurotrophic factors and glutamate interact to regulate developmental and adult neuroplasticity. For example, glutamate stimulates the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which, in turn, modifies neuronal glutamate sensitivity, Ca(2+) homeostasis, and plasticity. Neurotrophic factors may modify glutamate signaling directly, by changing the expression of glutamate receptor subunits and Ca(2+)-regulating proteins, and also indirectly by inducing the production of antioxidant enzymes, energy-regulating proteins, and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members. Excessive activation of glutamate receptors, under conditions of oxidative and metabolic stress, may contribute to neuronal dysfunction and degeneration in diseases ranging from stroke and Alzheimer's disease to psychiatric disorders. By enhancing neurotrophic factor signaling, environmental factors such as exercise and dietary energy restriction, and chemicals such as antidepressants may optimize glutamatergic signaling and protect against neurological disorders.

  12. Human milk and formulae: neurotrophic and new biological factors.

    PubMed

    Serpero, Laura D; Frigiola, Alessandro; Gazzolo, Diego

    2012-03-01

    Mother milk is widely accepted to be a unique product believed to contain biological factors involved in the regulation of newborn optimal growth including brain when compared to milk-formula milks. In this setting, there is growing evidence that in milk-formula neuro-oxidative stress biomarkers, neurotrophic proteins and calcium binding proteins, known to be involved in a cascade of events leading to brain, cardiac and vascular development/damage, are to date lacking or at a lower concentration than breast milk. Therefore, this review is aimed at offering additional insights to the role in human milk of some selected biomarkers such as: i) neurotrophic factors such as Activin A; ii) Calcium binding protein such as S100B and, iii) heat shock protein known to be involved in oxidative stress response (namely hemeoxygenase-1, HO-1 or Heat shock Protein 32, HSP32).

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Bathina, Siresha

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in neuronal survival and growth, serves as a neurotransmitter modulator, and participates in neuronal plasticity, which is essential for learning and memory. It is widely expressed in the CNS, gut and other tissues. BDNF binds to its high affinity receptor TrkB (tyrosine kinase B) and activates signal transduction cascades (IRS1/2, PI3K, Akt), crucial for CREB and CBP production, that encode proteins involved in β cell survival. BDNF and insulin-like growth factor-1 have similar downstream signaling mechanisms incorporating both p-CAMK and MAPK that increase the expression of pro-survival genes. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates glucose and energy metabolism and prevents exhaustion of β cells. Decreased levels of BDNF are associated with neurodegenerative diseases with neuronal loss, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and Huntington's disease. Thus, BDNF may be useful in the prevention and management of several diseases including diabetes mellitus. PMID:26788077

  14. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Suicide Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Yogesh

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern. The etiology and pathogenic mechanisms associated with suicidal behavior are poorly understood. Recent research on the biological perspective of suicide has gained momentum and appears to provide a promising approach for identifying potential risk factors associated with this disorder. One of the areas that has gained the most attention in suicide research is the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which participates in many physiological functions in the brain, including synaptic and structural plasticity. Several studies consistently show that expression of BDNF is reduced in blood cells of suicidal patients and in brains of subjects who committed suicide. Recent studies also demonstrate abnormalities in the functioning of BDNF, because its cognate receptors (tropomycin receptor kinase B and pan75 neurotrophic receptor) are abnormally active and/or expressed in the postmortem brains of suicide subjects. There is further evidence of the role of BDNF in suicide as numerous studies show a strong association of suicidal behavior with BDNF functional polymorphism. Overall, it appears that abnormalities in BDNF signaling may serve as an important biological risk factor in the etiology and pathogenesis of suicide. PMID:20166812

  15. Assembly of Neuronal Connectivity by Neurotrophic Factors and Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ledda, Fernanda; Paratcha, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of the nervous system critically relies on sophisticated neuronal networks interconnected in a highly specific pattern. The architecture of these connections arises from sequential developmental steps such as axonal growth and guidance, dendrite development, target determination, synapse formation and plasticity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane proteins have been involved in cell-type specific signaling pathways that underlie these developmental processes. The members of this superfamily of proteins execute their functions acting as trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in target specificity and synapse formation or working in cis as cell-intrinsic modulators of neurotrophic factor receptor trafficking and signaling. In this review, we will focus on novel physiological mechanisms through which LRR proteins regulate neurotrophic factor receptor signaling, highlighting the importance of these modulatory events for proper axonal extension and guidance, tissue innervation and dendrite morphogenesis. Additionally, we discuss few examples linking this set of LRR proteins to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27555809

  16. Assembly of Neuronal Connectivity by Neurotrophic Factors and Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Fernanda; Paratcha, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of the nervous system critically relies on sophisticated neuronal networks interconnected in a highly specific pattern. The architecture of these connections arises from sequential developmental steps such as axonal growth and guidance, dendrite development, target determination, synapse formation and plasticity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) transmembrane proteins have been involved in cell-type specific signaling pathways that underlie these developmental processes. The members of this superfamily of proteins execute their functions acting as trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules involved in target specificity and synapse formation or working in cis as cell-intrinsic modulators of neurotrophic factor receptor trafficking and signaling. In this review, we will focus on novel physiological mechanisms through which LRR proteins regulate neurotrophic factor receptor signaling, highlighting the importance of these modulatory events for proper axonal extension and guidance, tissue innervation and dendrite morphogenesis. Additionally, we discuss few examples linking this set of LRR proteins to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. PMID:27555809

  17. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Autry, Anita E.

    2012-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most prevalent growth factor in the central nervous system (CNS). It is essential for the development of the CNS and for neuronal plasticity. Because BDNF plays a crucial role in development and plasticity of the brain, it is widely implicated in psychiatric diseases. This review provides a summary of clinical and preclinical evidence for the involvement of this ubiquitous growth factor in major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, addiction, Rett syndrome, as well as other psychiatric and neurodevelopmental diseases. In addition, the review includes a discussion of the role of BDNF in the mechanism of action of pharmacological therapies currently used to treat these diseases, such antidepressants and antipsychotics. The review also covers a critique of experimental therapies such as BDNF mimetics and discusses the value of BDNF as a target for future drug development. PMID:22407616

  18. Neurotrophic factors and their effects in the treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Nazem, Ghasemi; Mardani, Mohammad; Esfandiari, Ebrahim; Salehi, Hossein; Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid Zarkesh

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophins are small molecules of polypeptides, which include nerve growth factor (NGF) family, glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family ligands, and neuropoietic cytokines. These factors have an important role in neural regeneration, remyelination, and regulating the development of the peripheral and central nervous systems (PNS and CNS, respectively) by intracellular signaling through specific receptors. It has been suggested that the pathogenesis of human neurodegenerative disorders may be due to an alteration in the neurotrophic factors and their receptors. The use of neurotrophic factors as therapeutic agents is a novel strategy for restoring and maintaining neuronal function during neurodegenerative disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Innate and adaptive immune responses contribute to pathology of neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, autoimmune and mesenchymal stem cells, by the release of neurotrophic factors, have the ability to protect neuronal population and can efficiently suppress the formation of new lesions. So, these cells may be an alternative source for delivering neurotrophic factors into the CNS. PMID:25802822

  19. Pleiotrophin is a neurotrophic factor for spinal motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Mi, Ruifa; Chen, Weiran; Höke, Ahmet

    2007-03-13

    Regeneration in the peripheral nervous system is poor after chronic denervation. Denervated Schwann cells act as a "transient target" by secreting growth factors to promote regeneration of axons but lose this ability with chronic denervation. We discovered that the mRNA for pleiotrophin (PTN) was highly up-regulated in acutely denervated distal sciatic nerves, but high levels of PTN mRNA were not maintained in chronically denervated nerves. PTN protected spinal motor neurons against chronic excitotoxic injury and caused increased outgrowth of motor axons out of the spinal cord explants and formation of "miniventral rootlets." In neonatal mice, PTN protected the facial motor neurons against cell death induced by deprivation from target-derived growth factors. Similarly, PTN significantly enhanced regeneration of myelinated axons across a graft in the transected sciatic nerve of adult rats. Our findings suggest a neurotrophic role for PTN that may lead to previously unrecognized treatment options for motor neuron disease and motor axonal regeneration.

  20. Inducible expression of neurotrophic factors by mesenchymal progenitor cells derived from traumatically injured human muscle.

    PubMed

    Bulken-Hoover, Jamie D; Jackson, Wesley M; Ji, Youngmi; Volger, Jared A; Tuan, Rocky S; Nesti, Leon J

    2012-06-01

    Peripheral nerve damage frequently accompanies musculoskeletal trauma and repair of these nerves could be enhanced by the targeted application of neurotrophic factors (NTFs), which are typically expressed by endogenous cells that support nerve regeneration. Injured muscle tissues express NTFs to promote reinnervation as the tissue regenerates, but the source of these factors from within the muscles is not fully understood. We have previously identified a population of mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) in traumatized muscle tissue with properties that support tissue regeneration, and our hypothesis was that MPCs also secrete the NTFs that are associated with muscle tissue reinnervation. We determined that MPCs express genes associated with neurogenic function and measured the protein-level expression of specific NTFs with known functions to support nerve regeneration. We also demonstrated the effectiveness of a neurotrophic induction protocol to enhance the expression of the NTFs, which suggests that the expression of these factors may be modulated by the cellular environment. Finally, neurotrophic induction affected the expression of cell surface markers and proliferation rate of the MPCs. Our findings indicate that traumatized muscle-derived MPCs may be useful as a therapeutic cell type to enhance peripheral nerve regeneration following musculoskeletal injury. PMID:21904958

  1. [Purification and bioassay of macrophage-derived neurotrophic factor].

    PubMed

    Li, S L; Guo, W H; Gu, X F

    1998-06-01

    Macrophage-derived neurotrophic factor (M phi DNF) is purified from macrophage conditioned medium by a procedure consisting of column chromatography with Sephacryl S-100-HR, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and a final step using reverse-phase HPLC. The product shows a single protein band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel. It has a molecular weight of 60.5 kD and an isoelectric point of pI 5.1 and contains more leucine, lysine, glutamine and aspartic acids in its amino acid composition. Purified M phi DNF can promote the survival, activity, and neurite outgrowth of cultured cerebellar cortical neurons and that this effect reaches maximal levels with concentrations of the M phi DNF ranging from 500-1000 ng/ml.

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor: role in depression and suicide

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Yogesh

    2009-01-01

    Depression and suicidal behavior have recently been shown to be associated with disturbances in structural and synaptic plasticity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), one of the major neurotrophic factors, plays an important role in the maintenance and survival of neurons and in synaptic plasticity. Several lines of evidence suggest that BDNF is involved in depression, such that the expression of BDNF is decreased in depressed patients. In addition, antidepressants up-regulate the expression of BDNF. This has led to the proposal of the “neurotrophin hypothesis of depression”. Increasing evidence demonstrates that suicidal behavior is also associated with lower expression of BDNF, which may be independent from depression. Recent genetic studies also support a link of BDNF to depression/suicidal behavior. Not only BDNF, but abnormalities in its cognate receptor tropomycin receptor kinase B (TrkB) and its splice variant (TrkB.T1) have also been reported in depressed/suicidal patients. It has been suggested that epigenetic modulation of the Bdnf and Trkb genes may contribute to their altered expression and functioning. More recently, impairment in the functioning of pan75 neurotrophin receptor has been reported in suicide brain specimens. pan75 neurotrophin receptor is a low-affinity neurotrophin receptor that, when expressed in conjunction with low availability of neurotropins/Trks, induces apoptosis. Overall, these studies suggest the possibility that BDNF and its mediated signaling may participate in the pathophysiology of depression and suicidal behavior. This review focuses on the critical evidence demonstrating the involvement of BDNF in depression and suicide. PMID:19721723

  3. Prolongation of Relaxation Time in Extraocular Muscles With Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Adult Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Krysta R.; Stevens, Shanlee M.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that short-term treatment with brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) would alter the contractile characteristics of rabbit extraocular muscle (EOM). Methods One week after injections of BDNF in adult rabbit superior rectus muscles, twitch properties were determined in treated and control muscles in vitro. Muscles were also examined for changes in mean cross-sectional areas, neuromuscular junction size, and percent of myofibers expressing specific myosin heavy chain isoforms, and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (SERCA) 1 and 2. Results Brain derived neurotrophic factor–treated muscles had prolonged relaxation times compared with control muscles. Time to 50% relaxation, time to 100% relaxation, and maximum rate of relaxation were increased by 24%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. No significant differences were seen in time to peak force, twitch force, or maximum rate of contraction. Brain derived neurotrophic factor treatment significantly increased mean cross-sectional areas of slow twitch and tonic myofibers, with increased areas ranging from 54% to 146%. Brain derived neurotrophic factor also resulted in an increased percentage of slow twitch myofibers in the orbital layers, ranging from 54% to 77%, and slow-tonic myofibers, ranging from 44% to 62%. No significant changes were seen SERCA1 or 2 expression or in neuromuscular junction size. Conclusions Short-term treatment with BDNF significantly prolonged the duration and rate of relaxation time and increased expression of both slow-twitch and slow-tonic myosin-expressing myofibers without changes in neuromuscular junctions or SERCA expression. The changes induced by BDNF treatment might have potential therapeutic value in dampening/reducing uncontrolled eye oscillations in nystagmus. PMID:27802489

  4. Macrophage Stimulating Protein Is a Novel Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Maria Cristina; Vercelli, Alessandro; Repici, Mariaelena; Follenzi, Antonia; Comoglio, Paolo M.

    2001-01-01

    Macrophage stimulating protein (MSP), also known as hepatocyte growth factor-like, is a soluble cytokine that belongs to the family of the plasminogen-related growth factors (PRGFs). PRGFs are α/β heterodimers that bind to transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors. MSP was originally isolated as a chemotactic factor for peritoneal macrophages. Through binding to its receptor, encoded by the RON gene, it stimulates dissociation of epithelia and works as an inflammatory mediator by repressing the production of nitric oxide (NO). Here, we identify a novel role for MSP in the central nervous system. As a paradigm to analyze this function we chose the hypoglossal system of adult mice. We demonstrate in vivo that either administration of exogenous MSP or transplantation of MSP-producing cells at the proximal stump of the resected nerve is sufficient to prevent motoneuron atrophy upon axotomy. We also show that the MSP gene is expressed in the tongue, the target of the hypoglossal nerve, and that MSP induces biosynthesis of Ron receptor in the motoneuron somata. Finally, we show that MSP suppresses NO production in the injured hypoglossal nuclei. Together, these data suggest that MSP is a novel neurotrophic factor for cranial motoneurons and, by regulating the production of NO, may have a role in brain plasticity and regeneration. PMID:11359926

  5. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Expression in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder: Effects of Treatment and Clinical Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N.; Rizavi, Hooriyah S.; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Pavuluri, Mani N.

    2008-01-01

    The study determines the gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the lymphocytes of subjects with pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) before and during treatment with mood stabilizers and in drug-free normal control subjects. Results indicate the potential of BDNF levels as a biomarker for PBD and as a treatment predictor and…

  6. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor in Megakaryocytes*♦

    PubMed Central

    Chacón-Fernández, Pedro; Säuberli, Katharina; Colzani, Maria; Moreau, Thomas; Ghevaert, Cedric

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has thus far been examined in neurons where it is expressed at very low levels, in an activity-dependent fashion. In humans, BDNF has long been known to accumulate in circulating platelets, at levels far higher than in the brain. During the process of blood coagulation, BDNF is released from platelets, which has led to its extensive use as a readily accessible biomarker, under the assumption that serum levels may somehow reflect brain levels. To identify the cellular origin of BDNF in platelets, we established primary cultures of megakaryocytes, the progenitors of platelets, and we found that human and rat megakaryocytes express the BDNF gene. Surprisingly, the pattern of mRNA transcripts is similar to neurons. In the presence of thapsigargin and external calcium, the levels of the mRNA species leading to efficient BDNF translation rapidly increase. Under these conditions, pro-BDNF, the obligatory precursor of biologically active BDNF, becomes readily detectable. Megakaryocytes store BDNF in α-granules, with more than 80% of them also containing platelet factor 4. By contrast, BDNF is undetectable in mouse megakaryocytes, in line with the absence of BDNF in mouse serum. These findings suggest that alterations of BDNF levels in human serum as reported in studies dealing with depression or physical exercise may primarily reflect changes occurring in megakaryocytes and platelets, including the ability of the latter to retain and release BDNF. PMID:27006395

  7. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression ex vivo in obesity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Mari, David C; Whitehurst, Michael; Slusher, Aaron; Wilson, Alan; Shibata, Yoshimi

    2014-01-17

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk in neurodegenerative diseases. To counteract the neuronal damage, the human body increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, leading to neuronal survival and plasticity. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have been found to release BDNF as a potential neuroprotective role of inflammation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PBMC activation would lead to differences in BDNF and inflammatory responses between obese and non-obese subjects. Thirty-one subjects (14 obese and 17 non-obese), ages 18 to 30years, were recruited. PBMCs were cultured for 24h with 10ng/mL LPS. BDNF, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured in both plasma and cell culture supernatants. Our results did not illustrate any differences in plasma BDNF levels between obese and non-obese groups. However, obese subjects elicited a greater plasma IL-6 production, which was positively associated with plasma BDNF. Furthermore, LPS-induced PBMCs expressed significantly higher BDNF and IL-6 levels in obese subjects compared to the non-obese subjects. Finally, these BDNF levels were positively correlated with IL-6 response ex vivo. These findings suggest that under a high inflammatory state, PBMCs produce greater BDNF and IL-6 expression which may play a collaborative role to protect against neuronal damage associated with obesity. PMID:24140987

  8. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Airways

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Y.S.; Martin, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their well-known roles in the nervous system, there is increasing recognition that neurotrophins such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as well as their receptors are expressed in peripheral tissues including the lung, and can thus potentially contribute to both normal physiology and pathophysiology of several diseases. The relevance of this family of growth factors lies in emerging clinical data indicating altered neurotrophin levels and function in a range of diseases including neonatal and adult asthma, sinusitis, influenza, and lung cancer. The current review focuses on 1) the importance of BDNF expression and signaling mechanisms in early airway and lung development, critical to both normal neonatal lung function and also its disruption in prematurity and insults such as inflammation and infection; 2) how BDNF, potentially derived from airway nerves modulate neurogenic control of airway tone, a key aspect of airway reflexes as well as dysfunctional responses to allergic inflammation; 3) the emerging idea that local BDNF production by resident airway cells such as epithelium and airway smooth muscle can contribute to normal airway structure and function, and to airway hyperreactivity and remodeling in diseases such as asthma. Furthermore, given its pleiotropic effects in the airway, BDNF may be a novel and appealing therapeutic target. PMID:24560686

  9. Changes in neurotrophic factors of adult rat laryngeal muscles during nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Morato, Ignacio; Sharma, Sansar; Pitman, Michael J

    2016-10-01

    Injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) leads to the loss of ipsilateral laryngeal fold movement, with dysphonia, and occasionally dysphagia. Functional movement of the vocal folds is never restored due to misrouting of regenerating axons to agonist and antagonist laryngeal muscles. Changes of neurotrophic factor expression within denervated muscles occur after nerve injury and may influence nerve regeneration, axon guidance and muscle reinnervation. This study investigates the expression of certain neurotrophic factors in the laryngeal muscles during the course of axonal regeneration using RT-PCR. The timing of neurotrophic factor expression was correlated to the reinnervation of the laryngeal muscles by motor axons. Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Netrin-1 (NTN-1) increased their expression levels in laryngeal muscles after nerve section and during regeneration of RLN. The upregulation of trophic factors returned to control levels following regeneration of RLN. The expression levels of the neurotrophic factors were correlated with the innervation of regenerating axons into the denervated muscles. The results suggest that certain neurotrophic factor expression is strongly correlated to the reinnervation pattern of the regenerating RLN. These factors may be involved in guidance and neuromuscular junction formation during nerve regeneration. In the future, their manipulation may enhance the selective reinnervation of the larynx. PMID:27421227

  10. Neuritin, a neurotrophic factor in nervous system physiology.

    PubMed

    Zhou, S; Zhou, J

    2014-04-01

    Neuritin (also known as candidate plasticity gene 15, cpg15) is an activity-induced glycosylphosphatidylinositol- anchored axonal protein and is mainly expressed in the brain. Neuritin mRNA expression is modulated by neurotrophic factors, synaptic activity, hormones, sensory experience, and electroconvulsive seizure therapy. Neuritin has several effects in the nervous system, such as promoting neurite outgrowth, modulating neurite outgrowth during neuronal differentiation, protecting motor neuron axons, promoting dendritic growth, shaping dendritic arbors of target neurons, regulating synaptic plasticity, stabilizing active synapses, promoting synaptic maturation and neuronal migration, promoting the development and maturation of visual cortical neurons, regulating apoptosis of proliferative neurons, and regenerating peripheral nerve and spinal axons. Neuritin is also implicated in cerebral ischemia, depression, and cognitive function in schizophrenia, and it upregulates transient outward K(+) currents in neurons, suggesting that neuritin may be a potential therapeutic target in peripheral and central nervous system diseases. This review focuses on the expression, distribution, and physiological functions of neuritin in the nervous system. PMID:24350851

  11. Neurotrophic factor GDNF promotes survival of salivary stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Nan; Lin, Yuan; Cao, Hongbin; Sirjani, Davud; Giaccia, Amato J; Koong, Albert C; Kong, Christina S; Diehn, Maximilian; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2014-08-01

    Stem cell-based regenerative therapy is a promising treatment for head and neck cancer patients that suffer from chronic dry mouth (xerostomia) due to salivary gland injury from radiation therapy. Current xerostomia therapies only provide temporary symptom relief, while permanent restoration of salivary function is not currently feasible. Here, we identified and characterized a stem cell population from adult murine submandibular glands. Of the different cells isolated from the submandibular gland, this specific population, Lin-CD24+c-Kit+Sca1+, possessed the highest capacity for proliferation, self renewal, and differentiation during serial passage in vitro. Serial transplantations of this stem cell population into the submandibular gland of irradiated mice successfully restored saliva secretion and increased the number of functional acini. Gene-expression analysis revealed that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf) is highly expressed in Lin-CD24+c-Kit+Sca1+ stem cells. Furthermore, GDNF expression was upregulated upon radiation therapy in submandibular glands of both mice and humans. Administration of GDNF improved saliva production and enriched the number of functional acini in submandibular glands of irradiated animals and enhanced salisphere formation in cultured salivary stem cells, but did not accelerate growth of head and neck cancer cells. These data indicate that modulation of the GDNF pathway may have potential therapeutic benefit for management of radiation-induced xerostomia. PMID:25036711

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor enhances conditioned taste aversion retention.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Diana V; Figueroa-Guzmán, Yazmín; Escobar, Martha L

    2006-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has recently emerged as one of the most potent molecular mediators of not only central synaptic plasticity, but also behavioral interactions between an organism and its environment. Our previous studies on the insular cortex (IC), a region of the temporal cortex implicated in the acquisition and storage of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), have demonstrated that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the projection from the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (Bla) to the IC, previous to CTA training, enhances the retention of this task. Recently, we found that intracortical microinfusion of BDNF induces a lasting potentiation of synaptic efficacy in the Bla-IC projection of adult rats in vivo. In this work, we present experimental data showing that intracortical microinfusion of BDNF previous to CTA training enhances the retention of this task. These findings support the concept that BDNF may contribute to memory-related functions performed by a neocortical area, playing a critical role in long-term synaptic plasticity.

  13. Tianeptine increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the rat amygdala.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Lawrence P; Hendry, Robert M; Reznikov, Leah R; Piroli, Gerardo G; Wood, Gwendolyn E; McEwen, Bruce S; Grillo, Claudia A

    2007-06-22

    Chronic restraint stress affects hippocampal and amygdalar synaptic plasticity as determined by electrophysiological, morphological and behavioral measures, changes that are inhibited by some but not all antidepressants. The efficacy of some classes of antidepressants is proposed to involve increased phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), leading to increased expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Conversely, some studies suggest that acute and chronic stress downregulate BDNF expression and activity. Accordingly, the aim of the current study was to examine total and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB), as well as BDNF mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus and amygdala of rats subjected to chronic restraint stress in the presence and absence of the antidepressant tianeptine. In the hippocampus, chronic restraint stress increased pCREB levels without affecting BDNF mRNA or protein expression. Tianeptine administration had no effect upon these measures in the hippocampus. In the amygdala, BDNF mRNA expression was not modulated in chronic restraint stress rats given saline in spite of increased pCREB levels. Conversely, BDNF mRNA levels were increased in the amygdala of chronic restraint stress/tianeptine rats in the absence of changes in pCREB levels when compared to non-stressed controls. Amygdalar BDNF protein increased while pCREB levels decreased in tianeptine-treated rats irrespective of stress conditions. Collectively, these results demonstrate that tianeptine concomitantly decreases pCREB while increasing BDNF expression in the rat amygdala, increases in neurotrophic factor expression that may participate in the enhancement of amygdalar synaptic plasticity mediated by tianeptine.

  14. In vitro assessment of TAT - Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor therapeutic potential for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Barbon, Silvia; Stocco, Elena; Negro, Alessandro; Dalzoppo, Daniele; Borgio, Luca; Rajendran, Senthilkumar; Grandi, Francesca; Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; De Caro, Raffaele; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo; Grandi, Claudio

    2016-10-15

    In regenerative neurobiology, Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) is raising high interest as a multifunctional neurocytokine, playing a key role in the regeneration of injured peripheral nerves. Despite its promising trophic and regulatory activity, its clinical application is limited by the onset of severe side effects, due to the lack of efficient intracellular trafficking after administration. In this study, recombinant CNTF linked to the transactivator transduction domain (TAT) was investigated in vitro and found to be an optimized fusion protein which preserves neurotrophic activity, besides enhancing cellular uptake for therapeutic advantage. Moreover, a compelling protein delivery method was defined, in the future perspective of improving nerve regeneration strategies. Following determination of TAT-CNTF molecular weight and concentration, its specific effect on neural SH-SY5Y and PC12 cultures was assessed. Cell proliferation assay demonstrated that the fusion protein triggers PC12 cell growth within 6h of stimulation. At the same time, the activation of signal transduction pathway and enhancement of cellular trafficking were found to be accomplished in both neural cell lines after specific treatment with TAT-CNTF. Finally, the recombinant growth factor was successfully loaded on oxidized polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds, and more efficiently released when polymer oxidation rate increased. Taken together, our results highlight that the TAT domain addiction to the protein sequence preserves CNTF specific neurotrophic activity in vitro, besides improving cellular uptake. Moreover, oxidized PVA could represent an ideal biomaterial for the development of nerve conduits loaded with the fusion protein to be delivered to the site of nerve injury. PMID:27597256

  15. Brain derived neurotrophic factor keeps pattern electroretinogram from dropping after superior colliculus lesion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bin-Bin; Yang, Xu; Ding, Huai-Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine if brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) could offer protention to retinal ganglion cells following a superior colliculus (SC) lesion in mice using pattern electroretinogram (PERG) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a measures of ganglion cell response and retinal health. METHODS Seven C57BL/6J mice with BDNF protection were tested with PERG and OCT before and after SC lesions. RESULTS Compared with baseline PERG, the amplitude of PERG decreased 11.7% after SC lesions, but not significantly (P>0.05). Through fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis of the PERGs before and after SC lesions, it was found that dominant frequency of PERGs stayed unchanged, suggesting that the ganglion cells of the retina remained relatively healthy inspite of damage to the ends of the ganglion cell axons. Also, OCT showed no changes in retinal thickness after lesions. CONCLUSION It was concluded that BDNF is essential component of normal retinal and helps retina keeping normal function. While retina lack of BDNF, ex vivo resource of BDNF provides protection to the sick retina. It implies that BDNF is a kind therapeutic neurotrophic factor to retina neurodegeneration diseases, such as glaucoma, age related macular degeneration. PMID:27158604

  16. DYNAMIC PLASTICITY: THE ROLE OF GLUCOCORTICOIDS, BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR AND OTHER TROPHIC FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    GRAY, J. D.; MILNER, T. A.; MCEWEN, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a secreted protein that has been linked to numerous aspects of plasticity in the central nervous system (CNS). Stress-induced remodeling of the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and amygdala is coincident with changes in the levels of BDNF, which has been shown to act as a trophic factor facilitating the survival of existing and newly born neurons. Initially, hippocampal atrophy after chronic stress was associated with reduced BDNF, leading to the hypothesis that stress-related learning deficits resulted from suppressed hippocampal neurogenesis. However, recent evidence suggests that BDNF also plays a rapid and essential role in regulating synaptic plasticity, providing another mechanism through which BDNF can modulate learning and memory after a stressful event. Numerous reports have shown BDNF levels are highly dynamic in response to stress, and not only vary across brain regions but also fluctuate rapidly, both immediately after a stressor and over the course of a chronic stress paradigm. Yet, BDNF alone is not sufficient to effect many of the changes observed after stress. Glucocorticoids and other molecules have been shown to act in conjunction with BDNF to facilitate both the morphological and molecular changes that occur, particularly changes in spine density and gene expression. This review briefly summarizes the evidence supporting BDNF’s role as a trophic factor modulating neuronal survival, and will primarily focus on the interactions between BDNF and other systems within the brain to facilitate synaptic plasticity. This growing body of evidence suggests a more nuanced role for BDNF in stress-related learning and memory, where it acts primarily as a facilitator of plasticity and is dependent upon the coactivation of glucocorticoids and other factors as the determinants of the final cellular response. PMID:22922121

  17. Neurotrophic factors and neural prostheses: potential clinical applications based upon findings in the auditory system.

    PubMed

    Pettingill, Lisa N; Richardson, Rachael T; Wise, Andrew K; O'Leary, Stephen J; Shepherd, Robert K

    2007-06-01

    Spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) are the target cells of the cochlear implant, a neural prosthesis designed to provide important auditory cues to severely or profoundly deaf patients. The ongoing degeneration of SGNs that occurs following a sensorineural hearing loss is, therefore, considered a limiting factor in cochlear implant efficacy. We review neurobiological techniques aimed at preventing SGN degeneration using exogenous delivery of neurotrophic factors. Application of these proteins prevents SGN degeneration and can enhance neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, chronic electrical stimulation of SGNs increases neurotrophic factor-induced survival and is correlated with functional benefits. The application of neurotrophic factors has the potential to enhance the benefits that patients can derive from cochlear implants; moreover, these techniques may be relevant for use with neural prostheses in other neurological conditions. PMID:17551571

  18. Parasite-Derived Neurotrophic Factor/trans-Sialidase of Trypanosoma cruzi Links Neurotrophic Signaling to Cardiac Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Ryan; Aridgides, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The Chagas' disease parasite Trypanosoma cruzi elicits a potent inflammatory response in acutely infected hearts that keeps parasitism in check and triggers cardiac abnormalities. A most-studied mechanism underlying innate immunity in T. cruzi infection is Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation by lipids and other parasite molecules. However, yet-to-be-identified pathways should exist. Here, we show that T. cruzi strongly upregulates monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 and fractalkine (FKN)/CX3CL1 in cellular and mouse models of heart infection. Mechanistically, upregulation of MCP-1 and FKN stems from the interaction of parasite-derived neurotrophic factor (PDNF)/trans-sialidase with neurotrophic receptors TrkA and TrkC, as assessed by pharmacological inhibition, neutralizing antibodies, and gene silencing studies. Administration of a single dose of intravenous PDNF to naive mice results in a dose-dependent increase in MCP-1 and FKN in the heart and liver with pulse-like kinetics that peak at 3 h postinjection. Intravenous PDNF also augments MCP-1 and FKN in TLR signaling-deficient MyD88-knockout mice, underscoring the MyD88-independent action of PDNF. Although single PDNF injections do not increase MCP-1 and FKN receptors, multiple PDNF injections at short intervals up the levels of receptor transcripts in the heart and liver, suggesting that sustained PDNF triggers cell recruitment at infection sites. Thus, given that MCP-1 and FKN are chemokines essential to the recruitment of immune cells to combat inflammation triggers and to enhance tissue repair, our findings uncover a new mechanism in innate immunity against T. cruzi infection mediated by Trk signaling akin to an endogenous inflammatory and fibrotic pathway resulting from cardiomyocyte-TrkA recognition by matricellular connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2). PMID:24935974

  19. Parasite-derived neurotrophic factor/trans-sialidase of Trypanosoma cruzi links neurotrophic signaling to cardiac innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Ryan; Aridgides, Daniel; PereiraPerrin, Mercio

    2014-09-01

    The Chagas' disease parasite Trypanosoma cruzi elicits a potent inflammatory response in acutely infected hearts that keeps parasitism in check and triggers cardiac abnormalities. A most-studied mechanism underlying innate immunity in T. cruzi infection is Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation by lipids and other parasite molecules. However, yet-to-be-identified pathways should exist. Here, we show that T. cruzi strongly upregulates monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1)/CCL2 and fractalkine (FKN)/CX3CL1 in cellular and mouse models of heart infection. Mechanistically, upregulation of MCP-1 and FKN stems from the interaction of parasite-derived neurotrophic factor (PDNF)/trans-sialidase with neurotrophic receptors TrkA and TrkC, as assessed by pharmacological inhibition, neutralizing antibodies, and gene silencing studies. Administration of a single dose of intravenous PDNF to naive mice results in a dose-dependent increase in MCP-1 and FKN in the heart and liver with pulse-like kinetics that peak at 3 h postinjection. Intravenous PDNF also augments MCP-1 and FKN in TLR signaling-deficient MyD88-knockout mice, underscoring the MyD88-independent action of PDNF. Although single PDNF injections do not increase MCP-1 and FKN receptors, multiple PDNF injections at short intervals up the levels of receptor transcripts in the heart and liver, suggesting that sustained PDNF triggers cell recruitment at infection sites. Thus, given that MCP-1 and FKN are chemokines essential to the recruitment of immune cells to combat inflammation triggers and to enhance tissue repair, our findings uncover a new mechanism in innate immunity against T. cruzi infection mediated by Trk signaling akin to an endogenous inflammatory and fibrotic pathway resulting from cardiomyocyte-TrkA recognition by matricellular connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2).

  20. Vascular function and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: The functional capacity factor.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Mahmoud A; Khabour, Omar F; Maikano, Abubakar; Alawneh, Khaldoon

    2015-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for neurocognitive function. This study aims at establishing a plausible link between level of serum BDNF, functional capacity (FC), and vascular function in 181 young (age 25.5±9.1 years old), apparently healthy adults. Fasting blood samples were drawn from participants' antecubital veins into plain glass tubes while they were in a sitting position to evaluate serum BDNF using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Mercury-in-silastic strain-gauge plethysmography was used to determine arterial function indices, blood flow and vascular resistance at rest and following 5 minutes of arterial ischemia. The 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) test was used to determine FC, according to the American Thoracic Society Committee on Proficiency Standards for Clinical Pulmonary Function Laboratories guidelines. It was conducted in an enclosed corridor on a flat surface with a circular track 33 meters long. The walking course was demarcated with bright colored cones. The 6MWD correlated with BDNF (r=0.3, p=0.000), as well as with forearm blood inflow (r=0.5, p=0.000) and vascular resistance (r = -0.4, p=0.000). Subsequent comparison showed that BDNF and blood inflow were greater (p<0.05) while vascular resistance was less (p<0.05) in participants who achieved a longer 6MWD. Similarly, BDNF correlated with forearm blood inflow (r=0.4, p=0.000) and vascular resistance (r = -0.4, p=0.000). Subsequent comparison showed improved vascular function (p<0.05) in the participants with greater BDNF. In conclusion, these findings might suggest that improved vascular function in individuals with greater FC is mediated, at least partially, by an enhanced serum BDNF level. PMID:26285588

  1. Vascular function and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: The functional capacity factor.

    PubMed

    Alomari, Mahmoud A; Khabour, Omar F; Maikano, Abubakar; Alawneh, Khaldoon

    2015-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is essential for neurocognitive function. This study aims at establishing a plausible link between level of serum BDNF, functional capacity (FC), and vascular function in 181 young (age 25.5±9.1 years old), apparently healthy adults. Fasting blood samples were drawn from participants' antecubital veins into plain glass tubes while they were in a sitting position to evaluate serum BDNF using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Mercury-in-silastic strain-gauge plethysmography was used to determine arterial function indices, blood flow and vascular resistance at rest and following 5 minutes of arterial ischemia. The 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) test was used to determine FC, according to the American Thoracic Society Committee on Proficiency Standards for Clinical Pulmonary Function Laboratories guidelines. It was conducted in an enclosed corridor on a flat surface with a circular track 33 meters long. The walking course was demarcated with bright colored cones. The 6MWD correlated with BDNF (r=0.3, p=0.000), as well as with forearm blood inflow (r=0.5, p=0.000) and vascular resistance (r = -0.4, p=0.000). Subsequent comparison showed that BDNF and blood inflow were greater (p<0.05) while vascular resistance was less (p<0.05) in participants who achieved a longer 6MWD. Similarly, BDNF correlated with forearm blood inflow (r=0.4, p=0.000) and vascular resistance (r = -0.4, p=0.000). Subsequent comparison showed improved vascular function (p<0.05) in the participants with greater BDNF. In conclusion, these findings might suggest that improved vascular function in individuals with greater FC is mediated, at least partially, by an enhanced serum BDNF level.

  2. Randomized Trial of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Delivered by Encapsulated Cell Intraocular Implants for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    BIRCH, DAVID G.; WELEBER, RICHARD G.; DUNCAN, JACQUE L.; JAFFE, GLENN J.; TAO, WENG

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the safety and effect on visual function of ciliary neurotrophic factor delivered via an intraocular encapsulated cell implant for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). DESIGN Ciliary neurotrophic factor for late-stage retinitis pigmentosa study 3 (CNTF3; n = 65) and ciliary neurotrophic factor for early-stage retinitis pigmentosa study 4 (CNTF4; n = 68) were multicenter, sham-controlled dose-ranging studies. METHODS Patients were randomly assigned to receive a high- or low-dose implant in 1 eye and sham surgery in the fellow eye. The primary endpoints were change in best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at 12 months for CNTF3 and change in visual field sensitivity at 12 months for CNTF4. Patients had the choice of retaining or removing the implant at 12 months for CNTF3 and 24 months for CNTF4. RESULTS There were no serious adverse events related to either the encapsulated cell implant or the surgical procedure. In CNTF3, there was no change in acuity in either ciliary neurotrophic factor–or sham-treated eyes at 1 year. In CNTF4, eyes treated with the high-dose implant showed a significant decrease in sensitivity while no change was seen in sham- and low dose–treated eyes at 12 months. The decrease in sensitivity was reversible upon implant removal. In both studies, ciliary neurotrophic factor treatment resulted in a dose-dependent increase in retinal thickness. CONCLUSIONS Long-term intraocular delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor is achieved by the encapsulated cell implant. Neither study showed therapeutic benefit in the primary outcome variable. PMID:23668681

  3. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-yue; Zhang, Ze-peng; Mo, Zhou-yun; Chen, Shi-jie; Xiang, Si-yu; Zhang, Qing-shan; Xue, Min

    2015-01-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury. PMID:26604912

  4. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-Yue; Zhang, Ze-Peng; Mo, Zhou-Yun; Chen, Shi-Jie; Xiang, Si-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Shan; Xue, Min

    2015-09-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury.

  5. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Deficiency Restricts Proliferation of Oligodendrocyte Progenitors Following Cuprizone-Induced Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Tsiperson, Vladislav; Huang, Yangyang; Bagayogo, Issa; Song, Yeri; VonDran, Melissa W; DiCicco-Bloom, Emanuel

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of growth factors that through its neurotrophic tyrosine kinase, receptor, type 2 (TrkB) receptor, increases 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in culture. Roles in vivo are less well understood; however, increases in numbers of OPCs are restricted in BDNF+/− mice following cuprizone-elicited demyelination. Here, we investigate whether these blunted increases in OPCs are associated with changes in proliferation. BDNF+/+ and BDNF+/− mice were fed cuprizone-containing or control feed. To assess effects on OPC numbers, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα)+ or NG2+ cells were counted. To monitor DNA synthesis, 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) was injected intraperitoneally and colocalized with PDGFRα+ cells. Alternatively, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was colocalized with PDGFRα or NG2. Labeling indices were determined in the BDNF+/+ and BDNF+/− animals. After 4 or 5 weeks of control feed, BDNF+/− mice exhibit similar numbers of OPCs compared with BDNF+/+ animals. The labeling indices for EdU and PCNA also were not significantly different, suggesting that neither the DNA synthesis phase (S phase) nor the proliferative pool size was different between genotypes. In contrast, when mice were challenged by cuprizone for 4 or 5 weeks, increases in OPCs observed in BDNF+/+ mice were reduced in the BDNF+/− mice. This difference in elevations in cell number was accompanied by decreases in EdU labeling and PCNA labeling without changes in cell death, indicating a reduction in the DNA synthesis and the proliferative pool. Therefore, levels of BDNF influence the proliferation of OPCs resulting from a demyelinating lesion. PMID:25586993

  6. Does a period of detraining cause a decrease in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor?

    PubMed

    Goekint, Maaike; Roelands, Bart; De Pauw, Kevin; Knaepen, Kristel; Bos, Inge; Meeusen, Romain

    2010-12-17

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the neurotrophins promoting cognitive function and contributing to neurogenesis and neuroprotection. Available evidence suggests that exercise influences serum BDNF concentrations, but that the effect is transient. The purpose of this study is to determine whether a period of aerobic training, followed by a period of detraining, can influence basal serum BDNF levels in humans. Sixteen young, sedentary subjects were assigned to an experimental group (n=9) and a control group (n=7). The experimental group performed an aerobic training program during 8 weeks, followed by 8 weeks of detraining, during which subjects returned to their previous, sedentary activity level. The control group remained physically inactive during 16 weeks. In both groups, performance on short-term (Digit Span test) and mid-term memory (Recall of Images) was assessed. Aerobic training significantly increased the VO(2) peak in the experimental group, and these values returned to baseline after 8 weeks of detraining. Basal serum BDNF was not influenced by 8 weeks of aerobic training and detraining did not seem to have an effect on basal peripheral BDNF concentrations. Both training and detraining did not clearly influence short-term memory performance on the Digit Span test and no differences were present between the experimental and control group on the mid-term memory test. Future studies should focus on patient groups and elderly to further investigate the effect of training and detraining on neurotrophic factors and cognitive function, and on the effects of training and detraining on the BDNF response to acute exercise.

  7. Neurotrophic Factor-Secreting Autologous Muscle Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of Laryngeal Denervation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Halum, Stacey L.; McRae, Bryan; Bijangi-Vishehsaraei, Khadijeh; Hiatt, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine if the spontaneous reinnervation that characteristically ensues after recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury could be selectively promoted and directed to certain laryngeal muscles with the use of neurotrophic factor (NF)-secreting muscle stem cell (MSC) vectors while antagonistic reinnervation is inhibited with vincristine (VNC). Study Design Basic science investigations involving primary cell cultures, gene cloning/transfer, and animal experiments. Methods (i.) MSC survival assays were used to test multiple individual NFs in vitro. (ii.) Motoneuron outgrowth assays assessed the trophic effects of identified NF on cranial nerve X-derived (CNX) motoneurons in vitro. (iii.) Therapeutic NF was cloned into a lentiviral vector, and MSCs were tranduced to secrete NF. 60 rats underwent left RLN transection injury, and at 3 weeks received injections of either MSCs (n=24), MSCs secreting NF (n=24), or saline (n=12) into the left thyroarytenoid muscle complex (TA); half of the animals in the MSC groups simultaneously received left posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) injections of vincristine (VNC) while half the animals received saline. Results (i.) Ciliary-derived neurotrophic factor (CNTF) had the greatest survival-promoting effect on MSCs in culture. (ii.) Addition of CNTF (50 ng/mL) to CN X motoneuron cultures resulted in enhanced neurite outgrowth and branching. (iii.) In the animal model, the injected MSCs fused with the denervated myofibers, immunohistochemistry demonstrated enhanced reinnervation based on motor endplate to nerve contact, and RT-PCR confirmed stable CNTF expression at longest follow-up (4 months) in the CNTF-secreting MSC treated groups. Conclusions MSC therapy may have a future role in selectively promoting and directing laryngeal reinnervation after RLN injury. Level of evidence: NA PMID:22965802

  8. Human obesity associated with an intronic SNP in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor locus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in energy balance. In population studies, SNPs of the BDNF locus have been linked to obesity, but the mechanism by which these variants cause weight gain is unknown. Here, we examined human hypothalamic BDNF expression in association with 44 ...

  9. Differential Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Transcripts during the Consolidation of Fear Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ressler, Kerry J.; Rattiner, Lisa M.; Davis, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated as a molecular mediator of learning and memory. The BDNF gene contains four differentially regulated promoters that generate four distinct mRNA transcripts, each containing a unique noncoding 5[prime]-exon and a common 3[prime]-coding exon. This study describes novel evidence for the…

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in human subjects with function-altering melanocortin-4 receptor variants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In rodents, hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression appears to be regulated by melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activity. The impact of MC4R genetic variation on circulating BDNF in humans is unknown. The objective of this study is to compare BDNF concentrations of subjects wi...

  11. The Effect of Repeated Electroacupuncture Analgesia on Neurotrophic and Cytokine Factors in Neuropathic Pain Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junying; Duanmu, Chenlin; Feng, Xiumei; Yan, Yaxia

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is a common disability influencing quality of life. Results of previous studies showed that acupuncture has a cumulative analgesic effect, but the relationship with spinal cytokines neurotrophic factors released by astrocytes remains unknown. The present study was designed to observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) treatment on spinal cytokines neurotrophic factors in chronic neuropathic pain rats. The chronic neuropathic pain was established by chronic constrictive injury (CCI). EA treatment was applied at Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34) (both bilateral) once a day, for 30 min. IL-1β mRNA, TNF-α mRNA, and IL-1 mRNA were detected by quantitative real-time PCR, and the proteins of BDNF, NGF, and NT3/4 were detected by Western blot. The expression levels of cytokines such as IL-1β mRNA, TNF-α mRNA, IL-6 mRNA, and neurotrophic factors such as BDNF, NGF, and NT3/4 in the spinal cord were increased significantly after CCI. The astrocytes released more IL-1β and BDNF after CCI. Repeated EA treatment could suppress the elevated expression of IL-1β mRNA, TNFα mRNA, and BDNF, NGF, and NT3/4 but had no effect on IL-6 mRNA. It is suggested that cytokines and neurotrophic factors which may be closely associated with astrocytes participated in the process of EA relieving chronic pain. PMID:27800006

  12. [Basic Research on Neurotrophic Factors and Its Application to Medical Uses].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Shoei

    2015-01-01

    The author has studied nerve growth factor (NGF) and its family of neurotrophic factors (neurotrophins) for over 40 years. During the first 20 years, my laboratory established a highly sensitive enzyme immunoassay for NGF and analyzed the regulatory mechanism of NGF synthesis in cultured primary cells. Fibroblast cells cultured from peripheral organs such as the heart and astrocytes from the brain produced a substantial amount of NGF in a growth-dependent manner. Furthermore, synthesis of NGF in these cells could be upregulated by catechol compounds including catecholamines. This observation might explain a physiological relation between the level of NGF mRNA and the density of innervation in the peripheral sympathetic nervous systems. Over the subsequent 20 years, my laboratory investigated the physiological functions of neurotrophic factors, including neurotrophins, during development or post-injury and found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in the formation of the laminar structure of the cerebral cortex. In addition, my laboratory discovered that endogenous glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) contributes to the amelioration of motor activity after spinal cord injury. Therefore we aimed to develop low-molecular weight compounds that generate neurotrophic factor-like intracellular signals to protect or ameliorate neurological/psychiatric diseases. 2-Decenoic acid derivatives and other similar molecules could protect or ameliorate in animal models of mood disorders such as depression and enhance recovery from spinal cord injury-induced motor paralysis. Compounds that can generate neurotrophin-like signals in neurons are expected to be developed as therapeutic drugs for certain neurological or psychiatric disorders.

  13. Gene profile of electroconvulsive seizures: induction of neurotrophic and angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Newton, Samuel S; Collier, Emily F; Hunsberger, Joshua; Adams, David; Terwilliger, Rose; Selvanayagam, Emmanuel; Duman, Ronald S

    2003-11-26

    Electroconvulsive seizure therapy (ECS) is a clinically proven treatment for depression and is often effective even in patients resistant to chemical antidepressants. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic efficacy of ECS are not fully understood. One theory that has gained attention is that ECS and other antidepressants increase the expression of select neurotrophic factors that could reverse or block the atrophy and cell loss resulting from stress and depression. To further address this topic, we examined the expression of other neurotrophic-growth factors and related signaling pathways in the hippocampus in response to ECS using a custom growth factor microarray chip. We report the regulation of several genes that are involved in growth factor and angiogenic-endothelial signaling, including neuritin, stem cell factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VGF (nonacronymic), cyclooxygenase-2, and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1. Some of these, as well as other growth factors identified, including VEGF, basic fibroblast growth factor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, have roles in mediating neurogenesis and cell proliferation in the adult brain. We also examined gene expression in the choroid plexus and found several growth factors that are enriched in this vascular tissue as well as regulated by ECS. These data suggest that an amplification of growth factor signaling combined with angiogenic mechanisms could have an important role in the molecular action of ECS. This study demonstrates the applicability of custom-focused microarray technology in addressing hypothesis-driven questions regarding the action of antidepressants. PMID:14645477

  14. Insulin-like growth factor I interfaces with brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated synaptic plasticity to modulate aspects of exercise-induced cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Ding, Q; Vaynman, S; Akhavan, M; Ying, Z; Gomez-Pinilla, F

    2006-07-01

    The ability of exercise to benefit neuronal and cognitive plasticity is well recognized. This study reveals that the effects of exercise on brain neuronal and cognitive plasticity are in part modulated by a central source of insulin-like growth factor-I. Exercise selectively increased insulin-like growth factor-I expression without affecting insulin-like growth factor-II expression in the rat hippocampus. To determine the role that insulin-like growth factor-I holds in mediating exercise-induced neuronal and cognitive enhancement, a specific antibody against the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor was used to block the action of insulin-like growth factor-I in the hippocampus during a 5-day voluntary exercise period. A two-trial-per-day Morris water maze was performed for five consecutive days, succeeded by a probe trial 2 days later. Blocking hippocampal insulin-like growth factor-I receptors did not significantly attenuate the ability of exercise to enhance learning acquisition, but abolished the effect of exercise on augmenting recall. Blocking the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor significantly reversed the exercise-induced increase in the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA and protein and pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein, suggesting that the effects of insulin-like growth factor-I may be partially accomplished by modulating the precursor to the mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor. A molecular analysis revealed that exercise significantly elevated proteins downstream to brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation important for synaptic function, i.e. synapsin I, and signal transduction cascades associated with memory processes, i.e. phosphorylated calcium/calmodulin protein kinase II and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase II. Blocking the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor abolished these exercise-induced increases. Our results illustrate a possible mechanism by which insulin-like growth factor-I interfaces

  15. SOX11 MODULATES BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR EXPRESSION IN AN EXON PROMOTER-SPECIFIC MANNER

    PubMed Central

    Salerno, Kathleen M.; Jing, Xiaotang; Diges, Charlotte M.; Cornuet, Pamela K.; Glorioso, Joseph C.; Albers, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    Sox11 is a high mobility group (HMG) containing transcription factor that is significantly elevated in peripheral neurons in response to nerve injury. In vitro and in vivo studies support a central role for Sox11 in adult neuron growth and survival following injury. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a pleiotropic growth factor that has effects on neuronal survival, differentiation, synaptic plasticity and regeneration. BDNF transcription is elevated in the DRG following nerve injury in parallel with Sox11 allowing for the possible regulation by Sox11. To begin to assess the possible influence of Sox11 we used reverse transcriptase PCR assays to determine the relative expression of the nine (I-IXa) noncoding exons and one coding exon (exon IX) of the BDNF gene after sciatic nerve axotomy in the mouse. Exons with upstream promoter regions containing the Sox binding motif 5′-AACAAAG-3′ (I, IV, VII and VIII) were increased at 1d or 3d following axotomy. Exons 1 and IV showed the greatest increase and only exon 1 remained elevated at 3d. Luciferase assays showed that Sox11 could activate the most highly regulated exons, I and IV, and that this activation was reduced by mutation of putative Sox binding sites. Exon expression in injured DRG neurons had some overlap with Neuro2a cells that overexpress Sox11, showing elevation in exon IV and VII transcripts. These findings indicate cell type and contextual specificity of Sox11 in modulation of BDNF transcription. PMID:22331573

  16. Coexpression of neurotrophic growth factors and their receptors in human facial motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, J M; Brackmann, D E; Hitselberger, W E; Linthicum, F H; Lim, D J

    1999-09-01

    Neuronal development and maintenance of facial motor neurons is believed to be regulated by neurotrophic growth factors. Using celloidin-embedded sections, we evaluated immunoreactivity of 11 neurotrophic factors and their receptors in facial nuclei of human brain stems (4 normal cases, and 1 from a patient with facial palsy and synkinesis). In the normal subjects, positive immunoreactivity of the growth factor neurotrophin-4 and acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) was observed in facial motor neurons, as was positive immunoreactivity against ret, the receptor shared by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and neurturin. Immunoreactivity was moderate for the receptor trkB and strong for trkC. In the case of partial facial palsy, surviving cells failed to show immunoreactivity against neurotrophins. However, immunoreactivity of aFGF was up-regulated in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells in this patient. Results suggest that these trophic growth factors and their receptors may protect facial neurons from secondary degeneration and promote regrowth of the facial nerve after axotomy or injury. PMID:10527284

  17. Ectopic Muscle Expression of Neurotrophic Factors Improves Recovery After Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Glat, Micaela Johanna; Benninger, Felix; Barhum, Yael; Ben-Zur, Tali; Kogan, Elena; Steiner, Israel; Yaffe, David; Offen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Sciatic nerve damage is a common medical problem. The main causes include direct trauma, prolonged external nerve compression, and pressure from disk herniation. Possible complications include leg numbness and the loss of motor control. In mild cases, conservative treatment is feasible. However, following severe injury, recovery may not be possible. Neuronal regeneration, survival, and maintenance can be achieved by neurotrophic factors (NTFs). In this study, we examined the potency of combining brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) on the recovery of motor neuron function after crush injury of the sciatic nerve. We show that combined NTF application increases the survival of motor neurons exposed to a hypoxic environment. The ectopic expression of NTFs in the injured muscle improves the recovery of the sciatic nerve after crush injury. A significantly faster recovery of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude and conduction velocity is observed after muscle injections of viral vectors expressing a mixture of the four NTF genes. Our findings suggest a rationale for using genetic treatment with a combination of NTF-expressing vectors, as a potential therapeutic approach for severe peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26385386

  18. Panax notoginseng saponins improve recovery after spinal cord transection by upregulating neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Li, Yu; Li, Xuan-Peng; Li, Yang

    2015-08-01

    Saponins extracted from Panax notoginseng are neuroprotective, but the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. In the present study, we established a rat model of thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection, and injected Panax notoginseng saponins (100 mg/kg) or saline 30 minutes after injury. Locomotor functions were assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale from 1 to 30 days after injury, and immunohistochemistry was carried out in the ventral horn of the spinal cord at 1 and 7 days to determine expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Our results show that at 7-30 days post injury, the BBB score was higher in rats treated with Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. Furthermore, at 7 days, more NGF- and BDNF-immunoreactive neurons were observed in the ventral horn of the spinal cord of rats that had received Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. These results indicate that Panax notoginseng saponins caused an upregulation of NGF and BDNF in rats with spinal cord transection, and improved hindlimb motor function. PMID:26487862

  19. Panax notoginseng saponins improve recovery after spinal cord transection by upregulating neurotrophic factors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Li, Yu; Li, Xuan-peng; Li, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Saponins extracted from Panax notoginseng are neuroprotective, but the mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. In the present study, we established a rat model of thoracic (T10) spinal cord transection, and injected Panax notoginseng saponins (100 mg/kg) or saline 30 minutes after injury. Locomotor functions were assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) scale from 1 to 30 days after injury, and immunohistochemistry was carried out in the ventral horn of the spinal cord at 1 and 7 days to determine expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Our results show that at 7–30 days post injury, the BBB score was higher in rats treated with Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. Furthermore, at 7 days, more NGF- and BDNF-immunoreactive neurons were observed in the ventral horn of the spinal cord of rats that had received Panax notoginseng saponins than in those that received saline. These results indicate that Panax notoginseng saponins caused an upregulation of NGF and BDNF in rats with spinal cord transection, and improved hindlimb motor function. PMID:26487862

  20. Shuganjieyu capsule increases neurotrophic factor expression in a rat model of depression

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jinhua; Zhang, Yingjin; Wu, Renrong; Zheng, Yingjun; Zhang, Xianghui; Yang, Mei; Zhao, Jingping; Liu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Shuganjieyu capsule has been approved for clinical treatment by the State Food and Drug Ad-ministration of China since 2008. In the clinic, Shuganjieyu capsule is often used to treat mild to moderate depression. In the rat model of depression established in this study, Shuganjieyu capsule was administered intragastrically daily before stress. Behavioral results confirmed that depressive symptoms lessened after treatment with high-dose (150 mg/kg) Shuganjieyu capsule. Immunohistochemistry results showed that high-dose Shuganjieyu capsule significantly increased phosphorylation levels of phosphorylation cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampal CA3 area. Overall, our results suggest that in rats, Shuganjieyu capsule effec-tively reverses depressive-like behaviors by increasing expression levels of neurotrophic factors in the brain. PMID:25206843

  1. Deletion of the Neurotrophic Factor neudesin Prevents Diet-induced Obesity by Increased Sympathetic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Hiroya; Konishi, Morichika; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Kashio, Atsuki; Mochiyama, Takayuki; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kimura, Ikuo; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Some neurotrophic factors, which are potent regulators of neuronal development and function, have recently been implicated in the control of energy balance by increasing energy expenditure. We previously identified neudesin as a novel neurotrophic factor with potential roles in the central nervous system. Although neudesin is also expressed in various peripheral tissues including adipose tissue, its physiological roles have not yet been elucidated. We found that neudesin knockout (KO) mice were resistant to high-fat diet-induced obesity and obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions. neudesin KO mice exhibited increased energy expenditure due to increased sympathetic activity, which resulted in increased heat production and fatty acid oxidation in brown adipose tissue and enhanced lipolysis in white adipose tissue. Thus, neudesin, which may be a negative regulator of sympathetic activity, could represent a novel regulator of the development of obesity and obesity-related metabolic dysfunctions. PMID:25955136

  2. Acute homocysteine administration impairs memory consolidation on inhibitory avoidance task and decreases hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor immunocontent: prevention by folic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Matté, C; Pereira, L O; Dos Santos, T M; Mackedanz, V; Cunha, A A; Netto, C A; Wyse, A T S

    2009-11-10

    In the present study, we first investigated the effect of single homocysteine administration on consolidation of short- and long-term memories of inhibitory avoidance task in Wistar rats. We also measured brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in the hippocampus and parietal cortex of rats. The influence of pretreatment with folic acid on behavioral and biochemical effects elicited by homocysteine was also studied. Wistar rats were subjected to a folic acid or saline pretreatment from their 22(nd) to 28(th) day of life; 12 h later they were submitted to a single administration of homocysteine or saline. For motor activity and memory evaluation we performed open-field and inhibitory avoidance tasks. Hippocampus and parietal cortex were obtained for brain-derived neurotrophic factor immunocontent determination. Results showed that homocysteine impaired short- and long-term memories and reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in the hippocampus. Pretreatment with folic acid prevented both the memory deficit and the reduction in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor immunocontent induced by homocysteine injection. Further studies are required to determine the entire mechanism by which folic acid acts and its potential therapeutic use for memory impairment prevention in homocystinuric patients.

  3. CHANGES IN PLASMA MULLERIAN INHIBITING SUBSTANCE AND BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR AFTER CHEMOTHERAPY IN PREMENOPAUSAL WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Muhammad Faisal; Merhi, Zaher O; Ahmed, Safaa; Kuzbari, Oumar; Seifer, David B.; Minkoff, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Eight premenopausal women with cancer had blood drawn for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Mullerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS) before and three months after receiving chemotherapy. Unlike MIS, BDNF levels were not reduced following chemotherapy. PMID:21075370

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and its receptors in Bergmann glia cells.

    PubMed

    Poblete-Naredo, Irais; Guillem, Alain M; Juárez, Claudia; Zepeda, Rossana C; Ramírez, Leticia; Caba, Mario; Hernández-Kelly, Luisa C; Aguilera, José; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2011-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is an abundant and widely distributed neurotrophin expressed in the Central Nervous System. It is critically involved in neuronal differentiation and survival. The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and that of its catalytic active cognate receptor (TrkB) has been extensively studied in neuronal cells but their expression and function in glial cells is still controversial. Despite of this fact, brain-derived neurotrophic factor is released from astrocytes upon glutamate stimulation. A suitable model to study glia/neuronal interactions, in the context of glutamatergic synapses, is the well-characterized culture of chick cerebellar Bergmann glia cells. Using, this system, we show here that BDNF and its functional receptor are present in Bergmann glia and that BDNF stimulation is linked to the activation of the phosphatidyl-inositol 3 kinase/protein kinase C/mitogen-activated protein kinase/Activator Protein-1 signaling pathway. Accordingly, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) experiments predicted the expression of full-length and truncated TrkB isoforms. Our results suggest that Bergmann glia cells are able to express and respond to BDNF stimulation favoring the notion of their pivotal role in neuroprotection.

  5. The expanding universe of neurotrophic factors: therapeutic potential in aging and age-associated disorders.

    PubMed

    Lanni, C; Stanga, S; Racchi, M; Govoni, S

    2010-01-01

    Multiple molecular, cellular, structural and functional changes occur in the brain during aging. Neural cells may respond to these changes adaptively by employing multiple mechanisms in order to maintain the integrity of nerve cell circuits and to facilitate responses to environmental demands. Otherwise, they may succumb to neurodegenerative cascades that result in disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. An important role in this balancement is played by neurotrophic factors, which are central to many aspects of nervous system function since they regulate the development, maintenance and survival of neurons and neuron-supporting cells such as glia and oligodendrocytes. A vast amount of evidence indicates that alterations in levels of neurotrophic factors or their receptors can lead to neuronal death and contribute to aging as well as to the pathogenesis of diseases of abnormal trophic support (such as neurodegenerative diseases and depression) and diseases of abnormal excitability (such as epilepsy and central pain sensitization). Cellular and molecular mechanisms by which neurotrophic factors may influence cell survival and excitability are also critically examined to provide novel concepts and targets for the treatment of physiological changes bearing detrimental functional alterations and of different diseases affecting the central nervous system during aging.

  6. Effect of childhood maltreatment and brain-derived neurotrophic factor on brain morphology

    PubMed Central

    Schmaal, Lianne; Jansen, Rick; Milaneschi, Yuri; Opmeer, Esther M.; Elzinga, Bernet M.; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Veltman, Dick J.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood maltreatment (CM) has been associated with altered brain morphology, which may partly be due to a direct impact on neural growth, e.g. through the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pathway. Findings on CM, BDNF and brain volume are inconsistent and have never accounted for the entire BDNF pathway. We examined the effects of CM, BDNF (genotype, gene expression and protein level) and their interactions on hippocampus, amygdala and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) morphology. Data were collected from patients with depression and/or an anxiety disorder and healthy subjects within the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) (N = 289). CM was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Interview. BDNF Val66Met genotype, gene expression and serum protein levels were determined in blood and T1 MRI scans were acquired at 3T. Regional brain morphology was assessed using FreeSurfer. Covariate-adjusted linear regression analyses were performed. Amygdala volume was lower in maltreated individuals. This was more pronounced in maltreated met-allele carriers. The expected positive relationship between BDNF gene expression and volume of the amygdala is attenuated in maltreated subjects. Finally, decreased cortical thickness of the ACC was identified in maltreated subjects with the val/val genotype. CM was associated with altered brain morphology, partly in interaction with multiple levels of the BNDF pathway. Our results suggest that CM has different effects on brain morphology in met-carriers and val-homozygotes and that CM may disrupt the neuroprotective effect of BDNF. PMID:27405617

  7. Increased circulating concentrations of mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor in children with type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Emilia; Härkönen, Taina; Sainio, Markus T.; Ustav, Mart; Toots, Urve; Urtti, Arto; Yliperttula, Marjo; Lindahl, Maria; Knip, Mikael; Saarma, Mart; Lindholm, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) was recently shown to be essential for the survival and proliferation of pancreatic β-cells in mice, where deletion of MANF resulted in diabetes. The current study aimed at determining whether the concentration of circulating MANF is associated with the clinical manifestation of human type 1 diabetes (T1D). MANF expression in T1D or MANF levels in serum have not been previously studied. We developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for MANF and measured serum MANF concentrations from 186 newly diagnosed children and adolescents and 20 adults with longer-term T1D alongside with age-matched controls. In healthy controls the mean serum MANF concentration was 7.0 ng/ml. High MANF concentrations were found in children 1–9 years of age close to the diagnosis of T1D. The increased MANF concentrations were not associated with diabetes-predictive autoantibodies and autoantibodies against MANF were extremely rare. Patients with conspicuously high MANF serum concentrations had lower C-peptide levels compared to patients with moderate MANF concentrations. Our data indicate that increased MANF concentrations in serum are associated with the clinical manifestation of T1D in children, but the exact mechanism behind the increase remains elusive. PMID:27356471

  8. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    PubMed

    Scassellati, Catia; Zanardini, Roberta; Tiberti, Alessandra; Pezzani, Marco; Valenti, Vera; Effedri, Paola; Filippini, Elena; Conte, Stefano; Ottolini, Alberto; Gennarelli, Massimo; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella

    2014-03-01

    It has been proposed that the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may be involved in attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) etiopathogenesis. Alterations in BDNF serum levels have been observed in childhood/adulthood neurodevelopmental pathologies, but no evidence is available for BDNF serum concentrations in ADHD. The study includes 45 drug-naïve ADHD children and 45 age-sex matched healthy subjects. Concentration of serum BDNF was determined by the ELISA method. BDNF serum levels in patients with ADHD were not different from those of controls (mean ± SD; ADHD: 39.33 ± 10.41 ng/ml; controls: 38.82 ± 8.29 ng/ml, t = -0.26, p = 0.80). Our findings indicate no alteration of serum BDNF levels in untreated patients with ADHD. A further stratification for cognitive, neuropsychological and psychopathological assessment in a larger sample could be useful to clarify the role of BDNF in the endophenotype characterization of ADHD.

  9. NG2 expression in microglial cells affects the expression of neurotrophic and proinflammatory factors by regulating FAK phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lie; Su, Qing; Jie, Xiang; Liu, Antang; Wang, Hui; He, Beiping; Jiang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Neural/glial antigen 2 (NG2), a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, is significantly upregulated in a subset of glial cells in the facial motor nucleus (FMN) following CNS injury. NG2 is reported to promote the resulting inflammatory reaction, however, the mechanism by which NG2 mediates these effects is yet to be determined. In this study, we examined the changes in NG2 expressing microglial cells in the FMN in response to facial nerve axotomy (FNA) in mice. Our findings indicated that NG2 expression was progressively induced and upregulated specifically in the ipsilateral facial nucleus following FNA. To further investigate the effects of NG2 expression, in vivo studies in NG2-knockout mice and in vitro studies in rat microglial cells transfected with NG2 shRNAs were performed. Abolition of NG2 expression both in vitro and in vivo resulted in increased expression of neurotrophic factors (nerve growth factor and glial derived neurotrophic factor), decreased expression of inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) and decreased apoptosis in the ipsilateral facial nucleus in response to FNA. Furthermore, we demonstrated the role of FAK in these NG2-induced effects. Taken together, our findings suggest that NG2 expression mediates inflammatory reactions and neurodegeneration in microglial cells in response to CNS injury, potentially by regulating FAK phosphorylation. PMID:27306838

  10. PERIPHERAL NERVE REGENERATION: CELL THERAPY AND NEUROTROPHIC FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Sebben, Alessandra Deise; Lichtenfels, Martina; da Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve trauma results in functional loss in the innervated organ, and recovery without surgical intervention is rare. Many surgical techniques can be used for nerve repair. Among these, the tubulization technique can be highlighted: this allows regenerative factors to be introduced into the chamber. Cell therapy and tissue engineering have arisen as an alternative for stimulating and aiding peripheral nerve regeneration. Therefore, the aim of this review was to provide a survey and analysis on the results from experimental and clinical studies that used cell therapy and tissue engineering as tools for optimizing the regeneration process. The articles used came from the LILACS, Medline and SciELO scientific databases. Articles on the use of stem cells, Schwann cells, growth factors, collagen, laminin and platelet-rich plasma for peripheral nerve repair were summarized over the course of the review. Based on these studies, it could be concluded that the use of stem cells derived from different sources presents promising results relating to nerve regeneration, because these cells have a capacity for neuronal differentiation, thus demonstrating effective functional results. The use of tubes containing bioactive elements with controlled release also optimizes the nerve repair, thus promoting greater myelination and axonal growth of peripheral nerves. Another promising treatment is the use of platelet-rich plasma, which not only releases growth factors that are important in nerve repair, but also serves as a carrier for exogenous factors, thereby stimulating the proliferation of specific cells for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:27027067

  11. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor decreased in chronic ketamine abusers

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xiaoyin; Ding, Yi; Xu, Ke; He, Hongbo; Zhang, Minling; Wang, Daping; Deng, Xuefeng; Zhang, Xifan; Zhou, Chao; Liu, Yuping; Ning, Yuping; Fan, Ni

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study investigated the serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in a group of chronic ketamine abusers in comparison to healthy controls. The correlations between the serum BDNF, NGF level with the subjects’ demographic, pattern of ketamine use were also examined. Methods 93 subjects who met the criteria of ketamine dependence and 39 healthy subjects were recruited. Serum BDNF and NGF levels were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Psychopathological symptoms were assessed using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Results Both serum levels of BDNF and NGF were significant lower in the ketamine users compared to the healthy control subjects (9.50 ± 6.68 versus 14.37 ± 6.07 ng/ml, p = 0.019 for BDNF; 1.93 ± 0.80 versus 2.60 ± 1.07 ng/ml, p = 0.011 for NGF). BDNF level was negatively associated with current frequency of ketamine use (r = −0.209, p = 0.045). Conclusions Both BDNF and NGF serum concentrations were significantly lower among chronic ketamine users than among health controls. PMID:25064020

  12. Identification of Pro- and Mature Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor in Human Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, AL; Ozdener, H; Utermohlen, V

    2009-01-01

    Objective Growth factors, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are polypeptides that are involved in the maintenance, survival, and death of central and peripheral cells. Numerous growth factors have been identified in saliva and are thought to promote wound healing and maintenance of the oral epithelium. The aim of this study was to determine if BDNF is also found in human saliva. Methods Whole, unstimulated saliva samples (n=30) were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot using an anti-human BDNF antibody. Proteolytic cleavage products were similarly assessed following the incubation of pooled saliva with N-glycanase F and plasmin. Subjects genotyped for the BDNF Val66Met single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Results These experiments revealed the presence of immunoreactive bands at 14, 32 and 34 kD, corresponding to mature (mBDNF) and proBDNF, as well as a truncated pro-form at 24 kD. Not every sample contained all forms of BDNF. Treatment with N-glycanase and plasmin reduced the size of the higher molecular weight bands, confirming the glycosylated pro-form of BDNF. mBDNF was detected significantly less often in subjects with the Val66Met SNP, compared to those without the polymorphism (X2 = 4.05; P<0.05). Conclusions While the function of salivary BDNF still requires elucidation, these findings suggest that it may be possible to use saliva in lieu of blood in future studies of BDNF and the Val66Met polymorphism. PMID:19467646

  13. Neurotrophic factor small-molecule mimetics mediated neuroregeneration and synaptic repair: emerging therapeutic modality for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kazim, Syed Faraz; Iqbal, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an incurable and debilitating chronic progressive neurodegenerative disorder which is the leading cause of dementia worldwide. AD is a heterogeneous and multifactorial disorder, histopathologically characterized by the presence of amyloid β (Aβ) plaques and neurofibrillary tangles composed of Aβ peptides and abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau protein, respectively. Independent of the various etiopathogenic mechanisms, neurodegeneration is a final common outcome of AD neuropathology. Synaptic loss is a better correlate of cognitive impairment in AD than Aβ or tau pathologies. Thus a highly promising therapeutic strategy for AD is to shift the balance from neurodegeneration to neuroregeneration and synaptic repair. Neurotrophic factors, by virtue of their neurogenic and neurotrophic activities, have potential for the treatment of AD. However, the clinical therapeutic usage of recombinant neurotrophic factors is limited because of the insurmountable hurdles of unfavorable pharmacokinetic properties, poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, and severe adverse effects. Neurotrophic factor small-molecule mimetics, in this context, represent a potential strategy to overcome these short comings, and have shown promise in preclinical studies. Neurotrophic factor small-molecule mimetics have been the focus of intense research in recent years for AD drug development. Here, we review the relevant literature regarding the therapeutic beneficial effect of neurotrophic factors in AD, and then discuss the recent status of research regarding the neurotrophic factor small-molecule mimetics as therapeutic candidates for AD. Lastly, we summarize the preclinical studies with a ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) small-molecule peptide mimetic, Peptide 021 (P021). P021 is a neurogenic and neurotrophic compound which enhances dentate gyrus neurogenesis and memory processes via inhibiting leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) signaling pathway and increasing

  14. Time Course of Behavioral Alteration and mRNA Levels of Neurotrophic Factor Following Stress Exposure in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa, Naoya; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Ogawa, Mami; Matsuo, Yumi; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi

    2015-08-01

    Stress is known to affect neurotrophic factor expression, which induces depression-like behavior. However, whether there are time-dependent changes in neurotrophic factor mRNA expression following stress remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether chronic stress exposure induces long-term changes in depression-related behavior, serum corticosterone, and hippocampal proliferation as well as neurotrophic factor family mRNA levels, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), in the mouse hippocampus. The mRNA level of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, NT-3, and CNTF) was measured using the real-time PCR. The serum corticosterone level was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and, for each subject, the hippocampal proliferation was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining. Mice exhibited depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test (FST) and decreased BDNF mRNA and hippocampal proliferation in the middle of the stress exposure. After 15 days of stress exposure, we observed increased immobility in the FST, serum corticosterone levels, and BDNF mRNA levels and degenerated hippocampal proliferation, maintained for at least 2 weeks. Anhedonia-like behavior in the sucrose preference test and NGF mRNA levels were decreased following 15 days of stress. NGF mRNA levels were significantly higher 1 week after stress exposure. The current data demonstrate that chronic stress exposure induces prolonged BDNF and NGF mRNA changes and increases corticosterone levels and depression-like behavior in the FST, but does not alter other neurotrophic factors or performance in the sucrose preference test.

  15. Localized delivery of fibroblast growth factor-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor reduces spontaneous seizures in an epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, Beatrice; Marconi, Peggy; Zucchini, Silvia; Berto, Elena; Binaschi, Anna; Bozac, Aleksandra; Buzzi, Andrea; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Magri, Eros; Navarro Mora, Graciela; Rodi, Donata; Su, Tao; Volpi, Ilaria; Zanetti, Lara; Marzola, Andrea; Manservigi, Roberto; Fabene, Paolo F; Simonato, Michele

    2009-04-28

    A loss of neurons is observed in the hippocampus of many patients with epilepsies of temporal lobe origin. It has been hypothesized that damage limitation or repair, for example using neurotrophic factors (NTFs), may prevent the transformation of a normal tissue into epileptic (epileptogenesis). Here, we used viral vectors to locally supplement two NTFs, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), when epileptogenic damage was already in place. These vectors were first characterized in vitro, where they increased proliferation of neural progenitors and favored their differentiation into neurons, and they were then tested in a model of status epilepticus-induced neurodegeneration and epileptogenesis. When injected in a lesioned hippocampus, FGF-2/BDNF expressing vectors increased neuronogenesis, embanked neuronal damage, and reduced epileptogenesis. It is concluded that reduction of damage reduces epileptogenesis and that supplementing specific NTFs in lesion areas represents a new approach to the therapy of neuronal damage and of its consequences.

  16. Neurotransmitters as neurotrophic factors: a new set of functions.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J P

    1992-01-01

    At the start of this review, factors were deemed trophic if they stimulated mitosis, permitted neural cell survival, promoted neurite sprouting and growth cone motility, or turned on a specific neuronal phenotype. The in vitro evidence from cell cultures is overwhelming that both neurotransmitters and neuropeptides can have such actions. Furthermore, the same chemical can exert several of these effects, either on the same or on different cell populations. Perhaps the most striking example is that of VIP, which can stimulate not only mitosis, but also survival and neurite sprouting of sympathetic ganglion neuroblasts (Pincus et al., 1990a,b). The in vivo data to support the in vitro experiments are starting to appear. A role for VIP in neurodevelopment is supported by in vivo studies that show behavioral deficits produced in neonatal rats by treatment with a VIP antagonist (Hill et al., 1991). The work of Shatz' laboratory (Chun et al., 1987; Ghosh et al., 1990) suggests that neuropeptide-containing neurons, transiently present, serve as guideposts for thalamocortical axons coming in to innervate specific cortical areas. Along similar lines, Wolff et al. (1979) demonstrated gamma-aminobutyric acid-accumulating glia in embryonic cortex that appeared to form axoglial synapses and suggested the possibility that gamma-aminobutyric acid released from the glia might play a role in synaptogenesis by increasing the number of postsynaptic thickenings. Meshul et al. (1987) have provided evidence that astrocytes can regulate synaptic density in the developing cerebellum. The work of Zagon and McLaughlin (1986a,b, 1987) has shown that naltrexone, an antagonist of the endogenous opioid peptides, affects both cell number and neuronal sprouting. Lauder's laboratory (Lauder et al., 1982) has shown a role for 5-HT in regulation of the proliferation of numerous cell types. These studies illustrate another important point, that neurotransmitters and neuropeptides function in

  17. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway, life stress, and chronic multi-site musculoskeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Milaneschi, Yuri; Jansen, Rick; Elzinga, Bernet M; Dekker, Joost; Penninx, Brenda WJH

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) disturbances and life stress, both independently and in interaction, have been hypothesized to induce chronic pain. We examined whether (a) the BDNF pathway (val66met genotype, gene expression, and serum levels), (b) early and recent life stress, and (c) their interaction are associated with the presence and severity of chronic multi-site musculoskeletal pain. Methods Cross-sectional data are from 1646 subjects of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. The presence and severity of chronic multi-site musculoskeletal pain were determined using the Chronic Pain Grade (CPG) questionnaire. The BDNF val66met polymorphism, BDNF gene expression, and BDNF serum levels were measured. Early life stress before the age of 16 was assessed by calculating a childhood trauma index using the Childhood Trauma Interview. Recent life stress was assessed as the number of recent adverse life events using the List of Threatening Events Questionnaire. Results Compared to val66val, BDNF met carriers more often had chronic pain, whereas no differences were found for BDNF gene expression and serum levels. Higher levels of early and recent stress were both associated with the presence and severity of chronic pain (p < 0.001). No interaction effect was found for the BDNF pathway with life stress in the associations with chronic pain presence and severity. Conclusions This study suggests that the BDNF gene marks vulnerability for chronic pain. Although life stress did not alter the impact of BDNF on chronic pain, it seems an independent factor in the onset and persistence of chronic pain. PMID:27145806

  18. Radix Bupleuri ameliorates depression by increasing nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Feng, Qing; Xiao, Yong; Li, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chinese herb Radix Bupleuri has been regarded effective to improve treatment of depression, but the molecular mechanism remains unknown. Low levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increase the likelihood of developing the depression. Therefore, we want to know whether Radix Bupleuri affects the levels of these factors. Methods: A total 160 hemodialysis patients were diagnosed with depression and randomly assigned to two groups: Radix Bupleuri group (received 1 g root power of Radix Bupleuri in a capsule daily Radix Bupleuri) and control group (receive placebo). Results: After three-month follow-up, the patients who received Radix Bupleuri had greater improvement in depression symptoms, anxiety symptoms and general functioning via controls after three-month follow-up (P < 0.05). Serum NGF levels were significantly higher in subjects accepted Radix Bupleuris (178.64 ± 52.18 pg/mL) when compared to a control (103.54 ± 31.23 pg/ml) (P < 0.01). Similarly, serum BDNF levels were significantly higher in subjects accepted Radix Bupleuris (1635.26 ± 121.66 pg/ml) when compared to a control (516.38 ± 44.89 pg/ml) (P < 0.01). The serum levels of NGF and BDNF were negatively related with Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and positively related with scores of RAND-36 item Health Survey (RAND-36) (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Thus, Radix Bupleuri ameliorates the patients with depression by increasing serum levels of NGF and BDNF. Radix Bupleuri should be developed a new drug for the therapy of depression. PMID:26309578

  19. Up-regulation of neurotrophic factors by cinnamon and its metabolite sodium benzoate: therapeutic implications for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Jana, Arundhati; Modi, Khushbu K; Roy, Avik; Anderson, John A; van Breemen, Richard B; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-06-01

    This study underlines the importance of cinnamon, a widely-used food spice and flavoring material, and its metabolite sodium benzoate (NaB), a widely-used food preservative and a FDA-approved drug against urea cycle disorders in humans, in increasing the levels of neurotrophic factors [e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3)] in the CNS. NaB, but not sodium formate (NaFO), dose-dependently induced the expression of BDNF and NT-3 in primary human neurons and astrocytes. Interestingly, oral administration of ground cinnamon increased the level of NaB in serum and brain and upregulated the levels of these neurotrophic factors in vivo in mouse CNS. Accordingly, oral feeding of NaB, but not NaFO, also increased the level of these neurotrophic factors in vivo in the CNS of mice. NaB induced the activation of protein kinase A (PKA), but not protein kinase C (PKC), and H-89, an inhibitor of PKA, abrogated NaB-induced increase in neurotrophic factors. Furthermore, activation of cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein, but not NF-κB, by NaB, abrogation of NaB-induced expression of neurotrophic factors by siRNA knockdown of CREB and the recruitment of CREB and CREB-binding protein to the BDNF promoter by NaB suggest that NaB exerts its neurotrophic effect through the activation of CREB. Accordingly, cinnamon feeding also increased the activity of PKA and the level of phospho-CREB in vivo in the CNS. These results highlight a novel neutrophic property of cinnamon and its metabolite NaB via PKA - CREB pathway, which may be of benefit for various neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Comparing interval and continuous exercise training regimens on neurotrophic factors in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Afzalpour, Mohammad Esmaiel; Chadorneshin, Hossein Taheri; Foadoddini, Mohsen; Eivari, Hossein Abtahi

    2015-08-01

    The research literature suggests that oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory factors influence neurotrophins in vitro. However, there is insufficient information about their effects on exercise training conditions, especially during high intensity trainings. This study aimed to compare the effects of 6weeks of high intensity interval and continuous training regimens on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the rat brain. For this purpose, twenty-four Albino Wistar rats were divided into sedentary control (SC), high intensity interval training (HIIT), and continuous training (CT) groups. Both HIIT and CT regimens increased H2O2 level and TNF-α concentration in the brain, and the alterations made were greater following HIIT than CT. In addition, both HIIT and CT regimens increased BDNF and GDNF concentrations significantly, with a higher elevation following HIIT than CT. Furthermore, H2O2 level and TNF-α concentration correlated positively with both BDNF and GDNF concentrations. Generally, high intensity interval training regimen, rather than continuous training regimen, is highly potential to improve BDNF and GDNF through a greater increase in H2O2 and TNF-α as oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory factors.

  1. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) enhances sympathetic neurite growth in rat hearts at early developmental stages.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Keiko; Lee, Jong-Kook; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Opthof, Tobias; Fu, Xianming; Kodama, Itsuo

    2010-12-01

    Molecular signaling of sympathetic innervation of myocardium is an unresolved issue. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neurotrophic factors on sympathetic neurite growth towards cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes (CMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs) were isolated from neonatal rat hearts and superior cervical ganglia, and were co-cultured, either in a random or localized way. Neurite growth from SNs toward CMs was assessed by immunohistochemistry for neurofilament M and α-actinin in response to neurotrophic factors-nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and a chemical repellent, semaphorin 3A. As a result, GDNF as well as NGF and BDNF stimulated neurite growth. GDNF enhanced neurite outgrowth even under the NGF-depleted culture condition, excluding an indirect effect of GDNF via NGF. Quantification of mRNA and protein by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry at different developmental stages revealed that GDNF is abundantly expressed in the hearts of embryos and neonates, but not in adult hearts. GDNF plays an important role in inducing cardiac sympathetic innervation at the early developmental stages. A possible role in (re)innervation of injured or transplanted or cultured and transplanted myocardium may deserve investigation.

  2. Analysis of Neurotrophic Factors in Limb and Extraocular Muscles of Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, Vahid M.; Lindquist, Susanne; Kolan, Shrikant Shantilal; Brännström, Thomas; Liu, Jing-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is currently an incurable fatal motor neuron syndrome characterized by progressive weakness, muscle wasting and death ensuing 3–5 years after diagnosis. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) are known to be important in both nervous system development and maintenance. However, the attempt to translate the potential of NTFs into the therapeutic options remains limited despite substantial number of approaches, which have been tested clinically. Using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) technique, the present study investigated mRNA expression of four different NTFs: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in limb muscles and extraocular muscles (EOMs) from SOD1G93A transgenic mice at early and terminal stages of ALS. General morphological examination revealed that muscle fibres were well preserved in both limb muscles and EOMs in early stage ALS mice. However, in terminal ALS mice, most muscle fibres were either atrophied or hypertrophied in limb muscles but unaffected in EOMs. qRT-PCR analysis showed that in early stage ALS mice, NT-4 was significantly down-regulated in limb muscles whereas NT-3 and GDNF were markedly up-regulated in EOMs. In terminal ALS mice, only GDNF was significantly up-regulated in limb muscles. We concluded that the early down-regulation of NT-4 in limb muscles is closely associated with muscle dystrophy and dysfunction at late stage, whereas the early up-regulations of GDNF and NT-3 in EOMs are closely associated with the relatively well-preserved muscle morphology at late stage. Collectively, the data suggested that comparing NTFs expression between limb muscles and EOMs from different stages of ALS animal models is a useful method in revealing the patho-physiology and progression of ALS, and eventually rescuing motor neuron in ALS patients. PMID:25334047

  3. Analysis of neurotrophic factors in limb and extraocular muscles of mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Harandi, Vahid M; Lindquist, Susanne; Kolan, Shrikant Shantilal; Brännström, Thomas; Liu, Jing-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is currently an incurable fatal motor neuron syndrome characterized by progressive weakness, muscle wasting and death ensuing 3-5 years after diagnosis. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) are known to be important in both nervous system development and maintenance. However, the attempt to translate the potential of NTFs into the therapeutic options remains limited despite substantial number of approaches, which have been tested clinically. Using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) technique, the present study investigated mRNA expression of four different NTFs: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in limb muscles and extraocular muscles (EOMs) from SOD1G93A transgenic mice at early and terminal stages of ALS. General morphological examination revealed that muscle fibres were well preserved in both limb muscles and EOMs in early stage ALS mice. However, in terminal ALS mice, most muscle fibres were either atrophied or hypertrophied in limb muscles but unaffected in EOMs. qRT-PCR analysis showed that in early stage ALS mice, NT-4 was significantly down-regulated in limb muscles whereas NT-3 and GDNF were markedly up-regulated in EOMs. In terminal ALS mice, only GDNF was significantly up-regulated in limb muscles. We concluded that the early down-regulation of NT-4 in limb muscles is closely associated with muscle dystrophy and dysfunction at late stage, whereas the early up-regulations of GDNF and NT-3 in EOMs are closely associated with the relatively well-preserved muscle morphology at late stage. Collectively, the data suggested that comparing NTFs expression between limb muscles and EOMs from different stages of ALS animal models is a useful method in revealing the patho-physiology and progression of ALS, and eventually rescuing motor neuron in ALS patients. PMID:25334047

  4. The skinny on brain-derived neurotrophic factor: evidence from animal models to GWAS.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, Emily G; Xu, Baoji

    2013-11-01

    Obesity and its sequelae constitute a major international healthcare problem. The obesity epidemic is due in part to higher calorie diets and reduced exercise over the past 30 years; however, increasing evidence has established genetic regulation of body weight as a major contributor to obesity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates development and plasticity of the central nervous system, and recent work has established a clear role for signaling through BDNF and its receptor TrkB in the control of body weight. Here we review research findings from animal models and human populations indicating that BDNF is a negative regulator of appetitive behavior and body weight.

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene-modified bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    HAN, ZHONG-MIN; HUANG, HE-MEI; WANG, FEI-FEI

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) on the differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into neuron-like cells. Lentiviral vectors carrying the hBDNF gene were used to modify the bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The rat BMSCs were isolated, cultured and identified. A lentivirus bearing hBDNF and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) genes was subcultured and used to infect the SD rat BMSCs. The expression of eGFP was observed under a fluorescence microscope to determine the infection rate and growth of the transfected cells. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) was used to detect the proliferation rate of cells following transfection. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis were used to detect the expression levels of hBDNF. Differentiation of neuron-like cells was induced in vitro and the differentiation rate of the induced neural-like cells was compared with that in control groups and analyzed statistically. In the cultured cells, flow cytometry demonstrated positive expression of cluster of differentiation (CD)90 and CD44, and negative expression of CD34 and CD45. The proliferation rate of the rat BMSCs increased following gene transfection. The expression of hBDNF-eGFP was detected in the BMSCs of the experimental group. The differentiation rate of hBDNF-modified cells into neuron-like cells in the experimental group was higher compared with that in empty plasmid and untransfected negative control groups. The difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Thus, BDNF gene transfection is able to promote the differentiation of BMSCs into neuron-like cells. BDNF may play an important role in the differentiation of MSCs into neuron-like cells. PMID:25574226

  6. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor induces cell proliferation in the mouse urogenital sinus.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Bolton, Eric C

    2015-02-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a TGFβ family member, and GDNF signals through a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-linked cell surface receptor (GFRα1) and RET receptor tyrosine kinase. GDNF signaling plays crucial roles in urogenital processes, ranging from cell fate decisions in germline progenitors to ureteric bud outgrowth and renal branching morphogenesis. Gene ablation studies in mice have revealed essential roles for GDNF signaling in urogenital development, although its role in prostate development is unclear. We investigated the functional role of GDNF signaling in the urogenital sinus (UGS) and the developing prostate of mice. GDNF, GFRα1, and RET show time-specific and cell-specific expression during prostate development in vivo. In the UGS, GDNF and GFRα1 are expressed in the urethral mesenchyme (UrM) and epithelium (UrE), whereas RET is restricted to the UrM. In each lobe of the developing prostate, GDNF and GFRα1 expression declines in the epithelium and becomes restricted to the stroma. Using a well-established organ culture system, we determined that exogenous GDNF increases proliferation of UrM and UrE cells, altering UGS morphology. With regard to mechanism, GDNF signaling in the UrM increased RET expression and phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Furthermore, inhibition of RET kinase activity or ERK kinases suppressed GDNF-induced proliferation of UrM cells but not UrE cells. We therefore propose that GDNF signaling in the UGS increases proliferation of UrM and UrE cells by different mechanisms, which are distinguished by the role of RET receptor tyrosine kinase and ERK kinase signaling, thus implicating GDNF signaling in prostate development and growth.

  7. Association analysis between polymorphisms in the conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) gene and cocaine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Lohoff, Falk W.; Bloch, Paul J.; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Berrettini, Wade H.; Pettinati, Helen M.; Dackis, Charles A.; O’Brien, Charles P.; Kampman, Kyle M.; Oslin, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Cocaine induced neuroplasticity changes in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems are thought to be involved in the pathophysiology of cocaine dependence. Since neurotrophic factors have been observed to prevent/reverse and mimic cocaine-induced neurobiological changes in the brain, related genes are plausible candidates for susceptibility to cocaine dependence. The novel conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor protein (CDNF) promotes the survival, growth, and function of dopamine-specific neurons and is expressed in brain regions that undergo cocaine-induced neuroplasticity. In this study, we hypothesize that polymorphisms in the CDNF gene (CDNF/ARMETL1) contribute to increased risk for cocaine dependence. Cocaine dependent individuals (n=351) and unaffected controls (n=257) of African descent were genotyped for four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CDNF gene (rs11259365, rs7094179, rs7900873, rs2278871). We observed no significant differences in allele, genotype, or haplotype frequencies between cases and controls for any of the tested SNPs. Our study suggests that there is no association between variants in the CDNF gene and cocaine dependence. However, additional studies using larger sample sizes, comprehensive SNP coverage, and clinically homogenous populations are necessary before confidently excluding CDNF as a significant genetic risk factor for cocaine dependence. PMID:19429035

  8. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments. PMID:27026484

  9. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments.

  10. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor influences proliferation of osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Gale, Zoe; Cooper, Paul R; Scheven, Ben A

    2012-02-01

    Little is known about the role of neurotrophic growth factors in bone metabolism. This study investigated the short-term effects of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on calvarial-derived MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. MC3T3-E1 expressed GDNF as well as its canonical receptors, GFRα1 and RET. Addition of recombinant GDNF to cultures in serum-containing medium modestly inhibited cell growth at high concentrations; however, under serum-free culture conditions GDNF dose-dependently increased cell proliferation. GDNF effects on cell growth were inversely correlated with its effect on alkaline phosphatase (AlP) activity showing a significant dose-dependent inhibition of relative AlP activity with increasing concentrations of GDNF in serum-free culture medium. Live/dead and lactate dehydrogenase assays demonstrated that GDNF did not significantly affect cell death or survival under serum-containing and serum-free conditions. The effect of GDNF on cell growth was abolished in the presence of inhibitors to GFRα1 and RET indicating that GDNF stimulated calvarial osteoblasts via its canonical receptors. Finally, this study found that GDNF synergistically increased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cell growth suggesting that GDNF interacted with TNF-α-induced signaling in osteoblastic cells. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for a direct, receptor-mediated effect of GDNF on osteoblasts highlighting a novel role for GDNF in bone physiology.

  11. Axon guidance of sympathetic neurons to cardiomyocytes by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF).

    PubMed

    Miwa, Keiko; Lee, Jong-Kook; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Opthof, Tobias; Fu, Xianming; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Jimbo, Yasuhiko; Kodama, Itsuo; Komuro, Issei

    2013-01-01

    Molecular signaling of cardiac autonomic innervation is an unresolved issue. Here, we show that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes cardiac sympathetic innervation in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ventricular myocytes (VMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs) isolated from neonatal rat ventricles and superior cervical ganglia were cultured at a close distance. Then, morphological and functional coupling between SNs and VMs was assessed in response to GDNF (10 ng/ml) or nerve growth factor (50 ng/ml). As a result, fractions of neurofilament-M-positive axons and synapsin-I-positive area over the surface of VMs were markedly increased with GDNF by 9-fold and 25-fold, respectively, compared to control without neurotrophic factors. Pre- and post-synaptic stimulation of β1-adrenergic receptors (BAR) with nicotine and noradrenaline, respectively, resulted in an increase of the spontaneous beating rate of VMs co-cultured with SNs in the presence of GDNF. GDNF overexpressing VMs by adenovirus vector (AdGDNF-VMs) attracted more axons from SNs compared with mock-transfected VMs. In vivo, axon outgrowth toward the denervated myocardium in adult rat hearts after cryoinjury was also enhanced significantly by adenovirus-mediated GDNF overexpression. GDNF acts as a potent chemoattractant for sympathetic innervation of ventricular myocytes, and is a promising molecular target for regulation of cardiac function in diseased hearts.

  12. Involvement of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Late-Life Depression

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Yogesh

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), one of the major neurotrophic factors, plays an important role in the maintenance and survival of neurons, synaptic integrity, and synaptic plasticity. Evidence suggests that BDNF is involved in major depression, such that the level of BDNF is decreased in depressed patients and that antidepressants reverse this decrease. Stress, a major factor in depression, also modulates BDNF expression. These studies have led to the proposal of the neurotrophin hypothesis of depression. Late-life depression is associated with disturbances in structural and neural plasticity as well as impairments in cognitive behavior. Stress and aging also play a crucial role in late-life depression. Many recent studies have suggested that not only expression of BDNF is decreased in the serum/plasma of patients with late-life depression, but structural abnormalities in the brain of these patients may be associated with a polymorphism in the BDNF gene, and that there is a relationship between a BDNF polymorphism and antidepressant remission rates. This review provides a critical review of the involvement of BDNF in major depression, in general, and in late-life depression, in particular. PMID:23570887

  13. Coupling energy metabolism with a mechanism to support brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Vaynman, S; Ying, Z; Wu, A; Gomez-Pinilla, F

    2006-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity and behaviors are likely dependent on the capacity of neurons to meet the energy demands imposed by neuronal activity. We used physical activity, a paradigm intrinsically associated with energy consumption/expenditure and cognitive enhancement, to study how energy metabolism interacts with the substrates for neuroplasticity. We found that in an area critical for learning and memory, the hippocampus, exercise modified aspects of energy metabolism by decreasing oxidative stress and increasing the levels of cytochrome c oxidase-II, a specific component of mitochondrial machinery. We infused 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, a modulator of energy metabolism, directly into the hippocampus during 3 days of voluntary wheel running and measured its effects on brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated synaptic plasticity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is a central player for the effects of exercise on synaptic and cognitive plasticity. We found that 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 decreased exercise-induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor but had no significant effect on neurotrophin-3 levels, thereby suggesting a level of specificity for brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hippocampus. 25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 injection also abolished the effects of exercise on the consummate end-products of brain-derived neurotrophic factor action, i.e. cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and synapsin I, and modulated phosphorylated calmodulin protein kinase II, a signal transduction cascade downstream to brain-derived neurotrophic factor action that is important for learning and memory. We also found that exercise significantly increased the expression of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2, an energy-balancing factor concerned with ATP production and free radical management. Our results reveal a fundamental mechanism by which key elements of energy metabolism may modulate the substrates of hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

  14. The intricacies of neurotrophic factor therapy for retinal ganglion cell rescue in glaucoma: a case for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Foldvari, Marianna; Chen, Ding Wen

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of damaged retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and their axons is an important aspect of reversing vision loss in glaucoma patients. While current therapies can effectively lower intraocular pressure, they do not provide extrinsic support to RGCs to actively aid in their protection and regeneration. The unmet need could be addressed by neurotrophic factor gene therapy, where plasmid DNA, encoding neurotrophic factors, is delivered to retinal cells to maintain sufficient levels of neurotrophins in the retina. In this review, we aim to describe the intricacies in the design of the therapy including: the choice of neurotrophic factor, the site and route of administration and target cell populations for gene delivery. Furthermore, we also discuss the challenges currently being faced in RGC-related therapy development with special considerations to the existence of multiple RGC subtypes and the lack of efficient and representative in vitro models for rapid and reliable screening in the drug development process. PMID:27482199

  15. Focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal brain delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Yang, Georgiana Zong Xin; Getachew, Hoheteberhan; Acosta, Camilo; Sierra Sánchez, Carlos; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to unveil the potential mechanism of focused ultrasound (FUS)-enhanced intranasal (IN) brain drug delivery and assess its feasibility in the delivery of therapeutic molecules. Delivery outcomes of fluorescently-labeled dextrans to mouse brains by IN administration either before or after FUS sonication were compared to evaluate whether FUS enhances IN delivery by active pumping or passive diffusion. Fluorescence imaging of brain slices found that IN administration followed by FUS sonication achieved significantly higher delivery than IN administration only, while pre-treatment by FUS sonication followed by IN administration was not significantly different from IN administration only. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a promising neurotrophic factor for the treatment of many central nervous system diseases, was delivered by IN followed by FUS to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique and compared with the established FUS technique where drugs are injected intravenously. Immunohistochemistry staining of BDNF revealed that FUS-enhanced IN delivery achieved similar locally enhanced delivery as the established FUS technique. This study suggested that FUS enhances IN brain drug delivery by FUS-induced active pumping of the drug and demonstrated that FUS-enhanced IN delivery is a promising technique for noninvasive and localized delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain.

  16. Serial changes in bladder, locomotion, and levels of neurotrophic factors in rats with spinal cord contusion.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Jung Keun; Lee, Young Il; Son, Young-Jin; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2009-10-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the evolution of the neurogenic bladder after spinal cord contusion and to correlate changes in bladder function with locomotor function and levels of neurotrophic factors. The MASCIS impactor was used to cause a mild contusion injury of the lower thoracic spinal cord of Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were divided into four groups according to the length of time from injury to sacrifice, at 4, 14, 28, and 56 days after injury. Gait analysis was performed each week, and urodynamic study was performed just before sacrifice. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) and coupling scores showed gradual recovery, as did the urinary voiding pattern and bladder volume; some parameters of micturition reached normal ranges. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the spinal cord, as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, decreased with time, whereas neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) levels remained unchanged. The micturition pattern, bladder volume, and locomotor function continued to recover during the time of observation; BDNF levels in the spinal cord and bladder were inversely correlated with BBB scores and the restoration of bladder volume. We conclude that urodynamic changes in the bladder correlate with locomotion recovery but not with the levels of BDNF or NT-3 after modified mild contusion injury in rats. PMID:19203225

  17. Focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal brain delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Yang, Georgiana Zong Xin; Getachew, Hoheteberhan; Acosta, Camilo; Sierra Sánchez, Carlos; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to unveil the potential mechanism of focused ultrasound (FUS)-enhanced intranasal (IN) brain drug delivery and assess its feasibility in the delivery of therapeutic molecules. Delivery outcomes of fluorescently-labeled dextrans to mouse brains by IN administration either before or after FUS sonication were compared to evaluate whether FUS enhances IN delivery by active pumping or passive diffusion. Fluorescence imaging of brain slices found that IN administration followed by FUS sonication achieved significantly higher delivery than IN administration only, while pre-treatment by FUS sonication followed by IN administration was not significantly different from IN administration only. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a promising neurotrophic factor for the treatment of many central nervous system diseases, was delivered by IN followed by FUS to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique and compared with the established FUS technique where drugs are injected intravenously. Immunohistochemistry staining of BDNF revealed that FUS-enhanced IN delivery achieved similar locally enhanced delivery as the established FUS technique. This study suggested that FUS enhances IN brain drug delivery by FUS-induced active pumping of the drug and demonstrated that FUS-enhanced IN delivery is a promising technique for noninvasive and localized delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain. PMID:27345430

  18. REGULATION OF BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR MESSENGER RNA LEVELS IN AVIAN HYPOTHALAMIC SLICE CULTURES. (R825294)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanisms regulating the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, a member of the neurotrophin family, have been extensively studied in the rat cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. In contrast, little is known regarding the regulation of this growth factor in ...

  19. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Alzheimer's Disease: Risk, Mechanisms, and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Jing-Hui; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lan

    2015-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has a neurotrophic support on neuron of central nervous system (CNS) and is a key molecule in the maintenance of synaptic plasticity and memory storage in hippocampus. However, changes of BDNF level and expression have been reported in the CNS as well as blood of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients in the last decade, which indicates a potential role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of AD. Therefore, this review aims to summarize the latest progress in the field of BDNF and its biological roles in AD pathogenesis. We will discuss the interaction between BDNF and amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide, the effect of BDNF on synaptic repair in AD, and the association between BDNF polymorphism and AD risk. The most important is, enlightening the detailed biological ability and complicated mechanisms of action of BDNF in the context of AD would provide a future BDNF-related remedy for AD, such as increment in the production or release of endogenous BDNF by some drugs or BDNF mimics.

  20. Strength training does not influence serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Goekint, Maaike; De Pauw, Kevin; Roelands, Bart; Njemini, Rose; Bautmans, Ivan; Mets, Tony; Meeusen, Romain

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the acute effect of a strength training session on brain-derived neurotrophic factor and insulin-like growth factor 1. Furthermore, the influence of a 10-week strength training program on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) resting levels and memory performance was studied. Fifteen untrained subjects followed a strength training program for 10 weeks. Eight control subjects remained physically inactive. To study the influence of an acute strength training session, blood samples were taken before and after the sixth and 30th sessions. Training effects were evaluated by taking blood samples at rest before and following the training program. Short- and mid-term memories were assessed using the digit span and a recall of images test. BDNF, IGF-1 and its binding protein (IGFBP-3) were measured in serum samples. Data were analyzed (p < 0.05) using a mixed design ANOVA model, Duncan's multiple range post hoc tests, and Pearson's correlation. A single strength training session did not influence BDNF and IGF-1 concentrations. No effect of the strength training period on BDNF, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 was found. No correlation was found between peripheral BDNF and IGF-1. Short-term memory improved in both the experimental and control groups, but no difference between groups was present. Mid-term memory did not improve following the 10 weeks of training. A period of strength training in sedentary subjects does not significantly change the growth factors or memory function compared to a control group. Also, BDNF and IGF-1 are not acutely influenced by a training session. Further research should focus on the beneficial role of physical exercise in neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Alcohol, Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Obesity among People Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Míguez-Burbano, María José; Espinoza, Luis; Cook, Robert L.; Mayra, Mayra; Bueno, Diego; Lewis, John E.; Asthana, Deshratan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In an expanding HAART era, obesity has become a health problem among persons living with HIV (PLWH). Whereas the rising level of obesity has been largely attributed to poor nutrition and exercise habits, differences in biological factors may explain why some individuals gain more weight than others. Thus, our main goal is to prospectively determine in PLWH whether plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and hazardous alcohol use (HAU), two overlooked but highly prevalent conditions among PLWH, correlate with an adverse anthropometric profile. Also to test whether these relationships varied in men and women Methods The Platelets mediating Alcohol and HIV Damage Study (PADS) is an ongoing multiethnic study of 400 PLWH receiving regular medical care in South Florida (37% females and 63% males). Semi-annual visits consisted of a medical exam, including anthropometrics to assess both general (body mass index: BMI) and central obesity (waist and hip circumferences). Participants also completed health history questionnaires, and provided a fasting blood sample to obtain BDNF and immune and biochemical assessments. Results A sizable proportion of participants met the National Institutes of Health definition of overweight (BMI = 25–29.9 kg/m2; 26%) and obese (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2; 35%). Women were more likely to be obese than men (OR=4.9, 95% CI=2.9–8.2, p=0.0001). Compared to men, women also exhibited the highest mean plasma BDNF levels (9,959 ± 6,578 vs. 7,470 ± 6,068 pg/ml, p=0.0001). Additional analyses indicated that HAU, particularly heavy drinkers, had the smallest waist and hip circumferences if they were males, but the opposite if they were females. High BDNF levels were positively correlated with BMI. Linear regression analysis revealed that gender, BDNF, and HAU were the best predictors of BMI. Conclusion In summary, our findings offer novel insights into the relationships between BDNF, and alcohol use among overweight and obese PLWH. Our

  2. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Transgenic Mice Exhibit Passive Avoidance Deficits, Increased Seizure Severity and In Vitro Hyperexcitability in the Hippocampus and Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Croll, S. D.; Suri, C.; Compton, D. L.; Simmons, M. V.; Yancopoulos, G. D.; Lindsay, R. M.; Wiegand, S. J.; Rudge, J. S.; Scharfman, H. E.

    2008-01-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor from the β-actin promoter were tested for behavioral, gross anatomical and physiological abnormalities. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor messenger RNA overexpression was widespread throughout brain. Overexpression declined with age, such that levels of overexpression decreased sharply by nine months. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor transgenic mice had no gross deformities or behavioral abnormalities. However, they showed a significant passive avoidance deficit. This deficit was dependent on continued overexpression, and resolved with age as brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcripts decreased. In addition, the brain-derived neurotrophic factor transgenic mice showed increased seizure severity in response to kainic acid. Hippocampal slices from brain-derived neurotrophic factor transgenic mice showed hyperexcitability in area CA3 and entorhinal cortex, but not in dentate gyrus. Finally, area CA1 long-term potentiation was disrupted, indicating abnormal plasticity. Our data suggest that overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the brain can interfere with normal brain function by causing learning impairments and increased excitability. The results also support the hypothesis that excess brain-derived neurotrophic factor could be pro-convulsant in the limbic system. PMID:10501474

  3. The Complex of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor-Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor α Up-Regulates Connexin43 and Intercellular Coupling in Astrocytes via the Janus Tyrosine Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription PathwayD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ozog, Mark A.; Bernier, Suzanne M.; Bates, Dave C.; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Lo, Cecilia W.; Naus, Christian C.G.

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines regulate numerous cell processes, including connexin expression and gap junctional coupling. In this study, we examined the effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on connexin43 (Cx43) expression and intercellular coupling in astrocytes. Murine cortical astrocytes matured in vitro were treated with CNTF (20 ng/ml), soluble ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α (CNTFRα) (200 ng/ml), or CNTF-CNTFRα. Although CNTF and CNTFRα alone had no effect on Cx43 expression, the heterodimer CNTF-CNTFRα significantly increased both Cx43 mRNA and protein levels. Cx43 immunostaining correlated with increased intercellular coupling as determined by dye transfer analysis. By using the pharmacological inhibitor α-cyano-(3,4-dihydroxy)-N-benzylcinnamide (AG490), the increase in Cx43 was found to be dependent on the Janus tyrosine kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that CNTF-CNTFRα treatment produced nuclear localization of phosphorylated STAT3, whereas CNTF treatment alone did not. Transient transfection of constructs containing various sequences of the Cx43 promoter tagged to a LacZ reporter into ROS 17/2.8 cells confirmed that the promoter region between -838 to -1693 was deemed necessary for CNTF-CNTFRα to induce heightened expression. CNTF-CNTFRα did not alter Cx30 mRNA levels, suggesting selectivity of CNTF-CNTFRα for connexin signaling. Together in the presence of soluble receptor, CNTF activates the JAK/STAT pathway leading to enhanced Cx43 expression and intercellular coupling. PMID:15342787

  4. Pleiotrophin promotes microglia proliferation and secretion of neurotrophic factors by activating extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jiayin; Ding, Minghui; Zhang, Aiwu; Xiao, Zijian; Qi, Weiwei; Luo, Ning; Di, Wei; Tao, Yuqian; Fang, Yannan

    2012-12-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an effective neuroprotective factor and its expression is strikingly increased in microglia after ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, whether PTN could provide neurotrophic support to neurons by regulating microglia function is not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of PTN was induced in microglia after oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion. PTN promoted the proliferation of microglia by enhancing the G1 to S phase transition. PTN also stimulated the secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in microglia, but did not upregulate the expression of proinflammatory factors such as TNF-α, IL-1β and iNOS. Mechanistically, we found that PTN increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in microglia in both concentration-dependent and time-dependent manners. In addition, ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 abolished the proliferation and G1 to S phase transition of microglia stimulated by PTN, and inhibited the production of BDNF, CNTF and NGF induced by PTN. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that PTN-ERK1/2 pathway plays important role in regulating microglia growth and secretion of neurotrophic factors. These findings provide new insight into the neuroprotective role of PTN and suggest that PTN is a new target for therapeutic intervention of stroke.

  5. Alterations in brain neurotrophic and glial factors following early age chronic methylphenidate and cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Simchon-Tenenbaum, Yaarit; Weizman, Abraham; Rehavi, Moshe

    2015-04-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) overdiagnosis and a pharmacological attempt to increase cognitive performance, are the major causes for the frequent (ab)use of psychostimulants in non-ADHD individuals. Methylphenidate is a non-addictive psychostimulant, although its mode of action resembles that of cocaine, a well-known addictive and abused drug. Neuronal- and glial-derived growth factors play a major role in the development, maintenance and survival of neurons in the central nervous system. We hypothesized that methylphenidate and cocaine treatment affect the expression of such growth factors. Beginning on postnatal day (PND) 14, male Sprague Dawley rats were treated chronically with either cocaine or methylphenidate. The rats were examined behaviorally and biochemically at several time points (PND 35, 56, 70 and 90). On PND 56, rats treated with cocaine or methylphenidate from PND 14 through PND 35 exhibited increased hippocampal glial-cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) mRNA levels, after 21 withdrawal days, compared to the saline-treated rats. We found a significant association between cocaine and methylphenidate treatments and age progression in the prefrontal protein expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Neither treatments affected the behavioral parameters, although acute cocaine administration was associated with increased locomotor activity. It is possible that the increased hippocampal GDNF mRNA levels, may be relevant to the reduced rate of drug seeking behavior in ADHD adolescence that were maintained from childhood on methylphenidate. BDNF protein level increase with age, as well as following stimulant treatments at early age may be relevant to the neurobiology and pharmacotherapy of ADHD. PMID:25576963

  6. Alterations in brain neurotrophic and glial factors following early age chronic methylphenidate and cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Simchon-Tenenbaum, Yaarit; Weizman, Abraham; Rehavi, Moshe

    2015-04-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) overdiagnosis and a pharmacological attempt to increase cognitive performance, are the major causes for the frequent (ab)use of psychostimulants in non-ADHD individuals. Methylphenidate is a non-addictive psychostimulant, although its mode of action resembles that of cocaine, a well-known addictive and abused drug. Neuronal- and glial-derived growth factors play a major role in the development, maintenance and survival of neurons in the central nervous system. We hypothesized that methylphenidate and cocaine treatment affect the expression of such growth factors. Beginning on postnatal day (PND) 14, male Sprague Dawley rats were treated chronically with either cocaine or methylphenidate. The rats were examined behaviorally and biochemically at several time points (PND 35, 56, 70 and 90). On PND 56, rats treated with cocaine or methylphenidate from PND 14 through PND 35 exhibited increased hippocampal glial-cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) mRNA levels, after 21 withdrawal days, compared to the saline-treated rats. We found a significant association between cocaine and methylphenidate treatments and age progression in the prefrontal protein expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Neither treatments affected the behavioral parameters, although acute cocaine administration was associated with increased locomotor activity. It is possible that the increased hippocampal GDNF mRNA levels, may be relevant to the reduced rate of drug seeking behavior in ADHD adolescence that were maintained from childhood on methylphenidate. BDNF protein level increase with age, as well as following stimulant treatments at early age may be relevant to the neurobiology and pharmacotherapy of ADHD.

  7. Treadmill exercise induced functional recovery after peripheral nerve repair is associated with increased levels of neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Sung; Höke, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Benefits of exercise on nerve regeneration and functional recovery have been reported in both central and peripheral nervous system disease models. However, underlying molecular mechanisms of enhanced regeneration and improved functional outcomes are less understood. We used a peripheral nerve regeneration model that has a good correlation between functional outcomes and number of motor axons that regenerate to evaluate the impact of treadmill exercise. In this model, the median nerve was transected and repaired while the ulnar nerve was transected and prevented from regeneration. Daily treadmill exercise resulted in faster recovery of the forelimb grip function as evaluated by grip power and inverted holding test. Daily exercise also resulted in better regeneration as evaluated by recovery of compound motor action potentials, higher number of axons in the median nerve and larger myofiber size in target muscles. Furthermore, these observations correlated with higher levels of neurotrophic factors, glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), in serum, nerve and muscle suggesting that increase in muscle derived neurotrophic factors may be responsible for improved regeneration. PMID:24618564

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates cell motility in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ssu-Ming; Lin, Chingju; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Chiu, Chien-Ming; Fang, Chia-Wei; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Dar-Ren; Yeh, Wei-Lan

    2015-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor that has been shown to affect cancer cell metastasis and migration. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of BDNF-induced cell migration in colon cancer cells. The migratory activities of two colon cancer cell lines, HCT116 and SW480, were found to be increased in the presence of human BDNF. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO)-1 is known to be involved in the development and progression of tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie HO-1 in the regulation of colon cancer cell migration remain unclear. Expression of HO-1 protein and mRNA increased in response to BDNF stimulation. The BDNF-induced increase in cell migration was antagonized by a HO-1 inhibitor and HO-1 siRNA. Furthermore, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also increased in response to BDNF stimulation, as did VEGF mRNA expression and transcriptional activity. The increase in BDNF-induced cancer cell migration was antagonized by a VEGF-neutralizing antibody. Moreover, transfection with HO-1 siRNA effectively reduced the increased VEGF expression induced by BDNF. The BDNF-induced cell migration was regulated by the ERK, p38, and Akt signaling pathways. Furthermore, BDNF-increased HO-1 and VEGF promoter transcriptional activity were inhibited by ERK, p38, and AKT pharmacological inhibitors and dominant-negative mutants in colon cancer cells. These results indicate that BDNF increases the migration of colon cancer cells by regulating VEGF/HO-1 activation through the ERK, p38, and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. The results of this study may provide a relevant contribution to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which BDNF promotes colon cancer cell motility.

  9. Differential expression of human placental neurotrophic factors in preterm and term deliveries.

    PubMed

    Dhobale, Madhavi V; Pisal, Hemlata R; Mehendale, Savita S; Joshi, Sadhana R

    2013-12-01

    Neurotrophic factors such as brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are involved in development of the placenta and fetal brain. A series of human and animal studies in our department have shown that micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B12) and omega 3 fatty acids like DHA are all interlinked in the one carbon cycle. Any alterations in one carbon components will lead to changes in methylation patterns that further affect the gene expression at critical periods of development resulting in complications during pregnancy. This may further contribute to risk for neurodevelopmental disorders in children born preterm. Therefore this study for the first time examines the mRNA levels from preterm and term placentae. A total number of 38 women delivering preterm (<37 weeks gestation) and 37 women delivering at term (=>37 weeks gestation) were recruited. The mRNA levels of BDNF and NGF were analyzed by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Our results indicate that BDNF and NGF mRNA levels were lower in preterm group as compared to term group. There was a positive association of placental BDNF and NGF mRNA levels with cord plasma BDNF and NGF levels. The differential expression of BDNF and NGF gene in preterm placentae may also alter the vascular development in preterm deliveries. Our data suggests that the reduced mRNA levels of BDNF and NGF may possibly be a result of altered epigenetic mechanisms and may have an implication for altered fetal programming in children born preterm. PMID:24076518

  10. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) as a novel candidate gene of anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kotyuk, Eszter; Keszler, Gergely; Nemeth, Nora; Ronai, Zsolt; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Szekely, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a neurotrophic factor for dopaminergic neurons with promising therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease. A few association analyses between GDNF gene polymorphisms and psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and drug abuse have also been published but little is known about any effects of these polymorphisms on mood characteristics such as anxiety and depression. Here we present an association study between eight (rs1981844, rs3812047, rs3096140, rs2973041, rs2910702, rs1549250, rs2973050 and rs11111) GDNF single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and anxiety and depression scores measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) on 708 Caucasian young adults with no psychiatric history. Results of the allele-wise single marker association analyses provided significant effects of two single nucleotide polymorphisms on anxiety scores following the Bonferroni correction for multiple testing (p = 0.00070 and p = 0.00138 for rs3812047 and rs3096140, respectively), while no such result was obtained on depression scores. Haplotype analysis confirmed the role of these SNPs; mean anxiety scores raised according to the number of risk alleles present in the haplotypes (p = 0.00029). A significant sex-gene interaction was also observed since the effect of the rs3812047 A allele as a risk factor of anxiety was more pronounced in males. In conclusion, this is the first demonstration of a significant association between the GDNF gene and mood characteristics demonstrated by the association of two SNPs of the GDNF gene (rs3812047 and rs3096140) and individual variability of anxiety using self-report data from a non-clinical sample.

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor infusion delays amygdala and perforant path kindling without affecting paired-pulse measures of neuronal inhibition in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Osehobo, P; Adams, B; Sazgar, M; Xu, Y; Racine, R J; Fahnestock, M

    1999-01-01

    Kindling is an animal model of human temporal lobe epilepsy in which excitability in limbic structures is permanently enhanced by repeated stimulations. Kindling also increases the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor messenger RNAs in both the hippocampus and cerebral cortex and causes structural changes in the hippocampus including hilar hypertrophy. We have recently shown that intraventricular nerve growth factor infusion enhances the development of kindling, whereas blocking nerve growth factor activity retards amygdaloid kindling. Furthermore, we have shown that nerve growth factor protects against kindling-induced hilar hypertrophy. The physiological role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in kindling is not as clear. Acute injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases neuronal excitability and causes seizures, whereas chronic brain-derived neurotrophic factor infusion in rats slows hippocampal kindling. In agreement with the latter, we show here that intrahilar brain-derived neurotrophic factor infusion delays amygdala and perforant path kindling. In addition, we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, unlike nerve growth factor, does not protect against kindling-induced increases in hilar area. To test the hypothesis that brain-derived neurotrophic factor suppresses kindling by increasing inhibition above normal levels, we performed paired-pulse measures in the perforant path-dentate gyrus pathway. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor infused into the hippocampus had no effect on the stimulus intensity function (input/output curves); there was also no significant effect on paired-pulse inhibition. We then kindled the perforant path 10 days after the end of brain-derived neurotrophic factor treatment. Once again, kindling was retarded, showing that the brain-derived neurotrophic factor effect is long-lasting. These results indicate that prolonged in vivo infusion

  12. Possible role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in autism spectrum disorder: current status.

    PubMed

    Halepoto, Dost Muhammad; Bashir, Shahid; A L-Ayadhi, Laila

    2014-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family of survival-promoting molecules, plays a vital role in the growth, development, maintenance, and function of several neuronal systems. The purpose of this review is to document the support for the involvement of this molecule in the maintenance of normal cognitive, emotional functioning, and to outline recent developments in the content of Autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Current and future treatment development can be guided by developing understanding of this molecule's actions in the brain and the ways the expression of BDNF can be planned. Over the years, research findings suggested a critical role played by BDNF in the development of autism including increased serum concentrations of BDNF in children with autism and identification of different forms of BDNF in families of autistic individuals. PMID:24709243

  13. Human Obesity Associated with an Intronic SNP in the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Locus.

    PubMed

    Mou, Zongyang; Hyde, Thomas M; Lipska, Barbara K; Martinowich, Keri; Wei, Peter; Ong, Chiew-Jen; Hunter, Lindsay A; Palaguachi, Gladys I; Morgun, Eva; Teng, Rujia; Lai, Chen; Condarco, Tania A; Demidowich, Andrew P; Krause, Amanda J; Marshall, Leslie J; Haack, Karin; Voruganti, V Saroja; Cole, Shelley A; Butte, Nancy F; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Nalls, Michael A; Zonderman, Alan B; Singleton, Andrew B; Evans, Michele K; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Tsao, Jack W; Kleinman, Joel E; Yanovski, Jack A; Han, Joan C

    2015-11-10

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in energy balance. In population studies, SNPs of the BDNF locus have been linked to obesity, but the mechanism by which these variants cause weight gain is unknown. Here, we examined human hypothalamic BDNF expression in association with 44 BDNF SNPs. We observed that the minor C allele of rs12291063 is associated with lower human ventromedial hypothalamic BDNF expression (p < 0.001) and greater adiposity in both adult and pediatric cohorts (p values < 0.05). We further demonstrated that the major T allele for rs12291063 possesses a binding capacity for the transcriptional regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D0B, knockdown of which disrupts transactivation by the T allele. Binding and transactivation functions are both disrupted by substituting C for T. These findings provide a rationale for BDNF augmentation as a targeted treatment for obesity in individuals who have the rs12291063 CC genotype. PMID:26526993

  14. Fingolimod increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels and ameliorates amyloid β-induced memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Kazuya; Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Kawanokuchi, Jun; Jin, Shijie; Mizuno, Tetsuya; Suzumura, Akio

    2014-07-15

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Amyloid β, a neurotoxic protein, causes disruption of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and induces cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease. We previously revealed that fingolimod, a new oral immunosuppressant used to treat multiple sclerosis, ameliorates oligomeric amyloid β-induced neuronal damage via up-regulation of neuronal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Here, we showed that oral administration of fingolimod ameliorated the impairment in object recognition memory and associative learning in mice injected with amyloid β. This effect was associated with restoration of normal BDNF expression levels in the cerebral cortices and hippocampi, suggesting that neuroprotection was mediated by up-regulation of neuronal BDNF levels. Therefore, fingolimod may provide therapeutic effects in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Advances in Neurotrophic Factor and Cell-Based Therapies for Parkinson's Disease: A Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Staudt, Michael D; Di Sebastiano, Andrea R; Xu, Hu; Jog, Mandar; Schmid, Susanne; Foster, Paula; Hebb, Matthew O

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) affects an estimated 7-10 million people worldwide and remains without definitive or disease-modifying treatment. There have been many recent developments in cell-based therapy (CBT) to replace lost circuitry and provide chronic biological sources of therapeutic agents to the PD-affected brain. Early neural transplantation studies underscored the challenges of immune compatibility, graft integration and the need for renewable, autologous graft sources. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) offer a potential class of cytoprotective pharmacotherapeutics that may complement dopamine (DA) replacement and CBT strategies in PD. Chronic NTF delivery may be an integral goal of CBT, with grafts consisting of autologous drug-producing (e.g., DA, NTF) cells that are capable of integration and function in the host brain. In this mini-review, we outline the past experience and recent advances in NTF technology and CBT as promising and integrated approaches for the treatment of PD. PMID:26330171

  16. Essential role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in adult hippocampal function

    PubMed Central

    Monteggia, Lisa M.; Barrot, Michel; Powell, Craig M.; Berton, Olivier; Galanis, Victor; Gemelli, Terry; Meuth, Sven; Nagy, Andreas; Greene, Robert W.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates neuronal development and function. However, it has been difficult to discern its role in the adult brain in influencing complex behavior. Here, we use a recently developed inducible knockout system to show that deleting BDNF in broad forebrain regions of adult mice impairs hippocampal-dependent learning and long-term potentiation. We use the inducible nature of this system to show that the loss of BDNF during earlier stages of development causes hyperactivity and more pronounced hippocampal-dependent learning deficits. We also demonstrate that the loss of forebrain BDNF attenuates the actions of desipramine, an antidepressant, in the forced swim test, suggesting the involvement of BDNF in antidepressant efficacy. These results establish roles for BDNF in the adult, and demonstrate the strength of this inducible knockout system in studying gene function in the adult brain. PMID:15249684

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor: a bridge between inflammation and neuroplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Francesca; Rossetti, Andrea C.; Racagni, Giorgio; Gass, Peter; Riva, Marco A.; Molteni, Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are key regulatory mediators involved in the host response to immunological challenges, but also play a critical role in the communication between the immune and the central nervous system. For this, their expression in both systems is under a tight regulatory control. However, pathological conditions may lead to an overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines that may have a detrimental impact on central nervous system. In particular, they may damage neuronal structure and function leading to deficits of neuroplasticity, the ability of nervous system to perceive, respond and adapt to external or internal stimuli. In search of the mechanisms by which pro-inflammatory cytokines may affect this crucial brain capability, we will discuss one of the most interesting hypotheses: the involvement of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which represents one of the major mediators of neuroplasticity. PMID:25565964

  18. [BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR (BDNF): NEUROBIOLOGY AND MARKER VALUE IN NEUROPSYCHIATRY].

    PubMed

    Levada, O A; Cherednichenko, N V

    2015-01-01

    In this review current publications about neurobiology and marker value of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in neuropsychiatry are analyzed. It is shown that BDNF is an important member of the family of neurotrophins which widely represented in various structures of the CNS. In prenatal period BDNF is involved in all stages of neuronal networks formation, and in the postnatal period its main role is maintaining the normal brain architectonics, involvement in the processes of neurogenesis and realization of neuroprotective functions. BDNF plays an important role in learning and memory organization, food and motor behavior. BDNF brain expression decreases with age, as well as in degenerative and vascular dementias, affective, anxiety, and behavioral disorders. The reducing of BDNF serum, level reflects the decreasing of its cerebral expression and could be used as a neurobiological marker of these pathological processes but the rising of its concentration could indicate the therapy effectiveness.

  19. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor with a Plasmonic Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawa, Keiko; Satoh, Mari; Uegaki, Koichi; Hara, Tomoko; Kojima, Masami; Kumanogoh, Haruko; Aota, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Yoshiki; Nakaoki, Takahiko; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Nakazawa, Hikaru; Kumagai, Izumi

    2013-06-01

    Plasmonic chips, which are grating replicas coated with thin metal layers and overlayers such as ZnO, were applied in immunosensors to improve their detection sensitivity. Fluorescence from labeled antibodies bound to plasmonic chips can be enhanced on the basis of a grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance (GC-SPR) field. In this study, as one of the representative candidate protein markers for brain disorders, the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was quantitatively measured by sandwich assay on a plasmonic chip and detected on our plasmonic chip in the concentration of 5-7 ng/mL within 40 min. Furthermore, BDNF was detected in the blood sera from three types of mice: wild-type mice and two types of mutant mice. This technique is promising as a new clinical diagnosis tool for brain disorders based on scientific evidence such as blood test results.

  20. Human Obesity Associated with an Intronic SNP in the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Locus.

    PubMed

    Mou, Zongyang; Hyde, Thomas M; Lipska, Barbara K; Martinowich, Keri; Wei, Peter; Ong, Chiew-Jen; Hunter, Lindsay A; Palaguachi, Gladys I; Morgun, Eva; Teng, Rujia; Lai, Chen; Condarco, Tania A; Demidowich, Andrew P; Krause, Amanda J; Marshall, Leslie J; Haack, Karin; Voruganti, V Saroja; Cole, Shelley A; Butte, Nancy F; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Nalls, Michael A; Zonderman, Alan B; Singleton, Andrew B; Evans, Michele K; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart; Tsao, Jack W; Kleinman, Joel E; Yanovski, Jack A; Han, Joan C

    2015-11-10

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in energy balance. In population studies, SNPs of the BDNF locus have been linked to obesity, but the mechanism by which these variants cause weight gain is unknown. Here, we examined human hypothalamic BDNF expression in association with 44 BDNF SNPs. We observed that the minor C allele of rs12291063 is associated with lower human ventromedial hypothalamic BDNF expression (p < 0.001) and greater adiposity in both adult and pediatric cohorts (p values < 0.05). We further demonstrated that the major T allele for rs12291063 possesses a binding capacity for the transcriptional regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D0B, knockdown of which disrupts transactivation by the T allele. Binding and transactivation functions are both disrupted by substituting C for T. These findings provide a rationale for BDNF augmentation as a targeted treatment for obesity in individuals who have the rs12291063 CC genotype.

  1. Serum concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in patients with gender identity disorder.

    PubMed

    Fontanari, Anna-Martha V; Andreazza, Tahiana; Costa, Ângelo B; Salvador, Jaqueline; Koff, Walter J; Aguiar, Bianca; Ferrari, Pamela; Massuda, Raffael; Pedrini, Mariana; Silveira, Esalba; Belmonte-de-Abreu, Paulo S; Gama, Clarissa S; Kauer-Sant'Anna, Marcia; Kapczinski, Flavio; Lobato, Maria Ines R

    2013-10-01

    Gender Identity Disorder (GID) is characterized by a strong and persistent cross-gender identification that affects different aspects of behavior. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in neurodevelopment and neuroplasticity. Altered BDNF-signaling is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of psychiatric disordersand is related to traumatic life events. To examine serum BDNF levels, we compared one group of DSM-IV GID patients (n = 45) and one healthy control group (n = 66). Serum BDNF levels were significantly decreased in GID patients (p = 0.013). This data support the hypothesis that the reduction found in serum BDNF levels in GID patients may be related to the psychological abuse that transsexuals are exposed during their life.

  2. Aerobic Exercise Does Not Predict Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor And Cortisol Alterations in Depressed Patients.

    PubMed

    Lamego, Murilo Khede; de Souza Moura, Antonio Marcos; Paes, Flávia; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza; Lattari, Eduardo; Rimes, Ridson; Manochio, João; Budde, Henning; Wegner, Mirko; Mura, Gioia; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of depression is related to neurobiological changes that occur in the monoamine system, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, neurogenesis system and the neuroimmune system. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the research of the effects of exercise on brain function, with a special focus on its effects on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cortisol and other biomarkers. Thus, the aim of this study is to present a review investigating the acute and chronic effects of aerobic exercise on BDNF and cortisol levels in individuals with depression. It was not possible to establish an interaction between aerobic exercise and concentration of BDNF and cortisol, which may actually be the result of the divergence of methods, such as type of exercises, duration of the sessions, and prescribed intensity and frequency of sessions.

  3. Human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor for optic nerve injury: a biomechanical evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong-jun; Li, Ya-jun; Liu, Xiao-guang; Huang, Feng-xiao; Liu, Tie-jun; Jiang, Dong-mei; Lv, Xue-man; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for optic nerve injury by brain-derived neurotrophic factor or the transplantation of human umbilical cord blood stem cells has gained progress, but analysis by biomechanical indicators is rare. Rabbit models of optic nerve injury were established by a clamp. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body received a one-time injection of 50 μg brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 106 human umbilical cord blood stem cells. After 30 days, the maximum load, maximum stress, maximum strain, elastic limit load, elastic limit stress, and elastic limit strain had clearly improved in rabbit models of optical nerve injury after treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor or human umbilical cord blood stem cells. The damage to the ultrastructure of the optic nerve had also been reduced. These findings suggest that human umbilical cord blood stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor effectively repair the injured optical nerve, improve biomechanical properties, and contribute to the recovery after injury. PMID:26330839

  4. Developmental Thyroid Hormone Insufficiency Reduces Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Adults But Not in Neonates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin critical for many developmental and physiological aspects of CNS function. Severe hypothyroidism in the early neonatal period results in developmental and cognitive impairments and reductions in mRNA and protein expressio...

  5. SNAP-25 is abundantly expressed in enteric neuronal networks and upregulated by the neurotrophic factor GDNF.

    PubMed

    Barrenschee, M; Böttner, M; Harde, J; Lange, C; Cossais, F; Ebsen, M; Vogel, I; Wedel, T

    2015-06-01

    Control of intestinal motility requires an intact enteric neurotransmission. Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) is an essential component of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. The aim of the study was to investigate the localization and expression of SNAP-25 in the human intestine and cultured enteric neurons and to assess its regulation by the neurotrophic factor glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). SNAP-25 expression and distribution were analyzed in GDNF-stimulated enteric nerve cell cultures, and synaptic vesicles were evaluated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Human colonic specimens were processed for site-specific SNAP-25 gene expression analysis and SNAP-25 immunohistochemistry including dual-labeling with the pan-neuronal marker PGP 9.5. Additionally, gene expression levels and distributional patterns of SNAP-25 were analyzed in colonic specimens of patients with diverticular disease (DD). GDNF-treated enteric nerve cell cultures showed abundant expression of SNAP-25 and exhibited granular staining corresponding to synaptic vesicles. SNAP-25 gene expression was detected in all colonic layers and isolated myenteric ganglia. SNAP-25 co-localized with PGP 9.5 in submucosal and myenteric ganglia and intramuscular nerve fibers. In patients with DD, both SNAP-25 mRNA expression and immunoreactive profiles were decreased compared to controls. GDNF-induced growth and differentiation of cultured enteric neurons is paralleled by increased expression of SNAP-25 and formation of synaptic vesicles reflecting enhanced synaptogenesis. The expression of SNAP-25 within the human enteric nervous system and its downregulation in DD suggest an essential role in enteric neurotransmission and render SNAP-25 as a marker for impaired synaptic plasticity in enteric neuropathies underlying intestinal motility disorders.

  6. The trophic effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor on injured masseter muscle in rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujun; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Mengmeng; Lin, Xuefen; Wu, Qingting; Yang, Yingying; Kong, Jingjing; Ji, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Occlusal trauma is one of the most common forms of oral biting dysfunction. Long-term occlusal trauma could weaken the stomatognathic system; especially damage one’s masticatory muscle. Through using the rat model, this study investigated the trophic effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on injured masseter muscle. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats (n=36) were randomly divided into five experimental groups and one control group (6 rats per group). Animals in the experimental group were cemented modified crowns on their mandibular first molars to artificially induce occlusal trauma in 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days. Control group was sham-treated with forced mouth-opening for about 5 min, while no crowns were placed. After 28 days of treatment, all rats were euthanized and their masseter muscle was collected. Through immunofluorescence and real-time quantitative PCR, the expression of desmin, CNTF, and CNTFRα was investigated in rat masseter muscle. The microstructure of masseter muscle was observed by transmission electron microscope. Results: The expression of desmin showed a time-dependent decrease on traumatic and non-traumatic sides masseter, until reached the nadir at the 14th day, then restored to its normal level at the 28th day; however, the expression of CNTF and CNTFRα on the traumatic and non-traumatic sides increased from day 7, reached the peak at the 14th day, and returned to normal level on the 28th day. Conclusion: CNTF, as an important neurotrophic factor, was tightly associated to the restoring of rat injured masseter muscle, which provides new target and treatment method for clinical application. PMID:26526387

  7. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor protects against high-fat diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Mwangi, Simon Musyoka; Nezami, Behtash Ghazi; Obukwelu, Blessing; Anitha, Mallappa; Marri, Smitha; Fu, Ping; Epperson, Monica F; Le, Ngoc-Anh; Shanmugam, Malathy; Sitaraman, Shanthi V; Tseng, Yu-Hua; Anania, Frank A; Srinivasan, Shanthi

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is a growing epidemic with limited effective treatments. The neurotrophic factor glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was recently shown to enhance β-cell mass and improve glucose control in rodents. Its role in obesity is, however, not well characterized. In this study, we investigated the ability of GDNF to protect against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. GDNF transgenic (Tg) mice that overexpress GDNF under the control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter and wild-type (WT) littermates were maintained on a HFD or regular rodent diet for 11 wk, and weight gain, energy expenditure, and insulin sensitivity were monitored. Differentiated mouse brown adipocytes and 3T3-L1 white adipocytes were used to study the effects of GDNF in vitro. Tg mice resisted the HFD-induced weight gain, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hyperleptinemia, and hepatic steatosis seen in WT mice despite similar food intake and activity levels. They exhibited significantly (P<0.001) higher energy expenditure than WT mice and increased expression in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α and β1- and β3-adrenergic receptor genes, which are associated with increased lipolysis and enhanced lipid β-oxidation. In vitro, GDNF enhanced β-adrenergic-mediated cAMP release in brown adipocytes and suppressed lipid accumulation in differentiated 3T3L-1 cells through a p38MAPK signaling pathway. Our studies demonstrate a novel role for GDNF in the regulation of high-fat diet-induced obesity through increased energy expenditure. They show that GDNF and its receptor agonists may be potential targets for the treatment or prevention of obesity.

  8. Electrically induced brain-derived neurotrophic factor release from Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Beier; Huang, Jinghui; Lu, Lei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing; Li, Ming

    2014-07-01

    Regulating the production of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in Schwann cells (SCs) is critical for their application in traumatic nerve injury, neurodegenerative disorders, and demyelination disease in both central and peripheral nervous systems. The present study investigated the possibility of using electrical stimulation (ES) to activate SCs to release BDNF. We found that short-term ES was capable of promoting BDNF production from SCs, and the maximal BDNF release was achieved by ES at 6 V (3 Hz, 30 min). We further examined the involvement of intracellular calcium ions ([Ca2+]i) in the ES-induced BDNF production in SCs by pharmacological studies. We found that the ES-induced BDNF release required calcium influx through T-type voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) and calcium mobilization from internal calcium stores, including inositol triphosphate-sensitive stores and caffeine/ryanodine-sensitive stores. In addition, calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CaMK IV), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) were found to play important roles in the ES-induced BDNF release from SCs. In conclusion, ES is capable of activating SCs to secrete BDNF, which requires the involvement of calcium influx through T-type VGCC and calcium mobilization from internal calcium stores. In addition, activation of CaMK IV, MAPK, and CREB were also involved in the ES-induced BDNF release. The findings indicate that ES can improve the neurotrophic ability in SCs and raise the possibility of developing electrically stimulated SCs as a source of cell therapy for nerve injury in both peripheral and central nervous systems. PMID:24753179

  9. Effect of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Haploinsufficiency on Stress-Induced Remodeling of Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Magariños, A.M.; Li, C.J.; Toth, J. Gal; Bath, K.G.; Jing, D.; Lee, F.S.; McEwen, B.S.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic restraint stress (CRS) induces the remodeling (i.e., retraction and simplification) of the apical dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons in rats, suggesting that intrahippocampal connectivity can be affected by a prolonged stressful challenge. Since the structural maintenance of neuronal dendritic arborizations and synaptic connectivity requires neurotrophic support, we investigated the potential role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin enriched in the hippocampus and released from neurons in an activity-dependent manner, as a mediator of the stress-induced dendritic remodeling. The analysis of Golgi-impregnated hippocampal sections revealed that wild type (WT) C57BL/6 male mice showed a similar CA3 apical dendritic remodeling in response to three weeks of CRS to that previously described for rats. Haploinsufficient BDNF mice (BDNF±) did not show such remodeling, but, even without CRS, they presented shorter and simplified CA3 apical dendritic arbors, like those observed in stressed WT mice. Furthermore, unstressed BDNF± mice showed a significant decrease in total hippocampal volume. The dendritic arborization of CA1 pyramidal neurons was not affected by CRS or genotype. However, only in WT mice, CRS induced changes in the density of dendritic spine shape subtypes in both CA1 and CA3 apical dendrites. These results suggest a complex role of BDNF in maintaining the dendritic and spine morphology of hippocampal neurons and the associated volume of the hippocampal formation. The inability of CRS to modify the dendritic structure of CA3 pyramidal neurons in BDNF± mice suggests an indirect, perhaps permissive, role of BDNF in mediating hippocampal dendritic remodeling. PMID:20095008

  10. Plasma Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Reverse Dipping Pattern of Nocturnal Blood Pressure in Patients with Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kadoya, Manabu; Koyama, Hidenori; Kanzaki, Akinori; Kurajoh, Masafumi; Hatayama, Miki; Shiraishi, Jun; Okazaki, Hirokazu; Shoji, Takuhito; Moriwaki, Yuji; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Inaba, Masaaki; Namba, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Context Basic studies have shown that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has critical roles in the survival, growth, maintenance, and death of central and peripheral neurons, while it is also involved in regulation of the autonomic nervous system. Furthermore, recent clinical studies have suggested potential role of plasma BDNF in the circulatory system. Objective We investigated the mutual relationships among plasma BDNF, patterns of nocturnal blood pressure changes (dippers, non-dippers, extra-dippers, and reverse-dippers), and cardiac autonomic function as determined by heart rate variability (HRV). Design This was a cross-sectional study of patients registered in the Hyogo Sleep Cardio-Autonomic Atherosclerosis (HSCAA) Study from October 2010 to November 2012. Patients Two-hundred fifty patients with 1 or more cardiovascular risk factor(s) (obesity, smoking, presence of cardiovascular event history, hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease) were enrolled. Results Plasma BDNF levels (natural logarithm transformed) were significantly (p = 0.001) lower in reverse-dipper patients (7.18±0.69 pg/ml, mean ± SD, n = 36) as compared to dippers (7.86±0.86 pg/ml, n = 100). Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that BDNF (odds ratios: 0.417, 95% confidence interval: 0.228–0.762, P = 0.004) was the sole factor significantly and independently associated with the reverse-dippers as compared with dippers. Furthermore, plasma BDNF level was significantly and positively correlated with the time-domain (SDNN, SDANN5, CVRR) and frequency-domain (LF) of HRV parameters. Finally, multiple logistic regression analyses showed that the relationship between plasma BDNF and the reverse-dippers was weakened, yet remained significant or borderline significant even after adjusting for HRV parameters. Conclusions Low plasma BDNF was independently associated with patients showing a reverse-dipper pattern of nocturnal blood pressure

  11. Effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor and leukemia inhibiting factor on oxytocin and vasopressin magnocellular neuron survival in rat and mouse hypothalamic organotypic cultures

    PubMed Central

    House, Shirley B.; Li, Congyu; Yue, Chunmei; Gainer, Harold

    2008-01-01

    Organotypic cultures of mouse and rat magnocellular neurons (MCNs) in the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system (HNS) have served as important experimental models for the molecular and physiological study of this neuronal phenotype. However, it has been difficult to maintain significant numbers of the MCNs, particularly vasopressin MCNs, in these cultures for long periods. In this paper, we describe the use of the neurotrophic factors, leukemia inhibiting factor (LIF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) to rescue rat vasopressin (Avp)- and oxytocin (Oxt) – MCNs from axotomy-induced, programmed cell death in vitro. Quantitative data are presented for the efficacy of the LIF family of neurotrophic factors on the survival of MCNs in three nuclei, the paraventricular (PVN), supraoptic (SON), and accessory (ACC) nuclei in the mouse and rat hypothalamus. PMID:19118574

  12. Increased serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in patients with narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Klein, Anders B; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Gammeltoft, Steen; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2013-06-01

    Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sudden loss of muscle tone (cataplexy), fragmentation of nocturnal sleep and sleep paralysis. The symptoms of the disease strongly correlate with a reduction in hypocretin levels in CSF and a reduction in hypocretin neurons in hypothalamus in post-mortem tissue. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are important for activity-dependent neuronal function and synaptic modulation and it is considered that these mechanisms are important in sleep regulation. We hypothesized that serum levels of these factors are altered in patients with narcolepsy compared to healthy controls without sleep disturbances. Polysomnography data was obtained and serum BDNF and NGF levels measured using ELISA, while hypocretin was measured using RIA. Serum BDNF levels were significantly higher in narcolepsy patients than in healthy controls (64.2±3.9 ng/ml vs. 47.3±2.6 ng/ml, P<0.01), while there were no significant differences in NGF levels. As expected, narcolepsy patients had higher BMI compared to controls, but BMI did not correlate with the serum BDNF levels. The change in BDNF levels was not related to disease duration and sleep parameters did not correlate with BDNF in narcolepsy patients. The mechanisms behind the marked increase in BDNF levels in narcolepsy patients remain unknown. PMID:23570723

  13. Dedifferentiation of Adult Human Myoblasts Induced by Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoping; Mao, Zebin; Liu, Shuhong; Liu, Hong; Wang, Xuan; Wu, Haitao; Wu, Yan; Zhao, Tong; Fan, Wenhong; Li, Yong; Yew, David T.; Kindler, Pawel M.; Li, Linsong; He, Qihua; Qian, Lingjia; Wang, Xiaomin; Fan, Ming

    2005-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is primarily known for its important cellular effects within the nervous system. However, recent studies indicate that its receptor can be highly expressed in denervated skeletal muscle. Here, we investigated the direct effect of CNTF on skeletal myoblasts of adult human. Surprisingly, we found that CNTF induced the myogenic lineage-committed myoblasts at a clonal level to dedifferentiate into multipotent progenitor cells—they not only could proliferate for over 20 passages with the expression absence of myogenic specific factors Myf5 and MyoD, but they were also capable of differentiating into new phenotypes, mainly neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, and adipocytes. These “progenitor cells” retained their myogenic memory and were capable of redifferentiating into myotubes. Furthermore, CNTF could activate the p44/p42 MAPK and down-regulate the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs). Finally, PD98059, a specific inhibitor of p44/p42 MAPK pathway, was able to abolish the effects of CNTF on both myoblast fate and MRF expression. Our results demonstrate the myogenic lineage-committed human myoblasts can dedifferentiate at a clonal level and CNTF is a novel regulator of skeletal myoblast dedifferentiation via p44/p42 MAPK pathway. PMID:15843428

  14. Corallocins A-C, Nerve Growth and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inducing Metabolites from the Mushroom Hericium coralloides.

    PubMed

    Wittstein, Kathrin; Rascher, Monique; Rupcic, Zeljka; Löwen, Eduard; Winter, Barbara; Köster, Reinhard W; Stadler, Marc

    2016-09-23

    Three new natural products, corallocins A-C (1-3), along with two known compounds were isolated from the mushroom Hericium coralloides. Their benzofuranone and isoindolinone structures were elucidated by spectral methods. All corallocins induced nerve growth factor and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in human 1321N1 astrocytes. Furthermore, corallocin B showed antiproliferative activity against HUVEC and human cancer cell lines MCF-7 and KB-3-1. PMID:27588730

  15. Adjuvant neurotrophic factors in peripheral nerve repair with chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan-reduced acellular nerve allografts

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Richard B.; Sexton, Kevin W.; Rodriguez-Feo, Charles L.; Nookala, Ratnam; Pollins, Alonda C.; Cardwell, Nancy L.; Tisdale, Keonna Y.; Nanney, Lillian B.; Shack, R. Bruce; Thayer, Wesley P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acellular nerve allografts are now standard tools in peripheral nerve repair due to decreased donor site morbidity and operative time savings. Preparation of nerve allografts involves several steps of decellularization and modification of extracellular matrix to remove chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), which have been shown to inhibit neurite outgrowth through a poorly understood mechanism involving RhoA and ECM-integrin interactions. Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) is an enzyme that degrades CSPG molecules and has been shown to promote neurite outgrowth following injury of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Variable results following chondroitinase ABC treatment make it difficult to predict the effects of this drug in human nerve allografts, especially in the presence of native extracellular signaling molecules. Several studies have shown cross-talk between neurotrophic factor and CSPG signaling pathways, but their interaction remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined the adjuvant effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on neurite outgrowth post-injury in CSPG-reduced substrates and acellular nerve allografts. Materials and Methods E12 chicken DRG explants were cultured in medium containing ChABC, ChABC + NGF, ChABC + GDNF or control media. Explants were imaged at 3 d and neurite outgrowths measured. The rat sciatic nerve injury model involved a 1-cm sciatic nerve gap that was microsurgically repaired with ChABC pre-treated acellular nerve allografts. Prior to implantation, nerve allografts were incubated in NGF, GDNF or sterile water. Nerve histology was evaluated at 5d and 8wk post-injury. Results The addition of GDNF in vitro produced significant increase in sensory neurite length at 3 d compared to ChABC alone (P < 0.01), while NGF was not significantly different from control. In vivo adjuvant NGF produced increases in total myelinated axon count (P < 0.005) and motor axon

  16. A Single Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Infusion into the Dorsomedial Prefrontal Cortex Attenuates Cocaine Self-Administration-Induced Phosphorylation of Synapsin in the Nucleus Accumbens during Early Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei-Lun; Eisenstein, Sarah A.; Zelek-Molik, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysregulation in the prefrontal cortex-nucleus accumbens pathway has been implicated in cocaine addiction. We have previously demonstrated that one intra-dorsomedial prefrontal cortex brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) infusion immediately following the last cocaine self-administration session caused a long-lasting inhibition of cocaine-seeking and normalized the cocaine-induced disturbance of glutamate transmission in the nucleus accumbens after extinction and a cocaine prime. However, the molecular mechanism mediating the brain-derived neurotrophic factor effect on cocaine-induced alterations in extracellular glutamate levels is unknown. Methods: In the present study, we determined the effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on cocaine-induced changes in the phosphorylation of synapsin (p-synapsin), a family of presynaptic proteins that mediate synaptic vesicle mobilization, in the nucleus accumbens during early withdrawal. Results: Two hours after cocaine self-administration, p-synapsin Ser9 and p-synapsin Ser62/67, but not p-synapsin Ser603, were increased in the nucleus accumbens. At 22 hours, only p-synapsin Ser9 was still elevated. Elevations at both time points were attenuated by an intra-dorsomedial prefrontal cortex brain-derived neurotrophic factor infusion immediately after the end of cocaine self-administration. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor also reduced cocaine self-administration withdrawal-induced phosphorylation of the protein phosphatase 2A C-subunit, suggesting that brain-derived neurotrophic factor disinhibits protein phosphatase 2A C-subunit, consistent with p-synapsin Ser9 dephosphorylation. Further, co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2A C-subunit and synapsin are associated in a protein-protein complex that was reduced after 2 hours of withdrawal from cocaine self-administration and reversed by brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Conclusions: Taken together, these findings demonstrate that

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene polymorphism predicts interindividual variation in the sleep electroencephalogram.

    PubMed

    Guindalini, Camila; Mazzotti, Diego R; Castro, Laura S; D'Aurea, Carolina V R; Andersen, Monica L; Poyares, Dalva; Bittencourt, Lia R A; Tufik, Sergio

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) participates in the homeostatic regulation of sleep. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the Val66Met functional polymorphism of the BDNF gene on sleep and sleep EEG parameters in a large population-based sample. In total 337 individuals participating in the São Paulo Epidemiologic Sleep Study were selected for analysis. None of the participants had indications of a sleep disorder, as measured by full-night polysomnography and questionnaire. Spectral analysis of the EEG was carried out in all individuals using fast Fourier transformation of the oscillatory signals for each EEG electrode. Sleep and sleep EEG parameters in individuals with the Val/Val genotype were compared with those in Met carriers (Val/Met and Met/Met genotypes). After correction for multiple comparisons and for potential confounding factors, Met carriers showed decreased spectral power in the alpha band in stage one and decreased theta power in stages two and three of nonrapid-eye-movement sleep, at the central recording electrode. No significant influence on sleep macrostructure was observed among the genotype groups. Thus, the Val66Met polymorphism seems to modulate the electrical activity of the brain, predicting interindividual variation of sleep EEG parameters. Further studies of this and other polymorphic variants in potential candidate genes will help the characterization of the molecular basis of sleep. PMID:24700661

  18. Are the changes in the peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels due to platelet activation?

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Millàs, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in central nervous system development, neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity. BDNF is also expressed in several non-neuronal tissues, and it could play an important role in other processes, such as cancer, angiogenesis, etc. Platelets are the major source of peripheral BDNF. However, platelets also contain high amounts of serotonin; they express specific surface receptors during activation, and a multitude of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory bioactive compounds are secreted from the granules. Until recently, there was insufficient knowledge regarding the relationship between BDNF and platelets. Recent studies showed that BDNF is present in two distinct pools in platelets, in α-granules and in the cytoplasm, and only the BDNF in the granules is secreted following stimulation, representing 30% of the total BDNF in platelets. BDNF has an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. Low levels of serum BDNF have been described in patients with major depressive disorder, and BDNF levels increased with chronic antidepressant treatment. Interestingly, there is an association between depression and platelet function. This review analyzed studies that evaluated the relationship between BDNF and platelet activation and the effect of treatments on both parameters. Only a few studies consider this possible confounding factor, and it could be very important in diseases such as depression, which show changes in both parameters. PMID:27014600

  19. Plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Su, Shanshan; Xiao, Zeping; Lin, Zhiguang; Qiu, Yongming; Jin, Yichao; Wang, Zhen

    2015-09-30

    A number of studies have been done to investigate the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this study we aimed to test the relationship between plasma BDNF levels and PTSD. We solicited 65 subjects having recently experienced road traffic accidents (RTA) conforming to screening criteria. They were given follow-up examinations after one month, three months, and six months. PTSD was diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-R-TR, American Psychiatric Association, 2000) using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). All participants were divided into two groups: a group with PTSD and a group without PTSD. There were no significant differences in plasma BDNF levels between the two groups at either the 48h or six-month examination. Within the PTSD group, no significant differences were found in plasma BDNF levels between the two examinations. BDNF levels in those without PTSD showed a higher trend over time after trauma. Higher BDNF levels may be an important protective factor for the prevention of traumatized subjects from developing PTSD.

  20. Developmental and degenerative modulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcript variants in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinwook; Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Juhwan; Song, Lina; Lee, Sueun; Son, Yeonghoon; Kang, Sohi; Bae, Chun-Sik; Kim, Jong-Choon; Kim, Sung-Ho; Shin, Taekyun; Wang, Hongbing; Moon, Changjong

    2014-11-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is regarded as an important factor for neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and neuronal network organization in brain circuits. However, little is known about the regulation of BDNF transcript variants in the hippocampus during postnatal development and following chemically induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, we examined the expression of individual BDNF transcript variants in the mouse hippocampus on postnatal day (PD) 3, 7, 14, 21, and 56, as well as in the adult hippocampus 1, 2, 4, and 8 days after trimethyltin (TMT) treatment. During postnatal development, the expression levels of common BDNF-coding transcripts and BDNF transcript variants increased gradually in the hippocampus, but the temporal patterns of each exon transcript showed significant differences. In the TMT-treated hippocampus, the levels of common BDNF-coding transcripts and exon I, IIC, III, VII, VIII, and IXA transcripts were significantly increased 1 day post-treatment. These observations suggest that the differential regulation of BDNF exon transcripts may be associated with neuronal and synaptic maturation during postnatal development, and neuronal survival and synaptic plasticity in chemically induced neurodegeneration.

  1. Effects of the neurotrophic factors BDNF, NT-3, and FGF2 on dissociated neurons of the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Völker, Johannes; Frenz, Silke; Scherzad, Agmal; Schendzielorz, Philipp; Radeloff, Andreas; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2014-08-20

    The cochlear nucleus is the first relay station for acoustic information in the auditory pathway and its cellular integrity is affected by hearing loss. Neurotrophic factors, which are known to regulate fundamental processes in the brain, are expressed in the cochlear nucleus and are regulated by the changes in the stimulation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the neurotrophins Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) and the neurotrophic factor Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) on primary cultured cells of the mouse cochlear nucleus. No effect on overall cell growth was detected after 8 days in culture by the factors applied. NT-3 had a strong impact on enhancement of neuronal survival, whereas BDNF stimulated neuronal survival and axonal outgrowth. Axonal branching was negatively affected by the administration of BDNF. FGF2 did not show any effect. The results presented represent fundamental research on auditory neurons, but might be one step toward defining novel therapeutic strategies in the future to prevent cochlear nucleus degeneration induced by hearing loss. PMID:24978398

  2. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor is related to cardiovascular risk factors in active and inactive elderly men.

    PubMed

    Zembron-Lacny, A; Dziubek, W; Rynkiewicz, M; Morawin, B; Woźniewski, M

    2016-06-20

    Regular exercise plays an important preventive and therapeutic role in heart and vascular diseases, and beneficially affects brain function. In blood, the effects of exercise appear to be very complex and could include protection of vascular endothelial cells via neurotrophic factors and decreased oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to identify the age-related changes in peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its relationship to oxidative damage and conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers, such as atherogenic index, C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL), in active and inactive men. Seventeen elderly males (61-80 years) and 17 young males (20-24 years) participated in this study. According to the 6-min Åstrand-Rhyming bike test, the subjects were classified into active and inactive groups. The young and elderly active men had a significantly better lipoprotein profile and antioxidant status, as well as reduced oxidative damage and inflammatory state. The active young and elderly men had significantly higher plasma BDNF levels compared to their inactive peers. BDNF was correlated with VO2max (r=0.765, P<0.001). In addition, we observed a significant inverse correlation of BDNF with atherogenic index (TC/HDL), hsCRP and oxLDL. The findings demonstrate that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness reflected in VO2max was associated with a higher level of circulating BDNF, which in turn was related to common CVD risk factors and oxidative damage markers in young and elderly men. PMID:27332774

  3. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor is related to cardiovascular risk factors in active and inactive elderly men

    PubMed Central

    Zembron-Lacny, A.; Dziubek, W.; Rynkiewicz, M.; Morawin, B.; Woźniewski, M.

    2016-01-01

    Regular exercise plays an important preventive and therapeutic role in heart and vascular diseases, and beneficially affects brain function. In blood, the effects of exercise appear to be very complex and could include protection of vascular endothelial cells via neurotrophic factors and decreased oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to identify the age-related changes in peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its relationship to oxidative damage and conventional cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers, such as atherogenic index, C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and oxidized LDL (oxLDL), in active and inactive men. Seventeen elderly males (61-80 years) and 17 young males (20-24 years) participated in this study. According to the 6-min Åstrand-Rhyming bike test, the subjects were classified into active and inactive groups. The young and elderly active men had a significantly better lipoprotein profile and antioxidant status, as well as reduced oxidative damage and inflammatory state. The active young and elderly men had significantly higher plasma BDNF levels compared to their inactive peers. BDNF was correlated with VO2max (r=0.765, P<0.001). In addition, we observed a significant inverse correlation of BDNF with atherogenic index (TC/HDL), hsCRP and oxLDL. The findings demonstrate that a high level of cardiorespiratory fitness reflected in VO2max was associated with a higher level of circulating BDNF, which in turn was related to common CVD risk factors and oxidative damage markers in young and elderly men. PMID:27332774

  4. Localized delivery of fibroblast growth factor–2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor reduces spontaneous seizures in an epilepsy model

    PubMed Central

    Paradiso, Beatrice; Marconi, Peggy; Zucchini, Silvia; Berto, Elena; Binaschi, Anna; Bozac, Aleksandra; Buzzi, Andrea; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Magri, Eros; Mora, Graciela Navarro; Rodi, Donata; Su, Tao; Volpi, Ilaria; Zanetti, Lara; Marzola, Andrea; Manservigi, Roberto; Fabene, Paolo F.; Simonato, Michele

    2009-01-01

    A loss of neurons is observed in the hippocampus of many patients with epilepsies of temporal lobe origin. It has been hypothesized that damage limitation or repair, for example using neurotrophic factors (NTFs), may prevent the transformation of a normal tissue into epileptic (epileptogenesis). Here, we used viral vectors to locally supplement two NTFs, fibroblast growth factor–2 (FGF-2) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), when epileptogenic damage was already in place. These vectors were first characterized in vitro, where they increased proliferation of neural progenitors and favored their differentiation into neurons, and they were then tested in a model of status epilepticus-induced neurodegeneration and epileptogenesis. When injected in a lesioned hippocampus, FGF-2/BDNF expressing vectors increased neuronogenesis, embanked neuronal damage, and reduced epileptogenesis. It is concluded that reduction of damage reduces epileptogenesis and that supplementing specific NTFs in lesion areas represents a new approach to the therapy of neuronal damage and of its consequences. PMID:19366663

  5. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) expression and NMJ plasticity in skeletal muscle following endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Gyorkos, A M; McCullough, M J; Spitsbergen, J M

    2014-01-17

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) supports and maintains the neuromuscular system during development and through adulthood by promoting neuroplasticity. The aim of this study was to determine if different modes of exercise can promote changes in GDNF expression and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) morphology in slow- and fast-twitch muscles. Rats were randomly assigned to a run training (run group), swim training (swim group), or sedentary control group. GDNF protein content was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. GDNF protein content increased significantly in soleus (SOL) following both training protocols (P<0.05). Although not significant, an increase of 60% in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) followed swim-training (NS; P<0.06). NMJ morphology was analyzed by measuring α-bungarotoxin labeled post-synaptic end plates. GDNF content and total end plate area were positively correlated. End plate area decreased in EDL of the run group and increased in SOL of the swim group. The results indicate that GDNF expression and NMJ morphological changes are activity dependent and that different changes may be observed by varying the exercise intensity in slow- and fast-twitch fibers.

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promoter methylation and cortical thickness in recurrent major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Na, Kyoung-Sae; Won, Eunsoo; Kang, June; Chang, Hun Soo; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Tae, Woo Suk; Kim, Yong-Ku; Lee, Min-Soo; Joe, Sook-Haeng; Kim, Hyun; Ham, Byung-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that methylation of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene promoter is associated with major depressive disorder (MDD). This study aimed to investigate the association between cortical thickness and methylation of BDNF promoters as well as serum BDNF levels in MDD. The participants consisted of 65 patients with recurrent MDD and 65 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Methylation of BDNF promoters and cortical thickness were compared between the groups. The right medial orbitofrontal, right lingual, right lateral occipital, left lateral orbitofrontal, left pars triangularis, and left lingual cortices were thinner in patients with MDD than in healthy controls. Among the MDD group, right pericalcarine, right medical orbitofrontal, right rostral middle frontal, right postcentral, right inferior temporal, right cuneus, right precuneus, left frontal pole, left superior frontal, left superior temporal, left rostral middle frontal and left lingual cortices had inverse correlations with methylation of BDNF promoters. Higher levels of BDNF promoter methylation may be closely associated with the reduced cortical thickness among patients with MDD. Serum BDNF levels were significantly lower in MDD, and showed an inverse relationship with BDNF methylation only in healthy controls. Particularly the prefrontal and occipital cortices seem to indicate key regions in which BDNF methylation has a significant effect on structure. PMID:26876488

  7. Peripheral Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Precursor Regulates Pain as an Inflammatory Mediator

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Cong; Zhong, Xiao-Lin; Zhou, Fiona H.; Li, Jia-yi; Zhou, Pei; Xu, Jun-Mei; Song, Bo; Li, Chang-Qi; Zhou, Xin-Fu; Dai, Ru-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The precursor of brain derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF), the unprocessed BDNF gene product, binds to its receptors and exerts the opposing biologic functions of mature BDNF. proBDNF is expressed in the peripheral tissues but the functions of peripheral proBDNF remain elusive. Here we showed that proBDNF and its predominant receptor, p75 pan-neurotrophin receptor were upregulated in the nerve fibers and inflammatory cells in the local tissue in inflammatory pain. Neutralization of proBDNF by polyclonal antibody attenuated pain in different models of inflammatory pain. Unilateral intra-plantar supplementation of proBDNF by injecting exogenous proBDNF or ectopic overexpression resulted in pain hypersensitivity and induced spinal phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. Exogenous proBDNF injection induced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the activation of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that inflammatory reaction contributed to the pro-algesic effect of proBDNF. Finally, we generated monoclonal anti-proBDNF antibody that could biologically block proBDNF. Administration of monoclonal Ab-proBDNF attenuated various types of inflammatory pain and surgical pain. Thus, peripheral proBDNF is a potential pain mediator and anti-proBDNF pretreatment may alleviate the development of inflammatory pain. PMID:27251195

  8. Synergetic effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor and olfactory ensheathing cells on optic nerve reparation (complete translation)

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Dan-ping; Chen, Qing-ying; Liu, Lin

    2016-01-01

    At present, there is no effective treatment for the repair of the optic nerve after injury, or improvement of its microenvironment for regeneration. Intravitreally injected ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) promote the long-distance regrowth of severed optic nerve fibers after intracranial injury. Here, we examined the efficacy of these techniques alone and in combination, in a rat model of optic nerve injury. We injected condensed OEC suspension at the site of injury, or CNTF into the vitreous body, or both simultaneously. Retrograde tracing techniques showed that 4 weeks postoperatively, the number of surviving retinal ganglion cells and their axonal density in the optic nerve were greater in rats subjected to OEC injection only than in those receiving CNTF injection only. Furthermore, combined OEC + CNTF injection achieved better results than either monotherapy. These findings confirm that OECs are better than CNTF at protecting injured neurons in the eye, but that combined OEC and CNTF therapy is notably more effective than either treatment alone. PMID:27482233

  9. Targeted delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for the treatment of blindness and deafness

    PubMed Central

    Khalin, Igor; Alyautdin, Renad; Kocherga, Ganna; Bakar, Muhamad Abu

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative causes of blindness and deafness possess a major challenge in their clinical management as proper treatment guidelines have not yet been found. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been established as a promising therapy against neurodegenerative disorders including hearing and visual loss. Unfortunately, the blood–retinal barrier and blood–cochlear barrier, which have a comparable structure to the blood–brain barrier prevent molecules of larger sizes (such as BDNF) from exiting the circulation and reaching the targeted cells. Anatomical features of the eye and ear allow use of local administration, bypassing histo-hematic barriers. This paper focuses on highlighting a variety of strategies proposed for the local administration of the BDNF, like direct delivery, viral gene therapy, and cell-based therapy, which have been shown to successfully improve development, survival, and function of spiral and retinal ganglion cells. The similarities and controversies for BDNF treatment of posterior eye diseases and inner ear diseases have been analyzed and compared. In this review, we also focus on the possibility of translation of this knowledge into clinical practice. And finally, we suggest that using nanoparticulate drug-delivery systems may substantially contribute to the development of clinically viable techniques for BDNF delivery into the cochlea or posterior eye segment, which, ultimately, can lead to a long-term or permanent rescue of auditory and optic neurons from degeneration. PMID:25995632

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor into adult neocortex strengthens a taste aversion memory.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Moreno, Araceli; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis F; Escobar, Martha L

    2016-01-15

    Nowadays, it is known that brain derived neurotrophic-factor (BDNF) is a protein critically involved in regulating long-term memory related mechanisms. Previous studies from our group in the insular cortex (IC), a brain structure of the temporal lobe implicated in acquisition, consolidation and retention of conditioned taste aversion (CTA), demonstrated that BDNF is essential for CTA consolidation. Recent studies show that BDNF-TrkB signaling is able to mediate the enhancement of memory. However, whether BDNF into neocortex is able to enhance aversive memories remains unexplored. In the present work, we administrated BDNF in a concentration capable of inducing in vivo neocortical LTP, into the IC immediately after CTA acquisition in two different conditions: a "strong-CTA" induced by 0.2M lithium chloride i.p. as unconditioned stimulus, and a "weak-CTA" induced by 0.1M lithium chloride i.p. Our results show that infusion of BDNF into the IC converts a weak CTA into a strong one, in a TrkB receptor-dependent manner. The present data suggest that BDNF into the adult insular cortex is sufficient to increase an aversive memory-trace.

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism, human memory, and synaptic neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Yvette N; McKay, Nicole S; Thompson, Christopher S; Hamm, Jeffrey P; Waldie, Karen E; Kirk, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Some people have much better memory than others, and there is compelling evidence that a considerable proportion of this variation in memory ability is genetically inherited. A form of synaptic plasticity known as long-term potentiation (LTP) is the principal candidate mechanism underlying memory formation in neural circuits, and it might be expected, therefore, that a genetic influence on the degree of LTP might in turn influence memory abilities. Of the genetic variations thought to significantly influence mnemonic ability in humans, the most likely to have its effect via LTP is a single nucleotide polymorphism affecting brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF (Val66Met)]. However, although it is likely that BDNF influences memory via a modulation of acute plasticity (i.e., LTP), BDNF also has considerable influence on structural development of neural systems. Thus, the influence of BDNF (Val66Met) on mnemonic performance via influences of brain structure as well as function must also be considered. In this brief review, we will describe the phenomenon of LTP and its study in non-human animals. We will discuss the relatively recent attempts to translate this work to studies in humans. We will describe how this has enabled investigation of the effect of the BDNF polymorphism on LTP, on brain structure, and on memory performance.

  12. The correlation between perceived social support, cortisol and brain derived neurotrophic factor levels in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Ma, Doy Yung; Chang, Wei Hung; Chi, Mei Hung; Tsai, Hsin Chun; Yang, Yen Kuang; Chen, Po See

    2016-05-30

    In this study, the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in stress resilience was investigated. With a focus on healthy subjects, we explored whether plasma BDNF levels are correlated with the dexamethasone suppression test (DST) and subjectively perceived social support status. Moreover, we examined the possible interacting effect of DST status and perceived social support on BDNF levels. Seventy-two healthy volunteers, 44 females and 28 males, were recruited from the community and completed the perceived routine support subscale of Measurement of Support Function (PRS_MSF) questionnaire. Plasma BDNF levels and DST suppression rate with the low dose DST were measured. There was a significant positive correlation between BDNF and DST suppression rate in the female subjects. This was also true for the plasma BDNF levels and PRS_MSF in the female subjects. The positive correlation between BDNF and PRS_MSF was significant only in female subjects with low DST suppression rates. Plasma BDNF levels were associated with stress resilience in a sex-specific manner. Subjects' belief in social support might buffer the biological stress reactions. Differences in social perception and the biological stress response between men and women merits further investigation. PMID:27137977

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor interacts with astrocytes and neurons to control respiration.

    PubMed

    Caravagna, Céline; Soliz, Jorge; Seaborn, Tommy

    2013-11-01

    Respiratory rhythm is generated and modulated in the brainstem. Neuronal involvement in respiratory control and rhythmogenesis is now clearly established. However, glial cells have also been shown to modulate the activity of brainstem respiratory groups. Although the potential involvement of other glial cell type(s) cannot be excluded, astrocytes are clearly involved in this modulation. In parallel, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) also modulates respiratory rhythm. The currently available data on the respective roles of astrocytes and BDNF in respiratory control and rhythmogenesis lead us to hypothesize that there is BDNF-mediated control of the communication between neurons and astrocytes in the maintenance of a proper neuronal network capable of generating a stable respiratory rhythm. According to this hypothesis, progression of Rett syndrome, an autism spectrum disease with disordered breathing, can be stabilized in mouse models by re-expressing the normal gene pattern in astrocytes or microglia, as well as by stimulating the BDNF signaling pathway. These results illustrate how the signaling mechanisms by which glia exerts its effects in brainstem respiratory groups is of great interest for pathologies associated with neurological respiratory disorders.

  14. Critical role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Shimizu, Eiji; Iyo, Masaomi

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this review is to integrate what is currently known about the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathophysiology of mood disorders including major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). We reviewed the pre-clinical and clinical papers demonstrating that BDNF plays a role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and in the mechanism of action of therapeutic agents. Pre-clinical studies suggest that the expression of BDNF might be a downstream target of antidepressant treatments and mood stabilizers such as lithium and valproate, and that BDNF exerts antidepressant activity in animal models of depression. Furthermore, BDNF protects against stress-induced neuronal damage, and it might affect neurogenesis in the hippocampus, which is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of mood disorders. Clinical studies have demonstrated that serum levels of BDNF in drug-naive patients with MDD are significantly decreased as compared with normal controls, and that BDNF might be an important agent for therapeutic recovery from MDD. Moreover, recent findings from family-based association studies have suggested that the BDNF gene is a potential risk locus for the development of BD. These findings suggest that BDNF plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and in the activity of therapeutic agents in patients with mood disorders. New agents capable of enhancing BDNF levels may lead aid the development of novel therapeutic drugs for patients with mood disorders.

  15. Excessive alcohol consumption is blocked by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Carnicella, Sebastien; Amamoto, Ryoji; Ron, Dorit

    2009-02-01

    We previously found that activation of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) pathway in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) reduces moderate alcohol (ethanol) intake in a rat operant self-administration paradigm. Here, we set out to assess the effect of GDNF in the VTA on excessive voluntary consumption of ethanol. Long-Evans rats were trained to drink large quantities of a 20% ethanol solution in an intermittent-access two-bottle choice drinking paradigm. The rats were given three 24-h sessions per week, and GDNF's actions were measured when rats achieved a baseline of ethanol consumption of 5.5g/kg/24h. We found that microinjection of GDNF into the VTA 10min before the beginning of an ethanol-drinking session significantly reduced ethanol intake and preference, but did not affect total fluid intake. We further show that GDNF greatly decreased both the first bout of excessive ethanol intake at the beginning of the session, and the later consummatory activity occurring during the dark cycle. These data suggest that GDNF is a rapid and long-lasting inhibitor of "binge-like" ethanol consumption.

  16. Increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in early crack cocaine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    von Diemen, Lisia; Kapczinski, Flavio; Sordi, Anne Orgle; de Magalhães Narvaez, Joana Correa; Guimarães, Luciano Santos Pinto; Kessler, Felix Henrique Paim; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; de Aguiar, Bianca Wollenhaupt; de Moura Gubert, Carolina; Pechansky, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) could be a biomarker for relapse, drug craving and withdrawal severity. In particular, elevated BDNF levels among former cocaine users have been associated with higher rates of relapse in 90 d. However, no data are available on BDNF levels at baseline and during crack cocaine withdrawal. This study evaluated BDNF among crack cocaine users during inpatient treatment, before and after withdrawal, vs. healthy controls. Clinical correlates with changes in BDNF levels were also assessed. Serum BDNF was evaluated in 49 male crack users on the first and last days of hospitalization and in 97 healthy controls. Serum BDNF was assayed using a sandwich ELISA kit. BDNF levels were significantly lower upon admission when compared to controls, even after adjustment for age, length of inpatient treatment, number of crack rocks used in the last 30 d, years of crack use and interaction between the latter two variables. At discharge, BDNF levels between patients and controls were similar. Number of crack rocks used in the last 30 d and years of crack use were inversely correlated with the outcome. Our findings show that BDNF levels increase during early crack cocaine withdrawal, at an inverse correlation with number of crack rocks used in the last 30 d and years of crack use. PMID:24067327

  17. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on dopaminergic function and motor behavior during aging.

    PubMed

    Boger, H A; Mannangatti, P; Samuvel, D J; Saylor, A J; Bender, T S; McGinty, J F; Fortress, A M; Zaman, V; Huang, P; Middaugh, L D; Randall, P K; Jayanthi, L D; Rohrer, B; Helke, K L; Granholm, A-C; Ramamoorthy, S

    2011-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critical in synaptic plasticity and in the survival and function of midbrain dopamine neurons. In this study, we assessed the effects of a partial genetic deletion of BDNF on motor function and dopamine (DA) neurotransmitter measures by comparing Bdnf(+/-) with wildtype mice (WT) at different ages. Bdnf(+/-) and WT mice had similar body weights until 12 months of age; however, at 21 months, Bdnf(+/-) mice were significantly heavier than WT mice. Horizontal and vertical motor activity was reduced for Bdnf(+/-) compared to WT mice, but was not influenced by age. Performance on an accelerating rotarod declined with age for both genotypes and was exacerbated for Bdnf(+/-) mice. Body weight did not correlate with any of the three behavioral measures studied. Dopamine neurotransmitter markers indicated no genotypic difference in striatal tyrosine hydroxylase, DA transporter (DAT) or vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) immunoreactivity at any age. However, DA transport via DAT (starting at 12 months) and VMAT2 (starting at 3 months) as well as KCl-stimulated DA release were reduced in Bdnf(+/-) mice and declined with age suggesting an increasingly important role for BDNF in the release and uptake of DA with the aging process. These findings suggest that a BDNF expression deficit becomes more critical to dopaminergic dynamics and related behavioral activities with increasing age.

  18. Pro-region engineering for improved yeast display and secretion of brain derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Burns, Michael L; Malott, Thomas M; Metcalf, Kevin J; Puguh, Arthya; Chan, Jonah R; Shusta, Eric V

    2016-03-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a promising therapeutic candidate for a variety of neurological diseases. However, it is difficult to produce as a recombinant protein. In its native mammalian context, BDNF is first produced as a pro-protein with subsequent proteolytic removal of the pro-region to yield mature BDNF protein. Therefore, in an attempt to improve yeast as a host for heterologous BDNF production, the BDNF pro-region was first evaluated for its effects on BDNF surface display and secretion. Addition of the wild-type pro-region to yeast BDNF production constructs improved BDNF folding both as a surface-displayed and secreted protein in terms of binding its natural receptors TrkB and p75, but titers remained low. Looking to further enhance the chaperone-like functions provided by the pro-region, two rounds of directed evolution were performed, yielding mutated pro-regions that further improved the display and secretion properties of BDNF. Subsequent optimization of the protease recognition site was used to control whether the produced protein was in pro- or mature BDNF forms. Taken together, we have demonstrated an effective strategy for improving BDNF compatibility with yeast protein engineering and secretion platforms. PMID:26580314

  19. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in different neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Zanardini, Roberta; Bonomini, Cristina; Zanetti, Orazio; Volpe, Daniele; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Gennarelli, Massimo; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella

    2013-01-01

    Consistent evidence indicates the involvement of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). In the present study, we compared serum BDNF in 624 subjects: 266 patients affected by AD, 28 by frontotemporal dementia (FTD), 40 by Lewy body dementia (LBD), 91 by vascular dementia (VAD), 30 by PD, and 169 controls. Our results evidenced lower BDNF serum levels in AD, FTD, LBD, and VAD patients (P < 0.001) and a higher BDNF concentration in patients affected by PD (P = 0.045). Analyses of effects of pharmacological treatments suggested significantly higher BDNF serum levels in patients taking mood stabilizers/antiepileptics (P = 0.009) and L-DOPA (P < 0.001) and significant reductions in patients taking benzodiazepines (P = 0.020). In conclusion, our results support the role of BDNF alterations in neurodegenerative mechanisms common to different forms of neurological disorders and underline the importance of including drug treatment in the analyses to avoid confounding effects. PMID:24024214

  20. Chronic stress affects the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in rat salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Saruta, Juri; Lee, Taeki; Shirasu, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Takeshi; Sato, Chikatoshi; Sato, Sadao; Tsukinoki, Keiichi

    2010-01-01

    Plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels are associated with several neural disorders. Previously, we reported that BDNF is produced from salivary glands under acute immobilization stress. Additionally, salivary glands are the origin of plasma BDNF during stress; however, the association between the expression of BDNF by the salivary glands under chronic stress conditions is not known. In the present study, we investigated whether plasma BDNF levels in chronic stress depend on the salivary glands. Expression of BDNF mRNA and protein were identified in the submandibular glands when male rats were exposed to chronic restraint stress (12 h daily for 22 days). Chronic stress significantly increased plasma BDNF concentration, as well as adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone levels, but was not altered under chronic stress in bilaterally sialoadenectomized rats. Since chronic stress increases plasma BDNF levels in the sialoadenectomized rat model, the plasma BDNF level was not dependent on BDNF from the salivary glands. Although the salivary glands were the source of plasma BDNF in acute stress conditions in our previous study, it seems that that the increased BDNF expression in the salivary glands in chronic stress does not contribute importantly to the increased circulating BDNF level. The increased plasma BDNF levels may play important roles in homeostasis under stress conditions.

  1. Sex and stress hormone influences on the expression and activity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Carbone, D L; Handa, R J

    2013-06-01

    The neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is recognized as a key component in the regulation of CNS ontogeny, homeostasis and adult neuroplasticity. The importance of BDNF in CNS development and function is well documented by numerous reports from animal studies linking abnormal BDNF signaling to metabolic disturbances and anxiety or depressive-like behavior. Despite the diverse roles for BDNF in nearly all aspects of CNS physiology, the regulation of BDNF expression, as well as our understanding of the signaling mechanisms associated with this neurotrophin, remains incomplete. However, links between sex hormones such as estradiol and testosterone, as well as endogenous and synthetic glucocorticoids (GCs), have emerged as important mediators of BDNF expression and function. Examples of such regulation include brain region-specific induction of Bdnf mRNA in response to estradiol. Additional studies have also documented regulation of the expression of the high-affinity BDNF receptor Tropomyosin-Related Kinase B by estradiol, thus implicating sex steroids not only in the regulation of BDNF expression, but also in mechanisms of signaling associated with it. In addition to gonadal steroids, further evidence also suggests functional interaction between BDNF and GCs, such as in the regulation of corticotrophin-releasing hormone and other important neuropeptides. In this review, we provide an overview of the roles played by selected sex or stress hormones in the regulation of BDNF expression and signaling in the CNS. PMID:23211562

  2. Plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and response to ketamine in treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Haile, C N; Murrough, J W; Iosifescu, D V; Chang, L C; Al Jurdi, R K; Foulkes, A; Iqbal, S; Mahoney, J J; De La Garza, R; Charney, D S; Newton, T F; Mathew, S J

    2014-02-01

    Ketamine produces rapid antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant depression (TRD), but the magnitude of response varies considerably between individual patients. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been investigated as a biomarker of treatment response in depression and has been implicated in the mechanism of action of ketamine. We evaluated plasma BDNF and associations with symptoms in 22 patients with TRD enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of ketamine compared to an anaesthetic control (midazolam). Ketamine significantly increased plasma BDNF levels in responders compared to non-responders 240 min post-infusion, and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores were negatively correlated with BDNF (r=-0.701, p = 0.008). Plasma BDNF levels at 240 min post-infusion were highly negatively associated with MADRS scores at 240 min (r = -0.897, p=.002), 24 h (r = -0.791, p = 0.038), 48 h (r = -0.944, p = 0.001) and 72 h (r = -0.977, p = 0.010). No associations with BDNF were found for patients receiving midazolam. These data support plasma BDNF as a peripheral biomarker relevant to ketamine antidepressant response.

  3. Oroxylin A enhances memory consolidation through the brain-derived neurotrophic factor in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Younghwan; Lee, Hyung Eun; Park, Se Jin; Jeon, Su Jin; Jeon, Se Jin; Cheong, Jae Hoon; Shin, Chan Young; Son, Kun Ho; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Memory consolidation is a process by which acquired information is transformed from a labile into a more stable state that can be retrieved at a later time. In the present study, we investigated the role of oroxylin A on the memory consolidation process in mice. Oroxylin A improved the memory retention administered at 0 h, 1 h and 3 h after training in a passive avoidance task, suggesting that oroxylin A facilitates memory consolidation. Oroxylin A increased mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (mBDNF) levels in the hippocampus from 6h to 24h after administration. Moreover, 3h post-training administration of oroxylin A enhanced the mBDNF level at 9h after the acquisition trial compared to the level at 6h after the acquisition trial. However, 6h post-training administration of oroxylin A did not increase the mBDNF level at 9h after the acquisition trial. Blocking mBDNF signaling with recombinant tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB)-Fc or k252a at 9h after the acquisition trial obstructed the effect of oroxylin A on memory consolidation. Taken together, our data suggest that oroxylin A facilitates memory consolidation through BDNF-TrkB signaling and confirms that the increase of BDNF in a specific time window plays a crucial role in memory consolidation.

  4. A meta-analytic review of the effects of exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Szuhany, Kristin L; Bugatti, Matteo; Otto, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Consistent evidence indicates that exercise improves cognition and mood, with preliminary evidence suggesting that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may mediate these effects. The aim of the current meta-analysis was to provide an estimate of the strength of the association between exercise and increased BDNF levels in humans across multiple exercise paradigms. We conducted a meta-analysis of 29 studies (N = 1111 participants) examining the effect of exercise on BDNF levels in three exercise paradigms: (1) a single session of exercise, (2) a session of exercise following a program of regular exercise, and (3) resting BDNF levels following a program of regular exercise. Moderators of this effect were also examined. Results demonstrated a moderate effect size for increases in BDNF following a single session of exercise (Hedges' g = 0.46, p < 0.001). Further, regular exercise intensified the effect of a session of exercise on BDNF levels (Hedges' g = 0.59, p = 0.02). Finally, results indicated a small effect of regular exercise on resting BDNF levels (Hedges' g = 0.27, p = 0.005). When analyzing results across paradigms, sex significantly moderated the effect of exercise on BDNF levels, such that studies with more women showed less BDNF change resulting from exercise. Effect size analysis supports the role of exercise as a strategy for enhancing BDNF activity in humans, but indicates that the magnitude of these effects may be lower in females relative to males.

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism, human memory, and synaptic neuroplasticity.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Yvette N; McKay, Nicole S; Thompson, Christopher S; Hamm, Jeffrey P; Waldie, Karen E; Kirk, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Some people have much better memory than others, and there is compelling evidence that a considerable proportion of this variation in memory ability is genetically inherited. A form of synaptic plasticity known as long-term potentiation (LTP) is the principal candidate mechanism underlying memory formation in neural circuits, and it might be expected, therefore, that a genetic influence on the degree of LTP might in turn influence memory abilities. Of the genetic variations thought to significantly influence mnemonic ability in humans, the most likely to have its effect via LTP is a single nucleotide polymorphism affecting brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF (Val66Met)]. However, although it is likely that BDNF influences memory via a modulation of acute plasticity (i.e., LTP), BDNF also has considerable influence on structural development of neural systems. Thus, the influence of BDNF (Val66Met) on mnemonic performance via influences of brain structure as well as function must also be considered. In this brief review, we will describe the phenomenon of LTP and its study in non-human animals. We will discuss the relatively recent attempts to translate this work to studies in humans. We will describe how this has enabled investigation of the effect of the BDNF polymorphism on LTP, on brain structure, and on memory performance. PMID:26263066

  6. Low-level laser therapy promotes dendrite growth via upregulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chengbo; He, Zhiyong; Xing, Da

    2014-09-01

    Downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus occurs early in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since BDNF plays a critical role in neuronal survival and dendrite growth, BDNF upregulation may contribute to rescue dendrite atrophy and cell loss in AD. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to regulate neuronal function both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we found that LLLT rescued neurons loss and dendritic atrophy via the increase of both BDNF mRNA and protein expression. In addition, dendrite growth was improved after LLLT, characterized by upregulation of PSD95 expression, and the increase in length, branching, and spine density of dendrites in hippocampal neurons. Together, these studies suggest that upregulation of BDNF with LLLT can ameliorate Aβ-induced neurons loss and dendritic atrophy, thus identifying a novel pathway by which LLLT protects against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. Our research may provide a feasible therapeutic approach to control the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Glucocorticoid regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor: relevance to hippocampal structural and functional plasticity.

    PubMed

    Suri, D; Vaidya, V A

    2013-06-01

    Glucocorticoids serve as key stress response hormones that facilitate stress coping. However, sustained glucocorticoid exposure is associated with adverse consequences on the brain, in particular within the hippocampus. Chronic glucocorticoid exposure evokes neuronal cell damage and dendritic atrophy, reduces hippocampal neurogenesis and impairs synaptic plasticity. Glucocorticoids also alter expression and signaling of the neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Since BDNF is known to promote neuroplasticity, enhance cell survival, increase hippocampal neurogenesis and cellular excitability, it has been hypothesized that specific adverse effects of glucocorticoids may be mediated by attenuating BDNF expression and signaling. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of literature examining the influence of glucocorticoids on BDNF, and to address whether specific effects of glucocorticoids arise through perturbation of BDNF signaling. We integrate evidence of glucocorticoid regulation of BDNF at multiple levels, spanning from the well-documented glucocorticoid-induced changes in BDNF mRNA to studies examining alterations in BDNF receptor-mediated signaling. Further, we delineate potential lines of future investigation to address hitherto unexplored aspects of the influence of glucocorticoids on BDNF. Finally, we discuss the current understanding of the contribution of BDNF to the modulation of structural and functional plasticity by glucocorticoids, in particular in the context of the hippocampus. Understanding the mechanistic crosstalk between glucocorticoids and BDNF holds promise for the identification of potential therapeutic targets for disorders associated with the dysfunction of stress hormone pathways.

  8. Ciliary neurotrophic factor has intrinsic and extrinsic roles in regulating B cell differentiation and bone structure

    PubMed Central

    Askmyr, Maria; White, Kirby E.; Jovic, Tanja; King, Hannah A.; Quach, Julie M.; Maluenda, Ana C.; Baker, Emma K.; Smeets, Monique F.; Walkley, Carl R.; Purton, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    The gp130 receptor and its binding partners play a central role in cytokine signalling. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of the cytokines that signals through the gp130 receptor complex. CNTF has previously been shown to be a negative regulator of trabecular bone remodelling and important for motor neuron development. Since haematopoietic cell maintenance and differentiation is dependent on the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, where cells of the osteoblastic lineage are important regulators, we hypothesised that CNTF may also have important roles in regulating haematopoiesis. Analysis of haematopoietic parameters in male and female Cntf−/− mice at 12 and 24 weeks of age revealed altered B lymphopoiesis. Strikingly, the B lymphocyte phenotype differed based on sex, age and also the BM microenvironment in which the B cells develop. When BM cells from wildtype mice were transplanted into Cntf−/− mice, there were minimal effects on B lymphopoiesis or bone parameters. However, when Cntf−/− BM cells were transplanted into a wildtype BM microenvironment, there were changes in both haematopoiesis and bone parameters. Our data reveal that haematopoietic cell-derived CNTF has roles in regulating BM B cell lymphopoiesis and both trabecular and cortical bone, the latter in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:26487326

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulates dopaminergic deficits in a transgenic mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Pineda, José R; Canals, Josep M; Bosch, Miquel; Adell, Albert; Mengod, Guadalupe; Artigas, Francesc; Ernfors, Patrik; Alberch, Jordi

    2005-06-01

    Dysfunction of dopaminergic neurons may contribute to motor impairment in Huntington's disease. Here, we study the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in alterations of the nigrostriatal system associated with transgenics carrying mutant huntingtin. Using huntingtin-BDNF+/- double-mutant mice, we analyzed the effects of reducing the levels of BDNF expression in a model of Huntington's disease (R6/1). When compared with R6/1 mice, these mice exhibit an increased number of aggregates in the substantia nigra pars compacta. In addition, reduction of BDNF expression exacerbates the dopaminergic neuronal dysfunction seen in mutant huntingtin mice, such as the decrease in retrograde labelling of dopaminergic neurons and striatal dopamine content. However, mutant huntingtin mice with normal or lowered BDNF expression show the same decrease in the anterograde transport, number of dopaminergic neurons and nigral volume. In addition, reduced BDNF expression causes decreased dopamine receptor expression in mutant huntingtin mice. Examination of changes in locomotor activity induced by dopamine receptor agonists revealed that, in comparison with R6/1 mice, the double mutant mice exhibit lower activity in response to amphetamine, but not to apomorphine. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that the decreased BDNF expression observed in Huntington's disease exacerbates dopaminergic neuronal dysfunction, which may participate in the motor disturbances associated with this neurodegenerative disorder.

  10. Post-traumatic stress disorder risk and brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Xian-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which regulates neuronal survival, growth differentiation, and synapse formation, is known to be associated with depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the molecular mechanism for those mental disorders remains unknown. Studies have shown that BDNF is associated with PTSD risk and exaggerated startle reaction (a major arousal manifestation of PTSD) in United States military service members who were deployed during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The frequency of the Met/Met in BDNF gene was greater among those with PTSD than those without PTSD. Among individuals who experienced fewer lifetime stressful events, the Met carriers have significantly higher total and startle scores on the PTSD Checklist than the Val/Val carriers. In addition, subjects with PTSD showed higher levels of BDNF in their peripheral blood plasma than the non-probable-PTSD controls. Increased BDNF levels and startle response were observed in both blood plasma and brain hippocampus by inescapable tail shock in rats. In this paper, we reviewed these data to discuss BDNF as a potential biomarker for PTSD risk and its possible roles in the onset of PTSD. PMID:27014593

  11. Meta-analysis and association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Zai, Gwyneth; Zai, Clement C; Arnold, Paul D; Freeman, Natalie; Burroughs, Eliza; Kennedy, James L; Richter, Margaret A

    2015-04-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a severe psychiatric condition with a clear genetic component (Nicolini et al., 2009) in which neurodevelopmental mechanisms may be etiologically important. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an interesting candidate for molecular analysis in OCD on the basis of potential functional relevance, positive association studies, and reported interaction between this gene and other neurotransmitters implicated in this disorder.

  12. The Impacts of Swimming Exercise on Hippocampal Expression of Neurotrophic Factors in Rats Exposed to Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Rui-Li; Zhang, Li-Hong; Xue, Ying; Tang, Mi-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Depression is associated with stress-induced neural atrophy in limbic brain regions, whereas exercise has antidepressant effects as well as increasing hippocampal synaptic plasticity by strengthening neurogenesis, metabolism, and vascular function. A key mechanism mediating these broad benefits of exercise on the brain is induction of neurotrophic factors, which instruct downstream structural and functional changes. To systematically evaluate the potential neurotrophic factors that were involved in the antidepressive effects of exercise, in this study, we assessed the effects of swimming exercise on hippocampal mRNA expression of several classes of the growth factors (BDNF, GDNF, NGF, NT-3, FGF2, VEGF, and IGF-1) and peptides (VGF and NPY) in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). Our study demonstrated that the swimming training paradigm significantly induced the expression of BDNF and BDNF-regulated peptides (VGF and NPY) and restored their stress-induced downregulation. Additionally, the exercise protocol also increased the antiapoptotic Bcl-xl expression and normalized the CUMS mediated induction of proapoptotic Bax mRNA level. Overall, our data suggest that swimming exercise has antidepressant effects, increasing the resistance to the neural damage caused by CUMS, and both BDNF and its downstream neurotrophic peptides may exert a major function in the exercise related adaptive processes to CUMS. PMID:25477997

  13. Effects of aerobic exercise training on peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and eotaxin-1 levels in obese young men

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Su Youn; Roh, Hee Tae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise training on the levels of peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and eotaxin-1 in obese young men. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects included sixteen obese young men with a body mass index greater than 25 kg/m2. They were randomly divided between control and exercise groups (n = 8 in each group). The exercise group performed treadmill exercise for 40 min, 3 times a week for 8 weeks at the intensity of 70% heart rate reserve. Blood collection was performed to examine the levels of serum glucose, plasma malonaldehyde, serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and plasma eotaxin-1 before and after the intervention (aerobic exercise training). [Results] Following the intervention, serum BDNF levels were significantly higher, while serum glucose, plasma MDA, and plasma eotaxin-1 levels were significantly lower than those prior to the intervention in the exercise group. [Conclusion] Aerobic exercise training can induce neurogenesis in obese individuals by increasing the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and reducing the levels of eotaxin-1. Alleviation of oxidative stress is possibly responsible for such changes. PMID:27190482

  14. Effects of aerobic exercise training on peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and eotaxin-1 levels in obese young men.

    PubMed

    Cho, Su Youn; Roh, Hee Tae

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise training on the levels of peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and eotaxin-1 in obese young men. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects included sixteen obese young men with a body mass index greater than 25 kg/m(2). They were randomly divided between control and exercise groups (n = 8 in each group). The exercise group performed treadmill exercise for 40 min, 3 times a week for 8 weeks at the intensity of 70% heart rate reserve. Blood collection was performed to examine the levels of serum glucose, plasma malonaldehyde, serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and plasma eotaxin-1 before and after the intervention (aerobic exercise training). [Results] Following the intervention, serum BDNF levels were significantly higher, while serum glucose, plasma MDA, and plasma eotaxin-1 levels were significantly lower than those prior to the intervention in the exercise group. [Conclusion] Aerobic exercise training can induce neurogenesis in obese individuals by increasing the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and reducing the levels of eotaxin-1. Alleviation of oxidative stress is possibly responsible for such changes. PMID:27190482

  15. The impacts of swimming exercise on hippocampal expression of neurotrophic factors in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei; Dang, Rui-Li; Li, Huan-De; Zhang, Li-Hong; Zhu, Wen-Ye; Xue, Ying; Tang, Mi-Mi

    2014-01-01

    Depression is associated with stress-induced neural atrophy in limbic brain regions, whereas exercise has antidepressant effects as well as increasing hippocampal synaptic plasticity by strengthening neurogenesis, metabolism, and vascular function. A key mechanism mediating these broad benefits of exercise on the brain is induction of neurotrophic factors, which instruct downstream structural and functional changes. To systematically evaluate the potential neurotrophic factors that were involved in the antidepressive effects of exercise, in this study, we assessed the effects of swimming exercise on hippocampal mRNA expression of several classes of the growth factors (BDNF, GDNF, NGF, NT-3, FGF2, VEGF, and IGF-1) and peptides (VGF and NPY) in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). Our study demonstrated that the swimming training paradigm significantly induced the expression of BDNF and BDNF-regulated peptides (VGF and NPY) and restored their stress-induced downregulation. Additionally, the exercise protocol also increased the antiapoptotic Bcl-xl expression and normalized the CUMS mediated induction of proapoptotic Bax mRNA level. Overall, our data suggest that swimming exercise has antidepressant effects, increasing the resistance to the neural damage caused by CUMS, and both BDNF and its downstream neurotrophic peptides may exert a major function in the exercise related adaptive processes to CUMS. PMID:25477997

  16. Human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells and brain-derived neurotrophic factor protect injured optic nerve: viscoelasticity characterization.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xue-Man; Liu, Yan; Wu, Fei; Yuan, Yi; Luo, Min

    2016-04-01

    The optic nerve is a viscoelastic solid-like biomaterial. Its normal stress relaxation and creep properties enable the nerve to resist constant strain and protect it from injury. We hypothesized that stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve change after injury. More-over, human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells may restore these changes to normal. To validate this hypothesis, a rabbit model of optic nerve injury was established using a clamp approach. At 7 days after injury, the vitreous body re-ceived a one-time injection of 50 μg human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or 1 × 10(6) human umbilical cord blood-derived stem cells. At 30 days after injury, stress relaxation and creep properties of the optic nerve that received treatment had recovered greatly, with patho-logical changes in the injured optic nerve also noticeably improved. These results suggest that human brain-derived neurotrophic factor or umbilical cord blood-derived stem cell intervention promotes viscoelasticity recovery of injured optic nerves, and thereby contributes to nerve recovery. PMID:27212930

  17. Interactive effect of excitotoxic injury and dietary restriction on neurogenesis and neurotrophic factors in adult male rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sushil; Parkash, Jyoti; Kataria, Hardeep; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2009-12-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) is known to have potential health benefits including enhanced resistance of neurons to excitotoxic, oxidative and metabolic insults, cancer, stress, diabetes, reduced morbidity, and increased life span. In the present study, we examined the effect of DR (alternate day feeding regimen) on neurogenesis, expression of immature neuronal marker polysialic acid neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) and neurotrophic factors from different brain regions such as subventricular zone (SVZ), subgranular zone (SGZ) of hippocampus, median eminence arcuate (ME-ARC) region of hypothalamus, and piriform cortex (PIR) of adult male rats and further challenged ad libitum fed (AL) and DR rats with pilocarpine to induce excitotoxic injury. The quantitative analysis of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling revealed a significant increase in the proliferation rate of neuronal progenitor cells from discrete brain regions in DR rats with and without pilocarpine induced seizures as compared to AL rats. DR significantly enhanced the expression of PSA-NCAM and neurotrophic factors, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3). There was a marked reduction in neuronal cell death in SVZ and PIR cortex after pilocarpine administration in DR rats. These results add to the accumulating evidence that DR may be an effective intervention to enhance the resistance of brain to excitotoxic injury.

  18. A novel cysteine-rich neurotrophic factor in Aplysia facilitates growth, MAPK activation, and long-term synaptic facilitation.

    PubMed

    Pu, Lu; Kopec, Ashley M; Boyle, Heather D; Carew, Thomas J

    2014-04-01

    Neurotrophins are critically involved in developmental processes such as neuronal cell survival, growth, and differentiation, as well as in adult synaptic plasticity contributing to learning and memory. Our previous studies examining neurotrophins and memory formation in Aplysia showed that a TrkB ligand is required for MAPK activation, long-term synaptic facilitation (LTF), and long-term memory (LTM) for sensitization. These studies indicate that neurotrophin-like molecules in Aplysia can act as key elements in a functionally conserved TrkB signaling pathway. Here we report that we have cloned and characterized a novel neurotrophic factor, Aplysia cysteine-rich neurotrophic factor (apCRNF), which shares classical structural and functional characteristics with mammalian neurotrophins. We show that apCRNF (1) is highly enriched in the CNS, (2) enhances neurite elongation and branching, (3) interacts with mammalian TrkB and p75(NTR), (4) is released from Aplysia CNS in an activity-dependent fashion, (5) facilitates MAPK activation in a tyrosine kinase dependent manner in response to sensitizing stimuli, and (6) facilitates the induction of LTF. These results show that apCRNF is a native neurotrophic factor in Aplysia that can engage the molecular and synaptic mechanisms underlying memory formation.

  19. The effect of regular Taekwondo exercise on Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and Stroop test in undergraduate student

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngil

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Taekwondo exercise on Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the Stroop test in undergraduate students. [Methods] Fourteen male subjects participated in this study. They were separated into a Control group (N = 7) and an Exercise group (N = 7). Subjects participated in Taekwondo exercise training for 8 weeks. They underwent to Taekwondo exercise training for 85 minutes per day, 5 times a week at RPE of 11~15. The taekwondo exercise training comprised an aerobic exercise (20min) mode and a dynamic exercise (65min) mode. All data were analyzed by repeated measures two-way ANOVA. [Results] There were no significant differences in the physical characteristics of the subjects. Although weight and BMI showed a tendency to decreased in the exercise group (EG). Also, neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, IGF-1) were not significantly different after 8 weeks in the two groups. However, BDNF and IGF-1 showed a tendency to increase in the exercise group (EG). Finally, the Stroop test (word, color) results were significantly different(p < .05) in the exercise group (EG). [Conclusion] These finding suggest that 8 weeks of regular Taekwondo exercise training may increase cognitive functions (Stroop test). However the training did not statistically affect neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, IGF-1) in undergraduate students. PMID:26244125

  20. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) for human retinal degeneration: phase I trial of CNTF delivered by encapsulated cell intraocular implants.

    PubMed

    Sieving, Paul A; Caruso, Rafael C; Tao, Weng; Coleman, Hanna R; Thompson, Darby J S; Fullmer, Keri R; Bush, Ronald A

    2006-03-01

    Neurotrophic factors are agents with a promising ability to retard progression of neurodegenerative diseases and are effective in slowing photoreceptor degeneration in animal models of retinitis pigmentosa. Here we report a human clinical trial of a neurotrophic factor for retinal neurodegeneration. In this Phase I safety trial, human ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was delivered by cells transfected with the human CNTF gene and sequestered within capsules that were surgically implanted into the vitreous of the eye. The outer membrane of the encapsulated cell implant is semipermeable to allow CNTF to reach the retina. Ten participants received CNTF implants in one eye. When the implants were removed after 6 months, they contained viable cells with minimal cell loss and gave CNTF output at levels previously shown to be therapeutic for retinal degeneration in rcd1 dogs. Although the trial was not powered to form a judgment as to clinical efficacy, of seven eyes for which visual acuity could be tracked by conventional reading charts, three eyes reached and maintained improved acuities of 10-15 letters, equivalent to two- to three-line improvement on standard Snellen acuity charts. A surgically related choroidal detachment in one eye resulted in a transient acuity decrease that resolved with conservative management. This Phase I trial indicated that CNTF is safe for the human retina even with severely compromised photoreceptors. The approach to delivering therapeutic proteins to degenerating retinas using encapsulated cell implants may have application beyond disease caused by genetic mutations.

  1. Effects of aerobic exercise training on peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and eotaxin-1 levels in obese young men.

    PubMed

    Cho, Su Youn; Roh, Hee Tae

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of aerobic exercise training on the levels of peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor and eotaxin-1 in obese young men. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects included sixteen obese young men with a body mass index greater than 25 kg/m(2). They were randomly divided between control and exercise groups (n = 8 in each group). The exercise group performed treadmill exercise for 40 min, 3 times a week for 8 weeks at the intensity of 70% heart rate reserve. Blood collection was performed to examine the levels of serum glucose, plasma malonaldehyde, serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and plasma eotaxin-1 before and after the intervention (aerobic exercise training). [Results] Following the intervention, serum BDNF levels were significantly higher, while serum glucose, plasma MDA, and plasma eotaxin-1 levels were significantly lower than those prior to the intervention in the exercise group. [Conclusion] Aerobic exercise training can induce neurogenesis in obese individuals by increasing the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and reducing the levels of eotaxin-1. Alleviation of oxidative stress is possibly responsible for such changes.

  2. Chagas’ disease parasite-derived neurotrophic factor activates cholinergic gene expression in neuronal PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Akpan, Nsikan; Caradonna, Kacey; Chuenkova, Marina V.; PereiraPerrin, Mercio

    2008-01-01

    A parasite-derived neurotrophic factor (PDNF) produced by the Chagas’ disease parasite Trypanosoma cruzi binds nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor TrkA, increasing receptor autophosphorylation, activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/Erk) pathways, and transcription factor CREB. The end-result is enhanced survival and neuritogenesis of various types of neurons. PDNF also enhances the expression and activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, a rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine and other catecholamine neurotransmitters. It remains unknown, however, if PDNF alters expression and metabolism of acetylcholine (ACh), a neurotransmitter thought to play a role in Chagas’ disease progression. Here we demonstrate that PDNF stimulates mRNA and protein expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), which are critical for synthesis and storage of ACh. Stimulation requires functional TrkA because it did not occur in cell mutants that lack the receptor and in TrkA-expressing wild-type cells treated with K252a, an inhibitor of TrkA kinase activity. It also requires TrkA-dependent PI3K and MAPK/Erk signaling pathways because PDNF stimulation of cholinergic transcripts is abolished by specific pharmacological inhibitors. Furthermore, the cholinergic actions of PDNF were reproduced by PDNF-expressing extracellular T. cruzi trypomastigotes at the start of host cell invasion. In contrast, host cells bearing intracellular T. cruzi showed decreased, rather than increased, cholinergic gene expression. These results suggest that T. cruzi invasion of the nervous system alters cholinergic gene expression and that could play a role in neuropathology, and/or lack thereof, in Chagas’ disease patients. PMID:18502403

  3. Chagas' disease parasite-derived neurotrophic factor activates cholinergic gene expression in neuronal PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Akpan, Nsikan; Caradonna, Kacey; Chuenkova, Marina V; PereiraPerrin, Mercio

    2008-06-27

    A parasite-derived neurotrophic factor (PDNF) produced by the Chagas' disease parasite Trypanosoma cruzi binds nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor TrkA, increasing receptor autophosphorylation, and activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/Erk) pathways, and transcription factor CREB. The end-result is enhanced survival and neuritogenesis of various types of neurons. PDNF also enhances the expression and activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, a rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine and other catecholamine neurotransmitters. It remains unknown, however, if PDNF alters expression and metabolism of acetylcholine (ACh), a neurotransmitter thought to play a role in Chagas' disease progression. Here we demonstrate that PDNF stimulates mRNA and protein expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), which are critical for synthesis and storage of ACh. Stimulation requires functional TrkA because it did not occur in cell mutants that lack the receptor and in TrkA-expressing wild-type cells treated with K252a, an inhibitor of TrkA kinase activity. It also requires TrkA-dependent PI3K and MAPK/Erk signaling pathways because PDNF stimulation of cholinergic transcripts is abolished by specific pharmacological inhibitors. Furthermore, the cholinergic actions of PDNF were reproduced by PDNF-expressing extracellular T. cruzi trypomastigotes at the start of host cell invasion. In contrast, host cells bearing intracellular T. cruzi showed decreased, rather than increased, cholinergic gene expression. These results suggest that T. cruzi invasion of the nervous system alters cholinergic gene expression and that could play a role in neuropathology, and/or lack thereof, in Chagas' disease patients. PMID:18502403

  4. Cerebrolysin, a mixture of neurotrophic factors induces marked neuroprotection in spinal cord injury following intoxication of engineered nanoparticles from metals.

    PubMed

    Menon, Preeti Kumaran; Muresanu, Dafin Fior; Sharma, Aruna; Mössler, Herbert; Sharma, Hari Shanker

    2012-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the world's most disastrous disease for which there is no effective treatment till today. Several studies suggest that nanoparticles could adversely influence the pathology of SCI and thereby alter the efficacy of many neuroprotective agents. Thus, there is an urgent need to find suitable therapeutic agents that could minimize cord pathology following trauma upon nanoparticle intoxication. Our laboratory has been engaged for the last 7 years in finding suitable therapeutic strategies that could equally reduce cord pathology in normal and in nanoparticle-treated animal models of SCI. We observed that engineered nanoparticles from metals e.g., aluminum (Al), silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) (50-60 nm) when administered in rats daily for 7 days (50 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in exacerbation of cord pathology after trauma that correlated well with breakdown of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) to serum proteins. The entry of plasma proteins into the cord leads to edema formation and neuronal damage. Thus, future drugs should be designed in such a way to be effective even when the SCI is influenced by nanoparticles. Previous research suggests that a suitable combination of neurotrophic factors could induce marked neuroprotection in SCI in normal animals. Thus, we examined the effects of a new drug; cerebrolysin that is a mixture of different neurotrophic factors e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and other peptide fragments to treat normal or nanoparticle-treated rats after SCI. Our observations showed that cerebrolysin (2.5 ml/kg, i.v.) before SCI resulted in good neuroprotection in normal animals, whereas nanoparticle-treated rats required a higher dose of the drug (5.0 ml/kg, i.v.) to induce comparable neuroprotection in the cord after SCI. Cerebrolysin also reduced spinal cord water content, leakage of plasma proteins

  5. Regulation of proteolytic cleavage of brain-derived neurotrophic factor precursor by antidepressants in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pao-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has supported the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in antidepressant effect. The precursor of BDNF (proBDNF) often exerts opposing biological effects on mature BDNF (mBDNF). Hence, the balance between proBDNF and mBDNF might be critical in total neurotrophic effects, leading to susceptibility to or recovery from depression. In the current study, we measured the protein expression levels of proBDNF, and its proteolytic products, truncated BDNF, and mBDNF, in human SH-SY5Y cells treated with different antidepressants. We found that the treatment significantly increased the production of mBDNF, but decreased the production of truncated BDNF and proBDNF. These results support that antidepressants can promote proBDNF cleavage. Further studies are needed to clarify whether proBDNF cleavage plays a role in antidepressant mechanisms. PMID:26491331

  6. The Effect of Exercise Training on Resting Concentrations of Peripheral Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF): A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dinoff, Adam; Herrmann, Nathan; Swardfager, Walter; Liu, Celina S.; Sherman, Chelsea; Chan, Sarah; Lanctôt, Krista L.

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanisms through which physical activity supports healthy brain function remain to be elucidated. One hypothesis suggests that increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mediates some cognitive and mood benefits. This meta-analysis sought to determine the effect of exercise training on resting concentrations of BDNF in peripheral blood. Methods MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, SPORTDiscus, Rehabilitation & Sports Medicine Source, and CINAHL databases were searched for original, peer-reviewed reports of peripheral blood BDNF concentrations before and after exercise interventions ≥ 2 weeks. Risk of bias was assessed using standardized criteria. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) were generated from random effects models. Risk of publication bias was assessed using funnel plots and Egger’s test. Potential sources of heterogeneity were explored in subgroup analyses. Results In 29 studies that met inclusion criteria, resting concentrations of peripheral blood BDNF were higher after intervention (SMD = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.17–0.60, p < 0.001). Subgroup analyses suggested a significant effect in aerobic (SMD = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.33–0.99, p < 0.001) but not resistance training (SMD = 0.07, 95% CI: -0.15–0.30, p = 0.52) interventions. No significant difference in effect was observed between males and females, nor in serum vs plasma. Conclusion Aerobic but not resistance training interventions increased resting BDNF concentrations in peripheral blood. PMID:27658238

  7. Pharmacological Profile of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Splice Variant Translation Using a Novel Drug Screening Assay

    PubMed Central

    Vaghi, Valentina; Polacchini, Alessio; Baj, Gabriele; Pinheiro, Vera L. M.; Vicario, Annalisa; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key regulator of neuronal development and plasticity. BDNF is a major pharmaceutical target in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. However, pharmacological modulation of this neurotrophin is challenging because BDNF is generated by multiple, alternatively spliced transcripts with different 5′- and 3′UTRs. Each BDNF mRNA variant is transcribed independently, but translation regulation is unknown. To evaluate the translatability of BDNF transcripts, we developed an in vitro luciferase assay in human neuroblastoma cells. In unstimulated cells, each BDNF 5′- and 3′UTR determined a different basal translation level of the luciferase reporter gene. However, constructs with either a 5′UTR or a 3′UTR alone showed poor translation modulation by BDNF, KCl, dihydroxyphenylglycine, AMPA, NMDA, dopamine, acetylcholine, norepinephrine, or serotonin. Constructs consisting of the luciferase reporter gene flanked by the 5′UTR of one of the most abundant BDNF transcripts in the brain (exons 1, 2c, 4, and 6) and the long 3′UTR responded selectively to stimulation with the different receptor agonists, and only transcripts 2c and 6 were increased by the antidepressants desipramine and mirtazapine. We propose that BDNF mRNA variants represent “a quantitative code” for regulated expression of the protein. Thus, to discriminate the efficacy of drugs in stimulating BDNF synthesis, it is appropriate to use variant-specific in vitro screening tests. PMID:25074925

  8. Association between serum levels of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor and attention deficits in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Niitsu, Tomihisa; Shirayama, Yukihiko; Matsuzawa, Daisuke; Shimizu, Eiji; Hashimoto, Kenji; Iyo, Masaomi

    2014-07-11

    Several lines of evidence suggest that glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we investigated the association between GDNF serum levels and the clinical status of medicated patients with schizophrenia. Sixty-three medicated patients with schizophrenia and 52 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited. Patients were evaluated using the brief psychiatry rating scale, the scale for the assessment of negative symptoms (SANS) and neuropsychological tests. Serum levels of GDNF were determined using an ELISA method. Serum levels of GDNF did not differ between schizophrenia patients and controls. Higher GDNF serum levels were associated with better performances on the Digit Span in healthy controls but not in schizophrenics. At the same time, higher GDNF serum levels were associated with severe attention deficits on the SANS subscale, in schizophrenics. Our preliminary study suggests that serum levels of GDNF may be an unsuitable biomarker for schizophrenia, although it may be associated with working memory in healthy controls and the pathophysiology of attention deficits in schizophrenia.

  9. Muscle Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor α Promotes Axonal Regeneration and Functional Recovery Following Peripheral Nerve Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy; Spearry, Rachel P.; Leahy, Kendra M.; Robitz, Rachel; Trinh, Dennis S.; Mason, Carter O.; Zurbrugg, Rebekah J.; Batt, Myra K.; Paul, Richard J.; Maclennan, A. John

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) administration maintains, protects, and promotes the regeneration of both motor neurons (MNs) and skeletal muscle in a wide variety of models. Expression of CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα), an essential CNTF receptor component, is greatly increased in skeletal muscle following neuromuscular insult. Together the data suggest that muscle CNTFRα may contribute to neuromuscular maintenance, protection, and/or regeneration in vivo. To directly address the role of muscle CNTFRα, we selectively-depleted it in vivo by using a “floxed” CNTFRα mouse line and a gene construct (mlc1f-Cre) that drives the expression of Cre specifically in skeletal muscle. The resulting mice were challenged with sciatic nerve crush. Counting of nerve axons and retrograde tracing of MNs indicated that muscle CNTFRα contributes to MN axonal regeneration across the lesion site. Walking track analysis indicated that muscle CNTFRα is also required for normal recovery of motor function. However, the same muscle CNTFRα depletion unexpectedly had no detected effect on the maintenance or regeneration of the muscle itself, even though exogenous CNTF has been shown to affect these functions. Similarly, MN survival and lesion-induced terminal sprouting were unaffected. Therefore, muscle CNTFRα is an interesting new example of a muscle growth factor receptor that, in vivo under physiological conditions, contributes much more to neuronal regeneration than to the maintenance or regeneration of the muscle itself. This novel form of muscle–neuron interaction also has implications in the therapeutic targeting of the neuromuscular system in MN disorders and following nerve injury. PMID:23504871

  10. Association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor gene polymorphisms with susceptibility to migraine

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Salih; Varol, Sefer; Ozdemir, Hasan H; Agacayak, Elif; Aydın, Birsen; Kapan, Oktay; Camkurt, Mehmet Akif; Tunc, Saban; Cevik, Mehmet Ugur

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most common neurological diseases worldwide. Migraine pathophysiology is very complex. Genetic factors play a major role in migraine. Neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), play an important role in central nervous system functioning, development, and modulation of pain. This study investigates whether polymorphisms in the BDNF and NGF genes are associated with migraine disease in a Turkish case–control population. Overall, 576 subjects were investigated (288 patients with migraine and 288 healthy controls) for the following polymorphisms: rs6265(G/A), rs8192466(C/T), rs925946(G/T), rs2049046(A/T), and rs12273363(T/C) in the BDNF gene, and rs6330(C/T), rs11466112(C/T), rs11102930(C/A), and rs4839435(G/A) in the NGF gene using 5′-exonuclease allelic discrimination assays. We found no differences in frequency of the analyzed eight polymorphisms between migraine and control groups. However, the frequency of minor A alleles of rs6265 in BDNF gene was borderline significant in the patients compared with the healthy controls (P=0.049; odds ratios [ORs] [95% confidence intervals {CIs}] =0.723 [0.523–0.999]). Moreover, when the migraine patients were divided into two subgroups, migraine with aura (MA) and migraine without aura (MO), the minor TT genotype of rs6330 in NGF was significantly higher in MA patients than in MO patients (P=0.036) or healthy controls (P=0.026), and this disappeared after correction for multiple testing. Also, the rs6330*T minor allele was more common in the MA group than in the MO group or controls (P=0.011, ORs [95% CIs] =1.626 [1.117–2.365] or P=0.007, ORs [95% CIs] =1.610 [1.140–2.274], respectively). In conclusion, this is the first clinical study to evaluate the association between BDNF and NGF polymorphisms in migraine patients compared with health controls. Our findings suggest that the NGF rs6330*T minor allele might be nominated as a risk

  11. Characterizing the Role of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Genetic Variation in Alzheimer’s Disease Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Honea, Robyn A.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Perea, Rodrigo D.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Goate, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that neurotrophins, like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), may impact aging and Alzheimer’s Disease. However, traditional genetic association studies have not found a clear relationship between BDNF and AD. Our goal was to test whether BDNF single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) impact Alzheimer’s Disease-related brain imaging and cognitive markers of disease. We completed an imaging genetics study on 645 Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative participants (ND=175, MCI=316, AD=154) who had cognitive, brain imaging, and genetics data at baseline and a subset of those with brain imaging data at two years. Samples were genotyped using the Illumina Human610-Quad BeadChip. 13 SNPs in BDNF were identified in the dataset following quality control measures (rs6265(Val66Met), rs12273363, rs11030094, rs925946, rs1050187, rs2203877, rs11030104, rs11030108, rs10835211, rs7934165, rs908867, rs1491850, rs1157459). We analyzed a subgroup of 8 SNPs that were in low linkage disequilibrium with each other. Automated brain morphometric measures were available through ADNI investigators, and we analyzed baseline cognitive scores, hippocampal and whole brain volumes, and rates of hippocampal and whole brain atrophy and rates of change in the ADAS-Cog over one and two years. Three out of eight BDNF SNPs analyzed were significantly associated with measures of cognitive decline (rs1157659, rs11030094, rs11030108). No SNPs were significantly associated with baseline brain volume measures, however six SNPs were significantly associated with hippocampal and/or whole brain atrophy over two years (rs908867, rs11030094, rs6265, rs10501087, rs1157659, rs1491850). We also found an interaction between the BDNF Val66Met SNP and age with whole brain volume. Our imaging-genetics analysis in a large dataset suggests that while BDNF genetic variation is not specifically associated with a diagnosis of AD, it appears to play a role in AD-related brain

  12. Imipramine ameliorates pain-related negative emotion via induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Seiko; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Yamagata, Hirotaka; Iwanaga, Yasutake; Suenaga, Hiromi; Ishikawa, Kozo; Nakano, Masako; Okuyama, Satoshi; Furukawa, Yoshiko; Furukawa, Shoei; Ishikawa, Toshizo

    2014-11-01

    Depression-like behavior is often complicated by chronic pain. Antidepressants including imipramine (IMI) are widely used to treat chronic pain, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neuromodulator that reduces depression by regulating synaptic transmission. We aimed to characterize the antidepressant effects of IMI without analgesia based on BDNF (trkB)-mediated signaling and gene expression in chronic pain. A chronic constriction injury (CCI) model was constructed in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. IMI (5 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered from day 10 after CCI. The pain response was assessed using the paw withdrawal latency (PWL) and depression was judged from the immobility time in a forced swim test. Anti-BDNF antibody, K252a, or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) were used to examine the antidepressant effects of imipramine. Changes in pERK1/2 (immunohistochemistry), 5-HT and BDNF (ELISA), and BDNF mRNA (RT-PCR) were measured in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), and spinal cord. After CCI, rats showed decreased PWL and increased immobility time. A low dose of IMI reduced the immobility time without having analgesic effects. This antidepressant effect was reversed by anti-BDNF antibody, K252a, and 5,7-DHT. IMI reduced excessive activation of pERK1/2 associated with decreased pCREB and BDNF mRNA, and these changes were reversed by 5,7-DHT. These results show that IMI reduces pain-related negative emotion without influencing pain and that this effect is diminished by denervation of 5-HT neurons and by anti-BDNF treatment. IMI also normalizes derangement of ERK/CREB coupling, which leads to induction of BDNF. This suggests a possible interaction between 5-HT and BDNF.

  13. Effects of brain derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Abode-Iyamah, Kingsley O; Stoner, Kirsten E; Grossbach, Andrew J; Viljoen, Stephanus V; McHenry, Colleen L; Petrie, Michael A; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Grosland, Nicole M; Shields, Richard K; Howard, Matthew A

    2016-02-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the leading cause of spinal cord related disability in the elderly. It results from degenerative narrowing of the spinal canal, which causes spinal cord compression. This leads to gait instability, loss of dexterity, weakness, numbness and urinary dysfunction. There has been indirect data that implicates a genetic component to CSM. Such a finding may contribute to the variety in presentation and outcome in this patient population. The Val66Met polymorphism, a mutation in the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, has been implicated in a number of brain and psychological conditions, and here we investigate its role in CSM. Ten subjects diagnosed with CSM were enrolled in this prospective study. Baseline clinical evaluation using the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scale, Nurick and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) were collected. Each subject underwent objective testing with gait kinematics, as well as hand functioning using the Purdue Peg Board. Blood samples were analyzed for the BDNF Val66Met mutation. The prevalence of the Val66Met mutation in this study was 60% amongst CSM patients compared to 32% in the general population. Individuals with abnormal Met allele had worse baseline mJOA and Nurick scores. Moreover, baseline gait kinematics and hand functioning testing were worse compared to their wild type counterpart. BDNF Val66Met mutation has a higher prevalence in CSM compared to the general population. Those with BDNF mutation have a worse clinical presentation compared to the wild type counterpart. These findings suggest implication of the BDNF mutation in the development and severity of CSM. PMID:26461908

  14. Association of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Val66Met Polymorphism with Primary Dysmenorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Fen; Shen, Horng-Der; Chao, Hsiang-Tai; Lin, Ming-Wei; Hsieh, Jen-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    Primary dysmenorrhea (PDM), the most prevalent menstrual cycle-related problem in women of reproductive age, is associated with negative moods. Whether the menstrual pain and negative moods have a genetic basis remains unknown. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a key role in the production of central sensitization and contributes to chronic pain conditions. BDNF has also been implicated in stress-related mood disorders. We screened and genotyped the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism (rs6265) in 99 Taiwanese (Asian) PDMs (20–30 years old) and 101 age-matched healthy female controls. We found that there was a significantly higher frequency of the Met allele of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism in the PDM group. Furthermore, BDNF Met/Met homozygosity had a significantly stronger association with PDM compared with Val carrier status. Subsequent behavioral/hormonal assessments of sub-groups (PDMs = 78, controls = 81; eligible for longitudinal multimodal neuroimaging battery studies) revealed that the BDNF Met/Met homozygous PDMs exhibited a higher menstrual pain score (sensory dimension) and a more anxious mood than the Val carrier PDMs during the menstrual phase. Although preliminary, our study suggests that the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism is associated with PDM in Taiwanese (Asian) people, and BDNF Met/Met homozygosity may be associated with an increased risk of PDM. Our data also suggest the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism as a possible regulator of menstrual pain and pain-related emotions in PDM. Absence of thermal hypersensitivity may connote an ethnic attribution. The presentation of our findings calls for further genetic and neuroscientific investigations of PDM. PMID:25383981

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor serum levels in cocaine-dependent patients during early abstinence.

    PubMed

    Corominas-Roso, Margarida; Roncero, Carlos; Eiroa-Orosa, Francisco Jose; Gonzalvo, Begoña; Grau-Lopez, Lara; Ribases, Marta; Rodriguez-Cintas, Laia; Sánchez-Mora, Cristina; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep-Antoni; Casas, Miguel

    2013-09-01

    Preclinical studies indicate that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in neuroplastic changes underlying enduring cocaine-seeking following withdrawal. However, little is known about temporal changes in serum BDNF levels or the involvement of BDNF in craving and abstinence in early-abstinent cocaine-dependent patients. Twenty-three cocaine-dependent individuals (aged 33.65 ± 6.85 years) completed a two-week detoxification program at an inpatient facility. Two serum samples were collected for each patient at baseline and at the end of the protocol. Serum samples were also collected for 46 healthy controls (aged 35.52 ± 9.37 years). Demographic, consumption and clinical data were recorded for all patients. Significantly lower serum BDNF levels (p<.0001) were observed for cocaine-dependent patients at baseline compared to healthy controls. Serum BDNF levels increased significantly across 12 days of early abstinence (p=.030). Baseline BDNF levels correlated with craving (p=.034). Post-detoxification BDNF levels correlated with craving (p=.018), loss of control (p<.000), abstinence measures (p=0.031), depression (p=0.036), and anxiety (p=0.036). Post-detoxification BDNF levels also had predictive value for the loss of control measure of craving. Chronic cocaine use is associated with decreased serum BDNF. A progressive increase in serum BDNF levels during early abstinence correlates with cocaine craving and abstinence symptoms and may reflect increasing BDNF levels in different brain regions. These findings suggest that serum BDNF may be a biomarker for cocaine addiction. PMID:23021567

  16. Effects of multiparity on recognition memory, monoaminergic neurotransmitters, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    PubMed

    Macbeth, Abbe H; Scharfman, Helen E; Maclusky, Neil J; Gautreaux, Claris; Luine, Victoria N

    2008-06-01

    Recognition memory and anxiety were examined in nulliparous (NP: 0 litters) and multiparous (MP: 5-6 litters) middle-aged female rats (12 months old) to assess possible enduring effects of multiparity at least 3 months after the last litter was weaned. MP females performed significantly better than NP females on the non-spatial memory task, object recognition, and the spatial memory task, object placement. Anxiety as measured on the elevated plus maze did not differ between groups. Monoaminergic activity and levels were measured in prefrontal cortex, CA1 hippocampus, CA3 hippocampus, and olfactory bulb (OB). NP and MP females differed in monoamine concentrations in the OB only, with MP females having significantly greater concentrations of dopamine and metabolite DOPAC, norepinephrine and metabolite MHPG, and the serotonin metabolite 5-HIAA, as compared to NP females. These results indicate a long-term change in OB neurochemistry as a result of multiparity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was also measured in hippocampus (CA1, CA3, dentate gyrus) and septum. MP females had higher BDNF levels in both CA1 and septum; as these regions are implicated in memory performance, elevated BDNF may underlie the observed memory task differences. Thus, MP females (experiencing multiple bouts of pregnancy, birth, and pup rearing during the first year of life) displayed enhanced memory task performance but equal anxiety responses, as compared to NP females. These results are consistent with previous studies showing long-term changes in behavioral function in MP, as compared to NP, rats and suggest that alterations in monoamines and a neurotrophin, BDNF, may contribute to the observed behavioral changes.

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates the suppression of alcohol self-administration by memantine.

    PubMed

    Jeanblanc, Jérôme; Coune, Fabien; Botia, Béatrice; Naassila, Mickaël

    2014-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) within the striatum is part of a homeostatic pathway regulating alcohol consumption. Memantine, a non-competitive antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, induces expression of BDNF in several brain regions including the striatum. We hypothesized that memantine could decrease ethanol (EtOH) consumption via activation of the BNDF signalling pathway. Effects of memantine were evaluated in Long-Evans rats self-administering moderate or high amounts of EtOH 6, 30 and 54 hours after an acute injection (12.5 and 25 mg/kg). Motivation to consume alcohol was investigated through a progressive ratio paradigm. The possible role for BDNF in the memantine effect was tested by blockade of the TrkB receptor using the pharmacological agent K252a and by the BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc. Candidate genes expression was also assessed by polymerase chain reaction array 4 and 28 hours after memantine injection. We found that memantine decreased EtOH self-administration and motivation to consume EtOH 6 and 30 hours post-injection. In addition, we found that inhibition or blockade of the BDNF signalling pathway prevented the early, but not the delayed decrease in EtOH consumption induced by memantine. Finally, Bdnf expression was differentially regulated between the early and delayed timepoints. These results demonstrate that an acute injection of memantine specifically reduces EtOH self-administration and motivation to consume EtOH for at least 30 hours. Moreover, we showed that BDNF was responsible for the early effect, but that the delayed effect was BDNF-independent.

  18. The relationship between serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cardiometabolic indices in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Nurjono, Milawaty; Tay, Yi Hang; Lee, Jimmy

    2014-08-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which has been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, has been recently shown to be involved in the regulation of metabolism and energy homeostasis. This study seeks to examine the relationship between BDNF, metabolic indices and cardiovascular (CVD) risk in patients with schizophrenia. Medical histories, demographic information and anthropometric measurements were collected and analyzed from 61 participants with schizophrenia. Fasting glucose and lipids were measured in a central laboratory, and serum BDNF was analyzed using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The 10-year CVD risk for each participant was computed using the Framingham risk score (FRS). Linear regressions were performed to examine the relationships between serum BDNF with body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (BP), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and glucose. To examine the relationship between serum BDNF and FRS, serum BDNF was categorized into quartiles, and a multiple regression was performed. After adjusting for age, gender and current smoking status, diastolic BP (dBP) (p=0.045) and TG (p=0.015) were found to be significantly associated with serum BDNF. Participants in the highest quartile of serum BDNF had a 3.3 times increase in FRS over those in the lowest quartile. Our findings support the possible regulatory role of BDNF in metabolism and cardiovascular homeostasis among patients with schizophrenia similar to that observed among the non-mentally ill. Serum BDNF not only present itself as a candidate biomarker of schizophrenia but also might be a viable marker of metabolic co-morbidities associated with schizophrenia.

  19. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in Asthma. Association with Severity and Type 2 Inflammatory Processes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tetsuya; Fajt, Merritt L; Trudeau, John B; Voraphani, Nipasiri; Hu, Haizhen; Zhou, Xiuxia; Holguin, Fernando; Wenzel, Sally E

    2015-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a member of the neurotrophin family, exists in several isoforms, which differentially impacts neuronal and immune cell survival and differentiation. The role of BDNF and its isoforms in asthma remains unclear. The objectives of this study were to compare the BDNF protein isoforms and specific splice variant expression in sputum and bronchoscopic samples from healthy control subjects and participants with asthma, and to relate these changes to findings in IL-13-stimulated human airway epithelial cells. Sputum and bronchoscopic samples from healthy control subjects and participants with asthma were evaluated for BDNF protein (ELISA and Western blot) and BDNF mRNA (gel and quantitative real-time PCR) in relation to asthma severity and type 2 inflammatory processes. BDNF mRNA was measured in cultured primary human airway epithelial cells after IL-13 stimulation. Total BDNF protein differed among the groups, and its mature isoform was significantly higher in sputum from subjects with severe asthma compared with healthy control subjects (overall P = 0.008, P = 0.027, respectively). Total BDNF was higher in those with elevated fractional exhaled nitric oxide and sputum eosinophilia. In vitro, IL-13 increased BDNF exon VIb splice variant and the ratio to BDNF common exon IX mRNA (P < 0.001, P = 0.003, respectively). Epithelial brushing exon VIb mRNA and total BDNF protein differed among the groups and were higher in subjects with severe asthma than in healthy control subjects (overall P = 0.01, P = 0.02, respectively). The mature BDNF isoform and the exon VIb splice variant are increased in human asthmatic airways. The in vitro increase in response to IL-13 suggests that type 2 cytokines regulate BDNF levels and activity in asthma.

  20. Acute aerobic exercise increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in elderly with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Flávia Gomes de Melo; Vital, Thays Martins; Stein, Angelica Miki; Arantes, Franciel José; Rueda, André Veloso; Camarini, Rosana; Teodorov, Elizabeth; Santos-Galduróz, Ruth Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate the involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Decreased BDNF levels may constitute a lack of trophic support and contribute to cognitive impairment in AD. The benefits of acute and chronic physical exercise on BDNF levels are well-documented in humans, however, exercise effects on BDNF levels have not been analyzed in older adults with AD. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute aerobic exercise on BDNF levels in older adults with AD and to verify associations among BDNF levels, aerobic fitness, and level of physical activity. Using a controlled design, twenty-one patients with AD (76.3 ± 6.2 years) and eighteen healthy older adults (74.6 ± 4.7 years) completed an acute aerobic exercise. The outcomes included measures of BDNF plasma levels, aerobic fitness (treadmill grade, time to exhaustion, VO2, and maximal lactate) and level of physical activity (Baecke Questionnaire Modified for the Elderly). The independent t-test shows differences between groups with respect to the BDNF plasma levels at baseline (p = 0.04; t = 4.53; df = 37). In two-way ANOVA, a significant effect of time was found (p = 0.001; F = 13.63; df = 37), the aerobic exercise significantly increased BDNF plasma levels in AD patients and healthy controls. A significant correlation (p = 0.04; r = 0.33) was found between BDNF levels and the level of physical activity. The results of our study suggest that aerobic exercise increases BDNF plasma levels in patients with AD and healthy controls. In addition to that, BDNF levels had association with level of physical activity.

  1. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and substrate utilization following acute aerobic exercise in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Slusher, A L; Whitehurst, M; Zoeller, R F; Mock, J T; Maharaj, A; Huang, C-J

    2015-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serves as a vital regulator of neuronal proliferation and survival, and has been shown to regulate energy homeostasis, glucose metabolism and body weight maintenance. Elevated concentrations of plasma BDNF have been associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Acute aerobic exercise transiently increases circulating BDNF, potentially correcting obesity-related metabolic impairment. The present study aimed to compare acute aerobic exercise elicited BDNF responses in obese and normal-weight subjects. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate whether acute exercise-induced plasma BDNF elevations would be associated with improved indices of insulin resistance, as well as substrate utilization [carbohydrate oxidation (CHOoxi) and fat oxidation (FAToxi)]. Twenty-two healthy, untrained subjects [11 obese (four men and seven women; age = 22.91 ± 4.44 years; body mass index = 35.72 ± 4.17 kg/m(2)) and 11 normal-weight (five men and six women; age = 23.27 ± 2.24 years; body mass index = 21.89 ± 1.63 kg/m(2))] performed 30 min of continuous submaximal aerobic exercise at 75% maximal oxygen consumption. Our analyses showed that the BDNF response to acute aerobic exercise was similar in obese and normal-weight subjects across time (time: P = 0.015; group: P = not significant) and was not associated with indices of IR. Although no differences in the rates of CHOoxi and FAToxi were found between both groups, total relative energy expenditure was significantly lower in obese subjects compared to normal-weight subjects (3.53 ± 0.25 versus 5.59 ± 0.85; P < 0.001). These findings suggest that acute exercise-elicited BDNF elevation may not be sufficient to modulate indices of IR or the utilization of either carbohydrates or fats in obese individuals.

  2. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene delivery via a polyethylene imine grafted chitosan carrier

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Shiang; Lai, Po-Liang; Peng, Sydney; Wu, His-Chin; Yu, Siang; Tseng, Tsan-Yun; Wang, Li-Fang; Chu, I-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is known to result from the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Direct intracerebral injections of high doses of recombinant glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) have been shown to protect adult nigral dopaminergic neurons. Because GDNF does not cross the blood–brain barrier, intracerebral gene transfer is an ideal option. Chitosan (CHI) is a naturally derived material that has been used for gene transfer. However, the low water solubility often leads to decreased transfection efficiency. Grafting of highly water-soluble polyethylene imines (PEI) and polyethylene glycol onto polymers can increase their solubility. The purpose of this study was to design a non-viral gene carrier with improved water solubility as well as enhanced transfection efficiency for treating Parkinsonism. Two molecular weights (Mw =600 and 1,800 g/mol) of PEI were grafted onto CHI (PEI600-g-CHI and PEI1800-g-CHI, respectively) by opening the epoxide ring of ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EX-810). This modification resulted in a non-viral gene carrier with less cytotoxicity. The transfection efficiency of PEI600-g-CHI/deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polyplexes was significantly higher than either PEI1800-g-CHI/DNA or CHI/DNA polyplexes. The maximal GDNF expression of PEI600-g-CHI/DNA was at the polymer:DNA weight ratio of 10:1, which was 1.7-fold higher than the maximal GDNF expression of PEI1800-g-CHI/DNA. The low toxicity and high transfection efficiency of PEI600-g-CHI make it ideal for application to GDNF gene therapy, which has potential for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:25061293

  3. Endogenous Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarius Tonically Regulates Synaptic and Autonomic Function

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Catharine G.; Hasser, Eileen M.; Kunze, Diana L.; Katz, David M.; Kline, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, TrkB, are highly expressed in the nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS), the principal target of cardiovascular primary afferent input to the brainstem. However, little is known about the role of BDNF signaling in nTS in cardiovascular homeostasis. We examined whether BDNF in nTS modulates cardiovascular function in vivo and regulates synaptic and/or neuronal activity in isolated brainstem slices. Microinjection of BDNF into the rat medial nTS (mnTS), a region critical for baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow, produced dose-dependent increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) that were blocked by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a. In contrast, immunoneutralization of endogenous BDNF (antiBDNF), or microinjection of K252a alone, decreased MAP, HR and LSNA. The effects of antiBDNF were abolished by blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors, indicating a role for glutamate signaling in the response to BDNF. In vitro, BDNF reduced the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) as well as solitary tract (TS)-evoked EPSC amplitude and action potential discharge (APD) in second-order nTS neurons. BDNF effects on EPSCs were independent of GABAergic signaling and ablated by AMPA receptor blockade. In contrast, K252a increased spontaneous EPSC frequency and TS-evoked EPSC amplitude. BDNF also attenuated APD evoked by injection of depolarizing current into second-order neurons, indicating reduced intrinsic neuronal excitability. Our data demonstrate that BDNF signaling in mnTS plays a tonic role in regulating cardiovascular function, likely via modulation of primary afferent glutamatergic excitatory transmission and neural activity. PMID:21865474

  4. Presynaptic modulation of spinal nociceptive transmission by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF).

    PubMed

    Salio, Chiara; Ferrini, Francesco; Muthuraju, Sangu; Merighi, Adalberto

    2014-10-01

    The role of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in nociceptive pathways is still controversial, as both pronociceptive and antinociceptive actions have been reported. To elucidate this role in the mouse, we performed combined structural and functional studies in vivo and in acute spinal cord slices where C-fiber activation was mimicked by capsaicin challenge. Nociceptors and their terminals in superficial dorsal horn (SDH; laminae I-II) constitute two separate subpopulations: the peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ cells expressing GDNF and the nonpeptidergic IB4+ neurons expressing the GFRα1-RET GDNF receptor complex. Ultrastructurally the dorsal part of inner lamina II (LIIid) harbors a mix of glomeruli that either display GDNF/somatostatin (GIb)-IR or GFRα1/IB4 labeling (GIa). LIIid thus represents the preferential site for ligand-receptor interactions. Functionally, endogenous GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors upon capsaicin stimulation exert a tonic inhibitory control on the glutamate excitatory drive of SDH neurons as measured after ERK1/2 phosphorylation assay. Real-time Ca(2+) imaging and patch-clamp experiments with bath-applied GDNF (100 nM) confirm the presynaptic inhibition of SDH neurons after stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive, nociceptive primary afferent fibers. Accordingly, the reduction of the capsaicin-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rise and of the frequency of mEPSCs in SDH neurons is specifically abolished after enzymatic ablation of GFRα1. Therefore, GDNF released from peptidergic CGRP/somatostatin+ nociceptors acutely depresses neuronal transmission in SDH signaling to nonpeptidergic IB4+ nociceptors at glomeruli in LIIid. These observations are of potential pharmacological interest as they highlight a novel modality of cross talk between nociceptors that may be relevant for discrimination of pain modalities.

  5. Dopamine receptor activation increases glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Kuric, Enida; Wieloch, Tadeusz; Ruscher, Karsten

    2013-09-01

    Treatment with levodopa enhances functional recovery after experimental stroke but its mechanisms of action are elusive. Reactive astrocytes in the ischemic hemisphere are involved in mechanisms promoting recovery and also express dopamine 1 (D1) and dopamine 2 (D2) receptors. Here we investigated if the activation of astrocytic dopamine receptors (D1 and D2) regulates the expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) after combined in vitro hypoxia/aglycemia (H/A) and studied the expression of GDNF in the ischemic brain after treatment with levodopa/benserazide following transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (tMCAO) in the rat. Twenty-four hours after H/A, GDNF levels were upregulated in exposed astrocytes compared to normoxic control cultures and further elevated by the addition of the selective D1 receptor agonist (R)-(+)-SKF-38393 hydrochloride while D1 receptor antagonism by R(+)-SCH-23390 hydrochloride significantly reduced GDNF. No effect on GDNF levels was observed by the application of the D2 receptor agonist R(-)-2,10,11-trihydroxy-N-propyl-noraporphine hydrobromide hydrate or S-(-)-eticlopride hydrochloride (D2 receptor antagonist). After tMCAO, GDNF was upregulated in D1 expressing reactive astrocytes in the peri-infarct area. In addition, treatment with levodopa/benserazide significantly increased GDNF levels in the infarct core and peri-infarct area after tMCAO without affecting the expression of glial fibrillar acidic protein (GFAP), an intermediate filament and marker of reactive gliosis. After stroke, GDNF levels increase in the ischemic hemisphere in rats treated with levodopa, implicating GDNF in the mechanisms of tissue reorganization and plasticity and in l-DOPA enhanced recovery of lost brain function. Our results support levodopa treatment as a potential recovery enhancing therapy in stroke patients.

  6. Explore the Features of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Fan-Chi; Kao, Chung-Feng; Kuo, Po-Hsiu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays important roles in neuronal survival and differentiation; however, the effects of BDNF on mood disorders remain unclear. We investigated BDNF from the perspective of various aspects of systems biology, including its molecular evolution, genomic studies, protein functions, and pathway analysis. Methods We conducted analyses examining sequences, multiple alignments, phylogenetic trees and positive selection across 12 species and several human populations. We summarized the results of previous genomic and functional studies of pro-BDNF and mature-BDNF (m-BDNF) found in a literature review. We identified proteins that interact with BDNF and performed pathway-based analysis using large genome-wide association (GWA) datasets obtained for mood disorders. Results BDNF is encoded by a highly conserved gene. The chordate BDNF genes exhibit an average of 75% identity with the human gene, while vertebrate orthologues are 85.9%-100% identical to human BDNF. No signs of recent positive selection were found. Associations between BDNF and mood disorders were not significant in most of the genomic studies (e.g., linkage, association, gene expression, GWA), while relationships between serum/plasma BDNF level and mood disorders were consistently reported. Pro-BDNF is important in the response to stress; the literature review suggests the necessity of studying both pro- and m-BDNF with regard to mood disorders. In addition to conventional pathway analysis, we further considered proteins that interact with BDNF (I-Genes) and identified several biological pathways involved with BDNF or I-Genes to be significantly associated with mood disorders. Conclusions Systematically examining the features and biological pathways of BDNF may provide opportunities to deepen our understanding of the mechanisms underlying mood disorders. PMID:26091093

  7. Neuroprotection elicited by nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor released from astrocytes in response to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Takuya; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Yamazaki, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    The protective roles of astrocytes in neurotoxicity induced by environmental chemicals, such as methylmercury (MeHg), are largely unknown. We found that conditioned medium of MeHg-treated astrocytes (MCM) attenuated neuronal cell death induced by MeHg, suggesting that astrocytes-released factors can protect neuronal cells. The increased expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was observed in MeHg-treated astrocytes. NGF and BDNF were detected in culture media as homodimers, which are able to bind specific tyrosine kinase receptors, tropomyosin related kinase (Trk) A and TrkB, respectively. The TrkA antagonist and TrkB antagonist abolished the protective effects of MCM in neuronal cell death induced by MeHg. Taken together, astrocytes synthesize and release NGF and BDNF in response to MeHg to protect neurons from MeHg toxicity. This study is considered to show a novel defense mechanism against MeHg-induced neurotoxicity.

  8. Music exposure differentially alters the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor in the mouse hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, Francesco; Ricci, Enzo; Padua, Luca; Sabino, Andrea; Tonali, Pietro Attilio

    2007-12-18

    It has been reported that music may have physiological effects on blood pressure, cardiac heartbeat, respiration, and improve mood state in people affected by anxiety, depression and other psychiatric disorders. However, the physiological bases of these phenomena are not clear. Hypothalamus is a brain region involved in the regulation of body homeostasis and in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression through the modulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Hypothalamic functions are also influenced by the presence of the neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF), which are proteins involved in the growth, survival and function of neurons in the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music exposure in mice on hypothalamic levels of BDNF and NGF. We exposed young adult mice to slow rhythm music (6h per day; mild sound pressure levels, between 50 and 60 dB) for 21 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment mice were sacrificed and BDNF and NGF levels in the hypothalamus were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that music exposure significantly enhanced BDNF levels in the hypothalamus. Furthermore, we observed that music-exposed mice had decreased NGF hypothalamic levels. Our results demonstrate that exposure to music in mice can influence neurotrophin production in the hypothalamus. Our findings also suggest that physiological effects of music might be in part mediated by modulation of neurotrophins.

  9. Binding characteristics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to its receptors on neurons from the chick embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Tebar, A.; Barde, Y.A.

    1988-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein known to support the survival of embryonic sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells, was derivatized with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and obtained in a biologically active, radioactive form (125I-BDNF). Using dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryos at 9 d of development, the basic physicochemical parameters of the binding of 125I-BDNF with its receptors were established. Two different classes of receptors were found, with dissociation constants of 1.7 x 10(-11) M (high-affinity receptors) and 1.3 x 10(-9) M (low-affinity receptors). Unlabeled BDNF competed with 125I-BDNF for binding to the high-affinity receptors with an inhibition constant essentially identical to the dissociation constant of the labeled protein: 1.2 x 10(-11) M. The association and dissociation rates from both types of receptors were also determined, and the dissociation constants calculated from these kinetic experiments were found to correspond to the results obtained from steady-state binding. The number of high-affinity receptors (a few hundred per cell soma) was 15 times lower than that of low-affinity receptors. No high-affinity receptors were found on sympathetic neurons, known not to respond to BDNF, although specific binding of 125I-BDNF to these cells was detected at a high concentration of the radioligand. These results are discussed and compared with those obtained with nerve growth factor on the same neuronal populations.

  10. The homeostatic regulation of REM sleep: A role for localized expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the brainstem.

    PubMed

    Datta, Subimal; Knapp, Clifford M; Koul-Tiwari, Richa; Barnes, Abigail

    2015-10-01

    Homeostatic regulation of REM sleep plays a key role in neural plasticity and deficits in this process are implicated in the development of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Little is known, however, about the molecular mechanisms that underlie this homeostatic regulation process. This study examined the hypothesis that, during selective REM sleep deprivation (RSD), increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in REM sleep regulating areas is critical for the development of homeostatic drive for REM sleep, as measured by an increase in the number of REM sleep transitions. Rats were assigned to RSD, non-sleep deprived (BSL), or total sleep deprivation (TSD) groups. Physiological recordings were obtained from cortical, hippocampal, and pontine EEG electrodes over a 6h period, in which sleep deprivation occurred during the first 3h. In the RSD, but not the other conditions, homeostatic drive for REM sleep increased progressively. BDNF protein expression was significantly greater in the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) and subcoeruleus nucleus (SubCD) in the RSD as compared to the TSD and BSL groups, areas that regulate REM sleep, but not in the medial preoptic area, which regulates non-REM sleep. There was a significant positive correlation between RSD-induced increases in number of REM sleep episodes and increased BDNF expression in the PPT and SubCD. These increases positively correlated with levels of homeostatic drive for REM sleep. These results, for the first time, suggest that selective RSD-induced increased expression of BDNF in the PPT and SubCD are determinant factors in the development of the homeostatic drive for REM sleep.

  11. Topographical Distribution of Morphological Changes in a Partial Model of Parkinson's Disease--Effects of Nanoencapsulated Neurotrophic Factors Administration.

    PubMed

    Requejo, C; Ruiz-Ortega, J A; Bengoetxea, H; Garcia-Blanco, A; Herrán, E; Aristieta, A; Igartua, M; Ugedo, L; Pedraz, J L; Hernández, R M; Lafuente, J V

    2015-10-01

    Administration of various neurotrophic factors is a promising strategy against Parkinson's disease (PD). An intrastriatal infusion of 6-hydroxidopamine (6-OHDA) in rats is a suitable model to study PD. This work aims to describe stereological parameters regarding rostro-caudal gradient, in order to characterize the model and verify its suitability for elucidating the benefits of therapeutic strategies. Administration of 6-OHDA induced a reduction in tyrosine hidroxylase (TH) reactivity in the dorsolateral part of the striatum, being higher in the caudal section than in the rostral one. Loss of TH-positive neurons and axodendritic network was highly significant in the external third of substantia nigra (e-SN) in the 6-OHDA group versus the saline one. After the administration of nanospheres loaded with neurotrophic factors (NTF: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) + glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)), parkinsonized rats showed more TH-positive fibers than those of control groups; this recovery taking place chiefly in the rostral sections. Neuronal density and axodendritic network in e-SN was more significant than in the entire SN; the topographical analysis showed that the highest difference between NTF versus control group was attained in the middle section. A high number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells were found in sub- and periventricular areas in the group receiving NTF, where most of them co-expressed doublecortin. Measurements on the e-SN achieved more specific and significant results than in the entire SN. This difference in rostro-caudal gradients underpins the usefulness of a topological approach to the assessment of the lesion and therapeutic strategies. Findings confirmed the neurorestorative, neurogenic, and synergistic effects of VEGF+GDNF administration. PMID:26041662

  12. Protective effects of neurotrophic factor-secreting cells in a 6-OHDA rat model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Sadan, Ofer; Bahat-Stromza, Merav; Barhum, Yael; Levy, Yossef S; Pisnevsky, Anat; Peretz, Hagit; Ilan, Avihay Bar; Bulvik, Shlomo; Shemesh, Noam; Krepel, Dana; Cohen, Yoram; Melamed, Eldad; Offen, Daniel

    2009-10-01

    Stem cell-based therapy is a promising treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. In our laboratory, a novel protocol has been developed to induce bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) into neurotrophic factors- secreting cells (NTF-SC), thus combining stem cell-based therapy with the NTF-based neuroprotection. These cells produce and secrete factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor. Conditioned medium of the NTF-SC that was applied to a neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) 1 h before exposure to the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) demonstrated marked protection. An efficacy study was conducted on the 6-OHDA-induced lesion, a rat model of Parkinson's disease. The cells, either MSC or NTF-SC, were transplanted on the day of 6-OHDA administration and amphetamine-induced rotations were measured as a primary behavior index. We demonstrated that when transplanted posterior to the 6-OHDA lesion, the NTF-SC ameliorated amphetamine-induced rotations by 45%. HPLC analysis demonstrated that 6-OHDA induced dopamine depletion to a level of 21% compared to the untreated striatum. NTF-SC inhibited dopamine depletion to a level of 72% of the contralateral striatum. Moreover, an MRI study conducted with iron-labeled cells, followed by histological verification, revealed that the engrafted cells migrated toward the lesion. In a histological assessment, we found that the cells induced regeneration in the damaged striatal dopaminergic nerve terminal network. We therefore conclude that the induced MSC have a therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative processes and diseases, both by the NTFs secretion and by the migratory trait toward the diseased tissue.

  13. Neurotrophic factors in women with crack cocaine dependence during early abstinence: the role of early life stress

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Thiago Wendt; Tractenberg, Saulo Gantes; Levandowski, Mateus Luz; Pezzi, Júlio Carlos; Bauer, Moisés Evandro; Teixeira, Antonio Lúcio; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurotrophic factors have been investigated in the pathophysiology of alcohol and drug dependence and have been related to early life stress driving developmental programming of neuroendocrine systems. Methods We conducted a follow-up study that aimed to assess the plasma levels of glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT3) and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT4/5) in crack users during 3 weeks of early abstinence in comparison with healthy controls. We performed a comprehensive clinical assessment in female inpatients with crack cocaine dependence (separated into 2 groups: participants with (CSA+) and without (CSA−) a history of childhood sexual abuse) and a group of nonuser control participants. Results Our sample included 104 women with crack cocaine dependence and 22 controls; of the women who used crack cocaine, 22 had a history of childhood sexual abuse and 82 did not. The GDNF plasma levels in the CSA+ group increased dramatically during 3 weeks of detoxification. In contrast, those in the CSA− group showed lower and stable levels of GDNF under the same conditions. Compared with the control group, BDNF plasma levels remained elevated and NGF levels were reduced during early abstinence. We found no differences in NT3 and NT4/5 between the patients and controls. However, within-group analyses showed that the CSA+ group exhibited higher levels of NT4/5 than the CSA− group at the end of detoxification. Limitations Some of the participants were using neuroleptics, mood stabilizers or antidepressants; our sample included only women; memory bias could not be controlled; and we did not investigate the possible confounding effects of other forms of stress during childhood. Conclusion This study supports the association between early life stress and peripheral neurotrophic factor levels in crack cocaine users. During early abstinence, plasmastic GDNF and NT4/5 were

  14. Action of Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Mouse Dorsal Vagal Complex.

    PubMed

    Senzacqua, Martina; Severi, Ilenia; Perugini, Jessica; Acciarini, Samantha; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces weight loss in obese rodents and humans through activation of the hypothalamic Jak-STAT (Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription) signaling pathway. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF also affects the brainstem centers involved in feeding and energy balance regulation. To this end, wild-type and leptin-deficient (ob/ob and db/db) obese mice were acutely treated with intraperitoneal recombinant CNTF. Coronal brainstem sections were processed for immunohistochemical detection of STAT3, STAT1, STAT5 phosphorylation and c-Fos. In wild-type mice, CNTF treatment for 45 min induced STAT3, STAT1, and STAT5 phosphorylation in neurons as well as glial cells of the area postrema; here, the majority of CNTF-responsive cells activated multiple STAT isoforms, and a significant proportion of CNTF-responsive glial cells bore the immaturity and plasticity markers nestin and vimentin. After 120 min CNTF treatment, c-Fos expression was intense in glial cells and weak in neurons of the area postrema, it was intense in several neurons of the rostral and caudal solitary tract nucleus (NTS), and weak in some cholinergic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. In the ob/ob and db/db mice, Jak-STAT activation and c-Fos expression were similar to those induced in wild-type mouse brainstem. Treatment with CNTF (120 min, to induce c-Fos expression) and leptin (25 min, to induce STAT3 phosphorylation) demonstrated the co-localization of the two transcription factors in a small neuron population in the caudal NTS portion. Finally, weak immunohistochemical CNTF staining, detected in funiculus separans, and meningeal glial cells, matched the modest amount of CNTF found by RT-qPCR in micropunched area postrema tissue, which in contrast exhibited a very high amount of CNTF receptor. Collectively, the present findings show that the area postrema and the NTS exhibit high, distinctive responsiveness to circulating

  15. Action of Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Mouse Dorsal Vagal Complex

    PubMed Central

    Senzacqua, Martina; Severi, Ilenia; Perugini, Jessica; Acciarini, Samantha; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces weight loss in obese rodents and humans through activation of the hypothalamic Jak-STAT (Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription) signaling pathway. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF also affects the brainstem centers involved in feeding and energy balance regulation. To this end, wild-type and leptin-deficient (ob/ob and db/db) obese mice were acutely treated with intraperitoneal recombinant CNTF. Coronal brainstem sections were processed for immunohistochemical detection of STAT3, STAT1, STAT5 phosphorylation and c-Fos. In wild-type mice, CNTF treatment for 45 min induced STAT3, STAT1, and STAT5 phosphorylation in neurons as well as glial cells of the area postrema; here, the majority of CNTF-responsive cells activated multiple STAT isoforms, and a significant proportion of CNTF-responsive glial cells bore the immaturity and plasticity markers nestin and vimentin. After 120 min CNTF treatment, c-Fos expression was intense in glial cells and weak in neurons of the area postrema, it was intense in several neurons of the rostral and caudal solitary tract nucleus (NTS), and weak in some cholinergic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. In the ob/ob and db/db mice, Jak-STAT activation and c-Fos expression were similar to those induced in wild-type mouse brainstem. Treatment with CNTF (120 min, to induce c-Fos expression) and leptin (25 min, to induce STAT3 phosphorylation) demonstrated the co-localization of the two transcription factors in a small neuron population in the caudal NTS portion. Finally, weak immunohistochemical CNTF staining, detected in funiculus separans, and meningeal glial cells, matched the modest amount of CNTF found by RT-qPCR in micropunched area postrema tissue, which in contrast exhibited a very high amount of CNTF receptor. Collectively, the present findings show that the area postrema and the NTS exhibit high, distinctive responsiveness to circulating

  16. Elevated levels of plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor in rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Munkholm, Klaus; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vinberg, Maj

    2014-09-01

    Impaired neuroplasticity may be implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, involving peripheral alterations of the neurotrophins brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3). Evidence is limited by methodological issues and is based primarily on case-control designs. The aim of this study was to investigate whether BDNF and NT-3 levels differ between patients with rapid cycling bipolar disorder and healthy control subjects and whether BDNF and NT-3 levels alter with affective states in rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients. Plasma levels of BDNF and NT-3 were measured in 37 rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients and in 40 age- and gender matched healthy control subjects using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In a longitudinal design, repeated measurements of BDNF and NT-3 were evaluated in various affective states in bipolar disorder patients during a 6-12 months period and compared with repeated measurements in healthy control subjects. Careful attention was given to standardization of all procedures and adjustment for potential confounders of BDNF and NT-3. In linear mixed models, adjusting for demographical and lifestyle factors, levels of BDNF were significantly elevated in bipolar disorder patients in euthymic- (p<0.05), depressed- (p<0.005) and manic/hypomanic (p<0.005) states compared with healthy control subjects. Within bipolar disorder patients, adjusting for medication, there was no significant difference in BDNF levels between affective states, with equally elevated levels present in euthymic-, depressive- and manic/hypomanic patients. Levels of BDNF were higher in patients with longer duration of illness compared with patients with shorter duration of illness. We found no difference in NT-3 levels between bipolar disorder patients in any affective state compared with healthy control subjects and no difference in NT-3 levels between affective states in bipolar disorder patients. The results suggest that

  17. Intraventricular brain-derived neurotrophic factor reduces infarct size after focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Schäbitz, W R; Schwab, S; Spranger, M; Hacke, W

    1997-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), acting through the high-affinity receptor tyrosine kinase (TrkB), is widely distributed throughout the central nervous system and displays in vitro trophic effects on a wide range of neuronal cells, including hippocampal, cerebellar, and cortical neurons. In vivo, BDNF rescues motorneurons, hippocampal, and substantia nigral dopaminergic cells from traumatic and toxic brain injury. After transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), upregulation of BDNF-mRNA in cortical neurons suggests that BDNF potentially plays a neuroprotective role in focal cerebral ischemia. In the current study, BDNF (2.1 micrograms/d) in vehicle or vehicle alone (controls) was delivered intraventricularly for 8 days, beginning 24 hours before permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion by intraluminal suture in Wistar rats (n = 13 per group). There were no differences in physiological variables recorded during surgery for the two groups. Neurological deficit (0 to 4 scale), which was assessed on a daily basis, improved in BDNF-treated animals compared with controls (P < 0.05; analysis of variance and Scheffe's test). There were no significant differences in weight in BDNF-treated animals and controls during the experiment. After elective killing on day 7 after MCAO, brains underwent 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining for calculation of the infarct volume and for histology (hematoxylin and eosin and glial fibrillary acid protein). The mean total infarct volume was 83.1 +/- 27.1 mm3 in BDNF-treated animals and 139.2 +/- 56.4 mm3 in controls (mean +/- SD; P < 0.01, unpaired, two-tailed t-test). The cortical infarct volume was 10.8 +/- 7.1 mm3 in BDNF-treated animals and 37.9 +/- 19.8 mm3 in controls (mean +/- SD; P < 0.05; unpaired, two-tailed t-test), whereas ischemic lesion volume in caudoputaminal infarction was not significantly different. These results show that pretreatment with intraventricular BDNF reduces infarct size after focal

  18. Time-Dependent Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Decline During Methamphetamine Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenwei; Tao, Jingyan; Wei, Youdan; Su, Hang; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Ying; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hailing; He, Jincai

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused illegal psychostimulant, which is confirmed to be neurotoxic and of great damage to human. Studies on the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in human METH addicts are limited and inconsistent. The purposes of this study are to compare the serum BDNF levels between METH addicts and healthy controls during early withdrawal, and explore the changes of serum BDNF levels during the first month after METH withdrawal.179 METH addicts and 90 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited in this study. We measured serum BDNF levels at baseline (both METH addicts and healthy controls) and at 1 month after abstinence of METH (METH addicts only).Serum BDNF levels of METH addicts at baseline were significantly higher than controls (1460.28  ±  490.69 vs 1241.27  ±  335.52  pg/mL; F = 14.51, P < 0.001). The serum BDNF levels of 40 METH addicts were re-examined after 1 month of METH abstinence, which were significantly lower than that at baseline (1363.70  ±  580.59 vs 1621.41  ±  591.07  pg/mL; t = 2.26, P = .03), but showed no differences to the controls (1363.70  ±  580.59 vs 1241.27  ±  335.52  pg/mL; F = 2.29, P = 0.13).Our study demonstrated that serum BDNF levels were higher in METH addicts than controls during early withdrawal, and were time dependent decreased during the first month of abstinence. These findings may provide further evidence that increased serum BDNF levels may be associated with the pathophysiology of METH addiction and withdrawal and may be a protective response against the subsequent METH-induced neurotoxicity. Besides, these findings may also promote the development of medicine in the treatment of METH addiction and withdrawal.

  19. Astrocytes Protect Against Isoflurane Neurotoxicity by Buffering pro Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Stary, Creed M.; Sun, Xiaoyun; Giffard, Rona G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Isoflurane induces cell death in neurons undergoing synaptogenesis via increased production of pro-brain derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF) and activation of post-synaptic p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). Astrocytes express p75NTR but their role in neuronal p75NTR mediated cell death remains unclear. We investigated whether astrocytes have the capacity to buffer increases in proBDNF and protect against isoflurane/p75NTR neurotoxicity. Methods Cell death was assessed in day-in-vitro (DIV) 7 mouse primary neuronal cultures alone or in co-culture with age-matched or DIV 21 astrocytes with propidium iodide 24 hours following 1 hour exposure to 2% isoflurane or recombinant proBDNF. Astrocyte-targeted knockdown of p75NTR in co-culture was achieved with small interfering RNA and astrocyte-specific transfection reagent and verified with immunofluorescence microscopy. proBDNF levels were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Each experiment used 6–8 replicate cultures/condition, and was repeated at least three times. Results Exposure to isoflurane significantly (p<0.05) increased neuronal cell death in primary neuronal cultures (1.5±0.7 fold, mean±SD) but not in co-culture with DIV 7 (1.0±0.5 fold) or DIV 21 astrocytes (1.2±1.2 fold). Exogenous proBDNF dose dependently induced neuronal cell death in both primary neuronal and co-cultures, an effect enhanced by astrocyte p75NTR inhibition. Astrocyte-targeted p75NTR knockdown in co-cultures increased media proBDNF (1.2±0.1 fold) and augmented isoflurane induced neuronal cell death (3.8±3.1 fold). Conclusions The presence of astrocytes provides protection to growing neurons by buffering elevated levels of proBDNF induced by isoflurane. These findings may hold clinical significance for the neonatal and injured brain where elevated levels of proBDNF impair neurogenesis. PMID:26270940

  20. Time-Dependent Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Decline During Methamphetamine Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenwei; Tao, Jingyan; Wei, Youdan; Su, Hang; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Ying; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hailing; He, Jincai

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused illegal psychostimulant, which is confirmed to be neurotoxic and of great damage to human. Studies on the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in human METH addicts are limited and inconsistent. The purposes of this study are to compare the serum BDNF levels between METH addicts and healthy controls during early withdrawal, and explore the changes of serum BDNF levels during the first month after METH withdrawal.179 METH addicts and 90 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited in this study. We measured serum BDNF levels at baseline (both METH addicts and healthy controls) and at 1 month after abstinence of METH (METH addicts only).Serum BDNF levels of METH addicts at baseline were significantly higher than controls (1460.28  ±  490.69 vs 1241.27  ±  335.52  pg/mL; F = 14.51, P < 0.001). The serum BDNF levels of 40 METH addicts were re-examined after 1 month of METH abstinence, which were significantly lower than that at baseline (1363.70  ±  580.59 vs 1621.41  ±  591.07  pg/mL; t = 2.26, P = .03), but showed no differences to the controls (1363.70  ±  580.59 vs 1241.27  ±  335.52  pg/mL; F = 2.29, P = 0.13).Our study demonstrated that serum BDNF levels were higher in METH addicts than controls during early withdrawal, and were time dependent decreased during the first month of abstinence. These findings may provide further evidence that increased serum BDNF levels may be associated with the pathophysiology of METH addiction and withdrawal and may be a protective response against the subsequent METH-induced neurotoxicity. Besides, these findings may also promote the development of medicine in the treatment of METH addiction and withdrawal. PMID:26844469

  1. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Stimulates Production of Prostacyclin in Cerebral Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Anantha Vijay R.; Smith, Leslie A.; Katusic, Zvonimir S.

    2009-01-01

    Background The role of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and its receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), in control of cerebral circulation is poorly understood. The present study was designed to investigate the cerebral vascular effects of BDNF in vivo. Methods Replication incompetent adenovirus encoding either rat BDNF (AdBDNF) or green fluorescent protein (AdGFP) was injected intracisternally into rabbits. Forty eight hours later, animals were euthanized. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of BDNF were measured by ELISA, vasomotor function of isolated basilar arteries was studied in organ chambers, protein expression in the basilar arteries was studied by Western blotting, prostanoid levels measured by ELISA and cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Results The levels of BDNF in the CSF were significantly elevated in AdBDNF-treated rabbits as compared to AdGFP-treated rabbits (37 ± 5 ng/ml vs. 0.006 ± 0.003 ng/ml, respectively, P<0.05, n=14). Western blotting studies revealed that in basilar arteries AdBDNF increased protein expression of prostacyclin (PGI2) synthase, while expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated (Ser 1177) eNOS remained unchanged. During incubation with arachidonic acid (1 μmol/L), PGI2 production and levels of cyclic AMP were significantly elevated only in AdBDNF-treated rabbit basilar arteries (P<0.05, n=6). Relaxations to acetylcholine (10−9 to 10−5 mol/L) and arachidonic acid (10−9 to 10−5 mol/L) were significantly potentiated in basilar arteries from rabbits injected with AdBDNF. Potentiation of relaxations to acetylcholine in AdBDNF-treated basilar arteries was inhibited by the non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (10−5 mol/l, P<0.05, n=6) and constitutive phospholipase A2 inhibitor, AACOCF3 (2 × 10−5 mol/L, P<0.05, n=5). Conclusion Our results demonstrate that in cerebral arteries, BDNF

  2. Time-Dependent Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Decline During Methamphetamine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenwei; Tao, Jingyan; Wei, Youdan; Su, Hang; Zhang, Jie; Xie, Ying; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Xiangyang; Zhang, Hailing; He, Jincai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused illegal psychostimulant, which is confirmed to be neurotoxic and of great damage to human. Studies on the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in human METH addicts are limited and inconsistent. The purposes of this study are to compare the serum BDNF levels between METH addicts and healthy controls during early withdrawal, and explore the changes of serum BDNF levels during the first month after METH withdrawal. 179 METH addicts and 90 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were recruited in this study. We measured serum BDNF levels at baseline (both METH addicts and healthy controls) and at 1 month after abstinence of METH (METH addicts only). Serum BDNF levels of METH addicts at baseline were significantly higher than controls (1460.28 ± 490.69 vs 1241.27 ± 335.52 pg/mL; F = 14.51, P < 0.001). The serum BDNF levels of 40 METH addicts were re-examined after 1 month of METH abstinence, which were significantly lower than that at baseline (1363.70 ± 580.59 vs 1621.41 ± 591.07 pg/mL; t = 2.26, P = .03), but showed no differences to the controls (1363.70 ± 580.59 vs 1241.27 ± 335.52 pg/mL; F = 2.29, P = 0.13). Our study demonstrated that serum BDNF levels were higher in METH addicts than controls during early withdrawal, and were time dependent decreased during the first month of abstinence. These findings may provide further evidence that increased serum BDNF levels may be associated with the pathophysiology of METH addiction and withdrawal and may be a protective response against the subsequent METH-induced neurotoxicity. Besides, these findings may also promote the development of medicine in the treatment of METH addiction and withdrawal. PMID:26844469

  3. Circulating Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Has Diagnostic and Prognostic Value in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Korley, Frederick K; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Wu, Alan H B; Yue, John K; Manley, Geoffrey T; Sair, Haris I; Van Eyk, Jennifer; Everett, Allen D; Okonkwo, David O; Valadka, Alex B; Gordon, Wayne A; Maas, Andrew I R; Mukherjee, Pratik; Yuh, Esther L; Lingsma, Hester F; Puccio, Ava M; Schnyer, David M

    2016-01-15

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for neuronal survival and regeneration. We investigated the diagnostic and prognostic values of serum BDNF in traumatic brain injury (TBI). We examined serum BDNF in two independent cohorts of TBI cases presenting to the emergency departments (EDs) of the Johns Hopkins Hospital (JHH; n = 76) and San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH, n = 80), and a control group of JHH ED patients without TBI (n = 150). Findings were subsequently validated in the prospective, multi-center Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in TBI (TRACK-TBI) Pilot study (n = 159). We investigated the association between BDNF, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) and recovery from TBI at 6 months in the TRACK-TBI Pilot cohort. Incomplete recovery was defined as having either post-concussive syndrome or a Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended score <8 at 6 months. Median day-of-injury BDNF concentrations (ng/mL) were lower among TBI cases (JHH TBI, 17.5 and SFGH TBI, 13.8) than in JHH controls (60.3; p = 0.0001). Among TRACK-TBI Pilot subjects, median BDNF concentrations (ng/mL) were higher in mild (8.3) than in moderate (4.3) or severe TBI (4.0; p = 0.004. In the TRACK-TBI cohort, the 75 (71.4%) subjects with very low BDNF values (i.e.,

  4. C3-induced release of neurotrophic factors from Schwann cells - potential mechanism behind its regeneration promoting activity.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Stahl, Frank; Höltje, Markus; Hettwer, Timo; Lindner, Patrick; Hagemann, Sandra; Pich, Andreas; Haastert-Talini, Kirsten

    2015-11-01

    Previous studies revealed a peripheral nerve regeneration (PNR)(1) promoting activity of Clostridium botulinum C3(2) exoenzyme or a 26(mer) C-terminal peptide fragment covering amino acids 156-181 (C3(156-181)),(3) when delivered as one-time injection at the lesion site. The current study was performed to 1) investigate if prolonged availability of C3 and C3(156-181) at the lesion site can further enhance PNR in vivo and to 2) elucidate effects of C3 and C3(156-181) on Schwann cells (SCs)(4)in vitro. For in vivo studies, 10 mm adult rat sciatic nerve gaps were reconstructed with the epineurial pouch technique or autologous nerve grafts. Epineurial pouches were filled with a hydrogel containing i) vehicle, ii) 40 μM C3 or iii) 40 μM C3(156-181). Sensory and motor functional recovery was monitored over 12 weeks and the outcome of PNR further analyzed by nerve morphometry. In vitro, we compared gene expression profiles (microarray analysis) and neurotrophic factor expression (western blot analysis) of untreated rat neonatal SCs with those treated with C3 or C3(156-181) for 72 h. Effects on neurotrophic factor expression levels were proven in adult human SCs. Unexpectedly, prolonged delivery of C3 and C3(156-181) at the lesion site did not increase the outcome of PNR. Regarding the potential mechanism underlying their previously detected PNR promoting action, however, 6 genes were found to be commonly altered in SCs upon treatment with C3 or C3(156-181). We demonstrate significant down-regulation of genes involved in glutamate uptake (Eaac1,(5)Grin2a(6)) and changes in neurotrophic factor expression (increase of FGF-2(7) and decrease of NGF(8)). Our microarray-based expression profiling revealed novel C3-regulated genes in SCs possibly involved in the axonotrophic (regeneration promoting) effects of C3 and C3(156-181). Detection of altered neurotrophic factor expression by C3 or C3(156-181) treated primary neonatal rat SCs and primary adult human SCs supports

  5. Phospholipase C gamma mediates endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor-regulated calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in colitis-induced visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Fiza; Liu, Miao; Shen, Shanwei

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral hypersensitivity is a complex pathophysiological paradigm with unclear mechanisms. Primary afferent neuronal plasticity marked by alterations in neuroactive compounds such as calcitonin gene-related peptide is suggested to underlie the heightened sensory responses. Signal transduction that leads to calcitonin gene-related peptide expression thereby sensory neuroplasticity during colitis remains to be elucidated. Results In a rat model with colitis induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, we found that endogenously elevated brain-derived neurotrophic factor elicited an up-regulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the lumbar L1 dorsal root ganglia. At seven days of colitis, neutralization of brain-derived neurotrophic factor with a specific brain-derived neurotrophic factor antibody reversed calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation in the dorsal root ganglia. Colitis-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide transcription was also inhibited by brain-derived neurotrophic factor antibody treatment. Signal transduction studies with dorsal root ganglia explants showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide expression was mediated by the phospholipase C gamma, but not the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt or the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase pathway. Application of PLC inhibitor U73122 in vivo confirmed that colitis-induced and brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation in the dorsal root ganglia was regulated by the phospholipase C gamma pathway. In contrast, suppression of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity in vivo had no effect on colitis-induced calcitonin gene-related peptide expression. During colitis, calcitonin gene-related peptide also co-expressed with phospholipase C gamma but not with p-Akt. Calcitonin gene-related peptide up-regulation during colitis correlated to the activation

  6. Autism as a disorder of deficiency of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and altered metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2013-10-01

    Autism has a strong genetic and environmental basis in which inflammatory markers and factors concerned with synapse formation, nerve transmission, and information processing such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): arachidonic (AA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) and their products and neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, γ-aminobutyric acid, and catecholamines and cytokines are altered. Antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and trace elements are needed for the normal metabolism of neurotrophic factors, eicosanoids, and neurotransmitters, supporting reports of their alterations in autism. But, the exact relationship among these factors and their interaction with genes and proteins concerned with brain development and growth is not clear. It is suggested that maternal infections and inflammation and adverse events during intrauterine growth of the fetus could lead to alterations in the gene expression profile and proteomics that results in dysfunction of the neuronal function and neurotransmitters, alteration(s) in the metabolism of PUFAs and their metabolites resulting in excess production of proinflammatory eicosanoids and cytokines and a deficiency of anti-inflammatory cytokines and bioactive lipids that ultimately results in the development of autism. Based on these evidences, it is proposed that selective delivery of BDNF and methods designed to augment the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids and PUFAs may prevent, arrest, or reverse the autism disease process.

  7. Reduced hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in neonatal rats after prenatal exposure to propylthiouracil (PTU).

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Goutam; Magagna-Poveda, Alejandra; Parratt, Carolyn; Umans, Jason G; MacLusky, Neil J; Scharfman, Helen E

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormone is critical for central nervous system development. Fetal hypothyroidism leads to reduced cognitive performance in offspring as well as other effects on neural development in both humans and experimental animals. The nature of these impairments suggests that thyroid hormone may exert its effects via dysregulation of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is critical to normal development of the central nervous system and has been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders. The only evidence of BDNF dysregulation in early development, however, comes from experimental models in which severe prenatal hypothyroidism occurred. By contrast, milder prenatal hypothyroidism has been shown to alter BDNF levels and BDNF-dependent functions only much later in life. We hypothesized that mild experimental prenatal hypothyroidism might lead to dysregulation of BDNF in the early postnatal period. BDNF levels were measured by ELISA at 3 or 7 d after birth in different regions of the brains of rats exposed to propylthiouracil (PTU) in the drinking water. The dose of PTU that was used induced mild maternal thyroid hormone insufficiency. Pups, but not the parents, exhibited alterations in tissue BDNF levels. Hippocampal BDNF levels were reduced at both d 3 and 7, but no significant reductions were observed in either the cerebellum or brain stem. Unexpectedly, more males than females were born to PTU-treated dams, suggesting an effect of PTU on sex determination. These results support the hypothesis that reduced hippocampal BDNF levels during early development may contribute to the adverse neurodevelopmental effects of mild thyroid hormone insufficiency during pregnancy.

  8. Zinc(II) interactions with brain-derived neurotrophic factor N-terminal peptide fragments: inorganic features and biological perspectives.

    PubMed

    Travaglia, Alessio; La Mendola, Diego; Magrì, Antonio; Pietropaolo, Adriana; Nicoletti, Vincenzo G; Grasso, Giuseppe; Malgieri, Gaetano; Fattorusso, Roberto; Isernia, Carla; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2013-10-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin essential for neuronal differentiation, growth, and survival; it is involved in memory formation and higher cognitive functions. The N-terminal domain of BDNF is crucial for the binding selectivity and activation of its specific TrkB receptor. Zn(2+) ion binding may influence BDNF activity. Zn(2+) complexes with the peptide fragment BDNF(1-12) encompassing the sequence 1-12 of the N-terminal domain of BDNF were studied by means of potentiometry, electrospray mass spectrometry, NMR, and density functional theory (DFT) approaches. The predominant Zn(2+) complex species, at physiological pH, is [ZnL] in which the metal ion is bound to an amino, an imidazole, and two water molecules (NH2, N(Im), and 2O(water)) in a tetrahedral environment. DFT-based geometry optimization of the zinc coordination environment showed a hydrogen bond between the carboxylate and a water molecule bound to zinc in [ZnL]. The coordination features of the acetylated form [AcBDNF(1-12)] and of a single mutated peptide [BDNF(1-12)D3N] were also characterized, highlighting the role of the imidazole side chain as the first anchoring site and ruling out the direct involvement of the aspartate residue in the metal binding. Zn(2+) addition to the cell culture medium induces an increase in the proliferative activity of the BDNF(1-12) peptide and of the whole protein on the SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. The effect of Zn(2+) is opposite to that previously observed for Cu(2+) addition, which determines a decrease in the proliferative activity for both peptide and protein, suggesting that these metals might discriminate and modulate differently the activity of BDNF.

  9. Expression and cell localization of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and TrkB during zebrafish retinal development

    PubMed Central

    Germanà, A; Sánchez-Ramos, C; Guerrera, M C; Calavia, M G; Navarro, M; Zichichi, R; García-Suárez, O; Pérez-Piñera, P; Vega, Jose A

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through TrkB regulates different aspects of neuronal development, including survival, axonal and dendritic growth, and synapse formation. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the functional significance of BDNF and TrkB in the retina, the cell types in the retina that express BDNF and TrkB, and the variations in their levels of expression during development, remain poorly defined. The goal of the present study is to determine the age-dependent changes in the levels of expression and localization of BDNF and TrkB in the zebrafish retina. Zebrafish retinas from 10 days post-fertilization (dpf) to 180 dpf were used to perform PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Both BDNF and TrkB mRNAs, and BDNF and full-length TrkB proteins were detected at all ages sampled. The localization of these proteins in the retina was very similar at all time points studied. BDNF immunoreactivity was found in the outer nuclear layer, the outer plexiform layer and the inner plexiform layer, whereas TrkB immunoreactivity was observed in the inner plexiform layer and, to a lesser extent, in the ganglion cell layer. These results demonstrate that the pattern of expression of BDNF and TrkB in the retina of zebrafish remains unchanged during postembryonic development and adult life. Because TrkB expression in retina did not change with age, cells expressing TrkB may potentially be able to respond during the entire lifespan of zebrafish to BDNF either exogenously administered or endogenously produced, acting through paracrine mechanisms. PMID:20649707

  10. Expression and cell localization of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and TrkB during zebrafish retinal development.

    PubMed

    Germanà, A; Sánchez-Ramos, C; Guerrera, M C; Calavia, M G; Navarro, M; Zichichi, R; García-Suárez, O; Pérez-Piñera, P; Vega, Jose A

    2010-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through TrkB regulates different aspects of neuronal development, including survival, axonal and dendritic growth, and synapse formation. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the functional significance of BDNF and TrkB in the retina, the cell types in the retina that express BDNF and TrkB, and the variations in their levels of expression during development, remain poorly defined. The goal of the present study is to determine the age-dependent changes in the levels of expression and localization of BDNF and TrkB in the zebrafish retina. Zebrafish retinas from 10 days post-fertilization (dpf) to 180 dpf were used to perform PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Both BDNF and TrkB mRNAs, and BDNF and full-length TrkB proteins were detected at all ages sampled. The localization of these proteins in the retina was very similar at all time points studied. BDNF immunoreactivity was found in the outer nuclear layer, the outer plexiform layer and the inner plexiform layer, whereas TrkB immunoreactivity was observed in the inner plexiform layer and, to a lesser extent, in the ganglion cell layer. These results demonstrate that the pattern of expression of BDNF and TrkB in the retina of zebrafish remains unchanged during postembryonic development and adult life. Because TrkB expression in retina did not change with age, cells expressing TrkB may potentially be able to respond during the entire lifespan of zebrafish to BDNF either exogenously administered or endogenously produced, acting through paracrine mechanisms.

  11. Reduced Hippocampal Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Neonatal Rats after Prenatal Exposure to Propylthiouracil (PTU)

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Goutam; Magagna-Poveda, Alejandra; Parratt, Carolyn; Umans, Jason G.; MacLusky, Neil J.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is critical for central nervous system development. Fetal hypothyroidism leads to reduced cognitive performance in offspring as well as other effects on neural development in both humans and experimental animals. The nature of these impairments suggests that thyroid hormone may exert its effects via dysregulation of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is critical to normal development of the central nervous system and has been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders. The only evidence of BDNF dysregulation in early development, however, comes from experimental models in which severe prenatal hypothyroidism occurred. By contrast, milder prenatal hypothyroidism has been shown to alter BDNF levels and BDNF-dependent functions only much later in life. We hypothesized that mild experimental prenatal hypothyroidism might lead to dysregulation of BDNF in the early postnatal period. BDNF levels were measured by ELISA at 3 or 7 d after birth in different regions of the brains of rats exposed to propylthiouracil (PTU) in the drinking water. The dose of PTU that was used induced mild maternal thyroid hormone insufficiency. Pups, but not the parents, exhibited alterations in tissue BDNF levels. Hippocampal BDNF levels were reduced at both d 3 and 7, but no significant reductions were observed in either the cerebellum or brain stem. Unexpectedly, more males than females were born to PTU-treated dams, suggesting an effect of PTU on sex determination. These results support the hypothesis that reduced hippocampal BDNF levels during early development may contribute to the adverse neurodevelopmental effects of mild thyroid hormone insufficiency during pregnancy. PMID:22253429

  12. High levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor are associated with treatment adherence among crack-cocaine users.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Juliana N; Schuch, Silvia; Ornell, Felipe; Sordi, Anne O; Bristot, Giovana; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Kapczinski, Flávio; Kessler, Felix H P; Fumagalli, Fabio; Pechansky, Flavio; von Diemen, Lisia

    2016-09-01

    Due to the complexity of crack -cocaine addiction treatment, the identification of biological markers that could help determining the impact or outcome of drug use has become a major subject of study. Therefore, we aim to evaluate the association of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS) levels in crack -cocaine users with treatment adherence and with drug addiction severity. A sample of 47 male inpatient crack- cocaine users were recruited in a treatment unit, and blood samples were collected at admission and discharge in order to measure BDNF and TBARS serum levels. Subjects were split into 2 groups: treatment non-completers (n=23) and treatment completers (n=24). The completer group had a tendency of higher levels of BDNF than non-completers at admission (16.85±3.24 vs. 14.65±5.45, p=0.10), and significant higher levels at discharge (18.10±4.88 vs. 13.91±4.77, p=0.001). A negative correlation between BDNF levels at admission and years of crack use was observed. We did not find significant changes in TBARS levels during inpatient treatment, although the completer group tended to decrease these levels while non-completers tend to increase it. These findings suggest an association between higher levels of BDNF and better clinical outcomes in crack- cocaine users after detoxification. We believe that the variation in BDNF and TBARS found here add evidence to literature data that propose that such biomarkers could be used to better understand the physiopathology of crack- cocaine addiction. PMID:27473943

  13. The brain-uterus connection: brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor (Ntrk2) are conserved in the mammalian uterus.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Jocelyn M; Wu, Liang; Leyland, Nicholas A; Wang, Hongmei; Foster, Warren G

    2014-01-01

    The neurotrophins are neuropeptides that are potent regulators of neurite growth and survival. Although mainly studied in the brain and nervous system, recent reports have shown that neurotrophins are expressed in multiple target tissues and cell types throughout the body. Additionally, dysregulation of neurotrophins has been linked to several disease conditions including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, psychiatric disorders, and cancer. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family that elicits its actions through the neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase type 2 (Ntrk2). Together BDNF and Ntrk2 are capable of activating the adhesion, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and proliferation pathways. These pathways are prominently involved in reproductive physiology, yet a cross-species examination of BDNF and Ntrk2 expression in the mammalian uterus is lacking. Herein we demonstrated the conserved nature of BDNF and Ntrk2 across several mammalian species by mRNA and protein sequence alignment, isolated BDNF and Ntrk2 transcripts in the uterus by Real-Time PCR, localized both proteins to the glandular and luminal epithelium, vascular smooth muscle, and myometrium of the uterus, determined that the major isoforms expressed in the human endometrium were pro-BDNF, and truncated Ntrk2, and finally demonstrated antibody specificity. Our findings suggest that BDNF and Ntrk2 are transcribed, translated, and conserved across mammalian species including human, mouse, rat, pig, horse, and the bat.

  14. Effects of acetylcholine and electrical stimulation on glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor production in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Vianney, John-Mary; Miller, Damon A; Spitsbergen, John M

    2014-11-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a neurotrophic factor required for survival of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system. Specifically, GDNF has been characterized as a survival factor for spinal motor neurons. GDNF is synthesized and secreted by neuronal target tissues, including skeletal muscle in the peripheral nervous system; however, the mechanisms by which GDNF is synthesized and released by skeletal muscle are not fully understood. Previous results suggested that cholinergic neurons regulate secretion of GDNF by skeletal muscle. In the current study, GDNF production by skeletal muscle myotubes following treatment with acetylcholine was examined. Acetylcholine receptors on myotubes were identified with labeled alpha-bungarotoxin and were blocked using unlabeled alpha-bungarotoxin. The question of whether electrical stimulation has a similar effect to that of acetylcholine was also investigated. Cells were stimulated with voltage pulses; at 1 and 5 Hz frequencies for times ranging from 30 min to 48 h. GDNF content in myotubes and GDNF in conditioned culture medium were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. Results suggest that acetylcholine and short-term electrical stimulation reduce GDNF secretion, while treatment with carbachol or long-term electrical stimulation enhances GDNF production by skeletal muscle.

  15. Calcitonin gene-related peptide regulation of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor in differentiated rat myotubes.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Elyse; Cha, Jieun; Bain, James R; Fahnestock, Margaret

    2015-03-01

    Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is the most potent trophic factor for motoneuron survival and neuromuscular junction formation. GDNF is upregulated in injured or denervated skeletal muscle and returns to normal levels following reinnervation. However, the mechanism by which GDNF is regulated in denervated muscle is not well understood. The nerve-derived neurotransmitter calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is upregulated following neuromuscular injury and is subsequently released from motoneurons at the neuromuscular junction. CGRP also promotes nerve regeneration, but the mechanism is not well understood. The current study investigates whether this increase in CGRP regulates GDNF, thus playing a key role in promoting regeneration of injured nerves. This study demonstrates that CGRP increases GDNF secretion without affecting its transcription or translation. Rat L6 myoblasts were differentiated into myotubes and subsequently treated with CGRP. GDNF mRNA expression levels were quantified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and secreted GDNF was quantified in the conditioned medium by ELISA. CGRP treatment increased secreted GDNF protein without altering GDNF mRNA levels. The translational inhibitor cycloheximide did not affect CGRP-induced GDNF secreted protein levels, whereas the secretional inhibitor brefeldin A blocked the CGRP-induced increase in GDNF. This study highlights the importance of injury-induced upregulation of CGRP by exposing its ability to increase GDNF levels and demonstrates a secretional mechanism for regulation of this key regeneration-promoting neurotrophic factor.

  16. Intracerebroventricular administration of α-ketoisocaproic acid decreases brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor levels in brain of young rats.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Miriam S W; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Zapelini, Hugo G; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Scaini, Giselli; Streck, Emilio L

    2016-04-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited aminoacidopathy resulting from dysfunction of the branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase complex, leading to accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) leucine, isoleucine and valine as well as their corresponding transaminated branched-chain α-ketoacids. This disorder is clinically characterized by ketoacidosis, seizures, coma, psychomotor delay and mental retardation whose pathophysiology is not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that oxidative stress may be involved in neuropathology of MSUD. However, the effect of accumulating α-ketoacids in MSUD on neurotrophic factors has not been investigated. Thus, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute intracerebroventricular administration of α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in the brains of young male rats. Ours results showed that intracerebroventricular administration of KIC decreased BDNF levels in hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex, without induce a detectable change in pro-BDNF levels. Moreover, NGF levels in the hippocampus were reduced after intracerebroventricular administration of KIC. In conclusion, these data suggest that the effects of KIC on demyelination and memory processes may be mediated by reduced trophic support of BDNF and NGF. Moreover, lower levels of BDNF and NGF are consistent with the hypothesis that a deficit in this neurotrophic factor may contribute to the structural and functional alterations of brain underlying the psychopathology of MSUD, supporting the hypothesis of a neurodegenerative process in MSUD.

  17. Intracerebroventricular administration of α-ketoisocaproic acid decreases brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor levels in brain of young rats.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Miriam S W; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara M; Zapelini, Hugo G; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Scaini, Giselli; Streck, Emilio L

    2016-04-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited aminoacidopathy resulting from dysfunction of the branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase complex, leading to accumulation of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) leucine, isoleucine and valine as well as their corresponding transaminated branched-chain α-ketoacids. This disorder is clinically characterized by ketoacidosis, seizures, coma, psychomotor delay and mental retardation whose pathophysiology is not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that oxidative stress may be involved in neuropathology of MSUD. However, the effect of accumulating α-ketoacids in MSUD on neurotrophic factors has not been investigated. Thus, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute intracerebroventricular administration of α-ketoisocaproic acid (KIC) on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) levels in the brains of young male rats. Ours results showed that intracerebroventricular administration of KIC decreased BDNF levels in hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex, without induce a detectable change in pro-BDNF levels. Moreover, NGF levels in the hippocampus were reduced after intracerebroventricular administration of KIC. In conclusion, these data suggest that the effects of KIC on demyelination and memory processes may be mediated by reduced trophic support of BDNF and NGF. Moreover, lower levels of BDNF and NGF are consistent with the hypothesis that a deficit in this neurotrophic factor may contribute to the structural and functional alterations of brain underlying the psychopathology of MSUD, supporting the hypothesis of a neurodegenerative process in MSUD. PMID:26586008

  18. Short-term ethanol exposure causes imbalanced neurotrophic factor allocation in the basal forebrain cholinergic system: a novel insight into understanding the initial processes of alcohol addiction.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takanori; Kusaka, Takashi; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Ohta, Ken-ichi; Suzuki, Shingo; Warita, Katsuhiko; Jamal, Mostofa; Wang, Zhi-Yu; Ueki, Masaaki; Liu, Jun-Qian; Yakura, Tomiko; Tamai, Motoki; Sumitani, Kazunori; Hosomi, Naohisa; Takeuchi, Yoshiki

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol ingestion affects both motor and cognitive functions. One brain system that is influenced by ethanol is the basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic projection system, which projects to diverse neocortical and limbic areas. The BF is associated with memory and cognitive function. Our primary interest is the examination of how regions that receive BF cholinergic projections are influenced by short-term ethanol exposure through alterations in the mRNA levels of neurotrophic factors [nerve growth factor/TrkA, brain-derived neurotrophic factor/TrkB, and glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)/GDNF family receptor α1]. Male BALB/C mice were fed a liquid diet containing 5 % (v/v) ethanol. Pair-fed control mice were maintained on an identical liquid diet, except that the ethanol was isocalorically substituted with sucrose. Mice exhibiting signs of ethanol intoxication (stages 1-2) were used for real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses. Among the BF cholinergic projection regions, decreased levels of GDNF mRNA and increased levels of TrkB mRNA were observed in the basal nucleus, and increased levels of TrkB mRNA were observed in the cerebral cortex. There were no significant alterations in the levels of expression of relevant neurotrophic factors in the septal nucleus and hippocampus. Given that neurotrophic factors function in retrograde/anterograde or autocrine/paracrine mechanisms and that BF cholinergic projection regions are neuroanatomically connected, these findings suggested that an imbalanced allocation of neurotrophic factor ligands and receptors is an initial phenomenon in alcohol addiction. The exact mechanisms underlying this phenomenon in the BF cholinergic system are unknown. However, our results provide a novel notion for the understanding of the initial processes in alcohol addiction.

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor superinduction parallels anti-epileptic--neuroprotective treatment in the pilocarpine epilepsy model.

    PubMed

    Biagini, G; Avoli, M; Marcinkiewicz, J; Marcinkiewicz, M

    2001-03-01

    Antiepileptic drugs provide neuroprotection in several animal models of brain damage, including those induced by status epilepticus (SE). The mechanisms involved in this action are unknown, but neurotrophic factors such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may play a role. In this study we investigated the changes in BDNF levels in rats in which SE had been induced by pilocarpine injection (400 mg/kg i.p.) and continued for several hours (unprotected group). In other animals (protected groups), SE was suppressed after 30 min by intraperitoneal injection of either diazepam (10 mg/kg) + pentobarbital (30 mg/kg) or paraldehyde (0.3 mg/kg). In diazepam + pentobarbital-treated rats the hippocampal damage caused by SE was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than in unprotected animals. In addition, 2 and 24 h after pilocarpine injection, the levels of BDNF mRNA were moderately increased in the unprotected group, but 'superinduced' in protected animals, especially in the neocortex and hippocampus. A time-dependent increase in BDNF immunoreactivity was also found by western blot analysis in rats treated with diazepam + pentobarbital. In contrast, a decrease of BDNF immunoreactivity occurred in the unprotected group. In conclusion, these results show that neuroprotection induced by anti-epileptic drugs in pilocarpine-treated rats is accompanied by strong potentiation of BDNF synthesis in brain regions involved in SE.

  20. Modulation of visceral hypersensitivity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α-3 in colorectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, M.; Feng, B.; Albers, K. M.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by colorectal hypersensitivity and contributed to by sensitized mechanosensitive primary afferents and recruitment of mechanoinsensitive (silent) afferents. Neurotrophic factors are well known to orchestrate dynamic changes in the properties of sensory neurons. Although pain modulation by proteins in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family has been documented in various pathophysiological states, their role in colorectal hypersensitivity remains unexplored. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of the GDNF family receptor α-3 (GFRα3) signaling in visceral hypersensitivity by quantifying visceromotor responses (VMR) to colorectal distension before and after intracolonic treatment with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Baseline responses to colorectal distension did not differ between C57BL/6 and GFRα3 knockout (KO) mice. Relative to intracolonic saline treatment, TNBS significantly enhanced the VMR to colorectal distension in C57BL/6 mice 2, 7, 10, and 14 days posttreatment, whereas TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity was significantly suppressed in GFRα3 KO mice. The proportion of GFRα3 immunopositive thoracolumbar and lumbosacral colorectal dorsal root ganglion neurons was significantly elevated 2 days after TNBS treatment. In single fiber recordings, responses to circumferential stretch of colorectal afferent endings in C57BL/6 mice were significantly increased (sensitized) after exposure to an inflammatory soup, whereas responses to stretch did not sensitize in GFRα3 KO mice. These findings suggest that enhanced GFRα3 signaling in visceral afferents may contribute to development of colorectal hypersensitivity. PMID:21193524

  1. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met polymorphism moderates early deprivation effects on attention problems.

    PubMed

    Gunnar, Megan R; Wenner, Jennifer A; Thomas, Kathleen M; Glatt, Charles E; McKenna, Morgan C; Clark, Andrew G

    2012-11-01

    Adverse early care is associated with attention regulatory problems, but not all so exposed develop attention problems. In a sample of 612 youth (girls = 432, M = 11.82 years, SD = 1.5) adopted from institutions (e.g., orphanages) in 25 countries, we examined whether the Val66Met polymorphism of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene moderates attention problems associated with the duration of institutional care. Parent-reported attention problem symptoms were collected using the MacArthur Health and Behavior Questionnaire. DNA was genotyped for the brain-derived neurotrophic factor Val66Met (rs6265) single nucleotide polymorphism. Among youth from Southeast (SE) Asia, the predominant genotype was valine/methionine (Val/Met), whereas among youth from Russia/Europe and Caribbean/South America, the predominant genotype was Val/Val. For analysis, youth were grouped as carrying Val/Val or Met/Met alleles. Being female, being from SE Asia, and being younger when adopted were associated with fewer attention regulatory problem symptoms. Youth carrying at least one copy of the Met allele were more sensitive to the duration of deprivation, yielding an interaction that followed a differential susceptibility pattern. Thus, youth with Val/Met or Met/Met genotypes exhibited fewer symptoms than Val/Val genotypes when adoption was very early and more symptoms when adoption occurred later in development. Similar patterns were observed when SE Asian youth and youth from other parts of the world were analyzed separately. PMID:23062292

  2. Endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor protects dopaminergic nigral neurons against transneuronal degeneration induced by striatal excitotoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Canudas, Anna M; Pezzi, Susana; Canals, Josep M; Pallàs, Mercè; Alberch, Jordi

    2005-03-24

    Injury to the central nervous system causes atrophy or death of connecting neurons and can modify the expression of neurotrophic factors. We observed transneuronal upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the rat ipsilateral substantia nigra pars compacta after a striatal lesion induced by kainate. This effect is developmentally regulated because the enhancement of nigral BDNF expression was only observed when striatal lesion was performed on postnatal day (P) 15 and in adulthood, but not at P7. Interestingly, the lack of regulation of BDNF was coincident with the transynaptic degeneration of nigral neurons after striatal excitotoxic injury. Hence, the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta decreased when the lesion was performed at P7, but not at P15 or at P30. The analysis of the functional significance of this BDNF upregulation was done using trkB-IgG fusion proteins. After striatal injury, blockade of endogenous BDNF by trkB fusion proteins induced an atrophy of the dopaminergic neurons of the pars compacta. The injection of trkB-IgG fusion proteins did not modify the effects of kainate in the substantia nigra pars reticulata. Thus, our results show that BDNF exerts an autocrine/paracrine protective effect selectively on dopaminergic neurons against the loss of trophic support from the target striatum.

  3. Treating skeletal pain: limitations of conventional anti-inflammatory drugs, and anti-neurotrophic factor as a possible alternative.

    PubMed

    Xian, Cory J; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2009-02-01

    Inflammatory and injury-induced skeletal pain are common conditions, and both conventional nonselective NSAIDs and the newer cyclo-oxygenase-2-specific inhibitors are widely used as post-traumatic and post-surgical analgesics. However, new research suggests that these drugs, particularly the cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, have a negative effect on the healing process in fractured bone and within orthopedic surgical sites, thus highlighting a need to develop new approaches for managing skeletal pain. Various experimental studies have revealed that locally upregulated neurotrophic factors, especially nerve growth factor, have a major role in mediating injury-induced or inflammatory pain. Nerve growth factor inhibitors, therefore, might be an effective alternative modality for post-traumatic and post-surgical analgesia, without impairing bone healing.

  4. Gray Matter Volume in Adolescent Anxiety: An Impact of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Val[superscript 66]Met Polymorphism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Sven C.; Aouidad, Aveline; Gorodetsky, Elena; Goldman, David; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Minimal research links anxiety disorders in adolescents to regional gray matter volume (GMV) abnormalities and their modulation by genetic factors. Prior research suggests that a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF) Val[superscript 66]Met polymorphism may modulate such brain morphometry profiles. Method: Using voxel-based…

  5. A putative model of overeating and obesity based on brain-derived neurotrophic factor: direct and indirect effects.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Cara L; Kennedy, James L; Levitan, Robert D

    2012-08-01

    Increased food intake is a major contributor to the obesity epidemic in all age groups. Elucidating brain systems that drive overeating and that might serve as targets for novel prevention and treatment interventions is thus a high priority for obesity research. The authors consider 2 major pathways by which decreased activity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may confer vulnerability to overeating and weight gain in an obesogenic environment. The first "direct" pathway focuses on the specific role of BDNF as a mediator of food intake control at brain areas rich in BDNF receptors, including the hypothalamus and hindbrain. It is proposed that low BDNF activity limited to this direct pathway may best explain overeating and obesity outside the context of major neuropsychiatric disturbance. A second "indirect" pathway considers the broad neurotrophic effects of BDNF on key monoamine systems that mediate mood dysregulation, impulsivity, and executive dysfunction as well as feeding behavior per se. Disruption in this pathway may best explain overeating and obesity in the context of various neuropsychiatric disturbances including mood disorders, attention-deficit disorder, and/or binge eating disorders. An integrative model that considers these potential roles of BDNF in promoting obesity is presented. The implications of this model for the early prevention and treatment of obesity are also considered.

  6. Assessment of oxidative stress parameters of brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice in acute stress model

    PubMed Central

    Hacioglu, Gulay; Senturk, Ayse; Ince, Imran; Alver, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Exposing to stress may be associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, high level of oxidative stress may eventually give rise to accumulation of oxidative damage and development of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. It has been presented that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) supports neurons against various neurodegenerative conditions. Lately, there has been growing evidence that changes in the cerebral neurotrophic support and especially in the BDNF expression and its engagement with ROS might be important in various disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Hence, we aimed to investigate protective effects of BDNF against stress-induced oxidative damage. Materials and Methods: Five- to six-month-old male wild-type and BDNF knock-down mice were used in this study. Activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes, and the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA) were assessed in the cerebral homogenates of studied groups in response to acute restraint stress. Results: Exposing to acute physiological stress led to significant elevation in the markers of oxidative stress in the cerebral cortexes of experimental groups. Conclusion: As BDNF-deficient mice were observed to be more susceptible to stress-induced oxidative damage, it can be suggested that there is a direct interplay between oxidative stress indicators and BDNF levels in the brain. PMID:27279982

  7. Modulatory effects of sex steroid hormones on brain-derived neurotrophic factor-tyrosine kinase B expression during adolescent development in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Hill, R A; Wu, Y W C; Kwek, P; van den Buuse, M

    2012-05-01

    Sex steroid hormones and neurotrophic factors are involved in pruning and shaping the adolescent brain and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental illness. We aimed to determine the association between altered levels of sex steroid hormones during adolescent development and neurotrophic signalling in the C57Bl/6 mouse. We first performed a week by week analysis from pre-pubescence to adulthood in male and female C57Bl/6 mice, measuring serum levels of testosterone and oestradiol in conjunction with western blot analysis of neurotrophin expression in the forebrain and hippocampal regions. Second, we manipulated adolescent sex steroid hormone levels by gonadectomy and hormone replacement at the pre-pubescent age of 5 weeks. Young-adult forebrain and hippocampal neurotrophin expression was then determined. Male mice showed significant changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the forebrain regions during weeks 7-10, which corresponded significantly with a surge in serum testosterone. Castration and testosterone or di-hydrotestosterone replacement experiments revealed an androgen receptor-dependent effect on BDNF-tyrosine kinase (Trk) B signalling in the forebrain and hippocampal regions during adolescence. Female mice showed changes in BDNF-TrkB signalling at a much earlier time point (weeks 4-8) in the forebrain and hippocampal regions and these did not correspond with changes in serum oestradiol. Ovariectomy actually increased BDNF expression but decreased TrkB phosphorylation in the forebrain regions. 17β-Oestradiol replacement had no effect, suggesting a role for other ovarian hormones in regulating BDNF-TrkB signalling in the adolescent female mouse brain. These results suggest the differential actions of sex steroid hormones in modulating BDNF-TrkB signalling during adolescence. These data provide insight into how the male and female brain changes in response to altered levels of

  8. LncRNA analysis of mouse spermatogonial stem cells following glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Lufan; Wang, Min; Wang, Mei; Wu, Xiaoxi; Geng, Lei; Xue, Yuanyuan; Wei, Xiang; Jia, Yuanyuan; Wu, Xin

    2015-09-01

    Spermatonial stem cells (SSCs) are the foundation of spermatogenesis. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs with at least 200 bp in length, which play important roles in various biological processes. Growth factor glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), secreted from testis niches, is critical for self-renewal of SSCs in vitro and in vivo. Using Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 high throughput sequencing, we found 55924 lncRNAs which were regulated by GDNF in SSCs in vitro; these included 21,929 known lncRNAs from NONCODE library (version 3.0) and 33,975 predicted lncRNAs which were identified using Coding Potential Calculator. Analyses of these data should provide new insights into regulated mechanism in SSC self-renewal and proliferation. The data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (series GSE66998).

  9. Cross-sex hormone treatment in male-to-female transsexual persons reduces serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    PubMed

    Fuss, Johannes; Hellweg, Rainer; Van Caenegem, Eva; Briken, Peer; Stalla, Günter K; T'Sjoen, Guy; Auer, Matthias K

    2015-01-01

    Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are reduced in male-to-female transsexual persons (MtF) compared to male controls. It was hypothesized before that this might reflect either an involvement of BDNF in a biomechanism of transsexualism or to be the result of persistent social stress due to the condition. Here, we demonstrate that 12 month of cross-sex hormone treatment reduces serum BDNF levels in male-to-female transsexual persons independent of anthropometric measures. Participants were acquired through the European Network for the Investigation of Gender Incongruence (ENIGI). Reduced serum BDNF in MtF thus seems to be a result of hormonal treatment rather than a consequence or risk factor of transsexualism.

  10. Differential effects of neonatal maternal separation on the expression of neurotrophic factors in rat brain. II: Regional differences in the cerebellum versus the cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takanori; Lee, Kyoung-Youl; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Liu, Jun-Qian; Kusaka, Takashi; Suzuki, Shingo; Ohta, Ken-ichi; Warita, Katsuhiko; Jamal, Mostofa; Ueki, Masaaki; Yakura, Tomiko; Hosomi, Naohisa; Takeuchi, Yoshiki

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to examine the effects of early postnatal maternal separation stress on the age-dependent fluctuations in the expression levels of neurotrophic factor ligands and receptors in the developing cerebellum. Wistar rats were separated from their mothers for 3 h each day during postnatal days (PND) 10 to 15. The expression level of mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and type-1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) were evaluated in the cerebellum on PND16, 20, 30, and 60 with real-time RT-PCR. The mRNA levels of cerebellar BDNF in maternally separated rats were increased on PND16, while the other variables showed no significant alterations at any of the time points examined. However, the effects of an identical maternal separation on the cerebral cortex were previously reported to be completely different. These results indicate regional differences in the responses of neurotrophic factor ligands/receptors between the cerebellum and cerebral cortex. Given that neurotrophic factors play important roles in brain development, alterations in these factors may interrupt normal brain development and ultimately, lead to functional disruptions.

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 activate striatal dopamine and serotonin metabolism and related behaviors: interactions with amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Martin-Iverson, M T; Todd, K G; Altar, C A

    1994-03-01

    To investigate behavioral and neurochemical effects of neurotrophic factors in vivo, rats received continuous 14 d infusions of either brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), or vehicle unilaterally into the substantia nigra. BDNF and NT-3 decreased body weights, an effect that was sustained over the infusion period. BDNF elevated daytime and nocturnal locomotion compared with infusions of vehicle or NT-3. At 2 weeks, a systemic injection of amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg, s.c.) increased the frequencies and durations of rotations contraversive to the side of BDNF and NT-3 infusions. Both factors attenuated amphetamine-induced locomotion without affecting amphetamine-induced stereotyped behaviors such as sniffing, head movements, and snout contact with cage surfaces. Only BDNF induced backward walking, and this response was augmented by amphetamine. BDNF, but not NT-3, increased dopamine turnover in the striatum ipsilateral to the infusion relative to the contralateral striatum. Both trophic factors decreased dopamine turnover in the infused substantia nigra relative to the contralateral hemisphere and increased 5-HT turnover in the striatum of both sides. Contraversive rotations were positively correlated with dopamine content decreases and 5-HT turnover increases in the striatum ipsilateral to the infused substantia nigra. Backward walking was positively correlated with increased dopamine and 5-HT turnover in the striatum of the infused hemisphere. Supranigral infusions of BDNF and NT-3 alter circadian rhythms, spontaneous motor activity, body weights, and amphetamine-induced behaviors including locomotion and contraversive rotations. These behavioral effects of the neurotrophins are consistent with a concomitant activation of dopamine and 5-HT systems in vivo.

  12. Reduced levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the serum of diabetic retinopathy patients and in the retina of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ola, M Shamsul; Nawaz, Mohd Imtiaz; El-Asrar, Ahmed Abu; Abouammoh, Marwan; Alhomida, Abdullah S

    2013-04-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is widely recognized as a neurovascular disease. Retina, being a neuronal tissue of the eye, produces neurotrophic factors for its maintenance. However, diabetes dysregulates their levels and thereby may damage the retina. Among neurotrophins, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most abundant in the retina. In this study, we investigated the level of BDNF in the serum of patients with DR and also in the serum and retina of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The level of BDNF was significantly decreased in the serum of proliferative diabetic retinopathy patients as compared to that of non-diabetic healthy controls (25.5 ± 8.5-10.0 ± 8.1 ng/ml, p < 0.001) as well as compared to that of diabetic patients with no retinopathy (21.8 ± 4.7-10.0 ± 8.1 ng/ml, p < 0.001), as measured by ELISA techniques. The levels of BDNF in the serum and retina of diabetic rats were also significantly reduced compared to that of non-diabetic controls (p < 0.05). In addition, the expression level of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) was significantly decreased in diabetic rat retina compared to that of non-diabetic controls as determined by Western blotting technique. Caspase-3 activity was increased in diabetic rat retina after 3 weeks of diabetes and remained elevated until 10 weeks, which negatively correlated with the level of BDNF (r = -0.544, p = 0.013). Our results indicate that reduced levels of BDNF in diabetes may cause apoptosis and neurodegeneration early in diabetic retina, which may lead to neuro-vascular damage later in DR. PMID:23271640

  13. Neurorestoration induced by the HDAC inhibitor sodium valproate in the lactacystin model of Parkinson’s is associated with histone acetylation and up-regulation of neurotrophic factors

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Ian F; Crum, William R; Vernon, Anthony C; Dexter, David T

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Histone hypoacetylation is associated with Parkinson's disease (PD), due possibly to an imbalance in the activities of enzymes responsible for histone (de)acetylation; correction of which may be neuroprotective/neurorestorative. This hypothesis was tested using the anti-epileptic drug sodium valproate, a known histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), utilizing a delayed-start study design in the lactacystin rat model of PD. Experimental Approach The irreversible proteasome inhibitor lactacystin was unilaterally injected into the substantia nigra of Sprague–Dawley rats that subsequently received valproate for 28 days starting 7 days after lactacystin lesioning. Longitudinal motor behavioural testing, structural MRI and post-mortem assessment of nigrostriatal integrity were used to track changes in this model of PD and quantify neuroprotection/restoration. Subsequent cellular and molecular analyses were performed to elucidate the mechanisms underlying valproate's effects. Key Results Despite producing a distinct pattern of structural re-modelling in the healthy and lactacystin-lesioned brain, delayed-start valproate administration induced dose-dependent neuroprotection/restoration against lactacystin neurotoxicity, characterized by motor deficit alleviation, attenuation of morphological brain changes and restoration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Molecular analyses revealed that valproate alleviated lactacystin-induced histone hypoacetylation and induced up-regulation of brain neurotrophic/neuroprotective factors. Conclusions and Implications The histone acetylation and up-regulation of neurotrophic/neuroprotective factors associated with valproate treatment culminate in a neuroprotective and neurorestorative phenotype in this animal model of PD. As valproate induced structural re-modelling of the brain, further research is required to determine whether valproate represents a viable candidate for disease treatment; however

  14. Regulation of embryonic development and apoptotic-related gene expression by brain-derived neurotrophic factor in two different culture conditions in ovine.

    PubMed

    Abazari-Kia, Amir Hossein; Dehghani-Mohammadabadi, Maryam; Mohammadi-Sangcheshmeh, Abdollah; Zhandi, Mahdi; Salehi, Mohammad

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, we aimed to evaluate effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) which is a member of neurotrophic factor family on developmental competence of oocytes in sheep. In vitro maturation was performed in presence of various concentrations (0, 10, and 100 ng/mL) of BDNF. Meiotic maturation, levels of intracellular glutathione, embryonic developmental potential after parthenogenetic activation, number of total and apoptotic cells in blastocysts, and expression of Bax and Bcl-2 genes in blastocyst cells were determined. Under unstressed condition, while at 100 ng/mL concentration, BDNF increased the IVM rate; an increase of glutathione level was observed at 10 ng/mL concentration. Moreover, when BDNF-treated oocytes were used for parthenogenetic activation, more blastocyst at both 10 and 100 ng/mL levels was obtained in comparison with the untreated group. Under heat stress (HS), the blastocyst rate was dramatically reduced in untreated oocytes compared to that obtained from 10 ng/mL BDNF groups. Total cell number in blastocysts was not affected by the treatment groups. The mean of Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive nuclei in blastocysts was not influenced by addition of BDNF in medium and that presence or absence of thermal stress during IVM than the control group. Moreover, our data revealed that the expression of Bax and Bcl-2 genes in blastocysts was affected by both BDNF concentration and HS. Conclusively, supplementation of IVM medium with 10 ng/mL BDNF had a beneficial effect on sheep oocyte competence by increasing the rate of blastocyst especially when HS exists.

  15. Relationship between Sonic hedgehog protein, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and oxidative stress in autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Al-Ayadhi, Laila Y

    2012-02-01

    The etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is not well known but oxidative stress has been suggested to play a pathological role. We report here that the serum levels of Sonic hedgehog (SHH) protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) might be linked to oxidative stress in ASD. By using the whole blood or polymorphonuclear leukocytes, we demonstrated that autistic children produced a significantly higher level of oxygen free radicals (OFR). In addition, we found significantly higher levels of serum SHH protein in children with mild as well as severe form of autism. We also found that the serum level of BDNF was significantly reduced in autistic children with mild form of the disorder but not with severe form of the disorder. Our findings are the first to report a correlation between SHH, BDNF and OFR in autistic children, suggesting a pathological role of oxidative stress and SHH in autism spectrum disorders. PMID:21984201

  16. ERK-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulation by hesperidin in mice exposed to chronic mild stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Fu; Chen, Shao-Mei; Chen, Xue-Mei; Mu, Rong-Hao; Wang, Shuang-Shuang; Geng, Di; Liu, Qing; Yi, Li-Tao

    2016-06-01

    A previous study found that the antidepressant-like effects of ethanolic extracts from Hemerocallis citrina are predominantly related to the flavonoid, hesperidin. The study herein aimed to explore the antidepressant-like mechanism of hesperidin in mice induced by chronic mild stress (CMS). The results indicated that hesperidin reversed the reduction of sucrose preference and the elevation of immobility time in mice induced by CMS. In addition, the increase in serum corticosterone levels and decrease in hippocampal extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in CMS mice were also ameliorated by hesperidin treatment. In contrast, improvement by hesperidin was suppressed by pretreatment with ERK inhibitor SL327. Taken together, our findings confirmed the antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin and indicated that hesperidin-induced BDNF up-regulation was mediated in an ERK-dependent manner. PMID:27018164

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits calcium channel activation, exocytosis, and endocytosis at a central nerve terminal.

    PubMed

    Baydyuk, Maryna; Wu, Xin-Sheng; He, Liming; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2015-03-18

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that regulates synaptic function and plasticity and plays important roles in neuronal development, survival, and brain disorders. Despite such diverse and important roles, how BDNF, or more generally speaking, neurotrophins affect synapses, particularly nerve terminals, remains unclear. By measuring calcium currents and membrane capacitance during depolarization at a large mammalian central nerve terminal, the rat calyx of Held, we report for the first time that BDNF slows down calcium channel activation, including P/Q-type channels, and inhibits exocytosis induced by brief depolarization or single action potentials, inhibits slow and rapid endocytosis, and inhibits vesicle mobilization to the readily releasable pool. These presynaptic mechanisms may contribute to the important roles of BDNF in regulating synapses and neuronal circuits and suggest that regulation of presynaptic calcium channels, exocytosis, and endocytosis are potential mechanisms by which neurotrophins achieve diverse neuronal functions.

  18. Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor reduces cell apoptosis via upregulating GRP78 in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingwei; Chen, Changyan; Gu, Hua; Li, Chen; Fu, Xing; Jiang, Ming; Sun, Hui; Xu, Jun; Fang, Jianmin; Jin, Lingjing

    2016-07-01

    Mesencephalic astrocyte-derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) protects dopaminergic neurons from damage. In this study, we used MTT, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL staining to investigate the protective effect of MANF in SH-SY5Y cells treated with 6-OHDA or overexpressed α-synuclein. Cleaved caspase-3 levels significantly increased in cells treated with 6-OHDA or overexpressed α-synuclein. 6-OHDA or α-synuclein overexpression that induced cleaved caspase-3 levels to increase was reduced by MANF treatment. In addition, MANF treatment upregulated GRP78 expressions in cells treated with 6-OHDA or overexpressed α-synuclein, and RNAi knockdown for GRP78 could block the MANF induced cell survival from 6-OHDA treatment. Furthermore, GRP78 overexpression inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that MANF inhibits apoptosis induced by 6-OHDA and overexpressed α-synuclein in SH-SY5Y cells via upregulating GRP78 in the transcriptional pattern.

  19. Reg-2, A Downstream Signaling Protein in the Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Survival Pathway, Alleviates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Tian, Ke-Wei; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Beibei; Han, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), originally described as a neurocytokine that could support the survival of neurons, has been recently found to alleviate demyelination, prevent axon loss, and improve functional recovery in a rat model of acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, poor penetration into the brain parenchyma and unfavorable side effects limit the utility of CNTF. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of a protein downstream of CNTF, regeneration gene protein 2 (Reg-2). Using multiple morphological, molecular biology, and electrophysiological methods to assess neuroinflammation, axonal loss, demyelination, and functional impairment, we observed that Reg-2 and CNTF exert similar effects in the acute phase of EAE. Both treatments attenuated axonal loss and demyelination, improved neuronal survival, and produced functional improvement. With a smaller molecular weight and improved penetration into the brain parenchyma, Reg-2 may be a useful substitute for CNTF therapy in EAE and multiple sclerosis (MS). PMID:27242448

  20. Clinical correlates of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor in post-traumatic stress disorder spectrum after a natural disaster.

    PubMed

    Stratta, Paolo; Sanità, Patrizia; Bonanni, Roberto L; de Cataldo, Stefano; Angelucci, Adriano; Rossi, Rodolfo; Origlia, Nicola; Domenici, Luciano; Carmassi, Claudia; Piccinni, Armando; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Rossi, Alessandro

    2016-10-30

    Clinical correlates of plasma Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) have been investigated in a clinical population with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms and healthy control subjects who survived to the L'Aquila 2009 earthquake. Twenty-six outpatients and 14 control subjects were recruited. Assessments included: Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis-I disorders Patient Version, Trauma and Loss Spectrum-Self Report (TALS-SR) for post-traumatic spectrum symptoms. Thirteen patients were diagnosed as Full PTSD and 13 as Partial PTSD. The subjects with full-blown PTSD showed lower BDNF level than subjects with partial PTSD and controls. Different relationship patterns of BDNF with post-traumatic stress spectrum symptoms have been reported in the three samples. Our findings add more insight on the mechanisms regulating BDNF levels in response to stress and further proofs of the utility of the distinction of PTSD into full and partial categories.

  1. Clinical correlates of plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor in post-traumatic stress disorder spectrum after a natural disaster.

    PubMed

    Stratta, Paolo; Sanità, Patrizia; Bonanni, Roberto L; de Cataldo, Stefano; Angelucci, Adriano; Rossi, Rodolfo; Origlia, Nicola; Domenici, Luciano; Carmassi, Claudia; Piccinni, Armando; Dell'Osso, Liliana; Rossi, Alessandro

    2016-10-30

    Clinical correlates of plasma Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) have been investigated in a clinical population with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms and healthy control subjects who survived to the L'Aquila 2009 earthquake. Twenty-six outpatients and 14 control subjects were recruited. Assessments included: Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis-I disorders Patient Version, Trauma and Loss Spectrum-Self Report (TALS-SR) for post-traumatic spectrum symptoms. Thirteen patients were diagnosed as Full PTSD and 13 as Partial PTSD. The subjects with full-blown PTSD showed lower BDNF level than subjects with partial PTSD and controls. Different relationship patterns of BDNF with post-traumatic stress spectrum symptoms have been reported in the three samples. Our findings add more insight on the mechanisms regulating BDNF levels in response to stress and further proofs of the utility of the distinction of PTSD into full and partial categories. PMID:27479108

  2. New insight in expression, transport, and secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor: Implications in brain-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Naoki; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Richards, Misty; Nakajima, Shingo; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) attracts increasing attention from both research and clinical fields because of its important functions in the central nervous system. An adequate amount of BDNF is critical to develop and maintain normal neuronal circuits in the brain. Given that loss of BDNF function has been reported in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative or psychiatric diseases, understanding basic properties of BDNF and associated intracellular processes is imperative. In this review, we revisit the gene structure, transcription, translation, transport and secretion mechanisms of BDNF. We also introduce implications of BDNF in several brain-related diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, depression and schizophrenia. PMID:25426265

  3. The effects of physical activity and exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor in healthy humans: A review.

    PubMed

    Huang, T; Larsen, K T; Ried-Larsen, M; Møller, N C; Andersen, L B

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize the effects of physical activity and exercise on peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in healthy humans. Experimental and observational studies were identified from PubMed, Web of Knowledge, Scopus, and SPORT Discus. A total of 32 articles met the inclusion criteria. Evidence from experimental studies suggested that peripheral BDNF concentrations were elevated by acute and chronic aerobic exercise. The majority of the studies suggested that strength training had no influence on peripheral BDNF. The results from most observational studies suggested an inverse relationship between the peripheral BDNF level and habitual physical activity or cardiorespiratory fitness. More research is needed to confirm the findings from the observational studies.

  4. Activation of signaling pathways following localized delivery of systemically administered neurotrophic factors across the blood-brain barrier using focused ultrasound and microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baseri, Babak; Choi, James J.; Deffieux, Thomas; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Olumolade, Oluyemi; Small, Scott A.; Morrison, Barclay, III; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-04-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to have broad neuroprotective effects in addition to its therapeutic role in neurodegenerative disease. In this study, the efficacy of delivering exogenous BDNF to the left hippocampus is demonstrated in wild-type mice (n = 7) through the noninvasively disrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB) using focused ultrasound (FUS). The BDNF bioactivity was found to be preserved following delivery as assessed quantitatively by immunohistochemical detection of the pTrkB receptor and activated pAkt, pMAPK, and pCREB in the hippocampal neurons. It was therefore shown for the first time that systemically administered neurotrophic factors can cross the noninvasively disrupted BBB and trigger neuronal downstream signaling effects in a highly localized region in the brain. This is the first time that the administered molecule is tracked through the BBB and localized in the neuron triggering molecular effects. Additional preliminary findings are shown in wild-type mice with two additional neurotrophic factors such as the glia-derived neurotrophic factor (n = 12) and neurturin (n = 2). This further demonstrates the impact of FUS for the early treatment of CNS diseases at the cellular and molecular level and strengthens its premise for FUS-assisted drug delivery and efficacy.

  5. Intraspinal Rewiring of the Corticospinal Tract Requires Target-Derived Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Compensates Lost Function after Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ueno, Masaki; Hayano, Yasufumi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2012-01-01

    Brain injury that results in an initial behavioural deficit is frequently followed by spontaneous recovery. The intrinsic mechanism of this functional recovery has never been fully understood. Here, we show that reorganization of the corticospinal tract induced by target-derived brain-derived neurotrophic factor is crucial for spontaneous recovery…

  6. Comparative Analysis of the Effects of Neurotrophic Factors CDNF and GDNF in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garea-Rodríguez, Enrique; Eesmaa, Ave; Lindholm, Päivi; Schlumbohm, Christina; König, Jessica; Meller, Birgit; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Helms, Gunther; Saarma, Mart; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) belongs to a newly discovered family of evolutionarily conserved neurotrophic factors. We demonstrate for the first time a therapeutic effect of CDNF in a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion model of Parkinson’s disease in marmoset monkeys. Furthermore, we tested the impact of high chronic doses of human recombinant CDNF on unlesioned monkeys and analyzed the amino acid sequence of marmoset CDNF. The severity of 6-OHDA lesions and treatment effects were monitored in vivo using 123I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN) SPECT. Quantitative analysis of 123I-FP-CIT SPECT showed a significant increase of dopamine transporter binding activity in lesioned animals treated with CDNF. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a well-characterized and potent neurotrophic factor for dopamine neurons, served as a control in a parallel comparison with CDNF. By contrast with CDNF, only single animals responded to the treatment with GDNF, but no statistical difference was observed in the GDNF group. However, increased numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons, observed within the lesioned caudate nucleus of GDNF-treated animals, indicate a strong bioactive potential of GDNF. PMID:26901822

  7. Design of a Conformationally Defined and Proteolytically Stable Circular Mimetic of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Jordan M.; Morton, Craig J.; Zwar, Richard A.; Murray, Simon S.; O'Leary, Paul D.; Hughes, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family of neurotrophic factors. BDNF has long been recognized to have potential for the treatment of a variety of human neurodegenerative diseases. However, clinical trials with recombinant BDNF have yet to yield success, leading to the suggestion that alternative means of harnessing BDNF actions for therapeutic use may be required. Here we describe an approach to create low molecular weight peptides that, like BDNF, promote neuronal survival. The peptides were designed to mimic a cationic tripeptide sequence in loop 4 of BDNF shown in previous studies to contribute to the binding of BDNF to the common neurotrophin receptor p75NTR. The best of these peptides, the cyclic pentapeptide 2 (cyclo(-d-Pro-Ala-Lys-Arg-)), despite being of low molecular weight (Mr 580), was found to be an effective promoter of the survival of embryonic chick dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons in vitro (maximal survival, 68 ± 3% of neurons supported by BDNF). Pentapeptide 2 did not affect the phosphorylation of either TrkB (the receptor tyrosine kinase for BDNF) or the downstream signaling molecule MAPK, indicating that its mechanism of neuronal survival action is independent of TrkB. NMR studies reveal that pentapeptide 2 adopts a well defined backbone conformation in solution. Furthermore, pentapeptide 2 was found to be effectively resistant to proteolysis when incubated in a solution of rat plasma in vitro. These properties of pentapeptide 2 (low molecular weight, appropriate pharmacological actions, a well defined solution conformation, and proteolytic stability) render it worthy of further investigation, either as a template for the further design of neuronal survival promoting agents or as a lead compound with therapeutic potential in its own right. PMID:18809686

  8. Eicosanoid receptor subtype-mediated opposing regulation of TLR-stimulated expression of astrocyte glial-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianwu; Cudaback, Eiron; Breyer, Richard M.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Keene, C. Dirk; Montine, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    A major therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease (PD) is providing increased glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to dopaminergic neurons. We tested the hypothesis that innate immune activation increases astrocyte GDNF production and that this is regulated by specific eicosanoid receptors. Innate immune-activated primary murine astrocytes were assayed for GDNF expression and secretion. Controls were agent vehicle exposure and wild-type mice. Rank order for up to 10-fold selectively increased GDNF expression was activators of TLR3 > TLR2 or TLR4 > TLR9. TLR3 activator-stimulated GDNF expression was selectively JNK-dependent, followed cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, was coincident with membranous PGE2 synthase, and was not significantly altered by a nonspecific COX- or a COX-2-selective inhibitor. Specific eicosanoid receptors had opposing effects on TLR3 activator-induced GDNF expression: ∼60% enhancement by blocking or ablating of PGE2 receptor subtype 1 (EP1), ∼30% enhancement by activating PGF2α receptor or thromboxane receptor, or ∼15% enhancement by activating EP4. These results demonstrate functionally antagonistic eicosanoid receptor subtype regulation of innate immunity-induced astrocyte GDNF expression and suggest that selective inhibition of EP1 signaling might be a means to augment astrocyte GDNF secretion in the context of innate immune activation in diseased regions of brain in PD.—Li, X., Cudaback, E., Breyer, R. M., Montine, K. S., Keene, C. D., Montine, T. J. Eicosanoid receptor subtype-mediated opposing regulation of Toll-like receptor-stimulated expression of astrocyte glial-derived neurotrophic factor. PMID:22499581

  9. Exercise reduces diet-induced cognitive decline and increases hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor in CA3 neurons

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Emily E.; Mavanji, Vijayakumar; Little, Morgan R.; Billington, Charles J.; Kotz, Catherine M.; Wang, ChuanFeng

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that a western diet impairs, whereas physical exercise enhances hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Both diet and exercise influence expression of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is associated with improved cognition. We hypothesized that exercise reverses diet-induced cognitive decline while increasing hippocampal BDNF. Methods To test the effects of exercise on hippocampal-dependent memory, we compared cognitive scores of Sprague-Dawley rats exercised by voluntary running wheel (RW) access or forced treadmill (TM) to sedentary (Sed) animals. Memory was tested by two-way active avoidance test (TWAA), in which animals are exposed to a brief shock in a specific chamber area. When an animal avoids, escapes or has reduced latency to do either, this is considered a measure of memory. In a second experiment, rats were fed either a high-fat diet or control diet for 16 weeks, then randomly assigned to running wheel access or sedentary condition, and TWAA memory was tested once a week for seven weeks of exercise intervention. Results Both groups of exercised animals had improved memory as indicated by reduced latency to avoid and escape shock, and increased avoid and escape episodes (p<0.05). Exposure to a high-fat diet resulted in poor performance during both the acquisition and retrieval phases of the memory test as compared to controls. Exercise reversed high-fat diet-induced memory impairment, and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in neurons of the hippocampal CA3 region. Conclusions These data suggest that exercise improves memory retrieval, particularly with respect to avoiding aversive stimuli, and may be beneficial in protecting against diet induced cognitive decline, likely via elevated BDNF in neurons of the CA3 region. PMID:24755094

  10. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor promotes barrier maturation and wound healing in intestinal epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meir, Michael; Flemming, Sven; Burkard, Natalie; Bergauer, Lisa; Metzger, Marco; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Schlegel, Nicolas

    2015-10-15

    Recent data suggest that neurotrophic factors from the enteric nervous system are involved in intestinal epithelial barrier regulation. In this context the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was shown to affect gut barrier properties in vivo directly or indirectly by largely undefined processes in a model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We further investigated the potential role and mechanisms of GDNF in the regulation of intestinal barrier functions. Immunostaining of human gut specimen showed positive GDNF staining in enteric neuronal plexus and in enterocytes. In Western blots of the intestinal epithelial cell lines Caco2 and HT29B6, significant amounts of GDNF were detected, suggesting that enterocytes represent an additional source of GDNF. Application of recombinant GDNF on Caco2 and HT29B6 cells for 24 h resulted in significant epithelial barrier stabilization in monolayers with immature barrier functions. Wound-healing assays showed a significantly faster closure of the wounded areas after GDNF application. GDNF augmented cAMP levels and led to significant inactivation of p38 MAPK in immature cells. Activation of p38 MAPK signaling by SB-202190 mimicked GDNF-induced barrier maturation, whereas the p38 MAPK activator anisomycin blocked GDNF-induced effects. Increasing cAMP levels had adverse effects on barrier maturation, as revealed by permeability measurements. However, increased cAMP augmented the proliferation rate in Caco2 cells, and GDNF-induced proliferation of epithelial cells was abrogated by the PKA inhibitor H89. Our data show that enterocytes represent an additional source of GDNF synthesis. GDNF contributes to wound healing in a cAMP/PKA-dependent manner and promotes barrier maturation in immature enterocytes cells by inactivation of p38 MAPK signaling.

  11. Chronic Sleep Restriction Elevates Brain Interleukin-1 beta and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha and Attenuates Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Mark R.; Kim, Youngsoo; Karpova, Svetlana A.; McCarley, Robert W.; Strecker, Robert E.; Gerashchenko, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Acute sleep loss increases pro-inflammatory and synaptic plasticity-related molecules in the brain, including interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These molecules enhance non-rapid eye movement sleep slow wave activity (SWA), also known as electroencephalogram delta power, and modulate neurocognitive performance. Evidence suggests that chronic sleep restriction (CSR), a condition prevalent in today's society, does not elicit the enhanced SWA that is seen after acute sleep loss, although it cumulatively impairs neurocognitive functioning. Rats were continuously sleep deprived for 18 h per day and allowed 6 h of ad libitum sleep opportunity for 1 (SR1), 3 (SR3), or 5 (SR5) successive days (i.e., CSR). IL-1β, TNF-α, and BDNF mRNA levels were determined in the somatosensory cortex, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and basal forebrain. Largely, brain IL-1β and TNF-α expression were significantly enhanced throughout CSR. In contrast, BDNF mRNA levels were similar to baseline values in the cortex after 1 day of SR and significantly lower than baseline values in the hippocampus after 5 days of SR. In the basal forebrain, BDNF expression remained elevated throughout the 5 days of CSR, although IL-1β expression was significantly reduced. The chronic elevations of IL-1β and TNF-α and inhibition of BDNF might contribute to the reported lack of SWA responses reported after CSR. Further, the CSR-induced enhancements in brain inflammatory molecules and attenuations in hippocampal BDNF might contribute to neurocognitive and vigilance detriments that occur from CSR. PMID:25093703

  12. Chronic sleep restriction elevates brain interleukin-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha and attenuates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Mark R; Kim, Youngsoo; Karpova, Svetlana A; McCarley, Robert W; Strecker, Robert E; Gerashchenko, Dmitry

    2014-09-19

    Acute sleep loss increases pro-inflammatory and synaptic plasticity-related molecules in the brain, including interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These molecules enhance non-rapid eye movement sleep slow wave activity (SWA), also known as electroencephalogram delta power, and modulate neurocognitive performance. Evidence suggests that chronic sleep restriction (CSR), a condition prevalent in today's society, does not elicit the enhanced SWA that is seen after acute sleep loss, although it cumulatively impairs neurocognitive functioning. Rats were continuously sleep deprived for 18h per day and allowed 6h of ad libitum sleep opportunity for 1 (SR1), 3 (SR3), or 5 (SR5) successive days (i.e., CSR). IL-1β, TNF-α, and BDNF mRNA levels were determined in the somatosensory cortex, frontal cortex, hippocampus, and basal forebrain. Largely, brain IL-1β and TNF-α expression were significantly enhanced throughout CSR. In contrast, BDNF mRNA levels were similar to baseline values in the cortex after 1 day of SR and significantly lower than baseline values in the hippocampus after 5 days of SR. In the basal forebrain, BDNF expression remained elevated throughout the 5 days of CSR, although IL-1β expression was significantly reduced. The chronic elevations of IL-1β and TNF-α and inhibition of BDNF might contribute to the reported lack of SWA responses reported after CSR. Further, the CSR-induced enhancements in brain inflammatory molecules and attenuations in hippocampal BDNF might contribute to neurocognitive and vigilance detriments that occur from CSR.

  13. Low plasma levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor are potential risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao-Yi; Du, Xiao-Fang; Ma, Xiang; Guo, Jian-Lian; Lu, Jian-Min; Ma, Lu-Sheng

    2016-01-15

    Previous studies suggested that neurotrophins play a role in the diabetic retinopathy (DR). We therefore evaluated the role of plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients with and without diabetic retinopathy (DR). Plasma levels of BDNF were determined in type 2 diabetic patients (N=344). At baseline, the demographical and clinical data were taken. Multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression models. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) was used to test the overall predict accuracy of BDNF and other markers. Diabetic patients with DR and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) had significantly lower BDNF levels on admission (P<0.0001 both). BDNF improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the diabetes duration for DR from 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.82) to 0.89 (95% CI, 0.82-0.95; P<0.01) and for VDTR from 0.84 (95% CI, 0.78-0.92) to 0.95 (95% CI, 0.90-0.98; P<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for common risk factors showed that plasma BDNF levels≤12.4 ng/mL(1(rd) quartiles) was an independent marker of DR (OR=3.92; 95%CI: 2.31-6.56) and VTDR (OR=4.88; 95%CI: 2.21-9.30). The present study demonstrated that decreased plasma levels of BDNF were independent markers for DR and VDTR in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients, suggesting a possible role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of DR complications.

  14. The exposure to nicotine affects expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in neonate rats.

    PubMed

    Xiaoyu, Wang

    2015-02-01

    In the current study effect of nicotine on expression of neurotrophins, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) has been studied in hippocampus and frontal cortex during development of brain in rats. Neurotrophins are factors that help in development of brain among which BDNF and NGF are very important, expressed at different stages during the developmental process. Different sedatives are reported to alter the expression of these factors. In this study, three groups of neonate rats (1-5, 5-10 and 10-15 days age) were used each having 20 rats. Ten were subjected to a dose of 66 μg of nicotine while other ten received the same amount of saline at the same time interval. Then expression of the BDNF and NGF was observed in hippocampus and frontal cortex tissue using immunoassay. Western blotting was used to observe the presence of BDNF in hippocampus as well as frontal cortex. In all groups there was a significant decrease in concentration of neurotrophic factors where nicotine was applied as compared to control. The highest expression of BDNF and NGF in hippocampus and frontal cortex was observed in 10-15 days group (G3) and in 5-10 group (G2) as compared to the control, P < 0.01. It was concluded that exposure of neonate rats to nicotine causes a decrease in the expression of NGF and BDNF and it effects the development of brain in neonates that can further impair brain functions.

  15. Localization and expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in postmortem sciatic nerve from patients with motor neuron disease and diabetic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.A.; Gross, L.; Wittrock, D.A.; Windebank, A.J.

    1996-08-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is thought to play an important role in the maintenance of the mature motor system. The factor is found most abundantly in myelinating Schwann cells in the adult sciatic nerve. Lack of neuronal growth factors has been proposed as one possible etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Growth factor replacement therapies are currently being evaluated as a treatment for motor neuron disease. In this report we determined whether the expression of CNTF in sciatic nerve differed in patients with motor neuron disease compared to controls or patients with another form of axonopathy. We identified 8 patients (7 with ALS and 1 with SMA) with motor neuron disease and 6 patients with diabetic motor neuropathy who had autopsy material available. Immunoperoxidase staining showed reduced CNTF expression in nerves of patients with motor neuron disease but not in patients with diabetic motor neuropathy. Decreased CNTF appears be associated with primary motor neuron disease rather than a generalized process of axon loss. This result supports suggestions that CNTF deficiency may be an important factor in the development of motor neuron disease. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Conserved Dopamine Neurotrophic Factor-Transduced Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Axon Regeneration and Functional Recovery of Injured Sciatic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Nie, Lin; Zhao, Hua; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Yuan-Qiang; Wang, Shuai-Shuai; Cheng, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a common disease that often results in axonal degeneration and the loss of neurons, ultimately leading to limited nerve regeneration and severe functional impairment. Currently, there are no effective treatments for PNI. In the present study, we transduced conserved dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in collagen tubes to investigate their regenerative effects on rat peripheral nerves in an in vivo transection model. Scanning electron microscopy of the collagen tubes demonstrated their ability to be resorbed in vivo. We observed notable overexpression of the CDNF protein in the distal sciatic nerve after application of CDNF-MSCs. Quantitative analysis of neurofilament 200 (NF200) and S100 immunohistochemistry showed significant enhancement of axonal and Schwann cell regeneration in the group receiving CDNF-MSCs (CDNF-MSCs group) compared with the control groups. Myelination thickness, axon diameter and the axon-to fiber diameter ratio (G-ratio) were significantly higher in the CDNF-MSCs group at 8 and 12 weeks after nerve transection surgery. After surgery, the sciatic functional index, target muscle weight, wet weight ratio of gastrocnemius muscle and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) tracing demonstrated functional recovery. Light and electron microscopy confirmed successful regeneration of the sciatic nerve. The greater numbers of HRP-labeled neuron cell bodies and increased sciatic nerve index values (SFI) in the CDNF-MSCs group suggest that CDNF exerts neuroprotective effects in vivo. We also observed higher target muscle weights and a significant improvement in muscle atrophism in the CDNF-MSCs group. Collectively, these findings indicate that CDNF gene therapy delivered by MSCs is capable of promoting nerve regeneration and functional recovery, likely because of the significant neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of CDNF and the superior environment offered by MSCs and collagen tubes. PMID

  17. A Lack of Correlation between Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Serum Level and Verbal Memory Performance in Healthy Polish Population.

    PubMed

    Wilkosc, Monika; Markowska, Anita; Zajac-Lamparska, Ludmila; Skibinska, Maria; Szalkowska, Agnieszka; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is considered to be connected with memory and learning through the processes of long term synaptic potentiation and synaptic plasticity. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between precursor BDNF (proBNDF) and mature BDNF (mBDNF) serum levels and performance on Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) in 150 healthy volunteers. In addition, we have verified the relationships between serum concentration of both forms of BDNF and RAVLT with sociodemographic and lifestyle factors.We found no strong evidence for the correlation of proBDNF and mBDNF serum levels with performance on RAVLT in healthy Polish population in early and middle adulthood. We observed the mBDNF serum concentration to be higher in women compared with men. Moreover, we revealed higher mBDNF level to be connected with lower body mass index (BMI). In turn, the results of RAVLT correlated with sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, such as: age, education, gender, BMI and smoking. PMID:27242447

  18. The effect of neurotrophic factors on morphology, TRPV1 expression and capsaicin responses of cultured human DRG sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Anand, U; Otto, W R; Casula, M A; Day, N C; Davis, J B; Bountra, C; Birch, R; Anand, P

    2006-05-15

    We have studied the effect of key neurotrophic factors (NTFs) on morphology, levels of the vanilloid receptor-1 (TRPV1) and responses to capsaicin in adult human sensory neurons in vitro. Avulsed dorsal root ganglia (DRG, n = 5) were cultured with or without a combination of nerve growth factor (NGF), glial cell (line)-derived growth factor (GDNF) and neurotrophin3 (NT3) for 5 days. In the absence of NTFs, the diameter of neurons ranged from 20 to 100 microm (mean 42 +/- 4 microm). Adding NTFs caused a significant increase in neuronal sizes, up to 120 microm (mean diameter 62 +/- 5 microm, P < 0.01, t-test), an overall 35% increase of TRPV1-positive neurons (P < 0.003), and notably of large TRPV1-positive neurons > 80 microm (P < 0.05). Responses to capsaicin were significantly enhanced with calcium ratiometry (P < 0.0001). Short duration (1h) exposure of dissociated sensory neurons to NTFs increased numbers of TRPV1-positive neurons, but not of TRPV3, Nav 1.8 and IK1 and the morphological size-distribution remained similar to intact post-mortem DRG neurons. NTFs thus increase size, elevate TRPV1 levels and enhance capsaicin responses in cultured human DRG neurons; these changes may relate to pathophysiology in disease states, and provide an in vitro model to study novel analgesics. PMID:16481104

  19. Investigating the neurobiology of music: brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulation in the hippocampus of young adult mice.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, Francesco; Fiore, Marco; Ricci, Enzo; Padua, Luca; Sabino, Andrea; Tonali, Pietro Attilio

    2007-09-01

    It has been shown that music might be able to improve mood state in people affected by psychiatric disorders, ameliorate cognitive deficits in people with dementia and increase motor coordination in Parkinson patients. Robust experimental evidence explaining the central effects of music, however, is missing. This study was designed to investigate the effect of music on brain neurotrophin production and behavior in the mouse. We exposed young adult mice to music with a slow rhythm (6 h/day; mild sound pressure levels, between 50 and 60 db) for 21 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment, mice were tested for passive avoidance learning and then killed for analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in selected brain regions. We found that music-exposed mice showed increased BDNF, but not nerve growth factor in the hippocampus. Furthermore, we observed that music exposure significantly enhanced learning performance, as measured by the passive avoidance test. Our results demonstrate that exposure to music can modulate the activity of the hippocampus by influencing BDNF production. Our findings also suggest that music exposure might be of help in several central nervous system pathologies. PMID:17762517

  20. Investigating the neurobiology of music: brain-derived neurotrophic factor modulation in the hippocampus of young adult mice.

    PubMed

    Angelucci, Francesco; Fiore, Marco; Ricci, Enzo; Padua, Luca; Sabino, Andrea; Tonali, Pietro Attilio

    2007-09-01

    It has been shown that music might be able to improve mood state in people affected by psychiatric disorders, ameliorate cognitive deficits in people with dementia and increase motor coordination in Parkinson patients. Robust experimental evidence explaining the central effects of music, however, is missing. This study was designed to investigate the effect of music on brain neurotrophin production and behavior in the mouse. We exposed young adult mice to music with a slow rhythm (6 h/day; mild sound pressure levels, between 50 and 60 db) for 21 consecutive days. At the end of the treatment, mice were tested for passive avoidance learning and then killed for analysis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in selected brain regions. We found that music-exposed mice showed increased BDNF, but not nerve growth factor in the hippocampus. Furthermore, we observed that music exposure significantly enhanced learning performance, as measured by the passive avoidance test. Our results demonstrate that exposure to music can modulate the activity of the hippocampus by influencing BDNF production. Our findings also suggest that music exposure might be of help in several central nervous system pathologies.

  1. A Lack of Correlation between Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Serum Level and Verbal Memory Performance in Healthy Polish Population

    PubMed Central

    Wilkosc, Monika; Markowska, Anita; Zajac-Lamparska, Ludmila; Skibinska, Maria; Szalkowska, Agnieszka; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is considered to be connected with memory and learning through the processes of long term synaptic potentiation and synaptic plasticity. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between precursor BDNF (proBNDF) and mature BDNF (mBDNF) serum levels and performance on Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) in 150 healthy volunteers. In addition, we have verified the relationships between serum concentration of both forms of BDNF and RAVLT with sociodemographic and lifestyle factors.We found no strong evidence for the correlation of proBDNF and mBDNF serum levels with performance on RAVLT in healthy Polish population in early and middle adulthood. We observed the mBDNF serum concentration to be higher in women compared with men. Moreover, we revealed higher mBDNF level to be connected with lower body mass index (BMI). In turn, the results of RAVLT correlated with sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, such as: age, education, gender, BMI and smoking. PMID:27242447

  2. Recurrent Moderate Hypoglycemia Suppresses Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in the Prefrontal Cortex and Impairs Sensorimotor Gating in the Posthypoglycemic Period in Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Rao, Raghavendra; Ennis, Kathleen; Mitchell, Eugena P; Tran, Phu V; Gewirtz, Jonathan C

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent hypoglycemia is common in infants and children. In developing rat models, recurrent moderate hypoglycemia leads to neuronal injury in the medial prefrontal cortex. To understand the effects beyond neuronal injury, 3-week-old male rats were subjected to 5 episodes of moderate hypoglycemia (blood glucose concentration, approx. 30 mg/dl for 90 min) once daily from postnatal day 24 to 28. Neuronal injury was determined using Fluoro-Jade B histochemistry on postnatal day 29. The effects on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its cognate receptor, tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) expression, which is critical for prefrontal cortex development, were determined on postnatal day 29 and at adulthood. The effects on prefrontal cortex-mediated function were determined by assessing the prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex on postnatal day 29 and 2 weeks later, and by testing for fear-potentiated startle at adulthood. Recurrent hypoglycemia led to neuronal injury confined primarily to the medial prefrontal cortex. BDNF/TrkB expression in the prefrontal cortex was suppressed on postnatal day 29 and was accompanied by lower prepulse inhibition, suggesting impaired sensorimotor gating. Following the cessation of recurrent hypoglycemia, the prepulse inhibition had recovered at 2 weeks. BDNF/TrkB expression in the prefrontal cortex had normalized and fear-potentiated startle was intact at adulthood. Recurrent moderate hypoglycemia during development has significant adverse effects on the prefrontal cortex in the posthypoglycemic period. PMID:26820887

  3. Preservation of biological activity of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) after microencapsulation and sterilization by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Checa-Casalengua, P; Jiang, C; Bravo-Osuna, I; Tucker, B A; Molina-Martínez, I T; Young, M J; Herrero-Vanrell, R

    2012-10-15

    A main issue in controlled delivery of biotechnological products from injectable biodegradable microspheres is to preserve their integrity and functional activity after the microencapsulation process and final sterilization. The present experimental work tested different technological approaches to maintain the biological activity of an encapsulated biotechnological product within PLGA [poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid)] microspheres (MS) after their sterilization by gamma irradiation. GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor), useful in the treatment of several neurodegenerative diseases, was chosen as a labile model protein. In the particular case of optic nerve degeneration, GDNF has been demonstrated to improve the damaged retinal ganglion cells (RGC) survival. GDNF was encapsulated in its molecular state by the water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) technique or as solid according to the solid-in-oil-in-water (S/O/W) method. Based on the S/O/W technique, GDNF was included in the PLGA microspheres alone (S/O/W 1) or in combination with an antioxidant (vitamin E, Vit E) (S/O/W 2). Microspheres were sterilized by gamma-irradiation (dose of 25 kGy) at room and low (-78 °C) temperatures. Functional activity of GDNF released from the different microspheres was evaluated both before and after sterilization in their potential target cells (retinal cells). Although none of the systems proposed achieved with the goal of totally retain the structural stability of the GDNF-dimer, the protein released from the S/O/W 2 microspheres was clearly the most biologically active, showing significantly less retinal cell death than that released from either W/O/W or S/O/W 1 particles, even in low amounts of the neurotrophic factor. According to the results presented in this work, the biological activity of biotechnological products after microencapsulation and sterilization can be further preserved by the inclusion of the active molecule in its solid state in combination with

  4. Ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and accelerates corneal epithelial wound healing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingjun; Chen, Peng; Di, Guohu; Zhang, Yangyang; Wang, Yao; Qi, Xia; Duan, Haoyun; Xie, Lixin

    2015-05-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a well-known neuroprotective cytokine, has been found to play an important role in neurogenesis and functional regulations of neural stem cells. As one of the most innervated tissue, however, the role of CNTF in cornea epithelium remains unclear. This study was to explore the roles and mechanisms of CNTF in the activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and wound healing of both normal and diabetic mouse corneal epithelium. In mice subjecting to mechanical removal of corneal epithelium, the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing were promoted by exogenous CNTF application, while delayed by CNTF neutralizing antibody. In cultured corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells, CNTF enhanced the colony-forming efficiency, stimulated the mitogenic proliferation, and upregulated the expression levels of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell-associated transcription factors. Furthermore, the promotion of CNTF on the corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cell activation and wound healing was mediated by the activation of STAT3. Moreover, in diabetic mice, the content of CNTF in corneal epithelium decreased significantly when compared with that of normal mice, and the supplement of CNTF promoted the diabetic corneal epithelial wound healing, accompanied with the advanced activation of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and the regeneration of corneal nerve fibers. Thus, the capability of expanding corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and promoting corneal epithelial wound healing and nerve regeneration indicates the potential application of CNTF in ameliorating limbal stem cell deficiency and treating diabetic keratopathy.

  5. An Association Study of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Val66Met Polymorphism and Amphetamine Response

    PubMed Central

    Flanagin, Brody A.; Cook, Edwin H.; de Wit, Harriet

    2008-01-01

    Although genetic factors are known to be important in addiction, no candidate genes have yet been consistently linked to drug use or abuse. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which has been implicated in the behavioral response to psychomotor stimulants and potentiates neurotransmitters that are strongly linked to addiction, is a logical candidate gene to study. Using a drug challenge approach, we tested for association between BDNF G196A (val66met) genotype and subjective responses to amphetamine (AMPH). Healthy volunteers participated in a double-blind, crossover design in which they received placebo, 10 mg, and 20 mg oral d-amphetamine in random order. Subjective and physical responses to ingestion of AMPH were measured at thirty minute intervals after drug ingestion. Each subject was genotyped for the BDNF G196A polymorphism and grouped and analyzed accordingly. The effects of AMPH on ratings of arousal, energy, and heart rate were compared in subjects with the val/val genotype (N = 67) and the subjects with either the val/met or met/met genotypes (N = 32). AMPH produced less pronounced self-ratings of arousal and energy, yet higher increases in heart rate, in the val/met and met/met compared to the val/val group. These results suggest that BDNF is related to the subjective and physical response to low doses of AMPH. PMID:16823800

  6. Affinity-based release of glial-derived neurotrophic factor from fibrin matrices enhances sciatic nerve regeneration†

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Matthew D.; Moore, Amy M.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Tuffaha, Sami; Borschel, Gregory H.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly E.

    2008-01-01

    Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes both sensory and motor neuron survival. The delivery of GDNF to the peripheral nervous system has been shown to enhance regeneration following injury. In this study we evaluated the effect of affinity-based delivery of GDNF from a fibrin matrix in a nerve guidance conduit on nerve regeneration in a 13 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Seven experimental groups were evaluated which received GDNF or nerve growth factor (NGF) with the delivery system within the conduit, control groups excluding one or more components of the delivery system, and nerve isografts. Nerves were harvested 6 weeks after treatment for analysis by histomorphometry and electron microscopy. The use of the delivery system (DS) with either GDNF or NGF resulted in a higher frequency of nerve regeneration vs. control groups, as evidenced by a neural structure spanning the 13 mm gap. The GDNF DS and NGF DS groups were also similar to the nerve isograft group in measures of nerve fiber density, percent neural tissue and myelinated area measurements, but not in terms of total fiber counts. In addition, both groups contained a significantly greater percentage of larger diameter fibers, with GDNF DS having the largest in comparison to all groups, suggesting more mature neural content. The delivery of GDNF via the affinity-based delivery system can enhance peripheral nerve regeneration through a silicone conduit across a critical nerve gap and offers insight into potential future alternatives to the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:19103514

  7. Essential Role for Vav GEFs in Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)-induced Dendritic Spine Growth and Synapse Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Carly F.; Dietz, Karen C.; Varela, Juan A.; Wood, Cody B.; Zirlin, Benjamin C.; Leverich, Leah S.; Greene, Robert W.; Cowan, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its cognate receptor, TrkB, regulate a wide range of cellular processes, including dendritic spine formation and functional synapse plasticity. However, the signaling mechanisms that link BDNF-activated TrkB to F-actin remodeling enzymes and dendritic spine morphological plasticity remain poorly understood. We report here that BDNF/TrkB signaling in neurons activates the Vav family of Rac/RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) through a novel TrkB kinase-dependent mechanism. We find that Vav is required for BDNF-stimulated Rac-GTP production in cortical and hippocampal neurons. Vav is partially enriched at excitatory synapses in the postnatal hippocampus, but does not appear to be required for normal dendritic spine density. Rather, we observe significant reductions in both BDNF-induced, rapid dendritic spine head growth and in CA3-CA1 theta burst stimulated (TBS) long-term potentiation (LTP) in Vav-deficient mouse hippocampal slices, suggesting that Vav-dependent regulation of dendritic spine morphological plasticity facilitates normal functional synapse plasticity. PMID:21880903

  8. Moderate-intensity interval training increases serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor level and decreases inflammation in Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, J A; Majerczak, J; Zeligowska, E; Mencel, J; Jaskolski, A; Jaskolska, A; Marusiak, J

    2014-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that physical training increases serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in healthy people. The aim of this study was to establish the effect of physical training on the basal serum level of the BDNF in the Parkinson's disease patients (PD patients) in relation to their health status. Twelve PD patients (mean ± S.E.M: age 70 ± 3 years; body mass 70 ± 2 kg; height 163 ± 3 cm) performed a moderate-intensity interval training (three 1-hour training sessions weekly), lasting 8 weeks. Basal serum BDNF in the PD patients before training amounted to 10,977 ± 756 pg x mL(-1) and after 8 weeks of training it has increased to 14,206 ± 1256 pg x mL(-1) (i.e. by 34%, P=0.03). This was accompanied by an attenuation of total Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) (P=0.01). The training resulted also in a decrease of basal serum soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1) (P=0.001) and serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) (P=0.03) levels. We have concluded that the improvement of health status of the Parkinson's disease patients after training could be related to the increase of serum BDNF level caused by the attenuated inflammation in those patients. PMID:24930517

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor as a model system for examining gene by environment interactions across development.

    PubMed

    Casey, B J; Glatt, C E; Tottenham, N; Soliman, F; Bath, K; Amso, D; Altemus, M; Pattwell, S; Jones, R; Levita, L; McEwen, B; Magariños, A M; Gunnar, M; Thomas, K M; Mezey, J; Clark, A G; Hempstead, B L; Lee, F S

    2009-11-24

    There has been a dramatic rise in gene x environment studies of human behavior over the past decade that have moved the field beyond simple nature versus nurture debates. These studies offer promise in accounting for more variability in behavioral and biological phenotypes than studies that focus on genetic or experiential factors alone. They also provide clues into mechanisms of modifying genetic risk or resilience in neurodevelopmental disorders. Yet, it is rare that these studies consider how these interactions change over the course of development. In this paper, we describe research that focuses on the impact of a polymorphism in a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, known to be involved in learning and development. Specifically we present findings that assess the effects of genotypic and environmental loadings on neuroanatomic and behavioral phenotypes across development. The findings illustrate the use of a genetic mouse model that mimics the human polymorphism, to constrain the interpretation of gene-environment interactions across development in humans. PMID:19358879

  10. Brain derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF) and personality traits: the modifying effect of season of birth and sex.

    PubMed

    Kazantseva, A; Gaysina, D; Kutlumbetova, Yu; Kanzafarova, R; Malykh, S; Lobaskova, M; Khusnutdinova, E

    2015-01-01

    Personality traits are complex phenotypes influenced by interactions of multiple genetic variants of small effect and environmental factors. It has been suggested that the brain derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF) is involved in personality traits. Season of birth (SOB) has also been shown to affect personality traits due to its influences on brain development during prenatal and early postnatal periods. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of BDNF on personality traits; and the modifying effects of SOB and sex on associations between BDNF and personality traits. A sample of 1018 young adults (68% women; age range 17-25years) of Caucasian origin from the Russian Federation was assessed on personality traits (Novelty Seeking, Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence, Persistence, Self-directedness, Cooperativeness, Self-transcendence) with the Temperament and Character Inventory-125 (TCI-125). Associations between personality traits and 12 BDNF SNPs were tested using linear regression models. The present study demonstrated the effect of rs11030102 on Persistence in females only (PFDR=0.043; r(2)=1.3%). There were significant interaction effects between Val66Met (rs6265) and SOB (PFDR=0.048, r(2)=1.4%), and between rs2030323 and SOB (PFDR=0.042, r(2)=1.3%), on Harm Avoidance. Our findings provide evidence for the modifying effect of SOB on the association between BDNF and Harm Avoidance, and for the modifying effect of sex on the association between BDNF and Persistence.

  11. Differential expression of genes encoding neurotrophic factors and their receptors along the septal-temporal axis of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Atsushi; Iio, Wataru; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Koike, Hiroaki; Tsukahara, Takamitsu

    2014-12-01

    The hippocampus plays a key role in learning and emotional regulation. The hippocampus' function varies along its septotemporal axis, with the septal pole being more frequently involved in spatial learning and memory, and the temporal pole playing a greater role in emotional behaviors. In this study, we present findings aimed at checking the expression level of the genes encoding neurotrophins and their receptors, including nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and their receptors (TrkA, TrkB and TrkC) in the hippocampus along the septotemporal axis. Using real-time PCR, several different expression patterns were observed. Remarkably, the expression of both NT-3 and TrkA genes in the septal hippocampus was higher than in the middle and temporal hippocampus. Higher expression of NT-3 and TrkA may implicate active neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the septal hippocampus because more neurogenesis occurs in the septal than the temporal DG of rats. Finally, the results obtained in this study emphasize the importance of choosing the hippocampal portion along its septotemporal axis for any hippocampal molecular and biochemical experimental studies.

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for the enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis following environmental enrichment.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Chiara; Angelucci, Andrea; Costantin, Laura; Braschi, Chiara; Mazzantini, Mario; Babbini, Francesco; Fabbri, Maria Elena; Tessarollo, Lino; Maffei, Lamberto; Berardi, Nicoletta; Caleo, Matteo

    2006-10-01

    Neurogenesis continues to occur in the adult mammalian hippocampus and is regulated by both genetic and environmental factors. It is known that exposure to an enriched environment enhances the number of newly generated neurons in the dentate gyrus. However, the mechanisms by which enriched housing produces these effects are poorly understood. To test a role for neurotrophins, we used heterozygous knockout mice for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF+/-) and mice lacking neurotrophin-4 (NT-4-/-) together with their wild-type littermates. Mice were either reared in standard laboratory conditions or placed in an enriched environment for 8 weeks. Animals received injections of the mitotic marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label newborn cells. Enriched wild-type and enriched NT-4-/- mice showed a two-fold increase in hippocampal neurogenesis as assessed by stereological counting of BrdU-positive cells in the dentate gyrus and double labelling for BrdU and the neuronal marker NeuN. Remarkably, this enhancement of hippocampal neurogenesis was not seen in enriched BDNF+/- mice. Failure to up-regulate BDNF accompanied the lack of a neurogenic response in enriched BDNF heterozygous mice. We conclude that BDNF but not NT-4 is required for the environmental induction of neurogenesis. PMID:17040481

  13. The Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Comorbid Depression: Possible Linkage with Steroid Hormones, Cytokines, and Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Numakawa, Tadahiro; Richards, Misty; Nakajima, Shingo; Adachi, Naoki; Furuta, Miyako; Odaka, Haruki; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates a connection between growth factor function (including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF), glucocorticoid levels (one of the steroid hormones), and the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. Because both BDNF and glucocorticoids regulate synaptic function in the central nervous system, their functional interaction is of major concern. Interestingly, alterations in levels of estrogen, another steroid hormone, may play a role in depressive-like behavior in postpartum females with fluctuations of BDNF-related molecules in the brain. BDNF and cytokines, which are protein regulators of inflammation, stimulate multiple intracellular signaling cascades involved in neuropsychiatric illness. Pro-inflammatory cytokines may increase vulnerability to depressive symptoms, such as the increased risk observed in patients with cancer and/or autoimmune diseases. In this review, we discuss the possible relationship between inflammation and depression, in addition to the cross-talk among cytokines, BDNF, and steroids. Further, since nutritional status has been shown to affect critical pathways involved in depression through both BDNF function and the monoamine system, we also review current evidence surrounding diet and supplementation (e.g., flavonoids) on BDNF-mediated brain functions. PMID:25309465

  14. Effect of Yoga on Pain, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, and Serotonin in Premenopausal Women with Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moseon

    2014-01-01

    Background. Serotonin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are known to be modulators of nociception. However, pain-related connection between yoga and those neuromodulators has not been investigated. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effect of yoga on pain, BDNF, and serotonin. Methods. Premenopausal women with chronic low back pain practiced yoga three times a week for 12 weeks. At baseline and after 12 weeks, back pain intensity was measured using visual analogue scale (VAS), and serum BDNF and serotonin levels were evaluated. Additionally, back flexibility and level of depression were assessed. Results. After 12-week yoga, VAS decreased in the yoga group (P < 0.001), whereas it increased (P < 0.05) in the control group. Back flexibility was improved in the yoga group (P < 0.01). Serum BDNF increased in the yoga group (P < 0.01), whereas it tended to decrease in the control group (P = 0.05). Serum serotonin maintained in the yoga group, while it reduced (P < 0.01) in the control group. The depression level maintained in the yoga group, whereas it tended to increase in the control group (P = 0.07). Conclusions. We propose that BDNF may be one of the key factors mediating beneficial effects of yoga on chronic low back pain. PMID:25120574

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor is required for normal development of the central respiratory rhythm in mice

    PubMed Central

    Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Katz, David M

    1998-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying maturation of the central respiratory rhythm are largely unknown. Previously, we found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is required for expression of normal breathing behaviour in newborn mice, raising the possibility that maturation of central respiratory output is dependent on BDNF. Respiratory activity was recorded in vitro from cervical ventral roots (C1 or C4) using the isolated brainstem–spinal cord preparation from postnatal day (P) 0.5–2.0 and P4.5 wild-type mice and mice lacking functional bdnf alleles. Loss of one or both bdnf alleles resulted in an approximately 50 % depression of central respiratory frequency compared with wild-type controls. In addition, respiratory cycle length variability was 214 % higher in bdnf null (bdnf−/−) animals compared with controls at P4.5. In contrast, respiratory burst duration was unaffected by bdnf gene mutation. These derangements of central respiratory rhythm paralleled the ventilatory depression and irregular breathing characteristic of bdnf mutants in vivo, indicating that central deficits can largely account for the abnormalities in resting ventilation produced by genetic loss of BDNF. BDNF is thus the first growth factor identified that is required for normal development of the central respiratory rhythm, including the stabilization of central respiratory output that occurs after birth. PMID:9706001

  16. In vivo visualisation of murine corneal nerve fibre regeneration in response to ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Reichard, Maria; Hovakimyan, Marina; Guthoff, Rudolf F; Stachs, Oliver

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the murine subbasal nerve fibre plexus (SNP) regeneration altered by surgical dissection. Investigations in the mouse model addressed the regeneration capabilities of the SNP, and the influence of local ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) application on the regeneration process. In preliminary experiments, the healthy mouse cornea was monitored using in vivo confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) from the age of 8-52 weeks, to reveal and rule out the age-dependent changes in SNP. Nerve fibre density (NFD) was determined with the semi-automatic nerve tracing program NeuronJ. No quantitative or qualitative changes in NFD were detected in untreated animals over time; mean NFD in mice aged 8 weeks (28.30 ± 9.12 mm/mm2), 16 weeks (29.23 ± 7.28 mm/mm2), 30 weeks (26.31 ± 8.58 mm/mm2) and 52 weeks (26.34 ± 6.04 mm/mm2) showed no statistically significant differences between time points (p > 0.05). For regeneration studies a circular incision through corneal epithelium and anterior stroma of minimum 60 μm depth was generated with a custom-made guided trephine system to cut the subbasal corneal nerves in adult mice. The corneal nerve pattern was monitored and NFD was measured before and up to 8 weeks after surgery. Animals were divided in three groups each comprising 6 mice. The CNTF group received eye drops containing CNTF (25 ng/ml) 3 times daily for 3 weeks, whereas the control group received no further medication. In the sham group the same treatment schedule was applied as in CNTF group, using vehicle. The regenerating subbasal nerve fibres sprouted out of stromal nerves within the cut and additionally regrew over the scar rim from outside. They showed parallel orientation but were thinner than before incision. Whorl patterning was observed after 4 weeks. All three groups revealed a marked NFD reduction starting at one week after incision, followed by continuous recovery. After 8 weeks the NFD reached 23.5 ± 2.4 mm/mm2 (78

  17. Involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in early retinal neuropathy of streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats: therapeutic potential of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for dopaminergic amacrine cells.

    PubMed

    Seki, Masaaki; Tanaka, Takayuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki; Usui, Tomoaki; Fukuchi, Takeo; Ikeda, Kazuhito; Abe, Haruki; Takei, Nobuyuki

    2004-09-01

    Although neurotrophins have been assessed as candidate therapeutic agents for neural complications of diabetes, their involvement in diabetic retinopathy has not been fully characterized. We found that the protein and mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retinas were reduced to 49% (P < 0.005) and 74% (P < 0.05), respectively, of those of normal control animals. In addition, dopaminergic amacrine cells appeared to be degenerating in the diabetic rat retinas, as revealed by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity. Overall TH protein levels in the retina were decreased to one-half that of controls (P < 0.01), reflecting reductions in the density of dopaminergic amacrine cells and the intensity of TH immunoreactivity within them. To confirm the neuropathological implications of BDNF reduction, we administered BDNF protein into the vitreous cavities of diabetic rats. Intraocular administration of BDNF rescued dopaminergic amacrine cells from neurodegeneration and counteracted the downregulation of TH expression, demonstrating its therapeutic potential. These findings suggest that the early retinal neuropathy of diabetes involves the reduced expression of BDNF and can be ameliorated by an exogenous supply of this neurotrophin. PMID:15331553

  18. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and electrical stimulation on survival and function of cochlear spiral ganglion neurons in deafened, developing cats.

    PubMed

    Leake, Patricia A; Stakhovskaya, Olga; Hetherington, Alexander; Rebscher, Stephen J; Bonham, Ben

    2013-04-01

    Both neurotrophic support and neural activity are required for normal postnatal development and survival of cochlear spiral ganglion (SG) neurons. Previous studies in neonatally deafened cats demonstrated that electrical stimulation (ES) from a cochlear implant can promote improved SG survival but does not completely prevent progressive neural degeneration. Neurotrophic agents combined with an implant may further improve neural survival. Short-term studies in rodents have shown that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes SG survival after deafness and may be additive to trophic effects of stimulation. Our recent study in neonatally deafened cats provided the first evidence of BDNF neurotrophic effects in the developing auditory system over a prolonged duration Leake et al. (J Comp Neurol 519:1526-1545, 2011). Ten weeks of intracochlear BDNF infusion starting at 4 weeks of age elicited significant improvement in SG survival and larger soma size compared to contralateral. In the present study, the same deafening and BDNF infusion procedures were combined with several months of ES from an implant. After combined BDNF + ES, a highly significant increase in SG numerical density (>50 % improvement re: contralateral) was observed, which was significantly greater than the neurotrophic effect seen with ES-only over comparable durations. Combined BDNF + ES also resulted in a higher density of myelinated radial nerve fibers within the osseous spiral lamina. However, substantial ectopic and disorganized sprouting of these fibers into the scala tympani also occurred, which may be deleterious to implant function. EABR thresholds improved (re: initial thresholds at time of implantation) on the chronically stimulated channels of the implant. Terminal electrophysiological studies recording in the inferior colliculus (IC) revealed that the basic cochleotopic organization was intact in the midbrain in all studied groups. In deafened controls or after ES-only, lower IC

  19. Altered maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B(12)) and omega 3 fatty acids through oxidative stress may reduce neurotrophic factors in preterm pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dhobale, Madhavi; Joshi, Sadhana

    2012-04-01

    Preterm pregnancies account for approximately 10% of the total pregnancies and are associated with low birth weight (LBW) babies. Recent studies have shown that LBW babies are at an increased risk of developing brain disorders such as cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric disorders. Maternal nutrition, particularly, micronutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism (folic acid, vitamin B(12), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)) have a major role during pregnancy for developing fetus and are important determinants of epigenesis. A series of our studies in pregnancy complications have well established the importance of omega 3 fatty acids especially DHA. DHA regulates levels of neurotrophins like brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor, which are required for normal neurological development. We have recently described that in one carbon metabolic pathway, membrane phospholipids are major methyl group acceptors and reduced DHA levels may result in diversion of methyl groups toward deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) ultimately resulting in DNA methylation. In this review, we propose that altered maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B(12)), increased homocysteine, and oxidative stress levels that cause epigenetic modifications may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to preterm birth and poor fetal outcome, increasing risk for behavioural disorders in children. PMID:21609203

  20. Altered maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B(12)) and omega 3 fatty acids through oxidative stress may reduce neurotrophic factors in preterm pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dhobale, Madhavi; Joshi, Sadhana

    2012-04-01

    Preterm pregnancies account for approximately 10% of the total pregnancies and are associated with low birth weight (LBW) babies. Recent studies have shown that LBW babies are at an increased risk of developing brain disorders such as cognitive dysfunction and psychiatric disorders. Maternal nutrition, particularly, micronutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism (folic acid, vitamin B(12), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)) have a major role during pregnancy for developing fetus and are important determinants of epigenesis. A series of our studies in pregnancy complications have well established the importance of omega 3 fatty acids especially DHA. DHA regulates levels of neurotrophins like brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor, which are required for normal neurological development. We have recently described that in one carbon metabolic pathway, membrane phospholipids are major methyl group acceptors and reduced DHA levels may result in diversion of methyl groups toward deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) ultimately resulting in DNA methylation. In this review, we propose that altered maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B(12)), increased homocysteine, and oxidative stress levels that cause epigenetic modifications may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to preterm birth and poor fetal outcome, increasing risk for behavioural disorders in children.

  1. Transplantation of Cerebral Dopamine Neurotrophic Factor Transducted BMSCs in Contusion Spinal Cord Injury of Rats: Promotion of Nerve Regeneration by Alleviating Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Cheng, Lei; Du, Xinwen; Hou, Yong; Liu, Yi; Cui, Zhaoqiang; Nie, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes neuron death and axonal damage resulting in functional motor and sensory loss, showing limited regeneration because of adverse microenvironment such as neuroinflammation and glial scarring. Currently, there is no effective therapy to treat SCI in clinical practice. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are candidates for cell therapies but its effect is limited by neuroinflammation and adverse microenvironment in the injured spinal cord. In this study, we developed transgenic BMSCs overexpressing cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF), a secretory neurotrophic factor that showed potent effects on neuron protection, anti-inflammation, and sciatic nerve regeneration in previous studies. Our results showed that the transplantation of CDNF-BMSCs suppressed neuroinflammation and decreased the production of proinflammatory cytokines after SCI, resulting in the promotion of locomotor function and nerve regeneration of the injured spinal cord. This study presents a novel promising strategy for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  2. Nerve injury induces glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) expression in Schwann cells through purinergic signaling and the PKC-PKD pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pin; Rosen, Kenneth M; Hedstrom, Kristian; Rey, Osvaldo; Guha, Sushovan; Hart, Courtney; Corfas, Gabriel

    2013-07-01

    Upon peripheral nerve injury, specific molecular events, including increases in the expression of selected neurotrophic factors, are initiated to prepare the tissue for regeneration. However, the mechanisms underlying these events and the nature of the cells involved are poorly understood. We used the injury-induced upregulation of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) expression as a tool to gain insights into these processes. We found that both myelinating and nonmyelinating Schwann cells are responsible for the dramatic increase in GDNF expression after injury. We also demonstrate that the GDNF upregulation is mediated by a signaling cascade involving activation of Schwann cell purinergic receptors, followed by protein kinase C signaling which activates protein kinase D (PKD), which leads to increased GDNF transcription. Given the potent effects of GDNF on survival and repair of injured peripheral neurons, we propose that targeting these pathways may yield therapeutic tools to treat peripheral nerve injury and neuropathies.

  3. High-mobility group box-1 induces decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor-mediated neuroprotection in the diabetic retina.

    PubMed

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M; Nawaz, Mohd Imtiaz; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj; Al-Kharashi, Abdullah S; Kangave, Dustan; Mohammad, Ghulam

    2013-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-(BDNF-) mediated neuroprotection is reduced by high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in diabetic retina, paired vitreous and serum samples from 46 proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 34 nondiabetic patients were assayed for BDNF, HMGB1, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and TBARS. We also examined retinas of diabetic and HMGB1 intravitreally injected rats. The effect of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin on diabetes-induced changes in retinal BDNF expressions was studied. Western blot, ELISA, and TBARS assays were used. BDNF was not detected in vitreous samples. BDNF levels were significantly lower in serum samples from diabetic patients compared with nondiabetics, whereas HMGB1, sRAGE, sICAM-1, and TBARS levels were significantly higher in diabetic serum samples. MCP-1 levels did not differ significantly. There was significant inverse correlation between serum levels of BDNF and HMGB1. Diabetes and intravitreal administration of HMGB1 induced significant upregulation of the expression of HMGB1, TBARS, and cleaved caspase-3, whereas the expression of BDNF and synaptophysin was significantly downregulated in rat retinas. Glycyrrhizin significantly attenuated diabetes-induced downregulation of BDNF. Our results suggest that HMGB1-induced downregulation of BDNF might be involved in pathogenesis of diabetic retinal neurodegeneration. PMID:23766563

  4. High-Mobility Group Box-1 Induces Decreased Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Mediated Neuroprotection in the Diabetic Retina

    PubMed Central

    Nawaz, Mohd Imtiaz; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj; Al-Kharashi, Abdullah S.; Kangave, Dustan; Mohammad, Ghulam

    2013-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-(BDNF-) mediated neuroprotection is reduced by high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in diabetic retina, paired vitreous and serum samples from 46 proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 34 nondiabetic patients were assayed for BDNF, HMGB1, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and TBARS. We also examined retinas of diabetic and HMGB1 intravitreally injected rats. The effect of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin on diabetes-induced changes in retinal BDNF expressions was studied. Western blot, ELISA, and TBARS assays were used. BDNF was not detected in vitreous samples. BDNF levels were significantly lower in serum samples from diabetic patients compared with nondiabetics, whereas HMGB1, sRAGE, sICAM-1, and TBARS levels were significantly higher in diabetic serum samples. MCP-1 levels did not differ significantly. There was significant inverse correlation between serum levels of BDNF and HMGB1. Diabetes and intravitreal administration of HMGB1 induced significant upregulation of the expression of HMGB1, TBARS, and cleaved caspase-3, whereas the expression of BDNF and synaptophysin was significantly downregulated in rat retinas. Glycyrrhizin significantly attenuated diabetes-induced downregulation of BDNF. Our results suggest that HMGB1-induced downregulation of BDNF might be involved in pathogenesis of diabetic retinal neurodegeneration. PMID:23766563

  5. Acute high-intensity exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in young, healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jungyun; Brothers, R Matthew; Castelli, Darla M; Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Chen, Yen T; Salinas, Mandy M; Kim, Jihoon; Jung, Yeonhak; Calvert, Hannah G

    2016-09-01

    Acute exercise can positively impact cognition. The present study examined the effect of acute high-intensity aerobic exercise on prefrontal-dependent cognitive performance and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Fifty-eight young adults were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: (a) an acute bout of high-intensity exercise (n=29) or (b) a non-exercise control (n=29). Participants in the exercise group improved performance on inhibitory control in Stroop interference and on cognitive flexibility in Trail Making Test (TMT) Part-B compared with participants in the control group and increased BDNF immediately after exercise. There was a significant relationship between BDNF and TMT Part-B on the pre-post change following exercise. These findings provide support for the association between improved prefrontal-dependent cognitive performance and increased BDNF in response to acute exercise. We conclude that the changes in BDNF concentration may be partially responsible for prefrontal-dependent cognitive functioning following an acute bout of exercise. PMID:27450438

  6. Nicotine regulates SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell proliferation through the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Serres, Florence; Carney, Stephen L

    2006-07-26

    Nicotine has been shown to produce some beneficial effects in neurodegenerative disorders, and several studies have suggested that these effects may be mediated in part through the action of the neurotrophic factor BDNF. To further elucidate the interaction between nicotine and BDNF, we examined the effect of nicotine on the proliferation of the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y, which, following differentiation with retinoic acid, expresses both nicotinic receptors and the receptor for BDNF, TrkB. Both nicotine and the nicotinic alpha-7 selective agonist AR-17779 significantly increased cell proliferation albeit with bell-shaped dose-response kinetics. The blockade of this effect with either the alpha-7 nicotinic antagonist methyllycaconitine or the non-selective nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine indicated that the effect was mediated by nicotinic receptors. Prior addition of neutralising BDNF antibodies or of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252A (200 nM) completely blocked nicotine-induced proliferation, suggesting the involvement of TrkB signalling in the mediation of the effect. Nicotine also enhanced both the secretion of BDNF from the SH-SY5Y and cell surface density of TrkB receptors. These effects were abolished by pretreatment with MLA. These data indicate that activation of nicotinic receptors has effects upon the BDNF-TrkB pathway, inducing cell proliferation by promoting the release of BDNF, which in turn activates TrkB receptors.

  7. Preservation of general intelligence following traumatic brain injury: contributions of the Met66 brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Barbey, Aron K; Colom, Roberto; Paul, Erick; Forbes, Chad; Krueger, Frank; Goldman, David; Grafman, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes survival and synaptic plasticity in the human brain. The Val66Met polymorphism of the BDNF gene interferes with intracellular trafficking, packaging, and regulated secretion of this neurotrophin. The human prefrontal cortex (PFC) shows lifelong neuroplastic adaption implicating the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism in the recovery of higher-order executive functions after traumatic brain injury (TBI). In this study, we examined the effect of this BDNF polymorphism on the preservation of general intelligence following TBI. We genotyped a sample of male Vietnam combat veterans (n = 156) consisting of a frontal lobe lesion group with focal penetrating head injuries for the Val66Met BDNF polymorphism. Val/Met did not differ from Val/Val genotypes in general cognitive ability before TBI. However, we found substantial average differences between these groups in general intelligence (≈ half a standard deviation or 8 IQ points), verbal comprehension (6 IQ points), perceptual organization (6 IQ points), working memory (8 IQ points), and processing speed (8 IQ points) after TBI. These results support the conclusion that Val/Met genotypes preserve general cognitive functioning, whereas Val/Val genotypes are largely susceptible to TBI. PMID:24586380

  8. Polymorphisms in the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Influence Memory and Processing Speed One Month after Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Anna L.; Flashman, Laura A.; Rhodes, C. Harker; McDonald, Brenna C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Tsongalis, Gregory J.; Moore, Jason H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in cognition, as well as neural survival and plasticity. There are several common polymorphisms in the BDNF gene, one of which (rs6265) is an extensively studied non-synonymous coding polymorphism (Val66Met) which has been linked to cognitive performance in healthy controls and some clinical populations. We hypothesized that the Met allele of rs6265 would be associated with poorer cognitive performance in individuals with mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury, and that other polymorphisms in the BDNF gene would also affect cognition. Genotype at 9 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the BDNF gene, and measures of speed of information processing, learning, and memory were assessed in 75 patients with mTBI and 38 healthy subjects. Consistent with previous reports, the Met allele of rs6265 was associated with cognition (slower processing speed) in the entire group. Two other SNPs were associated with processing speed in the mTBI group, but both are in linkage disequilibrium with rs6265, and neither remained significant after adjustment for rs6265 status. Within the mTBI group, but not the controls, 4 SNPs, but not rs6265, were associated with memory measures. These associations were not affected by adjustment for rs6265 status. Polymorphisms in BDNF influence cognitive performance shortly after mTBI. The results raise the possibility that a functional polymorphism other than rs6265 may contribute to memory function after mTBI. PMID:22188054

  9. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor-pretreated neuron stem cell transplantation on Alzheimer’s disease model mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Yu, Ying; Cai, Hongliu

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common case of dementia and its possible therapies, such as neuron stem cell (NSC) transplantation therapy, have been studied for years. In order to improve NSC transplantation effects, we were inspired to pretreat NSC using brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) before transplantation. The AD mouse model was constructed and effects of BDNF+NSC transplant group and traditional NSC transplant group were compared using the four indicators: conditions of learning and memory ability recovery tested by Morris Water Maze (MWM), number of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons, expression of synaptophysin, and number of acetylcholinesterase (ACHE)-positive fibers detected by chemical staining. Results showed all the four indicators were significantly lower in the AD model group than the control group (P < 0.05). Traditional NSC transplantation could improve these indicators to some extent but still possessed significant differences from the control group (P < 0.05). Especially, the BDNF+NSC transplant group showed significant improvements in the four indicators when compared with the AD model group (P < 0.05). Taken these data together, BDNF pretreatment improved the NSC transplantation effects, showing advantages over the traditional NSC transplantation. Our study could facilitate the application of stem cell transplantation therapy to AD treatment. PMID:26885166

  10. Serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in alcohol-dependent patients receiving high-dose baclofen.

    PubMed

    Geisel, Olga; Hellweg, Rainer; Müller, Christian A

    2016-06-30

    The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been suggested to be involved in the development and maintenance of addictive and other psychiatric disorders. Also, interactions of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic compounds and BDNF have been reported. The objective of this study was to investigate serum levels of BDNF over time in alcohol-dependent patients receiving individually titrated high-dose treatment (30-270mg/d) with the GABA-B receptor agonist baclofen or placebo for up to 20 weeks. Serum levels of BDNF were measured in patients of the baclofen/placebo group at baseline (t0), 2 weeks after reaching individual high-dose of baclofen/placebo treatment (t1) and after termination of study medication (t2) in comparison to carefully matched healthy controls. No significant differences in serum levels of BDNF between the baclofen and the placebo group or healthy controls were found at t0, t1, or at t2. Based on these findings, it seems unlikely that baclofen exerts a direct effect on serum levels of BDNF in alcohol-dependent patients. Future studies are needed to further explore the mechanism of action of baclofen and its possible relationship to BDNF in alcohol use disorders. PMID:27107672

  11. Zirconium oxide ceramic foam: a promising supporting biomaterial for massive production of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-wei; Li, Wen-qiang; Wang, Jun-kui; Ma, Xian-cang; Liang, Chen; Liu, Peng; Chu, Zheng; Dang, Yong-hui

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the potential application of a zirconium oxide (ZrO2) ceramic foam culturing system to the production of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Three sets of ZrO2 ceramic foams with different pore densities of 10, 20, and 30 pores per linear inch (PPI) were prepared to support a 3D culturing system. After primary astrocytes were cultured in these systems, production yields of GDNF were evaluated. The biomaterial biocompatibility, cell proliferation and activation of cellular signaling pathways in GDNF synthesis and secretion in the culturing systems were also assessed and compared with a conventional culturing system. In this study, we found that the ZrO2 ceramic foam culturing system was biocompatible, using which the GDNF yields were elevated and sustained by stimulated cell proliferation and activation of signaling pathways in astrocytes cultured in the system. In conclusion, the ZrO2 ceramic foam is promising for the development of a GDNF mass production device for Parkinson's disease treatment. PMID:25471830

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the anterior cingulate cortex is involved in the formation of fear memory.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing-Qing; Li, Bao-Ming

    2015-10-25

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a small dimeric secretory protein, plays a vital role in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. It has been shown that BDNF in the hippocampus and amygdala participates in the formation of fear memory. However, little is known about the functional role of BDNF in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). To address this question, we examined the mRNA and protein levels of BDNF in the ACC of rats at various time points after fear conditioning, using quantitative real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results showed that BDNF exhibited a temporally specific increase in both mRNA and protein levels after CS (tone) and US (foot shock) was paired. Such increase did not occur after the animals were exposed to CS or US alone. When BDNF antibody was locally infused into the ACC prior to CS-US pairing, both contextual and auditory fear memories were severely impaired. Taken together, these results suggest that BDNF in the ACC is required for the formation of fear memory.

  13. An Antioxidant Dietary Supplement Improves Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Serum of Aged Dogs: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Sechi, Sara; Chiavolelli, Francesca; Spissu, Nicoletta; Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Canello, Sergio; Guidetti, Gianandrea; Fiore, Filippo; Cocco, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Biological aging is characterized by a progressive accumulation of oxidative damage and decreased endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms. The production of oxidants by normal metabolism damages proteins, lipids, and nucleotides, which may contribute to cognitive impairment. In this study 36 dogs were randomly divided into four groups and fed croquettes of different compositions for 6 months. We monitored derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (dROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP) levels in dogs' plasma samples as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum levels at the beginning and at the end of the dietary regime. Our results showed that a dietary regime, enriched with antioxidants, induced a significant decrease of plasma levels of dROMs (p < 0.005) and a significant increase in BDNF serum levels (p < 0.005) after six months. Thus, we hypothesized a possible role of the diet in modulating pro- and antioxidant species as well as BDNF levels in plasma and serum, respectively. In conclusion the proposed diet enriched with antioxidants might be considered a valid alternative and a valuable strategy to counteract aging-related cognitive decline in elderly dogs. PMID:26464952

  14. Overexpression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor induces genes regulating migration and differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Pahnke, Jens; Mix, Eilhard; Knoblich, Rupert; Müller, Jana; Zschiesche, Marlies; Schubert, Beke; Koczan, Dirk; Bauer, Peter; Böttcher, Tobias; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Lazarov, Ludmil; Wree, Andreas; Rolfs, Arndt

    2004-07-15

    The glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is involved in the development and maintenance of neural tissues. Mutations in components of its signaling pathway lead to severe migration deficits of neuronal crest stem cells, tumor formation, or ablation of the urinary system. In animal models of Parkinson's disease, GDNF has been recognized to be neuroprotective and to improve motor function when delivered into the cerebral ventricles or into the substantia nigra. Here, we characterize the network of 43 genes induced by GDNF overproduction of neuronal progenitor cells (ST14A), which mainly regulate migration and differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells. GDNF down-regulates doublecortin, Paf-ah1b (Lis1), dynamin, and alpha-tubulin, which are involved in neocortical lamination and cytoskeletal reorganization. Axonal guidance depends on cell-surface molecules and extracellular matrix proteins. Laminin, Mpl3, Alcam, Bin1, Id1, Id2, Id3, neuregulin1, the ephrinB2-receptor, neuritin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Tc10, Pdpk1, clusterin, GTP-cyclooxygenase1, and follistatin are genes up-regulated by GDNF overexpression. Moreover, we found four key enzymes of the cholesterol-synthesis pathway to be down-regulated leading to decreased farnesyl-pyrophospate production. Many proteins are anchored by farnesyl-derivates at the cell membrane. The identification of these GDNF-regulated genes may open new opportunities for directly influencing differentiation and developmental processes of neurons. PMID:15212950

  15. Effects of music aerobic exercise on depression and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in community dwelling women.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Shu-Hui; Lin, Li-Wei; Chuang, Yu Kuan; Liu, Cheng-Ling; Tsai, Lu-Jen; Tsuei, Feng-Shiou; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Yang, Kuender D

    2015-01-01

    A randomized clinical trial was utilized to compare the improvement of depression and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels between community women with and without music aerobic exercise (MAE) for 12 weeks. The MAE group involved 47 eligible participants, whereas the comparison group had 59 participants. No significant differences were recorded in the demographic characteristics between the participants in the MAE group and the comparison group. Forty-one participants in the MAE group and 26 in the comparison group completed a pre- and posttest. The MAE group displayed significant improvement in depression scores (p = 0.016), decreased depression symptoms in crying (p = 0.03), appetite (p = 0.006), and fatigue (p = 0.011). The BDNF levels of the participants significantly increased after the 12-week MAE (p = 0.042). The parallel comparison group revealed no significant changes in depression scores or BDNF levels. In summary, the 12-week MAE had a significant impact on the enhancement of BDNF levels and improvement of depression symptoms. Middle-aged community women are encouraged to exercise moderately to improve their depression symptoms and BDNF levels. PMID:26075212

  16. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) for Macular Telangiectasia Type 2 (MacTel): Results from a phase I safety trial

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Emily Y.; Clemons, Traci E.; Peto, Tunde; Sallo, Ferenc B.; Ingerman, Avner; Tao, Weng; Singerman, Lawrence; Schwartz, Steven D.; Peachey, Neal S.; Bird, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the safety and tolerability of intraocular delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) using an encapsulated cell implant for the treatment of macular telangiectasia type 2. DESIGN An open-labeled safety trial conducted in 2 centers enrolling 7 participants with macular telangiectasia type 2. METHODS The participant’s more severely affected eye (worse baseline visual acuity) received the high dose implant of CNTF. Patients were followed for a period of 36 months. The primary safety outcome was a change in the parameters of the electroretinogram (ERG). Secondary efficacy outcomes were changes in visual acuity, en face measurements of the optical coherence tomography of the disruption in the ellipsoid zone, and microperimetry when compared with baseline. RESULTS The ERG findings demonstrated a reduction in the amplitude of the scotopic b-wave in 4 participants 3 months after implantation (month 3). All parameters returned to baseline values by month 12 and remained so at month 36 with no clinical impact on dark adaptation. There was no change in visual acuity compared with baseline. The area of the defect as measured functionally by microperimetry and structurally by the en face OCT imaging of the ellipsoid zone loss appeared unchanged from baseline. CONCLUSIONS The intraocular delivery of CNTF in the encapsulated cell implant appeared to be safe and well tolerated in eyes with macular telangiectasia type 2. Further evaluation in a randomized controlled clinical trial is warranted to test for efficacy. PMID:25528956

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor in arterial baroreceptor pathways: implications for activity-dependent plasticity at baroafferent synapses.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jessica L; Jenkins, Victoria K; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2009-01-01

    Functional characteristics of the arterial baroreceptor reflex change throughout ontogenesis, including perinatal adjustments of the reflex gain and adult resetting during hypertension. However, the cellular mechanisms that underlie these functional changes are not completely understood. Here, we provide evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin with a well-established role in activity-dependent neuronal plasticity, is abundantly expressed in vivo by a large subset of developing and adult rat baroreceptor afferents. Immunoreactivity to BDNF is present in the cell bodies of baroafferent neurons in the nodose ganglion, their central projections in the solitary tract, and terminal-like structures in the lower brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius. Using ELISA in situ combined with electrical field stimulation, we show that native BDNF is released from cultured newborn nodose ganglion neurons in response to patterns that mimic the in vivo activity of baroreceptor afferents. In particular, high-frequency bursting patterns of baroreceptor firing, which are known to evoke plastic changes at baroreceptor synapses, are significantly more effective at releasing BDNF than tonic patterns of the same average frequency. Together, our study indicates that BDNF expressed by first-order baroreceptor neurons is a likely mediator of both developmental and post-developmental modifications at first-order synapses in arterial baroreceptor pathways.

  18. Changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during abstinence could be associated with relapse in cocaine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Corominas-Roso, Margarida; Roncero, Carlos; Daigre, Constanza; Grau-Lopez, Lara; Ros-Cucurull, Elena; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Sanchez-Mora, Cristina; Lopez, Maria Victoria; Ribases, Marta; Casas, Miguel

    2015-02-28

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in cocaine craving in humans and drug seeking in rodents. Based on this, the aim of this study was to explore the possible role of serum BDNF in cocaine relapse in abstinent addicts. Forty cocaine dependent subjects (DSM-IV criteria) were included in an inpatient 2 weeks abstinence program. Organic and psychiatric co-morbidities were excluded. Two serum samples were collected for each subject at baseline and at after 14 abstinence days. After discharge, all cocaine addicts underwent a 22 weeks follow-up, after which they were classified into early relapsers (ER) (resumed during the first 14 days after discharge,) or late relapsers (LR) (resumed beyond 14 days after discharge). The only clinical differences between groups were the number of consumption days during the last month before detoxification. Serum BDNF levels increased significantly across the 12 days of abstinence in the LR group (p=0.02), whereas in the ER group BDNF remained unchanged. In the ER group, the change of serum BDNF during abstinence negatively correlated with the improvement in depressive symptoms (p=0.02). These results suggest that BDNF has a role in relapse to cocaine consumption in abstinent addicts, although the underlying neurobiological mechanisms remain to be clarified. PMID:25592977

  19. Deprivation of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor results in impairment of spatial learning and memory in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Mu, J S; Li, W P; Yao, Z B; Zhou, X F

    1999-07-24

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is abundantly expressed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex and is involved in synaptic plasticity and long-term potentiation (LTP). The present study was under taken to investigate whether endogenous BDNF was required for spatial learning and memory in a rat model. Antibodies to BDNF (anti-BDNF, n=7) or control immunoglobulin G (control, n=6) were delivered into the rat brain continuously for 7 days with an osmotic pump. The rats were then subjected to a battery of behavioral tests. The results show that the average escape latencies in the BDNF antibody treated group were dramatically longer than those of the control (F=13.3, p<0.001). The rats treated with control IgG swam for a significantly longer distance in the P quadrant (where the escape plane had been placed) compared with the other three quadrants (p<0.05). In contrast, anti-BDNF-treated rats swam an equivalent distance in all four quadrants. The average percentage of swimming distance in the P quadrant by anti-BDNF-treated rats was much less than that by control IgG treated rats (p<0.001). These results suggest that endogenous BDNF is required for spatial learning and memory in adult rats.

  20. On the role of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene in behavioral effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Kondaurova, Elena M; Bazovkina, Daria V; Tsybko, Anton S; Il'chibaeva, Tatyana V; Popova, Nina K

    2014-08-01

    Experiments were made on a congenic AKR.CBA-D13Mit76C (76C) mouse strain created by transferring a chromosome 13 fragment containing the 5-HT1A receptor gene from a CBA strain to an AKR background. It was shown that 76C mice differed from AKR mice by decreased 5-HT1A receptor and tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (tph-2) genes expression in the midbrain. Functional activity of 5-HT2A receptors and 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels in the midbrain and hippocampus of 76C mice were decreased compared with AKR mice. Central brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) administration (300 ng i.c.v.) reduced 5-HT1A and 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels in the frontal cortex and tph-2 mRNA level in the midbrain of AKR mice. However, BDNF failed to produce any effect on the expression of 5-HT(1A) , 5-HT(2A) , and tph-2 genes in 76C mice but decreased functional activity of 5-HT(2A) receptors in 76C mice and increased it in AKR mice. BDNF restored social deficiency in 76C mice but produced asocial behavior (aggressive attacks towards young mice) in AKR mice. The data indicate that a small genetic variation altered the response to BDNF and show an important role of 5-HT(1A) receptor gene in the 5-HT system response to BDNF treatment and in behavioral effects of BDNF.

  1. Effect of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in rats with Tourette syndrome

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XIUMEI; WANG, XUEMING; LI, AIMIN; JIAO, XIAOLING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the striatum of Tourette syndrome (TS) rats. In addition, the possible mechanism of MSC transplantation in the treatment of TS was investigated. A total of 72 Wistar rats were randomly allocated into the control (sham surgery) group and the two experimental groups, including the TS+vehicle and TS+MSC. MSCs were co-cultured with 5-bromodeoxyuridine for 24 h for labeling prior to grafting. An autoimmune TS rat model was successfully established in the present study. Rat MSCs were cultured and expanded using density gradient centrifugation in vitro, identified by flow cytometry and then transplanted into the striata of the TS+MSC group rats. The mRNA and protein expression levels of BDNF were detected by RT-qPCR and ELISA, respectively. The results indicated that the stereotypic behavior of TS rats was reduced 7 days after MSC transplantation, while the mRNA and protein BDNF levels in the striatum increased, compared with the sham surgery group (P<0.05). In addition, the BDNF mRNA and protein expression level was lower in the striatum of TS+MSC transplantation, compared with that in TS+vehicle rats. In conclusion, intrastriatal transplantation of MSCs may provide relief from stereotypic TS behavior, since the BDNF level was reduced in TS rats after MSC transplantation. PMID:27073424

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin receptors modulate glutamate-induced phase shifts of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Michel, S.; Clark, J. P.; Ding, J. M.; Colwell, C. S.

    2008-01-01

    Light information reaches the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) through a subpopulation of retinal ganglion cells. Previous work raised the possibility that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its high-affinity tropomyosin-related receptor kinase may be important as modulators of this excitatory input into the SCN. In order to test this possibility, we used whole-cell patch-clamp methods to measure spontaneous excitatory currents in mouse SCN neurons. We found that the amplitude and frequency of these currents were increased by BDNF and decreased by the neurotrophin receptor inhibitor K252a. The neurotrophin also increased the magnitude of currents evoked by application of N-methyl-D-aspartate and amino-methyl proprionic acid. Next, we measured the rhythms in action potential discharge from the SCN brain slice preparation. We found that application of K252a dramatically reduced the magnitude of phase shifts of the electrical activity rhythm generated by the application of glutamate. By itself, BDNF caused phase shifts that resembled those produced by glutamate and were blocked by K252a. The results demonstrate that BDNF and neurotrophin receptors can enhance glutamatergic synaptic transmission within a subset of SCN neurons and potentiate glutamate-induced phase shifts of the circadian rhythm of neural activity in the SCN. PMID:16930436

  3. Local Effect of Heparin Binding Neurotrophic Factor Combined With Chitosan Entubulization on Sciatic Nerve Repair in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mehrshad, Ali; Seddighnia, Ashkan; Shadabi, Mohammadreza; Najafpour, Alireza; Mohammadi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of on sciatic nerve regeneration in animal model of rat. Methods: Seventy-five male Wistar rats were divided into five experimental groups randomly (each group containing 15 animals): Sham operation group (SHAM), autograft group (AUTO), transected control (TC), chitosan conduit (CHIT) and heparin binding neurotrophic factor treated group (CHIT/HBNF). In AUTO group a segment of sciatic nerve was transected and reimplanted reversely. In SHAM group sciatic nerve was exposed and manipulated. In transected group left sciatic nerve was transected and stumps were fixed in adjacent muscle (TC). In treatment group defect was bridged using a chitosan conduit (CHIT) filled with 10 µL HBNF (CHIT/HBNF). Each group was subdivided into four subgroups of five animals each and nerve fibers were studied in a 12-week period. Results: Behavioral, functional, biomechanical, electrophysiological and gastrocnemius muscle mass findings and morphometric indices confirmed faster recovery of regenerated axons in treatment group than in CHIT group (P=0.001). Immunohistochemical reactions to S-100 in treatment group were more positive than that in CHIT group. Conclusion: Local administration of improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of sciatic nerve. It could be considered as an effective treatment for peripheral nerve repair in practice. PMID:27331064

  4. Zirconium oxide ceramic foam: a promising supporting biomaterial for massive production of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-wei; Li, Wen-qiang; Wang, Jun-kui; Ma, Xian-cang; Liang, Chen; Liu, Peng; Chu, Zheng; Dang, Yong-hui

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the potential application of a zirconium oxide (ZrO2) ceramic foam culturing system to the production of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Three sets of ZrO2 ceramic foams with different pore densities of 10, 20, and 30 pores per linear inch (PPI) were prepared to support a 3D culturing system. After primary astrocytes were cultured in these systems, production yields of GDNF were evaluated. The biomaterial biocompatibility, cell proliferation and activation of cellular signaling pathways in GDNF synthesis and secretion in the culturing systems were also assessed and compared with a conventional culturing system. In this study, we found that the ZrO2 ceramic foam culturing system was biocompatible, using which the GDNF yields were elevated and sustained by stimulated cell proliferation and activation of signaling pathways in astrocytes cultured in the system. In conclusion, the ZrO2 ceramic foam is promising for the development of a GDNF mass production device for Parkinson's disease treatment.

  5. Effects of music aerobic exercise on depression and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in community dwelling women.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Shu-Hui; Lin, Li-Wei; Chuang, Yu Kuan; Liu, Cheng-Ling; Tsai, Lu-Jen; Tsuei, Feng-Shiou; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Yang, Kuender D

    2015-01-01

    A randomized clinical trial was utilized to compare the improvement of depression and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels between community women with and without music aerobic exercise (MAE) for 12 weeks. The MAE group involved 47 eligible participants, whereas the comparison group had 59 participants. No significant differences were recorded in the demographic characteristics between the participants in the MAE group and the comparison group. Forty-one participants in the MAE group and 26 in the comparison group completed a pre- and posttest. The MAE group displayed significant improvement in depression scores (p = 0.016), decreased depression symptoms in crying (p = 0.03), appetite (p = 0.006), and fatigue (p = 0.011). The BDNF levels of the participants significantly increased after the 12-week MAE (p = 0.042). The parallel comparison group revealed no significant changes in depression scores or BDNF levels. In summary, the 12-week MAE had a significant impact on the enhancement of BDNF levels and improvement of depression symptoms. Middle-aged community women are encouraged to exercise moderately to improve their depression symptoms and BDNF levels.

  6. Non-viral liposome-mediated transfer of brain-derived neurotrophic factor across the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Ying; Wen, Chun-yan; Li, Song-tao; Xia, Zong-xin

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in the repair of central nervous system injury, but cannot directly traverse the blood-brain barrier. Liposomes are a new type of non-viral vector, able to carry macromolecules across the blood-brain barrier and into the brain. Here, we investigate whether BDNF could be transported across the blood-brain barrier by tail-vein injection of liposomes conjugated to transferrin (Tf) and polyethylene glycol (PEG), and carrying BDNF modified with cytomegalovirus promoter (pCMV) or glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter (pGFAP) (Tf-pCMV-BDNF-PEG and Tf-pGFAP-BDNF-PEG, respectively). Both liposomes were able to traverse the blood-brain barrier, and BDNF was mainly expressed in the cerebral cortex. BDNF expression in the cerebral cortex was higher in the Tf-pGFAP-BDNF-PEG group than in the Tf-pCMV-BDNF-PEG group. This study demonstrates the successful construction of a non-virus targeted liposome, Tf-pGFAP-BDNF-PEG, which crosses the blood-brain barrier and is distributed in the cerebral cortex. Our work provides an experimental basis for BDNF-related targeted drug delivery in the brain. PMID:27212923

  7. Dietary levels of pure flavonoids improve spatial memory performance and increase hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Rendeiro, Catarina; Vauzour, David; Rattray, Marcus; Waffo-Téguo, Pierre; Mérillon, Jean Michel; Butler, Laurie T; Williams, Claire M; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2013-01-01

    Evidence suggests that flavonoid-rich foods are capable of inducing improvements in memory and cognition in animals and humans. However, there is a lack of clarity concerning whether flavonoids are the causal agents in inducing such behavioral responses. Here we show that supplementation with pure anthocyanins or pure flavanols for 6 weeks, at levels similar to that found in blueberry (2% w/w), results in an enhancement of spatial memory in 18 month old rats. Pure flavanols and pure anthocyanins were observed to induce significant improvements in spatial working memory (p = 0.002 and p = 0.006 respectively), to a similar extent to that following blueberry supplementation (p = 0.002). These behavioral changes were paralleled by increases in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (R = 0.46, p<0.01), suggesting a common mechanism for the enhancement of memory. However, unlike protein levels of BDNF, the regional enhancement of BDNF mRNA expression in the hippocampus appeared to be predominantly enhanced by anthocyanins. Our data support the claim that flavonoids are likely causal agents in mediating the cognitive effects of flavonoid-rich foods.

  8. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mutant rats show selective cognitive changes and vulnerability to chronic corticosterone treatment.

    PubMed

    Gururajan, A; Hill, R A; van den Buuse, M

    2015-01-22

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a widely expressed neurotrophin involved in neurodevelopment, neuroprotection and synaptic plasticity. It is also implicated in a range of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Stress during adolescence/young adulthood can have long-term psychiatric and cognitive consequences, however it is unknown how altered BDNF signaling is involved in such effects. Here we investigated whether a congenital deficit in BDNF availability in rats increases vulnerability to the long-term effects of the stress hormone, corticosterone (CORT). Compared to wildtype (WT) littermates, BDNF heterozygous (HET) rats showed higher body weights and minor developmental changes, such as reduced relative brain and pituitary weight. These animals furthermore showed deficits in short-term spatial memory in the Y-maze and in prepulse inhibition and startle, but not in object-recognition memory. CORT treatment induced impairments in novel-object recognition memory in both genotypes but disrupted fear conditioning extinction learning in BDNF HET rats only. These results show selective behavioral changes in BDNF HET rats, at baseline or after chronic CORT treatment and add to our understanding of the role of BDNF and its interaction with stress. Importantly, this study demonstrates the utility of the BDNF HET rat in investigations into the pathophysiology of various psychiatric disorders.

  9. Effect of controlled release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 from collagen gel on neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fei; Wu, Yunfeng; Wang, Hao; Chang, Jun; Ma, Guangwen; Yin, Zongsheng

    2016-01-20

    This study aimed to examine the effect of controlled release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) from collagen gel on rat neural stem cells (NSCs). With three groups of collagen gel, BDNF/collagen gel, and NT-3/collagen gel as controls, BDNF and NT-3 were tested in the BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel group at different time points. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that BDNF and NT-3 were steadily released from collagen gels for 10 days. The cell viability test and the bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay showed that BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel supported the survival and proliferation of NSCs. The results also showed that the length of processes was markedly longer and differentiation percentage from NSCs into neurons was much higher in the BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel group than those in the collagen gel, BDNF/collagen gel, and NT-3/collagen gel groups. These findings suggest that BDNF-NT-3/collagen gel could significantly improve the ability of NSCs proliferation and differentiation.

  10. Changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) during abstinence could be associated with relapse in cocaine-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Corominas-Roso, Margarida; Roncero, Carlos; Daigre, Constanza; Grau-Lopez, Lara; Ros-Cucurull, Elena; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Sanchez-Mora, Cristina; Lopez, Maria Victoria; Ribases, Marta; Casas, Miguel

    2015-02-28

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in cocaine craving in humans and drug seeking in rodents. Based on this, the aim of this study was to explore the possible role of serum BDNF in cocaine relapse in abstinent addicts. Forty cocaine dependent subjects (DSM-IV criteria) were included in an inpatient 2 weeks abstinence program. Organic and psychiatric co-morbidities were excluded. Two serum samples were collected for each subject at baseline and at after 14 abstinence days. After discharge, all cocaine addicts underwent a 22 weeks follow-up, after which they were classified into early relapsers (ER) (resumed during the first 14 days after discharge,) or late relapsers (LR) (resumed beyond 14 days after discharge). The only clinical differences between groups were the number of consumption days during the last month before detoxification. Serum BDNF levels increased significantly across the 12 days of abstinence in the LR group (p=0.02), whereas in the ER group BDNF remained unchanged. In the ER group, the change of serum BDNF during abstinence negatively correlated with the improvement in depressive symptoms (p=0.02). These results suggest that BDNF has a role in relapse to cocaine consumption in abstinent addicts, although the underlying neurobiological mechanisms remain to be clarified.

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its precursor (proBDNF) in genetically defined fear-induced aggression.

    PubMed

    Ilchibaeva, Tatiana V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Tsybko, Anton S; Kozhemyakina, Rimma V; Popova, Nina K; Naumenko, Vladimir S

    2015-09-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its precursor (proBDNF) and BDNF mRNA levels were studied in the brain of wild rats selectively bred for more than 70 generations for either high level or for the lack of affective aggressiveness towards man. Significant increase of BDNF mRNA level in the frontal cortex and increase of BDNF level in the hippocampus of aggressive rats was revealed. In the midbrain and hippocampus of aggressive rats proBDNF level was increased, whereas BDNF/proBDNF ratio was reduced suggesting the prevalence and increased influence of proBDNF in highly aggressive rats. In the frontal cortex, proBDNF level in aggressive rats was decreased. Thus, considerable structure-specific differences in BDNF and proBDNF levels as well as in BDNF gene expression between highly aggressive and nonaggressive rats were shown. The data suggested the implication of BDNF and its precursor proBDNF in the mechanism of aggressiveness and in the creation of either aggressive or nonaggressive phenotype.

  12. Ethanol-induced increases in extracellular dopamine are blunted in brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Kelly E.; Mathews, Tiffany A.

    2010-01-01

    Drugs of abuse like ethanol have the ability to stimulate forebrain dopaminergic pathways. Although the positive reinforcing properties of abused substances are largely attributed to their effects on dopamine transmission, alcohol addiction involves complex interactions between numerous molecular mediators. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is suggested to have a protective role in regulating the reinforcing effects of ethanol. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of an acute, systemic injection of ethanol (2 g/kg) on BDNF protein levels and extracellular dopamine concentrations, measured by in vivo microdialysis, in the caudate-putamen of wildtype and heterozygous BDNF mice. In both genotypes, the peak increase in extracellular dopamine following ethanol coincided temporally with a decrease in BDNF protein levels following a similar ethanol treatment. Moreover, the effect of ethanol to increase extracellular dopamine was blunted in heterozygous BDNF mice compared to wildtype mice. While the magnitude of decrease in BDNF protein induced by ethanol was similar between genotypes (two-fold), ethanol treatment induced significantly lower BDNF protein levels in heterozygous BDNF mice overall. These findings suggest the effects of ethanol are influenced by an interaction between BDNF and dopamine transmission, which may relate to the pathway through which BDNF regulates ethanol intake. PMID:21163332

  13. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor as a regulator of systemic and brain energy metabolism and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Sarah M; Griffioen, Kathleen J; Wan, Ruiqian; Mattson, Mark P

    2012-08-01

    Overweight sedentary individuals are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and some neurological disorders. Beneficial effects of dietary energy restriction (DER) and exercise on brain structural plasticity and behaviors have been demonstrated in animal models of aging and acute (stroke and trauma) and chronic (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases) neurological disorders. The findings described later, and evolutionary considerations, suggest brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in the integration and optimization of behavioral and metabolic responses to environments with limited energy resources and intense competition. In particular, BDNF signaling mediates adaptive responses of the central, autonomic, and peripheral nervous systems from exercise and DER. In the hypothalamus, BDNF inhibits food intake and increases energy expenditure. By promoting synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis in the hippocampus, BDNF mediates exercise- and DER-induced improvements in cognitive function and neuroprotection. DER improves cardiovascular stress adaptation by a mechanism involving enhancement of brainstem cholinergic activity. Collectively, findings reviewed in this paper provide a rationale for targeting BDNF signaling for novel therapeutic interventions in a range of metabolic and neurological disorders.

  14. Functional Multipotency of Stem Cells: A Conceptual Review of Neurotrophic Factor-Based Evidence and Its Role in Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yang D; Yu, Dou; Ropper, Alexander E; Li, Jianxue; Kabatas, Serdar; Wakeman, Dustin R; Wang, Junmei; Sullivan, Maryrose P; Redmond, D. Eugene; Langer, Robert; Snyder, Evan Y; Sidman, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    We here propose an updated concept of stem cells (SCs), with an emphasis on neural stem cells (NSCs). The conventional view, which has touched principally on the essential property of lineage multipotency (e.g., the ability of NSCs to differentiate into all neural cells), should be broadened to include the emerging recognition of biofunctional multipotency of SCs to mediate systemic homeostasis, evidenced in NSCs in particular by the secretion of neurotrophic factors. Under this new conceptual context and taking the NSC as a leading example, one may begin to appreciate and seek the “logic” behind the wide range of molecular tactics the NSC appears to serve at successive developmental stages as it integrates into and prepares, modifies, and guides the surrounding CNS micro- and macro-environment towards the formation and self-maintenance of a functioning adult nervous system. We suggest that embracing this view of the “multipotency” of the SCs is pivotal for correctly, efficiently, and optimally exploiting stem cell biology for therapeutic applications, including reconstitution of a dysfunctional CNS. PMID:22654717

  15. Voluntary exercise ameliorates cognitive deficits in morphine dependent rats: the role of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Miladi-Gorji, Hossein; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Fathollahi, Yaghoub; Akhavan, Maziar M; Semnanian, Saeed; Safari, Manouchehr

    2011-10-01

    Chronic exposure to opiates impairs spatial learning and memory. Given the well-known beneficial effects of voluntary exercise on cognitive functions, we investigated whether voluntary exercise would ameliorate the cognitive deficits that are induced by morphine dependence. If an effect of exercise was observed, we aimed to investigate the possible role of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in morphine-dependent rats. The rats were injected with bi-daily doses (10mg/kg, at 12h intervals) of morphine over a period of 10 days of voluntary exercise. Following these injections, a water maze task was performed twice a day for five consecutive days, followed by a probe trial 2 days later. A specific BDNF inhibitor (TrkB-IgG chimera) was used to block the hippocampal BDNF action during the 10 days of voluntary exercise. We found that voluntary exercise blocked the ability of chronic morphine to impair spatial memory retention. A blockade of the BDNF action blunted the exercise-induced improvement of spatial memory in the dependent rats. Moreover, the voluntary exercise diminished the severity of the rats' dependency on morphine. This study demonstrates that voluntary exercise ameliorates, via a TrkB-mediated mechanism, the cognitive deficits that are induced by chronic morphine. Thus, voluntary exercise might be a potential method to ameliorate some of the deleterious behavioral consequences of the abuse of morphine and other opiates.

  16. Modulatory effect of coffee fruit extract on plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Izquierdo, Tania; Nemzer, Boris; Shu, Cynthia; Huynh, Lan; Argumedo, Ruby; Keller, Robert; Pietrzkowski, Zb

    2013-08-28

    The present single-dose study was performed to assess the effect of whole coffee fruit concentrate powder (WCFC), green coffee caffeine powder (N677), grape seed extract powder (N31) and green coffee bean extract powder (N625) on blood levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Randomly assorted groups of fasted subjects consumed a single, 100mg dose of each material. Plasma samples were collected at time zero (T0) and at 30 min intervals afterwards, up to 120 min. A total of two control groups were included: subjects treated with silica dioxide (as placebo) or with no treatment. The collected data revealed that treatments with N31 and N677 increased levels of plasma BDNF by about 31% under these experimental conditions, whereas treatment with WCFC increased it by 143% (n 10), compared with baseline. These results indicate that WCFC could be used for modulation of BDNF-dependent health conditions. However, larger clinical studies are needed to support this possibility.

  17. Exercise-induced neuroprotection in the spastic Han Wistar rat: the possible role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Van Kummer, Brooke H; Cohen, Randy W

    2015-01-01

    Moderate aerobic exercise has been shown to enhance motor skills and protect the nervous system from neurodegenerative diseases, like ataxia. Our lab uses the spastic Han Wistar rat as a model of ataxia. Mutant rats develop forelimb tremor and hind limb rigidity and have a decreased lifespan. Our lab has shown that exercise reduced Purkinje cell degeneration and delayed motor dysfunction, significantly increasing lifespan. Our study investigated how moderate exercise may mediate neuroprotection by analyzing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB. To link BDNF to exercise-induced neuroprotection, mutant and normal rats were infused with the TrkB antagonist K252a or vehicle into the third ventricle. During infusion, rats were subjected to moderate exercise regimens on a treadmill. Exercised mutants receiving K252a exhibited a 21.4% loss in Purkinje cells compared to their controls. Cerebellar TrkB expression was evaluated using non-drug-treated mutants subjected to various treadmill running regimens. Running animals expressed three times more TrkB than sedentary animals. BDNF was quantified via Sandwich ELISA, and cerebellar expression was found to be 26.6% greater in mutant rats on 7-day treadmill exercise regimen compared to 30 days of treadmill exercise. These results suggest that BDNF is involved in mediating exercise-induced neuroprotection. PMID:25710032

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor as a regulator of systemic and brain energy metabolism and cardiovascular health

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, Sarah M; Griffioen, Kathleen J; Wan, Ruiqian; Mattson, Mark P

    2012-01-01

    Overweight sedentary individuals are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and some neurological disorders. Beneficial effects of dietary energy restriction (DER) and exercise on brain structural plasticity and behaviors have been demonstrated in animal models of aging and acute (stroke and trauma) and chronic (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases) neurological disorders. The findings described later, and evolutionary considerations, suggest brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in the integration and optimization of behavioral and metabolic responses to environments with limited energy resources and intense competition. In particular, BDNF signaling mediates adaptive responses of the central, autonomic, and peripheral nervous systems from exercise and DER. In the hypothalamus, BDNF inhibits food intake and increases energy expenditure. By promoting synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis in the hippocampus, BDNF mediates exercise- and DER-induced improvements in cognitive function and neuroprotection. DER improves cardiovascular stress adaptation by a mechanism involving enhancement of brainstem cholinergic activity. Collectively, findings reviewed in this paper provide a rationale for targeting BDNF signaling for novel therapeutic interventions in a range of metabolic and neurological disorders. PMID:22548651

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signalling mediates the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in chronically stressed mice.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qing-Qiu; Huang, Zhen; Zhong, Xiao-Ming; Xian, Yan-Fang; Ip, Siu-Po

    2014-03-15

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that piperine produced antidepressant-like action in various mouse models of behavioral despair. This study aimed to investigate the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in mice exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). The results showed that CUMS caused depression-like behavior in mice, as indicated by the significant decrease in sucrose consumption and increase in immobility time in the forced swim test. It was also found that BDNF protein expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex were significantly decreased in CUMS-treated mice. Chronic treatment of piperine at the dose of 10mg/kg significantly ameliorated behavioural deficits of CUMS-treated mice in the sucrose preference test and forced swim test. Piperine treatment also significantly decreased immobility time in the forced swim test in naive mice. In parallel, chronic piperine treatment significantly increased BDNF protein expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of both naive and CUMS-treated mice. In addition, inhibition of BDNF signalling by injection of K252a, an inhibitor of the BDNF receptor TrkB, significantly blocked the antidepressant-like effect of piperine in the sucrose preference test and forced swim test of CUMS-treated mice. Taken together, this study suggests that BDNF signalling is an essential mediator for the antidepressant-like effect of piperine.

  20. Acute high-intensity exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in young, healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jungyun; Brothers, R Matthew; Castelli, Darla M; Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Chen, Yen T; Salinas, Mandy M; Kim, Jihoon; Jung, Yeonhak; Calvert, Hannah G

    2016-09-01

    Acute exercise can positively impact cognition. The present study examined the effect of acute high-intensity aerobic exercise on prefrontal-dependent cognitive performance and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Fifty-eight young adults were randomly assigned to one of two experimental groups: (a) an acute bout of high-intensity exercise (n=29) or (b) a non-exercise control (n=29). Participants in the exercise group improved performance on inhibitory control in Stroop interference and on cognitive flexibility in Trail Making Test (TMT) Part-B compared with participants in the control group and increased BDNF immediately after exercise. There was a significant relationship between BDNF and TMT Part-B on the pre-post change following exercise. These findings provide support for the association between improved prefrontal-dependent cognitive performance and increased BDNF in response to acute exercise. We conclude that the changes in BDNF concentration may be partially responsible for prefrontal-dependent cognitive functioning following an acute bout of exercise.

  1. Upregulation of p‑Akt by glial cell line‑derived neurotrophic factor ameliorates cell apoptosis in the hippocampus of rats with streptozotocin‑induced diabetic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weigang; Zhang, Yinghua; Lu, Derong; Ren, Mingxin; Yuan, Guoyan

    2016-01-01

    The loss of neurotrophic factor support has been shown to contribute to the development of the central nervous system. Glial cell line‑derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a potent neurotrophic factor, is closely associated with apoptosis and exerts neuroprotective effects on numerous populations of cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of these protective effects remain unknown. In the present study, a significant increase in Bax levels and DNA fragmentation was observed in the hippocampus obtained from the brains of diabetic rats 60 days after diabetes had been induced. The apoptotic changes were correlated with the loss of GDNF/Akt signaling. GDNF administration was found to reverse the diabetes‑induced Bax and DNA fragmentation changes. This was associated with an improvement in the level of p‑Akt/Akt. In addition, combination of GDNF with a specific inhibitor of the phosphoinositide 3‑kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, Wortmannin, significantly abrogated the effects of GDNF on the levels of p‑Akt/Akt, Bax and DNA fragmentation. However, a p38 mitogen‑activated proten kinase (MAPK) inhibitor, SB203580, had no effect on the expression of p‑Akt/Akt, Bax or DNA fragmentation. These results demonstrate the pivotal role of GDNF as well as the PI3K/Akt pathway, but not the MAPK pathway, in the prevention of diabetes‑induced neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus. PMID:26549420

  2. Effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 on the neuronal differentiation of rat adipose-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    JI, WENCHEN; ZHANG, XIAOWEI; JI, LE; WANG, KUNZHENG; QIU, YUSHENG

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising method that may be used to treat spinal cord injury (SCI). The underlying repair mechanism of tissue engineering involves the stable secretion of neurotrophins from seed cells, which eventually differentiate into neurons; therefore, the selection of appropriate seed cells, which stably secrete neurotrophins that easily differentiate into neurons requires investigation. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), which are adult SCs, are advantageous due to convenience sampling and easy expansion; therefore, ADSCs are currently the most popular type of seed cell. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) possess superior properties, when compared with other neurotrophic factors, in the maintenance of neuronal survival and promotion of SC differentiation into neurons. The present study used two lentiviruses, which specifically express BDNF and NT-3 [Lenti-BDNF-green fluorescent protein (GFP), Lenti-NT-3-red fluorescent protein (RFP)], to transfect third-generation ADSCs. Three types of seed cell were obtained: i) Seed cells overexpressing BDNF (ADSC/Lenti-BDNF-GFP); ii) seed cells overexpressing NT-3 (ADSC/Lenti-NT-3-RFP); and iii) seed cells overexpressing BDNF and NT-3 (ADSC/Lenti-BDNF-GFP and NT-3-RFP). The transfected cells were then induced to differentiate into neurons and were divided into a further four groups: i) The BDNF and NT-3 co-overexpression group; ii) the BDNF overexpression group; iii) the NT-3 overexpression group; and iv) the control group, which consisted of untransfected ADSCs. The results of the present study demonstrate that BDNF and NT-3 expression was higher 10 days after induction, as detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blotting. Neuron-specific enolase is a neuronal marker, the expression of which was highest in the BDNF and NT-3 co-overexpression group, followed by the BDNF overexpression group and then by the NT-3 overexpression

  3. Effects of brain‑derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin‑3 on the neuronal differentiation of rat adipose‑derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wenchen; Zhang, Xiaowei; Ji, Le; Wang, Kunzheng; Qiu, Yusheng

    2015-10-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising method that may be used to treat spinal cord injury (SCI). The underlying repair mechanism of tissue engineering involves the stable secretion of neurotrophins from seed cells, which eventually differentiate into neurons; therefore, the selection of appropriate seed cells, which stably secrete neurotrophins that easily differentiate into neurons requires investigation. Adipose‑derived stem cells (ADSCs), which are adult SCs, are advantageous due to convenience sampling and easy expansion; therefore, ADSCs are currently the most popular type of seed cell. Brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin‑3 (NT‑3) possess superior properties, when compared with other neurotrophic factors, in the maintenance of neuronal survival and promotion of SC differentiation into neurons. The present study used two lentiviruses, which specifically express BDNF and NT‑3 [Lenti‑BDNF‑green fluorescent protein (GFP), Lenti‑NT‑3‑red fluorescent protein (RFP)], to transfect third‑generation ADSCs. Three types of seed cell were obtained: i) Seed cells overexpressing BDNF (ADSC/Lenti‑BDNF‑GFP); ii) seed cells overexpressing NT‑3 (ADSC/Lenti‑NT‑3‑RFP); and iii) seed cells overexpressing BDNF and NT‑3 (ADSC/Lenti‑BDNF‑GFP and NT‑3‑RFP). The transfected cells were then induced to differentiate into neurons and were divided into a further four groups: i) The BDNF and NT‑3 co‑overexpression group; ii) the BDNF overexpression group; iii) the NT‑3 overexpression group; and iv) the control group, which consisted of untransfected ADSCs. The results of the present study demonstrate that BDNF and NT‑3 expression was higher 10 days after induction, as detected by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) and western blotting. Neuron‑specific enolase is a neuronal marker, the expression of which was highest in the BDNF and NT‑3 co‑overexpression group, followed by the

  4. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in relation to comorbid depression and cytokine levels in Nepalese men with alcohol-use disorders.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Sudan Prasad; Lien, Lars; Ueland, Thor; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Aukrust, Pål; Bramness, Jørgen G

    2015-08-01

    Neurodegenerative and inflammatory processes are involved separately in major depression (MD) and alcohol-use disorders (AUD). Little is known about the nature of this relationship in the context of comorbid AUD and depression disorders. In this study, we determined brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serum levels in patients with AUD and tested whether BDNF levels were related to history of major depression, recent depressive symptoms, AUD severity, and TNF-α and IL-6 levels. Nepalese male AUD inpatients (N=152) abstinent from alcohol for an average of 34 days were administered structured interviews to assess depression symptoms and pattern and extent of alcohol use, and to generate research diagnoses for AUD and MD. AUD severity was assessed by scores on the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test. Serum BDNF and cytokines were measured using ELISA and multiplex technology, respectively. Although serum BDNF levels were unrelated to MD history, patients with recent depressive symptoms (n=42) had lower (mean±SD) BDNF serum levels compared to those without (n=110) (21.6±8.1 ng/mL vs. 26.0±9.6 ng/mL; p=0.010), and patients with higher AUD severity and binge-drinking patterns had higher mean serum BDNF levels compared to lower AUD severity and non-binging (25.9±9.7 ng/mL vs. 22.1±8.7 ng/mL; p=0.022 and 25.7±9.3 vs. 21.8±9.7 ng/mL; p=0.029, respectively). Positive correlations were present between BDNF and TNF-α (r=0.39, p<0.001) and IL-6 (r=0.2, p=0.027). In particular, TNF-α levels were predictive of BDNF levels after controlling for confounders (B=0.3 [95% CI=0.2-0.5], p<0.001). These findings show that in alcohol-using populations, peripheral BDNF levels are related to severity of AUD as well as presence of depressive symptoms. The significant associations between inflammatory and neurotrophic factors may have implications for neuroadaptive changes during recovery from AUD.

  5. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) enhances neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth of immature neurons in adult mice by up-regulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Shi-Wei; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Cao, Zhen; Ge, Bi-Ying; Wang, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jin-Tao; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Li, Shao; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Although scorpions and their venom have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to treat chronic neurological disorders, the underlying mechanisms of these treatments remain unknown. We applied SVHRP in vitro and in vivo to understand its effects on the neurogenesis and maturation of adult immature neurons and explore associated molecular mechanisms. SVHRP administration increased the number of 5-bromo-2'-dexoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, BrdU-positive/neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-positive neurons, and polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM)-positive immature neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of hippocampus. Furthermore immature neurons incubated with SVHRP-pretreated astrocyte-conditioned medium exhibited significantly increased neurite length compared with those incubated with normal astrocyte-conditioned medium. This neurotrophic effect was further confirmed in vivo by detecting an increased average single area and whole area of immature neurons in the SGZ, SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB) in the adult mouse brain. In contrast to normal astrocyte-conditioned medium, higher concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) but not nerve growth factor (NGF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was detected in the conditioned medium of SVHRP-pretreated astrocytes, and blocking BDNF using anti-BDNF antibodies eliminated these SVHRP-dependent neurotrophic effects. In SVHRP treated mouse brain, more glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells were detected. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed increased numbers of GFAP/BDNF double-positive cells, which agrees with the observed changes in the culture system. This paper describes novel effects of scorpion venom-originated peptide on the stem cells and suggests the potential therapeutic values of SVHRP.

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype is associated with brain gray and white matter tissue volumes recovery in abstinent alcohol-dependent individuals

    PubMed Central

    Mon, A.; Durazzo, T. C.; Gazdzinski, S.; Hutchison, K. E.; Pennington, D.; Meyerhoff, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have linked the methionine (Met) allele of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF ) gene to abnormal regional brain volumes in several psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases. However, no neuroimaging studies assessed the effects of this allele on brain morphology in alcohol use disorders and its demonstrated change during abstinence from alcohol. Here we assessed the effects of the BDNF Val66Met (rs6265) polymorphism on regional brain tissue volumes and their recovery during short-term abstinence in treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent individuals. 3D T1 weighted magnetic resonance images from 62 individuals were acquired at 1.5 T at one week of abstinence from alcohol; 41 of the participants were rescanned at 5 weeks of abstinence. The images were segmented into gray matter (GM), white matter (WM) and cerebrospinal fluid and parcellated into regional volumes. The BDNF genotype was determined from blood samples using the TaqMan technique. Alcohol-dependent Val (Valine)/Met heterozygotes and Val homozygotes had similar regional brain volumes at either time point. However, Val homozygotes had significant GM volume increases, while Val/Met heterozygotes increased predominantly in WM volumes over the scan interval. Longitudinal increases in GM but not WM volumes were related to improvements in neurocognitive measures during abstinence. The findings suggest that functionally significant brain tissue volume recovery during abstinence from alcohol is influenced by BDNF genotype. PMID:22989210

  7. Study on the possible association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor polymorphism with the developmental course of symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Olle; Westberg, Lars; Lichtenstein, Paul; Eriksson, Elias; Larsson, Henrik

    2011-11-01

    Several studies have, with conflicting results, investigated the relationship between the Val⁶⁶Met polymorphism in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We assessed longitudinal, quantitative phenotypes of hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention in order to determine whether the Val⁶⁶Met polymorphism is associated with age-specific and/or persistent symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity and/or inattention in a community-based cohort of 1236 Swedish individuals for which ADHD symptom data were collected when the participants were aged 8-9, 13-14 and 16-17 yr. The Met allele was associated with symptoms of ADHD at ages 8-9 and 13-14 yr. A multivariate regression analysis revealed that the observed effect of the Met allele on ADHD symptoms reflects an influence on persistent hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms. The present findings support the hypothesis that BDNF is involved in the pathogenesis of ADHD. The results highlight the importance of distinguishing between hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention, respectively, and demonstrate the value of using a longitudinal approach in genetic studies of ADHD symptoms.

  8. Treadmill exercise and methylphenidate ameliorate symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder through enhancing dopamine synthesis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in spontaneous hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong; Heo, Hong-Im; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ko, Il-Gyu; Lee, Su-Shin; Kim, Sung-Eun; Kim, Bo-Kyun; Kim, Tae-Woon; Ji, Eun-Sang; Kim, Jae-Deung; Shin, Mal-Soon; Choi, Young-Woong; Kim, Chang-Ju

    2011-10-17

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a developmental disorder of cognition. Behavioral symptoms of ADHD are inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. We investigated the effects of treadmill exercise and methylphenidate (MPH) on activity and spatial learning memory in relation to dopamine synthesis and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression using spontaneously hypertensive adult male rats. The rats in the MPH-treated group received 1mg/kg MPH orally once a day for 28days. The rats in the treadmill exercise group were made to run on a treadmill for 30min once a day, five times a week, for 28days. Activity was determined by an open-field test and spatial learning memory was evaluated by an 8-arm maze test. Immunohistochemistry and Western blotting were conducted to examine the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine, and BDNF. The rats in the ADHD group showed hyperactivity and spatial learning memory deficit. Reduction of TH in the striatum and substantia nigra and BDNF in the hippocampus was observed of the rats in the ADHD group. Treadmill exercise and MPH alleviated the ADHD-induced hyperactivity and spatial learning memory impairment. Expressions of TH and BDNF in the ADHD rats were also increased by both treadmill exercise and MPH. These findings provide a possibility that exercise may be used as an effective therapeutic intervention for ADHD patients as MPH treatment.

  9. Induction of long-term potentiation and depression is reflected by corresponding changes in secretion of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Aicardi, Giorgio; Argilli, Emanuela; Cappello, Silvia; Santi, Spartaco; Riccio, Massimo; Thoenen, Hans; Canossa, Marco

    2004-01-01

    Neurotrophins play an important role in modulating activity-dependent neuronal plasticity. In particular, threshold levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are required to induce long-term potentiation (LTP) in acute hippocampal slices. Conversely, the administration of exogenous BDNF prevents the induction of long-term depression (LTD) in the visual cortex. A long-standing missing link in the analysis of this modulatory role of BDNF was the determination of the time-course of endogenous BDNF secretion in the same organotypic preparation in which LTP and LTD are elicited. Here, we fulfilled this requirement in slices of perirhinal cortex. Classical theta-burst stimulation patterns evoking LTP lasting >180 min elicited a large increase in BDNF secretion that persisted 5-12 min beyond the stimulation period. Weaker theta-burst stimulation patterns leading only to the initial phase of LTP (≈35 min) were accompanied by a smaller increase in BDNF secretion lasting <1 min. Sequestration of BDNF by TrkB-IgG receptor bodies prevented LTP. Low-frequency stimulations leading to LTD were accompanied by reductions in BDNF secretion that never lasted beyond the duration of the stimulation. PMID:15505222

  10. Pharmacological profile of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) splice variant translation using a novel drug screening assay: a "quantitative code".

    PubMed

    Vaghi, Valentina; Polacchini, Alessio; Baj, Gabriele; Pinheiro, Vera L M; Vicario, Annalisa; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2014-10-01

    The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key regulator of neuronal development and plasticity. BDNF is a major pharmaceutical target in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. However, pharmacological modulation of this neurotrophin is challenging because BDNF is generated by multiple, alternatively spliced transcripts with different 5'- and 3'UTRs. Each BDNF mRNA variant is transcribed independently, but translation regulation is unknown. To evaluate the translatability of BDNF transcripts, we developed an in vitro luciferase assay in human neuroblastoma cells. In unstimulated cells, each BDNF 5'- and 3'UTR determined a different basal translation level of the luciferase reporter gene. However, constructs with either a 5'UTR or a 3'UTR alone showed poor translation modulation by BDNF, KCl, dihydroxyphenylglycine, AMPA, NMDA, dopamine, acetylcholine, norepinephrine, or serotonin. Constructs consisting of the luciferase reporter gene flanked by the 5'UTR of one of the most abundant BDNF transcripts in the brain (exons 1, 2c, 4, and 6) and the long 3'UTR responded selectively to stimulation with the different receptor agonists, and only transcripts 2c and 6 were increased by the antidepressants desipramine and mirtazapine. We propose that BDNF mRNA variants represent "a quantitative code" for regulated expression of the protein. Thus, to discriminate the efficacy of drugs in stimulating BDNF synthesis, it is appropriate to use variant-specific in vitro screening tests.

  11. Expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of children with meningitis and encephalitis/encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Morichi, Shinichiro; Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Takekuma, Koji; Hoshika, Akinori; Kawashima, Hisashi

    2013-01-01

    Many reports in the field of childhood brain disorders have documented that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) affects central nervous system (CNS) functions. In this clinical study, BDNF levels were evaluated in association with pediatric CNS infections. BDNF levels in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 42 patients admitted during 5-year period, due to CNS infections, were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Control samples were collected from 108 patients with non-CNS infections (urinary tract infection, acute upper respiratory infection, acute gastroenteritis, etc.). Mean values of BDNF levels, at various ages, were determined and compared. BDNF levels were below the sensitivity of the ELISA in most CSF samples from the control group, but were significantly elevated in the patients with bacterial meningitis. The serum BDNF levels were elevated in all subgroups of patients with CNS infections, and the elevation was particularly notable in those with bacterial meningitis. BDNF expression in the CSF was correlated with CSF interleukin (IL)-6 levels as well as with blood platelet counts and neurological prognoses in those with bacterial meningitis. No correlation was found between BDNF levels and serum leukocyte numbers or C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. BDNF levels were found to be elevated in the serum and CSF of pediatric patients with CNS infections, particularly those with bacterial meningitis. Monitoring the changes in serum and CSF levels of BDNF may facilitate the diagnosis of acute meningitis and acute encephalopathy and allow the differential diagnosis of specific CNS infections.

  12. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism differentially affects performance on subscales of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III).

    PubMed

    Lamb, Yvette N; Thompson, Christopher S; McKay, Nicole S; Waldie, Karen E; Kirk, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene and the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene influence brain structure and function, as well as cognitive abilities. They are most influential in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC), respectively. Recall and recognition are forms of memory proposed to have different neural substrates, with recall having a greater dependence on the PFC and hippocampus. This study aimed to determine whether the BDNF val(66)met or COMT val(158)met polymorphisms differentially affect recall and recognition, and whether these polymorphisms interact. A sample of 100 healthy adults was assessed on recall and familiarity-based recognition using the Faces and Family Pictures subscales of the Wechsler Memory Scale - Third Edition (WMS-III). COMT genotype did not affect performance on either task. The BDNF polymorphism (i.e., met carriers relative to val homozygotes) was associated with poorer recall ability, while not influencing recognition. Combining subscale scores in memory tests such as the WMS might obscure gene effects. Our results demonstrate the importance of distinguishing between recall and familiarity-based recognition in neurogenetics research.

  13. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder-associated depression: evidence for reductions in the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Kevin K.; Sheema, S.; Paz, Rodrigo D; Samudio-Ruiz, Sabrina L.; Laughlin, Mary H.; Spence, Nathan E.; Roehlk, Michael J; Alcon, Sara N.; Allan, Andrea M.

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure is associated with an increased incidence of depressive disorders in patient populations. However, the mechanisms that link prenatal ethanol exposure and depression are unknown. Several recent studies have implicated reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the hippocampal formation and frontal cortex as important contributors to the etiology of depression. In the present studies, we sought to determine whether prenatal ethanol exposure is associated with behaviors that model depression, as well as with reduced BDNF levels in the hippocampal formation and/or medial frontal cortex, in a mouse model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Compared to control adult mice, prenatal ethanol-exposed adult mice displayed increased learned helplessness behavior and increased immobility in the Porsolt forced swim test. Prenatal ethanol exposure was associated with decreased BDNF protein levels in the medial frontal cortex, but not the hippocampal formation, while total BDNF mRNA and BDNF transcripts containing exon III, IV or VI were reduced in both the medial frontal cortex and the hippocampal formation of prenatal ethanol-exposed mice. These results identify reduced BDNF levels in the medial frontal cortex and hippocampal formation as potential mediators of depressive disorders associated with FASD. PMID:18558427

  14. Lack of Postprandial Peak in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Adults with Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Marta; Esteba-Castillo, Susanna; Novell, Ramon; Giménez-Palop, Olga; Coronas, Ramon; Gabau, Elisabeth; Corripio, Raquel; Baena, Neus; Viñas-Jornet, Marina; Guitart, Míriam; Torrents-Rodas, David; Deus, Joan; Pujol, Jesús; Rigla, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Context Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by severe hyperphagia. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and leptin are reciprocally involved in energy homeostasis. Objectives To analyze the role of BDNF and leptin in satiety in genetic subtypes of PWS. Design Experimental study. Setting University hospital. Subjects 90 adults: 30 PWS patients; 30 age-sex-BMI-matched obese controls; and 30 age-sex-matched lean controls. Interventions Subjects ingested a liquid meal after fasting ≥10 hours. Main Outcome Measures Leptin and BDNF levels in plasma extracted before ingestion and 30’, 60’, and 120’ after ingestion. Hunger, measured on a 100-point visual analogue scale before ingestion and 60’ and 120’ after ingestion. Results Fasting BDNF levels were lower in PWS than in controls (p = 0.05). Postprandially, PWS patients showed only a truncated early peak in BDNF, and their BDNF levels at 60' and 120' were lower compared with lean controls (p<0.05). Leptin was higher in PWS patients than in controls at all time points (p<0.001). PWS patients were hungrier than controls before and after eating. The probability of being hungry was associated with baseline BDNF levels: every 50-unit increment in BDNF decreased the odds of being hungry by 22% (OR: 0.78, 95%CI: 0.65–0.94). In uniparental disomy, the odds of being hungry decreased by 66% (OR: 0.34, 90%CI: 0.13–0.9). Postprandial leptin patterns did no differ among genetic subtypes. Conclusions Low baseline BDNF levels and lack of postprandial peak may contribute to persistent hunger after meals. Uniparental disomy is the genetic subtype of PWS least affected by these factors. PMID:27685845

  15. [Association between mood characteristics and polymorphisms of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GNDF) in patients with depression].

    PubMed

    Kotyuk, Eszter; Németh, Nóra; Halmai, Zsuzsa; Faludi, Gábor; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Székely, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GNDF) plays an important role in the development and synaptic plasticity of dopaminergic neurons, thus it could be an important therapeutic factor in Parkinson's disease. Results from candidate gene studies of GDNF in psychiatric disorders are contradictory. Moreover, the possible association between GDNF polymorphisms and major- or bipolar depression has not been studied to date. Recently, our research group has published an association between two GDNF polymorphisms (rs3812047, rs3096140) and the individual variability of anxiety measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) on a non-clinical sample. In the present study we further analyzed this association on a sample with major- and bipolar depression: we used data from 183 MDD, 116 BP, and 1172 control subjects and tested effect of GDNF rs3812047 and rs3096140 polymorphisms on mood disorders. The case control design did not show significant differences in the genotype distribution of BP or MDD versus control patients. However, in the bipolar group subjects with rs3812047 A allele showed a significantly higher anxiety and depression mean score then subjects with G allele (p=0.043). This result supports our previous findings demonstrated on a non-clinical sample. Interestingly we found an opposite effect of the rs3812047 using data from MDD patients: subjects with the G allele had higher depression scores (p=0.012). An interaction effect of patient subgroups and genetic variants of the rs3812047 was observed for both HADS subscales (anxiety: p=0.029; depression: 0.004). In summary, we confirmed the previously published association between the rs3812047 A allele and mood characteristics on the bipolar sample, and an effect in the opposite direction was detected in the patient group with major depression.

  16. Sodium Benzoate, a Metabolite of Cinnamon and a Food Additive, Upregulates Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor in Astrocytes and Oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Modi, Khushbu K; Jana, Malabendu; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-11-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a promyelinating trophic factor that plays an important role in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, mechanisms by which CNTF expression could be increased in the brain are poorly understood. Recently we have discovered anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities of sodium benzoate (NaB), a metabolite of cinnamon and a widely-used food additive. Here, we delineate that NaB is also capable of increasing the mRNA and protein expression of CNTF in primary mouse astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and primary human astrocytes. Accordingly, oral administration of NaB and cinnamon led to the upregulation of astroglial and oligodendroglial CNTF in vivo in mouse brain. Induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal model of MS, reduced the level of CNTF in the brain, which was restored by oral administration of cinnamon. While investigating underlying mechanisms, we observed that NaB induced the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and H-89, an inhibitor of PKA, abrogated NaB-induced expression of CNTF. The activation of cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein by NaB, the recruitment of CREB and CREB-binding protein to the CNTF promoter by NaB and the abrogation of NaB-induced expression of CNTF in astrocytes by siRNA knockdown of CREB suggest that NaB increases the expression of CNTF via the activation of CREB. These results highlight a novel myelinogenic property of NaB and cinnamon, which may be of benefit for MS and other demyelinating disorders.

  17. Repeated forced swimming impairs prepulse inhibition and alters brain-derived neurotrophic factor and astroglial parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Borsoi, Milene; Antonio, Camila Boque; Müller, Liz Girardi; Viana, Alice Fialho; Hertzfeldt, Vivian; Lunardi, Paula Santana; Zanotto, Caroline; Nardin, Patrícia; Ravazzolo, Ana Paula; Rates, Stela Maris Kuze; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate perturbations and altered neurotrophin levels have been strongly associated with the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Environmental stress is a risk factor for mood disorders, disrupting glutamatergic activity in astrocytes in addition to cognitive behaviours. Despite the negative impact of stress-induced neuropsychiatric disorders on public health, the molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the brain to stress has yet to be fully elucidated. Exposure to repeated swimming has proven useful for evaluating the loss of cognitive function after pharmacological and behavioural interventions, but its effect on glutamate function has yet to be fully explored. In the present study, rats previously exposed to repeated forced swimming were evaluated using the novel object recognition test, object location test and prepulse inhibition (PPI) test. In addition, quantification of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and protein levels, glutamate uptake, glutathione, S100B, GluN1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and calmodulin were evaluated in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after various swimming time points. We found that swimming stress selectively impaired PPI but did not affect memory recognition. Swimming stress altered the frontal cortical and hippocampal BDNF expression and the activity of hippocampal astrocytes by reducing hippocampal glutamate uptake and enhancing glutathione content in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, these data support the assumption that astrocytes may regulate the activity of brain structures related to cognition in a manner that alters complex behaviours. Moreover, they provide new insight regarding the dynamics immediately after an aversive experience, such as after behavioural despair induction, and suggest that forced swimming can be employed to study altered glutamatergic activity and PPI disruption in rodents. PMID:25444867

  18. Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Cognitive Status: The Delicate Balance Among People Living with HIV, with and without Alcohol Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Míguez-Burbano, María José; Espinoza, Luis; Whitehead, Nicole Ennis; Bryant, Vaughn E.; Vargas, Mayra; Cook, Robert L.; Quiros, Clery; Lewis, John E.; Deshratan, Asthana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The advent of combination antiretroviral therapy(cART) has lead to a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality among people living with HIV(PLWH). However, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) still remain a significant problem. One possible mechanism for the persistence of these disorders is through the effect of HIV on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF is influenced by various factors including hazardous alcohol use (HAU), which is prevalent among PLWH. This study attempts to elucidate the relationships between HAU, BDNF and HAND. Methods Cross-sectional analyses were conducted on a sample of 199 hazardous alcohol users and 198 non-HAU living with HIV. Members of each group were matched according to sociodemographic characteristics and CD4 count. Research procedures included validated questionnaires, neuropsychological assessments and a blood sample to obtain BDNF and immune measurements. Results Hazardous alcohol users showed either significantly lower or significantly higher BDNF levels compared to the Non-hazardous (OR=1,4; 95% CI: 1–2.1, p = 0.003). Therefore, for additional analyses, subjects were categorized based on BDNF values in: Group 1 < 4000, Group 2: 4001–7,999 (reference group), and Group 3 for those >8,000 pg/mL. Groups 1 and 3 performed significantly worse than those in Group 2 in the domains of processing speed, auditory-verbal and visuospatial learning and memory. Multivariate analyses confirmed that HAU and BDNF are significant contributors of HAND. Conclusion Our findings offer novel insights into the relationships between BDNF, and alcohol use among PLWH. Our results also lend support to expanding clinical movement to use BDNF as an intervention target for PLWH, in those with evidence of deficiencies, and highlight the importance of including HAU at the inception of clinical trials. PMID:25053366

  19. Neurotrophic Factor-α1 prevents stress-induced depression through enhancement of neurogenesis and is activated by rosiglitazone

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yong; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Murthy, Saravana R. K.; Senatorov, Vladimir; Thouennon, Erwan; Cawley, Niamh X.; Aryal, Dipendra K.; Ahn, Sohyun; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Wetsel, William C.; Loh, Y. Peng

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is often linked to stress. Whereas short-term stress is without effect in mice, prolonged stress leads to depressive-like behavior, indicating that an allostatic mechanism exists in this difference. Here we demonstrate that mice after short-term (1h/day for 7days) chronic restraint stress (CRS), do not display depressive-like behavior. Analysis of the hippocampus of these mice showed increased levels of neurotrophic factor-α1(NF-α1) (also known as carboxypeptidase E, CPE), concomitant with enhanced fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) expression, and an increase in neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. In contrast, after prolonged (6h/day for 21days) CRS, mice show decreased hippocampal NF-α1 and FGF2 levels and depressive-like responses. In NF-α1-knock out mice, hippocampal FGF2 levels and neurogenesis are reduced. These mice exhibit depressive-like behavior which is reversed by FGF2 administration. Indeed, studies in cultured hippocampal neurons reveal that NF-α1 treatment directly up-regulates FGF2 expression through ERK-Sp1 signaling. Thus, during short-term CRS, hippocampal NF-α1 expression is up-regulated and it plays a key role in preventing the onset of depressive-like behavior through enhanced FGF2-mediated neurogenesis. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of this pathway, we examined, rosiglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, which has been shown to have antidepressant activity in rodents and humans. Rosiglitazone up-regulates FGF2 expression in a NF-α1-dependent manner in hippocampal neurons. Mice fed rosiglitazone show increased hippocampal NF-α1 levels and neurogenesis compared to controls; thereby indicating the antidepressant action of this drug. Development of drugs that activate the NF-α1/FGF2/neurogenesis pathway can offer a new approach to depression therapy. PMID:25330741

  20. Repeated forced swimming impairs prepulse inhibition and alters brain-derived neurotrophic factor and astroglial parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Borsoi, Milene; Antonio, Camila Boque; Müller, Liz Girardi; Viana, Alice Fialho; Hertzfeldt, Vivian; Lunardi, Paula Santana; Zanotto, Caroline; Nardin, Patrícia; Ravazzolo, Ana Paula; Rates, Stela Maris Kuze; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate perturbations and altered neurotrophin levels have been strongly associated with the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Environmental stress is a risk factor for mood disorders, disrupting glutamatergic activity in astrocytes in addition to cognitive behaviours. Despite the negative impact of stress-induced neuropsychiatric disorders on public health, the molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the brain to stress has yet to be fully elucidated. Exposure to repeated swimming has proven useful for evaluating the loss of cognitive function after pharmacological and behavioural interventions, but its effect on glutamate function has yet to be fully explored. In the present study, rats previously exposed to repeated forced swimming were evaluated using the novel object recognition test, object location test and prepulse inhibition (PPI) test. In addition, quantification of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and protein levels, glutamate uptake, glutathione, S100B, GluN1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and calmodulin were evaluated in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after various swimming time points. We found that swimming stress selectively impaired PPI but did not affect memory recognition. Swimming stress altered the frontal cortical and hippocampal BDNF expression and the activity of hippocampal astrocytes by reducing hippocampal glutamate uptake and enhancing glutathione content in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, these data support the assumption that astrocytes may regulate the activity of brain structures related to cognition in a manner that alters complex behaviours. Moreover, they provide new insight regarding the dynamics immediately after an aversive experience, such as after behavioural despair induction, and suggest that forced swimming can be employed to study altered glutamatergic activity and PPI disruption in rodents.

  1. Ethanol- and acetaldehyde-induced cholinergic imbalance in the hippocampus of Aldh2-knockout mice does not affect nerve growth factor or brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Mostofa; Ameno, Kiyoshi; Ruby, Mostofa; Miki, Takanori; Tanaka, Naoko; Nakamura, Yu; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2013-11-20

    Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), play an important role in the maintenance of cholinergic-neuron function. The objective of this study was to investigate whether ethanol (EtOH)- and acetaldehyde (AcH)- induced cholinergic effects would cause neurotrophic alterations in the hippocampus of mice. We used Aldh2 knockout (Aldh2-KO) mice, a model of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2)-deficiency in humans, to examine the effects of acute administration of EtOH and the role of AcH. Hippocampal slices were collected and the mRNA and protein levels of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), NGF and BDNF were analyzed 30 min after the i.p. administration of EtOH (0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 g/kg). We show that treatment with 2.0 g/kg of EtOH decreased ChAT mRNA and protein levels in Aldh2-KO mice but not in wild-type (WT) mice, which suggests a role for AcH in the mechanism of action of EtOH. The administration of 2.0 g/kg of EtOH increased AChE mRNA in both strains of mice. EtOH failed to change the levels of NGF or BDNF at any dose. Aldh2-KO mice exhibited a distinctly lower expression of ChAT and a higher expression of NGF both at mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus compared with WT mice. Our observations suggest that administration of EtOH and elevated AcH can alter cholinergic markers in the hippocampus of mice, and this effect did not change the levels of NGF or BDNF. PMID:24096209

  2. Translating the therapeutic potential of neurotrophic factors to clinical 'proof of concept': a personal saga achieving a career-long quest.

    PubMed

    Bartus, Raymond T

    2012-11-01

    While the therapeutic potential of neurotrophic factors has been well-recognized for over two decades, attempts to translate that potential to the clinic have been disappointing, largely due to significant delivery obstacles. Similarly, gene therapy (or gene transfer) emerged as a potentially powerful, new therapeutic approach nearly two decades ago and despite its promise, also suffered serious setbacks when applied to the human clinic. As advances continue to be made in both fields, ironically, they may now be poised to complement each other to produce a translational breakthrough. The accumulated data argue that gene transfer provides the 'enabling technology' that can solve the age-old delivery problems that have plagued the translation of neurotrophic factors as treatments for chronic central nervous system diseases. A leading translational program applying gene transfer to deliver a neurotrophic factor to rejuvenate and protect degenerating human neurons is CERE-120 (AAV2-NRTN). To date, over two dozen nonclinical studies and three clinical trials have been completed. A fourth (pivotal) clinical trial has completed all dosing and is currently evaluating safety and efficacy. In total, eighty Parkinson's disease (PD) subjects have thus far been dosed with CERE-120 (some 7 years ago), representing over 250 cumulative patient-years of exposure, with no serious safety issues identified. In a completed sham-surgery, double-blinded controlled trial, though the primary endpoint (the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UDPRS) motor off score measured at 12 months) did not show benefit from CERE-120, several important motor and quality of life measurements did, including the same UPDRS-motor-off score, pre-specified to also be measured at a longer, 18-month post-dosing time point. Importantly, not a single measurement favored the sham control group. This study therefore, provided important, well-controlled evidence establishing 'clinical proof of concept' for

  3. Glucocorticoid Receptors, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Serotonin and Dopamine Neurotransmission are Associated with Interferon-Induced Depression

    PubMed Central

    Udina, M; Navinés, R; Egmond, E; Oriolo, G; Langohr, K; Gimenez, D; Valdés, M; Gómez-Gil, E; Grande, I; Gratacós, M; Kapczinski, F; Artigas, F; Vieta, E; Solà, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: The role of inflammation in mood disorders has received increased attention. There is substantial evidence that cytokine therapies, such as interferon alpha (IFN-alpha), can induce depressive symptoms. Indeed, proinflammatory cytokines change brain function in several ways, such as altering neurotransmitters, the glucocorticoid axis, and apoptotic mechanisms. This study aimed to evaluate the impact on mood of initiating IFN-alpha and ribavirin treatment in a cohort of patients with chronic hepatitis C. We investigated clinical, personality, and functional genetic variants associated with cytokine-induced depression. Methods: We recruited 344 Caucasian outpatients with chronic hepatitis C, initiating IFN-alpha and ribavirin therapy. All patients were euthymic at baseline according to DSM-IV-R criteria. Patients were assessed at baseline and 4, 12, 24, and 48 weeks after treatment initiation using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). We genotyped several functional polymorphisms of interleukin-28 (IL28B), indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO-1), serotonin receptor-1A (HTR1A), catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT), glucocorticoid receptors (GCR1 and GCR2), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5) genes. A survival analysis was performed, and the Cox proportional hazards model was used for the multivariate analysis. Results: The cumulative incidence of depression was 0.35 at week 24 and 0.46 at week 48. The genotypic distributions were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Older age (p = 0.018, hazard ratio [HR] per 5 years = 1.21), presence of depression history (p = 0.0001, HR = 2.38), and subthreshold depressive symptoms at baseline (p = 0.005, HR = 1.13) increased the risk of IFN-induced depression. So too did TCI personality traits, with high scores on fatigability (p = 0.0037, HR = 1.17), impulsiveness (p = 0.0200 HR = 1

  4. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor in autism spectrum disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhen; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Tingting; Huang, Jichong; Qu, Yi; Mu, Dezhi

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates neuronal survival and growth and promotes synaptic plasticity. Recently, researchers have begun to explore the relationship between peripheral BDNF levels and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but the findings are inconsistent. We undertook the first systematic review and meta-analysis of studies examining peripheral BDNF levels in ASD compared with healthy controls. The PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for studies published before February 2016. Fourteen studies involving 2,707 participants and 1,131 incident cases were included. The meta-analysis provided evidence of higher peripheral BDNF levels in ASD compared with controls [standardized mean difference (SMD) = 0.63, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.18–1.08; P = 0.006]. Subgroup analyses revealed higher BDNF levels in ASD compared with controls for both serum [SMD = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.11–1.04; P = 0.02] and plasma [SMD = 1.27, 95% CI = 0.92–1.61; P < 0.001]. Studies of childhood yielded similar cumulative effect size [SMD = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.31–1.26; P = 0.001], while this was not true for the studies of adulthood [SMD = 0.04, 95% CI = −1.72–1.80; P = 0.97]. This meta-analysis suggests that peripheral BDNF levels are a potential biomarker of ASD. PMID:27506602

  5. Hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates recovery from chronic stress-induced spatial reference memory deficits.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, J Bryce; Mathewson, Coy M; Hoffman, Ann N; Hanavan, Paul D; Terwilliger, Ernest F; Conrad, Cheryl D

    2014-11-01

    Chronic restraint stress impairs hippocampal-mediated spatial learning and memory, which improves following a post-stress recovery period. Here, we investigated whether brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein important for hippocampal function, would alter the recovery from chronic stress-induced spatial memory deficits. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were infused into the dorsal hippocampal cornu ammonis (CA)3 region with an adeno-associated viral vector containing the sequence for a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) directed against BDNF or a scrambled sequence (Scr). Rats were then chronically restrained (wire mesh, 6 h/day for 21 days) and assessed for spatial learning and memory using a radial arm water maze (RAWM) either immediately after stressor cessation (Str-Imm) or following a 21-day post-stress recovery period (Str-Rec). All groups learned the RAWM task similarly, but differed on the memory retention trials. Rats in the Str-Imm group, regardless of adeno-associated viral contents, committed more errors in the spatial reference memory domain on the single retention trial during day 3 than did the non-stressed controls. Importantly, the typical improvement in spatial memory following the recovery from chronic stress was blocked with the shRNA against BDNF, as Str-Rec-shRNA performed worse on the RAWM compared with the non-stressed controls or Str-Rec-Scr. The stress effects were specific for the reference memory domain, but knockdown of hippocampal BDNF in unstressed controls briefly disrupted spatial working memory as measured by repeated entry errors on day 2 of training. These results demonstrated that hippocampal BDNF was necessary for the recovery from stress-induced hippocampal-dependent spatial memory deficits in the reference memory domain.

  6. Association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism with early-onset bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nassan, Malik; Croarkin, Paul E; Luby, Joan L; Veldic, Marin; Joshi, Paramjit T; McElroy, Susan L; Post, Robert M; Walkup, John T; Cercy, Kelly; Geske, Jennifer; Wagner, Karen D; Cuellar-Barboza, Alfredo B; Casuto, Leah; Lavebratt, Catharina; Schalling, Martin; Jensen, Peter S; Biernacka, Joanna M; Frye, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met (rs6265) functional polymorphism has been implicated in early-onset bipolar disorder. However, results of studies are inconsistent. We aimed to further explore this association. Methods DNA samples from the Treatment of Early Age Mania (TEAM) and Mayo Clinic Bipolar Disorder Biobank were investigated for association of rs6265 with early-onset bipolar disorder. Bipolar cases were classified as early onset with the definition of first manic or depressive episode at age ≤ 19 years (versus adult-onset cases at age > 19 years). After quality control, 69 TEAM early-onset bipolar disorder cases, 725 Mayo Clinic bipolar disorder cases (including 189 early onset cases), and 764 controls were included in the analysis of association, assessed with logistic regression assuming log-additive allele effects. Results Comparison of TEAM cases with controls suggested association of early-onset bipolar disorder with the rs6265 minor allele [odds ratio (OR) = 1.55, p = 0.04]. Although comparison of early-onset adult bipolar disorder cases from Mayo Clinic versus controls was not statistically significant, the OR estimate indicated the same direction of effect (OR = 1.21, p = 0.19). When the early-onset TEAM and Mayo Clinic early-onset adult groups were combined and compared with the control group, the association of the minor allele rs6265 was statistically significant (OR = 1.30, p = 0.04). Conclusions These preliminary analyses of a relatively small sample with early-onset bipolar disorder are suggestive that functional variation in BDNF is implicated in bipolar disorder risk and may have a more significant role in early-onset expression of the disorder. PMID:26528762

  7. Chronic depression is associated with a pronounced decrease in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor over time.

    PubMed

    Bus, B A A; Molendijk, M L; Tendolkar, I; Penninx, B W J H; Prickaerts, J; Elzinga, B M; Voshaar, R C O

    2015-05-01

    One of the leading neurobiological hypotheses on depression states that decreased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) contributes to depression. This is supported by consistent findings of low serum BDNF levels in depressed patients compared with non-depressed controls. Whereas it has been generally assumed that this is a state characteristic of depression, strong inferences about state or trait effects require a longitudinal study design. To investigate the longitudinal association between serum BDNF and depression, we measured serum BDNF, (current and past) depression status, use of antidepressants, and all potential covariates at baseline and after 2 years in 1751 individuals, consisting of patients with an incident (n=153), remitted (n=420) and persistent depression (n=310) and non-depressed controls (n=868). We analyzed change/differences in serum BDNF across these four groups with analyses of covariance adjusted for covariates and baseline BDNF value, together with the effects of starting and stopping antidepressant treatment. Our analyses revealed a significant difference for the depression course groups (P=0.007). Compared with non-depressed controls, persistently depressed and remitted patients had a steeper decrease of BDNF levels over time (-1.33 (P=0.001) and -0.97 ng ml(-1) (P=0.011), respectively), whereas BDNF reductions in patients with incident depression were similar to those in healthy controls. Initiation or discontinuation of antidepressants was not associated with BDNF change (P=0.72). These findings suggest that BDNF not only contributes to depression, but that depression in turn may also contribute to low BDNF.

  8. Memory and brain-derived neurotrophic factor after subchronic or chronic amphetamine treatment in an animal model of mania.

    PubMed

    Fries, Gabriel R; Valvassori, Samira S; Bock, Hugo; Stertz, Laura; Magalhães, Pedro Vieira da Silva; Mariot, Edimilson; Varela, Roger B; Kauer-Sant'Anna, Marcia; Quevedo, João; Kapczinski, Flávio; Saraiva-Pereira, Maria Luiza

    2015-09-01

    Progression of bipolar disorder (BD) has been associated with cognitive impairment and changes in neuroplasticity, including a decrease in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, no study could examine BDNF levels directly in different brain regions after repeated mood episodes to date. The proposed animal model was designed to mimic several manic episodes and evaluate whether the performance in memory tasks and BDNF levels in hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala would change after repeated amphetamine (AMPH) exposure. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into subchronic (AMPH for 7 days) and chronic groups (35 days), mimicking manic episodes at early and late stages of BD, respectively. After open field habituation or inhibitory avoidance test, rats were killed, brain regions were isolated, and BDNF mRNA and protein levels were measured by quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. AMPH impaired habituation memory in both subchronic and chronic groups, and the impairment was worse in the chronic group. This was accompanied by increased Bdnf mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala region, as well as reduced BDNF protein in the hippocampus. In the inhibitory avoidance, AMPH significantly decreased the change from training to test when compared to saline. No difference was observed between subchronic and chronic groups, although chronically AMPH-treated rats presented increased Bdnf mRNA levels and decreased protein levels in hippocampus when compared to the subchronic group. Our results suggest that the cognitive impairment related to BD neuroprogression may be associated with BDNF alterations in hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases inhibitory synapses, revealed in solitary neurons cultured from rat visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Palizvan, M R; Sohya, K; Kohara, K; Maruyama, A; Yasuda, H; Kimura, F; Tsumoto, T

    2004-01-01

    To elucidate chronic actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on GABAergic synapses, we examined effects of a long-term application of BDNF for 10-15 days on autapses (synapses) of solitary GABAergic neurons cultured from rat visual cortex. Solitary neuron preparations were used to exclude a possible contamination of BDNF actions on excitatory neurons in dissociated neuron culture or slice preparations. Neurons were confirmed to be GABAergic pharmacologically with bicuculline, a selective antagonist for GABAA receptors and immunocytochemically with antibody against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, a GABA synthesizing enzyme. To evaluate GABAergic synaptic function, evoked and/or miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were recorded in the whole-cell voltage-clamp mode. The treatment with BDNF at a concentration of 100 ng/ml enhanced the amplitude of evoked IPSCs and the frequency of miniature IPSCs. In contrast, BDNF did not have a detectable effect on the amplitude of miniature IPSCs and the paired pulse ratio of IPSCs evoked by two, successive activations. To evaluate morphological changes, neurons were immunocytochemically stained with antibodies against microtubule-associated protein 2, to visualize somatodendritic region and synapsin I, to visualize presynaptic sites. The quantitative analysis indicated that BDNF increased the area of soma, the numbers of primary dendrites and dendritic branching points, the total length of dendrites and the number of synaptic sites. Such an action of BDNF was seen in both subgroups of GABAergic neurons, parvalbumin-positive and -negative neurons. To visualize functionally active presynaptic sites, neurons were stained with a styryl dye, FM1-43. BDNF increased the number of stained sites that was correlated with the frequency of miniature IPSCs. These results suggest that the chronic treatment with BDNF promotes dendritic and synaptic development of GABAergic neurons in visual cortex.

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor promotes nerve regeneration by activating the JAK/STAT pathway in Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guiting; Zhang, Haiyang; Sun, Fionna; Lu, Zhihua; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda; Lee, Yung-Chin; Wang, Guifang; Banie, Lia

    2016-01-01

    Background Radical prostatectomy (RP) carries the risk of erectile dysfunction (ED) due to cavernous nerve (CN) injury. Schwann cells are essential for the maintenance of integrity and function of peripheral nerves such as the CNs. We hypothesize that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) activates the Janus kinase (JAK)/(signal transducer and activator of transcription) STAT pathway in Schwann cells, not in neuronal axonal fibers, with the resultant secretion of cytokines from Schwann cells to facilitate nerve recovery. Methods Using four different cell lines—human neuroblastoma BE(2)-C and SH-SY5Y, human Schwann cell (HSC), and rat Schwann cell (RSC) RT4-D6P2T—we assessed the effect of BDNF application on the activation of the JAK/STAT pathway. We also assessed the time response of JAK/STAT pathway activation in RSCs and HSCs after BDNF treatment. We then assayed cytokine release from HSCs as a response to BDNF treatment using oncostatin M and IL6 as markers. Results We showed extensive phosphorylation of STAT3/STAT1 by BDNF at high dose (100 pM) in RSCs, with no JAK/STAT pathway activation in human neuroblastoma cell lines. The time response of JAK/STAT pathway activation in RSCs and HSCs after BDNF treatment showed an initial peak at shortly after treatment and then a second higher peak at 24–48 hours. Cytokine release from HSCs increased progressively after BDNF application, reaching statistical significance for IL6. Conclusions We demonstrated for the first time the indirect mechanism of BDNF enhancement of nerve regeneration through the activation of JAK/STAT pathway in Schwann cells, rather than directly on neurons. As a result of BDNF application, Schwann cells produce cytokines that promote nerve regeneration. PMID:27141442

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor as an indicator of chemical neurotoxicity: an animal-free CNS cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Woehrling, Elizabeth K; Hill, Eric J; Nagel, David; Coleman, Michael D

    2013-12-01

    Recent changes to the legislation on chemicals and cosmetics testing call for a change in the paradigm regarding the current 'whole animal' approach for identifying chemical hazards, including the assessment of potential neurotoxins. Accordingly, since 2004, we have worked on the development of the integrated co-culture of post-mitotic, human-derived neurons and astrocytes (NT2.N/A), for use as an in vitro functional central nervous system (CNS) model. We have used it successfully to investigate indicators of neurotoxicity. For this purpose, we used NT2.N/A cells to examine the effects of acute exposure to a range of test chemicals on the cellular release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). It was demonstrated that the release of this protective neurotrophin into the culture medium (above that of control levels) occurred consistently in response to sub-cytotoxic levels of known neurotoxic, but not non-neurotoxic, chemicals. These increases in BDNF release were quantifiable, statistically significant, and occurred at concentrations below those at which cell death was measureable, which potentially indicates specific neurotoxicity, as opposed to general cytotoxicity. The fact that the BDNF immunoassay is non-invasive, and that NT2.N/A cells retain their functionality for a period of months, may make this system useful for repeated-dose toxicity testing, which is of particular relevance to cosmetics testing without the use of laboratory animals. In addition, the production of NT2.N/A cells without the use of animal products, such as fetal bovine serum, is being explored, to produce a fully-humanised cellular model. PMID:24512234

  12. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Signaling Does Not Stimulate Subventricular Zone Neurogenesis in Adult Mice and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Galvão, Rui P.; Garcia-Verdugo, José Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    In rodents, the adult subventricular zone (SVZ) generates neuroblasts which migrate to the olfactory bulb (OB) and differentiate into interneurons. Recent work suggests that the neurotrophin Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) can enhance adult SVZ neurogenesis, but the mechanism by which it acts is unknown. Here, we analyzed the role of BDNF and its receptor TrkB in adult SVZ neurogenesis. We found that TrkB is the most prominent neurotrophin receptor in the mouse SVZ, but only the truncated, kinase-negative isoform (TrkB-TR) was detected. TrkB-TR is expressed in SVZ astrocytes and ependymal cells, but not in neuroblasts. TrkB mutants have reduced SVZ proliferation and survival and fewer new OB neurons. To test if this effect is cell-autonomous, we grafted SVZ cells from TrkB knockout mice (TrkB-KO) into the SVZ of wild-type mice (WT). Grafted progenitors generated neuroblasts that migrated to the OB in the absence of TrkB. The survival and differentiation of granular interneurons and Calbindin+ periglomerular interneurons seemed unaffected by the loss of TrkB, while dopaminergic periglomerular neurons were reduced. Intra-ventricular infusion of BDNF yielded different results depending on the animal species, having no effect on neuron production from mouse SVZ, while decreasing it in rats. Interestingly, mice and rats also differ in their expression of the neurotrophin receptor, p75. Our results indicate that TrkB is not essential for adult SVZ neurogenesis and do not support the current view that delivering BDNF to the SVZ can enhance adult neurogenesis. PMID:19074010

  13. Increased serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is predictive of cocaine relapse outcomes: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    D’Sa, Carrol; Fox, Helen C.; Hong, Adam K.; Dileone, Ralph J.; Sinha, Rajita

    2011-01-01

    Background Cocaine dependence is associated with high relapse rates but few biological markers associated with relapse outcomes have been identified. Extending preclinical research showing a role for central Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in cocaine seeking, we examined whether serum BDNF is altered in abstinent, early recovering, cocaine-dependent individuals and if it is predictive of subsequent relapse risk. Methods Serum samples were collected across three consecutive mornings from 35 treatment-engaged, 3 week abstinent cocaine-dependent inpatients (17M/18F) and 34 demographically matched hospitalized healthy control participants (17M/17F). Cocaine dependent individuals were prospectively followed on days 14, 30 and 90 post-treatment discharge to assess cocaine relapse outcomes. Time to cocaine relapse, number of days of cocaine use (frequency), and amount of cocaine use (quantity) were the main outcome measures. Results High correlations in serum BDNF across days indicated reliable and stable serum BDNF measurements. Significantly higher mean serum BDNF levels were observed for the cocaine-dependent patients compared to healthy control participants (p<.001). Higher serum BDNF levels predicted shorter subsequent time to cocaine relapse (hazard ratio: HR: 1.09, p<.05), greater number of days (p<.05) and higher total amounts of cocaine used (p = .05). Conclusions High serum BDNF levels in recovering cocaine-dependent individuals are predictive of future cocaine relapse outcomes and may represent a clinically relevant marker of relapse risk. These data suggest that serum BDNF levels may provide an indication of relapse risk during early recovery from cocaine dependence. PMID:21741029

  14. Different Circulating Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Responses to Acute Exercise Between Physically Active and Sedentary Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nofuji, Yu; Suwa, Masataka; Sasaki, Haruka; Ichimiya, Atsushi; Nishichi, Reiko; Kumagai, Shuzo

    2012-01-01

    Although circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) level is affected by both acute and chronic physical activity, the interaction of acute and chronic physical activity was still unclear. In this study, we compared the serum and plasma BDNF responses to maximal and submaximal acute exercises between physically active and sedentary subjects. Eight active and 8 sedentary female subjects participated in the present study. Both groups performed 3 exercise tests with different intensities, i.e. 100% (maximal), 60% (moderate) and 40% (low) of their peak oxygen uptake. In each exercise test, blood samples were taken at the baseline and immediately, 30 and 60 min after the test. The serum BDNF concentration was found to significantly increase immediately after maximal and moderate exercise tests in both groups. In maximal exercise test, the pattern of change in the serum BDNF concentration was different between the groups. While the serum BDNF level for the sedentary group returned to the baseline level during the recovery phase, the BDNF levels for the active group decreased below the baseline level after the maximal exercise test. No group differences were observed in the pattern of plasma BDNF change for all exercise tests. These findings suggest that regular exercise facilitates the utilization of circulating BDNF during and/or after acute exercise with maximal intensity. Key points In maximal exercise test, the pattern of change in the serum BDNF concentration was different between the groups. While the serum BDNF level for the sedentary group returned to the baseline level during the recovery phase, the BDNF levels for the active group decreased below the baseline level after the maximal exercise test. No group differences were observed in the pattern of serum BDNF change for moderate or low exercise tests. No group differences were observed in the pattern of plasma BDNF change for all exercise tests. PMID:24137066

  15. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Genetically Engineered to Overexpress Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Improve Outcomes in Huntington's Disease Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Nelson, Haley; Fink, Kyle D; Cary, Whitney; Hendrix, Kyle; Annett, Geralyn; Torrest, Audrey; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Joshua; Nacey, Catherine; Pepper, Karen; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; D Anderson, Johnathon; McGee, Jeannine; Gruenloh, William; Fury, Brian; Bauer, Gerhard; Duffy, Alexandria; Tempkin, Theresa; Wheelock, Vicki; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal degenerative autosomal dominant neuropsychiatric disease that causes neuronal death and is characterized by progressive striatal and then widespread brain atrophy. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a lead candidate for the treatment of HD, as it has been shown to prevent cell death and to stimulate the growth and migration of new neurons in the brain in transgenic mouse models. BDNF levels are reduced in HD postmortem human brain. Previous studies have shown efficacy of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC)/BDNF using murine MSCs, and the present study used human MSCs to advance the therapeutic potential of the MSC/BDNF platform for clinical application. Double-blinded studies were performed to examine the effects of intrastriatally transplanted human MSC/BDNF on disease progression in two strains of immune-suppressed HD transgenic mice: YAC128 and R6/2. MSC/BDNF treatment decreased striatal atrophy in YAC128 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also significantly reduced anxiety as measured in the open-field assay. Both MSC and MSC/BDNF treatments induced a significant increase in neurogenesis-like activity in R6/2 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also increased the mean lifespan of the R6/2 mice. Our genetically modified MSC/BDNF cells set a precedent for stem cell-based neurotherapeutics and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. These cells provide a platform delivery system for future studies involving corrective gene-editing strategies. PMID:26765769

  16. Protecting Neural Structures and Cognitive Function During Prolonged Space Flight by Targeting the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Molecular Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, M. A.; Goodwin, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the main activity-dependent neurotrophin in the human nervous system. BDNF is implicated in production of new neurons from dentate gyrus stem cells (hippocampal neurogenesis), synapse formation, sprouting of new axons, growth of new axons, sprouting of new dendrites, and neuron survival. Alterations in the amount or activity of BDNF can produce significant detrimental changes to cortical function and synaptic transmission in the human brain. This can result in glial and neuronal dysfunction, which may contribute to a range of clinical conditions, spanning a number of learning, behavioral, and neurological disorders. There is an extensive body of work surrounding the BDNF molecular network, including BDNF gene polymorphisms, methylated BDNF gene promoters, multiple gene transcripts, varied BDNF functional proteins, and different BDNF receptors (whose activation differentially drive the neuron to neurogenesis or apoptosis). BDNF is also closely linked to mitochondrial biogenesis through PGC-1alpha, which can influence brain and muscle metabolic efficiency. BDNF AS A HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT COUNTERMEASURE TARGET Earth-based studies reveal that BDNF is negatively impacted by many of the conditions encountered in the space environment, including oxidative stress, radiation, psychological stressors, sleep deprivation, and many others. A growing body of work suggests that the BDNF network is responsive to a range of diet, nutrition, exercise, drug, and other types of influences. This section explores the BDNF network in the context of 1) protecting the brain and nervous system in the space environment, 2) optimizing neurobehavioral performance in space, and 3) reducing the residual effects of space flight on the nervous system on return to Earth

  17. Low-level laser therapy for traumatic brain injury in mice increases brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and synaptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Weijun; Agrawal, Tanupriya; Huang, Liyi; Gupta, Gaurav K; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-06-01

    Transcranial low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) is a new non-invasive approach to treating a range of brain disorders including traumatic brain injury (TBI). We (and others) have shown that applying near-infrared light to the head of animals that have suffered TBI produces improvement in neurological functioning, lessens the size of the brain lesion, reduces neuroinflammation, and stimulates the formation of new neurons. In the present study we used a controlled cortical impact TBI in mice and treated the mice either once (4 h post-TBI, 1-laser), or three daily applications (3-laser) with 810 nm CW laser 36 J/cm(2) at 50 mW/cm(2). Similar to previous studies, the neurological severity score improved in laser-treated mice compared to untreated TBI mice at day 14 and continued to further improve at days 21 and 28 with 3-laser being better than 1-laser. Mice were sacrificed at days 7 and 28 and brains removed for immunofluorescence analysis. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was significantly upregulated by laser treatment in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus (DG) and the subventricular zone (SVZ) but not in the perilesional cortex (lesion) at day 7 but not at day 28. Synapsin-1 (a marker for synaptogenesis, the formation of new connections between existing neurons) was significantly upregulated in lesion and SVZ but not DG, at 28 days but not 7 days. The data suggest that the benefit of LLLT to the brain is partly mediated by stimulation of BDNF production, which may in turn encourage synaptogenesis. Moreover the pleiotropic benefits of BDNF in the brain suggest LLLT may have wider applications to neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. Neurological Severity Score (NSS) for TBI mice.

  18. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism affects sympathetic tone in a gender-specific way.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chuan-Chia; Chang, Hsin-An; Chen, Tien-Yu; Fang, Wen-Hui; Huang, San-Yuan

    2014-09-01

    The Val/Val genotype of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) polymorphism (Val66Met) has been reported to affect human anxiety-related phenotypes. Substantial research has demonstrated that anxiety is associated with sympathetic activation, while sex steroid hormones have been shown to exert differential actions in regulating BDNF expression. Thus, we examined whether the BDNF variant modulates autonomic function in a gender-dependent manner. From 708 adults initially screened for medical and psychiatric illnesses, a final cohort of 583 drug-free healthy Han Chinese (355 males, 228 females; age 34.43±8.42 years) was recruited for BDNF genotyping (Val/Val: 136, 23.3%, Val/Met: 294, 50.4%, and Met/Met: 153, 26.2%). Time- and frequency-domain analyses of heart rate variability (HRV) were used to assess autonomic outflow to the heart. Significant genotype-by-gender interaction effects were found on HRV indices. Even after adjusting for possible confounders, male participants bearing the Val/Val genotype had significant increases in low frequency (LF), LF% and LF/high frequency (HF) ratio, indicating altered sympathovagal balance with increased sympathetic modulation, compared to male Met/Met homozygotes. Females, however, showed an opposite but non-significant pattern. These results suggest that the studied BDNF polymorphism is associated with sympathetic control in a gender-specific way. The findings here support the view that male subjects with the Val/Val genotype have increased risk of anxiety by association with sympathetic activation.

  19. The neuroprotective effects of preconditioning exercise on brain damage and neurotrophic factors after focal brain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Shotaro; Sakakima, Harutoshi; Sumizono, Megumi; Takada, Seiya; Terashi, Takuto; Yoshida, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-15

    Preconditioning exercise can exert neuroprotective effects after stroke. However, the mechanism underlying these neuroprotective effects by preconditioning exercise remains unclear. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of preconditioning exercise on brain damage and the expression levels of the midkine (MK) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) after brain ischemia. Animals were assigned to one of 4 groups: exercise and ischemia (Ex), no exercise and ischemia (No-Ex), exercise and no ischemia (Ex-only), and no exercise and intact (Control). Rats ran on a treadmill for 30 min once a day at a speed of 25 m/min for 5 days a week for 3 weeks. After the exercise program, stroke was induced by a 60 min left middle cerebral artery occlusion using an intraluminal filament. The infarct volume, motor function, neurological deficits, and the cellular expressions levels of MK, BDNF, GFAP, PECAM-1, caspase 3, and nitrotyrosine (NT) were evaluated 48 h after the induction of ischemia. The infarct volume, neurological deficits and motor function in the Ex group were significantly improved compared to that of the No-Ex group. The expression levels of MK, BDNF, GFAP, and PECAM-1 were enhanced in the Ex group compared to the expression levels in the No-Ex group after brain ischemia, while the expression levels of activated caspase 3 and NT were reduced in the area surrounding the necrotic lesion. Our findings suggest that preconditioning exercise reduced the infract volume and ameliorated motor function, enhanced expression levels of MK and BDNF, increased astrocyte proliferation, increased angiogenesis, and reduced neuronal apoptosis and oxidative stress. PMID:26808606

  20. Physical exercise during adolescence versus adulthood: differential effects on object recognition memory and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, M E; Nitecki, R; Bucci, D J

    2011-10-27

    It is well established that physical exercise can enhance hippocampal-dependent forms of learning and memory in laboratory animals, commensurate with increases in hippocampal neural plasticity (brain-derived neurotrophic factor [BDNF] mRNA/protein, neurogenesis, long-term potentiation [LTP]). However, very little is known about the effects of exercise on other, non-spatial forms of learning and memory. In addition, there has been little investigation of the duration of the effects of exercise on behavior or plasticity. Likewise, few studies have compared the effects of exercising during adulthood versus adolescence. This is particularly important since exercise may capitalize on the peak of neural plasticity observed during adolescence, resulting in a different pattern of behavioral and neurobiological effects. The present study addressed these gaps in the literature by comparing the effects of 4 weeks of voluntary exercise (wheel running) during adulthood or adolescence on novel object recognition and BDNF levels in the perirhinal cortex (PER) and hippocampus (HP). Exercising during adulthood improved object recognition memory when rats were tested immediately after 4 weeks of exercise, an effect that was accompanied by increased BDNF levels in PER and HP. When rats were tested again 2 weeks after exercise ended, the effects of exercise on recognition memory and BDNF levels were no longer present. Exercising during adolescence had a very different pattern of effects. First, both exercising and non-exercising rats could discriminate between novel and familiar objects immediately after the exercise regimen ended; furthermore there was no group difference in BDNF levels. Two or four weeks later, however, rats that had previously exercised as adolescents could still discriminate between novel and familiar objects, while non-exercising rats could not. Moreover, the formerly exercising rats exhibited higher levels of BDNF in PER compared to HP, while the reverse was

  1. TDP6, a brain-derived neurotrophic factor-based trkB peptide mimetic, promotes oligodendrocyte myelination.

    PubMed

    Wong, Agnes W; Giuffrida, Lauren; Wood, Rhiannon; Peckham, Haley; Gonsalvez, David; Murray, Simon S; Hughes, Richard A; Xiao, Junhua

    2014-11-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays critical roles in the development and maintenance of the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous systems (PNS). BDNF exerts its biological effects via tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). We have recently identified that BDNF promotes CNS myelination via oligodendroglial TrkB receptors. In order to selectively target TrkB to promote CNS myelination, we have used a putative TrkB agonist, a small multicyclic peptide (tricyclic dimeric peptide 6, TDP6) previously described by us that structurally mimics a region of BDNF that binds TrkB. We confirmed that TDP6 acts as a TrkB agonist as it provoked autophosphorylation of TrkB and its downstream signalling effector extracellular related-kinase 1 and 2 (Erk1/2) in primary oligodendrocytes. Using an in vitro myelination assay, we show that TDP6 significantly promotes myelination by oligodendrocytes in vitro, as evidenced by enhanced myelin protein expression and an increased number of myelinated axonal segments. In contrast, a second, structurally distinct BDNF mimetic (cyclo-dPAKKR) that targets p75NTR had no effect upon oligodendrocyte myelination in vitro, despite the fact that cyclo-dPAKKR is a very effective promoter of peripheral (Schwann cell) myelination. The selectivity of TDP6 was further verified by using TrkB-deficient oligodendrocytes, in which TDP6 failed to promote myelination, indicating that the pro-myelinating effect of TDP6 is oligodendroglial TrkB-dependent. Together, our results demonstrate that TDP6 is a novel BDNF mimetic that promotes oligodendrocyte myelination in vitro via targeting TrkB.

  2. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Genetically Engineered to Overexpress Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Improve Outcomes in Huntington's Disease Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Kari; Dahlenburg, Heather; Nelson, Haley; Fink, Kyle D; Cary, Whitney; Hendrix, Kyle; Annett, Geralyn; Torrest, Audrey; Deng, Peter; Gutierrez, Joshua; Nacey, Catherine; Pepper, Karen; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; D Anderson, Johnathon; McGee, Jeannine; Gruenloh, William; Fury, Brian; Bauer, Gerhard; Duffy, Alexandria; Tempkin, Theresa; Wheelock, Vicki; Nolta, Jan A

    2016-05-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal degenerative autosomal dominant neuropsychiatric disease that causes neuronal death and is characterized by progressive striatal and then widespread brain atrophy. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a lead candidate for the treatment of HD, as it has been shown to prevent cell death and to stimulate the growth and migration of new neurons in the brain in transgenic mouse models. BDNF levels are reduced in HD postmortem human brain. Previous studies have shown efficacy of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC)/BDNF using murine MSCs, and the present study used human MSCs to advance the therapeutic potential of the MSC/BDNF platform for clinical application. Double-blinded studies were performed to examine the effects of intrastriatally transplanted human MSC/BDNF on disease progression in two strains of immune-suppressed HD transgenic mice: YAC128 and R6/2. MSC/BDNF treatment decreased striatal atrophy in YAC128 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also significantly reduced anxiety as measured in the open-field assay. Both MSC and MSC/BDNF treatments induced a significant increase in neurogenesis-like activity in R6/2 mice. MSC/BDNF treatment also increased the mean lifespan of the R6/2 mice. Our genetically modified MSC/BDNF cells set a precedent for stem cell-based neurotherapeutics and could potentially be modified for other neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and some forms of Parkinson's disease. These cells provide a platform delivery system for future studies involving corrective gene-editing strategies. PMID:26765769

  3. MicroRNA regulation of central glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) signalling in depression.

    PubMed

    Maheu, M; Lopez, J P; Crapper, L; Davoli, M A; Turecki, G; Mechawar, N

    2015-02-17

    Although multiple studies have reported that peripheral glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is reduced in depression, cerebral GDNF signalling has yet to be examined in this condition. Here, we report an isoform-specific decrease in GDNF family receptor alpha 1 (GFRA1) mRNA expression, resulting in lowered GFRα1a protein levels in basolateral amygdala (BLA) samples from depressed subjects. Downregulation of GFRα1a was associated with increased expression of microRNAs, including miR-511, predicted to bind to long 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR)-containing transcripts (GFRA1-L) coding for GFRα1a. Transfection of human neural progenitor cells (NPCs) with a miR-511 mimic was sufficient to repress GFRA1-L/GFRα1a without altering GFRα1b, and resulted in pathway-specific changes in immediate early gene activity. Unexpectedly, GFRα1a knockdown did not reduce NPC responses to GDNF. Rather, it greatly enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling. This effect appeared to be mediated by GDNF/soluble GFRα1/neural cell adhesion molecule binding, and substituting the soluble GFRα1a/GFRα1b content of miR-511-transfected NPCs with that of controls rescued signalling. In light of previous reports suggesting that GFRα1b can inhibit GFRα1a-induced neuroplasticity, we also assessed the association between GFRα1 and doublecortin (DCX; a hyperplastic marker) in human BLA. Although controls displayed coordinated expression of GFRα1a and b isoforms and these correlated positively with DCX, the only significant association observed among depressed subjects was a strongly negative correlation between GFRα1b and DCX. Taken together, these results suggest that microRNA-mediated reductions of GFRα1a in depression change the quality, rather than the quantity, of GDNF signalling. They also suggest that central GDNF signalling may represent a novel target for antidepressant treatment.

  4. Decreased glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients with depression: a meta-analytic study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pao-Yen; Tseng, Ping-Tao

    2015-04-01

    Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been shown to promote development, differentiation, and protection of CNS neurons and was thought to play an important role in various neuropsychiatric disorders. Several studies have examined the GDNF levels in patients with depression but shown inconsistent results. In this study, we compared blood GDNF levels between depressive patients and control subjects through meta-analytic method. The effect sizes (ESs) from all eligible studies were synthesized by using a random effect model. In this meta-analysis, we included 526 patients and 502 control subjects from 12 original articles. Compared to control subjects, blood GDNF levels are significantly decreased in patients with depression (ES = -0.62, p = 0.0011). However, significant heterogeneity was found among included studies. Through subgroup analysis, we found that GDNF was still decreased in studies with major depressive disorder (ES = -0.73, p = 0.0001); in studies with non-old-age depression (ES = -1.25, p = 0.0001), but not with old-age depression; and in studies using serum samples (ES = -0.86, p < 0.0001), but not in studies using plasma sample. Meta-regression did not show moderating effects of mean age of subjects, gender distribution, and age of onset of depression. Our findings support blood GDNF levels as a biomarker of depression as a whole, but the results were modulated by psychiatric diagnosis, age of included subjects, and sampling sources. With these results, future studies are required to examine whether effective antidepressant treatment is associated with an increase in serum GDNF levels.

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor as an indicator of chemical neurotoxicity: an animal-free CNS cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Woehrling, Elizabeth K; Hill, Eric J; Nagel, David; Coleman, Michael D

    2013-12-01

    Recent changes to the legislation on chemicals and cosmetics testing call for a change in the paradigm regarding the current 'whole animal' approach for identifying chemical hazards, including the assessment of potential neurotoxins. Accordingly, since 2004, we have worked on the development of the integrated co-culture of post-mitotic, human-derived neurons and astrocytes (NT2.N/A), for use as an in vitro functional central nervous system (CNS) model. We have used it successfully to investigate indicators of neurotoxicity. For this purpose, we used NT2.N/A cells to examine the effects of acute exposure to a range of test chemicals on the cellular release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). It was demonstrated that the release of this protective neurotrophin into the culture medium (above that of control levels) occurred consistently in response to sub-cytotoxic levels of known neurotoxic, but not non-neurotoxic, chemicals. These increases in BDNF release were quantifiable, statistically significant, and occurred at concentrations below those at which cell death was measureable, which potentially indicates specific neurotoxicity, as opposed to general cytotoxicity. The fact that the BDNF immunoassay is non-invasive, and that NT2.N/A cells retain their functionality for a period of months, may make this system useful for repeated-dose toxicity testing, which is of particular relevance to cosmetics testing without the use of laboratory animals. In addition, the production of NT2.N/A cells without the use of animal products, such as fetal bovine serum, is being explored, to produce a fully-humanised cellular model.

  6. Sigma-1 receptor chaperone and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: emerging links between cardiovascular disease and depression.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a close relationship between depression and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although it is known that the central nervous system (CNS) contributes to this relationship, the detailed mechanisms involved in this process remain unclear. Recent studies suggest that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperone sigma-1 receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) play a role in the pathophysiology of CVD and depression. Several meta-analysis studies have showed that levels of BDNF in the blood of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are lower than normal controls, indicating that blood BDNF might be a biomarker for depression. Furthermore, blood levels of BDNF in patients with CVD are also lower than normal controls. A recent study using conditional BDNF knock-out mice in animal models of myocardial infarction highlighted the role of CNS-mediated mechanisms in the cardioprotective effects of BDNF. In addition, a recent study shows that decreased levels of sigma-1 receptor in the mouse brain contribute to the association between heart failure and depression. Moreover, sigma-1 receptor agonists, including the endogenous neurosteroid dehydroepiandosterone (DHEA) and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine, show potent cardioprotective and antidepressive effects in rodents, via sigma-1 receptor stimulation. Interestingly, agonist activation of sigma-1 receptors increased the secretion of mature BDNF from its precursor proBDNF via chaperone activity in the ER. Given the role of ER stress in the pathophysiology of CVD and MDD, the author will discuss the potential link between sigma-1 receptors and BDNF-TrkB pathway in the pathophysiology of these two diseases. Finally, the author will make a case for potent sigma-1 receptor agonists and TrkB agonists as new potential therapeutic drugs for depressive patients with CVD.

  7. Physical exercise and acute restraint stress differentially modulate hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcripts and epigenetic mechanisms in mice.

    PubMed

    Ieraci, Alessandro; Mallei, Alessandra; Musazzi, Laura; Popoli, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Physical exercise and stressful experiences have been shown to exert opposite effects on behavioral functions and brain plasticity, partly by involving the action of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Although epigenetic modifications are known to play a pivotal role in the regulation of the different BDNF transcripts, it is poorly understood whether epigenetic mechanisms are also implied in the BDNF modulation induced by physical exercise and stress. Here, we show that total BDNF mRNA levels and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 were reduced immediately after acute restraint stress (RS) in the hippocampus of mice, and returned to control levels 24 h after the stress session. On the contrary, exercise increased BDNF mRNA expression and counteracted the stress-induced decrease of BDNF transcripts. Physical exercise-induced up-regulation of BDNF transcripts was accounted for by increase in histone H3 acetylated levels at specific BDNF promoters, whereas the histone H3 trimethylated lysine 27 and dimethylated lysine 9 levels were unaffected. Acute RS did not change the levels of acetylated and methylated histone H3 at the BDNF promoters. Furthermore, we found that physical exercise and RS were able to differentially modulate the histone deacetylases mRNA levels. Finally, we report that a single treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors, prior to acute stress exposure, prevented the down-regulation of total BDNF and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, and 6, partially reproducing the effect of physical exercise. Overall, these results suggest that physical exercise and stress are able to differentially modulate the expression of BDNF transcripts by possible different epigenetic mechanisms.

  8. The neuroprotective effects of preconditioning exercise on brain damage and neurotrophic factors after focal brain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Shotaro; Sakakima, Harutoshi; Sumizono, Megumi; Takada, Seiya; Terashi, Takuto; Yoshida, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-15

    Preconditioning exercise can exert neuroprotective effects after stroke. However, the mechanism underlying these neuroprotective effects by preconditioning exercise remains unclear. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of preconditioning exercise on brain damage and the expression levels of the midkine (MK) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) after brain ischemia. Animals were assigned to one of 4 groups: exercise and ischemia (Ex), no exercise and ischemia (No-Ex), exercise and no ischemia (Ex-only), and no exercise and intact (Control). Rats ran on a treadmill for 30 min once a day at a speed of 25 m/min for 5 days a week for 3 weeks. After the exercise program, stroke was induced by a 60 min left middle cerebral artery occlusion using an intraluminal filament. The infarct volume, motor function, neurological deficits, and the cellular expressions levels of MK, BDNF, GFAP, PECAM-1, caspase 3, and nitrotyrosine (NT) were evaluated 48 h after the induction of ischemia. The infarct volume, neurological deficits and motor function in the Ex group were significantly improved compared to that of the No-Ex group. The expression levels of MK, BDNF, GFAP, and PECAM-1 were enhanced in the Ex group compared to the expression levels in the No-Ex group after brain ischemia, while the expression levels of activated caspase 3 and NT were reduced in the area surrounding the necrotic lesion. Our findings suggest that preconditioning exercise reduced the infract volume and ameliorated motor function, enhanced expression levels of MK and BDNF, increased astrocyte proliferation, increased angiogenesis, and reduced neuronal apoptosis and oxidative stress.

  9. A thermoreversible polymer mediates controlled release of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor to enhance kidney regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gheisari, Yousof; Yokoo, Takashi; Matsumoto, Kei; Fukui, Akira; Sugimoto, Naomi; Ohashi, Toya; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Hosoya, Tatsuo; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2010-08-01

    Previously, we reported that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) that were cultivated in growing embryos differentiated in an appropriate developmental milieu, thereby facilitating the development of a functional renal unit. However, this approach required transfection with an adenovirus that expressed glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to enhance the development of hMSC-derived renal tissue, and safety issues restrict the clinical use of such viral vectors. To circumvent this problem, we tested an artificial polymer as a means to diffuse GDNF. This GDNF-polymer, which exists in liquid form at 4 degrees C but becomes a hydrogel upon heating to 37 degrees C, was used as a thermoreversible switch, allowing the injection of hMSCs at low viscosity using a mouth pipette, with subsequent slow diffusion of GDNF as it solidified. The polymer, which was dissolved in a solution of GDNF at 4 degrees C and then maintained at 37 degrees C, acted as a diffuser of GDNF for more than 48 h. LacZ-transfected hMSCs and the GDNF-polymer (at 4 degrees C) were placed in the nephrogenic sites of growing rat embryos that were maintained at 37 degrees C. Forty-eight hours later, the resultant kidney anlagen were dissected out and allowed to continue developing for 6 days in vitro. Whole-organ X-Gal staining and fluorescence activated cell sorter analysis showed that the number of hMSC-derived cells was significantly increased in developed anlagen that have been generated from hMSCs plus GDNF-polymer compared with those from hMSCs plus GDNF-containing medium and was comparable to those from adenovirus-transfected hMSCs. These findings suggest that the GDNF-polymer can be used as a diffuser of GDNF for kidney organogenesis.

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic and immunologic factors: beneficial effects of riboflavin on motor disability in murine model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Naghashpour, Mahshid; Amani, Reza; Sarkaki, Alireza; Ghadiri, Ata; Samarbafzadeh, Alireza; Jafarirad, Sima; Malehi, Amal Saki

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): In the present study, C57BL/6 female mice (n=56) were used to explore the neuroprotective effects of riboflavin in motor disability of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) as a model of multiple sclerosis. Materials and Methods: The animals were assigned into 7 groups: sham-operated 1 (SO1), healthy mice receiving PBS (phosphate buffer saline); sham-operated 2 (SO2), healthy mice receiving PBS and riboflavin; sham treatment 1 (ST1), EAE mice receiving water; sham treatment 2 (ST2), EAE mice receiving sodium acetate buffer; treatment 1 (T1), EAE mice receiving interferon beta-1a (INFβ-1a); treatment 2 (T2), EAE mice receiving riboflavin; treatment 3 (T3), EAE mice receiving INFβ-1a and riboflavin. After EAE induction, scoring was performed based on clinical signs. Upon detecting score 0.5, riboflavin at 10 mg/kg of body weight and/or INFβ-1a at 150 IU/g of body weight administration was started for two weeks. The brain and spinal cord levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-17A (IL-17A) were studied using real-time PCR and ELISA methods. Results: BDNF expression and protein levels were increased in the brain and spinal cord of the T3 group compared with the other groups (P<0.01). IL-6 and IL-17A expressions were increased in the brains of the T3 and T1 groups, respectively, compared to the other groups (P<0.01). The daily clinical score was reduced significantly by riboflavin in both effector and chronic phases of the disease compared with that of the controls (P<0.05). Conclusion: Our findings showed that riboflavin is capable of suppressing the neurological disability mediated by BDNF and IL-6. PMID:27279989

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor/tropomyosin-related kinase B pathway in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okugawa, Y; Tanaka, K; Inoue, Y; Kawamura, M; Kawamoto, A; Hiro, J; Saigusa, S; Toiyama, Y; Ohi, M; Uchida, K; Mohri, Y; Kusunoki, M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Brain-derived neutrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neutrophin family that is known to activate the high-affinity tropomyosin-related receptor kinase B (TrkB). This study aimed to clarify the clinical and biological significance of the BDNF/TrkB pathway in gastric cancer. Methods: We analysed BDNF and TrkB expression in gastric cancer samples by real-time reverse transcription PCR and immunohistochemistry. To investigate the biological role of BDNF/TrkB axis, recombinant human BDNF (rhBDNF) and the Trk antagonist K252a were used for in vitro and in vivo analysis. Results: The BDNF expression at the invasive front of primary tumours was significantly elevated compared with that in the tumour core and adjacent normal mucosa. Increased BDNF expression at the invasive front was significantly correlated with factors reflecting disease progression, and poor prognosis. Increased co-expression of the BDNF/TrkB axis was significantly correlated with poor prognosis. Gastric cancer cells expressed BDNF, and administration of rhBDNF promoted proliferation, migration, invasion, and inhibition of anoikis. These effects were generally inhibited by K252a. In an in vivo assay, BDNF(+)/TrkB(+) gastric cancer cells injected into nude mice established peritoneal dissemination, whereas K252a inhibited tumour growth. Conclusion: The BDNF/TrkB pathway might be deeply involved in gastric cancer disease progression. PMID:23175149

  12. Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Modification of Epileptiform Burst Discharges in a Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Model

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhari, Sanaz; Mehrabi, Soraya; Karimzadeh, Fariba; Joghataei, Mohammad-Taghi; Khaksarian, Mojtaba; Hadjighassem, Mahmoud Reza; Katebi, Majid; Soleimani, Mansooreh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 (TGF-β1) is a pleiotropic cytokine with potent anti-inflammatory property, which has been considered as an essential risk factor in the inflammatory process of Ischemic Stroke (IS), by involving in the pathophysiological progression of hypertension, atherosclerosis, and lipid metabolisms. -509C/T TGF-β1 gene polymorphism has been found to be associated with the risk of IS. The aim of this meta-analysis was to provide a relatively comprehensive account of the relation between -509C/T gene polymorphisms of TGF-β1 and susceptibility to IS. Methods: Male Wistar rats were divided into sham (receiving phosphate buffered saline within dorsal hippocampus), pilocarpine (epileptic model of TLE), single injection BDNF (epileptic rats which received single high dose of BDBF within dorsal hippocampus), and multiple injections BDNF (epileptic rats which received BDNF in days 10, 11, 12, and 13 after induction of TLE) groups. Their electrocorticogram was recorded and amplitude, frequency, and duration of spikes were evaluated. Results: Amplitude and frequency of epileptiform burst discharges were significantly decreased in animals treated with BDNF compared to pilocarpine group. Conclusion: Our findings suggested that BDNF may modulate the epileptic activity in the animal model of TLE. In addition, it may have therapeutic effect for epilepsy. More studies are necessary to clarify the exact mechanisms of BDNF effects. PMID:27303606

  13. [Brain-derived and ciliary neurotrophic factors in patients with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Trushnikova, T N; Medvedeva, E L; Baĭdina, T V; Danilova, M A

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To study serum concentrations of BDNF and CNTF in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and compare them to clinical characteristics of MS. Material and methods. We examined 43 patients with confirmed diagnosis of MS according to McDonald's criteria with remitting type of disease course. Patients were in a stable condition and did not receive hormone treatment during the last 30 days. Serum concentrations of BDNF and CNTF were measured using ELISA. Results. Mean serum BDNF concentration was 7.9 (5.21; 14.7) ng/ml that was significantly lower (p=0.0001) compared to control values and was correlated with depression severity (r= -0.31, p=0.04) and physical asthenia (r= -0.32, p=0.04). CNTF concentration was 69.9 (31.2; 123.3) pg/ml (CNTF was not found in healthy people) and was correlated with the results of cognitive function assessment (the PASAT test) (r= -0.30, p=0.046). Conclusion. The difference in BDNF and CNTF serum concentrations between MS patients and healthy people and correlations with some clinical characteristics of MS provide evidence for the involvement of these factors in MS pathogenesis. PMID:25591532

  14. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in normal and regenerating olfactory epithelium of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Jimena Laura; Cervino, Ailen Soledad; Jungblut, Lucas David; Paz, Dante Agustín

    2015-03-01

    Olfactory epithelium has the capability to continuously regenerate olfactory receptor neurons throughout life. Adult neurogenesis results from proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells, and consequently, olfactory neuroepithelium offers an excellent opportunity to study neural regeneration and the factors involved in the maintenance and regeneration of all their cell types. We analyzed the expression of BDNF in the olfactory system under normal physiological conditions as well as during a massive regeneration induced by chemical destruction of the olfactory epithelium in Xenopus laevis larvae. We described the expression and presence of BDNF in the olfactory epithelium and bulb. In normal physiological conditions, sustentacular (glial) cells and a few scattered basal (stem) cells express BDNF in the olfactory epithelium as well as the granular cells in the olfactory bulb. Moreover, during massive regeneration, we demonstrated a drastic increase in basal cells expressing BDNF as well as an increase in BDNF in the olfactory bulb and nerve. Together these results suggest an important role of BDNF in the maintenance and regeneration of the olfactory system.

  15. The effect of physical activity on the brain derived neurotrophic factor: from animal to human studies.

    PubMed

    Zoladz, J A; Pilc, A

    2010-10-01

    It is well documented that physical activity can induce a number of various stimuli which are able to enhance the strength and endurance performance of muscles. Moreover, regular physical activity can preserve or delay the appearance of several metabolic disorders in the human body. Physical exercise is also known to enhance the mood and cognitive functions of active people, although the physiological backgrounds of these effects remain unclear. In recent years, since the pioneering study in the past showed that physical activity increases the expression of the brain derived neurothophic factor (BDNF) in the rat brain, a number of studies were undertaken in order to establish the link between that neurothrophin and post-exercise enhancement of mood and cognitive functions in humans. It was recently demonstrated that physical exercise can increase plasma and/or serum BDNF concentration in humans. It was also reported that physical exercise or electrical stimulation can increase the BDNF expression in the skeletal muscles. In the present review, we report the current state of research concerning the effect of a single bout of exercise and training on the BDNF expression in the brain, in both the working muscles as well as on its concentrations in the blood. We have concluded that there may be potential benefits of the exercise-induced enhancement of the BDNF expression and release in the brain as well as in the peripheral tissues, resulting in the improvement of the functioning of the body, although this effect, especially in humans, requires more research.

  16. BDNF Val 66 Met and 5-HTTLPR genotype moderate the impact of early psychosocial adversity on plasma brain-derived neurotrophic factor and depressive symptoms: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, Arlette F; Hellweg, Rainer; Rietschel, Marcella; Treutlein, Jens; Witt, Stephanie H; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Schmidt, Martin H; Esser, Günter; Banaschewski, Tobias; Laucht, Manfred; Deuschle, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Recent studies have emphasized an important role for neurotrophins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), in regulating the plasticity of neural circuits involved in the pathophysiology of stress-related diseases. The aim of the present study was to examine the interplay of the BDNF Val⁶⁶Met and the serotonin transporter promoter (5-HTTLPR) polymorphisms in moderating the impact of early-life adversity on BDNF plasma concentration and depressive symptoms. Participants were taken from an epidemiological cohort study following the long-term outcome of early risk factors from birth into young adulthood. In 259 individuals (119 males, 140 females), genotyped for the BDNF Val⁶⁶Met and the 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms, plasma BDNF was assessed at the age of 19 years. In addition, participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Early adversity was determined according to a family adversity index assessed at 3 months of age. Results indicated that individuals homozygous for both the BDNF Val and the 5-HTTLPR L allele showed significantly reduced BDNF levels following exposure to high adversity. In contrast, BDNF levels appeared to be unaffected by early psychosocial adversity in carriers of the BDNF Met or the 5-HTTLPR S allele. While the former group appeared to be most susceptible to depressive symptoms, the impact of early adversity was less pronounced in the latter group. This is the first preliminary evidence indicating that early-life adverse experiences may have lasting sequelae for plasma BDNF levels in humans, highlighting that the susceptibility to this effect is moderated by BDNF Val⁶⁶Met and 5-HTTLPR genotype.

  17. Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) replacement attenuates motor impairments and nigrostriatal dopamine deficits in 12-month-old mice with a partial deletion of GDNF.

    PubMed

    Littrell, Ofelia M; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte; Gerhardt, Greg A; Boger, Heather A

    2013-03-01

    Glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been established as a growth factor for the survival and maintenance of dopamine (DA) neurons. In phase I clinical trials, GDNF treatment in Parkinson's disease patients led to improved motor function and GDNF has been found to be down regulated in Parkinson's disease patients. Studies using GDNF heterozygous (Gdnf(+/-)) mice have demonstrated that a partial reduction of GDNF leads to an age-related accelerated decline in nigrostriatal DA system- and motor-function and increased neuro-inflammation and oxidative stress in the substantia nigra (SN). Therefore, the purpose of the current studies was to determine if GDNF replacement restores motor function and functional markers within the nigrostriatal DA system in middle-aged Gdnf(+/-) mice. At 11months of age, male Gdnf(+/-) and wildtype (WT) mice underwent bilateral intra-striatal injections of GDNF (10μg) or vehicle. Locomotor activity was assessed weekly 1-4weeks after treatment. Four weeks after treatment, their brains were processed for analysis of GDNF levels and various DAergic and oxidative stress markers. An intrastriatal injection of GDNF increased motor activity in Gdnf(+/-) mice to levels comparable to WT mice (1week after injection) and this effect was maintained through the 4-week time point. This increase in locomotion was accompanied by a 40% increase in striatal GDNF protein levels and SN GDNF expression in Gdnf(+/-) mice. Additionally, GDNF treatment significantly increased the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the SN of middle-aged Gdnf(+/-) mice, but not WT mice, which was coupled with reduced oxidative stress in the SN. These studies further support that long-term changes related to the dysfunction of the nigrostriatal pathway are influenced by GDNF expression and add that this dysfunction appears to be responsive to GDNF treatment. Additionally, these studies suggest that long-term GDNF depletion alters the biological

  18. Altered neuronal responses and regulation of neurotrophic proteins in the medial septum following fimbria-fornix transection in CNTF- and leukaemia inhibitory factor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Thomas; Steup, Andreas; Schnell, Oliver; Schubert, Klaus Oliver; Zhi, Qixia; Guijarro, Christian; Kirsch, Matthias; Hofmann, Hans-Dieter

    2006-10-01

    Degeneration of axotomized GABAergic septohippocampal neurones has been shown to be enhanced in ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)-deficient mice following fimbria-fornix transection (FFT), indicating a neuroprotective function of endogenous CNTF. Paradoxically, however, the cholinergic population of septohippocampal neurones was more resistant to axotomy in these mutants. As leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) has been identified as a potential neuroprotective factor for the cholinergic medial septum (MS) neurones, FFT-induced responses were compared in CNTF(-/-), LIF(-/-) and CNTF/LIF double knockout mice. In CNTF(-/-) mice, FFT-induced cholinergic degeneration was confirmed to be attenuated as compared with wildtype mice. The expression of both LIF and LIF receptor beta was increased in the MS providing a possible explanation for the enhanced neuronal resistance to FFT in these animals. However, ablation of the LIF gene also produced paradoxical effects; following FFT in LIF(-/-) mice no loss of GABAergic or cholinergic MS neurones was detectable during the first postlesional week, suggesting that other efficient neuroprotective mechanisms are activated in these animals. In fact, enhanced activation of astrocytes, a source of neurotrophic proteins, was indicated by increased up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin expression. In addition, mRNA levels for neurotrophin signalling components (e.g. nerve growth factor, p75(NTR)) were differentially regulated. The positive effect on axotomized cholinergic neurones seen in CNTF(-/-) and LIF(-/-) mice as well as the increased up-regulation of astrogliose markers was abolished in CNTF/LIF double knockout animals. Our results indicate that endogenous CNTF and LIF are involved in the regulation of neuronal survival following central nervous system lesion and are integrated into a network of neurotrophic signals that mutually influence their expression and function. PMID:17074046

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor serum levels in genetically isolated populations: gender-specific association with anxiety disorder subtypes but not with anxiety levels or Val66Met polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Carlino, Davide; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Baj, Gabriele; Kulak, Karolina; d'Adamo, Pio; Ulivi, Sheila; Cappellani, Stefania; Gasparini, Paolo; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders (ADs) are disabling chronic disorders with exaggerated behavioral response to threats. This study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that ADs may be associated with reduced neurotrophic activity, particularly of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and determining possible effects of genetics on serum BDNF concentrations. In 672 adult subjects from six isolated villages in North-Eastern Italy with high inbreeding, we determined serum BDNF levels and identified subjects with different ADs subtypes such as Social and Specific Phobias (PHSOC, PHSP), Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), and Panic Disorder (PAD). Analysis of the population as a whole or individual village showed no significant correlation between serum BDNF levels and Val66Met polymorphism and no association with anxiety levels. Stratification of subjects highlighted a significant decrease in serum BDNF in females with GAD and males with PHSP. This study indicates low heritability and absence of any impact of the Val66Met polymorphism on circulating concentrations of BDNF. Our results show that BDNF is not a general biomarker of anxiety but serum BDNF levels correlate in a gender-specific manner with ADs subtypes. PMID:26539329

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor serum levels in genetically isolated populations: gender-specific association with anxiety disorder subtypes but not with anxiety levels or Val66Met polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Carlino, Davide; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Baj, Gabriele; Kulak, Karolina; d’Adamo, Pio; Ulivi, Sheila; Cappellani, Stefania; Gasparini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders (ADs) are disabling chronic disorders with exaggerated behavioral response to threats. This study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that ADs may be associated with reduced neurotrophic activity, particularly of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and determining possible effects of genetics on serum BDNF concentrations. In 672 adult subjects from six isolated villages in North-Eastern Italy with high inbreeding, we determined serum BDNF levels and identified subjects with different ADs subtypes such as Social and Specific Phobias (PHSOC, PHSP), Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), and Panic Disorder (PAD). Analysis of the population as a whole or individual village showed no significant correlation between serum BDNF levels and Val66Met polymorphism and no association with anxiety levels. Stratification of subjects highlighted a significant decrease in serum BDNF in females with GAD and males with PHSP. This study indicates low heritability and absence of any impact of the Val66Met polymorphism on circulating concentrations of BDNF. Our results show that BDNF is not a general biomarker of anxiety but serum BDNF levels correlate in a gender-specific manner with ADs subtypes. PMID:26539329

  1. Peripheral blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor in bipolar disorder: a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Munkholm, K; Vinberg, M; Kessing, L V

    2016-02-01

    Peripheral blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker related to disease activity and neuroprogression in bipolar disorder, speculated to mirror alterations in brain expression of BDNF. The research area is rapidly evolving; however, recent investigations have yielded conflicting results with substantial variation in outcomes, highlighting the need to critically assess the state of current evidence. The aims of the study were to investigate differences in peripheral blood BDNF concentrations between bipolar disorder patients and healthy control subjects and between affective states in bipolar disorder patients, including assessment of the effect of treatment of acute episodes on BDNF levels. A systematic review of English language studies without considering publication status was conducted in PubMed (January 1950-November 2014), Embase (1974-November 2014) and PsycINFO (1806-November 2014), and 35 studies comprising a total of 3798 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The results indicated that crude peripheral blood BDNF levels may be lower in bipolar disorder patients overall (Hedges' g=-0.28, 95% CI: -0.51 to -0.04, P=0.02) and in serum of manic (g=-0.77, 95% CI: -1.36 to -0.18, P=0.01) and depressed (g=-0.87, 95% CI: -1.42 to -0.32, P=0.002) bipolar disorder patients compared with healthy control subjects. No differences in peripheral BDNF levels were observed between affective states overall. Longer illness duration was associated with higher BDNF levels in bipolar disorder patients. Relatively low study quality, substantial unexplained between-study heterogeneity, potential bias in individual studies and indications of publication bias, was observed and studies were overall underpowered. It could thus not be excluded that identified differences between groups were due to factors not related to bipolar disorder. In conclusion, limitations in the evidence base prompt tempered conclusions regarding the

  2. Progesterone Increases the Release of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor from Glia via Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 (Pgrmc1)-Dependent ERK5 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chang; Cunningham, Rebecca L.; Rybalchenko, Nataliya

    2012-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) is cytoprotective in various experimental models, but our understanding of the mechanisms involved is still incomplete. Our laboratory has implicated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling as an important mediator of P4's protective actions. We have shown that P4 increases the expression of BDNF, an effect mediated by the classical P4 receptor (PR), and that the protective effects of P4 were abolished using inhibitors of Trk receptor signaling. In an effort to extend our understanding of the interrelationship between P4 and BDNF signaling, we determined whether P4 influenced BDNF release and examined the role of the classical PR and a putative membrane PR, progesterone receptor membrane component-1 (Pgrmc1), as mediators of this response. Given recent data from our laboratory that supported the role of ERK5 in BDNF release, we also tested whether P4-induced BDNF release was mediated by ERK5. In this study, we found that P4 and the membrane-impermeable P4 (P4-BSA) both induced BDNF release from cultured C6 glial cells and primary astrocytes. Both these cells lack the classical nuclear/intracellular PR but express high levels of membrane-associated PR, including Pgrmc1. Using RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Pgrmc1 expression, we determined that P4-induced BDNF release was dependent on the expression of Pgrmc1, although pharmacological inhibition of the PR failed to alter the effects of P4. Furthermore, the BDNF release elicited by P4 was mediated by ERK5, and not ERK1/2. Collectively, our data describe that P4 elicits an increase in BDNF release from glia via a Pgrmc1-induced ERK5 signaling mechanism and identify Pgrmc1 as a potential therapeutic target for future hormone-based drug development for the treatment of such degenerative diseases as Alzheimer's disease as well as other diseases wherein neurotrophin dysregulation is noted. PMID:22778217

  3. Downregulation of miR-219 enhances brain-derived neurotrophic factor production in mouse dorsal root ganglia to mediate morphine analgesic tolerance by upregulating CaMKIIγ

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xue-Ming; Cao, Shou-Bin; Zhang, Hai-Long; Lyu, Dong-Mei; Chen, Li-Ping; Xu, Heng; Pan, Zhi-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that microRNAs are functionally involved in the initiation and maintenance of pain hypersensitivity, including chronic morphine analgesic tolerance, through the posttranscriptional regulation of pain-related genes. We have previously demonstrated that miR-219 regulates inflammatory pain in the spinal cord by targeting calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gamma (CaMKIIγ). However, whether miR-219 regulates CaMKIIγ expression in the dorsal root ganglia to mediate morphine tolerance remains unclear. Results MiR-219 expression was downregulated and CaMKIIγ expression was upregulated in mouse dorsal root ganglia following chronic morphine treatment. The changes in miR-219 and CaMKIIγ expression closely correlated with the development of morphine tolerance, which was measured using the reduction of percentage of maximum potential efficiency to thermal stimuli. Morphine tolerance was markedly delayed by upregulating miR-219 expression using miR-219 mimics or downregulating CaMKIIγ expression using CaMKIIγ small interfering RNA. The protein and mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor were also induced in dorsal root ganglia by prolonged morphine exposure in a time-dependent manner, which were transcriptionally regulated by miR-219 and CaMKIIγ. Scavenging brain-derived neurotrophic factor via tyrosine receptor kinase B-Fc partially attenuated morphine tolerance. Moreover, functional inhibition of miR-219 via miR-219-sponge in naive mice elicited thermal hyperalgesia and spinal neuronal sensitization, which were both suppressed by CaMKIIγ small interfering RNA or tyrosine receptor kinase B-Fc. Conclusions These results demonstrate that miR-219 contributes to the development of chronic tolerance to morphine analgesia in mouse dorsal root ganglia by targeting CaMKIIγ and enhancing CaMKIIγ-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. PMID:27599867

  4. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Dependent cdk1 Inhibition Prevents G2/M Progression in Differentiating Tetraploid Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ovejero-Benito, María C.; Frade, José M.

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is often associated with DNA synthesis in neurons, the latter usually remaining for a long time as tetraploid cells before dying by apoptosis. The molecular mechanism preventing G2/M transition in these neurons remains unknown, but it may be reminiscent of the mechanism that maintains tetraploid retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a G2-like state during normal development, thus preventing their death. Here we show that this latter process, known to depend on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), requires the inhibition of cdk1 by TrkB. We demonstrate that a subpopulation of chick RGCs previously shown to become tetraploid co-expresses TrkB and cdk1 in vivo. By using an in vitro system that recapitulates differentiation and cell cycle re-entry of chick retinal neurons we show that BDNF, employed at concentrations specific for the TrkB receptor, reduces the expression of cdk1 in TrkB-positive, differentiating neurons. In this system, BDNF also inhibits the activity of both endogenous cdk1 and exogenously-expressed cdk1/cyclin B1 complex. This inhibition correlates with the phosphorylation of cdk1 at Tyr15, an effect that can be prevented with K252a, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor commonly used to prevent the activity of neurotrophins through their Trk receptors. The effect of BDNF on cdk1 activity is Tyr15-specific since BDNF cannot prevent the activity of a constitutively active form of cdk1 (Tyr15Phe) when expressed in differentiating retinal neurons. We also show that BDNF-dependent phosphorylation of cdk1 at Tyr15 could not be blocked with MK-1775, a Wee1-selective inhibitor, indicating that Tyr15 phosphorylation in cdk1 does not seem to occur through the canonical mechanism observed in proliferating cells. We conclude that the inhibition of both expression and activity of cdk1 through a BDNF-dependent mechanism contributes to the maintenance of tetraploid RGCs in a G2-like state. PMID:23741412

  5. Repetitive noxious neonatal stimuli increases dentate gyrus cell proliferation and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels.

    PubMed

    Malheiros, J M; Lima, M; Avanzi, R D T; Gomes da Silva, S; Suchecki, D; Guinsburg, R; Covolan, L

    2014-04-01

    Neonatal noxious stimulation has been proposed to model pain triggered by diagnostic/therapeutic invasive procedures in premature infants. Previous studies have shown that hippocampal neurogenesis rate and the behavioral repertoire of adult rats may be altered by neonatal noxious stimuli. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether noxious stimulation during neonatal period alters the nociceptive response and dentate gyrus neurogenesis when compared to rats subjected to a single noxious stimulus in late infancy. Plasma corticosterone and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were measured. Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus was evaluated in adolescent rats (postnatal day 40; P40) exposed twice to intra-plantar injections of Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) on P1 and P21 (group P1P21) or P8 and P21 (P8P21) or exposed once on P21 (pubertal). On P21, one subset of animals received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and was euthanized on P40 for identification of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus. Another subset was sampled for thermal response or plasma corticosterone measurement and hippocampal BDNF levels. Proliferative cell rate in dentate gyrus was the highest in all re-exposed groups (P < 0.001), except for P8 females (P8P21F), revealing also a sex difference, where P8P21 males showed higher rate than females (P < 0.001). Stimulated groups took longer than CTL animals to lick the paws (P < 0.001), regardless of the age when the noxious stimulus was applied. Re-exposed groups had lower corticosterone plasma level (P1P21 M and F, P8P21M) than controls. On the contrary, hippocampal BDNF was increased in males from both re-exposed groups. These results show that infant noxious stimulation in neonatally previously stimulated rats is related to high proliferation in the DG and this association seems to be modified by the animal's sex. The new generated dentate granule cells in the hippocampus may have a role in the long

  6. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) protein levels in anxiety disorders: systematic review and meta-regression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Suliman, Sharain; Hemmings, Sian M. J.; Seedat, Soraya

    2013-01-01

    Background: Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin that is involved in the synaptic plasticity and survival of neurons. BDNF is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of several neuropsychiatric disorders. As findings of BDNF levels in anxiety disorders have been inconsistent, we undertook to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that assessed BDNF protein levels in these disorders. Methods: We conducted the review using electronic databases and searched reference lists of relevant articles for any further studies. Studies that measured BDNF protein levels in any anxiety disorder and compared these to a control group were included. Effect sizes of the differences in BDNF levels between anxiety disorder and control groups were calculated. Results: Eight studies with a total of 1179 participants were included. Initial findings suggested that BDNF levels were lower in individuals with any anxiety disorder compared to those without [Standard Mean Difference (SMD) = −0.94 (−1.75, −0.12), p ≤ 0.05]. This was, however, dependent on source of BDNF protein [plasma: SMD = −1.31 (−1.69, −0.92), p ≤ 0.01; serum: SMD = −1.06 (−2.27, 0.16), p ≥ 0.01] and type of anxiety disorder [PTSD: SMD = −0.05 (−1.66, 1.75), p ≥ 0.01; OCD: SMD = −2.33 (−4.21, −0.45), p ≤ 0.01]. Conclusion: Although BDNF levels appear to be reduced in individuals with an anxiety disorder, this is not consistent across the various anxiety disorders and may largely be explained by the significantly lowered BDNF levels found in OCD. Results further appear to be mediated by differences in sampling methods. Findings are, however, limited by the lack of research in this area, and given the potential for BDNF as a biomarker of anxiety disorders, it would be useful to clarify the relationship further. PMID:23908608

  7. Proliferative responses and binding properties of hematopoietic cells transfected with low-affinity receptors for leukemia inhibitory factor, oncostatin M, and ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed Central

    Gearing, D P; Ziegler, S F; Comeau, M R; Friend, D; Thoma, B; Cosman, D; Park, L; Mosley, B

    1994-01-01

    Specific low-affinity receptors for leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), oncostatin M (OSM; gp130), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF; receptor alpha, CNTFR alpha) may be utilized in various combinations to generate high-affinity binding sites and signal transduction. We have tested the ability of combinations of these receptors to transduce a proliferative signal in BAF-B03 cells. Coexpression of the LIF receptor and gp130 in these cells conferred high-affinity LIF and OSM binding and responsiveness to LIF and OSM. These cells also responded to CNTF in the absence of detectable binding. The further addition of CNTFR alpha conferred high-affinity CNTF binding and enhanced responsiveness to CNTF but did not modify responses to LIF or OSM. Coexpression of LIF receptor and CNTFR alpha resulted in a nonfunctional high-affinity binding site. These data are consistent with a role for the CNTFR alpha in enhancing CNTF action but the CNTFR alpha is not absolutely required for CNTF action and suggest a wider range of targets for CNTF. PMID:8302840

  8. Effects of doxepin on brain-derived neurotrophic factor, tumor necrosis factor alpha, mitogen-activated protein kinase 14, and AKT1 genes expression in rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Eidelkhani, Nastaran; Radahmadi, Maryam; Kazemi, Mohammad; Rafiee, Laleh; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Reisi, Parham

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that doxepin in addition to enhancement of noradrenaline and serotonin levels may have neuroprotective effects. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of doxepin on gene expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), mitogen-activated protein kinase 14 (MAPK14), and serine-threonine protein kinase AKT1 in rat hippocampus. Materials and Methods: Male rats were divided randomly into three groups: Control, doxepin 1 mg/kg, and doxepin 5 mg/kg. Rats received an i.p injection of doxepin for 21 days. Then the hippocampi were dissected for the measurement of the expression of BDNF, TNF-α, MAPK14, and AKT1 genes. Results: Our results showed no significant effects of doxepin on gene expression of BDNF, TNF-α, MAPK14, and AKT1 genes in the hippocampus. Conclusions: These results did not show significant effects of doxepin on the genes that affect the neuronal survival in intact animals. However, more studies need to be done, especially in models associated with neuronal damage. PMID:26601091

  9. Evaluation of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor and memory in adult rats survivors of the neonatal meningitis by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Lemos, Joelson C; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Carradore, Mirelle M; Moreira, Ana Paula; Collodel, Allan; Zanatta, Jessiele R; Valvassori, Samira S; Quevedo, João

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) is a major cause of severe morbidity and mortality in neonates and young infants, causing sepsis, pneumonia and meningitis. The survivors from this meningitis can suffer serious long-term neurological consequences, such as, seizures, hearing loss, learning and memory impairments. Neurotrophins, such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) control the neuronal cell death during the brain development and play an important role in neuronal differentiation, survival and growth of neurons. Neonate Wistar rats, received either 10μL of sterile saline as a placebo or an equivalent volume of GBS suspension at a concentration of 1×10(6)cfu/mL. Sixty days after induction of meningitis, the animals underwent behavioral tests, after were killed and the hippocampus and cortex were retired for analyze of the BDNF and NGF levels. In the open-field demonstrated no difference in motor, exploratory activity and habituation memory between the groups. The step-down inhibitory avoidance, when we evaluated the long-term memory at 24h after training session, we found that the meningitis group had a decrease in aversive memory when compared with the long-term memory test of the sham group. BDNF levels decreased in hippocampus and cortex; however the NGF levels decreased only in hippocampus. These findings suggest that the meningitis model could be a good research tool for the study of the biological mechanisms involved in the behavioral alterations secondary to GBS meningitis.

  10. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor TrkB is critical for the acquisition but not expression of conditioned incentive value.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alexander W; Chen, Xi; Crombag, Hans S; Zhang, Chao; Smith, Dani R; Shokat, Kevan M; Gallagher, Michela; Holland, Peter C; Ginty, David D

    2008-09-01

    Stimuli paired with reward acquire incentive properties that are important for many aspects of motivated behavior, such as feeding and drug-seeking. Here we used a novel chemical-genetic strategy to determine the role of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) receptor TrkB, known to be critical to many aspects of neural development and plasticity, during acquisition and expression of positive incentive value by a cue paired with food. We assessed that cue's learned incentive value in a conditioned reinforcement task, in which its ability to reinforce instrumental responding later, in the absence of food itself, was examined. In TrkB (F616A) knock-in mice, TrkB kinase activity was suppressed by administering the TrkB inhibitor 1NMPP1 during the period of initial cue incentive learning only (i.e. Pavlovian training), during nose-poke conditioned reinforcement testing only, during both phases, or during neither phase. All mice acquired cue-food associations as indexed by approach responses. However, TrkB (F616A) mice that received 1NMPP1 during initial cue incentive learning failed to show conditioned reinforcement of nose-poking, regardless of their treatment in testing, whereas administration of 1NMMP1 only during the testing phase had no effect. The effects of 1NMPP1 administration were due to inhibition of TrkB(F616A), because the performance of wild-type mice was unaffected by administration of the compound during either phase. These data indicate that BDNF or NT4 signaling through TrkB receptors is required for the acquisition of positive incentive value, but is not needed for the expression of previously acquired incentive value in the reinforcement of instrumental behavior.

  11. Expansion of the dentate mossy fiber-CA3 projection in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor-enriched mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Isgor, C; Pare, C; McDole, B; Coombs, P; Guthrie, K

    2015-03-12

    Structural changes that alter hippocampal functional circuitry are implicated in learning impairments, mood disorders and epilepsy. Reorganization of mossy fiber (MF) axons from dentate granule cells is one such form of plasticity. Increased neurotrophin signaling is proposed to underlie MF plasticity, and there is evidence to support a mechanistic role for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in this process. Transgenic mice overexpressing BDNF in the forebrain under the α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II promoter (TgBDNF mice) exhibit spatial learning deficits at 2-3months of age, followed by the emergence of spontaneous seizures at ∼6months. These behavioral changes suggest that chronic increases in BDNF progressively disrupt hippocampal functional organization. To determine if the dentate MF pathway is structurally altered in this strain, the present study employed Timm staining and design-based stereology to compare MF distribution and projection volumes in transgenic and wild-type mice at 2-3months, and at 6-7months. Mice in the latter age group were assessed for seizure vulnerability with a low dose of pilocarpine given 2h before euthanasia. At 2-3months, TgBDNF mice showed moderate expansion of CA3-projecting MFs (∼20%), with increased volumes measured in the suprapyramidal (SP-MF) and intra/infrapyramidal (IIP-MF) compartments. At 6-7months, a subset of transgenic mice exhibited increased seizure susceptibility, along with an increase in IIP-MF volume (∼30%). No evidence of MF sprouting was seen in the inner molecular layer. Additional stereological analyses demonstrated significant increases in molecular layer (ML) volume in TgBDNF mice at both ages, as well as an increase in granule cell number by 8months of age. Collectively, these results indicate that sustained increases in endogenous BDNF modify dentate structural organization over time, and may thereby contribute to the development of pro-epileptic circuitry.

  12. Role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the excitatory–inhibitory imbalance during the critical period of postnatal respiratory development in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiu-ping; Zhang, Hanmeng; Wong-Riley, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The critical period of respiratory development in rats is a narrow window toward the end of the second postnatal week (P12–13), when abrupt neurochemical, electrophysiological, and ventilatory changes occur, when inhibition dominates over excitation, and when the animals’ response to hypoxia is the weakest. The goal of this study was to further test our hypothesis that a major mechanism underlying the synaptic imbalance during the critical period is a reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its TrkB receptors. Our aims were to determine (1) that the inhibitory dominance observed in hypoglossal motoneurons during the critical period was also demonstrable in a key respiratory chemosensor, NTSVL; (2) if in vivo application of a TrkB agonist, 7,8-DHF, would prevent, but a TrkB antagonist, ANA-12, would accentuate the synaptic imbalance; and (3) if hypoxia would also heighten the imbalance. Our results indicate that (1) the synaptic imbalance was evident in the NTSVL during the critical period; (2) intraperitoneal injections of 7,8-DHF prevented the synaptic imbalance during the critical period, whereas ANA-12 in vivo accentuated such an imbalance; and (3) acute hypoxia induced the weakest response in both the amplitude and frequency of sEPSCs during the critical period, but it increased the frequency of sIPSCs during the critical period. Thus, our findings are consistent with and strengthen our hypothesis that BDNF and TrkB play a significant role in inducing a synaptic imbalance during the critical period of respiratory development in the rat. PMID:26603459

  13. Effects of increased opportunity for physical exercise and learning experiences on recognition memory and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in brain and serum of rats.

    PubMed

    Vedovelli, K; Silveira, E; Velho, E; Stertz, L; Kapczinski, F; Schröder, N; Bromberg, E

    2011-12-29

    Studies with animal models showed that cellular, structural, and behavioral changes induced by environmental enrichment are related to increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the brain. These evidence suggest that BDNF could be an interesting biomarker of the effects of lifestyle on cognition and other behavioral parameters in humans, mainly if the BDNF alterations in brain are accompanied by correspondent peripheral modifications, since human studies depend basically on the evaluation of this neurotrophin in serum or plasma. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the effects of environmental enrichment on long-term memory for object recognition and on BDNF levels of hippocampus, frontal cortex, and serum of rats exposed to an experimental protocol that could be more easily translated to human intervention studies. Animals were maintained for 10 weeks in a social (standard laboratory conditions) or enriched (increased opportunity for physical exercise and learning experiences) condition. In the 7th week, they were submitted to behavioral testing (open field and novel object memory task), and at the end of the 10th week, they were killed and BDNF levels were analyzed. Animals maintained in the enriched condition showed enhanced performance on the memory task in the absence of any significant alteration in central or peripheral BDNF levels. The results of this study are important to highlight the need to develop experimental protocols using animal models that more closely resemble the characteristics of studies with humans and motivate more investigations to determine the conditions under which BDNF could be a biomarker of the effects of environment enrichment.

  14. Association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) haploinsufficiency with lower adaptive behaviour and reduced cognitive functioning in WAGR/11p13 deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Han, Joan C; Thurm, Audrey; Golden Williams, Christine; Joseph, Lisa A; Zein, Wadih M; Brooks, Brian P; Butman, John A; Brady, Sheila M; Fuhr, Shannon R; Hicks, Melanie D; Huey, Amanda E; Hanish, Alyson E; Danley, Kristen M; Raygada, Margarita J; Rennert, Owen M; Martinowich, Keri; Sharp, Stephen J; Tsao, Jack W; Swedo, Susan E

    2013-01-01

    In animal studies, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an important regulator of central nervous system development and synaptic plasticity. WAGR (Wilms tumour, Aniridia, Genitourinary anomalies, and mental Retardation) syndrome is caused by 11p13 deletions of variable size near the BDNF locus and can serve as a model for studying human BDNF haploinsufficiency (+/-). We hypothesized that BDNF+/- would be associated with more severe cognitive impairment in subjects with WAGR syndrome. Twenty-eight subjects with WAGR syndrome (6-28 years), 12 subjects with isolated aniridia due to PAX6 mutations/microdeletions (7-54 years), and 20 healthy controls (4-32 years) received neurocognitive assessments. Deletion boundaries for the subjects in the WAGR group were determined by high-resolution oligonucleotide array comparative genomic hybridization. Within the WAGR group, BDNF+/- subjects (n = 15), compared with BDNF intact (+/+) subjects (n = 13), had lower adaptive behaviour (p = .02), reduced cognitive functioning (p = .04), higher levels of reported historical (p = .02) and current (p = .02) social impairment, and higher percentage meeting cut-off score for autism (p = .047) on Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised. These differences remained nominally significant after adjusting for visual acuity. Using diagnostic measures and clinical judgement, 3 subjects (2 BDNF+/- and 1 BDNF+/+) in the WAGR group (10.7%) were classified with autism spectrum disorder. A comparison group of visually impaired subjects with isolated aniridia had cognitive functioning comparable to that of healthy controls. In summary, among subjects with WAGR syndrome, BDNF+/- subjects had a mean Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Compose score that was 14-points lower and a mean intelligence quotient (IQ) that was 20-points lower than BDNF+/+ subjects. Our findings support the hypothesis that BDNF plays an important role in human neurocognitive development.

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced tropomyosin-related kinase B (Trk B) signaling is a potential therapeutic target for peritoneal carcinomatosis arising from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Saigusa, Susumu; Kawamura, Mikio; Araki, Toshimitsu; Uchida, Keiichi; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Tropomyosin-related receptor kinase B (TrkB) signaling, stimulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) ligand, promotes tumor progression, and is related to the poor prognosis of various malignancies. We sought to examine the clinical relevance of BDNF/TrkB expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues, its prognostic value for CRC patients, and its therapeutic potential in vitro and in vivo. Two hundred and twenty-three CRC patient specimens were used to determine both BDNF and TrkB mRNA levels. The expression of these proteins in their primary and metastatic tumors was investigated by immunohistochemistry. CRC cell lines and recombinant BDNF and K252a (a selective pharmacological pan-Trk inhibitor) were used for in vitro cell viability, migration, invasion, anoikis resistance and in vivo peritoneal metastasis assays. Tissue BDNF mRNA was associated with liver and peritoneal metastasis. Tissue TrkB mRNA was also associated with lymph node metastasis. The co-expression of BDNF and TrkB was associated with liver and peritoneal metastasis. Patients with higher BDNF, TrkB, and co-expression of BDNF and TrkB had a significantly poor prognosis. BDNF increased tumor cell viability, migration, invasion and inhibited anoikis in the TrkB-expressing CRC cell lines. These effects were suppressed by K252a. In mice injected with DLD1 co-expressing BDNF and TrkB, and subsequently treated with K252a, peritoneal metastatic nodules was found to be reduced, as compared with control mice. BDNF/TrkB signaling may thus be a potential target for treating peritoneal carcinomatosis arising from colorectal cancer.

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val(66)Met polymorphism differentially predicts hippocampal function in medication-free patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, D P; Ianni, A M; Wei, S-M; Kohn, P D; Kolachana, B; Apud, J; Weinberger, D R; Berman, K F

    2013-06-01

    A Val(66)Met single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene impairs activity-dependent BDNF release in cultured hippocampal neurons and predicts impaired memory and exaggerated basal hippocampal activity in healthy humans. Several clinical genetic association studies along with multi-modal evidence for hippocampal dysfunction in schizophrenia indirectly suggest a relationship between schizophrenia and genetically determined BDNF function in the hippocampus. To directly test this hypothesized relationship, we studied 47 medication-free patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 74 healthy comparison individuals with genotyping for the Val(66)Met SNP and [(15)O]H(2)O positron emission tomography (PET) to measure resting and working memory-related hippocampal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). In patients, harboring a Met allele was associated with significantly less hippocampal rCBF. This finding was opposite to the genotype effect seen in healthy participants, resulting in a significant diagnosis-by-genotype interaction. Exploratory analyses of interregional resting rCBF covariation revealed a specific and significant diagnosis-by-genotype interaction effect on hippocampal-prefrontal coupling. A diagnosis-by-genotype interaction was also found for working memory-related hippocampal rCBF change, which was uniquely attenuated in Met allele-carrying patients. Thus, both task-independent and task-dependent hippocampal neurophysiology accommodates a Met allelic background differently in patients with schizophrenia than in control subjects. Potentially consistent with the hypothesis that cellular sequelae of the BDNF Val(66)Met SNP interface with aspects of schizophrenic hippocampal and frontotemporal dysfunction, these results warrant future investigation to understand the contributions of unique patient trait or state variables to these robust interactions.

  17. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Val66Met Polymorphism Differentially Predicts Hippocampal Function in Medication-Free Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Daniel Paul; Ianni, Angela M.; Wei, Shau-Ming; Kohn, Philip D.; Kolachana, Bhaskar; Apud, José; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Berman, Karen F.

    2012-01-01

    A Val66Met single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene impairs activity-dependent BDNF release in cultured hippocampal neurons and predicts impaired memory and exaggerated basal hippocampal activity in healthy humans. Several clinical genetic association studies, along with multi-modal evidence for hippocampal dysfunction in schizophrenia indirectly suggest a relationship between schizophrenia and genetically-determined BDNF function in the hippocampus. To directly test this hypothesized relationship, we studied 47 medication-free patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and 74 healthy comparison individuals with genotyping for the Val66Met SNP and [15O]H2O positron emission tomography (PET) to measure resting and working memory-related hippocampal regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). In patients, harboring a Met allele was associated with significantly less hippocampal rCBF. This finding was opposite to the genotype effect seen in healthy participants, resulting in a significant diagnosis-by-genotype interaction. Exploratory analyses of interregional resting rCBF covariation revealed a specific and significant diagnosis-by-genotype interaction effect on hippocampal-prefrontal coupling. A diagnosis-by-genotype interaction was also found for working-memory related hippocampal rCBF change, which was uniquely attenuated in Met allele-carrying patients. Thus, both task-independent and task-dependent hippocampal neurophysiology accommodates a Met allelic background differently in patients with schizophrenia than in control subjects. Potentially consistent with the hypothesis that cellular sequelae of the BDNF Val66Met SNP interface with aspects of schizophrenic hippocampal and frontotemporal dysfunction, these results warrant future investigation to understand the contributions of unique patient trait or state variables to these robust interactions. PMID:23319002

  18. The Production and Characteristics of a Mouse's Embryonic Stem Cell Lineage, Transfected by the Glia Neurotrophic Factor and Gene Fused with the Green Fluorescent Protein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Arsenieva, E. L.; Kuzmin, I. V.; Manuilova, E. S.; Novosadova, E. V.; Murkin, E. V.; Pavlova, G. V.; Tarantul, V. Z.

    2009-01-01

    The influence that the expression of the human (glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)) neurotrophic factor has on the morphology and proliferative activity of embryonic stem cells (SC) of a mouse with R1 lineage, as well as their ability to form embroid bodies (EB), has been studied. Before that, using a PCR (polymerase chain reaction) coupled with reverse transcription, it was shown that, in this very lineage of the embryonic SC, the expression of the receptors' genes is being fulfilled for the neurotropfic RET and GFRα1 glia factor. The mouse's embryonic SC lineage has been obtained, transfected by the human GDNF gene, and has been fused with the "green" fluorescent protein (GFP) gene. The presence of the expression of the human GDNF gene in the cells was shown by northern hybridization and the synthesis of its albuminous product by immunocitochemical coloration with the use of specific antibodies. The reliable slowing-down of the embriod-body formation by the embryonic SC transfected by the GDNF gene has been shown. No significant influence of the expression of the GDNF gene on the morphology and the proliferative activity of the transfected embryonic SCs has been found when compared with the control ones. PMID:22649595

  19. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial (Müller) and bipolar cells by activation of basic fibroblast growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Berk, B-A; Vogler, S; Pannicke, T; Kuhrt, H; Garcia, T B; Wiedemann, P; Reichenbach, A; Seeger, J; Bringmann, A

    2015-06-01

    Water accumulation in retinal glial (Müller) and neuronal cells resulting in cellular swelling contributes to the development of retinal edema and neurodegeneration. Intravitreal administration of neurotrophins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to promote survival of retinal neurons. Here, we show that exogenous BDNF inhibits the osmotic swelling of Müller cell somata induced by superfusion of rat retinal slices or freshly isolated cells with a hypoosmotic solution containing barium ions. BDNF also inhibited the osmotic swelling of bipolar cell somata in retinal slices, but failed to inhibit the osmotic soma swelling of freshly isolated bipolar cells. The inhibitory effect of BDNF on Müller cell swelling was mediated by activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and transactivation of fibroblast growth factor receptors. Exogenous basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) fully inhibited the osmotic swelling of Müller cell somata while it partially inhibited the osmotic swelling of bipolar cell somata. Isolated Müller cells displayed immunoreactivity of truncated TrkB, but not full-length TrkB. Isolated rod bipolar cells displayed immunoreactivities of both TrkB isoforms. Data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of exogenous BDNF in the retina is in part mediated by prevention of the cytotoxic swelling of retinal glial and bipolar cells. While BDNF directly acts on Müller cells by activation of TrkB, BDNF indirectly acts on bipolar cells by inducing glial release of factors like bFGF that inhibit bipolar cell swelling.

  20. The effects of neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor on cerebellar granule cell movement and neurite extension in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, S; Sekino, Y; Shirao, T

    2000-01-01

    Migration of the granule cells is a major stage of cerebellar maturation. Granule cells express neurotrophins and their receptors; however, their role in cell migration has not been defined. In this study we investigated the effects of exogenous neurotrophins on the movement and neurite extension of granule cells from glial-free cerebellar cell reaggregates in vitro. Our results provide direct evidence that neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor differentially affect the granule cells. Neurotrophin-3 significantly affected granule cell movements by decreasing the migration index (the ratio of the number of cells that moved further than half the neurite length) and the speed of cell soma movement, but did not affect neurite length or growth cone migration. In contrast, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-4 acted on growing neurites and growth cones by significantly increasing neurite length and the speed of growth cone migration, but had no effect either on the migration index or on the speed of the cell soma movement. The results suggest that neurotrophins differentially affect neurite extension and the movements of cerebellar granule cells. PMID:10842017

  1. AAK1 Identified as an Inhibitor of Neuregulin-1/ErbB4-Dependent Neurotrophic Factor Signaling Using Integrative Chemical Genomics and Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Kuai, Letian; Ong, Shao-En; Madison, Jon M.; Wang, Xiang; Duvall, Jeremy R.; Lewis, Timothy A.; Luce, Catherine J.; Conner, Sean D.; Pearlman, David A.; Wood, John L.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Carr, Steven A.; Scolnick, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Target identification remains a challenge for the field of chemical biology. We describe here an integrative chemical genomic and proteomic approach combining the use of differentially active analogs of small-molecule probes with stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-mediated affinity enrichment, followed by subsequent testing of candidate targets using RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing. We applied this approach to characterizing the natural product K252a and its ability to potentiate neuregulin-1 (Nrg1)/ErbB4 (v-erb-a erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 4)-dependent neurotrophic factor signaling and neuritogenesis. We show that AAK1 (adaptor-associated kinase 1) is a relevant target of K252a, and that the loss of AAK1 alters ErbB4 trafficking and expression levels providing evidence for a previously unrecognized role for AAK1 in Nrg1-mediated neurotrophic factor signaling. Similar strategies should lead to the discovery of novel targets for therapeutic development. PMID:21802010

  2. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Modulates the Transcriptional Activity of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor and Regulates Expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kino, Tomoshige; Jaffe, Howard; Amin, Niranjana D.; Chakrabarti, Mayukh; Zheng, Ya-Li; Chrousos, George P.; Pant, Harish C.

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, major end effectors of the stress response, play an essential role in the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and contribute to memory consolidation and emotional control through their intracellular receptors, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), on the other hand, plays important roles in the morphogenesis and functions of the central nervous system, and its aberrant activation has been associated with development of neurodegenerative disorders. We previously reported that CDK5 phosphorylated the glucocorticoid receptor and modulated its transcriptional activity. Here we found that CDK5 also regulated mineralocorticoid receptor-induced transcriptional activity by phosphorylating multiple serine and threonine residues located in its N-terminal domain through physical interaction. Aldosterone and dexamethasone, respectively, increased and suppressed mRNA/protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat cortical neuronal cells, whereas the endogenous glucocorticoid corticosterone showed a biphasic effect. CDK5 enhanced the effect of aldosterone and dexamethasone on BDNF expression. Because this neurotrophic factor plays critical roles in neuronal viability, synaptic plasticity, consolidation of memory, and emotional changes, we suggest that aberrant activation of CDK5 might influence these functions through corticosteroid receptors/BDNF. PMID:20357208

  3. Targeting neurotrophic factors and their receptors, but not cholinesterase or neurotransmitter, in the neurotoxicity of TDCPP in Chinese rare minnow adults (Gobiocypris rarus).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lilai; Li, Jiasu; Zha, Jinmiao; Wang, Zijian

    2016-01-01

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been detected at high concentrations in various environmental and biotic samples, but little is known about their toxicity. In this study, the potential neurotoxicity of three OPFRs (TCEP, TDCPP, and TPP) and Chlorpyrifos (CPF, an organophosphate pesticide) were compared in Chinese rare minnow using an acute toxicity test and a 21-day fish assay. The acute test demonstrated significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) by CPF. Although significant AChE inhibition at high concentration of TPP was also observed, none of the OPFRs had effects similar to CPF on these enzymes, indicating that their acute toxicities to Chinese rare minnow may be unrelated to cholinesterase inhibition. In addition, the 21-day fish assay with TDCPP demonstrated no significant effects on cholinesterase activities or neurotransmitter levels. Nonetheless, this OPFR exhibited widespread effects on the neurotrophic factors and their receptors (e.g., ntf3, ntrk1, ntrk2, ngfr, and fgf2, fgf11, fgf22, fgfr4), indicating that TDCPP or other OPFRs may elicit neurological effects by targeting neurotrophic factors and their receptors in Chinese rare minnow. PMID:26552522

  4. Intraspinal rewiring of the corticospinal tract requires target-derived brain-derived neurotrophic factor and compensates lost function after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Masaki; Hayano, Yasufumi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2012-04-01

    Brain injury that results in an initial behavioural deficit is frequently followed by spontaneous recovery. The intrinsic mechanism of this functional recovery has never been fully understood. Here, we show that reorganization of the corticospinal tract induced by target-derived brain-derived neurotrophic factor is crucial for spontaneous recovery of motor function following brain injury. After destruction of unilateral sensorimotor cortex, intact-side corticospinal tract formed sprouting fibres into the specific lamina of the denervated side of the cervical spinal cord, and made new contact with two types of spinal interneurons-segmental and propriospinal neurons. Anatomical and electrophysiological analyses revealed that this rewired corticospinal tract functionally linked to motor neurons and forelimb muscles. This newly formed corticospinal circuit was necessary for motor recovery, because transection of the circuit led to impairment of recovering forelimb function. Knockdown of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the spinal neurons or its receptor in the intact corticospinal neurons diminished fibre sprouting of the corticospinal tract. Our findings establish the anatomical, functional and molecular basis for the intrinsic capacity of neurons to form compensatory neural network following injury.

  5. Combination of chondroitinase ABC, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and Nogo A antibody delayed-release microspheres promotes the functional recovery of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Zuchao; Qiu, Guixing; Song, Yueming

    2013-11-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most devastating injuries for patients. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is an important neurotrophic factor for the regeneration of the spinal neuraxial bundle, but GDNF would degrade rapidly if the protein was injected into the site of injury; thus, it cannot exert its fullest effects. Therefore, we introduced a delivery system of GDNF, poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) delayed-release microspheres, in the current study and observed the effect of PLGA-GDNF and the combination of PLGA-GDNF and another 2 agents PLGA-chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) and PLGA-Nogo A antibody in the treatment of SCI rats. Our results showed that PLGA-GDNF and the combination of chABC, GDNF, and Nogo A antibody microspheres could elevate the locomotor scores of SCI rats. The effect of PLGA-GDNF was much better than that of GDNF. The cortical somatosensory evoked potential was also improved by PLGA-GDNF and the combination of chABC, GDNF, and Nogo A antibody microspheres. Our results suggest that PLGA delayed-release microsphere may be a useful and effective tool in delivering protein agents into the injury sites of patients with SCI. This novel combination therapy may provide a new idea in promoting the functional recovery of the damaged spinal cord.

  6. Angelica injection promotes peripheral nerve structure and function recovery with increased expressions of nerve growth factor and brain derived neurotrophic factor in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruilin; Zhang, Junjian; Zhang, Lei; Cui, Qin; Liu, Hui

    2010-08-01

    Several nervous system injury models, such as sciatic crush and chronic cerebral hypoperfusion have been well studied in terms of neuroprotective effect of angelica injection. However, definitive experimental studies are lacking on diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). This study sought to investigate the effects of angelica injection on DPN in type 1 diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). To examine whether DPN model succeeded, tail-flick latency (TFL) and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) were measured at 6 weeks after diabetes induction. Then, diabetic rats were treated with high- and low-dose angelica injection for 4 weeks. TFL, MNCV, morphology of sciatic nerve, myelinated nerve fiber density and the expressions of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in soleus and sciatic nerve were measured at 10 weeks after diabetes induction. The results showed the TFL was significantly shortened (p<0.001) and the MNCV was reduced (p<0.01) in diabetic rats compared with normal control rats at 6 weeks after diabetes induction. The TFL was obviously prolonged and the MNCV was further reduced in diabetic control group at 10 weeks after diabetes induction. TFL, MNCV and morphology of sciatic nerve were remarkably ameliorated and myelinated nerve fiber density and the expressions of NGF and BDNF in soleus and sciatic nerve were increased in the angelica treatment groups. This study suggests angelica injection has potential therapeutic effects on DPN, and the mechanism might be related to direct increase in NGF expression and direct or indirect increase in BDNF expression.

  7. In Vivo Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Dorsal Root Ganglia Is Mediated by Nerve Growth Factor-Triggered Akt Activation during Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Li-Ya; Yu, Sharon J.; Kay, Jarren C.; Xia, Chun-Mei

    2013-01-01

    The role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in sensory hypersensitivity has been suggested; however the molecular mechanisms and signal transduction that regulate BDNF expression in primary afferent neurons during visceral inflammation are not clear. Here we used a rat model of cystitis and found that the mRNA and protein levels of BDNF were increased in the L6 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in response to bladder inflammation. BDNF up-regulation in the L6 DRG was triggered by endogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) because neutralization of NGF with a specific NGF antibody reduced BDNF levels during cystitis. The neutralizing NGF antibody also subsequently reduced cystitis-induced up-regulation of the serine/threonine kinase Akt activity in L6 DRG. To examine whether the NGF-induced Akt activation led to BDNF up-regulation in DRG in cystitis, we found that in cystitis the phospho-Akt immunoreactivity was co-localized with BDNF in L6 DRG, and prevention of the endogenous Akt activity in the L6 DRG by inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) with a potent inhibitor LY294002 reversed cystitis-induced BDNF up-regulation. Further study showed that application of NGF to the nerve terminals of the ganglion-nerve two-compartmented preparation enhanced BDNF expression in the DRG neuronal soma; which was reduced by pre-treatment of the ganglia with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and wortmannin. These in vivo and in vitro experiments indicated that NGF played an important role in the activation of Akt and subsequent up-regulation of BDNF in the sensory neurons in visceral inflammation such as cystitis. PMID:24303055

  8. Single eight-hour shift of light-dark cycle increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein levels in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Sei, Hiroyoshi; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Morita, Kyoji; Kitahama, Kunio; Morita, Yusuke

    2003-05-23

    We previously reported that an eight hour phase advance in the light-dark (LD) cycle increases sleep in rats. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is suggested to be one of the sleep and circadian regulating factors. We have therefore observed the responses of BDNF protein in the hippocampus, cerebellum and brainstem under conditions of LD change. BDNF protein was quantitatively measured using an ELISA kit. Under an 8-h LD phase advance, the levels of hippocampal BDNF were significantly increased on the day of the phase change, while the levels in the cerebellum and brainstem remained constant. Plasma corticosterone levels were not largely affected. Thus, a single LD shift acutely affects hippocampal BDNF metabolism with no large stress response. PMID:12726886

  9. What keeps a body moving? The brain-derived neurotrophic factor val66met polymorphism and intrinsic motivation to exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Caldwell Hooper, Ann E; Bryan, Angela D; Hagger, Martin S

    2014-12-01

    Individuals who are intrinsically motivated to exercise are more likely to do so consistently. In previous research, those with at least one copy of the methionine (met) allele in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF; rs6265) had greater increases in positive mood and lower perceived exertion during exercise. This study examined whether genotype for BDNF is also related to intrinsic motivation, measured by self-report during a treadmill exercise session and a free-choice behavioral measure (continuing to exercise given the option to stop) among 89 regular exercisers (age M = 23.58, SD = 3.95). Those with at least one copy of the met allele reported greater increases in intrinsic motivation during exercise and were more likely to continue exercising when given the option to stop (55 vs. 33%). Results suggest that underlying genetic factors may partially influence perceptions of inherent rewards associated with exercise and might inform the development of individually targeted interventions. PMID:24805993

  10. What keeps a body moving? The brain-derived neurotrophic factor val66met polymorphism and intrinsic motivation to exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Caldwell Hooper, Ann E; Bryan, Angela D; Hagger, Martin S

    2014-12-01

    Individuals who are intrinsically motivated to exercise are more likely to do so consistently. In previous research, those with at least one copy of the methionine (met) allele in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF; rs6265) had greater increases in positive mood and lower perceived exertion during exercise. This study examined whether genotype for BDNF is also related to intrinsic motivation, measured by self-report during a treadmill exercise session and a free-choice behavioral measure (continuing to exercise given the option to stop) among 89 regular exercisers (age M = 23.58, SD = 3.95). Those with at least one copy of the met allele reported greater increases in intrinsic motivation during exercise and were more likely to continue exercising when given the option to stop (55 vs. 33%). Results suggest that underlying genetic factors may partially influence perceptions of inherent rewards associated with exercise and might inform the development of individually targeted interventions.

  11. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene Val66Met Polymorphism Is a Risk Factor for Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in a Turkish Sample

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Onder; Basay, Burge Kabukcu; Buber, Ahmet; Basay, Omer; Alacam, Huseyin; Bacanlı, Ali; Yılmaz, Şenay Görücü; Erdal, Mehmet Emin; Ercan, Eyup Sabri

    2016-01-01

    Objective Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that negatively affects different areas of life. We aimed to evaluate the associations between the Val66Met polymorphism of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and ADHD and to assess the effect of the BDNF polymorphism on the neurocognitive profile and clinical symptomatology in ADHD. Methods Two hundred one ADHD cases and 99 typically developing subjects (TD) between the ages of 8 and 15 years were involved in the study. All subjects were evaluated using a complete neuropsychological battery, Child Behavior Checklist, the Teacher's Report Form (TRF) and the DSM-IV Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale-teacher and parent forms. Results The GG genotype was significantly more frequent in the patients with ADHD than in the TD controls, and the GG genotype was also significantly more frequent in the ADHD-combined (ADHD-C) subtype patients than in the TDs. However, there were no significant associations of the BDNF polymorphism with the ADHD subtypes or neurocognitive profiles of the patients. The teacher-assessed hyperactivity and inattention symptom count and the total score were higher, and the appropriately behaving subtest score of the TRF was lower in the GG genotypes than in the GA and AA (i.e., the A-containing) genotypes. Conclusion We found a positive association between the BDNF gene Val66Met polymorphism and ADHD, and this association was observed specifically in the ADHD-C subtype and not the ADHD-predominantly inattentive subtype. Our findings support that the Val66Met polymorphism of BDNF gene might be involved in the pathogenesis of ADHD. Furthermore Val66Met polymorphism of BDNF gene may be more closely associated with hyperactivity rather than inattention. PMID:27757130

  12. Lipid Rafts Are Physiologic Membrane Microdomains Necessary for the Morphogenic and Developmental Functions of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Cynthia C; Gabreski, Nicole A; Hein, Sarah J; Pierchala, Brian A

    2015-09-23

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes PNS development and kidney morphogenesis via a receptor complex consisting of the glycerophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored, ligand binding receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Although Ret signal transduction in vitro is augmented by translocation into lipid rafts via GFRα1, the existence and importance of lipid rafts in GDNF-Ret signaling under physiologic conditions is unresolved. A knock-in mouse was produced that replaced GFRα1 with GFRα1-TM, which contains a transmembrane (TM) domain instead of the GPI anchor. GFRα1-TM still binds GDNF and promotes Ret activation but does not translocate into rafts. In Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice, GFRα1-TM is expressed, trafficked, and processed at levels identical to GFRα1. Although Gfrα1(+/TM) mice are viable, Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice display bilateral renal agenesis, lack enteric neurons in the intestines, and have motor axon guidance deficits, similar to Gfrα1(-/-) mice. Therefore, the recruitment of Ret into lipid rafts by GFRα1 is required for the physiologic functions of GDNF in vertebrates. Significance statement: Membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts have been proposed to be unique subdomains in the plasma membrane that are critical for the signaling functions of multiple receptor complexes. Their existence and physiologic relevance has been debated. Based on in vitro studies, lipid rafts have been reported to be necessary for the function of the Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of neurotrophic factors. The receptor for GDNF comprises the lipid raft-resident, glycerophosphatidylinositol-anchored receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Here we demonstrate, using a knock-in mouse model in which GFRα1 is no longer located in lipid rafts, that the developmental functions of GDNF in the periphery require the translocation of the GDNF receptor complex

  13. The synergistic effect of nanotopography and sustained dual release of hydrophobic and hydrophilic neurotrophic factors on human mesenchymal stem cell neuronal lineage commitment.

    PubMed

    Teo, Benjamin Kim Kiat; Tan, Guo-Dong Sean; Yim, Evelyn K F

    2014-08-01

    A combination of nanotopography and controlled release is a potential platform for neuronal tissue engineering applications. Previous studies showed that combining both physical and chemical guidance was more effective than individual cues in the directional promotion of neurite outgrowth. Nanotopography can direct human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into neuronal lineage, while controlled release of neurotrophic factors can deliver temporally controlled biochemical signals. Hypothesizing that the synergistic effect will enhance neuronal lineage commitment of hMSCs, a fabrication method for multiple neurotrophic factors delivery from a single nanopatterned (350 nm gratings), poly-ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) film was developed and evaluated. Our results showed a synergistic effect on hMSC differentiation cultured on substrates with both nanotopographical and biochemical cues. The protein/drug encapsulation into PCL nanopatterned films was first optimized using a hydrophilic model protein, bovine serum albumin. The hydrophobic retinoic acid (RA) molecule was directly incorporated into PCL films. To achieve sustained release, hydrophilic nerve growth factor (NGF) was first encapsulated within polyelectrolyte complexation fibers before they were embedded within the nanopatterned PCL film. Our results showed that nanotopography on the fabricated polymer films remained intact, while release of bioactive RA and NGF was sustained over a period of 3 weeks. Under the combinatorial effect of physical and biochemical cues, we observed an enhanced upregulation of neuronal genes such as microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and neurofilament light (NFL) as compared with sustained delivery of individual cues and bolus delivery. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that MAP2 and NFL gene upregulation in hMSCs was most pronounced on the nanogratings with sustained release of both RA and NGF. The fabricated platforms supported the sustained delivery of multiple

  14. Sustained running in rats administered corticosterone prevents the development of depressive behaviors and enhances hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity without increasing neurotrophic factor levels.

    PubMed

    Yau, Suk-Yu; Li, Ang; Zhang, En-Dong; Christie, Brian R; Xu, Aimin; Lee, Tatia M C; So, Kwok-Fai

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that voluntary running acts as an anxiolytic and ameliorates deficits in hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning. It also reduces depression-like behaviors that are normally observed in rats that were administered either low (30 mg/kg) or moderate (40 mg/kg) doses of corticosterone (CORT). However, the protective effects of running were absent in rats treated with a high (50 mg/kg) dose of CORT. We examined whether allowing animals to exercise for 2 weeks prior and/or concurrently with the administration of 50 mg/kg CORT treatment could have similar protective effects. We examined hippocampal neurogenesis using immunohistochemical staining of proliferative and survival cells with the thymidine analogs (BrdU, CIdU, and IdU). In addition, we monitored synaptic protein expression and quantified the levels of neurotrophic factors in these animals as well as performing behavioral analyses (forced swim test and sucrose preference test). Our results indicate that the depressive phenotype and reductions in neurogenesis that normally accompany high CORT administration could only be prevented by allowing animals to exercise both prior to and concurrently with the CORT administration period. These animals also showed increases in both synaptophysin and PSD-95 protein levels, but surprisingly, neither brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) nor insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels were increased in these animals. The results suggest that persistent exercise can strengthen resilience to stress by promoting hippocampal neurogenesis and increasing synaptic protein levels, thereby reducing the deleterious effects of stress.

  15. Association between obesity and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene polymorphism Val66Met in individuals with bipolar disorder in Mexican population

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Marín, Mirna Edith; Genis-Mendoza, Alma Delia; Tovilla-Zarate, Carlos Alfonso; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Escamilla, Michael; Nicolini, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    Background The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been considered as an important candidate gene in bipolar disorder (BD); this association has been derived from several genetic and genome-wide studies. A polymorphic variant of the BDNF (Val66Met) confers some differences in the clinical presentation of affective disorders. In this study, we evaluated a sample population from Mexico City to determine whether the BDNF (rs6265) Val66Met polymorphism is associated with the body mass index (BMI) of patients with BD. Methods This association study included a sample population of 357 individuals recruited in Mexico City. A total of 139 participants were diagnosed with BD and 137 were classified as psychiatrically healthy controls (all individuals were interviewed and evaluated by the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies). Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was performed in 96-well plates using the TaqMan Universal Thermal Cycling Protocol. After the PCR end point was reached, fluorescence intensity was measured in a 7,500 real-time PCR system and evaluated using the SDS v2.1 software, results were analyzed with Finetti and SPSS software. Concerning BMI stratification, random groups were defined as follows: normal <25 kg/m2, overweight (Ow) =25.1–29.9 kg/m2, and obesity (Ob) >30 kg/m2. Results In the present work, we report the association of a particular BMI phenotype with the presence of the Val66Met allele in patients with BD (P=0.0033 and odds ratio [95% confidence interval] =0.332 [157–0.703]), and correlated the risk for valine allele carriers with Ow and Ob in patients with BD. Conclusion We found that the methionine allele confers a lower risk of developing Ow and Ob in patients with BD. We also confirmed that the G polymorphism represents a risk of developing Ow and Ob in patients with BD. In future studies, the haplotype analysis should provide additional evidence

  16. Protective effect of polydatin on learning and memory impairments in neonatal rats with hypoxic‑ischemic brain injury by up‑regulating brain‑derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Qu, Yunxia; He, Huiming; Fan, Xiaolei; Qin, Yuanhua; Mao, Weifeng; Xu, Lixin

    2014-12-01

    Polydatin is a key component of Polygonum cuspidatum, a herb with medical and nutritional value. The present study investigated the protective effect of polydatin against learning and memory impairment in neonatal rats with hypoxic‑ischemic brain injury (HIBI). The unilateral common carotid artery ligation method was used to generate neonatal HIBI rats. Y‑maze testing revealed that rats with HIBI exhibited memory impairment, while rats with HIBI treated with polydatin displayed enhanced long‑term learning and memory. Of note, polydatin was found to upregulate the expression of hippocampal brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rats with HIBI. BDNF has a role in protecting HIBI‑induced brain tissue injury and alleviating memory impairment. These findings showed that polydatin had a protective effect against learning and memory impairment in neonatal rats with HIBI and that the protective effect may be mediated through the upregulation of BDNF.

  17. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor interacts with adult-born immature cells in the dentate gyrus during consolidation of overlapping memories

    PubMed Central

    Bekinschtein, Pedro; Kent, Brianne A; Oomen, Charlotte A; Clemenson, Gregory D; Gage, Fred H; Saksida, Lisa M; Bussey, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    Successful memory involves not only remembering information over time but also keeping memories distinct and less confusable. The computational process for making representations of similar input patterns more distinct from each other has been referred to as “pattern separation.” Although adult-born immature neurons have been implicated in this memory feature, the precise role of these neurons and associated molecules in the processing of overlapping memories is unknown. Recently, we found that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the dentate gyrus is required for the encoding/consolidation of overlapping memories. In this study, we provide evidence that consolidation of these “pattern-separated” memories requires the action of BDNF on immature neurons specifically. PMID:24825389

  18. Protective effect of polydatin on learning and memory impairments in neonatal rats with hypoxic‑ischemic brain injury by up‑regulating brain‑derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Qu, Yunxia; He, Huiming; Fan, Xiaolei; Qin, Yuanhua; Mao, Weifeng; Xu, Lixin

    2014-12-01

    Polydatin is a key component of Polygonum cuspidatum, a herb with medical and nutritional value. The present study investigated the protective effect of polydatin against learning and memory impairment in neonatal rats with hypoxic‑ischemic brain injury (HIBI). The unilateral common carotid artery ligation method was used to generate neonatal HIBI rats. Y‑maze testing revealed that rats with HIBI exhibited memory impairment, while rats with HIBI treated with polydatin displayed enhanced long‑term learning and memory. Of note, polydatin was found to upregulate the expression of hippocampal brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rats with HIBI. BDNF has a role in protecting HIBI‑induced brain tissue injury and alleviating memory impairment. These findings showed that polydatin had a protective effect against learning and memory impairment in neonatal rats with HIBI and that the protective effect may be mediated through the upregulation of BDNF. PMID:25241777

  19. Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor improves long-term memory in APP/PS1 transgenic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease as well as in wild-type mice.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Susanna; Lindholm, Päivi; Galli, Emilia; Lahtinen, Hanna-Maija; Koivisto, Henna; Hämäläinen, Elina; Saarma, Mart; Tanila, Heikki

    2015-09-15

    Cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF) protects and repairs dopamine neurons in animal models of Parkinson's disease, which motivated us to investigate its therapeutic effect in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We employed an established APP/PS1 mouse model of AD and gave intrahippocampal injections of CDNF protein or CDNF transgene in an AAV2 viral vector to 1-year-old animals. We performed a behavioral test battery 2 weeks after the injections and collected tissue samples after the 3-week test period. Intrahippocampal CDNF-therapy improved long-term memory in both APP/PS1 mice and wild-type controls, but did not affect spontaneous exploration, object neophobia or early stages of spatial learning. The memory improvement was not associated with decreased brain amyloid load or enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis. Intracranial CDNF treatment has beneficial effects on long-term memory and is well tolerated. The CDNF molecular mechanisms of action on memory await further studies.

  20. Solution synthesis and biological activity of human pleiotrophin, a novel heparin-binding neurotrophic factor consisting of 136 amino acid residues with five disulfide bonds.

    PubMed

    Inui, T; Nakao, M; Nishio, H; Nishiuchi, Y; Kojima, S; Muramatsu, T; Kimura, T

    2000-05-01

    Human pleiotrophin (hPTN), a novel heparin-binding neurotrophic factor consisting of 136 amino acid residues with five intramolecular disulfide bonds, was synthesized by solution procedure in order to demonstrate the utility of our strategy using our newly developed solvent system, a mixture of trifluoroethanol (TFE) and dichloromethane (DCM) or chloroform (CHL). The final protected peptide was synthesized by coupling two larger protected intermediates, Boc-(1-64)-OH and H-(65-136)-OBzl, in CHL/TFE (3:1; v/v) using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) in the presence of 3,4-dihydro-3-hydroxy-4-oxo-1,2,3-benzotriazine (HOOBt). After removal of all protecting groups using the HF procedure followed by treatment with Hg(OAc)2, the fully deprotected peptide was subjected to an oxidative folding reaction. The product was confirmed as having the correct disulfide structure by examining the cystine peptides obtained by enzymatic digestions, and as possessing the same biological activities as those of the natural product. The N- and C-terminal half domains (1-64 and 65-136) were also synthesized, and measurement of their biological activities indicated that the C-terminal half domain displays almost all the activities of the full-length molecule, whereas the N-terminal half domain shows almost no activity. From these results, we were able to confirm that the C-terminal half domain is responsible for the expression of biological activities in the same manner as human midkine (hMK), another heparin-binding neurotrophic growth factor.

  1. Effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor on behavior and key members of the brain serotonin system in mouse strains genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Bazovkina, Daria V; Semenova, Alina A; Tsybko, Anton S; Il'chibaeva, Tatyana V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Popova, Nina K

    2013-12-01

    The effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on behavior and on the serotonin (5-HT) system of a mouse strain predisposed to depressive-like behavior, ASC/Icg (Antidepressant Sensitive Cataleptics), in comparison with the parental "nondepressive" CBA/Lac mice was studied. Within 7 days after acute administration, GDNF (800 ng, i.c.v.) decreased cataleptic immobility but increased depressive-like behavioral traits in both investigated mouse strains and produced anxiolytic effects in ASC mice. The expression of the gene encoding the key enzyme for 5-HT biosynthesis in the brain, tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph-2), and 5-HT1A receptor gene in the midbrain as well as 5-HT2A receptor gene in the frontal cortex were increased in GDNF-treated ASC mice. At the same time, GDNF decreased 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor gene expression in the hippocampus of ASC mice. GDNF failed to change Tph2, 5-HT1A , or 5-HT2A receptor mRNA levels in CBA mice as well as 5-HT transporter gene expression and 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor functional activity in both investigated mouse strains. The results show 1) a GDNF-induced increase in the expression of key genes of the brain 5-HT system, Tph2, 5-HT1A , and 5-HT2A receptors, and 2) significant genotype-dependent differences in the 5-HT system response to GDNF treatment. The data suggest that genetically defined cross-talk between neurotrophic factors and the brain 5-HT system underlies the variability in behavioral response to GDNF.

  2. Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline activates fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in glial cells: involvement in glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor production.

    PubMed

    Hisaoka, Kazue; Tsuchioka, Mami; Yano, Ryoya; Maeda, Natsuko; Kajitani, Naoto; Morioka, Norimitsu; Nakata, Yoshihiro; Takebayashi, Minoru

    2011-06-17

    Recently, both clinical and animal studies demonstrated neuronal and glial plasticity to be important for the therapeutic action of antidepressants. Antidepressants increase glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) production through monoamine-independent protein-tyrosine kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) activation in glial cells (Hisaoka, K., Takebayashi, M., Tsuchioka, M., Maeda, N., Nakata, Y., and Yamawaki, S. (2007) J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 321, 148-157; Hisaoka, K., Maeda, N., Tsuchioka, M., and Takebayashi, M. (2008) Brain Res. 1196, 53-58). This study clarifies the type of tyrosine kinase and mechanism of antidepressant-induced GDNF production in C6 glioma cells and normal human astrocytes. The amitriptyline (a tricyclic antidepressant)-induced ERK activation was specifically and completely inhibited by fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors and siRNA for FGFR1 and -2. Treatment with amitriptyline or several different classes of antidepressants, but not non-antidepressants, acutely increased the phosphorylation of FGFRs and FGFR substrate 2α (FRS2α). Amitriptyline-induced CREB phosphorylation and GDNF production were blocked by FGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Therefore, antidepressants activate the FGFR/FRS2α/ERK/CREB signaling cascade, thus resulting in GDNF production. Furthermore, we attempted to elucidate how antidepressants activate FGFR signaling. The effect of amitriptyline was inhibited by heparin, non-permeant FGF-2 neutralizing antibodies, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors. Serotonin (5-HT) also increased GDNF production through FGFR2 (Tsuchioka, M., Takebayashi, M., Hisaoka, K., Maeda, N., and Nakata, Y. (2008) J. Neurochem. 106, 244-257); however, the effect of 5-HT was not inhibited b