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Sample records for neutral activation analysis

  1. Analysis of neutral active particle loss in afterglow in krypton at 2.6 mbar pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Pejovic, Momcilo M.; Karamarkovic, Jugoslav P.; Ristic, Goran S.; Pejovic, Milic M.

    2008-01-15

    This paper presents the analysis of the surface recombination and/or de-excitation of neutral active particles in two different volume krypton-filled tubes at pressure of 2.6 mbar with 1 ppm oxygen impurities. The analysis was performed on the basis of secondary electron emission from the cathode induced by positive ions and neutral active particles using the experimental data of electrical breakdown time delay mean value t{sub d} as a function of afterglow period {tau} ('memory curve'). It was shown that the main channel of neutral active particles' loss in afterglow is their recombination and/or de-excitation on the bulb walls. The loss rate increases with the increase of available wall surface per unit of gas volume. It was also shown that in early afterglow (15 ms for the tube with smaller bulb volume and 30 ms for the tube with bigger bulb volume) positive ions are formed in the mutual collisions of neutral active particles, and these ions dominantly influence the secondary electron emission from the cathode. In late afterglow (to 30 s for the tube with smaller bulb volume and to 150 s for the tube with bigger bulb volume) neutral active particles have dominant role in secondary electron emission from the cathode. The probability for this process decreases with the increase of afterglow period as a consequence of the decrease of the concentration of neutral active particles in gas, and this probability is smaller for the tube with smaller bulb volume. The influence of additional electron yield in the electrode gap caused by gamma radiation on breakdown initiation is also analyzed. It is shown that the influence of the neutral active particles in the process of secondary electron emission in the case of gamma radiation is also significant in both early and late afterglow.

  2. Steady state performance test analysis of actively cooled extractor grids for SST-1 neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, M. R.; Mattoo, S. K.; Khan, M.

    2010-11-15

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) system is a workhorse to heat magnetically confined tokamak fusion plasma. The heart of any NBI system is an ion extractor system. Steady State Superconducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) needs 0.5 MW of hydrogen beam power at 30 kV to raise the plasma ion temperature to {approx}1 keV and 1.7 MW of hydrogen beam power at 55 kV for future upgradation. To meet this requirement, an ion extractor system consisting of three actively cooled grids has been designed, fabricated, and its performance test has been done at MARION test stand, IPP, Julich, Germany. During long pulse (14 s) operation, hydrogen ion beam of energy 31 MJ has been extracted at 41 kV. In this paper, we have presented detailed analysis of calorimetric data of actively cooled extractor grids and showed that by monitoring outlet water temperature, grid material temperature can be monitored for safe steady state operation of a NBI system. Steady state operation of NBI is the present day interest of fusion research. In the present experimental case, performance test analysis indicates that the actively cooled grids attain steady state heat removal condition and the grid material temperature rise is {approx}18 deg. C and saturates after 10 s of beam pulse.

  3. Steady state performance test analysis of actively cooled extractor grids for SST-1 neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Jana, M R; Mattoo, S K; Khan, M

    2010-11-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) system is a workhorse to heat magnetically confined tokamak fusion plasma. The heart of any NBI system is an ion extractor system. Steady State Superconducting Tokamak-1 (SST-1) needs 0.5 MW of hydrogen beam power at 30 kV to raise the plasma ion temperature to ~1 keV and 1.7 MW of hydrogen beam power at 55 kV for future upgradation. To meet this requirement, an ion extractor system consisting of three actively cooled grids has been designed, fabricated, and its performance test has been done at MARION test stand, IPP, Julich, Germany. During long pulse (14 s) operation, hydrogen ion beam of energy 31 MJ has been extracted at 41 kV. In this paper, we have presented detailed analysis of calorimetric data of actively cooled extractor grids and showed that by monitoring outlet water temperature, grid material temperature can be monitored for safe steady state operation of a NBI system. Steady state operation of NBI is the present day interest of fusion research. In the present experimental case, performance test analysis indicates that the actively cooled grids attain steady state heat removal condition and the grid material temperature rise is ~18°C and saturates after 10 s of beam pulse.

  4. Neutral Proteinase Activity in Skeletal Muscle from Thermally Injured Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    By 21 days after injury, ployed as the substrate since it can be degraded¢) neutral proteinase activity (without Ca2 +) and by Ca2 +-activated neutral... Ca2 *-activated neutral proteinase was unchanged at this time. Neutral proteinase and Ca2 -activated neutral proteinase activities were unaltered at 21...absence of Ca2 was determined by sub- groups: a sham control group and a burned tracting a blank containing no homogenate group. The animals were burned

  5. An electromyographic analysis of orbicularis oris and buccinator muscle activity in patients with complete dentures fabricated using two neutral zone techniques--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ladha, Komal G; Gill, Shubhra; Gupta, Rekha; Verma, Mahesh; Gupta, Meena

    2013-10-01

    Several studies have evaluated electromyographic (EMG) activity of perioral muscles in patients using unsatisfactory old complete dentures and after the insertion of new clinically acceptable dentures; however, studies evaluating EMG activity of orbicularis oris (OO) and buccinator (BUC) muscles in patients wearing complete dentures fabricated using swallowing (SNZ) and phonetic neutral zone (PNZ) techniques are lacking in the literature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in muscle activity of the superior orbicularis oris (SOO), inferior orbicularis oris (IOO) and BUC muscle during the use of unsatisfactory old complete dentures, in comparison with the satisfactory dentures fabricated using the two neutral zone techniques. Ten completely edentulous participants dissatisfied with their existing mandibular complete dentures participated in the study. Each patient received two sets of new dentures fabricated using the SNZ and PNZ techniques. Surface EMG activity of the OO and BUC muscles was recorded using a 4-channel Medelec premier plus electromyography machine while the patients still used their old dentures (group A) and with the SNZ (group B) and PNZ (group C) dentures. On the basis of participation in the study, five participants first received the SNZ dentures and five the PNZ type. After having worn the prosthesis for a minimum of 2 months, EMG recordings were repeated for the first set of dentures. The prostheses were then changed and the procedures repeated. The activity of OO and BUC muscles was recorded at rest, while pursing and laughing, and during pronunciation of various syllables. Results are expressed as mean ± SD and as absolute numbers and percentage. ANOVA with appropriate correction (Bonferroni or Tamhane) and Student's t-test were used for statistical analysis. A p-value < 0.05 was taken to indicate a significant difference. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean EMG activity of SOO, IOO, and BUC

  6. Analysis of Non-Enzymatically Glycated Peptides: Neutral-Loss Triggered MS3 Versus Multi-Stage Activation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-10-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of tissue proteins has important implications in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has been shown to outperform collision-induced dissociation (CID) in sequencing glycated peptides by tandem mass spectrometry, ETD instrumentation is not yet available in all laboratories. In this study, we evaluated different advanced CID techniques (i.e., neutral-loss triggered MS3 and multi-stage activation) during LC-MSn analyses of Amadori-modified peptides enriched from human serum glycated in vitro. During neutral-loss triggered MS3 experiments, MS3 scans triggered by neutral-losses of 3 H2O or 3 H2O + HCHO produced similar results in terms of glycated peptide identifications. However, neutral losses of 3 H2O resulted in significantly more glycated peptide identifications during multi-stage activation experiments. Overall, the multi-stage activation approach produced more glycated peptide identifications, while the neutral-loss triggered MS3 approach resulted in much higher specificity. Both techniques offer a viable alternative to ETD for identifying glycated peptides when that method is unavailable.

  7. Enterovirus neutralizing activity in the gastrointestinal tract of piglets.

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, J B

    1974-10-01

    Neutralizing activity against porcine enterovirus strain T80 was demonstrated in the contents of the stomach, duodenum or ileum of four piglets which were suckling dams whose milk contained neutralizing substances against the same virus. No neutralizing activity was detected in the gastrointestinal contents of an unsuckled piglet or in four weaned piglets. Extracts of intestinal tissue from each of the above piglets failed to neutralize the virus. Four weaned piglets were dosed orally with live T80 virus. From nine days after infection virus neutralizing activity was found in extracts of tissue prepared from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon but not in the contents of the gastrointestinal tract and a serological response to the virus was demonstrated. No virus neutralizing activity was detected in gastrointestinal tissue or contents from four weaned piglets inoculated parenterally with live T80 virus or in four piglets dosed orally with inactivated T80 virus and these piglets did not respond serologically to the virus.

  8. Multifractal analysis of neutral community spatial structure.

    PubMed

    Yakimov, Basil N; Iudin, Dmitry I; Solntsev, Leonid A; Gelashvili, David B

    2014-02-21

    The spatial structure of neutral communities has nontrivial properties, which are described traditionally by the Species-area relationship (SAR) and the Species Abundance Distribution, (SAD). Fractal analysis is an alternative way to describe community structure, the final product of which - a multifractal spectrum - combines information both on the scaling parameters of species richness (similar to SAR), and about species' relative abundances (similar to SAD). We conducted a multifractal analysis of community spatial structure in a neutral lattice-based model. In a realistic range of dispersal distances, moments of the species abundance distribution form a family of curves of the same shape, which are reduced to a single universal curve through a scaling collapse procedure. Trivial scaling is observed on small and large scales, which reflects homogeneity of species distribution at small scales and a limiting log-series distribution at large scales. Multifractal spectra for different speciation rates and dispersal kernels are obtained for the intermediate region of scaling. Analysis of spectra reveals that the key model parameters determine not only the species richness and its scaling, but also of species dominance and rarity. We discovered a phenomenon of negative dimensions in the multifractal spectrum. Negative dimensions have no direct interpretation from a purely physical point of view, but have biological meaning because they reflect the negative relationship between the number of singletons and the area. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Orion's Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-21

    U.S. Navy divers, Air Force pararescuemen and Coast Guard rescue swimmers practice Orion recovery techniques at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The recovery team is practicing underway recovery techniques using a test version of the Orion spacecraft. Training will help the team prepare for Underway Recovery Test 5 for Exploration Mission 1 aboard the USS San Diego in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California in October. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program, along with the U.S. Navy and Lockheed Martin, are preparing the recovery team, hardware and operations to support EM-1 recovery.

  10. Orion's Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-21

    U.S. Navy divers are training in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. Navy divers, Air Force pararescuemen and Coast Guard rescue swimmers practice Orion underway recovery techniques using a test version of the Orion spacecraft. Training will help the team prepare for Underway Recovery Test 5 for Exploration Mission 1 aboard the USS San Diego in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California in October. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program, along with the U.S. Navy and Lockheed Martin, are preparing the recovery team, hardware and operations to support EM-1 recovery.

  11. Electromyographic analysis of gluteus maximus and hamstring activity during the supine resisted hip extension exercise versus supine unilateral bridge to neutral.

    PubMed

    Youdas, James W; Hartman, James P; Murphy, Brooke A; Rundle, Ashley M; Ugorowski, Jenna M; Hollman, John H

    2017-02-01

    Hip extension strengthening exercises which maximize gluteus maximus contributions and minimize hamstring influences may be beneficial for persons with hip pain. This study's aim was to compare muscle activation of the gluteus maximus and hamstrings from healthy subjects during a supine resisted hip extension exercise versus supine unilateral bridge to neutral. Surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were obtained from the right gluteus maximus and hamstrings in 13 healthy male and 13 healthy female subjects. Maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs) were collected to normalize data and permit meaningful comparisons across muscles. Peak median activation of the gluteus maximus was 33.8% MVIC for the bridge and 34.7% MVIC for the hip extension exercise, whereas peak median recruitment for hamstrings was 28.4% MVIC for the bridge and 51% MVIC for the hip extension exercise. The gluteus maximus to hamstrings ratio was compared between the two exercises using the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test (α = 0.05). The ratio (p = 0.014) was greater in the supine unilateral bridge (median = 111.3%) than supine hip extension exercise (median = 59.2%), suggesting a reduction of hamstring recruitment in the unilateral bridge to neutral compared to the supine resisted hip extension exercise. The supine hip extension exercise demonstrated higher EMG activity of hamstrings in comparison with supine unilateral bridge and, therefore, may be less appropriate in subjects who need to increase gluteus maximus activation.

  12. Orion Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-20

    Tim Goddard, far right, NASA Open Water Recovery Operations director, briefs U.S. Navy divers, Air Force pararescuemen and Coast Guard rescue swimmers during training in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The group is preparing to practice Orion underway recovery techniques using a test version of the Orion spacecraft. Training will help the team prepare for Underway Recovery Test 5 for Exploration Mission 1 aboard the USS San Diego in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California in October. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program, along with the U.S. Navy and Lockheed Martin, are preparing the recovery team, hardware and operations to support EM-1 recovery.

  13. Orion Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-20

    Tim Goddard, NASA Open Water Recovery Operations director, briefs U.S. Navy divers, Air Force pararescuemen and Coast Guard rescue swimmers during training in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The group is preparing to practice Orion underway recovery techniques using a test version of the Orion spacecraft. Training will help the team prepare for Underway Recovery Test 5 for Exploration Mission 1 aboard the USS San Diego in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California in October. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program, along with the U.S. Navy and Lockheed Martin, are preparing the recovery team, hardware and operations to support EM-1 recovery.

  14. Orion's Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-21

    Tim Goddard, center, NASA Open Water Recovery Operations director, briefs U.S. Navy divers, Air Force pararescuemen and Coast Guard rescue swimmers during training in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The group will practice Orion underway recovery techniques using a test version of the Orion spacecraft. Training will help the team prepare for Underway Recovery Test 5 for Exploration Mission 1 aboard the USS San Diego in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California in October. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program, along with the U.S. Navy and Lockheed Martin, are preparing the recovery team, hardware and operations to support EM-1 recovery.

  15. Orion Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-20

    NASA astronaut Dan Burbank speaks to a group of U.S. Navy divers at the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. Navy divers, Air Force pararescuemen and Coast Guard rescue swimmers are preparing to practice Orion underway recovery techniques with a test version of the Orion spacecraft. Training will help the team prepare for Underway Recovery Test 5 for Exploration Mission 1 aboard the USS San Diego in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California in October. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program, along with the U.S. Navy and Lockheed Martin, are preparing the recovery team, hardware and operations to support EM-1 recovery.

  16. Orion's Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) Activities

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-21

    Tim Goddard, center, NASA Open Water Recovery Operations director, reviews recovery procedures with U.S. Navy divers, Air Force pararescuemen and Coast Guard rescue swimmers during training in the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The group is practicing Orion underway recovery techniques using a test version of the Orion spacecraft. Training will help the team prepare for Underway Recovery Test 5 for Exploration Mission 1 aboard the USS San Diego in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California in October. The Ground Systems Development and Operations Program, along with the U.S. Navy and Lockheed Martin, are preparing the recovery team, hardware and operations to support EM-1 recovery.

  17. Computational Prediction of Broadly Neutralizing HIV-1 Antibody Epitopes from Neutralization Activity Data

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Andrew L.; Falkowska, Emilia; Walker, Laura M.; Seaman, Michael S.; Burton, Dennis R.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies effective against the majority of circulating isolates of HIV-1 have been isolated from a small number of infected individuals. Definition of the conformational epitopes on the HIV spike to which these antibodies bind is of great value in defining targets for vaccine and drug design. Drawing on techniques from compressed sensing and information theory, we developed a computational methodology to predict key residues constituting the conformational epitopes on the viral spike from cross-clade neutralization activity data. Our approach does not require the availability of structural information for either the antibody or antigen. Predictions of the conformational epitopes of ten broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies are shown to be in good agreement with new and existing experimental data. Our findings suggest that our approach offers a means to accelerate epitope identification for diverse pathogenic antigens. PMID:24312481

  18. Measurement of angular wrist neutral zone and forearm muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Fagarasanu, Mircea; Kumar, Shrawan; Narayan, Yogesh

    2004-08-01

    To determine the forearm muscles activity in different wrist deviated positions and wrist neutral zone, and to assess the self-selected resting position without visual feedback. Wrist deviation occurs in almost all industrial and office jobs. This has been deemed hazardous for carpal tunnel syndrome. Proper resting wrist position is likely to decrease the hazard for carpal tunnel pressure. Twenty blindfolded subjects without history of hand/forearm musculoskeletal disorders participated in the study. The EMG of the forearm muscles (flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis and, extensor carpi ulnaris) in deviated and neutral wrist postures was recorded at a sampling rate of 1 kHz. Also, wrist neutral zone at rest was measured using a custom-made calibrated uniaxial electrogoniometer. One-way ANOVA with repeated measures was used in order to find the impact of wrist deviation on muscles activity. The participants positioned their wrist in rest at 7 degrees -9 degrees extension and 5 degrees -7 degrees ulnar deviation. Significantly higher EMG activity was recorded for each muscle in the wrist deviated postures when compared to neutral position (P < 0.001). Self selected wrist neutral posture decreased the muscle activity significantly. Placement of wrists in neutral zone is expected to reduce risk of injuries.

  19. Niche versus neutrality: a dynamical analysis

    Treesearch

    Michael Kalyuzhny; Efrat Seri; Rachel Chocron; Curtis H. Flather; Ronen Kadmon; Nadav M. Shnerb

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the forces shaping ecological communities is of crucial importance for basic science and conservation. After 50 years in which ecological theory has focused on either stable communities driven by niche-based forces or nonstable “neutral” communities driven by demographic stochasticity, contemporary theories suggest that ecological communities are driven...

  20. Thermochemical Analysis of Neutralization Reactions: An Introductory Discovery Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Kenneth V.; Gullmette, Louise W.

    2007-01-01

    The article describes a new discovery experiment that uses thermodynamical analysis to study neutralization reactions based on neutralization of citric acid. The experiment would be able to reinforce students' understanding of stoichiometry and allow for the discovery of basic concepts of thermochemistry.

  1. Thermochemical Analysis of Neutralization Reactions: An Introductory Discovery Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Kenneth V.; Gullmette, Louise W.

    2007-01-01

    The article describes a new discovery experiment that uses thermodynamical analysis to study neutralization reactions based on neutralization of citric acid. The experiment would be able to reinforce students' understanding of stoichiometry and allow for the discovery of basic concepts of thermochemistry.

  2. Seismic active control by neutral networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yu

    1995-12-31

    A study on the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs) to active structural control under seismic loads is carried out. The structure considered is a single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system with an active bracing device. The control force is computed by a trained neural network. The feedforward neural network architecture and an adaptive backpropagation training algorithm is used in the study. The neural net is trained to reproduce the function that represents the response-excitation relationship of the SDF system under seismic loads. The input-output training patterns are generated randomly. In the backpropagation training algorithm, the learning rate is determined by ensuring the decrease of the error function at each epoch. The computer program implemented is validated by solving the classification of the XOR problem. Then, the trained ANN is used to compute the control force according to the control strategy. If the control force exceeds the actuator`s capacity limit, it is set equal to that limit. The concept of the control strategy employed herein is to apply the control force at every time step to cancel the system velocity induced at the preceding time step so that the gradual rhythmic buildup of the response is destroyed. The ground motions considered in the numerical example are the 1940 El Centro earthquake and the 1979 Imperial Valley earthquake in California. The system responses with and without the control are calculated and compared. The feasibility and potential of applying ANNs to seismic active control is asserted by the promising results obtained from the numerical examples studied.

  3. Statistical Analysis of the Heavy Neutral Atoms Measured by IBEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeewoo; Kucharek, Harald; Möbius, Eberhard; Galli, André; Livadiotis, George; Fuselier, Steve A.; McComas, David J.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere by using heavy neutral maps generated with the IBEX-Lo instrument over three years from 2009 to 2011. The interstellar neutral (ISN) O&Ne gas flow was found in the first-year heavy neutral map at 601 keV and its flow direction and temperature were studied. However, due to the low counting statistics, researchers have not treated the full sky maps in detail. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the statistical significance of each pixel in the heavy neutral maps to get a better understanding of the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere. Here, we examine three statistical analysis methods: the signal-to-noise filter, the confidence limit method, and the cluster analysis method. These methods allow us to exclude background from areas where the heavy neutral signal is statistically significant. These methods also allow the consistent detection of heavy neutral atom structures. The main emission feature expands toward lower longitude and higher latitude from the observational peak of the ISN O&Ne gas flow. We call this emission the extended tail. It may be an imprint of the secondary oxygen atoms generated by charge exchange between ISN hydrogen atoms and oxygen ions in the outer heliosheath.

  4. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE HEAVY NEUTRAL ATOMS MEASURED BY IBEX

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeewoo; Kucharek, Harald; Möbius, Eberhard; Galli, André; Livadiotis, George; Fuselier, Steve A.; McComas, David J.

    2015-10-15

    We investigate the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere by using heavy neutral maps generated with the IBEX-Lo instrument over three years from 2009 to 2011. The interstellar neutral (ISN) O and Ne gas flow was found in the first-year heavy neutral map at 601 keV and its flow direction and temperature were studied. However, due to the low counting statistics, researchers have not treated the full sky maps in detail. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the statistical significance of each pixel in the heavy neutral maps to get a better understanding of the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere. Here, we examine three statistical analysis methods: the signal-to-noise filter, the confidence limit method, and the cluster analysis method. These methods allow us to exclude background from areas where the heavy neutral signal is statistically significant. These methods also allow the consistent detection of heavy neutral atom structures. The main emission feature expands toward lower longitude and higher latitude from the observational peak of the ISN O and Ne gas flow. We call this emission the extended tail. It may be an imprint of the secondary oxygen atoms generated by charge exchange between ISN hydrogen atoms and oxygen ions in the outer heliosheath.

  5. Polyomavirus BK Neutralizing Activity in Human Immunoglobulin Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Randhawa, Parmjeet S; Schonder, Kristine; Shapiro, Ron; Farasati, Nousha; Huang, Yuchen

    2011-01-01

    Background Polyomavirus BK (BKV) infection can cause nephropathy in the allograft kidney. No well-established drug treatment is available at this time. Human intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) have been used as an empiric therapy without proof of effectiveness. Methods We tested five lots of commercially available IVIG preparations from two different suppliers for polyomavirus neutralizing activity. BKV and mouse polyomavirus were used to infect human and murine host cells, respectively, with or without prior treatment with IVIG. Neutralization activity was measured by quantitation of viral DNA after 7 days in culture. Results Coincubation of BKV but not mouse polyomavirus with clinically relevant concentrations of IVIG derived from healthy and hepatitis B vaccinated subjects caused more than 90% inhibition of viral DNA yield after 7 days in culture. Consistent with a direct neutralizing mechanism, this effect was significantly diminished if viral infection was performed in immunoglobulin pretreated cells or if immunoglobulin treatment was delayed 2 hr after addition of infectious virus. Conclusion Human IVIG preparations contain BKV neutralizing antibodies. Data on neutralizing capacity of these antibodies are presented to aid dose exploration in clinical trials seeking to validate the use of IVIG in patients with BKV infection. PMID:20568674

  6. Launch Deployment Assembly Extravehicular Activity Neutral Buoyancy Development Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loughead, T.

    1996-01-01

    This test evaluated the Launch Deployment Assembly (LDA) design for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) work sites (setup, igress, egress), reach and visual access, and translation required for cargo item removal. As part of the LDA design, this document describes the method and results of the LDA EVA Neutral Buoyancy Development Test to ensure that the LDA hardware support the deployment of the cargo items from the pallet. This document includes the test objectives, flight and mockup hardware description, descriptions of procedures and data collection used in the testing, and the results of the development test at the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS).

  7. Geomagnetic activity effects on the equatorial neutral thermosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, M.D.; Abreu, V.J.; Orsini, N. ); Fesen, C.G. ); Roble, R.G. )

    1992-04-01

    The effects of geomagnetic activity on the equatorial neutral thermosphere are investigated with mass spectrometer measurements from the Atmosphere Explorer E (AE-E) satellite and simulations generated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere/ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM). A study of the local time dependence of the equatorial geomagnetic storm response concentrates on a disturbed period from March 20 (day 79) to March 31 (day 90), 1979. This interval was the subject of an intense data-gathering and analysis campaign for the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop 6, and global TIGCM predictions are available for the specific conditions of the storm as a function of universal time. The AE-E measurements demonstrate that significant geomagnetic storm-induced perturbations of upper thermospheric N{sub 2} and O densities extend into the equatorial zone but are mainly restricted to the midnight/early morning sector. The qualitative features of the observations are reproduced by the TIGCM, although in general, the model simulations overestimate the storm temperature and density enhancements, primarily in the nighttime thermosphere. This suggests that either the nighttime cooling rates in the TIGCM are too small or that the specified auroral forcing of the model are too persistent.

  8. Lunar Neutral Exposphere Properties from Pickup Ion Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartle, R. E.; Sarantos, M.; Killen, R.; Sittler, E. C. Jr.; Halekas, J.; Yokota, S.; Saito, Y.

    2009-01-01

    , yielding the necessary ion velocity spectra needed to further analysis of parent neutral exosphere properties.

  9. Protective Efficacy of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies with Incomplete Neutralization Activity against Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus in Rhesus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Julg, Boris; Sok, Devin; Schmidt, Stephen D; Abbink, Peter; Newman, Ruchi M; Broge, Thomas; Linde, Caitlyn; Nkolola, Joseph; Le, Khoa; Su, David; Torabi, Julia; Pack, Melissa; Pegu, Amarendra; Allen, Todd M; Mascola, John R; Burton, Dennis R; Barouch, Dan H

    2017-10-15

    HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) have been shown to occasionally display unusual virus neutralization profiles with nonsigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% neutralization against a variety of viruses. The significance of incomplete neutralization for the ability of bnAbs to mediate protective effects in vivo, however, is undetermined. In the current study, we selected two bnAbs, PGT121 and 3BNC117, as they incompletely neutralize the clade C simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) stock (SHIV-327c) at 85% and 70%, respectively, and performed a protection study in rhesus macaques. The animals were intravenously (i.v.) administered PGT121 or 3BNC117 at 10 and 2 mg/kg of body weight before being rectally challenged with a single high dose of SHIV-327c. PGT121 protected 6 out of 7 monkeys, while 6 out of 7 3BNC117-pretreated animals became infected, although with significantly delayed plasma viremia compared to the control animals. These data suggest that complete neutralization is not imperative for bnAbs to prevent infection but that with increasing levels of incomplete neutralization the sterilizing activity diminishes.IMPORTANCE Multiple antibodies have been identified that potently neutralize a broad range of circulating HIV strains. However, not every virus-antibody combination results in complete neutralization of the input virus, suggesting that a fraction of virus particles are resistant to antibody neutralization despite high antibody concentrations. This observation of "incomplete neutralization" is associated with nonsigmoidal neutralization curves plateauing below 100% neutralization, but the significance of the phenomenon for the ability of neutralizing antibodies to mediate protective effects in vivo is undetermined. In this study, we show that the broadly neutralizing antibody PGT121, which neutralized only up to 85% of the SHIV-327c challenge stock in vitro, protected 6 out of 7 rhesus macaques against infection while the antibody 3BNC

  10. Analysis of neutral hydrogenic emission spectra in a tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Chung, J.; Jaspers, R. J. E.

    2015-10-01

    Balmer-α radiation by the excitation of thermal and fast neutral hydrogenic particles has been investigated in a magnetically confined fusion device, or tokamak, from the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). From the diagnostic point of view, the emission from thermal neutrals is associated with passive spectroscopy and that from energetic neutrals that are usually injected from the outside of the tokamak to the active spectroscopy. The passive spectroscopic measurement for the thermal Balmer-α emission from deuterium and hydrogen estimates the relative concentration of hydrogen in a deuterium-fueled plasma and therefore, makes a useful tool to monitor the vacuum wall condition. The ratio of hydrogen to deuterium obtained from this measurement qualitatively correlates with the energy confinement of the plasma. The Doppler-shifted Balmer-α components from the fast neutrals features the spectrum of the motional Stark effect (MSE) which is an essential principle for the measurement of the magnetic pitch angle profile. Characterization of this active MSE spectra, especially with multiple neutral beam lines crossing along the observation line of sight, has been done for the guideline of the multi-ion-source heating beam operation and for the optimization of the narrow bandpass filters that are required for the polarimeter-based MSE diagnostic system under construction at KSTAR.

  11. Neutral model analysis of landscape patterns from mathematical morphology

    Treesearch

    Kurt H. Riitters; Peter Vogt; Pierre Soille; Jacek Kozak; Christine Estreguil

    2007-01-01

    Mathematical morphology encompasses methods for characterizing land-cover patterns in ecological research and biodiversity assessments. This paper reports a neutral model analysis of patterns in the absence of a structuring ecological process, to help set standards for comparing and interpreting patterns identified by mathematical morphology on real land-cover maps. We...

  12. Mitigating the antimicrobial activities of selected organic acids and commercial sanitizers with various neutralizing agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoen Ju; Chen, Jinru

    2011-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the abilities of five neutralizing agents, Dey-Engley (DE) neutralizing broth (single or double strength), morpholinepropanesulfonic acid (MOPS) buffer, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and sodium thiosulfate buffer, in mitigating the activities of acetic or lactic acid (2%) and an alkaline or acidic sanitizer (a manufacturer-recommended concentration) againt the cells of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC; n = 9). To evaluate the possible toxicity of the neutralizing agents to the STEC cells, each STEC strain was exposed to each of the neutralizing agents at room temperature for 10 min. Neutralizing efficacy was evaluated by placing each STEC strain in a mixture of sanitizer and neutralizer under the same conditions. The neutralizing agents had no detectable toxic effect on the STEC strains. PBS was least effective for neutralizing the activity of selected organic acids and sanitizers. Single-strength DE and sodium thiosulfate neutralized the activity of both acetic and lactic acids. MOPS buffer neutralized the activity of acetic acid and lactic acid against six and five STEC strains, respectively. All neutralizing agents, except double-strength DE broth, had a limited neutralizing effect on the activity of the commercial sanitizers used in the study. The double-strength DE broth effectively neutralized the activity of the two commercial sanitizers with no detectable toxic effects on STEC cells.

  13. Electric-current Neutralization, Magnetic Shear, and Eruptive Activity in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Sun, Xudong; Török, Tibor; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Leake, James E.

    2017-09-01

    The physical conditions that determine whether or not solar active regions (ARs) produce strong flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are not yet well understood. Here, we investigate the association between electric-current neutralization, magnetic shear along polarity inversion lines (PILs), and eruptive activity in four ARs: two emerging and two well-developed ones. We find that the CME-producing ARs are characterized by a strongly non-neutralized total current, while the total current in the ARs that did not produce CMEs is almost perfectly neutralized. The difference in the PIL shear between these two groups is much less pronounced, which suggests that the degree of current neutralization may serve as a better proxy for assessing the ability of ARs to produce CMEs.

  14. Neutral density filters with Risley prisms: analysis and design.

    PubMed

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Nicolov, Mirela

    2009-05-10

    We achieve the analysis and design of optical attenuators with double-prism neutral density filters. A comparative study is performed on three possible device configurations; only two are presented in the literature but without their design calculus. The characteristic parameters of this optical attenuator with Risley translating prisms for each of the three setups are defined and their analytical expressions are derived: adjustment scale (attenuation range) and interval, minimum transmission coefficient and sensitivity. The setups are compared to select the optimal device, and, from this study, the best solution for double-prism neutral density filters, both from a mechanical and an optical point of view, is determined with two identical, symmetrically movable, no mechanical contact prisms. The design calculus of this optimal device is developed in essential steps. The parameters of the prisms, particularly their angles, are studied to improve the design, and we demonstrate the maximum attenuation range that this type of attenuator can provide.

  15. Identification of neutral and acidic deoxyribonuclease activities in Tetrahymena thermophila life stages.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Erhan; Arslanyolu, Muhittin

    2015-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleases (DNases) play a major role in apoptotic DNA fragmentation/degradation, and apoptotic-like DNA degradation is also observed during conjugation of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila; however, the characteristics of neutral and acidic DNases are still undefined in its life stages. Here, we report the biochemical characterization of DNase activities displayed in three different Tetrahymena life stages in a comparative manner. Maximum DNase activity of Tetrahymena was observed under acidic conditions, indicating that Tetrahymena has strong DNase II-like activities. Zymography revealed that Tetrahymena has at least five distinct DNase activity bands at 28, 32, 33.8, 35.5, and 69-kDa, and that the activities at 32 and 33.8-kDa were also secreted into starvation buffer. Cofactor analysis demonstrated that Mg(2+) exerted inhibitory effects on neutral DNase activities. Unexpectedly, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) had favorable effects on acidic DNase activities. The DNase activity profile of conjugating Tetrahymena cells revealed that the 32 and 33.8-kDa activities at pH 5.0 increased from 14 to 18 h of conjugation, corresponding to the final resorption of the old macronucleus by lysosomal enzymes during programmed nuclear death (PND). Overall, we found that Tetrahymena DNases exhibit different biochemical properties and a possible involvement of DNase II-like activities in PND. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Improving the neutral phytase activity from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Wang, Zupeng; Yan, Xiuhua

    2015-03-01

    Neutral phytase is used as a feed additive for degradation of anti-nutritional phytate in aquatic feed industry. Site-directed mutagenesis of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens DSM 1061 phytase was performed with an aim to increase its activity. Mutation residues were chosen based on multiple sequence alignments and structure analysis of neutral phytsaes from different microorganisms. The mutation sites on surface (D148E, S197E and N156E) and around the active site (D52E) of phytase were selected. Analysis of the phytase variants showed that the specific activities of mutants D148E and S197E remarkably increased by about 35 and 13% over a temperature range of 40-75 °C at pH 7.0, respectively. The k cat of mutants D148E and S197E were 1.50 and 1.25 times than that of the wild-type phytase, respectively. Both D148E and S197E showed much higher thermostability than that of the wild-type phytase. However, mutants N156E and D52E led to significant loss of specific activity of the enzyme. Structural analysis revealed that these mutations may affect conformation of the active site of phytase. The present mutant phytases D148E and S197E with increased activities and thermostabilities have application potential as additives in aquaculture feed.

  17. Magnitudes of muscle activation of spine stabilizers, gluteals, and hamstrings during supine bridge to neutral position.

    PubMed

    Youdas, James W; Hartman, James P; Murphy, Brooke A; Rundle, Ashley M; Ugorowski, Jenna M; Hollman, John H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the magnitude of selective core muscle activation during supine bridging to neutral exercises (three on a stable and three on an unstable surface). Surface EMG analysis was performed on the lumbar multifidus, gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, and hamstrings from 13 male and 13 female subjects. Lumbar multifidus recruitment was not influenced by exercise or condition and ranged between 29.2 and 35.9% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). Peak gluteus medius activation (42.0% MVIC) occurred in unstable single-leg bridge. Maximum recruitment of gluteus maximus (32.6% MVIC) appeared during stable single-leg bridge. Peak hamstring activation (59.6% MVIC) occurred during stable double-leg hamstring curl. Regardless of condition, hamstrings demonstrated high (51.9-59.6% MVIC) muscle recruitment during double-leg hamstring curls compared with the single-leg bridge or double-leg bridge. Various supine bridging to neutral exercises activated the hamstrings at levels conducive to strengthening, whereas recruitment of lumbar multifidus, gluteus medius, and gluteus maximus promoted endurance training. Clinically, we were unable to conclude the unstable support surface was preferable to the stable surface for boosting muscle recruitment of spine stabilizers, gluteals, and hamstring muscles during supine bridge to neutral position.

  18. Mechanical Activation-Assisted Reductive Leaching of Cadmium from Zinc Neutral Leaching Residue Using Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun; Min, Xiaobo; Chai, Liyuan; Zhang, Jianqiang; Wang, Mi

    2015-12-01

    In this work, zinc neutral leaching residue was mechanically activated by ball-milling. The subsequent leaching behavior and kinetics of cadmium extraction in a mixed SO2-H2SO4 system were studied. Changes in the crystalline phase, lattice distortion, particle size and morphology, which were induced by mechanical activation, were also investigated. The activated samples showed different physicochemical characteristics, and cadmium extraction was found to be easier than for the un-activated samples. Under the same conditions, mechanical activation contributed to higher cadmium leaching. The cadmium extraction kinetics at 75-95°C was found to fit the shrinking core model. The raw neutral leaching residue, and the samples activated for 60 min and 120 min had a calculated activation energy of 65.02 kJ/mol, 59.45 kJ/mol and 53.46 kJ/mol, respectively. The leaching residue was characterized by ICP, XRD and SEM analysis. According to XRD analysis, the main phases in the residue were lead sulfate (PbSO4), zinc sulfide (ZnS) and cadmium sulfide (CdS).

  19. In Vitro Selection of Cathepsin E-Activity-Enhancing Peptide Aptamers at Neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Biyani, Madhu; Futakami, Masae; Kitamura, Koichiro; Kawakubo, Tomoyo; Suzuki, Miho; Yamamoto, Kenji; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    The aspartic protease cathepsin E has been shown to induce apoptosis in cancer cells under physiological conditions. Therefore, cathepsin E-activity-enhancing peptides functioning in the physiological pH range are valuable potential cancer therapeutic candidates. Here, we have used a general in vitro selection method (evolutionary rapid panning analysis system (eRAPANSY)), based on inverse substrate-function link (SF-link) selection to successfully identify cathepsin E-activity-enhancing peptide aptamers at neutral pH. A successive enrichment of peptide activators was attained in the course of selection. One such peptide activated cathepsin E up to 260%, had a high affinity (KD; ∼300 nM), and had physiological activity as demonstrated by its apoptosis-inducing reaction in cancerous cells. This method is expected to be widely applicable for the identification of protease-activity-enhancing peptide aptamers. PMID:21527983

  20. Fusion of C3d molecule with neutralization epitope(s) of hepatitis E virus enhances antibody avidity maturation and neutralizing activity following DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shucai; Wang, Chunling; Fang, Xuefeng; Zhai, Lijie; Dong, Chen; Ding, Lei; Meng, Jihong; Wang, Lixin

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies have identified that a hepatits E virus peptide (HEV-p179), spanning amino acids (aa) 439-617 in the 660-aa protein encoded by open reading frame 2(ORF2) of the Chinese epidemic strain (genotype 4), is the minimal size fragment of conformation-dependent neutralization epitope(s). We report here the successful immunization of mice with DNA vaccines expressing the secreted form of HEV-p179 (fused with a human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) signal sequence) and the tPA-p179-C3d fusion protein (fused with three tandem copies of the murine complement C3d). Analysis of antibody responses in vaccinated mice revealed that immunizations with tPA-p179-C3d3 DNA vaccine dramatically increased both the level and avidity maturation of antibodies against HEV-p179 compared to p179 and tPA-p179 DNA vaccines. In addition, this increased antibody response correlated with neutralizing titers in a PCR-based cell culture neutralization assay. These results indicate that vaccination with C3d conjugated p179 DNA vaccine enhances antibody responses to HEV, and this approach may be applied to overcome the poor immunogenicity of DNA vaccines to generate HEV neutralizing antibodies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Au@Ag Heterogeneous Nanorods as Nanozyme Interfaces with Peroxidase-Like Activity and Their Application for One-Pot Analysis of Glucose at Nearly Neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Han, Lei; Li, Cuncheng; Zhang, Tao; Lang, Qiaolin; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-08

    As substitutes for natural peroxidases, most nanomaterial-based enzyme mimetics (nanozymes) have unique properties such as high stability, low-cost, large surface area, and high catalytic activity. However, they usually work in acidic conditions and thus impede their real applications. In this work, by modulating the nanostructure, composition, and surface property of the bimetallic materials, the positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium)-stabilized Au@Ag heterogeneous nanorods (NRs) were developed as synergistic peroxidase-like interfaces, which exhibited high activity over a wide pH range (pH 4.0-6.5) using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) as the chromogenic substrate. At pH 6.5, the peroxidase-like activity for the Au@Ag heterogeneous NRs was stable and optimal within 20-40 °C. Moreover, the Au@Ag heterogeneous NRs showed excellent temperature stability and long-term storage stability. Given these characters, the detection of H2O2 at pH 6.5 was proposed on the basis of the Au@Ag heterogeneous NRs catalyzing the colorimetric reaction of H2O2 and ABTS, where the oxidized ABTS showed a typical absorption peak at 414 nm. The absorbance at 414 nm was linear with H2O2 concentration from 0.01 to 10 mM. Further, considering that Au@Ag heterogeneous NRs and glucose oxidase (GOx) have similar optimal pH for catalytic activities, a novel one-pot method for the detection of glucose was developed by the coupled catalytic reaction using GOx, Au@Ag heterogeneous NRs, and ABTS at nearly neutral pH (pH 6.5) and 37 °C. This proposed method had simple and rapid processes, wide linear range (0.05-20 mM), and reliability for the successful analysis of real samples. On the basis of these attractive and unique characteristics, Au@Ag heterogeneous NRs can become promising substitutes for peroxidase in analytical chemistry and environmental science.

  2. Activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z.B. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains 16 chapters on the application of activation analysis in the fields of life sciences, biological materials, coal and its effluents, environmental samples, archaeology, material science, and forensics. Each chapter is processed separately for the data base.

  3. Neutralization of Electric Current, Magnetic Shear, and Eruptive Activity in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Sun, Xudong; Torok, Tibor; Titov, Viacheslav; Leake, James E.

    2017-08-01

    There has been an ongoing debate on whether or not the electric currents in solar active regions (ARs) are neutralized. Current-neutralization means that the direct coronal currents that connect the AR polarity centers are surrounded by return currents of equal total strength and opposite direction, i.e. the net current is zero. Using data from SDO/HMI, we analyze the direct and return currents in four ARs; two eruptive ones and two non-eruptive ones. The eruptive ARs produced strong flares and CMEs (successful eruptions), while the non-eruptive ARs include one quiet AR that produced no strong eruptions and one that produced a series of failed eruptions. It is found that the eruptive ARs have strong net currents and large shear of the magnetic field near their polarity inversion lines (PILs). In contrast, the currents in the non-eruptive ARs are well neutralized, and the PIL-shear is rather small. This agrees with MHD simulations that demonstrate a relationship between the level of current neutralization and the amount of magnetic shear near the PIL. We discuss the implications of these results for the capability of ARs to produce strong eruptions.

  4. The antioxidant activities effect of neutral and acidic polysaccharides from Epimedium acuminatum Franch. on Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhou; Feng, Shiling; Shen, Shian; Wang, Handong; Yuan, Ming; Liu, Jing; Huang, Yan; Ding, Chunbang

    2016-06-25

    A neutral polysaccharide (EAP-1N) and an acidic polysaccharide (EAP-2A) were purified from Epimedium acuminatum by DEAE-52 cellulose anion-exchange chromatography and gel-filtration chromatography. Their structures were characterized by chemical composition analysis, high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Further, their antioxidant activities were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that EAP-2A had higher uronic acid content and larger average molecular weight than EAP-1N. Compared with EAP-1N, EAP-2A exhibited significantly scavenging activities against free radical in vitro, as well as strongly stimulating effect on antioxidant enzyme activities (including superoxide dismutases (SOD), catalases (CAT), and glutathione peroxidases (GSH-PX)) and preferably inhibitory effect on lipid peroxidation and protein carboxyl in the mode of Caenorhabditis elegans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. EL4 cell-based colorimetric toxin neutralization activity assays for determination of neutralizing anti-ricin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Changhong Y; Brown, J Edward; Torabazar, Nahid R; Smith, Leonard A

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant ricin toxin A-chain 1-33/44-198 vaccine (RVEc), developed at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases as a vaccine candidate, is under investigation in a phase 1 clinical study. To effectively evaluate the immunogenicity of this ricin vaccine and to eliminate the use of radioactive material, an EL4 cell-based colorimetric toxin neutralization activity (TNA) assay using a CellTiter 96 AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay Reagent has been developed, optimized, and applied in the vaccine efficacy studies. The TNA assay measures the protective neutralizing anti-ricin antibodies in animal sera by determining the cell viability after ricin exposure in the assay system and comparing it to a purified mouse polyclonal antiricin IgG standard curve. The standard curve of the anti-ricin TNA assay closely fits a four-parameter logistic regression model. The unknown test sample concentration was expressed as microg/mL, but not the 50% effective concentration (EC50), which was determined by most TNA assays. The neutralizing endpoint titers, not the 50% effective dilution (ED50), of human specimens were measured with the TNA assay in support of the clinical study of the RVEc vaccine. The optimal amount of ricin toxin, EL4 cells, and concentration of standards used in the assay system was established to minimize false-negative and false-positive results of serum specimens from the nonclinical and clinical studies of RVEc. The testing conditions were adjusted to optimize assay performance. The colorimetric TNA assay replaced a radioactive TNA assay previously used in the ricin vaccine studies.

  6. Neutralization of Apis mellifera bee venom activities by suramin.

    PubMed

    El-Kik, Camila Z; Fernandes, Fabrício F A; Tomaz, Marcelo Amorim; Gaban, Glauco A; Fonseca, Tatiane F; Calil-Elias, Sabrina; Oliveira, Suellen D S; Silva, Claudia L M; Martinez, Ana Maria Blanco; Melo, Paulo A

    2013-06-01

    In this work we evaluated the ability of suramin, a polysulfonated naphthylurea derivative, to antagonize the cytotoxic and enzymatic effects of the crude venom of Apis mellifera. Suramin was efficient to decrease the lethality in a dose-dependent way. The hemoconcentration caused by lethal dose injection of bee venom was abolished by suramin (30 μg/g). The edematogenic activity of the venom (0.3 μg/g) was antagonized by suramin (10 μg/g) in all treatment protocols. The changes in the vascular permeability caused by A. mellifera (1 μg/g) venom were inhibited by suramin (30 μg/g) in the pre- and posttreatment as well as when the venom was preincubated with suramin. In addition, suramin also inhibited cultured endothelial cell lesion, as well as in vitro myotoxicity, evaluated in mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle, which was inhibited by suramin (10 and 25 μM), decreasing the rate of CK release, showing that suramin protected the sarcolemma against damage induced by components of bee venom (2.5 μg/mL). Moreover, suramin inhibited the in vivo myotoxicity induced by i.m. injection of A. mellifera venom in mice (0.5 μg/g). The analysis of the area under the plasma CK vs. time curve showed that preincubation, pre- and posttreatment with suramin (30 μg/g) inhibited bee venom myotoxic activity in mice by about 89%, 45% and 40%, respectively. Suramin markedly inhibited the PLA2 activity in a concentration-dependent way (1-30 μM). Being suramin a polyanion molecule, the effects observed may be due to the interaction of its charges with the polycation components present in A. mellifera bee venom. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Neutralizing activities against seasonal influenza viruses in human intravenous immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Hiroyuki; Urayama, Takeru; Hirota, Kazue; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Takahashi, Kazuo; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Yunoki, Mikihiro

    2017-01-01

    Influenza viruses A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B are known seasonal viruses that undergo annual mutation. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) contains anti-seasonal influenza virus globulins. Although the virus-neutralizing (VN) titer is an indicator of protective antibodies, changes in this titer over extended time periods have yet to be examined. In this study, variations in hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and VN titers against seasonal influenza viruses in IVIG lots over extended time periods were examined. In addition, the importance of monitoring the reactivity of IVIG against seasonal influenza viruses with varying antigenicity was evaluated. A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B influenza virus strains and IVIG lots manufactured from 1999 to 2014 were examined. The HI titer was measured by standard methods. The VN titer was measured using a micro-focus method. IVIG exhibited significant HI and VN titers against all investigated strains. Our results suggest that the donor population maintains both specific and cross-reactive antibodies against seasonal influenza viruses, except in cases of pandemic viruses, despite major antigen changes. The titers against seasonal influenza vaccine strains, including past strains, were stable over short time periods but increased slowly over time. PMID:28331286

  8. The Non-Neutrality of Technology: A Theoretical Analysis and Empirical Study of Computer Mediated Communication Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Yong; Alvarez-Torres, Maria Jose; Smith, Bryan; Tan, Hueyshan Sophia

    2004-01-01

    Arguing against the common perception of technology as passive, neutral, and universal, this article presents a theoretical analysis of a commonly used and frequently studied technology--Computer Mediated Communication (CMC)--to illustrate how a technology that is often undistinguished in practice and research is indeed active, biased, and…

  9. Promoting Active Species Generation by Electrochemical Activation in Alkaline Media for Efficient Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution in Neutral Media.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Cheng, Han; Liu, Linqi; Lv, Haifeng; Wu, Xiaojun; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2017-01-11

    In this study, by using dicobalt phosphide nanoparticles as precatalysts, we demonstrated that electrochemical activation of metallic precatalysts in alkaline media (comparing with directly electrochemical activation in neutral media) could significantly promote the OER catalysis in neutral media, specifically realizing a 2-fold enhanced activity and meanwhile showing a greatly decreased overpotential of about 100 mV at 10 mA cm(-2). Compared directly with electrochemical activation in neutral media, the electrochemical activation in harsh alkaline media could easily break the strong Co-Co bond and promote active species generation on the surface of metallic Co2P, thus accounting for the enhancement of neutral OER activity, which is also evidenced by HRTEM and the electrochemical double-layer capacitance measurement. The activation of electrochemical oxidation of metallic precatalysts in alkaline media enhanced neutral OER catalysis could also be observed on CoP nanoparticles and Ni2P nanoparticles, suggesting this is a generic strategy. Our work highlights that the activation of electrochemical oxidation of metallic precatalysts in alkaline media would pave new avenues for the design of advanced neutral OER electrocatalysts.

  10. An analysis of bipropellant neutralization for spacecraft refueling operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauffman, David

    1987-01-01

    Refueling of satellites on orbit with storable propellants will involve venting part or all of the pressurant gas from the propellant tanks. This gas will be saturated with propellant vapor, and it may also have significant amounts of entrained fine droplets of propellant. The two most commonly used bipropellants, monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4), are highly reactive and toxic. Various possible ways of neutralizing the vented propellants are examined. The amount of propellant vented in a typical refueling operation is shown to be in the range of 0.2 to 5% of the tank capacity. Four potential neutralization schemes are examined: chemical decomposition, chemical reaction, condensation and adsorption. Chemical decomposition to essentially inert materials is thermodynamically feasible for both MMH and N2O4. It would be the simplest and easiest neutralization method to implement. Chemical decomposition would require more complex control. Condensation would require a refrigeration system and a very efficent phase separator. Adsorption is likely to be much heavier. A preliminary assessment of the four neutralization shemes is presented, along with suggested research and development plans.

  11. Report for neutral buoyancy simulations of transfer orbit stage contingency extravehicular activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sexton, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The transfer orbit stage (TOS) will propel the advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) from the Space Shuttle to an Earth geosynchronous transfer orbit. Two neutral buoyancy test series were conducted at MSFC to validate the extravehicular activities (EVA) contingency operations for the ACTS/TOS/mission. The results of the neutral buoyancy tests are delineated and a brief history of the TOS EVA program is given.

  12. Ion-neutral coupling: Geomagnetic activity modulation of the Equatorial Thermosphere Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, J.; Dou, X.; Thayer, J. P.; Wang, W.; Luan, X.

    2012-12-01

    The two-way momentum coupling between the neutral thermosphere and its plasma environment plays an important role in producing the trough of the Equatorial Thermosphere Anomaly (ETA). It was found that field-aligned ion drag associated with the equatorial ionosphere anomaly (EIA) can result in vertical motion in the neutral gas over the magnetic equator leading to a reduction in temperature and a trough in thermosphere density at a given altitude. It was also found that the formation of the ETA crests is attributed to plasma-neutral heating which has two peaks in the topside ionosphere aside the magnetic equator. This study is devoted to address the geomagnetic activity affect on the coupling between the equatorial ionosphere and thermosphere on the basis of satellite observations and first-principle ionosphere-thermosphere simulations. The deposited magnetospheric energy into the upper atmosphere associated with geomagnetic activity changes the ionosphere and its background neutral atmosphere significantly and hence their coupling processes. On the other hand, the enhanced electric field and neutral wind during storm time can modulate the EIA and ETA and alter the momentum and energy coupling between the thermosphere and ionosphere in the equatorial F region. Results from NCAR-TIEGCM simulations will help elucidate the ion-neutral coupling processes related to the ETA under active geomagnetic conditions

  13. Values in the Net Neutrality Debate: Applying Content Analysis to Testimonies from Public Hearings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, An-Shou

    2012-01-01

    The Net neutrality debate is an important telecommunications policy issue that closely tied to technological innovation, economic development, and information access. Existing studies on Net neutrality have focused primarily on technological requirements, economic analysis, and regulatory justifications. Since values, technology, and policy are…

  14. Values in the Net Neutrality Debate: Applying Content Analysis to Testimonies from Public Hearings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, An-Shou

    2012-01-01

    The Net neutrality debate is an important telecommunications policy issue that closely tied to technological innovation, economic development, and information access. Existing studies on Net neutrality have focused primarily on technological requirements, economic analysis, and regulatory justifications. Since values, technology, and policy are…

  15. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for Edge Plasma Analysis in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Castracane, J.

    2001-01-04

    The Heavy Neutral Beam Probe (HNBP) developed initially with DOE funding under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program was installed on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) at the CCFM. This diagnostic was designed to perform fundamental measurements of edge plasma properties. The hardware was capable of measuring electron density and potential profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution. Fluctuation spectra for these parameters were obtained with HNBP for transport studies.

  16. Neutral meson and direct photon analysis with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, A. M.; ALICE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of neutral mesons, particularly π0, s and η’s, plays an important role in the study of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), the hot and dense medium created in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. Parton energy loss in the QGP, often called jet quenching, can be assessed via measuring the suppression of high-pT π0, s in heavy-ion collisions, when compared to pp collisions using the nuclear modification factor (Raa). Furthermore, neutral mesons are the dominant source of photons in pp and Pb-Pb collisions, and their precise measurement is required to measure direct photons that are produced thermally within the QGP or in hard initial scatterings in the earliest phases of the collision. In both cases, high- quality measurements in pp collisions are required as a reference for Pb-Pb collisions. ALICE measurements of neutral meson spectra cover a large p T range, with the Photon Conversion Method - which requires measurements from the ITS and TPC - covering low to intermediate p T and the PHOS and EMCal electromagnetic calorimeters covering an intermediate to high p T range. In this presentation, measurements of π0, s and η’s obtained from the ALICE experiment, for pp collisions at several collisional center of mass energies ≤ft(\\sqrt{{s}NN}\\right), from 0.9 TeV to 8 TeV and in Pb-Pb collisions at \\sqrt{{s}NN}=2.76 {{TeV}}, will be presented. The reconstruction of neutral mesons using the Photon Conversion Method (PCM) will also be discussed.

  17. Neural Activation Underlying Cognitive Control in the Context of Neutral and Affectively Charged Pictures in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Connie; White, Lauren K.; McDermott, Jennifer Martin; Fox, Nathan A.

    2012-01-01

    The neural correlates of cognitive control for typically developing 9-year-old children were examined using dense-array ERPs and estimates of cortical activation (LORETA) during a go/no-go task with two conditions: a neutral picture condition and an affectively charged picture condition. Activation was estimated for the entire cortex after which…

  18. Neural Activation Underlying Cognitive Control in the Context of Neutral and Affectively Charged Pictures in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Connie; White, Lauren K.; McDermott, Jennifer Martin; Fox, Nathan A.

    2012-01-01

    The neural correlates of cognitive control for typically developing 9-year-old children were examined using dense-array ERPs and estimates of cortical activation (LORETA) during a go/no-go task with two conditions: a neutral picture condition and an affectively charged picture condition. Activation was estimated for the entire cortex after which…

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Elite Neutralizers: Individuals with Broad and Potent Neutralizing Activity Identified by Using a High-Throughput Neutralization Assay together with an Analytical Selection Algorithm▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Simek, Melissa D.; Rida, Wasima; Priddy, Frances H.; Pung, Pham; Carrow, Emily; Laufer, Dagna S.; Lehrman, Jennifer K.; Boaz, Mark; Tarragona-Fiol, Tony; Miiro, George; Birungi, Josephine; Pozniak, Anton; McPhee, Dale A.; Manigart, Olivier; Karita, Etienne; Inwoley, André; Jaoko, Walter; DeHovitz, Jack; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Paris, Robert; Walker, Laura M.; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Fast, Patricia E.; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.

    2009-01-01

    The development of a rapid and efficient system to identify human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals with broad and potent HIV-1-specific neutralizing antibody responses is an important step toward the discovery of critical neutralization targets for rational AIDS vaccine design. In this study, samples from HIV-1-infected volunteers from diverse epidemiological regions were screened for neutralization responses using pseudovirus panels composed of clades A, B, C, and D and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs). Initially, 463 serum and plasma samples from Australia, Rwanda, Uganda, the United Kingdom, and Zambia were screened to explore neutralization patterns and selection ranking algorithms. Samples were identified that neutralized representative isolates from at least four clade/CRF groups with titers above prespecified thresholds and ranked based on a weighted average of their log-transformed neutralization titers. Linear regression methods selected a five-pseudovirus subset, representing clades A, B, and C and one CRF01_AE, that could identify top-ranking samples with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) neutralization titers of ≥100 to multiple isolates within at least four clade groups. This reduced panel was then used to screen 1,234 new samples from the Ivory Coast, Kenya, South Africa, Thailand, and the United States, and 1% were identified as elite neutralizers. Elite activity is defined as the ability to neutralize, on average, more than one pseudovirus at an IC50 titer of 300 within a clade group and across at least four clade groups. These elite neutralizers provide promising starting material for the isolation of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to assist in HIV-1 vaccine design. PMID:19439467

  20. Detection of Broadly Neutralizing Activity within the First Months of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fabra-Garcia, A.; Gonzalez, N.; Nicolas, D.; Merino-Mansilla, A.; Manzardo, C.; Ambrosioni, J.; Schultz, A.; Meyerhans, A.; Mascola, J. R.; Gatell, J. M.; Alcami, J.; Miro, J. M.; Yuste, E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A fraction of HIV-1 patients are able to generate broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) after 2 to 4 years of infection. In rare occasions such antibodies are observed close to the first year of HIV-1 infection but never within the first 6 months. In this study, we analyzed the neutralization breadth of sera from 157 antiretroviral-naive individuals who were infected for less than 1 year. A range of neutralizing activities was observed with a previously described panel of six recombinant viruses from five different subtypes (M. Medina-Ramirez et al., J Virol 85:5804–5813, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02482-10). Some sera were broadly reactive, predominantly targeting envelope epitopes within the V2 glycan-dependent region. The neutralization breadth was positively associated with time postinfection (P = 0.0001), but contrary to what has been reported for chronic infections, no association with the viral load was observed. Notably, five individuals within the first 6 months of infection (two as early as 77 and 96 days postinfection) showed substantial cross-neutralization. This was confirmed with an extended panel of 20 Env pseudoviruses from four different subtypes (two in tier 3, 14 in tier 2, and four in tier 1). Sera from these individuals were capable of neutralizing viruses from four different subtypes with a geometric mean 50% infective dose (ID50) between 100 and 800. These results indicate that induction of cross-neutralizing responses, albeit rare, is achievable even within 6 months of HIV-1 infection. These observations encourage the search for immunogens able to elicit this kind of response in preventive HIV-1 vaccine approaches. IMPORTANCE There are very few individuals able to mount broadly neutralizing activity (bNA) close to the first year postinfection. It is not known how early in the infection cross-neutralizing responses can be induced. In the present study, we show that bNAbs, despite being rare, can be induced much earlier

  1. Preclinical evaluation of three polyspecific antivenoms against the venom of Echis ocellatus: Neutralization of toxic activities and antivenomics.

    PubMed

    Calvete, Juan J; Arias, Ana Silvia; Rodríguez, Yania; Quesada-Bernat, Sarai; Sánchez, Laura V; Chippaux, Jean Philippe; Pla, Davinia; Gutiérrez, José María

    2016-09-01

    Snakebite envenoming has a heavy burden in the public health in sub-Saharan Africa. The viperid species Echis ocellatus (carpet viper or saw-scaled viper) is the medically most important snake in the savannahs of western sub-Saharan Africa. Several antivenoms are being distributed and used in this region for the treatment of envenomings by E. ocellatus, but the preclinical efficacy of some of these antivenoms has not been assessed. The present study evaluated the preclinical efficacy against E. ocellatus venom of three polyspecific antivenoms: (a) Snake Venom Antiserum (Pan Africa), manufactured by Premium Serums and Vaccines (India); (b) Snake Venom Antiserum (Africa), manufactured by VINS Bioproducts (India); and (c) Antivipmyn(®) Africa, manufactured by Instituto Bioclon (Mexico). Antivenomics analysis revealed the ability of the three antivenoms to immunocapture the majority of components of the venoms of E. ocellatus from Cameroon, Nigeria and Mali, although their maximal immunocapturing capability varied. Bioclon and Premium Serums antivenoms were effective in the neutralization of lethal, hemorrhagic and in vitro coagulant activities of the venom of E. ocellatus from Cameroon, albeit with different potencies. VINS antivenom neutralized hemorrhagic activity of this venom, but failed to neutralize lethality at the highest antivenom dose tested, and had a low neutralizing efficacy against in vitro coagulant effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Neurotoxicity is Neutralized by Recombinant ADAMTS 13

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Mengchen; Xu, Haochen; Wang, Lixiang; Luo, Haiyu; Zhu, Ximin; Cai, Ping; Wei, Lixiang; Lu, Lu; Cao, Yongliang; Ye, Rong; Fan, Wenying; Zhao, Bing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is an effective treatment for ischemic stroke, but its neurotoxicity is a significant problem. Here we tested the hypothesis that recombinant ADAMTS 13 (rADAMTS 13) would reduce tPA neurotoxicity in a mouse model of stroke. We show that treatment with rADAMTS 13 in combination with tPA significantly reduced infarct volume compared with mice treated with tPA alone 48 hours after stroke. The combination treatment significantly improved neurological deficits compared with mice treated with tPA or vehicle alone. These neuroprotective effects were associated with significant reductions in fibrin deposits in ischemic vessels and less severe cell death in ischemic brain. The effect of rADAMTS13 on tPA neurotoxicity was mimicked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist M-801, and was abolished by injection of NMDA. Moreover, rADAMTS 13 prevents the neurotoxicity effect of tPA, by blocking its interaction with the NMDA receptor NR2B and the attendant phosphorylation of NR2B and activation of ERK1/2. Finally, the NR2B-specific NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil abolished tPA neurotoxicity and rADAMTS 13 treatment had no further beneficial effect. Our data suggest that the combination of rADAMTS 13 and tPA may provide a novel treatment of ischemic stroke by diminishing the neurotoxic effects of exogenous tPA. PMID:27181025

  3. EEG source activity during processing of neutral stimuli in subjects with anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Gmaj, Bartłomiej; Januszko, Piotr; Kamiński, Jan; Drozdowicz, Ewa; Kopera, Maciej; Wołyńczyk-Gmaj, Dorota; Szelenberger, Waldemar; Wojnar, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are a social problem due to their prevalence and consequences. It is crucial to explore the influence of anxiety on cognitive processes. In this study we recorded EEG activity from 73 subjects (35 patients, 38 controls, matched for age and education) during performance of the Continuous Attention Task. We used low resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) for evaluation of mechanisms of impaired cognitive performance in anxiety disorders. Analysis showed that patients with anxiety disorders committed more errors than the controls, had a short latency of P300 and higher amplitude of ERPs at all steps of stimulus processing. Furthermore, we showed that there was a relationship between the scores of Hamilton Anxiety Scale and Beck Depression Inventory, and amplitudes and latencies of ERPs. The results of LORETA analysis showed that enhanced neural responses were found within circuits mediating visual information processing, sustained attention and anxiety. Also, we found higher current density within areas playing an important role in the brain fear network - anterior cingulate and anterior part of insula. Electrophysiological neuroimaging showed greater recruitment of cognitive resources in anxiety disorders, evidenced by higher current density and activation of greater number of brain areas. Despite the strategy employed to compensate for cognitive problems, the anxiety patients did not achieve the same performance as controls. Present study demonstrates that anxiety disorders influence processing of neutral stimuli and this influence is observable at both behavioral and electrophysiological level. The data suggests instability of neural systems responsible for information selection, working memory, engagement and focusing of attention.

  4. Pseudotype-Based Neutralization Assays for Influenza: A Systematic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carnell, George William; Ferrara, Francesca; Grehan, Keith; Thompson, Craig Peter; Temperton, Nigel James

    2015-01-01

    The use of vaccination against the influenza virus remains the most effective method of mitigating the significant morbidity and mortality caused by this virus. Antibodies elicited by currently licensed influenza vaccines are predominantly hemagglutination-inhibition (HI)-competent antibodies that target the globular head of hemagglutinin (HA) thus inhibiting influenza virus entry into target cells. These antibodies predominantly confer homosubtypic/strain specific protection and only rarely confer heterosubtypic protection. However, recent academia or pharma-led R&D toward the production of a “universal vaccine” has centered on the elicitation of antibodies directed against the stalk of the influenza HA that has been shown to confer broad protection across a range of different subtypes (H1–H16). The accurate and sensitive measurement of antibody responses elicited by these “next-generation” influenza vaccines is, however, hampered by the lack of sensitivity of the traditional influenza serological assays HI, single radial hemolysis, and microneutralization. Assays utilizing pseudotypes, chimeric viruses bearing influenza glycoproteins, have been shown to be highly efficient for the measurement of homosubtypic and heterosubtypic broadly neutralizing antibodies, making them ideal serological tools for the study of cross-protective responses against multiple influenza subtypes with pandemic potential. In this review, we will analyze and compare literature involving the production of influenza pseudotypes with particular emphasis on their use in serum antibody neutralization assays. This will enable us to establish the parameters required for optimization and propose a consensus protocol to be employed for the further deployment of these assays in influenza vaccine immunogenicity studies. PMID:25972865

  5. Neutral-Line Magnetic Shear and Enhanced Coronal Heating in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falconer, D. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Gary, G. A.; Shimizu, T.

    1997-01-01

    By examining the magnetic structure at sites in the bright coronal interiors of active regions that are not flaring but exhibit persistent strong coronal heating, we establish some new characteristics of the magnetic origins of this heating. We have examined the magnetic structure of these sites in five active regions, each of which was well observed by both the Yohkoh SXT and the Marshall Space Flight Center Vector Magnetograph and showed strong shear in its magnetic field along part of at least one neutral line (polarity inversion). Thus, we can assess whether this form of nonpotential field structure in active regions is a characteristic of the enhanced coronal heating and vice versa. From 27 orbits' worth of Yohkoh SXT images of the five active regions, we have obtained a sample of 94 persistently bright coronal features (bright in all images from a given orbit), 40 long (greater than or approximately equals 20,000 km) neutral-line segments having strong magnetic shear throughout (shear angle greater than 45 deg), and 39 long neutral-line segments having weak magnetic shear throughout (shear angle less than 45 deg). From this sample, we find that: (1) all of our persistently bright coronal features are rooted in magnetic fields that are stronger than 150 G; (2) nearly all (95%) of these enhanced coronal features are rooted near neutral lines (closer than 10,000 km); (3) a great majority (80%) of the bright features are rooted near strong-shear portions of neutral lines; (4) a great majority (85%) of long strong-shear segments of neutral lines have persistently bright coronal features rooted near them; (5) a large minority (40%) of long weak-shear segments of neutral lines have persistently bright coronal features rooted near them; and (6) the brightness of a persistently bright Coronal feature often changes greatly over a few hours. From these results, we conclude that most persistent enhanced heating of coronal loops in active regions: (1) requires the

  6. Computational analysis of anti–HIV-1 antibody neutralization panel data to identify potential functional epitope residues

    PubMed Central

    West, Anthony P.; Scharf, Louise; Horwitz, Joshua; Klein, Florian; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in single-cell antibody cloning methods have led to the identification of a variety of broadly neutralizing anti–HIV-1 antibodies. We developed a computational tool (Antibody Database) to help identify critical residues on the HIV-1 envelope protein whose natural variation affects antibody activity. Our simplifying assumption was that, for a given antibody, a significant portion of the dispersion of neutralization activity across a panel of HIV-1 strains is due to the amino acid identity or glycosylation state at a small number of specific sites, each acting independently. A model of an antibody’s neutralization IC50 was developed in which each site contributes a term to the logarithm of the modeled IC50. The analysis program attempts to determine the set of rules that minimizes the sum of the residuals between observed and modeled IC50 values. The predictive quality of the identified rules may be assessed in part by whether there is support for rules within individual viral clades. As a test case, we analyzed antibody 8ANC195, an anti-glycoprotein gp120 antibody of unknown specificity. The model for this antibody indicated that several glycosylation sites were critical for neutralization. We evaluated this prediction by measuring neutralization potencies of 8ANC195 against HIV-1 in vitro and in an antibody therapy experiment in humanized mice. These experiments confirmed that 8ANC195 represents a distinct class of glycan-dependent anti–HIV-1 antibody and validated the utility of computational analysis of neutralization panel data. PMID:23754383

  7. Neutralizing activities of caprine antibodies towards conserved regions of the HCV envelope glycoprotein E2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Anti HCV vaccine is not currently available and the present antiviral therapies fail to cure approximately half of the treated HCV patients. This study was designed to assess the immunogenic properties of genetically conserved peptides derived from the C-terminal region of HVR-1 and test their neutralizing activities in a step towards developing therapeutic and/or prophylactic immunogens against HCV infection. Antibodies were generated by vaccination of goats with synthetic peptides derived from HCV E2. Viral neutralizing capacity of the generated anti E2 antibodies was tested using in vitro assays. Goats immunized with E2 synthetic peptides termed p412 [a.a 412-419], p430 [a.a 430-447] and p517 [a.a 517-531] generated high titers of antibody responses 2 to 4.5 fold higher than comparable titers of antibodies to the same epitopes in chronic HCV patients. In post infection experiments of native HCV into cultured Huh7.5 cells anti p412 and anti p 517 were proven to be neutralizing to HCV genotype 4a from patients' sera (87.5% and 75% respectively). On the contrary anti p430 exhibited weak viral neutralization capacity on the same samples (31.25%). Furthermore Ab mixes containing anti p430 exhibited reduced viral neutralization properties. From these experiments one could predict that neutralization by Abs towards different E2-epitopes varies considerably and success in the enrichment of neutralization epitope-specific antibodies may be accompanied by favorable results in combating HCV infection. Also, E2 conserved peptides p517 and p412 represent potential components of a candidate peptide vaccine against HCV infection. PMID:21819575

  8. Standardized, mathematical model-based and validated in vitro analysis of anthrax lethal toxin neutralization.

    PubMed

    Li, Han; Soroka, Stephen D; Taylor, Thomas H; Stamey, Karen L; Stinson, Kelly Wallace; Freeman, Alison E; Abramson, Darbi R; Desai, Rita; Cronin, Li X; Oxford, J Wade; Caba, Joseph; Pleatman, Cynthia; Pathak, Sonal; Schmidt, Daniel S; Semenova, Vera A; Martin, Sandra K; Wilkins, Patricia P; Quinn, Conrad P

    2008-04-20

    Quantification of anthrax lethal toxin (LTx) neutralization activity (TNA) is pivotal in assessing protective antibody responses to anthrax vaccines and for evaluation of immunotherapies for anthrax. We have adapted and redesigned the TNA assay to establish a unifying, standardized, quantitative and validated technology platform for LTx neutralization in the J774A.1 murine cell line. Critical design features of this platform are 1) the application of a free-form or constrained 4 parameter logistic (4-PL) function to model neutralization responses within and between boundary limits of 100% cell survival and 95% cell lysis and 2) to exploit innovative assay curve recognition algorithms for interpretive endpoints. The assay was validated using human serum ED50 (dilution of serum effecting 50% neutralization) as the primary reportable value (RV). Intra-operator and intermediate precision, expressed as the coefficient of variation (%CV), were high at 10.5-15.5%CV and 13.5-14.5%CV respectively. TNA assay dilutional linearity was demonstrated for human sera using linear regression analysis of log(10) transformed data with slope=0.99, intercept=-0.03 and r(2)=0.985. Assay accuracy, inferred from the precision and linearity data and using a spike-recovery approach, was high with a percent error (%E) range of only 3.4-20.5%E. The lower limit of detection (LLOD) was ED50=12 and the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was ED50=36. The cell-based assay was robust, tolerating incubation temperatures from 35 to 39 degrees C, CO(2) concentrations from 3% to 7% and reporter substrate (MTT) concentrations of 2.5-7.5 mg/ml. Strict assay quality control parameters were met for up to 25 cell culture passages. The long term (50 month) assay stability, determined using human reference standards AVR414 and AVR801, indicated high precision, consistent accuracy and no detectable assay drift. A customized software program provided two additional assay metrics, Quantification Titer (QT) and

  9. Shelf life, dissolving action, and antibacterial activity of a neutralized 2.5% sodium hypochlorite solution.

    PubMed

    Camps, Jean; Pommel, Ludovic; Aubut, Virginie; Verhille, Bernard; Satoshi, Fukuzaki; Lascola, Bernad; About, Imad

    2009-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate the shelf life and the dissolving and antibacterial properties of a neutralized 2.5% NaOCl solution. The loss of available chlorine and the pH of the neutralized 2.5% NaOCl solution were recorded to determine its shelf life. The dissolving action on bovine dental pulp was assessed measuring weight loss, pH variation, and decrease in available chlorine content. The antibacterial activity was evaluated on artificially infected human teeth. The roots were endodontically prepared, sterilized, and inoculated with Enterococcus faecalis before irrigation with the neutralized solution. The presence of intracanal bacteria after irrigation was recorded. The neutralized solution presented a shelf life of 2 hours, dissolving capacities equivalent to control for the first 5 minutes, and a better antibacterial efficiency. The neutralized 2.5% NaOCl solution must be used within 2 hours after mixing, should be frequently renewed to maintain its dissolving capacities, and presented enhanced antibacterial properties.

  10. Method of active charge and current neutralization of intense ion beams for ICF

    SciTech Connect

    Guiragossian, Z.G.T.; Orthel, J.L.; Lemons, D.S.; Thode, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of generating the beam neutralization electrons with required properties are given in the context of a Light Ion Fusion Experiment (LIFE) designed accelerator. Recently derived envelope equations for neutralized and ballistically focused intense ion beams are applied to the LIFE geometry in which 10 MeV He/sup +/ multiple beamlets coalesce and undergo 45:1 radial compression while beam pulses experience a 20:1 axial compression in the propagation range of 10 m. Both active and auto-neutralization methods are examined and found to produce initial electron temperatures consistent with the requirement of the envelope equation for both radial and axial adiabatic beam pulse compressions. The stability of neutralized beam propagation is also examined concerning the Pierce type electrostatic instability and for the case of LIFE beams it is found to have insignificant effect. A scaled experimental setup is presented which can serve to perform near term tests on the ballistically focused propagation of neutralized light ion beams.

  11. Charge separation promoted activation of molecular oxygen by neutral gold clusters.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Alex P; Meijer, Gerard; Fielicke, André

    2013-02-06

    Gold nanoparticles and sub-nanoparticles famously act as highly efficient and selective low-temperature oxidation catalysts with molecular oxygen, in stark contrast to the nobility of the bulk phase. The origins of this activity and the nature of the active species remain open questions. Gas-phase studies of isolated gold clusters hold promise for disentangling these problems. Here we address the interaction of neutral gold clusters (Au(n); 4 ≤ n ≤ 21) with molecular oxygen by probing the highly characteristic O-O vibrational stretch frequencies. This reveals that for selected cluster sizes the oxygen is highly activated with respect to the free moiety. Complementary quantum chemical calculations provide evidence for substantial electron transfer to the O(2) unit and concomitant rearrangement of the parent gold cluster structure upon binding and activation. This gives evidence for a model of the interaction between neutral gold clusters and molecular oxygen.

  12. Chemical acceleration of a neutral granulated blast-furnace slag activated by sodium carbonate

    SciTech Connect

    Kovtun, Maxim Kearsley, Elsabe P. Shekhovtsova, Julia

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents results of a study on chemical acceleration of a neutral granulated blast-furnace slag activated using sodium carbonate. As strength development of alkali-activated slag cements containing neutral GBFS and sodium carbonate as activator at room temperature is known to be slow, three accelerators were investigated: sodium hydroxide, ordinary Portland cement and a combination of silica fume and slaked lime. In all cements, the main hydration product is C–(A)–S–H, but its structure varies between tobermorite and riversideite depending on the accelerator used. Calcite and gaylussite are present in all systems and they were formed due to either cation exchange reaction between the slag and the activator, or carbonation. With accelerators, compressive strength up to 15 MPa can be achieved within 24 h in comparison to 2.5 MPa after 48 h for a mix without an accelerator.

  13. Peptide-Modulated Activity Enhancement of Acidic Protease Cathepsin E at Neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Masayuki; Biyani, Madhu; Ghimire Gautam, Sunita; Nishigaki, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes are regulated by their activation and inhibition. Enzyme activators can often be effective tools for scientific and medical purposes, although they are more difficult to obtain than inhibitors. Here, using the paired peptide method, we report on protease-cathepsin-E-activating peptides that are obtained at neutral pH. These selected peptides also underwent molecular evolution, after which their cathepsin E activation capability improved. Thus, the activators we obtained could enhance cathepsin-E-induced cancer cell apoptosis, which indicated their potential as cancer drug precursors. PMID:23365585

  14. Prefusion F–specific antibodies determine the magnitude of RSV neutralizing activity in human sera

    PubMed Central

    Ngwuta, Joan O.; Chen, Man; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Joyce, M. Gordon; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Kumar, Azad; Yassine, Hadi M.; Moin, Syed M.; Killikelly, April M.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Rundlet, Emily J.; Sastry, Mallika; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Nason, Martha C.; Capella, Cristina; Peeples, Mark E.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; McLellan, Jason S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Graham, Barney S.

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is estimated to claim more lives among infants <1 year old than any other single pathogen, except malaria, and poses a substantial global health burden. Viral entry is mediated by a type I fusion glycoprotein (F) that transitions from a metastable prefusion (pre-F) to a stable postfusion (post-F) trimer. A highly neutralization-sensitive epitope, antigenic site Ø, is found only on pre-F. We determined what fraction of neutralizing (NT) activity in human sera is dependent on antibodies specific for antigenic site Ø or other antigenic sites on F in healthy subjects from ages 7 to 93 years. Adsorption of individual sera with stabilized pre-F protein removed >90% of NT activity and depleted binding antibodies to both F conformations. In contrast, adsorption with post-F removed ~30% of NT activity, and binding antibodies to pre-F were retained. These findings were consistent across all age groups. Protein competition neutralization assays with pre-F mutants in which sites Ø or II were altered to knock out binding of antibodies to the corresponding sites showed that these sites accounted for ~35 and <10% of NT activity, respectively. Binding competition assays with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) indicated that the amount of site Ø–specific antibodies correlated with NT activity, whereas the magnitude of binding competed by site II mAbs did not correlate with neutralization. Our results indicate that RSV NT activity in human sera is primarily derived from pre-F–specific antibodies, and therefore, inducing or boosting NT activity by vaccination will be facilitated by using pre-F antigens that preserve site Ø. PMID:26468324

  15. Potent Intratype Neutralizing Activity Distinguishes Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) from HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Özkaya Şahin, Gülşen; Holmgren, Birgitta; da Silva, Zacarias; Nielsen, Jens; Nowroozalizadeh, Salma; Esbjörnsson, Joakim; Månsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Sören; Norrgren, Hans; Aaby, Peter

    2012-01-01

    HIV-2 has a lower pathogenicity and transmission rate than HIV-1. Neutralizing antibodies could be contributing to these observations. Here we explored side by side the potency and breadth of intratype and intertype neutralizing activity (NAc) in plasma of 20 HIV-1-, 20 HIV-2-, and 11 dually HIV-1/2 (HIV-D)-seropositive individuals from Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Panels of primary isolates, five HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates, were tested in a plaque reduction assay using U87.CD4-CCR5 cells as targets. Intratype NAc in HIV-2 plasma was found to be considerably more potent and also broader than intratype NAc in HIV-1 plasma. This indicates that HIV-2-infected individuals display potent type-specific neutralizing antibodies, whereas such strong type-specific antibodies are absent in HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, the potency of intratype NAc was positively associated with the viral load of HIV-1 but not HIV-2, suggesting that NAc in HIV-1 infection is more antigen stimulation dependent than in HIV-2 infection, where plasma viral loads typically are at least 10-fold lower than in HIV-1 infection. Intertype NAc of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections was, instead, of low potency. HIV-D subjects had NAc to HIV-2 with similar high potency as singly HIV-2-infected individuals, whereas neutralization of HIV-1 remained poor, indicating that the difference in NAc between HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections depends on the virus itself. We suggest that immunogenicity and/or antigenicity, meaning the neutralization phenotype, of HIV-2 is distinct from that of HIV-1 and that HIV-2 may display structures that favor triggering of potent neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:22072782

  16. Intestinal immunostimulatory activity of neutral polysaccharide isolated from traditionally fermented Korean brown rice vinegar.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon; Lee, Ho; Shin, Kwang-Soon

    2016-12-01

    In this study, diverse intestinal immunostimulatory activities were demonstrated for polysaccharides (KBV-CP) isolated from Korean brown rice vinegar. Monosaccharide composition analysis indicated that KBV-CP was composed mainly of neutral sugar units, primarily glucose and mannose. In vitro, KBV-CP significantly augmented the productions of immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgA-related cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, results of an in vitro co-culture system of intestinal Caco-2 cells and RAW 264.7 macrophage cells suggested that KBV-CP is not only cytotoxic to Caco-2 cells but also capable of being transported across the small intestinal barrier. Oral administration of KBV-CP every other day for 20 days induced the IgA production by Peyer's patch cells as well as in intestinal fluid and fecal extract. In addition, the production of IgA-related cytokines such as TGF-β and IL-6, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor was triggered.

  17. Interaction between phosphate and acid-activated neutralized red mud during adsorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jie; Cong, Xiangna; Zhang, Panyue; Hoffmann, Erhard; Zeng, Guangming; Liu, Yang; Fang, Wei; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Haibo

    2015-11-01

    Acid-activated neutralized red mud (AaN-RM) has become a promising adsorbent for phosphate adsorption. The maximum phosphate adsorption capacity of AaN-RM reached 492.46 mg g-1 in this study, which was much higher than that of many other adsorbents. However, no study has specifically investigated how the phosphate reacted with AaN-RM. For the first time the interaction between phosphate and AaN-RM during adsorption process was investigated in this research. Kinetic models and isotherms were used to analyze the possible reaction pathways between AaN-RM and phosphate. Particularly, the phosphate complexes on AaN-RM surface, and the exact role of different adsorption mechanisms were systemically identified. The phosphate adsorption was well described by pseudo second-order kinetic model and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm, which suggested that chemisorption occurred between the phosphate and AaN-RM, and the phosphate adsorption was governed by heterogeneous processes. Furthermore, the phosphate complexes of Fe-P, Al-P, Fe-P-H3PO4 and Al-P-H3PO4 were formed on AaN-RM surface through ion exchange, precipitation and surface deposition mechanisms. XPS analysis of P 2p peak showed that 59.78% of the phosphate was adsorbed through the ion exchange and precipitation with strong chemical bonds, and 40.22% was adsorbed through the surface deposition with weak chemical bonds.

  18. Active to sterile neutrino mixing limits from neutral-current interactions in MINOS.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Auty, D J; Ayres, D S; Backhouse, C; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Cavanaugh, S; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Coleman, S J; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Danko, I Z; de Jong, J K; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grant, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Huang, X; Hylen, J; Ilic, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Lefeuvre, G; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mitchell, J; Moore, C D; Morfín, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Nowak, J A; Oliver, W P; Orchanian, M; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Pearce, G F; Petyt, D A; Phan-Budd, S; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Qiu, X; Ratchford, J; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Rodrigues, P A; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Shanahan, P; Sousa, A; Stamoulis, P; Strait, M; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tetteh-Lartey, E; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tinti, G; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Walding, J J; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2011-07-01

    Results are reported from a search for active to sterile neutrino oscillations in the MINOS long-baseline experiment, based on the observation of neutral-current neutrino interactions, from an exposure to the NuMI neutrino beam of 7.07×10(20) protons on target. A total of 802 neutral-current event candidates is observed in the Far Detector, compared to an expected number of 754 ± 28(stat) ± 37(syst) for oscillations among three active flavors. The fraction f(s) of disappearing ν(μ) that may transition to ν(s) is found to be less than 22% at the 90% C.L.

  19. Active to Sterile Neutrino Mixing Limits from Neutral-Current Interactions in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Bock, G. J.; Boehnlein, D. J.; Bogert, D.; Childress, S.; Harris, D.; Hatcher, R.; Hylen, J.; James, C.; Jensen, D.; Koizumi, G.; Kreymer, A.; Lucas, P.; Moore, C. D.; Morfin, J.; Plunkett, R. K.; Rebel, B.; Sharma, R.; Shanahan, P.; Torretta, D.

    2011-07-01

    Results are reported from a search for active to sterile neutrino oscillations in the MINOS long-baseline experiment, based on the observation of neutral-current neutrino interactions, from an exposure to the NuMI neutrino beam of 7.07x10{sup 20} protons on target. A total of 802 neutral-current event candidates is observed in the Far Detector, compared to an expected number of 754{+-}28(stat){+-}37(syst) for oscillations among three active flavors. The fraction f{sub s} of disappearing {nu}{sub {mu}} that may transition to {nu}{sub s} is found to be less than 22% at the 90% C.L.

  20. Activity Coefficient Derivatives of Ternary Systems Based on Scatchard's Neutral Electrolyte description

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D G

    2007-05-16

    Activity coefficient derivatives with respect to molality are presented for the Scatchard Neutral Electrolyte description of a ternary common-ion electrolyte system. These quantities are needed for the calculation of 'diffusion Onsager coefficients' and in turn for tests of the Onsager Reciprocal Relations in diffusion. The usually-omitted b{sub 23} term is included. The direct SNE binary approximations and a further approximation are discussed. Binary evaluation strategies other than constant ionic strength are considered.

  1. Pyrazinamide Is Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cultures at Neutral pH and Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    den Hertog, Alice L; Menting, Sandra; Pfeltz, Richard; Warns, Matthew; Siddiqi, Salman H; Anthony, Richard M

    2016-08-01

    For the past decades, an acidic pH has been used to render Mycobacterium tuberculosis susceptible to pyrazinamide for in vitro testing. Here, we show that at the standard breakpoint concentration and reduced culture temperatures, pyrazinamide (PZA) is active against tuberculosis (TB) at neutral pH. This finding should help unravel the mechanism of action of PZA and allow drug susceptibility testing (DST) methods to be optimized.

  2. Accumulated bending energy elicits neutral sphingomyelinase activity in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    López, David J; Egido-Gabas, Meritxell; López-Montero, Iván; Busto, Jon V; Casas, Josefina; Garnier, Marie; Monroy, Francisco; Larijani, Banafshé; Goñi, Félix M; Alonso, Alicia

    2012-05-02

    We propose that accumulated membrane bending energy elicits a neutral sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity in human erythrocytes. Membrane bending was achieved by osmotic or chemical processes, and SMase activity was assessed by quantitative thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The activity induced by hypotonic stress in erythrocyte membranes had the pH dependence, ion dependence, and inhibitor sensitivity of mammalian neutral SMases. The activity caused a decrease in SM contents, with a minimum at 6 min after onset of the hypotonic conditions, and then the SM contents were recovered. We also elicited SMase activity by adding lysophosphatidylcholine externally or by generating it with phospholipase A(2). The same effect was observed upon addition of chlorpromazine or sodium deoxycholate at concentrations below the critical micellar concentration, and even under hypertonic conditions. A unifying factor of the various agents that elicit this SMase activity is the accumulated membrane bending energy. Both hypo-and hypertonic conditions impose an increased curvature, whereas the addition of surfactants or phospholipase A(2) activation increases the outer monolayer area, thus leading to an increased bending energy. The fact that this latent SMase activity is tightly coupled to the membrane bending properties suggests that it may be related to the general phenomenon of stress-induced ceramide synthesis and apoptosis.

  3. Accumulated Bending Energy Elicits Neutral Sphingomyelinase Activity in Human Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    López, David J.; Egido-Gabas, Meritxell; López-Montero, Iván; Busto, Jon V.; Casas, Josefina; Garnier, Marie; Monroy, Francisco; Larijani, Banafshé; Goñi, Félix M.; Alonso, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    We propose that accumulated membrane bending energy elicits a neutral sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity in human erythrocytes. Membrane bending was achieved by osmotic or chemical processes, and SMase activity was assessed by quantitative thin-layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry. The activity induced by hypotonic stress in erythrocyte membranes had the pH dependence, ion dependence, and inhibitor sensitivity of mammalian neutral SMases. The activity caused a decrease in SM contents, with a minimum at 6 min after onset of the hypotonic conditions, and then the SM contents were recovered. We also elicited SMase activity by adding lysophosphatidylcholine externally or by generating it with phospholipase A2. The same effect was observed upon addition of chlorpromazine or sodium deoxycholate at concentrations below the critical micellar concentration, and even under hypertonic conditions. A unifying factor of the various agents that elicit this SMase activity is the accumulated membrane bending energy. Both hypo-and hypertonic conditions impose an increased curvature, whereas the addition of surfactants or phospholipase A2 activation increases the outer monolayer area, thus leading to an increased bending energy. The fact that this latent SMase activity is tightly coupled to the membrane bending properties suggests that it may be related to the general phenomenon of stress-induced ceramide synthesis and apoptosis. PMID:22824271

  4. Classification of illicit heroin by UPLC-Q-TOF analysis of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuimei; Hua, Zhendong; Bai, Yanping

    2015-12-01

    The illicit manufacture of heroin results in the formation of trace levels of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities that provide valuable information about the manufacturing process used. In this work, a new ultra performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF) method; that features high resolution, mass accuracy and sensitivity for profiling neutral and acidic heroin manufacturing impurities was developed. After the UPLC-Q-TOF analysis, the retention times and m/z data pairs of acidic and neutral manufacturing impurities were detected, and 19 peaks were found to be evidently different between heroin samples from "Golden Triangle" and "Golden Crescent". Based on the data set of these 19 impurities in 150 authentic heroin samples, classification of heroin geographic origins was successfully achieved utilizing partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). By analyzing another data set of 267 authentic heroin samples, the developed discrimiant model was validated and proved to be accurate and reliable.

  5. Alkaline, acid, and neutral phosphatase activities are induced during development in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, R A; Zusman, D R

    1990-05-01

    One of the signals that has been reported to be important in stimulating fruiting body formation of Myxococcus xanthus is starvation for phosphate. We therefore chose to study phosphatase activity during M. xanthus development. Many phosphatases can cleave the substrate p-nitrophenol phosphate. Using this substrate in buffers at various pHs, we obtained a profile of phosphatase activities during development and germination of M. xanthus. These experiments indicated that there are five patterns of phosphatase activity in M. xanthus: two vegetative and three developmental. The two uniquely vegetative activities have pH optima at 7.2 and 8.5. Both require magnesium and both are inhibited by the reducing agent dithiothreitol. The developmental (spores) patterns of activity have pH optima of 5.2, 7.2, and 8.5. All three activities are Mg independent. Only the alkaline phosphatase activity is inhibited by dithiothreitol. The acid phosphatase activity is induced very early in development, within the first 2 to 4 h. Both the neutral and alkaline phosphatase Mg-independent activities are induced much later, about the time that myxospores become evident (24 to 30 h). The three activities are greatly diminished upon germination; however, the kinetics of loss differ for all three. The acid phosphatase activity declines very rapidly, the neutral activity begins to decline only after spores begin to convert to rods, and the alkaline phosphatase activity remains high until the time the cells begin to divide. All three developmental activities were measured in the developmental signalling mutants carrying asg, csg, and dsg. The pattern of expression obtained in the mutants was consistent with that of other developmentally regulated genes which exhibit similar patterns of expression during development. The ease with which phosphatases can be assayed should make the activities described in this report useful biochemical markers of stages of both fruiting body formation and

  6. Interactions of alpha-amylase and calcium chelator during neutral detergent fiber analysis.

    PubMed

    Brougher, Daniel S; Oleas, Telmo B; Kohn, Richard A

    2005-07-13

    Amylase and calcium chelators, such as disodium ethylene diaminotetraacetate (EDTA), are used in analysis of neutral detergent fiber (NDF) to dissolve starch and pectin, respectively. However, these reagents may interfere with each other's activity. Six combinations of alpha-amylase and EDTA were examined for determining NDF values of beet pulp (Beta vulgaris), ground corn (Zea mays L.), timothy hay (Phleum pratense), and soybean meal (Glycine max L). For treatment A, 2.5 mL of alpha-amylase was added 5 min after boiling. Other treatments differed as follows: (B) 4.5 mL of alpha-amylase, (C) 4.5 mL of alpha-amylase added 30 min after boiling, (D) delayed addition of EDTA to 30 min after boiling, (E) no EDTA, and (F) no alpha-amylase. Inclusion of EDTA interfered with amylase activity in corn grain samples, and addition of amylase to beet pulp and soybean meal samples reduced the effectiveness of EDTA and increased ash in the NDF residue. Amylase should not be used for samples that do not contain starch. Calculating NDF on an ash-free basis minimized the negative effects of amylase on EDTA activity.

  7. Diaphragm dysfunction in heart failure is accompanied by increases in neutral sphingomyelinase activity and ceramide content.

    PubMed

    Empinado, Hyacinth M; Deevska, Gergana M; Nikolova-Karakashian, Mariana; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Christou, Demetra D; Ferreira, Leonardo F

    2014-05-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) causes inspiratory (diaphragm) muscle weakness and fatigue that contributes to dyspnoea and limited physical capacity in patients. However, the mechanisms that lead to diaphragm dysfunction in CHF remain poorly understood. Cytokines and angiotensin II are elevated in CHF and stimulate the activity of the enzyme sphingomyelinase (SMase) and accumulation of its reaction product ceramide. In the diaphragm, SMase or ceramide exposure in vitro causes weakness and fatigue. Thus, elevated SMase activity and ceramide content have been proposed as mediators of diaphragm dysfunction in CHF. In the present study, we tested the hypotheses that diaphragm dysfunction was accompanied by increases in diaphragm SMase activity and ceramide content. Myocardial infarction was used to induce CHF in rats. We measured diaphragm isometric force, SMase activity by high-performance liquid chromatography, and ceramide subspecies and total ceramide using mass spectrometry. Diaphragm force was depressed and fatigue accelerated by CHF. Diaphragm neutral SMase activity was increased by 20% in CHF, while acid SMase activity was unchanged. We also found that CHF increased the content of C18 -, C20 -, and C24 -ceramide subspecies and total ceramide. Downstream of ceramide degradation, diaphragm sphingosine was unchanged, and sphingosine-1-phosphate level was increased in CHF. Our major novel finding was that diaphragm dysfunction in CHF rats was accompanied by higher diaphragm neutral SMase activity, which is expected to cause the observed increase in diaphragm ceramide content. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2014 European Society of Cardiology.

  8. Actively Paranoid Patients with Schizophrenia Over Attribute Anger to Neutral Faces

    PubMed Central

    Pinkham, Amy E.; Brensinger, Colleen; Kohler, Christian; Gur, Raquel E.; Gur, Ruben C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous investigations of the influence of paranoia on facial affect recognition in schizophrenia have been inconclusive as some studies demonstrate better performance for paranoid relative to non-paranoid patients and others show that paranoid patients display greater impairments. These studies have been limited by small sample sizes and inconsistencies in the criteria used to define groups. Here, we utilized an established emotion recognition task and a large sample to examine differential performance in emotion recognition ability between patients who were actively paranoid (AP) and those who were not actively paranoid (NAP). Accuracy and error patterns on the Penn Emotion Recognition test (ER40) were examined in 132 patients (64 NAP and 68 AP). Groups were defined based on the presence of paranoid ideation at the time of testing rather than diagnostic subtype. AP and NAP patients did not differ in overall task accuracy; however, an emotion by group interaction indicated that AP patients were significantly worse than NAP patients at correctly labeling neutral faces. A comparison of error patterns on neutral stimuli revealed that the groups differed only in misattributions of anger expressions, with AP patients being significantly more likely to misidentify a neutral expression as angry. The present findings suggest that paranoia is associated with a tendency to over attribute threat to ambiguous stimuli and also lend support to emerging hypotheses of amygdala hyperactivation as a potential neural mechanism for paranoid ideation. PMID:21112186

  9. Inducing unconscious stress: Cardiovascular activity in response to subliminal presentation of threatening and neutral words.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, Melanie M; Brosschot, Jos F; Verkuil, Bart; Gillie, Brandon L; Williams, DeWayne P; Koenig, Julian; Vasey, Michael W; Thayer, Julian F

    2017-10-01

    Stress-related cognitive processes may occur outside of awareness, here referred to as unconscious stress, and affect one's physiological state. Evidence supporting this idea would provide necessary clarification of the relationship between psychological stress and cardiovascular (CV) health problems. We tested the hypothesis that increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and total peripheral resistance (TPR) and decreases in heart rate variability (HRV) would be larger when threatening stimuli are presented outside of awareness, or subliminally, compared with neutral stimuli. Additionally, it was expected that trait worry and resting HRV, as common risk factors for CV disease, would moderate the effect. We presented a subliminal semantic priming paradigm to college students that were randomly assigned to the threat (n = 56) or neutral condition (n = 60) and assessed changes from baseline of MAP, TPR, and HRV. Level of trait worry was assessed with the Penn State Worry Questionnaire. The findings indicate that CV activity changed according to the hypothesized pattern: A higher MAP and TPR and a lower HRV in the threat condition compared with the neutral condition were found with practically meaningful effect sizes. However, these findings were only statistically significant for TPR. Furthermore, changes in CV activity were not moderated by trait worry or resting HRV. This is the first study to explicitly address the role of subliminally presented threat words on health-relevant outcome measures and suggests that unconscious stress can influence peripheral vascular resistance. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  10. Thermospheric topside neutral density, ionospheric anomalous electric field and resistivity measurements by active experiment at EISCAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosch, Michael; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Rietveld, Michael; Blagoveshchenskaya, Nataly; Yamazaki, Yosuke

    2016-07-01

    We have developed an active ground-based technique to estimate the topside thermospheric neutral density as well as topside ionospheric anomalous electric field and resistivity at EISCAT, combining the EISCAT UHF radar, HF heater and optics. When pumping the ionosphere the F-region electron temperature is significantly raised, increasing the upward plasma pressure gradient in the topside ionosphere, resulting in observed ion up-flow along the magnetic field line. Simultaneously, pump-induced suprathermal electrons produce artificial optical emissions. Using the modified ion-momentum equation, the thermospheric neutral density is estimated. Alternatively, using the MSIS model the field-aligned anomalous electric field is estimated. From the optical data the suprathermal electron flux is estimated, giving an estimate of the anomalous resistivity. Results from recent observations at EISCAT are presented.

  11. Analysis of wave-like oscillations in parameters of sporadic E layer and neutral atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mošna, Z.; Koucká Knížová, P.

    2012-12-01

    The present study mainly concerns the wave-like activity in the ionospheric sporadic E layer (Es) and in the lower lying stratosphere. The proposed analysis involves parameters describing the state of plasma in the sporadic E layer. Critical frequencies foEs and layer heights hEs were measured at the Pruhonice station (50°N, 14.5°E) during summer campaigns 2004, 2006 and 2008. Further, we use neutral atmosphere (temperature data at 10 hPa) data from the same time interval. The analysis concentrates on vertically propagating wave-like structures within distant atmospheric regions. By means of continuous wavelet transform (CWT) we have detected significant wave-like oscillation at periods covering tidal and planetary oscillation domains both in the Es layer parameters (some of them were reported earlier, for instance in works of Abdu et al., 2003; Pancheva and Mitchel, 2004; Pancheva et al., 2003; Šauli and Bourdillon, 2008) and in stratospheric temperature variations. Further analyses using cross wavelet transform (XWT) and wavelet coherence analysis (WTC) show that despite high wave-like activity in a wide period range, there are only limited coherent wave-like bursts present in both spectra. Such common coherent wave bursts occur on periods close to eigen-periods of the terrestrial atmosphere. We suppose that vertical coupling between atmospheric regions realized by vertically propagating planetary waves occurs predominantly on periods close to those of Rossby modes. Analysis of the phase shift between data from distant atmospheric regions reveals high variability and very likely supports the non-linear scenario of the vertical coupling provided by planetary waves.

  12. High-pressure liquid chromatography of cannabis. Quantitative analysis of acidic and neutral cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Smith, R N; Vaughan, C G

    1976-12-22

    A reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatographic method has been developed for the simultaneous analysis of the acidic and neutral cannabinoids in cannabis. Cannabigerol and cannabigerolic acid have been located in the liquid chromatogram of cannabis and factors affecting the chromatographic process are discussed. A method for quantitating one component in the presence of a second unresolved component is described.

  13. Non-neutralizing Antibodies Targeting the V1V2 Domain of HIV Exhibit Strong Antibody-Dependent Cell-mediated Cytotoxic Activity.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Luzia M; Decoville, Thomas; Schmidt, Sylvie; Laumond, Géraldine; Klingler, Jéromine; Ducloy, Camille; Bahram, Seiamak; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Moog, Christiane

    2017-10-04

    The development of an effective vaccine against HIV-1 has proven to be challenging. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), whilst exhibiting neutralization breadth and potency, are elicited only in a small subset of infected individuals and have yet to be induced by vaccination. Case-control studies of RV144 identified an inverse correlation of HIV-1 infection risk with antibodies (Abs) to the V1V2 region of gp120 with high antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. The neutralizing activity of Abs was not found to contribute to this protective outcome. Using primary effector and target cells and primary virus isolates, we studied the ADCC profile of different monoclonal Abs targeting the V1V2 loop of gp120 that had low or no neutralizing activity. We compared their ADCC activity to some bNAbs targeting different regions of gp120. We found that mAbs targeting the V1V2 domain induce up to 60% NK cell mediated lysis of HIV-1 infected PBMCs in a physiologically relevant ADCC model, highlighting the interest in inducing such Abs in future HIV vaccine trials. Our data also suggest that in addition to neutralization, lysis of infected cells by Abs can effectively participate in HIV protection, as suggested by the RV144 immune correlate analysis.

  14. Analysis of neutralizing epitopes on foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, E; Thiel, H J; Beck, E; Strohmaier, K; Schaller, H

    1988-01-01

    For the investigation of the antigenic determinant structure of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against complete virus were characterized by Western blot (immunoblot), enzyme immunoassay, and competition experiments with a synthetic peptide, isolated coat protein VP1, and viral particles as antigens. Two of the four MAbs reacted with each of these antigens, while the other two MAbs recognized only complete viral particles and reacted only very poorly with the peptide. The four MAbs showed different neutralization patterns with a panel of 11 different FMDV strains. cDNA-derived VP1 protein sequences of the different strains were compared to find correlations between the primary structure of the protein and the ability of virus to be neutralized. Based on this analysis, it appears that the first two MAbs recognized overlapping sequential epitopes in the known antigenic site represented by the peptide, whereas the two other MAbs recognized conformational epitopes. These conclusions were supported and extended by structural analyses of FMDV mutants resistant to neutralization by an MAb specific for a conformational epitope. These results demonstrate that no amino acid exchanges had occurred in the primary antigenic site of VP1 but instead in the other coat proteins VP2 and VP3, which by themselves do not induce neutralizing antibodies. Images PMID:2835507

  15. An Isogeometric Analysis approach for the study of the gyrokinetic quasi-neutrality equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouseilles, Nicolas; Ratnani, Ahmed; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a new discretization scheme for the gyrokinetic quasi-neutrality equation is proposed. It is based on Isogeometric Analysis; the IGA which relies on NURBS functions, accommodates arbitrary coordinates and the use of complicated computation domains. Moreover, arbitrary high order degree of basis functions can be used and their regularity enables the use of a low number of elements. Here, this approach is successfully tested on elliptic problems like the quasi-neutrality equation arising in gyrokinetic models. In this last application, when polar coordinates are considered, a fast solver can be used and the non locality is dealt with a suitable decomposition which reduces the resolution of the gyrokinetic quasi-neutrality equation to a sequence of local 2D elliptic problems.

  16. Activity and stability trends of perovskite oxides for oxygen evolution catalysis at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Han, Binghong; Risch, Marcel; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Ling, Chen; Jia, Hongfei; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-09-21

    Perovskite oxides (ABO3) have been studied extensively to promote the kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline electrolytes. However, developing highly active catalysts for OER at near-neutral pH is desirable for many photoelectrochemical/electrochemical devices. In this paper, we systematically studied the activity and stability of well-known perovskite oxides for OER at pH 7. Previous activity descriptors established for perovskite oxides at pH 13, such as having an eg occupancy close to unity or having an O p-band center close to Fermi level, were shown to scale with OER activity at pH 7. Stability was a greater challenge at pH 7 than at pH 13, where two different modes of instability were identified from combined transmission electron microscopy and density functional theory analyses. Perovskites with O p-band close to Fermi level showed leaching of A-site atoms and surface amorphization under all overpotentials examined at pH 7, while those with O p-band far from Fermi level were stable under low OER current/potential but became unstable at high current/potential accompanied by leaching of B-site atoms. Therefore, efforts are needed to enhance the activity and stability of perovskites against A-site or B-site loss if used at neutral pH.

  17. Adsorption of Neutral Red onto Mn-impregnated activated carbons prepared from Typha orientalis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Shi, Qianqian; Zhang, Chenglu; Xu, Jingtao; Zhai, Bing; Zhang, Bo

    2008-12-01

    Activated carbon was prepared from an inexpensive and renewable carbon source, Typha orientalis, by H(3)PO(4) activation and then impregnated with different Mn salts and tested for its Neutral Red (NR) adsorption capacities. The amount of Mn impregnated in the activated carbon was influenced by the anion species. Impregnation with Mn decreased the surface area, changed the pore size and crystal structure, and introduced more acidic functional groups such as carboxyl, lactone and phenol groups. The optimum adsorption performance for all the activated carbons was obtained at pH 3.7, Mn-Carbon dose of 0.100g/100ml solution and contact time 4.5h. The adsorption isotherms fit the Langmuir isotherm equation. The kinetic data followed the pseudo-second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the processes were spontaneous and endothermic. According to these results, the prepared Mn modified activated carbons are promising adsorbents for the removal of Neutral Red from wastewater.

  18. Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles in afterglow in neon at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Pejović, Milić M. Nešić, Nikola T.; Pejović, Momčilo M.

    2014-04-15

    Kinetics of positive ions and electrically neutral active particles formed during breakdown and successive discharge in neon-filled tube at 6.6 millibars pressure had been analyzed. This analysis was performed on the basis of mean value of electrical breakdown time delay t{sup ¯}{sub d} dependence on afterglow period τ (memory curve). It was shown that positive ions are present in the 1μs < τ < 30 ms interval, which is manifested through t{sup ¯}{sub d} slow increase with the increase of τ. A rapid t{sup ¯}{sub d} increase in the 30 ms < τ < 3 s interval is a consequence of significant decrease of positive ions concentration and dominant role in breakdown initiation have ground state nitrogen atoms, which further release secondary electrons from the cathode by catalytic recombination process. These atoms are formed during discharge by dissociation of ground state nitrogen molecules that are present as impurities in neon. For τ > 3 s, breakdown is initiated by cosmic rays and natural radioactivity. The increase of discharge current leads to decrease of t{sup ¯}{sub d} due to the increase of positive ions concentration in inter electrode gap. The increase of applied voltage also decreases t{sup ¯}{sub d} for τ > 30 ms due to the increase of the probability for initial electron to initiate breakdown. The presence of UV radiation leads to the decrease of t{sup ¯}{sub d} due to the increased electron yield caused by photoelectrons. The influence of photoelectrons on breakdown initiation can be noticed for τ > 0.1 ms, while they dominantly determine t{sup ¯}{sub d} for τ > 30 ms.

  19. Interstellar neutral flow characteristics, composition, and interaction with the heliosphere - neutral gas and pickup ion analysis from ongoing observations and perspectives for IMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, E.; Bzowski, M.; Drews, C.; Frisch, P. C.; Fuselier, S. A.; Galli, A.; Gloeckler, G.; Kubiak, M. A.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; Leonard, T.; McComas, D. J.; Park, J.; Schwadron, N.; Swaczyna, P.; Sokol, J. M.; Wood, B. E.; Wurz, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Sun's motion relative to the surrounding interstellar medium leads to an interstellar neutral (ISN) wind through the heliosphere that is moderately depleted by ionization. This situation allows remote sensing of the ISN through resonant scattering of solar UV and in-situ sampling, first via pickup ions (PUI) and most recently with direct neutral atom imaging. PUI observations have revealed the gravitational focusing cone of interstellar He and Ne as well as the composition of high ionization potential elements. After the first direct ISN He observations with Ulysses GAS, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes with high collecting power the ISN flow trajectories very close to their perihelion in Earth's orbit for H, He, O, and Ne from December through March. Meanwhile, IBEX has recorded seven years of ISN observations, with changing solar activity and varying viewing strategies. These recurring and remarkably repeatable observations allow us to consolidate the derived physical parameters and some key compositional aspects of the interstellar medium. IBEX observations provide a very precise relation between ISN flow longitude and speed via the hyperbolic trajectory equation, but with larger uncertainties separately for longitude and speed. Recent concerted studies have led to a velocity vector that is consistent between IBEX and Ulysses, with a substantially higher temperature than found previously. The fact that the IBEX He and O ISN observations contain a substantial secondary neutral contribution adds complexity to the quantitative analysis of the physical interstellar medium parameters. However, their discovery also provides invaluable insight into the interstellar plasma interaction in the outer heliosheath, which is shaped strongly by the interstellar magnetic field. The longitude range of the IBEX observations limits the precision of the ISN velocity vector. The IBEX collection power and its sensitivity to the Earth's magnetosphere limit

  20. Neutralization activity of patient sera collected during the 2008-2009 Chikungunya outbreak in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kishishita, Natsuko; Sasayama, Mikiko; Takeda, Naokazu; Sa-Ngasang, Areerat; Anuegoonpipat, Atchareeya; Anantapreecha, Surapee

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection typically causes fever, rash, myalgia, and arthralgia and sometimes results in recurrent joint pain or, in severe cases, neurological disorders or death. How CHIKV infection leads to prolonged or severe symptoms is still not well understood. In this study, we examined the neutralization (NT) titer of 98 serum samples collected from patients during the 2008-2009 chikungunya outbreak in Thailand. While all serum samples showed neutralizing activity, virus was detected in 58% of the serum samples. When we analyzed a possible association between virus and antibody titers and the presence of typical symptoms of CHIKV infection, fever and joint pain, there was no significant association except that the number of patients with fever was over three times more than the number of those without fever when CHIKV was detectable in serum. This study indicates that although neutralizing antibody is critical to eliminate CHIKV, it appears not to be the main factor associated with clinical symptoms in some cases, so that other aspects of immune responses, such as those involving proinflammatory mediators and adaptive immune cells, should be considered altogether.

  1. Novel pyrazole derivatives as neutral CB₁ antagonists with significant activity towards food intake.

    PubMed

    Manca, Ilaria; Mastinu, Andrea; Olimpieri, Francesca; Falzoi, Matteo; Sani, Monica; Ruiu, Stefania; Loriga, Giovanni; Volonterio, Alessandro; Tambaro, Simone; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Zanda, Matteo; Pinna, Gérard Aimè; Lazzari, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    In spite of rimonabant's withdrawal from the European market due to its adverse effects, interest in the development of drugs based on CB1 antagonists is revamping on the basis of the peculiar properties of this class of compounds. In particular, new strategies have been proposed for the treatment of obesity and/or related risk factors through CB1 antagonists, i.e. by the development of selectively peripherally acting agents or by the identification of neutral CB1 antagonists. New compounds based on the lead CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant have been synthesized with focus on obtaining neutral CB1 antagonists. Amongst the new derivatives described in this paper, the mixture of the two enantiomers (±)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-(2-cyclohexyl-1-hydroxyethyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole ((±)-5), and compound 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-[(Z)-2-cyclohexyl-1-fluorovinyl]-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole ((Z)-6), showed interesting pharmacological profiles. According to the preliminary pharmacological evaluation, these novel pyrazole derivatives showed in fact both neutral CB1 antagonism behaviour and significant in vivo activity towards food intake.

  2. Toward Effective HIV Vaccination INDUCTION OF BINARY EPITOPE REACTIVE ANTIBODIES WITH BROAD HIV NEUTRALIZING ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; Nitti, Giovanni; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Jin, Lei; Symersky, Jindrich; Boivin, Stephane; Sienczyk, Marcin; Salas, Maria; Hanson, Carl V.; Paul, Sudhir

    2009-11-23

    We describe murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised by immunization with an electrophilic gp120 analog (E-gp120) expressing the rare ability to neutralize genetically heterologous human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains. Unlike gp120, E-gp120 formed covalent oligomers. The reactivity of gp120 and E-gp120 with mAbs to reference neutralizing epitopes was markedly different, indicating their divergent structures. Epitope mapping with synthetic peptides and electrophilic peptide analogs indicated binary recognition of two distinct gp120 regions by anti-E-gp120 mAbs, the 421-433 and 288-306 peptide regions. Univalent Fab and single chain Fv fragments expressed the ability to recognize both peptides. X-ray crystallography of an anti-E-gp120 Fab fragment revealed two neighboring cavities, the typical antigen-binding cavity formed by the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and another cavity dominated by antibody heavy chain variable (VH) domain framework (FR) residues. Substitution of the FR cavity VH Lys-19 residue by an Ala residue resulted in attenuated binding of the 421-433 region peptide probe. The CDRs and VH FR replacement/silent mutation ratios exceeded the ratio for a random mutation process, suggesting adaptive development of both putative binding sites. All mAbs studied were derived from VH1 family genes, suggesting biased recruitment of the V gene germ line repertoire by E-gp120. The conserved 421-433 region of gp120 is essential for HIV binding to host CD4 receptors. This region is recognized weakly by the FR of antibodies produced without exposure to HIV, but it usually fails to induce adaptive synthesis of neutralizing antibodies. We present models accounting for improved CD4-binding site recognition and broad HIV neutralizing activity of the mAbs, long sought goals in HIV vaccine development.

  3. Occurrence of neutral endopeptidase activity in the cat carotid body and its significance in chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G K; Runold, M; Ghai, R D; Cherniack, N S; Prabhakar, N R

    1990-05-28

    The carotid body contains both tachykinins and enkephalins. Neutral endopeptidase (NEP, E.C. 3.4.24.11), has been suggested to involve in the metabolism of these neuropeptides in several organs. In the present study we determined neutral endopeptidase activity of the cat carotid body and assessed its significance in chemoreception. The cytosolic and membrane fractions of the carotid body contained NEP-like activity whereas it occurred only in the membrane fractions of the superior cervical and the nodose ganglia. Phosphoramidon, thiorphan and metal ion chelators inhibited NEP-like activity of all the 3 tissues studied; other protease inhibitors, however, were ineffective. Close carotid body administration of phosphoramidon significantly potentiated the carotid body response to low PO2 but not to hypercapnia. The enhanced response to hypoxia following phosphoramidon was further augmented by naloxone, an enkephalin antagonist. These results demonstrate that the glomus tissue contains detectable amounts of NEP-like activity and its inhibition selectively affects the hypoxic response of the carotid body.

  4. Prokaryotic selectivity and LPS-neutralizing activity of short antimicrobial peptides designed from the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    PubMed

    Nan, Yong Hai; Bang, Jeong-Kyu; Jacob, Binu; Park, Il-Seon; Shin, Song Yub

    2012-06-01

    To develop novel antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with shorter lengths, improved prokaryotic selectivity and retained lipolysaccharide (LPS)-neutralizing activity compared to human cathelicidin AMP, LL-37, a series of amino acid-substituted analogs based on IG-19 (residues 13-31 of LL-37) were synthesized. Among the IG-19 analogs, the analog a4 showed the highest prokaryotic selectivity, but much lower LPS-neutralizing activity compared to parental LL-37. The analogs, a5, a6, a7 and a8 with higher hydrophobicity displayed LPS-neutralizing activity comparable to that of LL-37, but much lesser prokaryotic selectivity. These results indicate that the proper hydrophobicity of the peptides is crucial to exert the amalgamated property of LPS-neutralizing activity and prokaryotic selectivity. Furthermore, to increase LPS-neutralizing activity of the analog a4 without a remarkable decrease in prokaryotic selectivity, we synthesized Trp-substituted analogs (a4-W1 and a4-W2), in which Phe(5) or Phe(15) of a4 is replaced by Trp. Despite their same prokaryotic selectivity, a4-W2 displayed much higher LPS-neutralizing activity compared to a4-W1. When compared with parental LL-37, a4-W2 showed retained LPS-neutralizing activity and 2.8-fold enhanced prokaryotic selectivity. These results suggest that the effective site for Trp-substitution when designing novel AMPs with higher LPS-neutralizing activity, without a remarkable reduction in prokaryotic selectivity, is the amphipathic interface between the end of the hydrophilic side and the start of the hydrophobic side rather than the central position of the hydrophobic side in their α-helical wheel projection. Taken together, the analog a4-W2 can serve as a promising template for the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of endotoxic shock and bacterial infection. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Modeling activities on the negative-ion-based Neutral Beam Injectors of the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Agostinetti, P.; Antoni, V.; Chitarin, G.; Pilan, N.; Serianni, G.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.

    2011-09-26

    At the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) large-scaled negative ion sources have been widely used for the Neutral Beam Injectors (NBIs) mounted on the Large Helical Device (LHD), which is the world-largest superconducting helical system. These injectors have achieved outstanding performances in terms of beam energy, negative-ion current and optics, and represent a reference for the development of heating and current drive NBIs for ITER.In the framework of the support activities for the ITER NBIs, the PRIMA test facility, which includes a RF-drive ion source with 100 keV accelerator (SPIDER) and a complete 1 MeV Neutral Beam system (MITICA) is under construction at Consorzio RFX in Padova.An experimental validation of the codes has been undertaken in order to prove the accuracy of the simulations and the soundness of the SPIDER and MITICA design. To this purpose, the whole set of codes have been applied to the LHD NBIs in a joint activity between Consorzio RFX and NIFS, with the goal of comparing and benchmarking the codes with the experimental data. A description of these modeling activities and a discussion of the main results obtained are reported in this paper.

  6. Digital image analysis of four-frame holographic plasma and neutral gas interferograms

    SciTech Connect

    Mastin, G.A.; Allen, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnostic interferograms characterizing the dynamics of plasma and neutral in the anode-cathode gap of magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITL) are well suited for digital image analysis. The presence of plasma or a neutral gas near the cathode surface produces bending of a pattern of background fringes on the interferogram; the fringes would be straight and uniformly spaced in the absence of such a perturbation. Because the fringes are periodic, we can perform a Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and extract the phase of the dominant spatial frequency component of the fringe pattern. The fringe phase shift is proportional to the plasma electron or neutral gas density. Futhermore, the location of the plasma-cathode interface can be estimated from the interferogram so that electron density as a function of distance from the cathode surface can be computed. This report introduces the technical problem, examines the image analysis algorithm and presents diagnostic interferogram analysis results. The ability to reliably extract and estimate quantitative parameters from interferograms via digital image analysis is emphasized. This image analysis technique is applicable to a broad class of interferograms where a background fringe pattern is distorted by the refractive index of a plasma or gas.

  7. Production in yeast of pseudotype virus-like particles harboring functionally active antibody fragments neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin.

    PubMed

    Pleckaityte, Milda; Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Sezaite, Indre; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2011-12-15

    Recombinant antibodies can be produced in different formats and different expression systems. Single chain variable fragments (scFvs) represent an attractive alternative to full-length antibodies and they can be easily produced in bacteria or yeast. However, the scFvs exhibit monovalent antigen-binding properties and short serum half-lives. The stability and avidity of the scFvs can be improved by their multimerization or fusion with IgG Fc domain. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possibilities to produce in yeast high-affinity scFv-Fc proteins neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin (VLY), the main virulence factor of Gardnerella vaginalis. The scFv protein derived from hybridoma cell line producing high-affinity neutralizing antibodies against VLY was fused with human IgG1 Fc domain. Four different variants of anti-VLY scFv-Fc fusion proteins were constructed and produced in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The non-tagged scFv-Fc and hexahistidine-tagged scFv-Fc proteins were found predominantly as insoluble aggregates and therefore were not suitable for further purification and activity testing. The addition of yeast α-factor signal sequence did not support secretion of anti-VLY scFv-Fc but increased the amount of its intracellular soluble form. However, the purified protein showed a weak VLY-neutralizing capability. In contrast, the fusion of anti-VLY scFv-Fc molecules with hamster polyomavirus-derived VP2 protein and its co-expression with VP1 protein resulted in an effective production of pseudotype virus-like particles (VLPs) that exhibited strong VLY-binding activity. Recombinant scFv-Fc molecules displayed on the surface of VLPs neutralized VLY-mediated lysis of human erythrocytes and HeLa cells with high potency comparable to that of full-length antibody. Recombinant scFv-Fc proteins were expressed in yeast with low efficiency. New approach to display the scFv-Fc molecules on the surface of pseudotype VLPs was successful and

  8. Subcellular distribution of calcium-activated neutral proteinase (CANP) in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, A.; Yoshida, Y.; Singh, I.; Banik, N.; Hogan, E.

    1987-05-01

    In pursuing the association of calcium-activated neutral proteinase (CANP) with purified myelin, its subcellular distribution in myelin and other organelles of rat brain has been determined quantitatively. Subcellular fractions were prepared according to Eichberg et al. CANP was assayed using UC-azocasein as substrate in 50 mM Tris acetate buffer, pH 7.4, 0.1% Triton X-100 and 5 mM US -mercaptoethanol, with and without CaS . TCA-soluble radioactivity was that activity over an EGTA control. Triton X-100 increased CANP activitiy in homogenate and myelin by ten fold. CANP activity was present primarily in the particulate fractions P1 (nuclear), P2 (mitochondrial) and P3 (microsomal). On subfractionation of these fractions, over 50% of the activity was recovered in the myelin-rich fractions (P1A, P2A, P3A). The distribution of activity was P2A > P1 A > P3 A. The cytosolic fraction contained 30% of the homogenate activity. Further purification of myelin of P2A increased the specific activity by more than 2.5-fold over homogenate. The same myelin had the highest proportion and specific activity of CNPase. The purity of each subcellular fraction was tested by monitoring the activity of suitable marker enzymes. Their results indicate that in CNS CANP is present as membrane bound and soluble forms and the bulk of CANP is intimately associated with the myelin membrane.

  9. A single amino acid deletion in the matrix protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus confers resistance to a polyclonal swine antibody with broadly neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Trible, Benjamin R; Popescu, Luca N; Monday, Nicholas; Calvert, Jay G; Rowland, Raymond R R

    2015-06-01

    Assessment of virus neutralization (VN) activity in 176 pigs infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) identified one pig with broadly neutralizing activity. A Tyr-10 deletion in the matrix protein provided escape from broad neutralization without affecting homologous neutralizing activity. The role of the Tyr-10 deletion was confirmed through an infectious clone with a Tyr-10 deletion. The results demonstrate differences in the properties and specificities of VN responses elicited during PRRSV infection.

  10. Recombinant Clostridium difficile toxin fragments as carrier protein for PSII surface polysaccharide preserve their neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Romano, Maria R; Leuzzi, Rosanna; Cappelletti, Emilia; Tontini, Marta; Nilo, Alberto; Proietti, Daniela; Berti, Francesco; Costantino, Paolo; Adamo, Roberto; Scarselli, Maria

    2014-04-22

    Clostridium difficile is a Gram-positive bacterium and is the most commonly diagnosed cause of hospital-associated and antimicrobial-associated diarrhea. Despite the emergence of epidemic C. difficile strains having led to an increase in the incidence of the disease, a vaccine against this pathogen is not currently available. C. difficile strains produce two main toxins (TcdA and TcdB) and express three highly complex cell-surface polysaccharides (PSI, PSII and PSIII). PSII is the more abundantly expressed by most C. difficile ribotypes offering the opportunity of the development of a carbohydrate-based vaccine. In this paper, we evaluate the efficacy, in naive mice model, of PSII glycoconjugates where recombinant toxins A and B fragments (TcdA_B2 and TcdB_GT respectively) have been used as carriers. Both glycoconjugates elicited IgG titers anti-PSII although only the TcdB_GT conjugate induced a response comparable to that obtained with CRM197. Moreover, TcdA_B2 and TcdB_GT conjugated to PSII retained the ability to elicit IgG with neutralizing activity against the respective toxins. These results are a crucial proof of concept for the development of glycoconjugate vaccines against C. difficile infection (CDI) that combine different C. difficile antigens to potentially prevent bacterial colonization of the gut and neutralize toxin activity.

  11. Analysis of variola and vaccinia virus neutralization assays for smallpox vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Christine M; Newman, Frances K; Davidson, Whitni B; Olson, Victoria A; Smith, Scott K; Holman, Robert C; Yan, Lihan; Frey, Sharon E; Belshe, Robert B; Karem, Kevin L; Damon, Inger K

    2012-07-01

    Possible smallpox reemergence drives research for third-generation vaccines that effectively neutralize variola virus. A comparison of neutralization assays using different substrates, variola and vaccinia (Dryvax and modified vaccinia Ankara [MVA]), showed significantly different 90% neutralization titers; Dryvax underestimated while MVA overestimated variola neutralization. Third-generation vaccines may rely upon neutralization as a correlate of protection.

  12. Identification and characterization of a neutralizing monoclonal antibody against botulinum neurotoxin serotype F, following vaccination with active toxin.

    PubMed

    Brown, D R; Lloyd, J P; Schmidt, J J

    1997-10-01

    Clostridium botulinum may produce any of seven known serotypes of neurotoxin (BoNT/A-/G), which are the most toxic bacterial proteins known. Efforts to develop a second-generation vaccine to these toxins would benefit from the isolation of hybridomas producing neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). We hypothesized that previous efforts to isolate neutralizing MAbs against various BoNTs failed due to use of toxoided, chemically altered antigens. We employed a novel vaccination regimen employing native, active, single-chain BoNT/E (scBoNT/E). A number of the BoNT/E immunized mice were further vaccinated with lethal doses of fully active BoNT/F. MAb 7F8 consistently neutralized BoNT/F in three different assays: in vivo neutralization, passive neutralization, and neutralization of regional paralysis. There was no detectable recognition and essentially no neutralization of scBoNT/E. The epitope recognized by this MAb was denatured when treated with formalin, urea, guanidine chloride, or sodium dodecyl sulfate. Preliminary epitope mapping studies indicate that the MAb bound to a conformational epitope.

  13. EFFECT OF ION-NEUTRAL COLLISIONS IN SIMULATIONS OF EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, James E.; Linton, Mark G.

    2013-02-10

    We present results of 2.5D numerical simulations of the emergence of sub-surface magnetic flux into the solar atmosphere, with emerging flux regions ranging from 10{sup 18} to 10{sup 21} Mx, representing both ephemeral and active regions. We include the presence of neutral hydrogen in the governing equations, improve upon previous models by including the ionization in the equation of state, and use a more realistic convection zone model. We find that ionization and recombination of plasma during the rise of a convection zone flux tube reduces the rise speed of the tube's axis. The presence of neutral hydrogen allows the effective flow of mass across field lines, by the addition of a Pedersen resistivity to the generalized Ohm's law, which dissipates current perpendicular to the magnetic field. This causes an increase of up to 10% in the amount of magnetic in-plane flux supplied to the corona and a reduction of up to 89% in the amount of sub-surface plasma brought up into the corona. However, it also reduces the amount of free magnetic energy supplied to the corona, and thus does not positively affect the likelihood of creating unstable coronal structures.

  14. Polycistronic expression of human platelet factor 4 with heparin-neutralizing activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yitao; Wang, Zhe; Wu, Wei; Fang, Zhenjiang; Huang, He

    2012-01-01

    Human platelet factor 4 (hPF4) was evaluated as a clinical alternative to protamine for heparin neutralization, a protector against radiation injury and an anti-neoplastic. To achieve high-level expression of hPF4, expression vectors pET-28a(+)-nf PF4 (n=4, 5, 6) containing n tandem repeats of PF4 were constructed and transformed into the Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strain. A higher expression level, about 45% of the total proteins (TP), was obtained for E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET28a(+)-nf PF4 (n=4, 5, 6). The purified His-PF4 protein was further identified by cleavage with enterokinase and MS, and its heparin-neutralizing activity was determined by colony formation assay. This study represents a novel approach to large-scale production of PF4 in E. coli, one that might be applied to large-scale production of PF4 protein for possible clinical application. It also provides theoretical points for the expression and purification of other small-molecule peptides.

  15. Microcyn: a novel super-oxidized water with neutral pH and disinfectant activity.

    PubMed

    Landa-Solis, C; González-Espinosa, D; Guzmán-Soriano, B; Snyder, M; Reyes-Terán, G; Torres, K; Gutierrez, A A

    2005-12-01

    A new super-oxidized water (SOW) product, Microcyn, was tested for in vitro antimicrobial and antiviral activities. The effectiveness of this neutral-pH SOW at killing Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi and Candida albicans in pure culture was evaluated. One millilitre (approximately 10(8)colony-forming units/mL) of each micro-organism was subjected to 9 mL Microcyn or sterile water at room temperature for 30s. Under these conditions, a log(10) reduction factor of 8 in the level of all pathogens occurred in the treatment samples. In addition, results of tests with three batches of Microcyn exposed to Bacillus atrophaeus spores for 5 min demonstrated complete inactivation of the spores within 2-3 min (log(10) reduction factor >4). The effectiveness of Microcyn in reducing human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) on hard surfaces (glass) was also evaluated in compliance with Environmental Protection Agency requirements for virucidal claims. After exposure of the tested surfaces to Microcyn for 5 min without agitation, there was a log(10) reduction factor >3 in the viral load as measured by both cytopathic effect and antigen p24 of HIV-1 production in MT-2 cultures. Microcyn activity against adenoviral vector type 5 was also analysed under simulated laboratory in-use conditions with viral suspensions. In order to increase the sensitivity of the test, the fluorescent light emitted by AdGFP-infected cells was measured with the use of a flow cytometer. A log(10) reduction factor >3 in the viral load was achieved after a 5-min exposure to Microcyn under these strict conditions. These results show that Microcyn exerts a wide antimicrobial spectrum with major advantages over acidic SOWs, including neutral pH, lower free active chlorine (51-85 ppm) and long shelf life (1 year).

  16. Brain Activity in Response to Trauma-specific, Negative, and Neutral Stimuli. A fMRI Study of Recent Road Traffic Accident Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Andre S.; Blix, Ines; Leknes, Siri; Ekeberg, Øivind; Skogstad, Laila; Endestad, Tor; Østberg, Bjørn C.; Heir, Trond

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of neuro-functional patterns in trauma-exposed individuals have been conducted considerable time after the traumatic event. Hence little is known about neuro-functional processing shortly after trauma-exposure. We investigated brain activity patterns in response to trauma reminders as well as neutral and negative stimuli in individuals who had recently (within 3 weeks) been involved in a road traffic accident (RTA). Twenty-three RTA survivors and 17 non-trauma-exposed healthy controls (HCs) underwent functional MRI while viewing Trauma-specific, Negative, and Neutral pictures. Data were analyzed from four a priori regions of interest, including bilateral amygdala, subcallosal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortex. In addition, we performed a whole brain analysis and functional connectivity analysis during stimulus presentation. For both groups, Negative stimuli elicited more activity in the amygdala bilaterally than did Neutral and Trauma-specific stimuli. The whole brain analysis revealed higher activation in sensory processing related areas (bilateral occipital and temporal cortices and thalamus) as well as frontal and superior parietal areas, for the RTA group compared to HC, for Trauma-specific stimuli contrasted with Neutral stimuli. We also observed higher functional connectivity for Trauma-specific stimuli, between bilateral amygdala and somatosensory areas, for the RTA group compared to controls, when contrasted with Neutral stimuli. We argue that these results might indicate an attentional sensory processing bias toward Trauma-specific stimuli for trauma exposed individuals, a result in line with findings from the post-traumatic stress disorder literature. PMID:27547195

  17. Measurement of the total active 8B solar neutrino flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory with enhanced neutral current sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S N; Anthony, A E; Beier, E W; Bellerive, A; Biller, S D; Boger, J; Boulay, M G; Bowler, M G; Bowles, T J; Brice, S J; Bullard, T V; Chan, Y D; Chen, M; Chen, X; Cleveland, B T; Cox, G A; Dai, X; Dalnoki-Veress, F; Doe, P J; Dosanjh, R S; Doucas, G; Dragowsky, M R; Duba, C A; Duncan, F A; Dunford, M; Dunmore, J A; Earle, E D; Elliott, S R; Evans, H C; Ewan, G T; Farine, J; Fergani, H; Fleurot, F; Formaggio, J A; Fowler, M M; Frame, K; Fulsom, B G; Gagnon, N; Graham, K; Grant, D R; Hahn, R L; Hall, J C; Hallin, A L; Hallman, E D; Hamer, A S; Handler, W B; Hargrove, C K; Harvey, P J; Hazama, R; Heeger, K M; Heintzelman, W J; Heise, J; Helmer, R L; Hemingway, R J; Hime, A; Howe, M A; Jagam, P; Jelley, N A; Klein, J R; Kos, M S; Krumins, A V; Kutter, T; Kyba, C C M; Labranche, H; Lange, R; Law, J; Lawson, I T; Lesko, K T; Leslie, J R; Levine, I; Luoma, S; MacLellan, R; Majerus, S; Mak, H B; Maneira, J; Marino, A D; McCauley, N; McDonald, A B; McGee, S; McGregor, G; Mifflin, C; Miknaitis, K K S; Miller, G G; Moffat, B A; Nally, C W; Nickel, B G; Noble, A J; Norman, E B; Oblath, N S; Okada, C E; Ollerhead, R W; Orrell, J L; Oser, S M; Ouellet, C; Peeters, S J M; Poon, A W P; Robertson, B C; Robertson, R G H; Rollin, E; Rosendahl, S S E; Rusu, V L; Schwendener, M H; Simard, O; Simpson, J J; Sims, C J; Sinclair, D; Skensved, P; Smith, M W E; Starinsky, N; Stokstad, R G; Stonehill, L C; Tafirout, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tesić, G; Thomson, M; Thorman, M; Van Berg, R; Van de Water, R G; Virtue, C J; Wall, B L; Waller, D; Waltham, C E; Tseung, H Wan Chan; Wark, D L; West, N; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilkerson, J F; Wilson, J R; Wouters, J M; Yeh, M; Zuber, K

    2004-05-07

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has precisely determined the total active (nu(x)) 8B solar neutrino flux without assumptions about the energy dependence of the nu(e) survival probability. The measurements were made with dissolved NaCl in heavy water to enhance the sensitivity and signature for neutral-current interactions. The flux is found to be 5.21 +/- 0.27(stat)+/-0.38(syst) x 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1), in agreement with previous measurements and standard solar models. A global analysis of these and other solar and reactor neutrino results yields Deltam(2)=7.1(+1.2)(-0.6) x 10(-5) eV(2) and theta=32.5(+2.4)(-2.3) degrees. Maximal mixing is rejected at the equivalent of 5.4 standard deviations.

  18. Monte-Carlo Analysis of the Flavour Changing Neutral Current B \\to Gamma at Babar

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.

    2001-09-01

    The main theme of this thesis is a Monte-Carlo analysis of the rare Flavour Changing Neutral Current (FCNC) decay b→sγ. The analysis develops techniques that could be applied to real data, to discriminate between signal and background events in order to make a measurement of the branching ratio of this rare decay using the BaBar detector. Also included in this thesis is a description of the BaBar detector and the work I have undertaken in the development of the electronic data acquisition system for the Electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC), a subsystem of the BaBar detector.

  19. development of a neutral mass spectrometer dedicated to the analysis of planetary envelopes (NIMEIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J.

    2012-12-01

    LATMOS worked for several years on a newly designed instrument suitable for measuring neutral environments as rarefied exosphere of Mars, Venus, Europa, asteroids or Titan for example. This instrument NIMEIS for Neutral and Ion Mass and Energy Imaging Spectrometer has as main features the ability to measure low densities of neutral but also conduct an analysis of mass and energy in an energy range covering the thermal and suprathermal between ~ 1 eV and 20 eV far unexplored. My thesis is divided into two independent parts. First, we optimize the ionization source, that is an innovative concept, and secondly we design the optics of the instrument based on an electrostatic optimization. The ionization source is based on the use of carbon nanotubes and to extract the electrons and ionize the neutral. Employing this technology we can significantly reduce the power, because previously we were using heated filaments. We develop this technology in close collaboration with a laboratory Ajou University (South Korea) that provides us with carbon nanotubes. I did a simulation study of the mode of extraction of electrons from initial tests, from an assembly developed by our laboratory in South Korea. The instrument has been optimized so that the impact on the detector gives us the one hand the energy of the particle and on the other hand the mass of the particle simultaneously and in continuous time. I developed the optics of the instrument using an electrostatic optical software. A comprehensive numerical model has been defined and a prototype is being manufactured.

  20. Lipolytic activity of ricin from Ricinus sanguineus and Ricinus communis on neutral lipids.

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, S; Helmy, M E; Piéroni, G

    2001-01-01

    The present study was carried out with a view of determining ricin lipolytic activity on neutral lipids in emulsion and in a membrane-like model. Using 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol tributyrate (BAL-TC(4)) as substrate, the lipolytic activity of ricin was found to be proportional to ricin and substrate concentrations, with an apparent K(m) (K(m,app)) of 2.4 mM, a k(cat) of 200 min(-1) and a specific activity of 1.0 unit/mg of protein. This work was extended to p-nitrophenyl (pNP) fatty acid esters containing two to twelve carbon atoms. Maximum lipolytic activity was registered on pNP decanoate (pNPC(10)), with a K(m,app) of 3.5 mM, a k(cat) of 173 min(-1) and a specific activity of 3.5 units/mg of protein. Ricin lipolytic activity is pH and galactose dependent, with a maximum at pH 7.0 in the presence of 0.2 M galactose. Using the monolayer technique with dicaprin as substrate, ricin showed a lipolytic activity proportional to the ricin concentration at 20 mN/m, which is dependent on the surface pressure of the lipid monolayer and is detectable up to 30 mN/m, a surface pressure that is of the same order of magnitude as that of natural cell membranes. The methods based on pNPC(10) and BAL-TC(4) hydrolysis are simple and reproducible; thus they can be used for routine studies of ricin lipolytic activity. Ricin from Ricinus communis and R. sanguineus were treated with diethyl p-nitrophenylphosphate, an irreversible serine esterase inhibitor, and their lipolytic activities on BAL-TC(4) and pNPC(10), and cytotoxic activity, were concurrently recorded. A reduction in lipolytic activity was accompanied by a decrease in cytotoxicity on Caco2 cells. These data support the idea that the lipolytic activity associated with ricin is relevant to a lipase whose activity is pH and galactose dependent, sensitive to diethyl p-nitrophenylphosphate, and that a lipolytic step may be involved in the process of cell poisoning by ricin. Both colorimetric tests used in this study are sensitive

  1. Structural and pharmacological analysis of O-2050, a putative neutral cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Breivogel, Christopher S.; Mahadevan, Anu; Pertwee, Roger G.; Cascio, Maria Grazia; Bolognini, Daniele; Huffman, John W.; Walentiny, D. Matthew; Vann, Robert E.; Razdan, Raj K.; Martin, Billy R.

    2010-01-01

    Rimonabant, the prototypic antagonist of cannabinoid CB1 receptors, has been reported to have inverse agonist properties at higher concentrations, which may complicate its use as a tool for mechanistic evaluation of cannabinoid pharmacology. Consequently, recent synthesis efforts have concentrated on discovery of a neutral antagonist using a variety of structural templates. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological properties of the putative neutral cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist O-2050, a sulfonamide side chain analog of Δ8-tetrahydrocannabinol. O-2050 and related sulfonamide cannabinoids exhibited good affinity for both cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. While the other sulfonamide analogs produced cannabinoid agonist effects in vivo (e.g., activity suppression, antinociception, and hypothermia), O-2050 stimulated activity and was inactive in the other two tests. O-2050 also decreased food intake in mice, an effect that was reminiscent of that produced by rimonabant. Unlike rimonabant, however, O-2050 did not block the effects of cannabinoid agonists in vivo, even when administered i.c.v. In contrast, O-2050 antagonized the in vitro effects of cannabinoid agonists in [35S]GTPγS and mouse vas deferens assays without having activity on its own in either assay. Further evaluation revealed that O-2050 fully and dose-dependently substituted for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in a mouse drug discrimination procedure (a cannabinoid agonist effect) and that it inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP signaling with a maximum efficacy of approximately half that of the full agonist CP55,940 [(−)-cis-3-[2-hydroxy-4(1,1-dimethyl-heptyl)phenyl]-trans-4-(3-hydroxy-propyl)cyclohexanol]. Together, these results suggest that O-2050 is not a viable candidate for classification as a neutral cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist. PMID:21114999

  2. Lipophilicity is a key factor to increase the antiviral activity of HIV neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Augusto, Marcelo T; Hollmann, Axel; Troise, Fulvia; Veiga, Ana S; Pessi, Antonello; Santos, Nuno C

    2017-04-01

    The HIV broadly neutralizing antibody 2F5 targets the transiently exposed epitope in the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41, by a two-step mechanism involving the viral membrane and this viral glycoprotein. It was recently shown that 2F5 conjugation with a cholesterol moiety outside of the antibody paratope substantially increases its antiviral activity. Additionally, the antiviral activity of D5, a human antibody that binds to the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) of gp41 and lacks membrane binding, was boosted by the same cholesterol conjugation. In this work, we evaluated the membrane affinity of both antibodies towards membranes of different compositions, using surface plasmon resonance. A correlation was found between membrane affinity and antiviral activity against HIV-1. We propose that the conjugation of cholesterol to 2F5 or D5 allows a higher degree of antibody pre-concentration at the viral membrane. This way, the antibodies become more available to bind efficiently to the gp41 epitope, blocking viral fusion faster than the unconjugated antibody. These results set up a relevant strategy to improve the rational design of therapeutic antibodies against HIV.

  3. Neutral and cationic aluminium complexes containing a chiral (OSSO)-type bis(phenolato) ligand: synthesis, structures and polymerization activity.

    PubMed

    Lian, Bing; Ma, Haiyan; Spaniol, Thomas P; Okuda, Jun

    2009-11-07

    Reaction of trimethylaluminium with the linked bis(phenol) trans-1,4-dithiocyclohexanediyl-2,2-bis(4,6-di-tert-butylphenol) (cydtbpH2, 1a) led to the chiral methyl aluminium complex [Al(cydtbp)Me] (2a) as both racemate and resolved enantiomers, which were characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Rac-{trans-1,2-dithiocyclohexanediyl-2,2-bis(6-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol)} (cytbmpH2, rac-1b) similarly gave rac-2b. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction of (S,S)-2a and rac-2b showed a strongly distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry with significantly differing Al-S distances. Reaction of rac-2b with (-)-borneol gave the alkoxy complex 5 as a mixture of two diastereomers. Methyl abstraction from the neutral metal complex rac-2a using B(C6F5)3 gave the cationic complex [rac-Al(cydtbp)(THF)2]+[MeB(C6F5)3]- (rac-6 x (THF)2) that according to X-ray crystallography adopts an octahedral coordination geometry. Upon reacting trimethylaluminium with a bis(phenol) with a longer link, 3,4-trans-butanediyl-1,6-dithiahexanediyl)-2,2-bis(6-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol), (cmtbmpH2, 3, a dinuclear compound 4 was obtained that contains two square pyramidal aluminium centers with two "fly-over" bis(phenolate) ligands. The neutral methyl aluminium complexes are active in the polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and in the ring-polymerization of rac-lactide (LA), producing PMMAs and PLAs in a controlled fashion. The cationic aluminium complexes were active in the cationic polymerization of isoprene and benzofuran.

  4. Stabilisation analysis for switched neutral systems based on sampled-data control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnasamy, R.; Balasubramaniam, P.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the problem of stabilisation analysis for switched neutral systems based on sampled-data control and average dwell time approach is investigated. Delay-dependent stabilisation results are derived in terms of linear matrix inequalities by constructing piecewise Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional based on the Wirtinger's inequality. Also, the controller gain matrix is designed by applying an input-delay approach. Further convex combination technique and some integral inequalities are used to derive less conservative results. The effectiveness of the derived results is validated through numerical examples.

  5. Dengue Virus Infection-Enhancing Activity in Serum Samples with Neutralizing Activity as Determined by Using FcγR-Expressing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moi, Meng Ling; Lim, Chang-Kweng; Chua, Kaw Bing; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kurane, Ichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background Progress in dengue vaccine development has been hampered by limited understanding of protective immunity against dengue virus infection. Conventional neutralizing antibody titration assays that use FcγR-negative cells do not consider possible infection-enhancement activity. We reasoned that as FcγR-expressing cells are the major target cells of dengue virus, neutralizing antibody titration assays using FcγR-expressing cells that determine the sum of neutralizing and infection-enhancing activity, may better reflect the biological properties of antibodies in vivo. Methods and Findings We evaluated serum samples from 80 residents of a dengue endemic country, Malaysia, for neutralizing activity, and infection-enhancing activity at 1∶10 serum dilution by using FcγR-negative BHK cells and FcγR-expressing BHK cells. The serum samples consisted of a panel of patients with acute DENV infection (31%, 25/80) and a panel of donors without acute DENV infection (69%, 55/80). A high proportion of the tested serum samples (75%, 60/80) demonstrated DENV neutralizing activity (PRNT50≥10) and infection-enhancing activity. Eleven of 18 serum samples from patients with acute secondary DENV infection demonstrated neutralizing activity to the infecting serotype determined by using FcγR-negative BHK cells (PRNT50≥10), but not when determined by using FcγR-expressing cells. Conclusion Human serum samples with low neutralizing activity determined by using FcγR-negative cells showed DENV infection-enhancing activity using FcγR-expressing cells, whereas those with high neutralizing activity determined by using FcγR-negative cells demonstrate low or no infection-enhancing activity using FcγR-expressing cells. The results suggest an inverse relationship between neutralizing antibody titer and infection-enhancing activity, and that neutralizing activity determined by using FcγR-expressing cells, and not the activity determined by using FcγR-negative cells, may

  6. Generation of recombinant single-chain antibodies neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin, the main virulence factor of Gardnerella vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Pleckaityte, Milda; Mistiniene, Edita; Lasickiene, Rita; Zvirblis, Gintautas; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2011-11-03

    Gardnerella vaginalis is identified as the predominant colonist of the vaginal tract in women with bacterial vaginosis. Vaginolysin (VLY) is a protein toxin released by G. vaginalis. VLY possesses cytolytic activity and is considered as a main virulence factor of G. vaginalis. Inhibition of VLY-mediated cell lysis by antibodies may have important physiological relevance. Single-chain variable fragments of immunoglobulins (scFvs) were cloned from two hybridoma cell lines producing neutralizing antibodies against VLY and expressed as active proteins in E. coli. For each hybridoma, two variants of anti-VLY scFv consisting of either VL-VH or VH-VL linked with a 20 aa-long linker sequence (G₄S)₄ were constructed. Recovery of scFvs from inclusion bodies with subsequent purification by metal-chelate chromatography resulted in VLY-binding proteins that were predominantly monomeric. The antigen-binding activity of purified scFvs was verified by an indirect ELISA. The neutralizing activity was investigated by in vitro hemolytic assay and cytolytic assay using HeLa cell line. Calculated apparent Kd values and neutralizing potency of scFvs were in agreement with those of parental full-length antibodies. VH-VL and VL-VH variants of scFvs showed similar affinity and neutralizing potency. The anti-VLY scFvs derived from hybridoma clone 9B4 exhibited high VLY-neutralizing activity both on human erythrocytes and cervical epithelial HeLa cells. Hybridoma-derived scFvs with VLY-binding activity were expressed in E. coli. Recombinant anti-VLY scFvs inhibited VLY-mediated cell lysis. The monovalent scFvs showed reduced affinity and neutralizing potency as compared to the respective full-length antibodies. The loss of avidity could be restored by generating scFv constructs with multivalent binding properties. Generated scFvs is the first example of recombinant single-chain antibodies with VLY-neutralizing activity produced in prokaryote expression system. G. vaginalis caused

  7. HIV-1 Dual Infected LTNP-EC Patients Developed an Unexpected Antibody Cross-Neutralizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pernas, Maria; Sanchez-Merino, Victor; Casado, Concepcion; Merino-Mansilla, Alberto; Olivares, Isabel; Yuste, Eloisa; Lopez-Galindez, Cecilio

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the neutralization breadth in dually infected (DI) HIV-1 long-term non-progressor elite controller patients (LTNP-EC) using a representative minipanel of 6 viruses from 5 different subtypes. Our results showed an improved neutralization breadth in DI LTNP-EC patients when compared with matched LTNP single-infected patients. The role of viral diversity in neutralization was estimated with the Shannon Entropy and the p-distance in viral quasispecies. We found a positive correlation between neutralization breadth and diversity within the viral quasispecies. This correlation could explain why a group of LTNP-EC patients developed a broad neutralizing response despite having undetectable levels of viremia. PMID:26258485

  8. Performance of thermally activated dolomite for the treatment of Ni and Zn in contaminated neutral drainage.

    PubMed

    Calugaru, Iuliana Laura; Neculita, Carmen Mihaela; Genty, Thomas; Bussière, Bruno; Potvin, Robin

    2016-06-05

    Intensive research is ongoing for developing low-cost and highly efficient materials in metal removal from contaminated effluents. The present study evaluated dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2], both raw and modified by thermal activation (charring), for Ni and Zn treatment in contaminated neutral drainage (CND). Batch adsorption testing (equilibrium and kinetics) were conducted at pH 6, to evaluate the performance of initial vs. modified dolomite, and to assess potential mechanisms of metal removal. Charring of dolomite led to a rigid and porous material, mainly consisting of CaCO3 and MgO, which showed a sorption capacity increased sevenfold for Zn and doubled for Ni, relative to the raw material. In addition, Freundlich model best described the sorption of the both metals by dolomite, whereas the Langmuir model best described their sorption on charred dolomite. Plausible mechanisms of metal removal include cation exchange, surface precipitation and sorption processes, with carbonate ions and magnesium oxides acting as active centers. Based on these results, charred dolomite seems a promising option for the efficient treatment of Ni and Zn in CND.

  9. Light modulated activity of root alkaline/neutral invertase involves the interaction with 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; van Kleeff, Paula J M; Oecking, Claudia; Li, Ka Wan; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Hincha, Dirk K; de Boer, Albertus H

    2014-12-01

    Alkaline/neutral invertases (A/N-Invs) are now recognized as essential proteins in plant life. They catalyze the irreversible breakdown of sucrose into glucose and fructose and thus supply the cells with energy as well as signaling molecules. In this study we report on a mechanism that affects the activity of the cytosolic invertase AtCINV1 (At-A/N-InvG or AT1G35580). We demonstrate that Ser547 at the extreme C-terminus of the AtCINV1 protein is a substrate of calcium-dependent kinases (CPK3 and 21) and that phosphorylation creates a high-affinity binding site for 14-3-3 proteins. The invertase as such has basal activity, but we provide evidence that interaction with 14-3-3 proteins enhances its activity. The analysis of three quadruple 14-3-3 mutants generated from six T-DNA insertion mutants of the non-epsilon family shows both specificity as well as redundancy for this function of 14-3-3 proteins. The strong reduction in hexose levels in the roots of one 14-3-3 quadruple mutant plant is in line with the activating function of 14-3-3 proteins. The physiological relevance of this mechanism that affects A/N-invertase activity is underscored by the light-induced activation and is another example of the central role of 14-3-3 proteins in mediating dark/light signaling. The nature of the light-induced signal that travels from the shoot to root and the question whether this signal is transmitted via cytosolic Ca(++) changes that activate calcium-dependent kinases, await further study.

  10. Experiment and analysis of the neutralization of the electron cyclotron resonance ion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yizhou; Yang, Juan; Sun, Jun; Liu, Xianchuang; Huang, Yizhi

    2017-10-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance ion thruster must emit an electron current equivalent to its ion beam current to prevent the thruster system from being electrically charged. This operation is defined as neutralization. The factors which influence neutralization are categorized into the ion beam current parameters, the neutralizer input parameters, and the neutralizer position. To understand the mechanism of neutralization, an experiment and a calculation study on how these factors influence thruster neutralization are presented. The experiment results show that the minimum bias voltage of the neutralizer was -60 V at the ion beam current of 80 mA for the argon propellant, and a critical gas flow rate existed, below which the coupling voltage increased sharply. Based on the experiment, the neutralization was analyzed by means of a one-dimensional calculation model. The computation results show that the coupling voltage was influenced by the beam divergence and the negative potential zone near the grids.

  11. Sialorphin, a natural inhibitor of rat membrane-bound neutral endopeptidase that displays analgesic activity

    PubMed Central

    Rougeot, Catherine; Messaoudi, Michaël; Hermitte, Véronique; Rigault, Anne Gaëlle; Blisnick, Thierry; Dugave, Christophe; Desor, Didier; Rougeon, François

    2003-01-01

    Sialorphin is an exocrine and endocrine signaling mediator, which has been identified by a genomic approach. It is synthesized predominantly in the submandibular gland and prostate of adult rats in response to androgen steroids and is released locally and systemically in response to stress. We now demonstrate that the cell surface molecule to which sialorphin binds in vivo in the rat kidney is the membrane-anchored neutral endopeptidase (neprilysin; NEP, EC 3.4.24.11). NEP plays an important role in nervous and peripheral tissues, as it turns off several peptide-signaling events at the cell surface. We show that sialorphin prevents spinal and renal NEP from breaking down its two physiologically relevant substrates, substance P and Met-enkephalin in vitro. Sialorphin inhibited the breakdown of substance P with an IC50 of 0.4–1 μM and behaved as a competitive inhibitor. In vivo, i.v. sialorphin elicited potent antinociceptive responses in two behavioral rat models of injury-induced acute and tonic pain, the pin-pain test and formalin test. The analgesia induced by 100–200 μg/kg doses of sialorphin required the activation of μ- and δ-opioid receptors, consistent with the involvement of endogenous opioid receptors in enkephalinergic transmission. We conclude that sialorphin protects endogenous enkephalins released after nociceptive stimuli by inhibiting NEP in vivo. Sialorphin is a natural systemically active regulator of NEP activity. Furthermore, our study provides evidence that it is a physiological modulator of pain perception after injury and might be the progenitor of a new class of therapeutic molecules. PMID:12835417

  12. Novel neutralizing hedgehog antibody MEDI-5304 exhibits antitumor activity by inhibiting paracrine hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Neil R; Wang, Youzhen; McEachern, Kristen A; Jordan, Jerold J; Mazzola, Anne Marie; Hernandez, Axel; Jalla, Sanjoo; Chesebrough, Jon W; Hynes, Mark J; Belmonte, Matthew A; Wang, Lidong; Kang, Jaspal S; Jovanovic, Jelena; Laing, Naomi; Jenkins, David W; Hurt, Elaine; Liang, Meina; Frantz, Christopher; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Simeone, Diane M; Blakey, David C; Bedian, Vahe

    2014-02-01

    The hedgehog pathway has been implicated in the tumorigenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis of numerous human cancers. We generated the first fully human hedgehog antibody MEDI-5304 and characterized its antitumor activity and preclinical toxicology. MEDI-5304 bound sonic hedgehog (SHH) and Indian hedgehog (IHH) with low picomolar affinity and neutralized SHH and IHH activity in cellular mGLI1 reporter assays. The antibody inhibited transcription of hedgehog target genes and osteoblast differentiation of C3H10T1/2 cells. We evaluated the activity of MEDI-5304 in vivo in model systems that allowed us to evaluate two primary hypotheses of hedgehog function in human cancer, paracrine signaling between tumor and stromal cells and cancer stem cell (CSC) self-renewal. MEDI-5304 displayed robust pharmacodynamic effects in stromal cells that translated to antitumor efficacy as a single agent in an HT-29/MEF coimplantation model of paracrine hedgehog signaling. MEDI-5304 also improved responses to carboplatin in the HT-29/MEF model. The antibody, however, had no effect as a single agent or in combination with gemcitabine on the CSC frequency or growth of several primary pancreatic cancer explant models. These findings support the conclusion that hedgehog contributes to tumor biology via paracrine tumor-stromal signaling but not via CSC maintenance or propagation. Finally, the only safety study finding associated with MEDI-5304 was ondontodysplasia in rats. Thus, MEDI-5304 represents a potent dual hedgehog inhibitor suitable for continued development to evaluate efficacy and safety in human patients with tumors harboring elevated levels of SHH or IHH.

  13. Mean square delay dependent-probability-distribution stability analysis of neutral type stochastic neural networks.

    PubMed

    Muralisankar, S; Manivannan, A; Balasubramaniam, P

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to investigate the mean square delay dependent-probability-distribution stability analysis of neutral type stochastic neural networks with time-delays. The time-delays are assumed to be interval time-varying and randomly occurring. Based on the new Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and stochastic analysis approach, a novel sufficient condition is obtained in the form of linear matrix inequality such that the delayed stochastic neural networks are globally robustly asymptotically stable in the mean-square sense for all admissible uncertainties. Finally, the derived theoretical results are validated through numerical examples in which maximum allowable upper bounds are calculated for different lower bounds of time-delay.

  14. Synthesis, structural characterisation and antibacterial activity of Ag+-doped fluorapatite nanomaterials prepared by neutralization method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanić, Vojislav; Radosavljević-Mihajlović, Ana S.; Živković-Radovanović, Vukosava; Nastasijević, Branislav; Marinović-Cincović, Milena; Marković, Jelena P.; Budimir, Milica D.

    2015-05-01

    Silver doped fluorapatite nanopowders were synthesised by neutralization method, which consists of dissolving Ag2O in solution of HF and H3PO4 and addition to suspension of Ca(OH)2. The powder XRD, SEM and FTIR studies indicated the formation of a fluorapatite nanomaterials with average length of the particles is about 80 nm and a width of about 15 nm. The FTIR studies show that carbonate content in samples is very small and carbonte ions substitute both phosphate and hydroxyl groups in the crystal structure of samples, forming AB-type fluorapatite. Antibacterial studies have demonstrated that all Ag+-doped fluorapatite samples exhibit bactericidal effect against pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus and Kllebsiela pneumoniae. Antibacterial activity increased with the increase of Ag+ in the samples. The atomic force microscopy studies revealed extensive damage to the bacterial cell envelops in the presence of Ag+-doped fluorapatite particles which may lead to their death. The synthesized Ag+-doped fluorapatite nanomaterials are promising as antibacterial biomaterials in orthopedics and dentistry.

  15. Generation of antitumor active neutral medium-sized alpha-glycan in apple vinegar fermentation.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kaoru; Kushibiki, Toshisada; Matsue, Hajime; Furukawa, Ken-Ichi; Motomura, Shigeru

    2007-09-01

    The physiologically active substances in apple vinegar have not yet been chemically characterized. We studied the biological functions of apple vinegar produced from crushed apples, and found that the constituent neutral medium-sized alpha-glycan (NMalphaG) acts as an antitumor agent against experimental mouse tumors. NMalphaG is a homoglycan composed of glucose having a molecular weight of about 10,000 and a branched structure bearing alpha (1-4,6) linkages. In this study, we clarified the origin of NMalphaG in apple vinegar by examination of its content in alcohol and acetic acid fermentation products sequentially. We found that NMalphaG appeared in acetic acid fermentation, but not in alcohol fermentation. Furthermore we investigated NMalphaG origin using acetic acid fermentation from alcohol fortifiied apple without alcohol fermentation and from raw material with varying amounts of pomace. The results indicate that NMalphaG originated in the apple fruit body and that its production requires both fermentation processes.

  16. Opportunities to exploit non-neutralizing HIV-specific antibody activity

    PubMed Central

    Ackerman, Margaret E.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies act as a nexus between innate and adaptive immunity: they provide a means to engage a spectrum of innate immune effector cells in order to clear viral particles and infected cells, and prime antigen presentation. This functional landscape is remarkably complex, and depends on antibody isotype, subclass, and glycosylation; the expression levels and patterns of a suite of Fc receptors with both complementary and opposing activities; and a host of innate immune cells capable of differential responses to opsonized particles and present at different sites. In vivo, even neutralizing antibodies rely on their ability to act as molecular beacons and recruit innate immune effector cells in order to provide protection, and results from both human and macaque studies have implicated these effector functions in vaccine-mediated protection. Thus, while enhancing effector function is a tractable handle for potentiating antibody-mediated protection from HIV infection, success will depend critically on leveraging understanding of the means by which antibodies with specific functional profiles could be elicited, which effector functions could provide optimal protection, and perhaps most critically, how to efficiently recruit the innate effector cells present at sites of infection. PMID:24191934

  17. Relationships between adaptive and neutral genetic diversity and ecological structure and functioning: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the effects of intraspecific genetic diversity on the structure and functioning of ecological communities is a fundamentally important part of evolutionary ecology and may also have conservation relevance in identifying the situations in which genetic diversity coincides with species-level diversity.Early studies within this field documented positive relationships between genetic diversity and ecological structure, but recent studies have challenged these findings. Conceptual synthesis has been hampered because studies have used different measures of intraspecific variation (phenotypically adaptive vs. neutral) and have considered different measures of ecological structure in different ecological and spatial contexts. The aim of this study is to strengthen conceptual understanding by providing an empirical synthesis quantifying the relationship between genetic diversity and ecological structure.Here, I present a meta-analysis of the relationship between genetic diversity within plant populations and the structure and functioning of associated ecological communities (including 423 effect sizes from 70 studies). I used Bayesian meta-analyses to examine (i) the strength and direction of this relationship, (ii) the extent to which phenotypically adaptive and neutral (molecular) measures of diversity differ in their association with ecological structure and (iii) variation in outcomes among different measures of ecological structure and in different ecological contexts.Effect sizes measuring the relationship between adaptive diversity (genotypic richness) and both community- and ecosystem-level ecological responses were small, but significantly positive. These associations were supported by genetic effects on species richness and productivity, respectively.There was no overall association between neutral genetic diversity and measures of ecological structure, but a positive correlation was observed under a limited set of demographic conditions. These

  18. Important increase of negative secondary ion sensitivity during SIMS analysis by neutral cesium deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, P.; Wirtz, T.; Migeon, H.-N.; Scherrer, H.

    2006-07-01

    The Cation Mass Spectrometer (CMS) is a SIMS prototype developed in our laboratory in order to perform quantitative analysis with optimal sensitivity and high depth and lateral resolution in the MCs x+ and M - modes. For this aim, a patented neutral Cs evaporator for varying the Cs surface concentration over the whole range has been developed. The sputtering and the Cs introduction have been decoupled successfully by applying simultaneously X y+ bombardment and neutral Cs deposition. X stands for any element except Cs. Currently the CMS is equipped with a Cs + and a Ga + gun. These guns are used for studying the useful yield variations of negative secondary ions (Si -, Al -, Ni -, In -, P -) with respect to the Cs surface concentration. Furthermore, the observed variations of the useful yield were linked to work function shifts. Qualitative agreement with the predictions of the electron tunnelling model are obtained. Several applications give further evidence of successful optimization of the useful yield for elements with high electron affinity.

  19. Evolution of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing activity: therapy-associated decline, positive association with detectable viremia, and partial restoration of B-cell subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Carolina B; Merino-Mansilla, Alberto; Llano, Anuska; Pérez, Ignacio; Crespo, Isabel; Llinas, Laia; Garcia, Felipe; Gatell, Jose M; Yuste, Eloisa; Sanchez-Merino, Victor

    2013-11-01

    Little is known about the stability of HIV-1 cross-neutralizing responses. Taking into account the fact that neutralization breadth has been positively associated with plasma viral load, there is no explanation for the presence of broadly neutralizing responses in a group of patients on treatment with undetectable viremia. In addition, the B-cell profile responsible for broadly cross-neutralizing responses is unknown. Here we studied the evolution of neutralizing responses and the B-cell subpopulation distribution in a group of patients with broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing activity. We studied neutralization breadth evolution in a group of six previously identified broadly cross-neutralizing patients and six control patients during a 6-year period with a previously described minipanel of recombinant viruses from five different subtypes. B-cell subpopulation distribution during the study was also determined by multiparametric flow cytometry. Broadly cross-neutralizing activity was transient in four broad cross-neutralizers and stable, up to 4.6 years, in the other two. In four out of five broad cross-neutralizers who initiated treatment, a neutralization breadth loss occurred after viremia had been suppressed for as much as 20 months. B-cell subpopulation analyses revealed a significant increase in the frequency of naive B cells in broadly cross-reactive samples, compared with samples with less neutralization breadth (increased from 44% to 62%). We also observed a significant decrease in tissue-like and activated memory B cells (decreased from 19% to 12% and from 17% to 9%, respectively). Our data suggest that HIV-1 broadly cross-neutralizing activity is variable over time and associated with detectable viremia and partial B-cell restoration.

  20. Evolution of Broadly Cross-Reactive HIV-1-Neutralizing Activity: Therapy-Associated Decline, Positive Association with Detectable Viremia, and Partial Restoration of B-Cell Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Carolina B.; Merino-Mansilla, Alberto; Llano, Anuska; Pérez, Ignacio; Crespo, Isabel; Llinas, Laia; Garcia, Felipe; Gatell, Jose M.; Yuste, Eloisa

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the stability of HIV-1 cross-neutralizing responses. Taking into account the fact that neutralization breadth has been positively associated with plasma viral load, there is no explanation for the presence of broadly neutralizing responses in a group of patients on treatment with undetectable viremia. In addition, the B-cell profile responsible for broadly cross-neutralizing responses is unknown. Here we studied the evolution of neutralizing responses and the B-cell subpopulation distribution in a group of patients with broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing activity. We studied neutralization breadth evolution in a group of six previously identified broadly cross-neutralizing patients and six control patients during a 6-year period with a previously described minipanel of recombinant viruses from five different subtypes. B-cell subpopulation distribution during the study was also determined by multiparametric flow cytometry. Broadly cross-neutralizing activity was transient in four broad cross-neutralizers and stable, up to 4.6 years, in the other two. In four out of five broad cross-neutralizers who initiated treatment, a neutralization breadth loss occurred after viremia had been suppressed for as much as 20 months. B-cell subpopulation analyses revealed a significant increase in the frequency of naive B cells in broadly cross-reactive samples, compared with samples with less neutralization breadth (increased from 44% to 62%). We also observed a significant decrease in tissue-like and activated memory B cells (decreased from 19% to 12% and from 17% to 9%, respectively). Our data suggest that HIV-1 broadly cross-neutralizing activity is variable over time and associated with detectable viremia and partial B-cell restoration. PMID:24006439

  1. HIV-Neutralizing Activity of Cationic Polypeptides in Cervicovaginal Secretions of Women in HIV-Serodiscordant Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Pauline; Choi, Robert Y.; Cole, Amy L.; Hirbod, Taha; Rhedin, Samuel; Payne, Barbara; Guthrie, Brandon L.; Bosire, Rose; Cole, Alexander M.; Farquhar, Carey; Broliden, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV exposed seronegative (HESN) women represent the population most in need of a prophylactic antiviral strategy. Mucosal cationic polypeptides can potentially be regulated for this purpose and we here aimed to determine their endogenous expression and HIV neutralizing activity in genital secretions of women at risk of HIV infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Cervicovaginal secretions (CVS) of Kenyan women in HIV-serodiscordant relationships (HESN, n = 164; HIV seropositive, n = 60) and low-risk controls (n = 72) were assessed for the cationic polypeptides HNP1–3, LL-37 and SLPI by ELISA and for HIV neutralizing activity by a PBMC-based assay using an HIV primary isolate. Median levels of HNP1–3 and LL-37 in CVS were similar across study groups. Neither HSV-2 serostatus, nor presence of bacterial vaginosis, correlated with levels of HNP1–3 or LL-37 in the HESN women. However, an association with their partner's viral load was observed. High viral load (>10,000 HIV RNA copies/ml plasma) correlated with higher levels of HNP1–3 and LL-37 (p = 0.04 and 0.03, respectively). SLPI was most abundant in the low-risk group and did not correlate with male partner's viral load in the HESN women. HIV neutralizing activity was found in CVS of all study groups. In experimental studies, selective depletion of cationic polypeptides from CVS rendered the remaining CVS fraction non-neutralizing, whereas the cationic polypeptide fraction retained the activity. Furthermore, recombinant HNP1–3 and LL-37 could induce neutralizing activity when added to CVS lacking intrinsic activity. Conclusions/Significance These findings show that CVS from HESN, low-risk, and HIV seropositive women contain HIV neutralizing activity. Although several innate immune proteins, including HNP1–3 and LL-37, contribute to this activity these molecules can also have inflammatory properties. This balance is influenced by hormonal and environmental factors and in the

  2. [Analysis of serum neutralizing antibody response in patients with primary dengue virus type 1 infection].

    PubMed

    Hu, Dongmei; Li, Jie; Wang, Dahu; DI, Biao; Qiu, Liwen; Wang, Yadi; Ding, Xixia; Che, Xiaoyan

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the characteristics and dynamic changes of serum neutralizing antibody response in patients with primary infection of dengue virus type 1 (DENV-1). Serum samples were obtained from the same patients with primary infection of DENV-1 within 2 weeks after symptom onset in 2006 and in 2010. A group-specific DENV NS1 capture ELISA-based micro-neutralizing test (ELISA-MNT) capable of detecting neutralizing antibodies against all the 4 serotypes of DENV was used to test the neutralizing antibody titers against DENV in the serum samples. The neutralizing antibody titers against a standard strain and 2 clinically isolated strains of DENV-1 were detected in serum samples collected in 2010. Cross-reactive neutralizing antibody response against all the 4 serotypes of DENV was found in both of the serum samples collected in 2006 and 2010, but the samples collected in 2006 showed stronger cross-reactive neutralizing antibody responses. The neutralizing antibody against DENV-2, rather than the anticipated DENV-1 antibody, had the highest titer in the samples collected in 2006, whereas the antibody against homologous DENV-1 had the highest titer in the samples obtained in 2010. The neutralizing antibody titers against the homologous DENV-1 was significantly higher in samples collected in 2010 (U=86.500, P=0.000), which also demonstrated significantly different neutralizing antibody titers against the 3 different strains of DENV-1 (Χ(2)=12.123, P=0.002). The production of cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies between the 4 serotypes of DENV is a characteristic of DENV infection, particularly during early infection, but only the homologous neutralizing antibody increases obviously over time. The titers of the neutralizing antibodies against different strains, even of the same serotype, may differ distinctly.

  3. Neutralization Assay for Chikungunya Virus Infection: Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test.

    PubMed

    Azami, Nor Azila Muhammad; Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2016-01-01

    Neutralization assay is a technique that detects and quantifies neutralizing antibody in serum samples by calculating the percentage of reduction of virus activity, as the concentration of virus used is usually constant. Neutralizing antibody titer is conventionally determined by calculating the percentage reduction in total virus infectivity by counting and comparing number of plaques (localized area of infection due to cytopathic effect) with a standard amount of virus. Conventional neutralizing test uses plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT) to determine neutralizing antibody titers against Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Here we describe the plaque reduction neutralization assay (PRNT) using Vero cell lines to obtain neutralizing antibody titers.

  4. Response of microbial activities to heavy metals in a neutral loamy soil treated with biosolid.

    PubMed

    Kao, Po-Hsu; Huang, Cheng-Chieh; Hseu, Zeng-Yei

    2006-06-01

    Application of biosolid on land has been widespread in numerous countries for last several decades. This study performed incubation experiments by mixing a neutral loamy soil and biosolid enriched in Cu, Pb and Zn to explore how heavy metal affects soil mineralization and microbial biomass. The experimental results indicated that large nutrient, microorganism and C sources from biosolid were beneficial to microbial respiration. However, compared to the biosolid alone treatment, the supplemented Cu, Pb and Zn in biosolid reduced the mineralized C by roughly 36%. This phenomenon was probably caused by a portion of the Cu, Pb and Zn being complexed with organic matter to prevent decomposition of organic carbon by microorganisms. Equally, soil treated with biosolid increased the quantity of mineralized N by approximately five-fold and accelerated the rate of N mineralization by about one-fold compared to untreated soil. Notably, addition of heavy metals impaired the mineralization process, particularly when Pb reached about 64%. The reduced N mineralization occurred for similar reasons to the microbial respiration. The addition of biosolid in soil considerably increased the amount of mineralizable N; however, the increase was lower in biosolid-treated soil spiked by heavy metals. The addition of heavy metals in the soil-biosolid mixture clearly reduced the microbial biomasses C (MBC) and N (MBN), indicating that the microbial activities had been disrupted by the heavy metals. The microbial biomass C/N ratio had changed initially from 8 to 13 at the end of incubation period, owing to various groups of microbes expressing different mechanisms of metabolism, indicating that the microbial population had changed from bacteria to fungi, which had higher metal tolerance.

  5. ACTIVE IMMUNITY PRODUCED BY SO CALLED BALANCED OR NEUTRAL MIXTURES OF DIPHTHERIA TOXIN AND ANTITOXIN.

    PubMed

    Smith, T

    1909-03-01

    The foregoing and earlier data taken together demonstrate that an active immunity lasting several years can be produced in guinea-pigs, by the injection of toxin-antitoxin mixtures which have no recognizable harmful effect either immediate or remote. They also show, what might have been anticipated, that under the same conditions mixtures which produce local lesions and which, therefore, contain an excess of toxin produce a much higher degree of immunity than the neutral mixtures, and that an excess of antitoxin reduces the possibility of producing an active immunity, and may extinguish it altogether. There is, therefore, a certain definite relation between the components of the mixture and the degree of immunity producible. Furthermore, toxin-antitoxin mixtures do not change materially within five days at room temperature. They are apparently more efficacious at the end of forty-eight hours than immediately after preparation. The experiments finally prove that a relatively high degree of active immunity can be induced by a harmless procedure, whereas the use of toxin alone leading to very severe local lesions is incapable of producing more than an insignificant protection. The method, therefore, invites further tests in regard to its ultimate applicability to the human being. Unless the subcutis of the guinea-pig reacts to toxin-antitoxin mixtures in a manner peculiar to itself, a practical, easily controlled method for active immunization can be worked out which should afford a larger protection than the serum alone and avoid the complications associated with horse serum. That proportion of toxin and antitoxin which would produce the highest desirable immunity consistent with the least discomfort would have to be carefully worked out for the human subject. From the nature of the immunity induced it is obvious, however, that such a method of immunization cannot take the place of a large dose of antitoxin in exposed individuals who must be protected at once. It

  6. Strategic addition of an N-linked glycan to a monoclonal antibody improves its HIV-1-neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Song, Ruijiang; Oren, Deena A; Franco, David; Seaman, Michael S; Ho, David D

    2013-11-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4--a key receptor for HIV--and blocks HIV-1 infection. However, HIV-1 strains with mutations resulting in loss of an N-linked glycan from the V5 loop of the envelope glycoprotein gp120 are resistant to ibalizumab. Previous structural analysis suggests that this glycan fills a void between the gp120 V5 loop and the ibalizumab light chain, perhaps causing steric hindrance that disrupts viral entry. If this void contributes to HIV-1 resistance to ibalizumab, we reasoned that 'refilling' it by engineering an N-linked glycan into the ibalizumab light chain at a position spatially proximal to gp120 V5 may restore susceptibility to ibalizumab. Indeed, one such ibalizumab variant neutralized 100% of 118 diverse HIV-1 strains tested in vitro, including 10 strains resistant to parental ibalizumab. These findings demonstrate that the strategic placement of a glycan in the variable region of a monoclonal antibody can substantially enhance its activity.

  7. Strategic addition of an N-linked glycan to a monoclonal antibody improves its HIV-1-neutralizing activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ruijiang; Oren, Deena A.; Franco, David; Seaman, Michael S.; Ho, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Ibalizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds human CD4—a key receptor for HIV—and blocks HIV-1 infection. However, HIV-1 strains with mutations resulting in loss of an N-linked glycan from the V5 loop of the envelope protein gp120 are resistant to ibalizumab. Previous structural analysis suggests that this glycan fills a void between the gp120 V5 loop and the ibalizumab L chain, perhaps causing steric hindrance that disrupts viral entry. If this void contributes to HIV-1 resistance to ibalizumab, we reasoned that ‘refilling’ it by engineering an N-linked glycan into the ibalizumab L chain at a position spatially proximal to gp120 V5 may restore susceptibility to ibalizumab. Indeed, one such ibalizumab variant neutralized 100% of 118 tested diverse HIV-1 strains in vitro, including ten strains resistant to parental ibalizumab. These findings demonstrate that the strategic placement of a glycan in the variable region of a monoclonal antibody can substantially enhance its activity. PMID:24097413

  8. A role for calcium in the regulation of neutral trehalase activity in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Alejandro; Soto, Teresa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Paredes, Vanessa; Madrid, Marisa; Gacto, Mariano; Cansado, José

    2003-01-01

    Neutral trehalases mobilize trehalose accumulated by fungal cells as a protective and storage carbohydrate. A structural feature of these enzymes is the presence of an EF-like motif similar to that shown by many Ca2+-binding proteins. In this study we provide direct evidence for physical binding of Ca2+ to neutral trehalase (Ntp1p) of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and show that aspartic residues at positions 97 and 108 in the conserved putative Ca2+-binding motif of Ntp1p appear to be responsible for this interaction. Mutations in these residues do not interfere with the ability of Ntp1p to associate in vivo with trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, but prevent activation of neutral trehalase triggered by the addition of glucose or by subjecting cells to stressing conditions. Strains expressing Ntp1p variants that are unable to bind Ca2+ partially resemble those devoid of the ntp1+ gene in terms of trehalose hyperaccumulation. Gel filtration of cell extracts from wild-type cells after EDTA treatment or from cells containing Ntp1p with mutations in aspartic acid residues within the Ca2+-binding site revealed that Ntp1p eluted mainly in an inactive conformation instead of the dimeric or trimeric active form of the enzyme. These results suggest that activation of S. pombe Ntp1p under different conditions depends upon Ca2+ binding through the Ca2+-binding motif as a prerequisite for correct enzyme oligomerization to its active form. Given the high degree of conservation of the Ca2+ accommodation site, this might be a general mechanism regulating neutral trehalase activity in other yeasts and filamentous fungi. PMID:12943532

  9. Glycinin-gum arabic complex formation: Turbidity measurement and charge neutralization analysis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Die; Hua, Yufei

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between glycinin and anionic polysaccharides has gained considerable attention recently because of its scientific impact on the stability of acid soymilk systems. In this study, the formation of glycinin/gum arabic complexes driven by electrostatic interactions was investigated. Turbidity titrations at different glycinin/gum arabic ratios were conducted and critical pH values (pHφ1) where insoluble complexes began forming were determined firstly. The corresponding pHφ1 values at glycinin/gum arabic ratios of 1:4, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1 were 2.85, 3.25, 3.70, 4.40, 4.85 and 5.35, respectively. Afterwards, electromobilities for glycinin and gum arabic at the pH values between 4.1 and 2.6 were measured, and charge densities (ZN) for glycinin and gum arabic were calculated based on the soft particle analysis theory. Further analysis indicated that the product of glycinin/gum arabic ratio (ρ) and ZN ratio of glycinin/gum arabic was approximate 1 at any pHφ1 values. It was revealed that charge neutralization was achieved when glycinin/gum arabic insoluble complexes began forming. NaCl displayed multiple effects on glycinin/gum arabic complex formation according to turbidity and compositional analysis. The present study could provide basic guidance in acid soymilk designing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Cross-reactivity, antivenomics, and neutralization of toxic activities of Lachesis venoms by polyspecific and monospecific antivenoms

    PubMed Central

    Madrigal, Marvin; Pla, Davinia; Sanz, Libia; Barboza, Elexandra; Arroyo-Portilla, Cynthia; Corrêa-Netto, Carlos; Gutiérrez, José María; Alape-Girón, Alberto; Flores-Díaz, Marietta

    2017-01-01

    Background Bothrops, Crotalus and Lachesis represent the most medically relevant genera of pitvipers in Central and South America. Similarity in venom phenotype and physiopathological profile of envenomings caused by the four nominal Lachesis species led us to hypothesize that an antivenom prepared against venom from any of them may exhibit paraspecificity against all the other congeneric taxa. Methods To assess this hypothesis, in this work we have applied antivenomics and immunochemical methods to investigate the immunoreactivity of three monovalent antivenoms and two polyvalent antivenoms towards the venoms from different geographic populations of three different Lachesis species. The ability of the antivenoms to neutralize the proteolytic, hemorrhagic, coagulant, and lethal activities of the seven Lachesis venoms was also investigated. Results A conspicuous pattern of immunorecognition and cross-neutralization for all effects was evident by the polyspecific antivenoms, indicating large immunoreactive epitope conservation across the genus during more than 10 million years since the Central and South American bushmasters diverged. Conclusions Despite the broad geographic distribution of Lachesis, antivenoms against venoms of different species are effective in the neutralization of congeneric venoms not used in the immunization mixture, indicating that they can be used equivalently for the clinical treatment of any lachesic envenoming. General significance This study demonstrates that antivenoms raised against venom of different Lachesis species are indistinctly effective in the neutralization of congeneric venoms not used in the immunization mixture, indicating that antivenoms against conspecific venoms may be used equivalently for the clinical treatment of envenomings caused by any bushmaster species. PMID:28787445

  11. Amygdala activation as a marker for selective attention toward neutral faces in a chronic traumatic brain injury population.

    PubMed

    Young, Leanne R; Yu, Weikei; Holloway, Michael; Rodgers, Barry N; Chapman, Sandra B; Krawczyk, Daniel C

    2017-09-01

    There has been great interest in characterizing the response of the amygdala to emotional faces, especially in the context of social cognition. Although amygdala activation is most often associated with fearful or angry stimuli, there is considerable evidence that the response of the amygdala to neutral faces is both robust and reliable. This characteristic of amygdala function is of particular interest in the context of assessing populations with executive function deficits, such as traumatic brain injuries, which can be evaluated using fMRI attention modulation tasks that evaluate prefrontal control over representations, notably faces. The current study tested the hypothesis that the amygdala may serve as a marker of selective attention to neutral faces. Using fMRI, we gathered data within a chronic traumatic brain injury population. Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signal change within the left and right amygdalae and fusiform face areas was measured while participants viewed neutral faces and scenes, under conditions requiring participants to (1) categorize pictures of faces and scenes, (2) selectively attend to either faces or scenes, or (3) attend to both faces and scenes. Findings revealed that the amygdala is an effective marker for selective attention to neutral faces and, furthermore, it was more face-specific than the fusiform face area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. New Heterofunctional Supports Based on Glutaraldehyde-Activation: A Tool for Enzyme Immobilization at Neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Melo, Ricardo Rodrigues de; Alnoch, Robson Carlos; Vilela, Adriana Ferreira Lopes; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi de; Krieger, Nadia; Ruller, Roberto; Sato, Hélia Harumi; Mateo, Cesar

    2017-06-29

    Immobilization is an exciting alternative to improve the stability of enzymatic processes. However, part of the applied covalent strategies for immobilization uses specific conditions, generally alkaline pH, where some enzymes are not stable. Here, a new generation of heterofunctional supports with application at neutral pH conditions was proposed. New supports were developed with different bifunctional groups (i.e., hydrophobic or carboxylic/metal) capable of adsorbing biocatalysts at different regions (hydrophobic or histidine richest place), together with a glutaraldehyde group that promotes an irreversible immobilization at neutral conditions. To verify these supports, a multi-protein model system (E. coli extract) and four enzymes (Candidarugosa lipase, metagenomic lipase, β-galactosidase and β-glucosidase) were used. The immobilization mechanism was tested and indicated that moderate ionic strength should be applied to avoid possible unspecific adsorption. The use of different supports allowed the immobilization of most of the proteins contained in a crude protein extract. In addition, different supports yielded catalysts of the tested enzymes with different catalytic properties. At neutral pH, the new supports were able to adsorb and covalently immobilize the four enzymes tested with different recovered activity values. Notably, the use of these supports proved to be an efficient alternative tool for enzyme immobilization at neutral pH.

  13. Engineering HIV envelope protein to activate germline B cell receptors of broadly neutralizing anti-CD4 binding site antibodies.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Andrew T; Hoot, Sam; Dreyer, Anita M; Lippy, Adriana; Stuart, Andrew; Cohen, Kristen W; Jardine, Joseph; Menis, Sergey; Scheid, Johannes F; West, Anthony P; Schief, William R; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2013-04-08

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against HIV are believed to be a critical component of the protective responses elicited by an effective HIV vaccine. Neutralizing antibodies against the evolutionarily conserved CD4-binding site (CD4-BS) on the HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) are capable of inhibiting infection of diverse HIV strains, and have been isolated from HIV-infected individuals. Despite the presence of anti-CD4-BS broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) epitopes on recombinant Env, Env immunization has so far failed to elicit such antibodies. Here, we show that Env immunogens fail to engage the germline-reverted forms of known bnAbs that target the CD4-BS. However, we found that the elimination of a conserved glycosylation site located in Loop D and two glycosylation sites located in variable region 5 of Env allows Env-binding to, and activation of, B cells expressing the germline-reverted BCRs of two potent broadly neutralizing antibodies, VRC01 and NIH45-46. Our results offer a possible explanation as to why Env immunogens have been ineffective in stimulating the production of such bNAbs. Importantly, they provide key information as to how such immunogens can be engineered to initiate the process of antibody-affinity maturation against one of the most conserved Env regions.

  14. NON-NEUTRALIZED ELECTRIC CURRENT PATTERNS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS: ORIGIN OF THE SHEAR-GENERATING LORENTZ FORCE

    SciTech Connect

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Mikic, Zoran

    2012-12-10

    Using solar vector magnetograms of the highest available spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, we perform a detailed study of electric current patterns in two solar active regions (ARs): a flaring/eruptive and a flare-quiet one. We aim to determine whether ARs inject non-neutralized (net) electric currents in the solar atmosphere, responding to a debate initiated nearly two decades ago that remains inconclusive. We find that well-formed, intense magnetic polarity inversion lines (PILs) within ARs are the only photospheric magnetic structures that support significant net current. More intense PILs seem to imply stronger non-neutralized current patterns per polarity. This finding revises previous works that claim frequent injections of intense non-neutralized currents by most ARs appearing in the solar disk but also works that altogether rule out injection of non-neutralized currents. In agreement with previous studies, we also find that magnetically isolated ARs remain globally current-balanced. In addition, we confirm and quantify the preference of a given magnetic polarity to follow a given sense of electric currents, indicating a dominant sense of twist in ARs. This coherence effect is more pronounced in more compact ARs with stronger PILs and must be of sub-photospheric origin. Our results yield a natural explanation of the Lorentz force, invariably generating velocity and magnetic shear along strong PILs, thus setting a physical context for the observed pre-eruption evolution in solar ARs.

  15. Cross-Reactive and Cross-Neutralizing Activity of Human Mumps Antibodies Against a Novel Mumps Virus From Bats.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Shannon M; Nachbagauer, Raffael; Hirsh, Ariana; Vigant, Frederic; Duehr, James; Azarm, Kristopher D; Stelfox, Alice J; Bowden, Thomas A; Duprex, W Paul; Krammer, Florian; Lee, Benhur

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the antigenic relationship between bat mumps virus (BMV) and the JL5 vaccine strain of mumps virus (MuVJL5), we rescued a chimeric virus bearing the F and HN glycoproteins of BMV in the background of a recombinant JL5 genome (rMuVJL5). Cross-reactivity and cross-neutralization between this chimeric recombinant MuV bearing the F and HN glycoproteins of BMV (rMuVJL5-F/HNBMV) virus and rMuVJL5 were demonstrated using hyperimmune mouse serum samples and a curated panel of human serum. All mouse and human serum samples that were able to neutralize rMuVJL5 infection had cross-neutralizing activity against rMuVJL5-F/HNBMV. Our data suggest that persons who have neutralizing antibodies against MuV might be protected from infection by BMV. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Effects of Hypothermia and Self-Warming on Activity of Ca(2+)-Dependent Neutral Proteases in Tissues of Ground Squirrels and Rats.

    PubMed

    Nurmagomedova, P M; Emirbekov, E Z; Abasova, M M

    2016-04-01

    Effects of hypothermia and subsequent self-warming on activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteases were studied in tissues of ground squirrels and rats. Moderate hypothermia did not significantly change activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteases in the analyzed tissues of ground squirrels, but reduced protease activity in rat heart. Severe hypothermia reduced enzyme activity in the analyzed tissues of rats and ground squirrels. Differences in activity of Ca(2+)-dependent neutral proteases after long-term hypothermia and subsequent self-warming were found only in the heart.

  17. Preflight Extravehicular Activity Training for STS-114 at the Neutral Buoyancy Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-28

    JSC2002-E-23138 (28 May 2002) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson, STS-114 mission specialist, is photographed as the final touches are made on the training version of his Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit prior to being submerged in the waters of the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) near the Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  18. Electric fields measured by ISEE-1 within and near the neutral sheet during quiet and active times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattell, C. A.; Mozer, F. S.

    1982-01-01

    An understanding of the physical processes occurring in the magnetotail and plasmasheet during different interplanetary magnetic field orientations and differing levels of ground magnetic activity is crucial for the development of a theory of energy transfer from the solar wind to the particles which produce auroral arcs. In the present investigation, the first observations of electric fields during neutral sheet crossings are presented, taking into account the statistical correlations of the interplanetary magnetic field direction and ground activity with the character of the electric field. The electric field data used in the study were obtained from a double probe experiment on the ISEE-1 satellite. The observations suggest that turbulent electric and magnetic fields are intimately related to plasma acceleration in the neutral sheet and to the processes which create auroral particles.

  19. Towards energy neutrality by optimising the activated sludge process of the WWTP Bochum-Ölbachtal.

    PubMed

    Marner, S T; Schröter, D; Jardin, N

    2016-01-01

    As a result of Ruhrverband's regularly performed energy audits the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) Bochum-Ölbachtal shows substantial deficits concerning energy efficiency. Due to the energy consumption of internal recirculation, mixers and return activated sludge (RAS) pumping the existing pre-denitrification process configuration offers a specific energy consumption for biological treatment of 23 kWh (PE · a)(-1). In order to optimise the energy situation and to improve the treatment efficiency, the process layout was changed completely to a three-stage step-feed process. By optimising the hydraulic conditions, it was possible to reconstruct the plant with a free flow throughout the whole biological treatment system without any additional pumping. The total investment costs for this process scheme were 3.9 million €. These costs could be partly offset against the wastewater charge paid (2.9 million €). Compared to the overall energy consumption before the process modification, today the energy consumption for biological treatment amounts to 12.4 kWh (PE · a)(-1). The highest saving potential has been achieved by optimising mixing and reducing the energy demand for internal recirculation and RAS pumping. In the case of the WWTP Bochum-Ölbachtal, the modification of the treatment process not only results in an improved energy situation but also increased the treatment efficiency in such a way that the nitrogen concentration in the effluent could be constantly kept below 5 mg L(-1) N(tot), which provides the basis for being exempted from the wastewater discharge for nitrogen. As a result of all these measures, the rate of self-sufficiency by using biogas from the digester in combined heat and power units has been increased substantially from 60% before process modifications to 97%. With the upcoming optimisation measures, a further increase of self-sufficiency is expected to finally achieve energy neutrality based on yearly averages. The example of the

  20. Analysis of Potential Glove-Induced Hand Injury Metrics During Typical Neutral Buoyancy Training Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFarland, Shane

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the hands are common among astronauts who train for extravehicular activity. When the gloves are pressurized, they restrict movement and create pressure points during tasks, sometimes resulting in pain, muscle fatigue, abrasions, and occasionally more severe injuries such as onycholysis. A brief review of NASA's Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health's injury database reveals that 76 percent of astronaut hand and arm injuries from training between 1993 and 2010 occurred either to the fingernail, finger crotch, metacarpophalangeal joint, or fingertip. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of using small sensors to measure forces acting on the fingers and hand within pressurized gloves and other variables such as skin temperature, humidity, and fingernail strain of a NASA crewmember during typical NBL (Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory) training activity. During the 5-hour exercise, the crewmember seemed to exhibit very large forces on some fingers, resulting in higher strain than seen in previous glove-box testing. In addition, vital information was collected on the glove cavity environment with respect to temperature and humidity. All of this information gathered during testing will be carried forward into future testing, potentially in glove-box- or 1G- (1 gravitational force) or NBL-suited environments, to better characterize and understand the possible causes of hand injury amongst NASA crew.

  1. Disproportionation and nuclease activity of bis[2-ethyl-2-hydroxybutanoato(2-)]oxochromate(V) in neutral aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Levina, A; Lay, P A; Dixon, N E

    2000-02-07

    Complex 1, [Cr(V)O(ehba)2]- (ehba = 2-ethyl-2-hydroxybutanoate(2-)) is the most studied model compound of relevance to the biological activity of Cr(V) with regard to Cr-induced cancers. The first detailed kinetic study of disproportionation of 1 under neutral pH conditions (pH 6.0-8.0, [NaClO4] = 1.0 M, 37 degrees C) is reported. Kinetic data were collected by stopped-flow and conventional UV-vis spectroscopies and processed by the global analysis method. The disproportionation, which follows the stoichiometry 3Cr(V) --> 2Cr(VI) + Cr(III) (1), leads to release of 5 mol of H+/3 mol of Cr(V). Reaction 1 is accelerated by phosphate, but is not affected by acetate, HEPES, or Tris buffers. Initial rates of Cr(V) decay are directly proportional to [Cr(V)]0 (0.020-1.0 mM); they increase with an increase in the pH values and decrease in the presence of a large excess of ehba ligand. The first direct evidence for the formation of Cr(IV) intermediates in reaction 1 has been obtained; however, their UV-vis spectral properties were different from those of the well-characterized Cr(IV)-ehba complexes. The Cr(III) products of reaction I in phosphate buffers differ from those in the other buffers. A mechanism is proposed for reaction 1 on the basis of kinetic modeling. Influences of the reaction time and conditions on the extent of plasmid DNA cleavage induced by 1 have been studied under conditions corresponding to those of the kinetic studies. A comparison of the kinetic and DNA cleavage results has shown that direct interaction of 1 with the phosphate backbone of DNA is the most likely first step in the mechanism of DNA cleavage in neutral media. Small additions of Mn(II) ((0.01-0.1)[Cr(V)]0) did not affect the rate and stoichiometry of reaction 1, but suppressed the formation of Cr(IV) intermediates (presumably due to the catalysis of Cr(IV) disproportionation). However, much higher concentrations of Mn(II) ((0.1-1.0)[Cr(V)]0) were required to inhibit DNA cleavage induced by

  2. Spectral analysis of forced turbulence in a non-neutral plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Maero, G.; Romé, M.

    2017-06-01

    The paper investigates the dynamics of magnetized non-neutral (electron) plasmas subjected to external electric field perturbations. A two-dimensional (2-D) particle-in-cell code is effectively exploited to model this system with a special attention to the role that non-axisymmetric, multipolar radio frequency (RF) drives applied to the cylindrical (circular) boundary play on the insurgence of azimuthal instabilities and the subsequent formation of coherent structures preventing the relaxation to a fully developed turbulent state, when the RF fields are chosen in the frequency range of the low-order fluid modes themselves. The isomorphism of such system with a 2-D inviscid incompressible fluid offers an insight into the details of forced 2-D fluid turbulence. The choice of different initial density (i.e. fluid vorticity) distributions allows for a selection of conditions where different levels of turbulence and intermittency are expected and a range of final states is achieved. Integral and spectral quantities of interest are computed along the flow using a multiresolution analysis based on a wavelet decomposition of both enstrophy and energy 2-D maps. The analysis of a variety of cases shows that the qualitative features of turbulent relaxation are similar in conditions of both free and forced evolution; at the same time, fine details of the flow beyond the self-similarity turbulence properties are highlighted in particular in the formation of structures and their timing, where the influence of the initial conditions and the effect of the external forcing can be distinguished.

  3. Carboxylic acid functional group analysis using constant neutral loss scanning-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dron, Julien; Eyglunent, Gregory; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri

    2007-12-12

    The present study describes the development of a new analytical technique for the functional group determination of the carboxylic moiety using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) operated in the constant neutral loss scanning (CNLS) mode. Carboxylic groups were first derivatized into their corresponding methyl esters by reacting with BF3/methanol mix and the reaction mixture was then directly injected into the APCI chamber. The loss of methanol (m/z = 32 amu) resulting from the fragmentation of the protonated methyl esters was then monitored. Applying this method together with a statistical approach to reference mixtures containing 31 different carboxylic acids at randomly calculated concentrations demonstrated its suitability for quantitative functional group measurements with relative standard deviations below 15% and a detection limit of 0.005 mmol L(-1). Its applicability to environmental matrices was also shown through the determination of carboxylic acid concentrations inside atmospheric aerosol samples. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that the tandem mass spectrometry was successfully applied to functional group analysis, offering great perspectives in the characterization of complex mixtures which are prevailing in the field of environmental analysis as well as in the understanding of the chemical processes occurring in these matrices.

  4. Characterization of a neutral and thermostable glucoamylase from the thermophilic mold Thermomucor indicae-seudaticae: activity, stability, and structural correlation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pardeep; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Satyanarayana, T

    2010-03-01

    Glucoamylase from the thermophilic mold Thermomucor indicae-seudaticae was purified by anion exchange and gel filtration chromatographic techniques using a fast protein liquid chromatographic system. The structure and thermal stability of this unique 'thermostable and neutral glucoamylase' were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD). T. indicae-seudaticae glucoamylase (TGA) contained typical aromatic amino acid (tryptophan/tyrosine) fingerprints in its tertiary structure. Analysis of the far-UV CD spectrum at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees Celsius revealed the presence of 45% alpha-helix, 43% beta-sheet, and 12% remaining structures. The alpha-helix content was highest at pH 7.0, where glucoamylase is optimally active. This observation points towards the possible (alpha/alpha)(6) barrel catalytic domain in TGA, as reported in microbial glucoamylases. Thermal denaturation curves of the pure protein at different pH values revealed maximum stability at pH 7.0, where no change in the secondary structure was observed upon heating in the temperature range between 20 degrees Celsius and 60 degrees Celsius. The observed midpoint of thermal denaturation (T (m)) of glucoamylase at pH 7.0 was 67.1 degrees Celsius, which decreased on either sides of this pH. Thermostability of TGA enhanced in the presence of starch (0.1%) as no transition curve was obtained in the temperature range between 20 degrees Celsius and 85 degrees Celsius. The only product of TGA action on starch was glucose, and it did not exhibit transglycosylation activity even at 40% glucose that can also be considered as an advantage during starch saccharification.

  5. Organic matter in sediment layers of an acidic mining lake as assessed by lipid analysis. Part II: Neutral lipids.

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, Juergen; Koschorreck, Matthias; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2017-02-01

    Natural neutralization of acidic mining lakes is often limited by organic matter. The knowledge of the sources and degradability of organic matter is crucial for understanding alkalinity generation in these lakes. Sediments collected at different depths (surface sediment layer from 0 to 1 cm and deep sediment layer from 4 to 5cm) from an acidic mining lake were studied in order to characterize sedimentary organic matter based on neutral signature markers. Samples were exhaustively extracted, subjected to pre-chromatographic derivatizations and analyzed by GC/MS. Herein, molecular distributions of diagnostic alkanes/alkenes, terpenes/terpenoids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic alcohols and ketones, sterols, and hopanes/hopanoids were addressed. Characterization of the contribution of natural vs. anthropogenic sources to the sedimentary organic matter in these extreme environments was then possible based on these distributions. With the exception of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, combined concentrations across all marker classes proved higher in the surface sediment layer as compared to those in the deep sediment layer. Alkane and aliphatic alcohol distributions pointed to predominantly allochthonous over autochthonous contribution to sedimentary organic matter. Sterol patterns were dominated by phytosterols of terrestrial plants including stigmasterol and β-sitosterol. Hopanoid markers with the ββ-biohopanoid "biological" configuration were more abundant in the surface sediment layer, which pointed to higher bacterial activity. The pattern of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons pointed to prevailing anthropogenic input. Pyrolytic makers were likely to due to atmospheric deposition from a nearby former coal combustion facility. The combined analysis of the array of biomarkers provided new insights into the sources and transformations of organic matter in lake sediments.

  6. Immobilized carbon nanotubes as matrix for MALDI-TOF-MS analysis: applications to neutral small carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shi-fang; Zhang, Li; Cheng, Zhi-hong; Guo, Yin-long

    2005-03-01

    In this work, we reported on the advantages of immobilized carbon nanotubes as a novel MALDI-matrix. Recently, carbon nanotubes have been reported to be an effective MALDI matrix for small molecules (Anal. Chem.2003, 75, 6191), as it can eliminate the interfering matrix peaks as well as form a web morphology to fully disperse the analyte and allow strong ultraviolet absorption for enhanced pulsed laser desorption and ionization. In our study, to overcome the problem that the carbon nanotube matrix may fly off from the target, a type of polyurethane adhesive, NIPPOLAN-DC-205, is introduced to immobilize carbon nanotubes on the target, which enables widespread application of carbon nanotubes as matrix for MALDI-MS analysis. At the same time, the properties of the carbon nanotubes as an efficient matrix remained after immobilization. The presence of NIPPOLAN-DC-205 increases the time for analysis at a particular desorption spot by minimizing the time-consuming search for "hot spots" and facilitating experiments such as post source decay (PSD) which need longer-lasting signals. Moreover, NIPPOLAN-DC-205 produces no interference peaks and can easily be cleaned with acetone. Fast evaporation technology may be used to enhance signal reproducibility in MALDI analysis using carbon nanotubes as matrix. Consequently, the applicability of the carbon nanotube as matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) analysis of low molecular mass analytes is highly improved. The feasibility of the method employing polyurethane is demonstrated by comparison of the results produced from the carbon nanotube matrix with and without immobilization. In addition, neutral small carbohydrates, which are difficult to be ionized normally, can be cationized with high efficiency by MALDI-TOF-MS using the immobilized carbon nanotube matrix. The method was further applied to analyze peptides and detect urine glucose successfully.

  7. Visual offline sample stacking via moving neutralization boundary electrophoresis for analysis of heavy metal ion.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yinping; Li, Shan; Fan, Liuyin; Cao, Chengxi

    2012-06-15

    In this paper, a moving neutralization boundary (MNB) electrophoresis is developed as a novel model of visual offline sample stacking for the trace analysis of heavy metal ions (HMIs). In the stacking system, the cathodic-direction motion MNB is designed with 1.95-2.8mM HCl+98 mM KCl in phase alfa and 4.0mM NaOH+96 mM KCl in phase beta. If a little of HMI is present in phase alfa, the metal ion electrically migrates towards the MNB and react with hydroxyl ion, producing precipitation and moving precipitation boundary (MPB). The alkaline precipitation is neutralized by hydrogen ion, leading to a moving eluting boundary (MEB), release of HMI from its precipitation, circle of HMI from the MEB to the MPB, and highly efficient visual stacking. As a proof of concept, a set of metal ions (Cu(II), Co(II), Mn(II), Pb(II) and Cr(III)) were chosen as the model HMIs and capillary electrophoresis (CE) was selected as an analytical tool for the experiments demonstrating the feasibility of MNB-based stacking. As shown in this paper, (i) the visual stacking model was manifested by the experiments; (ii) there was a controllable stacking of HMI in the MNB system; (iii) the offline stacking could achieve higher than 123 fold preconcentration; and (iv) the five HMIs were simultaneously stacked via the developed stacking technique for the trace analyses with the limits of detection (LOD): 3.67×10(-3) (Cu(II)), 1.67×10(-3) (Co(II), 4.17×10(-3) (Mn(II)), 4.6×10(-4) (Pb(II)) and 8.40×10(-4)mM (Cr(III)). Even the off-line stacking was demonstrated for the use of CE-based HMI analysis, it has potential applications in atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography (IC) etc. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Analysis of Solar Wind Samples Returned by Genesis Using Laser Post Ionization Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veryovkin, I. V.; Calaway, W. F.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Burnett, D. S.

    2005-12-01

    A new secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) instrument implementing laser post ionization (LPI) of ion sputtered and laser desorbed neutral species has been developed and constructed for the specific purpose of quantitative analysis of metallic elements at ultra trace levels in solar wind collector samples returned to Earth by the Genesis Discovery mission. The first LPI SNMS measurements are focusing on determining Al, Ca, Cr, and Mg in these samples. These measurements provide the first concentration and isotopic abundances determinations for several key metallic elements and also elucidate possible fractionation effects between the photosphere and the solar wind compositions. It is now documented that Genesis samples suffered surface contamination both during flight and during the breach of the Sample Return Capsule when it crashed. Since accurate quantitative analysis is compromised by sample contamination, several features have been built into the new LPI SNMS instrument to mitigate this difficulty. A normally-incident, low-energy (<500 eV) ion beam combined with a keV energy ion beam and a desorbing laser beam (both microfocused) enables dual beam analyses. The low-energy ion beam can be used to remove surface contaminant by sputtering with minimum ion beam mixing. This low-energy beam also will be used to perform ion beam milling, while either the microfocused ion or laser beam probes the solar wind elemental compositions as a function of sample depth. Because of the high depth resolution of dual beam analyses, such depth profiles clearly distinguish between surface contaminants and solar wind implanted atoms. In addition, in-situ optical and electron beam imaging for observing and avoiding particulates and scratches on solar wind sample surfaces is incorporated in the new LPI SNMS instrument to further reduce quantification problems. The current status of instrument tests and analyses will be presented. This work is supported by the U. S. Department of

  9. Analysis of Power Distribution on Beamline Components at Different Neutralization Efficiencies on NBI Test Stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Xu, Yongjian; Yu, Ling; Chen, Yu; Hu, Chundong; Tao, Ling

    2016-12-01

    Neutral beam injection is recognized as one of the most effective means for plasma heating. According to the research plan of the EAST physics experiment, two sets of neutral beam injector (4-8 MW, 10-100 s) were built and operated in 2014. Neutralization efficiency is one of the important parameters for neutral beam. High neutralization efficiency can not only improve injection power at the same beam energy, but also decrease the power deposited on the heat-load components in the neutral beam injector (NBI). This research explores the power deposition distribution at different neutralization efficiencies on the beamline components of the NBI device. This work has great significance for guiding the operation of EAST-NBI, especially in long pulse and high power operation, which can reduce the risk of thermal damage of the beamline components and extend the working life of the NBI device. supported by the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (No. 2014DFG61950), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11405207) and the Foundation of ASIPP (No. DSJJ-15-GC03)

  10. Structural basis of selectivity and neutralizing activity of a TGFα/epiregulin specific antibody.

    PubMed

    Boyles, Jeffrey S; Atwell, Shane; Druzina, Zhanna; Heuer, Josef G; Witcher, Derrick R

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have implicated a role of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway in kidney disease. Skin toxicity associated with therapeutics which completely block the EGFR pathway precludes their use in chronic dosing. Therefore, we developed antibodies which specifically neutralize the EGFR ligands TGFα (transforming growth factor-alpha) and epiregulin but not EGF (epidermal growth factor), amphiregulin, betacellulin, HB-EGF (heparin-binding epidermal growth factor), or epigen. The epitope of one such neutralizing antibody, LY3016859, was characterized in detail to elucidate the structural basis for ligand specificity. Here we report a crystal structure of the LY3016859 Fab fragment in complex with soluble human TGFα. Our data demonstrate a conformational epitope located primarily within the C-terminal subdomain of the ligand. In addition, point mutagenesis experiments were used to highlight specific amino acids which are critical for both antigen binding and neutralization, most notably Ala(41) , Glu(44) , and His(45) . These results illustrate the structural basis for the ligand specificity/selectivity of LY3016859 and could also provide insight into further engineering to alter specificity and/or affinity of LY3016859. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  11. Clinical laboratory application of a reporter-gene assay for measurement of functional activity and neutralizing antibody response to infliximab.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Igor Y; Carper, James; Lázár-Molnár, Eszter; Delgado, Julio C

    2016-01-30

    TNF-α antagonists such as infliximab are effective for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease and other inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Development of an immune response and subsequent neutralizing antibodies against these protein-based drugs is a major impediment that contributes to therapeutic failure, or adverse effects such as hypersensitivity reactions. As opposed to empirical dose-escalation strategies, rational and cost-effective evaluation of clinical non-responsiveness includes measurement of serum drug levels, and detection of drug-specific antibodies. We present the validation and 2-y experience using a functional, cell-based reporter gene assay (RGA) developed for measuring the biological activity and antibody response to serum infliximab. The RGA was used to test 4699 clinical specimens from patients suspected of therapeutic failure. In contrast to binding assays, which detect an overall antibody response, the RGA specifically detects those antibodies that have drug-neutralizing function, and thus, poses higher risk for therapeutic failure. The RGA presented here is currently the only functional clinical test available to measure serum infliximab activity and neutralizing antibodies. Due to its accuracy and precision, and suitability for high-throughput testing, this robust platform can be applied to any TNF-α antagonist, providing an invaluable tool for the clinical management of patients with treatment failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, J. A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R. P.

    1981-10-01

    To test neutral beam sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam on times, actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles are required. The dumps should be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/sq cm anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on two different panel designs. The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies.

  13. Meta-analysis of neutralizing antibody conversion with onabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX®) across multiple indications.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Markus; Carruthers, Alastair; Carruthers, Jean; Aurora, Sheena K; Zafonte, Ross; Abu-Shakra, Susan; Boodhoo, Terry; Miller-Messana, Mary Ann; Demos, George; James, Lynn; Beddingfield, Frederick; VanDenburgh, Amanda; Chapman, Mary Ann; Brin, Mitchell F

    2010-10-15

    This meta-analysis evaluated the frequency of neutralizing antibody (nAb) conversion with onabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX®; Allergan) across five studied indications. The analysis was based on large, controlled or prospective, open-label trials (durations 4 months to ≥2 years). Serum samples were analyzed for nAbs using the Mouse Protection Assay. Subjects who were antibody negative at baseline and had at least one analyzable postbaseline antibody assay result were included. The 16 clinical studies included 3,006 subjects; of these, 2,240 met the inclusion criteria for this analysis. Subjects received 1-15 treatments (mean 3.8 treatments) with onabotulinumtoxinA. Total doses per treatment cycle ranged from 10 or 20 units in glabellar lines to 20-500 units in cervical dystonia. The numbers of subjects who converted from an antibody-negative status at baseline to antibody-positive status at any post-treatment time point were: cervical dystonia 4/312 (1.28%), glabellar lines 2/718 (0.28%), overactive bladder 0/22 (0%), post-stroke spasticity 1/317 (0.32%), and primary axillary hyperhidrosis 4/871 (0.46%). Across all indications, 11/2,240 subjects (0.49%) converted from antibody negative at baseline to positive at one or more post-treatment time points, but only three subjects became clinically unresponsive to onabotulinumtoxinA at some point following a positive assay. Based on these large trials, the frequency of antibody conversion after onabotulinumtoxinA treatment is very low, and infrequently leads to loss of efficacy. © 2010 Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Morin Attenuates Streptococcus suis Pathogenicity in Mice by Neutralizing Suilysin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gen; Lu, Gejin; Qi, Zhimin; Li, Hongen; Wang, Lin; Wang, Yanhui; Liu, Bowen; Niu, Xiaodi; Deng, Xuming; Wang, Jianfeng

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus suis, a Gram-positive pathogen, is widely recognized as an important agent of swine infection, and it is also known to cause a variety of zoonoses, such as meningitis, polyarthritis and pneumonia. Suilysin (SLY), an extracellular pore-forming toxin that belongs to the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin family, is an essential virulence factor of S. suis capsular type 2 (SS2). Here, we found that morin hydrate (morin), a natural flavonoid that lacks anti-SS2 activity, inhibits the hemolytic activity of SLY, protects J774 cells from SS2-induced injury and protects mice from SS2 infection. Further, by molecular modeling and mutational analysis, we found that morin binds to the “stem” domain 2 in SLY and hinders its transformation from the monomer form to the oligomer form, which causes the loss of SLY activity. Our study demonstrates that morin hinders the cell lysis activity of SLY through a novel mechanism of interrupting the heptamer formation. These findings may lead to the development of promising therapeutic candidates for the treatment of SS2 infections. PMID:28373868

  15. Efficient neutralizing activity of cocktailed recombinant human antibodies against hepatitis A virus infection in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jingyuan; Meng, Shufang; Li, Chuan; Ji, Yan; Meng, Qingling; Zhang, Quanfu; Liu, Feng; Li, Jiandong; Bi, Shengli; Li, Dexin; Liang, Mifang

    2008-07-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the major pathogen responsible for acute infectious hepatitis A, a disease that is prevalent worldwide. Although HAV immunization effectively prevents infection, primary immunizations must be administered at least 2 weeks prior to HAV exposure. In contrast, passive immunization with pooled human immunoglobulin (Ig) can provide immediate and rapid protection from HAV infection. Because the use of human sera-derived Igs carries the risk of contamination, we sought to develop recombinant HAV-neutralizing human antibodies. We prepared a combinatorial phage display library of recombinant human anti-HAV antibodies from RNA extracted from the blood lymphocytes of a convalescent hepatitis A patient. Two recombinant human IgG antibodies, HAIgG16 and HAIgG78, were screened from the antibody library by their ability to bind with high affinity to purified, inactivated HAV virions. These antibodies recognized different epitopes of the HAV virion capsid, and competed with both patient sera and well-characterized neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibodies. A cocktailed mixture of HAIgG16 and HAIgG78 at a 3:1 ratio was prepared to compare its combined biological activity with that conferred by each antibody individually. The cocktailed antibodies displayed a stronger neutralizing activity in vitro than that observed with either HAIgG16 and HAIgG78 alone. To determine the in vivo neutralizing abilities of these antibodies, rhesus monkeys were inoculated with cocktailed antibodies and challenged with HAV. Whereas control animals developed hepatitis A and seroconverted to the HAV antibody, animals receiving cocktailed antibodies were protected either from viral infection or from developing clinical hepatitis. These results demonstrate that recombinant human antibody preparations could be used to prevent or treat early-stage HAV infection.

  16. Quasi-linear analysis of ion Weibel instability in the earth's neutral sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Yoon, Peter H.; Chang, Chia-Lie

    1993-01-01

    A quasi-linear analysis of the ion Weibel instability (IWI) for waves with parallel propagation is carried out for parameters appropriate to the earth's neutral sheet during the substorm interval. For ion drift speed reaching sizable fraction of the ion thermal speed, unstable waves grow to a nonlinear regime in a time interval greater than an ion gyroperiod. The saturation level is attained with current density reduced to about 15-28 percent of its preactivity level. The unstable wave amplitude normalized to the initial ambient field is found to be in the range of 0.2-0.8. This is accompanied by ion heating along the magnetic field with the parallel temperature being enhanced by 25-90 percent. Thus, the IWI can provide nonadiabatic heating of ions in current disruptions during substorms. The associated anomalous resistivity is estimated to be about 1 x 10 exp -7 to 1 x 10 exp -6 s, which is about 11 to 12 orders of magnitude above the classical resistivity.

  17. Quasi-linear analysis of ion Weibel instability in the earth's neutral sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Yoon, Peter H.; Chang, Chia-Lie

    1993-01-01

    A quasi-linear analysis of the ion Weibel instability (IWI) for waves with parallel propagation is carried out for parameters appropriate to the earth's neutral sheet during the substorm interval. For ion drift speed reaching sizable fraction of the ion thermal speed, unstable waves grow to a nonlinear regime in a time interval greater than an ion gyroperiod. The saturation level is attained with current density reduced to about 15-28 percent of its preactivity level. The unstable wave amplitude normalized to the initial ambient field is found to be in the range of 0.2-0.8. This is accompanied by ion heating along the magnetic field with the parallel temperature being enhanced by 25-90 percent. Thus, the IWI can provide nonadiabatic heating of ions in current disruptions during substorms. The associated anomalous resistivity is estimated to be about 1 x 10 exp -7 to 1 x 10 exp -6 s, which is about 11 to 12 orders of magnitude above the classical resistivity.

  18. Ion temperature from tangential charge exchange neutral analysis on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Fiore, C.L.; Medley, S.S.; Hammett, G.W.; Kaita, R.; Roquemore, A.L.; Scott, S.D.

    1987-09-01

    Fokker-Planck simulations of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) energetic ion mode discharges were performed to evaluate the utility of deriving the central ion temperature, T/sub i/, from deuterium neutral beam charge exchange spectra above the neutral beam injection energy. The T/sub i/ values obtained from fitting the calculated spectra obtained from sightlines nearly tangent to the neutral beam injection radius reproduce the central ion temperature within +-10% over the full range of TFTR energetic ion mode parameters. The code simulations demonstrate that the ion temperature obtained from the high energy tangential deuterium charge exchange spectrum is insensitive to variations in the plasma density, Z/sub eff/, plasma current, loop voltage, and injected neutral beam power and energy. Use of this method to reduce charge exchange data from TFTR energetic ion mode plasmas is demonstrated. 17 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Capillary gas chromatographic analysis of alditol acetates of neutral and amino sugars in bacterial cell walls.

    PubMed

    Fox, A; Morgan, S L; Hudson, J R; Zhu, Z T; Lau, P Y

    1983-02-18

    Several improvements in the preparation of alditol acetates of neutral and amino sugars and in the preparation of glass capillary columns for their separation are described. Modifications in sample preparation permitted the simultaneous processing of multiple samples and eliminated extraneous background peaks. Efficient and inert columns were tailor-made for the separation of alditol acetates of neutral and amino sugars by leaching glass capillaries with aqueous hydrochloric acid and dynamically coating with SP-2330.

  20. Influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of acidic, neutral and basic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Chi; Zhao, Xia; Pu, Jiang-Hua; Luan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-06-05

    Monosaccharide composition analysis is important for structural characterization of polysaccharides. To investigate the influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides, we chose alginate, starch, chitosan and chondroitin sulfate as representative of acidic, neutral, basic and complex polysaccharides to compare the release degree of monosaccharides under different hydrolytic conditions. The hydrolysis stability of 10 monosaccharide standards was also explored. Results showed that the basic sugars were hard to release but stable, the acidic sugars (uronic acids) were easy to release but unstable, and the release and stability of neutral sugars were in between acidic and basic sugars. In addition, the hydrolysis process was applied to monosaccharide composition analysis of Hippocampus trimaculatus polysaccharide and the appropriate hydrolytic condition was accorded with that of the above four polysaccharides. Thus, different hydrolytic conditions should be used for the monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides based on their structural characteristics.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of higher amino acid Schiff bases, as monosodium salts and neutral forms. Investigation of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding in all Schiff bases, antibacterial and antifungal activities of neutral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, Özlem; Gürkan, Perihan

    2014-09-01

    Schiff bases derived from 5-nitro-salicylaldehyde and 4-aminobutyric acid, 5-aminopentanoic acid and 6-aminohexanoic acid were synthesized both as monosodium salts (1a-3a) and neutral forms (1b-3b). The monosodium-Schiff bases were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H/13C NMR, IR, powder XRD, UV-vis spectra and conductivity measurements. The neutral-Schiff bases were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H/13C NMR, 2D NMR (HMQC), mass, IR, powder XRD, UV-vis spectra and conductivity measurements. The intramolecular hydrogen bonding and related tautomeric equilibria in all the Schiff bases were studied by UV-vis and 1H NMR spectra in solution. Additionally, the neutral-Schiff bases were screened against Staphylococcus aureus-EB18, S. aureus-ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli-ATCC 11230, Candida albicans-M3 and C. albicans-ATCC 16231.

  2. Differential neutralizing activities of a single domain camelid antibody (VHH) specific for ricin toxin's binding subunit (RTB).

    PubMed

    Herrera, Cristina; Vance, David J; Eisele, Leslie E; Shoemaker, Charles B; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Ricin, a member of the A-B family of ribosome-inactivating proteins, is classified as a Select Toxin by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention because of its potential use as a biothreat agent. In an effort to engineer therapeutics for ricin, we recently produced a collection of alpaca-derived, heavy-chain only antibody VH domains (VHH or "nanobody") specific for ricin's enzymatic (RTA) and binding (RTB) subunits. We reported that one particular RTB-specific VHH, RTB-B7, when covalently linked via a peptide spacer to different RTA-specific VHHs, resulted in heterodimers like VHH D10/B7 that were capable of passively protecting mice against a lethal dose challenge with ricin. However, RTB-B7 itself, when mixed with ricin at a 1 ∶ 10 toxin:antibody ratio did not afford any protection in vivo, even though it had demonstrable toxin-neutralizing activity in vitro. To better define the specific attributes of antibodies associated with ricin neutralization in vitro and in vivo, we undertook a more thorough characterization of RTB-B7. We report that RTB-B7, even at 100-fold molar excess (toxin:antibody) was unable to alter the toxicity of ricin in a mouse model. On the other hand, in two well-established cytotoxicity assays, RTB-B7 neutralized ricin with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) that was equivalent to that of 24B11, a well-characterized and potent RTB-specific murine monoclonal antibody. In fact, RTB-B7 and 24B11 were virtually identical when compared across a series of in vitro assays, including adherence to and neutralization of ricin after the toxin was pre-bound to cell surface receptors. RTB-B7 differed from both 24B11 and VHH D10/B7 in that it was relatively less effective at blocking ricin attachment to receptors on host cells and was not able to form high molecular weight toxin:antibody complexes in solution. Whether either of these activities is important in ricin toxin neutralizing activity in vivo remains to be determined.

  3. Irreversible photolabeling of active site of neutral endopeptidase-24. 11 enkephalinase by azidothiorphan and (/sup 14/C)-azidothiorphan

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, A.; Hernandez, J.F.; Chaillet, P.; Crine, P.; Roques, B.P.

    1987-11-01

    Azidothiorphan and its (/sup 14/C)-labeled analogue have been developed as photoaffinity ligands for the active site of the neutral endopeptidase 24.11. In in vitro assays azidothiorphan inhibits the endopeptidase activity with a Ki of 0.75 nM. After ultraviolet irradiation the inhibitor binds irreversibly to the enzyme, and many factors suggest that the photolabeling occurs at the active site. The binding is accompanied by a loss of enzymatic activity, and the inclusion of the competitive inhibitor thiorphan protects the endopeptidase from this inactivation. In addition the binding of another competitive inhibitor (/sup 3/H)N-((R,S)-3-hydroxyaminocarbonyl-2-benzyl-1-oxopropyl)-glycine to the active site of endopeptidase-24.11 is inhibited after irradiation with azidothiorphan. Experiments with (/sup 14/C)-azidothiorphan have shown that very little nonspecific binding of inhibitor to enzyme occurs and the the labeled probe remains bound under denaturing conditions. Azidothiorphan has also been found to produce a long-lasting naloxone-reversible analgesia after intracerebroventricular administration. The results show that azidothiorphan should prove useful both for structural studies and for investigations on the synthesis and turnover of the neutral endopeptidase-24.11.

  4. NLTE Analysis of High-resolution H-band Spectra. II. Neutral Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junbo; Shi, Jianrong; Pan, Kaike; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Liu, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Aiming at testing the validity of our magnesium atomic model and investigating the effects of non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) on the formation of the H-band neutral magnesium lines, we derive the differential Mg abundances from selected transitions for 13 stars either adopting or relaxing the assumption of local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE). Our analysis is based on high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio H-band spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) and optical spectra from several instruments. The absolute differences between the Mg abundances derived from the two wavelength bands are always less than 0.1 dex in the NLTE analysis, while they are slightly larger for the LTE case. This suggests that our Mg atomic model is appropriate for investigating the NLTE formation of the H-band Mg lines. The NLTE corrections for the Mg i H-band lines are sensitive to the surface gravity, becoming larger for smaller log g values, and strong lines are more susceptible to departures from LTE. For cool giants, NLTE corrections tend to be negative, and for the strong line at 15765 Å they reach -0.14 dex in our sample, and up to -0.22 dex for other APOGEE stars. Our results suggest that it is important to include NLTE corrections in determining Mg abundances from the H-band Mg i transitions, especially when strong lines are used. Based on observations collected on the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, the 2.2 m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory, the 1.88 m reflector on the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, the Kitt Peak coudé feed telescope, and the McMath-Pierce solar telescope and the coudé focus of the Mayall 4 m reflector at Kitt Peak.

  5. Isolation of a human-like antibody fragment (scFv) that neutralizes ricin biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Pelat, Thibaut; Hust, Michael; Hale, Martha; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Dübel, Stefan; Thullier, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Background Ricin is a lethal toxin that inhibits protein synthesis. It is easily extracted from a ubiquitously grown plant, Ricinus communis, and thus readily available for use as a bioweapon (BW). Anti-ricin antibodies provide the only known therapeutic against ricin intoxication. Results In this study, after immunizing a non-human primate (Macaca fascicularis) with the ricin chain A (RTA), a phage-displayed immune library was built (2 × 108 clones), that included the λ light chain fragment. The library was screened against ricin, and specific binders were sequenced and further analyzed. The best clone, 43RCA, was isolated using a new, stringent neutralization test. 43RCA had a high, picomolar affinity (41 pM) and neutralized ricin efficiently (IC50 = 23 ± 3 ng/ml, corresponding to a [scFv]/[ricin] molar ratio of 4). The neutralization capacity of 43RCA compared favourably with that of polyclonal anti-deglycosylated A chain (anti-dgRCA) IgGs, obtained from hyperimmune mouse serum, which were more efficient than any monoclonal at our disposal. The 43RCA sequence is very similar to that for human IgG germline genes, with 162 of 180 identical amino acids for the VH and VL (90% sequence identity). Conclusion Results of the characterization studies, and the high degree of identity with human germline genes, altogether make this anti-ricin scFv, or an IgG derived from it, a likely candidate for use in humans to minimize effects caused by ricin intoxication. PMID:19563687

  6. Preflight Extravehicular Activity Training for STS-114 at the Neutral Buoyancy Lab

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-28

    JSC2002-E-23140 (28 May 2002) --- Astronaut Stephen K. Robinson and Soichi Noguchi (partially obscured), both STS-114 mission specialists, are submerged in the waters of the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). Robinson and Noguchi are wearing the training version of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) space suit. SCUBA-equipped divers are in the water to assist the astronauts in their rehearsal, intended to help prepare them for work on the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS). Noguchi represents Japan’s National Space Development Agency (NASDA).

  7. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia L.; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J.; Driscoll, Jonathan; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J.; Kamali, Anatoli; Allen, Susan; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A.; Parks, Christopher L.

    2015-08-15

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. - Highlights: • Screened 146 serum samples for measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb). • MV nAb is prevalent in the sera. • CDV neutralizing activity is generally low or absent and when detected it is present in sera with high MV nAb titers. • A neutralization-resistant CDV mutant was isolated using human serum selection. • A mutation was identified in the receptor-binding region of CDV hemagglutinin protein that confers the neutralization resistance.

  8. Antimicrobial activity of neutralized extracellular culture filtrates of lactic acid bacteria isolated from a cultured Indian milk product ('dahi').

    PubMed

    Varadaraj, M C; Devi, N; Keshava, N; Manjrekar, S P

    1993-12-01

    Neutralized extracellular culture filtrate obtained from isolates of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus delbruecki ssp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis from 'dahi' showed weak to moderate inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus brevis, Bacillus circulans, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus laterosporus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa when tested by the diffusion agar well assay method. The effective minimum quantity of lactic culture filtrates required to obtain complete inhibition of an inoculum of 10(3) cfu/ml of the bacteria tested was between 20 and 26% (vol/vol), as determined by the agar incorporation method. Neutralized extracellular culture filtrate of these lactic cultures added at a level of 10% in sterile, 10% reconstituted non-fat dry milk was able to either suppress or retard growth of selected bacterial cultures when incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h. This study indicated the antimicrobial activity of dahi and the potential of using neutralized extracellular culture filtrate of lactic acid bacteria in the biopreservation of foods.

  9. Design of multi-megawatt actively cooled beam dumps for the Neutral-Beam Engineering Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, J.A.; Koehler, G.; Wells, R.P.

    1981-10-01

    The Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility will test Neutral Beam Sources up to 170 keV, 65 Amps, with 30 second beam-on times. For this application actively cooled beam dumps for both the neutral and ionized particles will be required. The dumps will be able to dissipate a wide range of power density profiles by utilizing a standard modular panel design which is incorporated into a moveable support structure. The thermal hydraulic design of the panels permit the dissipation of 2 kW/cm/sup 2/ anywhere on the panel surface. The water requirements of the dumps are optimized by restricting the flow to panel sections where the heat flux falls short of the design value. The mechanical design of the beam-dump structures is described along with tests performed on a prototype panel. The prototype tests were performed on two different panel designs, one manufactured by Mc Donnell Douglas (MDAC) the other by United Technologies (UT). The dissipation capabilities of the panels were tested at the critical regions to verify their use in the beam dump assemblies.

  10. Effects of acute psychosocial stress on neural activity to emotional and neutral faces in a face recognition memory paradigm.

    PubMed

    Li, Shijia; Weerda, Riklef; Milde, Christopher; Wolf, Oliver T; Thiel, Christiane M

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that acute psychosocial stress impairs recognition of declarative memory and that emotional material is especially sensitive to this effect. Animal studies suggest a central role of the amygdala which modulates memory processes in hippocampus, prefrontal cortex and other brain areas. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural correlates of stress-induced modulation of emotional recognition memory in humans. Twenty-seven healthy, right-handed, non-smoker male volunteers performed an emotional face recognition task. During encoding, participants were presented with 50 fearful and 50 neutral faces. One hour later, they underwent either a stress (Trier Social Stress Test) or a control procedure outside the scanner which was followed immediately by the recognition session inside the scanner, where participants had to discriminate between 100 old and 50 new faces. Stress increased salivary cortisol, blood pressure and pulse, and decreased the mood of participants but did not impact recognition memory. BOLD data during recognition revealed a stress condition by emotion interaction in the left inferior frontal gyrus and right hippocampus which was due to a stress-induced increase of neural activity to fearful and a decrease to neutral faces. Functional connectivity analyses revealed a stress-induced increase in coupling between the right amygdala and the right fusiform gyrus, when processing fearful as compared to neutral faces. Our results provide evidence that acute psychosocial stress affects medial temporal and frontal brain areas differentially for neutral and emotional items, with a stress-induced privileged processing of emotional stimuli.

  11. Application of subtracted gDNA microarray-assisted Bulked Segregant Analysis for rapid discovery of molecular markers associated with day-neutrality in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa)

    PubMed Central

    Gor, Mian Chee; Mantri, Nitin; Pang, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    A Fragaria Discovery Panel (FDP; strawberry-specific SDA) containing 287 features was constructed by subtracting the pooled gDNA of nine non-angiosperm species from the pooled gDNA of five strawberry genotypes. This FDP was used for Bulk Segregant Analysis (BSA) to enable identification of molecular markers associated with day-neutrality. Analysis of hybridisation patterns of a short day (SD) DNA bulk and three day-neutral (DN) DNA bulks varying in flowering strength allowed identification of a novel feature, FaP2E11, closely linked to CYTOKININ OXIDASE 1 (CKX1) gene possibly involved in promoting flowering under non-inductive condition. The signal intensities of FaP2E11 feature obtained from the strong DN bulk (DN1) is three fold higher than the short day bulk (SD), indicating that the putative marker may linked to a CKX1 variant allele with lower enzyme activity. We propose a model for flowering regulation based on the hypothesis that flowering strength may be regulated by the copy number of FaP2E11-linked CKX1 alleles. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the SDA-based BSA approach for the identification of molecular markers associated with day-neutrality in strawberry. This innovative strategy is an efficient and cost-effective approach for molecular marker discovery. PMID:27586242

  12. Fishbone activity in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injection plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Liqing; Zhang, Jizong; Chen, Kaiyun; Hu, Liqun; Li, Erzhong; Lin, Shiyao; Shi, Tonghui; Duan, Yanmin; Zhu, Yubao

    2015-12-01

    Repetitive fishbones near the trapped ion procession frequency were observed for the first time in the neutral beam injection high confinement plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) tokamak, and diagnosed using a solid-state neutral particle analyzer based on a compact silicon photodiode together with an upgraded high spatial-temporal-resolution multi-arrays soft X-ray (SX) system. This 1/1 typical internal kink mode propagates in the ion-diamagnetism direction with a rotation speed faster than the bulk plasma in the plasma frame. From the SX measurements, this mode frequency is typical of chirping down and the energetic particle effect related to the twisting mode structure. This ion fishbone was found able to trigger a multiple core sawtooth crashes with edge-2/1 sideband modes, as well as to lead to a transition from fishbone to long lived saturated kink mode to fishbone. Furthermore, using SX tomography, a correlation between mode amplitude and mode frequency was found. Finally, a phenomenological prey-predator model was found to reproduce the fishbone nonlinear process well.

  13. Fishbone activity in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injection plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liqing; Zhang, Jizong; Chen, Kaiyun E-mail: lqhu@ipp.cas.cn; Hu, Liqun E-mail: lqhu@ipp.cas.cn; Li, Erzhong; Lin, Shiyao; Shi, Tonghui; Duan, Yanmin; Zhu, Yubao

    2015-12-15

    Repetitive fishbones near the trapped ion procession frequency were observed for the first time in the neutral beam injection high confinement plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) tokamak, and diagnosed using a solid-state neutral particle analyzer based on a compact silicon photodiode together with an upgraded high spatial-temporal-resolution multi-arrays soft X-ray (SX) system. This 1/1 typical internal kink mode propagates in the ion-diamagnetism direction with a rotation speed faster than the bulk plasma in the plasma frame. From the SX measurements, this mode frequency is typical of chirping down and the energetic particle effect related to the twisting mode structure. This ion fishbone was found able to trigger a multiple core sawtooth crashes with edge-2/1 sideband modes, as well as to lead to a transition from fishbone to long lived saturated kink mode to fishbone. Furthermore, using SX tomography, a correlation between mode amplitude and mode frequency was found. Finally, a phenomenological prey–predator model was found to reproduce the fishbone nonlinear process well.

  14. SNP Array Analysis Reveals Novel Genomic Abnormalities Including Copy Neutral Loss of Heterozygosity in Anaplastic Oligodendrogliomas

    PubMed Central

    Idbaih, Ahmed; Ducray, François; Dehais, Caroline; Courdy, Célia; Carpentier, Catherine; de Bernard, Simon; Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle; Mokhtari, Karima; Jouvet, Anne; Honnorat, Jérôme; Chinot, Olivier; Ramirez, Carole; Beauchesne, Patrick; Benouaich-Amiel, Alexandra; Godard, Joël; Eimer, Sandrine; Parker, Fabrice; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuelle; Colin, Philippe; Loussouarn, Delphine; Faillot, Thierry; Dam-Hieu, Phong; Elouadhani-Hamdi, Selma; Bauchet, Luc; Langlois, Olivier; Le Guerinel, Caroline; Fontaine, Denys; Vauleon, Elodie; Menei, Philippe; Fotso, Marie Janette Motsuo; Desenclos, Christine; Verelle, Pierre; Ghiringhelli, François; Noel, Georges; Labrousse, François; Carpentier, Antoine; Dhermain, Frédéric; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (AOD) are rare glial tumors in adults with relative homogeneous clinical, radiological and histological features at the time of diagnosis but dramatically various clinical courses. Studies have identified several molecular abnormalities with clinical or biological relevance to AOD (e.g. t(1;19)(q10;p10), IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1 mutations). To better characterize the clinical and biological behavior of this tumor type, the creation of a national multicentric network, named “Prise en charge des OLigodendrogliomes Anaplasiques (POLA),” has been supported by the Institut National du Cancer (InCA). Newly diagnosed and centrally validated AOD patients and their related biological material (tumor and blood samples) were prospectively included in the POLA clinical database and tissue bank, respectively. At the molecular level, we have conducted a high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, which included 83 patients. Despite a careful central pathological review, AOD have been found to exhibit heterogeneous genomic features. A total of 82% of the tumors exhibited a 1p/19q-co-deletion, while 18% harbor a distinct chromosome pattern. Novel focal abnormalities, including homozygously deleted, amplified and disrupted regions, have been identified. Recurring copy neutral losses of heterozygosity (CNLOH) inducing the modulation of gene expression have also been discovered. CNLOH in the CDKN2A locus was associated with protein silencing in 1/3 of the cases. In addition, FUBP1 homozygous deletion was detected in one case suggesting a putative tumor suppressor role of FUBP1 in AOD. Our study showed that the genomic and pathological analyses of AOD are synergistic in detecting relevant clinical and biological subgroups of AOD. PMID:23071531

  15. Analysis of the mineral acid-base components of acid-neutralizing capacity in Adirondack Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, R. K.; Gherini, S. A.

    1993-04-01

    Mineral acids and bases influence pH largely through their effects on acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). This influence becomes particularly significant as ANC approaches zero. Analysis of data collected by the Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation (ALSC) from 1469 lakes throughout the Adirondack region indicates that variations in ANC in these lakes correlate well with base cation concentrations (CB), but not with the sum of mineral acid anion concentrations (CA). This is because (CA) is relatively constant across the Adirondacks, whereas CB varies widely. Processes that supply base cations to solution are ion-specific. Sodium and silica concentrations are well correlated, indicating a common source, mineral weathering. Calcium and magnesium also covary but do not correlate well with silica. This indicates that ion exchange is a significant source of these cations in the absence of carbonate minerals. Iron and manganese concentrations are elevated in the lower waters of some lakes due to reducing conditions. This leads to an ephemeral increase in CB and ANC. When the lakes mix and oxic conditions are restored, these ions largely precipitate from solution. Sulfate is the dominant mineral acid anion in ALSC lakes. Sulfate concentrations are lowest in seepage lakes, commonly about 40 μeq/L less than in drainage lakes. This is due in part to the longer hydraulic detention time in seepage lakes, which allows slow sulfate reduction reactions more time to decrease lake sulfate concentration. Nitrate typically influences ANC during events such as snowmelt. Chloride concentrations are generally low, except in lakes impacted by road salt.

  16. Neutral redox-active hydrogen- and halogen-bonding [2]rotaxanes for the electrochemical sensing of chloride.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason Y C; Cunningham, Matthew J; Davis, Jason J; Beer, Paul D

    2014-12-14

    The first examples of redox-active ferrocene-functionalised neutral [2]rotaxanes have been synthesised via chloride anion templation. (1)H NMR spectroscopic titrations reveal that these [2]rotaxane host systems recognize chloride selectively over other halides and oxoanions in highly-competitive aqueous media. By replacing the hydrogen bonding prototriazole units of the rotaxane axle component with iodotriazole halogen bond-donor groups, the degree of chloride selectivity of the [2]rotaxanes is modulated. Electrochemical voltammetric experiments demonstrate that the rotaxanes can sense chloride via cathodic perturbations of the respective rotaxanes' ferrocene-ferrocenium redox-couple upon anion addition.

  17. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Andrew T.; Gray, Matthew D.; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D.; Freund, Natalia T.; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B.; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S.; Schief, William R.; Strong, Roland K.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  18. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew D; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D; Freund, Natalia T; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S; Schief, William R; Strong, Roland K; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-02-24

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype.

  19. A Highly Active and Robust Copper-Based Electrocatalyst toward Hydrogen Evolution Reaction with Low Overpotential in Neutral Solution.

    PubMed

    Du, Jialei; Wang, Jianying; Ji, Lvlv; Xu, Xiaoxiang; Chen, Zuofeng

    2016-11-09

    Although significant progress has been made recently, copper-based materials have long been considered to be ineffective catalysts toward the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), in most cases, requiring high overpotentials more than 300 mV. We report here that a Cu(0)-based nanoparticle film electrodeposited in situ from a Cu(II) oxime complex can act as a highly active and robust HER electrocatalyst in neutral phosphate buffer solution. The as-prepared nanoparticle film is of poor crystallization, which incorporates significant amounts of oxime ligand residues and buffer anions PO4(3-). The proposed mechanism suggests that the Cu(0)-based nanoparticle film is activated with incorporated or adsorbed PO4(3-) anions and the PO4(3-) anions-anchored sites might serve as the actual catalytic active sites with efficient proton transport mediators. Catalysis occurs with a low onset overpotential (η) of 65 mV, and a current density of 1 mA/cm(2) can be achieved with η = 120 mV. The nanoparticle film shows an excellent catalytic durability with slightly rising current density during electrolysis, presumably due to further incorporation or adsorption of PO4(3-) anions in the process. This electrocatalyst not only forms in situ from earth-abundant materials but also operates in neutral water with low overpotential and high stability.

  20. Evaluation of Shiga toxin 2e-specific chicken egg yolk immunoglobulin: production and neutralization activity.

    PubMed

    Arimitsu, Hideyuki; Sasaki, Keiko; Kohda, Tomoko; Shimizu, Toshiyasu; Tsuji, Takao

    2014-11-01

    Chicken egg yolk immunoglobulin (IgY) against Shiga toxin 2e (Stx2e), a major cause of swine edema disease, was prepared to evaluate its possible clinical applications. The titer of Stx2e-specific IgY in egg yolk derived from three chickens that had been immunized with an Stx2e toxoid increased 2 weeks after primary immunization and remained high until 90 days after this immunization. Anti-Stx2e IgY was found to neutralize the toxicity of Stx2e by reacting with its A and B subunits, indicating that IgY is a cost-effective agent to develop for prophylactic foods or diagnosis kits for edema disease.

  1. Reinstatement of pain-related brain activation during the recognition of neutral images previously paired with nociceptive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Forkmann, Katarina; Wiech, Katja; Sommer, Tobias; Bingel, Ulrike

    2015-08-01

    Remembering an event partially reactivates cortical and subcortical brain regions that were engaged during its experience and encoding. Such reinstatement of neuronal activation has been observed in different sensory systems, including the visual, auditory, olfactory, and somatosensory domain. However, so far, this phenomenon of incidental memory has not been explored in the context of pain. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated the neural reinstatement of pain-related and tone-related activations during the recognition of neutral images that had been encoded during (1) painful stimulation, (2) auditory stimulation of comparable unpleasantness, or (3) no additional stimulation. Stimulus-specific reinstatement was tested in 24 healthy male and female participants who performed a visual categorization task (encoding) that was immediately followed by a surprise recognition task. Neural responses were acquired in both sessions. Our data show a partial reinstatement of brain regions frequently associated with pain processing, including the left posterior insula, bilateral putamen, and right operculum, during the presentation of images previously paired with painful heat. This effect was specific to painful stimuli. Moreover, the bilateral ventral striatum showed stronger responses for remembered pain-associated images as compared with tone-associated images, suggesting a higher behavioral relevance of remembering neutral pictures previously paired with pain. Our results support the biological relevance of pain in that only painful but not equally unpleasant auditory stimuli were able to "tag" neutral images during their simultaneous presentation and reactivate pain-related brain regions. Such mechanisms might contribute to the development or maintenance of chronic pain and deserve further investigation in clinical populations.

  2. Antivenomics of Atropoides mexicanus and Atropoides picadoi snake venoms: Relationship to the neutralization of toxic and enzymatic activities

    PubMed Central

    Antúnez, José; Fernández, Julián; Lomonte, Bruno; Angulo, Yamileth; Sanz, Libia; Pérez, Alicia; Calvete, Juan José; Gutiérrez, José María

    2010-01-01

    Viperid snakes of the genus Atropoides are distributed in Mexico and Central America and, owing to their size and venom yield, are capable of provoking severe envenomings in humans. This study evaluated, using an ‘antivenomics’ approach, the ability of a polyspecific (polyvalent) antivenom manufactured in Costa Rica to recognize the proteins of Atropoides mexicanus and A. picadoi venoms, which are not included in the immunization mixture. In addition, the neutralization of lethal, hemorrhagic, myotoxic, coagulant, proteinase and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activities of these venoms by the antivenom was assessed. The antivenom was highly-effective in immunodepleting many venom components, particularly high molecular mass P-III metalloproteinases (SVMPs), L-amino acid oxidases, and some serine proteinases and P-I SVMPs. In contrast, PLA2s, certain serine proteinases and P-I SVMPs, and a C type lectin-like protein were only partially immunodepleted, and two PLA2 molecules were not depleted at all. The antivenom was able to neutralize all toxic and enzymatic activities tested, although neutralization of lethality by A. nummifer venom was achieved when a challenge dose of 3 LD50s of venom was used, but was iffective when 4 LD50s were used. These results, and previously obtained evidence on the immunoreactivity of this antivenom towards homologous and heterologous venoms, revealed the low immunogenicity of a number of venom components (PLA2s, CRISPs, P-I SVMPs, and some serine proteinases), underscoring the need to search for innovative immunization protocols to improve the immune response to these antigens. PMID:21544177

  3. Neutralizing activity of antibodies to the V3 loop region of HIV-1 gp120 relative to their epitope fine specificity

    PubMed Central

    Pantophlet, Ralph; Wrin, Terri; CavaciniJ, Lisa A.; Robinson, James E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2008-01-01

    The V3 loop of HIV-1 gp120 is considered occluded on many primary viruses. However, virus sensitivity to neutralization by different V3 mAbs often varies, indicating that access to V3 is not restricted equally for all antibodies. Here, we have sought to gain a better understanding of these restrictions by determining the neutralizing activities of 7 V3 mAbs (19b, 39F, CO11, F2A3, F530, LA21, and LE311) against 15 subtype B primary isolates and relating these activities to the fine specificity of the mAbs. Not surprisingly, we found that most mAbs neutralized the same 2–3 viruses, with only mAb F530 able to neutralize 2 additional viruses not neutralized by the other mAbs. Epitope mapping revealed that positively-charged residues in or near the V3 stem are important for the binding of all the mAbs and that most mAbs seem to require the Pro residue that forms the GPGR β hairpin turn in the V3 tip for binding. Based on the mapping, we determined that V3 sequence variation accounted for neutralization resistance of approximately half the viruses tested. Comparison of these results to those of select V3 mAbs with overall better neutralizing activities in the light of structural information suggests that an antibody’s mode of interaction with V3, driven by contact residue requirements, precludes the antibody from accessing its epitope on different viruses. Based on the data we propose an angle of interaction with V3 that is less stringent on access for antibodies with cross-neutralizing activity compared to antibodies that neutralize relatively fewer viruses. PMID:18822440

  4. Purification and characterization of neutral alpha-mannosidase from hen oviduct: studies on the activation mechanism of Co2+.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, K; Itoh, H; Yamagishi, M; Natsuka, S; Mega, T; Hase, S

    1997-12-01

    Neutral alpha-mannosidase was purified to homogeneity from hen oviduct. The molecular mass of the enzyme was 480 kDa on gel filtration, and the 110-kDa band on SDS-PAGE in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol indicated that it is composed of four subunits. The activated enzyme hydrolyzed both p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-mannoside and high mannose-type sugar chains. This substrate specificity is almost the same as that reported for the neutral a-mannosidase from Japanese quail oviduct [Oku and Hase (1991) J. Biochem. 110, 982-989]. Manalpha1-6(Manalpha1-3)Manalpha1-6(Manalpha1-3) Manbeta1-4GlcNAc (Km =0.44 mM) was hydrolyzed four times faster than Manalpha1-6(Manalpha1-3)Manalpha1-6(Manalpha1-3) Manbeta1-4GIcNAcbeta1-4GlcNAc, and Manalpha1-6(Manalpha1-2Manalpha1-2Manalpha1-3)++ +Manbeta1-4GlcNAc was obtained as the end product from Man9GlcNAc on digestion with the activated alpha-mannosidase. The enzyme was activated 24-fold on preincubation with Co2+. The activation with other metal ions, like Mn2+, Ca2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Sr2+, was less than 5-fold, and Zn2+, Cu2+, and Hg2+ inhibited the enzyme activity. The optimum pHs for both the enzyme activity and activation with Co2+ were around 7. The cobalt ion contents of the purified, EDTA-treated, and Co2+-activated enzymes were 1.5, 0.0, and 3.9, respectively, per molecule. Since the Co2+-activated enzyme gradually lost its activity on incubation with EDTA and the activity was restored promptly on the addition of Co2+, the binding of Co2+ to the enzyme seems to be essential for its activation. The results obtained with protease inhibitors together with those of the SDS-PAGE before and after activation, showed that the proteolytic cleavage reported for the activation of monkey brain alpha-mannosidase seems not to be involved.

  5. Effect of delayed anthrax vaccine dose on Bacillus anthracis protective antigen IgG response and lethal toxin neutralization activity.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Phillip R; Fisher, Diana; Quinn, Xiaofei; Schmader, Trevor; Barrera-Oro, Julio G

    2013-10-17

    We describe the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen IgG antibody response and the B. anthracis lethal toxin neutralization activity to a delayed dose of anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA, BioThrax(®)) using validated assays. 373 individuals received 1, 2, or 3 priming doses, 18-24 months afterward, they received a delayed dose of AVA. Overall, 23.6% of subjects showed detectable anti-PA IgG before the boost, compared to 99.2% (P<0.0001) 28 days after the boost. Geometric mean anti-PA IgG concentration (GMC) was 1.66 μg/mL before and 887.82 μg/mL after the boost (P<0.0001). The proportion of individuals with four-fold increase in GMC following the boost ranged from 93.8% to 100%. Robust anti-PA IgG levels and B. anthracis lethal toxin neutralization activity are induced when an AVA dose is delayed as long as two years. These data support continuing with the vaccination schedule when a dose is delayed as long as two years rather than restarting the series. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Neutral PEGylated liposomal formulation for efficient folate-mediated delivery of MCL1 siRNA to activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Freitas, Jaime; Loureiro, Ana; Nogueira, Patrícia; Gomes, Andreia C; Preto, Ana; Carmo, Alexandre M; Moreira, Alexandra; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2017-07-01

    Cationic liposomes are efficient vectors for systemic delivery of therapeutic small interfering RNA (siRNA), taking advantage of RNA interference (RNAi), a naturally occurring gene-silencing mechanism in mammalian cells. However, toxicity at high concentrations, short circulating half-lives and lack of specificity restrict their successful application in a wider scale. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of neutral liposomes containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) to encapsulate siRNA in their aqueous core. This formulation will reduce drastically the toxicity associated to cationic liposomes by bringing surface charge to almost zero, increasing stealth degree and therefore circulation time. In this study, we evaluate the efficiency of folate-targeted liposomes for specific delivery of siRNA to activated macrophages, key effector cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathology which specifically express folate receptor β (FRβ). Myeloid cell leukaemia-1 (Mcl-1) is a protein essential for synovial macrophage survival, since Mcl-1 suppression results in the induction of apoptosis. The effect of MCL1 siRNA incorporated in liposomal formulation was assessed in primary human macrophages and successful inhibition of Mcl-1 expression was achieved. Here we show that the neutral liposomal derived from DOPE (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine) formulation developed is efficient to encapsulate MCL1 siRNA and silencing gene expression in activated human macrophages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Divergent Trends of Anti-JCPyV Serum Reactivity and Neutralizing Activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Patients during Treatment with Natalizumab

    PubMed Central

    Diotti, Roberta Antonia; Capra, Ruggero; Moiola, Lucia; Caputo, Valeria; De Rossi, Nicola; Sangalli, Francesca; Martinelli, Vittorio; Burioni, Roberto; Clementi, Massimo; Mancini, Nicasio

    2016-01-01

    The association between natalizumab and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is established, but a reliable clinical risk stratification flow-chart is lacking. New risk factors are needed, such as the possible role of the anti-JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) neutralizing antibody. In this pilot study, we analyzed this parameter during natalizumab treatment. Sequential sera of 38 multiple sclerosis patients during their first year of natalizumab treatment were collected, and grouped according to the number of infusions. For 11 patients, samples were also available after 24 infusions (T24), when progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) risk is higher. The reactivity against VP1, the main JCPyV surface protein, and the anti-JCPyV neutralizing activity were evaluated. During the first year, a lack of correlation between anti-JCPyV antibody response and its neutralizing activity was observed: a significant decrease in anti-JCPyV antibody response was observed (p = 0.0039), not paralleled by a similar trend in the total anti-JCPyV neutralizing activity (p = 0.2239). This lack of correlation was even more evident at T24 when, notwithstanding a significant increase in the anti-JCPyV response (p = 0.0097), a further decrease of the neutralizing activity was observed (p = 0.0062). This is the first study evidencing, prospectively, the lack of correlation between the anti-JCPyV antibody response and its neutralizing activity during natalizumab treatment. PMID:27164128

  8. Repeatable Reverse Engineering with the Platform for Architecture-Neutral Dynamic Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-18

    record and replay functionality: on a live execution, the amount of compute resources needed to identify and halt on every memory access and inspect...and iteratively, running a replay of the previously gathered recording over and over to construct a deeper understanding of the important aspects of...system events happen during the replay . A second analysis pass over the replay might focus in on the activity of a particular program or a portion of the

  9. Impact of diagnostic neutral beam optimization on active spectroscopy in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiande; Nornberg, Mark. D.; den Hartog, Daniel. J.; Oliva, Steven. P.; Craig, Darren; Univ of Wisconsin, Madison Team; Wheaton College, IL Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam on MST provides local measurements of impurity ion emission through charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) and of core-localized magnetic field through the motional Stark effect (MSE). The beam has been optimized to operate at 50kV, 4A steady beam current with 20ms beam pulse and 75% primary energy ion fraction. It's achieved by tuning the beam voltage, arc current, fuel line pressure, arc and high voltage module timing, and the magnetic isolation field. Electron density measurements in the ion source revealed that ion extraction is maximized under low density conditions which are thought to affect the shape of the ion sheath at the extraction grid. The sheath may be transitioning from a planar or convex shape at high density to one which is concave which helps focus the ion trajectories and produce higher beam current. With the improvements in beam operation, the CHERS signal is expected to increase by 20%-30%, and the Stark broadening is expected to increase by 10%. These signal increases will help resolve convolved fine-structure components in both analyses. Beam voltage ripple is also measured to better quantify the accuracy of spectral MSE and CHERS measurement. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE.

  10. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  11. Cross-Neutralization Activity of Single-Chain Variable Fragment (scFv) Derived from Anti-V3 Monoclonal Antibodies Mediated by Post-Attachment Binding.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Yasuhiro; Kuwata, Takeo; Tanaka, Kazuki; Alam, Muntasir; Valdez, Kristel Paola Ramirez; Egami, Yoshika; Suwa, Yoshiaki; Morioka, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2016-09-21

    The V3 loop in the envelope (Env) of HIV-1 is one of the major targets of neutralizing antibodies. However, this antigen is hidden inside the Env trimer in most isolates and is fully exposed only during CD4-gp120 interaction. Thus, primary HIV-1 isolates are relatively resistant to anti-V3 antibodies because IgG is too large to access the V3 loop. To overcome this obstacle, we constructed single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) from anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies 0.5γ, 5G2, and 16G6. Enhanced neutralization by 0.5γ and 5G2 scFvs was observed in strains resistant to their IgG counterparts. Neutralization coverage by 0.5γ scFv reached up to 90% of the tested viruses (tier 2 and 3 classes). The temperature-regulated neutralization assay revealed that extensive cross-neutralization of 0.5γ scFv can be explained by post-attachment neutralization. Neutralization assay involving viruses carrying an inter-subunit disulfide bond (SOS virus) showed that the neutralization-susceptible timeframe after attachment was 60 to 120 min. These results indicate that the scFvs efficiently access the V3 loop and subsequently neutralize HIV-1, even after virus attachment to the target cells. Based on its broad and potent neutralizing activity, further development of anti-V3 scFv for therapeutic and preventive strategies is warranted.

  12. Opposite effects of EGTA and neutral surfactants on the loss of chicken pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Cabello, J C; Arpa, F; Agapito, M T; Recio, J M

    1990-01-01

    The effects of some general purpose drugs on the deactivation and activity measurement of the chicken pineal gland enzyme serotonin N-acetyl transferase (EC 2.3.1.5.) were studied. The drugs used were EGTA and two neutral surfactants, Nonidet P40 and Triton X-100. Enzyme activity showed significant variations ranging from 2.8 +/- 1.3 nmol/gland/h when Nonidet P40 was added to the homogenate buffer, to 31.8 +/- 1.7 nmol/gland/h when EGTA was present. This striking variation seemed to be caused by the ability of these compounds to modify the rate of NAT deactivation acting either as accelerating agents, as in the case of the detergents or as braking agent, as in the case of EGTA.

  13. Improved volatile fatty acids anaerobic production from waste activated sludge by pH regulation: Alkaline or neutral pH?

    PubMed

    Ma, Huijun; Chen, Xingchun; Liu, He; Liu, Hongbo; Fu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the anaerobic fermentation was carried out for volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production at different pH (between 7.0 and 10.0) conditions with untreated sludge and heat-alkaline pretreated waste activated sludge. In the fermentation with untreated sludge, the extent of hydrolysis of organic matters and extent of acidification at alkaline pH are 54.37% and 30.37%, respectively, resulting in the highest VFAs yield at 235.46mg COD/gVS of three pH conditions. In the fermentation with heat-alkaline pretreated sludge, the acidification rate and VFAs yield at neutral pH are 30.98% and 240.14mg COD/gVS, respectively, which are higher than that at other pH conditions. With the glucose or bovine serum albumin as substrate for VFAs production, the neutral pH showed a higher VFAs concentration than the alkaline pH condition. The results of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that the alkaline pH caused low microbial richness. Based on the results in this study, we demonstrated that the alkaline pH is favor of hydrolysis of organic matter in sludge while neutral pH improved the acidogenesis for the VFAs production from sludge. Our finding is obvious different to the previous research and helpful for the understanding of how heat-alkaline pretreatment and alkaline fermentation influence the VFAs production, and beneficial to the development of VFAs production process.

  14. Analysis of heavy oils: Method development and application to Cerro Negro heavy petroleum: Preliminary separation and analysis of acid, base, saturate, and neutral-aromatic fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.B.; Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Reynolds, J.W.; Thomson, J.S.; Yu, S.K-T.; Grigsby, R.D.; Tang, S.Y.; Shay, J.Y.; Hirsch, D.E.; Sanchez, V.

    1988-10-01

    Cerro Negro 200-425/degree/, 425-550/degree/, and 550-700/degree/C distillates and >700/degree/C residue were separated into acid, base, and neutral concentrates using an improved nonaqueous ion exchange liquid chromatographic procedure. Neutral concentrates were further separated into neutral aromatic and saturated hydrocarbon fractions. A dual column, normal phase high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the saturate-aromatic separation. Mass and elemental balances are given for separations of all distillates and the residue. In addition, fractions from the 200-425/degree/C and 425-550/degree/C distillates were analyzed by high resolution mass spectrometry. The applicability of published separation approaches and methods to heavy oil analysis is critically reviewed; the bulk of the available methodology developed for conventional petroleum and synfuels was found to be unproven or unsuitable for heavy oil analysis. Cerro Negro was found to contain 18.2 weight percent acids, 17.6 weight percent bases, 46.9 weight percent neutral aromatics, and 14.7 weight percent saturated hydrocarbons. Saturate fractions contained predominantly cycloparaffins, neutral-aromatics were largely comprised of aromatic hydrocarbons and sulfur compounds, bases were largely nitrogen-containing compounds, and acids were mostly oxygen-containing compounds and nitrogen compounds of pyrrolic type. 145 refs., 24 figs., 21 tabs.

  15. Heliopause Instabilities Driven by Plasma-Neutral Interaction: Linear Analysis from Fluid Model

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, B.; Avinash, K.; Florinski, V.; Zank, G. P.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Bandyopadhyay, A.

    2011-09-21

    The heliopause (HP) is the outer edge of the heliosphere that separates the tenuous and hot heliosheath plasma from the relatively dense and cool magnetized plasma of the local interstellar medium (LISM). As a surface of tangential discontinuity, the HP is subject to both Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities. The coupling between plasma ions and neutral atoms through charge exchange provides an ''effective gravity'' for RT, while shear flows due to the velocity difference between the heliosheath and the interstellar flows can drive KH modes. We derive the linearized dispersion relations for waves propagating along the surface of this discontinuity using a fluid picture, to study the possibility for both RT and KH instabilities, including a second population of energetic neutrals produced by charge exchange interactions between the hot solar wind plasma in the heliosheath with interstellar hydrogen. We show that due to charge exchange interactions, the HP is unconditionally unstable to all perturbations.

  16. Functionalized carbon nanotube based hybrid electrochemical capacitors using neutral bromide redox-active electrolyte for enhancing energy density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaohui; Lui, Yu Hui; Chen, Bolin; Hu, Shan

    2017-06-01

    A hybrid electrochemical capacitor (EC) with enhanced energy density is realized by integrating functionalized carbon nanotube (FCNT) electrodes with redox-active electrolyte that has a neutral pH value (1 M Na2SO4 and 0.5 M KBr mixed aqueous solution). The negative electrode shows an electric double layer capacitor-type behavior. On the positive electrode, highly reversible Br-/Br3- redox reactions take place, presenting a battery-type behavior, which contributes to increase the capacitance of the hybrid cell. The voltage window of the whole cell is extended up to 1.5 V because of the high over-potentials of oxygen and hydrogen evolution reactions in the neutral electrolyte. Compared with raw CNT, the FCNT has better wettability in the aqueous electrolyte and contributes to increase the electric double layer capacitance of the cell. As a result, the maximum energy density of 28.3 Wh kg-1 is obtained from the hybrid EC at 0.5 A g-1 without sacrificing its power density, which is around 4 times larger than that of the electrical double layer capacitor constructed by FCNT electrodes and 1 M Na2SO4 electrolyte. Moreover, the discharge capacity retained 86.3% of its initial performance after 10000 cycles of galvanostatic charge and discharge test (10 A/g), suggesting its long life cycle even at high current loading.

  17. Cryo-EM structures elucidate neutralizing mechanisms of anti-chikungunya human monoclonal antibodies with therapeutic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Feng; Fong, Rachel H.; Austin, Stephen K.; Chen, Zhenguo; Klose, Thomas; Fokine, Andrei; Liu, Yue; Porta, Jason; Sapparapu, Gopal; Akahata, Wataru; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Crowe, James E.; Diamond, Michael S.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-10-26

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes severe acute and chronic disease in humans. Although highly inhibitory murine and human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been generated, the structural basis of their neutralizing activity remains poorly characterized. In this paper, we determined the cryo-EM structures of chikungunya virus-like particles complexed with antibody fragments (Fab) of two highly protective human mAbs, 4J21 and 5M16, that block virus fusion with host membranes. Both mAbs bind primarily to sites within the A and B domains, as well as to the B domain’s β-ribbon connector of the viral glycoprotein E2. The footprints of these antibodies on the viral surface were consistent with results from loss-of-binding studies using an alanine scanning mutagenesis-based epitope mapping approach. The Fab fragments stabilized the position of the B domain relative to the virus, particularly for the complex with 5M16. Finally, this finding is consistent with a mechanism of neutralization in which anti-CHIKV mAbs that bridge the A and B domains impede movement of the B domain away from the underlying fusion loop on the E1 glycoprotein and therefore block the requisite pH-dependent fusion of viral and host membranes.

  18. Cryo-EM structures elucidate neutralizing mechanisms of anti-chikungunya human monoclonal antibodies with therapeutic activity

    DOE PAGES

    Long, Feng; Fong, Rachel H.; Austin, Stephen K.; ...

    2015-10-26

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes severe acute and chronic disease in humans. Although highly inhibitory murine and human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been generated, the structural basis of their neutralizing activity remains poorly characterized. In this paper, we determined the cryo-EM structures of chikungunya virus-like particles complexed with antibody fragments (Fab) of two highly protective human mAbs, 4J21 and 5M16, that block virus fusion with host membranes. Both mAbs bind primarily to sites within the A and B domains, as well as to the B domain’s β-ribbon connector of the viral glycoprotein E2. The footprints ofmore » these antibodies on the viral surface were consistent with results from loss-of-binding studies using an alanine scanning mutagenesis-based epitope mapping approach. The Fab fragments stabilized the position of the B domain relative to the virus, particularly for the complex with 5M16. Finally, this finding is consistent with a mechanism of neutralization in which anti-CHIKV mAbs that bridge the A and B domains impede movement of the B domain away from the underlying fusion loop on the E1 glycoprotein and therefore block the requisite pH-dependent fusion of viral and host membranes.« less

  19. Hyaluronidase and protease activities from Indian snake venoms: neutralization by Mimosa pudica root extract.

    PubMed

    Girish, K S; Mohanakumari, H P; Nagaraju, S; Vishwanath, B S; Kemparaju, K

    2004-06-01

    The aqueous root extract of Mimosa pudica dose dependently inhibited the hyaluronidase and protease activities of Indian snakes (Naja naja, Vipera russelii and Echis carinatus) venom. Copyright 2004 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Effectiveness of Resins in Neutralizing Antibiotic Activities in Bactec Plus Aerobic/F Culture Medium

    PubMed Central

    Spaargaren, J.; van Boven, C. P. A.; Voorn, G. P.

    1998-01-01

    Incorporating resins in blood culture media can effectively reduce the activities of several antibiotics. It was shown that the activities of some generally used antibiotics decreased by 80 to 90% within 2 h in Bactec Plus Aerobic/F resin-containing culture medium. Bactec vials containing resins were still found to be positive for bacteria when antibiotics were present. The addition of β-lactamase shortened the detection time irrespective of the presence of resins. PMID:9817911

  1. Neutralization of pharmacological and toxic activities of bothrops snake venoms by Schizolobium parahyba (Fabaceae) aqueous extract and its fractions.

    PubMed

    Vale, Luis Henrique F; Mendes, Mirian M; Hamaguchi, Amélia; Soares, Andreimar M; Rodrigues, Veridiana M; Homsi-Brandeburgo, Maria Inês

    2008-07-01

    The aqueous extract prepared from Schizolobium parahyba (Sp) leaves, a native plant from Atlantic Forest (Brazil), was tested to analyse its ability to inhibit some biological and enzymatic activities induced by Bothrops alternatus (BaltCV) and Bothrops moojeni (BmooCV) snake venoms. Sp inhibited 100% of lethality, blood incoagulability, haemorrhagic and indirect haemolytic activities at a 1:10 ratio (venom/extract, w/w), as well as coagulant activity at a 1:5 ratio (venom/extract, w/w) induced by both venoms. BaltCV fibrinogenolytic activity was also neutralized by Sp at a 1:10 ratio, resulting in total protection of fibrinogen Bbeta chain and partial protection of Aalpha chain. Interaction tests have demonstrated that, at certain extract/proteins ratios, Sp precipitates proteins non-specifically suggesting the presence of tannins, which are very likely responsible for the excellent inhibiting effects of the analysed ophidian activities. Sp aqueous extract chromatography on Sephadex LH-20 was carried out aiming at the separation of these compounds that mask the obtained results. Thus, the fractionation of Sp resulted in three fractions: F1 (methanolic fraction); F2 (methanol:water fraction, 1:1 v/v); and F3 (aqueous fraction). These fractions were analysed for their ability to inhibit the BaltCV fibrinogenolytic activity. F1 inhibited 100% the venom fibrinogenolytic activity without presenting protein precipitation effect; F2 showed only partial inhibition of this venom activity. Finally, F3 did not inhibit fibrinogen proteolysis, but presented strong protein precipitating action. We conclude that Sp aqueous extract, together with tannins, also contains other compounds that can display specific inhibitory activity against snake venom toxins.

  2. The Cross-Neutralizing Activity of Enterovirus 71 Subgenotype C4 Vaccines in Healthy Chinese Infants and Children

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingxin; Wang, Yiping; Li, Yanping; Gao, Fan; Yang, Lisheng; Yao, Xin; Shao, Jie; Xia, Ningshao; Liang, Zhenglun; Wang, Junzhi

    2013-01-01

    Background EV71 is one of major etiologic causes of hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) and leads to severe neurological complications in young children and infants. Recently inactivated EV71 vaccines have been developed by five manufactures and clinically show good safety and immunogenicity. However, the cross-neutralizing activity of these vaccines remains unclear, and is of particular interest because RNA recombination is seen more frequently in EV71 epidemics. Methodology/Principal Findings In this post-hoc study, sera from a subset of 119 infants and children in two clinical trials of EV71 subgenotype C4 vaccines (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01313715 and NCT01273246), were detected for neutralizing antibody (NTAb) titres with sera from infected patients as controls. Cytopathogenic effect method was employed to test NTAb against EV71 subgenotype B4, B5, C2, C4 and C5, which were prominent epidemic strains worldwide over the past decade. To validate the accuracy of the results, ELISpot assay was employed in parallel to detect NTAb in all the post-vaccine sera. After two-dose vaccination, 49 out of 53 participants in initially seronegative group and 52 out of 53 participants in initially seropositive group showed less than 4-fold differences in NTAb titers against five EV71 strains, whereas corresponding values among sera from pediatric patients recovering from EV71-induced HFMD and subclinically infected participants were 8/8 and 41/43, respectively. The geometric mean titers of participants against five subgenotypes EV71 all grew significantly after vaccinations, irrespective of the baseline NTAb titer. The relative fold increase in antibody titers (NTAb-FI) against B4, B5, C2, and C5 displayed a positive correlation to the NTAb-FI against C4. Conclusions/Significance The results demonstrated broad cross-neutralizing activity induced by two C4 EV71 vaccines in healthy Chinese infants and children. However, the degree of induced cross-protective immunity, and

  3. The cross-neutralizing activity of enterovirus 71 subgenotype c4 vaccines in healthy chinese infants and children.

    PubMed

    Mao, Qunying; Cheng, Tong; Zhu, Fengcai; Li, Jingxin; Wang, Yiping; Li, Yanping; Gao, Fan; Yang, Lisheng; Yao, Xin; Shao, Jie; Xia, Ningshao; Liang, Zhenglun; Wang, Junzhi

    2013-01-01

    EV71 is one of major etiologic causes of hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) and leads to severe neurological complications in young children and infants. Recently inactivated EV71 vaccines have been developed by five manufactures and clinically show good safety and immunogenicity. However, the cross-neutralizing activity of these vaccines remains unclear, and is of particular interest because RNA recombination is seen more frequently in EV71 epidemics. In this post-hoc study, sera from a subset of 119 infants and children in two clinical trials of EV71 subgenotype C4 vaccines (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01313715 and NCT01273246), were detected for neutralizing antibody (NTAb) titres with sera from infected patients as controls. Cytopathogenic effect method was employed to test NTAb against EV71 subgenotype B4, B5, C2, C4 and C5, which were prominent epidemic strains worldwide over the past decade. To validate the accuracy of the results, ELISpot assay was employed in parallel to detect NTAb in all the post-vaccine sera. After two-dose vaccination, 49 out of 53 participants in initially seronegative group and 52 out of 53 participants in initially seropositive group showed less than 4-fold differences in NTAb titers against five EV71 strains, whereas corresponding values among sera from pediatric patients recovering from EV71-induced HFMD and subclinically infected participants were 8/8 and 41/43, respectively. The geometric mean titers of participants against five subgenotypes EV71 all grew significantly after vaccinations, irrespective of the baseline NTAb titer. The relative fold increase in antibody titers (NTAb-FI) against B4, B5, C2, and C5 displayed a positive correlation to the NTAb-FI against C4. The results demonstrated broad cross-neutralizing activity induced by two C4 EV71 vaccines in healthy Chinese infants and children. However, the degree of induced cross-protective immunity, and the potential escape evolution for EV71 still need to be monitored

  4. Sorption of ionized and neutral emerging trace organic compounds onto activated sludge from different wastewater treatment configurations.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Katherine C; Dickenson, Eric R V; Drewes, Jörg E; Higgins, Christopher P

    2012-04-15

    The objective of this study was to examine sorption of a suite of 19 trace organic contaminants (TOrCs) to activated sludge. Compounds examined in this study included neutral, nonionized TOrCs as well as acidic TOrCs which may carry a negative charge and basic TOrCs which may carry a positive charge at the pH of wastewater. These TOrCs were evaluated to examine how sorptive behavior might differ for TOrCs in different states of charge. Additionally, multiple sludges from geographically and operationally different wastewater treatment plants were studied to elicit how solid-phase characteristics influence TOrC sorption. Characterization of sludge solids from 6 full scale treatment facilities and 3 bench-scale reactors showed no significant difference in fraction organic carbon (f(oc)) and cation exchange capacity (CEC). Sorption experiments demonstrated that sorption of TOrCs also exhibits little variation between these different sludges. Organic carbon normalized partition coefficients (logK(oc)) were determined as a measure of sorption, and were found to correlate well with octanol-water partition coefficients (logK(ow)) for nonionized TOrCs, and logD(ow) for anionic TOrCs where logD(ow) is greater than 2. These data were used to construct a linear free energy relationship (LFER), which was comparable to existing LFERs for sorption onto sludge. No trend in sorption was apparent for the remaining anionic TOrCs or for the cationic TOrCs. These data suggest that predicting sorption to activated sludge based on K(ow) values is a reasonable approach for neutral TOrCs using existing LFERs, but electrostatic (and likely other) interactions may govern the sorptive behavior of the charged organic chemicals to sludge.

  5. A novel neutral, halophile Stachybotrys microspora-based endoglucanase active impact on β-glucan.

    PubMed

    Benhmad, Ines; Boudabbous, Manel; Yaîch, Asma; Rebai, Maryem; Gargouri, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The production of cellulases from Stachybotrys microspora strain (A19) has been improved by fed-batch fermentation on Avicel cellulose 10 mg/ml. An endoglucanase EG2 was purified to homogeneity. This cellulase has a molecular mass estimated to 50 kDa when analyzed by a denaturant gel electrophoresis. It exhibited an optimal activity at 50 °C, pH 7.0 and 0.85 M NaCl. Specifically, these results show the thermo-active, alkali-tolerant and halo-tolerant properties of EG2. In addition, this endoglucanase showed its highest activity on barley-β-glucan, compared to the CMC. Moreover, it was less active on Avicel cellulose. Furthermore, the EG2 activity was stimulated in the presence of EDTA, urea and β-mercaptoethanol whereas it was reduced in the presence of SDS. This cellulase was highly stable in the presence of organic solvents such as acetone and n-hexane. TLC showed that the main hydrolysis products from EG2 were cellobiose and glucose. This fungal endoglucanase could be potentially important in the conversion of grass-derived biomass into fermentable sugars.

  6. Enantioselective analysis of chiral anteiso fatty acids in the polar and neutral lipids of food.

    PubMed

    Hauff, Simone; Hottinger, Georg; Vetter, Walter

    2010-04-01

    Anteiso fatty acids (aFA) are substituted with a methyl group on the antepenultimate carbon of the straight acyl chain. This feature leads to a stereogenic center. The 12-methyltetradecanoic acid (a15:0) and the 14-methylhexadecanoic acid (a17:0) are the most common aFA found in food, although they occur only in very small quantities. In this study we used gas chromatography in combination with a chiral stationary phase to determine the enantiomeric distribution of both a15:0 and a17:0 in the neutral and polar lipids of aquatic food samples and cheese. The best suited column was selected out of four custom-made combinations of heptakis(6-O-tert-butyldimethylsilyl-2,3-di-O-methyl)-beta-cyclodextrin (beta-TBDM) with different amount and polarity of an achiral polysiloxane. After separation of polar and neutral lipids of the food samples by solid phase extraction, fatty acid methyl esters were prepared and the fatty acid methyl esters were fractionated by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. Measurements of fractions high in aFA by enantioselective GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring mode verified the dominance of the (S)-enantiomers of a15:0 and a17:0 in both lipid fractions. However (R)-enantiomers were detectable in all samples. The relative proportion of the (R)-enantiomers was up to fivefold higher in the polar lipids than in the neutral lipids. The higher proportions in the polar lipids indicate that microorganisms might be involved in the formation of (R)-aFA.

  7. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DUST AND SOIL SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.14)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP summarizes the method for extracting and preparing a dust or soil sample for analysis of neutral persistent organic pollutants. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  8. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DUST AND SOIL SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.14)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP summarizes the method for extracting and preparing a dust or soil sample for analysis of neutral persistent organic pollutants. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  9. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  10. Measurement and analysis of electron-neutral collision frequency in the calibrated cutoff probe

    SciTech Connect

    You, K. H.; Seo, B. H.; Kim, J. H.; You, S. J.; Kim, D. W.; Na, B. K.; Chang, H. Y.

    2016-03-15

    As collisions between electrons and neutral particles constitute one of the most representative physical phenomena in weakly ionized plasma, the electron-neutral (e-n) collision frequency is a very important plasma parameter as regards understanding the physics of this material. In this paper, we measured the e-n collision frequency in the plasma using a calibrated cutoff-probe. A highly accurate reactance spectrum of the plasma/cutoff-probe system, which is expected based on previous cutoff-probe circuit simulations [Kim et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 99, 131502 (2011)], is obtained using the calibrated cutoff-probe method, and the e-n collision frequency is calculated based on the cutoff-probe circuit model together with the high-frequency conductance model. The measured e-n collision frequency (by the calibrated cutoff-probe method) is compared and analyzed with that obtained using a Langmuir probe, with the latter being calculated from the measured electron-energy distribution functions, in wide range of gas pressure.

  11. Mass analysis of neutral particles and ions released during electrical breakdowns on spacecraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1985-01-01

    Charged-particle fluxes from breakdown events were studied. Methods to measure mass spectra and total emitted flux of neutral particles were developed. The design and construction of the specialized mass spectrometer was completed. Electrical breakdowns were initiated by a movable blunt contact touching the insulating surface. The contact discharge apparatus was used for final development of two different high-speed recording systems and for measurements of the composition of the materials given off by the discharge. It was shown that intense instantaneous fluxes of neutral particles were released from the sites of electrical breakdown events. A laser micropulse mass analyzer showed that visible discoloration at breakdown sites were correllated with the presence of iron on the polymer side of the film, presumably caused by punch-through to the Inconel backing. Kapton samples irradiated by an oxygen ion beam were tested. The irradiated samples were free of surface hydrocarbon contamination but otherwise behaved in the same way as the Kapton samples tested earlier. Only the two samples exposed to oxygen ion bombardment were relatively clean. This indicates an additional variable that should be considered when testing spacecraft materials in the laboratory.

  12. Activity of Ca2+-dependent neutral proteases in tissues of ground squirrel during hibernation and during self-warming after induced awakening.

    PubMed

    Nurmagomedova, P M; Abasova, M M; Emirbekov, E Z

    2011-09-01

    Cyclic changes in activity of Ca2+-dependent neutral protease occur during preparation for hibernation, with an increase in September and November and decrease in October and December. During hibernation proteolytic enzyme activity decreased, while during self-warming after induced awakening, the role of Ca2+-dependent processes in the tissues of ground squirrels increased according to the body temperature.

  13. Allicin from garlic neutralizes the hemolytic activity of intra- and extra-cellular pneumolysin O in vitro.

    PubMed

    Arzanlou, M; Bohlooli, S; Jannati, E; Mirzanejad-Asl, H

    2011-03-15

    Pneumolysin (PLY) is a key virulence factor contributes to the pathogenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study we investigated the effect of allicin and aqueous garlic extracts on hemolytic activity of PLY both in prelysed and intact cells. Additionally the antimicrobial activity of allicin was tested against the bacteria. All tested materials potently inhibited the PLY hemolytic activity. Allicin neutralizes PLY in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Twenty five minute incubation of PLY (2 HU/mL) with 0.61 μM/mL concentration of allicin, totally inhibited hemolytic activity of PLY (IC50 = 0.28 μM/mL). The inhibitory activity of old extract of garlic was similar to pure allicin (IC50 = 50.46 μL/mL; 0.31 μM/mL; P < 0.05). In contrast fresh extract of garlic inhibits the PLY hemolytic activity at lower concentrations (IC50 = 13.96 μL/mL; 0.08 μM/mL allicin). Exposure of intact cells to allicin (1.8 μM) completely inhibited hemolytic activity of PLY inside bacterial cells. The inhibitory effect of the allicin was restored by addition of reducing agent DTT at 5 mM, proposing that allicin likely inhibits the PLY by binding to cysteinyl residue in the binding site. The MIC value of allicin was determined to be 512 μg/mL (3.15 μM/mL). These results indicate that PLY is a novel target for allicin and may provide a new line of investigation on pneumococcal diseases in the future.

  14. Identification of minute damage in composite bridge structures equipped with fiber optic sensors using the location of neutral axis and finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xi; Glisic, Branko

    2016-04-01

    By definition, the neutral axis of a loaded composite beam structure is the curve along which the section experiences zero bending strain. When no axial loading is present, the location of the neutral axis passes through the centroid of stiffness of the beam cross-section. In the presence of damage, the centroid of stiffness, as well as the neutral axis, shift from the healthy position. The concept of neutral axis can be widely applied to all beam-like structures. According to literature, a change in location of the neutral axis can be associated with damage in the corresponding cross-section. In this paper, the movement of neutral axis near locations of minute damage in a composite bridge structure was studied using finite element analysis and experimental results. The finite element model was developed based on a physical scale model of a composite simply-supported structure with controlled minute damage in the reinforced concrete deck. The structure was equipped with long-gauge fiber optic strain and temperature sensors at a healthy reference location as well as two locations of damage. A total of 12 strain sensors were installed during construction and used to monitor the structure during various loading events. This paper aims to explain previous experimental results which showed that the observed positions of neutral axis near damage locations were higher than the predicted healthy locations in some loading events. Analysis has shown that finite element analysis has potential to simulate and explain the physical behavior of the test structure.

  15. Design and evaluation of a hybrid passive and active gravity neutral orthosis (GNO).

    PubMed

    Koo, Benjamin; Montes, Jacqueline; Gamarnik, Viktor; Yeager, Keith; Marra, Jonathan; Dunaway, Sally; Montgomery, Megan; De Vivo, Darryl C; Strauss, Nancy; Konofagou, Elisa; Kaufmann, Petra; Morrison, Barclay

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular diseases (NMD), including Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) and Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), result in progressive muscular weakness that often leaves patients functionally dependent on caregivers for many activities of daily living (ADL) such as eating, bathing, grooming (touching the face and head), reaching (grabbing for objects), and dressing. In severe cases, patients are unable to perform even the simplest of activities from exploring their 3D space to touching their own face. The ability to move and initiate age appropriate tasks, such as playing and exploration, are considered to be of vital importance to both their physical and cognitive development. Therefore, to improve quality of life and reduce dependence on caregivers in children and young adults with NMD, we designed, built and evaluated an assistive, active orthosis to support arm function. The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of a mechanical arm orthosis to both encourage and assist functional arm movement while providing the user a sense of independence and control over one's own body.

  16. Compact, accurate description of diagnostic neutral beam propagation and attenuation in a high temperature plasma for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Bespamyatnov, Igor O; Rowan, William L; Granetz, Robert S

    2008-10-01

    Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on Alcator C-Mod relies on the use of the diagnostic neutral beam injector as a source of neutral particles which penetrate deep into the plasma. It employs the emission resulting from the interaction of the beam atoms with fully ionized impurity ions. To interpret the emission from a given point in the plasma as the density of emitting impurity ions, the density of beam atoms must be known. Here, an analysis of beam propagation is described which yields the beam density profile throughout the beam trajectory from the neutral beam injector to the core of the plasma. The analysis includes the effects of beam formation, attenuation in the neutral gas surrounding the plasma, and attenuation in the plasma. In the course of this work, a numerical simulation and an analytical approximation for beam divergence are developed. The description is made sufficiently compact to yield accurate results in a time consistent with between-shot analysis.

  17. Theoretical study of chlordecone and surface groups interaction in an activated carbon model under acidic and neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) are widely used in the purification of drinking water without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanisms of the persistent organic pollutants. Chlordecone (CLD, Kepone) is an organochlorinated synthetic compound that has been used mainly as agricultural insecticide. CLD has been identified and listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. The selection of the best suited AC for this type of contaminants is mainly an empirical and costly process. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on CLD adsorption is done in order to help understanding the process. This may provide a first selection criteria for the preparation of AC with suitable surface properties. A model of AC consisting of a seven membered ring graphene sheet (coronene) with a functional group on the edge was used to evaluate the influence of the SGs over the adsorption. Multiple Minima Hypersurface methodology (MMH) coupled with PM7 semiempirical Hamiltonian was employed in order to study the interactions of the chlordecone with SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) at acidic and neutral pH and different hydration conditions. Selected structures were re-optimized using CAM-B3LYP to achieve a well-defined electron density to characterize the interactions by the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach. The deprotonated form of surface carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of AC models show the strongest interactions, suggesting a chemical adsorption. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance CLD adsorption onto AC at neutral pH conditions.

  18. Microbial community dynamics during composting of sewage sludge and straw studied through phospholipid and neutral lipid analysis.

    PubMed

    Amir, S; Merlina, G; Pinelli, E; Winterton, P; Revel, J-C; Hafidi, M

    2008-11-30

    The composting process involves a succession of different communities of microorganisms that decompose the initial material, transforming it into a stable final product. In this work, the levels of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), neutral lipid fatty acid (NLFA) and sterol were monitored in compost versus time, as indicators of the activity of various microorganisms (Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria, fungi, etc.). During composting, the PLFA and NLFA from Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes (2-OH 10; 3-OH 12; 2-OH 14; 13:0; 16:1; 18:1 trans) as well as some sterols of plant origin (e.g. monostearin sterols) decreased until the end of composting. In contrast, the branched fatty acids with iso- and anteiso-forms (i-15:0; a-15:0; i-16; i-17) increased mainly in the thermophilic phase, but decreased right after. The PLFA 18:2 (6; 9), which is used as an index of the occurrence of some fungi, rose strongly at the beginning of composting, but fell after peak heating. In contrast, the other main sterol indicative of fungi, ergosterol, decreased at the beginning of the thermophilic phase, but increased strongly by the end of composting. Accordingly, cluster and PCA analysis separated the PLFA of Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotic cells from those of Gram-positive bacteria and long-chain fatty acids. The fungal PLFA considered, 18:2 (9, 12), was clustered more closely to iso- and anteiso-branched PLFAs. Stigmasterol, squalene and cholesterol occurred in the lower right part of the loading plot and were clustered more closely to iso-, anteiso-branched PLFAs and 18:2 w 6,9 suggesting their relationship to microbial activities. We also observed the tendency of resistance of fatty acid PLFAs and NLFAs of long chain (19:0 (cis-9); 20:0) and some recalcitrant sterols, e.g. sitosterol, at the end of composting. The presence of high levels of the latter in the final stage indicates their contribution to the structural stability of organic matter fractions. These

  19. Neutral Lipids and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Control Pulmonary Gene Expression and Inflammation-Triggered Pathogenesis in Lysosomal Acid Lipase Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Xuemei; Yan, Cong; Qin, Yulin; Knox, Lana; Li, Tingyu; Du, Hong

    2005-01-01

    The functional roles of neutral lipids in the lung are poorly understood. However, blocking cholesteryl ester and triglyceride metabolism in lysosomal acid lipase gene knockout mice (lal−/−) results in severe pathogenic phenotypes in the lung, including massive neutrophil infiltration, foamy macrophage accumulation, unwanted cell growth, and emphysema. To elucidate the mechanism underlining these pathologies, we performed Affymetrix GeneChip microarray analysis of 1-, 3-, and 6-month-old mice and identified aberrant gene expression that progressed with age. Among changed genes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12, apoptosis inhibitor 6 (Api-6), erythroblast transformation-specific domain (Ets) transcription factor family member Spi-C, and oncogene MafB were increased 100-, 70-, 40-, and 10-fold, respectively, in lal−/− lungs versus the wild-type lungs. The pathogenic increases of these molecules occurred primarily in alveolar type II epithelial cells. Transcriptional activities of the MMP-12 and Api-6 promoters were stimulated by Spi-C or MafB in respiratory epithelial cells. Treatment with 9-hydroxyoctadecanoic acids and ciglitazone significantly rescued lal−/− pulmonary inflammation and aberrant gene expression. In addition, both compounds as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma inhibited MMP-12 and Api-6 promoter activities. These data suggest that inflammation-triggered cell growth and emphysema during lysosomal acid lipase deficiency are partially caused by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ inactivation. PMID:16127159

  20. Complexity of Neutralizing Antibodies against Multiple Dengue Virus Serotypes after Heterotypic Immunization and Secondary Infection Revealed by In-Depth Analysis of Cross-Reactive Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Yang; Durbin, Anna; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Hsieh, Szu-Chia; Whitehead, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV) cause the most important and rapidly emerging arboviral diseases in humans. The recent phase 2b and 3 studies of a tetravalent dengue vaccine reported a moderate efficacy despite the presence of neutralizing antibodies, highlighting the need for a better understanding of neutralizing antibodies in polyclonal human sera. Certain type-specific (TS) antibodies were recently discovered to account for the monotypic neutralizing activity and protection after primary DENV infection. The nature of neutralizing antibodies after secondary DENV infection remains largely unknown. In this study, we examined sera from 10 vaccinees with well-documented exposure to first and second DENV serotypes through heterotypic immunization with live-attenuated vaccines. Higher serum IgG avidities to both exposed and nonexposed serotypes were found after secondary immunization than after primary immunization. Using a two-step depletion protocol to remove different anti-envelope antibodies, including group-reactive (GR) and complex-reactive (CR) antibodies separately, we found GR and CR antibodies together contributed to more than 50% of neutralizing activities against multiple serotypes after secondary immunization. Similar findings were demonstrated in patients after secondary infection. Anti-envelope antibodies recognizing previously exposed serotypes consisted of a large proportion of GR antibodies, CR antibodies, and a small proportion of TS antibodies, whereas those recognizing nonexposed serotypes consisted of GR and CR antibodies. These findings have implications for sequential heterotypic immunization or primary immunization of DENV-primed individuals as alternative strategies for DENV vaccination. The complexity of neutralizing antibodies after secondary infection provides new insights into the difficulty of their application as surrogates of protection. IMPORTANCE The four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV) are the leading cause of

  1. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor

    PubMed Central

    Manetta, Joseph; Bina, Holly; Ryan, Paul; Fox, Niles; Witcher, Derrick R; Kikly, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect. PMID:25258549

  2. Analysis of secondary particle behavior in multiaperture, multigrid accelerator for the ITER neutral beam injector.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, T; Taniguchi, M; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Tobari, H; Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Sakamoto, K; Inoue, T

    2010-02-01

    Heat load on acceleration grids by secondary particles such as electrons, neutrals, and positive ions, is a key issue for long pulse acceleration of negative ion beams. Complicated behaviors of the secondary particles in multiaperture, multigrid (MAMuG) accelerator have been analyzed using electrostatic accelerator Monte Carlo code. The analytical result is compared to experimental one obtained in a long pulse operation of a MeV accelerator, of which second acceleration grid (A2G) was removed for simplification of structure. The analytical results show that relatively high heat load on the third acceleration grid (A3G) since stripped electrons were deposited mainly on A3G. This heat load on the A3G can be suppressed by installing the A2G. Thus, capability of MAMuG accelerator is demonstrated for suppression of heat load due to secondary particles by the intermediate grids.

  3. SPEAR 3 flight analysis: Grounding by neutral gas release, and magnetic field effects on current distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandell, M. J.; Jongeward, G. A.; Cooke, D. L.; Raitt, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Power Experiment Aboard Rockets (SPEAR) 3 experiment was launched on March 15, 1993, to test grounding devices for negative payloads. In this paper we review two aspects of the high-altitude flight data and compare them with preflight predictions. The SPEAR 3 neutral gas release experiment studied a grounding mechanism observed on previous flights during attitude control system (ACS) firings. Preflight calculations using Paschen law physics generalized to three dimensions predicted that the high rate gas release (about one order of magnitude below normal ACS) would reduce the rocket potential to within 200-300 V of plasma ground. The flight data is well fit by a value of -225V. Orientation relative to Earth's magnetic field had no effect on the floating potential or grounding operations but had a large effect on the portion of the current collected by the boom. We compare these flight measurements with preflight calculations made with the DynaPAC computer code.

  4. Evidence for the neutralization of boron in silicon using surface analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kazmerski, L.L.; Nelson, A.J.; Dhere, R.G.

    1987-07-01

    Interactions between the shallow acceptor boron and hydrogen in single crystal, polycrystalline, and amorphous Si are investigated. Low-temperature secondary ion mass spectrometry depth-compositional profiles indicate a definite interaction between the boron concentration and the hydrogen penetration in single crystals and at grain boundaries. The bonding of the H is identified to be directly to the Si rather than to the B, and is confirmed by infrared measurements. Electrical neutralization of the B by hydroxyl-group bonding is also reported at oxygen-rich Si grain boundaries. No similar relationships between P concentration and H penetration are observed. In amorphous Si material, the B-doping level has only a limited effect on the hydrogen penetration which seems to be controlled instead by structural diffusion mechanisms.

  5. Exosomes neutralize synaptic-plasticity-disrupting activity of Aβ assemblies in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exosomes, small extracellular vesicles of endosomal origin, have been suggested to be involved in both the metabolism and aggregation of Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-associated amyloid β-protein (Aβ). Despite their ubiquitous presence and the inclusion of components which can potentially interact with Aβ, the role of exosomes in regulating synaptic dysfunction induced by Aβ has not been explored. Results We here provide in vivo evidence that exosomes derived from N2a cells or human cerebrospinal fluid can abrogate the synaptic-plasticity-disrupting activity of both synthetic and AD brain-derived Aβ. Mechanistically, this effect involves sequestration of synaptotoxic Aβ assemblies by exosomal surface proteins such as PrPC rather than Aβ proteolysis. Conclusions These data suggest that exosomes can counteract the inhibitory action of Aβ, which contributes to perpetual capability for synaptic plasticity. PMID:24284042

  6. Arsenic trioxide and resveratrol show synergistic anti-leukemia activity and neutralized cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuhua; Chen, Meng; Meng, Jia; Yu, Lei; Tu, Yingfeng; Wan, Lin; Fang, Kun; Zhu, Wenliang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is an aggravating side effect of many clinical antineoplastic agents such as arsenic trioxide (As2O3), which is the first-line treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Clinically, drug combination strategies are widely applied for complex disease management. Here, an optimized, cardiac-friendly therapeutic strategy for APL was investigated using a combination of As2O3 and genistein or resveratrol. Potential combinations were explored with respect to their effects on mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen species, superoxide dismutase activity, autophagy, and apoptosis in both NB4 cells and neonatal rat left ventricular myocytes. All experiments consistently suggested that 5 µM resveratrol remarkably alleviates As2O3-induced cardiotoxicity. To achieve an equivalent effect, a 10-fold dosage of genistein was required, thus highlighting the dose advantage of resveratrol, as poor bioavailability is a common concern for its clinical application. Co-administration of resveratrol substantially amplified the anticancer effect of As2O3 in NB4 cells. Furthermore, resveratrol exacerbated oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, and apoptosis, thereby reflecting its full range of synergism with As2O3. Addition of 5 µM resveratrol to the single drug formula of As2O3 also further increased the expression of LC3, a marker of cellular autophagy activity, indicating an involvement of autophagy-mediated tumor cell death in the synergistic action. Our results suggest a possible application of an As2O3 and resveratrol combination to treat APL in order to achieve superior therapeutics effects and prevent cardiotoxicity.

  7. Arsenic Trioxide and Resveratrol Show Synergistic Anti-Leukemia Activity and Neutralized Cardiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jia; Yu, Lei; Tu, Yingfeng; Wan, Lin; Fang, Kun; Zhu, Wenliang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiotoxicity is an aggravating side effect of many clinical antineoplastic agents such as arsenic trioxide (As2O3), which is the first-line treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Clinically, drug combination strategies are widely applied for complex disease management. Here, an optimized, cardiac-friendly therapeutic strategy for APL was investigated using a combination of As2O3 and genistein or resveratrol. Potential combinations were explored with respect to their effects on mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen species, superoxide dismutase activity, autophagy, and apoptosis in both NB4 cells and neonatal rat left ventricular myocytes. All experiments consistently suggested that 5 µM resveratrol remarkably alleviates As2O3-induced cardiotoxicity. To achieve an equivalent effect, a 10-fold dosage of genistein was required, thus highlighting the dose advantage of resveratrol, as poor bioavailability is a common concern for its clinical application. Co-administration of resveratrol substantially amplified the anticancer effect of As2O3 in NB4 cells. Furthermore, resveratrol exacerbated oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, and apoptosis, thereby reflecting its full range of synergism with As2O3. Addition of 5 µM resveratrol to the single drug formula of As2O3 also further increased the expression of LC3, a marker of cellular autophagy activity, indicating an involvement of autophagy-mediated tumor cell death in the synergistic action. Our results suggest a possible application of an As2O3 and resveratrol combination to treat APL in order to achieve superior therapeutics effects and prevent cardiotoxicity. PMID:25144547

  8. Evolutionary neutrality of mtDNA introgression: evidence from complete mitogenome analysis in roe deer.

    PubMed

    Matosiuk, M; Sheremetyeva, I N; Sheremetyev, I S; Saveljev, A P; Borkowska, A

    2014-11-01

    Introgressive hybridization offers a unique platform for studying the molecular basis of natural selection acting on mitogenomes. Most of the mtDNA protein-coding genes are extremely conserved; however, some of the observed variations have potentially adaptive significance. Here, we evaluated whether the evolution of mtDNA in closely related roe deer species affected by widespread mtDNA introgression is neutral or adaptive. We characterized and compared 16 complete mitogenomes of European (Capreolus capreolus) and Siberian (C. pygargus) roe deer, including four of Siberian origin introgressed into European species. The average sequence divergence of species-specific lineages was estimated at 2.8% and varied across gene classes. Only 21 of 315 fixed differences identified in protein-coding genes represented nonsynonymous changes. Only three of them were determined to have arisen in the C. pygargus lineage since the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of both Capreolus species, reflecting a decelerated evolutionary ratio. The almost four-fold higher dN /dS ratio described for the European roe deer lineage is constrained by overall purifying selection, especially pronounced in the ND4 and ND5 genes. We suggest that the highly divergent C. capreolus lineage could have maintained a capability for genomic incorporation of the well-preserved and almost ancestral type of mtDNA present in C. pygargus. Our analyses did not indicate any signs of positive selection for Siberian roe deer mtDNA, suggesting that the present widespread introgression is evolutionarily neutral.

  9. Analysis of molecular mechanisms of ATP synthesis from the standpoint of the principle of electrical neutrality.

    PubMed

    Nath, Sunil

    2017-05-01

    Theories of biological energy coupling in oxidative phosphorylation (OX PHOS) and photophosphorylation (PHOTO PHOS) are reviewed and applied to ATP synthesis by an experimental system containing purified ATP synthase reconstituted into liposomes. The theories are critically evaluated from the standpoint of the principle of electrical neutrality. It is shown that the obligatory requirement to maintain overall electroneutrality of bulk aqueous phases imposes strong constraints on possible theories of energy coupling and molecular mechanisms of ATP synthesis. Mitchell's chemiosmotic theory is found to violate the electroneutrality of bulk aqueous phases and is shown to be untenable on these grounds. Purely electroneutral mechanisms or mechanisms where the anion/countercation gradient is dissipated or simply flows through the lipid bilayer are also shown to be inadequate. A dynamically electrogenic but overall electroneutral mode of ion transport postulated by Nath's torsional mechanism of energy transduction and ATP synthesis is shown to be consistent both with the experimental findings and the principle of electrical neutrality. It is concluded that the ATP synthase functions as a proton-dicarboxylic acid anion cotransporter in OX PHOS or PHOTO PHOS. A logical chemical explanation for the selection of dicarboxylic acids as intermediates in OX PHOS and PHOTO PHOS is suggested based on the pioneering classical thermodynamic work of Christensen, Izatt, and Hansen. The nonequilibrium thermodynamic consequences for theories in which the protons originate from water vis-a-vis weak organic acids are compared and contrasted, and several new mechanistic and thermodynamic insights into biological energy transduction by ATP synthase are offered. These considerations make the new theory of energy coupling more complete, and lead to a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanism of ATP synthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antioxidant activity of idebenone-loaded neutral and cationic solid-lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Antonio; Crasci', Lucia; Panico, Annamaria; Pignatello, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Idebenone (IDE) is a lipophilic benzoquinone electron carrier synthetic analogue of coenzyme Q10, which behaves as an antioxidant and free radical scavenging molecule. Recently, the therapeutic application of IDE in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy has been discussed. This work was aimed at evaluating the encapsulation of IDE in solid-lipid nanoparticles (SLN). In particular, we tested the possibility of adapting the quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion technique, already proposed to produce polymeric nanoparticles, to prepare positively charged SLN with different compositions. Such a charge, due to the addition of a cationic lipid, would facilitate the interaction with the negatively charged eye surface epithelium, with a consequent longer pre-corneal residence time of the colloidal systems. In a preliminary evaluation of the produced IDE-loaded SLN, the antioxidant activity of the drug was demonstrated using an oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay. Encapsulation of the drug in the nanocarrier systems seems able to protect IDE from degradation and prolong its antioxidant potential.

  11. Direct analysis of sialylated or sulfated glycosphingolipids and other polar and neutral lipids using TLC-MS interfaces[S

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyejung; Zhou, Ying; Costello, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Gangliosides and sulfatides (STs) are acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) that have one or more sialic acids or sulfate substituents, in addition to neutral sugars, attached to the C-1 hydroxyl group of the ceramide long chain base. TLC is a widely employed and convenient technique for separation and characterization of GSLs. When TLC is directly coupled to MS, it provides both the molecular mass and structural information without further purification. Here, after development of the TLC plates, the structural analyses of acidic GSLs, including gangliosides and STs, were investigated using the liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA™) and CAMAG TLC-MS interfaces coupled to an ESI QSTAR Pulsar i quadrupole orthogonal TOF mass spectrometer. Coupling TLC with ESI-MS allowed the acquisition of high resolution mass spectra of the acidic GSLs with high sensitivity and mass accuracy, without the loss of sialic acid residues that frequently occurs during low-pressure MALDI MS. These systems were then applied to the analysis of total lipid extracts from bovine brain. This allowed profiling of many different lipid classes, not only gangliosides and STs, but also SMs, neutral GSLs, and phospholipids. PMID:24482490

  12. Direct analysis of sialylated or sulfated glycosphingolipids and other polar and neutral lipids using TLC-MS interfaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyejung; Zhou, Ying; Costello, Catherine E

    2014-04-01

    Gangliosides and sulfatides (STs) are acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs) that have one or more sialic acids or sulfate substituents, in addition to neutral sugars, attached to the C-1 hydroxyl group of the ceramide long chain base. TLC is a widely employed and convenient technique for separation and characterization of GSLs. When TLC is directly coupled to MS, it provides both the molecular mass and structural information without further purification. Here, after development of the TLC plates, the structural analyses of acidic GSLs, including gangliosides and STs, were investigated using the liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA™) and CAMAG TLC-MS interfaces coupled to an ESI QSTAR Pulsar i quadrupole orthogonal TOF mass spectrometer. Coupling TLC with ESI-MS allowed the acquisition of high resolution mass spectra of the acidic GSLs with high sensitivity and mass accuracy, without the loss of sialic acid residues that frequently occurs during low-pressure MALDI MS. These systems were then applied to the analysis of total lipid extracts from bovine brain. This allowed profiling of many different lipid classes, not only gangliosides and STs, but also SMs, neutral GSLs, and phospholipids.

  13. Bench-scale study of active mine water treatment using cement kiln dust (CKD) as a neutralization agent.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Allison L; Walsh, Margaret E

    2012-02-01

    The overall objective of this study was to investigate the potential impact on settled water quality of using cement kiln dust (CKD), a waste by-product, to replace quicklime in the active treatment of acidic mine water. Bench-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the treatment performance of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)(2)) slurries generated using four different CKD samples compared to a control treatment with quicklime (CaO) in terms of reducing acidity and metals concentrations in acid mine drainage (AMD) samples taken from the effluent of a lead/zinc mine in Atlantic Canada. Results of the study showed that all of the CKD samples evaluated were capable of achieving greater than 97% removal of total zinc and iron. The amount of solid alkaline material required to achieve pH targets required for neutralization of the AMD was found to be higher for treatment with the CKD slurries compared to the quicklime slurry control experiments, and varied linearly with the free lime content of the CKD. The results of this study also showed that a potential benefit of treating mine water with CKD could be reduced settled sludge volumes generated in the active treatment process, and further research into the characteristics of the sludge generated from the use of CKD-generated calcium hydroxide slurries is recommended.

  14. Approach on quantitative structure-activity relationship for design of a pH neutral carrier containing tertiary amino group.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhong; Gong, Fu-Chun; Li, He-Ping; Xiao, Zhong-Liang; Long, Shu; Zhang, Ling; Peng, San-Jun

    2007-01-02

    The quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for neutral carriers used to prepare hydrogen ion sensors has been studied. A series of synthesized carrier compounds were taken as the training set. Five molecular structure parameters of the compounds were calculated by using CNDO/2 algorithm and used as feature variables in constructing QSAR model. The lower and upper limits of the linear pH response range were taken as the activity measure. The corresponding model equations were derived from the stepwise regression procedure. With the established QSAR model, a new pH carrier, (4-hydroxybenzyl) didodecylamine (XIII) was proposed and synthesized. The PVC membrane pH electrode based on carrier XIII with a wide pH linear response range of 2.0-12.5 was prepared. Having a theoretical Nernstian response slope of 57.2+/-0.3 mV/pH (n=5 at 25 degrees C) without a super-Nernstian phenomenon, the sensor had low resistance, short response time, high selectivity and good reproducibility. Moreover, the sensor was successfully applied to detecting the pH value of serum samples.

  15. Simulation of Cl− Secretion in Epithelial Tissues: New Methodology Estimating Activity of Electro-Neutral Cl− Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Sasamoto, Kouhei; Niisato, Naomi; Taruno, Akiyuki; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Transcellular Cl− secretion is, in general, mediated by two steps; (1) the entry step of Cl− into the cytosolic space from the basolateral space across the basolateral membrane by Cl− transporters, such as Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1, an isoform of NKCC), and (2) the releasing step of Cl− from the cytosolic space into the luminal (air) space across the apical membrane via Cl− channels, such as cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel. Transcellular Cl− secretion has been characterized by using various experimental techniques. For example, measurements of short-circuit currents in the Ussing chamber and patch clamp techniques provide us information on transepithelial ion movements via transcellular pathway, transepithelial conductance, activity (open probability) of single channel, and whole cell currents. Although many investigators have tried to clarify roles of Cl− channels and transporters located at the apical and basolateral membranes in transcellular Cl− secretion, it is still unclear how Cl− channels/transporters contribute to transcellular Cl− secretion and are regulated by various stimuli such as Ca2+ and cAMP. In the present study, we simulate transcellular Cl− secretion using mathematical models combined with electrophysiological measurements, providing information on contribution of Cl− channels/transporters to transcellular Cl− secretion, activity of electro-neutral ion transporters and how Cl− channels/transporters are regulated. PMID:26779025

  16. The neuromuscular activity of Micrurus pyrrhocryptus venom and its neutralization by commercial and specific coral snake antivenoms

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Thiago Magalhães; de Roodt, Adolfo Rafael; da Cruz-Höfling, Maria Alice; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa

    2011-01-01

    The neuromuscular activity ofMicrurus pyrrochryptus venom was studied in chick biventer cervicis (BC) and mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparations. The venom (0.5-50μg/ml) caused irreversible, time- and concentration-dependent blockade, with BC being more sensitive than PND (50% blockade with 10μg/ml in 22±;3min and 62±4min, respectively; mean±SEM, n=6; p<0.05). In BC preparations, venom (0.5μg/ml) progressively abolished ACh-induced contractures, whereas contractures to exogenous KCl and muscle twitches in curarized preparations were unaffected. The venom neither altered creatine kinase release (venom: 25.8±1.75IU/l vs control: 24.3±2.2IU/l, n=6, after 120min), nor it caused significant muscle damage (50μg of venom/ml vs control: 3.5±0.8% vs 1.1±0.7% for PND; 4.3±1.5% vs 1.2±0.5% for BC, n=5). The venom had low PLA2 activity. Neurotoxicity was effectively neutralized by commercial Micrurus antivenom and specific antivenom. These findings indicate that M. pyrrhocryptus venom acts postsynaptically on nicotinic receptors, with no significant myotoxicity. PMID:21858249

  17. Decanting of Neutralized H-Canyon Unirradiated Nuclear Material High Activity Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect

    BRONIKOWSKI, MICHAELG.

    2004-08-05

    An option to dispose of the High Activity Waste (HAW) stream from the processing of unirradiated materials directly to Saltstone is being evaluated to conserve High Level Waste (HLW) tank farm space and to reduce the future production of HLW glass logs. To meet the Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), decanting the supernate from precipitated solids was proposed to reduce mercury and radionuclide levels in the waste. Only the caustic supernate will then be sent to Saltstone. Verification that the Saltstone WAC will be met has involved a series of laboratory studies using surrogate and actual HAW solutions from H-Canyon. The initial experiment involved addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to a surrogate HAW test solution and subsequent decanting of the supernate away from the precipitated solids. The chemical composition of the surrogate solution was based on a composition defined from analyses of actual HAW solutions generated during dissolution of unirradiated nuclear materials in H-Canyon [1]. Results from testing the surrogate HAW solution were reported in Reference [2]. Information obtained from the surrogate test solution study was used to define additional experiments on actual HAW solutions obtained from H-Canyon. These experiments were conducted with samples from three different batches of HAW solutions. The first and third HAW samples (HAW No.1 and HAW No.3 solutions) contained the centrifuge filter cake material from a gelatin strike that is periodically added to the waste stream. The second HAW sample (HAW No.2 solution) did not contain filter cake material. Monosodium titanate (MST) was added to the HAW No.2 and HAW No.3 solutions after addition of NaOH was complete and before the settling step. The addition of MST was to improve the decontamination of alpha and beta emitters (primarily plutonium and strontium) from the supernate. The addition of excess NaOH and the addition of MST were expected to result in sufficient alpha and beta

  18. Ebola virus-like particles produced in insect cells exhibit dendritic cell stimulating activity and induce neutralizing antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling; Lin Jianguo; Sun Yuliang; Bennouna, Soumaya; Lo, Michael; Wu Qingyang; Bu Zhigao; Pulendran, Bali; Compans, Richard W. . E-mail: compans@microbio.emory.edu; Yang Chinglai . E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-01

    Recombinant baculoviruses (rBV) expressing Ebola virus VP40 (rBV-VP40) or GP (rBV-GP) proteins were generated. Infection of Sf9 insect cells by rBV-VP40 led to assembly and budding of filamentous particles from the cell surface as shown by electron microscopy. Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs) were produced by coinfection of Sf9 cells with rBV-VP40 and rBV-GP, and incorporation of Ebola GP into VLPs was demonstrated by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Recombinant baculovirus infection of insect cells yielded high levels of VLPs, which were shown to stimulate cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells similar to VLPs produced in mammalian cells. The immunogenicity of Ebola VLPs produced in insect cells was evaluated by immunization of mice. Analysis of antibody responses showed that most of the GP-specific antibodies were of the IgG2a subtype, while no significant level of IgG1 subtype antibodies specific for GP was induced, indicating the induction of a Th1-biased immune response. Furthermore, sera from Ebola VLP immunized mice were able to block infection by Ebola GP pseudotyped HIV virus in a single round infection assay, indicating that a neutralizing antibody against the Ebola GP protein was induced. These results show that production of Ebola VLPs in insect cells using recombinant baculoviruses represents a promising approach for vaccine development against Ebola virus infection.

  19. Expression patterns, activities and carbohydrate-metabolizing regulation of sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase and neutral invertase in pineapple fruit during development and ripening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Wang, Wei; Du, Li-Qing; Xie, Jiang-Hui; Yao, Yan-Li; Sun, Guang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Differences in carbohydrate contents and metabolizing-enzyme activities were monitored in apical, medial, basal and core sections of pineapple (Ananas comosus cv. Comte de paris) during fruit development and ripening. Fructose and glucose of various sections in nearly equal amounts were the predominant sugars in the fruitlets, and had obvious differences until the fruit matured. The large rise of sucrose/hexose was accompanied by dramatic changes in sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and sucrose synthase (SuSy) activities. By contrast, neutral invertase (NI) activity may provide a mechanism to increase fruit sink strength by increasing hexose concentrations. Furthermore, two cDNAs of Ac-sps (accession no. GQ996582) and Ac-ni (accession no. GQ996581) were first isolated from pineapple fruits utilizing conserved amino-acid sequences. Homology alignment reveals that the amino acid sequences contain some conserved function domains. Transcription expression analysis of Ac-sps, Ac-susy and Ac-ni also indicated distinct patterns related to sugar accumulation and composition of pineapple fruits. It suggests that differential expressions of multiple gene families are necessary for sugar metabolism in various parts and developmental stages of pineapple fruit. A cycle of sucrose breakdown in the cytosol of sink tissues could be mediated through both Ac-SuSy and Ac-NI, and Ac-NI could be involved in regulating crucial steps by generating sugar signals to the cells in a temporally and spatially restricted fashion.

  20. Neutral Sphingomyelinase 2 Deficiency Increases Hyaluronan Synthesis by Up-regulation of Hyaluronan Synthase 2 through Decreased Ceramide Production and Activation of Akt*

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jingdong; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Poirer, Christophe; Schwartz, Nancy B.; Dawson, Glyn

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblasts from the fro/fro mouse, with a deletion in the Smpd3 gene coding for the active site of neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (NSMase2), secreted increased amounts of hyaluronan (HA). This was reversed by transfection with the Smpd3 gene, suggesting a connection between sphingolipid and glycosaminoglycan metabolism. The deficiency of NSMase2 resulted in storage of sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol with a 50% reduction in ceramides (Cer). RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showed that increased HA secretion resulted from increased hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) activity localized to sphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts. Although cholesterol levels were also elevated in lipid rafts from mouse fibroblasts deficient in lysosomal acid SMase activity (deletion of the Smpd1−/− gene), there was no increase in HA secretion. We then showed that in fro/fro fibroblasts, the reduced ceramide was associated with decreased phosphorylation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and increased phosphorylation of its substrate Akt-p, together with PI3K, PDK1, mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), and p70S6K, although PTEN was unaffected. Exogenous ceramide, as well as inhibitors of Akt (Akt inhibitor VIII), PI 3-kinase (LY294002 and wortmannin), and mTOR (rapamycin) reduced secretion of HA, whereas the NSMase2 inhibitor GW4869 increased HA synthesis and secretion. We propose that NSMase2/Cer are the key mediators of the regulation of HA synthesis, via microdomains and the Akt/mTOR pathway. PMID:22383528

  1. Expression Patterns, Activities and Carbohydrate-Metabolizing Regulation of Sucrose Phosphate Synthase, Sucrose Synthase and Neutral Invertase in Pineapple Fruit during Development and Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiu-Mei; Wang, Wei; Du, Li-Qing; Xie, Jiang-Hui; Yao, Yan-Li; Sun, Guang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Differences in carbohydrate contents and metabolizing-enzyme activities were monitored in apical, medial, basal and core sections of pineapple (Ananas comosus cv. Comte de paris) during fruit development and ripening. Fructose and glucose of various sections in nearly equal amounts were the predominant sugars in the fruitlets, and had obvious differences until the fruit matured. The large rise of sucrose/hexose was accompanied by dramatic changes in sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) and sucrose synthase (SuSy) activities. By contrast, neutral invertase (NI) activity may provide a mechanism to increase fruit sink strength by increasing hexose concentrations. Furthermore, two cDNAs of Ac-sps (accession no. GQ996582) and Ac-ni (accession no. GQ996581) were first isolated from pineapple fruits utilizing conserved amino-acid sequences. Homology alignment reveals that the amino acid sequences contain some conserved function domains. Transcription expression analysis of Ac-sps, Ac-susy and Ac-ni also indicated distinct patterns related to sugar accumulation and composition of pineapple fruits. It suggests that differential expressions of multiple gene families are necessary for sugar metabolism in various parts and developmental stages of pineapple fruit. A cycle of sucrose breakdown in the cytosol of sink tissues could be mediated through both Ac-SuSy and Ac-NI, and Ac-NI could be involved in regulating crucial steps by generating sugar signals to the cells in a temporally and spatially restricted fashion. PMID:22949808

  2. Changes in EEG activity before and after exhaustive exercise in sedentary women in neutral and hot environments.

    PubMed

    Ftaiti, Foued; Kacem, Asma; Jaidane, Nadia; Tabka, Zouhair; Dogui, Mohamed

    2010-10-01

    This study examined the effect of hyperthermia on brain electrical activity measured with encephalography during prolonged exhaustive exercise in a group of sedentary women (VO(2)max = 35 +/- 4 mL kg min(-1)). Two strenuous cycling exercises were performed either in neutral (N-Ex) or in heat (H-Ex) conditions. Tympanic temperature (Tty), heart rate (HR), body mass loss (BML), plasma volume decrease, and brain electrical activity [EEG: alpha (8-13 Hz) and beta(13-30 Hz)-band and alpha/beta index of fatigue: the ratio between EEG activity in the alpha band and beta-band] were recorded throughout the cycling sessions. The Tty increase 1.0 degrees C in the N-Ex and 1.8 degrees C in H-Ex. HR increased in both sessions but with significantly higher values during the H-Ex session when compared with the N-Ex session (p < 0.001) (from 85 +/- 4 beats min(-1) to 164 +/- 6 beats min(-1) and from 83 +/- 6 beats min(-1) to 181 +/- 8 beats min(-1), respectively in N-Ex and in H-Ex). This was associated with a significantly higher BML (p < 0.05) and a higher plasma volume decrease in the H-Ex session (p < 0.01). The alpha/beta index increased significantly during both trials particularly during the H-Ex session (p < 0.05). This was associated with a significant decrease of time to exhaustion (-34%). We suggest that exhausting work in the heat induced a change in gross brain activity (alpha/beta ratio) compared to a longer, less thermally demanding exposure. Fatigue in the heat could be attributed to central factors as well as thermal, cardiac and hydro-electrolytic impairment.

  3. Cell selectivity, mechanism of action and LPS-neutralizing activity of bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide-18 (BMAP-18) and its analogs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Kyu; Kim, Yoon-Chang; Nan, Yong Hai; Shin, Song Yub

    2011-06-01

    To develop novel antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with improved cell selectivity and potent LPS-neutralizing activity, we synthesized an 18 N-terminal residues peptide (BAMP-18) of bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide-27 (BMAP-27) and its analogs (BMAP-18-W, BMAP-18-L, BMAP-18-I and BMAP-18-f). BMAP-18 and its analogs displayed much higher cell selectivity (about 4-97-fold increased) as compared to parental BMAP-27 because of their decreased hemolytic activity and retained antimicrobial activity. BMAP-27 caused near-complete dye leakage from bacterial-membrane-mimicking vesicles even at very low concentration of 0.5μM, whereas BMAP-18 and its analogs induced very little dye leakage (less than 40%) even at 16μM. These peptides induced near-complete membrane depolarization of Staphylococcus aureus cells under their MIC (4μM). These results suggests that BMAP-18 and its analogs exhibit lethality toward microbes due to their ability to form small channels that permit the transit of ions or protons, but not molecules as large as calcein, and not by the membrane-disruption/perturbation mode. BMAP-18 and its analogs significantly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) release in LPS-stimulated mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells at 10μM. In particular, BMAP-18-W showed LPS-neutralizing activity comparable to that of BMAP-27. There was a significant linear correlation between the increase in the hydrophobicity of peptides and LPS-neutralizing activity. Although BMAP-18-W has lower hydrophobicity than BMAP-18-L, it showed higher LPS-neutralizing activity as compared to BMAP-18-L. This result suggests other important parameters of AMPs may be involved in their LPS-neutralizing activity, as well as positive charge and hydrophobicity.

  4. Neutral “Cp-Free” Silyl-Lanthanide(II) Complexes: Synthesis, Structure, and Bonding Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Complexes featuring lanthanide silicon bonds represent a research area still in its infancy. Herein, we report a series of Cp-free lanthanide (+II) complexes bearing σ-bonded silyl ligands. By reactions of LnI2 (Ln = Yb, Eu, Sm) either with a 1,4-oligosilanyl dianion [K-Si(SiMe3)2SiMe2SiMe2Si(SiMe3)2-K)] (1) or with 2 (Me3Si)3SiK (3) the corresponding neutral metallacyclopentasilanes ({Me2Si(Me3Si)2Si}2)Ln·(THF)4 (Ln = Yb (2a), Eu (2b), Sm (2c)), or the disilylated complexes ({Me3Si}3Si)2Ln·(THF)3 (Ln = Yb (4a), Eu (4b), Sm (4c)), were selectively obtained. Complexes 2b, 2c, 4b, and 4c represent the first examples of structurally characterized Cp-free Eu and Sm complexes with silyl ligands. In both series, a linear correlation was observed between the Ln–Si bond lengths and the covalent radii of the corresponding lanthanide metals. Density functional theory calculations were also carried out for complexes 2a–c and 4a–c to elucidate the bonding situation between the Ln(+II) centers and Si. PMID:26132550

  5. Hyperimmune bovine colostrum as a low-cost, large-scale source of antibodies with broad neutralizing activity for HIV-1 envelope with potential use in microbicides.

    PubMed

    Kramski, Marit; Center, Rob J; Wheatley, Adam K; Jacobson, Jonathan C; Alexander, Marina R; Rawlin, Grant; Purcell, Damian F J

    2012-08-01

    Bovine colostrum (first milk) contains very high concentrations of IgG, and on average 1 kg (500 g/liter) of IgG can be harvested from each immunized cow immediately after calving. We used a modified vaccination strategy together with established production systems from the dairy food industry for the large-scale manufacture of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 IgG. This approach provides a low-cost mucosal HIV preventive agent potentially suitable for a topical microbicide. Four cows were vaccinated pre- and/or postconception with recombinant HIV-1 gp140 envelope (Env) oligomers of clade B or A, B, and C. Colostrum and purified colostrum IgG were assessed for cross-clade binding and neutralization against a panel of 27 Env-pseudotyped reporter viruses. Vaccination elicited high anti-gp140 IgG titers in serum and colostrum with reciprocal endpoint titers of up to 1 × 10(5). While nonimmune colostrum showed some intrinsic neutralizing activity, colostrum from 2 cows receiving a longer-duration vaccination regimen demonstrated broad HIV-1-neutralizing activity. Colostrum-purified polyclonal IgG retained gp140 reactivity and neutralization activity and blocked the binding of the b12 monoclonal antibody to gp140, showing specificity for the CD4 binding site. Colostrum-derived anti-HIV antibodies offer a cost-effective option for preparing the substantial quantities of broadly neutralizing antibodies that would be needed in a low-cost topical combination HIV-1 microbicide.

  6. Structure, Aggregation, and Activity of a Covalent Insulin Dimer Formed During Storage of Neutral Formulation of Human Insulin.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Christian Fogt; Norrman, Mathias; Wahlund, Per-Olof; Benie, Andrew J; Petersen, Bent O; Jessen, Christian M; Pedersen, Thomas Å; Vestergaard, Kirsten; Steensgaard, Dorte B; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Naver, Helle; Hubálek, František; Poulsen, Christian; Otzen, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    A specific covalently linked dimeric species of insulin high molecular weight products (HMWPs), formed during prolonged incubation of a neutral pharmaceutical formulation of human insulin, were characterized in terms of tertiary structure, self-association, biological activity, and fibrillation properties. The dimer was formed by a covalent link between A21Asn and B29Lys. It was analyzed using static and dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering to evaluate its self-association behavior. The tertiary structure was obtained using nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray crystallography. The biological activity of HMWP was determined using 2 in vitro assays, and its influence on fibrillation was investigated using Thioflavin T assays. The dimer's tertiary structure was nearly identical to that of the noncovalent insulin dimer, and it was able to form hexamers in the presence of zinc. The dimer exhibited reduced propensity for self-association in the absence of zinc but significantly postponed the onset of fibrillation in insulin formulations. Consistent with its dimeric state, the tested species of HMWP showed little to no biological activity in the used assays. This study is the first detailed characterization of a specific type of human insulin HMWP formed during storage of a marketed pharmaceutical formulation. These results indicate that this specific type of HMWP is unlikely to antagonize the physical stability of the formulation, as HMWP retained a tertiary structure similar to the noncovalent dimer and participated in hexamer assembly in the presence of zinc. In addition, increasing amounts of HMWP reduce the rate of insulin fibrillation.

  7. Neutralization Analysis of a Chicken Single-Chain Variable Fragment Derived from an Immune Antibody Library Against Infectious Bronchitis Virus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Li, Benqiang; Ye, Jiaxin; Wang, Man; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Jianguo

    2015-09-01

    Avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), which is prevalent in many countries causing severe economic loss to the poultry industry, causes infectious bronchitis (IB) in birds. Recombinant single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) have been proven to effectively inhibit many viruses, both in vitro and in vivo, and they could be a potential diagnostic and therapeutic reagent to control IB. In this study, six anti-IBV chicken scFvs, ZL.10, ZL.64, ZL.78, ZL.80, ZL.138, and ZL.256, were obtained by screening random clones from an immune antibody library. An analysis of nucleotide sequences revealed that they represented distinctive genetic sequences and greatly varied in complementarity-determining region three of the heavy chain. Neutralization tests showed that ZL.10, which bound the S1 protein in western blots, inhibited the formation of syncytia in Vero cells 48 h post IBV infection and decreased the transcriptional level of nucleoprotein mRNA to 17.2%, while the other five scFvs, including ZL.78 and ZL.256, that bound the N protein did not. In conclusion, the results suggested that specific and neutralizing chicken scFvs against IBV, which can be safe and economical antibody reagents, can be produced in vitro through prokaryotic expression.

  8. A highly active and stable palladium catalyst on a g-C3N4 support for direct formic acid synthesis under neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, Hunmin; Lee, Ju Hyung; Kim, Eun Hyup; Kim, Kwang Young; Choi, Yo Han; Youn, Duck Hyun; Lee, Jae Sung

    2016-12-06

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) is applied as a support of the Pd catalyst for direct HCOOH synthesis by CO2 hydrogenation under neutral conditions. The high CO2 affinity of g-C3N4 is responsible for the enhanced catalytic activity and stability relative to the inert support such as a carbon nanotube.

  9. Oxalates as Activating Groups for Alcohols in Visible Light Photoredox Catalysis: Formation of Quaternary Centers by Redox-Neutral Fragment Coupling

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, David W. C.; Overman, Larry E.

    2015-01-01

    Alkyl oxalates are new bench-stable alcohol-activating groups for radical generation under visible light photoredox conditions. Using these precursors, the first net redox-neutral coupling of tertiary and secondary alcohols with electron-deficient alkenes is achieved. PMID:26322524

  10. Neutralization of dermonecrotic and lethal activities and differences among 32-35 kDa toxins of medically important Loxosceles spider venoms in Brazil revealed by monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, P; Fernandes, I; Barbaro, K C

    2001-09-01

    Neutralization of dermonecrotic and lethal activities and differences among the principal toxic proteins (32-35 kDa) of medically important Loxosceles spider venoms in Brazil (Loxosceles gaucho, Loxosceles laeta and Loxosceles intermedia) were studied using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) produced against the dermonecrotic component (35 kDa) of L. gaucho venom. MAb titers were 512,000 to homologous venom, between 2000 and 64,000 for L. intermedia venom and between 1000 and 64,000 for L. laeta venom. By Western blotting, MAbs could recognize mainly the 35 kDa protein of L. gaucho venom and with less intensity the 35 kDa protein of L. intermedia venom. These MAbs also recognized weakly or did not recognize the 32 kDa component of L. laeta venom. Only MoALg1 showed high affinity for L. gaucho venom and neutralized in vivo 90-97% of the dermonecrotic activity, besides delaying the lethality induced by homologous venom. MoALg1 maintained its capacity to neutralize the dermonecrotic activity, even when administered (i.v.) 6h after envenoming (i.d.). All MAbs obtained failed to neutralize the toxic activities of the heterologous venoms.These results suggest that different epitopes are present in the protein responsible for the dermonecrotic activity of Loxosceles venoms, and confirm the participation of other venom components during the local reaction process. This study also confirms the importance of antibodies for neutralization of dermonecrotic activity, even when administered some hours after envenoming, and emphasizes the differences of composition and toxicity of medically important Loxosceles venoms. These findings must be considered in order to improve loxoscelism immunotherapy.

  11. Development of IgY antibodies against anti-snake toxins endowed with highly lethal neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    da Rocha, David Gitirana; Fernandez, Jorge Hernandez; de Almeida, Cláudia Maria Costa; da Silva, Cláudia Letícia; Magnoli, Fábio Carlos; da Silva, Osmair Élder; da Silva, Wilmar Dias

    2017-08-30

    Snakebite envenoming is a major neglected disease related to poverty in developing countries. Treatment involves the administration of a specific antivenom serum and auxiliary therapies, if necessary. The improvement of antibodies is of great importance for the technological advancement of antivenom therapy and to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with this medical burden. In the present study, adult hens were immunized nine times with 20μg of B. arietans or C. d. terrificus venoms at three-week intervals between immunizations. Developing antibodies presented increasing avidity and affinity to antigenic toxin epitopes along immunization, attaining a plateau after the seventh immunization. Pooled egg yolk-purified IgY antivenom antibodies, subjected to in vitro-in vivo lethality assay using Swiss adult mice, exhibited potent venom lethal neutralizing activity. Taken together, chickens under the described immunization schedule were considered alternative candidates for antivenom production. Lower maintenance costs, a simple antibody manufacturing process and immunization suffering restrictions are additional advantages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Transintestinal Cholesterol Transport Is Active in Mice and Humans and Controls Ezetimibe-Induced Fecal Neutral Sterol Excretion.

    PubMed

    Jakulj, Lily; van Dijk, Theo H; de Boer, Jan Freark; Kootte, Ruud S; Schonewille, Marleen; Paalvast, Yared; Boer, Theo; Bloks, Vincent W; Boverhof, Renze; Nieuwdorp, Max; Beuers, Ulrich H W; Stroes, Erik S G; Groen, Albert K

    2016-12-13

    Except for conversion to bile salts, there is no major cholesterol degradation pathway in mammals. Efficient excretion from the body is therefore a crucial element in cholesterol homeostasis. Yet, the existence and importance of cholesterol degradation pathways in humans is a matter of debate. We quantified cholesterol fluxes in 15 male volunteers using a cholesterol balance approach. Ten participants repeated the protocol after 4 weeks of treatment with ezetimibe, an inhibitor of intestinal and biliary cholesterol absorption. Under basal conditions, about 65% of daily fecal neutral sterol excretion was bile derived, with the remainder being contributed by direct transintestinal cholesterol excretion (TICE). Surprisingly, ezetimibe induced a 4-fold increase in cholesterol elimination via TICE. Mouse studies revealed that most of ezetimibe-induced TICE flux is mediated by the cholesterol transporter Abcg5/Abcg8. In conclusion, TICE is active in humans and may serve as a novel target to stimulate cholesterol elimination in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. First administration to humans of a monoclonal antibody cocktail against rabies virus: safety, tolerability, and neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Bakker, A B H; Python, C; Kissling, C J; Pandya, P; Marissen, W E; Brink, M F; Lagerwerf, F; Worst, S; van Corven, E; Kostense, S; Hartmann, K; Weverling, G J; Uytdehaag, F; Herzog, C; Briggs, D J; Rupprecht, C E; Grimaldi, R; Goudsmit, J

    2008-11-05

    Immediate passive immune prophylaxis as part of rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) often cannot be provided due to limited availability of human or equine rabies immunoglobulin (HRIG and ERIG, respectively). We report first clinical data from two phase I studies evaluating a monoclonal antibody cocktail CL184 against rabies. The studies included healthy adult subjects in the USA and India and involved two parts. First, subjects received a single intramuscular dose of CL184 or placebo in a double blind, randomized, dose-escalation trial. Second, open-label CL184 (20IU/kg) was co-administered with rabies vaccine. Safety was the primary objective and rabies virus neutralizing activity (RVNA) was investigated as efficacy parameter. Pain at the CL184 injection site was reported by less than 40% of subjects; no fever or local induration, redness or swelling was observed. RVNA was detectable from day 1 to day 21 after a single dose of CL184 20 or 40IU/kg. All subjects had adequate (>0.5IU/mL) RVNA levels from day 14 onwards when combined with rabies vaccine. CL184 appears promising as an alternative to RIG in PEP.

  14. Learning the Relationship between the Primary Structure of HIV Envelope Glycoproteins and Neutralization Activity of Particular Antibodies by Using Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Buiu, Cătălin; Putz, Mihai V.; Avram, Speranta

    2016-01-01

    The dependency between the primary structure of HIV envelope glycoproteins (ENV) and the neutralization data for given antibodies is very complicated and depends on a large number of factors, such as the binding affinity of a given antibody for a given ENV protein, and the intrinsic infection kinetics of the viral strain. This paper presents a first approach to learning these dependencies using an artificial feedforward neural network which is trained to learn from experimental data. The results presented here demonstrate that the trained neural network is able to generalize on new viral strains and to predict reliable values of neutralizing activities of given antibodies against HIV-1. PMID:27727189

  15. Nonneutralizing Antibodies Induced by the HIV-1 gp41 NHR Domain Gain Neutralizing Activity in the Presence of the HIV Fusion Inhibitor Enfuvirtide: a Potential Therapeutic Vaccine Strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Bi, Wenwen; Zhu, Xiaojie; Li, Haoyang; Qi, Qianqian; Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-07-01

    A key barrier against developing preventive and therapeutic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccines is the inability of viral envelope glycoproteins to elicit broad and potent neutralizing antibodies. However, in the presence of fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide, we show that the nonneutralizing antibodies induced by the HIV type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain (N63) exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity against laboratory-adapted HIV-1 strains, including the drug-resistant variants, and primary HIV-1 isolates with different subtypes, suggesting the potential of developing gp41-targeted HIV therapeutic vaccines.

  16. Structural characterization of neutral oligosaccharides with blood-group A and H activity isolated from bovine submaxillary mucin.

    PubMed Central

    Savage, A V; D'Arcy, S M; Donoghue, C M

    1991-01-01

    In this study we investigated the structures of 11 neutral oligosaccharides released from bovine submaxillary mucin by alkaline borohydride treatment and isolated by h.p.l.c. One hexa-, one penta-, three tetra-, four tri- and two di-saccharides containing core types 1, 2, 3 or 4 were obtained. We report their structures, determined by a combination of one- and two-dimensional 1H n.m.r. spectroscopy at 270 MHz and methylation analysis involving g.l.c.-m.s., along with their approximate molar ratios. Only three of these oligosaccharides have previously been reported in this source. Of the new oligosaccharides, one contains the blood-group-A antigenic determinant, two contain the blood-group-H type 2 determinant, while another contains the blood-group-H type 3 determinant. The oligosaccharide GlcNAc beta (1----6)[GlcNAc beta (1----3)]GalNAcol, although previously found as a core structure, has been isolated here as a novel trisaccharide. PMID:1718265

  17. Analysis and application of a neutralizing linear epitope on liable toxin B of enterotoxin Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Guan, Weikun; Liu, Wenxin; Bao, Jun; Li, Jinping; Yuan, Chaowen; Tang, Jie; Shi, Dongfang

    2015-07-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is one of the major virulence factors for causing diarrhea in piglets, and LT is a strong immunogen. Thus, LT represents an important target for development of vaccines and diagnostic tests. In this study, bioinformatic tools were used to predict six antigenic B cell epitopes in the B subunit of LT protein (LTB) of ETEC strains. Then, seven antigenic B cell epitopes of LTB were identified by polyclonal antisera (polyclonal antibody (PAb)) using a set of LTB-derived peptides expressed as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion protein. In addition, one LTB-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) was generated and defined its corresponding epitope as mentioned above. This MAb was able to specifically bind with native LT toxin and has no cross-reaction with LT-II (type II heat-labile enterotoxin), Stx1 (Shiga toxin I), Stx2 (Shiga toxin II), STa (heat-stable enterotoxin I), and STb (heat-stable enterotoxin II) toxins. Further, this MAb was able to interrupt LT toxin specific binding to GM1 receptor, indicating that the corresponding epitope is the specific binding region to GM1 receptor. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo assay showed that the MAb was able to neutralize the native LT toxin. Diarrheal suckling pigs challenged with LT-positive ETEC strain recovered when an enema with this purified MAb was administered. This study will provide the foundation for further studies about the interaction between LT toxin and GM1 receptor and about the developing of epitope-based vaccines and specific therapeutic agent.

  18. The early melting of closed duplex DNA: analysis by banding in buoyant neutral rubidium trichloroacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, R L; Bauer, W R

    1980-01-01

    Aqueous RbTCA permits the buoyant banding of both native and denatured DNA at room temperature and neutral pH. A unique property of this solvent is the bouyant resolution of closed circular, underwound DNA (I) from the corresponding nicked (II) species. Conditions are reported here in which PM-2 DNA I is physically resolved from native PM-2 DNA II, the buoyant separation being 1.27 mq/ml in 3.3 M RbTCA at 25 degrees C. The separation between nicked and closed DNAs increases with temperature up to 35.5 degrees C, at which PM-2 DNA II cooperatively melts and subsequently pellets. The isothermal buoyant density of a cloed DNA increases linearly as the linking number (Lk) of the closed DNA decreases. The early melting of closed DNA may be monitored with high precision by buoyant banding in RbTCA, it being possible to detect the disruption of as few as 40 base pairs in PM-2 DNA (10,000 base pairs). The constraint that the linking number be conserved in closed DNA requires that a change in duplex winding be accompanied by a compensating change in supercoiling. We estimate the linking number deficiency of PM-2 DNA I to be 0.094 turns per decibase pair. This result permits the estimation of the EtdBr unwinding angle, phi, by comparison with alternative determinations of the linking number deficiency which depend upom the value of phi. The result obtained here is that phi = 27.7 degrees +/- 0.5 degrees and is approximately independent of temperature over the range 15 degrees-35 degrees. PMID:7443544

  19. NLTE Analysis of High-Resolution H-band Spectra. I. Neutral Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junbo; Shi, Jianrong; Pan, Kaike; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Liu, Chao

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the reliability of our silicon atomic model and the influence of non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) on the formation of neutral silicon (Si i) lines in the near-infrared (near-IR) H-band. We derived the differential Si abundances for 13 sample stars with high-resolution H-band spectra from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), as well as from optical spectra, both under local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE) and NLTE conditions. We found that the differences between the Si abundances derived from the H-band and from optical lines for the same stars are less than 0.1 dex when the NLTE effects are included, and that NLTE reduces the line-to-line scatter in the H-band spectra for most sample stars. These results suggest that our Si atomic model is appropriate for studying the formation of H-band Si lines. Our calculations show that the NLTE corrections of the Si i H-band lines are negative, i.e., the final Si abundances will be overestimated in LTE. The corrections for strong lines depend on surface gravity, and tend to be larger for giants, reaching ˜-0.2 dex in our sample, and up to ˜-0.4 dex in extreme cases of APOGEE targets. Thus, the NLTE effects should be included in deriving silicon abundances from H-band Si i lines, especially for the cases where only strong lines are available. Based on observations collected with the 2.16 m telescope at Xinglong station, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, the 2.2 m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory, the 1.88 m reflector at the Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, the Kitt Peak coudé feed telescope, and the McMath-Pierce solar telescope and the coudé focus of the Mayall 4 m reflector at Kitt Peak.

  20. Proteomic analysis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in neutral and alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Gonzales-Siles, Lucia; Karlsson, Roger; Kenny, Diarmuid; Karlsson, Anders; Sjöling, Åsa

    2017-01-07

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a major cause of diarrhea in children and travelers to endemic areas. Secretion of the heat labile AB5 toxin (LT) is induced by alkaline conditions. In this study, we determined the surface proteome of ETEC exposed to alkaline conditions (pH 9) as compared to neutral conditions (pH 7) using a LPI Hexalane FlowCell combined with quantitative proteomics. Relative quantitation with isobaric labeling (TMT) was used to compare peptide abundance and their corresponding proteins in multiple samples at MS/MS level. For protein identification and quantification samples were analyzed using either a 1D-LCMS or a 2D-LCMS approach. Strong up-regulation of the ATP synthase operon encoding F1Fo ATP synthase and down-regulation of proton pumping proteins NuoF, NuoG, Ndh and WrbA were detected among proteins involved in regulating the proton and electron transport under alkaline conditions. Reduced expression of proteins involved in osmotic stress was found at alkaline conditions while the Sec-dependent transport over the inner membrane and outer membrane protein proteins such as OmpA and the β-Barrel Assembly Machinery (BAM) complex were up-regulated. ETEC exposed to alkaline environments express a specific proteome profile characterized by up-regulation of membrane proteins and secretion of LT toxin. Alkaline microenvironments have been reported close to the intestinal epithelium and the alkaline proteome may hence represent a better view of ETEC during infection.

  1. Neutralizing Antibodies Protect against Lethal Flavivirus Challenge but Allow for the Development of Active Humoral Immunity to a Nonstructural Virus Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kreil, Thomas R.; Maier, Elisabeth; Fraiss, Sabine; Eibl, Martha M.

    1998-01-01

    Antibody-mediated neutralization of viruses has been extensively studied in vitro, but the precise mechanisms that account for antibody-mediated protection against viral infection in vivo still remain largely uncharacterized. The two points under discussion are antibodies conferring sterilizing immunity by neutralizing the virus inoculum or protection against the development of disease without complete inhibition of virus replication. For tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), a flavivirus, transfer of neutralizing antibodies specific for envelope glycoprotein E protected mice from subsequent TBEV challenge. Nevertheless, short-term, low-level virus replication was detected in these mice. Furthermore, mice that were exposed to replicating but not to inactivated virus while passively protected developed active immunity to TBEV rechallenge. Despite the priming of TBEV-specific cytotoxic T cells, adoptive transfer of serum but not of T cells conferred immunity upon naive recipient mice. These transferred sera were not neutralizing and were predominantly specific for NS1, a nonstructural TBEV protein which is expressed in and on infected cells and which is also secreted from these cells. Results of these experiments showed that despite passive protection by neutralizing antibodies, limited virus replication occurs, indicating protection from disease rather than sterilizing immunity. The protective immunity induced by replicating virus is surprisingly not T-cell mediated but is due to antibodies against a nonstructural virus protein absent from the virion. PMID:9525632

  2. Neutralization of lethal and myotoxic activities of South American rattlesnake venom by extracts and constituents of the plant Eclipta prostrata (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Mors, W B; do Nascimento, M C; Parente, J P; da Silva, M H; Melo, P A; Suarez-Kurtz, G

    1989-01-01

    Ethanolic extracts of the aerial parts of Eclipta prostrata L. (Asteraceae) neutralized the lethal activity of the venom of South American rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus) when mixed in vitro before i.p. injection into adult Swiss mice. Samples of ethanolic extract corresponding to 1.8 mg of dry extract per animal neutralized up to four lethal doses of the venom (LD50 = 0.08 micrograms venom/g animal). Three substances isolated from the plant--wedelolactone (0.54 mg/animal), sitosterol (2.3 mg/animal) and stigmasterol (2.3 mg/animal)--were able to neutralize three lethal doses of the venom. Aqueous extracts of the plant inhibited the release of creatine kinase from isolated rat muscle exposed to the crude venom. The protection conferred against the myotoxic effects of the venom could be demonstrated also in vivo, when the venom was preincubated with the extract prior to injection into mice.

  3. Factor Associated with Neutral Sphingomyelinase Activity Mediates Navigational Capacity of Leukocytes Responding to Wounds and Infection: Live Imaging Studies in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Boecke, Alexandra; Sieger, Dirk; Neacsu, Cristian Dan; Kashkar, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Factor associated with neutral sphingomyelinase activity (FAN) is an adaptor protein that specifically binds to the p55 receptor for TNF (TNF-RI). Our previous investigations demonstrated that FAN plays a role in TNF-induced actin reorganization by connecting the plasma membrane with actin cytoskeleton, suggesting that FAN may impact on cellular motility in response to TNF and in the context of immune inflammatory conditions. In this study, we used the translucent zebrafish larvae for in vivo analysis of leukocyte migration after morpholino knockdown of FAN. FAN-deficient zebrafish leukocytes were impaired in their migration toward tail fin wounds, leading to a reduced number of cells reaching the wound. Furthermore, FAN-deficient leukocytes show an impaired response to bacterial infections, suggesting that FAN is generally required for the directed chemotactic response of immune cells independent of the nature of the stimulus. Cell-tracking analysis up to 3 h after injury revealed that the reduced number of leukocytes is not due to a reduction in random motility or speed of movement. Leukocytes from FAN-deficient embryos protrude pseudopodia in all directions instead of having one clear leading edge. Our results suggest that FAN-deficient leukocytes exhibit an impaired navigational capacity, leading to a disrupted chemotactic response. PMID:22802420

  4. Monoclonal Antibody Combinations that Present Synergistic Neutralizing Activity: A Platform for Next-Generation Anti-Toxin Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Eran; Torgeman, Amram; Ozeri, Eyal; Zichel, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are among the fastest-growing therapeutics and are being developed for a broad range of indications, including the neutralization of toxins, bacteria and viruses. Nevertheless, MAbs potency is still relatively low when compared to conventional polyclonal Ab preparations. Moreover, the efficacy of an individual neutralizing MAb may significantly be hampered by the potential absence or modification of its target epitope in a mutant or subtype of the infectious agent. These limitations of individual neutralizing MAbs can be overcome by using oligoclonal combinations of several MAbs with different specificities to the target antigen. Studies conducted in our lab and by others show that such combined MAb preparation may present substantial synergy in its potency over the calculated additive potency of its individual MAb components. Moreover, oligoclonal preparation is expected to be better suited to compensating for reduced efficacy due to epitope variation. In this review, the synergistic neutralization properties of combined oligoclonal Ab preparations are described. The effect of Ab affinity, autologous Fc fraction, and targeting a critical number of epitopes, as well as the unexpected contribution of non-neutralizing clones to the synergistic neutralizing effect are presented and discussed. PMID:26035486

  5. A pulmonary influenza virus infection in SCID mice can be cured by treatment with hemagglutinin-specific antibodies that display very low virus-neutralizing activity in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Mozdzanowska, K; Furchner, M; Washko, G; Mozdzanowski, J; Gerhard, W

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that a pulmonary influenza virus infection in SCID mice can be cured by treatment with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the viral transmembrane protein hemagglutinin (HA) but not for matrix 2. Since both types of MAbs react with infected cells but only the former neutralizes the virus, it appeared that passive MAbs cured by neutralization of progeny virus rather than reaction with infected host cells. To prove this, we selected a set of four HA-specific MAbs, all of the immunoglobulin G2a isotype, which reacted well with native HA expressed on infected cells yet differed greatly (>10,000-fold) in virus neutralization (VN) activity in vitro, apparently because of differences in antibody avidity and accessibility of the respective determinants on the HA of mature virions. Since the VN activities of these MAbs in vitro were differentially enhanced by serum components, we determined their prophylactic activities in vivo and used them as measures of their actual VN activities in vivo. The comparison of therapeutic and prophylactic activities indicated that these MAbs cured the infection to a greater extent by VN activity (which was greatly enhanced in vivo) and to a lesser extent by reaction with infected host cells. Neither complement- nor NK cell-dependent mechanisms were involved in the MAb-mediated virus clearance. PMID:9151823

  6. Are there physical links between Saturn's magnetospheric planetary period oscillations, neutral atmosphere circulation, and thunderstorm activity? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provan, G.; Cowley, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    Suggestions that the planetary period oscillations (PPOs) observed in Saturn's magnetosphere may be driven or influenced by neutral atmospheric perturbations, motivates an exploratory comparison of PPO rotation periods with available tropospheric and stratospheric determinations. Non-polar atmospheric rotation periods occupy the range ~10.2-10.7 h associated with the latitudinal jet structure, are similar north and south, and independent of season, while PPO periods lie in a narrower partly overlapping range ~10.6-10.8 h, are persistently shorter north than south, and undergo a seasonal cycle. In this cycle, widely-separated north-south PPO periods during southern summer converge across equinox to values lying within the atmospheric west jet band, remaining well-separated from east jet periods. Closest convergence occurred one year post-equinox, contemporaneously with the switch in seasonal thunderstorm activity from southern to northern hemispheres. Since most large-scale atmospheric phenomena are related to the west jets, rotating with closely similar periods, they also rotate with periods close to the PPOs under post-equinoctial conditions, but not otherwise. Specifically, post-equinox northern PPOs rotate with a period close to the southern thunderstorms, as well as the north polar spot and hexagon features, while the post equinox southern PPOs rotate with a period close to the pre-equinox northern ';string of pearls' and the first co-located post-equinox northern thunderstorm, the Great White Spot event. However, even under these conditions no consistent correspondences in period are found at a detailed level, which taken together with the lack of correspondence at other times, does not suggest a direct physical link exists between these phenomena.

  7. Saturn's magnetospheric planetary period oscillations, neutral atmosphere circulation, and thunderstorm activity: Implications, or otherwise, for physical links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, S. W. H.; Provan, G.

    2013-11-01

    that the planetary period oscillations (PPOs) observed in Saturn's magnetosphere may be driven or influenced by neutral atmospheric perturbations motivate an exploratory comparison of PPO rotation periods with available tropospheric and stratospheric determinations. Nonpolar atmospheric rotation periods occupy the range ~10.2-10.7 h associated with the latitudinal jet structure, are similar north and south, and are independent of season, while PPO periods lie in a narrower partly overlapping range ~10.6-10.8 h, are persistently shorter north than south, and undergo a seasonal cycle. In this cycle, widely separated north-south PPO periods during southern summer converge across equinox to values lying within the atmospheric west jet band, remaining well-separated from east jet periods. Closest convergence occurred 1 year post equinox, contemporaneously with the switch in seasonal thunderstorm activity from Southern to Northern Hemispheres. Since most large-scale atmospheric phenomena are related to the west jets, rotating with closely similar periods, they also rotate with periods close to the PPOs under post equinoctial conditions but not otherwise. Specifically, post equinox northern PPOs rotate with a period close to the southern thunderstorms, as well as the north polar spot and hexagon features, while the post equinox southern PPOs rotate with a period close to the pre-equinox northern "string of pearls" and the first colocated post equinox northern thunderstorm, the Great White Spot event. However, even under these conditions, no consistent correspondences in period are found at a detailed level, which taken together with the lack of correspondence at other times does not suggest a direct physical link exists between these phenomena.

  8. Hyperimmune antisera against synthetic peptides representing the glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 can mediate neutralization and antibody-dependent cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Björling, E; Broliden, K; Bernardi, D; Utter, G; Thorstensson, R; Chiodi, F; Norrby, E

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-five 13- to 35-amino-acid-long peptides representing regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2), strain SBL6669, envelope proteins were evaluated for their immunogenic activity in guinea pigs. The peptides were selected to provide homologous representation of sites in the HIV-1 envelope proteins that were previously documented to have a particular immunogenic importance. A number of the HIV-2 peptides were found to be capable of inducing strain SBL6669 neutralizing and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) antibodies. Two overlapping peptides covering amino acids 311-337 representing the central and C-terminal part of the variable third (V3) region, terminology according to Modrow et al. [Modrow, S., Hahn, B., Shaw, G. M., Gallo, R. C., Wong-Staal, F. & Wolf, H. (1987) J. Virol. 61, 570-578], showed the most pronounced capacity to induce neutralizing antibodies. One of the peptides (amino acids 318-337) also induced antibodies mediating ADCC. Two additional regions in the large glycoprotein, gp125, containing linear sites reacting with neutralizing antibodies were identified (amino acids, 119-137 and 472-509). The transmembrane protein, gp36, of HIV-2 harbored two regions of importance for induction of neutralizing antibodies (amino acids 595-614 and 714-729). ADCC activity was induced by two additional gp125-specific peptides (amino acids 291-311 and 446-461). Thus, except for the single V3-specific site there was no correlation between linear immunogenic sites stimulating neutralizing antibody and ADCC activity. These findings pave the way for development of synthetic vaccines against HIV-2 and possibly also simian immunodeficiency virus infections. The capacity of such a product to induce protective immunity can be evaluated in macaque monkeys. Images PMID:2068087

  9. Crystal Structure of PG16 and Chimeric Dissection with Somatically Related PG9: Structure-Function Analysis of Two Quaternary-Specific Antibodies That Effectively Neutralize HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pancera, Marie; McLellan, Jason S.; Wu, Xueling; Zhu, Jiang; Changela, Anita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Yang, Yongping; Zhou, Tongqing; Phogat, Sanjay; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-11-03

    HIV-1 resists neutralization by most antibodies. Two somatically related human antibodies, PG9 and PG16, however, each neutralize 70 to 80% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. Here we present the structure of the antigen-binding fragment of PG16 in monoclinic and orthorhombic lattices at 2.4 and 4.0 {angstrom}, respectively, and use a combination of structural analysis, paratope dissection, and neutralization assessment to determine the functional relevance of three unusual PG9/PG16 features: N-linked glycosylation, extensive affinity maturation, and a heavy chain-third complementarity-determining region (CDR H3) that is one of the longest observed in human antibodies. Glycosylation extended off the side of the light chain variable domain and was not required for neutralization. The CDR H3 formed an axe-shaped subdomain, which comprised 42% of the CDR surface, with the axe head looming {approx}20 {angstrom} above the other combining loops. Comprehensive sets of chimeric swaps between PG9 and PG16 of light chain, heavy chain, and CDR H3 were employed to decipher structure-function relationships. Chimeric swaps generally complemented functionally, with differences in PG9/PG16 neutralization related primarily to residue differences in CDR H3. Meanwhile, chimeric reversions to genomic V genes showed isolate-dependent effects, with affinity maturation playing a significant role in augmenting neutralization breadth (P = 0.036) and potency (P < 0.0001). The structural and functional details of extraordinary CDR H3 and extensive affinity maturation provide insights into the neutralization mechanism of and the elicitation pathway for broadly neutralizing antibodies like PG9 and PG16.

  10. Appreciation of Hardy's Poem "Neutral Tones" from the Point of View of Functional Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hong-qin

    2008-01-01

    According to the theory of Systemic-Functional Linguistics (SFL), language cannot be disassociated from meaning. Function and semantics, as SFL suggests, are considered as the basis of human language and communicative activity. In order to reveal the inseparability of language and semantic, this paper aims to analyze and appreciate Hardy's poem…

  11. Toward Understanding the Cold, Hot, and Neutral Nature of Chinese Medicines Using in Silico Mode-of-Action Analysis.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xianjun; Mervin, Lewis H; Li, Xuebo; Yu, Huayun; Li, Jiaoyang; Mohamad Zobir, Siti Zuraidah; Zoufir, Azedine; Zhou, Yang; Song, Yongmei; Wang, Zhenguo; Bender, Andreas

    2017-03-27

    One important, however, poorly understood, concept of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is that of hot, cold, and neutral nature of its bioactive principles. To advance the field, in this study, we analyzed compound-nature pairs from TCM on a large scale (>23 000 structures) via chemical space visualizations to understand its physicochemical domain and in silico target prediction to understand differences related to their modes-of-action (MoA) against proteins. We found that overall TCM natures spread into different subclusters with specific molecular patterns, as opposed to forming coherent global groups. Compounds associated with cold nature had a lower clogP and contain more aliphatic rings than the other groups and were found to control detoxification, heat-clearing, heart development processes, and have sedative function, associated with "Mental and behavioural disorders" diseases. While compounds associated with hot nature were on average of lower molecular weight, have more aromatic ring systems than other groups, frequently seemed to control body temperature, have cardio-protection function, improve fertility and sexual function, and represent excitatory or activating effects, associated with "endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases" and "diseases of the circulatory system". Compounds associated with neutral nature had a higher polar surface area and contain more cyclohexene moieties than other groups and seem to be related to memory function, suggesting that their nature may be a useful guide for their utility in neural degenerative diseases. We were hence able to elucidate the difference between different nature classes in TCM on the molecular level, and on a large data set, for the first time, thereby helping a better understanding of TCM nature theory and bridging the gap between traditional medicine and our current understanding of the human body.

  12. Gender Neutralities, Dichotomies and Hidden Inequalities: Analysis of Vocational Teachers' Reflections on Gender in the Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lappalainen, Sirpa; Lahelma, Elina; Pehkonen, Leila; Isopahkala-Bouret, Ulpukka

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses how Finnish vocational teachers make sense of the meanings of gender in their work. The context of the study consists of the two most gender segregated environments of vocational education: the female-dominated Sector of Health and Social Services and the male-dominated Sector of Technology and Transport. Our analysis draws…

  13. COEXISTENCE, EXCLUSION, OR NEUTRALITY? A META-ANALYSIS OF COMPETITION BETWEEN AEDES ALBOPICTUS AND RESIDENT MOSQUITOES

    PubMed Central

    Juliano, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Competition experiments estimating the relative effects of inter- and intraspecific competition can help to resolve whether interspecific competition results in coexistence or exclusion. For mosquitoes, most such experiments have focused on invasive Aedes albopictus and its interactions with resident Aedes. A meta-analysis of such experiments tested whether the effect of interspecific competition is greater than, less than, or equal to that of intraspecific competition, and whether competitive outcomes are dependent on food quality. For A. albopictus and A. aegypti, there was significant context dependence, with interspecific competitive advantage for A. albopictus with low food quality, and competitive equivalence with high food quality. Meta-analysis of survivorship yielded more significant effects than did estimated rate of increase. Competitive effects and competitive responses of each species yielded similar results. This meta-analysis suggests competitive exclusion of A. aegypti by A. albopictus, and is thus consistent with field sampling, qualitative reviews, and interpretations from individual publications. For A. albopictus and A. triseriatus, most results indicated competitive equivalence and no context dependence, and are thus contrary to previous qualitative reviews and to interpretations from individual publications. For both pairs of species, published results suitable for meta-analysis remain scarce, and better experimental designs and improved analysis and reporting of statistical results are needed. Greater emphasis needs to be placed on estimating species’ inter- and intra-specific competitive effects, rather than the more common, but theoretically less interesting, competitive responses. Experiments without low-density controls (i.e., replacement series) are inadequate for comparing competitive effects and responses. PMID:23482823

  14. COEXISTENCE, EXCLUSION, OR NEUTRALITY? A META-ANALYSIS OF COMPETITION BETWEEN AEDES ALBOPICTUS AND RESIDENT MOSQUITOES.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Steven A

    2010-06-01

    Competition experiments estimating the relative effects of inter- and intraspecific competition can help to resolve whether interspecific competition results in coexistence or exclusion. For mosquitoes, most such experiments have focused on invasive Aedes albopictus and its interactions with resident Aedes. A meta-analysis of such experiments tested whether the effect of interspecific competition is greater than, less than, or equal to that of intraspecific competition, and whether competitive outcomes are dependent on food quality. For A. albopictus and A. aegypti, there was significant context dependence, with interspecific competitive advantage for A. albopictus with low food quality, and competitive equivalence with high food quality. Meta-analysis of survivorship yielded more significant effects than did estimated rate of increase. Competitive effects and competitive responses of each species yielded similar results. This meta-analysis suggests competitive exclusion of A. aegypti by A. albopictus, and is thus consistent with field sampling, qualitative reviews, and interpretations from individual publications. For A. albopictus and A. triseriatus, most results indicated competitive equivalence and no context dependence, and are thus contrary to previous qualitative reviews and to interpretations from individual publications. For both pairs of species, published results suitable for meta-analysis remain scarce, and better experimental designs and improved analysis and reporting of statistical results are needed. Greater emphasis needs to be placed on estimating species' inter- and intra-specific competitive effects, rather than the more common, but theoretically less interesting, competitive responses. Experiments without low-density controls (i.e., replacement series) are inadequate for comparing competitive effects and responses.

  15. Search for active neutrino disappearance using neutral-current interactions in the MINOS long-baseline experiment.

    PubMed

    Adamson, P; Andreopoulos, C; Arms, K E; Armstrong, R; Auty, D J; Ayres, D S; Backhouse, C; Baller, B; Barr, G; Barrett, W L; Becker, B R; Belias, A; Bernstein, R H; Bhattacharya, D; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Boehm, J; Boehnlein, D J; Bogert, D; Bower, C; Buckley-Geer, E; Cavanaugh, S; Chapman, J D; Cherdack, D; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Cobb, J H; Coleman, S J; Culling, A J; de Jong, J K; Dierckxsens, M; Diwan, M V; Dorman, M; Dytman, S A; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Harris, E Falk; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Godley, A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Gran, R; Grashorn, E W; Grossman, N; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Harris, D; Harris, P G; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Heller, K; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Hsu, L; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Ishitsuka, M; Jaffe, D E; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Kim, J J; Kim, M S; Koizumi, G; Kopp, S; Kordosky, M; Koskinen, D J; Kotelnikov, S K; Kreymer, A; Kumaratunga, S; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Litchfield, R P; Loiacono, L; Lucas, P; Ma, J; Mann, W A; Marchionni, A; Marshak, M L; Marshall, J S; Mayer, N; McGowan, A M; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Metelko, C J; Michael, D G; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Moore, C D; Morfín, J; Mualem, L; Mufson, S; Murgia, S; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nicholls, T C; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Oliver, W P; Ospanov, R; Paley, J; Paolone, V; Para, A; Patzak, T; Pavlović, Z; Pawloski, G; Pearce, G F; Peck, C W; Petyt, D A; Pittam, R; Plunkett, R K; Rahaman, A; Rameika, R A; Raufer, T M; Rebel, B; Reichenbacher, J; Rodrigues, P A; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Ryabov, V A; Sanchez, M C; Saoulidou, N; Schneps, J; Schreiner, P; Shanahan, P; Smart, W; Smith, C; Sousa, A; Speakman, B; Stamoulis, P; Strait, M; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Tavera, M A; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Thron, J L; Tinti, G; Trostin, I; Tsarev, V A; Tzanakos, G; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Ward, D R; Watabe, M; Weber, A; Webb, R C; Wehmann, A; West, N; White, C; Wojcicki, S G; Wright, D M; Yang, T; Zhang, K; Zwaska, R

    2008-11-28

    We report the first detailed comparisons of the rates and spectra of neutral-current neutrino interactions at two widely separated locations. A depletion in the rate at the far site would indicate mixing between nu(mu) and a sterile particle. No anomalous depletion in the reconstructed energy spectrum is observed. Assuming oscillations occur at a single mass-squared splitting, a fit to the neutral- and charged-current energy spectra limits the fraction of nu(mu) oscillating to a sterile neutrino to be below 0.68 at 90% confidence level. A less stringent limit due to a possible contribution to the measured neutral-current event rate at the far site from nu(e) appearance at the current experimental limit is also presented.

  16. Trend analysis of GIMMS and MODIS NDVI time series for establishing a land degradation neutrality national baseline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gichenje, Helene; Godinho, Sergio

    2017-04-01

    Land degradation is a key global environment and development problem that is recognized as a priority by the international development community. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were adopted by the global community in 2015, and include a goal related to land degradation and the accompanying target to achieve a land degradation-neutral (LDN) world by 2030. The LDN concept encompasses two joint actions of reducing the rate of degradation and increasing the rate of restoration. Using Kenya as the study area, this study aims to develop and test a spatially explicit methodology for assessing and monitoring the operationalization of a land degradation neutrality scheme at the national level. Time series analysis is applied to Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) satellite data records, based on the hypothesis that the resulting NDVI residual trend would enable successful detection of changes in vegetation photosynthetic capacity and thus serve as a proxy for land degradation and regeneration processes. Two NDVI data sets are used to identify the spatial and temporal distribution of degraded and regenerated areas: the long term coarse resolution (8km, 1982-2015) third generation Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) NDVI3g data record; and the shorter-term finer resolution (250m, 2001-2015) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) derived NDVI data record. Climate data (rainfall, temperature and soil moisture) are used to separate areas of human-induced vegetation productivity decline from those driven by climate dynamics. Further, weekly vegetation health (VH) indexes (4km, 1982-2015) developed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), are assessed as indicators for early detection and monitoring of land degradation by estimating vegetation stress (moisture, thermal and combined conditions).

  17. Correcting the Record on the Analysis of IBEX and STEREO Data Regarding Variations in the Neutral Interstellar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Bzowski, M.; Drews, C.; Leonard, T.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Möbius, E.; Schwadron, N.; Sokół, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    The journey of the Sun through space carries the solar system through a dynamic interstellar environment that is presently characterized by a Mach ~1 motion between the heliosphere and the surrounding warm partially ionized interstellar cloud. The interaction between the heliosphere and interstellar medium is an evolving process due to variable solar wind properties and the turbulent nature of the interstellar cloud that surrounds the heliosphere. Frisch et al. presented a meta-analysis of the historical data on the interstellar wind flowing through the heliosphere and concluded that temporal changes in the ecliptic longitude of the flow direction with time were statistically indicated by the data available in the refereed literature at the time of that writing. Lallement & Bertaux disagree with this result, and suggested, for instance, that a key instrumental response function of IBEX-Lo was incorrect and that the STEREO pickup ion data are unsuitable for diagnosing the flow of interstellar neutrals through the heliosphere. In this paper we first show that temporal variations in the interstellar wind through the heliosphere are consistent with our knowledge of the very local interstellar medium. The statistical analysis of the helium wind data is revisited, and a recent correction of a typographical error in the literature is incorporated into the new fits. With this correction, and including no newer IBEX results, these combined data still indicate that a change in the longitude of the interstellar neutral wind of λ = 5.°6 ± 2.°4 over the past forty years remains statistically likely, but an constant flow longitude is now statistically possible. Other scenarios for the selection of subsets of these data used in the fitting process produce similar conclusions. We show that the speculations made by Lallement & Bertin about the IBEX instrumental response function are incorrect, and that their other objections to the data used in the meta-analysis are either

  18. Electromyographic analysis: shoulder muscle activity revisited.

    PubMed

    Heuberer, Philipp; Kranzl, Andreas; Laky, Brenda; Anderl, Werner; Wurnig, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Restoring optimal strength and biomechanics of a pathologic shoulder knowledge of activity patterns of healthy glenohumeral muscles is mandatory. Yet, data on normal shoulder muscle activity are not always conclusive. The study was undertaken (a) to evaluate muscle activity patterns in the healthy shoulder using surface and fine-wire electromyography (EMG), and (b) to assess method's suitability in the clinical setting especially regarding painfulness and practicability. Surface and fine-wire EMG was performed on 11 healthy subjects (2f/9 m, Ø age 28 years) to assess 14 muscles including rotator cuff muscles during 8 planar standardised shoulder movements (abduction, forward flexion, internal and external rotation in neutral, 45° and 90° abduction). Pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale before testing, after inserting the fine-wire electrodes, after maximal voluntary contraction, before and after exercises, and after electrode removal. The most important finding regarding EMG activity patterns in the healthy shoulder was that the subscapularis activity was found to play a major role in abduction and forward flexion. Furthermore, this study was able to show that EMG measurements, especially fine-wire EMG, is prone to high failure rates (up to 32%); however, pain was not a limiting factor. The present study (1) revealed a new insight, especially finding the subscapularis activity playing a major role in abduction and forward flexion of the healthy shoulder; and (2) motion analysis system and the use of fine-wire electrodes were prone to failure; however, pain was not a limiting factor. Basic Science, Electrodiagnostic Study.

  19. Cancer-preventive rexinoid modulates neutral lipid contents of mammary epithelial cells through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Uray, Iván P; Rodenberg, Jennifer M; Bissonnette, Reid P; Brown, Powel H; Mancini, Michael A

    2012-02-01

    Synthetic rexinoids effectively suppress both estrogen receptor-positive and estrogen receptor-negative mammary tumors in animal models, which makes them prime candidates for a novel class of cancer-preventive agents. When used in combination with chemotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer, the rexinoid bexarotene was most effective for patients who developed hypertriglyceridemia as a side effect. Although serum triglycerides originate from the liver, the effect of bexarotene on lipogenesis in breast epithelial cells is not known. Gene expression studies with normal mammary epithelial cells indicated that rexinoids modulate lipid metabolism, particularly enzymes involved in triglyceride synthesis. High-content analysis revealed dose-dependent accumulation of neutral lipids within adipocyte differentiation-related protein-associated cytoplasmic lipid droplets after long-term bexarotene treatment. Bexarotene also induced mRNA and protein levels for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, whereas selective knockdown of PPARγ attenuated the induction of both lipid droplets and adipocyte differentiation-related protein. Pharmacological activation of PPARγ, but not PPARα or retinoic acid receptors, effectively induced lipid accumulation. Furthermore, the combination of the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone with bexarotene synergistically suppressed the growth of human mammary epithelial cells and revealed a strong, nonlinear, inverse correlation of cell growth with lipid droplet accumulation in the cell population. These findings indicate that rexinoids activate a lipogenic program in mammary epithelial cells through a retinoid X receptor/PPARγ-mediated mechanism. It is noteworthy that combining low doses of bexarotene with the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone provides effective growth suppression of mammary epithelial cells, potentially dissociating systemic adverse effects associated with standard bexarotene treatment from the antiproliferative effects on

  20. The neutral lipid composition present in the digestive vacuole of Plasmodium falciparum concentrates heme and mediates β-hematin formation with an unusually low activation energy.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Anh N; Sandlin, Rebecca D; Omar, Aneesa; Egan, Timothy J; Wright, David W

    2010-11-30

    In eukaryotic cells, neutral lipids serve as major energy storage molecules; however, in Plasmodium falciparum, a parasite responsible for causing malaria in humans, neutral lipids may have other functions during the intraerythrocytic stage of the parasite life cycle. Specifically, experimental data suggest that neutral lipid structures behave as a catalyst for the crystallization of hemozoin, a detoxification byproduct of several blood-feeding organisms, including malaria parasites. Synthetic neutral lipid droplets (SNLDs) were produced by depositing a lipid blend solution comprised of mono- and diglycerides onto an aqueous surface. These lipid droplets are able to mediate the production of brown pigments that are morphologically and chemically identical to hemozoin. The partitioning of heme into these SNLDs was examined by employing Nile Red, a lipid specific dye. Soluble ferriprotoporphyrin IX was observed to spontaneously localize to the lipid droplets, partitioning in a pH-dependent manner with an estimated log P of 2.6. Interestingly, the pH profile of heme partitioning closely resembles that of β-hematin formation. Differential scanning calorimetry and kinetic studies demonstrated that the SNLDs provide a unique environment that promotes hemozoin formation. SNLD-mediated formation of the malaria pigment displayed an activation energy barrier lower than those of individual lipid components. In particular, lipid droplets composed of diglycerides displayed activation barriers lower than those composed of monoglycerides. This difference was attributed to the greater fluidity of these lipids. In conjunction with the known pattern of lipid body proliferation, it is suggested that neutral lipid structures within the digestive vacuole not only are the location of in vivo hemozoin formation but are also essential for the survival of the parasite by functioning as a kinetically competent and site specific mediator for heme detoxification.

  1. Kinetic analysis about the effects of neutral salts on the thermal stability of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Ikegaya, Kazuo

    2005-03-01

    The effects of salts on the rate constants of inactivation by heat of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) at 60.0 degrees C were measured. Different effects were observed at low and high salt concentrations. At high concentrations, some salts had stabilizing effects, while others were destabilizing. The effects of salts in the high concentration range examined can be described as follows: (decreased thermal stability) NaClO(4) < NaI = (C(2)H(5))(4)NBr < NH(4)Br < NaBr = KBr = CsBr = (no addition) < (CH(3))(4)NBr < KCl < KF < Na(2)SO(4) (increased thermal stability). The decreasing effect of NaClO(4) on YADH controlled the thermal stability of the enzyme absolutely and was not compensated by the addition of Na(2)SO(4), a salt which stabilized the enzyme. However, Na(2)SO(4) compensation did occur in response to the decrease in thermal stability caused by (C(2)H(5))(4)NBr. The rate constants of inactivation by heat (k (in)) of the enzyme were measured at various temperatures. Effective values of the thermodynamic activation parameters of thermal inactivation, activation of free energy (DeltaG (double dagger)), activation enthalpy (DeltaH (double dagger)), and activation entropy (DeltaS (double dagger)), were determined. The thermal stability of YADH in 0.8 M Na(2)SO(4) increased more than that of pyruvate kinase from Bacillus stearothermophilus, a moderate thermophile. The changes in the values of DeltaH (double dagger) and DeltaS (double dagger) were great and showed a general compensatory tendency, with the exception of in the case of NaClO(4). The temperature for the general compensation effect (T (c)) was approximately 123 degrees C. With Na(2)SO(4), the thermal stability of YADH at a temperature below T (c) was greater than that in the absence of salt due to the higher values of DeltaH (double dagger) and DeltaS (double dagger), respectively, and thus was an example of low-temperature enzymatic stabilization. With (C(2)H(5))(4)NBr, the thermal stability of YADH

  2. Activation analysis using Cornell TRIGA

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Tim Z.

    1994-07-01

    A major use of the Cornell TRIGA is for activation analysis. Over the years many varieties of samples have been analyzed from a number of fields of interest ranging from geology, archaeology and textiles. More recently the analysis has been extended to high technology materials for applications in optical and semiconductor devices. Trace analysis in high purity materials like Si wafers has been the focus in many instances, while in others analysis of major/minor components were the goals. These analysis has been done using the delayed mode. Results from recent measurements in semiconductors and other materials will be presented. In addition the near future capability of using prompt gamma activation analysis using the Cornell cold neutron beam will be discussed. (author)

  3. Llama-Derived Single-Chain Antibody Fragments Directed to Rotavirus VP6 Protein Possess Broad Neutralizing Activity In Vitro and Confer Protection against Diarrhea in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Garaicoechea, Lorena; Olichon, Aurelien; Marcoppido, Gisela; Wigdorovitz, Andrés; Mozgovoj, Marina; Saif, Linda; Surrey, Thomas; Parreño, Viviana

    2008-01-01

    Group A rotavirus is one of the most common causes of severe diarrhea in human infants and newborn animals. Rotavirus virions are triple-layered particles. The outer capsid proteins VP4 and VP7 are highly variable and represent the major neutralizing antigens. The inner capsid protein VP6 is conserved among group A rotaviruses, is highly immunogenic, and is the target antigen of most immunodiagnosis tests. Llama-derived single-chain antibody fragments (VHH) are the smallest molecules with antigen-binding capacity and can therefore be expected to have properties different from conventional antibodies. In this study a library containing the VHH genes of a llama immunized with recombinant inner capsid protein VP6 was generated. Binders directed to VP6, in its native conformation within the viral particle, were selected and characterized. Four selected VHH directed to conformational epitopes of VP6 recognized all human and animal rotavirus strains tested and could be engineered for their use in immunodiagnostic tests for group A rotavirus detection. Three of the four VHH neutralized rotavirus in vivo independently of the strain serotype. Furthermore, this result was confirmed by in vivo partial protection against rotavirus challenge in a neonatal mouse model. The present study demonstrates for the first time a broad neutralization activity of VP6 specific VHH in vitro and in vivo. Neutralizing VHH directed to VP6 promise to become an essential tool for the prevention and treatment of rotavirus diarrhea. PMID:18632867

  4. Standardizing Activation Analysis: New Software for Photon Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wells, D.; Green, J.; Segebade, C.

    2011-06-01

    Photon Activation Analysis (PAA) of environmental, archaeological and industrial samples requires extensive data analysis that is susceptible to error. For the purpose of saving time, manpower and minimizing error, a computer program was designed, built and implemented using SQL, Access 2007 and asp.net technology to automate this process. Based on the peak information of the spectrum and assisted by its PAA library, the program automatically identifies elements in the samples and calculates their concentrations and respective uncertainties. The software also could be operated in browser/server mode, which gives the possibility to use it anywhere the internet is accessible. By switching the nuclide library and the related formula behind, the new software can be easily expanded to neutron activation analysis (NAA), charged particle activation analysis (CPAA) or proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Implementation of this would standardize the analysis of nuclear activation data. Results from this software were compared to standard PAA analysis with excellent agreement. With minimum input from the user, the software has proven to be fast, user-friendly and reliable.

  5. The Activity of Neutral α-Glucosidase and Selected Biochemical Parameters in the Annual Cycle of Breeding Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kotońska-Feiga, Julia; Dobicki, Wojciech; Pokorny, Przemysław; Nowacki, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate seasonal changes in the hydrolytic and transferase activity of neutral α-glucosidase, the level of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and total protein in the annual breeding cycle of the carp. The study was conducted on fish from a fish farm in Lower Silesia (Poland). Blood serum was collected from the heart in: June, September and December of two consecutive years. The results of the study show that the hydrolytic and transferase activity of neutral α-glucosidase, as well as the results of basic biochemical parameters are highest in summer, when the fish seek and intake food intensively. The lowest values were observed in spring, when carp have the lowest metabolism after the wintering period. PMID:26559406

  6. The Activity of Neutral α-Glucosidase and Selected Biochemical Parameters in the Annual Cycle of Breeding Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Kotońska-Feiga, Julia; Dobicki, Wojciech; Pokorny, Przemysław; Nowacki, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to demonstrate seasonal changes in the hydrolytic and transferase activity of neutral α-glucosidase, the level of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and total protein in the annual breeding cycle of the carp. The study was conducted on fish from a fish farm in Lower Silesia (Poland). Blood serum was collected from the heart in: June, September and December of two consecutive years. The results of the study show that the hydrolytic and transferase activity of neutral α-glucosidase, as well as the results of basic biochemical parameters are highest in summer, when the fish seek and intake food intensively. The lowest values were observed in spring, when carp have the lowest metabolism after the wintering period.

  7. Numerical analysis of the angular motion of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in shear flow at small Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Rosén, T; Einarsson, J; Nordmark, A; Aidun, C K; Lundell, F; Mehlig, B

    2015-12-01

    We numerically analyze the rotation of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in a shear flow at small shear Reynolds number. Using direct numerical stability analysis of the coupled nonlinear particle-flow problem, we compute the linear stability of the log-rolling orbit at small shear Reynolds number Re(a). As Re(a)→0 and as the box size of the system tends to infinity, we find good agreement between the numerical results and earlier analytical predictions valid to linear order in Re(a) for the case of an unbounded shear. The numerical stability analysis indicates that there are substantial finite-size corrections to the analytical results obtained for the unbounded system. We also compare the analytical results to results of lattice Boltzmann simulations to analyze the stability of the tumbling orbit at shear Reynolds numbers of order unity. Theory for an unbounded system at infinitesimal shear Reynolds number predicts a bifurcation of the tumbling orbit at aspect ratio λ(c)≈0.137 below which tumbling is stable (as well as log rolling). The simulation results show a bifurcation line in the λ-Re(a) plane that reaches λ≈0.1275 at the smallest shear Reynolds number (Re(a)=1) at which we could simulate with the lattice Boltzmann code, in qualitative agreement with the analytical results.

  8. Surface analysis of rubbers and plastics using secondary neutral mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M. J.; Savina, M. R.

    1999-08-23

    Rubber and plastics are complex mixtures of long-chain polymers, smaller organic additives used as plasticizers, mildicides, fungicides, colorants, etc., and inorganic additives such as carbon and silica. Surface analysis of such materials is at once difficult and important. The difficulty lies in the need to identify specific carbon molecules on a very similar organic surface. The importance arises from the dramatic effect that the distribution and concentration of additives have on the physical properties of polymeric materials. Recently we have had some success in applying laser desorption post-ionization mass spectrometry in measuring the surface concentration and distribution of both additives and the polymer molecules themselves. The key has been to use the photoionization properties of the analyte of interest to augment mass spectrometric information.

  9. Neutralized nanoparticle composed of SS-cleavable and pH-activated lipid-like material as a long-lasting and liver-specific gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Ukawa, Masami; Akita, Hidetaka; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Ishiba, Ryohei; Tange, Kota; Arai, Masaya; Kubo, Kazuhiro; Higuchi, Yuriko; Shimizu, Kazunori; Konishi, Satoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Charge-neutralized lipid envelope-type nanoparticles formed with SS-cleavable and pH-activated lipid-like materials (ssPalm) accumulate rapidly in the liver without forming aggregates in the blood circulation, and result in a liver-specific gene expression for a long duration (>2 weeks) with neither immunological responses nor hepatotoxicity after intraveneous administration, when it carries pDNA free from CpG-motifs.

  10. Plasma pharmacokinetics and biological activity of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 neutralizing human monoclonal antibody, F105, in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Cavacini, L A; Power, J; Emes, C L; Mace, K; Treacy, G; Posner, M R

    1994-05-01

    The IgG1 kappa human monoclonal antibody (HMab), F105 reacts with a discontinuous epitope on the CD4 binding site (CD4BS) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)/gp120 and has broad neutralizing activity. F105 HMab (60 mg/kg bolus) was administered intravenously to four monkeys and serum was collected at intervals to determine pharmacokinetics in a primate model. Average serum F105 concentrations, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, were analyzed with MINSQ software using a two-compartment, first-order model. The half-life for the alpha phase of the distribution curve is 6.7 h and for the beta elimination phase, 9.6 days. The volume of distribution is 0.65 L/kg and the rate of clearance 2 ml/kg/h. Serum levels of 1.3-1.6 mg/ml of F105 were maintained for 24 h. When monkey serum from day 15 postdose was tested, total serum F105 was 230 +/- 79 micrograms/ml and was immunoreactive with cells infected with the MN and IIIB strains of HIV-1 as determined by flow cytometry. Binding activity was identical to that obtained with stock F105 HMab. Identical neutralizing activity between the injected and uninjected antibody was also observed. Thus, serum neutralizing titers (90%) of 1:2000 at peak and 1:30 at day 15 postdose for MN virus were observed. These data indicate that high in vivo levels of HMab F105 can be attained by single bolus administration with full retention of biological activity. Of importance, levels of antibody necessary for effective neutralization can be achieved and maintained.

  11. Hydrolysis rate constants and activation parameters for phosphate- and phosphonate-bridged phthalonitrile monomers under acid, neutral and alkali conditions.

    PubMed

    Belsky, Kirill S; Sulimov, Artem V; Bulgakov, Boris A; Babkin, Alexandr V; Kepman, Alexey V

    2017-08-01

    Hydrolysis data for Bis(3-(3,4-dicyanophenoxy)phenyl) phenyl phosphate and Bis(3-(3,4-dicyanophenoxy)phenyl) phenylphosphonate under pH 4, 7 and 10 are presented. Conversion/time plots collected by HPLC analysis, typical chromatograms and NMR spectra of the reactions products are given. Pseudo-first order rate constants are determined for both substrates at 25, 50 and 80 °C. Activation parameters were calculated from Arrhenius equation.

  12. Constraining the Europa Neutral Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard T.; Mitchell, Donald; mauk, Barry; Johnson, Robert E.; clark, george

    2016-10-01

    "Neutral tori" consist of neutral particles that usually co-orbit along with their source forming a toroidal (or partial toroidal) feature around the planet. The distribution and composition of these features can often provide important, if not unique, insight into magnetospheric particles sources, mechanisms and dynamics. However, these features can often be difficult to directly detect. One innovative method for detecting neutral tori is by observing Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) that are generally considered produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between charged and neutral particles.Mauk et al. (2003) reported the detection of a Europa neutral particle torus using ENA observations. The presence of a Europa torus has extremely large implications for upcoming missions to Jupiter as well as understanding possible activity at this moon and providing critical insight into what lies beneath the surface of this icy ocean world. However, ENAs can also be produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between two ionized particles and in that case cannot be used to infer the presence of neutral particle population. Thus, a detailed examination of all possible source interactions must be considered before one can confirm that likely original source population of these ENA images is actually a Europa neutral particle torus. For this talk, we examine the viability that the Mauk et al. (2003) observations were actually generated from a neutral torus emanating from Europa as opposed to charge particle interactions with plasma originating from Io. These results help constrain such a torus as well as Europa source processes.

  13. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING AIR SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.12)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The method is for extracting an indoor and outdoor air sample consisting of a quartz fiber filter and an XAD-2 cartridge for analysis of neutral persistent organic pollutants. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass...

  14. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING AIR SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.12)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The method is for extracting an indoor and outdoor air sample consisting of a quartz fiber filter and an XAD-2 cartridge for analysis of neutral persistent organic pollutants. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass...

  15. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DERMAL WIPE SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.16)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The method for extracting and preparing a dermal (hand) wipe sample for analysis of neutral persistent organic pollutants is summarized in this SOP. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  16. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING SURFACE WIPE FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.17)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP summarizes the method for extracting and preparing a hard floor surface wipe or food preparation surface wipe sample for analysis of neutral persistent organic. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spect...

  17. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING DERMAL WIPE SAMPLES FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.16)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The method for extracting and preparing a dermal (hand) wipe sample for analysis of neutral persistent organic pollutants is summarized in this SOP. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  18. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR EXTRACTING AND PREPARING SURFACE WIPE FOR ANALYSIS OF NEUTRAL PERSISTENT ORGANIC POLLUTANTS (SOP-5.17)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP summarizes the method for extracting and preparing a hard floor surface wipe or food preparation surface wipe sample for analysis of neutral persistent organic. It covers the extraction and concentration of samples that are to be analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spect...

  19. Quetiapine Inhibits Microglial Activation by Neutralizing Abnormal STIM1-Mediated Intercellular Calcium Homeostasis and Promotes Myelin Repair in a Cuprizone-Induced Mouse Model of Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hanzhi; Liu, Shubao; Tian, Yanping; Wu, Xiyan; He, Yangtao; Li, Chengren; Namaka, Michael; Kong, Jiming; Li, Hongli; Xiao, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Microglial activation has been considered as a crucial process in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation and psychiatric disorders. Several antipsychotic drugs (APDs) have been shown to display inhibitory effects on microglial activation in vitro, possibly through the suppression of elevated intracellular calcium (Ca2+) concentration. However, the exact underlying mechanisms still remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to investigate the inhibitory effects of quetiapine (Que), an atypical APD, on microglial activation. We utilized a chronic cuprizone (CPZ)-induced demyelination mouse model to determine the direct effect of Que on microglial activation. Our results showed that treatment with Que significantly reduced recruitment and activation of microglia/macrophage in the lesion of corpus callosum and promoted remyelination after CPZ withdrawal. Our in vitro studies also confirmed the direct effect of Que on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of microglial N9 cells, whereby Que significantly inhibited the release of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Moreover, we demonstrated that pretreatment with Que, neutralized the up-regulation of STIM1 induced by LPS and declined both LPS and thapsigargin (Tg)-induced store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE). Finally, we found that pretreatment with Que significantly reduced the translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 subunit from cytoplasm to nuclei in LPS-activated primary microglial cells. Overall, our data suggested that Que may inhibit microglial activation by neutralization of the LPS-induced abnormal STIM1-mediated intercellular calcium homeostasis. PMID:26732345

  20. Structural Analysis of Human and Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies 2909 and 2.5B: Implications for the Configuration of the Quaternary Neutralizing Epitope of HIV-1 gp120

    SciTech Connect

    B Spurrier; J Sampson; M Totrov; H Li; T ONeal; C Williams; J Robinson; M Gorny; S Zolla-Pazner; X Kong

    2011-12-31

    The quaternary neutralizing epitope (QNE) of HIV-1 gp120 is preferentially expressed on the trimeric envelope spikes of intact HIV virions, and QNE-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) potently neutralize HIV-1. Here, we present the crystal structures of the Fabs of human mAb 2909 and macaque mAb 2.5B. Both mAbs have long beta hairpin CDR H3 regions >20 {angstrom} in length that are each situated at the center of their respective antigen-binding sites. Computational analysis showed that the paratopes include the whole CDR H3, while additional CDR residues form shallow binding pockets. Structural modeling suggests a way to understand the configuration of QNEs and the antigen-antibody interaction for QNE mAbs. Our data will be useful in designing immunogens that may elicit potent neutralizing QNE Abs.

  1. Analysis of neutral nitromusks in incenses by capillary electrophoresis in organic solvents and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gotti, Roberto; Fiori, Jessica; Mancini, Francesca; Cavrini, Vanni

    2005-09-01

    Nitromusks used as fragrances in a variety of personal-care products, cleansers, and domestic deodorants, including incense sticks, are neutral nitro aromatic compounds; some of these have been reported as photosensitizers. In this work, their analysis was performed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) in a methanol-based background electrolyte (BGE). In particular, a 10 mM solution of citric acid in methanol was used; under these conditions the strong suppression of the electroosmotic flow favored the use of negatively charged surfactants as additives for the anodic migration of the studied analytes. To this end, sodium taurodeoxycholate (TDC) was supplemented at high concentration (190 mM) to the organic background electrolyte (BGE), showing strong indication of the ability to give micelle-like aggregates. Since nitromusks are characterized by the presence of a nitroaromatic ring with low charge density, their association with TDC aggregates can be ascribed to donor-acceptor interactions. Separation of musk xylene, musk ketone, and the banned musk moskene and musk ambrette was obtained under full nonaqueous BGE; the addition of relatively small water percentages (15% v/v) was found to be useful in improving the separation of pairs of adjacent peaks. Under optimized conditions (190 mM sodium TDC in methanol-water, 85-15 v/v containing citric acid 10 mM) the system was applied to the analysis of nitromusks in incense sticks extracted with methanol. The results were compared with those obtained by the analysis of the same samples using gas chromatography with mass detector. The expected different selectivity of separation obtained using the two techniques can be useful in the unambiguous determination of the analytes; furthermore, a substantial accord of the preliminary quantitative results achieved with the two methods was assumed as the confirmation of the potential reliability of CE performed with high percentage of organic solvent.

  2. Spatial Variations of Turbulent Properties in Neutral Hydrogen Observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud Using Structure Function Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestingen-Palm, David; Stanimirovic, Snezana; Babler, Brian L.; Gonzalez Casanova, Diego; Jameson, Katherine; Bolatto, Alberto D.

    2017-01-01

    Turbulence is known to play a key role in shaping the many structures and features which make the Interstellar Medium (ISM) so interesting to study. It is still not understood, however, which processes are responsible for the turbulence in the ISM, and the scales at which these processes dominate. In our study, we use the structure function to analyze neutral hydrogen (HI) observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) to search for spacial variations in turbulent properties. Using an estimate of the star formation surface density as a guide, we separate the HI SMC observations into a central region which contains star formation rate (SFR) regions above a certain contour level, and an outer region which has SFR values below the chosen contour level. Our contour level begins at 1e-3 M⊙yr-1kpc-2 and is raised to 5e-3 M⊙yr-1kpc-2 by increments of 1e-4 M⊙yr-1kpc-2. At each contour level, we calculate the HI structure function slope for both the central and outer region by applying the Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) and progressively averaging HI velocity channels. Our preliminary results suggest a difference in the slopes of both velocity and density fields between the inner and outer SMC.

  3. The Double Helicity Asymmetry in Neutral Pion Production at PHENIX and Its Constraint on δG Through Global Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Kieran

    2013-04-01

    Understanding the gluon spin contribution to the proton spin, δG, is a primary goal of the RHIC spin program. The abundant production of pions in p+p collisions, coupled with the PHENIX detector's fine resolution Electromagnetic Calorimeter and high pT triggering capabilities, make neutral pions a prime candidate to study the proton spin structure in polarized p+p collisions at RHIC. Measurements of the double helicity asymmetry, ALL, in ^0 production from 2005 and 2006 were shown to significantly constrain the gluon helicity distribution, δG, in the proton [1]. With improved luminosity and polarization, the figure of merit for the 2009 data set was a factor of 1.5 better that the previous runs combined. We present the 2009 results for ^0 ALL, along with a discussion of the results from inclusion of these data in a recent update of the DSSV global analysis.[4pt] [1] D. de Florian, R. Sassot, M. Stratmann, W. Vogelsang (DSSV) Phys.Rev.Lett. 101 (2008) 072001

  4. Spatial Variations of Turbulent Properties of Neutral Hydrogen Gas in the Small Magellanic Cloud Using Structure-function Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestingen-Palm, David; Stanimirović, Snežana; González-Casanova, Diego F.; Babler, Brian; Jameson, Katherine; Bolatto, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    We investigate spatial variations of turbulent properties in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) by using neutral hydrogen (H i) observations. With the goal of testing the importance of stellar feedback on H i turbulence, we define central and outer SMC regions based on the star formation rate (SFR) surface density, as well as the H i integrated intensity. We use the structure function and the velocity channel analysis to calculate the power-law index (γ) for both underlying density and velocity fields in these regions. In all cases, our results show essentially no difference in γ between the central and outer regions. This suggests that H i turbulent properties are surprisingly homogeneous across the SMC when probed at a resolution of 30 pc. Contrary to recent suggestions from numerical simulations, we do not find a significant change in γ due to stellar feedback as traced by the SFR surface density. This could be due to the stellar feedback being widespread over the whole of the SMC, but more likely due to a large-scale gravitational driving of turbulence. We show that the lack of difference between central and outer SMC regions cannot be explained by the high optical depth H I.

  5. Beyond Viral Neutralization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena; Evans, David; Ferrari, Guido; Bournazos, Stylianos; Parsons, Matthew S; Bernard, Nicole F; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-01-13

    It has been known for more than 30 years that Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) infection drives a very potent B cell response resulting in the production of anti-HIV-1 antibodies targeting several viral proteins, particularly its envelope glycoproteins (Env). Env epitopes are exposed on the surfaces of viral particles and infected cells where they are targets of potentially protective antibodies. These antibodies can interdict infection by neutralization and there is strong evidence suggesting that Fc-mediated effector function can also contribute to protection. Current evidence suggests that Fc-mediated effector function plays a role in protection against infection by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) and it might be important for protection by non-neutralizing antibodies. Fc-mediated effector function includes diverse mechanisms that include antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-mediated complement activation (ADC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), antibody-mediated trancytosis inhibition, and antibody-mediated virus opsonization. All these functions could be beneficial in fighting viral infections including HIV-1. In this perspective, we discuss the latest developments for ADCC responses discussed at the HIVR4P satellite session on non-neutralizing antibodies, with emphasis on the mechanisms of ADCC resistance employed by HIV-1, the structural basis of epitopes recognized by antibodies that mediate ADCC, NK-cell education and ADCC, and murine models to study ADCC against HIV-1.

  6. Amygdala Activation During Emotion Processing of Neutral Faces in Children With Severe Mood Dysregulation Versus ADHD or Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Brotman, Melissa A.; Rich, Brendan A.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Lunsford, Jessica R.; Horsey, Sarah E.; Reising, Michelle M.; Thomas, Laura A.; Fromm, Stephen J.; Towbin, Kenneth; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Objective To understand disorder-unique and common pathophysiology, studies in multiple patient groups with overlapping symptoms are needed. Deficits in emotion processing and hyperarousal symptoms are prominent features of bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and severe mood dysregulation. The authors compared amygdala response during emotional and nonemotional ratings of neutral faces in youths with these disorders as well as a group of healthy comparison youths. Method Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the amygdala was examined in children with bipolar disorder (N=43), ADHD (N=18), and severe mood dysregulation (N=29) and healthy comparison subjects (N=37). During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants attended to emotional and nonemotional aspects of neutral faces. Results While rating subjective fear of neutral faces, youths with ADHD demonstrated left amygdala hyperactivity relative to the other three groups, whereas youths with severe mood dysregulation demonstrated hypoactivity. Conclusions These findings support the role of unique neural correlates in face-emotion processing among youths with bipolar disorder, ADHD, and severe mood dysregulation. PMID:19917597

  7. Search for active neutrino disappearance using neutral-current interactions in the MINOS long-baseline experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, Kregg E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D.J.; Ayres, D.S.; Backhouse, C. Baller, B.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W.L.; Becker, B.R.; /Minnesota U. /Rutherford

    2008-07-01

    We have measured the rates and spectra of neutral-current neutrino interactions in the MINOS detectors, which are separated by 734 km. A depletion in the rate at the far site would indicate mixing between {nu}{sub {mu}} and a sterile particle. The depletion of the total neutral-current event rate at the far site is limited to be below 17% at 90% confidence level without {nu}{sub e} appearance. Assuming oscillations occur at a single mass-squared splitting, a fit to the neutral- and charged-current energy spectra shows the fraction of {nu}{sub {mu}} oscillating to a sterile neutrino is 0.28{sub -0.28}{sup +0.25}(stat.+syst.). Including {nu}{sub e} appearance at the current experimental upper bound limits the depletion to be below 21% at 90% confidence level and the fit fraction of {nu}{sub {mu}} oscillating to a sterile neutrino is 0.43{sub -0.27}{sup +0.23}(stat.+syst.).

  8. In vitro genotoxicity of neutral red after photo-activation and metabolic activation in the Ames test, the micronucleus test and the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Guérard, Melanie; Zeller, Andreas; Singer, Thomas; Gocke, Elmar

    2012-07-04

    Neutral red (Nr) is relatively non-toxic and is widely used as indicator dye in many biological test systems. It absorbs visible light and is known to act as a photosensitizer, involving the generation of reactive oxygen species (type-I reaction) and singlet oxygen (type-II reaction). The mutagenicity of Nr was determined in the Ames test (with Salmonella typhimurium strains TA1535, TA97, TA98, TA98NR, TA100, and TA102) with and without metabolic activation, and with and without photo-activation on agar plates. Similarly to the situation following metabolic activation, photo-mutagenicity of Nr was seen with all Salmonella strains tested, albeit with different effects between these strains. To our knowledge, Nr is the only photo-mutagen showing such a broad action. Since the effects are also observed in strains not known to be responsive to ROS, this indicates that ROS production is not the sole mode of action that leads to photo-genotoxicity. The reactive species produced by irradiation are short-lived as pre-irradiation of an Nr solution did not produce mutagenic effects when added to the bacteria. In addition, mutagenicity in TA98 following irradiation was stronger than in the nitroreductase-deficient strain TA98NR, indicating that nitro derivatives that are transformed by bacterial nitroreductase to hydroxylamines appear to play a role in the photo-mutagenicity of Nr. Photo-genotoxicity of Nr was further investigated in the comet assay and micronucleus test in L5178Y cells. Concentration-dependent increases in primary DNA damage and in the frequency of micronuclei were observed after irradiation.

  9. Analysis of cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies in human HFMD serum with an EV71 pseudovirus-based assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huafei; An, Dong; Liu, Wei; Mao, Qunying; Jin, Jun; Xu, Lin; Sun, Shiyang; Jiang, Liping; Li, Xiaojun; Shao, Jie; Ma, Hongxia; Huang, Xueyong; Guo, Shijie; Chen, Haiying; Cheng, Tong; Yang, Lisheng; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Liang, Zhenglun; Jiang, Chunlai

    2014-01-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease, associated with enterovirus 71 (EV71) infections, has recently become an important public health issue throughout the world. Serum neutralizing antibodies are major indicators of EV71 infection and protective immunity. However, the potential for cross-reactivity of neutralizing antibodies for different EV71 genotypes and subgenotypes is unclear. Here we measured the cross-reactive neutralizing antibody titers against EV71 of different genotypes or subgenotypes in sera collected from EV71-infected children and vaccine-inoculated children in a phase III clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01636245) using a new pseudovirus-based neutralization assay. Antibodies induced by EV71-C4a were cross-reactive for different EV71 genotypes, demonstrating that C4a is a good candidate strain for an EV71 vaccine. Our study also demonstrated that this new assay is practical for analyses of clinical samples from epidemiological and vaccine studies.

  10. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A diver tests a secondary camera and maneuvering platform in Marshall's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS).The secondary camera will be beneficial for recording repairs and other extra vehicular activities (EVA) the astronuats will perform while making repairs on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The maneuvering platform was developed to give the astronauts something to stand on while performing maintenance tasks. These platforms were developed to be mobile so that the astronauts could move them to accommadate different sites.

  11. On the biochemical classification of yeast trehalases: Candida albicans contains two enzymes with mixed features of neutral and acid trehalase activities.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Fresneda, Ruth; González-Párraga, Pilar; Esteban, Oscar; Laforet, Leslie; Valentín, Eulogio; Argüelles, Juan-Carlos

    2009-05-22

    Two enzymes endowed with trehalase activity are present in Candida albicans. The cytosolic trehalase (Ntc1p), displayed high activity in exponential phase regardless of the carbon source (glucose, trehalose or glycerol). Ntc1p activity was similar in neutral (pH 7.1) or acid (pH 4.5) conditions, strongly inhibited by ATP, weakly stimulated by divalent cations (Ca(2+)or Mn(2+)) and unaffected in the presence of cyclic AMP. The Ntc1p activity decreased in stationary phase, except in glycerol-grown cultures, but the catalytic properties did not change. In turn, the cell wall-linked trehalase (Atc1p) showed elevated activity in resting cells or in cultures growing on trehalose or glycerol. Although Atc1p is subjected to glucose repression, exhaustion of glucose in itself did not increased the activity. Significant Atc1p values could also be measured at neutral or acid pH, but Atc1p was insensitive to ATP, cyclic AMP and divalent cations. These results are in direct contrast with the current classification of yeast trehalases based on their optimum pH. They are also relevant in the light of the proposed use of trehalase inhibitors for the treatment of candidiasis.

  12. FeP nanoparticles film grown on carbon cloth: an ultrahighly active 3D hydrogen evolution cathode in both acidic and neutral solutions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingqi; Liu, Qian; Liang, Yanhui; Xing, Zhicai; Asiri, Abdullah M; Sun, Xuping

    2014-12-10

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the direct growth of FeP nanoparticles film on carbon cloth (FeP/CC) through low-temperature phosphidation of its Fe3O4/CC precursor. Remarkably, when used as an integrated 3D hydrogen evolution cathode, this FeP/CC electrode exhibits ultrahigh catalytic activity comparable to commercial Pt/C and good stability in acidic media. This electrode also performs well in neutral solutions. This work offers us the most cost-effective and active 3D cathode toward electrochemical water splitting for large-scale hydrogen fuel production.

  13. Daily Activities for Data Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitch, Chris; Armstrong, Georganna

    1994-01-01

    Presents four sets of activities to develop the concepts of data analysis and graphing. Students estimate sample populations using beans, examine graphs from newspapers and magazines, predict the most popular color of cars, and simulate quality control in a manufacturing process. (MDH)

  14. Automated activation-analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, M.M.; Garcia, S.R.; Denton, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    An automated delayed neutron counting and instrumental neutron activation analysis system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Omega West Reactor (OWR) to analyze samples for uranium and 31 additional elements with a maximum throughput of 400 samples per day.

  15. Modeling thermospheric neutral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Liying

    Satellite drag prediction requires determination of thermospheric neutral density. The NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) and the global-mean Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIMEGCM) were used to quantify thermospheric neutral density and its variations, focusing on annual/semiannual variation, the effect of using measured solar irradiance on model calculations of solar-cycle variation, and global change in the thermosphere. Satellite drag data and the MSIS00 empirical model were utilized to compare to the TIEGCM simulations. The TIEGCM simulations indicated that eddy diffusion and its annual/semiannual variation is a mechanism for annual/semiannual density variation in the thermosphere. It was found that eddy diffusion near the turbopause can effectively influence thermospheric neutral density. Eddy diffusion, together with annual insolation variation and large-scale circulation, generated global annual/semiannual density variation observed by satellite drag. Using measured solar irradiance as solar input for the TIEGCM improved the solar-cycle dependency of the density calculation shown in F10.7 -based thermospheric empirical models. It has been found that the empirical models overestimate density at low solar activity. The TIEGCM simulations did not show such solar-cycle dependency. Using historic measurements of CO2 and F 10.7, simulations of the global-mean TIMEGCM showed that thermospheric neutral density at 400 km had an average long-term decrease of 1.7% per decade from 1970 to 2000. A forecast of density decrease for solar cycle 24 suggested that thermospheric density will decrease at 400 km from present to the end of solar cycle 24 at a rate of 2.7% per decade. Reduction in thermospheric density causes less atmospheric drag on earth-orbiting space objects. The implication of this long-term decrease of thermospheric neutral density is that it will increase the

  16. Mucosal Targeting of a BoNT/A Subunit Vaccine Adjuvanted with a Mast Cell Activator Enhances Induction of BoNT/A Neutralizing Antibodies in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Staats, Herman F.; Fielhauer, Jeffrey R.; Thompson, Afton L.; Tripp, Alice A.; Sobel, Ashley E.; Maddaloni, Massimo; Abraham, Soman N.; Pascual, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Background We previously reported that the immunogenicity of Hcβtre, a botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) immunogen, was enhanced by fusion to an epithelial cell binding domain, Ad2F, when nasally delivered to mice with cholera toxin (CT). This study was performed to determine if Ad2F would enhance the nasal immunogenicity of Hcβtre in rabbits, an animal model with a nasal cavity anatomy similar to humans. Since CT is not safe for human use, we also tested the adjuvant activity of compound 48/80 (C48/80), a mast cell activating compound previously determined to safely exhibit nasal adjuvant activity in mice. Methods New Zealand White or Dutch Belted rabbits were nasally immunized with Hcβtre or Hcβtre-Ad2F alone or combined with CT or C48/80, and serum samples were tested for the presence of Hcβtre-specific binding (ELISA) or BoNT/A neutralizing antibodies. Results Hcβtre-Ad2F nasally administered with CT induced serum anti-Hcβtre IgG ELISA and BoNT/A neutralizing antibody titers greater than those induced by Hcβtre + CT. C48/80 provided significant nasal adjuvant activity and induced BoNT/A-neutralizing antibodies similar to those induced by CT. Conclusions Ad2F enhanced the nasal immunogenicity of Hcβtre, and the mast cell activator C48/80 was an effective adjuvant for nasal immunization in rabbits, an animal model with a nasal cavity anatomy similar to that in humans. PMID:21304600

  17. Neutralization of toxicological activities of medically-relevant Bothrops snake venoms and relevant toxins by two polyvalent bothropic antivenoms produced in Peru and Brazil.

    PubMed

    Estevao-Costa, Maria I; Gontijo, Silea S; Correia, Barbara L; Yarleque, Armando; Vivas-Ruiz, Dan; Rodrigues, Edith; Chávez-Olortegui, Carlos; Oliveira, Luciana S; Sanchez, Eladio F

    2016-11-01

    Snakebite envenoming is a neglected public pathology, affecting especially rural communities or isolated areas of tropical and subtropical Latin American countries. The parenteral administration of antivenom is the mainstay and the only validated treatment of snake bite envenoming. Here, we assess the efficacy of polyspecific anti-Bothrops serum (α-BS) produced in the Instituto Nacional de Salud (INS, Peru) and at the Fundação Ezequiel Dias (FUNED, Brazil), to neutralize the main toxic activities induced by five medically-relevant venoms of: Bothrops atrox, B. barnetti, and B. pictus from Peru, and the Brazilian B. jararaca and B. leucurus, all of them inhabiting different geographical locations. Protein electrophoretic patterns of these venoms showed significant differences in composition, number and intensity of bands. Another goal was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of lyophilized α-BS developed at INS to neutralize the detrimental effects of these venoms using in vivo and in vitro assays. The availability of lyophilized α-BS has relevant significance in its distribution to distant rural communities where the access to antivenom in health facilities is more difficult. Despite the fact that different antigen mixtures were used for immunization during antivenom production, our data showed high toxin-neutralizing activity of α-BS raised against Bothrops venoms. Moreover, the antivenom cross-reacted even against venoms not included in the immunization mixture. Furthermore, we have evaluated the efficacy of both α-BS to neutralize key toxic compounds belonging to the predominant protein families of Bothrops snakes. Most significantly, both α-BS cross-specifically neutralized the main toxicological activities e.g. lethality and hemorrhage induced by these venoms. Thus, our data indicate that both α-BS are equally effective to treat snake bite victims inflicted by Bothrops snakes particularly B. atrox, responsible for the largest numbers of human

  18. The cellular resistance against oxidative stress (H2O2) is independent of neutral trehalase (Ntc1p) activity in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pendreño, Yolanda; Pedreño, Y; González-Párraga, Pilar; González-Párraga, P; Conesa, Sergio; Conesa, S; Martínez-Esparza, María; Martínez-Esparza, M; Aguinaga, Ana; Aguinaga, A; Hernández, José A; Hernández, J A; Argüelles, Juan Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The protective role of trehalose against oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide in Candida albicans has been investigated in the homozygous mutant ntc1Delta/ntc1Delta, disrupted in the NTC1 gene, which encodes the neutral (cytosolic) trehalase (Ntc1p). After a severe oxidative exposure (50 mM H(2)O(2)), both parental (CAI-4) and ntc1Delta/ntc1Delta exponential-phase cells stored large amounts of intracellular trehalose. In turn, the degree of cell survival was roughly equivalent in both strains, although slightly higher in ntc1Delta/ntc1Delta cultures. The mechanism of 'adaptive tolerance' was functional in the two strains. Thus, a gently oxidative pretreatment (5 mM H(2)O(2)) increased the recovery of cellular viability when it was followed by a severe challenge (50 mM H(2)O(2)); this phenomenon was accompanied by a significant elevation of the endogenous trehalose content. Oxidative stress also induced specific activation of the antioxidant enzymes catalase and glutathione reductase upon gentle oxidative treatment (5 mM H(2)O(2)), whereas superoxide dismutase activity was only activated upon prolonged exposure. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that in C. albicans neutral trehalase activity does not play an essential role in the protective response against oxidative stress. They also suggest that a diminished Ntc1p activity might favour the growth of C. albicans cells subjected to a strong oxidative exposure.

  19. Cytoskeletal protein Flightless (Flii) is elevated in chronic and acute human wounds and wound fluid: neutralizing its activity in chronic but not acute wound fluid improves cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ruzehaji, Nadira; Grose, Randall; Krumbiegel, Doreen; Zola, Heddy; Dasari, Pallave; Wallace, Hilary; Stacey, Michael; Fitridge, Robert; Cowin, Allison J

    2012-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds form a medical need which will expand as the population ages and the obesity epidemic grows. Whilst the complex mechanisms underlying wound repair are not fully understood, remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton plays a critical role. Elevated expression of the actin cytoskeletal protein Flightless I (Flii) is known to impair wound outcomes. To determine if Flii is involved in the impaired healing observed in chronic wounds, its expression in non-healing human wounds from patients with venous leg ulcers was determined and compared to its expression in acute wounds and unwounded skin. Increased expression of Flii was observed in both chronic and acute wounds with wound fluid and plasma also containing secreted Flii protein. Inflammation is a key aspect of wound repair and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis revealed Flii was located in neutrophils within the blood and that it co-localised with CD16+ neutrophils in chronic wounds. The function of secreted Flii was investigated as both chronic wound fluid and Flii have previously been shown to inhibit fibroblast proliferation. To determine if the inhibitory effect of wound fluid was due in part to the presence of Flii, wound fluids were depleted of Flii using Flii-specific neutralizing antibodies (FnAb). Flii depleted chronic wound fluid no longer inhibited fibroblast proliferation, suggesting that Flii may contribute to the inhibitory effect of chronic wound fluid on fibroblast function. Application of FnAbs to chronic wounds may therefore be a novel approach used to improve the local environment of non-healing wounds and potentially improve healing outcomes.

  20. Structural Characterization of Humanized Nanobodies with Neutralizing Activity against the Bordetella pertussis CyaA-Hemolysin: Implications for a Potential Epitope of Toxin-Protective Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Imtong, Chompounoot; Sookrung, Nitat; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2016-01-01

    Previously, the 126-kDa CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) fragment cloned from Bordetella pertussis—the causative agent of whooping cough—and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli was revealed as a key determinant for CyaA-mediated hemolysis against target erythrocytes. Here, phagemid-transfected E. coli clones producing nanobodies capable of binding to CyaA-Hly were selected from a humanized-camel VH/VHH phage-display library. Subsequently verified for binding activities by indirect ELISA and Western blotting, four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies were obtained and designated according to the presence/absence of VHH-hallmark amino acids as VHH2, VH5, VH18 and VHH37. In vitro neutralization assay revealed that all four ~17-kDa His-tagged VH/VHH nanobodies, in particular VHH37, which were over-expressed as inclusions and successfully unfolded-refolded, were able to effectively inhibit CyaA-Hly-mediated hemolysis. Phage-mimotope searching revealed that only peptides with sequence homologous to Linker 1 connecting Blocks I and II within the CyaA-RTX subdomain were able to bind to these four CyaA-Hly-specific nanobodies. Structural analysis of VHH37 via homology modeling and intermolecular docking confirmed that this humanized nanobody directly interacts with CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 through multiple hydrogen and ionic bonds. Altogether, our present data demonstrate that CyaA-RTX/Linker 1 could serve as a potential epitope of CyaA-protective antigen that may be useful for development of peptide-based pertussis vaccines. Additionally, such toxin-specific nanobodies have a potential for test-driven development of a ready-to-use therapeutic in passive immunization for mitigation of disease severity. PMID:27043627

  1. Neutralizing activity and protective immunity to ricin toxin conferred by B subunit (RTB)-specific Fab fragments.

    PubMed

    Yermakova, Anastasiya; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2013-09-01

    SylH3 and 24B11 are murine monoclonal antibodies directed against different epitopes on ricin toxin's binding (RTB) subunit that have been shown to passively protect mice against ricin challenge. Here we report that Fab fragments of SylH3 and 24B11 neutralize ricin in a cell based assay, and in a mouse challenge model as effectively as their respective full length parental IgGs. These data demonstrate that immunity to ricin can occur independent of Fc-mediated clearance.

  2. Effect of sub-lethal concentrations of aluminium on the filtration activity of the freshwater mussel Anodonta cygnea L. at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Kádár, Eniko; Salánki, J; Powell, J; White, K N; McCrohan, Catherine R

    2002-01-01

    Significant amounts of aluminium (Al) are commonly present in rivers and lakes, largely in particulate form in neutral waters. Freshwater bivalves, as filter feeders are therefore exposed to both particulate and dissolved metal and are potentially vulnerable to Al. The effect of Al on filtering behaviour of the freshwater mussel Anodonta cygnea L. was investigated during short (1 hour) and long-term (15 days) exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations (250 and 500 microg l(-1)) at neutral pH. Water flow through the outflow siphon was monitored as an indicator of pumping capacity. Short-term (1 hour) exposure to 500 microg l(-1) added Al produced an irreversible decrease in the duration of filtering periods, presumably as an avoidance response to the toxicant. One-hour exposure 250 microg l(-1) Al had no detectable effect. When mussels were exposed to 250 or 500 microg l(-1) added Al for 15 days, siphon activity measured in days 11-15 of exposure was inhibited by 50% and 65%, respectively, compared to pre-exposure levels. Recovery occurred following transfer of mussels to uncontaminated water. Interaction between Al and freshwater bivalves at neutral pH may affect both the performance of the mussels and the chemical speciation of the metal in the natural environment.

  3. Biological activity of neutral and cationic iridium(III) complexes with κP and κP,κS coordinated Ph₂PCH₂S(O)xPh (x = 0-2) ligands.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Gerd; Mijatović, Sanja; Ranđelović, Ivan; Bulatović, Mirna; Miljković, Djordje; Maksimović-Ivanić, Danijela; Korb, Marcus; Lang, Heinrich; Steinborn, Dirk; Kaluđerović, Goran N

    2013-11-01

    Neutral iridium(III) complexes of the type [Ir(η(5)-C₅Me₅)Cl₂{Ph₂PCH₂S(O)xPh-κP}] (1-3) with diphenylphosphino-functionalized methyl phenyl sulfides, sulfoxides, and sulfones Ph₂PCH₂S(O)xPh (x = 0, L1; 1, L2; 2, L3) and the cationic complex [Ir(η(5)-C₅Me₅)Cl{Ph₂PCH₂SPh-κP,κS}][PF6] (4) were synthesized and fully characterized analytically and spectroscopically. Furthermore, the structure of 2 was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The biological potential of the neutral and cationic iridium(III) complexes was tested in vitro against the cell lines 8505C, A253, MCF-7, SW480 and 518A2. Complex [Ir(η(5)-C₅Me₅)Cl₂{Ph₂PCH₂S(O)Ph-κP}] (2), with ligand L2 κP coordinated containing a pendent sulfinyl group, is the most active one (IC₅₀ values of about 3 μM), thus, with activities comparable to cisplatin. Complex 2 proved to have an even a higher antiproliferative activity than cisplatin against 8505C and SW480 cell lines, used as a model system of highly anaplastic cancers with low sensitivity to conventional chemotherapeutics such as cisplatin. Additional experiments demonstrated that apoptosis and autophagic cell death contribute to the drug's tumoricidal action. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Small Molecules with Similar Structures Exhibit Agonist, Neutral Antagonist or Inverse Agonist Activity toward Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hanzawa, Hiroyuki; Nakao, Naoki; Fujino, Masahiro; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Matsuo, Yoshino; Yanagisawa, Hiroaki; Koike, Hiroyuki; Komuro, Issei; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Saku, Keijiro

    2012-01-01

    Small differences in the chemical structures of ligands can be responsible for agonism, neutral antagonism or inverse agonism toward a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Although each ligand may stabilize the receptor conformation in a different way, little is known about the precise conformational differences. We synthesized the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB) olmesartan, R239470 and R794847, which induced inverse agonism, antagonism and agonism, respectively, and then investigated the ligand-specific changes in the receptor conformation with respect to stabilization around transmembrane (TM)3. The results of substituted cysteine accessibility mapping studies support the novel concept that ligand-induced changes in the conformation of TM3 play a role in stabilizing GPCR. Although the agonist-, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist-binding sites in the AT1 receptor are similar, each ligand induced specific conformational changes in TM3. In addition, all of the experimental data were obtained with functional receptors in a native membrane environment (in situ). PMID:22719858

  5. Early preservation of CXCR5+ PD-1+ helper T cells and B cell activation predict the breadth of neutralizing antibody responses in chronic HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Kristen; Altfeld, Marcus; Alter, Galit; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2014-11-01

    Much is known about the characteristics of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) generated during HIV-1 infection, but little is known about immunological mechanisms responsible for their development in only a minority of those infected by HIV-1. By monitoring longitudinally a cohort of HIV-1-infected subjects, we observed that the preservation of CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T helper cell frequencies and activation status of B cells during the first year of infection correlates with the maximum breadth of plasma neutralizing antibody responses during chronic infection independently of viral load. Although, during the first year of infection, no differences were observed in the abilities of peripheral CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T helper cells to induce antibody secretion by autologous naive B cells, higher frequencies of class-switched antibodies were detected in cocultures of CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T and B cells from the subjects who later developed broadly neutralizing antibody responses than those who did not. Furthermore, B cells from the former subjects had higher expression of AICDA than B cells from the latter subjects, and transcript levels correlated with the frequency of CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells. Thus, the early preservation of CXCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells and B cell function are central to the development of bNAbs. Our study provides a possible explanation for their infrequent generation during HIV-1 infection. Broadly neutralizing antibodies are developed by HIV-1-infected subjects, but so far (and despite intensive efforts over the past 3 decades) they have not been elicited by immunization. Understanding how bNAbs are generated during natural HIV-1 infection and why only some HIV-1-infected subjects generate such antibodies will assist our efforts to elicit bNAbs by immunization. CXCR5(+) PD-1(+) CD4(+) T cells are critical for the development of high-affinity antigen-specific antibody responses. In our study, we found that the HIV-1-infected subjects who develop bNAbs have a higher

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp120 Induces Apoptosis in Human Primary Neurons through Redox-Regulated Activation of Neutral Sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Arundhati; Pahan, Kalipada

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is known to cause disorders of the CNS, including HIV-associated dementia (HAD). HIV-1 coat protein gp120 (glycoprotein 120) induces neuronal apoptosis and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of HAD. However, the mechanism by which gp120 causes neuronal apoptosis is poorly understood. The present study underlines the importance of gp120 in inducing the production of ceramide, an important inducer of apoptosis, in human primary neurons. gp120 induced the activation of sphingomyelinases (primarily the neutral one) and the production of ceramide in primary neurons. Antisense knockdown of neutral (NSMase) but not acidic (ASMase) sphingomyelinase markedly inhibited gp120-mediated apoptosis and cell death of primary neurons, suggesting that the activation of NSMase but not ASMase plays an important role in gp120-mediated neuronal apoptosis. Similarly, the HIV-1 regulatory protein Tat also induced neuronal cell death via NSMase. Furthermore, gp120-induced production of ceramide was redox sensitive, because reactive oxygen species were involved in the activation of NSMase but not ASMase. gp120 coupled CXCR4 (CXC chemokine receptor 4) to induce NADPH oxidase-mediated production of superoxide radicals in neurons, which was involved in the activation of NSMase but not ASMase. These studies suggest that gp120 may induce neuronal apoptosis in the CNS of HAD patients through the CXCR4–NADPH oxidase–superoxide–NSMase–ceramide pathway. PMID:15509740

  7. Effects of ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid, A23187 and calmodulin, calcium activated neutral proteinase antagonists on melatonin secretion in perifused chick pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Agapito, M T; Pablos, M; Reiter, R J; Recio, J M; Gutierrez-Baraja, R

    1998-04-10

    We have recently described, using perifused pineal glands, that calcium influx participates in the activation of chick pineal gland. This study shows that the loss of perifused chick pineal gland activity is a complex process which seems to involve the release of calcium from intracellular stores, calmodulin and calcium-activated neutral protease (CANP). Pineal glands were perifused with Krebs medium (controls) or with Krebs medium plus the drugs ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA; calcium chelator), A23187 (calcium ionophore), EGTA plus A23187 (extra-intra cellular calcium chelation), trifluoperazine and CGS9343B (calmodulin inhibitors), and E-64 (CANP inhibitor) at the time of the natural peak of melatonin release. When EGTA or A23187 were added to the perifusion medium, no effects were observed. On the other hand, when the calcium chelator EGTA plus A23187 (free extra and intracellular calcium levels were dramatically decreased), trifluoperazine, CGS 9343B or E-64 were added to the perifusion medium melatonin synthesis increased significantly and was sustained for 8 h. We propose a prominent role for calcium output from intracellular stores in regulating melatonin production primarily by acting on Ca-calmodulin and calcium-activated neutral protease.

  8. Heterosis or Neutrality?

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    Various statistics have been proposed on an ad hoc basis to test whether alleles at a locus are selectively neutral. By considering population models in which selection operates, this paper shows that the population homozygosity is a powerful test statistic for testing departures from neutrality, in the direction of heterozygote advantage or disadvantage. The sample homozygosity plays a similar role when only sample data are available. Some numerical examples are included, showing the application of the test.—An analysis is made of the effect of heterosis on such quantities as the expected number of alleles in the population or sample, the effective number of alleles, the expected homozygosity, and on the population and sample allele frequency distributions generally. PMID:863245

  9. Analysis of the Pipe Heat Loss of the Water Flow Calorimetry System in EAST Neutral Beam Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chundong; Chen, Yu; Xu, Yongjian; Yu, Ling; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Weitang

    2016-11-01

    Neutral beam injection heating is one of the main auxiliary heating methods in controllable nuclear fusion research. In the EAST neutral beam injector, a water flow calorimetry (WFC) system is applied to measure the heat load on the electrode system of the ion source and the heat loading components of the beamline. Due to the heat loss in the return water pipe, there are some measuring errors for the current WFC system. In this paper, the errors were measured experimentally and analyzed theoretically, which lay a basis for the exact calculation of beam power deposition distribution and neutralization efficiency. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2013GB101001) and the International Science & Technology Cooperation Program of China (No. 2014DFG61950)

  10. Inertia-Centric Stability Analysis of a Planar Uniform Dust Molecular Cloud with Weak Neutral-Charged Dust Frictional Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    K. Karmakar, P.; Borah, B.

    2014-05-01

    This paper adopts an inertia-centric evolutionary model to study the excitation mechanism of new gravito-electrostatic eigenmode structures in a one-dimensional (1-D) planar self-gravitating dust molecular cloud (DMC) on the Jeans scale. A quasi-neutral multi-fluid consisting of warm electrons, warm ions, neutral gas and identical inertial cold dust grains with partial ionization is considered. The grain-charge is assumed not to vary at the fluctuation evolution time scale. The neutral gas particles form the background, which is weakly coupled with the collapsing grainy plasma mass. The gravitational decoupling of the background neutral particles is justifiable for a higher inertial mass of the grains with higher neutral population density so that the Jeans mode frequency becomes reasonably large. Its physical basis is the Jeans assumption of a self-gravitating uniform medium adopted for fiducially analytical simplification by neglecting the zero-order field. So, the equilibrium is justifiably treated initially as “homogeneous”. The efficacious inertial role of the thermal species amidst weak collisions of the neutral-charged grains is taken into account. A standard multiscale technique over the gravito-electrostatic equilibrium yields a unique pair of Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations. It is integrated numerically by the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method with multi-parameter variation for exact shape analyses. Interestingly, the model is conducive for the propagation of new conservative solitary spectral patterns. Their basic physics, parametric features and unique characteristics are discussed. The results go qualitatively in good correspondence with the earlier observations made by others. Tentative applications relevant to space and astrophysical environments are concisely highlighted.

  11. Second generation of pseudotype-based serum neutralization assay for Nipah virus antibodies: sensitive and high-throughput analysis utilizing secreted alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Akira; Marsh, Glenn A; Barr, Jennifer A; Okutani, Akiko; Hotta, Kozue; Bazartseren, Boldbaatar; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Broder, Christopher C; Yamada, Akio; Inoue, Satoshi; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV), Paramyxoviridae, Henipavirus, is classified as a biosafety level (BSL) 4 pathogen, along with the closely related Hendra virus (HeV). A novel serum neutralization test was developed for measuring NiV neutralizing antibodies under BSL2 conditions using a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) and pseudotyped with NiV F/G proteins (VSV-NiV-SEAP). A unique characteristic of this novel assay is the ability to obtain neutralization titers by measuring SEAP activity in supernatant using a common ELISA plate reader. This confers a remarkable advantage over the first generation of NiV-pseudotypes expressing green fluorescent protein or luciferase, which require expensive and specific measuring equipment. Using panels of NiV- and HeV-specific sera from various species, the VSV-NiV-SEAP assay demonstrated neutralizing antibody status (positive/negative) consistent with that obtained by conventional live NiV test, and gave higher antibody titers than the latter. Additionally, when screening sixty-six fruit bat sera at one dilution, the VSV-NiV-SEAP assay produced identical results to the live NiV test and only required a very small amount (2μl) of sera. The results suggest that this novel VSV-NiV-SEAP assay is safe, useful for high-throughput screening of sera using an ELISA plate reader, and has high sensitivity and specificity.

  12. Comprehensive analysis of sperm DNA fragmentation by five different assays: TUNEL assay, SCSA, SCD test and alkaline and neutral Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Maynou, J; García-Peiró, A; Fernández-Encinas, A; Abad, C; Amengual, M J; Prada, E; Navarro, J; Benet, J

    2013-09-01

    Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) is becoming an important test to assess male infertility. Several different tests are available, but no consensus has yet been reached as to which tests are most predictive of infertility. Few publications have reported a comprehensive analysis comparing these methods within the same population. The objective of this study was to analyze the differences between the five most common methodologies, to study their correlations and to establish their cut-off values, sensitivity and specificity in predicting male infertility. We found differences in SDF between fertile donors and infertile patients in TUNEL, SCSA, SCD and alkaline Comet assays, but none with the neutral Comet assay. The alkaline COMET assay was the best in predicting male infertility followed by TUNEL, SCD and SCSA, whereas the neutral COMET assay had no predictive power. For our patient population, threshold values for infertility were 20.05% for TUNEL assay, 18.90% for SCSA, 22.75% for the SCD test, 45.37% for alkaline Comet and 34.37% for neutral Comet. This work establishes in a comprehensive study that the all techniques except neutral Comet are useful to distinguish fertile and infertile men.

  13. Characterization of the neutralizing activity of three anti-human TNF monoclonal antibodies and prediction of their TNF epitopes by molecular modeling and mutant protein approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cansheng; Liu, Xuesong; Feng, Jiannan; Zhang, Wei; Shen, Beifen; Ou'yang, Weiming; Cao, Yunxin; Jin, Boquan

    2006-02-15

    The neutralizing activity of three anti-human TNF monoclonal antibodies, designated D2, E6, and F6 were investigated by three experimental systems. The results from the systems showed that all the three mAbs could neutralize TNF-mediated cytotoxicity in L929 cells, TNF-induced NF-kappaB activation in ECV304 cells, and TNF-upregulated ICAM-1 surface expression on ECV304 cells in dose-dependent manners. D2 had the highest neutralizing activity of the three mAbs, and F6 had higher level of neutralizing activity than E6. We also cloned the VH and VL cDNAs and obtained their cDNA sequences. The sequences were used in molecular modeling to establish the complex structures of TNF with variable regions of the three mAbs, respectively. In the structures, the TNF epitopes of D2, E6, and F6 were predicted at amino acids of (A109, A111-A112, C19, C21-C29, C44-C46, C66-C75, C77, C79, C90, C101, C103, C105, C114, C134-C148), (C18-C19, C21-C30, C32, C37, C43-C47, C67-C75, C83, C105-C106, C131, C135-C141), and (C21-C32, C45-C47, C65, C67-C72, C74, C81, C83, C90-C95, C105-C113, C133-C147), respectively, and the affinities of D2, E6, and F6 to TNF were predicted as -252.69, -232.83, and -299.92 kcal, respectively. Moreover, we proved the binding ability of F6 to the epitopes of amino acids of 141-146 in TNF molecule was better than that of E6, and that of D2 was the best of the three mAbs by Western blot and ELISA, in which the mutant TNF deleted the amino acids of 141-146 in TNF molecule was employed. These results make a basic foundation for selecting candidate mAbs for various purposes, such as construction of chimeric or humanized mAbs for therapeutic purpose, establishment of ELISA kits for determination of TNF, and production of affinity columns to purify TNF.

  14. 9G4 autoreactivity is increased in HIV-infected patients and correlates with HIV broadly neutralizing serum activity.

    PubMed

    Kobie, James J; Alcena, Danielle C; Zheng, Bo; Bryk, Peter; Mattiacio, Jonelle L; Brewer, Matthew; Labranche, Celia; Young, Faith M; Dewhurst, Stephen; Montefiori, David C; Rosenberg, Alexander F; Feng, Changyong; Jin, Xia; Keefer, Michael C; Sanz, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    The induction of a broadly neutralizing antibody (BNAb) response against HIV-1 would be a desirable feature of a protective vaccine. Vaccine strategies thus far have failed to elicit broadly neutralizing antibody responses; however a minority of HIV-infected patients do develop circulating BNAbs, from which several potent broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been isolated. The findings that several BNmAbs exhibit autoreactivity and that autoreactive serum antibodies are observed in some HIV patients have advanced the possibility that enforcement of self-tolerance may contribute to the rarity of BNAbs. To examine the possible breakdown of tolerance in HIV patients, we utilized the 9G4 anti-idiotype antibody system, enabling resolution of both autoreactive VH4-34 gene-expressing B cells and serum antibodies. Compared with healthy controls, HIV patients had significantly elevated 9G4+ serum IgG antibody concentrations and frequencies of 9G4+ B cells, a finding characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, both of which positively correlated with HIV viral load. Compared to the global 9G4-IgD--memory B cell population, the 9G4+IgD--memory fraction in HIV patients was dominated by isotype switched IgG+ B cells, but had a more prominent bias toward "IgM only" memory. HIV envelope reactivity was observed both in the 9G4+ serum antibody and 9G4+ B cell population. 9G4+ IgG serum antibody levels positively correlated (r = 0.403, p = 0.0019) with the serum HIV BNAbs. Interestingly, other serum autoantibodies commonly found in SLE (anti-dsDNA, ANA, anti-CL) did not correlate with serum HIV BNAbs. 9G4-associated autoreactivity is preferentially expanded in chronic HIV infection as compared to other SLE autoreactivities. Therefore, the 9G4 system provides an effective tool to examine autoreactivity in HIV patients. Our results suggest that the development of HIV BNAbs is not merely a consequence of a general breakdown in tolerance, but rather

  15. Neutralization of (NK-cell-derived) B-cell activating factor by Belimumab restores sensitivity of chronic lymphoid leukemia cells to direct and Rituximab-induced NK lysis.

    PubMed

    Wild, J; Schmiedel, B J; Maurer, A; Raab, S; Prokop, L; Stevanović, S; Dörfel, D; Schneider, P; Salih, H R

    2015-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that substantially contribute to the therapeutic benefit of antitumor antibodies like Rituximab, a crucial component in the treatment of B-cell malignancies. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the ability of NK cells to lyse the malignant cells and to mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity upon Fc receptor stimulation is compromised, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unclear. We report here that NK-cells activation-dependently produce the tumor necrosis factor family member 'B-cell activating factor' (BAFF) in soluble form with no detectable surface expression, also in response to Fc receptor triggering by therapeutic CD20-antibodies. BAFF in turn enhanced the metabolic activity of primary CLL cells and impaired direct and Rituximab-induced lysis of CLL cells without affecting NK reactivity per se. The neutralizing BAFF antibody Belimumab, which is approved for treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, prevented the effects of BAFF on the metabolism of CLL cells and restored their susceptibility to direct and Rituximab-induced NK-cell killing in allogeneic and autologous experimental systems. Our findings unravel the involvement of BAFF in the resistance of CLL cells to NK-cell antitumor immunity and Rituximab treatment and point to a benefit of combinatory approaches employing BAFF-neutralizing drugs in B-cell malignancies.

  16. MSFC Skylab neutral buoyancy simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of a neutral buoyancy simulator for developing extravehicular activity systems and for training astronauts in weightless activities is discussed. The construction of the facility and the operations are described. The types of tests and the training activities conducted in the simulator are reported. Photographs of the components of the simulator and actual training exercises are included.

  17. Quantifying Ruminal Digestion of Organic Matter and Neutral Detergent Fiber Using Omasal Sampling in Cattle--A Meta-Analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A data set from 32 studies (122 diets) was used to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the omasal sampling technique by investigating the relationships between ruminal and total digestion of neutral detergent fiber (NDF), between intake and apparent and true ruminal digestion of organic matter (O...

  18. Analysis of Physical Science Textbooks for Conceptual Frameworks on Acids, Bases and Neutralization: Implications for Students' Conceptual Understanding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erduran, Sibel

    Eight physical science textbooks were analyzed for coverage on acids, bases, and neutralization. At the level of the text, clarity and coherence of statements were investigated. The conceptual framework for this topic was represented in a concept map which was used as a coding tool for tracing concepts and links present in textbooks. Cognitive…

  19. Comparative study of the cytolytic activity of snake venoms from African spitting cobras (Naja spp., Elapidae) and its neutralization by a polyspecific antivenom.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Ileana; Gutiérrez, José María; Angulo, Yamileth; Calvete, Juan J; Lomonte, Bruno

    2011-11-01

    Venoms of several Naja species found in Sub-Saharan Africa, and commonly known as "spitting cobras", induce a predominantly cytotoxic pattern of envenomings that may evolve into tissue necrosis and gangrene. Cytotoxic components of their venoms have been identified as members of the three-finger toxin and phospholipase A(2) protein families. In this study, an in vitro assay using the myogenic cell line C2C12, was utilized to compare the cytolytic activities of venoms from five species of spitting cobras: Naja nigricollis, Naja katiensis, Naja pallida, Naja nubiae, and Naja mossambica. These venoms were strongly cytotoxic, causing a 50% effect at ~1.5 μg/well (15 μg/ml), except for N. katiensis venom, which required nearly twice this amount. Using the cell-based assay, the ability of an equine polyspecific antivenom (EchiTab-Plus-ICP) to neutralize cytotoxicity was assessed. The antivenom completely inhibited the cytotoxic activity of all five venoms, although high antivenom/venom ratios were needed. Neutralization curves displayed the following decreasing order of efficiency: N. nubiae > N. pallida > N. mossambica > N. nigricollis > N. katiensis. Results indicate that neutralizing antibodies toward toxins responsible for this particular effect are present in the antivenom, albeit in low titers. Fucoidan, a natural sulfated polysaccharide known to inhibit the toxic effects of some basic snake venom components, was unable to reduce cytotoxicity of Naja venoms. Results emphasize the need of enhancing the immunogenicity of low molecular mass toxins during antivenom production, as well as to search for useful toxin inhibitors which could complement antivenom therapy.

  20. Understanding low reliability of memories for neutral information encoded under stress: alterations in memory-related activation in the hippocampus and midbrain.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shaozheng; Hermans, Erno J; van Marle, Hein J F; Fernández, Guillén

    2012-03-21

    Exposure to an acute stressor can lead to unreliable remembrance of intrinsically neutral information, as exemplified by low reliability of eyewitness memories, which stands in contrast with enhanced memory for the stressful incident itself. Stress-sensitive neuromodulators (e.g., catecholamines) are believed to cause this low reliability by altering neurocognitive processes underlying memory formation. Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated neural activity during memory formation in 44 young, healthy human participants while incidentally encoding emotionally neutral, complex scenes embedded in either a stressful or neutral context. We recorded event-related pupil dilation responses as an indirect index of phasic noradrenergic activity. Autonomic, endocrine, and psychological measures were acquired to validate stress manipulation. Acute stress during encoding led to a more liberal response bias (more hits and false alarms) when testing memory for the scenes 24 h later. The strength of this bias correlated negatively with pupil dilation responses and positively with stress-induced heart rate increases at encoding. Acute stress, moreover, reduced subsequent memory effects (SMEs; items later remembered vs forgotten) in hippocampus and midbrain, and in pupil dilation responses. The diminished SMEs indicate reduced selectivity and specificity in mnemonic processing during memory formation. This is in line with a model in which stress-induced catecholaminergic hyperactivation alters phasic neuromodulatory signaling in memory-related circuits, resulting in generalized (gist-based) processing at the cost of specificity. Thus, one may speculate that loss of specificity may yield less discrete memory representations at time of encoding, thereby causing a more liberal response bias when probing these memories.

  1. An immunogen containing four tandem 10E8 epitope repeats with exposed key residues induces antibodies that neutralize HIV-1 and activates an ADCC reporter gene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiwu; Zhu, Yun; Wang, Qian; Ye, Ling; Dai, Yanyan; Su, Shan; Yu, Fei; Ying, Tianlei; Yang, Chinglai; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu

    2016-06-22

    After three decades of intensive research efforts, an effective vaccine against HIV-1 remains to be developed. Several broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1, such as 10E8, recognize the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 gp41 protein. Thus, the MPER is considered to be a very important target for vaccine design. However, the MPER segment has very weak immunogenicity and tends to insert its epitope residues into the cell membrane, thereby avoiding antibody binding. To address this complication in vaccine development, we herein designed a peptide, designated 10E8-4P, containing four copies of the 10E8 epitope as an immunogen. As predicted by structural simulation, 10E8-4P exhibits a well-arranged tandem helical conformation, with the key residues in the 10E8 epitope oriented at different angles, thus suggesting that some of these key residues may be exposed outside of the lipid membrane. Compared with a peptide containing a single 10E8 epitope (10E8-1P), 10E8-4P not only exhibited better antigenicity but also elicited neutralizing antibody response against HIV-1 pseudoviruses, whereas 10E8-1P could not induce detectable neutralizing antibody response. Importantly, antibodies elicited by 10E8-4P also possessed a strong ability to activate an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) reporter gene, thus suggesting that they may have ADCC activity. Therefore, this strategy shows promise for further optimization and application in future HIV-1 vaccine design.

  2. Energy-decomposition analysis of ion-neutral complexes along reaction coordinates of unimolecular proton-transfer reaction in gas phase: Comparison between 2-butanol radical ion and protonated 2-ethoxypropane ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimura, Natsuhiko; Igarashi, Yoko; Aoyama, Reiko; Shibue, Toshimichi

    2017-10-01

    An energy-decomposition analysis clarified the physical origins that change in gas-phase unimolecular proton-transfer reactions via ion-neutral complexes of the 2-butanol radical ion and protonated 2-ethoxypropane ion. In the bond cleavage and new bond-formation parts of the reaction coordinates, exchange and polarization energies provide a major source of the attraction. In the ion-neutral complex-formation part of the reaction coordinate, different major attractive sources, dispersion, and electrostatic energies were observed. The physical origins of weak interaction in the ion-neutral complexes were affected by the local charges and distances between the ion moieties and the neutral moieties.

  3. Structure-Function Analysis of the Epitope for 4E10, a Broadly Neutralizing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Antibody†

    PubMed Central

    Brunel, Florence M.; Zwick, Michael B.; Cardoso, Rosa M. F.; Nelson, Josh D.; Wilson, Ian A.; Burton, Dennis R.; Dawson, Philip E.

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibody 4E10 binds to a linear, highly conserved epitope within the membrane-proximal external region of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41. We have delineated the peptide epitope of the broadly neutralizing 4E10 antibody to gp41 residues 671 to 683, using peptides with different lengths encompassing the previously suggested core epitope (NWFDIT). Peptide binding to the 4E10 antibody was assessed by competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the Kd values of selected peptides were determined using surface plasmon resonance. An Ala scan of the epitope indicated that several residues, W672, F673, and T676, are essential (>1,000-fold decrease in binding upon replacement with alanine) for 4E10 recognition. In addition, five other residues, N671, D674, I675, W680, and L679, make significant contributions to 4E10 binding. In general, the Ala scan results agree well with the recently reported crystal structure of 4E10 in complex with a 13-mer peptide and with our circular dichroism analyses. Neutralization competition assays confirmed that the peptide NWFDITNWLWYIKKKK-NH2 could effectively inhibit 4E10 neutralization. Finally, to limit the conformational flexibility of the peptides, helix-promoting 2-aminoisobutyric acid residues and helix-inducing tethers were incorporated. Several peptides have significantly improved affinity (>1,000-fold) over the starting peptide and, when used as immunogens, may be more likely to elicit 4E10-like neutralizing antibodies. Hence, this study represents the first stage toward iterative development of a vaccine based on the 4E10 epitope. PMID:16439525

  4. Nondestructive neutron activation analysis of volcanic samples: Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Zoller, W.H.; Finnegan, D.L.; Crowe, B.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of volcanic emissions have been collected between and during eruptions of both Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes during the last three years. Airborne particles have been collected on Teflon filters and acidic gases on base-impregnated cellulose filters. Chemically neutral gas-phase species are collected on charcoal-coated cellulose filters. The primary analytical technique used is nondestructive neutron activation analysis, which has been used to determine the quantities of up to 35 elements on the different filters. The use of neutron activation analysis makes it possible to analyze for a wide range of elements in the different matrices used for the collection and to learn about the distribution between particles and gas phases for each of the elements.

  5. The Role of Co-Activation and Ligand Functionalization in Neutral Methallyl Nickel(II) Catalysts for Ethylene Oligomerization and Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Daniela E; Cortés-Arriagada, Diego; Trofymchuk, Oleksandra S; Yepes, Diana; Gutiérrez-Oliva, Soledad; Rojas, René S; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2017-07-26

    A detailed quantum chemical study that analyzed the mechanism of ethylene oligomerization and polymerization by means of a family of four neutral methallyl Ni(II) catalysts is presented. The role of the boron co-activators, BF3 and B(C6 F5 )3 , and the position of ligand functionalization (ortho or para position of the N-arylcyano moiety of the catalysts) were investigated to explain the chain length of the obtained polymers. The chain initialization proceeded with higher activation barriers for the ortho-functionalized complexes (≈19 kcal mol(-1) ) than the para-substituted isomers (17-18 kcal mol(-1) ). Two main pathways were revealed for the chain propagation: The first pathway was favored when using the B(C6 F5 )3 co-activated catalyst, and it produced long-chain polymers. A second pathway led to the β-hydrogen complexes, which resulted in chain oligomerization; this pathway was preferred when the BF3 co-activated catalysts were used. Otherwise, the termination of longer chains occurred via a stable hydride intermediate, which was formed with an energy barrier of about 14 kcal mol(-1) for the B(C6 F5 )3 co-activated catalysts. Significant new insights were made into the reaction mechanism, whereby neutral methallyl Ni(II) catalysts act in oligomerization and polymerization processes. Specifically, the role of co-activation and ligand functionalization, which are key information for the further design of related catalysts, were revealed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. A constant threat for HIV: Fc-engineering to enhance broadly neutralizing antibody activity for immunotherapy of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nimmerjahn, Falk

    2015-08-01

    Passive immunotherapy with polyclonal or hyperimmune serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) preparations provides an efficient means of protecting immunocompromised patients from microbial infections. More recently, the use of passive immunotherapy to prevent or to treat established infections with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has gained much attention, due to promising preclinical data obtained in monkey and humanized mouse in vivo model systems, demonstrating that the transfer of HIV-specific antibodies can not only prevent HIV infection, but also diminish virus load during chronic infection. Furthermore, an array of broadly neutralizing HIV-specific antibodies has become available and the importance of the IgG constant region as a critical modulator of broadly neutralizing activity has been demonstrated. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings with regard to the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for antibody-mediated clearance of HIV infection, and to discuss how this may help to improve HIV therapy via optimizing Fcγ-receptor-dependent activities of HIV-specific antibodies.

  7. Characterization of an invertase with pH tolerance and truncation of its N-terminal to shift optimum activity toward neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Du, Liqin; Pang, Hao; Wang, Zilong; Lu, Jian; Wei, Yutuo; Huang, Ribo

    2013-01-01

    Most invertases identified to date have optimal activity at acidic pH, and are intolerant to neutral or alkaline environments. Here, an acid invertase named uninv2 is described. Uninv2 contained 586 amino acids, with a 100 amino acids N-terminal domain, a catalytic domain and a C-terminal domain. With sucrose as the substrate, uninv2 activity was optimal at pH 4.5 and at 45°C. Removal of N-terminal domain of uninv2 has shifted the optimum pH to 6.0 while retaining its optimum temperaure at 45°C. Both uninv2 and the truncated enzyme retained highly stable at neutral pH at 37°C, and they were stable at their optimum pH at 4°C for as long as 30 days. These characteristics make them far superior to invertase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is mostly used as industrial enzyme.

  8. Prompt-Gamma Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Richard M

    1993-01-01

    A permanent, full-time instrument for prompt-gamma activation analysis is nearing completion as part of the Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF). The design of the analytical system has been optimized for high gamma detection efficiency and low background, particularly for hydrogen. Because of the purity of the neutron beam, shielding requirements are modest and the scatter-capture background is low. As a result of a compact sample-detector geometry, the sensitivity (counting rate per gram of analyte) is a factor of four better than the existing Maryland-NIST thermal-neutron instrument at this reactor. Hydrogen backgrounds of a few micrograms have already been achieved, which promises to be of value in numerous applications where quantitative nondestructive analysis of small quantities of hydrogen in materials is necessary.

  9. Neutralization of haemorrhagic activity of viper venoms by 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-oxo-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-5-carbonitrile.

    PubMed

    Sunitha, Kabburalli; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Gaonkar, Santosh Laxman; Sebastin Santhosh, Martin; Suresh Kumar, Muthuvel; Basappa; Priya, Babu Shubha; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal Subbegowda; Nanjunda Swamy, Shivananju; Girish, Kesturu Subbaiah

    2011-10-01

    Viper envenomation undeniably induces brutal local manifestations such as haemorrhage, oedema and necrosis involving massive degradation of extracellular matrix at the bitten region and many a times results in dangerous systemic haemorrhage including pulmonary shock. Snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs) are being considered to be the primary culprits for the venom-induced haemorrhage. As a consequence, the venom researchers and medical practitioners are in deliberate quest of SVMP inhibitors. In this study, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of 1-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-oxo-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-5-carbonitrile (DFD) on viper venom-induced haemorrhagic and PLA(2) activities. DFD effectively neutralized the haemorrhagic activity of the medically important viper venoms such as Echis carinatus, Echis ocelatus, Echis carinatus sochureki, Echis carinatus leakeyi and Crotalus atrox in a dose-dependent manner. The histological examinations revealed that the compound DFD effectively neutralizes the basement membrane degradation, and accumulation of inflammatory leucocytes at the site of Echis carinatus venom injection further confirms the inhibition of haemorrhagic activity. In addition, DFD dose dependently inhibited the PLA(2) activities of Crotalus atrox and E. c. leakeyi venoms. According to the docking studies, DFD binds to hydrophobic pocket of SVMP with the ki of 19.26 × 10(-9) (kcal/mol) without chelating Zn(2+) in the active site. It is concluded that the clinically approved inhibitors of haemorrhagins could be used as a potent first-aid agent in snakebite management. Furthermore, a high degree of structural and functional homology between SVMPs and their relatives, the MMPs, suggests that DFD analogues may find immense value in the regulation of multifactorial pathological conditions like inflammation, cancer and wound healing. © 2011 The Authors. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2011 Nordic Pharmacological Society.

  10. Increased frequencies of CD8+CD57+ T cells are associated with antibody neutralization breadth against HIV in viraemic controllers

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Christine D; Romero-Tejeda, Marisol; Scully, Eileen P; Lockhart, Ainsley; Seaman, Michael S; Goldenthal, Ariel; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Walker, Bruce D; Chibnik, Lori B; Jost, Stephanie; Porichis, Filippos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An effective prophylactic vaccine against HIV will need to elicit antibody responses capable of recognizing and neutralizing rapidly evolving antigenic regions. The immunologic milieu associated with development of neutralizing antibody breadth remains to be fully defined. In this study, we sought to identify immunological signatures associated with neutralization breadth in HIV controllers. We applied an immune monitoring approach to analyze markers of T cell and myeloid cell activation by flow cytometry, comparing broad neutralizers with low- and non-neutralizers using multivariate and univariate analyses. Methods Antibody neutralization breadth was determined, and cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stained for T cell and myeloid cell activation markers. Subjects were grouped according to neutralization breadth, and T cell and myeloid cell activation was analyzed by partial least squares discriminant analysis to determine immune signatures associated with high neutralization breadth. Results We show that neutralization breadth in HIV viraemic controllers (VC) was strongly associated with increased frequencies of CD8+CD57+ T cells and that this association was independent of viral load, CD4 count and time since HIV diagnosis. Conclusions Our data show elevated frequencies of CD8+CD57+ T cells in VC who develop neutralization breadth against HIV. This immune signature could serve as a potential biomarker of neutralization breadth and should be further investigated in other HIV-positive cohorts and in HIV vaccine trials. PMID:27938646

  11. Increased frequencies of CD8(+)CD57(+) T cells are associated with antibody neutralization breadth against HIV in viraemic controllers.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Christine D; Romero-Tejeda, Marisol; Scully, Eileen P; Lockhart, Ainsley; Seaman, Michael S; Goldenthal, Ariel; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Walker, Bruce D; Chibnik, Lori B; Jost, Stephanie; Porichis, Filippos

    2016-01-01

    An effective prophylactic vaccine against HIV will need to elicit antibody responses capable of recognizing and neutralizing rapidly evolving antigenic regions. The immunologic milieu associated with development of neutralizing antibody breadth remains to be fully defined. In this study, we sought to identify immunological signatures associated with neutralization breadth in HIV controllers. We applied an immune monitoring approach to analyze markers of T cell and myeloid cell activation by flow cytometry, comparing broad neutralizers with low- and non-neutralizers using multivariate and univariate analyses. Antibody neutralization breadth was determined, and cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stained for T cell and myeloid cell activation markers. Subjects were grouped according to neutralization breadth, and T cell and myeloid cell activation was analyzed by partial least squares discriminant analysis to determine immune signatures associated with high neutralization breadth. We show that neutralization breadth in HIV viraemic controllers (VC) was strongly associated with increased frequencies of CD8(+)CD57(+) T cells and that this association was independent of viral load, CD4 count and time since HIV diagnosis. Our data show elevated frequencies of CD8(+)CD57(+) T cells in VC who develop neutralization breadth against HIV. This immune signature could serve as a potential biomarker of neutralization breadth and should be further investigated in other HIV-positive cohorts and in HIV vaccine trials.

  12. Techniques of Neutralization and Persistent Sexual Abuse by Clergy: A Content Analysis of Priest Personnel Files From the Archdiocese of Milwaukee.

    PubMed

    Spraitz, Jason D; Bowen, Kendra N

    2016-09-01

    The sexual abuse problem in the Catholic Church has received considerable attention by the media in recent years and growing attention from empirical researchers. Despite this growth, there is a lack of theoretical research that uses neutralization techniques to examine clergy offending. Using Sykes and Matza's theory, this study examines the techniques of neutralization used by accused priests in the Archdiocese of Milwaukee. Priests' personnel files, which were made publicly available by the Archbishop of Milwaukee in July 2013, were analyzed retrospectively through a qualitative content analysis of all direct statements and correspondences from the accused. The findings indicate that many priests denied responsibility or injury in an effort to justify their sexually abusive behaviors, but that no discernible patterns of technique use emerged. The need for continued research using recently released personnel files from other dioceses is also discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Sequence analysis of cDNAs encoding the heavy and light chain variable regions of a WSSV-neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Natividad, Karlo Dante T; Nomura, Nakao; Matsumura, Masatoshi

    2008-12-01

    Antibodies raised against individual viral envelope proteins have been used in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) neutralization assays. We report here the sequence analysis of cDNAs encoding the variable regions of a novel monoclonal antibody that binds to the viral envelope protein and neutralizes WSSV infection. The heavy and light variable chains are most homologous to VH7183 germline gene (AF120472) and IgVk RF germline gene (AJ235936), respectively. Database searches using the derived sequences predicted residues comprising CDR loops. The 12 amino acid residue of the heavy chain CDR3 is rich in negatively charged aspartic acid (25%) and did not show significant homology to any murine V gene available on the database. This study provides insights on the paratope-epitope interaction and can be used to identify compounds with comparable properties as the paratope leading to future development of drugs and vaccines for WSSV infection.

  14. Fault analysis of space station dc power systems-using neutral network adaptive wavelets to detect faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momoh, James A.; Wang, Yanchun; Dolce, James L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the application of neutral network adaptive wavelets for fault diagnosis of space station power system. The method combines wavelet transform with neural network by incorporating daughter wavelets into weights. Therefore, the wavelet transform and neural network training procedure become one stage, which avoids the complex computation of wavelet parameters and makes the procedure more straightforward. The simulation results show that the proposed method is very efficient for the identification of fault locations.

  15. An analysis of post-vocalic /s-ʃ/ neutralization in Augsburg German: evidence for a gradient sound change

    PubMed Central

    Bukmaier, Véronique; Harrington, Jonathan; Kleber, Felicitas

    2014-01-01

    The study is concerned with a sound change in progress by which a post-vocalic, pre-consonantal /s-ʃ/ contrast in the standard variety of German (SG) in words such as west/wäscht (/vɛst/~/vɛʃt/, west/washes) is influencing the Augsburg German (AG) variety in which they have been hitherto neutralized as /veʃt/. Two of the main issues to be considered are whether the change is necessarily categorical; and the extent to which the change affects both speech production and perception equally. For the production experiment, younger and older AG and SG speakers merged syllables of hypothetical town names to create a blend at the potential neutralization site. These results showed a trend for a progressively greater /s-ʃ/ differentiation in the order older AG, younger AG, and SG speakers. For the perception experiment, forced-choice responses were obtained from the same subjects who had participated in the production experiment to a 16-step /s-ʃ/ continuum that was embedded into two contexts: /mIst-mIʃt/ in which /s-ʃ/ are neutralized in AG and /və'mIsə/-/və'mIʃə/ in which they are not. The results from both experiments are indicative of a sound change in progress such that the neutralization is being undone under the influence of SG, but in such a way that there is a gradual shift between categories. The closer approximation of the groups on perception suggests that the sound change may be more advanced on this modality than in production. Overall, the findings are consistent with the idea that phonological contrasts are experience-based, i.e., a continuous function of the extent to which a subject is exposed to, and makes use of, the distinction and are thus compatible with exemplar models of speech. PMID:25132828

  16. Computational Mechanistic Study of Redox-Neutral Rh(III)-Catalyzed C-H Activation Reactions of Arylnitrones with Alkynes: Role of Noncovalent Interactions in Controlling Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yang-Yang; Liu, Jian-Biao; Tian, Ying-Ying; Sun, Chuan-Zhi; Huang, Fang; Chen, De-Zhan

    2016-11-23

    The mechanism of redox-neutral Rh(III)-catalyzed coupling reactions of arylnitrones with alkynes was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The free energy profiles associated with the catalytic cycle, involving C(sp(2))-H activation, insertion of alkyne, transfer of O atom, cyclization and protodemetalation, are presented and analyzed. An overwhelming preference for alkyne insertion into Rh-C over Rh-O is observed among all pathways, and the most favorable route is determined. The pivalate-assisted C-H activation step is turnover-limiting, and the cyclization step determines the diastereoselectivity of the reaction, with the stereoselectivity arising mainly from the difference of noncovalent interactions in key transition states. The detailed mechanism of O atom transfer, Rh(III)-Rh(I)-Rh(III) versus Rh(III)-Rh(V)-Rh(III) cycle, is discussed.

  17. Bactericidal Dendritic Polycation Cloaked with Stealth Material via Lipase-Sensitive Intersegment Acquires Neutral Surface Charge without Losing Membrane-Disruptive Activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lulu; He, Chen; Hui, Liwei; Xie, Yuntao; Li, Jia-Min; He, Wei-Dong; Yang, Lihua

    2015-12-23

    Net cationicity of membrane-disruptive antimicrobials is necessary for their activity but may elicit immune attack when administered intravenously. By cloaking a dendritic polycation (G2) with poly(caprolactone-b-ethylene glycol) (PCL-b-PEG), we obtain a nanoparticle antimicrobial, G2-g-(PCL-b-PEG), which exhibits neutral surface charge but kills >99.9% of inoculated bacterial cells at ≤8 μg/mL. The observed activity may be attributed PCL's responsive degradation by bacterial lipase and the consequent exposure of the membrane-disruptive, bactericidal G2 core. Moreover, G2-g-(PCL-b-PEG) exhibits good colloidal stability in the presence of serum and insignificant hemolytic toxicity even at ≥2048 μg/mL. suggesting good blood compatibility required for intravenous administration.

  18. Binding of Gallic Acid and Epigallocatechin Gallate to Heat-Unfolded Whey Proteins at Neutral pH Alters Radical Scavenging Activity of in Vitro Protein Digests.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanyun; Xiong, Youling L

    2017-09-27

    Preheated (80 °C for 9 min) whey protein isolate (HWPI) was reacted with 20, 120, and 240 μmol/g (protein basis) gallic acid (GA) or epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) at neutral pH and 25 °C. Isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorometry showed a similar trend that GA binding to HWPI was moderate but weaker than EGCG binding. However, the shift of maximal fluorescence emission wavelength in opposite directions in response to GA (blue) and EGCG (red) suggests discrepant binding patterns. Electrophoresis results showed that EGCG induced formation of HWPI complexes while GA only had a marginal effect. Both free and phenolic-bound HWPI exhibited mild antiradical activity. However, when subjected to in vitro digestion, synergistic radical-scavenging activity was produced between the phenolics and peptides with the highest synergism being observed on 120 μmol/g phenolics.

  19. Response of neutral mesospheric density to geomagnetic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Wen; Reid, Iain M.; Xue, Xianghui; Younger, Joel P.; Murphy, Damian J.; Chen, Tingdi; Dou, Xiankang

    2017-08-01

    We report an analysis of the neutral mesosphere density response to geomagnetic activity from January 2016 to February 2017 over Antarctica. Neutral mesospheric densities from 85 to 95 km are derived using data from the Davis meteor radar (68.5°S, 77.9°E) and the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Aura satellite. Spectral and Morlet wavelet analyses indicate that a prominent oscillation with a periodicity of 13.5 days is observed in the mesospheric density during the declining phase of solar cycle 24 and is associated with variations in solar wind high-speed streams and recurrent geomagnetic activity. The periodic oscillation in density shows a strong anticorrelation with periodic changes in the auroral electrojet index. These results indicate that a significant decrease in neutral mesospheric density as the geomagnetic activity enhances.

  20. Characterization of a plant-produced recombinant human secretory IgA with broad neutralizing activity against HIV

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Matthew; Reljic, Rajko; Klein, Katja; Drake, Pascal MW; van Dolleweerd, Craig; Pabst, Martin; Windwarder, Markus; Arcalis, Elsa; Stoger, Eva; Altmann, Friedrich; Cosgrove, Catherine; Bartolf, Angela; Baden, Susan; Ma, Julian K-C

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant Secretory IgA (SIgA) complexes have the potential to improve antibody-based passive immunotherapeutic approaches to combat many mucosal pathogens. In this report, we describe the expression, purification and characterization of a human SIgA format of the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2G12, using both transgenic tobacco plants and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana as expression hosts (P2G12 SIgA). The resulting heterodecameric complexes accumulated in intracellular compartments in leaf tissue, including the vacuole. SIgA complexes could not be detected in the apoplast. Maximum yields of antibody were 15.2 μg/g leaf fresh mass (LFM) in transgenic tobacco and 25 μg/g LFM after transient expression, and assembly of SIgA complexes was superior in transgenic tobacco. Protein L purified antibody specifically bound HIV gp140 and neutralised tier 2 and tier 3 HIV isolates. Glycoanalysis revealed predominantly high mannose structures present on most N-glycosylation sites, with limited evidence for complex glycosylation or processing to paucimannosidic forms. O-glycan structures were not identified. Functionally, P2G12 SIgA, but not IgG, effectively aggregated HIV virions. Binding of P2G12 SIgA was observed to CD209 / DC-SIGN, but not to CD89 / FcalphaR on a monocyte cell line. Furthermore, P2G12 SIgA demonstrated enhanced stability in mucosal secretions in comparison to P2G12 IgG mAb. PMID:25484063

  1. A yeast mitotic activator sensitises the shoot apical meristem to become floral in day-neutral tobacco.

    PubMed

    Vojvodová, Petra; Mašková, Petra; Francis, Dennis; Lipavská, Helena

    2013-10-01

    True day-neutral (DN) plants flower regardless of day-length and yet they flower at characteristic stages. DN Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun, makes about forty nodes before flowering. The question still persists whether flowering starts because leaves become physiologically able to export sufficient floral stimulus or the shoot apical meristem (SAM) acquires developmental competence to interpret its arrival. This question was addressed using tobacco expressing the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle gene, Spcdc25, as a tool. Spcdc25 expression induces early flowering and we tested a hypothesis that this phenotype arises because of premature floral competence of the SAM. Scions of vegetative Spcdc25 plants were grafted onto stocks of vegetative WT together with converse grafts and flowering onset followed (as the time since sowing and number of leaves formed till flowering). Spcdc25 plants flowered significantly earlier with fewer leaves, and, unlike WT, also formed flowers from axillary buds. Scions from vegetative Spcdc25 plants also flowered precociously when grafted to vegetative WT stocks. However, in a WT scion to Spcdc25 stock, the plants flowered at the same time as WT. SAMs from young vegetative Spcdc25 plants were elongated (increase in SAM convexity determined by tracing a circumference of SAM sections) with a pronounced meristem surface cell layers compared with WT. Presumably, Spcdc25 SAMs were competent for flowering earlier than WT and responded to florigenic signal produced even in young vegetative WT plants. Precocious reproductive competence in Spcdc25 SAMs comprised a pronounced mantle, a trait of prefloral SAMs. Hence, we propose that true DN plants export florigenic signal since early developmental stages but the SAM has to acquire competence to respond to the floral stimulus.

  2. Quantitative analysis of serum neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from subtypes A, B, C, D, E, F, and I: lack of direct correlation between neutralization serotypes and genetic subtypes and evidence for prevalent serum-dependent infectivity enhancement.

    PubMed Central

    Kostrikis, L G; Cao, Y; Ngai, H; Moore, J P; Ho, D D

    1996-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) M group strains have been assigned to date to nine distinct genetic subtypes, designated A through I, according to phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide sequences of their env or gag genes. Whether there is any relationship between phylogenetic subtypes and the neutralization serotypes is not clear, yet defining the nature of any such relationship by mathematical means would be of major importance for the development of globally effective HIV-1 vaccines. We have therefore developed a quantitative method to analyze serum neutralization of HIV-1 isolates and to identify HIV-1 neutralization serotypes. This method involves calculations of the neutralization index, N(i), a newly defined parameter derived from plots generated from in vitro neutralization assays, calculations of pairwise serum-virus vector distances, and cluster analyses. We have applied this approach to analyze three independent neutralization matrices involving primary HIV-1 strains and sera from genetic subtypes A, B, C, D, E, F, and I. Detailed serum and HIV-1 isolate cluster analyses have shown that in general, the identified neutralization serotypes do not directly correlate with HIV-1 genetic subtypes. These results suggest that neutralization serotypes do not during natural HIV-1 infection are not governed by antibodies directed against simple epitopes within gp120 monomers. A significant proportion (28%) of 1,213 combinations of sera and HIV-1 isolates caused serum-dependent infectivity enhancement [negative N(i) values] rather than neutralization. We also noted that negative N(i) values tended to correlate better with certain HIV-1 isolates rather than with HIV-1-positive sera. Syncytium-inducing variants of HIV-1 were slightly more likely than non-syncytium-inducing variants to undergo serum-dependent infectivity enhancement, although the latter variants could clearly be susceptible to enhancement. PMID:8523557

  3. Improvement of activated carbons as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral solutions by ammonia gas treatment and their performance in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Valerie J.; Nieto Delgado, Cesar; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-11-01

    Commercially available activated carbon (AC) powders from different precursor materials (peat, coconut shell, coal, and hardwood) were treated with ammonia gas at 700 °C to improve their performance as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral pH solutions used in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The ammonia treated ACs exhibited better catalytic performance in rotating ring-disk electrode tests than their untreated precursors, with the bituminous based AC most improved, with an onset potential of Eonset = 0.12 V (untreated, Eonset = 0.08 V) and n = 3.9 electrons transferred in oxygen reduction (untreated, n = 3.6), and the hardwood based AC (treated, Eonset = 0.03 V, n = 3.3; untreated, Eonset = -0.04 V, n = 3.0). Ammonia treatment decreased oxygen content by 29-58%, increased nitrogen content to 1.8 atomic %, and increased the basicity of the bituminous, peat, and hardwood ACs. The treated coal based AC cathodes had higher maximum power densities in MFCs (2450 ± 40 mW m-2) than the other AC cathodes or a Pt/C cathode (2100 ± 1 mW m-2). These results show that reduced oxygen abundance and increased nitrogen functionalities on the AC surface can increase catalytic performance for oxygen reduction in neutral media.

  4. Neutralizing antibodies against West Nile virus identified directly from human B cells by single-cell analysis and next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tsioris, Konstantinos; Gupta, Namita T.; Ogunniyi, Adebola O.; Zimnisky, Ross M.; Qian, Feng; Yao, Yi; Wang, Xiaomei; Stern, Joel N. H.; Chari, Raj; Briggs, Adrian W.; Clouser, Christopher R.; Vigneault, Francois; Church, George M.; Garcia, Melissa N.; Murray, Kristy O.; Montgomery, Ruth R.; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Love, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    West Nile virus infection (WNV) is an emerging mosquito-borne disease that can lead to severe neurological illness and currently has no available treatment or vaccine. Using microengraving, an integrated single-cell analysis method, we analyzed a cohort of subjects infected with WNV - recently infected and post-convalescent subjects - and efficiently identified four novel WNV neutralizing antibodies. We also assessed the humoral response to WNV on a single-cell and repertoire level by integrating next generation sequencing (NGS) into our analysis. The results from single-cell analysis indicate persistence of WNV-specific memory B cells and antibody-secreting cells in post-convalescent subjects. These cells exhibited class-switched antibody isotypes. Furthermore, the results suggest that the antibody response itself does not predict the clinical severity of the disease (asymptomatic or symptomatic). Using the nucleotide coding sequences for WNV-specific antibodies derived from single cells, we revealed the ontogeny of expanded WNV-specific clones in the repertoires of recently infected subjects through NGS and bioinformatic analysis. This analysis also indicated that the humoral response to WNV did not depend on an anamnestic response, due to an unlikely previous exposure to the virus. The innovative and integrative approach presented here to analyze the evolution of neutralizing antibodies from natural infection on a single-cell and repertoire level can also be applied to vaccine studies, and could potentially aid the development of therapeutic antibodies and our basic understanding of other infectious diseases. PMID:26481611

  5. Metal-ion mutagenesis: conversion of a purple acid phosphatase from sweet potato to a neutral phosphatase with the formation of an unprecedented catalytically competent Mn(II)Mn(II) active site.

    PubMed

    Mitić, Natasa; Noble, Christopher J; Gahan, Lawrence R; Hanson, Graeme R; Schenk, Gerhard

    2009-06-17

    The currently accepted paradigm is that the purple acid phosphatases (PAPs) require a heterovalent, dinuclear metal-ion center for catalysis. It is believed that this is an essential feature for these enzymes in order for them to operate under acidic conditions. A PAP from sweet potato is unusual in that it appears to have a specific requirement for manganese, forming a unique Fe(III)-mu-(O)-Mn(II) center under catalytically optimal conditions (Schenk et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2005, 102, 273). Herein, we demonstrate, with detailed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic and kinetic studies, that in this enzyme the chromophoric Fe(III) can be replaced by Mn(II), forming a catalytically active, unprecedented antiferromagnetically coupled homodivalent Mn(II)-mu-(H)OH-mu-carboxylato-Mn(II) center in a PAP. However, although the enzyme is still active, it no longer functions as an acid phosphatase, having optimal activity at neutral pH. Thus, PAPs may have evolved from distantly related divalent dinuclear metallohydrolases that operate under pH neutral conditions by stabilization of a trivalent-divalent metal-ion core. The present Mn(II)-Mn(II) system models these distant relatives, and the results herein make a significant contribution to our understanding of the role of the chromophoric metal ion as an activator of the nucleophile. In addition, the detailed analysis of strain broadened EPR spectra from exchange-coupled dinuclear Mn(II)-Mn(II) centers described herein provides the basis for the full interpretation of the EPR spectra from other dinuclear Mn metalloenzymes.

  6. Direct on-line analysis of neutral analytes by dual sweeping via complexation and organic solvent field enhancement in nonionic MEKC.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jun; Li, Bin; Chang, Yan-Xu; Li, Ping

    2009-04-01

    Conventionally, neutral compounds cannot be separated by nonionic micelle capillary electrophoresis. In this report, the development of a novel on-line preconcentration technique combining dual sweeping based on complexation and organic solvent field enhancement is applied to the sensitive and selective analysis of three neutral glucosides: ginsenoside Rf, ginsenoside Rg1, and ginsenoside Re. Nonionic micelle detectability by CE is demonstrated through effective focusing of large sample volumes (up to 38% capillary length) using a dual sweeping mode. This results in a 50- to 130-fold improvement in the LODs relative to conventional injection method. Neutral compounds sweeping is examined in terms of analyte mobility dependence on borate complexation, solvent viscosity difference, and Brij-35 interaction. Enhanced focusing performance by this hyphenated method was demonstrated by a greater than fourfold reduction in glucoside bandwidth, as compared with common sweeping (devoid of organic solvent-mediated sweeping method in the sample matrices). Moreover, separation efficiencies greater than a million theoretical plates can be achieved by sweeping large sample volumes into narrow zones. The designated method was also tested for its ability to determine the presence of glucosides in the crude extracts obtained from plant sample.

  7. Quantitative analysis of neutral and acidic sugars in whole bacterial cell hydrolysates using high-performance anion-exchange liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wunschel, D; Fox, K F; Fox, A; Nagpal, M L; Kim, K; Stewart, G C; Shahgholi, M

    1997-08-01

    A procedure for analysis of a mixture of neutral and acidic sugars in bacterial whole cell hydrolysates using high-performance anion-exchange liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPAEC-ESI-MS-MS) is described. Certain bacteria (including bacilli), grown under phosphate-limited conditions, switch from producing a teichoic acid (containing ribitol) to a teichuronic acid (characterized by glucuronic acid content). Bacterial cells were hydrolyzed with sulfuric acid to release sugar monomers. The solution was neutralized by extraction with an organic base. Hydrophobic and cationic contaminants (including amino acids) were removed using C18 and SCX columns, respectively. HPAEC is well established as a high-resolution chromatographic technique, in conjunction with a pulsed amperometric detector. Alternatively, for more selective detection, sugars (as M-H- ions) were monitored using ESI-MS. In HPAEC, the mobile phase contains sodium hydroxide and sodium acetate, which are necessary for chromatographic separation of mixtures of neutral and acidic sugars. Elimination of this high ionic content prior to entry into the ESI ion source is vital to avoid compromising sensitivity. This was accomplished using an on-line suppressor and decreasing post-column flow-rates from 1 ml to 50 microliters/min. In the selected ion monitoring mode, background (from the complex sample matrix as well as the mobile phase) was eliminated, simplifying chromatograms. Sugar identification was achieved by MS-MS using collision-induced dissociation.

  8. Detection of serum antibodies to CagA and VacA and of serum neutralizing activity for vacuolating cytotoxin in patients with Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis.

    PubMed Central

    Donati, M; Moreno, S; Storni, E; Tucci, A; Poli, L; Mazzoni, C; Varoli, O; Sambri, V; Farencena, A; Cevenini, R

    1997-01-01

    Thirty patients with dyspepsia, with histological diagnosis of gastritis, and with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) (n = 13) or nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) (n = 17) were admitted to the study. Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin-producing strains (Tox+) were isolated from 14 (46.7%) patients, whereas non-cytotoxin-producing (Tox-) H. pylori strains were isolated from the remaining patients. Of 30 patients studied, 20 (66.7%) had serum cytotoxin neutralizing activity in vitro. Fourteen patients with Tox+ H. pylori strains showed serum cytotoxin neutralizing activity and serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies reactive with both 87-kDa H. pylori vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) and 128-kDa cytotoxin-associated gene product (CagA) by immunoblotting using native enriched preparations of VacA and CagA proteins from H. pylori culture supernatants as the antigens. A 94-kDa antigen cross-reacting with the 87-kDa VacA protein could be demonstrated in culture supernatant with immune sera from humans and animals. All patients (n = 10) lacking serum neutralizing activity were also negative for IgG or IgA against VacA antigen, whereas 6 of the 10 patients showed IgG serum antibody responses against CagA antigen. The prevalence of antibodies to VacA and CagA antigens was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in patients with gastritis (20 and 26 patients for VacA and CagA, respectively, of 30 patients) than in H. pylori culture-negative controls (0 of 27 for both VacA and CagA) and in randomly selected blood donors (17 and 21 for VacA and CagA, respectively, of 120 subjects). All patients with PUD had antibodies to CagA, whereas 13 of 17 (76.5%) patients with NUD had anti-CagA antibodies. Serum IgG antibodies to VacA were present in 9 (69.2%) patients with PUD of 13 patients and in 11 (64.7%) patients with NUD of 17 patients. Anti-CagA antibodies seemed to correlate better with PUD than anti-VacA antibodies. PMID:9220168

  9. Is /h/ phonetically neutral?

    PubMed

    Robb, Michael P; Chen, Yang

    2009-11-01

    Use of /h/ in the phrase, 'Say /hVC/ again' has been tacitly assumed to provide a neutral phonetic context in which to study the articulatory characteristics of speech either preceding or following /h/ articulation. Yet, assessment of the stability or neutrality of /h/ has gone untested. The current study sought to determine whether articulation of /h/ differs according to sex and language accent, as well as to examine its influence on subsequent vowel articulation. Selected acoustic features of /hVC/ were measured in 40 speakers of American English (AE) and 40 speakers of Mandarin-accented English (MAE). Results of an analysis of /h/ duration revealed no sex differences within each language group, however considerable variation was found according to accented vs unaccented English. Clear sex differences were found for the production of /h/, occurring more often among male speakers regardless of language variety. Considerable variation in production of /h/ was found between language groups. Analysis of vowel formant frequencies immediately following /h/ articulation indicated minimal coarticulatory effects for both AE and MAE speakers. The present results appear to support the suggestion that /h/ is not exclusively sex-linked and may indeed vary according to non-biological factors. In spite of these variations, /h/ articulation appears to have a negligible influence on neighbouring vowel articulation.

  10. Proposal of actively heated, long stem based Cs delivery system for diagnostic neutral beam source in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, G.; Mishra, S.; Pandya, K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Soni, J.; Gahlaut, A.; Parmar, K. G.; Shah, S.; Phukan, A.; Roopesh, G.; Ahmed, I.; Chakraborty, A. K.; Singh, M. J.; Schunke, B.; Hemsworth, R.; Svensson, L.; Chareyre, J.; Graceffa, J.

    2013-02-01

    Positioning of Cesium (Cs) oven modules in the complex interface dominated space envelope of a negative ion source such as Diagnostic Neutral Beam (DNB) source for ITER is a challenge not only for the designer of the ion source, but also that of remote handling. A more user friendly design of the Cs delivery could emerge from the consideration of a possibility of injecting the Cs from an oven located outside the vacuum envelope of the ion source, thereby ensuring an ease of Cs refilling and oven maintenance. The design of such a delivery system involves long transmission path of lengths ˜4 m, from ambient to vacuum. System design involves incorporation of a low loss transmission tube enveloped by highly reflective inner surface pipe to reduce the heat losses and therefore heating of the nearby systems. A combination of all metallic valves operated at high temperatures has been incorporated in such a way that the Cs refilling or oven maintenance can be done without breaking the ion source vacuum. Removable joints in the oven heating elements are provided at specific locations to remove the Cs oven for ion source maintenance. Experimental data on Cs transmission over such a long length, required for an effective design of a co-axial transmission, is not presently available. However, an experiment has been carried out in ITER-India making measurements of Cs distribution in coaxial transmission of a length of more than 5 m. These experiments incorporate an additional feature of multiple nozzle distributor based Cs delivery into the ion source which might help in reducing the need of multiple Cs ovens in large ion sources like ITER. The Cs flux from the oven is measured by surface ionization detector (SID). The angular distribution of the Cs flux is measured by a movable SID in linear direction and has been found in good agreement with the calculations. The Cs inventory in the oven reservoir was measured by electrical resistivity measurements methods. The paper

  11. Redox regulation of neutral sphingomyelinase-1 activity in HEK293 cells through a GSH-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Martín, Sergio F; Sawai, Hirofumi; Villalba, José M; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2007-03-15

    Phospholipases are essential enzymes in cellular signalling processes such as cellular differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. Based on its high degree of homology with sequences of prokaryote SMases, a type of Mg(2+)-dependent PLC (nSMase-1) was recently discovered which displayed strong redox dependence for activity in vitro [F. Rodrigues-Lima, A.C. Fensome, M. Josephs, J. Evans, R.J. Veldman, M. Katan (2000), J. Biol. Chem. 275 (36) 28316-28325]. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that glutathione could be a natural regulator of nSMase-1 activity ex vivo. We studied how altering glutathione levels and redox ratio modulate nSMase-1 activity in a HEK293 cell line that ectopically overexpressed the nSMase-1 gene. Diminishing total glutathione with BSO without altering significantly the GSH/GSSG ratio did not affect nSMase-1 activity. Treatment of cells with diamide produced a transient decrease of total glutathione and a sharp, but also transient, decrease of the GSH/GSSG ratio. Under these conditions, nSMase-1 activity was temporarily activated and then returned to normal levels. Simultaneous treatment with BSO and diamide that resulted in permanent decreases of total glutathione and GSH/GSSG redox ratio produced a sustained activation of nSMase-1 activity. Taken together, these data indicate that altering the GSH/GSSG ratio by increasing GSSG or decreasing GSH levels, but not the total concentration of glutathione, modulates nSMase-1 activity. Our findings are the first evidence supporting the ex vivo regulation of nSMase-1 through a redox glutathione-dependent mechanism.

  12. Assessing SABU (Serum Anti Bisa Ular), the sole Indonesian antivenom: A proteomic analysis and neutralization efficacy study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Choo Hock; Liew, Jia Lee; Tan, Kae Yi; Tan, Nget Hong

    2016-11-21

    Serum Anti Ular Bisa (SABU) is the only snake antivenom produced locally in Indonesia; however, its effectiveness has not been rigorously evaluated. This study aimed to assess the protein composition and neutralization efficacy of SABU. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, size-exclusion liquid chromatography and shotgun proteomics revealed that SABU consists of F(ab')2 but a significant amount of dimers, protein aggregates and contaminant albumins. SABU moderately neutralized Calloselasma rhodostoma venom (potency of 12.7 mg venom neutralized per ml antivenom, or 121.8 mg venom per g antivenom protein) and Bungarus fasciatus venom (0.9 mg/ml; 8.5 mg/g) but it was weak against the venoms of Naja sputatrix (0.3 mg/ml; 2.9 mg/g), Naja sumatrana (0.2 mg/ml; 1.8 mg/g) and Bungarus candidus (0.1 mg/ml; 1.0 mg/g). In comparison, NPAV, the Thai Neuro Polyvalent Antivenom, outperformed SABU with greater potencies against the venoms of N. sputatrix (0.6 mg/ml; 8.3 mg/g), N. sumatrana (0.5 mg/ml; 7.1 mg/g) and B. candidus (1.7 mg/ml; 23.2 mg/g). The inferior efficacy of SABU implies that a large antivenom dose is required clinically for effective treatment. Besides, the antivenom contains numerous impurities e.g., albumins that greatly increase the risk of hypersensitivity. Together, the findings indicate that the production of SABU warrants further improvement.

  13. Assessing SABU (Serum Anti Bisa Ular), the sole Indonesian antivenom: A proteomic analysis and neutralization efficacy study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Choo Hock; Liew, Jia Lee; Tan, Kae Yi; Tan, Nget Hong

    2016-01-01

    Serum Anti Ular Bisa (SABU) is the only snake antivenom produced locally in Indonesia; however, its effectiveness has not been rigorously evaluated. This study aimed to assess the protein composition and neutralization efficacy of SABU. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, size-exclusion liquid chromatography and shotgun proteomics revealed that SABU consists of F(ab’)2 but a significant amount of dimers, protein aggregates and contaminant albumins. SABU moderately neutralized Calloselasma rhodostoma venom (potency of 12.7 mg venom neutralized per ml antivenom, or 121.8 mg venom per g antivenom protein) and Bungarus fasciatus venom (0.9 mg/ml; 8.5 mg/g) but it was weak against the venoms of Naja sputatrix (0.3 mg/ml; 2.9 mg/g), Naja sumatrana (0.2 mg/ml; 1.8 mg/g) and Bungarus candidus (0.1 mg/ml; 1.0 mg/g). In comparison, NPAV, the Thai Neuro Polyvalent Antivenom, outperformed SABU with greater potencies against the venoms of N. sputatrix (0.6 mg/ml; 8.3 mg/g), N. sumatrana (0.5 mg/ml; 7.1 mg/g) and B. candidus (1.7 mg/ml; 23.2 mg/g). The inferior efficacy of SABU implies that a large antivenom dose is required clinically for effective treatment. Besides, the antivenom contains numerous impurities e.g., albumins that greatly increase the risk of hypersensitivity. Together, the findings indicate that the production of SABU warrants further improvement. PMID:27869134

  14. Food and drug cues activate similar brain regions: a meta-analysis of functional MRI studies.

    PubMed

    Tang, D W; Fellows, L K; Small, D M; Dagher, A

    2012-06-06

    In healthy individuals, food cues can trigger hunger and feeding behavior. Likewise, smoking cues can trigger craving and relapse in smokers. Brain imaging studies report that structures involved in appetitive behaviors and reward, notably the insula, striatum, amygdala and orbital frontal cortex, tend to be activated by both visual food and smoking cues. Here, by carrying out a meta-analysis of human neuro-imaging studies, we investigate the neural network activated by: 1) food versus neutral cues (14 studies, 142 foci) 2) smoking versus neutral cues (15 studies, 176 foci) 3) smoking versus neutral cues when correlated with craving scores (7 studies, 108 foci). PubMed was used to identify cue-reactivity imaging studies that compared brain response to visual food or smoking cues to neutral cues. Fourteen articles were identified for the food meta-analysis and fifteen articles were identified for the smoking meta-analysis. Six articles were identified for the smoking cue correlated with craving analysis. Meta-analyses were carried out using activation likelihood estimation. Food cues were associated with increased blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response in the left amygdala, bilateral insula, bilateral orbital frontal cortex, and striatum. Smoking cues were associated with increased BOLD signal in the same areas, with the exception of the insula. However, the smoking meta-analysis of brain maps correlating cue-reactivity with subjective craving did identify the insula, suggesting that insula activation is only found when craving levels are high. The brain areas identified here are involved in learning, memory and motivation, and their cue-induced activity is an index of the incentive salience of the cues. Using meta-analytic techniques to combine a series of studies, we found that food and smoking cues activate comparable brain networks. There is significant overlap in brain regions responding to conditioned cues associated with natural and drug rewards.

  15. Apoptosis induced by capsaicin in prostate PC-3 cells involves ceramide accumulation, neutral sphingomyelinase, and JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ana Maria; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Olea, Nuria; Vara, Diana; Chiloeches, Antonio; Díaz-Laviada, Inés

    2007-11-01

    Numerous studies have recently focused on the anticarcinogenic, antimutagenic, or chemopreventive activities of the main pungent component of red pepper, capsaicin (N-vanillyl-8-methyl-1-nonenamide). We have previously shown that, in the androgen-independent prostate cancer PC-3 cells, capsaicin inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis through reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation [Apoptosis 11 (2006) 89-99]. In the present study, we investigated the signaling pathways involved in the antiproliferative effect of capsaicin. Here, we report that capsaicin apoptotic effect was mediated by ceramide generation which occurred by sphingomyelin hydrolysis. Using siRNA, we demonstrated that N-SMase expression is required for the effect of capsaicin on prostate cell viability. We then investigated the role of MAP kinase cascades, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK, in the antiproliferative effect of capsaicin, and we confirmed that capsaicin could activate ERK and JNK but not p38 MAPK. Pharmacological inhibition of JNK kinase, as well as inhibition of ROS by the reducing agent N-acetylcysteine, prevented ceramide accumulation and capsaicin-induced cell death. However, inhibition of ceramide accumulation by the SMase inhibitor D609 did not modify JNK activation. These data reveal JNK as an upstream regulator of ceramide production. Capsaicin-promoted activation of ERK was prevented with all the inhibitors tested. We conclude that capsaicin induces apoptosis in PC-3 cells via ROS generation, JNK activation, ceramide accumulation, and second, ERK activation.

  16. A Label as a Hidden Persuader: Chemists' Neutralization Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen

    1991-01-01

    Identifies and describes the problems students have with the concept of neutralization. Analysis of over 7,500 students' answers to test questions over neutralization showed that many students understand the concept in its original meaning. Students assumed that in any neutralization reaction a neutral solution is formed, even if a weak acid or…

  17. A Label as a Hidden Persuader: Chemists' Neutralization Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen

    1991-01-01

    Identifies and describes the problems students have with the concept of neutralization. Analysis of over 7,500 students' answers to test questions over neutralization showed that many students understand the concept in its original meaning. Students assumed that in any neutralization reaction a neutral solution is formed, even if a weak acid or…

  18. Neutral buoyancy test evaluation of hardware and extravehicular activity procedures for on-orbit assembly of a 14 meter precision reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Lake, Mark S.

    1993-01-01

    A procedure that enables astronauts in extravehicular activity (EVA) to perform efficient on-orbit assembly of large paraboloidal precision reflectors is presented. The procedure and associated hardware are verified in simulated Og (neutral buoyancy) assembly tests of a 14 m diameter precision reflector mockup. The test article represents a precision reflector having a reflective surface which is segmented into 37 individual panels. The panels are supported on a doubly curved tetrahedral truss consisting of 315 struts. The entire truss and seven reflector panels were assembled in three hours and seven minutes by two pressure-suited test subjects. The average time to attach a panel was two minutes and three seconds. These efficient assembly times were achieved because all hardware and assembly procedures were designed to be compatible with EVA assembly capabilities.

  19. Neutral buoyancy test evaluation of hardware and extravehicular activity procedures for on-orbit assembly of a 14 meter precision reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Lake, Mark S.

    1993-02-01

    A procedure that enables astronauts in extravehicular activity (EVA) to perform efficient on-orbit assembly of large paraboloidal precision reflectors is presented. The procedure and associated hardware are verified in simulated Og (neutral buoyancy) assembly tests of a 14 m diameter precision reflector mockup. The test article represents a precision reflector having a reflective surface which is segmented into 37 individual panels. The panels are supported on a doubly curved tetrahedral truss consisting of 315 struts. The entire truss and seven reflector panels were assembled in three hours and seven minutes by two pressure-suited test subjects. The average time to attach a panel was two minutes and three seconds. These efficient assembly times were achieved because all hardware and assembly procedures were designed to be compatible with EVA assembly capabilities.

  20. Heavy Neutral Beam Probe for edge plasma analysis in Tokamaks. Annual progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Castracane, J.; Saravia, E.; Beckstead, J.; Aceto, S.

    1993-09-03

    The contents of this report present the progress achieved to date on the Heavy Neutral Beam Probe project. This effort is an international collaboration in magnetic confinement fusion energy research sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Research (Confinement Systems Division) and the Centre Canadien de Fusion Magnetique (CCFM). The overall objective of the effort is to develop and apply a neutral particle beam to the study of edge plasma dynamics in discharges on the Tokamak de Varennes (TdeV) facility in Montreal, Canada. To achieve this goal, a research and development project was established to produce the necessary hardware to make such measurements and meet the scheduling requirements of the program. At present the project is in the middle of its second budget period with the instrumentation on-site at TdeV. The first half of this budget period was used to complete total system tests at InterScience, Inc., dismantle and ship the hardware to TdeV, re-assemble and install the HNBP on the tokamak. Integration of the diagnostic into the TdeV facility has progressed to the point of first beam production and measurement on the plasma. At this time, the HNBP system is undergoing final de-bugging prior to re-start of machine operation in early Fall of this year.

  1. Fast targeted analysis of 132 acidic and neutral drugs and poisons in whole blood using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Di Rago, Matthew; Saar, Eva; Rodda, Luke N; Turfus, Sophie; Kotsos, Alex; Gerostamoulos, Dimitri; Drummer, Olaf H

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an LC-MS/MS based screening technique that covers a broad range of acidic and neutral drugs and poisons by combining a small sample volume and efficient extraction technique with simple automated data processing. After protein precipitation of 100μL of whole blood, 132 common acidic and neutral drugs and poisons including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, barbiturates, anticonvulsants, antidiabetics, muscle relaxants, diuretics and superwarfarin rodenticides (47 quantitated, 85 reported as detected) were separated using a Shimadzu Prominence HPLC system with a C18 separation column (Kinetex XB-C18, 4.6mm×150mm, 5μm), using gradient elution with a mobile phase of 25mM ammonium acetate buffer (pH 7.5)/acetonitrile. The drugs were detected using an ABSciex(®) API 2000 LC-MS/MS system (ESI+ and -, MRM mode, two transitions per analyte). The method was fully validated in accordance with international guidelines. Quantification data obtained using one-point calibration compared favorably to that using multiple calibrants. The presented LC-MS/MS assay has proven to be applicable for determination of the analytes in blood. The fast and reliable extraction method combined with automated processing gives the opportunity for high throughput and fast turnaround times for forensic and clinical toxicology.

  2. Analysis of arginine and lysine methylation utilizing peptide separations at neutral pH and electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Snijders, Ambrosius P L; Hung, Ming-Lung; Wilson, Stuart A; Dickman, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    Arginine and lysine methylation are widespread protein post-translational modifications. Peptides containing these modifications are difficult to retain using traditional reversed-phase liquid chromatography because they are intrinsically basic/hydrophilic and often fragment poorly during collision induced fragmentation (CID). Therefore, they are difficult to analyze using standard proteomic workflows. To overcome these caveats, we performed peptide separations at neutral pH, resulting in increased retention of the hydrophilic/basic methylated peptides before identification using MS/MS. Alternatively trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) was used for increased trapping of methylated peptides. Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) mass spectrometry was then used to identify and characterize methylated residues. In contrast to previous reports utilizing ETD for arginine methylation, we observed significant amount of side-chain fragmentation. Using heavy methyl stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture it was shown that, similar to CID, a loss of monomethylamine or dimethylamine from the arginine methylated side-chain during ETD can be used as a diagnostic to determine the type of arginine methylation. CID of lysine methylated peptides does not lead to significant neutral losses, but ETD is still beneficial because of the high charge states of such peptides. The developed LC MS/MS methods were successfully applied to tryptic digests of a number of methylated proteins, including splicing factor proline-glutamine-rich protein (SFPQ), RNA and export factor-binding protein 2 (REF2-I) and Sul7D, demonstrating significant advantages over traditional LC MS/MS approaches.

  3. Characterization of the variable regions of a chimpanzee monoclonal antibody with potent neutralizing activity against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Vijh-Warrier, S; Murphy, E; Yokoyama, I; Tilley, S A

    1995-10-01

    The variable (V) regions of C108G, a potent neutralizing chimpanzee mAb against a glycan-dependent epitope in the V2 region of HIV-1 gp120, have been characterized for reactivity with human VH and VK family-specific antisera, and their nucleotide sequences have been determined and analysed. To our knowledge, this is the first study characterizing expressed chimpanzee VH and VK genes. Results show that C108G expresses members of the VH3 and VK1 families, the largest VH and VK families in humans, respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence analyses reveal that C108G VH is most homologous to the human VH3 germline gene, hsigdp33 or V3-43, and the human JH4 minigene. The human germline VK1 gene that is most homologous to C108G VK, hsigk1012, was previously observed in unmutated form in a human autoantibody with anti-i red blood cell antigen specificity and in seven human Fabs and a mAb directed against epitopes overlapping the CD4-binding site of HIV-1 gp120. This germline gene was unmutated in three of the human Fabs and was somatically mutated in the other four Fabs and the mAb. In addition, the JK minigene was used in C108G VK, JK2, is apparently over-represented in anti-HIV-1 mAbs/Fabs; this minigene was used in 61% of the anti-gp120 human Fabs recently described and in three other anti-CD4-binding site human mAbs derived by EBV transformation. While the significance of these findings is unclear, they may suggest a bias in VK/JK gene usage and/or network regulation involving an hsigk1012/JK2 idiotope(s) in the antibody response to HIV-1. Both the C108G VH and VK genes showed evidence of somatic mutation and antigen selection that apparently occurred in vivo during chronic exposure to HIV-1 and its antigens. Surprisingly, this somatic mutation was most profound in the CDR3 region of C108G VK; this region shared only 48% nucleotide homology with hsigk1012 contrasted with a homology of 94% over the remainder of these two V gene sequences. Perhaps the most

  4. In vivo selection for the enhancement of Thermotoga maritima exopolygalacturonase activity at neutral pH and low temperature.

    PubMed

    Drone, Jullien; Dion, Michel; Tellier, Charles; Rabiller, Claude

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an Escherichia coli-based metabolic selection system for the uncovering of new oligogalacturonate-active enzymes. Based on the expression of the specific permease TogMNAB, this system enabled the entry of oligogalacturonates into the cytoplasm of E. coli thus providing a modified strain usable for this purpose. This tool was used for the metabolic selection of Thermotoga maritima exopolygalacturonase (TmGalU) mutants enabling the uptake of sodium trigalacturonate as the sole carbon source by the bacterium. In only one round of error-prone PCR and selection, mutants of TmGalU with a 4-fold increased turnover at pH 7.0 and 2-fold more active at 37 degrees C than wild-type enzyme were isolated. These results show the versatility of this strain for the evolution of oligogalacturonate-active enzymes.

  5. LY2875358, a neutralizing and internalizing anti-MET bivalent antibody, inhibits HGF-dependent and HGF-independent MET activation and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Zeng, Wei; Wortinger, Mark A; Yan, S Betty; Cornwell, Paul; Peek, Victoria L; Stephens, Jennifer R; Tetreault, Jonathan W; Xia, Jinqi; Manro, Jason R; Credille, Kelly M; Ballard, Darryl W; Brown-Augsburger, Patricia; Wacheck, Volker; Chow, Chi-Kin; Huang, Lihua; Wang, Yong; Denning, Irene; Davies, Julian; Tang, Ying; Vaillancourt, Peter; Lu, Jirong

    2014-12-01

    MET, the receptor for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), has been implicated in driving tumor proliferation and metastasis. High MET expression is correlated with poor prognosis in multiple cancers. Activation of MET can be induced either by HGF-independent mechanisms such as gene amplification, specific genetic mutations, and transcriptional upregulation or by HGF-dependent autocrine or paracrine mechanisms. Here, we report on LY2875358, a novel humanized bivalent anti-MET antibody that has high neutralization and internalization activities, resulting in inhibition of both HGF-dependent and HGF-independent MET pathway activation and tumor growth. In contrast to other bivalent MET antibodies, LY2875358 exhibits no functional agonist activity and does not stimulate biologic activities such as cell proliferation, scattering, invasion, tubulogenesis, or apoptosis protection in various HGF-responsive cells and no evidence of inducing proliferation in vivo in a monkey toxicity study. LY2875358 blocks HGF binding to MET and HGF-induced MET phosphorylation and cell proliferation. In contrast to the humanized one-armed 5D5 anti-MET antibody, LY2875358 induces internalization and degradation of MET that inhibits cell proliferation and tumor growth in models where MET is constitutively activated. Moreover, LY2875358 has potent antitumor activity in both HGF-dependent and HGF-independent (MET-amplified) xenograft tumor models. Together, these findings indicate that the mechanism of action of LY2875358 is different from that of the one-armed MET antibody. LY2875358 may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for patients whose tumors are driven by both HGF-dependent and HGF-independent MET activation. LY2875358 is currently being investigated in multiple clinical studies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. [Inefficacy of bothropic antivenin in the neutralization of the coagulation activity of Lachesis muta muta venom. Report of a case and experimental confirmation].

    PubMed

    Bard, R; de Lima, J C; de Sa Neto, R P; de Oliveira, S G; dos Santos, M C

    1994-01-01

    In the State of Amazonas and in areas nearby Manaus, the snakes responsible for the majority of accidents are Bothrops atrox and Lachesis muta muta, with a percentage of confirmed species of 76% and 17%, respectively. Frequently, in the absence of the laquetic and bothropic-laquetic antivenoms, the Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Manaus (IMTM) has been using bothropic antivenom in the treatment of laquetic accident. In this paper is related a case of accident caused by L. muta muta; the patient was treated with bothropic antivenom, and after received twenty ampoules of this antivenom, maintained blood incoagulability until the 13th day after the accident. Experiments to obtain the potency of the bothropic antivenom for the coagulant and hemorrhagic activities has been done, using Bothrops atrox venom as control. The results showed that the potency of the antivenom for the hemorrhagic activity was similar, and the potency for the coagulant activity for the L. m. muta venom was 9.2 times minor than that for B. atrox. The antibodies titles from three different lots of bothropic antivenom varied for the L. m. muta venom, and were constant for the B. atrox venom. Due to the inefficiency of the bothropic antivenom on the neutralization of the coagulant activity for the L. m. muta venom, the use of bothropic antivenom is not recommended in the treatment of Lachesis muta muta accidents.

  7. Mechanistic insight into conjugated N-N bond cleavage by Rh(III)-catalyzed redox-neutral C-H activation of pyrazolones.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weirong; Liu, Yuxia; Bi, Siwei

    2015-08-14

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to investigate the detailed mechanism of Rh(III)-catalyzed redox-neutral C-H activation of pyrazolones with PhC≡CPh. It is found that (1) the methylene C-H activation is prior to the phenyl C-H activation, (2) the N-N bond cleavage is realized via Rh(III) → Rh(I) → Rh(III) rather than via Rh(III) → Rh(V) → Rh(III). The zwitterionic Rh(I) complex is identified to be a key intermediate in promoting the N-N bond cleavage. (3) Different from the Rh(III)-catalyzed hydrazine-directed C-H activation for indole synthesis, the rate-determining step of the reaction studied in this work is the Rh(III) → Rh(I) → Rh(III) process resulting in the N-N bond cleavage rather than the alkyne insertion step. The present theoretical study provides new insight into the mechanism of the conjugated N-N bond cleavage.

  8. Glucose Administration Enhances fMRI Brain Activation and Connectivity Related to Episodic Memory Encoding for Neutral and Emotional Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Marise B.; Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Ryan, John P.; Wilson, Jennifer S.; Harenski, Carla; Hamann, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose enhances memory in a variety of species. In humans, glucose administration enhances episodic memory encoding, although little is known regarding the neural mechanisms underlying these effects. Here we examined whether elevating blood glucose would enhance functional MRI (fMRI) activation and connectivity in brain regions associated with…

  9. Glucose Administration Enhances fMRI Brain Activation and Connectivity Related to Episodic Memory Encoding for Neutral and Emotional Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parent, Marise B.; Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Ryan, John P.; Wilson, Jennifer S.; Harenski, Carla; Hamann, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Glucose enhances memory in a variety of species. In humans, glucose administration enhances episodic memory encoding, although little is known regarding the neural mechanisms underlying these effects. Here we examined whether elevating blood glucose would enhance functional MRI (fMRI) activation and connectivity in brain regions associated with…

  10. Neutral particle analyzer diagnostics on the TCV tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Karpushov, Alexander N.; Duval, Basil P.; Schlatter, Christian; Afanasyev, Valery I.; Chernyshev, Fedor V.

    2006-03-15

    Experimental apparatus and data analysis techniques used in neutral particle analyzer (NPA) diagnostics on the Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV) are described. Two NPAs are used on TCV to measure the energy spectrum of neutral particle fluxes from the plasma. The 'five-channel energy analyzer of atomic particles' used in double electrical analysis mode with fast voltage sweeping detect particles without atomic mass discrimination in the energy range of 0.6-8.0 keV with a time resolution of 0.5-2.0 ms and an energy resolution of 7%-20%. The 28-channel ''compact neutral particle analyzer'' (CNPA) is an EIIB spectrometer with mass and energy separations designed for medium sized fusion machines featuring a carbon neutral stripping foil, a permanent magnet for dispersion, and channel-electron multiplier detectors. The CNPA simultaneously detects two mass species [hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) or D and helium (He)] in the 0.5-50 keV energy range with a resolution of 60%-10% and a time resolution of 0.5-4.0 ms. The CNPA views the plasma across the path of the diagnostic neutral beam and can perform active charge-exchange NPA measurement. Data analysis procedures and numerical algorithms developed for NPA measurement are routinely used on TCV to obtain information on the plasma ion temperature, ion energy distribution function, plasma isotope ratios, and other plasma characteristics.

  11. Neutral particle analyzer diagnostics on the TCV tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpushov, Alexander N.; Duval, Basil P.; Schlatter, Christian; Afanasyev, Valery I.; Chernyshev, Fedor V.

    2006-03-01

    Experimental apparatus and data analysis techniques used in neutral particle analyzer (NPA) diagnostics on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) are described. Two NPAs are used on TCV to measure the energy spectrum of neutral particle fluxes from the plasma. The "five-channel energy analyzer of atomic particles" used in double electrical analysis mode with fast voltage sweeping detect particles without atomic mass discrimination in the energy range of 0.6-8.0keV with a time resolution of 0.5-2.0ms and an energy resolution of 7%-20%. The 28-channel "compact neutral particle analyzer" (CNPA) is an EIIB spectrometer with mass and energy separations designed for medium sized fusion machines featuring a carbon neutral stripping foil, a permanent magnet for dispersion, and channel-electron multiplier detectors. The CNPA simultaneously detects two mass species [hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) or D and helium (He)] in the 0.5-50keV energy range with a resolution of 60%-10% and a time resolution of 0.5-4.0ms. The CNPA views the plasma across the path of the diagnostic neutral beam and can perform active charge-exchange NPA measurement. Data analysis procedures and numerical algorithms developed for NPA measurement are routinely used on TCV to obtain information on the plasma ion temperature, ion energy distribution function, plasma isotope ratios, and other plasma characteristics.

  12. Directed evolution and mutagenesis of glutamate decarboxylase from Lactobacillus brevis Lb85 to broaden the range of its activity toward a near-neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Xie, Yilong; Jiang, Junjun; Wang, Nannan; Li, Yongfu; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) transforms l-glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the consumption of a proton. GAD derived from lactic acid bacteria exhibits optimum activity at pH 4.0-5.0 and significantly loses activity at near-neutral pH. To broaden the active range of the GAD GadB1 from Lactobacillus brevis Lb85 toward a near-neutral pH, irrational design using directed evolution and rational design using site-specific mutagenesis were performed. For directed evolution of GadB1, a sensitive high-throughput screening strategy based on a pH indicator was established. One improved mutant, GadB1(T17I/D294G/Q346H), was selected from 800 variants after one round of EP-PCR. It exhibited 3.9- and 25.0-fold increase in activity and catalytic efficiency, respectively at pH 6.0. Through site-specific mutagenesis, several improved mutants were obtained, with GadB1(E312S) being the best one. The combined mutant GadB1(T17I/D294G/E312S/Q346H) showed even higher catalytic efficiency, 13.1- and 43.2-fold that of wild-type GadB1 at pH 4.6 and 6.0, respectively. The amount of GABA produced in gadB1(T17I/D294G/Q346H)-, gadB1(E312S)- and gadB1(T17I/D294G/E312S/Q346H)-expressing Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 from endogenous l-glutamate increased by 9.6%, 20.3% and 63.9%, respectively. These results indicate that these mutations have beneficial effects on expanding the active pH range and on GABA biosynthesis, suggesting these GadB1 variants as potent candidates for GABA production.

  13. Enzymatic characterization, antigenic cross-reactivity and neutralization of dermonecrotic activity of five Loxosceles spider venoms of medical importance in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Barbaro, Katia Cristina; Knysak, Irene; Martins, Rosana; Hogan, Christopher; Winkel, Ken

    2005-03-15

    Loxosceles spiders have a wide distribution in the temperate and tropical regions of the world. Loxoscelism is characterized by necrotic skin ulceration at the bite site and, less commonly, a systemic illness that may be fatal. The purpose of this study was to characterize and compare aspects of the major medically important Loxosceles spider venoms in a standardized manner, particularly considering their neutralization by two Brazilian antivenoms. By SDS-PAGE (12% acrylamide), Loxosceles deserta, Loxosceles gaucho, Loxosceles intermedia, Loxosceles laeta and Loxosceles reclusa venoms had similar electrophoretic profiles, with the major protein bands of 32-35 kDa. All venoms exhibited gelatinolytic, caseinolytic and fibrinogenolytic activities in vitro with a large array of proteases, mainly between 18.1 and 31.8 kDa. Most of these enzymes were metalloproteases as this activity was abolished by 1,10-phenanthroline. Hyaluronidase activity was detected in a protein band of approximately 44 kDa in all venoms. Sphingomyelinase activity was demonstrated in all five venoms. Antigenic cross-reactivity, by Western blotting, was also observed among all venoms studied using commercial equine antivenoms produced in Brazil (Institute Butantan and CPPI). These antivenoms recognized mainly components between 25 and 40 kDa in all venoms with several minor components of >89 kDa. Strong cross-reactivity was also seen among all venoms through the ELISA technique (titre range: 64,000-512,000). All venoms (5 microg doses) induced a similar local reaction when injected intradermally into the flank of rabbits, demonstrating dermonecrosis, hemorrhage, vasoconstriction, edema, and erythema. However, no reaction was observed when each venom was pre-incubated (1 h, 37 degrees C) with Brazilian commercial sera prior to injection. The antivenoms also abolished the sphingomyelinase activity in vitro, suggesting the venoms of the major medically important Loxosceles spider species have

  14. Generation and reactivity of putative support systems, Ce-Al neutral binary oxide nanoclusters: CO oxidation and C-H bond activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Yin, Shi; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2013-11-01

    Both ceria (CeO2) and alumina (Al2O3) are very important catalyst support materials. Neutral binary oxide nanoclusters (NBONCs), CexAlyOz, are generated and detected in the gas phase and their reactivity with carbon monoxide (CO) and butane (C4H10) is studied. The very active species CeAlO4• can react with CO and butane via O atom transfer (OAT) and H atom transfer (HAT), respectively. Other CexAlyOz NBONCs do not show reactivities toward CO and C4H10. The structures, as well as the reactivities, of CexAlyOz NBONCs are studied theoretically employing density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The ground state CeAlO4• NBONC possesses a kite-shaped structure with an OtCeObObAlOt configuration (Ot, terminal oxygen; Ob, bridging oxygen). An unpaired electron is localized on the Ot atom of the AlOt moiety rather than the CeOt moiety: this Ot centered radical moiety plays a very important role for the reactivity of the CeAlO4• NBONC. The reactivities of Ce2O4, CeAlO4•, and Al2O4 toward CO are compared, emphasizing the importance of a spin-localized terminal oxygen for these reactions. Intramolecular charge distributions do not appear to play a role in the reactivities of these neutral clusters, but could be important for charged isoelectronic BONCs. DFT studies show that the reaction of CeAlO4• with C4H10 to form the CeAlO4H•C4H9• encounter complex is barrierless. While HAT processes have been previously characterized for cationic and anionic oxide clusters, the reported study is the first observation of a HAT process supported by a ground state neutral oxide cluster. Mechanisms for catalytic oxidation of CO over surfaces of AlxOy/MmOn or MmOn/AlxOy materials are proposed consistent with the presented experimental and theoretical results.

  15. CDAW 7 revisited - Further evidence for the creation of a near-earth substorm neutral line. [Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kettmann, G.; Fritz, T. A.; Hones, E. W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Eastman et al. (1988) have interpreted the CDAW 7 substorm of April 24, 1979, previously taken as unambiguously supporting the near-earth neutral line model of magnetospheric substorms, in terms of spatial movements of a preexisting plasma-sheet boundary layer (PSBL) and its associated current sheets across the observing ISEE 1 and 2 spacercraft. It is presently noted that, by contrast, a reinvestigation of ISEE 1 and 2 energetic particle measurements around substorm onset on short time-scales shows the observed flux pattern to require the formation of a particle source eastward of the ISEE spacecraft, well within the plasma sheet, associated with the substorm onset. Strong flows were absent prior to substorm onset, indicating the temporal nature of the event, as opposed to an encounter with a preexisting PSBL containing large flows.

  16. Cryoelectron tomographic analysis of an HIV-neutralizing protein and its complex with native viral gp120.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Adam; Liu, Jun; Van Ryk, Donald; Bliss, Donald; Arthos, James; Henderson, Robert M; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2007-09-21

    Identifying structural determinants of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) neutralization is an important component of rational drug and vaccine design. We used cryoelectron tomography and atomic force microscopy to characterize the structure of an extremely potent HIV-neutralizing protein, D1D2-Ig alpha tp (abbreviated as D1D2-IgP), a polyvalent antibody construct that presents dodecameric CD4 in place of the Fab regions. We show that D1D2-IgP has a novel structure, displaying greater flexibility of its antibody arms than the closely related IgM. Using simian immunodeficiency virus in complex with D1D2-IgP, we present unequivocal evidence that D1D2-IgP can cross-link surface spikes on the same virus and on neighboring viruses. The observed binding to the viral envelope spikes is the result of specific CD4-gp120 interaction, because binding was not observed with MICA-IgP, a construct that is identical to D1D2-IgP except that major histocompatibility complex Class I-related Chain A (MICA) replaces the CD4 moiety. CD4-mediated binding was also associated with a significantly elevated proportion of ruptured viruses. The ratio of inactivated to CD4-liganded gp120-gp41 spikes can be much greater than 1:1, because all gp120-gp41 spikes on the closely apposed surfaces of cross-linked viruses should be incapable of accessing the target cell surface and mediating entry, as a result of inter-virus spike cross-linking. These results implicate flexibility rather than steric bulk or polyvalence per se as a structural explanation for the extreme potency of D1D2-IgP and thus suggest polyvalence presented on a flexible scaffold as a key design criterion for small molecule HIV entry inhibitors.

  17. Neutralizing properties of Musa paradisiaca L. (Musaceae) juice on phospholipase A2, myotoxic, hemorrhagic and lethal activities of crotalidae venoms.

    PubMed

    Borges, M H; Alves, D L F; Raslan, D S; Piló-Veloso, D; Rodrigues, V M; Homsi-Brandeburgo, M I; de Lima, M E

    2005-04-08

    The use of plants as medicine has been referred to since ancient peoples, perhaps as early as Neanderthal man. Plants are a source of many biologically active products and nowadays they are of great interest to the pharmaceutical industry. The study of how people of different culture use plants in particular ways has led to the discovery of important new medicines. In this work, we verify the possible activity of Musa paradisiaca L. (Musaceae) against the toxicity of snake venoms. Musa paradisiaca, an important source of food in the world, has also been reported to be popularly used as an anti-venom. Interaction of Musa paradisiaca extract (MsE) with snake venom proteins has been examined in this study. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2), myotoxic and hemorrhagic activities, including lethality in mice, induced by crotalidae venoms were significantly inhibited when different amounts of MsE were mixed with these venoms before assays. On the other hand, mice that received MsE and venoms without previous mixture or by separated routes were not protected against venom toxicity. Partial chemical characterization of MsE showed the presence of polyphenols and tannins and they are known to non-specifically inactivate proteins. We suggest that these compounds can be responsible for the in vitro inhibition of the toxic effects of snake venoms. In conclusion, according to our results, using mice as experimental model, MsE does not show protection against the toxic effects of snake venoms in vivo, but if was very effective when the experiments were done in vitro.

  18. The chimeric antibody chLpMab-7 targeting human podoplanin suppresses pulmonary metastasis via ADCC and CDC rather than via its neutralizing activity

    PubMed Central

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Fujii, Yuki; Oki, Hiroharu; Fukayama, Masashi; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Kaneko, Mika K.

    2015-01-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN/Aggrus/T1α) binds to C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) and induces platelet aggregation. PDPN is associated with malignant progression, tumor metastasis, and poor prognosis in several types of cancer. Although many anti-human PDPN (hPDPN) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), such as D2-40 and NZ-1, have been established, these epitopes are limited to the platelet aggregation-stimulating (PLAG) domain (amino acids 29-54) of hPDPN. Recently, we developed a novel mouse anti-hPDPN mAb, LpMab-7, which is more sensitive than D2-40 and NZ-1, using the Cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) method. The epitope of LpMab-7 was shown to be entirely different from that of NZ-1, a neutralizing mAb against the PLAG domain according to an inhibition assay and lectin microarray analysis. In the present study, we produced a mouse-human chimeric anti-hPDPN mAb, chLpMab-7. ChLpMab-7 showed high antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). Furthermore, chLpMab-7 inhibited the growth of hPDPN-expressing tumors in vivo. Although chLpMab-7 recognizes a non-PLAG domain of hPDPN, it suppressed the hematogenous metastasis of hPDPN-expressing tumors. These results indicated that chLpMab-7 suppressed tumor development and hematogenous metastasis in a neutralization-independent manner. In conclusion, hPDPN shows promise as a target in the development of a novel antibody-based therapy. PMID:26416352

  19. Geographical variability of the venoms of four populations of Bothrops asper from Panama: Toxicological analysis and neutralization by a polyvalent antivenom.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Sara María; Salazar, Marcos; Acosta de Patiño, Hildaura; Gómez, Leandra; Rodriguez, Abdiel; Correa, David; Saldaña, Julio; Navarro, Deyvi; Lomonte, Bruno; Otero-Patiño, Rafael; Gutiérrez, José María

    2017-04-06

    Bothrops asper is the medically most important venomous snake in Central America. In Panama, the country having the highest incidence of snakebites in Latin America, B. asper is widely distributed throughout the country and is responsible for the vast majority of snakebites. This study was performed to analyze whether there are variations in the toxicological profile and in some biochemical parameters between the venoms of B. asper from four different regions in Panama. The venoms showed a similar profile of lethal, hemorrhagic, in vitro coagulant, defibrinogenating, edema-forming, myotoxic and indirect hemolytic activities, with subtle quantitative variations between samples of some regions. The venoms also had similar SDS-PAGE patterns and reverse phase HPLC profiles. A polyvalent antivenom manufactured in Costa Rica, and regularly used in Panama, was effective in the neutralization of lethal activity of the venoms of the four populations, with Mean Effective Doses (ED50) ranging from 5.98 to 9.72 mg venom/mL antivenom. In agreement, a widespread pattern of cross-reactivity between this antivenom and the four venoms was observed by immunoblotting. Overall, results highlight the lack of marked differences between the venoms of the various populations of B. asper in Panama, and that the antivenom from Costa Rica is effective in neutralizing lethality.

  20. RE: Pedagogy--After Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    I'Anson, John

    2010-01-01

    Within the UK and in many parts of the world, official accounts of what it is to make sense of religion are framed within a rhetorics of neutrality in which such study is premised upon the possibility of dispassionate engagement and analysis. This paper, which is largely theoretical in scope, explores both the affordances and the costs of such an…

  1. Potent neutralization of VEGF biological activities with a fully human antibody Fab fragment directed against VEGF receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, H.-Q. . E-mail: hua-quan.miao@imclone.com; Hu, Kun; Jimenez, Xenia; Navarro, Elizabeth; Zhang, Haifan; Lu Dan; Ludwig, Dale L.; Balderes, Paul; Zhu Zhenping . E-mail: zhenping.zhu@imclone.com

    2006-06-23

    Compelling evidence suggest that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors, especially receptor 2 (VEGFR2, or kinase insert domain-containing receptor, KDR), play a critical role in angiogenesis under both physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer and angiogenic retinopathies such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To this end, inhibition of angiogenesis with antagonists to either VEGF or KDR has yielded significant therapeutic efficacy both in preclinical studies in animal models and in clinical trials in patients with cancer and AMD. We previously reported the identification of a high affinity, fully human anti-KDR antibody fragment, 1121B Fab, through a highly stringent affinity maturation process with a Fab originally isolated from a naive human antibody phage display library. In this study, we demonstrate that 1121B Fab is able to strongly block KDR/VEGF interaction, resulting in potent inhibition of an array of biological activities of VEGF, including activation of the receptor and its signaling pathway, intracellular calcium mobilization, and migration and proliferation of endothelial cells. Taken together, our data lend strong support to the further development of 1121B Fab fragment as an anti-angiogenesis agent in both cancer and angiogenic retinopathies.

  2. An in-source multiple collision-neutral loss filtering based nontargeted metabolomics approach for the comprehensive analysis of malonyl-ginsenosides from Panax ginseng, P. quinquefolius, and P. notoginseng.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-Jian; Yang, Wen-Zhi; Qiu, Shi; Yao, Chang-Liang; Shen, Yao; Pan, Hui-Qin; Bi, Qi-Rui; Yang, Min; Wu, Wan-Ying; Guo, De-An

    2017-02-01

    The simultaneous identification and quantification of target metabolites from herbal medicines are difficult to implement by the full-scan MS based nontargeted metabolomics approaches. Here an in-source multiple collision-neutral loss filtering (IMC-NLF) based nontargeted metabolomics approach is developed and applied to identify and quantify the variations of malonyl-ginsenosides, a common group of acyl saponins with potential anti-diabetic activity, among Panax ginseng, P. quinquefolius, and P. notoginseng. The key steps of the IMC-NLF strategy are the acquisition of specific high-resolution neutral loss data and the efficient filtering of target precursor ions from the full-scan spectra. Using a hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer after UHPLC separation, abundant in-source product ions, [M-H-CO2](-) (due to the vulnerability of the carboxyl group) and [M-H-Mal.](-), were generated at the energies of 70 V and 90 V, respectively. After spectral deconvolution, the generated peak list was screened by dual NLF using a Neutral Loss MS Finder software (NL of 43.9898 Da for CO2 and 86.0004 Da for the malonyl substituent). By combining the precursor ions list-triggered HCD-MS/MS and basic hydrolysis, a total of 101 malonyl-ginsenosides (including 69 from P. ginseng, 52 from P. quinquefolius, and 44 from P. notoginseng) were identified or tentatively characterized. The variations of 81 characterized malonyl-ginsenosides among 45 batches of Ginseng samples were statistically analyzed disclosing ten potential markers. It is the first systematic analysis of malonyl-ginsenosides. The IMC-NLF approach by a single analytical platform is promising in targeted analyses of modification-specific metabolites in metabolomics and drug metabolism.

  3. Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation experiment is scheduled to be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission. The objective of this experiment is to measure very faint emissions at nighttime arising from fluxes of energetic neutral atoms in the thermosphere. These energetic atoms have energies ranging up to about 50 keV, and arise from ions of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen trapped in the inner magnetosphere. Some of these ions become neutralized in charge exchange reactions with neutral hydrogen in the hydrogen geocorona that extends through the region. The ions are trapped on magnetic field lines which cross the equatorial plane at 2 to 6 earth radii distance, and they mirror at a range of heights on these field lines, extending down to the thermosphere at 500 km altitude. The ATLAS 1 measurements will not be of the neutral atoms themselves but of the optical emission produced by those on trajectories that intersect the thermosphere. The ENAP measurements are to be made using the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) which is being flown on the ATLAS mission primarily for daytime spectral observations, and the ENAP measurements will all be nighttime measurements because of the faintness of the emissions and the relatively low level of magnetic activity expected.

  4. Selective neutrality and enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1997-10-01

    This article appeals to a recent theory of enzyme evolution to show that the properties, neutral or adaptive, which characterize the observed allelic variation in natural populations can be inferred from the functional parameters, substrate specificity, and reaction rate. This study delineates the following relations between activity variables, and the forces--adaptive or neutral--determining allelic variation: (1) Enzymes with broad substrate specificity: The observed polymorphism is adaptive; mutations in this class of enzymes can result in increased fitness of the organism and hence be relevant for positive selection. (2) Enzymes with absolute substrate specificity and diffusion-controlled rates: Observed allelic variation will be absolutely neutral; mutations in this class of enzymes will be either deleterious or have no effect on fitness. (3) Enzymes with absolute or group specificity and nondiffusion-controlled rates: Observed variation will be partially neutral; mutants which are selectively neutral may become advantageous under an appropriate environmental condition or different genetic background. We illustrate each of the relations between kinetic properties and evolutionary states with examples drawn from enzymes whose evolutionary dynamics have been intensively studied.

  5. Lymphokine-activated killer and dendritic cell carriage enhances oncolytic reovirus therapy for ovarian cancer by overcoming antibody neutralization in ascites

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, VA; Ilett, EJ; Scott, KJ; West, EJ; Vile, R; Pandha, H; Harrington, K; Young, A; Hall, GD; Coffey, M; Selby, P; Errington-Mais, F; Melcher, AA

    2014-01-01

    Reovirus is an oncolytic virus (OV), which acts by both direct tumor cell killing and priming of antitumor immunity. A major obstacle for effective oncolytic virotherapy is effective delivery of OV to tumor cells. Ovarian cancer is often confined to the peritoneal cavity and therefore i.p. delivery of reovirus may provide the ideal locoregional delivery, avoiding systemic dissemination. However, ovarian cancer is associated with an accumulation of ascitic fluid, which may interfere with oncolytic viral therapy. Here, we investigated the effect of ascites on reovirus-induced oncolysis against primary ovarian cancer cells and ovarian cancer cell lines. In the absence of ascites, reovirus was cytotoxic against ovarian cancer cells; however, cytotoxicity was abrogated in the presence of ascitic fluid. Neutralizing antibodies (NAb) were identified as the cause of this inhibition. Loading OV onto cell carriers may facilitate virus delivery in the presence of NAb and immune cells which have their own antitumor effector activity are particularly appealing. Immature dendritic cells (iDC), Lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and LAKDC cocultures were tested as potential carriers for reovirus for tumor cell killing and immune cell priming. Reovirus-loaded LAKDC, and to a lesser degree iDC, were able to: (i) protect from NAb and hand-off reovirus for tumor cell killing; (ii) induce a proinflammatory cytokine milieu (IFNɣ, IL-12, IFNα and TNFα) and (iii) generate an innate and specific antitumor adaptive immune response. Hence, LAKDC pulsed with reovirus represent a novel, clinically practical treatment for ovarian cancer to maximise both direct and innate/adaptive immune-mediated tumor cell killing. What’s new? Oncolytic viruses (OVs) specifically infect and kill tumor cells. In this study, the authors began to examine whether intraperitoneal delivery of an OV could be effective against ovarian cancer. They found that, while the virus does kill ovarian-cancer cells in

  6. Functional MRI activation in response to panic-specific, non-panic aversive, and neutral pictures in patients with panic disorder and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Engel, K R; Obst, K; Bandelow, B; Dechent, P; Gruber, O; Zerr, I; Ulrich, K; Wedekind, D

    2016-09-01

    There is evidence that besides limbic brain structures, prefrontal and insular cortical activations and deactivations are involved in the pathophysiology of panic disorder. This study investigated activation response patterns to stimulation with individually selected panic-specific pictures in patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) and healthy control subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Structures of interest were the prefrontal, cingulate, and insular cortex, and the amygdalo-hippocampal complex. Nineteen PDA subjects (10 females, 9 males) and 21 healthy matched controls were investigated using a Siemens 3-Tesla scanner. First, PDA subjects gave Self-Assessment Manikin (SAM) ratings on 120 pictures showing characteristic panic/agoraphobia situations, of which 20 pictures with the individually highest SAM ratings were selected. Twenty matched pictures showing aversive but not panic-specific stimuli and 80 neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System were chosen for each subject as controls. Each picture was shown twice in each of four subsequent blocks. Anxiety and depression ratings were recorded before and after the experiment. Group comparisons revealed a significantly greater activation in PDA patients than control subjects in the insular cortices, left inferior frontal gyrus, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, the left hippocampal formation, and left caudatum, when PA and N responses were compared. Comparisons for stimulation with unspecific aversive pictures showed activation of similar brain regions in both groups. Results indicate region-specific activations to panic-specific picture stimulation in PDA patients. They also imply dysfunctionality in the processing of interoceptive cues in PDA and the regulation of negative emotionality. Therefore, differences in the functional networks between PDA patients and control subjects should be further investigated.

  7. Energetic Neutral Atom Imaging at Low Altitudes from the Swedish Microsatellite Astrid: Images and Spectral Analysis. Paper 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Pontus C:son; Barabash, Stas; Norberg, Olle; Lundin, Rickard; Roelof, Rdmond C.; Chase, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENA) in the energy range 26- 52 keV are reported from four occasions during geomagnetically disturbed periods. The data were acquired by the ENA imager flown on the Swedish microsatellite Astrid in a 1000 km circular orbit with 83 deg inclination. The ENA imager separates charged particles from neutrals through an electrostatic deflection system in the energy range between 0.1 and 114 keV. ENA images obtained from vantage points in the polar cap and in the afternoon magnetic local time (MLT) hours looking into the antisunward hemisphere show intense ENA fluxes (approx. 10(exp 4)/sq cm sr s over 26-37 keV) coming from the dusk region and low altitudes (approx. 300 km). The morphology shows no relation to local magnetic field excluding the possibility of charged particle detection. It is concluded that the source of these ENAs are precipitating/mirroring ions from the ring current/trapped radiation interacting with the exobase on auroral L-shells and in the dusk region. The observed ENA fluxes show a relation with Kp and Dst geomagnetic indices. The observed ENA spectrum from a geomagnetic storm on February 8, 1995, is investigated in more detail and compared to the parent ion spectrum obtained by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Project (DMSP) satellite, Fl2, during the same period on L = 6 +/- 2 around dusk. The observed ENA spectral slope is used to derive the parent ion spectral temperature. The derived ion temperatures range is 3.0 - 6.0 keV for H and 4.5 - 8.5 keV for O. The higher of these ion temperatures comes closest in agreement to the extrapolated DMSP spectrum leading us to favor O over H as the species of the detected ENAS. It is shown that the detected ENAs must have been produced at L greater than or equal to 6 to reach the detector without atmospheric attenuation and that the main energy dependence of the ENA spectrum, apart from the parent ion spectrum, is governed by the energy dependence of the charge

  8. Canine distemper virus neutralization activity is low in human serum and it is sensitive to an amino acid substitution in the hemagglutinin protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Wallace, Olivia L; Domi, Arban; Wright, Kevin J; Driscoll, Jonathan; Anzala, Omu; Sanders, Eduard J; Kamali, Anatoli; Karita, Etienne; Allen, Susan; Fast, Pat; Gilmour, Jill; Price, Matt A; Parks, Christopher L

    2015-08-01

    Serum was analyzed from 146 healthy adult volunteers in eastern Africa to evaluate measles virus (MV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) neutralizing antibody (nAb) prevalence and potency. MV plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) results indicated that all sera were positive for MV nAbs. Furthermore, the 50% neutralizing dose (ND50) for the majority of sera corresponded to antibody titers induced by MV vaccination. CDV nAbs titers were low and generally were detected in sera with high MV nAb titers. A mutant CDV was generated that was less sensitive to neutralization by human serum. The mutant virus genome had 10 nucleotide substitutions, which coded for single amino acid substitutions in the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin (H) glycoproteins and two substitutions in the large polymerase (L) protein. The H substitution occurred in a conserved region involved in receptor interactions among morbilliviruses, implying that this region is a target for cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies.

  9. Modeling Secondary Neutral Helium in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Hans-Reinhard; Möbius, Eberhard; Wood, Brian E.

    2016-11-01

    An accurate, analytic heliospheric neutral test-particle code for helium atoms from the interstellar medium (ISM) is coupled to global heliospheric models dominated by hydrogen and protons from the solar wind and the ISM. This coupling enables the forward-calculation of secondary helium neutrals from first principles. Secondaries are produced predominantly in the outer heliosheath, upwind of the heliopause, by charge exchange of helium ions with neutral atoms. The forward model integrates the secondary production terms along neutral trajectories and calculates the combined neutral helium phase space density in the innermost heliosphere where it can be related to in-situ observations. The phase space density of the secondary component is lower than that of primary neutral helium, but its presence can change the analysis of primaries and the ISM, and can yield valuable insight into the characteristics of the plasma in the outer heliosheath.

  10. Neutralization of radical toxicity by temperature-dependent modulation of extracellular SOD activity in coral bleaching pathogen Vibrio shiloi and its role as a virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Murali, Malliga Raman; Raja, Subramaniya Bharathi; Devaraj, Sivasitambaram Niranjali

    2010-08-01

    Vibrio shiloi is the first and well-documented bacterium which causes coral bleaching, particularly, during summer, when seawater temperature is between 26 and 31 degrees C. Coral bleaching is the disruption of the symbiotic association between coral hosts and their photosynthetic microalgae zooxanthellae. This is either due to lowered resistance in corals to infection or increased virulence of the bacterium at the higher sea surface temperature. The concentration of the oxygen and resulting oxygen radicals produced by the zooxanthellae during photosynthesis are highly toxic to bacteria, which also assist corals in resisting the infection. Hence, in this study we examined the effect of different temperatures on the activity of a novel extracellular SOD in V. shiloi. We also partially characterized the SOD and clearly confirmed that the extracellular SOD produced by V. shiloi is Mn-SOD type, as it was not inhibited by H2O2 or KCN. Performing chemical susceptibility killing assay, we confirmed that extracellular SOD may act as first line of defense for the bacteria against the reactive oxygen species. Since, increased activity of novel Mn-SOD at higher temperature, leads to the neutralization of radical toxicity and facilitates the survival of V. shiloi. Hence, the extracellular Mn-SOD may be considered as a virulence factor.

  11. Quantitative Surface Analysis of a Binary Drug Mixture—Suppression Effects in the Detection of Sputtered Ions and Post-Ionized Neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karras, Gabriel; Lockyer, Nicholas P.

    2014-05-01

    A systematic mass spectrometric study of two of the most common analgesic drugs, paracetamol and ibuprofen, is reported. The drugs were studied by means of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) using laser post-ionization (LPI) both in pure samples and in a two-component mixture. Ion suppression within the two-component system observed in SIMS mode is ameliorated using LPI under room temperature analysis. However, suppression effects are apparent in LPI mode on performing the analysis at cryogenic temperatures, which we attribute to changes in the desorption characteristics of sputtered molecules, which influences the subsequent post-ionization efficiency. This suggests different mechanisms of ion suppression in SIMS and LPI modes.

  12. Pesticide residue analysis of a dietary ingredient by gas chromatography/selected-ion monitoring mass spectrometry using neutral alumina solid-phase extraction cleanup.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mijeong Lee; Zahn, Michael; Trinh, Thao; Brooke, Fay A; Ma, Wenwen

    2008-01-01

    A sample cleanup procedure has been developed to remove coextractives that interfere with pesticide residue analysis of a dietary ingredient (Product B), an extract consisting of Scutellaria baicalensis and Acacia catechu. Samples were extracted using 1% acetic acid in acetonitrile, followed by solid-phase extraction and analysis by capillary gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in the selective-ion monitoring mode. Neutral alumina (alumina N) was found to be the most effective sorbent to remove coextractives from Product B; other materials that were tested but failed to remove interference were graphitized carbon black/primary-secondary amine (PSA), octadecylsilane (C18), Florisil, Oasis MCX, and strong anion exchange-PSA. The method was specifically developed for Product B, which was spiked with 41 organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides, and resulted in the recovery of 80 to 120% at U.S. Pharmacopeia limits (0.06 to 4 microg/g) for the majority of the pesticides.

  13. Ion-Ion Neutralization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-31

    Accession No. 3. Recipient’s Catalog Number FGL -TR-82 -0202 b- /- 4. Title (and Subtitle) 5. Type of Report & Period Covered ION-ION NEUTRALIZATION Final...few years under the terms of the grant has been the detailed study of binary ion-ion neutralization reactions involving ions of atmospheric...2TT, England. 1. INTRODUCTION Binary positive-ion negative-ion mutual neutralization viz: A+ + B->C + D (1) can be an important loss process for

  14. Phylogenetic analysis of the main neutralization and hemagglutination determinants of all human adenovirus prototypes as a basis for molecular classification and taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Madisch, Ijad; Harste, Gabi; Pommer, Heidi; Heim, Albert

    2005-12-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV) are responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases. The neutralization epsilon determinant (loops 1 and 2) and the hemagglutination gamma determinant are relevant for the taxonomy of HAdV. Precise type identification of HAdV prototypes is crucial for detection of infection chains and epidemiology. epsilon and gamma determinant sequences of all 51 HAdV were generated to propose molecular classification criteria. Phylogenetic analysis of epsilon determinant sequences demonstrated sufficient genetic divergence for molecular classification, with the exception of HAdV-15 and HAdV-29, which also cannot be differentiated by classical cross-neutralization. Precise sequence divergence criteria for typing (<2.5% from loop 2 prototype sequence and <2.4% from loop 1 sequence) were deduced from phylogenetic analysis. These criteria may also facilitate identification of new HAdV prototypes. Fiber knob (gamma determinant) phylogeny indicated a two-step model of species evolution and multiple intraspecies recombination events in the origin of HAdV prototypes. HAdV-29 was identified as a recombination variant of HAdV-15 (epsilon determinant) and a speculative, not-yet-isolated HAdV prototype (gamma determinant). Subanalysis of molecular evolution in hypervariable regions 1 to 6 of the epsilon determinant indicated different selective pressures in subclusters of species HAdV-D. Additionally, gamma determinant phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that HAdV-8 did not cluster with -19 and -37 in spite of their having the same tissue tropism. The phylogeny of HAdV-E4 suggested origination by interspecies recombination between HAdV-B (hexon) and HAdV-C (fiber), as in simian adenovirus 25, indicating additional zoonotic transfer. In conclusion, molecular classification by systematic sequence analysis of immunogenic determinants yields new insights into HAdV phylogeny and evolution.

  15. Analysis of the Henderson-Abraham-Barker equation in the case of a polar liquid near a neutral hard wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badiali, J. P.; Russier, V.; Holovko, M. E.

    1993-11-01

    The physical content of the wall-particle direct correlation function cw(1), defined from the Ornstein-Zernike equation in the framework of the Henderson-Abraham-Barker approach, is analyzed in the case of a dipolar-hard-sphere fluid near a pure and dielectric neutral wall. The exact asymptotic behavior of cw(1) is established and we show that it is not related to simple physical concepts as, e.g., the image potential. We show that the exact Henderson-Abraham-Barker equation introduces some bridge diagrams which are more simple graphs in another approach. Due to this fact, at least for systems with long range interactions, it is misleading to use the usual closures of the theory of homogeneous liquids for cw(1). In the case of a dielectric wall, we emphasize that the diagrammatic structure of cw(1) requires the introduction of a three-body Mayer function. The dipolar-hard-sphere liquid is a good candidate for analyzing cw(1) because some exact results are known and related to simple electrostatic effects; however, the present results are not restricted to this system.

  16. Neutral Higgs boson production at e^+e^- colliders in the complex MSSM: a full one-loop analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemeyer, S.; Schappacher, C.

    2016-04-01

    For the search for additional Higgs bosons in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) as well as for future precision analyses in the Higgs sector precise knowledge of their production properties is mandatory. We evaluate the cross sections for the neutral Higgs boson production at e^+e^- colliders in the MSSM with complex parameters (cMSSM). The evaluation is based on a full one-loop calculation of the production mechanism e^+e^- → h_i Z, h_i γ , h_i h_j (i,j = 1,2,3), including soft and hard QED radiation. The dependence of the Higgs boson production cross sections on the relevant cMSSM parameters is analyzed numerically. We find sizable contributions to many cross sections. They are, depending on the production channel, roughly of 10-20 % of the tree-level results, but can go up to 50 % or higher. The full one-loop contributions are important for a future linear e^+e^- collider such as the ILC or CLIC. There are plans to implement the evaluation of the Higgs boson production cross sections into the code FeynHiggs.

  17. A temporal analysis shows major histocompatibility complex loci in the Scandinavian wolf population are consistent with neutral evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, J. M.; Ellegren, H.

    2004-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has an integral role in the immune system, and hence diversity at its genes may be of particular importance for the health of populations. In large populations, balancing selection maintains diversity in MHC genes, but theoretical expectations indicate that this form of selection is absent or inefficient in small populations. We examine the level of diversity at three MHC class II loci in the wolf population of Scandinavia, a population naturally recolonized with a genetic contribution from as few as three founders, and in four neighbouring wolf populations. In the Scandinavian wolf population, two alleles were found for each locus and the distribution of alleles is compatible with their linkage into two haplotypes. Changes in the level of heterozygosity over time since recolonization demonstrate the effects of the proposed arrival of an immigrant wolf. The maintenance of diversity is shown to be compatible with a neutral, random allocation of alleles, in conjunction with crossing between packs. A total of 15 DRB1, seven DQA and 10 DQB1 alleles are found in four neighbouring wolf populations, with substantial sharing across populations. Even in these larger populations, bottlenecks and fragmentation with consequent genetic drift are likely to have resulted in few indicators for balancing selection and significant differentiation of populations. PMID:15539354

  18. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  19. Effects of Physically Effective Neutral Detergent Fiber Content on Intake, Digestibility, and Chewing Activity in Fattening Heifer Fed Total Mixed Ration

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Mi Rae; Hong, Heeok; Li, Hong Liang; Jeon, Byong Tae; Choi, Cheong Hee; Ding, Yu Ling; Tang, Yu Jiao; Kim, Eun Kyung; Jang, Se Young; Seong, Hye Jin; Moon, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of physically effective neutral detergent fiber (peNDF) content in total mixed ration (TMR) on dry matter intake, digestibility, and chewing activity in fattening Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae) heifers. The experiment was designed as a replicated 3×3 Latin square using 12 heifers. Fattening heifers were offered one of three diets [high (T1), medium (T2), and low (T3) peNDF] obtained by different mixing times (3, 10, and 25 min) for the same TMR feed. The peNDF content of TMR was determined by multiplying the proportion of dry matter retained by a 1.18 mm-screen in a Penn State Particle Separator by the dietary NDF content. The peNDF1.18 content was 30.36%, 29.20%, and 27.50% for the T1, T2, and T3 diets, respectively (p<0.05). Dry matter intake was not affected by peNDF content in TMR. Total weight gain in T1 group was significantly higher (p<0.05) than in T2 and T3 groups. However, weight gain did not differ between T2 and T3 groups. The feed conversion ratio decreased with an increase in the peNDF content (T1: 12.18, T2: 14.17, and T3: 14.01 g/g). An increase in the peNDF content of TMR was associated with a linear increase in the digestibility of dry matter, crude protein, crude fiber, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber (p<0.05). Also, an increase in peNDF content of the TMR resulted in a linear increase in the number of chews in eating and ruminating (p<0.05), and consequently in the number of total chews (p<0.05). These results indicate that peNDF content affects digestibility and chewing activity. Consequently, the peNDF content of TMR should be considered for improving feed efficiency, digestibility, body weight gain, and performance in fattening heifers. PMID:27488845

  20. Analysis of the variability of the slow solar wind from a highly tilted neutral line: implications for the origin of the slow solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Diaz, Eduardo; Rouillard, Alexis P.; Davies, Jackie A.; Lavraud, Benoit; Kilpua, Emilia; Plotnikov, Illya; Genot, Vincent; Pinto, Rui F.

    2017-04-01

    The continual emergence of small transient structures from helmet streamers is thought to constitute one of the sources of the Slow Solar Wind (SSW) and an important contribution to its variability. In Sanchez-Diaz et al. (2017), we found strong suggestion that these transients are continually released through magnetic reconnection above the helmet streamers. Determining the periodicity of release of these small transients, their size and their morphology is key to establishing whether they constitute the main source of the SSW or only a small contribution to its total mass flux. This type of analysis is not possible for small transients released from an East-West directed neutral line with images taken from the ecliptic plane because the white-light scattered by different transients is integrated along a same line of sight. We take advantage of a highly tilted neutral line that passed through the STEREO SECCHI-A field of view during Carrington rotation 2137, to separate individual transients in the images and characterize their rate of release, their size and their morphology in 3-D at different heliocentric distances. This study reveals for the first time that the periodic release of transients occurs over an extended area of the streamer simultaneously. This study allows to better recognize these small transients in-situ, in order to characterize their plasma and magnetic field properties. This work was made with the funding from the HELCATS project under the FP7 EU contract number 606692.

  1. Analysis of γ-ray production in neutral-current neutrino-oxygen interactions at energies above 200 MeV.

    PubMed

    Ankowski, Artur M; Benhar, Omar; Mori, Takaaki; Yamaguchi, Ryuta; Sakuda, Makoto

    2012-02-03

    It has long been recognized that the observation of γ rays originating from nuclear deexcitation can be exploited to identify neutral-current neutrino-nucleus interactions in water-Cherenkov detectors. We report the results of a calculation of the neutrino- and antineutrino-induced γ-ray production cross section for the oxygen target. Our analysis is focused on the kinematical region of neutrino energy larger than ∼200  MeV, in which a single-nucleon knockout is known to be the dominant reaction mechanism. The numerical results have been obtained using for the first time a realistic model of the target spectral function, extensively tested against electron-nucleus scattering data. We find that at a neutrino energy of 600 MeV the fraction of neutral-current interactions leading to emission of γ rays of energy larger than 6 MeV is ∼41%, and that the contribution of the p_{3/2} state is overwhelming.

  2. Neutral-current detectors for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Hime, A.; SNO Collaboration

    1997-09-01

    With its heavy water target, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has the unique opportunity to measure both the {sup 8}B flux of electron neutrinos from the Sun and the flux of all active neutrino species independently, thus offering a direct and model-independent test of a neutrino oscillation solution to the solar neutrino problem. The authors report on the physics intent and design of a discrete method of neutral-current detection in the Sudbury neutrino observatory that will utilize ultra-low background {sup 3}He proportional counters dispersed throughout the heavy water volume. Projections of background in all components of the detector are considered in an analysis of the ability to extract the neutral-current signal and the neutral-current to charged-current ratio.

  3. Total body nitrogen analysis. [neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of two potential in vivo neutron activation methods for determining total and partial body nitrogen in animals and humans are described. A method using the CO-11 in the expired air as a measure of nitrogen content was found to be adequate for small animals such as rats, but inadequate for human measurements due to a slow excretion rate. Studies on the method of measuring the induced N-13 in the body show that with further development, this method should be adequate for measuring muscle mass changes occurring in animals or humans during space flight.

  4. Neutralizing effects of Nectandra angustifolia extracts against Bothrops neuwiedi snake venom.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ana M; Camargo, Francisco J; Ricciardi, Gabriela A L; Ricciardi, Armando I A; Dellacassa, Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    Leaves extracts and essential oil of Nectandra angustifolia were explored for the first time for neutralization of Bothrops neuwiedi diporus snake venom. The ethanol extract was the most active and inhibited both venom activities (hemolytic and coagulant), while the oil was only active on the coagulant activity. These observations confirmed that certain medicinal plants from Corrientes and Chaco Provinces possess significant snake venom neutralizing capacity and need further examination for their active constituents. Analysis by GC and GC-MS of the essential oil and the enantiomeric excess found for alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and limonene allowed a better characterization of this species.

  5. Temporal analysis of HIV envelope sequence evolution and antibody escape in a subtype A-infected individual with a broad neutralizing antibody response

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Katherine A.; Rainwater, Stephanie; Jaoko, Walter; Overbaugh, Julie

    2010-01-01

    The origin of broadly neutralizing HIV-specific antibodies and their relation to HIV evolution are not well defined. Here we examined virus evolution and neutralizing antibody escape in a subtype A infected individual with a broad, cross subtype, antibody response. The majority of envelope variants isolated over the first ~ 5 years post-infection were poorly neutralized by contemporaneous plasma that neutralized variants from earlier in infection, consistent with a dynamic process of escape. The majority of variants could be neutralized by later plasma, suggesting these evolving variants may have contributed to the elicitation of new antibody responses. However, some variants from later in infection were recognized by plasma from earlier in infection, including one notably neutralization-sensitive variant that was sensitive due to a proline at position 199 in V2. These studies suggest a complex pattern of virus evolution in this individual with a broad NAb response, including persistence of neutralization-sensitive viruses. PMID:20034648

  6. A microplate assay for the coupled transglycosylase-transpeptidase activity of the penicillin binding proteins; a vancomycin-neutralizing tripeptide combination prevents penicillin inhibition of peptidoglycan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vidya P; Basavannacharya, Chandrakala; de Sousa, Sunita M

    2014-07-18

    A microplate, scintillation proximity assay to measure the coupled transglycosylase-transpeptidase activity of the penicillin binding proteins in Escherichia coli membranes was developed. Membranes were incubated with the two peptidoglycan sugar precursors UDP-N-acetyl muramylpentapeptide (UDP-MurNAc(pp)) and UDP-[(3)H]N-acetylglucosamine in the presence of 40 μM vancomycin to allow in situ accumulation of lipid II. In a second step, vancomycin inhibition was relieved by addition of a tripeptide (Lys-D-ala-D-ala) or UDP-MurNAc(pp), resulting in conversion of lipid II to cross-linked peptidoglycan. Inhibitors of the transglycosylase or transpeptidase were added at step 2. Moenomycin, a transglycosylase inhibitor, had an IC50 of 8 nM. Vancomycin and nisin also inhibited the assay. Surprisingly, the transpeptidase inhibitors penicillin and ampicillin showed no inhibition. In a pathway assay of peptidoglycan synthesis, starting from the UDP linked sugar precursors, inhibition by penicillin was reversed by a 'neutral' combination of vancomycin plus tripeptide, suggesting an interaction thus far unreported.

  7. The glow discharge inception and post-discharge relaxation of charged and neutral active particles in synthetic air at low pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, A. P.; Marković, V. Lj; Stamenković, S. N.; Stankov, M. N.

    2015-11-01

    The study of dc glow discharge inception and post-discharge relaxation of charged and neutral active particles in synthetic air at low pressure is presented. The breakdown time delay dependence as a function of relaxation time \\overline{{{t}\\text{d}}}(τ ) (the memory curve) is measured and modelled from milliseconds to the saturation region determined by the cosmic rays and natural radioactivity level. Due to fast conversion \\text{N}2++{{\\text{O}}2}\\to {{\\text{N}}2}+\\text{O}2+ , relaxation of dc discharge in synthetic air in the time interval from one to about ninety milliseconds is dominated by the diffusion decay of molecular oxygen {{O}}_2^ + ions. The change of regimes, from ambipolar to the free diffusion limit, is investigated and the variation of effective diffusion coefficients is determined. The late relaxation is explained by the kinetics of nitrogen atoms, recombining on the surfaces of gas discharge tube and stainless steel electrodes and relevant surface recombination coefficients are determined.

  8. The fission yeast mitotic activator cdc25 and sucrose induce early flowering synergistically in the day-neutral Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun.

    PubMed

    Teichmanová, Martina; Masková, Petra; Vojvodová, Petra; Krekule, Jan; Francis, Dennis; Lipavská, Helena

    2007-01-01

    Here, the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) day-neutral (DN) cv. Samsun transformed with the Schizosaccharomyces pombe mitotic activator gene Spcdc25 was used to study the onset of flowering. Wild type (WT) and cdc25 plants were grown from seeds in vitro until they were 20 cm high. Apical and basal nodes were then subcultured repeatedly and the regenerated plants were used to document time to flowering and the number of leaves formed before flowering. Three sucrose treatments (3, 5 or 7% (weight/volume)) were used and measurements of leaf endogenous soluble carbohydrates were performed. In the 3% treatment, cdc25 plants flowered but WT plants did not. The higher sucrose treatments enabled WT flowering; two-thirds of the plants flowered at 5%, while all plants flowered at 7% sucrose. However, in all treatments, cdc25 plants exhibited significantly earlier flowering and fewer leaves compared with wild type. Remarkably, a typical acropetal flowering gradient in WT plants did not occur in cdc25 plants. In cdc25 leaves, there were significantly higher amounts of endogenous sugars with a higher proportion of sucrose compared with WT. Our data demonstrate that Spcdc25 expression and sucrose act synergistically to induce precocious flowering.

  9. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) neutral beam design

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.J.; Brook, J.W.; Spampinato, P.T.; Mueller, J.P.; Luzzi, T.E.; Sedgley, D.W. . Space Systems Div.)

    1990-10-01

    This report discusses the following topics on ITER neutral beam design: ion dump; neutralizer and module gas flow analysis; vacuum system; cryogenic system; maintainability; power distribution; and system cost.

  10. In vitro assay for neutralizing antibody to hepatitis C virus: evidence for broadly conserved neutralization epitopes.

    PubMed

    Bartosch, Birke; Bukh, Jens; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Granier, Christelle; Engle, Ronald E; Blackwelder, William C; Emerson, Suzanne U; Cosset, François-Loïc; Purcell, Robert H

    2003-11-25

    Our understanding of the humoral immune response to hepatitis C virus (HCV) is limited because the virus can be studied only in humans and chimpanzees and because previously described neutralization assays have not been robust or simple to perform. Nevertheless, epidemiologic and laboratory studies suggested that neutralizing Ab to HCV might be important in preventing infection. We have recently described a neutralization assay based on the neutralization of pseudotyped murine retrovirus constructs bearing HCV envelope glycoproteins on their surface. We have applied the assay to well characterized clinical samples from HCV-infected patients and chimpanzees, confirmed the existence of neutralizing Ab to HCV, and validated most previously reported neutralizations of the virus. We did not find neutralizing anti-HCV in resolving infections but did find relatively high titers (>1:320) of such Ab in chronic infections. Neutralizing Ab was directed not only to epitope(s) in the hypervariable region of the E2 envelope protein but also to one or more epitopes elsewhere in the envelope of the virus. Neutralizing Ab was broadly reactive and could neutralize pseudotype particles bearing the envelope glycoproteins of two different subgenotypes (1a and 1b). The ability to assay neutralizing anti-HCV should permit an assessment of the prospects for successful Ab-mediated passive and active immunoprophylaxis against hepatitis C.

  11. Characterization and epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies raised against rat hepatitis E virus capsid protein: An evaluation of their neutralizing activity in a cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tominari; Takahashi, Masaharu; Tanggis; Mulyanto; Jirintai, Suljid; Nagashima, Shigeo; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the causative agent of acute hepatitis. Rat HEV is a recently discovered virus related to, but distinct from, human HEV. Since laboratory rats can be reproducibly infected with rat HEV and a cell culture system has been established for rat HEV, this virus may be used as a surrogate virus for human HEV, enabling studies on virus replication and mechanism of infection. However, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against rat HEV capsid (ORF2) protein are not available. In this study, 12 murine MAbs were generated against a recombinant ORF2 protein of rat HEV (rRatHEV-ORF2: amino acids 101-644) and were classified into at least six distinct groups by epitope mapping and a cross-reactivity analysis with human HEV ORF2 proteins. Two non-cross-reactive MAbs recognizing the protruding (P) domain detected both non-denatured and denatured rRatHEV-ORF2 protein and efficiently captured cell culture-produced rat HEV particles that had been treated with deoxycholate and trypsin, but not those without prior treatment. In addition, these two MAbs were able to efficiently neutralize replication of cell culture-generated rat HEV particles without lipid membranes (but not those with lipid membranes) in a cell culture system, similar to human HEV.

  12. Neutron activation analysis of a penny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard E.

    2000-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis has been used for many years as an analysis tool and as an educational tool to teach students about nuclear properties. This article presents an exercise in the neutron activation analysis of a penny which, due to the simplicity of the resulting gamma-ray spectra, is appropriate for general physics classes. Students express a great deal of interest both in seeing the reactor in use as well as determining the composition of something that is familiar to them.

  13. Measurement of the neutral D meson mixing parameters in a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the D0→π+π-π0 decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Brown, D. N.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Bhuyan, B.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Cheaib, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Heß, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We perform the first measurement on the D0-D¯ 0 mixing parameters using a time-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay D0→π+π-π0 . The data were recorded with the BABAR detector at center-of-mass energies at and near the ϒ (4 S ) resonance, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of approximately 468.1 fb-1 . The neutral D meson candidates are selected from D*(2010 )+→D0πs+ decays where the flavor at the production is identified by the charge of the low-momentum pion, πs+ . The measured mixing parameters are x =(1.5 ±1.2 ±0.6 )% and y =(0.2 ±0.9 ±0.5 )% , where the quoted uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  14. Effects of errors in velocity tilt on maximum longitudinal compression during neutralized drift compression of intense beam pulses: II. Analysis of experimental data of the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment-I (NDCX-I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massidda, Scott; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Lidia, Steven M.; Seidl, Peter; Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-01

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective means for particle beam focusing and current amplification with applications to heavy ion fusion. In the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment-I (NDCX-I), a non-relativistic ion beam pulse is passed through an inductive bunching module that produces a longitudinal velocity modulation. Due to the applied velocity tilt, the beam pulse compresses during neutralized drift. The ion beam pulse can be compressed by a factor of more than 100; however, errors in the velocity modulation affect the compression ratio in complex ways. We have performed a study of how the longitudinal compression of a typical NDCX-I ion beam pulse is affected by the initial errors in the acquired velocity modulation. Without any voltage errors, an ideal compression is limited only by the initial energy spread of the ion beam, ΔΕb. In the presence of large voltage errors, δU≫ΔEb, the maximum compression ratio is found to be inversely proportional to the geometric mean of the relative error in velocity modulation and the relative intrinsic energy spread of the beam ions. Although small parts of a beam pulse can achieve high local values of compression ratio, the acquired velocity errors cause these parts to compress at different times, limiting the overall compression of the ion beam pulse.

  15. The effects of adding fat to diets of lactating dairy cows on total-tract neutral detergent fiber digestibility: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Weld, K A; Armentano, L E

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine the effects of supplemental fat on fiber digestibility in lactating dairy cattle. Published papers that evaluated the effects of adding fat to the diets of lactating dairy cattle on total-tract neutral detergent fiber digestibility (ttNDFd) and dry matter intake (DMI) were compiled. The final data set included 108 fat-supplemented treatment means, not including low-fat controls, from 38 publications. The fat-supplemented treatment means exhibited a wide range of ttNDFd (49.4% ± 9.3, mean ± standard deviation) and DMI (21.3 kg/d ± 3.5). Observations were summarized as the difference between the treatment means for fat-supplemented diets minus their respective low-fat control means. Additionally, those differences were divided by the difference in diet fatty acid (FA) concentration between the treatment and control diets. Treatment means were categorized by the type of fat supplement. Supplementing 3% FA in the diet as medium-chain fats (containing predominately 12- and 14-carbon saturated FA) or unsaturated vegetable oil decreased ttNDFd by 8.0 and 1.2 percentage units, respectively. Adding 3% calcium salts of long-chain FA or saturated fats increased ttNDFd by 3.2 and 1.3 percentage units, respectively. No other fat supplement type affected ttNDFd. Except for saturated fats and animal-vegetable fats, supplementing dietary fat decreased DMI. When the values for changes in ttNDFd are regressed on changes in DMI there was a positive relationship, though the coefficient of determination is only 0.20. When changes in ttNDFd were regressed on changes in DMI, within individual fat supplement types, there was no relationship within calcium salt supplements. There was a positive relationship between changes in ttNDFd and changes in DMI for saturated fats. Neither relationship suggested that the increased ttNDFd with calcium salts or saturated FA was due to decreased DMI for these fat sources. A subset of the means

  16. Modified activity of a VP2-located neutralizing epitope on various vaccine, pathogenic and hypervirulent strains of infectious bursal disease virus.

    PubMed

    Eterradossi, N; Toquin, D; Rivallan, G; Guittet, M

    1997-01-01

    Nine monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) to a vaccine strain of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) of intermediate virulence were characterized in Western-blot, radioimmunoprecipitation, ELISA additivity, and neutralization assays. At least two distinct serotype 1-specific conformation-dependent overlapping neutralizing antigenic domains were shown to be present on IBDV-VP2, and were respectively probed by Mabs 3 and 4, and by Mabs 6 and 7. Ten serotype 1 vaccine or pathogenic IBDV strains were tested for neutralization. Most mild or intermediate vaccine strains were efficiently neutralized by all Mabs, whereas US variant A, European pathogenic strain Faragher 52/70 and French hypervirulent isolate 89163 were not neutralized by Mabs 3 and 4. In addition, these two Mabs were shown to bind to the Faragher 52/70 strain, but not to the 89163 isolate, in an antigen-capture ELISA. These results suggest that a neutralizing epitope is possibly modified in European pathogenic IBDV strains, and that Mabs 3 and 4 may prove useful for antigenic differentiation between European classical and hypervirulent isolates.

  17. Structure, activity and interactions of the cysteine deleted analog of tachyplesin-1 with lipopolysaccharide micelle: Mechanistic insights into outer-membrane permeabilization and endotoxin neutralization.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Rathi; Mohanram, Harini; Joshi, Mangesh; Domadia, Prerna N; Torres, Jaume; Ruedl, Christiane; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2012-07-01

    Tachyplesin-1, a disulfide stabilized beta-hairpin antimicrobial peptide, can be found at the hemocytes of horse shoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. A cysteine deleted linear analog of tachyplesin-1 or CDT (KWFRVYRGIYRRR-NH2) contains a broad spectrum of bactericidal activity with a reduced hemolytic property. The bactericidal activity of CDT stems from selective interactions with the negatively charged lipids including LPS. In this work, CDT-LPS interactions were investigated using NMR spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy and functional assays. We found that CDT neutralized LPS and disrupted permeability barrier of the outer membrane. Zeta potential and ITC studies demonstrated charge compensation and hydrophobic interactions of CDT with the LPS-outer membrane, respectively. Secondary structure of the peptide was probed by CD and FT-IR experiments indicating beta-strands and/or beta-turn conformations in the LPS micelle. An ensemble of structures, determined in LPS micelle by NMR, revealed a beta-hairpin like topology of the CDT peptide that was typified by an extended cationic surface and a relatively shorter segment of hydrophobic region. Interestingly, at the non-polar face, residue R11 was found to be in a close proximity to the indole ring of W2, suggesting a cation-n type interactions. Further, saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR studies established intimate contacts among the aromatic and cationic residues of CDT with the LPS micelle. Fluorescence and dynamic light scattering experiments demonstrated that CDT imparted structural destabilization to the aggregated states of LPS. Collectively, atomic resolution structure and interactions of CDT with the outer membrane-LPS could be exploited for developing potent broad spectrum antimicrobial and anti-sepsis agents.

  18. Monohydroxylated metabolites of the K2 synthetic cannabinoid JWH-073 retain intermediate to high cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) affinity and exhibit neutral antagonist to partial agonist activity

    PubMed Central

    Brents, Lisa K.; Gallus-Zawada, Anna; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; Vasiljevik, Tamara; Prisinzano, Thomas E.; Fantegrossi, William E.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2012-01-01

    K2 and several similar purported “incense products” spiked with synthetic cannabinoids are abused as cannabis substitutes. We hypothesized that metabolism of JWH-073, a prevalent cannabinoid found in K2, contributes to toxicity associated with K2 use. Competition receptor binding studies and G-protein activation assays, both performed by employing mouse brain homogenates, were used to determine the affinity and intrinsic activity, respectively, of potential monohydroxylated (M1, M3–M5) and monocarboxylated (M6) metabolites at cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs). Surprisingly, M1, M4 and M5 retain nanomolar affinity for CB1Rs, while M3 displays micromolar affinity and M6 does not bind to CB1Rs. JWH-073 displays equivalent efficacy to that of the CB1R full agonist CP-55,940, while M1, M3, and M5 act as CB1R partial agonists, and M4 shows little or no intrinsic activity. Further in vitro investigation by Schild analysis revealed that M4 acts as a competitive neutral CB1R antagonist (Kb~40nM). In agreement with in vitro studies, M4 also demonstrates CB1R antagonism in vivo by blunting cannabinoid-induced hypothermia in mice. Interestingly, M4 does not block agonist-mediated responses of other measures in the cannabinoid tetrad (e.g., locomotor suppression, catalepsy or analgesia). Finally, also as predicted by in vitro results, M1 exhibits agonist activity in vivo by inducing significant hypothermia and suppression of locomotor activity in mice. In conclusion, the present study indicates that further work examining the physiological effects of synthetic cannabinoid metabolism is warranted. Such a complex mix of metabolically produced CB1R ligands may contribute to the adverse effect profile of JWH-073-containing products. PMID:22266354

  19. Monohydroxylated metabolites of the K2 synthetic cannabinoid JWH-073 retain intermediate to high cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) affinity and exhibit neutral antagonist to partial agonist activity.

    PubMed

    Brents, Lisa K; Gallus-Zawada, Anna; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; Vasiljevik, Tamara; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Fantegrossi, William E; Moran, Jeffery H; Prather, Paul L

    2012-04-01

    K2 and several similar purported "incense products" spiked with synthetic cannabinoids are abused as cannabis substitutes. We hypothesized that metabolism of JWH-073, a prevalent cannabinoid found in K2, contributes to toxicity associated with K2 use. Competition receptor binding studies and G-protein activation assays, both performed by employing mouse brain homogenates, were used to determine the affinity and intrinsic activity, respectively, of potential monohydroxylated (M1, M3-M5) and monocarboxylated (M6) metabolites at cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs). Surprisingly, M1, M4 and M5 retain nanomolar affinity for CB1Rs, while M3 displays micromolar affinity and M6 does not bind to CB1Rs. JWH-073 displays equivalent efficacy to that of the CB1R full agonist CP-55,940, while M1, M3, and M5 act as CB1R partial agonists, and M4 shows little or no intrinsic activity. Further in vitro investigation by Schild analysis revealed that M4 acts as a competitive neutral CB1R antagonist (K(b)∼40nM). In agreement with in vitro studies, M4 also demonstrates CB1R antagonism in vivo by blunting cannabinoid-induced hypothermia in mice. Interestingly, M4 does not block agonist-mediated responses of other measures in the cannabinoid tetrad (e.g., locomotor suppression, catalepsy or analgesia). Finally, also as predicted by in vitro results, M1 exhibits agonist activity in vivo by inducing significant hypothermia and suppression of locomotor activity in mice. In conclusion, the present study indicates that further work examining the physiological effects of synthetic cannabinoid metabolism is warranted. Such a complex mix of metabolically produced CB1R ligands may contribute to the adverse effect profile of JWH-073-containing products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Origins and variation of terrestrial energetic neutral atoms outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. R.; Moore, T. E.

    2005-02-01

    Analysis of ENA data from the LENA instrument on the IMAGE spacecraft shows that the terrestrial atmosphere is a copious emitter of energetic neutral atoms (<300 eV) under all conditions. When activity is low, the observed emissions are concentrated close to the Earth and are presumed to be the high-energy tail of the warm oxygen geocorona, with energies <2 eV. When activity increases, the relative abundance of the higher-energy neutrals increases, and the emissions can be seen farther from the Earth. Because of the close correlation between the postperigee ENA flux (fluxes seen 1-2 hours after spacecraft perigee) and Ap and the fact that the postperigee fluxes are seen when no magnetic storm is in progress we conclude that many of the emitted ENA come from the auroral zone and are produced by energized ionospheric ions rather than by precipitating energetic ions. In more spectacular events, such as the Bastille Day storm event (14-16 July 2000), oxygen neutral emissions produced by precipitation of keV ring current oxygen ions can also make an important contribution to the total neutral emission. We conclude that diurnal variation in ENA emissions is a winter hemisphere feature that is absent in the summer hemisphere. As activity increases, the altitude range of the auroral oval ENA emission region increases.

  1. Equivalent Neutral Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Wenqing

    1996-01-01

    The definition of equivalent neutral wind and the rationale for using it as the geophysical product of a spaceborne scatterometer are reviewed. The differences between equivalent neutral wind and actual wind, which are caused by atmospheric density stratification, are demonstrated with measurements at selected locations. A method of computing this parameter from ship and buoy measurements is described and some common fallacies in accounting for the effects of atmospheric stratification on wind shear are discussed. The computer code for the model to derive equivalent neutral wind is provided.

  2. The neutral upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. N.

    2002-07-01

    After World War II, Professor S.K. Mitra wrote a comprehensive book called The Upper Atmosphere, which dealt with information available from ground-based and balloon-borne experiments. As a result, topics such as day airglow were investigated and further ground-based experiments using incoherent back-scattering were carried out. These activities resulted in important new information on the ozonosphere. The dramatic discovery of ozone holes forms a new and exciting chapter in the discovery of atmospheric processes. While dealing with the limits of the atmosphere, reference may be made to interstellar molecules whose discovery has raised considerable scientific curiosity. Knowledge on the solar-terrestrial relationship advanced a great deal when more information on solar radiation became available by measuring higher energy photons in the UV, EUV, and even X-ray regime. All this information is incorporated in this volume and presented under the title The Neutral Upper Atmosphere. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/0-7923-6434-1

  3. Simple purification (desalting) procedure to facilitate structural analysis of an alkali-solubilized/neutralized starch solution by intermediate-pressure size-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Seok; Huber, Kerry C

    2007-06-27

    A technique was established to remove impurities (e.g., salts) from starch dissolved in strong alkali and neutralized with acid to accommodate starch structural analysis via intermediate-pressure size-exclusion chromatography (IPSEC). Starch (corn and wheat) subjected to an alkaline-microwave dissolution scheme (35 s microwave heating in a mixture of 6 M urea and 1 M KOH) was either treated with ion-exchange resin or passed through a desalting column to remove salt/urea contaminants. Control (untreated) starch solution analyzed by IPSEC displayed a significant interfering peak (attributable to salt/urea), which coeluted with the starch amylose peak. The interfering peak was most efficiently eliminated by first passing the starch solution through a desalting column, which process effectively removed impurities (e.g., salts/urea) without appearing to adversely impact the starch structural analysis. This simple technique coupled with the rapid alkaline-microwave starch dissolution procedure greatly expedites structural investigation of starch by facilitating analysis by IPSEC.

  4. Degradation of 32 emergent contaminants by UV and neutral photo-fenton in domestic wastewater effluent previously treated by activated sludge.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz, N; Giménez, J; Esplugas, S; Grandjean, D; de Alencastro, L F; Pulgarín, C

    2012-04-15

    This study focuses on the removal of 32 selected micropollutants (pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitors and biocides/pesticides) found in an effluent coming from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP) based on activated sludge. Dissolved organic matter was present, with an initial total organic carbon of 15.9 mg L(-1), and a real global quantity of micropollutants of 29.5 μg L(-1). The treatments tested on the micropollutants removal were: UV-light emitting at 254 nm (UV(254)) alone, dark Fenton (Fe(2+,3+)/H(2)O(2)) and photo-Fenton (Fe(2+,3+)/H(2)O(2)/light). Different irradiation sources were used for the photo-Fenton experiences: UV(254) and simulated sunlight. Iron and H(2)O(2) concentrations were also changed in photo-Fenton experiences in order to evaluate its influence on the degradation. All the experiments were developed at natural pH, near neutral. Photo-Fenton treatments employing UV(254), 50 mg L(-1) of H(2)O(2), with and without adding iron (5 mg L(-1) of Fe(2+) added or 1.48 mg L(-1) of total iron already present) gave the best results. Global percentages of micropollutants removal achieved were 98 and a 97% respectively, after 30 min of treatments. As the H(2)