Science.gov

Sample records for neutral bose gas

  1. Canonical Bose gas simulations with stochastic gauges.

    PubMed

    Drummond, P D; Deuar, P; Kheruntsyan, K V

    2004-01-30

    A technique to simulate the grand canonical ensembles of interacting Bose gases is presented. Results are generated for many temperatures by averaging over energy-weighted stochastic paths, each corresponding to a solution of coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations with phase noise. The stochastic gauge method used relies on an off-diagonal coherent-state expansion, thus taking into account all quantum correlations. As an example, the second-order spatial correlation function and momentum distribution for an interacting 1D Bose gas are calculated.

  2. Excitation picture of an interacting Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kira, M.

    2014-12-15

    Atomic Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) can be viewed as macroscopic objects where atoms form correlated atom clusters to all orders. Therefore, the presence of a BEC makes the direct use of the cluster-expansion approach–lucrative e.g. in semiconductor quantum optics–inefficient when solving the many-body kinetics of a strongly interacting Bose. An excitation picture is introduced with a nonunitary transformation that describes the system in terms of atom clusters within the normal component alone. The nontrivial properties of this transformation are systematically studied, which yields a cluster-expansion friendly formalism for a strongly interacting Bose gas. Its connections and corrections to the standard Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov approach are discussed and the role of the order parameter and the Bogoliubov excitations are identified. The resulting interaction effects are shown to visibly modify number fluctuations of the BEC. Even when the BEC has a nearly perfect second-order coherence, the BEC number fluctuations can still resolve interaction-generated non-Poissonian fluctuations. - Highlights: • Excitation picture expresses interacting Bose gas with few atom clusters. • Semiconductor and BEC many-body investigations are connected with cluster expansion. • Quantum statistics of BEC is identified in terms of atom clusters. • BEC number fluctuations show extreme sensitivity to many-body correlations. • Cluster-expansion friendly framework is established for an interacting Bose gas.

  3. Stability of a unitary Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Richard J; Gaunt, Alexander L; Navon, Nir; Smith, Robert P; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2013-09-20

    We study the stability of a thermal (39)K Bose gas across a broad Feshbach resonance, focusing on the unitary regime, where the scattering length a exceeds the thermal wavelength λ. We measure the general scaling laws relating the particle-loss and heating rates to the temperature, scattering length, and atom number. Both at unitarity and for positive a<λ we find agreement with three-body theory. However, for a<0 and away from unitarity, we observe significant four-body decay. At unitarity, the three-body loss coefficient, L(3) proportional λ(4), is 3 times lower than the universal theoretical upper bound. This reduction is a consequence of species-specific Efimov physics and makes (39)K particularly promising for studies of many-body physics in a unitary Bose gas.

  4. Nonequilibrium States of a Quenched Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hong; Kain, Ben

    2014-05-01

    Yin and Radzihovsky [Phys. Rev. A 88, 063611 (2014)] recently developed a self-consistent extension of a Bogoliubov theory, in which the condensate number density, nc, is treated as a mean field that changes with time in order to analyze a JILA experiment by Makotyn et al. [Nature Physics doi:10.1038/nphys2850 (2014)] on a 85Rb Bose gas following a deep quench to a large scattering length. We apply this theory to construct a set of closed equations that highlight the role of dnc/dt, which is to induce an effective interaction between quasiparticles. We show analytically that such a system supports a steady state characterized by a constant condensate density and a steady but periodically changing momentum distribution, whose time average is described exactly by the generalized Gibbs ensemble. We discuss how the dnc/dt-induced effective interaction, which cannot be ignored on the grounds of the adiabatic approximation for modes near the gapless Goldstone mode, can affect experimentally measurable quantities such as Tan's contact. This work is supported in part by the US Army Research Office under Grant No. W911NF-10-1-0096 and in part by the US National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY11-25915.

  5. Degenerate Bose gas without anomalous averages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, V. B.; Trigger, S. A.; Schram, P. P.

    2016-11-01

    Theory of a weakly non-ideal Bose gas in the canonical ensemble is developed without assumption of the C-number representation of the creation and annihilation operators with zero momentum. Instead of this assumption, we use the assumption on the C-number nature of the density operator N0 = a† 0a0 with zero momentum. It is shown that the pole of the “density-density” Green function (DDGF), as well as the pole of the single-particle Green function (SPGF), exactly coincide with the Bogoliubov phonon-roton spectrum of excitations for both assumptions. This spectrum, as is known confirmed by many neutron and x-ray experimental measurements of the dynamic structure factor in He II, is straightly related to the DDGF. At the same time, we show that in the other case under consideration, when neither N0 nor a† 0 and a0 are C-numbers, a gap can exist in SPGF. This gap in SPGF excitations is straightly related to the density of particles in the “condensate”. Therefore, the spectra of excitations for the DDGF and SPGF in the last case under consideration are different, in contrast to the Bogoliubov-type theory where these spectra are identical.

  6. Anisotropic Expansion of a Thermal Dipolar Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Sykes, A. G.; Burdick, N. Q.; DiSciacca, J. M.; Petrov, D. S.; Lev, B. L.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the anisotropic expansion of ultracold bosonic dysprosium gases at temperatures above quantum degeneracy and develop a quantitative theory to describe this behavior. The theory expresses the postexpansion aspect ratio in terms of temperature and microscopic collisional properties by incorporating Hartree-Fock mean-field interactions, hydrodynamic effects, and Bose-enhancement factors. Our results extend the utility of expansion imaging by providing accurate thermometry for dipolar thermal Bose gases. Furthermore, we present a simple method to determine scattering lengths in dipolar gases, including near a Feshbach resonance, through observation of thermal gas expansion.

  7. Anisotropic Expansion of a Thermal Dipolar Bose Gas.

    PubMed

    Tang, Y; Sykes, A G; Burdick, N Q; DiSciacca, J M; Petrov, D S; Lev, B L

    2016-10-07

    We report on the anisotropic expansion of ultracold bosonic dysprosium gases at temperatures above quantum degeneracy and develop a quantitative theory to describe this behavior. The theory expresses the postexpansion aspect ratio in terms of temperature and microscopic collisional properties by incorporating Hartree-Fock mean-field interactions, hydrodynamic effects, and Bose-enhancement factors. Our results extend the utility of expansion imaging by providing accurate thermometry for dipolar thermal Bose gases. Furthermore, we present a simple method to determine scattering lengths in dipolar gases, including near a Feshbach resonance, through observation of thermal gas expansion.

  8. Percolation analysis of a disordered spinor Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Sk Noor; Basu, Saurabh

    2016-06-01

    We study the effects of an on-site disorder potential in a gas of spinor (spin-1) ultracold atoms loaded in an optical lattice corresponding to both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic spin-dependent interactions. Starting with a disordered spinor Bose-Hubbard model (SBHM) on a two-dimensional square lattice, we observe the appearance of a Bose glass phase using the fraction of the lattice sites having finite superfluid order parameter and non integer local densities as an indicator. A precise distinction between three different types of phases namely, superfluid, Mott insulator and Bose glass is done via a percolation analysis thereby demonstrating that a reliable enumeration of phases is possible at particular values of the parameters of the SBHM. Finally, we present the phase diagram based on the above information for both antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic interactions.

  9. Fast thermalization and Helmholtz oscillations of an ultracold Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Papoular, D J; Pitaevskii, L P; Stringari, S

    2014-10-24

    We analyze theoretically the transport properties of a weakly interacting ultracold Bose gas enclosed in two reservoirs connected by a constriction. We assume that the transport of the superfluid part is hydrodynamic, and we describe the ballistic transport of the normal part using the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Modeling the coupled evolution of the phase, atom number, and temperature mismatches between the reservoirs, we predict that Helmholtz (plasma) oscillations can be observed at nonzero temperatures below Tc. We show that, because of its strong compressibility, the Bose gas is characterized by a fast thermalization compared to the damping time for plasma oscillations, accompanied by a fast transfer of the normal component. This fast thermalization also affects the gas above Tc, where we present a comparison to the ideal fermionic case. Moreover, we outline the possible realization of a superleak through the inclusion of a disordered potential.

  10. Neutral gas dynamics in fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-06-01

    Fireballs are local discharge phenomena on positively biased electrodes in partially ionized plasmas. Electrons, energized at a double layer, heat neutral gas which expands. The gas pressure exceeds the plasma pressure, hence becomes important to the stability and transport in fireballs. The flow of gas moves the electrode and sensors similar to a mica pendulum. Flow speed and directions are measured. A fireball gun has been developed to partially collimate the flow of hot gas and heat objects in its path. New applications of fireballs are suggested.

  11. Gas cell neutralizers (Fundamental principles)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehrer, B.

    1985-06-01

    Neutralizing an ion-beam of the size and energy levels involved in the neutral-particle-beam program represents a considerable extension of the state-of-the-art of neutralizer technology. Many different mediums (e.g., solid, liquid, gas, plasma, photons) can be used to strip the hydrogen ion of its extra electron. A large, multidisciplinary R and D effort will no doubt be required to sort out all of the ''pros and cons'' of these various techniques. The purpose of this particular presentation is to discuss some basic configurations and fundamental principles of the gas type of neutralizer cell. Particular emphasis is placed on the ''Gasdynamic Free-Jet'' neutralizer since this configuration has the potential of being much shorter than other type of gas cells (in the beam direction) and it could operate in nearly a continuous mode (CW) if necessary. These were important considerations in the ATSU design which is discussed in some detail in the second presentation entitled ''ATSU Point Design''.

  12. Dynamics of impurities in ultracold Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchadilova, Yulia; Grusdt, Fabian; Rubtsov, Alexey; Demler, Eugene

    2015-05-01

    A system of an impurity immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) exhibits the polaronic effect, which is known to be an ubiquitous phenomenon in a wide range of physical systems including semiconductors, doped Mott insulators, and high-Tc superconductors. Recent analysis of the BEC-polaron problem showed that existing analytical approaches do not provide reliable results in the experimentally relevant range of parameters when tested against Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. In this contribution we demonstrate that the description of polarons at finite momentum can be done by employing an analytical class of wavefunctions based on the correlated Gaussian ansatz (CGWs). We show that CGWs show excellent agreement with known MC results for the polaron binding energy for a wide range of interactions. We discuss the properties of the polarons and atomic mixtures in systems of ultracold atoms in which polaronic effects can be observed with current experimental technology. Our CGWs predicts a specific pattern of correlations between host atoms that can be measured in time-of-flight experiments. Department of Physics, Harvard University.

  13. Anisotropic superfluidity in a dipolar Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ticknor, Christopher; Wilson, Ryan M; Bohn, John L

    2010-11-04

    A quintessential feature of superfluidity is the ability to support dissipationless flow, for example, when an object moves through a superfluid and experiences no drag. This, however, only occurs when the object is moving below a certain critical velocity; when it exceeds this critical velocity it dissipates energy into excitations of the superfluid, resulting in a net drag force on the object and the breakdown of superfluid flow. In many superfluids, such as dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) of atoms with contact interactions, this critical velocity is simply the speed of sound in the system, where the speed of sound is set by the density and the s-wave scattering length of the atoms. However, for other superfluids, such as liquid {sup 4}He, this is not the case. In {sup 4}He, the critical velocity is set by a roton mode, corresponding to a peak in the static structure factor of the system at some finite, non-zero momentum, with a characteristic velocity that is considerably less than the speed of sound in the liquid. This feature has been verified experimentally via measurements of ion-drift velocity in the fluid, thereby providing insight into the detailed structure of the system. Interestingly, a roton-like feature was predicted to exist in the dispersion relation of a quasi-two-dimensional (q2D) dipolar BEC (DBEC) [16], or a BEC with dipole-dipole interactions. However, unlike the dispersion of {sup 4}He, the disperSion of a DBEC is highly tunable as a function of the condensate density or dipole-dipole interaction (ddi) strength. Additionally, the DBEC is set apart from liquid {sup 4}He in that its interactions depend on how the dipoles are oriented in space. Thus, the DBEC provides an ideal system to study the effects that anisotropies have on the bulk properties of a superfluid, such as the critical velocity. Here we consider a DBEC in a quasi-two-dimensional (q2D) geometry and allow for the dipoles to be polarized at a nonzero angle into the plane

  14. Equilibrium state of a trapped two-dimensional Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, Steffen P.; Yefsah, Tarik; Guenter, Kenneth J.; Cheneau, Marc; Desbuquois, Remi; Dalibard, Jean; Holzmann, Markus; Krauth, Werner

    2010-07-15

    We study experimentally and numerically the equilibrium density profiles of a trapped two-dimensional {sup 87}Rb Bose gas and investigate the equation of state of the homogeneous system using the local density approximation. We find a clear discrepancy between in situ measurements and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, which we attribute to a nonlinear variation of the optical density of the atomic cloud with its spatial density. However, good agreement between experiment and theory is recovered for the density profiles measured after time of flight, taking advantage of their self-similarity in a two-dimensional expansion.

  15. Ground state of a resonantly interacting Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Diederix, J. M.; Heijst, T. C. F. van; Stoof, H. T. C.

    2011-09-15

    We show that a two-channel mean-field theory for a Bose gas near a Feshbach resonance allows for an analytic computation of the chemical potential, and therefore the universal constant {beta}, at unitarity. To improve on this mean-field theory, which physically neglects condensate depletion, we study a variational Jastrow ansatz for the ground-state wave function and use the hypernetted-chain approximation to minimize the energy for all positive values of the scattering length. We also show that other important physical quantities such as Tan's contact and the condensate fraction can be directly obtained from this approach.

  16. On the Ground-State Energy and Local Pressure of an Inhomogeneous Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, V. B.; Trigger, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The exact expression for the average kinetic energy of an inhomogeneous Bose gas in the ground state is obtained as a functional of the inhomogeneous density of the Bose-Einstein condensate. The result is based on existence of the off-diagonal long-range order in the single-particle density matrix for systems with a Bose-Einstein condensate. This makes it possible to avoid the use of anomalous averages. On this basis, the explicit expressions for the ground-state energy and the local pressure of an inhomogeneous Bose gas are derived within the self-consistent Hartree-Fock approximation.

  17. Localization of weakly interacting Bose gas in quasiperiodic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Sayak; Pandey, Mohit; Ghosh, Anandamohan; Sinha, Subhasis

    2016-01-01

    We study the localization properties of weakly interacting Bose gas in a quasiperiodic potential. The Hamiltonian of the non-interacting system reduces to the well known ‘Aubry-André model’, which shows the localization transition at a critical strength of the potential. In the presence of repulsive interaction we observe multi-site localization and obtain a phase diagram of the dilute Bose gas by computing the superfluid fraction and the inverse participation ratio. We construct a low-dimensional classical Hamiltonian map and show that the onset of localization is manifested by the chaotic phase space dynamics. The level spacing statistics also identify the transition to localized states resembling a Poisson distribution that are ubiquitous for both non-interacting and interacting systems. We also study the quantum fluctuations within the Bogoliubov approximation and compute the quasiparticle energy spectrum. Enhanced quantum fluctuation and multi-site localization phenomenon of non-condensate density are observed above the critical coupling of the potential. We briefly discuss the effect of the trapping potential on the localization of matter wave.

  18. Investigation of Bose Condensation in Ideal Bose Gas Trapped under Generic Power Law Potential in d Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehedi Faruk, Mir; Sazzad Hossain, Md.; Muktadir Rahman, Md.

    2016-02-01

    The changes in characteristics of Bose condensation of ideal Bose gas due to an external generic power law potential U=\\sumi=1dci\\vert xi/ai\\vertni are studied carefully. Detailed calculation of Kim et al. (J. Phys. Condens. Matter 11 (1999) 10269) yielded the hierarchy of condensation transitions with changing fractional dimensionality. In this manuscript, some theorems regarding specific heat at constant volume CV are presented. Careful examination of these theorems reveal the existence of hidden hierarchy of the condensation transition in trapped systems as well.

  19. Quench dynamics of a strongly interacting resonant Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiao; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2015-03-01

    We explore the dynamics of a resonant Bose gas following its quench to a strongly interacting regime near a Feshbach resonance. For such deep quenches, we utilize a self-consistent dynamic mean-field approximation and find that after an initial regime of many-body Rabi-like oscillations between the condensate and finite-momentum quasiparticle pairs, at long times, the gas reaches a prethermalized nonequilibrium steady state. We explore the resulting state through its broad stationary momentum distribution function, that exhibits a power-law high momentum tail. We study the associated enhanced depletion, quench-rate dependent excitation energy, Tan's contact, structure function and radio frequency spectroscopy. We find these predictions to be in a qualitative agreement with recent experiments We acknowledge the supported by the NSF through DMR-1001240 on this research.

  20. Bose gas with generalized dispersion relation plus an energy gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis, M. A.; Martinez, J. G.; Garcia, J.

    We report the critical temperature, the condensed fraction, the internal energy and the specific heat for a d-dimensional Bose gas with a generalized dispersion relation plus an energy gap, i.e., ɛ =ɛ0 for k = 0 and ɛ =ɛ0 + Δ +csks , for k > 0 , where ℏk is the particle momentum, ɛ0 the lowest particle energy, cs a constant with dimension of energy multiplied by a length to the power s > 0 . When Δ > 0 , a Bose-Einstein critical temperature Tc ≠ 0 exists for any d / s >= 0 at which the internal energy shows a peak and the specific heat shows a jump. The critical temperature and the specific heat jump increase as functions of the gap but they decrease as functions of d / s . Thermodynamic properties are ɛ0 independent since this is just a reference energy. For Δ = 0 we recover the results reported in Ref. [1]. V. C. Aguilera-Navarro, M. de Llano y M. A. Solís, Eur. J. Phys. 20, 177 (1999). We acknowledge partial support from Grants PAPIIT IN111613 and CONACyT 221030.

  1. Dynamics of a finite temperature Bose gas in atomtronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colussi, Victor; Holland, Murray; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the problem of modeling atomtronic devices that utilize the nonequilibrium dynamics of a finite temperature Bose-condensed gas placed underneath an atom chip to mimic the properties of classical circuit elements. Our model consists of the full dynamics of the condensate and thermal cloud. The thermal cloud is treated semiclassically, in the spirit of the ZNG method (Zaremba, Nikuni and Griffin.) However, we develop a novel procedure to account for collisions between the condensate and thermal cloud which evaluates collision rates directly. We present the results of this model compared to two experiments: the atomtronic battery and transistor [arXiv:1208.3109v2]. Also presented are predictions for more complex circuit elements. This work is funded by the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JILA and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  2. Superfluid density of a spin-orbit-coupled Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi-Cai; Yu, Zeng-Qiang; Ng, Tai Kai; Zhang, Shizhong; Pitaevskii, Lev; Stringari, Sandro

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the superfluid properties of a uniform, weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensed gas with spin-orbit coupling, realized recently in experiments. We find a finite normal fluid density ρn at zero temperature which turns out to be a function of the Raman coupling. In particular, the entire fluid becomes normal at the transition point from the zero momentum to the plane wave phase, even though the condensate fraction remains finite. We emphasize the crucial role played by the breaking of Galilean invariance and by the gapped branch of the elementary excitations whose contribution to various sum rules is discussed explicitly. Our predictions for the superfluid density are successfully compared with the available experimental results based on the measurement of the sound velocities.

  3. The production of neutral kaons in Z0 decays and their Bose-Einstein correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, R.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Ametewee, K.; Anderson, K. J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A. H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J. R.; Beaudoin, G.; Beck, A.; Beck, G. A.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bock, P.; Bosch, H. M.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, R. M.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H. J.; Bürgin, R.; Burgard, C.; Capdevielle, N.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlesworth, C.; Charlton, D. G.; Chu, S. L.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clayton, J. C.; Clowes, S. G.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J. E.; Cooke, O. C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Darling, C.; de Jong, S.; Del Pozo, L. A.; Deng, H.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M. S.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Duboscq, J. E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Dunwoody, U. C.; Edwards, J. E. G.; Elcombe, P. A.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H. G.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbro, B.; Fanti, M.; Fath, P.; Fierro, M.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fischer, H. M.; Fischer, P.; Folman, R.; Fong, D. G.; Foucher, M.; Fukui, H.; Fürtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gaidot, A.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; Geddes, N. I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gensler, S. W.; Gentit, F. X.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gillies, J. D.; Goldberg, J.; Gingrich, D. M.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Hagemann, J.; Hanson, G. G.; Hansroul, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hart, P. A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Heflin, E.; Hemingway, R. J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hilse, T.; Hobson, P. R.; Hochman, D.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A. K.; Howard, R.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D. C.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, M.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jovanovic, P.; Jui, C.; Karlen, D.; Kanzaki, J.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; King, B.; King, J.; Kirk, J.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D. S.; Kokott, T. P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, R.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lafoux, H.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W. P.; Lauber, J.; Layter, J. G.; Leblanc, P.; Lee, A. M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Leroy, C.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Long, G. D.; Lorazo, B.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X. C.; Ludwig, J.; Luig, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Mashimo, T.; Matthews, W.; Mättig, P.; Maur, U.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T. J.; McNab, A. I.; Meijers, F.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Middleton, R. P.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Müller, U.; Nellen, B.; Nijjhar, B.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H. O.; Oldershaw, N. J.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Palmonari, F.; Pansart, J. P.; Patrick, G. N.; Pearce, M. J.; Phillips, P. D.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Pritchard, T. W.; Przysiezniak, H.; Redmond, M. W.; Rees, D. L.; Rigby, D.; Rison, M. G.; Robins, S. A.; Robinson, D.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J. M.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A. M.; Rosvick, M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D. R.; Sasaki, M.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schröder, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H. C.; Schütz, P.; Schulz, M.; Schwick, C.; Schwiening, J.; Scott, W. G.; Settles, M.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, T. J.; Snow, G. A.; Sobie, R.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Starks, M.; Stegmann, C.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Strom, D.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Tecchio, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Tesch, N.; Thomson, M. A.; Tousignant, O.; Towers, S.; Tscheulin, M.; Tsukamoto, T.; Turcot, A. S.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; Utzat, P.; van Kooten, R.; Vasseur, G.; Vikas, P.; Vincter, M.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, D. L.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Ward, J. J.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Weber, P.; Wells, P. S.; Wermes, N.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Winterer, V.-H.; Wlodek, T.; Wolf, G.; Wotton, S.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yeaman, A.; Yekutieli, G.; Yurko, M.; Zacek, V.; Zeuner, W.; Zorn, G. T.

    1995-09-01

    The production of neutral kaons in e+e- annihilation at centre-of-mass energies in the region of the Z0 mass and their Bose-Einstein correlations are investigated with the OPAL detector at LEP. A total of about 1.26×106 Z0 hadronic decay events are used in the analysis. The production rate of K0 mesons is found to be 1.99±0.01±0.04 per hadronic event, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. Both the rate and the differential cross section for K0 production are compared to the predictions of Monte Carlo generators. This comparison indicates that the fragmentation is too soft in both Jetset and Herwig. Bose-Einstein correlations in K{s/0}K{s/0} pairs are measured through the quantity Q, the four momentum difference of the pair. A threshold enhancement is observed in K{s/0}K{s/0} pairs originating from a mixed sample ofK^0 bar K^0 and K0K0 (bar K^0 bar K^0) pairs. For the strength of the effect and for the radius of the emitting source we find values of λ=1.14±0.23±0.32 and R 0=(0.76±0.10±0.11) fm respectively. The first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  4. Surface Region of Superfluid Helium as an Inhomogeneous Bose-Condensed Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, A.; Stringari, S.

    1996-01-01

    We present arguments that the low density surface region of self-bounded superfluid 4He systems is an inhomogeneous dilute Bose gas, with almost all of the atoms occupying the same single-particle state at T = 0. Numerical evidence for this complete Bose-Einstein condensation was first given by the many-body variational calculations of 4He droplets by Lewart, Pandharipande, and Pieper in 1988 [Phys. Rev. B 37, 4950 (1988)]. We show that the low density surface region can be treated rigorously using a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the Bose order parameter.

  5. Quantum hydrodynamics in dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, Peter

    2012-10-01

    The peculiar dynamics of superfluids are a fascinating research topic. Since the first generation of a dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in 1995, quantum degenerate atomic gases have taken the investigation of quantum hydrodynamics to a new level. The atomic physics toolbox has grown tremendously and now provides unique and powerful ways to explore nonlinear quantum systems. As an example, pioneering results have recently revealed that the counterflow between two superfluids can be used as a well controlled tool to access the rich dynamics of vector systems. New structures, such as beating dark-dark solitons which only exist in multicomponent systems and have never been observed before, can now be realized in the lab for the first time. Furthermore, the field of nonlinear quantum hydrodynamics is entering new regimes by exploiting Raman dressing as a tool to directly modify the dispersion relation. This leads to the generation of spin-orbit coupled BECs, artificial gauge fields, etc. that are currently receiving tremendous interest due to their parallels to complex condensed-matter systems. Studies of quantum hydrodynamics help to develop a profound understanding of nonlinear quantum dynamics, which is not only of fundamental interest but also of eminent importance for future technological applications, e.g. in telecommunication applications using optical solitons in fibers. This talk will showcase some ``classic'' hallmark results and highlight recent advances from the forefront of the field.

  6. Interacting Bose gas confined in a Kronig-Penney potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, O. A.; Solís, M. A.

    We analyze the effect of the 1D periodic Kronig-Penney potential, composed of barriers of width b and separated a distance a, over an interacting Bose gas. At T = 0 , the Gross-Pitaevskii equation is solved analytically in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions for repulsive or attractive interaction between bosons. By applying the boundary conditions for periodic solutions as well as the normalization of the wave function, we arrive to a set of nonlinear equations from which we obtain the density profile and the chemical potential of the condensate as a function of the particle momentum. The profiles for attractive and repulsive interactions are compared with that of the non-interacting case. For attractive interaction we are able to observe a pronounced spatial localization in the middle of every two barriers. We reproduce the well known results when the Kronig-Penney potential becomes a Dirac Comb. We acknowledge partial support from Grants PAPIIT IN111613 and CONACyT 221030.

  7. Vortex patterns in moderately rotating Bose-condensed gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imran, Mohd; Ahsan, M. A. H.

    2017-02-01

    Using exact diagonalization, we investigate the many-body ground state for regular vortex patterns in a rotating Bose-condensed gas of N spinless particles, confined in a quasi-two-dimensional harmonic trap and interacting repulsively via finite-range Gaussian potential. The N-body Hamiltonian matrix is diagonalized in given subspaces of quantized total angular momentum L z , to obtain the lowest-energy eigenstate. Further, the internal structure of these eigenstates is analyzed by calculating the corresponding conditional probability distribution. Specifically, the quantum mechanically stable as well as unstable states in a co-rotating frame are examined in the moderately rotating regime corresponding to angular momenta 4N≤slant {L}z< 5N for N = 16 bosons. In response to externally impressed rotation, the patterns of singly quantized vortices are formed, shaping into canonical polygons with a central vortex at the trap center. The internal structure of unstable states reveals the mechanism of entry, nucleation and pattern formation of vortices with structural phase transition, as the condensate goes from one stable vortical state to the other. The stable polygonal vortex patterns having discrete p-fold rotational symmetry with p = 5 and p = 6 are observed. The hexagonal vortex pattern with p = 6 symmetry is a precursor to the triangular vortex lattice of singly quantized vortices in the thermodynamic limit. For unstable states, quantum melting of vortex patterns due to uncertainty in positions of individual vortices, is also briefly discussed.

  8. Bose-Einstein condensation in an ultra-hot gas of pumped magnons.

    PubMed

    Serga, Alexander A; Tiberkevich, Vasil S; Sandweg, Christian W; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I; Bozhko, Dmytro A; Chumak, Andrii V; Neumann, Timo; Obry, Björn; Melkov, Gennadii A; Slavin, Andrei N; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2014-03-11

    Bose-Einstein condensation of quasi-particles such as excitons, polaritons, magnons and photons is a fascinating quantum mechanical phenomenon. Unlike the Bose-Einstein condensation of real particles (like atoms), these processes do not require low temperatures, since the high densities of low-energy quasi-particles needed for the condensate to form can be produced via external pumping. Here we demonstrate that such a pumping can create remarkably high effective temperatures in a narrow spectral region of the lowest energy states in a magnon gas, resulting in strikingly unexpected transitional dynamics of Bose-Einstein magnon condensate: the density of the condensate increases immediately after the external magnon flow is switched off and initially decreases if it is switched on again. This behaviour finds explanation in a nonlinear 'evaporative supercooling' mechanism that couples the low-energy magnons overheated by pumping with all the other thermal magnons, removing the excess heat, and allowing Bose-Einstein condensate formation.

  9. Ultrarelativistic Bose-Einstein gas on Lorentz symmetry violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sales, J. A.; Costa-Soares, T.; Vasquez Otoya, V. J.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of Lorentz Symmetry Breaking on the thermodynamic properties of ideal gases. Inspired by the dispersion relation coming from the Carroll-Field-Jackiw model for Electrodynamics with Lorentz and CPT violation term, we compute the thermodynamics quantities for a Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein distributions. Two regimes are analyzed: the large and the small Lorentz violation. In the first case, we show that the topological mass induced by the Chern-Simons term behaves as a chemical potential. For Bose-Einstein gases, a condensation in both regimes can be found.

  10. Single-particle spectral density of a Bose gas in the two-fluid hydrodynamic regime

    SciTech Connect

    Arahata, Emiko; Nikuni, Tetsuro; Griffin, Allan

    2011-11-15

    In Bose superfluids, the single-particle Green's function can be directly related to the superfluid velocity-velocity correlation function in the hydrodynamic regime. An explicit expression for the single-particle spectral density was originally written down by Hohenberg and Martin in 1965, starting from the two-fluid equations for a superfluid. We give a simple derivation of their results. Using these results, we calculate the relative weights of first and second sound modes in the single-particle spectral density as a function of temperature in a uniform Bose gas. We show that the second sound mode makes a dominant contribution to the single-particle spectrum in a relatively high-temperature region. We also discuss the possibility of experimental observation of the second sound mode in a Bose gas by photoemission spectroscopy.

  11. Momentum-Space Correlations of a One-Dimensional Bose Gas.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bess; Johnson, Aisling; Roscilde, Tommaso; Bouchoule, Isabelle

    2016-02-05

    Analyzing the noise in the momentum profiles of single realizations of one-dimensional Bose gases, we present the experimental measurement of the full momentum-space density correlations ⟨δn_{p}δn_{p^{'}}⟩, which are related to the two-body momentum correlation function. Our data span the weakly interacting region of the phase diagram, going from the ideal Bose gas regime to the quasicondensate regime. We show experimentally that the bunching phenomenon, which manifests itself as super-Poissonian local fluctuations in momentum space, is present in all regimes. The quasicondensate regime is, however, characterized by the presence of negative correlations between different momenta, in contrast to the Bogolyubov theory for Bose condensates, predicting positive correlations between opposite momenta. Our data are in good agreement with ab initio calculations.

  12. Momentum-Space Correlations of a One-Dimensional Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Bess; Johnson, Aisling; Roscilde, Tommaso; Bouchoule, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    Analyzing the noise in the momentum profiles of single realizations of one-dimensional Bose gases, we present the experimental measurement of the full momentum-space density correlations ⟨δ npδ np'⟩ , which are related to the two-body momentum correlation function. Our data span the weakly interacting region of the phase diagram, going from the ideal Bose gas regime to the quasicondensate regime. We show experimentally that the bunching phenomenon, which manifests itself as super-Poissonian local fluctuations in momentum space, is present in all regimes. The quasicondensate regime is, however, characterized by the presence of negative correlations between different momenta, in contrast to the Bogolyubov theory for Bose condensates, predicting positive correlations between opposite momenta. Our data are in good agreement with ab initio calculations.

  13. Distribution of Zeros and the Equation of State. IV ---Ideal Bose-Einstein Gas---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, K.

    1982-09-01

    The ideal Bose-Einstein gas is investigated on the basis of the fundamental concept of the distribution of zeros of the grand partition function on the complex z(= activity) plane. For this gas there are no zeros; but poles play essentially the same role as zeros from an analytical point of view, and are distributed on the part of the positive real axis from λ-3(>0) to +∞, where λ=h(2π mkT)-1/2. The distribution function of poles is calculated, and the function-theoretical structure of the equation of state is discussed. The Bose-Einstein condensation (especially the continuity of the slope of the p-v isotherm at the condensation point and the continuity of the specific heat at the transition temperature) is examined from the point of view of the distribution of poles. From the same point of view the two-dimensional and one-dimensional ideal Bose-Einstein gases are treated. Finally, the n-dimensional (n≥ 4) ideal Bose-Einstein gas is discussed, and it is shown that for n≥ 5 the specific heat is discontinuous at the transition temperature.

  14. Equation of state and contact of a strongly interacting Bose gas in the normal state

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xia -Ji; Mulkerin, Brendan; He, Lianyi; Hu, Hui

    2015-04-27

    Here, we theoretically investigate the equation of state and Tan's contact of a nondegenerate three-dimensional Bose gas near a broad Feshbach resonance, within the framework of large-N expansion. Our results agree with the path-integral Monte Carlo simulations in the weak-coupling limit and recover the second-order virial expansion predictions at strong interactions and high temperatures. At resonance, we find that the chemical potential and energy are significantly enhanced by the strong repulsion, while the entropy does not change significantly. With increasing temperature, the two-body contact initially increases and then decreases like T–1 at large temperature, and therefore exhibits a peak structure at about 4Tc0, where Tc0 is the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature of an ideal, noninteracting Bose gas. These results may be experimentally examined with a nondegenerate unitary Bose gas, where the three-body recombination rate is substantially reduced. In particular, the nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the two-body contact could be inferred from the momentum distribution measurement.

  15. Equation of state and contact of a strongly interacting Bose gas in the normal state

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xia -Ji; Mulkerin, Brendan; He, Lianyi; ...

    2015-04-27

    Here, we theoretically investigate the equation of state and Tan's contact of a nondegenerate three-dimensional Bose gas near a broad Feshbach resonance, within the framework of large-N expansion. Our results agree with the path-integral Monte Carlo simulations in the weak-coupling limit and recover the second-order virial expansion predictions at strong interactions and high temperatures. At resonance, we find that the chemical potential and energy are significantly enhanced by the strong repulsion, while the entropy does not change significantly. With increasing temperature, the two-body contact initially increases and then decreases like T–1 at large temperature, and therefore exhibits a peak structuremore » at about 4Tc0, where Tc0 is the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature of an ideal, noninteracting Bose gas. These results may be experimentally examined with a nondegenerate unitary Bose gas, where the three-body recombination rate is substantially reduced. In particular, the nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the two-body contact could be inferred from the momentum distribution measurement.« less

  16. Stability spectroscopy of rotons in a dipolar Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, John P.; Wilson, Ryan M.; Bohn, John L.

    2013-05-01

    We study the stability of a quasi-one-dimensional dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate that is perturbed by a weak lattice potential along its axis. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that systems exhibiting a roton-maxon structure destabilize readily when the lattice wavelength equals either half the roton wavelength or a low roton subharmonic. We apply perturbation theory to the Gross-Pitaevskii and Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations to illustrate the mechanisms behind the instability threshold. The features of our stability diagram may be used as a direct measurement of the roton wavelength for quasi-one-dimensional geometries.

  17. Stability Spectroscopy of Rotons in a Dipolar Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, John; Wilson, Ryan; Bohn, John

    2013-05-01

    We study the stability of a quasi-one-dimensional dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate that is perturbed by a weak lattice potential along its axis. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that systems exhibiting a roton-maxon structure destabilize readily when the lattice wavelength equals either half the roton wavelength or a low roton subharmonic. We apply perturbation theory to the Gross-Pitaevskii and Bogoliubov de Gennes equations to illustrate the mechanisms behind the instability threshold. The features of our stability diagram are a novel signature of roton physics, and their experimental observation would constitute a direct measurement of the roton wavelength for quasi-one-dimensional geometries.

  18. Onset of thermalization in a 1D Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riou, Jean-Felix; Reinhard, Aaron W.; Adams, Laura; Weiss, David S.

    2011-05-01

    There has been considerable theoretical debate about how nearly integrable many-body quantum systems approach thermal equilibrium. Experiments on one dimensional Bose gases in optical lattices may shed light on this issue. We have studied the time evolution of momentum distributions of Rb clouds initially prepared in ``quantum Newton's cradle'' states [T. Kinoshita, T. Wenger and David S. Weiss, ``A quantum Newton's Cradle,'' Nature 440, 900 (2006)]. The measured evolution rates are found to depend on density and lattice depth. In order to isolate the part of the approach to equilibrium due to atom-atom interactions, it has been necessary to quantify, experimentally and theoretically, the contributions of various heating and loss processes to these rates.

  19. Itinerant-localized dual character of a strongly correlated superfluid Bose gas in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Y.; Kitaura, M.; Matsumoto, H.

    2006-03-15

    We investigate a strongly correlated Bose gas in an optical lattice. Extending the standard-basis operator method developed by Haley and Erdoes to a boson Hubbard model, we calculate excitation spectra in the superfluid phase, as well as in the Mott insulating phase, at T=0. In the Mott phase, the excitation spectrum has a finite energy gap, reflecting the localized character of atoms. In the superfluid phase, the excitation spectrum is shown to have an itinerant-localized dual structure, where the gapless Bogoliubov mode (which describes the itinerant character of superfluid atoms) and a band with a finite energy gap coexist. We also show that the rf-tunneling current measurement would give useful information about the duality of a strongly correlated superfluid Bose gas near the superfluid-insulator transition.

  20. Measuring the Edwards-Anderson order parameter of the Bose glass: A quantum gas microscope approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, S. J.; Walker, L. S.; Harte, T. L.; Bruce, G. D.

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of spatially resolved fluorescence imaging in quantum gas microscopes, it is now possible to directly image glassy phases and probe the local effects of disorder in a highly controllable setup. Here we present numerical calculations using a spatially resolved local mean-field theory, show that it captures the essential physics of the disordered system, and use it to simulate the density distributions seen in single-shot fluorescence microscopy. From these simulated images we extract local properties of the phases which are measurable by a quantum gas microscope and show that unambiguous detection of the Bose glass is possible. In particular, we show that experimental determination of the Edwards-Anderson order parameter is possible in a strongly correlated quantum system using existing experiments. We also suggest modifications to the experiments which will allow further properties of the Bose glass to be measured.

  1. Laboratory simulation of cometary neutral gas ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tsuey-Fen; Rahman, H. U.; White, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    The laboratory simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with a comet is used to study the cometary neural gas ionization. The experiment is carried out in the UCR T-1 facility with an ice ball as the comet model. Photographs and data are taken with a variety of values of the solar wind velocity, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and comet configurations. The results show that the cometary neutral gas ionization depends on both the velocity of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field. The plasma cloud surrounding the comet is visible only when the solar wind velocity and IMF are both above certain minimum values. This velocity dependent phenomena is explained by Alfven's critical ionization velocity effect. The critical magnetic field may be explained by assuming two stream lower hybrid instability as a triggering mechanism for the ionization of the neutral gas by plasma flow. Critical upper and lower limits for the magnetic field, required by anomalous ionization, are also derived that satisfy the experimental observations.

  2. Experiments on a one-dimensional Bose gas: Thomas Fermi to Tonks-Girardeau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, Trevor

    A set of experiments was performed on a one-dimensional Bose gas system. A 3D Bose-Einstein condensate of 87Rb atoms was formed in an all-optical trap. The BEC was then loaded into a 2D optical lattice that consists of an array of parallel 1D tubes. Measurements of the energy, cloud size, and local pair correlation function probe the properties of the gas from the weak coupling to strong coupling (Tonks-Girardeau) limit. The characteristic property of fermionization of the wave functions was observed in the TG limit. Another experiment was done to probe the nature on non-equilibrium 1D Bose gases. This integrable system, when placed in a non-equilibrium momentum distribution, was found not to thermalize on the time scale of our experiment (hundreds of trap oscillations or thousands of collisions). This is in stark contrast to the 3D case, which thermalizes on the order of 3 trap oscillations.

  3. Spontaneously Broken Gauge Symmetry in a Bose Gas with Constant Particle Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelle, A.

    The interplay between spontaneously broken gauge symmetries and Bose-Einstein condensation has long been controversially discussed in science, since the equations of motion are invariant under phase transformations. Within the present model, it is illustrated that spontaneous symmetry breaking appears as a non-local process in position space, but within disjoint subspaces of the underlying Hilbert space. Numerical simulations show that it is the symmetry of the relative phase distribution between condensate and non-condensate quantum fields which is spontaneously broken when passing the critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation. Since the total number of gas particles remains constant over time, the global U(1)-gauge symmetry of the system is preserved.

  4. Critical temperature of a Rashba spin-orbit-coupled Bose gas in a harmonic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui; Liu, Xia-Ji

    2012-01-01

    We investigate theoretically Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal, trapped Bose gas in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling. Analytic results for the critical temperature and condensate fraction are derived based on a semiclassical approximation to the single-particle-energy spectrum and density of states and are compared with exact results obtained by explicitly summing discrete energy levels for a small number of particles. We find a significant decrease of the critical temperature and of the condensate fraction due to finite spin-orbit coupling. For a large coupling strength and a finite number of particles N, the critical temperature scales as N2/5 and N2/3 in three and two dimensions, respectively, contrasted to the predictions of N1/3 and N1/2 in the absence of spin-orbit coupling. Finite-size corrections in three dimensions are also discussed.

  5. Correlation dynamics during a slow interaction quench in a one-dimensional Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Jean-Sébastien; Citro, Roberta; Kollath, Corinna; Orignac, Edmond

    2014-02-14

    We investigate the response of a one-dimensional Bose gas to a slow increase of its interaction strength. We focus on the rich dynamics of equal-time single-particle correlations treating the Lieb-Liniger model within a bosonization approach and the Bose-Hubbard model using the time-dependent density-matrix renormalization group method. For short distances, correlations follow a power law with distance with an exponent given by the adiabatic approximation. In contrast, for long distances, correlations decay algebraically with an exponent understood within the sudden quench approximation. This long distance regime is separated from an intermediate distance one by a generalized Lieb-Robinson criterion. At long times, in this intermediate regime, bosonization predicts that single-particle correlations decay following a stretched exponential, an unconventional behavior. We develop here an intuitive understanding for the propagation of correlations, in terms of a generalized light cone, applicable to a large variety of systems and quench forms.

  6. Isobars of an ideal Bose gas within the grand canonical ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Imtak; Park, Jeong-Hyuck; Kim, Sang-Woo

    2011-08-15

    We investigate the isobar of an ideal Bose gas confined in a cubic box within the grand canonical ensemble for a large yet finite number of particles, N. After solving the equation of the spinodal curve, we derive precise formulas for the supercooling and the superheating temperatures that reveal an N{sup -1/3} or N{sup -1/4} power correction to the known Bose-Einstein condensation temperature in the thermodynamic limit. Numerical computations confirm the accuracy of our analytical approximation, and further show that the isobar zigzags on the temperature-volume plane if N{>=}14 393. In particular, for the Avogadro's number of particles, the volume expands discretely about 10{sup 5} times. Our results quantitatively agree with a previous study on the canonical ensemble within 0.1% error.

  7. Isobars of an ideal Bose gas within the grand canonical ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Imtak; Kim, Sang-Woo; Park, Jeong-Hyuck

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the isobar of an ideal Bose gas confined in a cubic box within the grand canonical ensemble for a large yet finite number of particles, N. After solving the equation of the spinodal curve, we derive precise formulas for the supercooling and the superheating temperatures that reveal an N-1/3 or N-1/4 power correction to the known Bose-Einstein condensation temperature in the thermodynamic limit. Numerical computations confirm the accuracy of our analytical approximation, and further show that the isobar zigzags on the temperature-volume plane if N≥14393. In particular, for the Avogadro’s number of particles, the volume expands discretely about 105 times. Our results quantitatively agree with a previous study on the canonical ensemble within 0.1% error.

  8. Optimum criteria of an irreversible quantum Brayton refrigeration cycle with an ideal Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Sanqiu; He, Jizhou

    2008-11-01

    An irreversible cycle model of the quantum Brayton refrigeration cycle is established, in which finite-time processes and irreversibility in the two adiabatic processes are taken into account. On the basis of the thermodynamic properties of an ideal Bose gas, by using the optimal control-theory, the mathematical expressions for several important performance parameters, such as the coefficient of performance, power input and cooling load, are derived and some important performance parameters, e.g., the temperatures of the working substance at several important state-points, are optimized. By means of numerical predictions, the optimal performance characteristic curves of a Bose-Brayton refrigeration cycle are obtained and analyzed. Furthermore, some optimal operating regions including those for the cooling load, coefficient of performance and the temperatures of the cyclic working substance at the two important state-points are determined and evaluated. Finally, several special cases are discussed in detail.

  9. Probing the Quantum State of a 1D Bose Gas Using Off-Resonant Light Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, A. G.; Ballagh, R. J.

    2011-12-30

    We present a theoretical treatment of coherent light scattering from an interacting 1D Bose gas at finite temperatures. We show how this can provide a nondestructive measurement of the atomic system states. The equilibrium states are determined by the temperature and interaction strength, and are characterized by the spatial density-density correlation function. We show how this correlation function is encoded in the angular distribution of the fluctuations of the scattered light intensity, thus providing a sensitive, quantitative probe of the density-density correlation function and therefore the quantum state of the gas.

  10. Coherence-enhanced imaging of a degenerate Bose-Einstein gas.

    PubMed

    Sadler, L E; Higbie, J M; Leslie, S R; Vengalattore, M; Stamper-Kurn, D M

    2007-03-16

    We present coherence-enhanced imaging, an in situ technique that uses Raman superradiance to probe the spatial coherence of an ultracold gas. Applying this technique, we identify the coherent portion of an inhomogeneous degenerate (87)Rb gas and obtain a spatially resolved measurement of the first-order spatial correlation function. We find that the decay of spin gratings is enhanced in high density regions of a Bose-Einstein condensate, and ascribe the enhancement to collective atom-atom scattering. Further, we directly observe spatial inhomogeneities that arise generally in the course of extended-sample superradiance.

  11. Neutral gas density depletion due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Tynan, George R.; Cattolica, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral gas temperature and total pressure have been measured for pure N2, He/5%N2 and Ar/5%N2 in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor, and a significant rise in the neutral gas temperature has been observed. When thermal transpiration is used to correct total pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Neutral pressure is depleted due to the pressure balance when the plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure) becomes comparable to the neutral pressure in high density plasma. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile was obtained from the neutral gas temperature and the corrected neutral pressure measurements. The results show that the neutral gas density at the centre of the plasma chamber (factor of 2-4 ×) decreases significantly in the presence of a plasma discharge. Significant spatial variation in neutral gas uniformity occurs in such plasmas due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance.

  12. Theory of a Nearly Two-Dimensional Dipolar Bose Gas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-11

    gases of bosonic atoms at ultracold, but finite temperatures . Under these circumstances, the gas can undergo a phase transition to a purely quantum...matter wave. At exactly zero temperature , all of the atoms occupy the BEC; at finite temperatures , a significant fraction of the atoms leave the BEC...and form a thermal cloud. Thus, the state of a low, but finite- temperature gas of bosonic atoms involves the coexistence of a BEC and a thermal cloud

  13. Ground state and excitations of a Bose gas: From a harmonic trap to a double well

    SciTech Connect

    Japha, Y.; Band, Y. B.

    2011-09-15

    We determine the low-energy properties of a trapped Bose gas split in two by a potential barrier over the whole range of barrier heights and asymmetry between the wells. For either weak or strong coupling between the wells, our two-mode theory yields a two-site Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian with the tunneling, interaction, and bias parameters calculated simply using an explicit form of two mode functions. When the potential barrier is relatively low, most of the particles occupy the condensate mode and our theory reduces to a two-mode version of the Bogoliubov theory, which gives a satisfactory estimate of the spatial shape and energy of the lowest collective excitation. When the barrier is high, our theory generalizes the standard two-site Bose-Hubbard model into the case of asymmetric modes, and correctly predicts a full separation of the modes in the limit of strong separation of the wells. We provide explicit analytic forms for the number squeezing and coherence as a function of particle number and temperature. We compare our theory to other two-mode theories for bosons in a double well and discuss their validity in different parameter regimes.

  14. Entanglement pre-thermalization in a one-dimensional Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminishi, Eriko; Mori, Takashi; Ikeda, Tatsuhiko N.; Ueda, Masahito

    2015-12-01

    An isolated quantum system often shows relaxation to a quasi-stationary state before reaching thermal equilibrium. Such a pre-thermalized state was observed in recent experiments in a one-dimensional Bose gas after it had been coherently split into two. Although the existence of local conserved quantities is usually considered to be the key ingredient of pre-thermalization, the question of whether non-local correlations between the subsystems can influence pre-thermalization of the entire system has remained unanswered. Here we study the dynamics of coherently split one-dimensional Bose gases and find that the initial entanglement combined with energy degeneracy due to parity and translation invariance strongly affects the long-term behaviour of the system. The mechanism of this entanglement pre-thermalization is quite general and not restricted to one-dimensional Bose gases. In view of recent experiments with a small and well-defined number of ultracold atoms, our predictions based on exact few-body calculations could be tested in experiments.

  15. Dynamical Simulation of Sound Propagation in a Highly Elongated Trapped Bose Gas at Finite Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arahata, E.; Nikuni, T.

    2013-05-01

    We study sound propagation in a Bose-condensed gas confined in a highly elongated harmonic trap at finite temperatures. Our analysis is based on Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin (ZNG) formalism, which consists of Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate and the kinetic equation for a thermal cloud. We extend ZNG formalism to deal with a highly-anisotropic trap potential, and use it to simulate sound propagation in the two fluid hydrodynamic regime. We use the trap parameters for the experiment that has reported second sound propagation. Our simulation results show that propagation of two sound pulses corresponding to first and second sound can be observed in an intermediate temperature.

  16. Coherence properties of a two-dimensional trapped Bose gas around the superfluid transition

    SciTech Connect

    Plisson, T.; Allard, B.; Salomon, G.; Aspect, A.; Bourdel, T.; Holzmann, M.; Bouyer, P.

    2011-12-15

    We measure the momentum distribution of a two-dimensional trapped Bose gas and observe the increase of the range of coherence around the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) transition. We quantitatively compare our observed profiles to both a Hartree-Fock mean-field theory and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. In the normal phase, the momentum distribution is observed to sharpen well before the phase transition. This behavior is partially captured in a mean-field approach, in contrast to the physics of the BKT transition.

  17. Momentum-Resolved Observation of Thermal and Quantum Depletion in a Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, R.; Bouton, Q.; Cayla, H.; Qu, C.; Aspect, A.; Westbrook, C. I.; Clément, D.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the single-atom-resolved measurement of the distribution of momenta ℏk in a weakly interacting Bose gas after a 330 ms time of flight. We investigate it for various temperatures and clearly separate two contributions to the depletion of the condensate by their k dependence. The first one is the thermal depletion. The second contribution falls off as k-4, and its magnitude increases with the in-trap condensate density as predicted by the Bogoliubov theory at zero temperature. These observations suggest associating it with the quantum depletion. How this contribution can survive the expansion of the released interacting condensate is an intriguing open question.

  18. Non-equilibrium scale invariance and shortcuts to adiabaticity in a one-dimensional Bose gas

    PubMed Central

    Rohringer, W.; Fischer, D.; Steiner, F.; Mazets, I. E.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Trupke, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence for scale invariant behaviour of the excitation spectrum in phase-fluctuating quasi-1d Bose gases after a rapid change of the external trapping potential. Probing density correlations in free expansion, we find that the temperature of an initial thermal state scales with the spatial extension of the cloud as predicted by a model based on adiabatic rescaling of initial eigenmodes with conserved quasiparticle occupation numbers. Based on this result, we demonstrate that shortcuts to adiabaticity for the rapid expansion or compression of the gas do not induce additional heating. PMID:25867640

  19. Two- and three-body contacts in the unitary Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Richard J.; Lopes, Raphael; Man, Jay; Navon, Nir; Smith, Robert P.; Zwierlein, Martin W.; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2017-01-01

    In many-body systems governed by pairwise contact interactions, a wide range of observables is linked by a single parameter, the two-body contact, which quantifies two-particle correlations. This profound insight has transformed our understanding of strongly interacting Fermi gases. Using Ramsey interferometry, we studied coherent evolution of the resonantly interacting Bose gas, and we show here that it cannot be explained by only pairwise correlations. Our experiments reveal the crucial role of three-body correlations arising from Efimov physics and provide a direct measurement of the associated three-body contact.

  20. Finite Size Effect on the Specific Heat of a Bose Gas in Multi-filament Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guijarro, G.; Solís, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    The specific heat for an ideal Bose gas confined in semi-infinite multi-filament cables is analyzed. We start with a Bose gas inside a semi-infinite tube of impenetrable walls and finite rectangular cross section. The internal filament structure is created by applying to the gas two, mutually perpendicular, finite Kronig-Penney delta potentials along the tube cross section, while particles are free to move perpendicular to the cross section. The energy spectrum accessible to the particles is obtained and introduced into the grand potential to calculate the specific heat of the system as a function of temperature for different values of the periodic structure parameters such as the cross-section area, the wall impenetrability, and the number of filaments. The specific heat as a function of temperature shows at least two maxima and one minimum. The main difference with respect to the infinite case is that the peak associated with the BE condensation becomes a smoothed maximum, namely there is not a jump in the specific heat derivative, whose temperature no longer represents a critical point.

  1. Level density of a bose gas and extreme value statistics.

    PubMed

    Comtet, A; Leboeuf, P; Majumdar, Satya N

    2007-02-16

    We establish a connection between the level density of a gas of noninteracting bosons and the theory of extreme value statistics. Depending on the exponent that characterizes the growth of the underlying single-particle spectrum, we show that at a given excitation energy the limiting distribution function for the number of excited particles follows the three universal distribution laws of extreme value statistics, namely, the Gumbel, Weibull, and Fréchet distributions. Implications of this result, as well as general properties of the level density at different energies, are discussed.

  2. Strong correlation effects in a two-dimensional Bose gas with quartic dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radić, Juraj; Natu, Stefan S.; Galitski, Victor

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by the fundamental question of the fate of interacting bosons in flat bands, we consider a two-dimensional Bose gas at zero temperature with an underlying quartic single-particle dispersion in one spatial direction. This type of band structure can be realized using the NIST scheme of spin-orbit coupling [Y.-J. Lin, K. Jiménez-Garcia, and I. B. Spielman, Nature (London) 471, 83 (2011), 10.1038/nature09887], in the regime where the lower-band dispersion has the form ɛk˜kx4/4 +ky2+... , or using the shaken lattice scheme of Parker et al. [C. V. Parker, L.-C. Ha, and C. Chin, Nat. Phys. 9, 769 (2013), 10.1038/nphys2789]. We numerically compare the ground-state energies of the mean-field Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) and various trial wave functions, where bosons avoid each other at short distances. We discover that, at low densities, several types of strongly correlated states have an energy per particle (ɛ ), which scales with density (n ) as ɛ ˜n4 /3 , in contrast to ɛ ˜n for the weakly interacting Bose gas. These competing states include a Wigner crystal, quasicondensates described in terms of properly symmetrized fermionic states, and variational wave functions of Jastrow type. We find that one of the latter has the lowest energy among the states we consider. This Jastrow-type state has a strongly reduced, but finite, condensate fraction, and true off-diagonal long-range order, which suggests that the ground state of interacting bosons with quartic dispersion is a strongly correlated condensate reminiscent of superfluid helium-4. Our results show that even for weakly interacting bosons in higher dimensions, one can explore the crossover from a weakly coupled BEC to a strongly correlated condensate by simply tuning the single-particle dispersion or density.

  3. Quantum Joule-Thomson effect in a saturated homogeneous Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Schmidutz, Tobias F; Gotlibovych, Igor; Gaunt, Alexander L; Smith, Robert P; Navon, Nir; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2014-01-31

    We study the thermodynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation in a weakly interacting quasihomogeneous atomic gas, prepared in an optical-box trap. We characterize the critical point for condensation and observe saturation of the thermal component in a partially condensed cloud, in agreement with Einstein's textbook picture of a purely statistical phase transition. Finally, we observe the quantum Joule-Thomson effect, namely isoenthalpic cooling of an (essentially) ideal gas. In our experiments this cooling occurs spontaneously, due to energy-independent collisions with the background gas in the vacuum chamber. We extract a Joule-Thomson coefficient μJT>10(9)  K/bar, about 10 orders of magnitude larger than observed in classical gases.

  4. Quantum Joule-Thomson Effect in a Saturated Homogeneous Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidutz, Tobias F.; Gotlibovych, Igor; Gaunt, Alexander L.; Smith, Robert P.; Navon, Nir; Hadzibabic, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    We study the thermodynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation in a weakly interacting quasihomogeneous atomic gas, prepared in an optical-box trap. We characterize the critical point for condensation and observe saturation of the thermal component in a partially condensed cloud, in agreement with Einstein's textbook picture of a purely statistical phase transition. Finally, we observe the quantum Joule-Thomson effect, namely isoenthalpic cooling of an (essentially) ideal gas. In our experiments this cooling occurs spontaneously, due to energy-independent collisions with the background gas in the vacuum chamber. We extract a Joule-Thomson coefficient μJT>109 K /bar, about 10 orders of magnitude larger than observed in classical gases.

  5. Generation and exploration of the Spin-Orbit coupled Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jian-Wei

    2013-03-01

    To generate an artificial gauge field with ultracold quantum gas becomes a very hot topic in last few years and will continue to be attractive for ultracold atomic and condensed matter physics in the coming future. Many interesting and important topics such as Fractional Quantum Hall effect, Spin-orbit coupling and Topological insulator are connected to this topic very closely. Here we present our recent experimental progress of the synthesized gauge potential and the spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in optical dipole trap. Raman coupling technique and a bias magnetic field is applied to tune the structure of the gauge potential and spin-orbit coupling. Several fundamental properties of spin-orbit coupled BEC is experimentally studied including the properties of collective dipole oscillation, the stability of excited dressed state, the critical temperature of spin-orbit coupled Bose gas and the formation of magnetic order during evaporative cooling. These studies enrich the knowledge of this field and further explorations are also in planning.

  6. Nondissipative drag of superflow in a two-component Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Fil, D.V.; Shevchenko, S.I.

    2005-07-15

    A microscopic theory of a nondissipative drag in a two-component superfluid Bose gas is developed. The expression for the drag current in the system with the components of different atomic masses, densities, and scattering lengths is derived. It is shown that the drag current is proportional to the square root of the gas parameter. The temperature dependence of the drag current is studied and it is shown that at temperature of order or smaller than the interaction energy the temperature reduction of the drag current is rather small. A possible way of measuring the drag factor is proposed. A toroidal system with the drag component confined in two half-ring wells separated by two Josephson barriers is considered. Under certain condition such a system can be treated as a Bose-Einstein counterpart of the Josephson charge qubit in an external magnetic field. It is shown that the measurement of the difference of number of atoms in two wells under a controlled evolution of the state of the qubit allows one to determine the drag factor.

  7. Quantum sine-Gordon dynamics on analogue curved spacetime in a weakly imperfect scalar Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkoff, T. J.; Fischer, Uwe R.

    2016-07-01

    Using the coherent state functional integral expression of the partition function, we show that the sine-Gordon model on an analogue curved spacetime arises as the effective quantum field theory for phase fluctuations of a weakly imperfect Bose gas on an incompressible background superfluid flow when these fluctuations are restricted to a subspace of the single-particle Hilbert space. We consider bipartitions of the single-particle Hilbert space relevant to experiments on ultracold bosonic atomic or molecular gases, including, e.g., restriction to high- or low-energy sectors of the dynamics and spatial bipartition corresponding to tunnel-coupled planar Bose gases. By assuming full unitary quantum control in the low-energy subspace of a trapped gas, we show that (1) appropriately tuning the particle number statistics of the lowest-energy mode partially decouples the low- and high-energy sectors, allowing any low-energy single-particle wave function to define a background for sine-Gordon dynamics on curved spacetime and (2) macroscopic occupation of a quantum superposition of two states of the lowest two modes produces an analogue curved spacetime depending on two background flows, with respective weights continuously dependent on the corresponding weights of the superposed quantum states.

  8. Bose-Einstein Condensation in a Dilute Gas; the First 70 Years and Some Recent Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, E. A.; Wieman, C. E.

    Bose-Einstein condensation, or BEC, has a long and rich history dating from the early 1920s. In this article we will trace briefly over this history and some of the developments in physics that made possible our successful pursuit of BEC in a gas. We will then discuss what was involved in this quest. In this discussion we will go beyond the usual technical description to try and address certain questions that we now hear frequently, but are not covered in our past research papers. These are questions along the lines of ``How did you get the idea and decide to pursue it? Did you know it was going to work? How long did it take you and why?'' We will review some of our favorites from among the experiments we have carried out with BEC. There will then be a brief encore on why we are optimistic that BEC can be created with nearly any species of magnetically trappable atom. Throughout this article we will try to explain what makes BEC in a dilute gas so interesting, unique, and experimentally challenging. This article is our ``Nobel Lecture'' and as such takes a relatively personal approach to the story of the development of experimental Bose-Einstein condensation. For a somewhat more scholarly treatment of the history, the interested reader is referred to E. A. Cornell, J. R. Ensher and C. E. Wieman, ``Experiments in dilute atomic Bose-Einstein condensation in Bose-Einstein Condensation in Atomic Gases, Proceedings of the International School of Physics ``Enrico Fermi'' Course CXL'' (M. Inguscio, S. Stringari and C. E. Wieman, Eds., Italian Physical Society, 1999), pp. 15-66, which is also available as cond-mat/9903109. For a reasonably complete technical review of the three years of explosive progress that immediately followed the first observation of BEC, we recommend reading the above article in combination with the corresponding review from Ketterle, cond-mat/9904034.

  9. Strongly correlated Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevy, F.; Salomon, C.

    2016-10-01

    The strongly interacting Bose gas is one of the most fundamental paradigms of quantum many-body physics and the subject of many experimental and theoretical investigations. We review recent progress on strongly correlated Bose gases, starting with a description of beyond mean-field corrections. We show that the Efimov effect leads to non universal phenomena and to a metastability of the low temperature Bose gas through three-body recombination to deeply bound molecular states. We outline differences and similarities with ultracold Fermi gases, discuss recent experiments on the unitary Bose gas, and finally present a few perspectives for future research.

  10. Hydrodynamic versus collisionless dynamics of a one-dimensional harmonically trapped Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosi, Giulia; Stringari, Sandro

    2016-12-01

    By using a sum-rule approach we investigate the transition between the hydrodynamic and the collisionless regime of the collective modes in a one-dimensional (1D) harmonically trapped Bose gas. Both the weakly interacting gas and the Tonks-Girardeau limits are considered. We predict that the excitation of the dipole compression mode is characterized in the high-temperature collisionless regime by a beating signal of two different frequencies (ωz and 3 ωz ), while in the high-temperature collisional regime, the excitation consists of a single frequency (√{7 }ωz ). This behavior differs from the case of the lowest breathing mode whose excitation consists of a single frequency (2 ωz ) in both regimes. Our predictions for the dipole compression mode open promising perspectives for the experimental investigation of collisional effects in 1D configurations.

  11. Lorentz-violating effects in the Bose-Einstein condensation of an ideal bosonic gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casana, Rodolfo; da Silva, Kleber A. T.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied the effects of Lorentz-violation in the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of an ideal boson gas, by assessing both the nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic limits. Our model describes a massive complex scalar field coupled to a CPT-even and Lorentz-violating background. We first analyze the nonrelativistic case, at this level by using experimental data, we obtain upper-bounds for some LIV parameters. In the sequel, we have constructed the partition function for the relativistic ideal boson gas which to be able of a consistent description requires the imposition of severe restrictions on some LIV coefficients. In both cases, we have demonstrated that the LIV contributions are contained in an overall factor, which multiplies almost all thermodynamical properties. An exception is the fraction of the condensed particles.

  12. Spreading of correlations and Loschmidt echo after quantum quenches of a Bose gas in the Aubry-André potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Gullo, Nicola; Dell'Anna, Luca

    2015-12-01

    We study the spreading of density-density correlations and the Loschmidt echo, after different sudden quenches in an interacting one-dimensional Bose gas on a lattice, also in the presence of a superimposed aperiodic potential. We use a time dependent Bogoliubov approach to calculate the evolution of the correlation functions and employ the linked cluster expansion to derive the Loschmidt echo.

  13. Ultra-cold dilute gas Bose-Fermi mixture with ^87Rb and ^40K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldwin, J.; Olsen, M. L.; Inouye, S.; Jin, D. S.

    2003-05-01

    Sympathetic cooling experiments with Bose-Fermi mixtures offer a way to cool Fermi gases to quantum degeneracy with relatively little loss in atom number, as well as offering interesting new systems for study with the control and precision typical of atomic physics experiments. Here we report on the sympathetic cooling of fermionic ^40K with bosonic ^87Rb. We first trap and cool ^87Rb atoms in a two-species MOT together with ^40K. After loading into a purely magnetic quadrupole configuration trap, the gas is transferred mechanically nearly a meter to a Ioffe-Pritchard type magnetic trap in an ultra-high vacuum cell. radio-frequency induced evaporation of the ^87Rb atoms results in pure Bose-Einstein condensates of ˜ 2× 10^5 atoms. In the process ^40K atoms are cooled by virtue of thermal contact with the ^87Rb reservoir resulting in cooling of ^40K, with ˜ 1 × 10^4 atoms at temperatures below 100 nK. We present results from the experiment demonstrating the efficiency of the cooling, and describe ongoing investigations into the limits of the cooling and the strong inter-species interactions in the mixture. Finally, future directions for the experiment are discussed.

  14. Emergent structure in a dipolar Bose gas in a one-dimensional lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Ryan M.; Bohn, John L.

    2011-02-15

    We consider an ultracold dipolar Bose gas in a one-dimensional lattice. For a sufficiently large lattice recoil energy, such a system becomes a series of nonoverlapping Bose-Einstein condensates that interact via the long-range dipole-dipole interaction (ddi). We model this system via a coupled set of nonlocal Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs) for lattices of both infinite and finite extent. We find significantly modified stability properties in the lattice due to the softening of a discrete roton-like mode, as well as ''islands'' in parameter space where biconcave densities are predicted to exist and that only exist in the presence of the other condensates on the lattice. We solve for the elementary excitations of the system to check the dynamical stability of these solutions and to uncover the nature of their collapse. By solving a coupled set of GPEs exactly on a full numeric grid, we show that this emergent biconcave structure can be realized in a finite lattice with atomic {sup 52}Cr.

  15. Quenched Dynamics of the Momentum Distribution of the Unitary Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancilotto, Francesco; Rossi, Maurizio; Salasnich, Luca; Toigo, Flavio

    2015-12-01

    We study the quenched dynamics of the momentum distribution of a unitary Bose gas under isotropic harmonic confinement within a time-dependent density functional approach based on our recently calculated Monte Carlo bulk equation of state. In our calculations the inter-atomic s-wave scattering length of the trapped bosons is suddenly increased to a very large value and the real-time evolution of the system is studied. Prompted by the very recent experimental data of 85Rb atoms at unitarity (Makotyn et al. in Nat Phys 10:116, 2014) we focus on the momentum distribution as a function of time. Our results suggest that at low momenta, a quasi-stationary momentum distribution is reached after a long transient, contrary to what found experimentally for large momenta which equilibrate on a time scale shorter than the one for three body losses.

  16. Spatial Nonlocal Pair Correlations in a Repulsive 1D Bose Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, A. G.; Davis, M. J.; Kheruntsyan, K. V.; Gangardt, D. M.; Viering, K.; Raizen, M. G.

    2008-04-25

    We analytically calculate the spatial nonlocal pair correlation function for an interacting uniform 1D Bose gas at finite temperature and propose an experimental method to measure nonlocal correlations. Our results span six different physical realms, including the weakly and strongly interacting regimes. We show explicitly that the characteristic correlation lengths are given by one of four length scales: the thermal de Broglie wavelength, the mean interparticle separation, the healing length, or the phase coherence length. In all regimes, we identify the profound role of interactions and find that under certain conditions the pair correlation may develop a global maximum at a finite interparticle separation due to the competition between repulsive interactions and thermal effects.

  17. Thermodynamic Properties of a Trapped Bose Gas:. a Diffusion Monte Carlo Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, S.

    We investigate the thermodynamic properties of a trapped Bose gas of Rb atoms interacting through a repulsive potential at low but finite temperature (kBT < μ < Tc) by Quantum Monte Carlo method based upon the generalization of Feynman-Kac method1-3 applicable to many-body systems at T=0 to finite temperatures. In this paper, we report temperature variation of condensation fraction, chemical potential, density profile, total energy of the system, release energy, frequency shifts and moment of inertia within the realistic potential model (Morse type) for the first time by diffusion Monte Carlo technique. The most remarkable success was in achieving the same trend in the temperature variation of frequency shifts as was observed in JILA4 for both m=2 and m=0 modes. For other things, we agree with the work of Giorgini et al.,5 Pitaevskii et al.6 and Krauth.7

  18. Spin squeezing of a dipolar Bose gas in a double-well potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qing-Shou; Lu, Hai-Yan; Yi, Su

    2016-01-01

    The spin-squeezing dynamics of a quasi-one-dimensional dipolar Bose gas trapped in a double-well potential is studied by employing the method of the multiconfigurational time-dependent Hartree for bosons. We find that optimal squeezing generated by the dipolar interaction can be improved over the one-axis twisting limit, and this squeezing is much stronger than that obtained by the contact interaction. Moreover, natural orbital-related squeezing can be controlled by the direction of the dipole moment, which provides control for storing the optimal spin squeezing. The origin of the squeezing as well as the relationship between spin squeezing and the two-order correlation function are also discussed.

  19. Reentrant behavior of the breathing-mode-oscillation frequency in a one-dimensional Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudyma, A. Iu.; Astrakharchik, G. E.; Zvonarev, Mikhail B.

    2015-08-01

    Exciting temporal oscillations of the density distribution is a high-precision method for probing ultracold trapped atomic gases. Interaction effects in their many-body dynamics are particularly puzzling and counter-intuitive in one spatial dimension (1D) due to enhanced quantum correlations. We consider 1D quantum Bose gas in a parabolic trap at zero temperature and explain, analytically and numerically, how oscillation frequency depends on the number of particles, their repulsion, and the trap strength. We identify the frequency with the energy difference between the ground state and a particular excited state. This way we avoided resolving the dynamical evolution of the system, simplifying the problem immensely. We find an excellent quantitative agreement of our results with the data from the Innsbruck experiment [Science 325, 1224 (2009), 10.1126/science.1175850].

  20. Off-diagonal long-range order, cycle probabilities, and condensate fraction in the ideal Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, Maguelonne; Krauth, Werner

    2007-11-01

    We discuss the relationship between the cycle probabilities in the path-integral representation of the ideal Bose gas, off-diagonal long-range order, and Bose-Einstein condensation. Starting from the Landsberg recursion relation for the canonic partition function, we use elementary considerations to show that in a box of size L3 the sum of the cycle probabilities of length k>L2 equals the off-diagonal long-range order parameter in the thermodynamic limit. For arbitrary systems of ideal bosons, the integer derivative of the cycle probabilities is related to the probability of condensing k bosons. We use this relation to derive the precise form of the pik in the thermodynamic limit. We also determine the function pik for arbitrary systems. Furthermore, we use the cycle probabilities to compute the probability distribution of the maximum-length cycles both at T=0, where the ideal Bose gas reduces to the study of random permutations, and at finite temperature. We close with comments on the cycle probabilities in interacting Bose gases.

  1. Modeling of neutral gas dynamics in high-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canupp, Patrick Wellington

    This thesis describes a physical model of chemically reactive neutral gas flow and discusses numerical solutions of this model for the flow in an inductively coupled plasma etch reactor. To obtain these solutions, this research develops an efficient, implicit numerical method. As a result of the enhanced numerical stability of the scheme, large time steps advance the solution from initial conditions to a final steady state in fewer iterations and with less computational expense than simpler explicit methods. This method would incorporate suitably as a module in currently existing large scale plasma simulation tools. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis presents results from two simulations of flows that possess theoretical solutions. The first case is the inviscid flow of a gas through a converging nozzle. A comparison of the numerical solution to isentropic flow theory shows that the numerical technique capably captures the essential flow features of this environment. The second case is the Couette flow of a gas between two parallel plates. The simulation results compare well with the exact solution for this flow. After establishing the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis discusses results for the flow of chemically reactive gases in a chlorine plasma etch reactor. This research examines the influence of the plasma on the neutral gas and the dynamics exhibited by the neutral gas in the reactor. This research finds that the neutral gas temperature strongly depends on the rate at which inelastic, electron-impact dissociation reactions occur and on atomic chlorine wall recombination rates. Additionally, the neutral gas Aow in the reactor includes a significant mass flux of etch product from the wafer surface. Resolution of these effects is useful for neutral gas simulation. Finally, this thesis demonstrates that continuum fluid models provide reasonable accuracy for these low pressure reactor flows due to the fact

  2. Modeling of modification experiments involving neutral-gas release

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments involve the injection of neutral gases into the upper atmosphere. Examples are critical velocity experiments, MHD wave generation, ionospheric hole production, plasma striation formation, and ion tracing. Many of these experiments are discussed in other sessions of the Active Experiments Conference. This paper limits its discussion to: (1) the modeling of the neutral gas dynamics after injection, (2) subsequent formation of ionosphere holes, and (3) use of such holes as experimental tools.

  3. FK-DLR properties of a quantum multi-type Bose-gas with a repulsive interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhov, Y.; Stuhl, I.

    2014-08-01

    The paper extends earlier results from Suhov and Kelbert ["FK-DLR states of a quantum Bose-gas with a hardcore interaction," arXiv:1304.0782] and Suhov et al. ["Shift-invariance for FK-DLR states of a 2D quantum Bose-gas," arXiv:1304.4177] about infinite-volume quantum bosonic states (FK-DLR states) to the case of multi-type particles with non-negative interactions. (An example is a quantum Widom-Rowlinson model.) Following the strategy from Suhov and Kelbert and Suhov et al., we establish that, for the values of fugacity z ∈ (0, 1) and inverse temperature β > 0, finite-volume Gibbs states form a compact family in the thermodynamic limit. Next, in dimension two we show that any limit-point state (an FK-DLR state in the terminology adopted in Suhov and Kelbert and Suhov et al.) is translation-invariant.

  4. Disordered spin dependent interactions in a spinor (S=1) Bose gas: A percolation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Sk. Noor; Basu, Saurabh

    2016-05-01

    We study the effect of disorder in the spin dependent interaction of a spinor Bose Hubbard model. We apply mean field theory and observe the presence of Bose glass phase by computing the superfluid order parameter and compressibility. The extent of different types of phase is computed via a percolation analysis for phase diagram corresponding to antiferromagnetic interactions.

  5. Ground State Energy of the Two-Dimensional Weakly Interacting Bose Gas: First Correction Beyond Bogoliubov Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mora, Christophe; Castin, Yvan

    2009-05-08

    We consider the grand potential {omega} of a two-dimensional weakly interacting homogeneous Bose gas at zero temperature. Building on a number-conserving Bogoliubov method for a lattice model in the grand canonical ensemble, we calculate the next order term as compared to the Bogoliubov prediction, in a systematic expansion of {omega} in powers of the parameter measuring the weakness of the interaction. Our prediction is in very good agreement with recent Monte Carlo calculations.

  6. Bose-Einstein Condensation in a Dilute Gas:. the First 70 Years and Some Recent Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornell, E. A.; Wieman, C. E.

    2003-04-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation, or BEC, has a long and rich history dating from the early 1920s. In this article we will trace briefly over this history and some of the developments in physics that made possible our successful pursuit of BEC in a gas. We will then discuss what was involved in this quest. In this discussion we will go beyond the usual technical description to try and address certain questions that we now hear frequently, but are not covered in our past research papers. These are questions along the lines of "How did you get the idea and decide to pursue it? Did you know it was going to work? How long did it take you and why?" We will review some of our favorites from among the experiments we have carried out with BEC. There will then be a brief encore on why we are optimistic that BEC can be created with nearly any species of magnetically trappable atom. Throughout this article we will try to explain what makes BEC in a dilute gas so interesting, unique, and experimentally challenging.

  7. Black hole thermodynamics as seen through a microscopic model of a relativistic Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skákala, Jozef; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2016-02-01

    Equations of gravity when projected on spacetime horizons resemble Navier-Stokes equation of a fluid with a specific equation of state [T. Damour, Surface effects of black hole physics, in Proc. M. Grossman Meeting (North Holland, 1982), p. 587, T. Padmanabhan, Phys. Rev. D 83 (2011) 044048, arXiv:gr-qc/1012.0119, S. Kolekar and T. Padmanabhan, Phys. Rev. D 85 (2011) 024004, arXiv:gr-qc/1012.5421]. We show that this equation of state describes massless ideal relativistic gas. We use these results, and build an explicit and simple molecular model of the fluid living on the Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström black hole horizons. For the spin zero Bose gas, our model makes two predictions: (i) The horizon area/entropy is quantized as given by Bekenstein’s quantization rule, (ii) The model explains the correct type of proportionality between horizon area and entropy. However, for the physically relevant range of parameters, the proportionality constant is never equal to 1/4.

  8. Microcanonical finite-size scaling of an ideal Bose gas in a box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honghui; He, Jizhou; Wang, Jianhui

    2017-01-01

    We derive an exact recursive scheme to determine exactly the microcanonical partition function of a finite Bose system. Such a recursive approach is identical to that previously obtained within the context of counting statistics. Within the exact microcanonical ensemble, we study microcanonical finite-size scaling behaviors of condensate fraction and specific heat around the critical energy ɛ c for the finite ideal Bose system. We show that the microcanonical scaling functions governing the various critical behaviors are universal in the ideal Bose-Einstein condensates.

  9. Quantum states of dark solitons in the 1D Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Jun; Kanamoto, Rina; Kaminishi, Eriko; Deguchi, Tetsuo

    2016-07-01

    We present a series of quantum states that are characterized by dark solitons of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (i.e. the Gross-Pitaevskii equation) for the one-dimensional Bose gas interacting through the repulsive delta-function potentials. The classical solutions satisfy the periodic boundary conditions and we simply call them classical dark solitons. Through exact solutions we show corresponding aspects between the states and the solitons in the weak coupling case: the quantum and classical density profiles completely overlap with each other not only at an initial time but also at later times over a long period of time, and they move together with the same speed in time; the matrix element of the bosonic field operator between the quantum states has exactly the same profiles of the square amplitude and the phase as the classical complex scalar field of a classical dark soliton not only at the initial time but also at later times, and the corresponding profiles move together for a long period of time. We suggest that the corresponding properties hold rigorously in the weak coupling limit. Furthermore, we argue that the lifetime of the dark soliton-like density profile in the quantum state becomes infinitely long as the coupling constant approaches zero, by comparing it with the quantum speed limit time. Thus, we call the quantum states quantum dark soliton states.

  10. Nonlinear quantization of a degenerate charged Bose gas in an external Coulomb trap

    SciTech Connect

    Reinisch, Gilbert

    2004-09-01

    We consider a degenerate charged Bose-Coulomb gas populating several discrete stationary boson bound states that are located in a spherical-symmetrical central Coulombian potential. Each such state is defined, through appropriate boundary conditions and normalization, by a so-called 'nonlinear eigenstate' that is actually a solution of the coupled (linear) stationary Schroedinger-like Gross-Pitaevskii differential equation and the (nonlinear) Poisson equation. The corresponding eigenvalues allow us to define the energies of these degenerate boson states, much like the Koopmans orbital energy in atomic physics. This theory applies surprisingly well (compared with the corresponding Hartree-Fock results) to spherical-symmetrical s orbital states in atomic physics (i.e., bosonlike restricted orbital states where the additional spin degree of freedom is already integrated out). Finally the superposition of two such stationary nonlinear eigenstates is investigated and given a semiclassical physical significance similar to a Thomas-Fermi approach. The resulting concepts apply particularly well (namely within an average 1% error bar with respect to spectroscopic data) to the 1s{sup 2}-2s{sup 2} orbital states of the 3{<=}Z{<=}9 atomic subsystems.

  11. Real-space mean-field theory of a spin-1 Bose gas in synthetic dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Hilary M.; Wilson, Justin H.; Pixley, J. H.; Spielman, I. B.; Natu, Stefan S.

    2016-12-01

    The internal degrees of freedom provided by ultracold atoms provide a route for realizing higher dimensional physics in systems with limited spatial dimensions. Nonspatial degrees of freedom in these systems are dubbed "synthetic dimensions." This connection is useful from an experimental standpoint but complicated by the fact that interactions alter the condensate ground state. Here we use the Gross-Pitaevskii equation to study the ground-state properties of a spin-1 Bose gas under the combined influence of an optical lattice, spatially varying spin-orbit coupling, and interactions at the mean-field level. The associated phases depend on the sign of the spin-dependent interaction parameter and the strength of the spin-orbit field. We find "charge"- and spin-density-wave phases which are directly related to helical spin order in real space and affect the behavior of edge currents in the synthetic dimension. We determine the resulting phase diagram as a function of the spin-orbit coupling and spin-dependent interaction strength, considering both attractive (ferromagnetic) and repulsive (polar) spin-dependent interactions, and we provide a direct comparison of our results with the noninteracting case. Our findings are applicable to current and future experiments, specifically with 87Rb, 7Li, 41K, and 23Na.

  12. Norm preserving stochastic field equation for an ideal Bose gas in a trap: numerical implementation and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Sigmund; Strunz, Walter T.

    2010-12-01

    Stochastic field equations represent a powerful tool to describe the thermal state of a trapped Bose gas. Often, such approaches are confronted with the old problem of an ultraviolet catastrophe, which demands a cutoff at high energies. In Heller and Strunz (2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 081001) we introduce a quantum stochastic field equation, avoiding the cutoff problem through a fully quantum approach based on the Glauber-Sudarshan P-function. For a close link to actual experimental setups, the theory is formulated for a fixed particle number and thus based on the canonical ensemble. In this work the derivation and the non-trivial numerical implementation of the equation is explained in detail. We present applications for finite Bose gases trapped in a variety of potentials and show results for ground state occupation numbers and their equilibrium fluctuations. Moreover, we investigate spatial coherence properties by studying correlation functions of various orders.

  13. Quantum particle-number fluctuations in a two-component Bose gas in a double-well potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zin, Pawel; Oles, Bartlomiej; Sacha, Krzysztof

    2011-09-15

    A two-component Bose gas in a double-well potential with repulsive interactions may undergo a phase separation transition if the interspecies interactions outweigh the intraspecies ones. We analyze the transition in the strong interaction limit within the two-mode approximation. Numbers of particles in each potential well are equal and constant. However, at the transition point, the ground state of the system reveals huge fluctuations of numbers of particles belonging to the different gas components; that is, the probability for observation of any mixture of particles in each potential well becomes uniform.

  14. Rigorous investigation of the reduced density matrix for the ideal Bose gas in harmonic traps by a loop-gas-like approach

    SciTech Connect

    Beau, Mathieu; Savoie, Baptiste

    2014-05-15

    In this paper, we rigorously investigate the reduced density matrix (RDM) associated to the ideal Bose gas in harmonic traps. We present a method based on a sum-decomposition of the RDM allowing to treat not only the isotropic trap, but also general anisotropic traps. When focusing on the isotropic trap, the method is analogous to the loop-gas approach developed by Mullin [“The loop-gas approach to Bose-Einstein condensation for trapped particles,” Am. J. Phys. 68(2), 120 (2000)]. Turning to the case of anisotropic traps, we examine the RDM for some anisotropic trap models corresponding to some quasi-1D and quasi-2D regimes. For such models, we bring out an additional contribution in the local density of particles which arises from the mesoscopic loops. The close connection with the occurrence of generalized-Bose-Einstein condensation is discussed. Our loop-gas-like approach provides relevant information which can help guide numerical investigations on highly anisotropic systems based on the Path Integral Monte Carlo method.

  15. Gas-liquid chromatography of fecal neutral steriods.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, K O; Gehrke, C W; Rogers, I T; Flynn, M A; Hentges, D J

    1977-05-21

    A method is described for the analysis of fecal neutral steriods with a dual-column gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) system. After saponification of the fecal slurry, the neutral steroids were extracted with hexane. The GLC separation of the compounds and quantitation were achieved by simultaneous injection of the derivatized and derivatized aliquots of the extract onto dual colmuns under identical conditions. The neutral steroids of interest were than identified by matching the retention times with those of known standards, and identification was confirmed by use of an interfaced GLC high-resolution mass spectrometry system. The detection limit was 0.003 mg of steroid/g of fecal slurry. The pricision of the method is illustrated by a relative standard diviation of 2-10% and a recovery of neutral steroids from 73-96%. The method was applied to the determination of fecal neutral steroids in a "High protein diet in colon cancer study". A considerably larger level of coprostanone than of coprostanol was observed. Data on neutral steroids in fecal samples from subjects on different diets are the subject of a separate publication.

  16. Condensation of N bosons. II. Nonequilibrium analysis of an ideal Bose gas and the laser phase-transition analogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocharovsky, V. V.; Scully, Marlan O.; Zhu, Shi-Yao; Suhail Zubairy, M.

    2000-02-01

    A nonequilibrium approach to the dynamics and statistics of the condensate of an ideal N-atom Bose gas cooling via interaction with a thermal reservoir using the canonical ensemble is developed. We derive simple analytical expressions for the canonical partition function and equilibrium distribution of the number of atoms in the ground state of a trap under different approximations, and compare them with exact numerical results. The N-particle constraint associated with the canonical ensemble is usually a burden. In the words of Kittel, ``in the investigation of the Bose-Einstein...laws it is very inconvenient to impose the restriction that the number of particles in the subsystem shall be held constant.'' But in the present approach, based on the analogy between a second-order phase transition and laser threshold behavior, the N-particle constraint makes the problem easier. We emphasize that the present work provides another example of a case in which equilibrium (detailed balance) solutions to nonequilibrium equations of motion provide a useful supplementary approach to conventional statistical mechanics. We also discuss some dynamical and mesoscopic aspects of Bose-Einstein condensation. The conclusion is that the present analytical (but approximate) results, based on a nonequilibrium approach, are in excellent agreement with exact (but numerical) results. The present analysis has much in common with the quantum theory of the laser.

  17. Observational Constraints on a Pluto Torus of Circumsolar Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, M. E.; Kollmann, P.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Smith, H. T.; Bagenal, F.; Brown, L. E.; Elliott, H. A.; Haggerty, D. K.; Horanyi, M.; Krimigis, S. M.; Kusterer, M. B.; Lisse, C. M.; McComas, D. J.; Piquette, M. R.; Sidrow, E. J.; Strobel, D. F.; Szalay, J.; Vandegriff, J. D.; Zirnstein, E.; Ennico Smith, K.; Olkin, C.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Young, L. A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the concept of a neutral gas torus surrounding the Sun, aligned with Pluto's orbit, and place observational constraints based primarily on comparison of New Horizons (NH) measurements with a 3-D Monte Carlo model adapted from analogous satellite tori surrounding Saturn and Jupiter. Such a torus, or perhaps partial torus, should result from neutral N2 escaping from Pluto's exosphere. Unlike other more massive planets closer to the Sun, neutrals escape Pluto readily owing, e.g., to the high thermal speed relative to the escape velocity. Importantly, escaped neutrals have a long lifetime due to the great distance from the Sun, ~100 years for photoionization of N2 and ~180 years for photoionization of N, which results from disassociated N2. Despite the lengthy 248-year orbit, these long e-folding lifetimes may allow an enhanced neutral population to form an extended gas cloud that modifies the N2 spatial profile near Pluto. These neutrals are not directly observable by NH but once ionized N2+ or N+ are picked up by the solar wind, reaching ~50 keV, making these pickup ions (PUIs) detectable by NH's Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument. PEPSSI observations analyzed to date may constrain the N2 density; the remaining ~95% of the encounter data, scheduled for downlink in August along with similarly anticipated data from the Solar Wind Around Pluto (SWAP) experiment, should help determine the Pluto outgassing rates. Measurements from SWAP include the solar wind speed, a quantity that greatly enhances PUI studies by enabling us to directly account for the PUI distribution's sensitive dependence on plasma speed. Note that anomalous cosmic ray Si observed at Voyager is overabundant by a factor of ~3000 relative to interstellar composition. This might be related to "outer source" PUIs, but the fact that N2 and Si are indistinguishable in many instruments could mean that N2 is actually driving this apparent Si discrepancy.

  18. Crossover behavior in the phase transition of the Bose-Einstein condensation in a microwave-driven magnon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rezende, Sergio M.

    2009-09-01

    A magnon gas in a film of yttrium iron garnet driven by microwave radiation exhibits Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) when the driving power exceeds a critical value. We show that the nature and the critical exponents of the BEC transition change dramatically if the BEC magnons are significantly coupled to the zone-center magnons. The theoretical results explain the diverse behavior of the order parameter inferred from the experimental data for the light scattering and the microwave emission from the BEC observed with coherent and incoherent microwave pumping.

  19. Metastable quantum phase transitions in a periodic one-dimensional Bose gas. II. Many-body theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kanamoto, R.; Carr, L. D.; Ueda, M.

    2010-02-15

    We show that quantum solitons in the Lieb-Liniger Hamiltonian are precisely the yrast states. We identify such solutions with Lieb's type II excitations from weak to strong interactions, clarifying a long-standing question of the physical meaning of this excitation branch. We demonstrate that the metastable quantum phase transition previously found in mean-field analysis of the weakly interacting Lieb-Liniger Hamiltonian [Phys. Rev. A 79, 063616 (2009)] extends into the medium- to strongly interacting regime of a periodic one-dimensional Bose gas. Our methods are exact diagonalization, finite-size Bethe ansatz, and the boson-fermion mapping in the Tonks-Girardeau limit.

  20. Mott-insulator transition in a two-dimensional atomic Bose gas.

    PubMed

    Spielman, I B; Phillips, W D; Porto, J V

    2007-02-23

    Cold atoms in periodic potentials are versatile quantum systems for implementing simple models prevalent in condensed matter theory. Here we realize the 2D Bose-Hubbard model by loading a Bose-Einstein condensate into an optical lattice, and study the resulting Mott insulator. The measured momentum distributions agree quantitatively with theory (no adjustable parameters). In these systems, the Mott insulator forms in a spatially discrete shell structure which we probe by focusing on correlations in atom shot noise. These correlations show a marked dependence on the lattice depth, consistent with the changing size of the insulating shell expected from simple arguments.

  1. Superfluid to Normal Fluid Phase Transition in the Bose Gas Trapped in Two-Dimensional Optical Lattices at Finite Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, M. O. C.; de Passos, E. J. V.

    2017-02-01

    We develop the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory at finite temperature for Bose gas trapped in the two-dimensional optical lattice with the on-site energy low enough that the gas presents superfluid properties. We obtain the condensate density as function of the temperature neglecting the anomalous density in the thermodynamics equation. The condensate fraction provides two critical temperature. Below the temperature T_{C1}, there is one condensate fraction. Above two condensate fractions merger up to the critical temperature T_{C2}. At temperatures larger than T_{C2}, the condensate fraction is null and, therefore, the gas is normal fluid. We resume by a finite-temperature phase diagram where three domains can be identified: the normal fluid, the superfluid with one stable condensate fraction and the superfluid with two condensate fractions being unstable one of them.

  2. Neutral Gas and Ion Measurements by the CONTOUR Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Niemann, Hasso B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) on the Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) Mission will measure the chemical and isotopic composition of neutral and ion species in the coma of comet Encke and the subsequent targets of this mission. Currently the second target of this mission is comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3. This neutral gas and ion data together with complementary data from the dust analyzer and the imaging spectrometer is designed to allow a broad characterization of the molecular and elemental composition of each cometary nucleus. These experiments enable the study of the of the likely variations in chemical conditions present in different regions of the early solar nebula where the comets formed. With these experiments we will also test ideas about cometary contributions of organics, water, and other volatiles to the inner planets. The CONTOUR NGIMS data set from multiple comets is expected to provide an important extension of to the only other detailed in situ data set from a close flyby of a nucleus, that from Halley. CONTOUR will extend this measurement of an Oort cloud comet to the class of short period comets thought to originate in the Kuiper belt. This data will complement the detailed measurements to be carried out at a single nucleus by the Rosetta Mission.

  3. P-wave superfluid in a quasi-two-dimensional dipolar Bose-Fermi quantum gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kain, Ben; Ling, Hong

    2013-03-01

    The p-wave (px + ipy) superfluid has attracted significant attention in recent years mainly because its vortex core supports a Majorana fermion which, due to its non-Abelian statistics, can be explored for implementing topological quantum computation (TQC). Mixing in bosons may lead to p-wave pairing in a Fermi gas. In a dipolar condensate, the dipole-dipole interaction represents a control knob inaccessible to nondipolar Bosons. Thus, mixing dipolar bosons with fermions opens up new possibilities. We consider a mixture of a spin-polarized Fermi gas and a dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate in a quasi-two-dimensional trap setting. We take the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field approach and develop a theory for studying the stability of the mixture and estimating the critical temperature of the p-wave superfluid. We use this theory to identify the experimentally accessible parameter space in which the mixture is stable against phase separation and the p-wave superfluid pairing can be resonantly enhanced. An enhanced p-wave superfluid order parameter can make the fault tolerant TQC less susceptible to thermal fluctuations. This work aims to stimulate experimental activity in creating dipolar Bose-Fermi mixtures. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation and the US Army Research Office

  4. Thermodynamics and renormalized quasiparticles in the vicinity of the dilute Bose gas quantum critical point in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, Jan; Strassel, Dominik; Streib, Simon; Eggert, Sebastian; Kopietz, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We use the functional renormalization group (FRG) to derive analytical expressions for thermodynamic observables (density, pressure, entropy, and compressibility) as well as for single-particle properties (wave-function renormalization and effective mass) of interacting bosons in two dimensions as a function of temperature T and chemical potential μ . We focus on the quantum disordered and the quantum critical regime close to the dilute Bose gas quantum critical point. Our approach is based on a truncated vertex expansion of the hierarchy of FRG flow equations and the decoupling of the two-body contact interaction in the particle-particle channel using a suitable Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. Our analytic FRG results extend previous analytical renormalization-group calculations for thermodynamic observables at μ =0 to finite values of μ . To confirm the validity of our FRG approach, we have also performed quantum Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the magnetization, susceptibility, and correlation length of the two-dimensional spin-1 /2 quantum X Y model with coupling J in a regime where its quantum critical behavior is controlled by the dilute Bose gas quantum critical point. We find that our analytical results describe the Monte Carlo data for μ ≤0 rather accurately up to relatively high temperatures T ≲0.1 J .

  5. FK-DLR properties of a quantum multi-type Bose-gas with a repulsive interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suhov, Y.; Stuhl, I.

    2014-08-01

    The paper extends earlier results from Suhov and Kelbert [“FK-DLR states of a quantum Bose-gas with a hardcore interaction,” http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1304.0782 ] and Suhov et al. [“Shift-invariance for FK-DLR states of a 2D quantum Bose-gas,” http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1304.4177 ] about infinite-volume quantum bosonic states (FK-DLR states) to the case of multi-type particles with non-negative interactions. (An example is a quantum Widom–Rowlinson model.) Following the strategy from Suhov and Kelbert and Suhov et al., we establish that, for the values of fugacity zϵ(0, 1) and inverse temperature β > 0, finite-volume Gibbs states form a compact family in the thermodynamic limit. Next, in dimension two we show that any limit-point state (an FK-DLR state in the terminology adopted in Suhov and Kelbert and Suhov et al.) is translation-invariant.

  6. Experimental and numerical studies of neutral gas depletion in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi

    The central theme of this dissertation is to explore the impact of neutral depletion and coupling between plasma and neutral gas in weakly ionized unmagnetized plasma. Since there have been few systematic studies of the mechanism which leads to non-uniform neutral distribution in processing plasmas, this work investigated the spatial profiles of neutral temperature and pressure experimentally, and the mechanism of resulting neutral depletion by simulation. The experimental work is comprised of neutral temperature measurements using high resolution atomic spectroscopy and molecular spectroscopy, and neutral pressure measurements considering thermal transpiration. When thermal transpiration effects are used to correct the gas pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile is also obtained from the measured neutral gas temperature and the corrected pressure measurements. The results show that neutral gas temperature rises close to ˜ 900 [K], and the neutral gas density at the center of plasma chamber has a significant (factor of 2-4x) decrease in the presence of a plasma discharge. In numerical work, neutral and ion transport phenomena were simulated by a hybrid-type direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of one dimensional (1D) electrostatic plasma to identify the mechanism of the neutral gas density depletion in Ar/N2 mixtures. The simulation reveals that the neutral depletion is the result of the interplay between plasma and neutral gas, and a parametric study indicates that neutral depletion occurs mainly due to gas heating and pressure balance for the typical condition of plasma processing. In high density plasma sources (Te ≈ 2-5 eV, ne ≈ 1011-1012 cm-3) where the plasma pressure becomes comparable to neutral pressure, total pressure (neutral pressure and plasma pressure) is conserved before and after the discharge. Therefore

  7. Sub-Poissonian Fluctuations in a 1D Bose Gas: From the Quantum Quasicondensate to the Strongly Interacting Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Jacqmin, Thibaut; Armijo, Julien; Bouchoule, Isabelle; Berrada, Tarik; Kheruntsyan, Karen V.

    2011-06-10

    We report on local, in situ measurements of atom number fluctuations in slices of a one-dimensional Bose gas on an atom chip setup. By using current modulation techniques to prevent cloud fragmentation, we are able to probe the crossover from weak to strong interactions. For weak interactions, fluctuations go continuously from super- to sub-Poissonian as the density is increased, which is a signature of the transition between the subregimes where the two-body correlation function is dominated, respectively, by thermal and quantum contributions. At stronger interactions, the super-Poissonian region disappears, and the fluctuations go directly from Poissonian to sub-Poissonian, as expected for a ''fermionized'' gas.

  8. Optimum performance analysis of an irreversible quantum cryogenic refrigeration cycle working with an ideal Bose or Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bihong; Chen, Jincan

    2008-05-01

    An irreversible model of the Carnot cryogenic refrigeration cycle working with an ideal Bose or Fermi gas is established, which is composed of two irreversible adiabatic and two isothermal processes. The effects of the quantum degeneracy of the working substance, the irreversibility of the finite-rate heat transfer between the working fluid and the heat reservoirs, and the internal irreversibility in two adiabatic processes on the optimum performance characteristics of the quantum refrigeration cycle are analyzed. The performance characteristics of the cycle in strong and weak gas degeneracy cases are discussed. Expressions for several important performance parameters such as the coefficient of performance, cooling rate and power input are derived. By using numerical solutions, the cooling rate of the cycle is optimized for a given power input. The maximum cooling rate and the corresponding parameters are calculated numerically. The optimal regions of the coefficient of performance and power input are determined. Some optimum criteria are given.

  9. Sub-Poissonian fluctuations in a 1D Bose gas: from the quantum quasicondensate to the strongly interacting regime.

    PubMed

    Jacqmin, Thibaut; Armijo, Julien; Berrada, Tarik; Kheruntsyan, Karen V; Bouchoule, Isabelle

    2011-06-10

    We report on local, in situ measurements of atom number fluctuations in slices of a one-dimensional Bose gas on an atom chip setup. By using current modulation techniques to prevent cloud fragmentation, we are able to probe the crossover from weak to strong interactions. For weak interactions, fluctuations go continuously from super- to sub-Poissonian as the density is increased, which is a signature of the transition between the subregimes where the two-body correlation function is dominated, respectively, by thermal and quantum contributions. At stronger interactions, the super-Poissonian region disappears, and the fluctuations go directly from Poissonian to sub-Poissonian, as expected for a "fermionized" gas.

  10. Loading and compression of a single two-dimensional Bose gas in an optical accordion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ville, J. L.; Bienaimé, T.; Saint-Jalm, R.; Corman, L.; Aidelsburger, M.; Chomaz, L.; Kleinlein, K.; Perconte, D.; Nascimbène, S.; Dalibard, J.; Beugnon, J.

    2017-01-01

    The experimental realization of two-dimensional (2D) Bose gases with a tunable interaction strength is an important challenge for the study of ultracold quantum matter. Here we report on the realization of an optical accordion creating a lattice potential with a spacing that can be dynamically tuned between 11 and 2 μ m . We show that we can load ultracold 87Rb atoms into a single node of this optical lattice in the large spacing configuration and then decrease nearly adiabatically the spacing to reach a strong harmonic confinement with frequencies larger than ωz/2 π =10 kHz. Atoms are trapped in an additional flat-bottom in-plane potential that is shaped with a high resolution. By combining these tools we create custom-shaped uniform 2D Bose gases with tunable confinement along the transverse direction and hence with a tunable interaction strength.

  11. Phases of a two-dimensional bose gas in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-García, K; Compton, R L; Lin, Y-J; Phillips, W D; Porto, J V; Spielman, I B

    2010-09-10

    Ultracold atoms in optical lattices realize simple condensed matter models. We create an ensemble of ≈60 harmonically trapped 2D Bose-Hubbard systems from a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate in an optical lattice and use a magnetic resonance imaging approach to select a few 2D systems for study, thereby eliminating ensemble averaging. Our identification of the transition from superfluid to Mott insulator, as a function of both atom density and lattice depth, is in excellent agreement with a universal state diagram [M. Rigol, Phys. Rev. A 79 053605 (2009)] suitable for our trapped system. In agreement with theory, our data suggest a failure of the local density approximation in the transition region.

  12. Quenching to unitarity: Quantum dynamics in a 3D Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Andrew; Corson, John; D'Incao, Jose; Koller, Andrew; Bohn, John; Rey, Ana Maria; Hazzard, Kaden; Greene, Chris

    2014-03-01

    We study the dynamics of a zero temperature Bose condensate following a sudden quench of the scattering length from noninteracting to unitarity (infinite scattering length). In this talk we discuss how a qualitative understanding of the dynamics can be built up by understanding few-body physics under the same dynamical scenario. We calculate the coherent evolution of the momentum distribution, particularly focusing on the time dependence of the contact. By comparing the results to a many-body mean-field calculation, we gauge the qualitative and quantitative accuracy of this approach. We then discuss the results of a three-body calculation, in which loss dynamics occurs due to three-body recombination. One the key results of this work indicates that loss dynamics takes place over a much longer timescale than the coherent dynamics. This exciting result supports the idea that meta-stable degenerate unitary Bose gases may be experimentally observable in such a non-equilibrium scenario.

  13. Condensate fraction in a 2D Bose gas measured across the Mott-insulator transition.

    PubMed

    Spielman, I B; Phillips, W D; Porto, J V

    2008-03-28

    We realize a single-band 2D Bose-Hubbard system with Rb atoms in an optical lattice and measure the condensate fraction as a function of lattice depth, crossing from the superfluid to the Mott-insulating phase. We quantitatively identify the location of the superfluid to normal transition by observing when the condensed fraction vanishes. Our measurement agrees with recent quantum Monte Carlo calculations for a finite-sized 2D system to within experimental uncertainty.

  14. Ramsey Interferometry Using the Zeeman Sublevels in a Spin-2 Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Eto, Yujiro; Sekine, Sawako; Suzuki, Hirosuke; Hirano, Takuya

    2013-09-01

    We perform atom interferometry using the Zeeman sublevels of a spin-2 Bose--Einstein condensate of 87Rb. The observed fringes are strongly peaked, and fringe repetition rates higher than the fundamental Ramsey frequency are found in agreement with a simple theory based on spin rotations. With a suitable choice of initial states, the interferometer could function as a useful tool for magnetometry and studies of spinor dynamics in general.

  15. First and second sound in a two-dimensional harmonically trapped Bose gas across the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless transition

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xia-Ji Hu, Hui

    2014-12-15

    We theoretically investigate first and second sound of a two-dimensional (2D) atomic Bose gas in harmonic traps by solving Landau’s two-fluid hydrodynamic equations. For an isotropic trap, we find that first and second sound modes become degenerate at certain temperatures and exhibit typical avoided crossings in mode frequencies. At these temperatures, second sound has significant density fluctuation due to its hybridization with first sound and has a divergent mode frequency towards the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless (BKT) transition. For a highly anisotropic trap, we derive the simplified one-dimensional hydrodynamic equations and discuss the sound-wave propagation along the weakly confined direction. Due to the universal jump of the superfluid density inherent to the BKT transition, we show that the first sound velocity exhibits a kink across the transition. These predictions might be readily examined in current experimental setups for 2D dilute Bose gases with a sufficiently large number of atoms, where the finite-size effect due to harmonic traps is relatively weak.

  16. High-temperature superfluidity of the two-component Bose gas in a transition metal dichalcogenide bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Oleg L.; Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.

    2016-06-01

    The high-temperature superfluidity of two-dimensional dipolar excitons in two parallel transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) layers is predicted. We study Bose-Einstein condensation in the two-component system of dipolar A and B excitons. The effective mass, energy spectrum of the collective excitations, the sound velocity, and critical temperature are obtained for different TMDC materials. It is shown that in the Bogoliubov approximation, the sound velocity in the two-component dilute exciton Bose gas is always larger than in any one-component exciton system. The difference between the sound velocities for two-component and one-component dilute gases is caused by the fact that the sound velocity for a two-component system depends on the reduced mass of A and B excitons, which is always smaller than the individual mass of A or B exciton. Due to this fact, the critical temperature Tc for superfluidity for the two-component exciton system in a TMDC bilayer is about one order of magnitude higher than Tc in any one-component exciton system. We propose to observe the superfluidity of two-dimensional dipolar excitons in two parallel TMDC layers, which causes two opposite superconducting currents in each TMDC layer.

  17. Lasing in Bose-Fermi mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochereshko, Vladimir P.; Durnev, Mikhail V.; Besombes, Lucien; Mariette, Henri; Sapega, Victor F.; Askitopoulos, Alexis; Savenko, Ivan G.; Liew, Timothy C. H.; Shelykh, Ivan A.; Platonov, Alexey V.; Tsintzos, Simeon I.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Savvidis, Pavlos G.; Kalevich, Vladimir K.; Afanasiev, Mikhail M.; Lukoshkin, Vladimir A.; Schneider, Christian; Amthor, Matthias; Metzger, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Hoefling, Sven; Lagoudakis, Pavlos; Kavokin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation, well-known for revolutionising photonic science, has been realised primarily in fermionic systems including widely applied diode lasers. The prerequisite for fermionic lasing is the inversion of electronic population, which governs the lasing threshold. More recently, bosonic lasers have also been developed based on Bose-Einstein condensates of exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. These electrically neutral bosons coexist with charged electrons and holes. In the presence of magnetic fields, the charged particles are bound to their cyclotron orbits, while the neutral exciton-polaritons move freely. We demonstrate how magnetic fields affect dramatically the phase diagram of mixed Bose-Fermi systems, switching between fermionic lasing, incoherent emission and bosonic lasing regimes in planar and pillar microcavities with optical and electrical pumping. We collected and analyzed the data taken on pillar and planar microcavity structures at continuous wave and pulsed optical excitation as well as injecting electrons and holes electronically. Our results evidence the transition from a Bose gas to a Fermi liquid mediated by magnetic fields and light-matter coupling.

  18. Lasing in Bose-Fermi mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Kochereshko, Vladimir P.; Durnev, Mikhail V.; Besombes, Lucien; Mariette, Henri; Sapega, Victor F.; Askitopoulos, Alexis; Savenko, Ivan G.; Liew, Timothy C. H.; Shelykh, Ivan A.; Platonov, Alexey V.; Tsintzos, Simeon I.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Savvidis, Pavlos G.; Kalevich, Vladimir K.; Afanasiev, Mikhail M.; Lukoshkin, Vladimir A.; Schneider, Christian; Amthor, Matthias; Metzger, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Hoefling, Sven; Lagoudakis, Pavlos; Kavokin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation, well-known for revolutionising photonic science, has been realised primarily in fermionic systems including widely applied diode lasers. The prerequisite for fermionic lasing is the inversion of electronic population, which governs the lasing threshold. More recently, bosonic lasers have also been developed based on Bose-Einstein condensates of exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. These electrically neutral bosons coexist with charged electrons and holes. In the presence of magnetic fields, the charged particles are bound to their cyclotron orbits, while the neutral exciton-polaritons move freely. We demonstrate how magnetic fields affect dramatically the phase diagram of mixed Bose-Fermi systems, switching between fermionic lasing, incoherent emission and bosonic lasing regimes in planar and pillar microcavities with optical and electrical pumping. We collected and analyzed the data taken on pillar and planar microcavity structures at continuous wave and pulsed optical excitation as well as injecting electrons and holes electronically. Our results evidence the transition from a Bose gas to a Fermi liquid mediated by magnetic fields and light-matter coupling. PMID:26822483

  19. Role of neutral gas in scrape-off layer tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bisai, N.; Jha, R.; Kaw, P. K.

    2015-02-15

    Neutral gas in scrape-off layer of tokamak plasma plays an important role as it can modify the plasma turbulence. In order to investigate this, we have derived a simple two-dimensional (2D) model that consists of electron continuity, quasi-neutrality, and neutral gas continuity equations using neutral gas ionization and charge exchange processes. Simple 1D profile analysis predicts neutral penetration depth into the plasma. Growth rate obtained from the linear theory has been presented. The 2D model equations have been solved numerically. It is found that the neutral gas reduces plasma fluctuations and shifts spectrum of the turbulence towards lower frequency side. The neutral gas fluctuation levels have been presented. The numerical results have been compared with Aditya tokamak experiments.

  20. Collapse and revival of the monopole mode of a degenerate Bose gas in an isotropic harmonic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straatsma, C. J. E.; Colussi, V. E.; Davis, M. J.; Lobser, D. S.; Holland, M. J.; Anderson, D. Z.; Lewandowski, H. J.; Cornell, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    We study the monopole (breathing) mode of a finite temperature Bose-Einstein condensate in an isotropic harmonic trap recently developed by Lobser et al. [Nat. Phys. 11, 1009 (2015), 10.1038/nphys3491]. We observe a nonexponential collapse of the amplitude of the condensate oscillation followed by a partial revival. This behavior is identified as being due to beating between two eigenmodes of the system, corresponding to in-phase and out-of-phase oscillations of the condensed and noncondensed fractions of the gas. We perform finite temperature simulations of the system dynamics using the Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin methodology [J. Low Temp. Phys. 116, 277 (1999), 10.1023/A:1021846002995], and find good agreement with the data, thus confirming the two mode description.

  1. Theory of coherence in Bose-Einstein condensation phenomena in a microwave-driven interacting magnon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rezende, Sergio M.

    2009-05-01

    Strong experimental evidences of the formation of quasiequilibrium Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of magnons at room temperature in a film of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) excited by microwave radiation have been recently reported. Here we present a theory for the dynamics of the magnon gas driven by a microwave field far out of equilibrium that provides rigorous support for the formation of a BEC of magnons in a YIG film magnetized in the plane. We show that if the microwave driving power exceeds a threshold value the nonlinear magnetic interactions create cooperative mechanisms for the onset of a phase transition leading to the spontaneous generation of quantum coherence and magnetic dynamic order in a macroscopic scale. The theoretical results agree with the experimental data for the intensity and the decay rate of the Brillouin light scattering from the BEC as a function of power and for the microwave emission from the uniform mode generated by the confluence of BEC magnon pairs.

  2. Excitation dynamics in a lattice Bose gas within the time-dependent Gutzwiller mean-field approach

    SciTech Connect

    Krutitsky, Konstantin V.; Navez, Patrick

    2011-09-15

    The dynamics of the collective excitations of a lattice Bose gas at zero temperature is systematically investigated using the time-dependent Gutzwiller mean-field approach. The excitation modes are determined within the framework of the linear-response theory as solutions of the generalized Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations valid in the superfluid and Mott-insulator phases at arbitrary values of parameters. The expression for the sound velocity derived in this approach coincides with the hydrodynamic relation. We calculate the transition amplitudes for the excitations in the Bragg scattering process and show that the higher excitation modes make significant contributions. We simulate the dynamics of the density perturbations and show that their propagation velocity in the limit of week perturbation is satisfactorily described by the predictions of the linear-response analysis.

  3. Transport of a Bose gas in 1D disordered lattices at the fluid-insulator transition.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Luca; Lucioni, Eleonora; Chaudhuri, Saptarishi; Gori, Lorenzo; Kumar, Avinash; D'Errico, Chiara; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni

    2013-09-13

    We investigate the momentum-dependent transport of 1D quasicondensates in quasiperiodic optical lattices. We observe a sharp crossover from a weakly dissipative regime to a strongly unstable one at a disorder-dependent critical momentum. In the limit of nondisordered lattices the observations suggest a contribution of quantum phase slips to the dissipation. We identify a set of critical disorder and interaction strengths for which such critical momentum vanishes, separating a fluid regime from an insulating one. We relate our observation to the predicted zero-temperature superfluid-Bose glass transition.

  4. Exponents of the spectral functions and dynamical structure factor of the 1D Lieb-Liniger Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Sacramento, P. D.

    2016-06-01

    We study the (k , ω) -plane finite-energy line shape of the zero-temperature one-boson removal spectral function (ω < 0) , one-boson addition spectral function (ω > 0) , and charge dynamical structure factor (ω > 0) of the 1D Lieb-Liniger Bose gas with repulsive boson interaction c > 0. Our analysis of the problem focuses on the line shape at finite excitation energies in the vicinity of these functions spectrum upper (ω < 0) or lower (ω > 0) threshold. Specifically, we derive the exact momentum, interaction, and density dependences of the exponents controlling such a line shape in each of the N = 1 , 2 , 3 , … momentum subdomains k ∈ [(N - 1) 2 πn , N 2 πn ] . Here n = N / L is the boson density, N the boson number, and L the system length. In the thermodynamic limit considered in our study nearly all spectral weight of the dynamical correlation functions is for large values of n / c contained in the N = 1 momentum subdomain k ∈ [ 0 , 2 πn ] . As n / c decreases a small fraction of that weight is transferred to the remaining set of N = 2 , 3 , 4 , … momentum subdomains, particularly to the N = 2 subdomain. In the case of the momentum subdomain k ∈ [ 0 , 2 πn ] , our exact results agree with those of previous studies. For that subdomain the above exponents are plotted as a function of the momentum for several n / c values. Our derivation of the line shapes of the three dynamical correlation functions relies on the use of a simplified form of the pseudofermion dynamical theory of the fermionic 1D Hubbard model suitably modified in this paper for the 1D Bose gas.

  5. Neutral Gas Outside the Disks of Local Group Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.

    2017-03-01

    Of the three kinds of neutral gas found outside the stellar disks of Local Group galaxies, only the products of interaction, like the Magellanic Stream, have a clearly understandable origin. Both the high-velocity clouds and the faint H I between M31 and M33 remain a mystery. New observations of the region between M31 and M33 with the Green Bank Telescope show that the H I there resides in clouds with a size and mass similar to that of dwarf galaxies, but without stars. These clouds might be products of an interaction, or condensations in the hot circumgalactic medium of M31, but both these models have difficulties. The prevalence of clouds like this in the Local Group remains to be determined.

  6. Einstein, Bose and Bose-Einstein Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wali, Kameshwar C.

    2005-05-01

    In June 1924, a relatively unknown Satyendra Nath Bose from Dacca, India, wrote a letter to Einstein beginning with ``Respected Sir, I have ventured to send you the accompanying article for your perusal. I am anxious to know what you think of it. You will see that I have ventured to deduce the coefficient 8πυ^2/c^3 in Planck's law independent of the classical electrodynamics, only assuming that the ultimate elementary regions in Phase-space have the content h^3. I do not know sufficient German to translate the paper. If you think the paper worth publication, I shall be grateful if you arrange for its publication in Zeitschrift für Physik.'' Einstein did translate the article himself and got it published. He wrote to Ehrenfest: ``The Indian Bose has given a beautiful derivation of Planck's law, including the constant [i.e.8πυ^2/c^3].'' Einstein extended the ideas of Bose that implied, among other things, a new statistics for the light-quanta to the molecules of an ideal gas and wrote to Ehrenfest, `from a certain temperature on, the molecules ``condense'' without attractive forces, that is, they accumulate at zero velocity. The theory is pretty, but is there also some truth to it?' Abraham Pais has called Bose's paper ``the fourth and the last revolutionary papers of the old quantum theory.'' My paper will present the works of Bose and Einstein in their historical perspective and the eventual birth of the new quantum Bose-Einstein statistics.

  7. Observation of a Rosensweig Instability and Stable Quantum Droplets in a Dipolar Bose Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfau, Tilman; Ferrier Barbut, Igor; Kadau, Holger; Schmitt, Matthias; Wenzel, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Ferrofluids show unusual hydrodynamic effects due to the magnetic nature of their constituents. For increasing magnetization a classical ferrofluid undergoes a Rosensweig instability and creates self-organized ordered surface structures or droplet crystals. We observe a related instability in a Bose-Einstein condensate with strong dipolar interactions resulting in surprisingly stable droplet crystals. We find that quantum fluctuations which are the origin of genuine quantum many-body effects cannot be neglected and provide a stabilizing mechanism. We study experimentally individual stable quantum droplets containing about 800 atoms which are expected to collapse at the mean-field level due to the essentially attractive interaction. By systematic measurements on individual droplets we demonstrate quantitatively that quantum fluctuations stabilize them against the mean-field collapse. We observe in addition interference of several droplets indicating that this stable many-body state is phase coherent.

  8. Quenching to unitarity: Quantum dynamics in a three-dimensional Bose gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, A. G.; Corson, J. P.; D'Incao, J. P.; Koller, A. P.; Greene, C. H.; Rey, A. M.; Hazzard, K. R. A.; Bohn, J. L.

    2014-02-01

    We study the dynamics of a zero-temperature Bose condensate following a sudden quench of the scattering length from noninteracting to unitarity (infinite scattering length). We apply three complementary approaches to understand the momentum distribution and loss rate. First, using a time-dependent variational ansatz for the many-body state, we calculate the dynamics of the momentum distribution. Second, we demonstrate that, at short times and large momenta compared to those set by the density, the physics can be understood within a simple, analytic two-body model. We make a quantitative prediction for the evolution of Tan's contact and find features in the momentum distribution that are absent in equilibrium. Third, we study three-body loss at finite density under the same dynamic scenario. We find lifetimes that are long compared to the saturation times of large-momentum modes, and we relate this result to the three-body inelasticity parameter.

  9. Virial coefficients in the (μ ˜,q ) -deformed Bose gas model related to compositeness of particles and their interaction: Temperature-dependence problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilik, A. M.; Mishchenko, Yu. A.

    2014-11-01

    We establish the relation of the second virial coefficient of a recently proposed (μ ˜,q ) -deformed Bose gas model [A. M. Gavrilik and Yu. A. Mishchenko, Ukr. J. Phys. 58, 1171 (2013)] to the interaction and compositeness parameters when either of these factors is taken into account separately. When the interaction is dealt with, the deformation parameter becomes linked directly to the scattering length and the effective radius of interaction (in general, to scattering phases). The additionally arising temperature dependence is a feature absent in the deformed Bose gas model within the adopted interpretation of the deformation parameters μ ˜ and q . Here the problem of the temperature dependence is analyzed in detail and its possible solution is proposed.

  10. Virial coefficients in the (μ[over ̃],q)-deformed Bose gas model related to compositeness of particles and their interaction: Temperature-dependence problem.

    PubMed

    Gavrilik, A M; Mishchenko, Yu A

    2014-11-01

    We establish the relation of the second virial coefficient of a recently proposed (μ[over ̃],q)-deformed Bose gas model [A. M. Gavrilik and Yu. A. Mishchenko, Ukr. J. Phys. 58, 1171 (2013)] to the interaction and compositeness parameters when either of these factors is taken into account separately. When the interaction is dealt with, the deformation parameter becomes linked directly to the scattering length and the effective radius of interaction (in general, to scattering phases). The additionally arising temperature dependence is a feature absent in the deformed Bose gas model within the adopted interpretation of the deformation parameters μ[over ̃] and q. Here the problem of the temperature dependence is analyzed in detail and its possible solution is proposed.

  11. Transport of an interacting Bose gas in 1D disordered lattices

    SciTech Connect

    D'Errico, C.; Chaudhuri, S.; Gori, L.; Kumar, A.; Lucioni, E.; Tanzi, L.; Inguscio, M.; Modugno, G.

    2014-08-20

    We use ultracold atoms in a quasiperiodic lattice to study two outstanding problems in the physics of disordered systems: a) the anomalous diffusion of a wavepacket in the presence of disorder, interactions and noise; b) the transport of a disordered superfluid. a) Our results show that the subdiffusion, observed when interaction alone is present, can be modelled with a nonlinear diffusion equation and the peculiar shape of the expanding density profiles can be connected to the microscopic nonlinear diffusion coefficients. Also when noise alone is present we can describe the observed normal diffusion dynamics by existing microscopic models. In the unexplored regime in which noise and interaction are combined, instead, we observe an anomalous diffusion, that we model with a generalized diffusion equation, where noise- and interaction-induced contributions add each other. b) We find that an instability appearing at relatively large momenta can be employed to locate the fluid-insulator crossover driven by disorder. By investigating the momentum-dependent transport, we observe a sharp crossover from a weakly dissipative regime to a strongly unstable one at a disorder-dependent critical momentum. The set of critical disorder and interaction strengths for which such critical momentum vanishes, can be identified with the separation between a fluid regime and an insulating one and can be related to the predicted zero-temperature superfluid-Bose glass transition.

  12. Three-dimensional modeling of the neutral gas depletion effect in a helicon discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollasch, Jeffrey; Schmitz, Oliver; Norval, Ryan; Reiter, Detlev; Sovinec, Carl

    2016-10-01

    Helicon discharges provide an attractive radio-frequency driven regime for plasma, but neutral-particle dynamics present a challenge to extending performance. A neutral gas depletion effect occurs when neutrals in the plasma core are not replenished at a sufficient rate to sustain a higher plasma density. The Monte Carlo neutral particle tracking code EIRENE was setup for the MARIA helicon experiment at UW Madison to study its neutral particle dynamics. Prescribed plasma temperature and density profiles similar to those in the MARIA device are used in EIRENE to investigate the main causes of the neutral gas depletion effect. The most dominant plasma-neutral interactions are included so far, namely electron impact ionization of neutrals, charge exchange interactions of neutrals with plasma ions, and recycling at the wall. Parameter scans show how the neutral depletion effect depends on parameters such as Knudsen number, plasma density and temperature, and gas-surface interaction accommodation coefficients. Results are compared to similar analytic studies in the low Knudsen number limit. Plans to incorporate a similar Monte Carlo neutral model into a larger helicon modeling framework are discussed. This work is funded by the NSF CAREER Award PHY-1455210.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo study of the Bose-polaron problem in a one-dimensional gas with contact interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisi, L.; Giorgini, S.

    2017-02-01

    We present a theoretical study based upon quantum Monte Carlo methods of the Bose polaron in one-dimensional systems with contact interactions. In this instance of the problem of a single impurity immersed in a quantum bath, the medium is a Lieb-Liniger gas of bosons ranging from the weakly interacting to the Tonks-Girardeau regime, whereas the impurity is coupled to the bath via a different contact potential, producing both repulsive and attractive interactions. Both the case of a mobile impurity, having the same mass as the particles in the medium, and the case of a static impurity with infinite mass are considered. We make use of numerical techniques that allow us to calculate the ground-state energy of the impurity, its effective mass, and the contact parameter between the impurity and the bath. These quantities are investigated as a function of the strength of interactions between the impurity and the bath and within the bath. In particular, we find that the effective mass rapidly increases to very large values when the impurity gets strongly coupled to an otherwise weakly repulsive bath. This heavy impurity hardly moves within the medium, thereby realizing the "self-localization" regime of the Landau-Pekar polaron. Furthermore, we compare our results with predictions of perturbation theory valid for weak interactions and with exact solutions available when the bosons in the medium behave as impenetrable particles.

  14. Non-equilibrium Properties of a Pumped-Decaying Bose-Condensed Electron-Hole Gas in the BCS-BEC Crossover Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanai, R.; Littlewood, P. B.; Ohashi, Y.

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically investigate a Bose-condensed exciton gas out of equilibrium. Within the framework of the combined BCS-Leggett strong-coupling theory with the non-equilibrium Keldysh formalism, we show how the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of excitons is suppressed to eventually disappear, when the system is in the non-equilibrium steady state. The supply of electrons and holes from the bath is shown to induce quasi-particle excitations, leading to the partial occupation of the upper branch of Bogoliubov single-particle excitation spectrum. We also discuss how this quasi-particle induction is related to the suppression of exciton BEC, as well as the stability of the steady state.

  15. Einstein and Bose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wali, Kameshwar C.

    2005-04-01

    In June 1924, a relatively unknown Satyendra Nath Bose from Dacca, India, wrote a letter to Einstein beginning with ``Respected Sir, I have ventured to send you the accompanying article for your perusal. I am anxious to know what you think of it. You will see that I have ventured to deduce the coefficient 8πυ^2/c^3 in Planck's law independent of the classical electrodynamics, only assuming that the ultimate elementary regions in Phase-space have the content h^3. I do not know sufficient German to translate the paper. If you think the paper worth publication, I shall be grateful if you arrange for its publication in Zeitschrift für Physik.'' Einstein did translate the article himself and got it published. He wrote to Ehrenfest: ``The Indian Bose has given a beautiful derivation of Planck's law, including the constant [i.e.8πυ^2/c^3].'' Einstein extended the ideas of Bose that implied, among other things, a new statistics for the light-quanta to the molecules of an ideal gas and wrote to Ehrenfest, `from a certain temperature on, the molecules ``condense'' without attractive forces, that is, they accumulate at zero velocity. The theory is pretty, but is there also some truth to it?' Abraham Pais has called Bose's paper ``the fourth and the last revolutionary papers of the old quantum theory.'' My paper will present the works of Bose and Einstein in their historical perspective and the eventual birth of the new quantum Bose-Einstein statistics.

  16. Investigation of Sterilization Mechanism for Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores with Plasma-Excited Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the mechanism of the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas that uniformly sterilizes both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Only reactive neutral species such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals are separated from the plasma and sent to the reactor chamber for chemical sterilization. The plasma source gas uses humidified mixture of nitrogen and oxygen. Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores and tyrosine which is amino acid are treated by the plasma-excited neutral gas. Shape change of the treated spore is observed by SEM, and chemical modification of the treated tyrosine is analyzed by HPLC. As a result, the surface of the treated spore shows depression. Hydroxylation and nitration of tyrosine are shown after the treatment. For these reasons, we believe that the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas results from the deformation of spore structure due to the chemical modification of amino acid.

  17. Gibbons-Hawking effect in the sonic de Sitter space-time of an expanding Bose-Einstein-condensed gas.

    PubMed

    Fedichev, Petr O; Fischer, Uwe R

    2003-12-12

    We propose an experimental scheme to observe the Gibbons-Hawking effect in the acoustic analog of a (1+1)-dimensional de Sitter universe, produced in an expanding, cigar-shaped Bose-Einstein condensate. It is shown that a two-level system created at the center of the trap, an atomic quantum dot interacting with phonons, observes a thermal Bose distribution at the de Sitter temperature.

  18. A new apparatus for studies of quantized vortex dynamics in dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Zachary L.

    The presence of quantized vortices and a high level of control over trap geometries and other system parameters make dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) a natural environment for studies of vortex dynamics and quantum turbulence in superfluids, primary interests of the BEC group at the University of Arizona. Such research may lead to deeper understanding of the nature of quantum fluid dynamics and far-from-equilbrium phenomena. Despite the importance of quantized vortex dynamics in the fields of superfluidity, superconductivity and quantum turbulence, direct imaging of vortices in trapped BECs remains a significant technical challenge. This is primarily due to the small size of the vortex core in a trapped gas, which is typically a few hundred nanometers in diameter. In this dissertation I present the design and construction of a new 87Rb BEC apparatus with the goal of studying vortex dynamics in trapped BECs. The heart of the apparatus is a compact vacuum chamber with a custom, all-glass science cell designed to accommodate the use of commercial high-numerical-aperture microscope objectives for in situ imaging of vortices. The designs for the new system are, in part, based on prior work in our group on in situ imaging of vortices. Here I review aspects of our prior work and discuss some of the successes and limitations that are relevant to the new apparatus. The bulk of the thesis is used to described the major subsystems of the new apparatus which include the vacuum chamber, the laser systems, the magnetic transfer system and the final magnetic trap for the atoms. Finally, I demonstrate the creation of a BEC of ˜ 2 x 106 87Rb atoms in our new system and show that the BEC can be transferred into a weak, spherical, magnetic trap with a well defined magnetic field axis that may be useful for future vortex imaging studies.

  19. Fiber Bragg grating-based temperature sensor for neutral gas in capacitively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zigeng; Han, Daoman; Zhang, Xinpu; Liu, Yongxin; Peng, Wei; Wang, Younian

    2016-11-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) has been utilized in capacitively coupled plasmas (CCP) for thermometry of neutral gas. We studied the effects of high frequency and low frequency power on radial distribution of neutral gas temperature. The result shows that the neutral gas temperature increases with increasing high frequency power. However, the presence of low frequency power will decrease the neutral gas temperature. Particularly, we eliminated the effect of ion bombardment on temperature measurement by studying axial distribution near plasma-sheath boundary. With features of immune to electromagnetic interference, high precision, and spatial resolving power, the FBG is a commendable candidate for CCP or other radio-frequency plasmas thermometry in both laboratory and industry.

  20. Effects of a finite number of particles on the thermodynamic properties of a harmonically trapped ideal charged Bose gas in a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan-Liang, Xiao; Meng-Yun, Lai; Xiao-Yin, Pan

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic properties of an ideal charged Bose gas confined in an anisotropic harmonic potential and a constant magnetic field. Using an accurate density of states, we calculate analytically the thermodynamic potential and consequently various intriguing thermodynamic properties, including the Bose-Einstein transition temperature, the specific heat, magnetization, and the corrections to these quantities due to the finite number of particles are also given explicitly. In contrast to the infinite number of particles scenarios, we show that those thermodynamic properties, particularly the Bose-Einstein transition temperature depends upon the strength of the magnetic field due to the finiteness of the particle numbers, and the collective effects of a finite number of particles become larger when the particle number decreases. Moreover, the magnetization varies with the temperature due to the finiteness of the particle number while it keeps invariant in the thermodynamic limit N → ∞. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11375090), and the K. C. Wong Magna Foundation of Ningbo University, China.

  1. Gas utilization in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Kugel, H.W.; Grisham, L.R.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1987-08-01

    Measurements of gas utilization in a test TFTR neutral beam injector have been performed to study the feasibility of running tritium neutral beams with existing ion sources. Gas consumption is limited by the restriction of 50,000 curies of T/sub 2/ allowed on site. It was found that the gas efficiency of the present long-pulse ion sources is higher than it was with previous short-pulse sources. Gas efficiencies were studied over the range of 35 to 55%. At the high end of this range the neutral fraction of the beam fell below that predicted by room temperature molecular gas flow. This is consistent with observations made on the JET injectors, where it has been attributed to beam heating of the neutralizer gas and a concomitant increase in conductance. It was found that a working gas isotope exchange from H/sub 2/ to D/sub 2/ could be accomplished on the first beam shot after changing the gas supply, without any intermediate preconditioning. The mechanism believed responsible for this phenomenon is heating of the plasma generator walls by the arc and a resulting thermal desorption of all previously adsorbed and implanted gas. Finally, it was observed that an ion source conditioned to 120 kV operation could produce a beam pulse after a waiting period of fourteen hours by preceding the beam extraction with several hi-pot/filament warm-up pulses, without any gas consumption. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Absorption spectroscopy of xenon and ethylene-noble gas mixtures at high pressure: towards Bose-Einstein condensation of vacuum ultraviolet photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Christian; Brausemann, Rudolf; Schmitt, Julian; Vewinger, Frank; Christopoulos, Stavros; Weitz, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation is a phenomenon well known for material particles as cold atomic gases, and this concept has in recent years been extended to photons confined in microscopic optical cavities. Essential for the operation of such a photon condensate is a thermalization mechanism that conserves the average particle number, as in the visible spectral regime can be realized by subsequent absorption re-emission processes in dye molecules. Here we report on the status of an experimental effort aiming at the extension of the concept of Bose-Einstein condensation of photons towards the vacuum ultraviolet spectral regime, with gases at high-pressure conditions serving as a thermalization medium for the photon gas. We have recorded absorption spectra of xenon gas at up to 30 bar gas pressure of the 5p^6-5p^56s transition with a wavelength close to 147 nm. Moreover, spectra of ethylene noble gas mixtures between 158 and 180 nm wavelength are reported.

  3. Determination of scale-invariant equations of state without fitting parameters: application to the two-dimensional Bose gas across the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition.

    PubMed

    Desbuquois, Rémi; Yefsah, Tarik; Chomaz, Lauriane; Weitenberg, Christof; Corman, Laura; Nascimbène, Sylvain; Dalibard, Jean

    2014-07-11

    We present a general "fit-free" method for measuring the equation of state (EoS) of a scale-invariant gas. This method, which is inspired from the procedure introduced by Ku et al. [Science 335, 563 (2012)] for the unitary three-dimensional Fermi gas, provides a general formalism which can be readily applied to any quantum gas in a known trapping potential, in the frame of the local density approximation. We implement this method on a weakly interacting two-dimensional Bose gas across the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition and determine its EoS with unprecedented accuracy in the critical region. Our measurements provide an important experimental benchmark for classical-field approaches which are believed to accurately describe quantum systems in the weakly interacting but nonperturbative regime.

  4. Magnetic-modulation spectroscopy of an atomic Fermi gas in the BCS-BEC crossover: Dissociation spectra in the Bose-Einstein condensate regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plata, J.

    2006-07-01

    The effect of magnetic-field modulation on a Fermi gas of atoms in the BCS-BEC crossover is studied analytically. Recent experimental findings on the system response to a sinusoidal variation of the field are explained. Specifically, the dissociation processes induced by the modulation in the Bose-Einstein condensate regime are described. The role played by the frequency, amplitude, and application time of the perturbation in the emergence of the observed behavior is clarified. The results uncover also the relevance of the detuning from the Feshbach resonance to the appearance of particular spectral features. The applicability of the field modulation as a spectroscopic tool for probing the crossover is discussed.

  5. Investigation of the Neutral Gas Pressure Effect on the Metal Resistive Bolometer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D.; Giannone, L.; Piechotka, M.; Windisch, T.; Klinger, T.; Grulke, O.; Stark, A.

    2008-03-19

    The bolometer system planned for W7-X consists mainly of metal (Au) resistive detector arrays. All the detectors are exposed to neutral gas environment. The thin bolometer foil used for detecting the radiated power loss may be sensitive to the neutral gas pressure due to the strain gauge effect. Recently, a prototype of this kind of bolometer camera consisting of 12 channels has been installed on the cylindrical plasma device VINETA in order to investigate the influences of the neutral gas pressure on the bolometer signals. Experiments are carried out for Ar-discharges under different gas pressure conditions. It is found that the pressure effect of the neutral gas can make considerable contributions, thus inducing non-negligible errors of the results in most of the investigated cases. Using the VINETA plasmas (Ar, T{sub e}<10 eV, n{sub e}<10{sup -19} m{sup -3}) as examples, the paper demonstrates and discusses how to minimize the neutral gas effects, especially in the data analysis process. The radiated power and the radiation intensity profile obtained in helicon discharges are presented.

  6. Finite-momentum superfluidity and phase transitions in a p-wave resonant Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sungsoo; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2011-10-15

    We study a degenerate two-species gas of bosonic atoms interacting through a p-wave Feshbach resonance as, for example, realized in a {sup 85}Rb-{sup 87}Rb mixture. We show that, in addition to a conventional atomic and a p-wave molecular spinor-1 superfluidity at large positive and negative detunings, respectively, the system generically exhibits a finite-momentum atomic-molecular superfluidity at intermediate detuning around the unitary point. We analyze the detailed nature of the corresponding phases and the associated quantum and thermal phase transitions.

  7. Density form factors of the 1D Bose gas for finite entropy states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Nardis, J.; Panfil, M.

    2015-02-01

    We consider the Lieb-Liniger model for a gas of bosonic δ-interacting particles. Using Algebraic Bethe Ansatz results we compute the thermodynamic limit of the form factors of the density operator between finite entropy eigenstates such as finite temperature states or generic non-equilibrium highly excited states. These form factors are crucial building blocks to obtain the thermodynamic exact dynamic correlation functions of such physically relevant states. As a proof of principle we compute an approximated dynamic structure factor by including only the simplest types of particle-hole excitations and show the agreement with known results.

  8. Neutral gas heating via non-resonant optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornella, Barry Michael

    The influence of intense optical lattices on atoms or molecules offers a particularly useful method for energy and momentum deposition into a non-resonant gas. In this investigation, a proof-of-concept experiment was conducted to validate high intensity pulsed optical lattices as a means of creating high temperature gases for a myriad of aerospace, basic physics, and nanotechnology applications. Traditional methods for creating these flows have either involved altering the chemical composition of the initial gas sample through combustion or ionization or relied on laser resonant interactions with internal energy modes through laser pyrolysis. Due to its non-resonant nature, the use of optical lattices might be beneficial compared to existing methods since it provides an arbitrary, localized, high temperature gas that is tunable and does not introduce unwanted chemical species or high ionization concentrations. As an intermediate step toward verifying optical lattice gas heating, a coherent Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering (CRBS) study was also performed to verify the presented methodology. CRBS is a gas diagnostic technique used for non-intrusive probing of gas thermodynamic properties. In addition to the experimental investigation, a complementary numerical study was conducted using a direct simulation Monte Carlo approach. The numerical study used a modified version of SMILE to predict the gas phenomena within the strong optical potential fields. The goal of substantiating optical lattice heating was accomplished by detecting the acoustic wave generated from the heated volume. The magnitude of the resulting acoustic wave was shown to vary with the optical lattice phase velocity, peaking on the order of the gas' most probable speed. The trend with lattice velocity is consistent with both theory and the numerical study and eliminates other possible heating mechanisms such as laser-induced ionization or molecular dissociation. Limitations for the investigated heating

  9. Localized collapse and revival of coherence in an ultracold Bose gas

    SciTech Connect

    McGuirk, J. M.; Zajiczek, L. F.

    2011-01-15

    We study the collapse and revival of coherence induced by dipolar spin waves in a trapped gas of {sup 87}Rb atoms. In particular, we observe spatially localized collapse and revival of Ramsey fringe contrast and show how the pattern of coherence depends on the strength of the spin-wave excitation. We find that the spatial character of the coherence dynamics is incompatible with a simple model based only on position-space overlap of wave functions. We show that this phenomenon requires a full phase-space description of the atomic spin using a quantum Boltzmann transport equation, which highlights spin-wave-induced coherent spin currents and the ensuing dynamics they drive.

  10. Method and apparatus for confinement of ions in the presence of a neutral gas

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Barlow, Stephan E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for combining ions with a neutral gas and flowing the mixture with a radial flow component through a magnetic field so that the weakly ionized gas is confined by the neutral gas. When the weakly ionized gas is present in sufficient density, a weakly ionized non-neutral plasma is formed that may be trapped in accordance with the present invention. Applications for a weakly ionized non-neutral plasma exploit the trap's ability to store and manipulate ionic species in the presence of neutral gas. The trap may be connected to a mass spectrometer thereby permitting species identification after a fixed period of time. Delicate and/or heavy particles such as clusters may be held and studied in a "gentle" environment. In addition, the trap can provide a relatively intense, low-energy source of a particular ion species for surface implantation or molecular chemistry. Finally, a long trap may permit spectroscopy of unprecedented accuracy to be performed on ionic species.

  11. Method and apparatus for confinement of ions in the presence of a neutral gas

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, A.J.; Barlow, S.E.

    1999-08-03

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for combining ions with a neutral gas and flowing the mixture with a radial flow component through a magnetic field so that the weakly ionized gas is confined by the neutral gas. When the weakly ionized gas is present in sufficient density, a weakly ionized non-neutral plasma is formed that may be trapped in accordance with the present invention. Applications for a weakly ionized non-neutral plasma exploit the trap`s ability to store and manipulate ionic species in the presence of neutral gas. The trap may be connected to a mass spectrometer thereby permitting species identification after a fixed period of time. Delicate and/or heavy particles such as clusters may be held and studied in a ``gentle`` environment. In addition, the trap can provide a relatively intense, low-energy source of a particular ion species for surface implantation or molecular chemistry. Finally, a long trap may permit spectroscopy of unprecedented accuracy to be performed on ionic species. 4 figs.

  12. Neutral gas temperature estimates and metastable resonance energy transfer for argon-nitrogen discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Greig, A. Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2016-01-15

    Rovibrational spectroscopy band fitting of the nitrogen (N{sub 2}) second positive system is a technique used to estimate the neutral gas temperature of N{sub 2} discharges, or atomic discharges with trace amounts of a N{sub 2} added. For mixtures involving argon and N{sub 2}, resonant energy transfer between argon metastable atoms (Ar*) and N{sub 2} molecules may affect gas temperature estimates made using the second positive system. The effect of Ar* resonance energy transfer is investigated here by analyzing neutral gas temperatures of argon-N{sub 2} mixtures, for N{sub 2} percentages from 1% to 100%. Neutral gas temperature estimates are higher than expected for mixtures involving greater than 5% N{sub 2} addition, but are reasonable for argon with less than 5% N{sub 2} addition when compared with an analytic model for ion-neutral charge exchange collisional heating. Additional spatiotemporal investigations into neutral gas temperature estimates with 10% N{sub 2} addition demonstrate that although absolute temperature values may be affected by Ar* resonant energy transfer, spatiotemporal trends may still be used to accurately diagnose the discharge.

  13. Interactions between anionic and neutral bromine and rare gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Buchachenko, Alexei A.; Grinev, Timur A.; Wright, Timothy G.; Viehland, Larry A.

    2008-02-14

    High-quality, ab initio potential energy functions are obtained for the interaction of bromine atoms and anions with atoms of the six rare gases (Rg) from He to Rn. The potentials of the nonrelativistic {sup 2}{sigma}{sup +} and {sup 2}{pi} electronic states arising from the ground-state Br({sup 2}P)-Rg interactions are computed over a wide range of internuclear separations using a spin-restricted version of the coupled cluster method with single and double excitations and noniterative correction to triple excitations [RCCSD(T)] with an extrapolation to the complete basis set limit, from basis sets of d-aug-cc-pVQZ and d-aug-cc-pV5Z quality. These are compared with potentials derived previously from experimental measurements and ab initio calculations. The same approach is used also to refine the potentials of the Br{sup -}-Rg anions obtained previously [Buchachenko et al., J. Chem. Phys. 125, 064305 (2006)]. Spin-orbit coupling in the neutral species is included both ab initio and via an atomic approximation; deviations between two approaches that are large enough to affect the results significantly are observed only in the Br-Xe and Br-Rn systems. The resulting relativistic potentials are used to compute anion zero electron kinetic energy photoelectron spectra, differential scattering cross sections, and the transport coefficients of trace amounts of both anionic and neutral bromine in the rare gases. Comparison with available experimental data for all systems considered proves a very high precision of the present potentials.

  14. A general model for Io's neutral gas clouds. I - Mathematical description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, W. H.; Combi, M. R.

    1988-01-01

    A general mathematical formalism for calculating the physical properties of any of Io's neutral gas clouds (Na, K, O, S, SO2) is presented. The dynamical effects of both the gravitational fields of Io and Jupiter and solar radiation pressure are included, in addition to the many complex space- and time-dependent interactions that occur between the neutral clouds and the plasma torus. The importance of this new model in studying both the plasma conditions prevalent in the inner planetary magnetosphere and the nature of Io's local atmosphere is discussed. A numerical method for evaluating the physical properties of the neutral clouds using the new model is described.

  15. Measurement of neutral gas temperature in a 13.56 MHz inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi Hoong

    2015-04-24

    Measuring the temperature of neutrals in inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) is important as heating of neutral particles will influence plasma characteristics such as the spatial distributions of plasma density and electron temperature. Neutral gas temperatures were deduced using a non-invasive technique that combines gas actinometry, optical emission spectroscopy and simulation which is described here. Argon gas temperature in a 13.56 MHz ICP were found to fall within the range of 500 − 800 K for input power of 140 − 200 W and pressure of 0.05 − 0.2 mbar. Comparing spectrometers with 0.2 nm and 0.5 nm resolution, improved fitting sensitivity was observed for the 0.2 nm resolution.

  16. Neutral Gas Properties of Extremely Isolated Early-type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Trisha; Marcum, Pamela M.; Fanelli, Michael N.

    2017-04-01

    We present the results of single-dish atomic hydrogen (H i) observations of six highly isolated early-type galaxies. These objects are a representative subset of galaxies previously studied at optical wavelengths and selected to be separated by at least 2.5 Mpc from companions brighter than M V = ‑16.5 mag. Each galaxy was observed with a single pointing using the NRAO Green Bank Telescope L-band receiver. Five of these systems were strongly detected in H i. These five galaxies exhibit H i profiles with a range of properties: single Gaussian-like peaks, separate double peaks, and double horn-like profiles. The four bluest galaxies (B‑V < 0.54) all contain significant gas with H i masses ranging from 1.1 × 108 to 1.4 × 109.

  17. An apparatus for immersing trapped ions into an ultracold gas of neutral atoms.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Stefan; Härter, Arne; Frisch, Albert; Hoinka, Sascha; Denschlag, Johannes Hecker

    2012-05-01

    We describe a hybrid vacuum system in which a single ion or a well-defined small number of trapped ions (in our case Ba(+) or Rb(+)) can be immersed into a cloud of ultracold neutral atoms (in our case Rb). This apparatus allows for the study of collisions and interactions between atoms and ions in the ultracold regime. Our setup is a combination of a Bose-Einstein condensation apparatus and a linear Paul trap. The main design feature of the apparatus is to first separate the production locations for the ion and the ultracold atoms and then to bring the two species together. This scheme has advantages in terms of stability and available access to the region where the atom-ion collision experiments are carried out. The ion and the atoms are brought together using a moving one-dimensional optical lattice transport which vertically lifts the atomic sample over a distance of 30 cm from its production chamber into the center of the Paul trap in another chamber. We present techniques to detect and control the relative position between the ion and the atom cloud.

  18. An enhancement of plasma density by neutral gas injection observed in SEPAC Spacelab-1 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Kubota, S.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.; Williamson, P. R.

    1985-01-01

    An enhancement of plasma density observed during a neutral gas injection in Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators by the Space Shuttle/Spacelab-1 is presented. When a plume of nitrogen gas was injected from the orbiter into space, a large amount of plasma was detected by an onboard plasma probe. The observed density often increased beyond the background plasma density and was strongly dependent on the attitude of the orbiter with respect to the velocity vector. This effect has been explained by a collisional interaction between the injected gas molecules and the ionospheric ions relatively drifting at the orbital speed.

  19. Disorder, three body interaction and Bose glass phase in a spinor atomic gas in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Sk Noor; Basu, Saurabh

    2016-10-01

    We study the effects of disorder on the spin dependent interaction term of a spinor Bose Hubbard model with a three body interaction potential. The signature of the Bose glass (BG) phase is observed by computing the fraction of the lattice sites having finite superfluid (SF) order parameter and non integer occupation densities. We obtain the phase diagram both for the antiferromagnetic (AF) and ferromagnetic (F) cases via a percolation analysis. In the AF case, the BG phase intervenes between the odd-even Mott insulating (MI) lobes (for example, the lobes corresponding to occupation densities, n=1 and (n=2) but not between the even-odd MI lobes. In the ferromagnetic case, the presence of the BG phase is observed between all the MI lobes irrespective of them being even or odd. The BG phase almost destroys the first MI lobe while the MI phase looks more stable than the SF phase both in the AF and F cases due to the presence of the three body interactions.

  20. Collision of an Arched Plasma-Filled Flux Rope with a Target Cloud of Initially Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongwaitayakornkul, Pakorn; Bellan, Paul M.

    2015-11-01

    The Caltech solar loop experiment apparatus had been used to create an arched plasma-filled flux rope that expands to collide with a pre-injected initially-neutral gas. We investigated such a situation in two regimes: (i) plasma made by heavy gas impacting a much lighter neutral gas cloud and (ii) a light-gas plasma impacting much heavier neutral gas. The neutral gas became ionized immediately upon impact. In regime (i), multiple shock layers were formed in the target cloud; these magnetized collisionless shocks are relevant to solar physics as such shocks develop ahead of Coronal Mass Ejections and occur in Co-rotating Interaction Regions. In regime (ii), plasma expansion was inhibited. In both cases, fast camera images, magnetic probe measurements, and spectroscopy data will be reported. The analysis of plasma and shock expansion, as well as associated density and temperature changes, will be presented.

  1. The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Benna, Mehdi; King, Todd; Harpold, Daniel N.; Arvey, Robert; Barciniak, Michael; Bendt, Mirl; Carrigan, Daniel; Errigo, Therese; Holmes, Vincent; Kellogg, James; Jaeger, Ferzan; Raaen, Eric; Tan, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) is designed to measure the composition, structure, and variability of the upper atmosphere of Mars. The NGIMS complements two other instrument packages on the MAVEN spacecraft designed to characterize the neutral upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars and the solar wind input to this region of the atmosphere. The combined measurement set is designed to quantify atmosphere escape rates and provide input to models of the evolution of the martian atmosphere. The NGIMS is designed to measure both surface reactive and inert neutral species and ambient ions along the spacecraft track over the 125-500 km altitude region utilizing a dual ion source and a quadrupole analyzer.

  2. The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Benna, Mehdi; King, Todd; Harpold, Daniel N.; Arvey, Robert; Barciniak, Michael; Bendt, Mirl; Carrigan, Daniel; Errigo, Therese; Holmes, Vincent; Johnson, Christopher S.; Kellogg, James; Kimvilakani, Patrick; Lefavor, Matthew; Hengemihle, Jerome; Jaeger, Ferzan; Lyness, Eric; Maurer, John; Melak, Anthony; Noreiga, Felix; Noriega, Marvin; Patel, Kiran; Prats, Benito; Raaen, Eric; Tan, Florence; Weidner, Edwin; Gundersen, Cynthia; Battel, Steven; Block, Bruce P.; Arnett, Ken; Miller, Ryan; Cooper, Curt; Edmonson, Charles; Nolan, J. Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission (MAVEN) is designed to measure the composition, structure, and variability of the upper atmosphere of Mars. The NGIMS complements two other instrument packages on the MAVEN spacecraft designed to characterize the neutral upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars and the solar wind input to this region of the atmosphere. The combined measurement set is designed to quantify atmosphere escape rates and provide input to models of the evolution of the martian atmosphere. The NGIMS is designed to measure both surface reactive and inert neutral species and ambient ions along the spacecraft track over the 125-500 km altitude region utilizing a dual ion source and a quadrupole analyzer.

  3. Alfalfa discovery of the nearby gas-rich dwarf galaxy LEO P. V. Neutral gas dynamics and kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein-Cooper, Elijah Z.; Pardy, Stephen A.; Cannon, John M. E-mail: spardy@astro.wisc.edu; and others

    2014-08-01

    We present new H I spectral line imaging of the extremely metal-poor, star-forming dwarf irregular galaxy Leo P. Our H I images probe the global neutral gas properties and the local conditions of the interstellar medium (ISM). The H I morphology is slightly elongated along the optical major axis. We do not find obvious signatures of interaction or infalling gas at large spatial scales. The neutral gas disk shows obvious rotation, although the velocity dispersion is comparable to the rotation velocity. The rotation amplitude is estimated to be V {sub c} =15 ± 5 km s{sup –1}. Within the H I radius probed by these observations, the mass ratio of gas to stars is roughly 2:1, while the ratio of the total mass to the baryonic mass is ≳15:1. We use this information to place Leo P on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation, testing the baryonic content of cosmic structures in a sparsely populated portion of parameter space that has hitherto been occupied primarily by dwarf spheroidal galaxies. We detect the signature of two temperature components in the neutral ISM of Leo P; the cold and warm components have characteristic velocity widths of 4.2 ± 0.9 km s{sup –1} and 10.1 ± 1.2 km s{sup –1}, corresponding to kinetic temperature upper limits of ∼1100 K and ∼6200 K, respectively. The cold H I component is unresolved at a physical resolution of 200 pc. The highest H I surface densities are observed in close physical proximity to the single H II region. A comparison of the neutral gas properties of Leo P with other extremely metal-deficient (XMD) galaxies reveals that Leo P has the lowest neutral gas mass of any known XMD, and that the dynamical mass of Leo P is more than two orders of magnitude smaller than any known XMD with comparable metallicity.

  4. Asymptotic theory of neutral stability curve of the Couette flow of vibrationally excited gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigor'ev, Yu N.; Ershov, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The asymptotic theory of neutral stability curve of the supersonic plane Couette flow of vibrationally excited gas is constructed. The system of two-temperature viscous gas dynamics equations was used as original mathematical model. Spectral problem for an eighth order linear system of ordinary differential equations was obtained from the system within framework of classical theory of linear stability. Transformations of the spectral problem universal for all shear flows were carried along the classical Dunn — Lin scheme. As a result the problem was reduced to secular algebraic equation with a characteristic division on “inviscid” and “viscous” parts which was solved numerically. The calculated neutral stability curves coincide in limits of 10% with corresponding results of direct numerical solution of original spectral problem.

  5. Neutral gas laser: a tool for sensing atmospheric species by infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wormhoudt, Joda C.; Kebabian, Paul L.

    1994-07-01

    In the spectroscopic analysis of atmospheric composition, there is a continuing need for stable and reproducible mid-infrared light sources. The neutral rare gas lasers offer several important benefits, in the many cases where one of their lines coincides with an absorption line of an atmospheric species to be observed. As atomic spectral lines, they are not subject to the drift and aging effects seen in diode lasers. Furthermore, the Zeeman effect provides up to a few tenths of a wavenumber of tunability, which can be an advantage over molecular lasers (such as CO2) which can only be tuned by line selection. We present observations in applications of neutral rare gas lasers to measurements of CO, N2O and CH4, and discuss possible applications to a variety of other species, including formaldehyde, methanol, hydrazine, water vapor, and the methyl radical.

  6. Bose-Einstein condensation in a dilute gas: the first 70 years and some recent experiments (Nobel Lecture).

    PubMed

    Cornell, Eric A; Wieman, Carl E

    2002-06-17

    Bose-Einstein condensates of dilute gases offer a rich field to study fundamental quantum-mechanical processes, manipulation of the speed at which light propogates, observation of atomic pair-formation and superfluidity, or even simulating white dwarf stars. Still more radical applications are on the horizon. However, their initial creation was a masterpiece of experimental physics. After an initial process of laser cooling (which itself won its developers the 1997 Nobel Prize), atoms in a magnetic-optical trap must be safely transferred into a purely magnetic trap, where the condensation process begins at 170 nK and 20 nK a pure condensate of 2000 atoms could be created. More astonishingly, Wieman and Cornell showed these low temperatures could be achieved in "bench scale" equipment rather than the massive pieces normally demanded by cryoscience. For their 1995 discovery of this new state of matter, they were awarded the 2001 Nobel Prize in Physics.

  7. Propagation of first and second sound in a highly elongated trapped Bose-condensed gas at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arahata, Emiko; Nikuni, Tetsuro

    2013-03-01

    We study sound propagation in Bose-condensed gases in a highly elongated harmonic trap at finite temperatures. This problem is studied within the framework of the Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin (ZNG) formalism, which consists of a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate and a kinetic equation for the thermal cloud. We extend the ZNG formalism to deal with a highly anisotropic trap potential and use it to simulate sound propagation using the trap parameters corresponding to an experiment on sound pulse propagation at finite temperature. We focus on the high-density two-fluid hydrodynamic regime, and explore the possibility of observing first- and second-sound pulse propagation. The results of numerical simulation are compared with analytical results derived from linearized ZNG hydrodynamic equations. We show that the second-sound mode makes the dominant contribution to condensate motion at relatively high temperature, while the first-sound mode makes an appreciable contribution.

  8. Collective modes of a one-dimensional trapped Bose gas in the presence of the anomalous density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudjemâa, Abdelâali

    2016-11-01

    We study the collective modes of a one-dimensional harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate in the presence of the anomalous density using the time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory. Within the hydrodynamic equations, we derive analytical expressions for the mode frequencies and the density fluctuations of the anomalous density which constitutes the minority component at very low temperature and feels an effective external potential exerted by the majority component, i.e., the condensate. On the other hand, we numerically examine the temperature dependence of the breathing mode oscillations of the condensate at finite temperature in the weak-coupling regime. At zero temperature, we compare our predictions with available experimental data, theoretical treatments, and Monte carlo simulations in all interaction regimes and the remaining hindrances are emphasized. We show that the anomalous correlations have a non-negligible role on the collective modes at both zero and finite temperatures.

  9. Quantum de Laval nozzle: Stability and quantum dynamics of sonic horizons in a toroidally trapped Bose gas containing a superflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, P.; Bradley, A. S.; Gardiner, C. W.

    2007-08-01

    We study an experimentally realizable system containing stable black hole white hole acoustic horizons in toroidally trapped Bose-Einstein condensates—the quantum de Laval nozzle. We numerically obtain stationary flow configurations and assess their stability using Bogoliubov theory, finding both in hydrodynamic and nonhydrodynamic regimes there exist dynamically unstable regions associated with the creation of positive and negative energy quasiparticle pairs in analogy with the gravitational Hawking effect. The dynamical instability takes the form of a two mode squeezing interaction between resonant pairs of Bogoliubov modes. We study the evolution of dynamically unstable flows using the truncated Wigner method, which confirms the two mode squeezed state picture of the analogue Hawking effect for low winding number.

  10. The interaction between the solar wind and the heterogeneous neutral gas coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Martin; Toth, Gabor; Tenishev, Valeriy; Fougere, Nicolas; Huang, Zhenguang

    2016-07-01

    Comets are surrounded by an extended gas and dust coma. Neutral particles are continuously ionized by solar irradiation and then picked-up by the solar wind. This leads to a complex interaction between the neutral gas coma and the solar wind, which changes over the course of the comet's orbit around the Sun. The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft has been in orbit around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko since August 2014. Rosetta carries several instruments to investigate the comet's nucleus and surrounding neutral gas coma and plasma. Part of the payload is the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA) that consists of two mass spectrometers and a pressure sensor. ROSINA was designed to measure the neutral gas abundance and composition and low energy ions in the coma in situ. ROSINA observations have shown that the coma is very heterogeneous both in total density and composition of the neutral gas. This heterogeneity is driven in large part by the complex shape of the nucleus and the varying illumination conditions associated with the comet's rotation. In this presentation we will show the time-dependent distribution of the major volatiles around the comet constrained by ROSINA observations. Furthermore we will investigate the impact of the highly non-symmetric neutral gas coma on the interaction of the solar wind with the comet.

  11. A Ring with a Spin: Superfluidity in a toroidal Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, Anand Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    Superfluidity is a remarkable phenomenon. Superfluidity was initially characterized by flow without friction, first seen in liquid helium in 1938, and has been studied extensively since. Superfluidity is believed to be related to, but not identical to Bose-Einstein condensation, a statistical mechanical phenomena predicted by Albert Einstein in 1924 based on the statistics of Satyendra Nath Bose, where bosonic atoms make a phase transition to form a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), a gas which has macroscopic occupation of a single quantum state. Developments in laser cooling of neutral atoms and the subsequent realization of Bose-Einstein condensates in ultracold gases have opened a new window into the study of superfluidity and its relation to Bose-Einstein condensation. In our atomic sodium BEC experiment, we studied superfluidity and dissipationless flow in an all-optical toroidal trap, constructed using the combination of a horizontal "sheet"-like beam and vertical "ring"-like beam, which, like a circuit loop, allows flow around the ring. On inducing a single quantum of circulation in the condensate, the smoothness and uniformity of the toroidal BEC enabled the sustaining of a persistent current lasting 40 seconds, limited by the lifetime of the BEC due to background gas pressure. This success set the stage for further experiments studying superfluidity. In a first set of experiments, we studied the stability of the persistent current by inserting a barrier in the flow path of the ring. The superflow stopped abruptly at a barrier strength such that the local flow velocity at the barrier exceeded a critical velocity, which supported decay via the creation of a vortex-antivortex pair. Our precise control in inducing and arresting superflow in the BEC is a first step toward studying other aspects of superfluidity, such as the effect of temperature and dimensionality. This thesis discusses these experiments and also details partial-transfer absorption imaging, an

  12. Asymptotic theory of neutral stability of the Couette flow of a vibrationally excited gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigor'ev, Yu. N.; Ershov, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    An asymptotic theory of the neutral stability curve for a supersonic plane Couette flow of a vibrationally excited gas is developed. The initial mathematical model consists of equations of two-temperature viscous gas dynamics, which are used to derive a spectral problem for a linear system of eighth-order ordinary differential equations within the framework of the classical linear stability theory. Unified transformations of the system for all shear flows are performed in accordance with the classical Lin scheme. The problem is reduced to an algebraic secular equation with separation into the "inviscid" and "viscous" parts, which is solved numerically. It is shown that the thus-calculated neutral stability curves agree well with the previously obtained results of the direct numerical solution of the original spectral problem. In particular, the critical Reynolds number increases with excitation enhancement, and the neutral stability curve is shifted toward the domain of higher wave numbers. This is also confirmed by means of solving an asymptotic equation for the critical Reynolds number at the Mach number M ≤ 4.

  13. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Neutral Basic Residues in Polypeptide Cations by Periodate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, Alice L.; Bu, Jiexun; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2016-12-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of doubly protonated peptides containing neutral basic residues to various products, including [M + H + O]+, [M - H]+, and [M - H - NH3]+, is demonstrated here via ion/ion reactions with periodate. It was previously demonstrated that periodate anions are capable of oxidizing disulfide bonds and methionine, tryptophan, and S-alkyl cysteine residues. However, in the absence of these easily oxidized sites, we show here that systems containing neutral basic residues can undergo oxidation. Furthermore, we show that these neutral basic residues primarily undergo different types of oxidation (e.g., hydrogen abstraction) reactions than those observed previously (i.e., oxygen transfer to yield the [M + H + O]+ species) upon gas-phase ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. This chemistry is illustrated with a variety of systems, including a series of model peptides, a cell-penetrating peptide containing a large number of unprotonated basic sites, and ubiquitin, a roughly 8.6 kDa protein.

  14. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Neutral Basic Residues in Polypeptide Cations by Periodate.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Alice L; Bu, Jiexun; McLuckey, Scott A

    2016-12-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of doubly protonated peptides containing neutral basic residues to various products, including [M + H + O](+), [M - H](+), and [M - H - NH3](+), is demonstrated here via ion/ion reactions with periodate. It was previously demonstrated that periodate anions are capable of oxidizing disulfide bonds and methionine, tryptophan, and S-alkyl cysteine residues. However, in the absence of these easily oxidized sites, we show here that systems containing neutral basic residues can undergo oxidation. Furthermore, we show that these neutral basic residues primarily undergo different types of oxidation (e.g., hydrogen abstraction) reactions than those observed previously (i.e., oxygen transfer to yield the [M + H + O](+) species) upon gas-phase ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. This chemistry is illustrated with a variety of systems, including a series of model peptides, a cell-penetrating peptide containing a large number of unprotonated basic sites, and ubiquitin, a roughly 8.6 kDa protein. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Si II mapping of the neutral gas ring in the Galactic center - Evidence for dust destruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herter, T.; Gull, G. E.; Megeath, S. T.; Rowlands, N.; Houck, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of Si II emission in the Galactic center has been measured and found to extend beyond 4 pc from the center. The observed forbidden Si II 34.8 micron line, which is thermally excited by H I and H2 collisions, originates from the photodissociation region formed in the neutral gas ring surrounding the ionized core. Two peaks in the Si II emission are found, one lying 20 arcsec northeast of Sgr A-asterisk along the Galactic plane and the other located about 80 arcsec north of Sgr A-asterisk. The latter peak is located beyond the northern arm seen in the ionized gas. The ratio of Si II to dust mass density varies in the ring, indicating changes in the gas-to-dust ratio. The mass density of Si II and dust are anticorrelated, indicating that Si II tracks the destruction of dust.

  16. Competition between Bose-Einstein Condensation and Spin Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Naylor, B; Brewczyk, M; Gajda, M; Gorceix, O; Maréchal, E; Vernac, L; Laburthe-Tolra, B

    2016-10-28

    We study the impact of spin-exchange collisions on the dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensation by rapidly cooling a chromium multicomponent Bose gas. Despite relatively strong spin-dependent interactions, the critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation is reached before the spin degrees of freedom fully thermalize. The increase in density due to Bose-Einstein condensation then triggers spin dynamics, hampering the formation of condensates in spin-excited states. Small metastable spinor condensates are, nevertheless, produced, and they manifest in strong spin fluctuations.

  17. Discrete clouds of neutral gas between the galaxies M31 and M33.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Spencer A; Pisano, D J; Lockman, Felix J; McGaugh, Stacy S; Shaya, Edward J

    2013-05-09

    Spiral galaxies must acquire gas to maintain their observed level of star formation beyond the next few billion years. A source of this material may be the gas that resides between galaxies, but our understanding of the state and distribution of this gas is incomplete. Radio observations of the Local Group of galaxies have revealed hydrogen gas extending from the disk of the galaxy M31 at least halfway to M33. This feature has been interpreted to be the neutral component of a condensing intergalactic filament, which would be able to fuel star formation in M31 and M33, but simulations suggest that such a feature could also result from an interaction between both galaxies within the past few billion years (ref. 5). Here we report radio observations showing that about 50 per cent of this gas is composed of clouds, with the rest distributed in an extended, diffuse component. The clouds have velocities comparable to those of M31 and M33, and have properties suggesting that they are unrelated to other Local Group objects. We conclude that the clouds are likely to be transient condensations of gas embedded in an intergalactic filament and are therefore a potential source of fuel for future star formation in M31 and M33.

  18. Gas-phase structures and thermochemistry of neutral histidine and its conjugated acid and base.

    PubMed

    Riffet, Vanessa; Bouchoux, Guy

    2013-04-28

    Extensive exploration of the conformational space of neutral, protonated and deprotonated histidine has been conducted at the G4MP2 level. Theoretical protonation and deprotonation thermochemistry as well as heats of formation of gaseous histidine and its ionized forms have been calculated at the G4 level considering either the most stable conformers or an equilibrium population of conformers at 298 K. These theoretical results were compared to evaluated experimental determinations. Recommended proton affinity and protonation entropy deduced from these comparisons are PA(His) = 980 kJ mol(-1) and ΔpS(His) ∼ 0 J mol(-1) K(-1), thus leading to a gas-phase basicity value of GB(His) = 947.5 kJ mol(-1). Similarly, gas phase acidity parameters are ΔacidH(o)(His) = 1373 kJ mol(-1), ΔacidS(His) ∼ 10 J mol(-1) K(-1) and ΔacidG(o)(His) = 1343 kJ mol(-1). Computed G4 heats of formation values are equal to -290, 265 and -451 kJ mol(-1) for gaseous neutral histidine and its protonated and deprotonated forms, respectively. The present computational data correct, and complete, previous thermochemical parameter estimates proposed for gas-phase histidine and its acido-basic properties.

  19. A Pre-ionization System to Limit Neutral Gas in a Compact Toroid Injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allfrey, Ian; Roche, Thomas; Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Garate, Eusebio; Gota, Hiroshi; Asai, Tomohiko; the TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Fusion plasmas require long lifetimes and high temperatures, both of which are limited by particle loss, among other factors. Therefore, refueling a long-lived advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma in C-2U is necessary, and injecting a supersonic compact toroid (CT) is an effective means of introducing particles into the FRC core. However, neutral gas that trails the CT into the target chamber cools the FRC. Pre-ionization (PI) system assists the break down between electrodes of the CT injector (CTI), so the amount of introduced gas can be lowered by up to a factor of two, effectively increasing the ionization fraction; thus, reducing the amount of neutral gas in the system. Additionally, the PI decreases the delay in CTI breakdown so a highly reproducible operation is achievable. The PI system consists of a fast, high voltage, pulse discharge circuit coupled to a Teflon insulated semi-rigid coaxial cable inserted into the CTI. System details and experimental data will be presented, in addition to issues such as the introduction of impurities and pre-ionizer lifetime.

  20. Energetic neutral atoms from a trans-Europa gas torus at Jupiter.

    PubMed

    Mauk, B H; Mitchell, D G; Krimigis, S M; Roelof, E C; Paranicas, C P

    2003-02-27

    The space environments--or magnetospheres--of magnetized planets emit copious quantities of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) at energies between tens of electron volts to hundreds of kiloelectron volts (keV). These energetic atoms result from charge exchange between magnetically trapped energetic ions and cold neutral atoms, and they carry significant amounts of energy and mass from the magnetospheres. Imaging their distribution allows us to investigate the structure of planetary magnetospheres. Here we report the analysis of 50-80 keV ENA images of Jupiter's magnetosphere, where two distinct emission regions dominate: the upper atmosphere of Jupiter itself, and a torus of emission residing just outside the orbit of Jupiter's satellite Europa. The trans-Europa component shows that, unexpectedly, Europa generates a gas cloud comparable in gas content to that associated with the volcanic moon Io. The quantity of gas found indicates that Europa has a much greater impact than hitherto believed on the structure of, and the energy flow within, Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  1. Detection of cold gas releases in space via low energy neutral atom imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Funsten, H.O.; Moore, K.R.; Scime, E.E.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    Low energy neutral atoms (LENAs) are produced in space plasmas by charge exchange between the ambient magnetospheric plasma ions and cold neutral atoms. Under normal conditions these cold neutrals come from the terrestrial geocorona, a shroud of few-ev hydrogen atoms surrounding the Earth. As a consequence of this charge exchange, it has become possible to remotely image many regions of the magnetosphere for the first time utilizing recently developed LENA imaging technology. In addition to the natural hydrogen geocorona, conventional explosions and maneuvering thruster firings can also introduce large amounts of cold gas into the space environment. In this paper we examine whether such potentially clandestine activities could also be remotely observed for the first time via LENA imaging. First, we examine the fluxes of LENAs produced in the space environment from a conventional explosion. Then we review the present state of the art in the emerging field of LENA detection and imaging. Recent work has shown that LENAs can be imaged by first converting the neutrals to ions with ultra-thin (10s of [Angstrom]) foils and then electrostatically analyzing these newly created ions to reject the large (>10[sup 10] cm[sup [minus]2] [sup [minus]1]) UV background to which the low energy detectors are sensitive. We conclude that the sensitivities for present LENA imager designs may be just adequate for detecting some man-made releases. With additional improvements in LENA detection capabilities, this technique could become an important new method for monitoring for conventional explosions, as well as other man-made neutral releases, in the space environment.

  2. Detection of cold gas releases in space via low energy neutral atom imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Funsten, H.O.; Moore, K.R.; Scime, E.E.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1993-04-01

    Low energy neutral atoms (LENAs) are produced in space plasmas by charge exchange between the ambient magnetospheric plasma ions and cold neutral atoms. Under normal conditions these cold neutrals come from the terrestrial geocorona, a shroud of few-ev hydrogen atoms surrounding the Earth. As a consequence of this charge exchange, it has become possible to remotely image many regions of the magnetosphere for the first time utilizing recently developed LENA imaging technology. In addition to the natural hydrogen geocorona, conventional explosions and maneuvering thruster firings can also introduce large amounts of cold gas into the space environment. In this paper we examine whether such potentially clandestine activities could also be remotely observed for the first time via LENA imaging. First, we examine the fluxes of LENAs produced in the space environment from a conventional explosion. Then we review the present state of the art in the emerging field of LENA detection and imaging. Recent work has shown that LENAs can be imaged by first converting the neutrals to ions with ultra-thin (10s of {Angstrom}) foils and then electrostatically analyzing these newly created ions to reject the large (>10{sup 10} cm{sup {minus}2} {sup {minus}1}) UV background to which the low energy detectors are sensitive. We conclude that the sensitivities for present LENA imager designs may be just adequate for detecting some man-made releases. With additional improvements in LENA detection capabilities, this technique could become an important new method for monitoring for conventional explosions, as well as other man-made neutral releases, in the space environment.

  3. Tracing neutral FeI gas evaporating from exocomets in the beta Pictoris disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Barry; Montgomery, Sharon Lynn; DeMark, Richard; Price, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Absorption variability due to the evaporating gas from comet-like bodies on their grazing approach towards a parent star has now been observed in over a dozen A-type stellar systems. Ground based observations of the resultant replenished gas have routinely been performed using high resolution spectroscopy of the CaII-K (3933Å) and NaI (5890Å) circumstellar absorption lines, especially towards the well-known exoplanet bearing Beta Pictoris stellar system. Here we present a preliminary study of the neutral FeI (3860Å) circumstellar absorption line observed towards Beta Pictoris using data in the ESO Data Archive obtained over the 2003 to 2014 timeframe. This spectral line samples neutral gas with an ionization potential < 7.9eV and from a sample of 15 observations we show 5 examples in which high velocity absorption features (Vhelio > +35 km s-1) have, for the first time, been simultaneously detected in both the FeI and CaII line profiles. Such absorption features can be associated with liberated exocomet gas which seems to be preferentially observed at circumstellar disk velocities of +35 to +45 km s-1. Additional absorption features with velocities > 100 km s-1 in the FeI line profile have also been observed on two occasions. Our data supports the recent findings of Kiefer et al (2014) in which at least two families of exocomets exist with distinctly different circumstellar gas disk velocities, both residing within~ 1 AU from the central star.

  4. Tracing the neutral gas environments of young radio AGN with ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Moss, V. A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, I.; Indermuehle, B. T.; McConnell, D.; Sault, R. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-02-01

    At present neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) gas in galaxies at redshifts above {z ˜ 0.3} (the extent of 21 cm emission surveys in individual galaxies) and below {z ˜ 1.7} (where the Lyman-\\alpha line is not observable with ground-based telescopes) has remained largely unexplored. The advent of precursor telescopes to the Square Kilometre Array will allow us to conduct the first systematic radio-selected 21 cm absorption surveys for H I over these redshifts. While H I absorption is a tracer of the reservoir of cold neutral gas in galaxies available for star formation, it can also be used to reveal the extreme kinematics associated with jet-driven neutral outflows in radio-loud active galactic nuclei. Using the six-antenna Boolardy Engineering Test Array of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder, we have demonstrated that in a single frequency tuning we can detect H I absorption over a broad range of redshifts between z = 0.4 and 1.0. As part of our early science and commissioning program, we are now carrying out a search for absorption towards a sample of the brightest GPS and CSS sources in the southern sky. These intrinsically compact sources present us with an opportunity to study the circumnuclear region of recently re-started radio galaxies, in some cases showing direct evidence of mechanical feedback through jet-driven outflows. With the sensitivity of the full ASKAP array we will be able to study the kinematics of atomic gas in a few thousand radio galaxies, testing models of radio jet feedback well beyond the nearby Universe.

  5. Neutral gas outflows in nearby [U]LIRGs via optical NaD feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzoli, S.; Arribas, S.; Maiolino, R.; Colina, L.

    2016-05-01

    We studied the properties of the neutral gas in a sample of 38 local luminous and ultra luminous infrared galaxies ([U]LIRGs, 51 individual galaxies at z ≤ 0.09), which mainly covers the less explored LIRG luminosity range. This study is based on the analysis of the spatially integrated and spatially resolved spectra of the NaDλλ 5890, 5896 Å feature obtained with the integral field unit (IFU) of VIMOS at the Very Large Telescope. Analyzing spatially integrated spectra, we find that the contribution of the stars to the observed NaD equivalent width is small (<35%) for about half of the sample, and therefore this feature is dominated by inter stellar medium (ISM) absorption. After subtracting the stellar contribution, we find that the pure-ISM integrated spectra generally show blueshifted NaD profiles, indicating neutral gas outflow velocities, V, in the range 65-260 km s-1. Excluding the galaxies with powerful AGNs, V shows a dependency with the star formation rate (SFR) of the type V ∝ SFR0.15, which is in rather good agreement with previous results. The spatially resolved analysis could be performed for 40 galaxies, 22 of which have neutral gas velocity fields dominated by noncircular motions with signatures of cone-like winds. However, a large number of targets (11/40) show disk rotation signatures. Based on a simple model, we found that the wind masses are in the range 0.4-7.5 × 108 M⊙, reaching up to ~3% of the dynamical mass of the host. The mass rates are typically only ~0.2-0.4 times the corresponding global SFR indicating that, in general, the mass loss is too small to slow down the star formation significantly. In the majority of cases, the velocity of the outflowing gas is not sufficient to escape the host potential well and, therefore, most of the gas rains back into the galaxy disk. On average V/vesc is higher in less massive galaxies, confirming that the galaxy mass has a primary role in shaping the recycling of gas and metals. The

  6. SPEAR 3 flight analysis: Grounding by neutral gas release, and magnetic field effects on current distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandell, M. J.; Jongeward, G. A.; Cooke, D. L.; Raitt, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Power Experiment Aboard Rockets (SPEAR) 3 experiment was launched on March 15, 1993, to test grounding devices for negative payloads. In this paper we review two aspects of the high-altitude flight data and compare them with preflight predictions. The SPEAR 3 neutral gas release experiment studied a grounding mechanism observed on previous flights during attitude control system (ACS) firings. Preflight calculations using Paschen law physics generalized to three dimensions predicted that the high rate gas release (about one order of magnitude below normal ACS) would reduce the rocket potential to within 200-300 V of plasma ground. The flight data is well fit by a value of -225V. Orientation relative to Earth's magnetic field had no effect on the floating potential or grounding operations but had a large effect on the portion of the current collected by the boom. We compare these flight measurements with preflight calculations made with the DynaPAC computer code.

  7. Infrared Action Spectroscopy of Low-Temperature Neutral Gas-Phase Molecules of Arbitrary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J.; Salén, Peter; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M.; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a technique for IR action spectroscopy that enables measuring IR spectra in a background-free fashion for low-temperature neutral gas-phase molecules of arbitrary structure. The method is exemplified experimentally for N -methylacetamide molecules in the mid-IR spectral range of 1000 - 1800 cm-1 , utilizing the free electron laser FELIX. The technique involves the resonant absorption of multiple mid-IR photons, which induces molecular dissociation. The dissociation products are probed with 10.49 eV vacuum ultraviolet photons and analyzed with a mass spectrometer. We also demonstrate the capability of this method to record, with unprecedented ease, mid-IR spectra for the molecular associates, such as clusters and oligomers, present in a molecular beam. In this way the mass-selected spectra of low-temperature gas-phase dimers and trimers of N -methylacetamide are measured in the full amide I-III range.

  8. Temperature Variations in the Martian Upper Atmosphere from the MAVEN Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Shane W.; Yelle, Roger; Mahaffy, Paul; Benna, Mehdi; Elrod, Meredith K.; Bougher, Stephen W.; MAVEN

    2016-10-01

    The MAVEN Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) measures composition and variability of neutral and ionic species in the Martian upper atmosphere, allowing us to calculate neutral temperatures from roughly 130 km to 300 km above the surface. Over the past two years at Mars, NGIMS has collected an extensive and useful data set that covers much of the Martian thermosphere and exosphere. We use new, improved algorithms for the most accurate determination of densities from the NGIMS data. We use the densities of inert species (specifically CO2, Ar, and N2) along with a hydrostatic equilibrium model to infer the temperature profile and its uncertainty. Uncertainties include the errors in the density measurements, unknown upper boundary conditions, and horizontal variations in the atmosphere. Our calculations reveal diurnal temperature variations of up to 90 K and maximum latitudinal temperature variations of 130 K. These fluctuations in temperature in the upper atmosphere are surprising because they are significantly larger than those predicted by the latest 3D general circulation models for Mars.

  9. Bose Polarons in the Strongly Interacting Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming-Guang; Van de Graaff, Michael J.; Kedar, Dhruv; Corson, John P.; Cornell, Eric A.; Jin, Deborah S.

    2016-07-01

    When an impurity is immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate, impurity-boson interactions are expected to dress the impurity into a quasiparticle, the Bose polaron. We superimpose an ultracold atomic gas of 87Rb with a much lower density gas of fermionic 40 impurities. Through the use of a Feshbach resonance and radio-frequency spectroscopy, we characterize the energy, spectral width, and lifetime of the resultant polaron on both the attractive and the repulsive branches in the strongly interacting regime. The width of the polaron in the attractive branch is narrow compared to its binding energy, even as the two-body scattering length diverges.

  10. Using IBEX data to constrain the heliosphere's large-scale structure: interstellar neutral gas and the Warm Breeze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzowski, Maciej; McComas, David; Galli, Andre; Kucharek, Harald; Wurz, Peter; Sokol, Justyna M.; Schwadron, Nathan; Heirtzler, David M.; Kubiak, M. Marzena A.; Möbius, Eberhard; Fuselier, Stephen; Swaczyna, Paweł; Leonard, Trevor; Park, Jeewoo

    2016-07-01

    The large-scale structure of the heliosphere is governed by the interaction of the partly ionized, magnetized interstellar gas and the magnetized, fully ionized solar wind, structured in heliolatitude. Determining factors of this interaction are the density and flow velocity of interstellar gas relative to the Sun, the Mach number of this flow and the strength and inclination of the interstellar magnetic field to the flow vector at the interstellar side, and the magnitude of dynamic pressure of solar wind and the strength of its embedded magnetic field at the solar side. As a result of charge exchange interactions operating in the boundary region between the heliosphere and interstellar matter, a new population of neutral atoms is created, in addition to the population of unperturbed interstellar neutral gas. Both of these populations penetrate deep inside the heliosphere, where they can be sampled by the first space probe dedicated to observations of the heliosphere and its immediate surroundings by means of neutral atoms: the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). Due to distortion of the heliosphere from axial symmetry, the secondary population of interstellar neutrals, created via charge exchange between the plasma flowing past the heliopause and the unperturbed pristine neutral interstellar gas, appears to be coming from a different direction than the unperturbed interstellar neutral flow. These two directions should be coplanar with the plane defined by the local interstellar magnetic field and the flow direction of the unperturbed gas. IBEX provides an unprecedented opportunity to study and interpret these relations. The IBEX science team have recently accomplished important milestones in researching the primary and secondary populations of interstellar gas and their relation to the local interstellar magnetic fields. First, the temperature and velocity vector of the inflowing interstellar neutral gas has been determined with unprecedented robustness based

  11. Developing QSPR model of gas/particle partition coefficients of neutral poly-/perfluoroalkyl substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Quan; Ma, Guangcai; Xu, Ting; Serge, Bakire; Yu, Haiying; Chen, Jianrong; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-10-01

    Poly-/perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a class of synthetic fluorinated organic substances that raise increasing concern because of their environmental persistence, bioaccumulation and widespread presence in various environment media and organisms. PFASs can be released into the atmosphere through both direct and indirect sources, and the gas/particle partition coefficient (KP) is an important parameter that helps us to understand their atmospheric behavior. In this study, we developed a temperature-dependent predictive model for log KP of PFASs and analyzed the molecular mechanism that governs their partitioning equilibrium between gas phase and particle phase. All theoretical computation was carried out at B3LYP/6-31G (d, p) level based on neutral molecular structures by Gaussian 09 program package. The regression model has a good statistical performance and robustness. The application domain has also been defined according to OECD guidance. The mechanism analysis shows that electrostatic interaction and dispersion interaction play the most important role in the partitioning equilibrium. The developed model can be used to predict log KP values of neutral fluorotelomer alcohols and perfluor sulfonamides/sulfonamidoethanols with different substitutions at nitrogen atoms, providing basic data for their ecological risk assessment.

  12. Modeling the neutral gas and dust coma of Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Martin; Tenishev, Valeriy M.; Combi, Michael R.; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans

    2010-05-01

    The neutral gas environment of a comet is largely influenced by dissociation of parent molecules created at the surface of the comet and collisions of all the involved species. We compare the results from a kinetic model of the neutral cometary environment with measurements from the Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS) and the Dust Impact Detection System (DIDSY) onboard the Giotto spacecraft which flew-by at comet 1P/Halley in 1986. We further show that our model is in good agreement to measurements obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE), sounding rocket experiments, and the International Halley Watch (IHW). The model solves the Boltzmann equation with a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo technique [Tenishev et al. (2008, Astrophys. J., 685, 659-677)] by tracking trajectories of gas molecules and dust grains under the influence of the comet's weak gravity field with momentum exchange among particles modeled in a probabilistic manner. The cometary nucleus is considered to be the source of dust and the parent species (in our model: H2O, CO, H2CO, CO2, CH3OH, C2H6, C2H4, C2H2, HCN, NH3, and CH4) in the coma. Subsequently our model also tracks the corresponding dissociation products (H, H2, O, OH, C, CH, CH2, CH3, N, NH, NH2, C2, C2H, C2H5, CN, and HCO). This work has been supported by JPL subcontract 1266313 under NASA grant NMO710889, NASA planetary atmospheres program grant NNX09AB59G, grant AST-0707283 from the NSF Planetary Astronomy program, and the Swiss National Science Foundation.

  13. Charge transfer reactions at interfaces between neutral gas and plasma: Dynamical effects and X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provornikova, E.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Lallement, R.

    2012-04-01

    Charge-transfer is the main process linking neutrals and charged particles in the interaction regions of neutral (or partly ionized) gas with a plasma. In this paper we illustrate the importance of charge-transfer with respect to the dynamics and the structure of neutral gas-plasma interfaces. We consider the following phenomena: (1) the heliospheric interface - region where the solar wind plasma interacts with the partly-ionized local interstellar medium (LISM) and (2) neutral interstellar clouds embedded in a hot, tenuous plasma such as the million degree gas that fills the so-called ``Local Bubble". In (1), we discuss several effects in the outer heliosphere caused by charge exchange of interstellar neutral atoms and plasma protons. In (2) we describe the role of charge exchange in the formation of a transition region between the cloud and the surrounding plasma based on a two-component model of the cloud-plasma interaction. In the model the cloud consists of relatively cold and dense atomic hydrogen gas, surrounded by hot, low density, fully ionized plasma. We discuss the structure of the cloud-plasma interface and the effect of charge exchange on the lifetime of interstellar clouds. Charge transfer between neutral atoms and minor ions in the plasma produces X-ray emission. Assuming standard abundances of minor ions in the hot gas surrounding the cold interstellar cloud, we estimate the X-ray emissivity consecutive to the charge transfer reactions. Our model shows that the charge-transfer X-ray emission from the neutral cloud-plasma interface may be comparable to the diffuse thermal X-ray emission from the million degree gas cavity itself.

  14. Observing the Interstellar Neutral He Gas Flow with a Variable IBEX Pointing Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, T.; Moebius, E.; Bzowski, M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Heirtzler, D.; Kubiak, M. A.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N.; Wurz, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Interstellar Neutral (ISN) gas flow can be observed at Earth's orbit due to the motion of the solar system relative to the surrounding interstellar gas. Since He is minimally influenced by ionization and charge exchange, the ISN He flow provides a sample of the pristine interstellar environment. The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has observed the ISN gas flow over the past 7 years from a highly elliptical orbit around the Earth. IBEX is a Sun-pointing spinning spacecraft with energetic neutral atom (ENA) detectors observing perpendicular to the spacecraft spin axis. Due to the Earth's orbital motion around the Sun, it is necessary for IBEX to perform spin axis pointing maneuvers every few days to maintain a sunward pointed spin axis. The IBEX operations team has successfully pointed the spin axis in a variety of latitude orientations during the mission, including in the ecliptic during the 2012 and 2013 seasons, about 5 degrees below the ecliptic during the 2014 season, and recently about 5 degrees above the ecliptic during the 2015 season, as well as optimizing observations with the spin axis pointed along the Earth-Sun line. These observations include a growing number of measurements near the perihelion of the interstellar atom trajectories, which allow for an improved determination of the ISN He bulk flow longitude at Earth orbit. Combining these bulk flow measurements with an analytical model (Lee et al. 2012 ApJS, 198, 10) based upon orbital mechanics improves the knowledge of the narrow ISN parameter tube, obtained with IBEX, which couples the interstellar inflow longitude, latitude, speed, and temperature.

  15. Four-fluid MHD Simulations of the Plasma and Neutral Gas Environment of Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko Near Perihelio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Toth, G.; Gombosi, T. I.; Jia, X.; Rubin, M.; Hansen, K. C.; Fougere, N.; Bieler, A. M.; Shou, Y.; Altwegg, K.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V.

    2015-12-01

    The neutral and plasma environment is critical in understanding the interaction of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG), the target of the Rosetta mission, and the solar wind. To serve this need and support the Rosetta mission, we develop a 3-D four fluid model, which is based on BATS-R-US within the SWMF (Space Weather Modeling Framework) that solves the governing multi-fluid MHD equations and the Euler equations for the neutral gas fluid. These equations describe the behavior and interactions of the cometary heavy ions, the solar wind protons, the electrons, and the neutrals. This model incorporates different mass loading processes, including photo and electron impact ionization, charge exchange, dissociative ion-electron recombination, and collisional interactions between different fluids. We simulate the near nucleus plasma and neutral gas environment near perihelion with a realistic shape model of CG and compare our simulation results with Rosetta observations.

  16. Far-Ir Spectroscopy of Neutral Gas Phase Peptides: Signatures from Combined Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahé, Jérôme; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Bakker, Daniël; Jaeqx, Sander; Rijs, Anouk

    2016-06-01

    Within the past two decades, action vibrational spectroscopy has become an almost routine experimental method to probe the structures of molecules and clusters in the gas phase (neutral and ions). Such experiments are mainly performed in the 1000-4000 wn fingerprint regions. Though successful in many respects, these spectral domains can be however restrictive in the information provided, and sometimes reach limitations for unravelling structures without ambiguity. In a collaborative work with the group of Dr A.M. Rijs (FELIX laboratory, Radbout University, The Netherlands) we have launched a new strategy where the far-IR/Tera-Hertz domain (100-800 wn domain) is experimentally probed for neutral gas phase molecules. Our group in Paris apply finite temperature DFT-based molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations in order to unravel the complex signatures arising in the far-IR domain, and provide an unambiguous assignment both of the structural conformation of the gas phase molecules (taking into account the experimental conditions) and an understanding of the spectral signatures/fingerprints. We will discuss our experimental and theoretical investigations on two neutral peptides in the 100-800 wn far-IR spectral domain, i.e. Z-Ala6 and PheGly dipeptide, that represent two systems which definitive conformational assignment was not possible without the far IR signatures. We will also present our very recent results on the Phe-X peptide series, where X stands for Gly, Ala, Pro, Val, Ser, Cys, combining experiments and DFT-MD simulations, providing a detailed understanding of the vibrational fingerprints in the far-IR domain. In all exemples, we will show how DFT-MD simulations is the proper theoretical tool to account for vibrational anharmonicities and mode couplings, of prime importance in the far-IR domain. References : J. Mahé, S. Jaeqx, A.M. Rijs, M.P. Gaigeot, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 17 :25905 (2015) S. Jaeqx, J. Oomens, A. Cimas, M.P. Gaigeot, A.M. Rijs, Angew

  17. Motion of a distinguishable Impurity in the Bose gas: Arrested expansion without a lattice and impurity snaking

    SciTech Connect

    Neil J. Robinson; Caux, Jean -Sebastien; Konik, Robert M.

    2016-04-07

    We consider the real-time dynamics of an initially localized distinguishable impurity injected into the ground state of the Lieb-Liniger model. Focusing on the case where integrability is preserved, we numerically compute the time evolution of the impurity density operator in regimes far from analytically tractable limits. We find that the injected impurity undergoes a stuttering motion as it moves and expands. For an initially stationary impurity, the interaction-driven formation of a quasibound state with a hole in the background gas leads to arrested expansion—a period of quasistationary behavior. In conclusion, when the impurity is injected with a finite center-of-mass momentum, the impurity moves through the background gas in a snaking manner, arising from a quantum Newton’s cradlelike scenario where momentum is exchanged back and forth between the impurity and the background gas.

  18. Motion of a distinguishable Impurity in the Bose gas: Arrested expansion without a lattice and impurity snaking

    DOE PAGES

    Neil J. Robinson; Caux, Jean -Sebastien; Konik, Robert M.

    2016-04-07

    We consider the real-time dynamics of an initially localized distinguishable impurity injected into the ground state of the Lieb-Liniger model. Focusing on the case where integrability is preserved, we numerically compute the time evolution of the impurity density operator in regimes far from analytically tractable limits. We find that the injected impurity undergoes a stuttering motion as it moves and expands. For an initially stationary impurity, the interaction-driven formation of a quasibound state with a hole in the background gas leads to arrested expansion—a period of quasistationary behavior. In conclusion, when the impurity is injected with a finite center-of-mass momentum,more » the impurity moves through the background gas in a snaking manner, arising from a quantum Newton’s cradlelike scenario where momentum is exchanged back and forth between the impurity and the background gas.« less

  19. Motion of a Distinguishable Impurity in the Bose Gas: Arrested Expansion Without a Lattice and Impurity Snaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Neil J.; Caux, Jean-Sébastien; Konik, Robert M.

    2016-04-01

    We consider the real-time dynamics of an initially localized distinguishable impurity injected into the ground state of the Lieb-Liniger model. Focusing on the case where integrability is preserved, we numerically compute the time evolution of the impurity density operator in regimes far from analytically tractable limits. We find that the injected impurity undergoes a stuttering motion as it moves and expands. For an initially stationary impurity, the interaction-driven formation of a quasibound state with a hole in the background gas leads to arrested expansion—a period of quasistationary behavior. When the impurity is injected with a finite center-of-mass momentum, the impurity moves through the background gas in a snaking manner, arising from a quantum Newton's cradlelike scenario where momentum is exchanged back and forth between the impurity and the background gas.

  20. Prediction of a neutral noble gas compound in the triplet state.

    PubMed

    Manna, Debashree; Ghosh, Ayan; Ghanty, Tapan K

    2015-05-26

    Discovery of the HArF molecule associated with H-Ar covalent bonding [Nature, 2000, 406, 874-876] has revolutionized the field of noble gas chemistry. In general, this class of noble gas compound involving conventional chemical bonds exists as closed-shell species in a singlet electronic state. For the first time, in a bid to predict neutral noble gas chemical compounds in their triplet electronic state, we have carried out a systematic investigation of xenon inserted FN and FP species by using quantum chemical calculations with density functional theory and various post-Hartree-Fock-based correlated methods, including the multireference configuration interaction technique. The FXeP and FXeN species are predicted to be stable by all the computational methods employed in the present work, such as density functional theory (DFT), second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), coupled-cluster theory (CCSD(T)), and multireference configuration interaction (MRCI). For the purpose of comparison we have also included the Kr-inserted compounds of FN and FP species. Geometrical parameters, dissociation energies, transition-state barrier heights, atomic charge distributions, vibrational frequency data, and atoms-in-molecules properties clearly indicate that it is possible to experimentally realize the most stable state of FXeP and FXeN molecules, which is triplet in nature, through the matrix isolation technique under cryogenic conditions.

  1. Emission and afterglow properties of an expanding RF plasma with nonuniform neutral gas density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-08-01

    We describe some notable aspects of the light emission and afterglow properties in pulsed, high-density ( 1018-1020 m-3 ) argon inductively coupled discharges initiated following fast gas injection. The plasma was created in a long, narrow discharge tube and then expanded downstream of the radiofrequency (RF) antenna into a large chamber. Fast camera images of the expanding plasma revealed a multi-phase time-dependent emission pattern that did not follow the ion density distribution. Dramatic differences in visible brightness were observed between discharges with and without an externally applied magnetic field. These phenomena were studied by tracking excited state populations using passive emission spectroscopy and are discussed in terms of the distinction between ionizing and recombining phase plasmas. Additionally, a method is presented for inferring the unknown neutral gas pressure in the discharge tube from the time-dependent visible and infrared emission measured by a simple photodiode placed near the antenna. In magnetized discharges created with fast gas injection, the downstream ion density rose by Δni˜1018 m-3 in the first ˜100 μs after the RF power was turned off. The conditions conducive to this afterglow density rise are investigated in detail, and the effect is tentatively attributed to pooling ionization.

  2. Inhibition of Coherence in Trapped Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Imamoglu, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    1997-03-01

    We analyze the dependence of the collapse and revival of many-atom coherence of a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate on the trap potential, dimensionality of the gas, and atom number fluctuations. We show that in a class of experimentally relevant systems the collapse time vanishes in the limit of a large number of atoms, implying that the trapped Bose gas cannot sustain a well-defined quantum phase. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. On the oxygen abundance of neutral gas in I ZW 18.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettini, M.; Lipman, K.

    1995-05-01

    Whether the H II regions of dwarf emission line galaxies are self-polluted by the nucleosynthetic products of massive stars remains an open question, despite recent claims to the contrary. We show that the finding by Kunth and collaborators that the neutral interstellar medium of I Zw 18 has a metallicity one order of magnitude lower than that of the ionized gas is highly uncertain. The range of possible values of (O/H) admitted by the saturated O I absorption line used in their analysis is very large, spanning a factor of ~1000. We suggest that future observations of the intrinsically weaker S II λ1256 multiplet offer the best prospects for measuring the true degree of metal enrichment of this dwarf galaxy.

  4. Diagnosing the Neutral Interstellar Gas Flow at 1 AU with IBEX-Lo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möbius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Clark, G.; O'Neill, M.; Petersen, L.; Bzowski, M.; Saul, L.; Wurz, P.; Fuselier, S. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; McComas, D. J.; Müller, H. R.; Alexashov, D. B.

    2009-08-01

    Every year in fall and spring the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) will observe directly the interstellar gas flow at 1 AU over periods of several months. The IBEX-Lo sensor employs a powerful triple time-of-flight mass spectrometer. It can distinguish and image the O and He flow distributions in the northern fall and spring, making use of sensor viewing perpendicular to the Sun-pointing spin axis. To effectively image the narrow flow distributions IBEX-Lo has a high angular resolution quadrant in its collimator. This quadrant is employed selectively for the interstellar gas flow viewing in the spring by electrostatically shutting off the remainder of the aperture. The operational scenarios, the expected data, and the necessary modeling to extract the interstellar parameters and the conditions in the heliospheric boundary are described. The combination of two key interstellar species will facilitate a direct comparison of the pristine interstellar flow, represented by He, which has not been altered in the heliospheric boundary region, with a flow that is processed in the outer heliosheath, represented by O. The O flow distribution consists of a depleted pristine component and decelerated and heated neutrals. Extracting the latter so-called secondary component of interstellar neutrals will provide quantitative constraints for several important parameters of the heliosheath interaction in current global heliospheric models. Finding the fraction and width of the secondary component yields an independent value for the global filtration factor of species, such as O and H. Thus far filtration can only be inferred, barring observations in the local interstellar cloud proper. The direction of the secondary component will provide independent information on the interstellar magnetic field strength and orientation, which has been inferred from SOHO SWAN Ly- α backscattering observations and the two Voyager crossings of the termination shock.

  5. Spatial distribution of interstellar dust in the Sun's vicinity. Comparison with neutral sodium-bearing gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergely, J.-L.; Valette, B.; Lallement, R.; Raimond, S.

    2010-07-01

    Aims: 3D tomography of the interstellar dust and gas may be useful in many respects, from the physical and chemical evolution of the interstellar medium itself to foreground decontamination of the cosmic microwave background, or various studies of the environments of specific objects. However, while spectral data cubes of the galactic emission become increasingly precise, the information on the distance to the emitting regions has not progressed as well and relies essentially on the galactic rotation curve. Our goal here is to bring more precise information on the distance to nearby interstellar dust and gas clouds within 250 pc. Methods: We apply the best available calibration methods to a carefully screened set of stellar Strömgren photometry data for targets possessing a Hipparcos parallax and spectral type classification. We combine the derived interstellar extinctions and the parallax distances for about 6000 stars to build a 3D tomography of the local dust. We use an inversion method based on a regularized Bayesian approach and a least squares criterion, optimized for this specific data set. We apply the same inversion technique to a totally independent set of neutral sodium absorption data available for about 1700 target stars. Results: We obtain 3D maps of the opacity and the distance to the main dust-bearing clouds within 250 pc and identify in those maps well-known dark clouds and high galactic more diffuse entities. We calculate the integrated extinction between the Sun and the cube boundary and compare this with the total galactic extinction derived from infrared 2D maps. The two quantities reach similar values at high latitudes, as expected if the local dust content is satisfyingly reproduced and the dust is closer than 250 pc. Those maps show a larger high latitude dust opacity in the North compared to the South, reinforcing earlier evidences. Interestingly the gas maps do not show the same asymmetry, suggesting a polar asymmetry of the dust to gas

  6. Early Observations of the Upper Atmosphere and Ionosphere of Mars by MAVEN’s Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benna, Mehdi; Mahaffy, Paul R.; Elrod, Meredith

    2015-04-01

    The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) Mission is designed to characterize the source region of escaping atoms in the upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. The NGIMS instrument is a quadrupole analyzer with a mass rang of 2-150 Da. It utilizes a dual ion source in order to measure both surface reactive neutrals (using the Open Source Neutral mode - OSN), inert neutrals (using the Closed Source Neutral mode - CSN), and thermal ions (using the Open Source Ion mode - OSI) at altitudes below 500 km.In the first few months of the MAVEN mission, NGIMS alternated on sequential orbits between measurement sequences that focus on fully characterizing neutral species (using the CSN/OSN modes) and ions (using the CSN/OSI modes). The collected data revealed the substantial structure present in both neutral and ion densities with spatial scales of hundreds of kilometers along the spacecraft track. The data also brought to light the sharp contrast between the day side and night side atmospheric profiles of neutrals and ions in both total density and relative abundance.

  7. Effect of neutral gas heating on the wave magnetic fields of a low pressure 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled argon discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K. Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2014-04-15

    The axial and radial magnetic field profiles in a 13.56 MHz (radio frequency) laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor are simulated with the consideration of the effect of neutral gas heating. Spatially resolved electron densities, electron temperatures, and neutral gas temperatures were obtained for simulation using empirically fitted electron density and electron temperature and heuristically determined neutral gas temperature. Comparison between simulated results and measured fields indicates that neutral gas heating plays an important role in determining the skin depth of the magnetic fields.

  8. Effect of neutral gas heating on the wave magnetic fields of a low pressure 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled argon discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2014-04-01

    The axial and radial magnetic field profiles in a 13.56 MHz (radio frequency) laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor are simulated with the consideration of the effect of neutral gas heating. Spatially resolved electron densities, electron temperatures, and neutral gas temperatures were obtained for simulation using empirically fitted electron density and electron temperature and heuristically determined neutral gas temperature. Comparison between simulated results and measured fields indicates that neutral gas heating plays an important role in determining the skin depth of the magnetic fields.

  9. A Field-Reversed Configuration Plasma Translated into a Neutral Gas Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Jun'ichi; Asai, Tomohiko; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Ando, Hirotoshi; Arai, Mamiko; Katayama, Seri; Takahashi, Toshiki

    2014-10-01

    A field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a compact toroid dominantly with poloidal magnetic field. Because of its simply-connected configuration, an FRC can be translated axially along a gradient of guide magnetic field, and trapped in a confinement region with quasi-static external magnetic field. FRC translation experiments have been performed several facilities. Translation speed of those translated FRCs is comparable with super-Alfvenic speed of approximately 200 km/s. In this experiments, FRC translation has been performed on the FAT (FRC Amplification via Translation) facility. Achieved translation speed in the case of translation into a confinement chamber maintained as the vacuum state is in the range from 130 to 210 km/s. On the other hand, FRC translation into a statically filled deuterium gas atmosphere has also been performed. In the case of translation into filled neutral gas, FRC translation speed is approximately 80 km/s and the separatrix volume has extremely expanded compared with the case of a vacuum state. The phenomenon suggests the presence of regeneration process of translation kinetic energy back into the internal plasma energy during the translation process. This work was partially supported by ``Nihon University Symbolic Project.'' The authors gratefully acknowledge contributions from Nac Image Technology Inc. on the fast camera measurements.

  10. Extreme ultraviolet emission from laser-induced plasma relevance to neutral gas environment simulation in LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, Masahito; Kimoto, Yugo; Yokota, Kumiko; Ohira, Junki; Watanabe, Daiki; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    The reaction mechanism of atomic oxygen (AO) in low Earth orbit (LEO) with spacecraft materials has been studied by ground-based experiments using laser-detonation hyperthermal beam source, which enables to accelerate the electrically neutral AO up to 8 km/s. However, the beam conditions in the laser-detonation sources could not fully duplicate the AO environment in space. The difference in beam condition including side products leads to the different material responses. The light emission from the laser-induced oxygen plasma may affect the erosion of ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive materials. However, the light emission could also be used as a diagnostic tool to understand the molecular processes in plasma. In this presentation, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission from the laser-induced plasma during AO test was evaluated by the flat field EUV spectrometer. Many emission lines between 25-40 nm originated from OII and OIII were observed from the laser-induced oxygen plasma. This result suggested multiple-charged O ions are generated in the laser-induced plasma. Promotion of oxygen dissociation effect by adding Ar in the target gas was explained by the energy transfer processes from Ar to O2 in the plasma. From the viewpoint of reducing the side products in the AO exposure tests, a method to reduce the EUV emission will also be investigated. These results could be used for establishing more accurate ground-based natural gas simulations on the space environmental effect of materials.

  11. Quantum phase transition of a Bose gas in a lattice with a controlled number of atoms per site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xu

    2005-05-01

    We have studied the superfluid-Mott insulator quantum phase transition [1] of a gas of ^87Rb atoms in an optical lattice. We are able to prepare the gas with a controllable number of one, two, or three atoms per lattice site, as verified with photoassociation spectroscopy. We measure momentum distributions using standard time-of-flight imaging techniques. These are similar to those of ref. [1], and exhibit narrow peaks at moderate lattice strengths. We find that the width of these peaks increases for lattice heights greater than about 13 times the recoil energy [2], and we observe interesting differences in this behavior, depending on the number of atoms per site. The data suggest that the quantum phase transition occurs at higher lattice strength with larger site occupation. We acknowledge the support of this work by the R. A. Welch Foundation, The N. S. F., and the D.O.E. Quantum Optics Initiative. [1] Markus Greiner et al., Nature 415, 39 (2002). [2] Thilo St"oferle et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 130403 (2004).

  12. Metal enrichment of the neutral gas of blue compact dwarf galaxies: the compelling case of Pox 36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebouteiller, V.; Kunth, D.; Thuan, T. X.; Désert, J. M.

    2009-02-01

    Context: Evidence has grown over the past few years that the neutral phase of blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies may be metal-deficient as compared to the ionized gas of their H ii regions. These results have strong implications for our understanding of the chemical evolution of galaxies, and it is essential to strengthen the method, as well as to find possible explanations. Aims: We present the analysis of the interstellar spectrum of Pox 36 with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Pox 36 was selected because of the relatively low foreground gas content that makes it possible to detect absorption-lines weak enough that unseen components should not be saturated. Methods: Interstellar lines of H i, N i, O i, Si ii, P ii, Ar i, and Fe ii are detected. Column densities are derived directly from the observed line profiles except for H i, whose lines are contaminated by stellar absorption, thus needing the stellar continuum to be removed. We used the TLUSTY models to remove the stellar continuum and isolate the interstellar component. The best fit indicates that the dominant stellar population is B0. The observed far-UV flux agrees with an equivalent number of ~300 B0 stars. The fit of the interstellar H i line gives a column density of 1020.3±0.4 cm-2. Chemical abundances were then computed from the column densities using the dominant ionization stage in the neutral gas. Our abundances are compared to those measured from emission-line spectra in the optical, probing the ionized gas of the H ii regions. Results: Our results suggest that the neutral gas of Pox 36 is metal-deficient by a factor ~7 as compared to the ionized gas, and they agree with a metallicity of ≈1/35 Z_⊙. Elemental depletion is not problematic because of the low dust content along the selected lines of sight. In contrast, the ionized gas shows a clear depletion pattern, with iron being strongly depleted. Conclusions: The abundance discontinuity between the neutral and ionized phases

  13. Modelling the interaction between the plasma and the neutral gas in a pulsed glow discharge in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Guiberteau, E.; Bonhomme, G.; Zoheir, C.

    1995-12-31

    We present here the first results obtained from the modelling of a pulsed glow discharge in nitrogen, taking into account the heat transfer to the neutral gas. The aim of modelling is to optimize the plasma process in a nitriding reactor. The iron sample to be nitrided forms the cathode of the glow discharge at low pressure (100 to 200 Pa). The reactor uses two disks of diameter 50 mm as electrodes with a 40 mm gap. It works in a pulsed regime (cycle period varies from 10 to 100 ms) with a discharge duration which can be varied from 0.5 to 10 ms. Experimental studies have been carried out using emission spectroscopy resolved in space (1 mm) and time (1 {mu}s), under various discharge and post-discharge durations. These studies have shown the important effect of energy transfer from the discharge to the neutral gas. In fact this transfer produces an expansion of the negative glow observed when the post-discharge duration is decreased. A realistic modelling should thus be performed bearing in mind that the neutral gas behaves not as a thermostat. Consequently the thermal and hydrodynamic evolution of the neutral gas must be considered in the whole modelling.

  14. Ground state energy of the δ-Bose and Fermi gas at weak coupling from double extrapolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prolhac, Sylvain

    2017-04-01

    We consider the ground state energy of the Lieb–Liniger gas with δ interaction in the weak coupling regime γ \\to 0 . For bosons with repulsive interaction, previous studies gave the expansion {{e}\\text{B}}≤ft(γ \\right)≃ γ -4{γ3/2}/3π +≤ft(1/6-1/{π2}\\right){γ2} . Using a numerical solution of the Lieb–Liniger integral equation discretized with M points and finite strength γ of the interaction, we obtain very accurate numerics for the next orders after extrapolation on M and γ. The coefficient of {γ5/2} in the expansion is found to be approximately equal to -0.001 587 699 865 505 944 989 29 , accurate within all digits shown. This value is supported by a numerical solution of the Bethe equations with N particles, followed by extrapolation on N and γ. It was identified as ≤ft(3\\zeta (3)/8-1/2\\right)/{π3} by G Lang. The next two coefficients are also guessed from the numerics. For balanced spin 1/2 fermions with attractive interaction, the best result so far for the ground state energy has been {{e}\\text{F}}≤ft(γ \\right)≃ {π2}/12-γ /2+{γ2}/6 . An analogue double extrapolation scheme leads to the value -\\zeta (3)/{π4} for the coefficient of {γ3} .

  15. Bcs-Bose Crossover Picture for a 2d Electron Gas with a Finite-Range Attractive Interfermion Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís, Miguel A.; Sevilla, Francisco J.; Fortes, Mauricio; de Llano, Manuel

    2002-03-01

    Cooper pair formation is studied in a 2D electron gas interacting pairwise through a finite-range, separable interfermion potential in wavevector space V_ kk^' =-(v_0/L^2)g_kg_k^' , where L^2 is the system area, v0 >= 0 the interaction strength, g_k≡ (1+k^2/k_0^2)-1/2 with k0 the inverse interaction range. The interaction strength v0 is eliminated [1] in favor of the (positive) binding energy B2 of an electron pair in vacuum under the same interfermion interaction. For finite range, i.e., 1/k_0>0, we report numerical calculations of the gap, the critical temperature and the chemical potential as functions of B2 and 1/k_0. For k_0= ∞ or zero-range (viz., a delta potential well) we recover at T=0 the well-known Miyake [2] results. Finally, the gap-to-Tc ratio is exhibited as a function of B2 and compared with other calculations as well as with empirical values for cuprate superconductors. [1] S.K. Adhikari, M. Casas, A. Puente, A. Rigo, M. Fortes, M.A. Solís, M. de Llano, A.A. Valladares and O. Rojo, Phys. Rev. B 62, 8671 (2000). [2] K. Miyake, Prog. Theor. Phys. 69, 1794 (1983). We thank UNAM-DGAPA-PAPIIT # IN102198 and CONACyT # 27828E for partial support.

  16. Condensate fluctuations of interacting Bose gases within a microcanonical ensemble.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhui; He, Jizhou; Ma, Yongli

    2011-05-01

    Based on counting statistics and Bogoliubov theory, we present a recurrence relation for the microcanonical partition function for a weakly interacting Bose gas with a finite number of particles in a cubic box. According to this microcanonical partition function, we calculate numerically the distribution function, condensate fraction, and condensate fluctuations for a finite and isolated Bose-Einstein condensate. For ideal and weakly interacting Bose gases, we compare the condensate fluctuations with those in the canonical ensemble. The present approach yields an accurate account of the condensate fluctuations for temperatures close to the critical region. We emphasize that the interactions between excited atoms turn out to be important for moderate temperatures.

  17. Condensate fluctuations of interacting Bose gases within a microcanonical ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianhui; He Jizhou; Ma Yongli

    2011-05-15

    Based on counting statistics and Bogoliubov theory, we present a recurrence relation for the microcanonical partition function for a weakly interacting Bose gas with a finite number of particles in a cubic box. According to this microcanonical partition function, we calculate numerically the distribution function, condensate fraction, and condensate fluctuations for a finite and isolated Bose-Einstein condensate. For ideal and weakly interacting Bose gases, we compare the condensate fluctuations with those in the canonical ensemble. The present approach yields an accurate account of the condensate fluctuations for temperatures close to the critical region. We emphasize that the interactions between excited atoms turn out to be important for moderate temperatures.

  18. Bose-Einstein condensate strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harko, Tiberiu; Lake, Matthew J.

    2015-02-01

    We consider the possible existence of gravitationally bound general relativistic strings consisting of Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) matter which is described, in the Newtonian limit, by the zero temperature time-dependent nonlinear Schrödinger equation (the Gross-Pitaevskii equation), with repulsive interparticle interactions. In the Madelung representation of the wave function, the quantum dynamics of the condensate can be formulated in terms of the classical continuity equation and the hydrodynamic Euler equations. In the case of a condensate with quartic nonlinearity, the condensates can be described as a gas with two pressure terms, the interaction pressure, which is proportional to the square of the matter density, and the quantum pressure, which is without any classical analogue, though, when the number of particles in the system is high enough, the latter may be neglected. Assuming cylindrical symmetry, we analyze the physical properties of the BEC strings in both the interaction pressure and quantum pressure dominated limits, by numerically integrating the gravitational field equations. In this way we obtain a large class of stable stringlike astrophysical objects, whose basic parameters (mass density and radius) depend sensitively on the mass and scattering length of the condensate particle, as well as on the quantum pressure of the Bose-Einstein gas.

  19. Edge Charge Neutralization of Clay for Improved Oxygen Gas Barrier in Multilayer Nanobrick Wall Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Song, Yixuan; Hagen, David A; Qin, Shuang; Holder, Kevin M; Falke, Kyle; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2016-12-21

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled polymer-clay multilayer thin films are known to provide transparent and flexible gas barrier. In an effort to further lower the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of these nanobrick wall thin films, sodium chloride was introduced into montmorillonite (MMT) suspension as an "indifferent electrolyte". At pH 6.5 the amphoteric edge sites of MMT have a neutral net charge, and a moderate concentration of NaCl effectively shields the charge from neighboring platelets, allowing van der Waals forces to attract the edges to one another. This edge-to-edge bonding creates a much more tortuous path for diffusing oxygen molecules. An eight-bilayer (BL) polyethylenimine (PEI)/MMT multilayer coating (∼50 nm thick), assembled with 5 mM NaCl in the aqueous clay suspension, exhibited an order of magnitude reduction in oxygen permeability (∼4 × 10(-20) cm(3)·cm/(cm(2)·Pa·s)) relative to its salt-free counterpart. This result represents the best barrier among polymer-clay bilayer systems, which is also lower than SiOx or AlxOy thin films. At higher NaCl concentration, the strong charge screening causes edge-to-face bonding among MMT nanoplatelets, which leads to misalignment in assembled films and increased OTR. This "salty-clay" strategy provides an efficient way to produce better multilayer oxygen barrier thin films by altering ionic strength of the MMT suspension. This simple modification reduces the number of layers necessary for high gas barrier, potentially making these multilayer films interesting for commercial packaging applications.

  20. The Neutral Gas Desorption and Breakdown on a Metal-Dielectric Junction Immersed in a Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vayner, Boris; Galofaro, Joel; Ferguson, Dale; Lyons, Valerie J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    New results are presented of an experimental study and theoretical analysis of arcing on metal-dielectric junctions immersed in a low-density plasma. Two samples of conventional solar arrays have been used to investigate the effects of arcing within a wide range of neutral gas pressures, ion currents, and electron number densities. All data (except video) were obtained in digital form that allowed us to study the correlation between external parameters (plasma density, additional capacitance, bias voltage, etc) and arc characteristics (arc rate, arc current pulse width and amplitude, gas species partial pressures, intensities of spectral lines, and so on). Arc sites were determined by employing a video-camera, and it is shown that the most probable sites for arc inception are trip le-junctions, even though some arcs were initiated in gaps between cells. The effect of surface conditioning (decrease of arc rate due to outgassing) was clearly demonstrated. Moreover, a considerable increase in arc rate due to absorption of molecules from atmospheric air has been confirmed. The analysis of optical spectra (240-800 nm) reveals intense narrow atomic lines (Ag, H) and wide molecular bands (OH, CH, SiH, SiN) that confirm a complicated mechanism of arc plasma generation. The rate of plasma contamination due to arcing was measured by employing a mass-spectrometer. These measurements provided quite reliable data for the development of a theoretical model of plasma contamination, In conclusion, the arc threshold was increased to above 350 V (from 190 V) by keeping a sample in vacuum (20 micronTorr) for seven days. The results obtained are important for the understanding of the arc inception mechanism, which is absolutely essential for progress toward the design of high voltage solar arrays for space applications.

  1. Three-body physics in quenched unitary Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Incao, Jose P.; Sykes, Andrew G.; Corson, John P.; Koller, Andrew P.; Greene, Chris H.; Rey, Ana M.; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.; Bohn, John L.

    2014-05-01

    A degenerate Bose gas, quenched to unitarity, displays rapid losses that are attributed to three-body recombination. The rate at which this occurs is an item of keen interest in producing and probing a unitary Bose gas. In this work we explore the three-body physics relevant for unitary Bose gases using the hyperspherical adiabatic representation and determine the population of Efimov states formed during the quench and their subsequent decay rate by assuming a local interaction model in which a harmonic potential mimics the finite density of other particles. Our findings, consistent with experiments at JILA, indicate that the three-body loss time scales are generally longer than the system's equilibration time, therefore bolstering this scheme as an efficient route to create and explore the dynamics of unitary Bose gases. Supported by National Science Foundation, AFOSR-MURI, ARO-MURI, NDSEG and NRC.

  2. Investigating the Neutral-Gas Manometers in the Wendelstein 7-X Experimental Fusion Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisano-Brown, Jeannette; Wenzel, Uwe; Sunn-Pederson, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The neutral-gas manometer is a powerful diagnostic tool used in the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, a magnetized fusion experiment located in Germany. The Wendelstein, produced at a cost of 1.2 billion euros, and 20 years in the making, had its first experimental results in Winter 2016. Initial findings exceeded expectations but further study is still necessary. The particular instrument we examined was a hot-cathode ionization gauge, critical for attaining a quality in-vessel environment and a stable plasma. However, after the winter operation of Wendelstein, we found that some of the gauges had failed the six-second (maximum) plasma runs. Wendelstein is on track for 30-minute operations within three years, so it has become of utmost importance to scrutinize gauge design claims. We therefore subjected the devices to high magnetic field, input current, and temperature, as well as to long operational periods. Our results confirmed that the manometer cannot survive a 30-minute run. Though our findings did motivate promising recommendations for design improvement and for further experimentation so that the gauge can be ready for upcoming operations in Summer 2017 and eventual installment in ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, currently under construction. This research was graciously supported by the Max Planck Institute and the MIT-Germany Initiative.

  3. Neutral Gas Temperature Estimates in an Inductively Coupled CF4 Plasma by Fitting Diatomic Emission Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, M.

    2001-01-01

    This work examines the accuracy of plasma neutral temperature estimates by fitting the rotational band envelope of different diatomic species in emission. Experiments are performed in an inductively coupled CF4 plasma generated in a Gaseous Electronics Conference reference cell. Visible and ultraviolet emission spectra are collected at a power of 300 W (approximately 0.7 W/cc) and pressure of 30 mtorr. The emission bands of several molecules (CF, CN, C2, CO, and SiF) are fit simultaneously for rotational and vibrational temperatures and compared. Four different rotational temperatures are obtained: 1250 K for CF and CN, 1600 K for CO, 1800 K for C2, and 2300 K for SiF. The vibrational temperatures obtained vary from 1750-5950 K, with the higher vibrational temperatures generally corresponding to the lower rotational temperatures. These results suggest that the different species have achieved different degrees of equilibration between the rotational and vibrational modes and may not be equilibrated with the translational temperatures. The different temperatures are also related to the likelihood that the species are produced by ion bombardment of the surface, with etch products like SiF, CO, and C2 having higher temperatures than species expected to have formed in the gas phase.

  4. A Tetrapositive Metal Ion in the Gas Phase: Thorium(IV) Coordinated by Neutral Tridentate Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; Hu, Han-Shi; Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng; Li, Jun; Gibson, John K.

    2013-07-01

    ESI of 1:1 mixtures of Th(ClO₄)₄ and ligand TMOGA in acetonitrile resulted in the observation of the TMOGA supported tetracation, Th(L)₃⁴⁺, in the gas phase. Three TMOGA ligands are necessary to stabilize the tetrapositive thorium ion; no Th(L)₂⁴⁺ or Th(L)₄⁴⁺ was observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that the Th(L)₃⁴⁺ complex possesses C₃ symmetry with the thorium center coordinated by nine oxygen atoms from three ligands, which forms a twisted TPP geometry. Actinide compounds with such a geometry feature a nine-coordinate chiral actinide center. The Th-L binding energy and bond orders of Th(L)n⁴⁺ decrease as the coordination number increases, consistent with the trend of concurrently increasing Th-O distances. The Th-O bonding is mainly electrostatic in nature, but the covalent interactions are not negligible. CID of the Th(L)₃⁴⁺ complex mainly resulted in charge reduction to form Th(L)₂(L-86)³⁺oss of neutral TMOGA was not observed. The protic ligand methanol stabilized only tri- and dications of ligated thorium. The intensity of the Th(L)₃⁴⁺ peak was reduced as the percentage of water increased in the Th(ClO₄)₄/TMOGA solution.

  5. A World of Bose Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sudarshan, E. C. G.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a four page paper written by S. Bose who helped found quantum statistics. The consequences of the paper to modern physics are presented. Contrasted are the scientific relationships of Einstein, Dirac, and Bose. (GH)

  6. Collision Experiment of an Arched Plasma-Filled Flux Rope and a Target Cloud of Initially Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongwaitayakornkul, Pakorn; Bellan, Paul; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai

    2016-10-01

    Shocks occur in the co-rotating interaction regions just beyond the solar corona, in the corona during CME events, and when the solar wind impacts Earth's magnetosphere. The Caltech solar loop experiment investigates shock physics by creating an arched plasma-filled flux rope that expands to collide with a pre-injected, initially-neutral gas. We focus the investigation on the situation of a heavy-gas plasma (Argon) impacting a much lighter neutral gas cloud (Hydrogen). The neutral gas target cloud ionizes immediately upon being impacted and plasma-induced shock waves propagate in the target cloud away from the impact region. Analysis of data from magnetic probes, Langmuir probes, a fast camera, and spectroscopic measurements will be presented. The measurements suggest that a thin, compressed, ionized layer of hydrogen is formed just downstream of the Argon plasma loop and that thin, supersonic shocks form further downstream and propagate obliquely away from the plasma loop. Numerical simulation of an ideal MHD plasma is underway to enable comparison of the measurements with the predictions of MHD theory.

  7. The neutral gas extent of galaxies as derived from weak intervening Ca ii absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, P.; Krause, F.; Fechner, C.; Charlton, J. C.; Murphy, M. T.

    2011-04-01

    We present a systematic study of weak intervening Ca ii absorbers at low redshift (z < 0.5), based on the analysis of archival high-resolution (R ≥ 45 000) optical spectra of 304 quasars and active galactic nuclei observed with VLT/UVES. Along a total redshift path of Δz ≈ 100 we detected 23 intervening Ca ii absorbers in both the Ca ii H & K lines, with rest frame equivalent widths Wr,3934 = 15-799 mÅ and column densities log N(Ca ii) = 11.25-13.04 (obtained by fitting Voigt-profile components). We obtain a bias-corrected number density of weak intervening Ca ii absorbers of {d{N}/dz=0.117 ± 0.044} at ⟨zabs⟩ = 0.35 for absorbers with log N(Ca ii) ≥ 11.65 (Wr,3934 ≥ 32 mÅ). This is 2.6 times the value obtained for damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) at low redshift. All Ca ii absorbers in our sample show associated absorption by other low ions such as Mg ii and Fe ii; 45 percent of them have associated Na i absorption. From ionization modelling we conclude that intervening Ca ii absorption with log N(Ca ii) ≥ 11.5 arises in DLAs, sub-DLAs and Lyman-limit systems (LLS) at H i column densities of log N(H i) ≥ 17.4. Using supplementary H i information for nine of the absorbers we find that the Ca ii/H i ratio decreases strongly with increasing H i column density, indicating a column-density-dependent dust depletion of Ca. The observed column density distribution function of Ca ii absorption components follows a relatively steep power law, f(N) ∝ N - β, with a slope of - β = -1.68, which again points towards an enhanced dust depletion in high column density systems. The relatively large cross section of these absorbers together with the frequent detection of Ca ii absorption in high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in the halo of the Milky Way suggests that a considerable fraction of the intervening Ca ii systems trace (partly) neutral gas structures in the halos and circumgalactic environment of galaxies (i.e., they are HVC analogs). Based on the recently

  8. Four-fluid MHD simulations of the plasma and neutral gas environment of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko near perihelion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhenguang; Tóth, Gábor; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Jia, Xianzhe; Rubin, Martin; Fougere, Nicolas; Tenishev, Valeriy; Combi, Michael R.; Bieler, Andre; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Shou, Yinsi; Altwegg, Kathrin

    2016-05-01

    The neutral and plasma environment is critical in understanding the interaction of the solar wind and comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG), the target of the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission. To serve this need and support the Rosetta mission, we have developed a 3-D four-fluid model, which is based on BATS-R-US (Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme) within SWMF (Space Weather Modeling Framework) that solves the governing multifluid MHD equations and the Euler equations for the neutral gas fluid. These equations describe the behavior and interactions of the cometary heavy ions, the solar wind protons, the electrons, and the neutrals. This model incorporates different mass loading processes, including photoionization and electron impact ionization, charge exchange, dissociative ion-electron recombination, and collisional interactions between different fluids. We simulated the plasma and neutral gas environment near perihelion in three different cases: an idealized comet with a spherical body and uniform neutral gas outflow, an idealized comet with a spherical body and illumination-driven neutral gas outflow, and comet CG with a realistic shape model and illumination-driven neutral gas outflow. We compared the results of the three cases and showed that the simulations with illumination-driven neutral gas outflow have magnetic reconnection, a magnetic pileup region and nucleus directed plasma flow inside the nightside reconnection region, which have not been reported in the literature.

  9. Blue-sky bifurcation of ion energies and the limits of neutral-gas sympathetic cooling of trapped ions

    PubMed Central

    Schowalter, Steven J.; Dunning, Alexander J.; Chen, Kuang; Puri, Prateek; Schneider, Christian; Hudson, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic cooling of trapped ions through collisions with neutral buffer gases is critical to a variety of modern scientific fields, including fundamental chemistry, mass spectrometry, nuclear and particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics. Despite its widespread use over four decades, there remain open questions regarding its fundamental limitations. To probe these limits, here we examine the steady-state evolution of up to 10 barium ions immersed in a gas of three-million laser-cooled calcium atoms. We observe and explain the emergence of nonequilibrium behaviour as evidenced by bifurcations in the ion steady-state temperature, parameterized by ion number. We show that this behaviour leads to the limitations in creating and maintaining translationally cold samples of trapped ions using neutral-gas sympathetic cooling. These results may provide a route to studying non-equilibrium thermodynamics at the atomic level. PMID:27511602

  10. Flowing afterglow measurements of the density dependence of gas-phase ion-ion mutual neutralization reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Johnsen, Rainer

    2013-05-28

    We have studied the dependence of several ion-ion mutual neutralization (MN) reactions on helium density in the range from 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} to 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} at 300 K, using the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry method. The rate coefficients of the reactions Ar{sup +}+ Br{sub 2}{sup -}, Ar{sup +}+ SF{sub 6}{sup -}, and Ar{sup +}+ C{sub 7}F{sub 14}{sup -} were found to be independent of gas density over the range studied, in disagreement with earlier observations that similar MN reactions are strongly enhanced at the same gas densities. The cause of the previous enhancement with density is traced to the use of 'orbital-motion-limit' theory to infer ion densities from the currents collected by ion-attracting Langmuir probes in a region where it is not applicable.

  11. Flowing afterglow measurements of the density dependence of gas-phase ion-ion mutual neutralization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Johnsen, Rainer

    2013-05-01

    We have studied the dependence of several ion-ion mutual neutralization (MN) reactions on helium density in the range from 1.6 × 1016 to 1.5 × 1017 cm-3 at 300 K, using the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry method. The rate coefficients of the reactions Ar+ + Br2-, Ar+ + SF6-, and Ar+ + C7F14- were found to be independent of gas density over the range studied, in disagreement with earlier observations that similar MN reactions are strongly enhanced at the same gas densities. The cause of the previous enhancement with density is traced to the use of "orbital-motion-limit" theory to infer ion densities from the currents collected by ion-attracting Langmuir probes in a region where it is not applicable.

  12. Thermodynamic stability of neutral and anionic PFOS: a gas-phase, n-octanol, and water theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Montero-Campillo, M Merced; Mora-Diez, Nelaine; Lamsabhi, Al Mokhtar

    2010-09-23

    The thermodynamic stability of the 89 isomers of the eight-carbon-atom compound perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in their neutral and anionic forms has been studied in the gas phase, n-octanol, and water using density functional theory (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p)). The gas-phase calculations are compared with previous semiempirical and partial ab initio studies; the calculations in water and n-octanol are reported for the first time. The results obtained indicate that the thermodynamic stability assessment of this family of persistent organic pollutants is independent of the environment and type of species (neutral or anionic) considered and that it is important to consider other PFOSs outside of the 83-89 set, which is the most frequently studied.

  13. Mutual Neutralization of Atomic Rare-Gas Cations (Ne+, Ar+, Kr+, Xe+) with Atomic Halide Anions (Cl-, Br-, I-)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-07

    Belvoir, VA 22060-6218 1 cy AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 2 cys Official Record Copy AFRL /RVBXT/Dr. Albert Viggiano 1 cy... AFRL -RV-PS- TP-2015-0001 AFRL -RV-PS- TP-2015-0001 MUTUAL NEUTRALIZATION OF ATOMIC RARE- GAS CATIONS (Ne+, Ar+, Kr+, Xe+) WITH ATOMIC HALIDE...RESEARCH LABORATORY Space Vehicles Directorate 3550 Aberdeen Ave SE AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND KIRTLAND AIR FORCE BASE, NM 87117-5776 REPORT

  14. Gas-phase energies of actinide oxides -- an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium

    SciTech Connect

    Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-08-10

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  15. Gas-Phase Energetics of Actinide Oxides: An Assessment of Neutral and Cationic Monoxides and Dioxides from Thorium to Curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-09-01

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  16. Gas-phase energetics of actinide oxides: an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium.

    PubMed

    Marçalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K

    2009-11-12

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  17. Double ionization effect in electron accelerations by high-intensity laser pulse interaction with a neutral gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandan Gupta, Devki

    2013-11-01

    We study the effect of laser-induced double-ionization of a helium gas (with inhomogeneous density profile) on vacuum electron acceleration. For enough laser intensity, helium gas can be found doubly ionized and it strengthens the divergence of the pulse. The double ionization of helium gas can defocus the laser pulse significantly, and electrons are accelerated by the front of the laser pulse in vacuum and then decelerated by the defocused trail part of the laser pulse. It is observed that the electrons experience a very low laser-intensity at the trailing part of the laser pulse. Hence, there is not much electron deceleration at the trailing part of the pulse. We found that the inhomogeneity of the neutral gas reduced the rate of tunnel ionization causing less defocusing of the laser pulse and thus the electron energy gain is reduced.

  18. Atomtronics with Ultracold Bose Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Herwig

    Neutral atom systems can exhibit similar transport properties like solid state devices. For instance, a neutral atom current is induced by a difference in chemical potential very much in the same way as a voltage drives an electric current. Employing Bose-Einstein condensed atomic gases allows observing superfluid transport phenomena, thus drawing connections to superconductivity. With help of light fields, the atomic current can additionally be guided in engineered potential landscapes in which one can also incorporate tunneling junctions. Eventually, the different components and elements can be integrated in atomtronic circuits which shed light on fundamental transport properties of many-body quantum systems. In this talk, I will present two fundamental atomtronic devices. The first is the observation of negative differential conductivity, which occurs at a multimode tunneling junction for ultracold atoms. The second is the appearance of a DC Josephson current in a biased tunneling junction, which features bistable transport characteristics. I will discuss the prospects of these basic elements for more complex atomtronic circuits.

  19. A simple drift-diffusion model for calculating the neutralization time of H- in xe gas for choppers placed in the LEBT

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yan; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01

    The neutralization of H{sup -} beam with a gas like Xe is an important part of low energy beam transport (LEBT). It is well known that choppers which use an electric field when placed in the LEBT strongly affects the neutralization of H{sup -}. The question then naturally arises as to whether a magnetic chopper has a better neutralization time than an electric chopper. To answer this question, a simple 1-space, 1 time drift-diffusion model of H{sup -} beam in Xe gas has been used to calculate the neutralization times for the following scenarios: (a) a region initially cleared of Xe+ ions with an electric field but partially neutralized outside, (b) a region within and outside the chopper which is initially partially neutralized.

  20. Capillary gas chromatographic analysis of alditol acetates of neutral and amino sugars in bacterial cell walls.

    PubMed

    Fox, A; Morgan, S L; Hudson, J R; Zhu, Z T; Lau, P Y

    1983-02-18

    Several improvements in the preparation of alditol acetates of neutral and amino sugars and in the preparation of glass capillary columns for their separation are described. Modifications in sample preparation permitted the simultaneous processing of multiple samples and eliminated extraneous background peaks. Efficient and inert columns were tailor-made for the separation of alditol acetates of neutral and amino sugars by leaching glass capillaries with aqueous hydrochloric acid and dynamically coating with SP-2330.

  1. Interstellar Neutral Gas Flow Measurements with the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) - Implications on Interstellar Medium and Heliosphere Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, E.; Bochsler, P. A.; Bzowski, M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Heirtzler, D.; Hlond, M.; Kubiak, M.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; Leonard, T.; McComas, D. J.; Saul, L. A.; Schwadron, N. A.; Sokol, J.; Wurz, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes the interstellar neutral gas flow tra-jectories at their perihelion in Earth's orbit every year from December through late March, when the Earth moves into the oncoming flow. Surprisingly, the initial quantita-tive analysis resulted in a somewhat different interstellar flow vector with noticeably lower speed than obtained previously. In comparison with astronomical observations of the flow vectors of neighboring interstellar clouds, this result locates the solar system within the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC), contrary to the previous determination, which indicated values between the LIC and the G-Cloud. This year, the fifth season is being accumulated, providing a database over increasing solar activity and with varying view-ing strategies. These recurring observations of the interstellar flow pattern and its spatial distribution allow us to consolidate the derived physical conditions of the surrounding interstellar medium. We can also track variations in the flow at 1 AU that may arise from solar cycle related changes in ionization and radiation pressure for H and explore any other variations of the neutral gas flow. Based on the angular distributions in latitude and longitude, the neutral flow observations also indicate the presence of a secondary compo-nent for most of the species, which most probably stems from charge exchange with ions in the outer heliosheath. We will review our observations and discuss implications for the LIC and its interaction with the heliosphere in the light of a growing data set and improv-ing analysis techniques.

  2. Bending and turbulent enhancement phenomena of neutral gas flow containing an atmospheric pressure plasma by applying external electric fields measured by schlieren optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiromasa; Yamagishi, Yusuke; Sakakita, Hajime; Tsunoda, Syuichiro; Kasahara, Jiro; Fujiwara, Masanori; Kato, Susumu; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Kim, Jaeho; Kiyama, Satoru; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Ikehara, Sanae; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of turbulent enhancement phenomena of a neutral gas flow containing plasma ejected from the nozzle of plasma equipment, the schlieren optical method was performed to visualize the neutral gas behavior. It was confirmed that the turbulent starting point became closer to the nozzle exit, as the amplitude of discharge voltage (electric field) increased. To study the effect of electric field on turbulent enhancement, two sets of external electrodes were arranged in parallel, and the gas from the nozzle was allowed to flow between the upper and lower electrodes. It was found that the neutral gas flow was bent, and the bending angle increased as the amplitude of the external electric field increased. The results obtained using a simple model analysis roughly coincide with experimental data. These results indicate that momentum transport from drifted ions induced by the electric field to neutral particles is an important factor that enhances turbulence.

  3. Interstellar neutral flow characteristics, composition, and interaction with the heliosphere - neutral gas and pickup ion analysis from ongoing observations and perspectives for IMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, E.; Bzowski, M.; Drews, C.; Frisch, P. C.; Fuselier, S. A.; Galli, A.; Gloeckler, G.; Kubiak, M. A.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; Leonard, T.; McComas, D. J.; Park, J.; Schwadron, N.; Swaczyna, P.; Sokol, J. M.; Wood, B. E.; Wurz, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Sun's motion relative to the surrounding interstellar medium leads to an interstellar neutral (ISN) wind through the heliosphere that is moderately depleted by ionization. This situation allows remote sensing of the ISN through resonant scattering of solar UV and in-situ sampling, first via pickup ions (PUI) and most recently with direct neutral atom imaging. PUI observations have revealed the gravitational focusing cone of interstellar He and Ne as well as the composition of high ionization potential elements. After the first direct ISN He observations with Ulysses GAS, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes with high collecting power the ISN flow trajectories very close to their perihelion in Earth's orbit for H, He, O, and Ne from December through March. Meanwhile, IBEX has recorded seven years of ISN observations, with changing solar activity and varying viewing strategies. These recurring and remarkably repeatable observations allow us to consolidate the derived physical parameters and some key compositional aspects of the interstellar medium. IBEX observations provide a very precise relation between ISN flow longitude and speed via the hyperbolic trajectory equation, but with larger uncertainties separately for longitude and speed. Recent concerted studies have led to a velocity vector that is consistent between IBEX and Ulysses, with a substantially higher temperature than found previously. The fact that the IBEX He and O ISN observations contain a substantial secondary neutral contribution adds complexity to the quantitative analysis of the physical interstellar medium parameters. However, their discovery also provides invaluable insight into the interstellar plasma interaction in the outer heliosheath, which is shaped strongly by the interstellar magnetic field. The longitude range of the IBEX observations limits the precision of the ISN velocity vector. The IBEX collection power and its sensitivity to the Earth's magnetosphere limit

  4. Coupled two-dimensional edge plasma and neutral gas modeling of tokamak scrape-off-layers

    SciTech Connect

    Maingi, R.

    1992-08-01

    The objective of this study is to devise a detailed description of the tokamak scrape-off-layer (SOL), which includes the best available models of both the plasma and neutral species and the strong coupling between the two in many SOL regimes. A good estimate of both particle flux and heat flux profiles at the limiter/divertor target plates is desired. Peak heat flux is one of the limiting factors in determining the survival probability of plasma-facing-components at high power levels. Plate particle flux affects the neutral flux to the pump, which determines the particle exhaust rate. A technique which couples a two-dimensional (2-D) plasma and a 2-D neutral transport code has been developed (coupled code technique), but this procedure requires large amounts of computer time. Relevant physics has been added to an existing two-neutral-species model which takes the SOL plasma/neutral coupling into account in a simple manner (molecular physics model), and this model is compared with the coupled code technique mentioned above. The molecular physics model is benchmarked against experimental data from a divertor tokamak (DIII-D), and a similar model (single-species model) is benchmarked against data from a pump-limiter tokamak (Tore Supra). The models are then used to examine two key issues: free-streaming-limits (ion energy conduction and momentum flux) and the effects of the non-orthogonal geometry of magnetic flux surfaces and target plates on edge plasma parameter profiles.

  5. A new technique for in situ measurement of the composition of neutral gas in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    Neutral atoms in interplanetary space play an important role in many processes relevant to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. An experimental approach is proposed for in situ atom detection based on the conversion of neutral atoms to negative ions at a specially prepared sensitive surface. Negative ions are subsequently analyzed and detected in an essentially noise-free mode. The use of the technique for in situ study of the composition of neutral interstellar atoms is considered. It is shown that interstellar H, D, and O atoms and possibly H2 molecules can be measured by the proposed technique. The experiment can be performed from a high-apogee Earth-orbiting satellite or from a deep space probe. Possible applications of the technique are discussed.

  6. A SEARCH FOR CO-EVOLVING ION AND NEUTRAL GAS SPECIES IN PRESTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Hezareh, Talayeh; Willacy, Karen

    2012-11-20

    A comparison between the widths of ion and neutral molecule spectral lines has been recently used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field in turbulent star-forming regions. However, the ion (HCO{sup +}) and neutral (HCN) species used in such studies may not be necessarily co-evolving at every scale and density, and thus, may not trace the same regions. Here, we use coupled chemical/dynamical models of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores including non-equilibrium chemistry, with and without magnetic fields, to study the spatial distribution of HCO{sup +} and HCN, which have been used in observations of spectral line width differences to date. In addition, we seek new ion-neutral pairs that are good candidates for such observations, because they have similar evolution and are approximately co-spatial in our models. We identify three such good candidate pairs: HCO{sup +}/NO, HCO{sup +}/CO, and NO{sup +}/NO.

  7. Basic Mean-Field Theory for Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevrekidis, P. G.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Carretero-González, R.

    The phenomenon of Bose-Einstein condensation, initially predicted by Bose [1] and Einstein [2, 3] in 1924, refers to systems of particles obeying the Bose statistics. In particular, when a gas of bosonic particles is cooled below a critical transition temperature T c , the particles merge into the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), in which a macroscopic number of particles (typically 103 to 106) share the same quantum state. Bose-Einstein condensation is in fact a quantum phase transition, which is connected to the manifestation of fundamental physical phenomena, such as superfluidity in liquid helium and superconductivity in metals (see, e.g., [4] for a relevant discussion and references). Dilute weakly-interacting BECs were first realized experimentally in 1995 in atomic gases, and specifically in vapors of rubidium [5] and sodium [6]. In the same year, first signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation in vapors of lithium were also reported [7] and were later more systematically confirmed [8]. The significance and importance of the emergence of BECs has been recognized through the 2001 Nobel prize in Physics [9, 10]. During the last years there has been an explosion of interest in the physics of BECs. Today, over fifty experimental groups around the world can routinely produce BECs, while an enormous amount of theoretical work has ensued.

  8. Mutual neutralization of atomic rare-gas cations (Ne+, Ar+, Kr+, Xe+) with atomic halide anions (Cl-, Br-, I-)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Johnsen, Rainer; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2014-01-01

    We report thermal rate coefficients for 12 reactions of rare gas cations (Ne+, Ar+, Kr+, Xe+) with halide anions (Cl-, Br-, I-), comprising both mutual neutralization (MN) and transfer ionization. No rate coefficients have been previously reported for these reactions; however, the development of the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry technique makes it possible to measure the difference of the rate coefficients for pairs of parallel reactions in a Flowing Afterglow-Langmuir Probe apparatus. Measurements of 18 such combinations of competing reaction pairs yield an over-determined data set from which a consistent set of rate coefficients of the 12 MN reactions can be deduced. Unlike rate coefficients of MN reactions involving at least one polyatomic ion, which vary by at most a factor of ˜3, those of the atom-atom reactions vary by at least a factor 60 depending on the species. It is found that the rate coefficients involving light rare-gas ions are larger than those for the heavier rare-gas ions, but the opposite trend is observed in the progression from Cl- to I-. The largest rate coefficient is 6.5 × 10-8 cm3 s-1 for Ne+ with I-. Rate coefficients for Ar+, Kr+, and Xe+ reacting with Br2- are also reported.

  9. Mutual neutralization of atomic rare-gas cations (Ne(+), Ar(+), Kr(+), Xe(+)) with atomic halide anions (Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)).

    PubMed

    Shuman, Nicholas S; Miller, Thomas M; Johnsen, Rainer; Viggiano, Albert A

    2014-01-28

    We report thermal rate coefficients for 12 reactions of rare gas cations (Ne(+), Ar(+), Kr(+), Xe(+)) with halide anions (Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)), comprising both mutual neutralization (MN) and transfer ionization. No rate coefficients have been previously reported for these reactions; however, the development of the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry technique makes it possible to measure the difference of the rate coefficients for pairs of parallel reactions in a Flowing Afterglow-Langmuir Probe apparatus. Measurements of 18 such combinations of competing reaction pairs yield an over-determined data set from which a consistent set of rate coefficients of the 12 MN reactions can be deduced. Unlike rate coefficients of MN reactions involving at least one polyatomic ion, which vary by at most a factor of ∼3, those of the atom-atom reactions vary by at least a factor 60 depending on the species. It is found that the rate coefficients involving light rare-gas ions are larger than those for the heavier rare-gas ions, but the opposite trend is observed in the progression from Cl(-) to I(-). The largest rate coefficient is 6.5 × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1) for Ne(+) with I(-). Rate coefficients for Ar(+), Kr(+), and Xe(+) reacting with Br2 (-) are also reported.

  10. Analytical approach to relaxation dynamics of condensed Bose gases

    SciTech Connect

    Escobedo, Miguel; Pezzotti, Federica; Valle, Manuel

    2011-04-15

    Research Highlights: > Time evolution of perturbations from equilibrium in a condensed Bose gas is studied. > Just below the critical temperature the perturbations vanish algebraically. > Anisotropic perturbations are unstable. > At very low temperature perturbations decay exponentially. - Abstract: The temporal evolution of a perturbation of the equilibrium distribution of a condensed Bose gas is investigated using the kinetic equation which describes collision between condensate and noncondensate atoms. The dynamics is studied in the low momentum limit where an analytical treatment is feasible. Explicit results are given for the behavior at large times in different temperature regimes.

  11. Oscillons in coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shih-Wei; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Liu, I.-Kang; Bradley, Ashton S.; Fialko, Oleksandr; Brand, Joachim

    2015-02-01

    Long-lived, spatially localized, and temporally oscillating nonlinear excitations are predicted by numerical simulation of coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations. These oscillons closely resemble the time-periodic breather solutions of the sine-Gordon equation but decay slowly by radiating Bogoliubov phonons. Their time-dependent profile is closely matched with solutions of the sine-Gordon equation, which emerges as an effective field theory for the relative phase of two linearly coupled Bose fields in the weak-coupling limit. For strong coupling the long-lived oscillons persist and involve both relative and total phase fields. The oscillons decay via Bogoliubov phonon radiation that is increasingly suppressed for decreasing oscillon amplitude. Possibilities for creating oscillons are addressed in atomic gas experiments by collision of oppositely charged Bose-Josephson vortices and direct phase imprinting.

  12. Monte Carlo modeling of neutral gas and dust in the coma of Comet 1P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Martin; Tenishev, Valeriy M.; Combi, Michael R.; Hansen, Kenneth C.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Altwegg, Kathrin; Balsiger, Hans

    2011-06-01

    The neutral gas environment of a comet is largely influenced by dissociation of parent molecules created at the surface of the comet and collisions of all the involved species. We compare the results from a kinetic model of the neutral cometary environment with measurements from the Neutral Mass Spectrometer and the Dust Impact Detection System onboard the Giotto spacecraft taken during the fly-by at Comet 1P/Halley in 1986. We also show that our model is in good agreement with contemporaneous measurements obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer, sounding rocket experiments, and various ground based observations. The model solves the Boltzmann equation with a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo technique (Tenishev, V., Combi, M., Davidsson, B. [2008]. Astrophys. J. 685, 659-677) by tracking trajectories of gas molecules and dust grains under the influence of the comet's weak gravity field with momentum exchange among particles modeled in a probabilistic manner. The cometary nucleus is considered to be the source of dust and the parent species (in our model: H 2O, CO, H 2CO, CO 2, CH 3OH, C 2H 6, C 2H 4, C 2H 2, HCN, NH 3, and CH 4) in the coma. Subsequently our model also tracks the corresponding dissociation products (H, H 2, O, OH, C, CH, CH 2, CH 3, N, NH, NH 2, C 2, C 2H, C 2H 5, CN, and HCO) from the comet's surface all the way out to 10 6 km. As a result we are able to further constrain cometary the gas production rates of CO (13%), CO 2 (2.5%), and H 2CO (1.5%) relative to water without invoking unknown extended sources.

  13. Upper-Thermospheric Observations and Neutral-Gas Dynamics at High Latitudes During Solar Maximum.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    thermosphere is sensitive, vary vith solar activity. These variations effect the global ...While solar - flare effects are of practical importance, the solar phenomenon that routinely controls upper- thermospheric dynamics is the low-energy plasma...Mechanisms in the Thermosphere 2.3.4 Global - Thermospheric Neutral Winds 2.4 Perturbations From the Mean Thermospheric State 2.4.1 Variations in Solar

  14. Modeling the Neutral Gas and Plasma Environment of Jupiter's Moon Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Martin; Tenishev, Valeriy; Hansen, Kenneth; Jia, Xianzhe; Combi, Michael; Gombosi, Tamas

    Jupiter's moon Europa has a thin gravitationally bound neutral atmosphere, which is mostly created through sputtering of high-energy ions impacting on its icy surface. The interaction of Europa with the Jovian magnetosphere is simulated using the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model BATSRUS. We start from the model by Kabin et al. [JGR, Vol. 104, No. A9, (1999)], which accounts for the exospheric mass loading, ion-neutral charge exchange, and ion-electron recombination. The derived magnetic field topology and plasma speeds are used to calculate the Lorentz force for our test particle Monte Carlo model. We use this model to simulate Europa's plasma and neutral environment by tracking particles created on the moon's surface by sputtering or sublimation, through dissociation and/or ionization in the atmosphere, or entering the system from Jupiter's magnetosphere as high energy ions. Neutral particle trajectories are followed by solving the equation of motion in Europa's gravity field whereas the ion population is additionally subject to the Lorentz force. We will show preliminary results of this work with application to the missions to the Jupiter system currently under consideration by NASA (JEO) and ESA (JGO).

  15. Far-IR spectroscopy of the galactic center: Neutral and ionized gas in the central 10 pc of the galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D. J.; Watson, D. M.; Townes, C. H.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Hollenbach, D.; Lester, D. F.; Werner, M.; Storey, J. W. V.

    1983-01-01

    The 3P1 - 3P2 fine structure line emission from neutral atomic oxygen at 63 microns in the vicinity of the galactic center was mapped. The emission is extended over more than 4' (12 pc) along the galactic plane, centered on the position of Sgr A West. The line center velocities show that the O I gas is rotating around the galactic center with an axis close to that of the general galactic rotation, but there appear also to be noncircular motions. The rotational velocity at R is approximately 1 pc corresponds to a mass within the central pc of about 3 x 10(6) solar mass. Between 1 and 6 pc from the center the mass is approximately proportional to radius. The (O I) line probability arises in a predominantly neutral, atomic region immediately outside of the ionized central parsec of out galaxy. Hydrogen densities in the (O I) emitting region are 10(3) to 10(6) cm(-3) and gas temperatures are or = 100 K. The total integrated luminosity radiated in the line is about 10(5) solar luminosity, and is a substantial contribution to the cooling of the gas. Photoelectric heating or heating by ultraviolet excitation of H2 at high densities (10(5) cm(-3)) are promising mechanisms for heating of the gas, but heating due to dissipation of noncircular motions of the gas may be an alternative possibility. The 3P1 - 3P0 fine structure line of (O III) at 88 microns toward Sgr A West was also detected. The (O III) emission comes from high density ionized gas (n 10(4) cm(-3)), and there is no evidence for a medium density region (n 10(3) cm(-3)), such as the ionized halo in Sgr A West deduced from radio observations. This radio halo may be nonthermal, or may consist of many compact, dense clumps of filaments on the inner edges of neutral condensations at R or = 2 pc.

  16. The effect of tailored voltage waveforms on neutral gas heating in a radio-frequency driven electrothermal microthruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Scott; Gibson, Andrew; Boswell, Roderick; Charles, Christine; Dedrick, James

    2016-09-01

    Over the past few decades there has been a growing interest in the development compact sources of electric propulsion. In this study the effect of driving the `Pocket Rocket' radio-frequency electrothermal microthruster with non-sinusoidal voltage waveforms, consisting of multiple harmonics of 13.56 MHz, is investigated using the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM). The results are compared to previous experiments and simulation results using CFD-ACE+ to investigate the potential to generate an increased neutral gas temperature and density in the source. The authors gratefully acknowledge M. Kushner of the University of Michigan for the use of the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM).

  17. Two-component Bose gases under rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Bargi, S.; Kaerkkaeinen, K.; Christensson, J.; Reimann, S. M.; Kavoulakis, G. M.; Manninen, M.

    2008-04-04

    We examine the formation of vortices in a one- and two-component gas of bosonic atoms in a harmonic trap that is set rotating. Both the mean-field Gross-Pitaevskii approach, and the numerical diagonalization method are employed. For a two-component Bose gas, we show that beside the well-known coreless vortices of single quantization, the interatomic interactions between the two species may lead to coreless vortices of multiple quantization. We furthermore comment on the geometries of the interlaced vortex patterns. In the limit of weak interactions, we finally demonstrate a number of exact results.

  18. Multiple condensed phases in attractively interacting Bose systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Männel, M.; Morawetz, K.; Lipavský, P.

    2010-03-01

    We investigate a Bose gas with finite-range interaction using a scheme to eliminate unphysical processes in the T-matrix approximation. In this way the corrected T-matrix becomes suitable to calculate properties below the critical temperature. For attractive interaction, an Evans-Rashid transition occurs between a quasi-ideal Bose gas and a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer-like phase with a gap dispersion. The gap decreases with increasing density and vanishes at a critical density where the single-particle dispersion becomes linear for small momenta, indicating Bose-Einstein condensation. The investigation of the pressure shows, however, that the mentioned quantum phase transitions might be inaccessible due to a preceding first-order transition.

  19. Bose-Einstein Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2005-03-17

    This article gives a brief review of Bose-Einstein condensation. It is an exotic quantum phenomenon that was observed in dilute atomic gases for the first time in 1995. It exhibits a new state of matter in which a group of atoms behaves as a single particle. Experiments on this form of matter are relevant to many different areas of physics- from atomic clocks and quantum computing to super fluidity, superconductivity and quantum phase transition.

  20. Neutral-pion-decay gamma rays from the Galaxy and the interstellar gas content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1973-01-01

    Knowledge of the total gamma-ray production rate per H atom from the decay of neutral pions produced in interstellar cosmic-ray interactions is essential for determining the possible amount of interstellar H2. This production rate is recalculated here using the latest accelerator data on neutral pion production in p-p interactions up to about 1500 GeV. A simple but accurate approximation used here resolves the past disagreement over the magnitude of this rate. An upper limit is obtained of (1.51 plus or minus 0.23) times 10 to the -25th power/sec, consistent with the observed upper limit of 1.6 times 10 to the -25th power/sec.

  1. New look at thermodynamics of gas and at clusterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, V. P.

    2008-12-01

    In the paper, by using the example of a rigorous formulation and rigorous proof of the Maxwell distribution, estimates for the distribution in dependence of the parameter N (the number of particles) are established. Further, the problem concerning the creation of dimers in classical gas is regarded as an analog of Bose condensation, and estimates for the lower level of the analog of Bose condensation are proved. The relationship between this level and the theory of “capture” in the scattering problem corresponding to interaction in the form of Lennard-Jones potential is clarified. The equation of state of a nonideal gas as a result of pairwise interaction of particles in the Lennard-Jones and Kihara models is derived. New quantum equations for the transfer of neutral gas consisting of particles with evenly and oddly many neutrons in capillaries and nanotubes are also presented.

  2. Neutral gas temperature measurements of high-power-density fluorocarbon plasmas by fitting swan bands of C{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Bo; Sawin, Herbert H.; Cruden, Brett A.

    2006-01-01

    The neutral gas temperature of fluorocarbon plasmas in a remote toroidal transformer-coupled source was measured to be greater than 5000 K, under the conditions of a power density greater than 15 W/cm{sup 3} and pressures above 2 torr. The rovibrational bands of C{sub 2} molecules (swan bands, d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) were fitted to obtain the rotational temperature that was assumed to equal the translational temperature. This rotational-translational temperature equilibrium assumption was supported by the comparison with the rotational temperature of second positive system of added N{sub 2}. For the same gas mixture, the neutral gas temperature is nearly a linear function of plasma power, since the conduction to chamber wall and convection are the major energy-loss processes, and they are both proportional to neutral gas temperature. The dependence of the neutral gas temperature on O{sub 2} flow rate and pressure can be well represented through the power dependence, under the condition of constant current operation. An Arrhenius type of dependence between the etching rate of oxide film and the neutral gas temperature is observed, maybe indicating the importance of the pyrolytic dissociation in the plasma formation process when the temperature is above 5000 K.

  3. Kinetic Modeling of the Neutral Gas, Ions, and Charged Dust in Europa's Exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenishev, V.; Borovikov, D.; Rubin, M.; Jia, X.; Combi, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere with Europa has been a subject of active research during the last few decades both through in-situ and remote sensing observations as well as theoretical considerations. Linking the magnetosphere and the moon's surface and interior, Europa's exosphere has become one of the primary objects of study in the field. Understanding the physical processes occurring in the exosphere and its chemical composition is required for the understanding of the interaction between Europa and Jupiter. Europa's surface-bound exosphere originates mostly from ion sputtering of the water ice surface. Minor neutral species and ions of exospheric origin are produced via photolytic and electron impact reactions. The interaction of the Jovian magnetosphere and Europa affects the exospheric population of both neutrals and ions via source and loss processes. Moreover, the Lorentz force causes the newly created exospheric ions to move preferably aligned with the magnetic field lines. Contrary to the ions, heavier and slow-moving charged dust grains are mostly affected by gravity and the electric field component of the Lorentz force. As a result, escaping dust forms a narrow tail aligned in the direction of the convection electric field. Here we present results of a kinetic model of the neutral species (H2O, OH, O2, O, and H), ions (O+, O2+, H+, H2+, H2O+, and OH+), and neutral and charged dust in Europa's exosphere. In our model H2O and O2 are produced via sputtering and other exospheric neutral and ions species are produced via photolytic and electron impact reactions. For the charged dust we compute the equilibrium grain charge by balancing the electron and ion collecting currents according to the local plasma flow conditions at the grain's location. For the tracking of the ions, charged dust, and the calculation of the grains' charge we use plasma density and velocity, and the magnetic field derived from our multi-fluid MHD model of Europa

  4. Atmospheric concentrations and gas/particle partitioning of neutral poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances in northern German coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen; Xie, Zhiyong; Möller, Axel; Mi, Wenying; Wolschke, Hendrik; Ebinghaus, Ralf

    2014-10-01

    Total 58 high volume air samples were collected in Büsum, Germany, from August 2011 to October 2012 to investigate air concentrations of 12 per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) and their gas/particle partitioning. The total concentration (vapor plus particle phases) of the 12 PFASs (ΣPFASs) ranged from 8.6 to 155 pg/m3 (mean: 41 pg/m3) while fluorotelomer alcohols 8:2 (8:2 FTOH) dominated all samples accounting for 61.9% of ΣPFASs and the next most species were 10:2 FTOH (12.7%). Air mass back trajectory analysis showed that atmospheric PFASs in most samples were from long range atmospheric transport processes and had higher ratios of 8:2 to 6:2 FTOH compared to the data obtained from urban/industrial sources. Small portion of particle PFASs in the atmosphere was observed and the average percent to ΣPFASs was 2.0%. The particle-associated fractions of different PFASs decreased from perfluorooctane sulfonamidoethanols (FOSEs) (15.5%) to fluorotelomer acrylates (FTAs) (7.6%) to perfluorooctane sulfonamides (FOSAs) (3.1%) and FTOHs (1.8%), indicating the functional group obviously influenced their gas/particle partitioning. For neutral compounds with acid dissociation constant (pKa) > 7.0 (i.e., FTOHs, FOSEs and FOSAs), a significant log-linear relationship was observed between their gas/particle partition coefficients (KSP) and vapor pressures (pºL), suggesting the gas/particle partitioning of neutral PFASs agreed with the classical logKSP-logpºL relation. Due to the pKa values of 6:2 and 8:2 FTA below the typical environmental pH conditions, they mainly exist as ionic form in aerosols, and the corrected logKSP (neutral form) were considerably lower than those of FTOHs, FOSEs and FOSAs with similar vapor pressures. Considering the strong partitioning potential to aqueous phases for ionic PFASs at higher pH values, a need exists to develop a model taking account of the ad/absorption mechanism to the condensed phase of aerosols for ionizable PFASs (e

  5. Reduction of gas flow into a hollow cathode ion source for a neutral beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shigeru; Akiba, Masato; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Horiike, Hiroshi; Sakuraba, Junji

    1982-07-01

    Experimental studies have been made on the reduction of the gas flow rate into ion sources which utilize a hollow cathode. The electron emitter of the hollow cathode was a barium oxide impregnated porous tungsten tube. The hollow cathode was mounted to a circular or a rectangular bucket source and the following results were obtained. There was a tendency for the minimum gas flow rate for the stable source operation to decrease with increasing orifice diameter of the hollow cathode up to 10 mm. A molybdenum button with an appropriate diameter set in front of the orifice reduced the minimum gas flow rate to one half of that without button. An external magnetic field applied antiparallel to the field generated by the heater current stabilized the discharges and reduced the minimum gas flow rate to one half of that without field. Combination of the button and the antiparallel field reduced the minimum gas flow rate from the initial value (9.5 Torr 1/s) to 2.4 Torr 1/s. The reason for these effects was discussed on the basis of the theory for arc starvation.

  6. Effects of neutral gas collisions on the power transmission factor at the divertor sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futch, A. H.; Hill, D. N.; Jong, R. A.; Porter, G. D.; Matthews, G. F.; Buchenauer, D.

    1992-03-01

    We show that charge-exchange and other ion-neutral collisions can reduce the power transmission factor of the plasma sheath, thereby lowering the ion impact energy and target plate sputtering. The power transmission factor relates the heat flux reaching the divertor target to the surface: Delta= Q(sub surf)/n(sub e)T(sub e)C(sub s). Experimental data from the D3-D tokamak suggest that Delta could be as low as 2-3 near the region of peak divertor particle flux, instead of the 7-8 expected from usual sheath theory. Several effects combine to allow ion-neutral interactions to be important in the divertor plasma sheath. The shallow angle of incidence of the magnetic field (1-3 degrees in D3-D) leads to the spatial extension of the sheath from approximately (pi)i approximately = 1 mm normal to the plate to several centimeters along the field lines. Ionization reduces the sheath potential, and collisions reduce the ion impact energy.

  7. Detecting quantum coherence of Bose gases in optical lattices by scattering light intensity in cavity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoji; Xu, Xu; Yin, Lan; Liu, W M; Chen, Xuzong

    2010-07-19

    We propose a new method of detecting quantum coherence of a Bose gas trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice by measuring the light intensity from Raman scattering in cavity. After pump and displacement process, the intensity or amplitude of scattering light is different for different quantum states of a Bose gas, such as superfluid and Mott-Insulator states. This method can also be useful to detect quantum states of atoms with two components in an optical lattice.

  8. Measurement of neutral gas pressure in the D-module of GAMMA 10/PDX by using ASDEX type fast ionization gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichimura, K.; Fukumoto, M.; Islam, M. M.; Islam, M. S.; Shimizu, K.; Fukui, K.; Ohuchi, M.; Nojiri, K.; Terakado, A.; Yoshikawa, M.; Ezumi, N.; Sakamoto, M.; Nakashima, Y.

    2016-11-01

    In the divertor simulation experiments in the GAMMA 10/PDX tandem mirror, pressure of the neutral gas was investigated by using a fast ionization gauge. The gauge was absolutely calibrated for hydrogen gas by using a capacitance manometer. Change of the gauge sensitivity due to the magnetic field of GAMMA 10/PDX was also evaluated. The typical gas pressure measured in detached plasma experiments was 0.1-10 Pa. The degree of plasma detachment determined from the reduction of heat flux was enhanced as the gas pressure increases. Rapid increase of the gas pressure under the plasma flow was also observed.

  9. Quantum Phase Diffusion of a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Lewenstein, M.; You, L. |

    1996-10-01

    We discuss the quantum properties of the Bose-Einstein condensate of a dilute gas of atoms in a trap. We show that the phase of the condensate undergoes quantum diffusion which can be detected in far off-resonant light scattering experiments. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Bose gases, Bose–Einstein condensation, and the Bogoliubov approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Seiringer, Robert

    2014-07-15

    We review recent progress towards a rigorous understanding of the Bogoliubov approximation for bosonic quantum many-body systems. We focus, in particular, on the excitation spectrum of a Bose gas in the mean-field (Hartree) limit. A list of open problems will be discussed at the end.

  11. Azimuthal and Kinematic Segregation of Neutral and Molecular Gas in Arp 118: The Yin-Yang Galaxy NGC 1144

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appleton, P. N.; Charmandaris, V.; Gao, Yu; Jarrett, Tom; Bransford, M. A.

    2003-03-01

    We present new high-resolution H I observations of the disk of the collisional infrared luminous (LIR=2.2×1011Lsolar) galaxy NGC 1144, which reveal an apparent large-scale azimuthal and kinematic segregation of neutral hydrogen relative to the molecular gas distribution. Even among violently collisional galaxies, the CO/H I asymmetry in NGC 1144 is unusual, both in the inner regions and in the outer disk. We suggest that we are observing Arp 118 at a special moment, shortly after a high-speed collision between NGC 1144 and its elliptical companion NGC 1143. H I emission with an average molecular fraction fmol<0.5 is observed on one side (northwest) of the rotating disk of NGC 1144, while the other side (southeast) is dominated by dense molecular complexes in which fmol is almost unity. The interface region between the warm- and cool-cloud dominated regions lies on a deep spiral-like dust lane that we identify as a shock wave responsible for the relative shift in the dominance of H I and H2 gas. A strong shock being fed by diffuse H I clouds with unusually large (>400 km s-1) rotational velocities can explain (1) the CO/H I asymmetries, (2) a large velocity jump (185 km s-1) across the arm as measured by H I absorption against a radio bright continuum source that straddles the arm, and (3) the asymmetric distribution of star formation and off-nuclear molecular gas resulting from likely streaming motions associated with the strong shock. The new results provide for the first time a coherent picture of Arp 118's many peculiarities and underline the potentially complex changes in the gas phase that can accompany large gravitational perturbations of gas-rich galaxies.

  12. The effects of neutral gas heating on H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2012-09-15

    The H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor are simulated for low pressure argon discharge range of 0.02-0.3 mbar with neutral gas heating and at ambient temperature. An experimentally fitted 3D power evolution plot for 0.02 mbar argon pressure is also shown to visualize the effects of hysteresis in the system. Comparisons between simulation and experimental measurements show good agreement in the pressure range of 0.02-0.3 mbar for transition currents and 0.02-0.1 mbar for maintenance currents only when neutral gas heating is considered. This suggests that neutral gas heating plays a non-negligible role in determining the mode transition points of a rf ICP system.

  13. Measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a cold, dense Rydberg gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeson, Scott; Lyon, Mary

    2016-05-01

    We report measurements of the ion velocity distribution in an ultracold neutral plasma derived from a dense, cold Rydberg gas in a MOT. The Rydberg atoms are excited using a resonant two-step excitation pathway with lasers of 4 ns duration. The plasma forms spontaneously and rapidly. The rms width of the ion velocity distribution is determined by measuring laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the ions. The measured excitation efficiency is compared with a Monte-Carlo wavefunction calculation, and significant differences are observed. We discuss the conditions for blockaded Rydberg excitation and the subsequent spatial ordering of Rydberg atom domains. While the blockade interaction is greater than the Rabi frequency in portions of the atomic sample, no evidence for spatial ordering is observed. This research is supported in part by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant No. FA9950-12- 0308) and by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. PHY-1404488).

  14. Coagulation of charged microparticles in neutral gas and charge-induced gel transitions.

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A V; Morfill, G E; Konopka, U

    2002-11-04

    Coagulation of charged particles was studied using the mean-field Smoluchowski equation. The coagulation equation was generalized for the case of a conserved system of charged particles. It was shown that runaway cluster growth (gelation) solutions exist if the charge-dipole (induced) interaction of clusters is included. When clusters are in thermal equilibrium with the ambient gas, the charge-dipole interaction dramatically enhances the aggregation process and considerably increases the likelihood of a gelation transition.

  15. Neutralization of solvated protons and formation of noble-gas hydride molecules: Matrix-isolation indications of tunneling mechanisms?

    SciTech Connect

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Lignell, Antti; Raesaenen, Markku

    2005-08-08

    The (NgHNg){sup +} cations (Ng=Ar and Kr) produced via the photolysis of HF/Ar, HF/Kr, and HBr/Kr solid mixtures are studied, with emphasis on their decay mechanisms. The present experiments provide a large variety of parameters connected to this decay phenomenon, which allows us to reconsider various models for the decay of the (NgHNg){sup +} cations in noble-gas matrices. As a result, we propose that this phenomenon could be explained by the neutralization of the solvated protons by electrons. The mechanism of this neutralization reaction probably involves tunneling of an electron from an electronegative fragment or another trap to the (NgHNg){sup +} cation. The proposed electron-tunneling mechanism should be considered as a possible alternative to the literature models based on tunneling-assisted or radiation-induced diffusion of protons in noble-gas solids. As a novel experimental observation of this work, the efficient formation of HArF molecules occurs at 8 K in a photolyzed HF/Ar matrix. It is probable that the low-temperature formation of HArF involves local tunneling of the H atom to the Ar-F center, which in turn supports the locality of HF photolysis in solid Ar. In this model, the decay of (ArHAr){sup +} ions and the formation of HArF molecules observed at low temperatures are generally unconnected processes; however, the decaying (ArHAr){sup +} ions may contribute to some extent to the formation of HArF molecules.

  16. Beams of fast neutral atoms and molecules in low-pressure gas-discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Metel, A. S.

    2012-03-15

    Fast neutral atom and molecule beams have been studied, the beams being produced in a vacuum chamber at nitrogen, argon, or helium pressure of 0.1-10 Pa due to charge-exchange collisions of ions accelerated in the sheath between the glow discharge plasma and a negative grid immersed therein. From a flat grid, two broad beams of molecules with continuous distribution of their energy from zero up to e(U + U{sub c}) (where U is voltage between the grid and the vacuum chamber and U{sub c} is cathode fall of the discharge) are propagating in opposite directions. The beam propagating from the concave surface of a 0.2-m-diameter grid is focused within a 10-mm-diameter spot on the target surface. When a 0.2-m-diameter 0.2-m-high cylindrical grid covered by end disks and composed of parallel 1.5-mm-diameter knitting needles spaced by 4.5 mm is immersed in the plasma, the accelerated ions pass through the gaps between the needles, turn inside the grid into fast atoms or molecules, and escape from the grid through the gaps on its opposite side. The Doppler shift of spectral lines allows for measuring the fast atom energy, which corresponds to the potential difference between the plasma inside the chamber and the plasma produced as a result of charge-exchange collisions inside the cylindrical grid.

  17. Electrically Detected Magnetic Resonance of Neutral Donors Interacting with a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C. C.; Lang, V.; George, R. E.; Morton, J. J. L.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Lyon, A.; Bokor, J.; Schenkel, T.

    2011-04-20

    We have measured the electrically detected magnetic resonance of donor-doped silicon field-effect transistors in resonant X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) microwave cavities. The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) resonance signal increases by two orders of magnitude from X- to W-band, while the donor resonance signals are enhanced by over one order of magnitude. Bolometric effects and spin-dependent scattering are inconsistent with the observations. We propose that polarization transfer from the donor to the 2DEG is the main mechanism giving rise to the spin resonance signals.

  18. Renewable Doesn’t Mean Carbon Neutral: Emerging Greenhouse Gas Inventory Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-17

    Renewable” energy purchases produced via combustion of: – Biomass / biogas – Biofuels – Biomass portion of MSW FES-East Conference – June 17...and materials), such as: – Biomass , wood, and wood waste – Landfill gas / biogas – Biofuels (B100, E100) – Biofuel component of mixed fuels (B20, E85...included in Scope 1 or 2 emissions – P.85 - Biofuels fall under “renewable energy ”  CCAR, General Reporting Protocol, Version 3 (April 2008) – P.41

  19. Renewable Doesn’t Mean Carbon Neutral: Emerging Greenhouse Gas Inventory Challenge

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-06

    produced via combustion of: – Biomass / biogas – Biofuels – Biomass portion of MSW E2S2 Conference – May 06, 20096National Defense Center for Energy and...and wood waste – Landfill gas / biogas – Biofuels (B100, E100) – Biofuel component of mixed fuels (B20, E85)  “Renewable” energy purchases... Biofuels fall under “renewable energy ”  CCAR, General Reporting Protocol, Version 3 (April 2008) – P.41 – Lack of international consensus on biogenic

  20. Smoothed MHD equations for numerical simulations of ideal quasi-neutral gas dynamic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Mikhail V.; Elizarova, Tatiana G.

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a mathematical model and related numerical method for numerical modeling of ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) gas flows as an extension of previously known quasi-gasdynamic (QGD) equations. This approach is based on smoothing, or averaging of the original MHD equation system over a small time interval that leads to a new equation system, named quasi-MHD, or QMHD system. The QMHD equations are closely related to the original MHD system except for additional strongly non-linear dissipative τ-terms with a small parameter τ as a factor. The τ-terms depend on the solution itself and decrease in regions with the small space gradients of the solution. In this sense the QMHD system could be regarded as an approach with adaptive artificial dissipation. The QMHD is a generalization of regularized (or quasi-) gas dynamic equation system suggested in last three decades. In the QMHD numerical method the evolution of all physical variables is presented in a non-split divergence form. Divergence-free evolution of the magnetic field provides by using a constrained transport method based on Faraday's law of induction. Accuracy and convergence of the QMHD method is verified on a wide set of standard MHD tests including the 3D Orszag-Tang vortex flow.

  1. PIC code modeling of spacecraft charging potential during electron beam injection into a background of neutral gas and plasma, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, J. K.; Lin, C. S.; Winglee, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Injections of nonrelativistic electron beams from an isolated equipotential conductor into a uniform background of plasma and neutral gas were simulated using a 2-D electrostatic particle code. The ionization effects on spacecraft charging are examined by including interactions of electrons with neutral gas. The simulations show that the conductor charging potential decreases with increasing neutral background density due to the production of secondary electrons near the conductor surface. In the spacecraft wake, the background electrons accelerated towards the charged spacecraft produce an enhancement of secondary electrons and ions. Simulations run for longer times indicate that the spacecraft potential is further reduced and short wavelength beam-plasma oscillations appear. The results are applied to explain the spacecraft charging potential measured during the SEPAC experiments from Spacelab 1.

  2. COMPLETE IONIZATION OF THE NEUTRAL GAS: WHY THERE ARE SO FEW DETECTIONS OF 21 cm HYDROGEN IN HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO GALAXIES AND QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, S. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2012-11-10

    From the first published z {approx}> 3 survey of 21 cm absorption within the hosts of radio galaxies and quasars, Curran et al. found an apparent dearth of cool neutral gas at high redshift. From a detailed analysis of the photometry, each object is found to have a {lambda} = 1216 A continuum luminosity in excess of L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}, a critical value above which 21 cm has never been detected at any redshift. At these wavelengths, and below, hydrogen is excited above the ground state so that it cannot absorb in 21 cm. In order to apply the equation of photoionization equilibrium, we demonstrate that this critical value also applies to the ionizing ({lambda} {<=} 912 A) radiation. We use this to show, for a variety of gas density distributions, that upon placing a quasar within a galaxy of gas, there is always an ultraviolet luminosity above which all of the large-scale atomic gas is ionized. While in this state, the hydrogen cannot be detected or engage in star formation. Applying the mean ionizing photon rate of all of the sources searched, we find, using canonical values for the gas density and recombination rate coefficient, that the observed critical luminosity gives a scale length (3 kpc) similar that of the neutral hydrogen (H I) in the Milky Way, a large spiral galaxy. Thus, this simple yet physically motivated model can explain the critical luminosity (L {sub 912} {approx} L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}), above which neutral gas is not detected. This indicates that the non-detection of 21 cm absorption is not due to the sensitivity limits of current radio telescopes, but rather that the lines of sight to the quasars, and probably the bulk of the host galaxies, are devoid of neutral gas.

  3. Two characteristic temperatures for a Bose-Einstein condensate of a finite number of particles

    SciTech Connect

    Idziaszek, Z.; Rzazewski, K.

    2003-09-01

    We consider two characteristic temperatures for a Bose-Einstein condensate, which are related to certain properties of the condensate statistics. We calculate them for an ideal gas confined in power-law traps and show that they approach the critical temperature in the limit of large number of particles. The considered characteristic temperatures can be useful in the studies of Bose-Einstein condensates of a finite number of atoms indicating the point of a phase transition.

  4. Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Condensation Phenomena in Tuneable 3D and 2D Bose Gases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    equilibrium and non-equilibrium many-body phenomena, trapping ultracold atomic gases in different geometries including both 3 and 2 spatial dimensions...box trap we created the world’s first atomic BEC in a quasi-uniform potential. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Bose gas, ultracold, condensation, equilibrium... atom trap, Bose-Einstein condensate 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 3 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE

  5. Bose-Einstein condensation on a manifold with non-negative Ricci curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Akant, Levent Ertuğrul, Emine Tapramaz, Ferzan Turgut, O. Teoman

    2015-01-15

    The Bose-Einstein condensation for an ideal Bose gas and for a dilute weakly interacting Bose gas in a manifold with non-negative Ricci curvature is investigated using the heat kernel and eigenvalue estimates of the Laplace operator. The main focus is on the nonrelativistic gas. However, special relativistic ideal gas is also discussed. The thermodynamic limit of the heat kernel and eigenvalue estimates is taken and the results are used to derive bounds for the depletion coefficient. In the case of a weakly interacting gas, Bogoliubov approximation is employed. The ground state is analyzed using heat kernel methods and finite size effects on the ground state energy are proposed. The justification of the c-number substitution on a manifold is given.

  6. Abundances of O, Mg, S, Cr, Mn, Ti, Ni and Zn from absorption lines of neutral gas in the Large Magellanic Cloud in front of R136

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Boer, K. S.; Fitzpatrick, E. L.; Savage, B. D.

    1985-01-01

    Weak absorption lines of C I, O I, Mg I, Mg II, Si I, Si II, P I, Cl I, Cr II, Mn II, Fe I, Ni II, Zn II, CO and C2 are detected in neutral gas in front of the 30 Doradus H II region by IUE spectra of R 136. The Large Magellanic Cloud abundances from the absorption lines are a factor of 2 or 3 below those of the Milky Way, in agreement with emission line study results. Neutral gas density and temperature are estimated from the observed excitation and ionization to be about 300/cu cm and 100 K, respectively; this implies a gas pressure of 30,000/cu cm K.

  7. Enhanced electrodynamic tether currents due to electron emission from a neutral gas discharge: Results from the TSS-1R Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, B. E.; Bonifazi, C.; Bilén, S. G.; Raitt, W. J.; Burke, W. J.; Stone, N. H.; Lebreton, J. P.

    During the reflight of the first electrodynamic Tethered Satellite System (TSS-1R) mission, the unplanned separation of the tether at the Orbiter end resulted in the highest tether current during the mission. In the moments just prior to the tether separation with 19.7 km of tether deployed and a generated electromotive force (EMF) of 3482 V, currents reaching approximately 0.97 A were shunted through the tether to the Orbiter electrical ground, which was in contact with the ionosphere primarily through its main engine surfaces. This current level was nearly twice as large as observed during any nominal operating period. As the failure point of the tether entered into the ambient plasma, the current increased to 1.1 A and maintained this level even after the break for approximately 75 s. The principal surprise in these results was that the broken end of the tether, with only a few short strands of copper wire, could support higher currents than the much larger Orbiter conducting surface areas. Analysis of possible current enhancement mechanisms revealed that only a gas-enhanced electrical discharge, providing an electron emission source, was plausible. Ground plasma chamber tests confirmed this analysis. The TSS-1R results thus represent the highest electron current emission from a neutral plasma source yet demonstrated in a space plasma. This is of interest for current collection processes in general and plasma contactor development in particular.

  8. Bose-Einstein condensation in binary mixture of Bose gases

    SciTech Connect

    Tran Huu Phat; Le Viet Hoa; Nguyen Tuan Anh Nguyen Van Long

    2009-10-15

    The Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in a binary mixture of Bose gases is studied by means of the Cornwall-Jackiw-Tomboulis (CJT) effective action approach. The equations of state (EoS) and various scenarios of phase transitions of the system are considered in detail, in particular, the numerical computations are carried out for symmetry restoration (SR), symmetry nonrestoration (SNR) and inverse symmetry breaking (ISB) for getting an insight into their physical nature. It is shown that due to the cross interaction between distinct components of mixture there occur two interesting phenomena: the high temperature BEC and the inverse BEC, which could be tested in experiments.

  9. D-dimensional Bose gases and the Lambert W function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguay, J.; Gil, M.; Jeffrey, D. J.; Valluri, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    The applications of the Lambert W function (also known as the W function) to D-dimensional Bose gases are presented. We introduce two sets of families of logarithmic transcendental equations that occur frequently in thermodynamics and statistical mechanics and present their solution in terms of the W function. The low temperature T behavior of free ideal Bose gases is considered in three and four dimensions. It is shown that near condensation in four dimensions, the chemical potential μ and pressure P can be expressed in terms of T through the W function. The low T behavior of one- and two-dimensional ideal Bose gases in a harmonic trap is studied. In 1D, the W function is used to express the condensate temperature, T_C, in terms of the number of particles N; in 2D, it is used to express μ in terms of T. In the low T limit of the 1D hard-core and the 3D Bose gas, T can be expressed in terms of P and μ through the W function. Our analysis allows for the possibility to consider μ, T, and P as complex variables. The importance of the underlying logarithmic structure in ideal quantum gases is seen in the polylogarithmic and W function expressions relating thermodynamic variables such as μ, T, and P.

  10. Diffusion dynamics in the disordered Bose Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadleigh, Laura; Russ, Philip; Demarco, Brian

    2016-05-01

    We explore the dynamics of diffusion for out-of-equilibrium superfluid, Mott insulator, and Bose glass states using an atomic realization of the disordered Bose Hubbard (DBH) model. Dynamics in strongly correlated systems, especially far from equilibrium, are not well understood. The introduction of disorder further complicates these systems. We realize the DBH model--which has been central to our understanding of quantum phase transitions in disordered systems--using ultracold Rubidium-87 atoms trapped in a cubic disordered optical lattice. By tightly focusing a beam into the center of the gas, we create a hole in the atomic density profile. We achieve Mott insulator, superfluid, or Bose glass states by varying the interaction and disorder strength, and measure the time evolution of the density profile after removing the central barrier. This allows us to infer diffusion rates from the velocities at the edge of the hole and to look for signatures of superfluid puddles in the Bose glass state. We acknowledge funding from NSF Grant PHY 15-05468, NSF Grant DGE-1144245, and ARO Grant W911NF-12-1-0462.

  11. Bose polaron problem: Effect of mass imbalance on binding energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardila, L. A. Peña; Giorgini, S.

    2016-12-01

    By means of quantum Monte Carlo methods we calculate the binding energy of an impurity immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate at T =0 . The focus is on the attractive branch of the Bose polaron and on the role played by the mass imbalance between the impurity and the surrounding particles. For an impurity resonantly coupled to the bath, we investigate the dependence of the binding energy on the mass ratio and on the interaction strength within the medium. In particular, we determine the equation of state in the case of a static (infinite mass) impurity, where three-body correlations are irrelevant and the result is expected to be a universal function of the gas parameter. For the mass ratio corresponding to 40K impurities in a gas of 87Rb atoms, we provide an explicit comparison with the experimental findings of a recent study carried out at JILA.

  12. Performance analysis and parametric optimum criteria of an irreversible Bose-Otto engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Sanqiu; He, Jizhou

    2009-04-01

    An irreversible cycle model of a Bose-Otto engine is established, in which finite time thermodynamic processes and the irreversibility result from the nonisentropic compression and expansion processes are taken into account. Based on the model, expressions for the power output and efficiency of the Bose-Otto engine are derived. On the basis of the thermodynamic properties of ideal Bose gas, the effects of the irreversibility and the compression ratio of the two isochoric processes on the performance of the Bose-Otto engine are revealed and some important performance parameters are optimized. Furthermore, some optimal operating regions including those for the power output, efficiency, and the temperatures of the cyclic working substance at two important state points are determined and evaluated. Finally, several special cases are discussed in detail.

  13. Evolution and dynamical properties of Bose-Einstein condensate dark matter stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madarassy, Eniko J. M.; Toth, Viktor T.

    2015-02-01

    Using recently developed nonrelativistic numerical simulation code, we investigate the stability properties of compact astrophysical objects that may be formed due to the Bose-Einstein condensation of dark matter. Once the temperature of a boson gas is less than the critical temperature, a Bose-Einstein condensation process can always take place during the cosmic history of the Universe. Because of dark matter accretion, a Bose-Einstein condensed core can also be formed inside massive astrophysical objects such as neutron stars or white dwarfs, for example. Numerically solving the Gross-Pitaevskii-Poisson system of coupled differential equations, we demonstrate, with longer simulation runs, that within the computational limits of the simulation the objects we investigate are stable. Physical properties of a self-gravitating Bose-Einstein condensate are examined both in nonrotating and rotating cases.

  14. Transport of ultracold Bose gases beyond the Gross-Pitaevskii description

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Thomas; Paul, Tobias; Schlagheck, Peter

    2010-01-15

    We explore atom-laser-like transport processes of ultracold Bose-condensed atomic vapors in mesoscopic waveguide structures beyond the Gross-Pitaevskii mean-field theory. Based on a microscopic description of the transport process in the presence of a coherent source that models the outcoupling from a reservoir of perfectly Bose-Einstein condensed atoms, we derive a system of coupled quantum evolution equations that describe the dynamics of a dilute condensed Bose gas in the framework of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation. We apply this method to study the transport of dilute Bose gases through an atomic quantum dot and through waveguides with disorder. Our numerical simulations reveal that the onset of an explicitly time-dependent flow corresponds to the appearance of strong depletion of the condensate on the microscopic level and leads to a loss of global phase coherence.

  15. Bose-Einstein condensation of quasi-equilibrium magnons at room temperature under pumping.

    PubMed

    Demokritov, S O; Demidov, V E; Dzyapko, O; Melkov, G A; Serga, A A; Hillebrands, B; Slavin, A N

    2006-09-28

    Bose-Einstein condensation is one of the most fascinating phenomena predicted by quantum mechanics. It involves the formation of a collective quantum state composed of identical particles with integer angular momentum (bosons), if the particle density exceeds a critical value. To achieve Bose-Einstein condensation, one can either decrease the temperature or increase the density of bosons. It has been predicted that a quasi-equilibrium system of bosons could undergo Bose-Einstein condensation even at relatively high temperatures, if the flow rate of energy pumped into the system exceeds a critical value. Here we report the observation of Bose-Einstein condensation in a gas of magnons at room temperature. Magnons are the quanta of magnetic excitations in a magnetically ordered ensemble of magnetic moments. In thermal equilibrium, they can be described by Bose-Einstein statistics with zero chemical potential and a temperature-dependent density. In the experiments presented here, we show that by using a technique of microwave pumping it is possible to excite additional magnons and to create a gas of quasi-equilibrium magnons with a non-zero chemical potential. With increasing pumping intensity, the chemical potential reaches the energy of the lowest magnon state, and a Bose condensate of magnons is formed.

  16. Analysis of plasma and neutral gas flow inside of a PET bottle under PIII condition by particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyagawa, Y.; Tanaka, M.; Ikeyama, M.; Nakao, S.; Choi, J.; Miyagawa, S.

    2006-01-01

    The plasma behavior inside of a PET bottle has been simulated under the condition of plasma immersed ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) using the simulation software "PEGASUS". The software uses the "PIC-MCCM" module for the plasma analysis and the "DSMCM" module for the gas flow field analysis. DSMCM gives densities, velocities, fluxes, temperatures and pressures of each neutral species such as the fed gas species and radicals. By coupling PIC-MCCM with DSMCM simulation, the plasma behavior in the flowing Ar gas and N2 gas has been simulated. The gas was injected from the tip of the gas inlet which was inserted into the center of the bottle. The base gas pressure was 1-50 Pa and a positive pulse voltage (maximum voltage = 0.1-1 kV) was applied to the center rod. A two-dimensional cylindrical coordinate system was used. Time evolution of the spacial distribution was obtained for densities of electrons, N2+ ions, N2∗ radicals and N atoms in N2 gas, and Ar+ ions, Ar∗ and Ar∗(4s) radicals in Ar gas. Time evolution of the particle flux and the energy flux of electrons and ions on the target surface was also obtained.

  17. Analysis of neutral nitromusks in incenses by capillary electrophoresis in organic solvents and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gotti, Roberto; Fiori, Jessica; Mancini, Francesca; Cavrini, Vanni

    2005-09-01

    Nitromusks used as fragrances in a variety of personal-care products, cleansers, and domestic deodorants, including incense sticks, are neutral nitro aromatic compounds; some of these have been reported as photosensitizers. In this work, their analysis was performed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) in a methanol-based background electrolyte (BGE). In particular, a 10 mM solution of citric acid in methanol was used; under these conditions the strong suppression of the electroosmotic flow favored the use of negatively charged surfactants as additives for the anodic migration of the studied analytes. To this end, sodium taurodeoxycholate (TDC) was supplemented at high concentration (190 mM) to the organic background electrolyte (BGE), showing strong indication of the ability to give micelle-like aggregates. Since nitromusks are characterized by the presence of a nitroaromatic ring with low charge density, their association with TDC aggregates can be ascribed to donor-acceptor interactions. Separation of musk xylene, musk ketone, and the banned musk moskene and musk ambrette was obtained under full nonaqueous BGE; the addition of relatively small water percentages (15% v/v) was found to be useful in improving the separation of pairs of adjacent peaks. Under optimized conditions (190 mM sodium TDC in methanol-water, 85-15 v/v containing citric acid 10 mM) the system was applied to the analysis of nitromusks in incense sticks extracted with methanol. The results were compared with those obtained by the analysis of the same samples using gas chromatography with mass detector. The expected different selectivity of separation obtained using the two techniques can be useful in the unambiguous determination of the analytes; furthermore, a substantial accord of the preliminary quantitative results achieved with the two methods was assumed as the confirmation of the potential reliability of CE performed with high percentage of organic solvent.

  18. Four-fluid MHD Simulations of the Plasma and Neutral Gas Environment of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Near Perihelion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhenguang; Toth, Gabor; Gombosi, Tamas; Jia, Xianzhe; Rubin, Martin; Fougere, Nicolas; Tenishev, Valeriy; Combi, Michael; Bieler, Andre; Hansen, Kenneth; Shou, Yinsi; Altwegg, Kathrin

    2016-04-01

    The neutral and plasma environment is critical in understanding the interaction of the solar wind and comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (CG), the target of the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission. In this study, we have developed a 3-D four-fluid model, which is based on BATS-R-US (Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme) within SWMF (Space Weather Modeling Framework) that solves the governing multi-fluid MHD equations and the Euler equations for the neutral gas fluid. These equations describe the behavior and interactions of the cometary heavy ions, the solar wind protons, the electrons, and the neutrals. We simulated the plasma and neutral gas environment of comet CG with SHAP5 model near perihelion and we showed that the plasma environment in the inner coma region have some new features: magnetic reconnection in the tail region, a magnetic pile-up region on the nightside, and nucleus directed plasma flow inside the nightside reconnection region.

  19. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Cm+ and Cm2+ -- Thermodynamics of neutral and ionized CmO

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, John K; Haire, Richard G.; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2008-12-08

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the products and kinetics of gas-phase reactions of Cm+ and Cm2+; parallel studies were carried out with La+/2+, Gd+/2+ and Lu+/2+. Reactions with oxygen-donor molecules provided estimates for the bond dissociation energies, D[M+-O](M = Cm, Gd, Lu). The first ionization energy, IE[CmO], was obtained from the reactivity of CmO+ with dienes, and the second ionization energies, IE[MO+](M = Cm, La, Gd, Lu), from the rates of electron-transfer reactions from neutrals to the MO2+ ions. The following thermodynamic quantities for curium oxide molecules were obtained: IE[CmO]= 6.4+-0.2 eV; IE[CmO+]= 15.8+-0.4 eV; D[Cm-O]= 710+-45 kJ mol-1; D[Cm+-O]= 670+-40 kJ mol-1; and D[Cm2+-O]= 342+-55 kJ mol-1. Estimates for the M2+-O bond energies for M = Cm, La, Gd and Lu are all intermediate between D[N2-O]and D[OC-O]--i.e., 167 kJ mol-1< D[M2+-O]< 532 kJ mol-1 -- such that the four MO2+ ions fulfill the thermodynamic requirement for catalytic O-atom transport from N2O to CO. It was demonstrated that the kinetics are also favorable and that the CmO2+, LaO2+, GdO2+ and LuO2+ dipositive ions each catalyze the gas-phase oxidation of CO to CO2 by N2O. The CmO2+ ion appeared during the reaction of Cm+ with O2 when the intermediate, CmO+, was not collisionally cooled -- although its formation is kinetically and/or thermodynamically unfavorable, CmO2+ is a stable species.

  20. 10-30 micrometer Maps of the Central 5 parsecs of the Galaxy: Heating of the Cavity and Neutral-Gas Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesco, C. M.; Davidson, J. A.; Werner, M. W.

    1995-01-01

    Maps are presented for 10, 20, and 30 micrometers of the central 60' X 90' (RA X Dec) of the galaxy made at approximately 4' resolution with the MSFC bolometer array. The maps are the first to show the thermal emission from dust particles in both the ionized cavity and the neutral-gas ring with high sensitivity and an angular resolution as good as several arcsec.

  1. Solitonic vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tylutki, M.; Donadello, S.; Serafini, S.; Pitaevskii, L. P.; Dalfovo, F.; Lamporesi, G.; Ferrari, G.

    2015-04-01

    We analyse, theoretically and experimentally, the nature of solitonic vortices (SV) in an elongated Bose-Einstein condensate. In the experiment, such defects are created via the Kibble-Zurek mechanism, when the temperature of a gas of sodium atoms is quenched across the BEC transition, and are imaged after a free expansion of the condensate. By using the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, we calculate the in-trap density and phase distributions characterizing a SV in the crossover from an elongated quasi-1D to a bulk 3D regime. The simulations show that the free expansion strongly amplifies the key features of a SV and produces a remarkable twist of the solitonic plane due to the quantized vorticity associated with the defect. Good agreement is found between simulations and experiments.

  2. Approaching Bose-Einstein Condensation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Loris

    2011-01-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) is discussed at the level of an advanced course of statistical thermodynamics, clarifying some formal and physical aspects that are usually not covered by the standard pedagogical literature. The non-conventional approach adopted starts by showing that the continuum limit, in certain cases, cancels out the crucial…

  3. Earth’s Interaction Region: Plasma-Neutral Interactions in the Weakly Ionized gas of Earth’s High Latitude Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, Jeffrey; Hsu, Vicki

    2015-04-01

    The high-latitude regions of Earth’s upper atmosphere are strongly influenced by plasma-neutral interactions. These interactions couple electrodynamic processes of the ionosphere with hydrodynamic processes of the more abundant thermosphere neutral gas, consequently connecting the high-latitude upper atmosphere to distant regions of the geoplasma environment. This produces a complex spatial and temporal interplay of competing processes that results in a myriad of physical and chemical responses and a rich array of neutral and plasma morphologies that constitute the high-latitude thermosphere and ionosphere. The altitude extent from the lower thermosphere to the upper ionosphere (90km - 1000km) can be considered Earth’s space-atmosphere interaction region - likened to the solar chromosphere’s interaction region where radiative processes and hydrodynamic waves from the dense lower atmosphere produce a cold lower boundary that quickly transitions over a few 100 kilometers to neutral and plasma temperatures that are five times hotter. A thousand or more kilometers further in altitude, Earth's upper atmosphere becomes a hot, collisionless, geomagnetically controlled protonosphere whose neutral and plasma population originates from the thermosphere and ionosphere. A grand challenge in the study of Earth’s interaction region is how the collision-dominated thermosphere/ionosphere system exchanges energy, mass and momentum with the collisionless magnetosphere. This talk will focus primarily on collision-dominated processes of the high-latitude ionosphere and the electromagnetic energy transfer processes that lead to frictional heating of ions and neutrals, and plasma instability phenomenon that leads to extreme electron heating. Observations of the ionosphere response to these processes will be illustrated using incoherent scatter radar measurements. Relevance to the solar chromosphere will be identified where appropriate and outstanding issues in Earth

  4. Diagnostics and two-dimensional simulation of low-frequency inductively coupled plasmas with neutral gas heating and electron heat fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrikov, K. N.; Denysenko, I. B.; Tsakadze, E. L.; Xu, S.; Storer, R. G.

    2002-11-01

    This article presents the results on the diagnostics and numerical modeling of low-frequency (approx460 KHz) inductively coupled plasmas generated in a cylindrical metal chamber by an external flat spiral coil. Experimental data on the electron number densities and temperatures, electron energy distribution functions, and optical emission intensities of the abundant plasma species in low/intermediate pressure argon discharges are included. The spatial profiles of the plasma density, electron temperature, and excited argon species are computed, for different rf powers and working gas pressures, using the two-dimensional fluid approach. The model allows one to achieve a reasonable agreement between the computed and experimental data. The effect of the neutral gas temperature on the plasma parameters is also investigated. It is shown that neutral gas heating (at rf powers[greater-than-or-equal, slanted]0.55 kW) is one of the key factors that control the electron number density and temperature. The dependence of the average rf power loss, per electron-ion pair created, on the working gas pressure shows that the electron heat flux to the walls appears to be a critical factor in the total power loss in the discharge.

  5. The effect of adiabaticity on strongly quenched Bose Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Hong; Kain, Ben

    2015-05-01

    We study the properties of a Bose-Einstein condensate following a deep quench to a large scattering length during which the condensate fraction nc changes with time. We construct a closed set of equations that highlight the role of the adiabaticity or equivalently, dnc/dt, the rate change of nc, which is to induce an (imaginary) effective interaction between quasiparticles. We show analytically that such a system supports a steady state characterized by a constant condensate density and a steady but periodically changing momentum distribution, whose time average is described exactly by the generalized Gibbs ensemble. We discuss how the nc -induced effective interaction, which cannot be ignored on the grounds of the adiabatic approximation for modes near the gapless Goldstone mode, can significantly affect condensate populations and Tan's contact for a Bose gas that has undergone a deep quench. In particular, we find that even when the Bose gas is quenched to unitarity, nc(t) does not completely deplete, approaching, instead, to a steady state with a finite condensate fraction. ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics; KITP, University of Santa Barbara.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamics of Bose-Einstein Condensates with Long-Range Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wunner, G.; Cartarius, H.; Fabcic, T.; Koeberle, P.; Main, J.; Schwidder, T.

    2008-11-13

    The motto of this paper is: Let's face Bose-Einstein condensation through nonlinear dynamics. We do this by choosing variational forms of the condensate wave functions (of given symmetry classes), which convert the Bose-Einstein condensates via the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation into Hamiltonian systems that can be studied using the methods of nonlinear dynamics. We consider in particular cold quantum gases where long-range interactions between the neutral atoms are present, in addition to the conventional short-range contact interaction, viz. gravity-like interactions, and dipole-dipole interactions. The results obtained serve as a useful guide in the search for nonlinear dynamics effects in numerically exact quantum calculations for Bose-Einstein condensates. A main result is the prediction of the existence of stable islands as well as chaotic regions for excited states of dipolar condensates, which could be checked experimentally.

  7. Core excitation and decay in rare gas mono- and multilayers on a metal surface: screening, deexcitation, and desorption of neutrals and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocker, G.; Feulner, P.; Scheuerer, R.; Zhu, L.; Menzel, D.

    1990-06-01

    In order to investigate the modification of excitation and decay of core holes by condensation and adsorption in the simplest possible cases, as well as the coupling to atomic motion, we have studied the Ar2p and Kr3d excitation regions in Ar and Kr mono- and multilayers on Ru(001). Using synchrotron radiation from BESSY (Berlin), total and Auger electron yields and yields of desorbing ions and neutrals, as function of photon energy, as well as decay electron spectra for specific primary excitations have been measured. The main results are: Multilayers: Energies for resonant core excitations are shifted to higher values by 0.6 to 1 eV compared to free atoms; for Kr, surface (smaller shifts) and bulk excitations can be distinguished. Autoionization and normal Auger spectra are clearly different, as in the gas phase. Besides desorption of neutral atoms as in the valence region, singly and doubly charged ions as well as ionic clusters are desorbed. Monolayers: The shift of resonant excitation energies relative to the gas phase is smaller than for condensed layers. Decay spectra for resonant and non-resonant excitations are identical, as for strongly coupled chemisorbates, proving that charge exchange with the metal is fast compared to core decay. As in the valence region, only neutral atoms desorb. The results shed light on the screening and charge transfer behaviour and on the mechanisms of stimulated desorption which are operative in them.

  8. Sideband Rabi spectroscopy of finite-temperature trapped Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, Baptiste; Fadel, Matteo; Schmied, Roman; Treutlein, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    We use Rabi spectroscopy to explore the low-energy excitation spectrum of a finite-temperature Bose gas of rubidium atoms across the phase transition to a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). To record this spectrum, we coherently drive the atomic population between two spin states. A small relative displacement of the spin-specific trapping potentials enables sideband transitions between different motional states. The intrinsic nonlinearity of the motional spectrum, mainly originating from two-body interactions, makes it possible to resolve and address individual excitation lines. Together with sensitive atom counting, this constitutes a feasible technique to count single excited atoms of a BEC and to determine the temperature of nearly pure condensates. As an example, we show that for a nearly pure BEC of N =800 atoms the first excited state has a population of less than five atoms, corresponding to an upper bound on the temperature of 30 nK .

  9. Landau criterion for an anisotropic Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zeng-Qiang

    2017-03-01

    In this work we discuss the Landau criterion for anisotropic superfluidity. To this end we consider a pointlike impurity moving in a uniform Bose-Einstein condensate with either interparticle dipole-dipole interaction or Raman-induced spin-orbit coupling. In both cases we find that the Landau critical velocity vc is generally smaller than the sound velocity in the moving direction. Beyond vc, the energy dissipation rate is explicitly calculated via a perturbation approach. In the plane-wave phase of a spin-orbit-coupled Bose gas, the dissipationless motion is suppressed by the Raman coupling even in the direction orthogonal to the recoil momentum. Our predictions can be tested in the experiments with ultracold atoms.

  10. Internal Josephson effects in spinor dipolar Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Yasunaga, Masashi; Tsubota, Makoto

    2010-02-15

    We theoretically study the internal Josephson effect, which is driven by spin-exchange interactions and magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, in a three-level system for spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates, obtaining novel spin dynamics. We introduce single spatial mode approximations into the Gross-Pitaevskii equations and derive the Josephson-type equations, which are analogous to tunneling currents through three junctions between three superconductors. From an analogy with two interacting nonrigid pendulums, we identify unique varied oscillational modes, called the 0-{pi}, 0-running, running-running, 2n{pi} and running-2{pi}, single nonrigid pendulum, and two rigid pendulums phase modes. These Josephson modes in the three states are expected to be found in real atomic Bose gas systems.

  11. Bose polarons in the strongly interacting regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedar, Dhruv; Hu, Ming-Guang; van de Graaff, Michael; Corson, John; Cornell, Eric; Jin, Deborah

    2016-05-01

    Impurities immersed in and interacting with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) are predicted to form quasiparticle excitations called Bose polarons. I will present experimental evidence of Bose polarons in cold atoms obtained using radio-frequency spectroscopy to measure the excitation spectrum of fermionic K-40 impurities interacting with a BEC of Rb-87 atoms. We use an interspecies Feshbach resonance to tune the interactions between the impurities and the bosons, and we take data in the strongly interacting regime.

  12. Free-free absorption of infrared radiation in collisions of electrons with neutral rare-gas atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A relationship between the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption cross section and the electron neutral momentum transfer cross section has been utilized to determine the infrared free-free continuum absorption coefficient for the negative ions of helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon. The values of the momentum transfer cross section for this calculation have been obtained from experimental measurements. Analytical expressions for the absorption coefficient have also been developed. From the results of this calculation, it is possible to determine the absorption coefficient per unit electron density per neutral atom for temperatures in the range from 2500 to 25,000 K. The results are compared with those from tabulations of previous calculations and those computed from theoretical values of the phase shifts for the elastic scattering of electrons by neutral atoms.

  13. Polymer Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, E.; Chacón-Acosta, G.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we analyze a non-interacting one-dimensional polymer Bose-Einstein condensate in a harmonic trap within the semiclassical approximation. We use an effective Hamiltonian coming from the polymer quantization that arises in loop quantum gravity. We calculate the number of particles in order to obtain the critical temperature. The Bose-Einstein functions are replaced by series, whose high order terms are related to powers of the polymer length. It is shown that the condensation temperature presents a shift respect to the standard case, for small values of the polymer scale. In typical experimental conditions, it is possible to establish a bound for λ2 up to ≲10-16 m2. To improve this bound we should decrease the frequency of the trap and also decrease the number of particles.

  14. Morphology, luminescence, and electrical resistance response to H 2 and CO gas exposure of porous InP membranes prepared by electrochemistry in a neutral electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volciuc, O.; Monaico, E.; Enachi, M.; Ursaki, V. V.; Pavlidis, D.; Popa, V.; Tiginyanu, I. M.

    2010-11-01

    Porous InP membranes have been prepared by anodization of InP wafers with electron concentration of 1 × 10 17 cm -3 and 1 × 10 18 cm -3 in a neutral NaCl electrolyte. The internal surfaces of pores in some membranes were modified by electrochemical deposition of gold in a pulsed voltage regime. Photoluminescence and photosensitivity measurements indicate efficient light trapping and porous surface passivation. The photoluminescence and electrical resistivity of the membranes are sensitive to the adsorption of H 2 and CO gas molecules. These properties are also influenced by the deposition of Au nanoparticles inside the pores.

  15. The Star Formation Rate Efficiency of Neutral Atomic-Dominated Hydrogen Gas in the Ooutskirts of Star-Forming Galaxies From z approx. 1 to z approx. 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafelski, Marc; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Fumagalli, Michele; Neeleman, Marcel; Teplitz, Harry I.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Scarlata, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Current observational evidence suggests that the star formation rate (SFR)efficiency of neutral atomic hydrogen gas measured in damped Ly(alpha) systems (DLAs) at z approx. 3 is more than 10 times lower than predicted by the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS)relation. To understand the origin of this deficit, and to investigate possible evolution with redshift and galaxy properties, we measure the SFR efficiency of atomic gas at z approx. 1, z approx. 2, and z approx. 3 around star-forming galaxies. We use new robust photometric redshifts in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to create galaxy stacks in these three redshift bins, and measure the SFR efficiency by combining DLA absorber statistics with the observed rest-frame UV emission in the galaxies' outskirts. We find that the SFR efficiency of H I gas at z > 1 is approx. 1%-3% of that predicted by the KS relation. Contrary to simulations and models that predict a reduced SFR efficiency with decreasing metallicity and thus with increasing redshift, we find no significant evolution in the SFR efficiency with redshift. Our analysis instead suggests that the reduced SFR efficiency is driven by the low molecular content of this atomic-dominated phase, with metallicity playing a secondary effect in regulating the conversion between atomic and molecular gas. This interpretation is supported by the similarity between the observed SFR efficiency and that observed in local atomic-dominated gas, such as in the outskirts of local spiral galaxies and local dwarf galaxies.

  16. Soliton resonance in bose-einstein condensate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail; Kulikov, I.

    2002-01-01

    A new phenomenon in nonlinear dispersive systems, including a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC), has been described. It is based upon a resonance between an externally induced soliton and 'eigen-solitons' of the homogeneous cubic Schrodinger equation. There have been shown that a moving source of positive /negative potential induces bright /dark solitons in an attractive / repulsive Bose condensate.

  17. Collision of Bose Condensate Dark Matter structures

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman, F. S.

    2008-12-04

    The status of the scalar field or Bose condensate dark matter model is presented. Results about the solitonic behavior in collision of structures is presented as a possible explanation to the recent-possibly-solitonic behavior in the bullet cluster merger. Some estimates about the possibility to simulate the bullet cluster under the Bose Condensate dark matter model are indicated.

  18. Bose-Einstein condensation of light: general theory.

    PubMed

    Sob'yanin, Denis Nikolaevich

    2013-08-01

    A theory of Bose-Einstein condensation of light in a dye-filled optical microcavity is presented. The theory is based on the hierarchical maximum entropy principle and allows one to investigate the fluctuating behavior of the photon gas in the microcavity for all numbers of photons, dye molecules, and excitations at all temperatures, including the whole critical region. The master equation describing the interaction between photons and dye molecules in the microcavity is derived and the equivalence between the hierarchical maximum entropy principle and the master equation approach is shown. The cases of a fixed mean total photon number and a fixed total excitation number are considered, and a much sharper, nonparabolic onset of a macroscopic Bose-Einstein condensation of light in the latter case is demonstrated. The theory does not use the grand canonical approximation, takes into account the photon polarization degeneracy, and exactly describes the microscopic, mesoscopic, and macroscopic Bose-Einstein condensation of light. Under certain conditions, it predicts sub-Poissonian statistics of the photon condensate and the polarized photon condensate, and a universal relation takes place between the degrees of second-order coherence for these condensates. In the macroscopic case, there appear a sharp jump in the degrees of second-order coherence, a sharp jump and kink in the reduced standard deviations of the fluctuating numbers of photons in the polarized and whole condensates, and a sharp peak, a cusp, of the Mandel parameter for the whole condensate in the critical region. The possibility of nonclassical light generation in the microcavity with the photon Bose-Einstein condensate is predicted.

  19. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  20. Pluto, Near and Far: PEPSSI Measurements of Energetic Particles During the New Horizons Flyby and Investigating a Pluto Torus of Circumsolar Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Matthew Eric; Kollmann, Peter; McNutt, Ralph L.; Smith, H. Todd; Bagenal, Fran; Brown, Lawrence E.; Elliott, Heather A.; Haggerty, Dennis K.; Horanyi, Mihaly; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Kusterer, Martha; Lisse, Carey M.; McComas, David J.; Piquette, Marcus; Strobel, Darrell; Szalay, Jamey; Vandegriff, Jon; Zirnstein, Eric; Ennico, Kimberly; Olkin, Cathy B.; Weaver, Harold A.; Young, Leslie A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    The energetic particle environment at Pluto has been unknown, and little modeled, until this year’s historic encounter by the New Horizon (NH) spacecraft on 14 July 2015. The first energetic particle observations, made with the Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) instrument, were downlinked in August 2015. There are variations in the intensities of suprathermal (~3-30 keV/nucleon) ions that are associated with a combination of the position of the spacecraft relative to Pluto, the look direction of PEPSSI, and (potentially) temporal evolution in the system. We present the results of the near encounter with Pluto, to as close as ~11.6 Rp (1 Rp = 1187 km), which, early analysis shows, include large intensity variations associated with Pluto. We also present the concept of a neutral gas torus surrounding the Sun, aligned with Pluto’s orbit, and place observational constraints on it based primarily on comparison of NH measurements with a 3-D Monte Carlo model adapted from analogous satellite tori surrounding Saturn and Jupiter. Such a torus, or perhaps partial torus, could result from neutral N2 escaping from Pluto’s exosphere. Unlike other more massive planets, gaseous neutrals escape Pluto readily via Jeans escape (i.e., owing to the high thermal speed relative to the escape velocity). These neutrals are not directly observable by NH but, once ionized to N2+ or N+ via photolysis or charge exchange, are picked up by the solar wind, ultimately reaching ~50 keV or more, making these pickup ions detectable by PEPSSI. This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  1. The BCS Bose crossover theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S. K.; de Llano, M.; Sevilla, F. J.; Solís, M. A.; Valencia, J. J.

    2007-03-01

    We contrast four distinct versions of the BCS-Bose statistical crossover theory according to the form assumed for the electron-number equation that accompanies the BCS gap equation. The four versions correspond to explicitly accounting for two-hole-(2h) as well as two-electron-(2e) Cooper pairs (CPs), or both in equal proportions, or only either kind. This follows from a recent generalization of the Bose-Einstein condensation (GBEC) statistical theory that includes not boson-boson interactions but rather 2e- and also (without loss of generality) 2h-CPs interacting with unpaired electrons and holes in a single-band model that is easily converted into a two-band model. The GBEC theory is essentially an extension of the Friedberg-Lee 1989 BEC theory of superconductors that excludes 2h-CPs. It can thus recover, when the numbers of 2h- and 2e-CPs in both BE-condensed and non-condensed states are separately equal, the BCS gap equation for all temperatures and couplings as well as the zero-temperature BCS (rigorous-upper-bound) condensation energy for all couplings. But ignoring either 2h- or 2e-CPs it can do neither. In particular, only half the BCS condensation energy is obtained in the two crossover versions ignoring either kind of CPs. We show how critical temperatures Tc from the original BCS-Bose crossover theory in 2D require unphysically large couplings for the Cooper/BCS model interaction to differ significantly from the Tcs of ordinary BCS theory (where the number equation is substituted by the assumption that the chemical potential equals the Fermi energy).

  2. Quantum Monte Carlo method for the Bose-Hubbard model with harmonic confining potential.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Naoki

    2009-02-01

    We study the Bose-Hubbard model with an external harmonic field, which is effective for modeling a cold atomic Bose gas trapped in an optical lattice. We modify the directed-loop algorithm to simulate large systems efficiently. As a demonstration we carry out the simulation of a system consisting of 1. 8 x 10{5} particles on a 64{3} lattice. These numbers are comparable to those in the pioneering experimental work by Greiner [Nature (London) 415, 39 (2002)]. Furthermore, we observe coherence between two superfluid spheres separated by a Mott insulator region in a "wedding-cake" structure.

  3. Properties of the single-site reduced density matrix in the Bose-Bose resonance model in the ground state and in quantum quenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfner, F.; Heidrich-Meisner, F.

    2016-06-01

    We study properties of the single-site reduced density matrix in the Bose-Bose resonance model as a function of system parameters. This model describes a single-component Bose gas with a resonant coupling to a diatomic molecular state, here defined on a lattice. A main goal is to demonstrate that the eigenstates of the single-site reduced density matrix have structures that are characteristic for the various quantum phases of this system. Since the Hamiltonian conserves only the global particle number but not the number of bosons and molecules individually, these eigenstates, referred to as optimal modes, can be nontrivial linear combinations of bare eigenstates of the molecular and boson particle number. We numerically analyze the optimal modes and their weights, the latter giving the importance of the corresponding state, in the ground state of the Bose-Bose resonance model. We find that the single-site von Neumann entropy is sensitive to the location of the phase boundaries. We explain the structure of the optimal modes and their weight spectra using perturbation theory and via a comparison to results for the single-component Bose-Hubbard model. We further study the dynamical evolution of the optimal modes and of the single-site entanglement entropy in two quantum quenches that cross phase boundaries of the model and show that these quantities are thermal in the steady state. For our numerical calculations, we use the density-matrix renormalization group method for ground-state calculations and time evolution in a Krylov subspace for the quench dynamics as well as exact diagonalization.

  4. Superfluidity of a nonequilibrium Bose-Einstein condensate of polaritons

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, Michiel; Savona, Vincenzo

    2010-02-01

    We study theoretically superfluidity in a driven-dissipative Bose gas out of thermal equilibrium, and discuss the relation with conventional superfluids. We show how the superfluid behavior is characterized by a dramatic increase in the lifetime of a quantized vortex and point out the influence of the spatial geometry of the condensate. We apply our study to a condensate of polaritons in a semiconductor microcavity, whose properties can be directly inferred from optical spectroscopy. We propose three different experimental schemes to measure the vorticity of the polariton condensate.

  5. Robustness of discrete semifluxons in closed Bose-Hubbard chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallemí, A.; Guilleumas, M.; Martorell, J.; Mayol, R.; Polls, A.; Juliá-Díaz, B.

    2016-07-01

    We present the properties of the ground state and low-energy excitations of Bose-Hubbard chains with a geometry that varies from open to closed and with a tunable twisted link. In the vicinity of the symmetric π-flux case the system behaves as an interacting gas of discrete semifluxons for finite chains and interactions in the Josephson regime. The energy spectrum of the system is studied by direct diagonalization and by solving the corresponding Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. The atom-atom interactions are found to enhance the presence of strongly correlated macroscopic superpositions of semifluxons.

  6. Pairing and condensation in a resonant Bose-Fermi mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, Elisa; Pieri, Pierbiagio

    2010-05-01

    We study by diagrammatic means a Bose-Fermi mixture, with boson-fermion coupling tuned by a Fano-Feshbach resonance. For increasing coupling, the growing boson-fermion pairing correlations progressively reduce the boson condensation temperature and make it eventually vanish at a critical coupling. Such quantum critical point depends very weakly on the population imbalance and, for vanishing boson densities, coincides with that found for the polaron-molecule transition in a strongly imbalanced Fermi gas, thus bridging two quite distinct physical systems.

  7. Probing the Bose glass-superfluid transition using quantum quenches of disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meldgin, Carolyn; Ray, Ushnish; Russ, Philip; Chen, David; Ceperley, David M.; Demarco, Brian

    2016-07-01

    The disordered Bose-Hubbard model--a paradigm for strongly correlated and disordered bosonic systems--is central to our understanding of quantum phase transitions. Despite extensive theoretical work on the disordered Bose-Hubbard model, little is known about the impact of temperature, the dynamical behaviour of quantum phases, and how equilibrium is affected during quantum phase transitions. These issues are critically important to applications such as quantum annealing and electronics based on quantum phase transitions. Here, we use a quantum quench of disorder in an ultracold lattice gas to dynamically probe the superfluid-Bose glass quantum phase transition at non-zero temperature ( Fig. 1). By measuring excitations generated during the quench, we provide evidence for superfluid puddles in the Bose glass phase and produce a superfluid-Bose glass phase diagram consistent with completely constrained, finite temperature, and equilibrium quantum Monte Carlo simulations. The residual energy from the quench, which is an efficacy measure for optimization through quantum annealing, is unchanged for quench times spanning nearly a hundred tunnelling times.

  8. Topological Superfluid in a Fermi-Bose Mixture with a High Critical Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhigang; Bruun, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    We show that a 2D spin-polarized Fermi gas immersed in a 3D Bose-Einstein condensate constitutes a very promising system for realizing a px+i py superfluid. The fermions attract each other via an induced interaction mediated by the bosons, and the resulting pairing is analyzed with retardation effects fully taken into account. This is further combined with Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) theory to obtain reliable results for the superfluid critical temperature. We show that both the strength and the range of the induced interaction can be tuned experimentally, which can be used to make the critical temperature approach the maximum value allowed by general BKT theory. Moreover, this is achieved while keeping the Fermi-Bose interaction weak so that three-body losses are small. Our results show that realizing a topological superfluid with atomic Fermi-Bose mixtures is within experimental reach.

  9. Ultracold Bose gases: From the Gross-Pitaevskii to the fractional quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhongale, Satyan Gopal

    Ultra-cold Bose gases present an ideal environment for the study of many-body physics. These systems can be prepared under various experimental conditions with precise control. Techniques like Feshbach resonances allow us to dynamically tune the inter atomic interaction, from strongly attractive to a strongly repulsive one. In the first part of the thesis, we study the weakly interacting Bose gas in connection with the dynamics of an atom laser. Here we propose a possible optical pumping model for loading the reservoir of a continuous wave atom laser. The finite temperature effects like phase diffusion require a thorough understanding of the kinetic regime of the dilute Bose gas. In this respect, we develop a non-Markovian quantum kinetic theory and thereby show the emergence of different time scales for correlation and subsequent relaxation to an equilibrium states. Using numerical simulations, we also predict the damping rates and frequencies of collective modes. In the second part, we study the strongly correlated regime where the interaction energy is greater than any other (single particle) energy scale of the problem. Here, in the presence of a Feshbach interaction we predict the generation of novel strongly correlated paired states. Such states while similar to the one observed in a 5/2 fractional quantum hall effect, are unique in symmetry to the Bose gas system.

  10. Description of Gas-Phase Ion/Neutral Interactions in Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry: CV Prediction Using Calibration Runs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, David; Aspenleiter, Julia; Volmer, Dietrich A.

    2014-09-01

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) coupled to mass spectrometry is increasingly used in both quantitative analyses of biological samples and as a means of removing background interferences for enhanced selectivity and improved quality of mass spectra. However, DMS separation efficiency using dry inert gases often lacks the required selectivity to achieve baseline separation. Polar gas-phase modifiers such as alcohols are therefore frequently employed to improve selectivity via clustering/declustering processes. The choice of an optimal modifier currently relies on trial and error experiments, making method development a tedious activity. It was the goal of this study to establish a means of CV prediction for compounds using a homologous series of alcohols as gas-phase modifiers. This prediction was based on linear regression of compensation voltages of two calibration runs for the alcohols with the lowest and the highest molecular weights and readily available descriptors such as proton affinity and gas phase acidity of the modifier molecules. All experiments were performed on a commercial quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with a DMS device between electrospray ionization source and entrance quadrupole lens. We evaluated our approach using a homologous series of 4-alkylbenzoic acids and a selection of 23 small molecules of high chemical diversity. Predicted CV values typically deviated from the experimentally determined values by less than 0.5 V. Several test compounds changed their ion mobility behavior for the investigated gas phase modifiers (e.g., from type B to type A) and thus could thus not be evaluated.

  11. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE DENSE NEUTRAL AND DIFFUSE IONIZED GAS IN THE THICK DISKS OF TWO EDGE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Rueff, Katherine M.; Howk, J. Christopher; Pitterle, Marissa; Hirschauer, Alec S.; Fox, Andrew J.; Savage, Blair D.

    2013-03-15

    We present high-resolution, optical images (BVI + H{alpha}) of the multiphase interstellar medium (ISM) in the thick disks of the edge-on spiral galaxies NGC 4013 and NGC 4302. Our images from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Large Binocular Telescope, and WIYN 3.5 m telescope reveal an extensive population of filamentary dust absorption seen to z {approx}2-2.5 kpc. Many of these dusty thick disk structures have characteristics reminiscent of molecular clouds found in the Milky Way disk. Our H{alpha} images show that the extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (DIG) in these galaxies is dominated by a smooth, diffuse component. The strongly filamentary morphologies of the dust absorption have no counterpart in the smoothly distributed H{alpha} emission. We argue that the thick disk DIG and dust-bearing filaments trace physically distinct phases of the thick disk ISM, the latter tracing a dense, warm or cold neutral medium. The dense, dusty matter in the thick disks of spiral galaxies is largely tracing matter ejected from the thin disk via energetic feedback from massive stars. The high densities of the gas may be a result of converging gas flows. This dense material fuels some thick disk star formation, as evidenced by the presence of thick disk H II regions.

  12. A Massively Parallel Particle Code for Rarefied Ionized and Neutral Gas Flows in Earth and Planetary Atmospheres, Ionospheres and Magnetospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the global structure, dynamics, and physical and chemical processes occurring in the upper atmospheres, exospheres, and ionospheres of the Earth, the other planets, comets and planetary satellites and their interactions with their outer particles and fields environs, it is often necessary to address the fundamentally non-equilibrium aspects of the physical environment. These are regions where complex chemistry, energetics, and electromagnetic field influences are important. Traditional approaches are based largely on hydrodynamic or magnetohydrodynamic MHD) formulations and are very important and highly useful. However, these methods often have limitations in rarefied physical regimes where the molecular collision rates and ion gyrofrequencies are small and where interactions with ionospheres and upper neutral atmospheres are important.

  13. Bose-Einstein Condensation in low dimensionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nho, Kwangsik; Landau, D. P.

    2006-03-01

    Using path integral Monte Carlo simulation methods[1], we have studied properties of Bose-Einstein Condensates harmonically trapped in low dimemsion. Each boson has a hard-sphere potential whose core radius equals its corresponding scattering length. We have tightly confined the motion of trapped particles in one or more direction by increasing the trap anisotropy in order to simulate lower dimensional atomic gases. We have investigated the effect of both the temperature and the dimemsionality on the energetics and structural properties such as the total energy, the density profile, and the superfluid fraction. Our results show that the physics of low dimensional bosonic systems is very different from that of their three dimensional counterparts[2]. The superfluid fraction for a quasi-2D boson gas decreases faster than that for both a quasi-1D system[3] and a true 3D system with increasing temperature. The superfluid fraction decreases gradually as the two-body interaction strength increases although it shows no noticable dependence for both a quasi-1D system and a true 3D system. [1] K. Nho and D. P. Landau, Phys. Rev. A. 70, 53614 (2004).[2] N. D. Mermin and H. Wagner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 22, 1133 (1966);1.5inP. C. Hohenberg, Phys. Rev. 158, 383 (1967).[3] K. Nho and D. Blume, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 193601 (2005).

  14. Perturbative thermodynamic geometry of nonextensive ideal classical, Bose, and Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadeh, Hosein; Adli, Fereshteh; Nouri, Sahereh

    2016-12-01

    We investigate perturbative thermodynamic geometry of nonextensive ideal classical, Bose, and Fermi gases. We show that the intrinsic statistical interaction of nonextensive Bose (Fermi) gas is attractive (repulsive) similar to the extensive case but the value of thermodynamic curvature is changed by a nonextensive parameter. In contrary to the extensive ideal classical gas, the nonextensive one may be divided to two different regimes. According to the deviation parameter of the system to the nonextensive case, one can find a special value of fugacity, z*, where the sign of thermodynamic curvature is changed. Therefore, we argue that the nonextensive parameter induces an attractive (repulsive) statistical interaction for z z* ) for an ideal classical gas. Also, according to the singular point of thermodynamic curvature, we consider the condensation of nonextensive Boson gas.

  15. Improvement of activated carbons as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral solutions by ammonia gas treatment and their performance in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Valerie J.; Nieto Delgado, Cesar; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-11-01

    Commercially available activated carbon (AC) powders from different precursor materials (peat, coconut shell, coal, and hardwood) were treated with ammonia gas at 700 °C to improve their performance as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral pH solutions used in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The ammonia treated ACs exhibited better catalytic performance in rotating ring-disk electrode tests than their untreated precursors, with the bituminous based AC most improved, with an onset potential of Eonset = 0.12 V (untreated, Eonset = 0.08 V) and n = 3.9 electrons transferred in oxygen reduction (untreated, n = 3.6), and the hardwood based AC (treated, Eonset = 0.03 V, n = 3.3; untreated, Eonset = -0.04 V, n = 3.0). Ammonia treatment decreased oxygen content by 29-58%, increased nitrogen content to 1.8 atomic %, and increased the basicity of the bituminous, peat, and hardwood ACs. The treated coal based AC cathodes had higher maximum power densities in MFCs (2450 ± 40 mW m-2) than the other AC cathodes or a Pt/C cathode (2100 ± 1 mW m-2). These results show that reduced oxygen abundance and increased nitrogen functionalities on the AC surface can increase catalytic performance for oxygen reduction in neutral media.

  16. Behaviour and stability of Trivelpiece-Gould modes in non-neutral plasma containing small density fraction of background gas ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeliseyev, Y. N.

    2013-03-19

    It is shown that the frequencies of Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) modes in non-neutral plasma can get into the low-frequency range due to the Doppler shift caused by plasma rotation in crossed fields. TG modes interact with the ion modes that leads to plasma instability. In paper the frequency spectrum of 'cold' electron plasma completely filling a waveguide and containing small density fraction of ions of background gas is determined numerically. For ions the kinetic description is used. Oscillations having azimuthal number m= 2 are considered. In this case both low- and upper-hybrid TG modes get into the low-frequency range. The spectrum consists of families of 'modified' ion cyclotron (MIC) modes and electron TG modes with the frequencies equal to hybrid frequencies with the Doppler shift. The growth rates of upper-hybrid modes are much faster than the growth rates of low-hybrid and MIC modes.

  17. Pesticide residue analysis of a dietary ingredient by gas chromatography/selected-ion monitoring mass spectrometry using neutral alumina solid-phase extraction cleanup.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mijeong Lee; Zahn, Michael; Trinh, Thao; Brooke, Fay A; Ma, Wenwen

    2008-01-01

    A sample cleanup procedure has been developed to remove coextractives that interfere with pesticide residue analysis of a dietary ingredient (Product B), an extract consisting of Scutellaria baicalensis and Acacia catechu. Samples were extracted using 1% acetic acid in acetonitrile, followed by solid-phase extraction and analysis by capillary gas chromatography with mass spectrometry in the selective-ion monitoring mode. Neutral alumina (alumina N) was found to be the most effective sorbent to remove coextractives from Product B; other materials that were tested but failed to remove interference were graphitized carbon black/primary-secondary amine (PSA), octadecylsilane (C18), Florisil, Oasis MCX, and strong anion exchange-PSA. The method was specifically developed for Product B, which was spiked with 41 organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides, and resulted in the recovery of 80 to 120% at U.S. Pharmacopeia limits (0.06 to 4 microg/g) for the majority of the pesticides.

  18. Coupling of the Photosphere to the Solar Corona: A laboratory and observational study of Alfvén wave interaction with a neutral gas

    SciTech Connect

    watts, Christopher

    2010-01-31

    The grant funded a three year project to investigate the role of Alfvén waves as a possible mechanism heating plasmas, with relevance to solar coronal heating. Evidence suggests that there is strong coupling between the solar photosphere, corona and solar wind through Alfvén wave interaction with the neutral gas particles. A laboratory experimental and solar observational plan was designed to investigate in detail this interaction. Although many of the original research goals were met, difficulties in detecting the Alfvén wave signature meant that much of the research was stymied. This report summaries the work during the grant period, the challenges encountered and overcome, and the future research directions.

  19. Neutral hydrogen gas, past and future star formation in galaxies in and around the `Sausage' merging galaxy cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Oosterloo, Tom; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Sobral, David; van Weeren, Reinout; Dawson, William

    2015-09-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 (z = 0.188, nicknamed `Sausage') is an extremely massive (M200 ˜ 2.0 × 1015 M⊙), merging cluster with shock waves towards its outskirts, which was found to host numerous emission line galaxies. We performed extremely deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope H I observations of the `Sausage' cluster to investigate the effect of the merger and the shocks on the gas reservoirs fuelling present and future star formation (SF) in cluster members. By using spectral stacking, we find that the emission line galaxies in the `Sausage' cluster have, on average, as much H I gas as field galaxies (when accounting for the fact cluster galaxies are more massive than the field galaxies), contrary to previous studies. Since the cluster galaxies are more massive than the field spirals, they may have been able to retain their gas during the cluster merger. The large H I reservoirs are expected to be consumed within ˜0.75-1.0 Gyr by the vigorous SF and active galactic nuclei activity and/or driven out by the outflows we observe. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a large fraction of H α emission line cluster galaxies correlates well with the radio broad-band emission, tracing supernova remnant emission. This suggests that the cluster galaxies, all located in post-shock regions, may have been undergoing sustained SFR for at least 100 Myr. This fully supports the interpretation proposed by Stroe et al. and Sobral et al. that gas-rich cluster galaxies have been triggered to form stars by the passage of the shock.

  20. Recent developments in Bose-Einstein condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalman, G.

    1997-09-22

    This paper contains viewgraphs on developments on Bose-Einstein condensation. Some topics covered are: strongly coupled coulomb systems; standard response functions of the first and second kind; dynamical mean field theory; quasi localized charge approximation; and the main equations.

  1. Can genetically modified Escherichia coli with neutral buoyancy induced by gas vesicles be used as an alternative method to clinorotation for microgravity studies?

    PubMed

    Benoit, Michael; Klaus, David

    2005-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to affect various bacterial growth parameters. It is proposed that weightlessness allows the cells to remain evenly distributed, consequently altering the chemical makeup of their surrounding fluid, and hence indirectly affecting their physiological behaviour. In support of this argument, ground-based studies using clinostats to partially simulate the quiescent environment attained in microgravity have generally been successful in producing bacterial growth characteristics that mimic responses reported under actual space conditions. A novel approach for evaluating the effects of reduced cell sedimentation is presented here through use of Escherichia coli cultures genetically modified to be neutrally buoyant. Since clinorotation would not (or would only minimally) affect cell distribution of this already near-colloidal cell system, it was hypothesized that the effects on final population density would be eliminated relative to a static control. Gas-vesicle-producing E. coli cultures were grown under clinostat and static conditions and the culture densities at 60 h were compared. As a control, E. coli that do not produce gas vesicles, but were otherwise identical to the experimental strain, were also grown under clinostat and static conditions. As hypothesized, no significant difference was observed in cell populations at 60 h between the clinorotated and static gas-vesicle-producing E. coli cultures, while the cells that did not produce gas vesicles showed a mean increase in population density of 10.5 % (P = 0.001). These results further suggest that the lack of cumulative cell sedimentation is the dominant effect of space flight on non-stirred, in vitro E. coli cultures.

  2. Bose-Einstein condensates in rotating lattices.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Rajiv; Holland, M J; Carr, L D

    2006-02-17

    Strongly interacting bosons in a two-dimensional rotating square lattice are investigated via a modified Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian. Such a system corresponds to a rotating lattice potential imprinted on a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate. Second-order quantum phase transitions between states of different symmetries are observed at discrete rotation rates. For the square lattice we study, there are four possible ground-state symmetries.

  3. Atomic Phase Conjugation From a Bose Condensate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-01

    Schrödinger equation that we use in this paper is not the Gross - Pitaevskii nonlinear Schrödinger equation familiar in the description of Bose conden...dipole- dipole interaction as local, so that our nonlinear Schrödinger equation is itself local, just like the Gross - Pitaevskii equation. However, the...dynamics of a Bose condensate is described by the Gross - Pitaevskii nonlinear Schrödinger equation [15], in which the nonlinearity results from short

  4. A simulation study of interactions of Space-Shuttle generated electron beams with ambient plasma and neutral gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The object was to conduct large scale simulations of electron beams injected into space. The study of active injection of electron beams from spacecraft is important since it provides valuable insight into beam-plasma interactions and the development of current systems in the ionosphere. However, the beam injection itself is not simple, being constrained by the ability of the spacecraft to draw return current from the ambient plasma. The generation of these return currents is dependent on several factors, including the density of the ambient plasma relative to the beam density, the presence of neutrals around the spacecraft, the configuration of the spacecraft, and the motion of the spacecraft through the plasma. Two dimensional particle simulations with collisional processes included are used to show how these different and often coupled processes can be utilized to enhance beam propagation from the spacecraft. To understand the radical expansion of mechanism of an electron beam from a highly charged spacecraft, two dimensional particle in cell simulations were conducted for a high density electron beam injected parallel to magnetic fields from an isolated equipotential conductor into a cold background plasma. The simulations indicate that charge buildup at the beam stagnation point causes the beam to expand radially to the beam electron gyroradius.

  5. A simulation study of interactions of space-shuttle generated electron beams with ambient plasma and neutral gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to conduct large scale simulations of electron beams injected into space. The study of the active injection of electron beams from spacecraft is important, as it provides valuable insight into the plasma beam interactions and the development of current systems in the ionosphere. However, the beam injection itself is not simple, being constrained by the ability of the spacecraft to draw current from the ambient plasma. The generation of these return currents is dependent on several factors, including the density of the ambient plasma relative to the beam density, the presence of neutrals around the spacecraft, the configuration of the spacecraft, and the motion of the spacecraft through the plasma. Two dimensional (three velocity) particle simulations with collisional processes included are used to show how these different and often coupled processes can be used to enhance beam propagation from the spacecraft. To understand the radial expansion mechanism of an electron beam injected from a highly charged spacecraft, two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations were conducted for a high density electron beam injected parallel to magnetic fields from an isolated equipotential conductor into a cold background plasma. The simulations indicate that charge build-up at the beam stagnation point causes the beam to expand radially to the beam electron gyroradius.

  6. Interactions of neutral and singly charged keV atomic particles with gas-phase adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Fresia; Bari, Sadia; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Schlathoelter, Thomas

    2007-07-21

    KeV atomic particles traversing biological matter are subject to charge exchange and screening effects which dynamically change this particle's effective charge. The understanding of the collision cascade along the track thus requires a detailed knowledge of the interaction dynamics of radiobiologically relevant molecules, such as DNA building blocks or water, not only with ionic but also with neutral species. We have studied collisions of keV H{sup +}, He{sup +}, and C{sup +} ions and H{sup 0}, He{sup 0}, and C{sup 0} atoms with the DNA base adenine by means of high resolution time-of-flight spectrometry. For H{sup 0} and H{sup +} we find qualitatively very similar fragmentation patterns, while for carbon, strong differences are observed when comparing C{sup 0} and C{sup +} impact. For collisions with He{sup 0} and He{sup +} projectiles, a pronounced delayed fragmentation channel is observed, which has not been reported before.

  7. Spin-incoherent one-dimensional spin-1 Bose Luttinger liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, H. H.; Yip, S.-K.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate spin-incoherent Luttinger liquid of a one-dimensional spin-1 Bose gas in a harmonic trap. In this regime highly degenerate spin configurations emerge since the energy splitting between different spin states is much less than the thermal energy of the system, while the temperature is low enough that the lowest energetic orbitals are occupied. As an example we numerically study the momentum distribution of a one-dimensional spin-1 Bose gas in Tonks-Girardeau gas limit and in the sector of zero magnetization. We find that the momentum distributions broaden as the number of atoms increase due to the averaging of spin function overlaps. Large momentum (p ) asymptotic is analytically derived, showing the universal 1 /p4 dependence. We demonstrate that the spin-incoherent Luttinger liquid has a momentum distribution also distinct from spinless bosons at finite temperature.

  8. Origin of saline, neutral-pH, reduced epithermal waters by reaction of acidic magmatic gas condensates with wall rock

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, M.H. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Fluid inclusions in quartz and sphalerite of epithermal veins containing galena, sphalerite and chalcopyrite with silver sulfides and electrum commonly have salinities of 2 to 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Examples include Bohemia, OR, Comstock, NV, and Creede, CO. Salinities in such base metal-rich systems are apparently greater than those in gold-adularia, base metal-poor systems such as Sleeper, NV, Republic, WA, and Hishikare, Kyushu. Saline epithermal fluids are commonly assumed to have been derived from saline magmatic brines, from local host formations, as has been suggested for Creede, or from evaporative concentration (boiling) of more dilute meteoric ground water. Another possibility, which may be the most common origin, is reaction of wall rocks with magmatic gas condensates rich in HCl and sulfuric acid. A mixture of one part Augustine Volcanic gas condensate in 10 parts cold ground water has a pH of 0.7 and the dominant cation is H[sup +] by a factor of 10[sup 4]. Calculated reaction of this condensate mixture with andesite at 300 C to a water/rock ratio (w/r) of 4.6 yields an NaCl-dominated fluid with a total salinity of 2.1 wt %. and pH 3.7. Further reaction, to w/r 0.14 yields a fluid salinity of 2.6 wt % and pH of 5.7; this fluid is in equilibrium with a propylitic alteration assemblage. Aqueous sulfide accumulates during the rock reaction as sulfate is reduced to sulfide when ferrous iron is oxidized to ferric iron. Sulfide concentration in the latter fluid is 32 ppm, far exceeding sulfate concentration. In the overall reaction, hydrogen ion is exchanged for base cations (including base metals) and sulfate is reduced to sulfide.

  9. Experiments on hydrodynamic transport in ultra-cold bose gasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, S. B.

    2012-09-01

    At temperatures near the absolut zero, a gas, here atomic sodium vapour, with high enough density cannot be described as tiny balls moving around as in classical physics. Since the temperature is low, the atoms are so slow that the matterwave of each atom starts to extend over the size of the atom and even over the interatomic distance. Therefore, they start to interfere like waves. Quantum mechanics start to dominate the physics in this regime. Further, depending on the sort of atoms (bosons or fermions) the atoms prefer to be in the same state or avoid to be in the same state. In the case of bosons as in the thesis, if the temperature is lowered to sub micro Kelvin temperature, a new state of matter appears after a phase transition - a macroscopic, standing wave, the Bose-Einstein condensate. This leads to a new phenomena: superfluidity - frictionless flow, second sound, vorticity and coherent scattering effects to name a few. The atoms are trapped in a elongated trap as in most of the experiments in ultra cold gasses. Usually experiments are done in a regime where the atoms seldomly collide with each other while travelling from one end to the other end of the cloud. In this experiment, however, the atoms collide many times with each other when they oscillate in the trap. This means that the cloud is hydrodynamic and leads to a very different behaviour. Two different sound waves (first and second sound), heat conduction, and collisional dominated transport can be observed in this case. The fact that the gas is weakly interacting allows comparison with current theory. At very low temperatures as in the experiments described in the thesis, the Bose character strongly alters the collisions of the atoms. The outcome of the collision does not only depend on the colliding atoms, but also on the atoms near by in phase space. The experiments outlined in this thesis cover some aspects of physics involved. Vortices have been created and observed in the Bose

  10. Prediction of neutral noble gas insertion compounds with heavier pnictides: FNgY (Ng = Kr and Xe; Y = As, Sb and Bi).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ayan; Manna, Debashree; Ghanty, Tapan K

    2016-04-28

    A novel class of interesting insertion compounds obtained through the insertion of a noble gas atom into the heavier pnictides have been explored by various ab initio quantum chemical techniques. Recently, the first neutral noble gas insertion compounds, FXeY (Y = P, N), were theoretically predicted to be stable; the triplet state was found to be the most stable state, with a high triplet-singlet energy gap, by our group. In this study, we investigated another noble gas inserted compound, FNgY (Ng = Kr and Xe; Y = As, Sb and Bi), with a triplet ground state. Density functional theory (DFT), second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), coupled-cluster theory (CCSD(T)) and multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) based techniques have been utilized to investigate the structures, stabilities, harmonic vibrational frequencies, charge distributions and topological properties of these compounds. These predicted species, FNgY (Ng = Kr and Xe; Y = As, Sb and Bi) are found to be energetically stable with respect to all the probable 2-body and 3-body dissociation pathways, except for the 2-body channel leading to the global minimum products (FY + Ng). Nevertheless, the finite barrier height corresponding to the saddle points of the compounds connected to their respective global minima products indicates that these compounds are kinetically stable. The structural parameters, energetics, and charge distribution results as well as atoms-in-molecules (AIM) analysis suggest that these predicted molecules can be best represented as F(-)[(3)NgY](+). Thus, all the aforementioned computed results clearly indicate that it may be possible to experimentally prepare the most stable triplet state of FNgY molecules under cryogenic conditions through a matrix isolation technique.

  11. THE M81 GROUP DWARF IRREGULAR GALAXY DDO 165. I. HIGH-VELOCITY NEUTRAL GAS IN A POST-STARBURST SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, John M.; Most, Hans P.; Skillman, Evan D.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Warren, Steven R.; Cook, David; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Lee, Janice; Seth, Anil; Walter, Fabian E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: warren@astro.umn.edu E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com E-mail: jlee@obs.carnegiescience.edu E-mail: walter@mpia.de

    2011-07-01

    We present new multi-configuration Very Large Array H I spectral line observations of the M81 group dwarf irregular post-starburst galaxy DDO 165. The H I morphology is complex, with multiple column density peaks surrounding a large region of very low H I surface density that is offset from the center of the stellar distribution. The bulk of the neutral gas is associated with the southern section of the galaxy; a secondary peak in the north contains {approx}15% of the total H I mass. These components appear to be kinematically distinct, suggesting that either tidal processes or large-scale blowout have recently shaped the interstellar medium (ISM) of DDO 165. Using spatially resolved position-velocity maps, we find multiple localized high-velocity gas features. Cross-correlating with radius-velocity analyses, we identify eight shell/hole structures in the ISM with a range of sizes ({approx}400-900 pc) and expansion velocities ({approx}7-11 km s{sup -1}). These structures are compared with narrow- and broadband imaging from the Kitt Peak National Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Using the latter data, recent works have shown that DDO 165's previous 'burst' phase was extended temporally ({approx}>1 Gyr). We thus interpret the high-velocity gas features, H I holes, and kinematically distinct components of the galaxy in the context of the immediate effects of 'feedback' from recent star formation (SF). In addition to creating H I holes and shells, extended SF events are capable of creating localized high-velocity motion of the surrounding interstellar material. A companion paper connects the energetics from the H I and HST data.

  12. Neutral carbon and CO in 76 (U)LIRGs and starburst galaxy centers. A method to determine molecular gas properties in luminous galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israel, F. P.; Rosenberg, M. J. F.; van der Werf, P.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present fluxes in the [ CI ] lines of neutral carbon at the centers of some 76 galaxies with far-infrared luminosities ranging from 109 to 1012L⊙, as obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory and ground-based facilities, along with the line fluxes of the J = 7-6, J = 4-3, J = 2-112CO, and J = 2-113CO transitions. With this dataset, we determine the behavior of the observed lines with respect to each other and then investigate whether they can be used to characterize the molecular interstellar medium (ISM) of the parent galaxies in simple ways and how the molecular gas properties define the model results. In most starburst galaxies, the [ CI ] to 13CO line flux ratio is much higher than in Galactic star-forming regions, and it is correlated to the total far-infrared luminosity. The [ CI ] (1-0)/12CO (4-3), the [ CI ] (2-1)/12CO (7-6), and the [ CI ] (2-1)/(1-0) flux ratios are correlated, and they trace the excitation of the molecular gas. In the most luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs), the ISM is fully dominated by dense (n( H2) = 104-105 cm-3) and moderately warm (Tkin ≈ 30 K) gas clouds that appear to have low [C°]/[CO] and [13CO]/[12CO] abundances. In less luminous galaxies, emission from gas clouds at lower densities becomes progressively more important, and a multiple-phase analysis is required to determine consistent physical characteristics. Neither the 12CO nor the [ CI ] velocity-integrated line fluxes are good predictors of molecular hydrogen column densities in individual galaxies. In particular, so-called X( [ CI ]) conversion factors are not superior to X( 12CO) factors. The methods and diagnostic diagrams outlined in this paper also provide a new and relatively straightforward means of deriving the physical characteristics of molecular gas in high-redshift galaxies up to z = 5, which are otherwise hard to determine.

  13. A METHOD FOR AUTOMATED ANALYSIS OF 10 ML WATER SAMPLES CONTAINING ACIDIC, BASIC, AND NEUTRAL SEMIVOLATILE COMPOUNDS LISTED IN USEPA METHOD 8270 BY SOLID PHASE EXTRACTION COUPLED IN-LINE TO LARGE VOLUME INJECTION GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented showing the progress made towards the development of a new automated system combining solid phase extraction (SPE) with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the single run analysis of water samples containing a broad range of acid, base and neutral compounds...

  14. Formaldehyde and methanol formation from reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen on neutral Fe2S2 clusters in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shi; Wang, Zhechen; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2013-04-07

    Reaction of CO with H2 on neutral FemSn clusters in a fast flow reactor is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Single photon ionization at 118 nm is used to detect neutral cluster distributions through time of flight mass spectrometry. FemSn clusters are generated through laser ablation of a mixed iron-sulfur target in the presence of a pure helium carrier gas. A strong size dependent reactivity of (FeS)m clusters toward CO is characterized. The reaction FeS + CO → Fe + OCS is found for the FeS cluster, and the association product Fe2S2CO is observed for the Fe2S2 cluster. Products Fe2S2(13)COH2 and Fe2S2(13)COH4 are identified for reactions of (13)CO and H2 on Fe2S2 clusters: this suggests that the Fe2S2 cluster has a high catalytic activity for hydrogenation reactions of CO to form formaldehyde and methanol. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to explore the potential energy surfaces for the two reactions: Fe2S2 + CO + 2H2 → Fe2S2 + CH3OH; and Fe2S2 + CO + H2 → Fe2S2 + CH2O. A barrierless, thermodynamically favorable pathway is obtained for both catalytic processes. Catalytic cycles for formaldehyde and methanol formation from CO and H2 on a Fe2S2 cluster are proposed based on our experimental and theoretical investigations. The various reaction mechanisms explored by DFT are in good agreement with the experimental results. Condensed phase iron sulfide, which contains exposed Fe2S2 units on its surface, is suggested to be a good catalyst for low temperature formaldehyde/methanol synthesis.

  15. Microcanonical fluctuations of the condensate in weakly interacting Bose gases

    SciTech Connect

    Idziaszek, Zbigniew

    2005-05-15

    We study fluctuations of the number of Bose condensed atoms in a weakly interacting homogeneous and trapped gases. For a homogeneous system we apply the particle-number-conserving formulation of the Bogoliubov theory and calculate the condensate fluctuations within the canonical and the microcanonical ensembles. We demonstrate that, at least in the low-temperature regime, predictions of the particle-number-conserving and traditional, nonconserving theory are identical, and lead to the anomalous scaling of fluctuations. Furthermore, the microcanonical fluctuations differ from the canonical ones by a quantity which scales normally in the number of particles, thus predictions of both ensembles are equivalent in the thermodynamic limit. We observe a similar behavior for a weakly interacting gas in a harmonic trap. This is in contrast to the trapped, ideal gas, where microcanonical and canonical fluctuations are different in the thermodynamic limit.

  16. Mechanisms controlling the leaching kinetics of fixated flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material under neutral and acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chin-Min; Walker, Harold W; Bigham, Jerry M

    2007-01-01

    A number of agricultural and engineering uses for fixated flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material exist; however, the potential for leaching of hazardous elements has limited widespread application and the processes controlling the leaching of this material are poorly understood. In this study, a flow-through rotating-disk system was applied to elucidate the relative importance of bulk diffusion, pore diffusion, and surface chemical reaction in controlling the leaching of fixated FGD material under pH conditions ranging from 2.2 to 6.8. Changing the hydrodynamics in the rotating disk system did not affect the leaching kinetics at both pH 2.2 and 6.8, indicating that bulk diffusion was not the kinetic-limiting step. Application of the shrinking core model (SCM) to the data suggested a surface reaction-controlled mechanism, rather than a pore diffusion mechanism. The leaching of fixated FGD material increased with decreasing pH, suggesting it can be described by a combination of an intrinsic hydration reaction and a proton-promoted dissolution reaction. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and elemental composition analyses before and after leaching suggests that for most elements a number of solid phases controlled the leaching process.

  17. THE GEOMETRY EFFECTS OF AN EXPANDING UNIVERSE ON THE DETECTION OF COOL NEUTRAL GAS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, S. J.

    2012-03-20

    Recent high-redshift surveys for 21 cm absorption in damped Ly{alpha} absorption systems (DLAs) take the number of published searches at z{sub abs} > 2 to 25, the same number as at z{sub abs} < 2, although the detection rate at high redshift remains significantly lower (20% compared to 60%). Using the known properties of the DLAs to estimate the unknown profile widths of the 21 cm non-detections and including the limits via a survival analysis, we show that the mean spin temperature/covering factor degeneracy at high redshift is, on average, double that of the low-redshift sample. This value is significantly lower than the previous factor of eight for the spin temperatures and is about the same factor as in the angular diameter distance ratios between the low- and high-redshift samples. That is, without the need for the several pivotal assumptions, which lead to an evolution in the spin temperature, we show that the observed distribution of 21 cm detections in DLAs can be accounted for by the geometry effects of an expanding universe. That is, as yet there is no evidence of the spin temperature of gas-rich galaxies evolving with redshift.

  18. The Herschel Comprehensive (U)LIRG Emission Survey (HERCULES): CO Ladders, Fine Structure Lines, and Neutral Gas Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; van der Werf, P. P.; Aalto, S.; Armus, L.; Charmandaris, V.; Díaz-Santos, T.; Evans, A. S.; Fischer, J.; Gao, Y.; González-Alfonso, E.; Greve, T. R.; Harris, A. I.; Henkel, C.; Israel, F. P.; Isaak, K. G.; Kramer, C.; Meijerink, R.; Naylor, D. A.; Sanders, D. B.; Smith, H. A.; Spaans, M.; Spinoglio, L.; Stacey, G. J.; Veenendaal, I.; Veilleux, S.; Walter, F.; Weiß, A.; Wiedner, M. C.; van der Wiel, M. H. D.; Xilouris, E. M.

    2015-03-01

    (Ultra) luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) are objects characterized by their extreme infrared (8-1000 μm) luminosities (L LIRG > 1011 L ⊙ and L ULIRG > 1012 L ⊙). The Herschel Comprehensive ULIRG Emission Survey (PI: van der Werf) presents a representative flux-limited sample of 29 (U)LIRGs that spans the full luminosity range of these objects (1011 L ⊙ <= L IR <= 1013 L ⊙). With the Herschel Space Observatory, we observe [C II] 157 μm, [O I] 63 μm, and [O I] 145 μm line emission with Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer, CO J = 4-3 through J = 13-12, [C I] 370 μm, and [C I] 609 μm with SPIRE, and low-J CO transitions with ground-based telescopes. The CO ladders of the sample are separated into three classes based on their excitation level. In 13 of the galaxies, the [O I] 63 μm emission line is self absorbed. Comparing the CO excitation to the InfraRed Astronomical Satellite 60/100 μm ratio and to far infrared luminosity, we find that the CO excitation is more correlated to the far infrared colors. We present cooling budgets for the galaxies and find fine-structure line flux deficits in the [C II], [Si II], [O I], and [C I] lines in the objects with the highest far IR fluxes, but do not observe this for CO 4 <= J upp <= 13. In order to study the heating of the molecular gas, we present a combination of three diagnostic quantities to help determine the dominant heating source. Using the CO excitation, the CO J = 1-0 linewidth, and the active galactic nucleus (AGN) contribution, we conclude that galaxies with large CO linewidths always have high-excitation CO ladders, and often low AGN contributions, suggesting that mechanical heating is important. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  19. Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope observations of neutral atomic hydrogen gas in the COSMOS field at z ˜ 0.37

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, Jonghwan; Lah, Philip; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Briggs, Frank H.; Colless, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of H I spectral stacking analysis of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations targeting the Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The GMRT data cube contains 474 field galaxies with redshifts known from the zCOSMOS-bright 10 k catalogue. Spectra for the galaxies are co-added and the stacked spectrum allows us to make a ˜3σ measurement of the average H I mass. Using this average H I mass, along with the integral optical B-band luminosity of the galaxies and the luminosity density of the COSMOS field, a volume normalization is applied to obtain the cosmic H I mass density (ΩH I). We find a cosmic H I mass density of ΩH I = (0.42 ± 0.16) × 10-3 at z ˜ 0.37, which is the highest redshift measurement of ΩH I ever made using H I spectral stacking. The value we obtained for ΩH I at z ˜ 0.37 is consistent with that measured from large blind 21-cm surveys at z = 0, as well as measurements from other H I stacking experiments at lower redshifts. Our measurement, in conjunction with earlier measurements, indicates that there has been no significant evolution of H I gas abundance over the last 4 Gyr. A weighted mean of ΩH I from all 21-cm measurements at redshifts z ≲ 0.4 gives ΩH I = (0.35 ± 0.01) × 10-3. The ΩH I measured (from H I 21-cm emission measurements) at z ≲ 0.4 is, however, approximately half that measured from damped Lyman-α absorption (DLA) systems at z ≳ 2. Deeper surveys with existing and upcoming instruments will be critical to understand the evolution of ΩH I in the redshift range intermediate between z ˜ 0.4 and the range probed by DLA observations.

  20. Domain walls and bubble droplets in immiscible binary Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatrella, G.; Malomed, Boris A.; Salerno, Mario

    2014-10-01

    The existence and stability of domain walls (DWs) and bubble-droplet (BD) states in binary mixtures of quasi-one-dimensional ultracold Bose gases with inter- and intraspecies repulsive interactions is considered. Previously, DWs were studied by means of coupled systems of Gross-Pitaevskii equations (GPEs) with cubic terms, which model immiscible binary Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). We address immiscible BECs with two- and three-body repulsive interactions, as well as binary Tonks-Girardeau (TG) gases, using systems of GPEs with cubic and quintic nonlinearities for the binary BEC, and coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with quintic terms for the TG gases. Exact DW solutions are found for the symmetric BEC mixture, with equal intraspecies scattering lengths. Stable asymmetric DWs in the BEC mixtures with dissimilar interactions in the two components, as well as of symmetric and asymmetric DWs in the binary TG gas, are found by means of numerical and approximate analytical methods. In the BEC system, DWs can be easily put in motion by phase imprinting. Combining a DW and anti-DW on a ring, we construct BD states for both the BEC and TG models. These consist of a dark soliton in one component (the "bubble"), and a bright soliton (the "droplet") in the other. In the BEC system, these composite states are mobile, too.

  1. Diquark Bose-Einstein condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Nawa, K.; Nakano, E.; Yabu, H.

    2006-08-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation of composite diquarks in quark matter (the color superconductor phase) is discussed using the quasichemical equilibrium theory at a relatively low-density region near the deconfinement phase transition, where dynamical quark-pair fluctuations are assumed to be described as bosonic degrees of freedom (diquarks). A general formulation is given for the diquark formation and particle-antiparticle pair-creation processes in the relativistic framework, and some interesting properties are shown, which are characteristic for the relativistic many-body system. Behaviors of transition temperature and phase diagram of the quark-diquark matter are generally presented in model parameter space, and their asymptotic behaviors are also discussed. As an application to the color superconductivity, the transition temperatures and the quark and diquark density profiles are calculated in case with constituent/current quarks, where the diquark is in the bound/resonant state. We obtained T{sub C}{approx}60-80 MeV for constituent quarks and T{sub C}{approx}130 MeV for current quarks at a moderate density ({rho}{sub b}{approx}3{rho}{sub 0}). The method is also developed to include interdiquark interactions into the quasichemical equilibrium theory within a mean-field approximation, and it is found that a possible repulsive diquark-diquark interaction lowers the transition temperature by {approx}50%.

  2. Tautomerism in neutral histidine.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Celina; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2014-10-06

    Histidine is an important natural amino acid, involved in many relevant biological processes, which, because of its physical properties, proved difficult to characterize experimentally in its neutral form. In this work, neutral histidine has been generated in the gas phase by laser ablation of solid samples and its N(ε)H tautomeric form unraveled through its rotational spectrum. The quadrupole hyperfine structure, arising from the existing three (14)N nuclei, constituted a site-specifically probe for revealing the tautomeric form as well as the side chain configuration of this proteogenic amino acid.

  3. Novel experimental setup for time-of-flight mass spectrometry ion detection in collisions of anionic species with neutral gas-phase molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Oller, J C; Ellis-Gibbings, L; da Silva, F Ferreira; Limão-Vieira, P; García, G

    We report a novel experimental setup for studying collision induced products resulting from the interaction of anionic beams with a neutral gas-phase molecular target. The precursor projectile was admitted into vacuum through a commercial pulsed valve, with the anionic beam produced in a hollow cathode discharge-induced plasma, and guided to the interaction region by a set of deflecting plates where it was made to interact with the target beam. Depending on the collision energy regime, negative and positive species can be formed in the collision region and ions were time-of-flight (TOF) mass-analysed. Here, we present data on O2 precursor projectile, where we show clear evidence of O(-) and O2(-) formation from the hollow cathode source as well as preliminary results on the interaction of these anions with nitromethane, CH3NO2. The negative ions formed in such collisions were analysed using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The five most dominant product anions were assigned to H(-), O(-), NO(-), CNO(-) and CH3NO2(-).

  4. Chemical recycling of carbon dioxide to methanol and dimethyl ether: from greenhouse gas to renewable, environmentally carbon neutral fuels and synthetic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Goeppert, Alain; Prakash, G K Surya

    2009-01-16

    Nature's photosynthesis uses the sun's energy with chlorophyll in plants as a catalyst to recycle carbon dioxide and water into new plant life. Only given sufficient geological time can new fossil fuels be formed naturally. In contrast, chemical recycling of carbon dioxide from natural and industrial sources as well as varied human activities or even from the air itself to methanol or dimethyl ether (DME) and their varied products can be achieved via its capture and subsequent reductive hydrogenative conversion. The present Perspective reviews this new approach and our research in the field over the last 15 years. Carbon recycling represents a significant aspect of our proposed Methanol Economy. Any available energy source (alternative energies such as solar, wind, geothermal, and atomic energy) can be used for the production of needed hydrogen and chemical conversion of CO(2). Improved new methods for the efficient reductive conversion of CO(2) to methanol and/or DME that we have developed include bireforming with methane and ways of catalytic or electrochemical conversions. Liquid methanol is preferable to highly volatile and potentially explosive hydrogen for energy storage and transportation. Together with the derived DME, they are excellent transportation fuels for internal combustion engines (ICE) and fuel cells as well as convenient starting materials for synthetic hydrocarbons and their varied products. Carbon dioxide thus can be chemically transformed from a detrimental greenhouse gas causing global warming into a valuable, renewable and inexhaustible carbon source of the future allowing environmentally neutral use of carbon fuels and derived hydrocarbon products.

  5. Bose polarons: Dynamical decay and RF signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, John; Bohn, John

    2016-05-01

    Interactions of a single impurity with a quantum many-body environment are known to alter the character of the impurity, thereby forming a ``quasiparticle''. The condensed matter tradition often identifies quasiparticles as poles of a Green function in the complex plane, a notion whose sophistication sometimes obscures the underlying physics. The problem of a single quantum impurity in a Bose condensate, or Bose polaron, is an illustrative example where the meaning of the impurity Green function, and hence the quasiparticle itself, becomes especially transparent. Using direct diagonalization in a truncated Hilbert space, we examine the dynamical evolution and quasiparticle decay of the repulsive Bose polaron. This approach also allows us to simulate RF spectroscopy across a Feshbach resonance and outside the linear regime, as well as account for motional and thermal effects in a harmonic trap.

  6. A Simple Model of Bose-Einstein Condensation of Interacting Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poluektov, Yu. M.

    2017-03-01

    A simple model of Bose-Einstein condensation of interacting particles is proposed. It is shown that in the condensate state the dependence of thermodynamic quantities on the interaction constant does not allow an expansion in powers of the coupling constant. Therefore, it is impossible to pass to the Einstein model of condensation in an ideal Bose gas by means of a limiting passage, setting the interaction constant to zero. The account for the interaction between particles eliminates difficulties in the description of condensation available in the model of an ideal gas, which are connected with the fulfillment of thermodynamic relations and an infinite value of the particle number fluctuation in the condensate phase.

  7. Bose-Einstein condensation. Twenty years after

    DOE PAGES

    Bagnato, V. S.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; ...

    2015-02-23

    The aim of this introductory article is two-fold. First, we aim to offer a general introduction to the theme of Bose-Einstein condensates, and briefly discuss the evolution of a number of relevant research directions during the last two decades. Second, we introduce and present the articles that appear in this Special Volume of Romanian Reports in Physics celebrating the conclusion of the second decade since the experimental creation of Bose-Einstein condensation in ultracold gases of alkali-metal atoms.

  8. Energy dependent 3-body loss in out-of-equilibrium 1D Bose gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zundel, Laura; Xia, Lin; Wilson, Joshua; Riou, Jean-Felix; Weiss, David

    2015-05-01

    We measure the three-body loss of out-of-equilibrium one-dimensional (1D) Bose gases and find that it depends strongly on the average energy of the distribution. The theory of three-body loss in 1D gas experiments is incomplete due to the challenge of calculating how correlations evolve. We present an empirical model based on energy dependent correlations and show that it reproduces the data.

  9. The Aharonov-Bohm effect in neutral liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonin, E. B.

    2010-09-01

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect was discovered as a quantum-mechanical effect for charged particles, but it has its counterpart in classical wave mechanics. The Aharonov-Bohm interference arises at the scattering of a sound wave by a vortex in classical and quantum hydrodynamics. This interference leads to a transverse force between quasiparticles and vortices in superfluids and superconductors. The Aharonov-Bohm effect was also generalized to neutral particles with magnetic or electric dipole momenta. The Aharonov-Bohm effect for charge particles and its modification for magnetic momenta (the Aharonov-Casher effect) have already been experimentally observed, and the efforts to detect the Aharonov-Bohm effect for electrically polarized neutral particles are on the way. A possible system for this detection is a Bose-condensate of excitons in a double quantum well. Observation of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in this system would provide direct evidence of Bose-Einstein condensation.

  10. Extended Bose-Hubbard models with ultracold magnetic atoms.

    PubMed

    Baier, S; Mark, M J; Petter, D; Aikawa, K; Chomaz, L; Cai, Z; Baranov, M; Zoller, P; Ferlaino, F

    2016-04-08

    The Hubbard model underlies our understanding of strongly correlated materials. Whereas its standard form only comprises interactions between particles at the same lattice site, extending it to encompass long-range interactions is predicted to profoundly alter the quantum behavior of the system. We realize the extended Bose-Hubbard model for an ultracold gas of strongly magnetic erbium atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Controlling the orientation of the atomic dipoles, we reveal the anisotropic character of the onsite interaction and hopping dynamics and their influence on the superfluid-to-Mott insulator quantum phase transition. Moreover, we observe nearest-neighbor interactions, a genuine consequence of the long-range nature of dipolar interactions. Our results lay the groundwork for future studies of exotic many-body quantum phases.

  11. Extended Bose-Hubbard models with ultracold magnetic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, S.; Mark, M. J.; Petter, D.; Aikawa, K.; Chomaz, L.; Cai, Z.; Baranov, M.; Zoller, P.; Ferlaino, F.

    2016-04-01

    The Hubbard model underlies our understanding of strongly correlated materials. Whereas its standard form only comprises interactions between particles at the same lattice site, extending it to encompass long-range interactions is predicted to profoundly alter the quantum behavior of the system. We realize the extended Bose-Hubbard model for an ultracold gas of strongly magnetic erbium atoms in a three-dimensional optical lattice. Controlling the orientation of the atomic dipoles, we reveal the anisotropic character of the onsite interaction and hopping dynamics and their influence on the superfluid-to-Mott insulator quantum phase transition. Moreover, we observe nearest-neighbor interactions, a genuine consequence of the long-range nature of dipolar interactions. Our results lay the groundwork for future studies of exotic many-body quantum phases.

  12. Loschmidt echo in one-dimensional interacting Bose gases

    SciTech Connect

    Lelas, K.; Seva, T.; Buljan, H.

    2011-12-15

    We explore Loschmidt echo in two regimes of one-dimensional interacting Bose gases: the strongly interacting Tonks-Girardeau (TG) regime, and the weakly interacting mean-field regime. We find that the Loschmidt echo of a TG gas decays as a Gaussian when small (random and time independent) perturbations are added to the Hamiltonian. The exponent is proportional to the number of particles and the magnitude of a small perturbation squared. In the mean-field regime the Loschmidt echo shows richer behavior: it decays faster for larger nonlinearity, and the decay becomes more abrupt as the nonlinearity increases; it can be very sensitive to the particular realization of the noise potential, especially for relatively small nonlinearities.

  13. Bose-Einstein condensation of positronium in silica pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morandi, O.; Hervieux, P.-A.; Manfredi, G.

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the possibility to produce a Bose-Einstein condensate made of positronium atoms in a porous silica material containing isolated nanometric cavities. The evolution equation of a weakly interacting positronium system is presented. The model includes the interactions among the atoms in the condensate, the surrounding gas of noncondensed atoms, and the pore surface. The final system is expressed by the Boltzmann evolution equation for noncondensed particles coupled with the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate. In particular, we focus on the estimation of the time necessary to form a condensate containing a macroscopic fraction of the positronium atoms initially injected in the material. The numerical simulations reveal that the condensation process is compatible with the lifetime of ortho-positronium.

  14. Bose-Einstein condensates of bosonic Thomson atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Tobias; Blümel, Reinhold

    1999-10-01

    A system of charged particles in a harmonic trap is a realization of Thomson's raisin cake model. Therefore, we call it a Thomson atom. Bosonic, fermionic and mixed Thomson atoms exist. In this paper we focus on bosonic Thomson atoms in isotropic traps. Approximating the exact ground state by a condensate we investigate ground-state properties at temperature T = 0 using the Hartree-Fock theory for bosons. In order to assess the quality of our mean-field approach we compare the Hartree-Fock results for bosonic Thomson helium with an exact diagonalization. In contrast to the weakly interacting Bose gas (alkali vapours) mean-field calculations are reliable in the limit of large particle density. The Wigner regime (low particle density) is discussed.

  15. Thermalization of Bipartite Bose-Hubbard Models.

    PubMed

    Khripkov, Christine; Cohen, Doron; Vardi, Amichay

    2016-05-19

    We study the time evolution of a bipartite Bose-Hubbard model prepared far from equilibrium. When the classical dynamics is chaotic, we observe ergodization of the number distribution and a constant increase of the entanglement entropy between the constituent subsystems until it saturates to thermal equilibrium values. No thermalization is obtained when the system is launched in quasi-integrable phase space regions.

  16. Bose Metal Phase from Inhomogeneous Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimanyi, Gergely; Jensen, Niels

    2008-03-01

    Numerous experiments report a Bose Metal phase between the Superconducting (S) and the Insulating (I) phases at an SI transition. [1,2] However, theoretically the origin of the corresponding dissipation remains unclear. We propose a picture in which inhomogeneous superconducting flow occurs in channels/filaments, defined by islands of localized Bose Glass. The superconducting bosons interact with the localized bosons of the Bose Glass via the Coulomb interaction. This Coulomb drag generates an effective dissipation for the superflow. We developed a new numerical technique to simulate superconductivity by inertial dynamics and a current generator. We found a Bose Metal phase in a finite range of the disorder, bracketed by the superconducting and insulating phases. The noise spectrum was also determined and compared to recent experiments. [1] H.M. Jaeger, D.B. Haviland, B.G. Orr and A.M. Goldman, Phys. Rev. B 40, 182 (1989). [2] A. Yazdani and A. Kapitulnik, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 3037 (1995); M. Steiner, N. Breznay and A. Kapitulnik, arxiv: 0710.1822.

  17. Neutral depletion versus repletion due to ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Makrinich, G.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Liard, L.; Rax, J.-M.; Chabert, P.

    2008-05-15

    Recent theoretical analyses which predicted unexpected effects of neutral depletion in both collisional and collisionless plasmas are reviewed. We focus on the depletion of collisionless neutrals induced by strong ionization of a collisionless plasma and contrast this depletion with the effect of strong ionization on thermalized neutrals. The collisionless plasma is analyzed employing a kinetic description. The collisionless neutrals and the plasma are coupled through volume ionization and wall recombination only. The profiles of density and pressure both of the plasma and of the neutral-gas and the profile of the ionization rate are calculated. It is shown that for collisionless neutrals the ionization results in neutral depletion, while when neutrals are thermalized the ionization induces a maximal neutral-density at the discharge center, which we call neutral repletion. The difference between the two cases stems from the relation between the neutral density and pressure. The pressure of the collisionless neutral-gas turns out to be maximal where its density is minimal, in contrast to the case of a thermalized neutral gas.

  18. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  19. Spin-momentum coupled Bose-Einstein condensates with lattice band pseudospins.

    PubMed

    Khamehchi, M A; Qu, Chunlei; Mossman, M E; Zhang, Chuanwei; Engels, P

    2016-02-29

    The quantum emulation of spin-momentum coupling, a crucial ingredient for the emergence of topological phases, is currently drawing considerable interest. In previous quantum gas experiments, typically two atomic hyperfine states were chosen as pseudospins. Here, we report the observation of a spin-momentum coupling achieved by loading a Bose-Einstein condensate into periodically driven optical lattices. The s and p bands of a static lattice, which act as pseudospins, are coupled through an additional moving lattice that induces a momentum-dependent coupling between the two pseudospins, resulting in s-p hybrid Floquet-Bloch bands. We investigate the band structures by measuring the quasimomentum of the Bose-Einstein condensate for different velocities and strengths of the moving lattice, and compare our measurements to theoretical predictions. The realization of spin-momentum coupling with lattice bands as pseudospins paves the way for engineering novel quantum matter using hybrid orbital bands.

  20. Limits to the analog Hawking temperature in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Wuester, S.; Savage, C. M.

    2007-07-15

    Quasi-one-dimensional outflow from a dilute gas Bose-Einstein condensate reservoir is a promising system for the creation of analog Hawking radiation. We use numerical modeling to show that stable sonic horizons exist in such a system under realistic conditions, taking into account the transverse dimensions and three-body loss. We find that loss limits the analog Hawking temperatures achievable in the hydrodynamic regime, with sodium condensates allowing the highest temperatures. A condensate of 30 000 atoms, with transverse confinement frequency {omega}{sub perpendicular}=6800x2{pi} Hz, yields horizon temperatures of about 20 nK over a period of 50 ms. This is at least four times higher than for other atoms commonly used for Bose-Einstein condensates.

  1. Developing density functional theory for Bose-Einstein condensates. The case of chemical bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Putz, Mihai V.

    2015-01-22

    Since the nowadays growing interest in Bose-Einstein condensates due to the expanded experimental evidence on various atomic systems within optical lattices in weak and strong coupling regimes, the connection with Density Functional Theory is firstly advanced within the mean field framework at three levels of comprehension: the many-body normalization condition, Thomas-Fermi limit, and the chemical hardness closure with the inter-bosonic strength and universal Hohenberg-Kohn functional. As an application the traditional Heitler-London quantum mechanical description of the chemical bonding for homopolar atomic systems is reloaded within the non-linear Schrödinger (Gross-Pitaevsky) Hamiltonian; the results show that a two-fold energetic solution is registered either for bonding and antibonding states, with the bosonic contribution being driven by the square of the order parameter for the Bose-Einstein condensate density in free (gas) motion, while the associate wave functions remain as in classical molecular orbital model.

  2. Inflationary Quasiparticle Creation and Thermalization Dynamics in Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posazhennikova, Anna; Trujillo-Martinez, Mauricio; Kroha, Johann

    2016-06-01

    A Bose gas in a double-well potential, exhibiting a true Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) amplitude and initially performing Josephson oscillations, is a prototype of an isolated, nonequilibrium many-body system. We investigate the quasiparticle (QP) creation and thermalization dynamics of this system by solving the time-dependent Keldysh-Bogoliubov equations. We find avalanchelike QP creation due to a parametric resonance between BEC and QP oscillations, followed by slow, exponential relaxation to a thermal state at an elevated temperature, controlled by the initial excitation energy of the oscillating BEC above its ground state. The crossover between the two regimes occurs because of an effective decoupling of the QP and BEC oscillations. This dynamics is analogous to elementary particle creation in models of the early universe. The thermalization in our setup occurs because the BEC acts as a grand canonical reservoir for the quasiparticle system.

  3. Bose-Einstein Condensation of Long-Lifetime Polaritons in Thermal Equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongbao; Wen, Patrick; Yoon, Yoseob; Liu, Gangqiang; Steger, Mark; Pfeiffer, Loren N; West, Ken; Snoke, David W; Nelson, Keith A

    2017-01-06

    The experimental realization of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) with atoms and quasiparticles has triggered wide exploration of macroscopic quantum effects. Microcavity polaritons are of particular interest because quantum phenomena such as BEC and superfluidity can be observed at elevated temperatures. However, polariton lifetimes are typically too short to permit thermal equilibration. This has led to debate about whether polariton condensation is intrinsically a nonequilibrium effect. Here we report the first unambiguous observation of BEC of optically trapped polaritons in thermal equilibrium in a high-Q microcavity, evidenced by equilibrium Bose-Einstein distributions over broad ranges of polariton densities and bath temperatures. With thermal equilibrium established, we verify that polariton condensation is a phase transition with a well-defined density-temperature phase diagram. The measured phase boundary agrees well with the predictions of basic quantum gas theory.

  4. Inflationary Quasiparticle Creation and Thermalization Dynamics in Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates.

    PubMed

    Posazhennikova, Anna; Trujillo-Martinez, Mauricio; Kroha, Johann

    2016-06-03

    A Bose gas in a double-well potential, exhibiting a true Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) amplitude and initially performing Josephson oscillations, is a prototype of an isolated, nonequilibrium many-body system. We investigate the quasiparticle (QP) creation and thermalization dynamics of this system by solving the time-dependent Keldysh-Bogoliubov equations. We find avalanchelike QP creation due to a parametric resonance between BEC and QP oscillations, followed by slow, exponential relaxation to a thermal state at an elevated temperature, controlled by the initial excitation energy of the oscillating BEC above its ground state. The crossover between the two regimes occurs because of an effective decoupling of the QP and BEC oscillations. This dynamics is analogous to elementary particle creation in models of the early universe. The thermalization in our setup occurs because the BEC acts as a grand canonical reservoir for the quasiparticle system.

  5. Performance analysis and parametric optimum criteria of a regeneration Bose-Otto engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Sanqiu; Du, Jianqiang

    2009-05-01

    A general regenerative model of the Otto engine cycle working with an ideal Bose gas is used to discuss the influence of quantum degeneracy, regeneration and finite rate heat transfer on the performance of the cycle. Based on the model, expressions for some important parameters, such as the power output and efficiency of the Bose-Otto engine cycle, are derived analytically. By means of numerical calculation and illustration, the influence of the compression ratio of the two isochoric processes and the regenerator effectiveness on the performance of the cycle are discussed and evaluated in detail. Moreover, the general optimal performance characteristics of the cycle are revealed. This analysis could provide a general theoretical tool for the optimal design and operation of real power plants.

  6. Bose-Einstein Condensation of Long-Lifetime Polaritons in Thermal Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongbao; Wen, Patrick; Yoon, Yoseob; Liu, Gangqiang; Steger, Mark; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken; Snoke, David W.; Nelson, Keith A.

    2017-01-01

    The experimental realization of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) with atoms and quasiparticles has triggered wide exploration of macroscopic quantum effects. Microcavity polaritons are of particular interest because quantum phenomena such as BEC and superfluidity can be observed at elevated temperatures. However, polariton lifetimes are typically too short to permit thermal equilibration. This has led to debate about whether polariton condensation is intrinsically a nonequilibrium effect. Here we report the first unambiguous observation of BEC of optically trapped polaritons in thermal equilibrium in a high-Q microcavity, evidenced by equilibrium Bose-Einstein distributions over broad ranges of polariton densities and bath temperatures. With thermal equilibrium established, we verify that polariton condensation is a phase transition with a well-defined density-temperature phase diagram. The measured phase boundary agrees well with the predictions of basic quantum gas theory.

  7. Optimized evaporative cooling for sodium Bose-Einstein condensation against three-body loss

    SciTech Connect

    Shobu, Takahiko; Yamaoka, Hironobu; Imai, Hiromitsu; Morinaga, Atsuo; Yamashita, Makoto

    2011-09-15

    We report on a highly efficient evaporative cooling optimized experimentally. We successfully created sodium Bose-Einstein condensates with 6.4x10{sup 7} atoms starting from 6.6x10{sup 9} thermal atoms trapped in a magnetic trap by employing a fast linear sweep of radio frequency at the final stage of evaporative cooling so as to overcome the serious three-body losses. The experimental results such as the cooling trajectory and the condensate growth quantitatively agree with the numerical simulations of evaporative cooling on the basis of the kinetic theory of a Bose gas carefully taking into account our specific experimental conditions. We further discuss theoretically a possibility of producing large condensates, more than 10{sup 8} sodium atoms, by simply increasing the number of initial thermal trapped atoms and the corresponding optimization of evaporative cooling.

  8. Beyond mean-field properties of binary dipolar Bose mixtures at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastukhov, Volodymyr

    2017-02-01

    We rigorously analyze the low-temperature properties of homogeneous three-dimensional two-component Bose mixture with dipole-dipole interaction. For such a system the effective hydrodynamic action that governs the behavior of low-energy excitations is derived. The infrared structure of the exact single-particle Green's functions is obtained in terms of macroscopic parameters, namely the inverse compressibility and the superfluid density matrices. Within the one-loop approximation we calculate some of the most relevant observable quantities and give the beyond mean-field stability condition for the binary dipolar Bose gas in the dilute limit. A brief variational derivation of the coupled equations that describe macroscopic hydrodynamics of the system in the external nonuniform potential at zero temperature is presented.

  9. Spin-momentum coupled Bose-Einstein condensates with lattice band pseudospins

    PubMed Central

    Khamehchi, M. A.; Qu, Chunlei; Mossman, M. E.; Zhang, Chuanwei; Engels, P.

    2016-01-01

    The quantum emulation of spin-momentum coupling, a crucial ingredient for the emergence of topological phases, is currently drawing considerable interest. In previous quantum gas experiments, typically two atomic hyperfine states were chosen as pseudospins. Here, we report the observation of a spin-momentum coupling achieved by loading a Bose-Einstein condensate into periodically driven optical lattices. The s and p bands of a static lattice, which act as pseudospins, are coupled through an additional moving lattice that induces a momentum-dependent coupling between the two pseudospins, resulting in s–p hybrid Floquet-Bloch bands. We investigate the band structures by measuring the quasimomentum of the Bose-Einstein condensate for different velocities and strengths of the moving lattice, and compare our measurements to theoretical predictions. The realization of spin-momentum coupling with lattice bands as pseudospins paves the way for engineering novel quantum matter using hybrid orbital bands. PMID:26924575

  10. The Effects of Plasma-Neutral Interactions on Neutral Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, V.; Thayer, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Plasma-neutral interactions are fundamental to the structure and behavior of the neutral thermosphere. This interaction, primarily through ion-neutral collisions, ties electrodynamics with hydrodynamics requiring a fully coupled ionosphere - thermosphere model to simulate and dissect the sequence of responses that occur in the neutral gas when a change occurs in the ionosphere. In particular, changes in the ion drag force prompt a hydrodynamic response that will alter several properties of the thermosphere, including neutral winds. Here, the fully coupled National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (NCAR TIEGCM) is used to evaluate how changes in mechanical coupling, through the ion drag force, alter thermosphere properties, with a focus on thermospheric neutral winds. The equatorial thermosphere anomaly (ETA) produces a transient wind system, and a dissection of the hydrodynamic processes responsible for its formation will be used to demonstrate the causal structure in neutral gas response to a change in field-aligned ion drag force. This well-behaved response elucidates processes that must be occurring in other regions of the thermosphere where more significant changes in the ion drag force occur.

  11. Mechanocaloric and thermomechanical effects in Bose-Einstein-condensed systems

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, G.C.; Bagnato, V.S.; Muniz, S.R.; Spehler, D.

    2004-05-01

    In this paper we extend previous hydrodynamic equations, governing the motion of Bose-Einstein-condensed fluids, to include temperature effects. This allows us to analyze some differences between a normal fluid and a Bose-Einstein-condensed one. We show that, in close analogy with superfluid {sup 4}He, a Bose-Einstein-condensed fluid exhibits the mechanocaloric and thermomechanical effects. In our approach we can explain both effects without using the hypothesis that the Bose-Einstein-condensed fluid has zero entropy. Such ideas could be investigated in existing experiments.

  12. Atomic Bose-Hubbard Systems with Single-Particle Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiss, Philipp Moritz

    Experiments with ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide outstanding opportunities to realize exotic quantum states due to a high degree of tunability and control. In this thesis, I present experiments that extend this control from global parameters to the level of individual particles. Using a quantum gas microscope for 87Rb, we have developed a single-site addressing scheme based on digital amplitude holograms. The system self-corrects for aberrations in the imaging setup and creates arbitrary beam profiles. We are thus able to shape optical potentials on the scale of single lattice sites and control the dynamics of individual atoms. We study the role of quantum statistics and interactions in the Bose-Hubbard model on the fundamental level of two particles. Bosonic quantum statistics are apparent in the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of massive particles, which we observe in tailored double-well potentials. These underlying statistics, in combination with tunable repulsive interactions, dominate the dynamics in single- and two-particle quantum walks. We observe highly coherent position-space Bloch oscillations, bosonic bunching in Hanbury Brown-Twiss interference and the fermionization of strongly interacting bosons. Many-body states of indistinguishable quantum particles are characterized by large-scale spatial entanglement, which is difficult to detect in itinerant systems. Here, we extend the concept of Hong-Ou-Mandel interference from individual particles to many-body states to directly quantify entanglement entropy. We perform collective measurements on two copies of a quantum state and detect entanglement entropy through many-body interference. We measure the second order Renyi entropy in small Bose-Hubbard systems and detect the buildup of spatial entanglement across the superfluid-insulator transition. Our experiments open new opportunities for the single-particle-resolved preparation and characterization of many-body quantum states.

  13. Dynamic effects of surface plasmons on the lifetimes of neutral excited rare-gas atoms physisorbed on metal surfaces Radiative and nonradiative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavroyannis, Constantine

    We have considered the excitation spectra of neutral rare-gas atoms physisorbed on metal surfaces. The adsorbed atom and its image interact through the dipole-dipole interaction and radiate to each other as well. The charge of the image atom is screened by the dielectric function of the surface plasmons. Due to the common radiation field between the atom and its image, the excitation spectra consist of the symmetric and antisymmetric modes, respectively. Each of them splits into two excitations: the atomic-like and the surface plasmon-like excitations, which arise because of the presence of the surface plasmons. The surface plasmon-like excitations appear near the surface plasmon frequencies and consist of broad spectral lines, which have large radiative widths and small relative intensities in comparison with those of the atomic like excitations, that emerge near the atomic frequencies. The spectral functions describing the symmetric and antisymmetric modes have been calculated in the presence of the plasmon damping and consist of asymmetric Lorentzian lines, where the extent of the asymmetry depends on the strength of the surface plasmons. Competition between the cooperative radiative and non-radiative processes takes place. In the absence of plasmon damping or when the effective radiative damping is greater than the damping of the surface plasmons, the largest enhancement of the relative intensities per atom occurs for the spectra of the symmetric modes of the excited Xe, Kr and Ar when they are physisorbed on Mg with K and Li holding the second and third place, respectively. The relative intensities per atom for the spectra of Xe, Kr and Ar on the surfaces of A1, Cu, Ag and Au are much less than the corresponding ones for the single free atoms in question, respectively. The enhancement or the decrease of the maximum relative intensity per atom is due to the dynamic effect arising from the presence of the surface plasmons. In the opposite limit, when the

  14. Dynamical thermalization in Bose-Hubbard systems.

    PubMed

    Schlagheck, Peter; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2016-01-01

    We numerically study a Bose-Hubbard ring of finite size with disorder containing a finite number of bosons that are subject to an on-site two-body interaction. Our results show that moderate interactions induce dynamical thermalization in this isolated system. In this regime the individual many-body eigenstates are well described by the standard thermal Bose-Einstein distribution for well-defined values of the temperature and the chemical potential, which depend on the eigenstate under consideration. We show that the dynamical thermalization conjecture works well at both positive and negative temperatures. The relations to quantum chaos, quantum ergodicity, and the Åberg criterion are also discussed.

  15. Bose-Einstein condensation in microgravity.

    PubMed

    van Zoest, T; Gaaloul, N; Singh, Y; Ahlers, H; Herr, W; Seidel, S T; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E; Eckart, M; Kajari, E; Arnold, S; Nandi, G; Schleich, W P; Walser, R; Vogel, A; Sengstock, K; Bongs, K; Lewoczko-Adamczyk, W; Schiemangk, M; Schuldt, T; Peters, A; Könemann, T; Müntinga, H; Lämmerzahl, C; Dittus, H; Steinmetz, T; Hänsch, T W; Reichel, J

    2010-06-18

    Albert Einstein's insight that it is impossible to distinguish a local experiment in a "freely falling elevator" from one in free space led to the development of the theory of general relativity. The wave nature of matter manifests itself in a striking way in Bose-Einstein condensates, where millions of atoms lose their identity and can be described by a single macroscopic wave function. We combine these two topics and report the preparation and observation of a Bose-Einstein condensate during free fall in a 146-meter-tall evacuated drop tower. During the expansion over 1 second, the atoms form a giant coherent matter wave that is delocalized on a millimeter scale, which represents a promising source for matter-wave interferometry to test the universality of free fall with quantum matter.

  16. Environmental neutralization of polonium-218

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.D.; Hopke, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that two mechanisms of neutralization of the singly charged polonium ion exist. Charged Polonium-218 can be neutralized by reacting with oxygen to form a polonium oxide ion with a higher ionization potential than that of the polonium metal and then accepting an electron transferred from a lower ionization potential gas. In this present work, this mechanism has been verified by determining that the polonium oxide has an ionization potential in the range 10.35-10.53 eV. It was also previously reported that /sup 218/Po can be neutralized, in the absence of oxygen, by the scavenging of electrons by a trace gas such as water or nitrogen dioxide and their diffusion to the polonium ion. To verify this second neutralization mechanism, concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in nitrogen in the range of 50 ppb-1 ppm were examined for their ability to neutralize the polonium ion. Complete neutralization of /sup 218/Po was observed at nitrogen dioxide concentrations greater than 700 ppb. For concentrations below 700 ppb, the degree of neutralization was found to increase smoothly with the nitrogen dioxide concentration.

  17. Schrodinger Leopards in Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Dounas-Frazer, Dimitri R.

    2008-03-01

    We present the complex quantum dynamics of vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates in a double well via exact diagonalization of a discretized Hamiltonian. When the barrier is high, vortices evolve into macroscopic superposition (NOON) states of a vortex in either well -- a Schrodinger cat with spots. Such Schrodinger leopard states are more robust than previously proposed NOON states, which only use two single particle modes of the double well potential.

  18. Bose-Einstein condensation in quantum magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapf, Vivien; Jaime, Marcelo; Batista, C. D.

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews experimental and theoretical work on Bose-Einstein condensation in quantum magnets. These magnets are natural realizations of gases of interacting bosons whose relevant parameters such as dimensionality, lattice geometry, amount of disorder, nature of the interactions, and particle concentration can vary widely between different compounds. The particle concentration can be easily tuned by applying an external magnetic field which plays the role of a chemical potential. This rich spectrum of realizations offers a unique possibility for studying the different physical behaviors that emerge in interacting Bose gases from the interplay between their relevant parameters. The plethora of other bosonic phases that can emerge in quantum magnets, of which the Bose-Einstein condensate is the most basic ground state, is reviewed. The compounds discussed in this review have been intensively studied in the last two decades and have led to important contributions in the area of quantum magnetism. In spite of their apparent simplicity, these systems often exhibit surprising behaviors. The possibility of using controlled theoretical approaches has triggered the discovery of unusual effects induced by frustration, dimensionality, or disorder.

  19. Carbon neutral hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Frank S; Keith, David W

    2008-11-13

    Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector may be the most difficult aspect of climate change mitigation. We suggest that carbon neutral hydrocarbons (CNHCs) offer an alternative pathway for deep emission cuts that complement the use of decarbonized energy carriers. Such fuels are synthesized from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon neutral hydrogen. The result is a liquid fuel compatible with the existing transportation infrastructure and therefore capable of a gradual deployment with minimum supply disruption. Capturing the atmospheric CO2 can be accomplished using biomass or industrial methods referred to as air capture. The viability of biomass fuels is strongly dependent on the environmental impacts of biomass production. Strong constraints on land use may favour the use of air capture. We conclude that CNHCs may be a viable alternative to hydrogen or conventional biofuels and warrant a comparable level of research effort and support.

  20. Calorimetry of a Bose–Einstein-condensed photon gas

    PubMed Central

    Damm, Tobias; Schmitt, Julian; Liang, Qi; Dung, David; Vewinger, Frank; Weitz, Martin; Klaers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Phase transitions, as the condensation of a gas to a liquid, are often revealed by a discontinuous behaviour of thermodynamic quantities. For liquid helium, for example, a divergence of the specific heat signals the transition from the normal fluid to the superfluid state. Apart from liquid helium, determining the specific heat of a Bose gas has proven to be a challenging task, for example, for ultracold atomic Bose gases. Here we examine the thermodynamic behaviour of a trapped two-dimensional photon gas, a system that allows us to spectroscopically determine the specific heat and the entropy of a nearly ideal Bose gas from the classical high temperature to the Bose-condensed quantum regime. The critical behaviour at the phase transition is clearly revealed by a cusp singularity of the specific heat. Regarded as a test of quantum statistical mechanics, our results demonstrate a quantitative agreement with its predictions at the microscopic level. PMID:27090978

  1. Impurity transport through a strongly interacting bosonic quantum gas

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T. H.; Clark, S. R.; Bruderer, M.; Jaksch, D.

    2011-08-15

    Using near-exact numerical simulations, we study the propagation of an impurity through a one-dimensional Bose lattice gas for varying bosonic interaction strengths and filling factors at zero temperature. The impurity is coupled to the Bose gas and confined to a separate tilted lattice. The precise nature of the transport of the impurity is specific to the excitation spectrum of the Bose gas, which allows one to measure properties of the Bose gas nondestructively, in principle, by observing the impurity; here we focus on the spatial and momentum distributions of the impurity as well as its reduced density matrix. For instance, we show it is possible to determine whether the Bose gas is commensurately filled as well as the bandwidth and gap in its excitation spectrum. Moreover, we show that the impurity acts as a witness to the crossover of its environment from the weakly to the strongly interacting regime, i.e., from a superfluid to a Mott insulator or Tonks-Girardeau lattice gas, and the effects on the impurity in both of these strongly interacting regimes are clearly distinguishable. Finally, we find that the spatial coherence of the impurity is related to its propagation through the Bose gas.

  2. ION SOURCE WITH SPACE CHARGE NEUTRALIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Flowers, J.W.; Luce, J.S.; Stirling, W.L.

    1963-01-22

    This patent relates to a space charge neutralized ion source in which a refluxing gas-fed arc discharge is provided between a cathode and a gas-fed anode to provide ions. An electron gun directs a controlled, monoenergetic electron beam through the discharge. A space charge neutralization is effected in the ion source and accelerating gap by oscillating low energy electrons, and a space charge neutralization of the source exit beam is effected by the monoenergetic electron beam beyond the source exit end. The neutralized beam may be accelerated to any desired energy at densities well above the limitation imposed by Langmuir-Child' s law. (AEC)

  3. Bose-Einstein condensation in dark power-law laser traps

    SciTech Connect

    Jaouadi, A.; Gaaloul, N.; Viaris de Lesegno, B.; Pruvost, L.; Telmini, M.; Charron, E.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate theoretically an original route to achieve Bose-Einstein condensation using dark power-law laser traps. We propose to create such traps with two crossing blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian optical beams. Controlling their azimuthal order l allows for the exploration of a multitude of power-law trapping situations in one, two, and three dimensions, ranging from the usual harmonic trap to an almost square-well potential, in which a quasihomogeneous Bose gas can be formed. The usual cigar-shaped and disk-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates obtained in a 1D or 2D harmonic trap take the generic form of a 'finger' or of a 'hockey puck' in such Laguerre-Gaussian traps. In addition, for a fixed atom number, higher transition temperatures are obtained in such configurations when compared with a harmonic trap of the same volume. This effect, which results in a substantial acceleration of the condensation dynamics, requires a better but still reasonable focusing of the Laguerre-Gaussian beams.

  4. Bose-Einstein condensation in dark power-law laser traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaouadi, A.; Gaaloul, N.; Viaris de Lesegno, B.; Telmini, M.; Pruvost, L.; Charron, E.

    2010-08-01

    We investigate theoretically an original route to achieve Bose-Einstein condensation using dark power-law laser traps. We propose to create such traps with two crossing blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian optical beams. Controlling their azimuthal order ℓ allows for the exploration of a multitude of power-law trapping situations in one, two, and three dimensions, ranging from the usual harmonic trap to an almost square-well potential, in which a quasihomogeneous Bose gas can be formed. The usual cigar-shaped and disk-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates obtained in a 1D or 2D harmonic trap take the generic form of a “finger” or of a “hockey puck” in such Laguerre-Gaussian traps. In addition, for a fixed atom number, higher transition temperatures are obtained in such configurations when compared with a harmonic trap of the same volume. This effect, which results in a substantial acceleration of the condensation dynamics, requires a better but still reasonable focusing of the Laguerre-Gaussian beams.

  5. Magnetoplasmon Fano resonance in Bose-Fermi mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boev, M. V.; Kovalev, V. M.; Savenko, I. G.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate theoretically the magnetoplasmon (cyclotron) resonance in a hybrid system consisting of spatially separated two-dimensional layers of electron and dipolar exciton gases coupled via Coulomb forces. We study the dynamics of this system under the action of a weak alternating external electromagnetic field in the presence of a uniform magnetic field, perpendicular to the layers. We reveal that the electromagnetic power absorption exhibits a double-resonance spectrum. We show that the first resonance is associated with the conventional well-studied magnetoplasmon excitations of the electron gas and it has a standard Lorentzian shape, whereas the second resonance is a peculiarity attributed to the Bose-condensed exciton gas. Further, we explicitly demonstrate that the spectrum of the system exhibits an asymmetric Fano-type profile, where the excitonic peak is extremely narrow in comparison with the magnetoplasmon one. We show that the shape of the resonance and the position of the peaks depend on the magnitude of the applied magnetic field, exciton-condensate density, and exciton-impurity scattering time. In particular, the Fano profile turns into a Lorentzian shape with decreasing exciton-impurity scattering time and the position of the plasmon-associated resonance is mainly sensitive and determined by the magnetic field strength, whereas the exciton-condensate peak position is determined by the exciton-condensate density. It opens the experimental possibility to determine the latter quantity in cyclotron resonance experiments.

  6. Bose-Einstein condensation in low dimensional layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Patricia; Solis, M. A.

    2008-03-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation critical temperature, among other thermodynamic properties are reported for an ideal boson gas inside layered structures created by trapping potential of the Kronig-Penney type. We start with a big box where we introduce the Kronig-Penney potential in three directions to get a honey comb of cubes of side a size and walls of variable penetrability (P=mV0ab/^2), with bosons instead of bees. We are able to reduce the dimensions of the cubes to simulate bosons inside quantum dots. The critical temperature, starting from that of an ideal boson gas inside the big box, decreases as the small cube wall impenetrability increases arriving to a tiny but different from zero when the penetrability is zero (P-->∞). We also calculate the internal energy and the specific heat, and compare them to the ones obtained for the case of the same Kronig-Penney potential in one direction (simulating layers), and two directions (nanotubes).

  7. Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic alkali gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, Robert J.

    1998-05-01

    I present a review of the time-independent Gross-Pitaevskii (GP), Bogoliubov, and finite-temperature Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) mean-field theories used to study trapped, Bose-Einstein condensed alkali gases. Numerical solutions of the (zero-temperature) GP equation are presented for attractive (negative scattering length) and repulsive (positive scattering length) interactions. Comparison is made with the Thomas-Fermi and (variational) trial wavefunction appr oximations that are used in the literature to study condensed gases. Numerical calculations of the (zero-temperature) Bogoliubov quasi-particle excitation frequencies are found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results. The finite-temperature properties of condensed gases are examined using the Popov approximation (of the HFB theory) and a simple two-gas model. Specific, quantitative comparisons are made with experimental results for finite-temperature excitation frequencies. Qualitative comparisons are made between the results of the Popov approximation, two-gas model, and other published models for condensate fraction and thermal density distribution. The time-independent mean-field theories are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental results at relatively low temperatures (high condensate fractions). However, at higher temperatures (and condensate fractions of less than 50%) there are significant discrepancies between experimental data and theoretical calculations. This work was undertaken at the University of Maryland at College Park and was supported in part by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9601261) and the U.S. Office of Naval Research.

  8. Quantum dynamics of a Bose superfluid vortex.

    PubMed

    Thompson, L; Stamp, P C E

    2012-05-04

    We derive a fully quantum-mechanical equation of motion for a vortex in a 2-dimensional Bose superfluid in the temperature regime where the normal fluid density ρ(n)(T) is small. The coupling between the vortex "zero mode" and the quasiparticles has no term linear in the quasiparticle variables--the lowest-order coupling is quadratic. We find that as a function of the dimensionless frequency Ω=ℏΩ/k(B)T, the standard Hall-Vinen-Iordanskii equations are valid when Ω≪1 (the "classical regime"), but elsewhere, the equations of motion become highly retarded, with significant experimental implications when Ω≳1.

  9. Atomic Phase Conjugation From a Bose Condensate

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Elena V.; Plättner, Katja; Meystre, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of observing atomic phase conjugation from Bose condensates, and using it as a diagnostic tool to access the spatial coherence properties and to measure the lifetime of the condensate. We argue that since phase conjugation results from the scattering of a partial matter wave off the spatial grating produced by two other waves, it offers a natural way to directly measure such properties, and as such provides an attractive alternative to the optical methods proposed in the past. PMID:27805111

  10. From the Cooper problem to canted supersolids in Bose-Fermi mixtures.

    PubMed

    Anders, Peter; Werner, Philipp; Troyer, Matthias; Sigrist, Manfred; Pollet, Lode

    2012-11-16

    We calculate the phase diagram of the Bose-Fermi Hubbard model on the 3d cubic lattice at fermionic half filling and bosonic unit filling by means of single-site dynamical mean-field theory. For fast bosons, this is equivalent to the Cooper problem in which the bosons can induce s-wave pairing between the fermions. We also find miscible superfluid and canted supersolid phases depending on the interspecies coupling strength. In contrast, slow bosons favor fermionic charge density wave structures for attractive fermionic interactions. These competing instabilities lead to a rich phase diagram within reach of cold gas experiments.

  11. Observation of Spontaneous Coherence in Bose-Einstein Condensate of Magnons

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. E.; Dzyapko, O.; Demokritov, S. O.; Melkov, G. A.; Slavin, A. N.

    2008-02-01

    The room-temperature dynamics of a magnon gas driven by short microwave pumping pulses is studied. An overpopulation of the lowest energy level of the system following the pumping is observed. Using the sensitivity of the Brillouin light scattering technique to the coherence degree of the scattering magnons we demonstrate the spontaneous emergence of coherence of the magnons at the lowest level, if their density exceeds a critical value. This finding is clear proof of the quantum nature of the observed phenomenon and direct evidence of Bose-Einstein condensation of magnons at room temperature.

  12. Finite-temperature simulations of the scissors mode in Bose-Einstein condensed gases.

    PubMed

    Jackson, B; Zaremba, E

    2001-09-03

    The dynamics of a trapped Bose-condensed gas at finite temperatures is described by a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the condensate order parameter and a semiclassical kinetic equation for the thermal cloud, solved using N-body simulations. The two components are coupled by mean fields as well as collisional processes that transfer atoms between the two. We use this scheme to investigate scissors modes in anisotropic traps as a function of temperature. Frequency shifts and damping rates of the condensate mode are extracted, and are found to be in good agreement with recent experiments.

  13. Creation and counting of defects in a temperature-quenched Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donadello, S.; Serafini, S.; Bienaimé, T.; Dalfovo, F.; Lamporesi, G.; Ferrari, G.

    2016-08-01

    We study the spontaneous formation of defects in the order parameter of a trapped ultracold bosonic gas while crossing the critical temperature for Bose-Einstein condensation at different rates. The system has the shape of an elongated ellipsoid, whose transverse width can be varied. For slow enough temperature quenches we find a power-law scaling of the average defect number with the quench rate, as predicted by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. A breakdown of such a scaling is found for fast quenches, leading to a saturation of the average defect number. We suggest an explanation for this saturation in terms of the mutual interactions among defects.

  14. Bose-Einstein condensation in a vapor of sodium atoms in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Pei-Lin

    2016-06-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at normal temperature (T=343K) has been observed because an electric field was first applied. There are two ways to achieve phase transition: lower the temperature of Bose gas or increase its density. This article provides more appropriate method: increase the voltage. In theory, 3s and 3p states of sodium are not degenerate, but Na may be polar atom doesnot conflict with quantum mechanics because it is hydrogen-like atom. Our innovation lies in we applied an electric field used for the orientation polarization. Na vapor was filled in a cylindrical capacitor. In order to determine the polarity of sodium, we measured the capacitance at different temperatures. If Na is non-polar atom, its capacitance should be independent of temperature because the nucleus of atom is located at the center of the electron cloud. But our experiment shows that its capacitance is related to temperature, so Na is polar atom. In order to achieve Na vapor phase transition, we measured the capacitance at different voltages. From the entropy of Na vapor S=0, the critical voltage Vc=68volts. When V0; when V>Vc, the atoms become aligned with the field S<0, phase transition occurred. When V=390 volts »Vc, the capacitance decreased from C=1.9C0 to C≈C0 (C0 is the vacuum capacitance), this result implies that almost all the Na atoms (more than 98%) are aligned with the field, Na vapor entered quasi-vacuum state. We create a BEC with 2.506×1017 atoms, condensate fraction reached 98.9%. This is BEC in momentum space. Our experiment shows that if a Bose gas enters quasi-vacuum state, this also means that it underwent phase transition and generates BEC. Therefore, quasi-vacuum state of alkali gas is essentially large-scale BEC. This is an unexpected discovery. BEC and vacuum theory are two unrelated research areas, but now they are closely linked together. The maximum induced dipole moment dind≤7.8×10-15 e cm can be

  15. Dynamic structure factor of one-dimensional lattice bosons in a disordered potential: a spectral fingerprint of the Bose-glass phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Guillaume; Minguzzi, Anna; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2013-05-01

    We study the dynamic structure factor of a one-dimensional Bose gas confined in an optical lattice and modeled by the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian, using a variety of numerical and analytical approaches. The dynamic structure factor, experimentally measurable by Bragg spectroscopy, is studied in three relevant cases: in the clean regime, featuring either a superfluid or a Mott phase; and in the presence of two types of (quasi-)disordered external potentials: a quasi-periodic potential obtained from a bichromatic superlattice and a random box disorder—both featuring a Bose-glass phase. In the clean case, we show the emergence of a gapped doublon mode (corresponding to a repulsively bound state) for incommensurate filling, well separated from the low-energy acoustic mode. In the disordered case, we show that the dynamic structure factor provides direct insight into the spatial structure of the excitations, unveiling their localized nature, which represents a fundamental signature of the Bose-glass phase. Furthermore, it provides a clear fingerprint of the very nature of the localization mechanism which differs for the two kinds of disorder potentials we consider. In special cases, the dynamic structure factor may provide an estimate of the position of the localization transition from superfluid to Bose glass, in a complementary manner to the information deduced from the momentum distribution.

  16. Implications of tritium in neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J; Stewart, L D

    1980-01-01

    Neutral injectors for heating plasmas of D-T burning fusion reactors are subject to tritium contamination. This paper discusses relevant questions and problem areas pertinent to tritium environment, including calculations of tritium contaminations in different neutral injectors, gas handling and pumping systems, and implications on beam line components.

  17. Bose-Einstein Condensation: Where Many Become One and So There is Plenty of Room at the Bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, N.

    Classically identical particles become quantum mechanically indistinguishable. Satyendra Nath Bose taught us, in 1924, how to correctly count the distinct microstates for the indistinguishables, and for a gas of light quanta (later photons), whose number is not conserved, e.g. can vary with temperature, he gave a proper derivation of Planck's law of black body radiation. Einstein, in 1925, generalized the Bose statistics to a quantum gas of material particles whose number is now fixed, or conserved, e.g. 4He, and thus opened a new direction in condensed matter physics: He showed that for low enough temperatures (˜1 Kelvin and below), a oscopic number of the particles must accumulate in the lowest one-particle state. This degenerate gas with an extensively occupied single one-particle state is the Bose-Einstein condensate, now called BEC. (Fragmented BEC involving a multiplicity of internal states of non-scalar Bose atoms is, however, also realizable now.) Initially thought to be a pathology of an ideal non-interacting Bose system, the BEC turned out to be robust against interactions. Thus, the Bose-Einstein condensation is a quantum phase transition, but one with a difference — it is a purely quantum statistical effect, and requires no inter-particle interaction for its occurrence. Indeed, it happens in spite of it. The condensate fraction, however, diminishes with increasing interaction strength — to less than ten per cent for 4He. The BEC turned out to underlie superfluidity, namely that the superfluid may flow through finest atomic capillaries without any viscosity. Interaction, however, seems essential to superfluidity. But, the precise connection between BEC and the superfluidity remains elusive. Thus, for example, we may have superfluidity in two-dimensions where there is no condensate! Seventy years later now, the BEC has come alive with the breakthrough in 1995 when near-ideal BEC was created in dilute alkali gases of 87Rb and 23Na atoms cooled in the

  18. Bose-Einstein condensation of spin wave quanta at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Dzyapko, O; Demidov, V E; Melkov, G A; Demokritov, S O

    2011-09-28

    Spin waves are delocalized excitations of magnetic media that mainly determine their magnetic dynamics and thermodynamics at temperatures far below the critical one. The quantum-mechanical counterparts of spin waves are magnons, which can be considered as a gas of weakly interacting bosonic quasi-particles. Here, we discuss the room-temperature kinetics and thermodynamics of the magnon gas in yttrium iron garnet films driven by parametric microwave pumping. We show that for high enough pumping powers, the thermalization of the driven gas results in a quasi-equilibrium state described by Bose-Einstein statistics with a non-zero chemical potential. Further increases of the pumping power cause a Bose-Einstein condensation documented by an observation of the magnon accumulation at the lowest energy level. Using the sensitivity of the Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy to the degree of coherence of the scattering magnons, we confirm the spontaneous emergence of coherence of the magnons accumulated at the bottom of the spectrum, occurring if their density exceeds a critical value.

  19. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  20. Probing a scattering resonance with Rydberg molecules inside a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Rios, J.; Schlagmüller, M.; Liebisch, T. C.; Nguyen, H.; Lochead, G.; Engel, F.; Böottcher, F.; Westphal, K. M.; Kleinbach, K. S.; Löw, R.; Hofferberth, S.; Pfau, T.; Greene, C. H.

    2016-05-01

    The spectroscopy of a single Rydberg atom within a Bose-Einstein condensate is studied, and as a result a line shape dependence on the principal Rydberg quantum number n is observed, apart from the expected density shift due to the large number of neutrals inside the Rydberg orbit. The observed line broadening depends on the Rydberg electron-neutral interaction, in particular, it manifests the influence of the e-Rb(5S) p-wave scattering shape resonance, which dramatically affects the potential energy landscape for the neutrals embedded within the Rydberg orbit. The observed spectroscopic line shapes are reproduced with an overall good agreement by means of a microscopic model, in which the atoms overlapped with the Rydberg orbit are treated as zero-velocity point-like particles, with binding energies associated with the ion-neutral distance. We acknowledge support from Deutsche Forschungsge5 meinschaft (DFG) within the SFB/TRR21 and the project PF 381/13-1. This work has been supported by NSF under Grand Number PHY-130690.

  1. Reactive formulations for a neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D.; Betty, Rita G.

    2006-10-24

    Decontamination formulations for neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals, and methods of making and using same. The formulations are effective for neutralizing malathion, hydrogen cyanide, sodium cyanide, butyl isocyanate, carbon disulfide, phosgene gas, capsaicin in commercial pepper spray, chlorine gas, anhydrous ammonia gas; and may be effective at neutralizing hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, methyl bromide, boron trichloride, fluorine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate, phosphorous trichloride, arsine, and tungsten hexafluoride.

  2. Bose-Einstein condensation in a frustrated triangular optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, Peter; Huang, Wen-Min; Mathey, L.

    2016-12-01

    The recent experimental condensation of ultracold atoms in a triangular optical lattice with a negative effective tunneling parameter paves the way for the study of frustrated systems in a controlled environment. Here, we explore the critical behavior of the chiral phase transition in such a frustrated lattice in three dimensions. We represent the low-energy action of the lattice system as a two-component Bose gas corresponding to the two minima of the dispersion. The contact repulsion between the bosons separates into intra- and intercomponent interactions, referred to as V0 and V12, respectively. We first employ a Huang-Yang-Luttinger approximation of the free energy. For V12/V0=2 , which corresponds to the bare interaction, this approach suggests a first-order phase transition, at which both the U (1 ) symmetry of condensation and the Z2 symmetry of the emergent chiral order are broken simultaneously. Furthermore, we perform a renormalization-group calculation at one-loop order. We demonstrate that the coupling regime 0 1 we show that V0 flows to a negative value, while V12 increases and remains positive. This results in a breakdown of the effective quartic-field theory due to a cubic anisotropy and, again, suggests a discontinuous phase transition.

  3. Fluctuations and correlations in rotating Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Baharian, Soheil; Baym, Gordon

    2010-12-15

    We investigate the effects of correlations on the properties of the ground state of the rotating harmonically trapped Bose gas by adding Bogoliubov fluctuations to the mean-field ground state of an N-particle single-vortex system. We demonstrate that the fluctuation-induced correlations lower the energy compared to that of the mean-field ground state, that the vortex core is pushed slightly away from the center of the trap, and that an unstable mode with negative energy (for rotations slower than a critical frequency) emerges in the energy spectrum, thus pointing to a better state for slow rotation. We construct mean-field ground states of zero-, one-, and two-vortex states as a function of rotation rate and determine the critical frequencies for transitions between these states, as well as the critical frequency for appearance of a metastable state with an off-center vortex and its image vortex in the evanescent tail of the cloud.

  4. Rapidly rotating Bose-Einstein condensates in strongly anharmonic traps

    SciTech Connect

    Correggi, M.; Rindler-Daller, T.; Yngvason, J.

    2007-04-15

    We study a rotating Bose-Einstein condensate in a strongly anharmonic trap (flat trap with a finite radius) in the framework of two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii theory. We write the coupling constant for the interactions between the gas atoms as 1/{epsilon}{sup 2} and we are interested in the limit {epsilon}{yields}0 (Thomas-Fermi limit) with the angular velocity {omega} depending on {epsilon}. We derive rigorously the leading asymptotics of the ground state energy and the density profile when {omega} tends to infinity as a power of 1/{epsilon}. If {omega}({epsilon})={omega}{sub 0}/{epsilon} a ''hole'' (i.e., a region where the density becomes exponentially small as 1/{epsilon}{yields}{infinity}) develops for {omega}{sub 0} above a certain critical value. If {omega}({epsilon})>>1/{epsilon} the hole essentially exhausts the container and a ''giant vortex'' develops with the density concentrated in a thin layer at the boundary. While we do not analyze the detailed vortex structure we prove that rotational symmetry is broken in the ground state for const vertical bar log {epsilon} vertical bar <{omega}({epsilon}) < or approx. const/{epsilon}.

  5. Feshbach resonances in ultracold Bose-Fermi mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bortolotti, Daniele Carlo Enrico

    In the wake of successful experiments in Fermi condensates, experimental attention is broadening to include resonant interactions in degenerate Bose-Fermi mixtures. In this thesis we wish to study the equilibrium properties of the fermionic molecules that can be created in such a mixture. To this end, we first discuss the two body properties of the system, and introduce the model Hamiltonian we use to describe the resonant physics, highlighting its virtues, as well as its limitations. We then proceed by analyzing the mean field solution of this model, by studying both the equilibrium problem, and the non-equilibrium equations of motion, thus developing a powerful language to discuss the system. We then highlight the limitations of the mean-field approach, and develop a numerically tractable generalized version of this theory, which is able to correctly describe the two-body properties of the system in the low-density limit. Finally, we study the properties of the system using this generalized mean-field theory, by first analyzing the two-body scattering matrix in the many-body environment, assessing its complex poles in order to understand the stability properties of the Feshbach molecules in the gas. Secondly we solve the equilibrium equations self-consistently, to study the molecular populations and density distributions at equilibrium, as a function of external bias magnetic field.

  6. Mutual neutralization of atomic rare-gas cations (Ne{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, Kr{sup +}, Xe{sup +}) with atomic halide anions (Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, I{sup −})

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Johnsen, Rainer

    2014-01-28

    We report thermal rate coefficients for 12 reactions of rare gas cations (Ne{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, Kr{sup +}, Xe{sup +}) with halide anions (Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, I{sup −}), comprising both mutual neutralization (MN) and transfer ionization. No rate coefficients have been previously reported for these reactions; however, the development of the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry technique makes it possible to measure the difference of the rate coefficients for pairs of parallel reactions in a Flowing Afterglow-Langmuir Probe apparatus. Measurements of 18 such combinations of competing reaction pairs yield an over-determined data set from which a consistent set of rate coefficients of the 12 MN reactions can be deduced. Unlike rate coefficients of MN reactions involving at least one polyatomic ion, which vary by at most a factor of ∼3, those of the atom-atom reactions vary by at least a factor 60 depending on the species. It is found that the rate coefficients involving light rare-gas ions are larger than those for the heavier rare-gas ions, but the opposite trend is observed in the progression from Cl{sup −} to I{sup −}. The largest rate coefficient is 6.5 × 10{sup −8} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for Ne{sup +} with I{sup −}. Rate coefficients for Ar{sup +}, Kr{sup +}, and Xe{sup +} reacting with Br{sub 2}{sup −} are also reported.

  7. Conserving Gapless Mean-Field Theory for Weakly Interacting Bose Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Takafumi

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a conserving gapless mean-field theory for weakly interacting Bose gases. We first construct a mean-field Luttinger-Ward thermodynamic functional in terms of the condensate wave function \\Psi and the Nambu Green’s function \\hat{G} for the quasiparticle field. Imposing its stationarity respect to \\Psi and \\hat{G} yields a set of equations to determine the equilibrium for general non-uniform systems. They have a plausible property of satisfying the Hugenholtz-Pines theorem to provide a gapless excitation spectrum. Also, the corresponding dynamical equations of motion obey various conservation laws. Thus, the present mean-field theory shares two important properties with the exact theory: “conserving” and “gapless.” The theory is then applied to a homogeneous weakly interacting Bose gas with s-wave scattering length a and particle mass m to clarify its basic thermodynamic properties under two complementary conditions of constant density n and constant pressure p. The superfluid transition is predicted to be first-order because of the non-analytic nature of the order-parameter expansion near Tc inherent in Bose systems, i.e., the Landau-Ginzburg expansion is not possible here. The transition temperature Tc shows quite a different interaction dependence between the n-fixed and p-fixed cases. In the former case Tc increases from the ideal gas value T0 as Tc/T0= 1+ 2.33 an1/3, whereas it decreases in the latter as Tc/T0= 1- 3.84a(m p/2π\\hbar2)1/5. Temperature dependences of basic thermodynamic quantities are clarified explicitly.

  8. Spin and field squeezing in a spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yixiao; Hu, Zheng-Da

    2015-01-01

    Recently, strong spin-orbit coupling with equal Rashba and Dresselhaus strength has been realized in neutral atomic Bose-Einstein condensates via a pair of Raman lasers. In this report, we investigate spin and field squeezing of the ground state in spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensate. By mapping the spin-orbit coupled BEC to the well-known quantum Dicke model, the Dicke type quantum phase transition is presented with the order parameters quantified by the spin polarization and occupation number of harmonic trap mode. This Dicke type quantum phase transition may be captured by the spin and field squeezing arising from the spin-orbit coupling. We further consider the effect of a finite detuning on the ground state and show the spin polarization and the quasi-momentum exhibit a step jump at zero detuning. Meanwhile, we also find that the presence of the detuning enhances the occupation number of harmonic trap mode, while it suppresses the spin and the field squeezing. PMID:25620051

  9. Extended Bose Hubbard model of interacting bosonic atoms in optical lattices: From superfluidity to density waves

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzarella, G.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.

    2006-01-15

    For systems of interacting, ultracold spin-zero neutral bosonic atoms, harmonically trapped and subject to an optical lattice potential, we derive an Extended Bose Hubbard (EBH) model by developing a systematic expansion for the Hamiltonian of the system in powers of the lattice parameters and of a scale parameter, the lattice attenuation factor. We identify the dominant terms that need to be retained in realistic experimental conditions, up to nearest-neighbor interactions and nearest-neighbor hoppings conditioned by the on-site occupation numbers. In the mean field approximation, we determine the free energy of the system and study the phase diagram both at zero and at finite temperature. At variance with the standard on site Bose Hubbard model, the zero-temperature phase diagram of the EBH model possesses a dual structure in the Mott insulating regime. Namely, for specific ranges of the lattice parameters, a density wave phase characterizes the system at integer fillings, with domains of alternating mean occupation numbers that are the atomic counterparts of the domains of staggered magnetizations in an antiferromagnetic phase. We show as well that in the EBH model, a zero-temperature quantum phase transition to pair superfluidity is, in principle, possible, but completely suppressed at the lowest order in the lattice attenuation factor. Finally, we determine the possible occurrence of the different phases as a function of the experimentally controllable lattice parameters.

  10. Bose-Einstein Condensation and Bose Glasses in an S = 1 Organo-metallic quantum magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Zapf, Vivien

    2012-06-01

    I will speak about Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in quantum magnets, in particular the compound NiCl2-4SC(NH2)2. Here a magnetic field-induced quantum phase transition to XY antiferromagnetism can be mapped onto BEC of the spins. The tuning parameter for BEC transition is the magnetic field rather than the temperature. Some interesting phenomena arise, for example the fact that the mass of the bosons that condense can be strongly renormalized by quantum fluctuations. I will discuss the utility of this mapping for both understanding the nature of the quantum magnetism and testing the thermodynamic limit of Bose-Einstein Condensation. Furthermore we can dope the system in a clean and controlled way to create the long sought-after Bose Glass transition, which is the bosonic analogy of Anderson localization. I will present experiments and simulations showing evidence for a new scaling exponent, which finally makes contact between theory and experiments. Thus we take a small step towards the difficult problem of understanding the effect of disorder on bosonic wave functions.

  11. Non-equilibrium disordered Bose gases: condensation, superfluidity and dynamical Bose glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Liang, Zhaoxin; Hu, Ying; Zhang, Zhidong

    2016-01-01

    In an equilibrium three-dimensional (3D) disordered condensate, it is well established that disorder can generate an amount of normal fluid ρ n equaling to 4/3 of ρ ex , where ρ ex is a sum of interaction-induced quantum depletion and disorder-induced condensate deformation. The concept that the superfluid is more volatile to the existence of disorder than the condensate is crucial to the understanding of the Bose glass phase. In this work, we show that, by bringing a weakly disordered 3D condensate to non-equilibrium regime via a quantum quench in the interaction, disorder can destroy superfluid significantly more, leading to a steady state of Hamiltonian H f in which the ρ n far exceeds 4/3 of the ρ ex . This suggests the possibility of engineering Bose glass in the dynamic regime. Here, we refer to the dynamical Bose glass as the case where in the steady state of quenched condensate, the superfluid density goes to zero while the condensate density remains finite. As both the ρ n and ρ ex are measurable quantities, our results allow an experimental demonstration of the dramatized interplay between the disorder and interaction in the non-equilibrium scenario.

  12. Quantum simulation of driven para-Bose oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alderete, C. Huerta; Rodríguez-Lara, B. M.

    2017-01-01

    Quantum mechanics allows paraparticles with mixed Bose-Fermi statistics that have not been experimentally confirmed. We propose a trapped-ion scheme whose effective dynamics are equivalent to a driven para-Bose oscillator of even order. Our mapping suggest highly entangled vibrational and internal ion states as the laboratory equivalent of quantum simulated parabosons. Furthermore, we show the generation and reconstruction of coherent oscillations and para-Bose analogs of Gilmore-Perelomov coherent states from population inversion measurements in the laboratory frame. Our proposal, apart from demonstrating an analog quantum simulator of para-Bose oscillators, provides a quantum state engineering tool that foreshadows the potential use of paraparticle dynamics in the design of quantum information systems.

  13. Bragg spectroscopy with an accelerating Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Geursen, R.; Thomas, N.R.; Wilson, A.C.

    2003-10-01

    We present the results of Bragg spectroscopy performed on an accelerating Bose-Einstein condensate. The Bose-Einstein condensate undergoes circular micromotion in a magnetic time-averaged orbiting potential trap and the effect of this motion on the Bragg spectrum is analyzed. A simple frequency modulation model is used to interpret the observed complex structure, and broadening effects are considered using numerical solutions to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation.

  14. Kinetic simulation of neutral/ionized gas and electrically charged dust in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    SciTech Connect

    Tenishev, Valeriy; Rubin, Martin; Combi, Michael R.

    2011-05-20

    The cometary coma is a unique phenomenon in the solar system being a planetary atmosphere influenced by little or no gravity. As a comet approaches the sun, the water vapor with some fraction of other gases sublimate, generating a cloud of gas, ice and other refractory materials (rocky and organic dust) ejected from the surface of the nucleus. Sublimating gas molecules undergo frequent collisions and photochemical processes in the near-nucleus region. Owing to its negligible gravity, comets produce a large and highly variable extensive dusty coma with a size much larger than the characteristic size of the cometary nucleus.The Rosetta spacecraft is en route to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for a rendezvous, landing, and extensive orbital phase beginning in 2014. Both, interpretation of measurements and safety consideration of the spacecraft require modeling of the comet's dusty gas environment.In this work we present results of a numerical study of multispecies gaseous and electrically charged dust environment of comet Chyuryumov-Gerasimenko. Both, gas and dust phases of the coma are simulated kinetically. Photolytic reactions are taken into account. Parameters of the ambient plasma as well as the distribution of electric/magnetic fields are obtained from an MHD simulation of the coma connected to the solar wind. Trajectories of ions and electrically charged dust grains are simulated by accounting for the Lorentz force and the nucleus gravity.

  15. Stability of ultracold atomic Bose condensates with Rashba spin-orbit coupling against quantum and thermal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Tomoki; Baym, Gordon

    2012-07-13

    We study the stability of Bose condensates with Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling in three dimensions against quantum and thermal fluctuations. The ground state depletion of the plane-wave condensate due to quantum fluctuations is, as we show, finite, and therefore the condensate is stable. We also calculate the corresponding shift of the ground state energy. Although the system cannot condense in the absence of interparticle interactions, by estimating the number of excited particles we show that interactions stabilize the condensate even at nonzero temperature. Unlike in the usual Bose gas, the normal phase is not kinematically forbidden at any temperature; calculating the free energy of the normal phase at finite temperature, and comparing with the free energy of the condensed state, we infer that generally the system is condensed at zero temperature, and undergoes a transition to normal at nonzero temperature.

  16. Ferroelectricity by Bose-Einstein condensation in a quantum magnet.

    PubMed

    Kimura, S; Kakihata, K; Sawada, Y; Watanabe, K; Matsumoto, M; Hagiwara, M; Tanaka, H

    2016-09-26

    The Bose-Einstein condensation is a fascinating phenomenon, which results from quantum statistics for identical particles with an integer spin. Surprising properties, such as superfluidity, vortex quantization or Josephson effect, appear owing to the macroscopic quantum coherence, which spontaneously develops in Bose-Einstein condensates. Realization of Bose-Einstein condensation is not restricted in fluids like liquid helium, a superconducting phase of paired electrons in a metal and laser-cooled dilute alkali atoms. Bosonic quasi-particles like exciton-polariton and magnon in solids-state systems can also undergo Bose-Einstein condensation in certain conditions. Here, we report that the quantum coherence in Bose-Einstein condensate of the magnon quasi particles yields spontaneous electric polarization in the quantum magnet TlCuCl3, leading to remarkable magnetoelectric effect. Very soft ferroelectricity is realized as a consequence of the O(2) symmetry breaking by magnon Bose-Einstein condensation. The finding of this ferroelectricity will open a new window to explore multi-functionality of quantum magnets.

  17. Effective Action for Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Takafumi

    2014-06-01

    We clarify basic properties of an effective action (i.e., self-consistent perturbation expansion) for interacting Bose-Einstein condensates, where field ψ itself acquires a finite thermodynamic average < ψ > besides two-point Green's function hat{G} to form an off-diagonal long-range order. It is shown that the action can be expressed concisely order by order in terms of the interaction vertex and a special combination of < ψ > and hat{G} so as to satisfy both Noether's theorem and Goldstone's theorem (I) corresponding to the first proof. The self-energy is predicted to have a one-particle-reducible structure due to < ψ > ≠ 0 to transform the Bogoliubov mode into a bubbling mode with a substantial decay rate.

  18. Coupling a Bose condensate to micromechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Chandler; Fox, Eli; Flanz, Scott; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2011-05-01

    We describe the construction of a compact apparatus to investigate the interaction of a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate and a micromechanical oscillator. The apparatus uses a double magneto-optical trap, Raman sideband cooling, and evaporative cooling to rapidly produce a 87Rb BEC in close proximity to a high Q membrane. The micromotion of the membrane results in small Zeeman shifts at the location of the BEC due to a magnetic domain attached to the oscillator. Detection of this micromotion by the condensate results in a backaction on the membrane. We investigate prospects of using this backaction to generate nonclassical states of the mechanical oscillator. This work was funded by the DARPA ORCHID program.

  19. Quantum Dynamics of Ultracold Bose Polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchadilova, Yulia E.; Schmidt, Richard; Grusdt, Fabian; Demler, Eugene

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of Bose polarons in the vicinity of a Feshbach resonance between the impurity and host atoms. We compute the radio-frequency absorption spectra for the case when the initial state of the impurity is noninteracting and the final state is strongly interacting with the host atoms. We compare results of different theoretical approaches including a single excitation expansion, a self-consistent T -matrix method, and a time-dependent coherent state approach. Our analysis reveals sharp spectral features arising from metastable states with several Bogoliubov excitations bound to the impurity atom. This surprising result of the interplay of many-body and few-body Efimov type bound state physics can only be obtained by going beyond the commonly used Fröhlich model and including quasiparticle scattering processes. Close to the resonance we find that strong fluctuations lead to a broad, incoherent absorption spectrum where no quasiparticle peak can be assigned.

  20. Relativistic Axions from Collapsing Bose Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levkov, D. G.; Panin, A. G.; Tkachev, I. I.

    2017-01-01

    The substructures of light bosonic (axionlike) dark matter may condense into compact Bose stars. We study the collapse of critical-mass stars caused by attractive self-interaction of the axionlike particles and find that these processes proceed in an unexpected universal way. First, nonlinear self-similar evolution (called "wave collapse" in condensed matter physics) forces the particles to fall into the star center. Second, interactions in the dense center create an outgoing stream of mildly relativistic particles which carries away an essential part of the star mass. The collapse stops when the star remnant is no longer able to support the self-similar infall feeding the collisions. We shortly discuss possible astrophysical and cosmological implications of these phenomena.

  1. Nonlinear interferometry with Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Tacla, Alexandre B.; Boixo, Sergio; Datta, Animesh; Shaji, Anil; Caves, Carlton M.

    2010-11-15

    We analyze a proposed experiment [Boixo et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 040403 (2008)] for achieving sensitivity scaling better than 1/N in a nonlinear Ramsey interferometer that uses a two-mode Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of N atoms. We present numerical simulations that confirm the analytical predictions for the effect of the spreading of the BEC ground-state wave function on the ideal 1/N{sup 3/2} scaling. Numerical integration of the coupled, time-dependent, two-mode Gross-Pitaevskii equations allows us to study the several simplifying assumptions made in the initial analytic study of the proposal and to explore when they can be justified. In particular, we find that the two modes share the same spatial wave function for a length of time that is sufficient to run the metrology scheme.

  2. Bose Condensation at He-4 Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draeger, E. W.; Ceperley, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Path Integral Monte Carlo was used to calculate the Bose-Einstein condensate fraction at the surface of a helium film at T = 0:77 K, as a function of density. Moving from the center of the slab to the surface, the condensate fraction was found to initially increase with decreasing density to a maximum value of 0.9, before decreasing. Long wavelength density correlations were observed in the static structure factor at the surface of the slab. A surface dispersion relation was calculated from imaginary-time density-density correlations. Similar calculations of the superfluid density throughout He-4 droplets doped with linear impurities (HCN)(sub n) are presented. After deriving a local estimator for the superfluid density distribution, we find a decreased superfluid response in the first solvation layer. This effective normal fluid exhibits temperature dependence similar to that of a two-dimensional helium system.

  3. Reservoir interactions of a vortex in a trapped three-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, S. J.; Allen, A. J.; Zülicke, U.; Proukakis, N. P.; Bradley, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    We simulate the dissipative evolution of a vortex in a trapped finite-temperature dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensate using first-principles open-systems theory. Simulations of the complete stochastic projected Gross-Pitaevskii equation for a partially condensed Bose gas containing a single quantum vortex show that the transfer of condensate energy to the incoherent thermal component without population transfer provides an important channel for vortex decay. For the lower temperatures considered, this effect is significantly larger that the population transfer process underpinning the standard theory of vortex decay, and is the dominant determinant of the vortex lifetime. A comparison with the Zaremba-Nikuni-Griffin kinetic (two-fluid) theory further elucidates the role of the particle transfer interaction, and suggests the need for experimental testing of reservoir interaction theory. The dominance of this particular energetic decay mechanism for this open quantum system should be testable with current experimental setups, and its observation would have broad implications for the dynamics of atomic matter waves and experimental studies of dissipative phenomena.

  4. Solitons in Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.

    2003-05-01

    The stationary form, dynamical properties, and experimental criteria for creation of matter-wave bright and dark solitons, both singly and in trains, are studied numerically and analytically in the context of Bose-Einstein condensates [1]. The full set of stationary solutions in closed analytic form to the mean field model in the quasi-one-dimensional regime, which is a nonlinear Schrodinger equation equally relevant in nonlinear optics, is developed under periodic and box boundary conditions [2]. These solutions are extended numerically into the two and three dimensional regimes, where it is shown that dark solitons can be used to create vortex-anti-vortex pairs under realistic conditions. Specific experimental prescriptions for creating viable dark and bright solitons in the quasi-one-dimensional regime are provided. These analytic methods are then extended to treat the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a generalized lattice potential, which models a Bose-Einstein condensate trapped in the potential generated by a standing light wave. A novel solution family is developed and stability criterion are presented. Experiments which successfully carried out these ideas are briefly discussed [3]. [1] Dissertation research completed at the University of Washington Physics Department under the advisorship of Prof. William P. Reinhardt. [2] L. D. Carr, C. W. Clark, and W. P. Reinhardt, Phys. Rev. A v. 62 p. 063610-1--10 and Phys. Rev. A v.62, p.063611-1--10 (2000). [3] L. Khaykovich, F. Schreck, T. Bourdel, J. Cubizolles, G. Ferrari, L. D. Carr, Y. Castin, and C. Salomon, Science v. 296, p.1290--1293 (2002).

  5. Observation of Zitterbewegung in a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Chunlei; Hamner, Chris; Gong, Ming; Zhang, Chuanwei; Engels, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Spin-orbit-coupled ultracold atoms provide an intriguing new avenue for the study of rich spin dynamics in superfluids. In this Rapid Communication, we observe Zitterbewegung, the simultaneous velocity (thus position) and spin oscillations, of neutral atoms between two spin-orbit-coupled bands in a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) through sudden quantum quenches of the Hamiltonian. The observed Zitterbewegung oscillations are perfect on a short time scale but gradually damp out on a long time scale, followed by sudden and strong heating of the BEC. As an application, we also demonstrate how Zitterbewegung oscillations can be exploited to populate the upper spin-orbit band and observe a subsequent dipole motion. Our experimental results are corroborated by a theoretical and numerical analysis and showcase the great flexibility that ultracold atoms provide for investigating rich spin dynamics in superfluids.

  6. Mean-Field Dynamics of Spin-Orbit Coupled Bose-Einstein Condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongping; Mao, Li; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2012-01-01

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the interaction between the spin and momentum of a quantum particle, is crucial for many important condensed matter phenomena. The recent experimental realization of SOC in neutral bosonic cold atoms provides a new and ideal platform for investigating spin-orbit coupled quantum many-body physics. In this Letter, we derive a generic Gross-Pitaevskii equation as the starting point for the study of many-body dynamics in spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensates. We show that different laser setups for realizing the same SOC may lead to different mean-field dynamics. Various ground state phases (stripe, phase separation, etc.) of the condensate are found in different parameter regions. A new oscillation period induced by the SOC, similar to the Zitterbewegung oscillation, is found in the center-of-mass motion of the condensate.

  7. Observation of Bose-Einstein condensation in a strong synthetic magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Colin J.; Burton, William Cody; Chung, Woo Chang; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Extensions of Berry’s phase and the quantum Hall effect have led to the discovery of new states of matter with topological properties. Traditionally, this has been achieved using magnetic fields or spin-orbit interactions, which couple only to charged particles. For neutral ultracold atoms, synthetic magnetic fields have been created that are strong enough to realize the Harper-Hofstadter model. We report the first observation of Bose-Einstein condensation in this system and study the Harper-Hofstadter Hamiltonian with one-half flux quantum per lattice unit cell. The diffraction pattern of the superfluid state directly shows the momentum distribution of the wavefunction, which is gauge-dependent. It reveals both the reduced symmetry of the vector potential and the twofold degeneracy of the ground state. We explore an adiabatic many-body state preparation protocol via the Mott insulating phase and observe the superfluid ground state in a three-dimensional lattice with strong interactions.

  8. Mean-field dynamics of spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongping; Mao, Li; Zhang, Chuanwei

    2012-01-20

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC), the interaction between the spin and momentum of a quantum particle, is crucial for many important condensed matter phenomena. The recent experimental realization of SOC in neutral bosonic cold atoms provides a new and ideal platform for investigating spin-orbit coupled quantum many-body physics. In this Letter, we derive a generic Gross-Pitaevskii equation as the starting point for the study of many-body dynamics in spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensates. We show that different laser setups for realizing the same SOC may lead to different mean-field dynamics. Various ground state phases (stripe, phase separation, etc.) of the condensate are found in different parameter regions. A new oscillation period induced by the SOC, similar to the Zitterbewegung oscillation, is found in the center-of-mass motion of the condensate.

  9. High resolution studies of the origins of polyatomic ions in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, Part I. Identification methods and effects of neutral gas density assumptions, extraction voltage, and cone material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Jill Wisnewski; Houk, R. S.

    2006-08-01

    Common polyatomic ions (ArO +, NO +, H 2O +, H 3O +, Ar 2+, ArN +, OH +, ArH +, O 2+) in inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are identified using high mass resolution and studied using kinetic gas temperatures ( Tgas) determined from a dissociation reaction approach. Methods for making accurate mass measurements, confirming ion identifications, and correcting for mass bias are discussed. The effects of sampler and skimmer cone composition and extraction voltage on polyatomic ion formation are also explored. Neutral species densities at several locations in the extraction interface are estimated and the corresponding effects of the Tgas value are calculated. The results provide information about the origins of background ions and indicate possible locations for their formation or removal.

  10. Neutral interstellar helium parameters based on Ulysses/GAS and IBEX-LO observations: What are the reasons for the differences?

    SciTech Connect

    Katushkina, O. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Wood, B. E.; McMullin, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent analysis of the interstellar helium fluxes measured in 2009-2010 at Earth's orbit by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has suggested that the interstellar velocity (both direction and magnitude) is inconsistent with that derived previously from Ulysses/GAS observations made in the period from 1990 to 2002 at 1.5-5.5 AU from the Sun. Both results are model dependent, and models that were used in the analyses are different. In this paper, we perform an analysis of the Ulysses/GAS and IBEX-Lo data using our state-of-the-art three-dimensional time-dependent kinetic model of interstellar atoms in the heliosphere. For the first time, we analyze Ulysses/GAS data from year 2007, the closest available Ulysses/GAS observations in time to the IBEX observations. We show that the interstellar velocity derived from the Ulysses 2007 data is consistent with previous Ulysses results and does not agree with the velocity derived from IBEX. This conclusion is very robust since, as is shown in the paper, it does not depend on the ionization rates adopted in theoretical models. We conclude that Ulysses data are not consistent with the new local interstellar medium (LISM) velocity vector from IBEX. In contrast, IBEX data, in principle, could be explained with the LISM velocity vector derived from the Ulysses data. This is possible for the models where the interstellar temperature increased from 6300 K to 9000 K. There is a need to perform further studies of possible reasons for the broadening of the helium signal core measured by IBEX, which could be an instrumental effect or could be due to unconsidered physical processes.

  11. Electronic properties of GaSe, InSe, GaS and GaTe layered semiconductors: charge neutrality level and interface barrier heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudnyi, V. N.; Sarkisov, S. Yu; Kosobutsky, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been applied to study the structural and electronic properties of layered ɛ-GaSe, γ-InSe, β-GaS and GaTe compounds. The optimized lattice parameters have been obtained using vdW-DF2-C09 exchange-correlation functional, which is able to describe dispersion forces and produces interlayer distances in close agreement with experiments. Based on the calculated electronic band structures, the energy position of the charge neutrality level (CNL) in the III-VI semiconductors has been estimated for the first time. The room-temperature values of CNL are found to be 0.80 eV, 1.02 eV, 0.72 eV and 0.77 eV for ɛ-GaSe, β-GaS, GaTe and γ-InSe, respectively. The persistent p-type conductivity of the intentionally undoped ɛ-GaSe, β-GaS and GaTe and n-type conductivity of γ-InSe crystals are discussed and explained using the concept of CNL. We also estimated the barrier heights for a number of metal/semiconductor and semiconductor/semiconductor interfaces assuming partial Fermi level pinning at the CNL. A reasonable agreement between our calculations and the available experimental data has been obtained.

  12. Ground-based neutral gas environment simulation related to material degradation phenomena in the orbital altitudes of 200-500 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, Masahito; Yokota, Kumiko; Oyabu, Takashi; Ohira, Junki; Watanabe, Daiki; Yamasaki, Yuki

    The exterior surface of the spacecraft was covered by thermal control materials that mainly made of polymeric materials such as polyimide or fluorinated ethylenepropylene (FEP). It has been widely known that materials in low Earth orbit (LEO) are subjected to severe degradation caused by various space environmental factors. There are many environmental factors in space, however, atomic oxygen (AO) is one of the major concerns on the material degradation in LEO. The reaction mechanism of AO with materials has been studied by ground-based experiments using laser-detonation hyperthermal beam source, which enables to accelerate the electrically neutral AO up to 8 km/s (orbital velocity of spacecraft). Besides the AO-induced material degradation of hydrocarbons, it has been suspected that the chemically inert heavy molecules, such as N2, have influenced material erosions. In this presentation, effects of Ar collision (simulating the collision energy of N2 in space), sample temperature and vacuum ultraviolet exposures on the AO-induced material erosion were studied. Not only the mass-loss effect, but also the difference in surface chemistry by AO or Ar bombardment will also be presented.

  13. Quantum Monte Carlo Studies of Dense Hydrogen and Two-Dimensional Bose Liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magro, William R.

    Quantum Monte Carlo techniques; in their various incarnations, calculate ground state or finite temperature properties of many-body quantum systems. We apply the path-integral Monte Carlo method to hydrogen at densities and temperatures in the regime of cooperative thermal and pressure dissociation, relevant to structural models of the giant planets' interiors. We treat the protons and electrons as quantum particles, thereby avoiding the Born -Oppenheimer approximation. Fermi-Dirac exchange statistics are treated within the fixed-node approximation, with the nodes specified by the free Fermi gas. In the region of molecular dissociation, we observe properties consistent with and suggestive of a first order phase transition with positive density discontinuity (n_{ rm H2}Bose Yukawa liquid and the Bose Coulomb liquid. The Yukawa system is a model for flux line interactions in high temperature superconductors. We determine the phase diagram as a function of mass and density and find a high density scaling relation describing the crossover to Coulomb behavior. We apply our results to a sample superconducting compound, rm Bi_2Sr_2CaCu_2O _8. Next the results of the Coulomb system are presented. We show that the predominance of long wavelength plasmons destroys Bose condensation in this system. The ground state of this system is closely related to the bosonic representation of Laughlin's wave function for the fractional quantum Hall system.

  14. Constraints on Bose-Einstein-condensed axion dark matter from the Hi nearby galaxy survey data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Hua; Li, Zhi-Bing

    2014-05-01

    One of the leading candidates for dark matter is the axion or axionlike particle in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). In this paper, we present an analysis of 17 high-resolution galactic rotation curves from the Hi nearby galaxy survey (THINGS) data [F. Walter et al., Astron. J. 136, 2563 (2008)] in the context of the axionic Bose-Einstein condensed dark matter model. Assuming a repulsive two-body interaction, we solve the nonrelativistic Gross-Pitaevskii equation for N gravitationally trapped bosons in the Thomas-Fermi approximation. We obtain the maximum possible radius R and the mass profile M(r) of a dilute axionic Bose-Einstein condensed gas cloud. A standard least- χ2 method is employed to find the best-fit values of the total mass M of the axion BEC and its radius R. The local mass density of BEC axion dark matter is ρa ≃0.02 GeV /cm3, which agrees with that presented by Beck [C. Beck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 231801 (2013)]. The axion mass ma we obtain depends not only on the best-fit value of R, but also on the s-wave scattering length a (ma∝a1/3). The transition temperature Ta of an axion BEC on galactic scales is also estimated. Comparing the calculated Ta with the ambient temperature of galaxies and galaxy clusters implies that a ˜10-3 fm. The corresponding axion mass is ma≃0.58 meV. We compare our results with others.

  15. Rayleigh surface wave interaction with the 2D exciton Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Boev, M. V.; Kovalev, V. M.

    2015-06-15

    We describe the interaction of a Rayleigh surface acoustic wave (SAW) traveling on the semiconductor substrate with the excitonic gas in a double quantum well located on the substrate surface. We study the SAW attenuation and its velocity renormalization due to the coupling to excitons. Both the deformation potential and piezoelectric mechanisms of the SAW-exciton interaction are considered. We focus on the frequency and excitonic density dependences of the SAW absorption coefficient and velocity renormalization at temperatures both above and well below the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation of the excitonic gas. We demonstrate that the SAW attenuation and velocity renormalization are strongly different below and above the critical temperature.

  16. Ground states of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in a one-dimensional laser-assisted optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qing; Hu, Jie; Wen, Lin; Liu, W.-M.; Juzeliūnas, G.; Ji, An-Chun

    2016-11-01

    We study the ground-state behavior of a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) in a Raman-laser-assisted one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice potential forming a multilayer system. We find that, such system can be described by an effective model with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) of pseudospin (N-1)/2, where N is the number of layers. Due to the intricate interplay between atomic interactions, SOC and laser-assisted tunnelings, the ground-state phase diagrams generally consist of three phases-a stripe, a plane wave and a normal phase with zero-momentum, touching at a quantum tricritical point. More important, even though the single-particle states only minimize at zero-momentum for odd N, the many-body ground states may still develop finite momenta. The underlying mechanisms are elucidated. Our results provide an alternative way to realize an effective spin-orbit coupling of Bose gas with the Raman-laser-assisted optical lattice, and would also be beneficial to the studies on SOC effects in spinor Bose systems with large spin.

  17. Ground states of a Bose-Einstein Condensate in a one-dimensional laser-assisted optical lattice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qing; Hu, Jie; Wen, Lin; Liu, W.-M.; Juzeliūnas, G.; Ji, An-Chun

    2016-01-01

    We study the ground-state behavior of a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) in a Raman-laser-assisted one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice potential forming a multilayer system. We find that, such system can be described by an effective model with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) of pseudospin (N-1)/2, where N is the number of layers. Due to the intricate interplay between atomic interactions, SOC and laser-assisted tunnelings, the ground-state phase diagrams generally consist of three phases–a stripe, a plane wave and a normal phase with zero-momentum, touching at a quantum tricritical point. More important, even though the single-particle states only minimize at zero-momentum for odd N, the many-body ground states may still develop finite momenta. The underlying mechanisms are elucidated. Our results provide an alternative way to realize an effective spin-orbit coupling of Bose gas with the Raman-laser-assisted optical lattice, and would also be beneficial to the studies on SOC effects in spinor Bose systems with large spin. PMID:27883037

  18. Laser Cooling and Trapping of Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, William D.

    1998-05-01

    Laser cooling was proposed in 1975 and first demonstrated for trapped ions in 1978, but the effective laser cooling of neutral atoms took longer, in part because neutrals are so hard to trap. Laser deceleration and cooling of an atomic beam came in the early 1980s, followed by magnetic trapping of atoms in 1985. In 1988 we discovered that laser cooling results in temperatures far lower than expected from the then-accepted theory. The new understanding, developed in the groups of Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and Steve Chu, of the physical process of laser cooling has allowed us to achieve temperatures below a microkelvin. Today, laser cooling and trapping is being used for applications ranging from atomic clocks to Bose-Einstein condensation. This talk is an adaptation of the Nobel Lecture given in Stockholm, December 1997. Special thanks go to my colleagues at NIST and to the entire laser cooling community. This work was supported by NIST and by the ONR.

  19. Effects of interaction on thermodynamics of a repulsive Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Satadal; Das, Tapan Kumar; Chakrabarti, Barnali

    2013-11-01

    We report the effects of interaction on thermodynamic properties of a repulsive Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a harmonic trap by using the correlated potential harmonics expansion method. This many-body technique permits the use of a realistic interactomic interaction, which gives rise to the effective long-range interaction of the condensate in terms of the s-wave scattering length. We have computed temperature (T) dependence of the chemical potential, specific heat, condensate fraction, entropy, pressure, and the average energy per particle of a system containing a large number (A) of 87Rb atoms in the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA) trap. The repulsion among the interacting bosons results in a small but measurable drop of condensate fraction and critical temperature (Tc), compared to those of a noninteracting condensate. These are in agreement with the experiment. Although all thermodynamic quantities have a strong dependence on A and to a smaller extent on the interatomic interaction, our numerical calculation appears to show that a thermodynamic quantity per particle follows a universal behavior as a function of T/Tc. This shows the importance of Tc for all thermodynamic properties of the condensate. As expected, for T>Tc, these properties follow those of a trapped noncondensed Bose gas.

  20. Gravitational dynamics in Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Girelli, F.; Liberati, S.; Sindoni, L.

    2008-10-15

    Analogue models for gravity intend to provide a framework where matter and gravity, as well as their intertwined dynamics, emerge from degrees of freedom that have a priori nothing to do with what we call gravity or matter. Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) are a natural example of an analogue model since one can identify matter propagating on a (pseudo-Riemannian) metric with collective excitations above the condensate of atoms. However, until now, a description of the 'analogue gravitational dynamics' for such model was missing. We show here that in a BEC system with massive quasiparticles, the gravitational dynamics can be encoded in a modified (semiclassical) Poisson equation. In particular, gravity is of extreme short range (characterized by the healing length) and the cosmological constant appears from the noncondensed fraction of atoms in the quasiparticle vacuum. While some of these features make the analogue gravitational dynamics of our BEC system quite different from standard Newtonian gravity, we nonetheless show that it can be used to draw some interesting lessons about 'emergent gravity' scenarios.

  1. Nonlinear phenomena in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.

    2008-05-01

    We present a medley of results from the last three years on nonlinear phenomena in BECs [1]. These include exact dynamics of multi-component condensates in optical lattices [2], vortices and ring solitons [3], macroscopic quantum tunneling [4], nonlinear band theory [5], and a pulsed atomic soliton laser [6]. 1. Emergent Nonlinear Phenomena in Bose-Einstein Condensates: Theory and Experiment, ed. P. G. Kevrekidis, D. J. Frantzeskakis, and R. Carretero-Gonzalez (Springer-Verlag, 2008). 2. R. Mark Bradley, James E. Bernard, and L. D. Carr, e-print arXiv:0711.1896 (2007). 3. G. Herring, L. D. Carr, R. Carretero-Gonzalez, P. G. Kevrekidis, D. J. Frantzeskakis, Phys. Rev. A in press, e-print arXiv:0709.2193 (2007); L. D. Carr and C. W. Clark, Phys. Rev. A v. 74, p.043613 (2006); L. D. Carr and C. W. Clark, Phys. Rev. Lett. v. 97, p.010403 (2006). 4. L. D. Carr, M. J. Holland, and B. A. Malomed, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys., v.38, p.3217 (2005) 5. B. T. Seaman, L. D. Carr, and M. J. Holland, Phys. Rev. A, v. 71, p.033622 (2005). 6. L. D. Carr and J. Brand, Phys. Rev. A, v.70, p.033607 (2004); L. D. Carr and J. Brand, Phys. Rev. Lett., v.92, p.040401 (2004).

  2. Dynamical properties of Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Rafael

    Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) provide a testbed for a wide array of coherent structures with complex dynamical properties. Of these structures, vortices and two-component BECs are at the forefront in understanding fundamental properties of BECs and have been under intense scrutiny in both experiments and theoretical studies. The behavior of these structures elucidates the mechanics of nonlinear processes that give rise to patterns in vortex lattices and patterns in binary BECs. This has lead to the integration of BECs into the new field of emergent phenomena that has unified many seemingly unrelated disciplines because at a fundamental level, the nonlinear processes provide a blueprint to give rise to coherence out of randomness. First, we study the interactions between two atomic species in a binary BEC to determine conditions for miscibility, oscillations between species, steady state solutions and their stability. Second, the two component system is extended to a quasi-2D systems for a pancake-shaped condensate. Third, the shape of the background atomic density as well as the background with a vortex is studied to determine the role of the phase and background on the precession of a vortex. Lastly, the dynamics of small clusters of same charge vortices in a trapped BEC is studied giving fixed point configurations that rotate at a constant speed.

  3. ITER neutral beam system US conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Purgalis, P.

    1990-09-01

    In this document we present the US conceptual design of a neutral beam system for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The design incorporates a barium surface conversion D{sup {minus}} source feeding a linear array of accelerator channels. The system uses a dc accelerator with electrostatic quadrupoles for strong focusing. A high voltage power supply that is integrated with the accelerator is presented as an attractive option. A gas neutralizer is used and residual ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected to water-cooled dumps. Cryopanels are located at the accelerator exit to pump excess gas from the source and the neutralizer, and in the ion dump cavity to pump re-neutralized ions and neutralizer gas. All the above components are packaged in compact identical, independent modules which can be removed for remote maintenance. The neutral beam system delivers 75 MW of DO at 1.3 MeV, into three ports with a total of 9 modules arranged in stacks of three modules per port . To increase reliability each module is designed to deliver up to 10 MW; this allows eight modules operating at partial capacity to deliver the required power in the event one module is out of service, and provides 20% excess capacity to improve availability. Radiation protection is provided by shielding and by locating critical components in the source and accelerator 46.5 m from the torus centerline. Neutron shielding in the drift duct and neutralizer provides the added feature of limiting conductance and thus reducing gas flow to and from the torus.

  4. Decay of hydrodynamic modes in dilute Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gust, Erich; Reichl, Linda

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of Bogoliubov mean field theory applied to the hydrodynamic modes in a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate. The condensate has six hydrodynamic modes, two of which are decaying shear modes related to the viscosity, and two pairs pairs of sound modes which undergo an avoided crossing as the equilibrium temperature is varied. The two pairs of sound modes decay at very different rates, except in the neighborhood of the avoided crossing, where the identity of the longest-lived mode switches. The predicted speed and lifetime of the longest-lived sound mode are consistent with recent experimental observations on sound in an 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate. The strong depedence of the decay rates on temperature implies a possible new method for determining the temperature of Bose-Einstein condensates. The authors wish to thank the Robert A. Welch Foundation Grant No. F-1051 for support of this work.

  5. Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism in economic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianping

    2015-06-01

    This paper starts from modifying the kinetic exchange model and ends with making a parallel between economic crisis and the Bose-Einstein condensation. By introducing a parameter δ, we incorporate the time influence into the Bose-Einstein statistics. And δ is found to represent the technology level in an economy. δ's growth in time enlarges the rich and poor gap and induces economic crisis in free market despite the fact that average living standard is raised. Then we find the “δ-Te-Entropy” dilemma which features a strong implication of the second law of thermodynamics. The dilemma means when an economy is isolated the entropy grows and synergetically Te and δ grow inducing the Bose-Einstein condensation, i.e., economic crisis while for open economy the dilemma breaks. Then we raise the question: What would happen if the world economy as a whole became isolated with ultimately omnibearing globalization?

  6. Theory of cold atoms: Bose-Einstein statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.

    2016-06-01

    This tutorial is the continuation of the previous tutorial part, published in (2013 Laser Phys. 23 062001), where the basic mathematical techniques required for an accurate description of cold atoms for both types of quantum statistics are expounded. In the present part, the specifics of the correct theoretical description of atoms obeying Bose-Einstein statistics are explained, including trapped Bose atoms. In the theory of systems exhibiting the phenomenon of Bose-Einstein condensation, there exists a number of delicate mathematical points, whose misunderstanding often results in principally wrong conclusions. This is why the consideration in the present tutorial is sufficiently detailed in order that the reader could clearly understand the underlying mathematics and would avoid confusions.

  7. Bose-Einstein correlations in W-pair decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barate, R.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Graugés, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L. M.; Morawitz, P.; Pacheco, A.; Riu, I.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Boix, G.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Davies, G.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T. C.; Halley, A. W.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Leroy, O.; Maley, P.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Spagnolo, P.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tournefier, E.; Valassi, A.; Wright, A. E.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Chalmers, M.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raeven, B.; Smith, D.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Ward, J. J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Marinelli, N.; Martin, E. B.; Nash, J.; Nowell, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Sciabà, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; Thomson, E.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Kröcker, M.; Müller, A.-S.; Nürnberger, H.-A.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Tilquin, A.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Gilardoni, S.; Ragusa, F.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Azzurri, P.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; de Vivie de Régie, J.-B.; Zerwas, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Giassi, A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Coles, J.; Cowan, G.; Green, M. G.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Jones, L. T.; Medcalf, T.; Strong, J. A.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Faïf, G.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Seager, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Loomis, C.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Misiejuk, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Williams, R. W.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2000-04-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations are studied in semileptonic (WW-->qq¯lν) and fully hadronic (WW-->qq¯qq¯) W-pair decays with the ALEPH detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies of 172, 183 and 189 GeV. They are compared with those made at the Z peak after correction for the different flavour compositions. A Monte Carlo model of Bose-Einstein correlations based on the JETSET hadronization scheme was tuned to the Z data and reproduces the correlations in the WW-->qq¯lν events. The same Monte Carlo reproduces the correlations in the WW-->qq¯qq¯ channel assuming independent fragmentation of the two W's. A variant of this model with Bose-Einstein correlations between decay products of different W's is disfavoured.

  8. Vortex formation in a fast rotating Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Tarun Kanti

    2004-04-01

    We study rotational motion of an interacting atomic Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a quadratic-plus-quartic potential. We calculate the lowest energy surface mode frequency and show that a symmetric trapped (harmonic and quartic) Bose-Einstein condensate breaks the rotational symmetry of the Hamiltonian when rotational frequency is greater than one-half of the lowest energy surface mode frequency. We argue that the formation of a vortex is not possible in a noninteracting as well as in an attractive Bose-Einstein condensate confined in a harmonic trap due to the absence of the spontaneous shape deformation, but it can occur which leads to the vortex formation if we add an additional quartic potential. Moreover, the spontaneous shape deformation and consequently the formation of a vortex in an attractive system depends on the strengths of the two-body interaction and the quartic potential.

  9. Bose-Einstein condensation of dipolar excitons in quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, V. B.; Gorbunov, A. V.

    2009-02-01

    The experiments on Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) of dipolar (spatially-indirect) excitons in the lateral traps in GaAs/AlGaAs Schottky-diode heterostructures with double and single quantum wells are presented. The condensed part of dipolar excitons under detection in the far zone is placed in k-space in the range which is almost two orders of magnitude less than thermal exciton wave vector. BEC occurs spontaneously in a reservoir of thermalized excitons. Luminescence images of Bose-condensate of dipolar excitons exhibit along perimeter of circular trap axially symmetrical spatial structures of equidistant bright spots which strongly depend on excitation power and temperature. By means of two-beam interference experiments with the use of cw and pulsed photoexcitation it was found that the state of dipolar exciton Bose-condensate is spatially coherent and the whole patterned luminescence configuration in real space is described by a common wave function.

  10. Directly Imaging Damped Ly-Alpha Galaxies at Redshifts Greater Than 2. III: The Star Formation Rates of Neutral Gas Reservoirs at Redshifts of Approximately 2.7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fumagalli, Michele; OMeara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Rafelski, Marc; Kanekar, Nissim

    2014-01-01

    We present results from a survey designed to probe the star formation properties of 32 damped Ly alpha systems (DLAs) at redshifts of approximately 2.7. By using the "double-DLA" technique that eliminates the glare of the bright background quasars, we directly measure the rest-frame FUV flux from DLAs and their neighbouring galaxies. At the position of the absorbing gas, we place stringent constraints on the unobscured star formation rates (SFRs) of DLAs to 2 sigma limits of psi less than 0.09-0.27 solar mass yr(exp -1), corresponding to SFR surface densities sigma(sub sfr) less than 10(exp -2.6)-10(exp -1.5) solar mass yr(exp -1) kpc(exp -2). The implications of these limits for the star formation law, metal enrichment, and cooling rates of DLAs are examined. By studying the distribution of impact parameters as a function of SFRs for all the galaxies detected around these DLAs, we place new direct constraints on the bright end of the UV luminosity function of DLA hosts. We find that less than or equal to 13% of the hosts have psi greater than or equal to 2 solar mass yr(exp -1) at impact parameters b(sub dla) less than or equal to (psi/solar mass yr(exp -1))(exp 0.8) + 6 kpc, differently from current samples of confirmed DLA galaxies. Our observations also disfavor a scenario in which the majority of DLAs arise from bright LBGs at distances 20 less than or equal to b(sub dla) less than 100 kpc. These new findings corroborate a picture in which DLAs do not originate from highly star forming systems that are coincident with the absorbers, and instead suggest that DLAs are associated with faint, possibly isolated, star-forming galaxies. Potential shortcomings of this scenario and future strategies for further investigation are discussed.

  11. Formation and stability of gas-phase o-benzoquinone from oxidation of ortho-hydroxyphenyl: A combined neutral and distonic radical study

    DOE PAGES

    Prendergast, Matthew B.; Kirk, Benjamin B.; Savee, John D.; ...

    2015-10-19

    Gas-phase product detection studies of o-hydroxyphenyl radical and O2 are reported at 373, 500, and 600 K, at 4 Torr (533.3 Pa), using VUV time-resolved synchrotron photoionisation mass spectrometry. The dominant products are assigned as o-benzoquinone (C6H4O2, m/z 108) and cyclopentadienone (C5H4O, m/z 80). It is concluded that cyclopentadienone forms as a secondary product from prompt decomposition of o-benzoquinone (and dissociative ionization of o-benzoquinone may contribute to the m/z 80 signal at photon energies ≳9.8 eV). Ion-trap reactions of the distonic o-hydroxyphenyl analogue, the 5-ammonium-2-hydroxyphenyl radical cation, with O2 are also reported and concur with the assignment of o-benzoquinone asmore » the dominant product. In addition, the ion-trap study also provides support for a mechanism where cyclopentadienone is produced by decarbonylation of o-benzoquinone. Kinetic studies compare oxidation of the ammonium-tagged o-hydroxyphenyl and o-methylphenyl radical cations along with trimethylammonium-tagged analogues. Reaction efficiencies are found to be ca. 5% for both charge-tagged o-hydroxyphenyl and o-methylphenyl radicals irrespective of the charged substituent. G3X-K quantum chemical calculations are deployed to rationalise experimental results for o-hydroxyphenyl + O2 and its charge-tagged counterpart. The prevailing reaction mechanism, after O2 addition, involves a facile 1,5-H shift in the peroxyl radical and subsequent elimination of OH to yield o-benzoquinone that is reminiscent of the Waddington mechanism for β-hydroxyperoxyl radicals. These results suggest o-hydroxyphenyl + O2 and decarbonylation of o-benzoquinone serve as plausible OH and CO sources in combustion.« less

  12. Breath gas metabolites and bacterial metagenomes from cystic fibrosis airways indicate active pH neutral 2,3-butanedione fermentation.

    PubMed

    Whiteson, Katrine L; Meinardi, Simone; Lim, Yan Wei; Schmieder, Robert; Maughan, Heather; Quinn, Robert; Blake, Donald R; Conrad, Douglas; Rohwer, Forest

    2014-06-01

    The airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are chronically colonized by patient-specific polymicrobial communities. The conditions and nutrients available in CF lungs affect the physiology and composition of the colonizing microbes. Recent work in bioreactors has shown that the fermentation product 2,3-butanediol mediates cross-feeding between some fermenting bacteria and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and that this mechanism increases bacterial current production. To examine bacterial fermentation in the respiratory tract, breath gas metabolites were measured and several metagenomes were sequenced from CF and non-CF volunteers. 2,3-butanedione was produced in nearly all respiratory tracts. Elevated levels in one patient decreased during antibiotic treatment, and breath concentrations varied between CF patients at the same time point. Some patients had high enough levels of 2,3-butanedione to irreversibly damage lung tissue. Antibiotic therapy likely dictates the activities of 2,3-butanedione-producing microbes, which suggests a need for further study with larger sample size. Sputum microbiomes were dominated by P. aeruginosa, Streptococcus spp. and Rothia mucilaginosa, and revealed the potential for 2,3-butanedione biosynthesis. Genes encoding 2,3-butanedione biosynthesis were disproportionately abundant in Streptococcus spp, whereas genes for consumption of butanedione pathway products were encoded by P. aeruginosa and R. mucilaginosa. We propose a model where low oxygen conditions in CF lung lead to fermentation and a decrease in pH, triggering 2,3-butanedione fermentation to avoid lethal acidification. We hypothesize that this may also increase phenazine production by P. aeruginosa, increasing reactive oxygen species and providing additional electron acceptors to CF microbes.

  13. Explicit solvent simulations of the aqueous oxidation potential and reorganization energy for neutral molecules: gas phase, linear solvent response, and non-linear response contributions.

    PubMed

    Guerard, Jennifer J; Tentscher, Peter R; Seijo, Marianne; Samuel Arey, J

    2015-06-14

    First principles simulations were used to predict aqueous one-electron oxidation potentials (Eox) and associated half-cell reorganization energies (λaq) for aniline, phenol, methoxybenzene, imidazole, and dimethylsulfide. We employed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the oxidized and reduced species in an explicit aqueous solvent, followed by EOM-IP-CCSD computations with effective fragment potentials for diabatic energy gaps of solvated clusters, and finally thermodynamic integration of the non-linear solvent response contribution using classical MD. A priori predicted Eox and λaq values exhibit mean absolute errors of 0.17 V and 0.06 eV, respectively, compared to experiment. We also disaggregate Eox into several well-defined free energy properties, including the gas phase adiabatic free energy of ionization (7.73 to 8.82 eV), the solvent-induced shift in the free energy of ionization due to linear solvent response (-2.01 to -2.73 eV), and the contribution from non-linear solvent response (-0.07 to -0.14 eV). The linear solvent response component is further apportioned into contributions from the solvent-induced shift in vertical ionization energy of the reduced species (ΔVIEaq) and the solvent-induced shift in negative vertical electron affinity of the ionized species (ΔNVEAaq). The simulated ΔVIEaq and ΔNVEAaq are found to contribute the principal sources of uncertainty in computational estimates of Eox and λaq. Trends in the magnitudes of disaggregated solvation properties are found to correlate with trends in structural and electronic features of the solute. Finally, conflicting approaches for evaluating the aqueous reorganization energy are contrasted and discussed, and concluding recommendations are given.

  14. Middle Pleistocene bifaces from Fengshudao (Bose Basin, Guangxi, China).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Bae, Christopher J; Huang, Shengmin; Huang, Xin; Tian, Feng; Mo, Jinyou; Huang, Zhitao; Huang, Chaolin; Xie, Shaowen; Li, Dawei

    2014-04-01

    The Bose (also Baise) Basin in Guangxi, southern China is well known for the presence of Paleolithic bifacially worked implements. The Bose Basin handaxes came to the attention of the international scientific community primarily for two reasons: 1) the age at 803 ka (thousands of years), places it at the Early to Middle Pleistocene transition; and 2) the presence of bifaces tests the validity of the Movius Line and whether it was time to simply discard the model. However, questions were almost immediately raised because the age was based on the supposed association of Australasian tektites that may or may not have been redeposited, and at the time of the initial publications all of the Bose Basin handaxes were surface collected. Thus, whether the Bose bifaces can necessarily be associated with the tektites and whether the tektites themselves were redeposited are important considerations. Here, we report the findings from recent excavations from the Fengshudao site located in the Bose Basin. The primary findings are: 1) the in situ excavation of tektites, which do not appear to have been redeposited, in association with bifaces from one stratigraphic level from one site indicates that the age of these stone tools should be around 803 ka; 2) the Fengshudao hominins were utilizing locally-available quartz, quartzite, and sandstone river cobbles; and 3) in a number of aspects, the Fengshudao handaxe morphology differs from the typical western Acheulean, and are quite large and thick compared with even the bifaces from other regions of eastern Asia (e.g., Luonan Basin, China; Imjin/Hantan River Basins, Korea). Although Fengshudao may be a case of western Acheulean hominins dispersing into the Bose Basin from nearby South Asia, it is quite possible that the Fengshudao bifaces can be considered an example of convergent evolution.

  15. Quantum and thermal fluctuations of trapped Bose-Einstein condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglov, V.I.; Collett, M.J.; Olsen, M.K.

    2005-09-15

    We quantize a semiclassical system defined by the Hamiltonian obtained from the asymptotic self-similar solution of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation for a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate with a linear gain term. On the basis of a Schroedinger equation derived in a space of ellipsoidal parameters, we analytically calculate the quantum mechanical and thermal variance in the ellipsoidal parameters for Bose-Einstein condensates in various shapes of trap. We show that, except for temperatures close to zero, dimensionless dispersions do not depend on the frequencies of the trap and they have the same dependence on dimensionless temperatures.

  16. Bose-Einstein condensation of relativistic Scalar Field Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Urena-Lopez, L. Arturo

    2009-01-15

    Standard thermodynamical results of ideal Bose gases are used to study the possible formation of a cosmological Bose-Einstein condensate in Scalar Field Dark Matter models; the main hypothesis is that the boson particles were in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. It is then shown that the only relevant case needs the presence of both particles and anti-particles, and that it corresponds to models in which the bosonic particle is very light. Contrary to common wisdom, the condensate should be a relativistic phenomenon. Some cosmological implications are discussed in turn.

  17. Quantum glass phases in the disordered Bose-Hubbard model.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Pinaki; Haas, Stephan

    2007-08-03

    The phase diagram of the Bose-Hubbard model in the presence of off-diagonal disorder is determined using quantum Monte Carlo simulations. A sequence of quantum glass phases intervene at the interface between the Mott insulating and the superfluid phases of the clean system. In addition to the standard Bose glass phase, the coexistence of gapless and gapped regions close to the Mott insulating phase leads to a novel Mott glass regime which is incompressible yet gapless. Numerical evidence for the properties of these phases is given in terms of global (compressibility, superfluid stiffness) and local (compressibility, momentum distribution) observables.

  18. Double species Bose-Einstein condensate with tunable interspecies interactions.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, G; Barontini, G; De Sarlo, L; Catani, J; Minardi, F; Inguscio, M

    2008-05-30

    We produce Bose-Einstein condensates of two different species, 87Rb and 41K, in an optical dipole trap in proximity of interspecies Feshbach resonances. We discover and characterize two Feshbach resonances, located around 35 and 79 G, by observing the three-body losses and the elastic cross section. The narrower resonance is exploited to create a double species condensate with tunable interactions. Our system opens the way to the exploration of double species Mott insulators and, more in general, of the quantum phase diagram of the two-species Bose-Hubbard model.

  19. Infrared Behavior of Dipolar Bose Systems at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastukhov, Volodymyr

    2017-01-01

    We rigorously discuss the infrared behavior of the uniform three-dimensional dipolar Bose systems. In particular, it is shown that low-temperature physics of the system is controlled by two parameters, namely isothermal compressibility and intensity of the dipole-dipole interaction. By using a hydrodynamic approach, we calculate the spectrum and damping of low-lying excitations and analyze the infrared behavior of the one-particle Green's function. The low-temperature corrections to the anisotropic superfluid density as well as condensate depletion are found. Additionally, we derive equations of the two-fluid hydrodynamics for dipolar Bose systems and calculate velocities of first and second sound.

  20. Formation and stability of gas-phase o-benzoquinone from oxidation of ortho-hydroxyphenyl: A combined neutral and distonic radical study

    SciTech Connect

    Prendergast, Matthew B.; Kirk, Benjamin B.; Savee, John D.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Masters, Kye -Simeon; Blanksby, Stephen J.; da Silva, Gabriel; Trevitt, Adam J.

    2015-10-19

    Gas-phase product detection studies of o-hydroxyphenyl radical and O2 are reported at 373, 500, and 600 K, at 4 Torr (533.3 Pa), using VUV time-resolved synchrotron photoionisation mass spectrometry. The dominant products are assigned as o-benzoquinone (C6H4O2, m/z 108) and cyclopentadienone (C5H4O, m/z 80). It is concluded that cyclopentadienone forms as a secondary product from prompt decomposition of o-benzoquinone (and dissociative ionization of o-benzoquinone may contribute to the m/z 80 signal at photon energies ≳9.8 eV). Ion-trap reactions of the distonic o-hydroxyphenyl analogue, the 5-ammonium-2-hydroxyphenyl radical cation, with O2 are also reported and concur with the assignment of o-benzoquinone as the dominant product. In addition, the ion-trap study also provides support for a mechanism where cyclopentadienone is produced by decarbonylation of o-benzoquinone. Kinetic studies compare oxidation of the ammonium-tagged o-hydroxyphenyl and o-methylphenyl radical cations along with trimethylammonium-tagged analogues. Reaction efficiencies are found to be ca. 5% for both charge-tagged o-hydroxyphenyl and o-methylphenyl radicals irrespective of the charged substituent. G3X-K quantum chemical calculations are deployed to rationalise experimental results for o-hydroxyphenyl + O2 and its charge-tagged counterpart. The prevailing reaction mechanism, after O2 addition, involves a facile 1,5-H shift in the peroxyl radical and subsequent elimination of OH to yield o-benzoquinone that is reminiscent of the Waddington mechanism for β-hydroxyperoxyl radicals. These results suggest o-hydroxyphenyl + O2 and decarbonylation of o-benzoquinone serve as plausible OH and CO sources in combustion.

  1. Bogoliubov approach to superfluid-Bose glass phase transition of a disordered Bose-Hubbard model in weakly interacting regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Botao; Jiang, Ying

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the disorder effect on coherent fraction and the quantum phase transition of ultracold dilute Bose gases trapped in disordered optical lattices. Within the framework of Bogoliubov theory, an analytical expression for the particle density is derived and the dependence of coherent fraction on disorder strength as well as on lattice depth is discussed. In weak disorder regime, we find a decreased sensitivity of coherent fraction to disorder with the increase of on-site interaction strength. For strong disorder, the quantum phase boundary between superfluid phase and Bose glass phase in the disordered Bose-Hubbard system in weak interaction regime is discussed qualitatively. The obtained phase diagram is in agreement with the empirical square-root law. The dependence of the corresponding critical value of the disorder strength on optical lattice depth is presented as well, and may serve as a reference object for possible experimental investigation.

  2. Mixing of charged and neutral Bose condensates at nonzero temperature and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Alexander; Schmitt, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    It is expected that in the interior of compact stars a proton superconductor coexists with and couples to a neutron superfluid. Starting from a field-theoretical model for two complex scalar fields - one of which is electrically charged - we derive a Ginzburg-Landau potential which includes entrainment between the two fluids and temperature effects from thermal excitations of the two scalar fields and the gauge field. The Ginzburg-Landau description is then used for an analysis of the phase structure in the presence of an external magnetic field. In particular, we study the effect of the superfluid on the flux tube phase by computing the various critical magnetic fields and deriving an approximation for the flux tube interaction. As a result, we point out differences to the naive expectations from an isolated superconductor, for instance the existence of a first-order flux tube onset, resulting in a more complicated phase structure in the region between type-I and type-II superconductivity.

  3. Neutral matter in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.

    1991-01-01

    A review of current studies of neutral envelopes is presented with particular attention given to the use of the envelopes as test cases for understanding the ionization and thermal structure of photodissociation regions. The study of near-IR H2 emission is discussed with detailed spectra given for a few planetary nebulae, and airborne observations of far-IR atomic lines are discussed. These two methods can discern photodissociation regions with warm gas and UV flux is fairly prominent. The use of resonance-absorption-line spectroscopy is also reviewed with respect to the analysis of the Na D lines, and thereby allows the measurement of integrated columns of material through the shell. The methods provide evidence for the notion that planetary nebulae consist of more than just ionized material; large amounts of neutral and molecular material are being confirmed, which has important implications for the mass-loss episode of the nebulae.

  4. Nonlinear Phenomena in Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.

    2008-03-01

    We present a medley of results from the last three years on nonlinear phenomena in BECs [1]. These include exact dynamics of multi-component condensates in optical lattices [2], vortices and ring solitons [3], macroscopic quantum tunneling [4], nonlinear band theory [5], and a pulsed atomic soliton laser [6]. 1. Emergent Nonlinear Phenomena in Bose-Einstein Condensates: Theory and Experiment, ed. P. G. Kevrekidis, D. J. Frantzeskakis, and R. Carretero-Gonzalez (Springer-Verlag, to appear, 2008) -- see L. D. Carr and Joachim Brand, e-print arXiv:0705.1139 (2007); Joachim Brand, L. D. Carr, B. P. Anderson, e-print arXiv:0705.1341 (2007). 2. R. Mark Bradley, James E. Bernard, and L. D. Carr, e-print arXiv:0711.1896 (2007). 3. G. Herring, L. D. Carr, R. Carretero-Gonzalez, P. G. Kevrekidis, D. J. Frantzeskakis, e-print arXiv:0709.2193 (2007); L. D. Carr and C. W. Clark, Phys. Rev. A v. 74, p.043613 (2006); L. D. Carr and C. W. Clark, Phys. Rev. Lett. v. 97, p.010403 (2006). 4. L. D. Carr, M. J. Holland, and B. A. Malomed, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys., v.38, p.3217 (2005) 5. B. T. Seaman, L. D. Carr, and M. J. Holland, Phys. Rev. A, v. 71, p.033622 (2005). 6. L. D. Carr and J. Brand, Phys. Rev. A, v.70, p.033607 (2004); L. D. Carr and J. Brand, Phys. Rev. Lett., v.92, p.040401 (2004).

  5. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between ions and neutrals in a partially ionized plasma are important throughout heliophysics, including near the solar surface in prominences. Understanding how ion-neutral coupling affects formation, support, structure, and dynamics of prominences will advance our physical understanding of magnetized systems involving a transition from a weakly ionized dense gas to a fully ionized tenuous plasma. We address the fundamental physics of prominence support, which is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force, and the implications for observations. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized, it is necessary to consider the support of the both the ionized and neutral components. Support of the neutrals is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material.

  6. Wave function of a microwave-driven Bose-Einstein magnon condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Rezende, Sergio M.

    2010-01-01

    It has been observed experimentally that a magnon gas in a film of yttrium-iron garnet at room temperature driven by a microwave field exhibits Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) when the driving power exceeds a critical value. In a previous paper we presented a model for the dynamics of the magnon system in wave-vector space that provides firm theoretical support for the formation of the BEC. Here we show that the wave function of the magnon condensate in configuration space satisfies a Gross-Pitaevskii equation similarly to other BEC systems. The theory is consistent with the previous model in wave-vector space, and its results are in qualitative agreement with recent measurements of the spatial distribution of the magnon condensate driven by a nonuniform microwave field.

  7. Solitons of Bose-Fermi mixtures in a strongly elongated trap

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanam, J.; Kenkre, V. M.; Konotop, V. V.

    2006-01-15

    It is shown that a Bose-Fermi mixture of a degenerate gas of spin-polarized fermions, whose number significantly exceeds the number of bosons, embedded in a strongly anisotropic trap, is described by the one-dimensional coupled nonlinear Schroedinger equation for the boson component and the wave equation with external source for the fermion component. Depending on the type of boson-fermion interaction, the system may display modulational instability and the existence of solitons in the fermion and boson components, respectively. Such solitons represent either a local decrease (increase) of the density of both the components or a decrease of the density in one component and an increase of the density in the other component. It is shown that the type of the effective interactions can be easily managed by varying the trap geometry or by means of Feshbach resonance.

  8. Deterministic creation, pinning, and manipulation of quantized vortices in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, E. C.; Wilson, K. E.; Newman, Z. L.; Anderson, B. P.

    2016-02-01

    We experimentally and numerically demonstrate deterministic creation and manipulation of a pair of oppositely charged singly quantized vortices in a highly oblate Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Two identical blue-detuned, focused Gaussian laser beams that pierce the BEC serve as repulsive obstacles for the superfluid atomic gas; by controlling the positions of the beams within the plane of the BEC, superfluid flow is deterministically established around each beam such that two vortices of opposite circulation are generated by the motion of the beams, with each vortex pinned to the in situ position of a laser beam. We study the vortex creation process, and show that the vortices can be moved about within the BEC by translating the positions of the laser beams. This technique can serve as a building block in future experimental techniques to create, on-demand, deterministic arrangements of few or many vortices within a BEC for precise studies of vortex dynamics and vortex interactions.

  9. Anisotropic dynamics of a spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martone, Giovanni I.; Li, Yun; Pitaevskii, Lev P.; Stringari, Sandro

    2012-12-01

    By calculating the density response function we identify the excitation spectrum of a Bose-Einstein condensate with equal Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling. We find that the velocity of sound along the direction of spin-orbit coupling is deeply quenched and vanishes when one approaches the second-order phase transition between the plane-wave and the zero momentum quantum phases. We also point out the emergence of a roton minimum in the excitation spectrum for small values of the Raman coupling, providing the onset of the transition to the stripe phase. Our findings point out the occurrence of a strong anisotropy in the dynamic behavior of the gas. A hydrodynamic description accounting for the collective oscillations in both uniform and harmonically trapped gases is also derived.

  10. Evidence of Dirac Monopoles in a Spin-1 Bose-Einstein Condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Michael; Ruokokoski, Emmi; Kandel, Saugat; Möttönen, Mikko; Hall, David

    2014-03-01

    Isolated magnetic poles (monopoles) have not yet been observed, although there are good theoretical reasons for thinking that they may exist -- and profound implications if they do. The first successful theoretical description of a magnetic monopole consistent with quantum mechanics was formulated by Dirac, but may be applied more generally to quantum-mechanical systems in the presence of gauge potentials. We describe the successful experimental creation of Dirac monopoles in a synthetic magnetic field in the context of a dilute-gas Bose-Einstein condensate. The existence of a monopole is inferred from direct observations of a vortex line that terminates inside the condensate, which evidence is supported by excellent agreement between experiment and numerical simulations.

  11. Magnetic phases of spin-1 spin–orbit-coupled Bose gases

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, D. L.; Price, R. M.; Putra, A.; Valdés-Curiel, A.; Trypogeorgos, D.; Spielman, I. B.

    2016-01-01

    Phases of matter are characterized by order parameters describing the type and degree of order in a system. Here we experimentally explore the magnetic phases present in a near-zero temperature spin-1 spin–orbit-coupled atomic Bose gas and the quantum phase transitions between these phases. We observe ferromagnetic and unpolarized phases, which are stabilized by spin–orbit coupling's explicit locking between spin and motion. These phases are separated by a critical curve containing both first- and second-order transitions joined at a tricritical point. The first-order transition, with observed width as small as h × 4 Hz, gives rise to long-lived metastable states. These measurements are all in agreement with theory. PMID:27025562

  12. Control of spinor dynamics in an anti-ferromagnetic F=1 Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassman, Zachary; Fahey, Donald; Wilson, Ryan; Tiesinga, Eite; Lett, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Spin-exchange collisions driving coherent population oscillations of the F = 1 ground state magnetic sublevels can be used for precision quantum measurements in a condensed Bose gas. Entanglement generated by these dynamics enables below standard quantum limit phase estimation by way of an SU(1,1) interferometer and antiferromagnetic spin-nematic squeezing. In order to observe these effects, we have simulated the spinor dynamics in the single mode approximation with both fully quantum and semi-classical models. We present a study of microwave pulse sequences, which can be used to control the spinor dynamics via energy level shifts and rotations, and discuss improved methods for future experiments in this field.

  13. Bose-Einstein quantum phase transition in an optical lattice model

    SciTech Connect

    Aizenman, Michael; Lieb, Elliott H.; Seiringer, Robert; Solovej, Jan Philip; Yngvason, Jakob

    2004-08-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) in cold gases can be turned on and off by an external potential, such as that presented by an optical lattice. We present a model of this phenomenon which we are able to analyze rigorously. The system is a hard core lattice gas at half of the maximum density and the optical lattice is modeled by a periodic potential of strength {lambda}. For small {lambda} and temperature, BEC is proved to occur, while at large {lambda} or temperature there is no BEC. At large {lambda} the low-temperature states are in a Mott insulator phase with a characteristic gap that is absent in the BEC phase. The interparticle interaction is essential for this transition, which occurs even in the ground state. Surprisingly, the condensation is always into the p=0 mode in this model, although the density itself has the periodicity of the imposed potential.

  14. Pair dynamics in the formation of molecules in a Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Naidon, Pascal; Masnou-Seeuws, Francoise

    2003-09-01

    We revisit the mean-field treatment of photoassociation and Feshbach resonances in a Bose-Einstein condensate previously used by various authors. Generalizing the Cherny and Shanenko approach [Phys. Rev. E 62, 1646 (2000)] where the finite size of the potentials is explicitly introduced, we develop a two-channel model for a mixed atomic-molecular condensate. Besides the individual dynamics of the condensed and noncondensed atoms, the model also takes into account their pair dynamics by means of pair wave functions. We show that the resulting set of coupled equations can be reduced to the usual coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations when the time scale of the pair dynamics is short compared to that of the individual dynamics. Such time scales are discussed in the case of typical photoassociation experiments with cw lasers. We show that the individual dynamics plays a minor role, demonstrating the validity of the rates predicted by the usual models describing photoassociation in a nondegenerate gas.

  15. Bose-Einstein condensates and the spectrum of excitations in a two-dimensional channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shunyaev, I. V.; Elistratov, A. A.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2016-11-01

    The transverse spatial distribution of weakly interacting Bose gas in a narrow channel is found. The corresponding analytical solution of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation has the form of a cnoidal wave. The possible physical realization of the model is a system of cold atoms or quasiparticles, e.g., excitons, cavity photons, exciton polaritons. The obtained formula is used for the numerical calculation of the spectrum of excitations and the critical velocity of the condensate. These numerical results do not coincide with the Bogoliubov spectrum, and we show that the strongly inhomogeneous condensate density leads to larger values of the critical velocity. We also make numerical estimation of the critical velocity for various types of considered particles or quasiparticles.

  16. Signals of Bose Einstein condensation and Fermi quenching in the decay of hot nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, P.; Zheng, H.; Boisjoli, M.; Verde, G.; Chbihi, A.; Napolitani, P.; Ademard, G.; Augey, L.; Bhattacharya, C.; Borderie, B.; Bougault, R.; Frankland, J. D.; Fable, Q.; Galichet, E.; Gruyer, D.; Kundu, S.; La Commara, M.; Lombardo, I.; Lopez, O.; Mukherjee, G.; Parlog, M.; Rivet, M. F.; Rosato, E.; Roy, R.; Spadaccini, G.; Vigilante, M.; Wigg, P. C.; Bonasera, A.

    2016-05-01

    We report on first experimental observations of nuclear fermionic and bosonic components displaying different behaviours in the decay of hot Ca projectile-like sources produced in mid-peripheral collisions at sub-Fermi energies. The experimental setup, constituted by the coupling of the INDRA 4π detector array to the forward angle VAMOS magnetic spectrometer, allowed to reconstruct the mass, charge and excitation energy of the decaying hot projectile-like sources. By means of quantum-fluctuation analysis techniques, temperatures and local partial densities of bosons and fermions could be correlated to the excitation energy of the reconstructed system. The results are consistent with the production of dilute mixed systems of bosons and fermions, where bosons experience higher phase-space and energy density as compared to the surrounding fermionic gas. Our findings recall phenomena observed in the study of Bose condensates and Fermi gases in atomic traps despite the different scales.

  17. Bose-Einstein condensation of magnons pumped by the bulk spin Seebeck effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Bender, Scott A.; Duine, Rembert A.; Flebus, Benedetta

    2016-03-01

    We propose inducing Bose-Einstein condensation of magnons in a magnetic insulator by a heat flow oriented toward its boundary. At a critical heat flux, the oversaturated thermal gas of magnons accumulated at the boundary precipitates the condensate, which then grows gradually as the thermal bias is dialed up further. The thermal magnons thus pumped by the magnonic bulk (spin) Seebeck effect must generally overcome both the local Gilbert damping associated with the coherent magnetic dynamics as well as the radiative spin-wave losses toward the magnetic bulk, in order to achieve the threshold of condensation. We quantitatively estimate the requisite bias in the case of the ferrimagnetic yttrium iron garnet, discuss different physical regimes of condensation, and contrast it with the competing (so-called Doppler-shift) bulk instability.

  18. Dilute Bose gases with large scattering length using Bijl-Jastrow wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sykes, Andrew; Corson, John; Sze, Michelle; Bohn, John

    2014-05-01

    The Bijl-Jastrow wavefunction, which explicitly includes two-body correlations, has been reasonably successful in explaining macroscopic properties of liquid Helium at low temperatures. We apply the same techniques to understand dilute Bose gases with an effective zero-range interaction (employing the Bethe-Peierls boundary condition rather than including an explicit two-body potential). We discuss the renormalisation issues which arise as a result of this diverging zero-range boundary condition. We calculate observables such as the ground state energy, the condensate fraction, and Tan's contact in the system, with particularly interest in the regime where the gas parameter na3 is appreciable (n being the number density and a the scattering length). Finally, we will discuss possible extensions and avenues for further research.

  19. Experimental apparatus to study cold collisions in sodium spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nematollahi, Delaram; Foster, Aaron; Yates, Kyle; Altermatt, Joseph; Lee, Hyoyeon; Zhang, Qimin; Schwettmann, Arne

    2015-05-01

    We present our progress on building an apparatus to study matter-wave quantum optics in spin space, including our design of the sodium oven, Zeeman slower, vacuum and laser systems. The nonlinear interaction needed to implement quantum optical devices with matter waves will be provided by spin-exchange collisions in a sodium spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Microwave dressing will allow us to exert precise control over the collisional dynamics and tune the system to behave as an interferometer in spin space with reduced noise, or as a phase-sensitive amplifier for sensitive atom number measurements. Apart from microwave dressing, we are also planning to study the effect of Rydberg excitations on the collisional spin dynamics of the gas.

  20. Supercurrent in a room-temperature Bose-Einstein magnon condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhko, Dmytro A.; Serga, Alexander A.; Clausen, Peter; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I.; Heussner, Frank; Melkov, Gennadii A.; Pomyalov, Anna; L'Vov, Victor S.; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2016-11-01

    A supercurrent is a macroscopic effect of a phase-induced collective motion of a quantum condensate. So far, experimentally observed supercurrent phenomena such as superconductivity and superfluidity have been restricted to cryogenic temperatures. Here, we report on the discovery of a supercurrent in a Bose-Einstein magnon condensate prepared in a room-temperature ferrimagnetic film. The magnon condensate is formed in a parametrically pumped magnon gas and is subject to a thermal gradient created by local laser heating of the film. The appearance of the supercurrent, which is driven by a thermally induced phase shift in the condensate wavefunction, is evidenced by analysis of the temporal evolution of the magnon density measured by means of Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy. Our findings offer opportunities for the investigation of room-temperature macroscopic quantum phenomena and their potential applications at ambient conditions.