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Sample records for neutral hydrogen fraction

  1. A large neutral fraction of cosmic hydrogen a billion years after the Big Bang.

    PubMed

    Wyithe, J Stuart B; Loeb, Abraham

    2004-02-26

    The fraction of ionized hydrogen left over from the Big Bang provides evidence for the time of formation of the first stars and quasar black holes in the early Universe; such objects provide the high-energy photons necessary to ionize hydrogen. Spectra of the two most distant known quasars show nearly complete absorption of photons with wavelengths shorter than the Lyman alpha transition of neutral hydrogen, indicating that hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) had not been completely ionized at a redshift of z approximately 6.3, about one billion years after the Big Bang. Here we show that the IGM surrounding these quasars had a neutral hydrogen fraction of tens of per cent before the quasar activity started, much higher than the previous lower limits of approximately 0.1 per cent. Our results, when combined with the recent inference of a large cumulative optical depth to electron scattering after cosmological recombination therefore suggest the presence of a second peak in the mean ionization history of the Universe.

  2. Development of miniaturized, spectroscopically assisted Penning gauges for fractional helium and hydrogen neutral pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesch, K.; Kremeyer, T.; Schmitz, O.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wenzel, U.

    2016-11-01

    Direct measurements of the helium (He) fractional neutral pressure in the neutral gas around fusion devices is challenging because of the small mass difference between the abundant D2 molecules and the He ash which will be produced by deuterium-tritium fusion. To study He exhaust, an in situ Penning gauge system is being developed at UW-Madison that is optimized for good pressure and high spectroscopic sensitivity. Three different anode geometries have been studied regarding their vacuum electrostatic fields, light output, and ion current. The light output of the two new anode configurations are at least one order of magnitude above the currently available designs, hence improving the spectroscopic sensitivity at similar total neutral pressure resolution.

  3. Phenolic compounds containing/neutral fractions extract and products derived therefrom from fractionated fast-pyrolysis oils

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-06-29

    A process is described for preparing phenol-formaldehyde novolak resins and molding compositions in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenol/neutral fractions extract obtained from fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils. The fractionation consists of a neutralization stage which can be carried out with aqueous solutions of bases or appropriate bases in the dry state, followed by solvent extraction with an organic solvent having at least a moderate solubility parameter and good hydrogen bonding capacity. Phenolic compounds-containing/neutral fractions extracts obtained by fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils from a lignocellulosic material, is such that the oil is initially in the pH range of 2-4, being neutralized with an aqueous bicarbonate base, and extracted into a solvent having a solubility parameter of approximately 8.4-9.11 [cal/cm[sup 3

  4. VLA neutral hydrogen imaging of compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, B. A.; Mcmahon, P. M.; Vangorkom, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    Images of the neutral hydrogen (H I) in the direction of the compact groups of galaxies, HCG 31, HCG 44, and HCG 79 are presented. The authors find in HCG 31 and HCG 79, emission contained within a cloud much larger than the galaxies as well as the entire group. The H I emission associated with HCG 44 is located within the individual galaxies but shows definite signs of tidal interactions. The authors imaged the distribution and kinematics of neutral hydrogen at the two extremes of group sizes represented in Hickson's sample. HCG 44 is at the upper limit while HCG 18, HCG 31, and HCG 79 are at the lower end. Although the number of groups that have been imaged is still very small, there may be a pattern emerging which describes the H I morphology of compact groups. The true nature of compact groups has been the subject of considerable debate and controversy. The most recent observational and theoretical evidence strongly suggests that compact groups are physically dense, dynamical systems that are in the process of merging into a single object (Williams and Rood 1987, Hickson and Rood 1988, Barnes 1989). The neutral hydrogen deficiency observed by Williams and Rood (1987) is consistent with a model in which frequent galactic collisions and interactions have heated some of the gas during the short lifetime of the group. The H I disks which are normally more extended than the luminous ones are expected to be more sensitive to collisions and to trace the galaxy's response to recent interactions. Very Large Array observations can provide in most cases the spatial resolution needed to confirm the dynamical interactions in these systems.

  5. Phenolic compounds containing/neutral fractions extract and products derived therefrom from fractionated fast-pyrolysis oils

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Black, Stuart K.; Diebold, James P.; Kreibich, Roland E.

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde novolak resins and molding compositions in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenol/neutral fractions extract obtained from fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils. The fractionation consists of a neutralization stage which can be carried out with aqueous solutions of bases or appropriate bases in the dry state, followed by solvent extraction with an organic solvent having at least a moderate solubility parameter and good hydrogen bonding capacity. Phenolic compounds-containing/neutral fractions extracts obtained by fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils from a lignocellulosic material, is such that the oil is initially in the pH range of 2-4, being neutralized with an aqueous bicarbonate base, and extracted into a solvent having a solubility parameter of approximately 8.4-9.11 [cal/cm.sup.3 ].sup.1/2 with polar components in the 1.8-3.0 range and hydrogen bonding components in the 2-4.8 range and the recovery of the product extract from the solvent with no further purification being needed for use in adhesives and molding compounds. The product extract is characterized as being a mixture of very different compounds having a wide variety of chemical functionalities, including phenolic, carbonyl, aldehyde, methoxyl, vinyl and hydroxyl. The use of the product extract on phenol-formaldehyde thermosetting resins is shown to have advantages over the conventional phenol-formaldehyde resins.

  6. Weighing Neutrinos with Cosmic Neutral Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Bull, Philip; Viel, Matteo

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the signatures left by massive neutrinos on the spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen (H i) in the post-reionization era by running hydrodynamic simulations that include massive neutrinos as additional collisionless particles. We find that halos in massive/massless neutrino cosmologies host a similar amount of neutral hydrogen, although for a fixed halo mass, on average, the H i mass increases with the sum of the neutrino masses. Our results show that H i is more strongly clustered in cosmologies with massive neutrinos, while its abundance, ΩH i(z), is lower. These effects arise mainly from the impact of massive neutrinos on cosmology: they suppress both the amplitude of the matter power spectrum on small scales and the abundance of dark matter halos. Modeling the H i distribution with hydrodynamic simulations at z > 3 and a simple analytic model at z < 3, we use the Fisher matrix formalism to conservatively forecast the constraints that Phase 1 of the Square Kilometre Array will place on the sum of neutrino masses, Mν ≡ Σ mν. We find that with 10,000 hr of interferometric observations at 3 ≲ z ≲ 6 from a deep and narrow survey with SKA1-LOW, the sum of the neutrino masses can be measured with an error σ(Mν) ≲ 0.3 eV (95% CL). Similar constraints can be obtained with a wide and deep SKA1-MID survey at z ≲ 3, using the single-dish mode. By combining data from MID, LOW, and Planck, plus priors on cosmological parameters from a Stage IV spectroscopic galaxy survey, the sum of the neutrino masses can be determined with an error σ(Mν) ≃ 0.06 eV (95% CL).

  7. WEIGHING NEUTRINOS WITH COSMIC NEUTRAL HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Bull, Philip E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the signatures left by massive neutrinos on the spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen (H i) in the post-reionization era by running hydrodynamic simulations that include massive neutrinos as additional collisionless particles. We find that halos in massive/massless neutrino cosmologies host a similar amount of neutral hydrogen, although for a fixed halo mass, on average, the H i mass increases with the sum of the neutrino masses. Our results show that H i is more strongly clustered in cosmologies with massive neutrinos, while its abundance, Ω{sub H} {sub i}(z), is lower. These effects arise mainly from the impact of massive neutrinos on cosmology: they suppress both the amplitude of the matter power spectrum on small scales and the abundance of dark matter halos. Modeling the H i distribution with hydrodynamic simulations at z > 3 and a simple analytic model at z < 3, we use the Fisher matrix formalism to conservatively forecast the constraints that Phase 1 of the Square Kilometre Array will place on the sum of neutrino masses, M{sub ν} ≡ Σ m{sub ν}. We find that with 10,000 hr of interferometric observations at 3 ≲ z ≲ 6 from a deep and narrow survey with SKA1-LOW, the sum of the neutrino masses can be measured with an error σ(M{sub ν}) ≲ 0.3 eV (95% CL). Similar constraints can be obtained with a wide and deep SKA1-MID survey at z ≲ 3, using the single-dish mode. By combining data from MID, LOW, and Planck, plus priors on cosmological parameters from a Stage IV spectroscopic galaxy survey, the sum of the neutrino masses can be determined with an error σ(M{sub ν}) ≃ 0.06 eV (95% CL)

  8. LOCAL INTERSTELLAR NEUTRAL HYDROGEN SAMPLED IN SITU BY IBEX

    SciTech Connect

    Saul, Lukas; Wurz, Peter; Rodriguez, Diego; Scheer, Juergen; Moebius, Eberhard; Schwadron, Nathan; Kucharek, Harald; Leonard, Trevor; Bzowski, Maciej; Fuselier, Stephen; Crew, Geoff; McComas, Dave

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen gas is the dominant component of the local interstellar medium. However, owing to ionization and interaction with the heliosphere, direct sampling of neutral hydrogen in the inner heliosphere is more difficult than sampling the local interstellar neutral helium, which penetrates deep into the heliosphere. In this paper, we report on the first detailed analysis of the direct sampling of neutral hydrogen from the local interstellar medium. We confirm that the arrival direction of hydrogen is offset from that of the local helium component. We further report the discovery of a variation of the penetrating hydrogen over the first two years of Interstellar Boundary Explorer observations. Observations are consistent with hydrogen experiencing an effective ratio of outward solar radiation pressure to inward gravitational force greater than unity ({mu} > 1); the temporal change observed in the local interstellar hydrogen flux can be explained with solar variability.

  9. Predictions for ASKAP neutral hydrogen surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Alan R.; Meyer, Martin J.; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Bernyk, Maksym; Croton, Darren J.; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Gerstmann, Derek; Westerlund, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) will revolutionize our knowledge of gas-rich galaxies in the universe. Here we present predictions for two proposed extragalactic ASKAP neutral hydrogen (H I) emission-line surveys, based on semi-analytic models applied to cosmological N-body simulations. The ASKAP H I All-Sky Survey, known as Widefield ASKAP L-band Legacy All-sky Blind surveY (WALLABY), is a shallow 3 π survey (z = 0-0.26) which will probe the mass and dynamics of over 6 × 105 galaxies. A much deeper small-area H I survey, called Deep Investigation of Neutral Gas Origins (DINGO), aims to trace the evolution of H I from z = 0 to 0.43, a cosmological volume of 4 × 107 Mpc3, detecting potentially 105 galaxies. The high-sensitivity 30 antenna ASKAP core (diameter ˜2 km) will provide an angular resolution of 30 arcsec (at z = 0). Our simulations show that the majority of galaxies detected in WALLABY (87.5 per cent) will be resolved. About 5000 galaxies will be well resolved, i.e. more than five beams (2.5 arcmin) across the major axis, enabling kinematic studies of their gaseous discs. This number would rise to 1.6 × 105 galaxies if all 36 ASKAP antennas could be used; the additional six antennas provide baselines up to 6 km, resulting in an angular resolution of 10 arcsec. For DINGO this increased resolution is highly desirable to minimize source confusion, reducing confusion rates from a maximum of 10 per cent of sources at the survey edge to 3 per cent. We estimate that the sources detected by WALLABY and DINGO will span four orders of magnitude in total halo mass (from 1011 to 1015 M⊙) and nearly seven orders of magnitude in stellar mass (from 105 to 1012 M⊙), allowing us to investigate the process of galaxy formation across the last four billion years.

  10. Dust clouds in Orion and the interstellar neutral hydrogen distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bystrova, N. V.

    1989-01-01

    According to published examples of the far IR observations in the Orion and its surroundings, several well defined dust clouds of different sizes and structure are present. For comparison of these clouds with the neutral hydrogen distribution on the area of approx. 1000 sq degs, the data from Pulkovo Sky Survey in the interstellar neutral Hydrogen Radio Line as well as special observations with the RATAN-600 telescope in 21 cm line were used. From the materials of Pulkovo HI Survey, the data were taken near the line emission at ten velocities between -21.8 and +25.6 km/s LSR for the structural component of the interstellar hydrogen emission. The results given concern mainly the Orion's Great Dust Cloud and the Lambda Orionis region where the information about the situation with the dust and interstellar hydrogen is very essential for interpretation.

  11. Identifying OH Imposters in the ALFALFA Neutral Hydrogen Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, Katherine A.; Darling, Jeremy; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2016-06-01

    OH megamasers (OHMs) are rare, luminous molecular masers that are typically observed in (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies and serve as markers of major galaxy mergers. In blind emission line surveys such as the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-Band Feed Array (ALFALFA) survey for neutral hydrogen (H I), OHMs at z ˜ 0.2 can mimic z ˜ 0.05 H I lines. We present the results of optical spectroscopy of ambiguous H I detections in the ALFALFA 40 per cent data release detected by the Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) but with uncertain optical counterparts. The optical redshifts, obtained from observations at the Apache Point Observatory, revealed five new OHMs and identified 129 H I optical counterparts. 60 candidates remain ambiguous. The new OHMs are the first detected in a blind spectral line survey. The number of OHMs in ALFALFA is consistent with predictions from the OH luminosity function. Additionally, the mid-infrared magnitudes and colours of the OHM host galaxies found in a blind survey do not seem to differ from those found in previous targeted surveys. This validates the methods used in previous IR-selected OHM surveys and indicates there is no previously unknown OHM-producing population at z ˜ 0.2. We also provide a method for future surveys to separate OH megamasers from 99 per cent of H I line emitters without optical spectroscopy by using WISE infrared colours and magnitudes. Since the fraction of OHMs found in flux-limited H I surveys is expected to increase with the survey's redshift, this selection method can be applied to future flux-limited high-redshift hydrogen surveys.

  12. Thermal cracking of heavy fraction of hydrocarbon hydrogenate

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuter, W.; Schliebener, C.; Wernicke, H.J.

    1981-04-07

    To obtain olefins by the thermal cracking of hydrocarbons, E.G., vacuum gas oil, by hydrogenation and subsequent steam cracking, an intermediate fractionation of the hydrogenate is provided so that the light fraction enriched in branched isomers can be used as fuel and the heavy fraction only is subjected to the steam cracking.

  13. Neutral hydrogen in the solar wind acceleration region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Espen Lyngdal; Leer, Egil; Holzer, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    Observation of solar Ly alpha radiation scattered by coronal neutral hydrogen atoms can be used to investigate the acceleration region of the solar wind. In this paper we focus on the use of these observations to study Alfven waves, which can accelerate the solar wind plasma to flow speeds observed in high-speed streams if their amplitude at the coronal base is 20 km/s or larger. The wave amplitude is then larger than the proton thermal speed in the outer corona, so that the mean proton speed (averaged over a wave period) is significantly larger than the proton thermal speed. For low-frequency wave the hydrogen atoms follow the proton motion in the waves, while for higher frequencies the protons move relative to the neutrals. Nevertheless, in the higher frequency case, the rates for charge exchange and recombination are high enough to broaden the velocity distribution function of neutral hydrogen. Both the wave motion of the hydrogen atoms in low-frequency Alfven waves and the 'heating' by higher frequency waves lead to a broadening of the scattered solar Ly alpha line. For coronal base amplitues of 20 km/s, the line broadening increases with heliocentric distance beyond 4-5 solar radii.

  14. Spectroscopic determination of the composition of a 50 kV hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, X.; Nornberg, M. D.; Craig, D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Oliva, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    A grating spectrometer with an electron multiplying charge-coupled device camera is used to diagnose a 50 kV, 5 A, 20 ms hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam. The ion source density is determined from Stark broadened Hβ emission and the spectrum of Doppler-shifted Hα emission is used to quantify the fraction of ions at full, half, and one-third beam energy under a variety of operating conditions including fueling gas pressure and arc discharge current. Beam current is optimized at low-density conditions in the ion source while the energy fractions are found to be steady over most operating conditions.

  15. The cool phase of neutral hydrogen in the galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, Simon T.

    We analyze 815 emission and absorption spectra toward continuum background point sources in the Canadian, Southern, and VLA Galactic Plane Surveys (CGPS, SGPS, and VGPS. The neutral hydrogen (H I) data covers the plane between Galactic longitude 18°, and 174°, and between longitude 253° to 355°, at approximately 1 arcminute resolution. We are thus able to study the global variation in fundamental ISM parameters. We find spin temperatures ( T s ) between 20 K and 300 K, with a distribution peak around 100 K. We do not observe a strong dependence on Galactocentric radius, R , in the northern Galaxy (covered by the VGPS and CGPS) but in the SGPS T s clearly drops outside the solar circle. The opacity generally decreases with R , peaking inside the solar circle in all three surveys. The ratio of the opacity to the column density rises with R in the CGPS and VGPS, but stays constant in the SGPS. We are not able to fit Gaussian components to a majority of the emission spectra because they are highly blended. By approximating the unabsorbed warm- phase emission with a second order polynomial, we are able to derive a cool- phase temperature, T c . T c ranges between 20 K and 200 K, and its distribution peaks at 50 K to 60 K. Values in the SGPS are somewhat higher than in the CGPS. The fraction of cool-phase gas drops slowly with R , from 0.4 to approximately 0.25. To investigate the presence of absorption lines narrower than 1 km s -1 , we obtained high spectral resolution (0.16 km s -1 ) VLA spectra toward five background sources. Toward each of the targets at least one absorption line in the CGPS is only partially resolved. We find one absorption line with a width of only 19 ± 9 K, significantly narrower than indicated by the lower resolution data. We trace the Outer and Distant spiral arms in H I absorption throughout the surveys. We find several distinct clouds within these arms, and are able to calculate arm pitch angles. This is the first detection of a

  16. Depolarizing collisions with hydrogen: Neutral and singly ionized alkaline earths

    SciTech Connect

    Manso Sainz, Rafael; Ramos, Andrés Asensio; Bueno, Javier Trujillo; Aguado, Alfredo

    2014-06-20

    Depolarizing collisions are elastic or quasielastic collisions that equalize the populations and destroy the coherence between the magnetic sublevels of atomic levels. In astrophysical plasmas, the main depolarizing collider is neutral hydrogen. We consider depolarizing rates on the lowest levels of neutral and singly ionized alkali earths Mg I, Sr I, Ba I, Mg II, Ca II, and Ba II, due to collisions with H°. We compute ab initio potential curves of the atom-H° system and solve the quantum mechanical dynamics. From the scattering amplitudes, we calculate the depolarizing rates for Maxwellian distributions of colliders at temperatures T ≤ 10,000 K. A comparative analysis of our results and previous calculations in the literature is completed. We discuss the effect of these rates on the formation of scattering polarization patterns of resonant lines of alkali earths in the solar atmosphere, and their effect on Hanle effect diagnostics of solar magnetic fields.

  17. Neutral hydrogen in the starburst galaxy NGC3690/IC694

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolstoy, E.; Dickey, John M.; Israel, F. P.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers made observations of the neutral hydrogen (HI) emission structure surrounding the very deep absorption peak (observed earlier by Dickey (1986)) in the galaxy pair NGC3690/IC694. This galaxy pair is highly luminous in the far infrared, and known to exhibit extensive star formation as well as nuclear activity. Knowledge of the spatial distribution and velocity structure of the HI emission is of great importance to the understanding of the dynamics of the interaction and the resulting environmental effects on the galaxies.

  18. Constraining a halo model for cosmological neutral hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Refregier, Alexandre

    2017-02-01

    We describe a combined halo model to constrain the distribution of neutral hydrogen (H I) in the post-reionization universe. We combine constraints from the various probes of H I at different redshifts: the low-redshift 21-cm emission line surveys, intensity mapping experiments at intermediate redshifts, and the Damped Lyman-Alpha (DLA) observations at higher redshifts. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach to combine the observations and place constraints on the free parameters in the model. Our best-fitting model involves a relation between neutral hydrogen mass M_{H I} and halo mass M with a non-unit slope, and an upper and a lower cutoff. We find that the model fits all the observables but leads to an underprediction of the bias parameter of DLAs at z ˜ 2.3. We also find indications of a possible tension between the H I column density distribution and the mass function of H I-selected galaxies at z ˜ 0. We provide the central values of the parameters of the best-fitting model so derived. We also provide a fitting form for the derived evolution of the concentration parameter of H I in dark matter haloes, and discuss the implications for the redshift evolution of the H I-halo mass relation.

  19. Xenon Fractionation and Archean Hydrogen Escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2015-01-01

    Xenon is the heaviest gas found in significant quantities in natural planetary atmospheres. It would seem the least likely to escape. Yet there is more evidence for xenon escape from Earth than for any element other than helium and perhaps neon. The most straightforward evidence is that most of the radiogenic Xe from the decay of (129)I (half-life 15.7 Myr) and (244)Pu (half-life 81 Myr) that is Earth's birthright is missing. The missing xenon is often attributed to the impact erosion of early atmospheres of Earth and its ancestors. It is obvious that if most of the radiogenic xenon were driven off by impacts, most of the rest of the atmophiles fared the same fate. The other line of evidence is in the nonradiogenic isotopes of xenon and its silent partner, krypton. Atmospheric xenon is strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) compared to any known solar system source (Figure 1). This is in stark contrast to krypton, which may not be fractionated at all: atmospheric Kr is slightly heavier than solar Kr (at about 0.5% per amu), but it is the same as in carbonaceous chondrites. Nonradiogenic xenon is also under abundant relative to krypton (the so-called "missing xenon" problem). Together these observations imply that xenon has been subject to fractionating escape and krypton not.

  20. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in methane plasma.

    PubMed

    Robert, François; Derenne, Sylvie; Lombardi, Guillaume; Hassouni, Khaled; Michau, Armelle; Reinhardt, Peter; Duhamel, Rémi; Gonzalez, Adriana; Biron, Kasia

    2017-01-31

    The hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H) is commonly used to reconstruct the chemical processes at the origin of water and organic compounds in the early solar system. On the one hand, the large enrichments in deuterium of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from the carbonaceous meteorites are interpreted as a heritage of the interstellar medium or resulting from ion-molecule reactions taking place in the diffuse part of the protosolar nebula. On the other hand, the molecular structure of this IOM suggests that organic radicals have played a central role in a gas-phase organosynthesis. So as to reproduce this type of chemistry between organic radicals, experiments based on a microwave plasma of CH4 have been performed. They yielded a black organic residue in which ion microprobe analyses revealed hydrogen isotopic anomalies at a submicrometric spatial resolution. They likely reflect differences in the D/H ratios between the various CHx radicals whose polymerization is at the origin of the IOM. These isotopic heterogeneities, usually referred to as hot and cold spots, are commensurable with those observed in meteorite IOM. As a consequence, the appearance of organic radicals in the ionized regions of the disk surrounding the Sun during its formation may have triggered the formation of organic compounds.

  1. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in methane plasma

    PubMed Central

    Robert, François; Derenne, Sylvie; Lombardi, Guillaume; Hassouni, Khaled; Michau, Armelle; Reinhardt, Peter; Duhamel, Rémi; Gonzalez, Adriana; Biron, Kasia

    2017-01-01

    The hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H) is commonly used to reconstruct the chemical processes at the origin of water and organic compounds in the early solar system. On the one hand, the large enrichments in deuterium of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from the carbonaceous meteorites are interpreted as a heritage of the interstellar medium or resulting from ion−molecule reactions taking place in the diffuse part of the protosolar nebula. On the other hand, the molecular structure of this IOM suggests that organic radicals have played a central role in a gas-phase organosynthesis. So as to reproduce this type of chemistry between organic radicals, experiments based on a microwave plasma of CH4 have been performed. They yielded a black organic residue in which ion microprobe analyses revealed hydrogen isotopic anomalies at a submicrometric spatial resolution. They likely reflect differences in the D/H ratios between the various CHx radicals whose polymerization is at the origin of the IOM. These isotopic heterogeneities, usually referred to as hot and cold spots, are commensurable with those observed in meteorite IOM. As a consequence, the appearance of organic radicals in the ionized regions of the disk surrounding the Sun during its formation may have triggered the formation of organic compounds. PMID:28096422

  2. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in methane plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, François; Derenne, Sylvie; Lombardi, Guillaume; Hassouni, Khaled; Michau, Armelle; Reinhardt, Peter; Duhamel, Rémi; Gonzalez, Adriana; Biron, Kasia

    2017-01-01

    The hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H) is commonly used to reconstruct the chemical processes at the origin of water and organic compounds in the early solar system. On the one hand, the large enrichments in deuterium of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from the carbonaceous meteorites are interpreted as a heritage of the interstellar medium or resulting from ion‑molecule reactions taking place in the diffuse part of the protosolar nebula. On the other hand, the molecular structure of this IOM suggests that organic radicals have played a central role in a gas-phase organosynthesis. So as to reproduce this type of chemistry between organic radicals, experiments based on a microwave plasma of CH4 have been performed. They yielded a black organic residue in which ion microprobe analyses revealed hydrogen isotopic anomalies at a submicrometric spatial resolution. They likely reflect differences in the D/H ratios between the various CHx radicals whose polymerization is at the origin of the IOM. These isotopic heterogeneities, usually referred to as hot and cold spots, are commensurable with those observed in meteorite IOM. As a consequence, the appearance of organic radicals in the ionized regions of the disk surrounding the Sun during its formation may have triggered the formation of organic compounds.

  3. Two Photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence for Neutral Hydrogen Profile Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, Earl E.

    2016-09-23

    The magnitude and spatial dependence of neutral density in magnetic confinement fusion experiments is a key physical parameter, particularly in the plasma edge. Modeling codes require precise measurements of the neutral density to calculate charge-exchange power losses and drag forces on rotating plasmas. However, direct measurements of the neutral density are problematic. In this work, we proposed to construct a laser-based diagnostic capable of providing spatially resolved measurements of the neutral density in the edge of plasma in the DIII-D tokamak. The diagnostic concept is based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). By injecting two beams of 205 nm light (co or counter propagating), ground state hydrogen (or deuterium or tritium) can be excited from the n = 1 level to the n = 3 level at the location where the two beams intersect. Individually, the beams experience no absorption, and therefore have no difficulty penetrating even dense plasmas. After excitation, a fraction of the hydrogen atoms decay from the n = 3 level to the n = 2 level and emit photons at 656 nm (the Hα line). Calculations based on the results of previous TALIF experiments in magnetic fusion devices indicated that a laser pulse energy of approximately 3 mJ delivered in 5 ns would provide sufficient signal-to-noise for detection of the fluorescence. In collaboration with the DIII-D engineering staff and experts in plasma edge diagnostics for DIII-D from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), WVU researchers designed a TALIF system capable of providing spatially resolved measurements of neutral deuterium densities in the DIII-D edge plasma. The laser systems were specified, purchased, and assembled at WVU. The TALIF system was tested on a low-power hydrogen discharge at WVU and the plan was to move the instrument to DIII-D for installation in collaboration with ORNL researchers. After budget cuts at DIII-D, the DIII-D facility declined to support

  4. Studying neutral hydrogen structures during the epoch of reionization using fractal dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Bidisha; Choudhury, T. Roy; Seshadri, T. R.

    2017-04-01

    Fractal dimensions can be used to characterize the clustering and lacunarities in density distributions. We use generalized fractal dimensions to study the neutral hydrogen distribution (H I) during the epoch of reionization. Using a semi-numeric model of ionized bubbles to generate the H I field, we calculate the fractal dimensions for length-scales ∼10 h-1cMpc. We find that the H I field displays significant multifractal behaviour and is not consistent with homogeneity at these scales when the mass-averaged neutral fraction bar{x}_{H I}^M ≳ 0.5. This multifractal nature is driven entirely by the shapes and distribution of the ionized regions. The sensitivity of the fractal dimension to the neutral fraction implies that it can be used for constraining reionization history. We find that the fractal dimension is relatively less sensitive to the value of the minimum mass of ionizing haloes when it is in the range ∼109-1010h-1M⊙. Interestingly, the fractal dimension is very different when the reionization proceeds inside-out compared to when it is outside-in. Thus, the multifractal nature of H I density field at high redshifts can be used to study the nature of reionization.

  5. Carbon and Hydrogen Isotopic Fractionation during Anaerobic Biodegradation of Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Silvia A.; Ulrich, Ania C.; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sleep, Brent; Edwards, Elizabeth A.; Sherwood Lollar, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis has the potential to distinguish physical from biological attenuation processes in the subsurface. In this study, carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation effects during biodegradation of benzene under anaerobic conditions with different terminal-electron-accepting processes are reported for the first time. Different enrichment factors (ɛ) for carbon (range of −1.9 to −3.6‰) and hydrogen (range of −29 to −79‰) fractionation were observed during biodegradation of benzene under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. These differences are not related to differences in initial biomass or in rates of biodegradation. Carbon isotopic enrichment factors for anaerobic benzene biodegradation in this study are comparable to those previously published for aerobic benzene biodegradation. In contrast, hydrogen enrichment factors determined for anaerobic benzene biodegradation are significantly larger than those previously published for benzene biodegradation under aerobic conditions. A fundamental difference in the previously proposed initial step of aerobic versus proposed anaerobic biodegradation pathways may account for these differences in hydrogen isotopic fractionation. Potentially, C-H bond breakage in the initial step of the anaerobic benzene biodegradation pathway may account for the large fractionation observed compared to that in aerobic benzene biodegradation. Despite some differences in reported enrichment factors between cultures with different terminal-electron-accepting processes, carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis has the potential to provide direct evidence of anaerobic biodegradation of benzene in the field. PMID:12513995

  6. Modelling the post-reionization neutral hydrogen (H I ) bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Debanjan; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Anathpindika, S.

    2016-08-01

    Observations of the neutral hydrogen (H I) 21-cm signal hold the potential of allowing us to map out the cosmological large-scale structures (LSS) across the entire post-reionization era (z ≤ 6). Several experiments are planned to map the LSS over a large range of redshifts and angular scales, many of these targeting the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations. It is important to model the H I distribution in order to correctly predict the expected signal, and more so to correctly interpret the results after the signal is detected. In this paper we have carried out semi-numerical simulations to model the H I distribution and study the H I power spectrum P_{H I}(k,z) across the redshift range 1 ≤ z ≤ 6. We have modelled the H I bias as a complex quantity tilde{b}(k,z) whose modulus squared b2(k, z) relates P_{H I}(k,z) to the matter power spectrum P(k, z), and whose real part br(k, z) quantifies the cross-correlation between the H I and the matter distribution. We study the z and k dependence of the bias, and present polynomial fits which can be used to predict the bias across 0 ≤ z ≤ 6 and 0.01 ≤ k ≤ 10 Mpc-1. We also present results for the stochasticity r = br/b which is important for cross-correlation studies.

  7. The Neutral Hydrogen Cosmological Mass Density at z = 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, Neil H. M.; Murphy, Michael T.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Worseck, Gábor; Rafelski, Marc; Becker, George D.; Ellison, Sara L.; Fumagalli, Michele; Lopez, Sebastian; Meiksin, Avery; O’Meara, John M.

    2017-03-01

    We present the largest homogeneous survey of redshift > 4.4 damped Lyα systems (DLAs) using the spectra of 163 quasars that comprise the Giant Gemini GMOS (GGG) survey. With this survey we make the most precise high-redshift measurement of the cosmological mass density of neutral hydrogen, ΩHI. After correcting for systematic effects using a combination of mock and higher-resolution spectra, we find ΩHI= 0.98+0.20 -0.18 × 10-3 at = 4.9, assuming a 20% contribution from lower column density systems below the DLA threshold. By comparing to literature measurements at lower redshifts, we show that ΩHI can be described by the functional form ΩHI(z) ~ (1 + z)0.4. This gradual decrease from z = 5 to 0 suggests that in the galaxies which dominate the cosmic star formation rate, Hi is a transitory gas phase fuelling star formation which must be continually replenished by more highly-ionized gas from the intergalactic medium, and from recycled galactic winds.

  8. Measuring the neutral hydrogen mass of galaxy cluster A262

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mohd Shaiful Rizal; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Ibrahim, Ungku Ferwani Salwa Ungku; Hashim, Norsiah

    2013-05-01

    The total neutral hydrogen mass of galaxy cluster, MHI is measured using spectra taken by a 7 meter single dish radio telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory. This have been done by using a concept introduced by R. A. Bettye which is make use of small single radio telescope for findings MHI as a whole. MHI is calculated by using simple relationship involving parameter distance of the object from the observer, D and radiated flux of continuum radio source, Sν. A262 is chosen as our test subject since it is compatible with the capability of our instrument. It is a spiral rich galaxy cluster and a fragment of Pisces in the Perseus supercluster, located approximately at 62 - 77 Mpc. It is a part of Local Group Supercluster that is centered at giant elliptical galaxy, NGC 708, and it is also called `cluster dominant' because of its strongly X-ray source concentrated. A262 is chosen as our candidate in this study because of its relatively low redshift, z = 0.0156, observed in 21 cm emission as their tracer. We calculate MHI of A262 according to some analysis from previous studies. Preliminary detection of A262 showed some degree of success.

  9. The neutral hydrogen cosmological mass density at z = 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, Neil H. M.; Murphy, Michael T.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Worseck, Gábor; Rafelski, Marc; Becker, George D.; Ellison, Sara L.; Fumagalli, Michele; Lopez, Sebastian; Meiksin, Avery; O'Meara, John M.

    2015-09-01

    We present the largest homogeneous survey of z > 4.4 damped Lyα systems (DLAs) using the spectra of 163 QSOs that comprise the Giant Gemini GMOS (GGG) survey. With this survey we make the most precise high-redshift measurement of the cosmological mass density of neutral hydrogen, Ω_{H I}. At such high redshift, important systematic uncertainties in the identification of DLAs are produced by strong intergalactic medium absorption and QSO continuum placement. These can cause spurious DLA detections, result in real DLAs being missed or bias the inferred DLA column density distribution. We correct for these effects using a combination of mock and higher resolution spectra, and show that for the GGG DLA sample the uncertainties introduced are smaller than the statistical errors on Ω_{H I}. We find Ω _{H I}=0.98^{+0.20}_{-0.18}× 10^{-3} at = 4.9, assuming a 20 per cent contribution from lower column density systems below the DLA threshold. By comparing to literature measurements at lower redshifts, we show that Ω_{H I} can be described by the functional form Ω _{H I}(z)∝ (1+z)^{0.4}. This gradual decrease from z = 5 to 0 is consistent with the bulk of H I gas being a transitory phase fuelling star formation, which is continually replenished by more highly ionized gas from the intergalactic medium and from recycled galactic winds.

  10. Spectra of accelerated particles at supernova shocks in the presence of neutral hydrogen: the case of Tycho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morlino, G.; Blasi, P.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The presence of neutral hydrogen in the shock proximity changes the structure of the shock and affects the spectra of particles accelerated through the first-order Fermi mechanism. This phenomenon has profound implications for the interpretation of the multifrequency spectra of radiation from supernova remnants. Aims: Neutrals that undergo charge exchange with hot ions downstream of the shock may result in fast neutrals moving towards the upstream gas, where they can suffer additional charge exchange or ionisation reactions, thereby depositing energy and momentum upstream. Here we discuss the implications of this neutral return flux, which was already predicted in our previous work on neutral mediated supernova shocks, and show how the spectra of accelerated particles turn out to be appreciably steeper than p-4, thereby affecting the gamma ray spectra from supernova remnants in general and from Tycho specifically. Methods: The theory that describes non-linear diffusive shock acceleration in the presence of neutral hydrogen has been developed in recent years. Here we use a semi-analytical theory developed in previous work and specialise our predictions to the case of the Tycho supernova shock, where there is evidence from gamma ray observations that the spectrum of the parent cosmic rays is steeper than expected from the traditional theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Results: We show that, if the fraction of neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of the Tycho supernova shock is, as suggested by observations, ~70-90%, then spectra of accelerated protons steeper than p-4 may be a natural consequence of charge exchange reactions and the associated neutral return flux. The spectral shape is affected by this phenomenon for particles with energies below ~100-1000 GeV, for which the diffusion length is less than or at most comparable to the path length of charge exchange and ionisation upstream of the shock.

  11. Equilibrium carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation in iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauble, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [1-3]) have suggested that Si- and Fe-isotopic signatures can be used to characterize the compositions and conditions of segregation of metallic cores in planetary interiors. This study expands the theoretical framework to include carbon and hydrogen, which may also be alloying elements. Hydrogen (D/H) and carbon (13C/12C) fractionations in iron-rich metallic melts are estimated by modeling analogous iron-rich crystals, i.e., dhcp-FeH and η-Fe2C. C- and H-atoms in these crystals are completely coordinated by iron. The driving energy for equilibrium fractionation is assumed to come from the reduction of vibrational frequencies when heavy isotopes are substituted for light ones; vibrations are assumed to be harmonic. This treatment is crude at high temperature, and for the relatively anharmonic vibrations typical of hydrogen-bearing substances, but may provide a reasonably accurate, semi-quantitative approximation of real fractionation behavior. Vibrational frequencies of all crystals are modeled with density functional theory, using gradient-corrected functionals and ultrasoft pseudopotentials. For both carbon and hydrogen, the models suggest that the metal phase will be strongly depleted in heavy isotopes. At 2000 K, 1 atm, η-Fe2C will have 3‰ lower 13C/12C than coexisting diamond. Combining this result with previous high-temperature theoretical and experimental studies (e.g., [4]), metal-graphite fractionation is expected to be very similar, while metal-CO2 fractionation will be almost twice as large, ca. -5‰. Deuterium/hydrogen fractionations are expected to be an order of magnitude larger, with 50-70‰ lower D/H in dhcp-FeH than in coexisting H2 gas at 2000 K, and approximately 100‰ lower D/H than water vapor. These fractionations are much larger than those inferred for silicon and iron, as expected given the differences in atomic mass. References: 1. Georg et al. (2007) Nature 447:1102; 2. Rustad & Yin

  12. Neutral hydrogen self-absorption in the Milky Way Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavars, Dain William

    2006-06-01

    To develop a better understanding of the cold neutral medium phase of the interstellar medium, we present a detailed analysis of neutral hydrogen self- absorption (HISA) clouds in the Milky Way Galaxy. These HISA clouds are in the Southern Galactic Plane Survey (SGPS), spanning the region l = 253°--358° and | b | <= 1.3°, and in the VLA Galactic Plane Survey (VGPS), spanning the region l = 18°--67° and | b | <= 1.3°--2.3°. The SGPS and VGPS have an angular resolution of ~1 arcminute and a velocity channel spacing of 0.82 km s -1 . With the recent completion of these surveys, we can study HISA features across the Galaxy at a much better resolution and sensitivity than any previous work. To analyze HISA in detail, catalogs of clouds of all sizes, including those undetectable by eye alone, are required. We present an automated search routine to detect all HISA clouds in the SGPS. We compare HISA to CO data and find some HISA clouds associated with CO, but others have no associated CO. This suggests that HISA clouds are in a transition between molecular and atomic gas, bridging the gap between dense molecular clouds and warmer, diffuse atomic clouds. HISA thus plays an important role in the overall evolution of the Galaxy. To study this transition further, we present observations of the OH molecule toward a select sample of HISA clouds in the VGPS, using the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). We present an analysis of the molecular properties of this sample, including a derivation of an OH to H 2 conversion factor and H 2 to H I abundance ratios. We discuss the complex relationship between H I, OH, 12 CO, and 13 CO emission. Finally we present a statistical analysis comparing HISA with infrared data from the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) project. The GLIMPSE data reveal a large number of compact, dark infrared clouds believed to be in the early stages of star formation. If GLIMPSE clouds are associated with HISA, they provide

  13. The Dearth of Neutral Hydrogen in Galactic Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spekkens, Kristine; Urbancic, Natasha; Mason, Brian S.; Willman, Beth; Aguirre, James E.

    2014-11-01

    We present new upper limits on the neutral hydrogen (H I) content within the stellar half-light ellipses of 15 Galactic dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs), derived from pointed observations with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) as well as Arecibo L-band Fast ALFA survey and Galactic All-Sky Survey data. All of the limits MH \\scriptsize{I}^lim are more stringent than previously reported values, and those from the GBT improve upon constraints in the literature by a median factor of 23. Normalizing by V-band luminosity LV and dynamical mass M dyn, we find MH \\scriptsize{I}^lim/L_V˜ 10-3 {M⊙ / L⊙ } and MH \\scriptsize{I}^lim/M_dyn˜ 5× 10-5, irrespective of location in the Galactic halo. Comparing these relative H I contents to those of the Local Group and nearby neighbor dwarfs compiled by McConnachie, we find that the Galactic dSphs are extremely gas-poor. Our H I upper limits therefore provide the clearest picture yet of the environmental dependence of the H I content in Local Volume dwarfs. If ram pressure stripping explains the dearth of H I in these systems, then orbits in a relatively massive Milky Way are favored for the outer halo dSph Leo I, while Leo II and Canes Venatici I have had a pericentric passage in the past. For Draco and Ursa Minor, the interstellar medium mass that should accumulate through stellar mass loss in between pericentric passages exceeds MH \\scriptsize{I}^lim by a factor of ~30. In Ursa Minor, this implies that either this material is not in the atomic phase, or that another mechanism clears the recycled gas on shorter timescales.

  14. GLOBAL PROPERTIES OF NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN COMPACT GROUPS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Privon, George C.; Kepley, Amanda A.; Whelan, David G.; Desjardins, Tyler D.; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2016-02-15

    Compact groups of galaxies provide a unique environment to study the evolution of galaxies amid frequent gravitational encounters. These nearby groups have conditions similar to those in the earlier universe when galaxies were assembled and give us the opportunity to witness hierarchical formation in progress. To understand how the compact group environment affects galaxy evolution, we examine the gas and dust in these groups. We present new single-dish GBT neutral hydrogen (H i) observations of 30 compact groups and define a new way to quantify the group H i content as the H i-to-stellar mass ratio of the group as a whole. We compare the H i content with mid-IR indicators of star formation and optical [g − r] color to search for correlations between group gas content and star formation activity of individual group members. Quiescent galaxies tend to live in H i-poor groups, and galaxies with active star formation are more commonly found in H i-rich groups. Intriguingly, we also find “rogue” galaxies whose star formation does not correlate with group H i content. In particular, we identify three galaxies (NGC 2968 in RSCG 34, KUG 1131+202A in RSCG 42, and NGC 4613 in RSCG 64) whose mid-IR activity is discrepant with the H i. We speculate that this mismatch between mid-IR activity and H i content is a consequence of strong interactions in this environment that can strip H i from galaxies and abruptly affect star formation. Ultimately, characterizing how and on what timescales the gas is processed in compact groups will help us understand the interstellar medium in complex, dense environments similar to the earlier universe.

  15. [Fractionation of hydrogen stable isotopes in the human body].

    PubMed

    Siniak, Iu E; Grigor'ev, A I; Skuratov, V M; Ivanova, S M; Pokrovskiĭ, B G

    2006-01-01

    Fractionation of hydrogen stable isotopes was studied in 9 human subjects in a chamber with normal air pressure imitating a space cabin. Mass-spectrometry of isotopes in blood, urine, saliva, and potable water evidenced increases in the contents of heavy H isotope (deuterium) in the body liquids as compared with water. These results support one of the theories according to which the human organism eliminates heavy stable isotopes of biogenous chemical elements.

  16. Water hydrogen bonding in proton exchange and neutral polymer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedley, Sarah Black

    to the increased conductivity. The polyamide active layer of commercially available reverse osmosis membranes was studied at various relative humilities to better understand how the structure of the active layer changes when hydrated. In summary, by studying the water hydrogen bonding network in various proton exchange membranes and neutral polyamide membranes, a new understanding of structure-property relationships has been developed. This will lead to a greater understanding of transport properties and conductivity in various polymer membranes. Expanding this fundamental knowledge will lead to the development of smarter materials for energy and reverse osmosis applications, and the ideas developed here can be extended to new types of materials used for various needs. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  17. Fractionation of inorganic arsenic by adjusting hydrogen ion concentration.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Andrea; Gonzalez, Mario Henrique; Queiroz, Helena Müller; Cadore, Solange

    2016-12-15

    The inorganic fraction of arsenic species, iAs=∑[As(III)+As(V)] present in fish samples can be quantified in the presence of other arsenic species also found in fishes, such as: monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and arsenobetaine (AsB). The toxic arsenic fraction was selected taking into account the dissociation constants of these arsenic species in different hydrogen ions concentration leading to the arsine formation from iAs compounds detected as As(III) by HG AAS. For thus, a microwave assisted extraction was carried out using HCl 1molL(-1) in order to maintain the integrity of the arsenic species in this mild extraction media. Recovery experiments were done for iAs fraction, in the presence of other arsenic species. The recovery values obtained for iAs fraction added were quantitative about 87-107% (for N=3, RSD⩽3%). The limit of detection (LOD), and the limit of quantification (LOQ), were 5μgkg(-1) and 16μgkg(-1) respectively.

  18. Contact allergy to acid and neutral fractions of rosins. Sensitization experiments in guinea pigs and patch testing in patients.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, A T; Boman, A; Holmbom, B; Lidén, C

    1986-01-01

    The allergenicity of two different types of rosins (gum rosin and tall oil rosin) was compared. The rosins were divided into their neutral and acid fractions. The neutral fraction of tall oil rosin failed to induce contact sensitivity in animals tested according to the Guinea pig maximization test method (GPMT). The neutral fraction of gum rosin as well as the two acid fractions gave significant responses. Relatively fewer dermatitis patients reacted to the neutral fraction compared with reactions to the unfractionated gum rosin when patch tested. Fewer reactions to tall oil rosin than to gum rosin (p less than 0.05) were observed. It is concluded that tall oil rosin is less allergenic than gum rosin, which may be due to the absence of allergens in its neutral fraction.

  19. Effects of Flux and Energy of Neutral Beam on Hydrogenation of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Takeru; Samukawa, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen modification, hydrogenation, of graphene, has attracted due to the possibility of hydrogen storage. Chemisorbed hydrogen has strong interaction with graphene surface and sp3 bond forms. Surprisingly, ideal structure of graphene shows reversible absorption of hydrogen and it leads to effective designing of hydrogen storage material. In this paper, we have demonstrated neutral beam (NB) technique for hydrogenation of graphene instead of conventional plasma method. NB system consists of a plasma generation chamber and a process chamber, which are separated by a carbon plate with many apertures. The charged particles can be effectively neutralized by collision with the sidewall of the apertures when passing through them to the process chamber. Development of the D-band and blue shift of G-band were observed after hydrogen NB irradiation by Raman spectroscopy. FTIR analysis reveals CH bending mode was appeared and it depends on beam energy, thus CH formation has reaction threshold and potential to control it. In addition, it is shown that beam flux affects hydrogenation and additional effect is also included in reaction process. We believe our investigation will provide development of hydrogenated graphene applications.

  20. Ion Pairs or Neutral Molecule Adducts? Cooperativity in Hydrogen Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKock, Roger L.; Schipper, Laura A.; Dykhouse, Stephanie C.; Heeringa, Lee P.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    We performed theoretical studies on the systems NH[subscript 3] times HF times mH[subscript 2]O, NH[subscript 3] times HCl times mH[subscript 2]O, with m = 0, 1, 2, and 6. The molecules with m = 0 form hydrogen-bonded adducts with little tendency to form an ion-pair structure. The molecule NH[subscript 3] times HCl times H[subscript 2]O cannot be…

  1. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    SciTech Connect

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A. Mishagin, V.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.; Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2015-11-15

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  2. Isotope Effect in Tunneling Ionization of Neutral Hydrogen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Xu, H.; Atia-Tul-Noor, A.; Hu, B. T.; Kielpinski, D.; Sang, R. T.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates [O. I. Tolstikhin, H. J. Worner, and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013)]. We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H2/D2 gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus, we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H2 and D2 . The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.

  3. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of cold negative ions

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1984-02-13

    A process for selectively neutralizing H/sup -/ ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H/sup -/ ions that are

  4. Neutral Hydrogen and Its Emission Lines in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Jean-Claude; Chane-Yook, Martine

    2016-12-01

    Since the Lyman-α rocket observations of Gabriel ( Solar Phys. 21, 392, 1971), it has been realized that the hydrogen (H) lines could be observed in the corona and that they offer an interesting diagnostic for the temperature, density, and radial velocity of the coronal plasma. Moreover, various space missions have been proposed to measure the coronal magnetic and velocity fields through polarimetry in H lines. A necessary condition for such measurements is to benefit from a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. The aim of this article is to evaluate the emission in three representative lines of H for three different coronal structures. The computations have been performed with a full non-local thermodynamic-equilibrium (non-LTE) code and its simplified version without radiative transfer. Since all collisional and radiative quantities (including incident ionizing and exciting radiation) are taken into account, the ionization is treated exactly. Profiles are presented at two heights (1.05 and 1.9 solar radii, from Sun center) in the corona, and the integrated intensities are computed at heights up to five solar radii. We compare our results with previous computations and observations ( e.g. Lα from Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer) and find a rough (model-dependent) agreement. Since the Hα line is a possible candidate for ground-based polarimetry, we show that in order to detect its emission in various coronal structures, it is necessary to use a very narrow (less than 2 Å wide) bandpass filter.

  5. Evidence for Neutral-Current Diffractive π0 Production from Hydrogen in Neutrino Interactions on Hydrocarbon

    DOE PAGES

    Wolcott, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; ...

    2016-09-01

    Here, the MINERvA experiment observes an excess of events containing electromagnetic showers relative to the expectation from Monte Carlo simulations in neutral-current neutrino interactions with mean beam energy of 4.5 GeV on a hydrocarbon target. The excess is characterized and found to be consistent with neutral-current π0 production with a broad energy distribution peaking at 7 GeV and a total cross section of 0.26more » $$\\pm$$ 0.02 (stat) $$\\pm$$ 0.08 (sys) x $$10^{-39} cm^{2}$$. The angular distribution, electromagnetic shower energy, and spatial distribution of the energy depositions of the excess are consistent with expectations from neutrino neutral-current diffractive neutral pion production from hydrogen in the hydrocarbon target. These data comprise the first direct experimental observation and constraint for a reaction that poses an important background process in neutrino oscillation experiments searching for $$\

  6. THE NEUTRAL HYDROGEN BRIDGE BETWEEN M31 AND M33

    SciTech Connect

    Lockman, Felix J.; Free, Nicole L.; Shields, Joseph C.

    2012-08-15

    The Green Bank Telescope has been used to search for 21 cm H I emission over a large area between the galaxies M31 and M33 in an attempt to confirm at 9.'1 angular resolution the detection by Braun and Thilker of a very extensive neutral gas 'bridge' between the two systems at the level N{sub HI} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. We detect H I emission at several locations up to 120 kpc in projected distance from M31, at least half the distance to M33, with velocities similar to that of the galaxies, confirming the essence of the Braun and Thilker discovery. The H I does not appear to be associated with the extraplanar high-velocity clouds of either galaxy. In two places we measure N{sub HI} > 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}, indicative of concentrations of H I with {approx}10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} on scales {approx}< 2 kpc, but over most of the field we have only 5{sigma} upper limits of N{sub HI} {<=} 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. In very deep measurements in two directions H I lines were detected at a few 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}. The absence of emission at another location to a 5{sigma} limit N{sub HI} {<=} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -2} suggests that the H I bridge is either patchy or confined to within {approx}125 kpc of M31. The measurements also cover two of M31's dwarf galaxies, And II and And XV, but in neither case is there evidence for associated H I at the 5{sigma} level of 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} for And II and 9.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} for And XV.

  7. The effects of the small-scale DM power on the cosmological neutral hydrogen (HI) distribution at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Abir; Mondal, Rajesh; Das, Subinoy; Sethi, Shiv. K.; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Marsh, David J. E.

    2016-04-01

    The particle nature of dark matter remains a mystery. In this paper, we consider two dark matter models—Late Forming Dark Matter (LFDM) and Ultra-Light Axion (ULA) models—where the matter power spectra show novel effects on small scales. The high redshift universe offers a powerful probe of their parameters. In particular, we study two cosmological observables: the neutral hydrogen (HI) redshifted 21-cm signal from the epoch of reionization, and the evolution of the collapsed fraction of HI in the redshift range 2 < z < 5. We model the theoretical predictions of the models using CDM-like N-body simulations with modified initial conditions, and generate reionization fields using an excursion set model. The N-body approximation is valid on the length and halo mass scales studied. We show that LFDM and ULA models predict an increase in the HI power spectrum from the epoch of reionization by a factor between 2-10 for a range of scales 0.1 < k < 4 Mpc-1. Assuming a fiducial model where a neutral hydrogen fraction bar xHI = 0.5 must be achieved by z = 8, the reionization process allows us to put approximate bounds on the redshift of dark matter formation zf > 4 × 105 (for LFDM) and the axion mass ma > 2.6 × 10-23 eV (for ULA). The comparison of the collapsed mass fraction inferred from damped Lyman-α observations to the theoretical predictions of our models lead to the weaker bounds: zf > 2 × 105 and ma > 10-23 eV. These bounds are consistent with other constraints in the literature using different observables; we briefly discuss how these bounds compare with possible constraints from the observation of luminosity function of galaxies at high redshifts. In the case of ULAs, these constraints are also consistent with a solution to the cusp-core problem of CDM.

  8. Biochemical Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation during Lipid Biosynthesis in Higher Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmen, A.; Gamarra, B.; Cormier, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Although hydrogen isotopes (δ2H) of leaf wax lipids are increasingly being applied as (paleo-) hydrological proxies, we still do not understand some of the basic processes that shape the δ2H values of these compounds. In general, it is believed that three variables shape the δ2H values of leaf wax lipids: source water δ2H values, evaporative deuterium (2H) enrichment of leaf water and the biosynthetic fractionation (ɛbio) during the synthesis of organic compounds. While the influences of source water δ2H values and leaf water evaporative 2H enrichment have been well documented, very little is known how ɛbio shapes the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids. I will present the results from recent experiments, where we show that the magnitude of ɛbio, and thus the δ2H value of plant-derived lipids, strongly depends on the carbon (C) metabolism of a plant. Specifically, I will show that plants that rely for their tissue formation on recently assimilated C have δ2H values in their n-alkanes that are up to 60‰ more negative than plants that depend for their tissue formation on stored carbohydrates. Our findings can be explained by the fact that NADPH is the primary source of hydrogen in plant lipids and that the δ2H value of NADPH differs whether NADPH was generated directly in the light reaction of photosynthesis or whether it was generated by processing stored carbohydrates. As such, the δ2H values of plant-derived lipids will directly depend on whether the tissue containing these lipids was synthesized using recent assimilates, e.g. in a C autonomous state or, if it was synthesized from stored or otherwise aquired C sources, e.g. in a not C autonomous state. Given the magnidude of this effect, our results have important implications for interpretation of plant-derived lipid δ2H values when used as (paleo-) hydrological proxies. In addition, our results suggest, that δ2H values of plant-derived lipids could be employed as a new tools to assess the C

  9. Star formation associated with neutral hydrogen in the outskirts of early-type galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yıldız, Mustafa K.; Serra, Paolo; Peletier, Reynier F.; Oosterloo, Tom A.; Duc, Pierre-Alain

    2017-01-01

    About 20 per cent of all nearby early-type galaxies (M⋆ ≳ 6 × 109 M⊙) outside the Virgo cluster are surrounded by a disc or ring of low-column-density neutral hydrogen (H I) gas with typical radii of tens of kpc, much larger than the stellar body. In order to understand the impact of these gas reservoirs on the host galaxies, we analyse the distribution of star formation out to large radii as a function of H I properties using GALEX UV and SDSS optical images. Our sample consists of 18 H I-rich galaxies as well as 55 control galaxies where no H I has been detected. In half of the H I-rich galaxies, the radial UV profile changes slope at the position of the H I radial profile peak. To study the stellar populations, we calculate the FUV-NUV and UV-optical colours in two apertures, 1-3 and 3-10 Reff. We find that H I-rich galaxies are on average 0.5 and 0.8 mag bluer than the H I-poor ones, respectively. This indicates that a significant fraction of the UV emission traces recent star formation and is associated with the H I gas. Using FUV emission as a proxy for star formation, we estimate the integrated star formation rate in the outer regions (R > 1Reff) to be on average ˜6 × 10-3 M⊙ yr-1 for the H I-rich galaxies. This rate is too low to build a substantial stellar disc and, therefore, change the morphology of the host. We find that the star formation efficiency and the gas depletion time are similar to those at the outskirts of spirals.

  10. Renewable Hydrogen Carrier Carbohydrate: Constructing the Carbon-Neutral Carbohydrate Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The hydrogen economy presents an appealing energy future but its implementation must solve numerous problems ranging from low-cost sustainable production, high-density storage, costly infrastructure, to eliminating safety concern. The use of renewable carbohydrate as a high-density hydrogen carrier and energy source for hydrogen production is possible due to emerging cell-free synthetic biology technology called cell-free synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB). Assembly of numerous enzymes and co-enzymes in vitro can create complicated set of biological reactions or pathways that microorganisms cannot complete, for example, C6H10O5 (aq) + 7 H2O (l) 12 H2 (g) + 6 CO2 (g) (PLoS One 2007, 2:e456). Thanks to 100% selectivity of enzymes, modest reaction conditions, and high-purity of generated hydrogen, carbohydrate is a promising hydrogen carrier for end users. Gravimetric density of carbohydrate is 14.8 H2 mass% if water can be recycled from PEM fuel cells or 8.33% H2 mass% without water recycling. Renewable carbohydrate can be isolated from plant biomass or would be produced from a combination of solar electricity/hydrogen and carbon dioxide fixation mediated by high-efficiency artificial photosynthesis mediated by SyPaB. The construction of this carbon-neutral carbohydrate economy would address numerous sustainability challenges, such as electricity and hydrogen storage, CO2 fixation and long-term storage, water conservation, transportation fuel production, plus feed and food production.

  11. Neutral hydrogen flux measured at 100- to 200-km altitude in an electron aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iglesias, G. E.; Anderson, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Neutral hydrogen fluxes were measured at altitudes of 120-200 km by a rocket payload that also measured electron and proton fluxes and vector magnetic fields. An intense electron arc was crossed, while an upper limit to the flux of 0.5- to 20-keV protons was 1,000,000 per sq cm s sr keV. A neutral flux of 50,000,000 per sq cm s sr was observed, assuming hydrogen with greater than 1-keV energy, with greater north-south extent than the electron flux. Its pitch angle distribution was peaked toward 90 deg, tending toward isotropy in the center. This is fitted to a model describing spreading of an initial proton arc above 500 km.

  12. Emission of hydrogen energetic neutral atoms from the Martian subsolar magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.-D.; Alho, M.; Jarvinen, R.; Kallio, E.; Barabash, S.; Futaana, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We have simulated the hydrogen energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions from the subsolar magnetosheath of Mars using a hybrid model of the proton plasma charge exchanging with the Martian exosphere to study statistical features revealed from the observations of the Neutral Particle Detectors on Mars Express. The simulations reproduce well the observed enhancement of the hydrogen ENA emissions from the dayside magnetosheath in directions perpendicular to the Sun-Mars line. Our results show that the neutralized protons from the shocked solar wind are the dominant ENA population rather than those originating from the pickup planetary ions. The simulation also suggests that the observed stronger ENA emissions in the direction opposite to the solar wind convective electric field result from a stronger proton flux in the same direction at the lower magnetosheath; i.e., the proton fluxes in the magnetosheath are not cylindrically symmetric. We also confirm the observed increasing of the ENA fluxes with the solar wind dynamical pressure in the simulations. This feature is associated with a low altitude of the induced magnetic boundary when the dynamic pressure is high and the magnetosheath protons can reach to a denser exosphere, and thus, the charge exchange rate becomes higher. Overall, the analysis suggests that kinetic effects play an important and pronounced role in the morphology of the hydrogen ENA distribution and the plasma environment at Mars, in general.

  13. Thermal cracking with post hydrogenation and recycle of heavy fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Schliebener, C.; Wernicke, H.J.

    1981-10-27

    In a process for the thermal cracking of hydrocarbons to produce olefins. Improvements include recovering of hydrocarbons boiling above 200/sup 0/ C from the thermal cracking stage, removal of polymeric components therefrom, catalytically hydrogenating resultant hydrocarbons boiling above 200/sup 0/ C, and recycling resultant hydrogenated hydrocarbons to the thermal cracking stage.

  14. Mass fractionation of noble gases in diffusion-limited hydrodynamic hydrogen escape.

    PubMed

    Zahnle, K; Kasting, J F; Pollack, J B

    1990-01-01

    Mass fractionation by hydrodynamic hydrogen escape is a promising mechanism for explaining the observed elemental and isotopic abundance patterns in terrestrial planet atmospheres. Previous work has considered only pure hydrogen winds. Here, the theory of mass fractionation by hydrogen escape is extended to atmospheres in which hydrogen is not the only major constituent. Analytical solutions are derived for cases in which all relevant atmospheric constituents escape; both analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for cases in which important heavy constituents are retained. In either case the fractionation patterns that result can differ significantly from those produced by pure hydrogen winds. Three applications of the theory are discussed: (1) The observed fractionation of terrestrial atmospheric neon with respect to mantle neon can be explained as a by-product of diffusion-limited hydrogen escape from a steam atmosphere toward the end of accretion. (2) The anomalously high Martian (SNC) 38Ar/36Ar ratio is attributed to hydrodynamic fractionation by a vigorously escaping, nearly pure hydrogen wind. (3) It is possible that the present high Martian D/H ratio was established during the same hydrodynamic escape phase that fractionated argon, but the predicted degree of D/H enrichment is sensitive to other, less well constrained parameters.

  15. Mass fractionation of noble gases in diffusion-limited hydrodynamic hydrogen escape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The theory of mass fractionation by hydrogen is presently extended to atmospheres in which hydrogen is not the major constituent. This theoretical framework is applied to three different cases. In the first, it is shown that the fractionation of terrestrial atmospheric neon with respect to mantle neon is explainable as a consequence of diffusion-limited hydrogen escape from a steam atmosphere toward the end of the accretion process. In the second, the anomalously high Ar-38/Ar-36 ratio of Mars is shown to be due to hydrodynamic fractionation by a vigorously escaping and very pure hydrogen wind. In the last case, it is speculated that the currently high Martian D/H ratio emerged during the hydrodynamic escape phase which fractionated Ar.

  16. Determination of neutral beam energy fractions from collisional radiative measurements on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D. M.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Grierson, B. A.; Munoz Burgos, J. M.

    2012-10-15

    Neutral beams based on positive ion source technology are a key component of contemporary fusion research. An accurate assessment of the injected beam species mix is important for determining the actual plasma heating and momentum input as well as proper interpretation of beam-based diagnostics. On DIII-D, the main ion charge-exchange spectroscopy system is used to extract well-resolved intensity ratios of the Doppler-shifted D{sub {alpha}} emission from the full, half, and third energy beam components for a variety of beam operational parameters. In conjunction with accurate collisional-radiative modeling, these measurements indicate the assumed species mix and power fractions can vary significantly and should be regularly monitored and updated for the most accurate interpretation of plasma performance. In addition, if stable active control of the power fractions can be achieved through appropriate source tuning, the resulting control over the deposition profile can serve as an additional experimental knob for advanced tokamak studies, e.g., varying the off axis beam current drive without altering the beam trajectory.

  17. Determination of neutral beam energy fractions from collisional radiative measurements on DIII-D.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D M; Grierson, B A; Muñoz Burgos, J M; Van Zeeland, M A

    2012-10-01

    Neutral beams based on positive ion source technology are a key component of contemporary fusion research. An accurate assessment of the injected beam species mix is important for determining the actual plasma heating and momentum input as well as proper interpretation of beam-based diagnostics. On DIII-D, the main ion charge-exchange spectroscopy system is used to extract well-resolved intensity ratios of the Doppler-shifted D(α) emission from the full, half, and third energy beam components for a variety of beam operational parameters. In conjunction with accurate collisional-radiative modeling, these measurements indicate the assumed species mix and power fractions can vary significantly and should be regularly monitored and updated for the most accurate interpretation of plasma performance. In addition, if stable active control of the power fractions can be achieved through appropriate source tuning, the resulting control over the deposition profile can serve as an additional experimental knob for advanced tokamak studies, e.g., varying the off axis beam current drive without altering the beam trajectory.

  18. Ionic Solid Hydrogen Fuel: Production and Properties of Hydrogen ion and Energetic Neutral Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    rocket propulsion system based on fusion is comparable with that based on antimatter . However, the conventional fusion devices seem too bulky to be...extremely high energy density for rocket propulsion is the use of hydrogen-containing cluster ions for igniting nuclear fusion (cluster-impact fusion, CIF...LOX/H 2 (1.6 x 106 J/kg). For missions with Is  s , the CIF rocket performance will be essentially identical to that of antimatter . However

  19. The reanalysis of spectra of GRB 080913 to estimate the neutral fraction of the IGM at a redshift of 6.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, M.; Warren, S. J.; Mortlock, D. J.; Fynbo, J. P. U.

    2010-03-01

    Aims: We reanalyse optical spectra of the z=6.7 gamma-ray burst GRB 080913, adding hitherto unpublished spectra, to reassess the measurement of the neutral fraction of the IGM at high redshifts. Methods: In the data reduction, we take particular care to minimise systematic errors in the sky subtraction, which are evident in the published spectrum, and compromise our analysis. The final combined spectrum has a higher signal-to-noise ration (S/N) than the previously published spectrum by a factor of 1.3. Results: We find a single significant absorption line redward of the Lyα continuum break, which we identify with the ii + Siii λ 0.126 μm blend, at z=6.733. The sharp spectral break at Lyα implies a comparatively low total column density of neutral hydrogen along the line of sight, log({N_HI}/cm-2)<20. We model the absorption with a host-galaxy DLA, surrounded by an ionised region of unknown size r, within the IGM of neutral fraction, xHI. Despite knowing the source redshift, and the improved S/N of the spectrum, when fitting only over wavelengths redward of Lyα, no useful constraints on xHI can be obtained. We consider the possibility of including the ionised region, blueward of Lyα, when constraining the fit. For the optimistic assumption that the ionised region is transparent, τ_GP≪1, we find that the region is of small size r<2 proper Mpc, and we obtain an upper limit to the neutral fraction of the IGM at z=6.7 of x_HI<0.73 at a probability of 90%.

  20. The Direction of the Neutral Hydrogen Velocity in the Inner Heliosphere as a Possible Interstellar Magnetic Field Compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Zank, Gary P.

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the physical reasons that lead to the deflection of the interstellar neutral hydrogen flow from the direction of propagation of neutral helium in the inner heliosheath. On the basis of numerical simulations, the possibilities are investigated for deriving the orientation of the interstellar magnetic field as a function of the deflection angle.

  1. Production of intense negative hydrogen beams with polarized nuclei by selective neutralization of negative ions

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    1987-01-01

    A process for selectively neutralizing H.sup.- ions in a magnetic field to produce an intense negative hydrogen ion beam with spin polarized protons. Characteristic features of the process include providing a multi-ampere beam of H.sup.- ions that are intersected by a beam of laser light. Photodetachment is effected in a uniform magnetic field that is provided around the beam of H.sup.- ions to spin polarize the H.sup.- ions and produce first and second populations or groups of ions, having their respective proton spin aligned either with the magnetic field or opposite to it. The intersecting beam of laser light is directed to selectively neutralize a majority of the ions in only one population, or given spin polarized group of H.sup.- ions, without neutralizing the ions in the other group thereby forming a population of H.sup.- ions each of which has its proton spin down, and a second group or population of H.sup.o atoms having proton spin up. Finally, the two groups of ions are separated from each other by magnetically bending the group of H.sup.- ions away from the group of neutralized ions, thereby to form an intense H.sup.- ion beam that is directed toward a predetermined objective.

  2. Existence and exponential stability for neutral stochastic integrodifferential equations with impulses driven by a fractional Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthi, G.; Park, Ju H.; Jung, H. Y.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we establish the results on existence and uniqueness of mild solution of impulsive neutral stochastic integrodifferential equations driven by a fractional Brownian motion. Further, by using an impulsive integral inequality, some novel sufficient conditions are derived to ensure the exponential stability of mild solution in the mean square moment. The results are obtained by utilizing the fractional power of operators and the semigroup theory. Finally, an example is presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed result.

  3. The effects of the small-scale DM power on the cosmological neutral hydrogen (HI) distribution at high redshifts

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Abir; Sethi, Shiv K.; Mondal, Rajesh; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Das, Subinoy; Marsh, David J.E. E-mail: rm@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in E-mail: sethi@rri.res.in E-mail: david.marsh@kcl.ac.uk

    2016-04-01

    The particle nature of dark matter remains a mystery. In this paper, we consider two dark matter models—Late Forming Dark Matter (LFDM) and Ultra-Light Axion (ULA) models—where the matter power spectra show novel effects on small scales. The high redshift universe offers a powerful probe of their parameters. In particular, we study two cosmological observables: the neutral hydrogen (HI) redshifted 21-cm signal from the epoch of reionization, and the evolution of the collapsed fraction of HI in the redshift range 2 < z < 5. We model the theoretical predictions of the models using CDM-like N-body simulations with modified initial conditions, and generate reionization fields using an excursion set model. The N-body approximation is valid on the length and halo mass scales studied. We show that LFDM and ULA models predict an increase in the HI power spectrum from the epoch of reionization by a factor between 2–10 for a range of scales 0.1 < k < 4 Mpc{sup −1}. Assuming a fiducial model where a neutral hydrogen fraction x-bar {sub HI} = 0.5 must be achieved by z = 8, the reionization process allows us to put approximate bounds on the redshift of dark matter formation z{sub f} > 4 × 10{sup 5} (for LFDM) and the axion mass m{sub a} > 2.6 × 10{sup −23} eV (for ULA). The comparison of the collapsed mass fraction inferred from damped Lyman-α observations to the theoretical predictions of our models lead to the weaker bounds: z{sub f} > 2 × 10{sup 5} and m{sub a} > 10{sup −23} eV. These bounds are consistent with other constraints in the literature using different observables; we briefly discuss how these bounds compare with possible constraints from the observation of luminosity function of galaxies at high redshifts. In the case of ULAs, these constraints are also consistent with a solution to the cusp-core problem of CDM.

  4. The Radial Flow Speed of the Neutral Hydrogen in the Oval Distortion of NGC 4736

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speights, Jason; Benton, Allen; Reimer, Rebecca; Lemaire, Robert; Godwin, Caleb

    2017-01-01

    Radial flows are difficult to measure in the presence of elliptical flows. This is because the model describing the observed velocity field when both kinds of flows are present is degenerate in the unknown parameters. In this poster we show that the degeneracy can be overcome if the pattern speed and position angle of the elliptical flows are known. The method is demonstrated for NGC 4736 using 3.6 micrometer and neutral hydrogen data. We find a mean inward radial flow speed of 5.6 +/- 1.7 km/s in the region of the oval distortion.

  5. Hemispheric Imaging of Galactic Neutral Hydrogen with a Phased Array Antenna System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijnholds, Stefan J.; De Bruyn, A. Ger; Bregman, Jaap D.; Bij De Vaate, Jan Geralt

    2004-06-01

    The thousand element array (THEA) system is a phased array system consisting of 1 m2 tiles having 64 Vivaldi elements each, arranged on a regular 8-by-8 grid, which has been developed as a demonstrator of technology and applicability for SKA. In this paper we present imaging results of Galactic neutral hydrogen with THEA. Measurements have been taken using a dense 2-by-2 array of four tiles as a four tile adder. The results are compared with results from the Leiden-Dwingeloo Survey, showing qualitative agreement, but also indicating that further studies are needed on the instrumental characteristics.

  6. Northern dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies. I - The Arecibo neutral hydrogen survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stephen E.; Thuan, Trinh X.; Magri, Christopher; Wadiak, James E.

    1990-01-01

    Neutral hydrogen observations of a large sample of dwarf and other low surface brightness galaxies are presented. Nearly all galaxies classified in the Uppsala General Catalogue as dwarf, irregular, Sd-m, or later and in the declination range of the Arecibo telescope have now been observed; here observations for 762 galaxies are reported. About 40 percent of these galaxies have no previously published detections. In total, counting previous detections, over 90 percent of these late-type systems are detected at Arecibo. The galaxies are examined for potential confusion with nearby galaxies, and substantially better SNR are derived for many previously detected galaxies.

  7. Surprising stability of neutral interstitial hydrogen in diamond and cubic BN

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J. L.; Van de Walle, C. G.

    2016-01-21

    We report that in virtually all semiconductors and insulators, hydrogen interstitials (Hi) act as negative-U centers, implying that hydrogen is never stable in the neutral charge state. Using hybrid density functional calculations, we find a different behavior for Hi in diamond and cubic BN. In diamond, Hi is a very strong positive-U center, and the H0icharge state is stable over a Fermi-level range of more than 2 eV. In cubic BN, a III-V compound similar to diamond, we also find positive-U behavior, though over a much smaller Fermi-level range. Finally, these results highlight the unique behavior of Hi in these covalent wide-band-gap semiconductors.

  8. Surprising stability of neutral interstitial hydrogen in diamond and cubic BN

    DOE PAGES

    Lyons, J. L.; Van de Walle, C. G.

    2016-01-21

    We report that in virtually all semiconductors and insulators, hydrogen interstitials (Hi) act as negative-U centers, implying that hydrogen is never stable in the neutral charge state. Using hybrid density functional calculations, we find a different behavior for Hi in diamond and cubic BN. In diamond, Hi is a very strong positive-U center, and the H0icharge state is stable over a Fermi-level range of more than 2 eV. In cubic BN, a III-V compound similar to diamond, we also find positive-U behavior, though over a much smaller Fermi-level range. Finally, these results highlight the unique behavior of Hi in thesemore » covalent wide-band-gap semiconductors.« less

  9. The distribution of neutral hydrogen in the interstellar medium. 1: The data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fruscione, Antonella; Hawkins, Isabel; Jelinsky, Patrick; Wiercigroch, Alexandria

    1994-01-01

    We compile, from the existing literature, the largest sample to date (842 data points) of hydrogen column density measurements, N(H I), of the gas in the interstellar medium. We include only results obtained from absorption measurements toward individual stars (594 in our sample) in an effort to construct a three-dimensional picture of the interstellar gas. We derive hydrogen column densities toward a fraction of the stars in the sample from published column density measurements of metal ions. A three-dimensional physical model derived from this data set will be presented in a companion paper. The observed stars span distances from a few parsecs to a few thousand parsecs, and more than half of the sample serves to describe the local interstellar medium within a few hundred parsecs of the Sun. Hydrogen column densities range from 10(exp 17) to 10(exp 22)/sq cm. We describe here the various observational methods used to estimate the hydrogen column densities and present the table with the stellar and hydrogen column density data. The provided table is intended as a global reference work, not to introduce new results.

  10. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation of benzene and toluene during hydrophobic sorption in multistep batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Imfeld, G; Kopinke, F-D; Fischer, A; Richnow, H-H

    2014-07-01

    The application of compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) for evaluating degradation of organic pollutants in the field implies that other processes affecting pollutant concentration are minor with respect to isotope fractionation. Sorption is associated with minor isotope fractionation and pollutants may undergo successive sorption-desorption steps during their migration in aquifers. However, little is known about isotope fractionation of BTEX compounds after consecutive sorption steps. Here, we show that partitioning of benzene and toluene between water and organic sorbents (i.e. 1-octanol, dichloromethane, cyclohexane, hexanoic acid and Amberlite XAD-2) generally exhibits very small carbon and hydrogen isotope effects in multistep batch experiments. However, carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation was observed for the benzene-octanol pair after several sorption steps (Δδ(13)C=1.6 ± 0.3‰ and Δδ(2)H=88 ± 3‰), yielding isotope fractionation factors of αC=1.0030 ± 0.0005 and αH=1.195 ± 0.026. Our results indicate that the cumulative effect of successive hydrophobic partitioning steps in an aquifer generally results in insignificant isotope fractionation for benzene and toluene. However, significant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation cannot be excluded for specific sorbate-sorbent pairs, such as sorbates with π-electrons and sorbents with OH-groups. Consequently, functional groups of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) may specifically interact with BTEX compounds migrating in an aquifer, thereby resulting in potentially relevant isotope fractionation.

  11. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event reported by Mewaldt et al. (2009). The observations were made during the 5 December 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV particles arriving from the Sun. The derived solar emission profile, arrival directions, and energy spectrum all show that the <5 MeV particles were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. CME-driven shock acceleration is also considered. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances .2 solar radii.

  12. Observations and Interpretations of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Shih, A. Y.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. f.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. c.; Labrador, A. W.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2009-01-01

    We discuss recently reported observations of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) from an X9 solar flare/coronal mass ejection event on 5 December 2006, located at E79. The observations were made by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on STEREO A and B. Prior to the arrival of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV energetic neutral hydrogen atoms produced by either flare or shock-accelerated protons. RHESSI measurements of the 2.2-MeV gamma-ray line provide an estimate of the number of interacting flare-accelerated protons in this event, which leads to an improved estimate of ENA production by flare-accelerated protons. Taking into account ENA losses, we find that the observed ENAs must have been produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances > or equal to 2 solar radii. Although there are no CME images from this event, it is shown that CME-shock-accelerated protons can, in principle, produce a time-history consistent with the observations.

  13. STEREO Observations of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms during the 5 December 2006 Solar Flare

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms emitted during the X9 solar event of December 5, 2006. Beginning 1 hour following the onset of this E79 flare, the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on both the STEREO A and B spacecraft observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons beginning hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within 10 of the Sun, consistent with the measurement resolution. The derived emission profile at the Sun had onset and peak times remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile and continued for more than an hour. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events less than 5 MeV were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs). To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. Possible origins for the production of ENAs in a large solar event are considered. We conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona and that charge-transfer reactions between accelerated protons and partially-stripped coronal ions are an important source of ENAs in solar events.

  14. How to Search for Islands of Neutral Hydrogen in the z ~ 5.5 IGM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matthew; Lidz, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Observations of the Lyman-alpha (Lyα) forest may allow reionization to complete as late as z ~ 5.5, provided the ionization state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is sufficiently inhomogeneous at these redshifts. In this case, significantly neutral islands may remain among highly ionized gas with the ionized regions allowing some transmission through the Lyα forest. This possibility has the important virtue that it is eminently testable with existing Lyα forest data. In particular, we describe three observable signatures of significantly neutral gas in the z ~ 5.5 IGM. We use mock quasar spectra produced from numerical simulations of reionization to develop these tests. First, we quantify how the abundance and length of absorbed regions in the forest increase with the volume-averaged neutral fraction in our reionization model. Second, we consider stacking the transmission profile around highly absorbed regions in the forest. If and only if there is significantly neutral gas in the IGM, absorption in the damping wing of the Lyα line will cause the transmission to recover slowly as one moves from absorbed to transmitted portions of the spectrum. Third, the deuterium Lyβ line should imprint a small but distinctive absorption feature slightly blueward of absorbed neutral regions in the Lyβ forest. We show that these tests can be carried out with existing Keck HIRES spectra at z ~ 5.5, with the damping wing being observable for < xH \\scriptsize{I}> ≳ 0.05 and the deuterium feature observable with additional high-resolution spectra for < xH \\scriptsize{I}> ≳ 0.2.

  15. HOW TO SEARCH FOR ISLANDS OF NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN THE z ∼ 5.5 IGM

    SciTech Connect

    Malloy, Matthew; Lidz, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Observations of the Lyman-alpha (Lyα) forest may allow reionization to complete as late as z ∼ 5.5, provided the ionization state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is sufficiently inhomogeneous at these redshifts. In this case, significantly neutral islands may remain among highly ionized gas with the ionized regions allowing some transmission through the Lyα forest. This possibility has the important virtue that it is eminently testable with existing Lyα forest data. In particular, we describe three observable signatures of significantly neutral gas in the z ∼ 5.5 IGM. We use mock quasar spectra produced from numerical simulations of reionization to develop these tests. First, we quantify how the abundance and length of absorbed regions in the forest increase with the volume-averaged neutral fraction in our reionization model. Second, we consider stacking the transmission profile around highly absorbed regions in the forest. If and only if there is significantly neutral gas in the IGM, absorption in the damping wing of the Lyα line will cause the transmission to recover slowly as one moves from absorbed to transmitted portions of the spectrum. Third, the deuterium Lyβ line should imprint a small but distinctive absorption feature slightly blueward of absorbed neutral regions in the Lyβ forest. We show that these tests can be carried out with existing Keck HIRES spectra at z ∼ 5.5, with the damping wing being observable for 〈x{sub H} {sub I}〉≳0.05 and the deuterium feature observable with additional high-resolution spectra for 〈x{sub H} {sub I}〉≳0.2.

  16. Adsorption of hydrogen on neutral and charged fullerene: experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, A; Leidlmair, C; Bartl, P; Zöttl, S; Denifl, S; Mauracher, A; Probst, M; Scheier, P; Echt, O

    2013-02-21

    Helium droplets are doped with fullerenes (either C60 or C70) and hydrogen (H2 or D2) and investigated by high-resolution mass spectrometry. In addition to pure helium and hydrogen cluster ions, hydrogen-fullerene complexes are observed upon electron ionization. The composition of the main ion series is (H2)(n)HC(m)(+) where m = 60 or 70. Another series of even-numbered ions, (H2)(n)C(m)(+), is slightly weaker in stark contrast to pure hydrogen cluster ions for which the even-numbered series (H2)(n)(+) is barely detectable. The ion series (H2)(n)HC(m)(+) and (H2)(n)C(m)(+) exhibit abrupt drops in ion abundance at n = 32 for C60 and 37 for C70, indicating formation of an energetically favorable commensurate phase, with each face of the fullerene ion being covered by one adsorbate molecule. However, the first solvation layer is not complete until a total of 49 H2 are adsorbed on C60(+); the corresponding value for C70(+) is 51. Surprisingly, these values do not exhibit a hydrogen-deuterium isotope effect even though the isotope effect for H2/D2 adsorbates on graphite exceeds 6%. We also observe doubly charged fullerene-deuterium clusters; they, too, exhibit abrupt drops in ion abundance at n = 32 and 37 for C60 and C70, respectively. The findings imply that the charge is localized on the fullerene, stabilizing the system against charge separation. Density functional calculations for C60-hydrogen complexes with up to five hydrogen atoms provide insight into the experimental findings and the structure of the ions. The binding energy of physisorbed H2 is 57 meV for H2C60(+) and (H2)2C60(+), and slightly above 70 meV for H2HC60(+) and (H2)2HC60(+). The lone hydrogen in the odd-numbered complexes is covalently bound atop a carbon atom but a large barrier of 1.69 eV impedes chemisorption of the H2 molecules. Calculations for neutral and doubly charged complexes are presented as well.

  17. Evidence for Neutral-Current Diffractive π^{0} Production from Hydrogen in Neutrino Interactions on Hydrocarbon.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, J; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Endress, E; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ramirez, M A; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Solano Salinas, C J; Sánchez Falero, S; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wospakrik, M; Zhang, D

    2016-09-09

    The MINERvA experiment observes an excess of events containing electromagnetic showers relative to the expectation from Monte Carlo simulations in neutral-current neutrino interactions with mean beam energy of 4.5 GeV on a hydrocarbon target. The excess is characterized and found to be consistent with neutral-current π^{0} production with a broad energy distribution peaking at 7 GeV and a total cross section of 0.26±0.02(stat.)±0.08(sys.)×10^{-39}  cm^{2}. The angular distribution, electromagnetic shower energy, and spatial distribution of the energy depositions of the excess are consistent with expectations from neutrino neutral-current diffractive π^{0} production from hydrogen in the hydrocarbon target. These data comprise the first direct experimental observation and constraint for a reaction that poses an important background process in neutrino-oscillation experiments searching for ν_{μ} to ν_{e} oscillations.

  18. Evidence for Neutral-Current Diffractive π0 Production from Hydrogen in Neutrino Interactions on Hydrocarbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Endress, E.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Sánchez Falero, S.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wospakrik, M.; Zhang, D.; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The MINERvA experiment observes an excess of events containing electromagnetic showers relative to the expectation from Monte Carlo simulations in neutral-current neutrino interactions with mean beam energy of 4.5 GeV on a hydrocarbon target. The excess is characterized and found to be consistent with neutral-current π0 production with a broad energy distribution peaking at 7 GeV and a total cross section of 0.26 ±0.02 (stat. )±0.08 (sys.)×10-39 cm2 . The angular distribution, electromagnetic shower energy, and spatial distribution of the energy depositions of the excess are consistent with expectations from neutrino neutral-current diffractive π0 production from hydrogen in the hydrocarbon target. These data comprise the first direct experimental observation and constraint for a reaction that poses an important background process in neutrino-oscillation experiments searching for νμ to νe oscillations.

  19. Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation As a Tool to Identify Aerobic and Anaerobic PAH Biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Kümmel, Steffen; Starke, Robert; Chen, Gao; Musat, Florin; Richnow, Hans H; Vogt, Carsten

    2016-03-15

    Aerobic and anaerobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) biodegradation was characterized by compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of the carbon and hydrogen isotope effects of the enzymatic reactions initiating specific degradation pathways, using naphthalene and 2-methylnaphtalene as model compounds. Aerobic activation of naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene by Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816 and Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17483 containing naphthalene dioxygenases was associated with moderate carbon isotope fractionation (εC = -0.8 ± 0.1‰ to -1.6 ± 0.2‰). In contrast, anaerobic activation of naphthalene by a carboxylation-like mechanism by strain NaphS6 was linked to negligible carbon isotope fractionation (εC = -0.2 ± 0.2‰ to -0.4 ± 0.3‰). Notably, anaerobic activation of naphthalene by strain NaphS6 exhibited a normal hydrogen isotope fractionation (εH = -11 ± 2‰ to -47 ± 4‰), whereas an inverse hydrogen isotope fractionation was observed for the aerobic strains (εH = +15 ± 2‰ to +71 ± 6‰). Additionally, isotope fractionation of NaphS6 was determined in an overlaying hydrophobic carrier phase, resulting in more reliable enrichment factors compared to immobilizing the PAHs on the bottle walls without carrier phase. The observed differences especially in hydrogen fractionation might be used to differentiate between aerobic and anaerobic naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene biodegradation pathways at PAH-contaminated field sites.

  20. Vanadium and nickel complexes in petroleum resid acid, base, and neutral fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, C.D.; Green, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Acid and base fractions from petroleum vacuum resids with no detectable (by visible spectrophotometry) quantities of porphyrinic Ni or V complexes were hydrotreated under various conditions to determine if significant amounts of porphyrinic metals were released, via disassociation or other means, upon hydrotreating. No significant quantities were observed, thereby indicating that nonporphyrinic metals were not simply associated, complexed or otherwise masked (in terms of visible spectrophotometric response) porphyrinic metal complexes. However, it is possible that hydrotreating was simply not effective in breaking up these associates and/or that some porphyrinic forms of metal were in fact released but were rapidly destroyed by hydrotreating. In addition, three liquid chromatographic (LC) separation methods were sequentially applied to Cerro Negro (Orinoco belt Venezuelan heavy crude) >700{degree}C resid in an effort to separate and concentrate the metal complexes present. Nonaqueous ion exchange chromatography was used initially to separate the resid into acid, base and neutral types. Two concentrates containing 19,500 and 13,500 ppm total V, or an estimated 19 and 13 wt % V-containing compounds respectively, were obtained. The degree of enrichment of Ni compounds obtained was significantly lower. By visible spectrophotometry, using vanadyl etioporphyrin as a standard, each of the concentrates contained near a 1:1 ratio of porphyrinic:nonporphyrinic V complexes. Analogous separation behavior for porphyrinic versus nonporphyrinic metal forms was observed throughout much of the work, thereby suggesting that a comparable diversity of structures existed within each general class of metal compounds. The generally wide dispersion of both Ni and V over the LC separation scheme suggests a structural variety of metal complexes that is comparable to that observed for other heteroatoms (N, S, O) in petroleum.

  1. Vanadium and nickel complexes in petroleum resid acid, base, and neutral fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, C.D.; Green, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Acid and base fractions from petroleum vacuum resids with no detectable (by visible spectrophotometry) quantities of porphyrinic Ni or V complexes were hydrotreated under various conditions to determine if significant amounts of porphyrinic metals were released, via disassociation or other means, upon hydrotreating. No significant quantities were observed, thereby indicating that nonporphyrinic metals were not simply associated, complexed or otherwise masked (in terms of visible spectrophotometric response) porphyrinic metal complexes. However, it is possible that hydrotreating was simply not effective in breaking up these associates and/or that some porphyrinic forms of metal were in fact released but were rapidly destroyed by hydrotreating. In addition, three liquid chromatographic (LC) separation methods were sequentially applied to Cerro Negro (Orinoco belt Venezuelan heavy crude) >700[degree]C resid in an effort to separate and concentrate the metal complexes present. Nonaqueous ion exchange chromatography was used initially to separate the resid into acid, base and neutral types. Two concentrates containing 19,500 and 13,500 ppm total V, or an estimated 19 and 13 wt % V-containing compounds respectively, were obtained. The degree of enrichment of Ni compounds obtained was significantly lower. By visible spectrophotometry, using vanadyl etioporphyrin as a standard, each of the concentrates contained near a 1:1 ratio of porphyrinic:nonporphyrinic V complexes. Analogous separation behavior for porphyrinic versus nonporphyrinic metal forms was observed throughout much of the work, thereby suggesting that a comparable diversity of structures existed within each general class of metal compounds. The generally wide dispersion of both Ni and V over the LC separation scheme suggests a structural variety of metal complexes that is comparable to that observed for other heteroatoms (N, S, O) in petroleum.

  2. Fractionation of Hydrogen Isotopes by Sulfate- and Nitrate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Osburn, Magdalena R.; Dawson, Katherine S.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Sessions, Alex L.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen atoms from water and food are incorporated into biomass during cellular metabolism and biosynthesis, fractionating the isotopes of hydrogen—protium and deuterium—that are recorded in biomolecules. While these fractionations are often relatively constant in plants, large variations in the magnitude of fractionation are observed for many heterotrophic microbes utilizing different central metabolic pathways. The correlation between metabolism and lipid δ2H provides a potential basis for reconstructing environmental and ecological parameters, but the calibration dataset has thus far been limited mainly to aerobes. Here we report on the hydrogen isotopic fractionations of lipids produced by nitrate-respiring and sulfate-reducing bacteria. We observe only small differences in fractionation between oxygen- and nitrate-respiring growth conditions, with a typical pattern of variation between substrates that is broadly consistent with previously described trends. In contrast, fractionation by sulfate-reducing bacteria does not vary significantly between different substrates, even when autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions are compared. This result is in marked contrast to previously published observations and has significant implications for the interpretation of environmental hydrogen isotope data. We evaluate these trends in light of metabolic gene content of each strain, growth rate, and potential flux and reservoir-size effects of cellular hydrogen, but find no single variable that can account for the differences between nitrate- and sulfate-respiring bacteria. The emerging picture of bacterial hydrogen isotope fractionation is therefore more complex than the simple correspondence between δ2H and metabolic pathway previously understood from aerobes. Despite the complexity, the large signals and rich variability of observed lipid δ2H suggest much potential as an environmental recorder of metabolism. PMID:27531993

  3. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, J.B.; Comolli, A.G.; McLean, J.B.

    1989-10-17

    A process is described for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600--750 F to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650 F and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710--800 F temperature, 1,000--4,000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft[sup 3] catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760--860 F temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600--750 F[sup +] fraction containing 0--20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials. 2 figs.

  4. Catalytic two-stage coal hydrogenation process using extinction recycle of heavy liquid fraction

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, James B.; Comolli, Alfred G.; McLean, Joseph B.

    1989-01-01

    A process for catalytic two-stage hydrogenation and liquefaction of coal with selective extinction recycle of all heavy liquid fractions boiling above a distillation cut point of about 600.degree.-750.degree. F. to produce increased yields of low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid and gas products. In the process, the particulate coal feed is slurried with a process-derived liquid solvent normally boiling above about 650.degree. F. and fed into a first stage catalytic reaction zone operated at conditions which promote controlled rate liquefaction of the coal, while simultaneously hydrogenating the hydrocarbon recycle oils. The first stage reactor is maintained at 710.degree.-800.degree. F. temperature, 1000-4000 psig hydrogen partial pressure, and 10-90 lb/hr per ft.sup.3 catalyst space velocity. Partially hydrogenated material withdrawn from the first stage reaction zone is passed directly to the second stage catalytic reaction zone maintained at 760.degree.-860.degree. F. temperature for further hydrogenation and hydroconversion reactions. A 600.degree.-750.degree. F..sup.+ fraction containing 0-20 W % unreacted coal and ash solids is recycled to the coal slurrying step. If desired, the cut point lower boiling fraction can be further catalytically hydrotreated. By this process, the coal feed is successively catalytically hydrogenated and hydroconverted at selected conditions, to provide significantly increased yields of desirable low-boiling hydrocarbon liquid products and minimal production of hydrocarbon gases, and no net production of undesirable heavy oils and residuum materials.

  5. Model Insensitive and Calibration Independent Method for Determination of the Downstream Neutral Hydrogen Density Through Ly-alpha Glow Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangopadhyay, P.; Judge, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    Our knowledge of the various heliospheric phenomena (location of the solar wind termination shock, heliopause configuration and very local interstellar medium parameters) is limited by uncertainties in the available heliospheric plasma models and by calibration uncertainties in the observing instruments. There is, thus, a strong motivation to develop model insensitive and calibration independent methods to reduce the uncertainties in the relevant heliospheric parameters. We have developed such a method to constrain the downstream neutral hydrogen density inside the heliospheric tail. In our approach we have taken advantage of the relative insensitivity of the downstream neutral hydrogen density profile to the specific plasma model adopted. We have also used the fact that the presence of an asymmetric neutral hydrogen cavity surrounding the sun, characteristic of all neutral densities models, results in a higher multiple scattering contribution to the observed glow in the downstream region than in the upstream region. This allows us to approximate the actual density profile with one which is spatially uniform for the purpose of calculating the downstream backscattered glow. Using different spatially constant density profiles, radiative transfer calculations are performed, and the radial dependence of the predicted glow is compared with the observed I/R dependence of Pioneer 10 UV data. Such a comparison bounds the large distance heliospheric neutral hydrogen density in the downstream direction to a value between 0.05 and 0.1/cc.

  6. Impact-induced devolatilization and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of serpentine: implications for planetary accretion.

    PubMed

    Tyburczy, J A; Krishnamurthy, R V; Epstein, S; Ahrens, T J

    1990-05-01

    The degree of impact-induced devolatilization of nonporous serpentine, porous serpentine, and deuterium-enriched serpentine was investigated using two independent experimental methods, the gas recovery method and the solid recovery method, yielding consistent results. The gas recovery method enables determination of the chemical and hydrogen isotopic composition of the recovered gases. Experiments on deuterium-enriched serpentine unambiguously identify the samples as the source of the recovered gases, as opposed to other possible contaminants. For shock pressures near incipient devolatilization (Pinitial = 5.0 GPa), the hydrogen isotopic composition of the evolved gas is similar to that of the starting material. For higher shock pressures the bulk evolved gas is significantly lower in deuterium than the starting material. There is also significant reduction of H2O to H2 in gases recovered at higher shock pressures, probably caused by reaction of evolved H2O with the metal gas recovery fixture. The hydrogen isotopic fractionation between the evolved gas and the residual solid indicates nonequilibrium, kinetic control of gas-solid isotopic ratios. In contrast, gaseous H2O-H2 isotopic fractionation suggests high temperature (800-1300 K) isotopic equilibrium between the gaseous species, indicating initiation of devolatilization at sites of greater than average energy deposition (i.e., shear bands). Impact-induced hydrogen isotopic fractionation of hydrous silicates during accretion can affect the distribution of hydrogen isotopes of planetary bodies during accretion, leaving the interiors enriched in deuterium. The significance of this process for planetary development depends on the models used for extrapolation of the observed isotopic fractionation to devolatilizations greater than those investigated experimentally and assumptions about timing and rates of protoatmosphere loss, frequency of multiple impacts, and rates of gas-solid or gas-melt isotopic re

  7. Specific features of measuring the isotopic composition of hydrogen ions in ITER plasma by using neutral particle diagnostics under neutral beam injection conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasyev, V. I.; Goncharov, P. R.; Mironov, M. I.; Nesenevich, V. G. Petrov, M. P.; Petrov, S. Ya.; Sergeev, V. Yu.

    2015-12-15

    Results of numerical simulation of signals from neutral particle analyzers under injection of the heating and diagnostic neutral beams in different operating modes of the ITER tokamak are presented. The distribution functions of fast ions in plasma are simulated, and the corresponding neutral particle fluxes escaping from the plasma along the line of sight of the analyzers are calculated. It is shown that the injection of heating deuterium (D{sup 0}) beams results in the appearance of an intense background signal hampering measurements of the ratio between the densities of deuterium and tritium fuel ions in plasma in the thermal energy range. The injection of a diagnostic hydrogen (H{sup 0}) beam does not affect measurements owing to the high mass resolution of the analyzers.

  8. ϕ-meson photoproduction on hydrogen in the neutral decay mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seraydaryan, H.; Amaryan, M. J.; Gavalian, G.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Weinstein, L.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Anderson, M. D.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Collins, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; Fassi, L. El; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Fleming, J. A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, A.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lewis, S.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Martinez, D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nasseripour, R.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, E.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; CLAS Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We report the first measurement of the photoproduction cross section of the ϕ meson in its neutral decay mode in the reaction γp →pϕ(KSKL). The experiment was performed with a tagged photon beam of energy 1.6≤Eγ≤3.6 GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target of the CLAS spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The pϕ final state is identified via reconstruction of KS in the invariant mass of two oppositely charged pions and by requiring the missing particle in the reaction γp →pKSX to be KL. The presented results significantly enlarge the existing data on ϕ photoproduction. These data, combined with the data from the charged decay mode, will help to constrain different mechanisms of ϕ photoproduction.

  9. Northern dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies. II - The Green Bank neutral hydrogen survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stephen E.; Thuan, Trinh X.; Mangum, Jeffrey G.; Miller, John

    1992-01-01

    The paper reports neutral hydrogen observations of a large sample of dwarf and other low surface brightness galaxies. A detailed discussion and error analysis of the observations are presented, and spectra are displayed for 329 galaxies detected for the first time, or detected with substantially better signal-to-noise ratios than achieved previously. The positions on the sky of 667 galaxies meeting the present selection criteria north of delta = 38 deg are shown. The distribution of the redshifts of galaxies detected at Green Bank is illustrated. The Green Bank detections tapered off strongly below the median H I flux of 3.7 Jy km/s detected at Arecibo: only 12 percent of the Green Bank sample was detected with smaller fluxes.

  10. De-coding the Neutral Hydrogen (21cm) Line Profiles of Disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moak, Sandy; Madore, Barry; Khatami, David

    2017-01-01

    Neutral hydrogen is the most abundant element in the interstellar medium, and it has long lent astronomers insight into galaxy structure, galactic interactions, and even dark matter prevalence. It is necessary to implement a detailed coding scheme that characterizes the 21-cm HI line profiles which exist in abundance throughout literature. We have utilized a new computer simulation program that exposes the internal architecture of a galaxy by way of mapping the one-dimensional line profile on to the three-dimensional parameters of a given galaxy. We have created a naming system to classify HI line profiles, which represents a kinematic description of the galaxy simply by considering its classification within the coding scheme.

  11. phi-meson photoproduction on Hydrogen in the neutral decay mode

    SciTech Connect

    Seraydaryan, Helena; Amaryan, Moscov J.; Gavalian, Gagik; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes A.; Weinstein, Larry

    2014-05-01

    We report the first measurement of the photoproduction cross section of the $\\phi$ meson in its neutral decay mode in the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p\\phi(K_SK_L)$. The experiment was performed with a tagged photon beam of energy $1.6 \\le E_\\gamma \\le 3.6$ GeV incident on a liquid hydrogen target of the CLAS spectrometer at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The $p \\phi$ final state is identified via reconstruction of $K_S$ in the invariant mass of two oppositely charged pions and by requiring the missing particle in the reaction $\\gamma p \\to p K_S X$ to be $K_L$. The presented results significantly enlarge the existing data on $\\phi$-photoproduction. These data, combined with the data from the charged decay mode, will help to constrain different mechanisms of $\\phi$ photoproduction.

  12. The spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen as traced by low H I mass galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Seek; Wyithe, J. Stuart. B.; Baugh, C. M.; Lagos, C. d. P.; Power, C.; Park, Jaehong

    2017-02-01

    The formation and evolution of galaxies with low neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) masses, M_{H I} < 108 h-2 M⊙, are affected by host dark matter halo mass and photoionization feedback from the UV background after the end of reionization. We study how the physical processes governing the formation of galaxies with low H I mass are imprinted on the distribution of neutral hydrogen in the Universe using the hierarchical galaxy formation model, GALFORM. We calculate the effect on the correlation function of changing the H I mass detection threshold at redshifts 0 ≤ z ≤ 0.5. We parametrize the clustering as ξ(r) = (r/r0)-γ and we find that including galaxies with M_{H I} < 108 h-2 M⊙ increases the clustering amplitude r0 and slope γ compared to samples of higher H I masses. This is due to these galaxies with low H I masses typically being hosted by haloes with masses greater than 1012 h-1 M⊙, and is in contrast to optically selected surveys for which the inclusion of faint, blue galaxies lowers the clustering amplitude. We show the H I mass function for different host dark matter halo masses and galaxy types (central or satellite) to interpret the values of r0 and γ of the clustering of H I-selected galaxies. We also predict the contribution of low H I mass galaxies to the 21 cm intensity mapping signal. We calculate that a dark matter halo mass resolution better than ˜1010 h-1 M⊙ at redshifts higher than 0.5 is required in order to predict converged 21 cm brightness temperature fluctuations.

  13. Single discharge of the matrix source of negative hydrogen ions: Influence of the neutral particle dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Paunska, Ts.; Todorov, D. Shivarova, A.; Tarnev, Kh.

    2015-04-08

    The study presents two-dimensional (2D) fluid-plasma-model description of a planar-coil inductively-driven discharge, considered as a single element of a matrix source of volume-produced negative hydrogen ions. Whereas the models developed up to now have been directed towards description of the charged particle behavior in the discharge, including that of the negative ions, this model stresses on the role of the neutral particle dynamics and of the surface processes in the formation of the discharge structure. The latter is discussed based on comparison of results obtained for discharges in a flowing gas and at a constant gas pressure as well as for different values of the coefficient of atom recombination on the walls. The conclusions are that the main plasma parameters – electron density and temperature and plasma potential – determining the gas discharge regime stay stable, regardless of changes in the redistribution of the densities of the neutral particles and of the positive ions. With regards to the volume production of the ions, which requires high density of (vibrationally excited) molecules, the impact on the degree of dissociation of the coefficient of atom recombination on the wall is discussed.

  14. Neutral hydrogen and magnetic fields in M83 observed with the SKA Pathfinder KAT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heald, G.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Lucero, D.; Carignan, C.; Jarrett, T.; Elson, E.; Oozeer, N.; Randriamampandry, T. H.; van Zee, L.

    2016-10-01

    We present new KAT-7 observations of the neutral hydrogen (H I) spectral line, and polarized radio continuum emission, in the grand-design spiral M83. These observations provide a sensitive probe of the outer-disc structure and kinematics, revealing a vast and massive neutral gas distribution that appears to be tightly coupled to the interaction of the galaxy with the environment. We present a new rotation curve extending out to a radius of 50 kpc. Based on our new H I data set and comparison with multiwavelength data from the literature, we consider the impact of mergers on the outer disc and discuss the evolution of M83. We also study the periphery of the H I distribution and reveal a sharp edge to the gaseous disc that is consistent with photoionization or ram pressure from the intergalactic medium. The radio continuum emission is not nearly as extended as the H I and is restricted to the main optical disc. Despite the relatively low angular resolution, we are able to draw broad conclusions about the large-scale magnetic field topology. We show that the magnetic field of M83 is similar in form to other nearby star-forming galaxies, and suggest that the disc-halo interface may host a large-scale regular magnetic field.

  15. Major evolutionary trends in hydrogen isotope fractionation of vascular plant leaf waxes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Edwards, Erika J; Zeng, Yongbo; Huang, Yongsong

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopic ratios of terrestrial plant leaf waxes (δD) have been widely used for paleoclimate reconstructions. However, underlying controls for the observed large variations in leaf wax δD values in different terrestrial vascular plants are still poorly understood, hampering quantitative paleoclimate interpretation. Here we report plant leaf wax and source water δD values from 102 plant species grown in a common environment (New York Botanic Garden), chosen to represent all the major lineages of terrestrial vascular plants and multiple origins of common plant growth forms. We found that leaf wax hydrogen isotope fractionation relative to plant source water is best explained by membership in particular lineages, rather than by growth forms as previously suggested. Monocots, and in particular one clade of grasses, display consistently greater hydrogen isotopic fractionation than all other vascular plants, whereas lycopods, representing the earlier-diverging vascular plant lineage, display the smallest fractionation. Data from greenhouse experiments and field samples suggest that the changing leaf wax hydrogen isotopic fractionation in different terrestrial vascular plants may be related to different strategies in allocating photosynthetic substrates for metabolic and biosynthetic functions, and potential leaf water isotopic differences.

  16. Major Evolutionary Trends in Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation of Vascular Plant Leaf Waxes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li; Edwards, Erika J.; Zeng, Yongbo; Huang, Yongsong

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopic ratios of terrestrial plant leaf waxes (δD) have been widely used for paleoclimate reconstructions. However, underlying controls for the observed large variations in leaf wax δD values in different terrestrial vascular plants are still poorly understood, hampering quantitative paleoclimate interpretation. Here we report plant leaf wax and source water δD values from 102 plant species grown in a common environment (New York Botanic Garden), chosen to represent all the major lineages of terrestrial vascular plants and multiple origins of common plant growth forms. We found that leaf wax hydrogen isotope fractionation relative to plant source water is best explained by membership in particular lineages, rather than by growth forms as previously suggested. Monocots, and in particular one clade of grasses, display consistently greater hydrogen isotopic fractionation than all other vascular plants, whereas lycopods, representing the earlier-diverging vascular plant lineage, display the smallest fractionation. Data from greenhouse experiments and field samples suggest that the changing leaf wax hydrogen isotopic fractionation in different terrestrial vascular plants may be related to different strategies in allocating photosynthetic substrates for metabolic and biosynthetic functions, and potential leaf water isotopic differences. PMID:25402476

  17. Doubly labeled water method: in vivo oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Schoeller, D.A.; Leitch, C.A.; Brown, C.

    1986-12-01

    The accuracy and precision of the doubly labeled water method for measuring energy expenditure are influenced by isotope fractionation during evaporative water loss and CO/sub 2/ excretion. To characterize in vivo isotope fractionation, we collected and isotopically analyzed physiological fluids and gases. Breath and transcutaneous water vapor were isotopically fractionated. The degree of fractionation indicated that the former was fractionated under equilibrium control at 37/sup 0/C, and the latter was kinetically fractionated. Sweat and urine were unfractionated. By use of isotopic balance models, the fraction of water lost via fractionating routes was estimated from the isotopic abundances of body water, local drinking water, and dietary solids. Fractionated water loss averaged 23% (SD = 10%) of water turnover, which agreed with our previous estimates based on metabolic rate, but there was a systematic difference between the results based on O/sub 2/ and hydrogen. Corrections for isotopic fractionation of water lost in breath and (nonsweat) transcutaneous loss should be made when using labeled water to measure water turnover or CO/sub 2/ production.

  18. Poly(neutral red) based hydrogen peroxide biosensor for chromium determination by inhibition measurements.

    PubMed

    Attar, Aisha; Emilia Ghica, M; Amine, Aziz; Brett, Christopher M A

    2014-08-30

    Amperometric hydrogen peroxide enzyme inhibition biosensors based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) immobilised on electropolymerised neutral red (NR) or directly on the surface of carbon film electrodes (CFE) have been successfully applied to the determination of toxic Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Parameters influencing the performance of the biosensor including the enzyme immobilisation method, the amount of hydrogen peroxide, applied potential and electrolyte pH were optimised. The inhibition of horseradish peroxidase by the chromium species was studied under the optimised conditions. Results from the quantitative analysis of chromium ions are discussed in terms of detection limit, linear range and sensitivity. The HRP kinetic interactions reveal mixed binding of Cr(III) with I50=3.8μM and inhibition binding constant Ki=11.3μM at HRP/PNR/CFE biosensors and uncompetitive binding of Cr(VI) with I50=3.9μM and Ki=0.78μM at HRP/CFE biosensors in the presence of H2O2 substrate. Interferences from other heavy metal ions were studied and the inhibition show very good selectivity towards Cr(III) and Cr(VI).

  19. Origin of Terrestrial Water: Hydrogen/Deuterium Fractionation into Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Buseck, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen isotopic compositions are among the most important constraints on the origin of Earth's water. Earth's bulk water content, which is small but not negligible, is significantly greater than what the thermal gradient of the solar nebula disk would suggest for planetesimal materials condensed at one astronomical unit. The proto-solar nebula is a likely source of early Earth's water, with probable contributions from one or more of the following: water-rich planetesimals, ordinary and carbonaceous meteorites, comets, asteroids, and interplanetary dust particles. However, all of these sources have been questioned, and the proposed proto-solar nebular origin has been disputed in light of the large difference in hydrogen isotopic composition between it and terrestrial water. Current opposition to the solar nebular hypothesis is based on the critical assumption that no processes in the interior of the early Earth changed the isotopic composition of hydrogen. Nevertheless, a hypothesized hydrogenation reaction of liquid iron (2Fe + xH2 ↔ 2FeHx) during core formation likely provided a fractionation mechanism between hydrogen and deuterium (D). We propose that modern D/H ratios at Earth's surface resulted from this isotopic fractionation and that terrestrial water originated from oxidation of proto-solar hydrogen dissolved in the magma ocean in the early Earth by coexisting oxides (such as FeO). Thus, the isotopic composition of water on Earth can be mainly explained by internal terrestrial processes.

  20. Hydrogen isotope fractionation by Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus in coculture and pure culture conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Hideyoshi; Sakata, Susumu; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2008-06-01

    We grew a hydrogen-utilizing methanogen, Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus strain ΔH, in coculture and pure culture conditions to evaluate the hydrogen isotope fractionation associated with carbonate reduction under low (< several tens of μM; coculture) and high (>6 mM; pure culture) concentrations of H 2 in the headspace. In the cocultures, which were grown at 55 °C with a thermophilic butyrate-oxidizing syntroph, the hydrogen isotopic relationship between methane and water was well represented by the following equation: δD=0.725(±0.003)·δDO-275(±3), in which the hydrogen isotope fractionation factor ( αH) was 0.725 ± 0.003. The relationship was consistent with the isotopic data on methane and water from terrestrial fields (a peat bog in Washington State, USA, and a sandy aquifer in Denmark), where carbonate reduction was reported to be the dominant pathway of methanogenesis. In the pure cultures, grown at 55 and 65 °C, the αH values were 0.755 ± 0.014 and 0.749 ± 0.014, respectively. Dependence of αH on growth temperature was not observed. The αH value at 55 °C in the pure culture was slightly higher than that in the coculture, a finding that disagrees with a hypothesis proposed by Burke [Burke, Jr. R. A. (1993) Possible influence of hydrogen concentration on microbial methane stable hydrogen isotopic composition. Chemosphere26, 55-67] that hydrogen isotope fractionation between methane and water increases (and αH decreases) with increasing H 2 concentration.

  1. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Yunyan; Ma, Qisheng; Ellis, Geoffrey S.; Dai, Jinxing; Katz, Barry; Zhang, Shuichang; Tang, Yongchun

    2011-05-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2 cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using δD values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the δ 13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that δD values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that δD values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane.

  2. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Palladium on Nitrogen-Doped Mesoporous Carbon: A Bifunctional Catalyst for Formate-Based, Carbon-Neutral Hydrogen Storage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fanan; Xu, Jinming; Shao, Xianzhao; Su, Xiong; Huang, Yanqiang; Zhang, Tao

    2016-02-08

    The lack of safe, efficient, and economical hydrogen storage technologies is a hindrance to the realization of the hydrogen economy. Reported herein is a reversible formate-based carbon-neutral hydrogen storage system that is established over a novel catalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon. The support was fabricated by a hard template method and nitridated under a flow of ammonia. Detailed analyses demonstrate that this bicarbonate/formate redox equilibrium is promoted by the cooperative role of the doped nitrogen functionalities and the well-dispersed, electron-enriched palladium nanoparticles.

  4. The Broadening of Spectral Lines by Collisions with Neutral Hydrogen Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, P. S.

    1998-10-01

    In this thesis the theory of collisional broadening by neutral hydrogen of Anstee and O'Mara (1991,1992,1995) for s-p and p-s transitions of neutrals is extended and applied to both p-d, d-p, d-f and f-d transitions of neutral atoms, and the broadening of transitions of ions. The interaction between a ground state hydrogen atom with a generic neutral atom, is considered using Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory. The usual second order expression for the interaction energy between the two atoms involves an infinite sum over virtual states of the two-atom system, and an energy denominator which is the energy debt incurred when the two atom system makes a transition from the state of interest to a virtual state. Unsöld (1927,1955) showed that the expression for the in teraction energy can be greatly simplified if the variable energy debt incurred in making a transition from the state of interest to a virtual state is replaced by a fixed debt Ep. Closure can then be used to complete the sum over the virtual states leading to an expression for the interaction energy in terms of diagonal matrix elements of V2 (where V is the electrostatic interaction between the two atoms), and Ep. This is commonly referred to as the Unsöld approximation. It is the most important approximation in the development of the treatment of spectral line broadening presented in this thesis. Expressions for the interaction energy between a ground state hydrogen atom and a generic neutral atom in both d- and f-states are presented. Adiabatic potential curves calculated from code written to compute these expressions are presented. For interactions of neutral atoms, the Unsöld value of Ep=-4/9 atomic units is used throughout. Code was written to compute line broadening cross-sections for p-d, d-p, d-f and f-d transitions of neutral atoms, using the semi-classical procedure of Roueff (1974) adapted for these transitions. Firstly, the dependence of cross-sections on regions of the potential

  5. Release time of residual oxygen after dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide: effect of a catalase-based neutralizing agent.

    PubMed

    Guasso, Bárbara; Salomone, Paloma; Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Pozzobon, Roselaine Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    This article assessed the effect of a catalase-based agent on residual oxygen (O2) release from teeth exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The use of the catalase-based neutralizer agent for 2-3 minutes was able to release residual O2 5 days after exposure to a 35% H2O2-based bleaching gel.

  6. Fractional Consumption of Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen During the Space Shuttle Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Jonathan K.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle uses the propellants, liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, to meet part of the propulsion requirements from ground to orbit. The Kennedy Space Center procured over 25 million kilograms of liquid hydrogen and over 250 million kilograms of liquid oxygen during the 3D-year Space Shuttle Program. Because of the cryogenic nature of the propellants, approximately 55% of the total purchased liquid hydrogen and 30% of the total purchased liquid oxygen were used in the Space Shuttle Main Engines. The balance of the propellants were vaporized during operations for various purposes. This paper dissects the total consumption of liqUid hydrogen and liqUid oxygen and determines the fraction attributable to each of the various processing and launch operations that occurred during the entire Space Shuttle Program at the Kennedy Space Center.

  7. A measurement of the branching fractions of the b-quark into charged and neutral b-hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Bugge, L.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crawley, B.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Ramler, L.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Segar, A.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Lysebetten, A.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.; Delphi Collaboration

    2003-12-01

    The production fractions of charged and neutral b-hadrons in b-quark events from Z0 decays have been measured with the DELPHI detector at LEP. An algorithm has been developed, based on a neural network, to estimate the charge of the weakly-decaying b-hadron by distinguishing its decay products from particles produced at the primary vertex. From the data taken in the years 1994 and 1995, the fraction of b¯-quarks fragmenting into positively charged weakly-decaying b-hadrons has been measured to be: f+=42.09±0.82(stat)±0.89(syst)%. Subtracting the rates for charged Ξ¯b+ and Ω¯b+ baryons gives the production fraction of B+ mesons: fBu=40.99±0.82(stat)±1.11(syst)%.

  8. Large effect of irradiance on hydrogen isotope fractionation of alkenones in Emiliania huxleyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Marcel T. J.; Benthien, Albert; French, Katherine L.; Epping, Eric; Zondervan, Ingrid; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Bijma, Jelle; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    The hydrogen isotopic (δD) composition of long-chain alkenones produced by certain haptophyte algae has been suggested as a potential proxy for reconstructing paleo sea surface salinity. However, environmental parameters other than salinity may also affect the δD of alkenones. We investigated the impact of the level of irradiance on hydrogen isotopic fractionation of alkenones versus growth water by cultivating two strains of the cosmopolitan haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi at different light intensities. The hydrogen isotope fractionation decreased by approximately 40‰ when irradiance was increased from 15 to 200 μmol photons m-2 s-1 above which it was relatively constant. The response is likely a direct effect of photosystem I and II activity as the relationship of the fractionation factor α versus light intensity can be described by an Eilers-Peeters photosynthesis model. This irradiance effect is in agreement with published δD data of alkenones derived from suspended particulate matter collected from different depths in the photic zone of the Gulf of California and the eastern tropical North Pacific. However, haptophyte algae tend to bloom at relatively high light intensities (>500 μmol photons m-2 s-1) occurring at the sea surface, at which hydrogen isotope fractionation is relatively constant and not affected by changes in light intensity. Alkenones accumulating in the sediment are likely mostly derived from these surface water haptophyte blooms, when the largest amount of biomass is produced. Therefore, the observed irradiance effect is unlikely to affect the applicability of the hydrogen isotopic composition of sedimentary long chain alkenones as a proxy for paleosalinity.

  9. Observation and Interpretation of Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the December 5, 2006 Solar Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, R. A.; Leske, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; Barghouty, A. F.; Shih, A. Y.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Labrador, A. W.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Cummings, A. C.; Cummings, A. C.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first observations of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection event. The observations were made during the December 5, 2006 X9 solar flare, located at E79, by the Low Energy Telescopes (LETs) on the STEREO A and B spacecraft. Within 1-2 hours of the flare onset, both LETs observed a sudden burst of 1.6 to 15 MeV protons arriving hours before the onset of the main solar energetic particle (SEP) event at Earth. More than 70% of these particles arrived from a longitude within +-10 degrees of the Sun. The derived emission profile at the Sun lasted for more than an hour and had a profile remarkably similar to the GOES soft X-ray profile. The observed arrival directions and energy spectrum argue strongly that the particle events <5 MeV were due to energetic neutral hydrogen atoms that were stripped of their electrons upon entering the LET sensor. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of ENA emission from a solar flare/coronal mass ejection. We discuss possible origins for the production of ENAs in solar events, including charge-transfer reactions involving both flare and shock-accelerated protons. Assuming isotropic emission, we find that 2 x 10E28 ENAs escaped from the Sun in the upper hemisphere. Based on the 2.2 MeV gamma-ray emission observed by RHESSI in this event, and using measured and theoretical cross sections, we estimate that 3 x 10E31 ENAs with 1.8 - 5 MeV could be produced by protons accelerated in the flare. CME-driven shock acceleration is also a possible ENA source, but unfortunately there were no CME observations available from this event. Taking into account ENA losses, we conclude that the observed ENAs were most likely produced in the high corona at heliocentric distances 1.6 solar radii.

  10. Radiation-damped profiles of extremely high column density neutral hydrogen: implications of cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Kiehunn

    2017-01-01

    Incorporating the time-dependent second-order perturbation theory for the Lyman scattering cross-section, we investigate the intergalactic absorption profiles of extremely high column density systems near the end of cosmic reionization. Assuming a representative set of the redshift distribution of neutral hydrogen, we quantitatively examined the impact of inhomogeneous density on the intrinsic absorption profiles. The cumulative absorption by neutral patches in the line of sight mainly affects the far off-centre region of the red damping wing, but the effect is not significant. The shape of the line centre can be modified by the near-zone distribution due to high opacities of the near-resonance scattering. On the other hand, the HWHM (half width at half-maximum) as an effective line width is relatively less sensitive to the local inhomogeneity. Specifically, when the two local damping wings of Lyα and Lyβ are close in spectra of the strongly damped systems, accurate profiles of both lines are required. In the case of N_{H I}≲ 10^{21} { cm^{-2}}, the two-level approximation is marginally applicable for the damping wing fit within 5 - 7 per cent errors. However, as the local column density reaches N_{H I}˜ 10^{22.3} { cm^{-2}}, this classical approximation yields a relative error of a 10 per cent overestimation in the red wing and a 20 per cent underestimation in the blue wing of Lyα. If severe extinction by the Lyα forests is carefully subtracted, the intrinsic absorption profile will provide a better constraint on the local ionized states. For practical applications, an analytic fitting function for the Lyβ scattering is derived.

  11. Fractionation of hydrogen and deuterium on Venus due to collisional ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurwell, M. A.; Yung, Y. L.

    1993-02-01

    The collisional ejection process for hydrogen on Venus is reanalyzed. Improved values for the efficiency of H and D escape as a function of the ionospheric temperature are reported. It is proposed that the reduction of the hydrogen flux for collisional ejection be reduced from 8 to 3.5 x 10 exp 6/sq cm/s, and a revised D/H fractional factor of 0.47 due to collisional ejection is suggested. The resulting deuterium flux is 3.1 x 10 exp 4/sq cm/s, roughly six times the flux due to charge exchange, making collisional ejection the dominant escape mechanism for deuterium on Venus.

  12. Ultrafiltration by a compacted clay membrane-I. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coplen, T.B.; Hanshaw, B.B.

    1973-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation of distilled water and of 0.01 N NaCl forced to flow at ambient temperature under a hydraulic pressure drop of 100 bars across a montmorillonite disc compacted to a porosity of 35 per cent by a pressure of 330 bars. The ultrafiltrates in both experiments were depleted in D by 2.5%. and in O18 by 0.8%. relative to the residual solution. No additional isotopic fractionation due to a salt filtering mechanism was observed at NaCl concentrations up to 0.01 N. Adsorption is most likely the principal mechanism which produces isotopic fractionation, but molecular diffusion may play a minor role. The results suggest that oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of ground water during passage through compacted clayey sediments should be a common occurrence, in accord with published interpretations of isotopic data from the Illinois and Alberta basins. ?? 1973.

  13. New power source from fractional quantum energy levels of atomic hydrogen that surpasses internal combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R. L.; Ray, P.; Dhandapani, B.; Nansteel, M.; Chen, X.; He, J.

    2002-12-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscopy was recorded on microwave discharges of helium with 2% hydrogen. Novel emission lines were observed with energies of q·13.6 eV where q=1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9, or 11 or these lines inelastically scattered by helium atoms wherein 21.2 eV was absorbed in the excitation of He (1s 2) to He (1s 12p 1). These lines were identified as hydrogen transitions to electronic energy levels below the 'ground' state corresponding to fractional quantum numbers. Significant line broadening corresponding to an average hydrogen atom temperature of 33-38 eV was observed for helium-hydrogen discharge plasmas; whereas pure hydrogen showed no excessive broadening corresponding to an average hydrogen atom temperature of ≈3 eV. Since a significant increase in H temperature was observed with helium-hydrogen discharge plasmas, and energetic hydrino lines were observed at short wavelengths in the corresponding microwave plasmas that required a very significant reaction rate due to low photon detection efficiency in this region, the power balance was measured on the helium-hydrogen microwave plasmas. With a microwave input power of 30 W, the thermal output power was measured to be at least 300 W corresponding to a reactor temperature rise from room temperature to 900 °C within 90 s, a power density of 30 MW/m 3, and an energy balance of about -4×10 5 kJ/mol H 2 compared to the enthalpy of combustion of hydrogen of -241.8 kJ/mol H 2.

  14. Hydrogen absorption of titanium and nickel-titanium alloys during long-term immersion in neutral fluoride solution.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Ogawa, Toshio; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi

    2006-07-01

    Hydrogen absorption of biomedical titanium and Ni-Ti alloys in a neutral fluoride (2.0% NaF) solution for up to 10,000 h at 37 degrees C has been evaluated by means of hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. For alpha titanium (commercial pure titanium), the amount of absorbed hydrogen was, at most, 10-30 mass ppm, and the corrosion product and hydride formation were revealed on the surface of the specimen by X-ray diffraction analysis. Ni-Ti superelastic alloy absorbed approximately 150 mass ppm of hydrogen, which was probably sufficient to result in the pronounced degradation of the mechanical properties, although corrosion was hardly observed. In contrast, hydrogen absorption of alpha-beta titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) and beta titanium (Ti-11.3Mo-6.6Zr-4.3Sn) alloys was negligible, although general corrosion was observed. The results of the present study indicate that the susceptibility of titanium and Ni-Ti alloys to hydrogen absorption in the neutral fluoride solution is different from that in the acidic fluoride solution reported previously.

  15. Impact-induced devolatilization and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of serpentine: Implications for planetary accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyburczy, James A.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, Samuel; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Impact-induced devolatilization of porous serpentine was investigated using two independent experimental methods, the gas recovery and the solid recovery method, each yielding nearly identical results. For shock pressures near incipient devolatilization, the hydrogen isotopic composition of the evolved H2O is very close to that of the starting material. For shock pressures at which up to 12 percent impact-induced devolatilization occurs, the bulk evolved gas is significantly lower in deuterium than the starting material. There is also significant reduction of H2O to H2 in gases recovered at these higher shock pressures, probably caused by reaction of evolved H2O with the metal gas recovery fixture. Gaseous H2O-H2 isotopic fractionation suggests high temperature isotopic equilibrium between the gaseous species, indicating initiation of devolatilization at sites of greater than average energy deposition. Bulk gas-residual solid isotopic fractionations indicate nonequilibrium, kinetic control of gas-solid isotopic ratios. Impact-induced hydrogen isotopic fractionation of hydrous silicates during accretion can strongly affect the long-term planetary isotopic ratios of planetary bodies, leaving the interiors enriched in deuterium. Depending on the model used for extrapolation of the isotopic fractionation to devolatilization fractions greater than those investigated experimentally can result from this process.

  16. Use of predissociation to enhance the atomic hydrogen ion fraction in ion sources

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jinchoon

    1979-01-01

    A duopigatron ion source is modified by replacing the normal oxide-coated wire filament cathode of the ion source with a hot tungsten oven through which hydrogen gas is fed into the arc chamber. The hydrogen gas is predissociated in the hot oven prior to the arc discharge, and the recombination rate is minimized by hot walls inside of the arc chamber. With the use of the above modifications, the atomic H.sub.1.sup.+ ion fraction output can be increased from the normal 50% to greater than 70% with a corresponding decrease in the H.sub.2.sup.+ and H.sub.3.sup.+ molecular ion fraction outputs from the ion source.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Green Bank neutral hydrogen survey (Schneider+, 1992)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, S. E.; Thuan, T. X.; Mangum, J. G.; Miller, J.

    1999-09-01

    Neutral hydrogen observations at 21cm, made at the Green Bank 91m telescope in 1984, 1985 and 1986, of a large sample of dwarf and other low surface brightness galaxies are presented. The majority of galaxies classified in the Uppsala General Catalogue as dwarf, irregular, Sdm, or later and with declinations north of the range of the Arecibo telescope (δ>38°) have been observed, along with a number of galaxies farther south for flux comparisons with Arecibo observations (Schneider et al., 1990ApJS...72..245S, Paper I), totaling over 600 galaxies. About half of these galaxies have no previously published detections. In total, counting previous detections, over 80% of these late-type systems are detected at Green Bank. We have examined the galaxies for potential confusion with nearby galaxies, and we also present substantially better signal-to-noise measurements for many previously detected galaxies. Some general results of the Green Bank survey are discussed here, but the total data base of northern dwarf and low surface brightness galaxies, including new measurements of the galaxies' photographic magnitudes, will be examined in subsequent papers. (4 data files).

  18. Chemical characterization of the inorganic fraction of aerosols and mechanisms of the neutralization of atmospheric acidity in Athens, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karageorgos, E. T.; Rapsomanikis, S.

    2007-06-01

    with inter-ionic correlations suggested that atmospheric ammonia is the major neutralizing agent of sulfate, while being insufficient to neutralize it to full extend. The formation of NH4NO3 is therefore not favored and additional contribution to the neutralization of acidity has been shown to be provided by Ca2+ and Mg2+. In the coarse particle fraction, the predominantly abundant Ca2+ has been found to correlate well with NO3- and SO42-, indicating its role as important neutralizing agent in this particle size range. The proximity of the location under study to the sea explains the important concentrations of salts with marine origin like NaCl and MgCl2 that were found in the coarse fraction, while chloride depletion in the gaseous phase was found to be limited to the fine particulate fraction. Total analyzed inorganic mass (elemental+ionic) was found to be ranging between approximately 25-33% of the total coarse particle mass and 35-42% of the total fine particle mass.

  19. Neutralization of pharmacological and toxic activities of bothrops snake venoms by Schizolobium parahyba (Fabaceae) aqueous extract and its fractions.

    PubMed

    Vale, Luis Henrique F; Mendes, Mirian M; Hamaguchi, Amélia; Soares, Andreimar M; Rodrigues, Veridiana M; Homsi-Brandeburgo, Maria Inês

    2008-07-01

    The aqueous extract prepared from Schizolobium parahyba (Sp) leaves, a native plant from Atlantic Forest (Brazil), was tested to analyse its ability to inhibit some biological and enzymatic activities induced by Bothrops alternatus (BaltCV) and Bothrops moojeni (BmooCV) snake venoms. Sp inhibited 100% of lethality, blood incoagulability, haemorrhagic and indirect haemolytic activities at a 1:10 ratio (venom/extract, w/w), as well as coagulant activity at a 1:5 ratio (venom/extract, w/w) induced by both venoms. BaltCV fibrinogenolytic activity was also neutralized by Sp at a 1:10 ratio, resulting in total protection of fibrinogen Bbeta chain and partial protection of Aalpha chain. Interaction tests have demonstrated that, at certain extract/proteins ratios, Sp precipitates proteins non-specifically suggesting the presence of tannins, which are very likely responsible for the excellent inhibiting effects of the analysed ophidian activities. Sp aqueous extract chromatography on Sephadex LH-20 was carried out aiming at the separation of these compounds that mask the obtained results. Thus, the fractionation of Sp resulted in three fractions: F1 (methanolic fraction); F2 (methanol:water fraction, 1:1 v/v); and F3 (aqueous fraction). These fractions were analysed for their ability to inhibit the BaltCV fibrinogenolytic activity. F1 inhibited 100% the venom fibrinogenolytic activity without presenting protein precipitation effect; F2 showed only partial inhibition of this venom activity. Finally, F3 did not inhibit fibrinogen proteolysis, but presented strong protein precipitating action. We conclude that Sp aqueous extract, together with tannins, also contains other compounds that can display specific inhibitory activity against snake venom toxins.

  20. Isotopic fractionation in proteins as a measure of hydrogen bond length

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, Ross H.; Athokpam, Bijyalaxmi; Ramesh, Sai G.

    2015-07-28

    If a deuterated molecule containing strong intramolecular hydrogen bonds is placed in a hydrogenated solvent, it may preferentially exchange deuterium for hydrogen. This preference is due to the difference between the vibrational zero-point energy for hydrogen and deuterium. It is found that the associated fractionation factor Φ is correlated with the strength of the intramolecular hydrogen bonds. This correlation has been used to determine the length of the H-bonds (donor-acceptor separation) in a diverse range of enzymes and has been argued to support the existence of short low-barrier H-bonds. Starting with a potential energy surface based on a simple diabatic state model for H-bonds, we calculate Φ as a function of the proton donor-acceptor distance R. For numerical results, we use a parameterization of the model for symmetric O–H⋯O bonds [R. H. McKenzie, Chem. Phys. Lett. 535, 196 (2012)]. We consider the relative contributions of the O–H stretch vibration, O–H bend vibrations (both in plane and out of plane), tunneling splitting effects at finite temperature, and the secondary geometric isotope effect. We compare our total Φ as a function of R with NMR experimental results for enzymes, and in particular with an earlier model parametrization Φ(R), used previously to determine bond lengths.

  1. Cysteamine-induced inhibition of acid neutralization and the increase in hydrogen ion back-diffusion in duodenal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Ohe, K.; Okada, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Inoue, M.; Miyoshi, A.

    1982-03-01

    To investigate the possible impairment of defensive mechanisms in cysteamine-induced duodenal ulceration, the effect of cysteamine on the neutralization of acid by the duodenum and the back-diffusion of hydrogen ions into the duodenal mucosa has been studied. The results obtained were as follows. (1) The intraduodenal pH started to decrease between 3 and 4 hr after cysteamine injection. (2) By perfusion of the duodenal loop excluding the opening of bile and pancreatic ducts, the amount of hydrogen ions (H+) neutralized was found to be significantly lower in cysteamine-treated animals than in the controls. (3) the back-diffusion of luminal H+ into the duodenal mucosa, estimated by measuring the H+ disappearance from the test solution including 100 mM HCl, was significantly increased by cysteamine. From these findings, it has been concluded that cysteamine reduces the resistance of duodenal mucosa to acid coming from the stomach.

  2. Experimental Investigation of Irradiation-driven Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in Analogs of Protoplanetary Hydrous Silicate Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roskosz, Mathieu; Laurent, Boris; Leroux, Hugues; Remusat, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The origin of hydrogen in chondritic components is poorly understood. Their isotopic composition is heavier than the solar nebula gas. In addition, in most meteorites, hydrous silicates are found to be lighter than the coexisting organic matter. Ionizing irradiation recently emerged as an efficient hydrogen fractionating process in organics, but its effect on H-bearing silicates remains essentially unknown. We report the evolution of the D/H of hydrous silicates experimentally irradiated by electrons. Thin films of amorphous silica, amorphous “serpentine,” and pellets of crystalline muscovite were irradiated at 4 and 30 keV. For all samples, irradiation leads to a large hydrogen loss correlated with a moderate deuterium enrichment of the solid residue. The entire data set can be described by a Rayleigh distillation. The calculated fractionation factor is consistent with a kinetically controlled fractionation during the loss of hydrogen. Furthermore, for a given ionizing condition, the deuteration of the silicate residues is much lower than the deuteration measured on irradiated organic macromolecules. These results provide firm evidence of the limitations of ionizing irradiation as a driving mechanism for D-enrichment of silicate materials. The isotopic composition of the silicate dust cannot rise from a protosolar to a chondritic signature during solar irradiations. More importantly, these results imply that irradiation of the disk naturally induces a strong decoupling of the isotopic signatures of coexisting organics and silicates. This decoupling is consistent with the systematic difference observed between the heavy organic matter and the lighter water typically associated with minerals in the matrix of most carbonaceous chondrites.

  3. Composition variability of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and effects on hydrogen and methane production potentials.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2015-02-01

    The composition of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW) strongly depends on the place and time of collection for a specific municipality or area. Moreover synthetic food waste or organic waste from cafeterias and restaurants may not be representative of the overall OFMSW received at treatment facilities for source-separated waste. This work is aimed at evaluating the composition variability of OFMSW, the potential productions of hydrogen and methane from specific organic waste fractions typically present in MSW and the effects of waste composition on overall hydrogen and methane yields. The organic waste fractions considered in the study were: bread-pasta, vegetables, fruits, meat-fish-cheese and undersieve 20mm. Composition analyses were conducted on samples of OFMSW that were source segregated at household level. Batch tests for hydrogen and methane productions were carried out under mesophilic conditions on selected fractions and OFMSW samples. Results indicated that the highest production of hydrogen was achieved by the bread-pasta fraction while the lowest productions were measured for the meat-fish-cheese fraction. The results indicated that the content of these two fractions in organic waste had a direct influence on the hydrogen production potentials of OFMSW. The higher the content of bread-pasta fraction, the higher the hydrogen yields were while the contrary was observed for the meat-fish-cheese fraction. The definition of waste composition therefore represents fundamental information to be reported in scientific literature to allow data comparison. The variability of OFMSW and its effects on hydrogen potentials might also represents a problematic issue in the management of pilot or full-scale plants for the production of hydrogen by dark fermentation.

  4. A Study of the Neutral Hydrogen Content of Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacHattie, Jeremy A.

    The results of a study of the neutral hydrogen (HI) content and distribution within a sample of 18 blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs) are presented. An investigation of the behaviour of the gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) as a function of metallicity (Z) is also presented. Observations of these BCDs was performed using the Very Large Array (VLA) in 2009, a year in which the array was undergoing a technological upgrade to the the Karl G. Jansky VLA (JVLA). The observations were reduced and images processed using the Astronomical Image Processing Software (AIPS), and data cubes for each galaxy were produced. The results include detections of eleven HI lines (two new detections) and ten background continuum sources (two new discoveries). All detections are at a higher resolution and/or sensitivity than previous measurements. These detections spanned a large range of line widths and H I masses; some masses comparable to those in normal galaxies. Of particular interest was the discovery of a compact absorption feature in the dwarf galaxy Haro 11. A paper submitted to the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS) Letters on this discovery is presented. Another significant result was the discovery of a highly extended and massive HI region in the dwarf galaxy CGCG 297-017. For those galaxies with no detected HI line or radio continuum, an upper limit to the flux density was computed, which was used to derive upper limits to the HI mass or star-formation rate (SFR) respectively. Three HI flux density upper limits are new results, and seven continuum flux density upper limits are also new. The GDR-Z relation at low metallicities shows a potential power law or broken power law relation with a turning point at Z=7.96 or Z=8.05. To within error, these turning points and power law indices of the broken power law fits are consistent with other work.

  5. High brightness neutral hydrogen in M31: A new probe of interstellar pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Robert; Walterbos, Rene

    1990-01-01

    An observational parameter of our own Galaxy, the peak brightness temperature of neutral hydrogen in emission, was determined almost twenty years ago (Burton 1970). This quantity, although possessing a degree of local variations, has a remarkably consistent peak value of 125 K towards spiral arm segments with a few isolated peaks extending to 135 K, once sufficient spatial and velocity resolution are used (less than or equal to 70 pc, less than or equal to 5 km/s) to resolve the emission peaks. The higher spatial and velocity resolution of more recent surveys has not led to the detection of higher brightnesses. For many years this remarkable observational result has received little attention, primarily because similar data for other galaxies, which would allow a meaningful comparison and analysis, did not exist. Recently this situation has changed. A Westerbork survey of M33 (Deul and Van der Hulst 1987, and private comm.) with 40 pc x 8 km/s resolution has revealed consistent peak values of only 95 plus or minus 5 K (although there is still some question of whether the velocity resolution was sufficient in this case), while a Very Large Array (VLA) survey of M31 (Braun 1989a) with 35 pc x 5 km/s resolution has shown consistent peak values but at a temperature of 155 to 165 K. It has become clear that although peak HI brightness seems to be a well-defined quantity within individual galaxies (with a degree of local variation) there are very significant differences in this quantity amongst different galaxies. Researchers embarked on an observational program directed at a sample of 11 nearby galaxies: NGC 55, 247, 7793, 3031, 2366, 2403, 4236, 4826, 4736, 4244, and 5457. They hope to determine the gas properties and phases as a function of both galaxy type and position within the galaxies utilizing high resolution HI observations and optical narrow band imagery and spectroscopy which are now underway.

  6. A Search for Diffuse Neutral Hydrogen and H I Clouds in the NGC 2403 Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chynoweth, Katie M.; Langston, Glen I.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Lockman, Felix J.

    2009-07-01

    We have observed the NGC 2403 group of galaxies using the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope in a search for faint, extended neutral hydrogen clouds similar to the clouds found around the M81/M82 group, which is located approximately 250 kpc from the NGC 2403 group along the same filament of galaxies. For an H I cloud with a size <=10 kpc within 50 kpc of a group galaxy, our 7σ mass detection limit is 2.2 × 106 M sun for a cloud with a line width of 20 km s-1, over the velocity range from -890 to 1750 km s-1. At this sensitivity level, we detect three new H I clouds in the direction of the group, as well as the known galaxies. The mean velocity of the new clouds differs from that of the group galaxies by more than 250 km s-1, but are in the range of Milky Way high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in that direction. It is most likely that the clouds are part of the Milky Way HVC population. If H I clouds exist in the NGC 2403 group, their masses are less than 2.2 × 106 M sun. We also compared our results to structures that are expected based on recent cosmological models, and found none of the predicted clouds. If NGC 2403 is surrounded by a population of dark matter halos similar to those proposed for the Milky Way in recent models, our observations imply that their H I content is less than 1% of their total mass.

  7. Clouds of neutral hydrogen between M31 and M33 and around the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Spencer A.; Pisano, D. J.; Lockman, F. J.; McGaugh, S. S.; Shaya, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Large spiral galaxies like our own Milky Way must acquire fresh gas to continue forming new stars. The gas that resides between galaxies may be a source of this material, but we know little about the gas’ structure or extent. I will present my thesis research, which attempts to answer these questions, based on our Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations of the very faint M31-M33 neutral hydrogen (HI) stream that was first discovered a decade ago using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Our spectral line observations have over five times higher spatial resolution and roughly three times higher velocity resolution than the Westerbork data. These are the most sensitive observations of the 21 cm line conducted with the GBT. I will discuss our observing and reduction techniques used to reach the sensitivities needed to study the HI stream in detail. We find that the gas is actually composed of small clouds only a few kiloparsecs in diameter. The kinematics of the clouds also suggests that they are associated with M31 and M33 and not each galaxy’s respective High Velocity Cloud (HVC) population. Most, if not all, of the clouds do not appear to have stars associated with them. Thus, we believe that these clouds are part of a condensing intergalactic filament and may be a source of future star formation for M31 and M33. In addition, I will briefly present my research on the High Velocity and Intermediate Velocity Clouds around our Milky Way using the Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) at 21 cm that was conducted with the Parkes 64m radio telescope. I will discuss the basic properties of this gas and some interesting features seen in the survey.

  8. A neutral hydrogen study of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 3319

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, E. M.; Gottesman, S. T.

    1998-03-01

    Neutral hydrogen line observations of the late-type barred spiral galaxy NGC 3319 are presented. The distribution and kinematics of the galaxy are studied using the Very Large Array, with spatial resolutions between 11 and 50 arcsec and a channel separation of 10.33 km/s. As is typical for late-type galaxies, NGC 3319 is rich in H I, with a gaseous bar and spiral features. Several large, low-density regions are present, and the H I spiral structure is distorted, especially in the south. The gas distribution is asymmetric and extends significantly further to the southeast due to a long, off-center tail. Noncircular motions caused by the bar, spiral structure, and low-density regions are present in the radial velocity field, complicating the rotation curve analysis. These nonaxisymmetric structures cause the values of the position angle and inclination derived from the velocity field to vary across the disk. In addition, beyond a radius of 180 arcsec, the velocity field is severely perturbed on the approaching (southern) side of the galaxy, and the disk becomes nonplanar. However, the galaxy does not show the typical 'integral sign' shape of a warped system. We detect a small system approximately 11 arcmin south of the center of NGC 3319. It is seen in eight velocity channels and is coincident with a small, resolved object in the Palomar Sky Survey. A tidal interaction between this object and NGC 3319 is the most likely cause of the distorted spiral structure, the H I tail, and the velocity perturbations found in the southern half of the galaxy. Infalling tidal debris from such an event may account for the large, low-density regions found in the disk, several of which show kinematic evidence that suggest they are expanding superstructures.

  9. Carbon and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Fractionation Associated with the Aerobic and Anaerobic Degradation of Saturated and Alkylated Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Musat, Florin; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans H

    2016-01-01

    Saturated hydrocarbons (alkanes) and alkylated aromatic hydrocarbons are abundant environmental compounds. Hydrocarbons are primarily removed from the environment by biodegradation, a process usually associated with moderate carbon and significant hydrogen isotope fractionation allowing monitoring of biodegradation processes in the environment. Here, we review the carbon and hydrogen stable isotope fractionation associated with the cleavage of C-H bonds at alkyl chains of hydrocarbons. Propane, n-butane and ethylbenzene were used as model components for alkyl moieties of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons with emphasis on the cleavage of the C-H bond without the involvement of molecular oxygen. The carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation factors were further used to explore the diagnostic potential for characterizing the mode of bond cleavage under oxic and anoxic conditions. x039B; factors, calculated to correlate carbon and hydrogen fractionation, allowed to distinguish between aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation processes in the environment.

  10. Hydrogen and carbon isotope fractionation during degradation of chloromethane by methylotrophic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nadalig, Thierry; Greule, Markus; Bringel, Françoise; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Keppler, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Chloromethane (CH3Cl) is a widely studied volatile halocarbon involved in the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. Nevertheless, its global budget still remains debated. Stable isotope analysis is a powerful tool to constrain fluxes of chloromethane between various environmental compartments which involve a multiplicity of sources and sinks, and both biotic and abiotic processes. In this study, we measured hydrogen and carbon isotope fractionation of the remaining untransformed chloromethane following its degradation by methylotrophic bacterial strains Methylobacterium extorquens CM4 and Hyphomicrobium sp. MC1, which belong to different genera but both use the cmu pathway, the only pathway for bacterial degradation of chloromethane characterized so far. Hydrogen isotope fractionation for degradation of chloromethane was determined for the first time, and yielded enrichment factors (ε) of −29‰ and −27‰ for strains CM4 and MC1, respectively. In agreement with previous studies, enrichment in 13C of untransformed CH3Cl was also observed, and similar isotope enrichment factors (ε) of −41‰ and −38‰ were obtained for degradation of chloromethane by strains CM4 and MC1, respectively. These combined hydrogen and carbon isotopic data for bacterial degradation of chloromethane will contribute to refine models of the global atmospheric budget of chloromethane. PMID:24019296

  11. Neutral hydrolysable sugars, OC and N content across soil aggregate size fractions, as an effect of two different crop rotations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeletti, Carlo; Giannetta, Beatrice; Kölbl, Angelika; Monaci, Elga; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Vischetti, Costantino

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results regarding the effects of two 13 years long crop rotations, on the composition of mineral associated neutral sugars, organic carbon (OC) and N concentration, across different aggregate size fractions. The two cropping sequences were characterized by different levels of N input from plant residues and tillage frequency. We also analysed the changes that occurred in soil organic matter (SOM) chemical composition following the cultivation in the two soils of winter wheat and chickpea on the same soils. The analysis of OC and N content across soil aggregate fractions allowed getting an insight into the role played by SOM chemical composition in the formation of organo-mineral associations, while neutral sugars composition provided information on mineral associated SOM origin and decomposition processes, as pentoses derive mostly from plant tissues and hexoses are prevalently of microbial origin. Soil samples were collected from two adjacent fields, from the 0-10 cm layer, in November 2011 (T0). For 13 years before the beginning of the experiment, one soil was cultivated mostly with alfalfa (ALF), while a conventional cereal-sunflower-legume rotation (CON) was carried out on the other. Winter wheat and chickpea were sown on the two soils during the following 2 growing seasons and the sampling was repeated after 18 months (T1). A combination of aggregates size and density fractionation was used to isolate OM associated with mineral particles in: macro-aggregates (>212 μm), micro-aggregates (<200 μm, > 63 μm) and silt and clay size particles (<63 μm). For every fraction, OC and N contents were measured by means of elemental analysis, while the content of the following neutral hydrolysable sugar monomers was measured via GC-FID: rhamnose, fucose, ribose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, galactose, glucose. OC and N contents were higher in ALF as compared to CON for every aggregate fraction, both at T0 and T1. During the 18-months cultivation

  12. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation by microbial methane oxidation: Improved determination

    SciTech Connect

    Mahieu, Koenraad . E-mail: Koenraad.Mahieu@Ugent.be; Visscher, Alex De; Vanrolleghem, Peter A.; Cleemput, Oswald Van

    2006-07-01

    Isotope fractionation is a promising tool for quantifying methane oxidation in landfill cover soils. For good quantification an accurate determination of the isotope fractionation factor ({alpha}) of methane oxidation based on independent batch experiments with soil samples from the landfill cover is required. Most studies so far used data analysis methods based on approximations of the Rayleigh model to determine {alpha}. In this study, the two most common approximations were tested, the simplified Rayleigh approach and the Coleman method. To do this, the original model of Rayleigh was described in measurable variables, methane concentration and isotopic abundances, and fitted to batch oxidation data by means of a weighted non-linear errors-in-variables regression technique. The results of this technique were used as a benchmark to which the results of the two conventional approximations were compared. Three types of batch data were used: simulated data, data obtained from the literature, and data obtained from new batch experiments conducted in our laboratory. The Coleman approximation was shown to be acceptable but not recommended for carbon fractionation (error on {alpha} - 1 up to 5%) and unacceptable for hydrogen fractionation (error up to 20%). The difference between the simplified Rayleigh approach and the exact Rayleigh model is much smaller for both carbon and hydrogen fractionation (error on {alpha} - 1 < 0.05%). There is also a small difference when errors in both variables (methane concentration and isotope abundance) are accounted for instead of assuming an error-free independent variable. By means of theoretical calculations general criteria, not limited to methane, {sup 13}C, or D, were developed for the validity of the simplified Rayleigh approach when using labelled compounds.

  13. Effects of USDA beef quality grade and cooking on fatty acid composition of neutral and polar lipid fractions.

    PubMed

    Legako, J F; Dinh, T T N; Miller, M F; Brooks, J C

    2015-02-01

    The effects of USDA beef quality grade (QG; Prime, Low Choice, and Standard; n=8) and cooking (RC) on fatty acid (FA) concentrations (mg/g dry matter) and percentages of neutral and polar lipid fractions (NL and PL, respectively)from strip steaks were explored. An increase in QG led to an accumulation of most FA, especially in the NL fraction (P < 0.001). Common effects on FA percentages were two-way interactions of either QG or RC with LF (P ≤ 0.019). Fatty acids were affected differently by QG and RC depending on their originating LF. Monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) percentages of the PL were dependent on QG (P ≤ 0.014). Cooking and QG had minimal impact on FA percentages of the NL, however, greatly influenced PL MUFA and PUFA percentages (P b 0.001). There was evidence indicating that dry heat cookery affected not only PUFA, as generally thought, but also the MUFA of PL fraction.

  14. Observation of Fractional Stokes-Einstein Behavior in the Simplest Hydrogen-bonded Liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Herwig, Kenneth W; Molaison, Jamie J; Fernandez-Alonso, F.; Bermejo, F. J.; Turner, John F. C.; McLain, Sylvia E.

    2007-01-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to investigate the single-particle dynamics of hydrogen fluoride across its entire liquid range at ambient pressure. For T > 230 K, translational diffusion obeys the celebrated Stokes-Einstein relation, in agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance studies. At lower temperatures, we find significant deviations from the above behavior in the form of a power law with exponent xi = -0.71+/-0.05. More striking than the above is a complete breakdown of the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relation for rotational diffusion. Our findings provide the first experimental verification of fractional Stokes-Einstein behavior in a hydrogen-bonded liquid, in agreement with recent computer simulations.

  15. Observation of fractional Stokes-Einstein behavior in the simplest hydrogen-bonded liquid.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Alonso, F; Bermejo, F J; McLain, S E; Turner, J F C; Molaison, J J; Herwig, K W

    2007-02-16

    Quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to investigate the single-particle dynamics of hydrogen fluoride across its entire liquid range at ambient pressure. For T>230 K, translational diffusion obeys the celebrated Stokes-Einstein relation, in agreement with nuclear magnetic resonance studies. At lower temperatures, we find significant deviations from the above behavior in the form of a power law with exponent xi=-0.71+/-0.05. More striking than the above is a complete breakdown of the Debye-Stokes-Einstein relation for rotational diffusion. Our findings provide the first experimental verification of fractional Stokes-Einstein behavior in a hydrogen-bonded liquid, in agreement with recent computer simulations [S. R. Becker, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 055901 (2006)10.1103/PhysRevLett.97.055901].

  16. Modeling the neutral hydrogen distribution in the post-reionization Universe: intensity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Datta, Kanan K.; Choudhury, T. Roy E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it E-mail: tirth@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2014-09-01

    We model the distribution of neutral hydrogen (HI) in the post-reionization era and investigate its detectability in 21 cm intensity mapping with future radio telescopes like the Square Kilometer array (SKA). We rely on high resolution hydrodynamical N-body simulations that have a state-of-the-art treatment of the low density photoionized gas in the inter-galactic medium (IGM). The HI is assigned a-posteriori to the gas particles following two different approaches: a halo-based method in which HI is assigned only to gas particles residing within dark matter halos; a particle-based method that assigns HI to all gas particles using a prescription based on the physical properties of the particles. The HI statistical properties are then compared to the observational properties of Damped Lyman-α Absorbers (DLAs) and of lower column density systems and reasonable good agreement is found for all the cases. Among the halo-based method, we further consider two different schemes that aim at reproducing the observed properties of DLAs by distributing HI inside halos: one of this results in a much higher bias for DLAs, in agreement with recent observations, which boosts the 21 cm power spectrum by a factor ∼ 4 with respect to the other recipe. Furthermore, we quantify the contribution of HI in the diffuse IGM to both Ω{sub HI} and the HI power spectrum finding to be subdominant in both cases. We compute the 21 cm power spectrum from the simulated HI distribution and calculate the expected signal for both SKA1-mid and SKA1-low configurations at 2.4 ≤ z ≤ 4. We find that SKA will be able to detect the 21 cm power spectrum, in the non-linear regime, up to k ∼ 1 h/Mpc for SKA1-mid and k ∼ 5 h/Mpc for SKA1-low with 100 hours of observations. We also investigate the perspective of imaging the HI distribution. Our findings indicate that SKA1-low could detect the most massive HI peaks with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) higher than 5 for an observation time of about 1000

  17. Neutral Hydrogen in the Local Group and around the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Spencer A.

    Galaxies in our universe must acquire fresh gas to continue forming new stars. A likely source of this material may be the gas that resides between galaxies. We do not, however, have a clear understanding of the specifics, such as its distribution. The first claimed detection of this "cosmic web" of material directly in emission was published a decade ago using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the Netherlands while surveying neutral hydrogen in the Local Group of galaxies. Later evidence, in the form of stellar surveys and test particle simulations, showed that a tidal origin of the gas was another possibility. More recent survey work of the Local Group, specifically between the galaxies M31 and M33, motivated us to map a section of the Westerbork emission using the Robert C . Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). Our survey covers a 12 square degree area between M31 and M33, in which we reach 21 cm column density sensitivities of 1017.2 cm-2 after 400 hours of observations. These observations provide more than a factor of five better spatial resolution, and better than a factor of three in velocity resolution. Not only do we confirm the emission seen in the Westerbork data, we find that the hydrogen gas is composed of clouds a few kiloparsecs across, with properties suggesting they are a unique population to the Local Group. We conclude that the clouds are likely transient condensations from an intergalactic filament of gas, although a tidal feature cannot currently be ruled out. We also conducted GBT pointings to the northwest of M31 to search for the extended emission seen in the Westerbork data as well. What detections we find appear to be more related to the high velocity cloud population of M31. We are continuing to map other regions around M31 to search for more diffuse emission. We also present southern sky maps of the high velocity and intermediate velocity clouds around our own Milky Way, using 21 cm survey data from the Parkes telescope in

  18. Aluminium recovery vs. hydrogen production as resource recovery options for fine MSWI bottom ash fraction.

    PubMed

    Biganzoli, Laura; Ilyas, Aamir; Praagh, Martijn van; Persson, Kenneth M; Grosso, Mario

    2013-05-01

    Waste incineration bottom ash fine fraction contains a significant amount of aluminium, but previous works have shown that current recovery options based on standard on-step Eddy Current Separation (ECS) have limited efficiency. In this paper, we evaluated the improvement in the efficiency of ECS by using an additional step of crushing and sieving. The efficiency of metallic Al recovery was quantified by measuring hydrogen gas production. The ash samples were also tested for total aluminium content with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). As an alternative to material recovery, we also investigated the possibility to convert residual metallic Al into useful energy, promoting H2 gas production by reacting metallic Al with water at high pH. The results show that the total aluminium concentration in the <4 mm bottom ash fraction is on average 8% of the weight of the dry ash, with less than 15% of it being present in the metallic form. Of this latter, only 21% can be potentially recovered with ECS combined with crushing and sieving stages and subsequently recycled. For hydrogen production, using 10MNaOH at 1L/S ratio results in the release of 6-11l of H2 gas for each kilogram of fine dry ash, equivalent to an energy potential of 118 kJ.

  19. Deflection of the Interstellar Neutral Hydrogen Flow Across the Heliospheric Interface: an Interstellar Magnetic Compass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallement, R.; Eric, Q.; Jean-Loup, B.; Dimitra, K.; Risto, P.

    2005-05-01

    Analyses of SOHO-SWAN observations show that the interstellar neutral H flow direction differs by about 4 degrees from the neutral He flow direction recently derived with an unprecedented accuracy using combined data sets (Mobius et al, 2004). The most likely explanation is a distortion of the heliospheric interface under the action of an inclined interstellar magnetic field, with imprints of the distorsion on the neutral H flow due to charge-transfer reactions between H atoms and ions. The direction of the ambient interstellar magnetic field and the heliospheric shape can be derived from the observed deviation. Implications for Voyager trajectories are discussed.

  20. Hydrogen isotope fractionation and redox-controlled solution mechanisms in silicate-COH melt + fluid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysen, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    The behavior of volatiles in silicate-COH melts and fluids and hydrogen isotope fractionation between melt and fluid were determined experimentally to advance our understanding of the role of volatiles in magmatic processes. Experiments were conducted in situ while the samples were at the desired temperature and pressure to 825°C and ~1.6 GPa and with variable redox conditions. Under oxidizing conditions, melt and fluid comprised CO2, CO3, HCO3, OH, H2O, and silicate components, whereas under reducing conditions, the species were CH4, H2, H2O, and silicate components. Temperature-dependent hydrogen isotope exchange among structural entities within coexisting fluids and melts yields ΔH values near 14 and 24 kJ/mol and -5 and -1 kJ/mol under oxidizing and reducing conditions, respectively. This temperature (and probably pressure)-dependent D/H fractionation is because of interaction between D and H and silicate and C-bearing species in silicate-saturated fluids and in COH fluid-saturated melts. The temperature- and pressure-dependent D/H fractionation factors suggest that partial melts in the presence of COH volatiles in the upper mantle can have δD values 100% or more lighter relative to coexisting silicate-saturated fluid. This effect is greater under oxidizing than under reducing conditions. It is suggested that δD variations of upper mantle mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) sources, inferred from the δD of MORB magmatic rocks, can be explained by variations in redox conditions during melting. Lower δD values of the MORB magma reflect more reducing conditions in the mantle source.

  1. Neutral redox-active hydrogen- and halogen-bonding [2]rotaxanes for the electrochemical sensing of chloride.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason Y C; Cunningham, Matthew J; Davis, Jason J; Beer, Paul D

    2014-12-14

    The first examples of redox-active ferrocene-functionalised neutral [2]rotaxanes have been synthesised via chloride anion templation. (1)H NMR spectroscopic titrations reveal that these [2]rotaxane host systems recognize chloride selectively over other halides and oxoanions in highly-competitive aqueous media. By replacing the hydrogen bonding prototriazole units of the rotaxane axle component with iodotriazole halogen bond-donor groups, the degree of chloride selectivity of the [2]rotaxanes is modulated. Electrochemical voltammetric experiments demonstrate that the rotaxanes can sense chloride via cathodic perturbations of the respective rotaxanes' ferrocene-ferrocenium redox-couple upon anion addition.

  2. Fractionation of terrestrial neon by hydrodynamic hydrogen escape from ancient steam atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahnle, K.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric neon is isotopically heavier than mantle neon. By contrast, nonradiogenic mantle Ar, Kr, and Xe are not known to differ from the atmosphere. These observations are most easily explained by selective neon loss to space; however, neon is much too massive to escape from the modern atmosphere. Steam atmospheres are a likely, if intermittent, feature of the accreting Earth. They occur because, on average, the energy liberated during accretion places Earth above the runaway greenhouse threshold, so that liquid water is not stable at the surface. It is found that steam atmospheres should have lasted some ten to fifty million years. Hydrogen escape would have been vigorous, but abundant heavy constituents would have been retained. There is no lack of plausible candidates; CO2, N2, or CO could all suffice. Neon can escape because it is less massive than any of the likely pollutants. Neon fractionation would have been a natural byproduct. Assuming that the initial Ne-20/Ne-22 ratio was solar, it was found that it would have taken some ten million years to effect the observed neon fractionation in a 30 bar steam atmosphere fouled with 10 bars of CO. Thicker atmospheres would have taken longer; less CO, shorter. This mechanism for fractionating neon has about the right level of efficiency. Because the lighter isotope escapes much more readily, total neon loss is pretty minimal; less than half of the initial neon endowment escapes.

  3. Assessing carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of diesel fuel n-alkanes during progressive evaporation.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Syahidah A; Hayman, Alan R; Van Hale, Robert; Frew, Russell D

    2015-01-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis offers potential for fingerprinting of diesel fuels, however, possible confounding effects of isotopic fractionation due to evaporation need to be assessed. This study measured the fractionation of the stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes in n-alkane compounds in neat diesel fuel during evaporation. Isotope ratios were measured using a continuous flow gas chromatograph/isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Diesel samples were progressively evaporated at 24 ± 2°C for 21 days. Increasing depletion of deuterium in nC12-nC17 alkanes in the remaining liquid with increasing carbon chain length was observed. Negligible carbon isotope fractionation was observed. Preferential vaporization was measured for the shorter chain n-alkanes and the trend decreased with increasing chain length. The decrease in δ(2) H values indicates the preferential vaporization of the isotopically heavier species consistent with available quantitative data for hydrocarbons. These results are most important in the application of stable isotope technology to forensic analysis of diesel.

  4. Influence of salinity on hydrogen isotope fractionation in Rhizophora mangroves from Micronesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, S. Nemiah; Sachs, Julian P.

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios (2H/1H or δ2H) of plant leaf waxes typically covary with those of precipitation, and are therefore used as a proxy for past hydrologic variability. Mangroves present an important exception to this relationship, as salinity can strongly influence 2H fractionation in leaf lipids. To better understand and calibrate this effect, δ2H values of taraxerol and n-alkanes were measured in the leaves of Rhizophora spp. (red mangroves) from three estuaries and four brackish lakes on the Micronesian islands of Pohnpei and Palau, and compared to the δ2H and δ18O values of leaf water, xylem water and surface water. Net 2H discrimination between surface water and taraxerol increased by 0.9 ± 0.2‰ per part per thousand (ppt-1) over a salinity range of 1-34 ppt. Xylem water was always depleted in 2H relative to surface water, and the magnitude of this depletion increased with salinity, which is most likely due to a combination of greater 2H discrimination by roots during water uptake and opportunistic use of freshwater. Changes in the 2H content of xylem water can account for up to 43% of the change in net taraxerol fractionation with salinity. Leaf water isotopes were minimally enriched relative to xylem water and there was not significant variability in leaf water enrichment with salinity, which is consistent with a Péclet-modified Craig-Gordon model of leaf water enrichment. As leaf water enrichment is therefore unlikely to be responsible for increased 2H/1H fractionation in mangrove leaf lipids at elevated salinities, the majority of this signal is most likely explained either by changes in biosynthetic fractionation in response to salt stress or by salinity influenced changes in the timing of water uptake and lipid synthesis.

  5. Photochemical production of hydrogen peroxide in size-fractionated Southern California coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Clark, Catherine D; De Bruyn, Warren J; Jones, Joshua G

    2009-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) photochemical production was measured in bulk and size-fractionated surf zone and source waters (Orange County, California, USA). Post-irradiation (60 min; 300 W ozone-free xenon lamp), maximum H(2)O(2) concentrations were approximately 10000 nM (source) and approximately 1500 nM (surf zone). Average initial hydrogen peroxide production rates (HPPR) were higher in bulk source waters (11+/-7.0 nM s(-1)) than the surf zone (2.5+/-1 nM s(-1)). A linear relationship was observed between non-purgeable dissolved organic carbon and absorbance coefficient (m(-1) (300 nm)). HPPR increased with increasing absorbance coefficient for bulk and size-fractionated source waters, consistent with photochemical production from CDOM. However, HPPR varied significantly (5x) for surf zone samples with the same absorbance coefficients, even though optical properties suggested CDOM from salt marsh source waters dominates the surf zone. To compare samples with varying CDOM levels, apparent quantum yields (Phi) for H(2)O(2) photochemical production were calculated. Source waters showed no significant difference in Phi between bulk, large (>1000 Da (>1 kDa)) and small (<1 kDa) size fractions, suggesting H(2)O(2) production efficiency is homogeneously distributed across CDOM size. However, surf zone waters had significantly higher Phi than source (bulk 0.086+/-0.04 vs. 0.034+/-0.013; <1 kDa 0.183+/-0.012 vs. 0.027+/-0.018; >1 kDa 0.151+/-0.090 vs. 0.016+/-0.009), suggesting additional production from non-CDOM sources. H(2)O(2) photochemical production was significant for intertidal beach sand and senescent kelp (sunlight; approximately 42 nM h(-1) vs. approximately 5 nM h(-1)), on the order of CDOM production rates previously measured in coastal and oceanic waters. This is the first study of H(2)O(2) photochemical production in size-fractionated coastal waters showing significant production from non-CDOM sources in the surf zone.

  6. Analysis of heavy oils: Method development and application to Cerro Negro heavy petroleum: Preliminary separation and analysis of acid, base, saturate, and neutral-aromatic fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.B.; Sturm, G.P. Jr.; Reynolds, J.W.; Thomson, J.S.; Yu, S.K-T.; Grigsby, R.D.; Tang, S.Y.; Shay, J.Y.; Hirsch, D.E.; Sanchez, V.

    1988-10-01

    Cerro Negro 200-425/degree/, 425-550/degree/, and 550-700/degree/C distillates and >700/degree/C residue were separated into acid, base, and neutral concentrates using an improved nonaqueous ion exchange liquid chromatographic procedure. Neutral concentrates were further separated into neutral aromatic and saturated hydrocarbon fractions. A dual column, normal phase high performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the saturate-aromatic separation. Mass and elemental balances are given for separations of all distillates and the residue. In addition, fractions from the 200-425/degree/C and 425-550/degree/C distillates were analyzed by high resolution mass spectrometry. The applicability of published separation approaches and methods to heavy oil analysis is critically reviewed; the bulk of the available methodology developed for conventional petroleum and synfuels was found to be unproven or unsuitable for heavy oil analysis. Cerro Negro was found to contain 18.2 weight percent acids, 17.6 weight percent bases, 46.9 weight percent neutral aromatics, and 14.7 weight percent saturated hydrocarbons. Saturate fractions contained predominantly cycloparaffins, neutral-aromatics were largely comprised of aromatic hydrocarbons and sulfur compounds, bases were largely nitrogen-containing compounds, and acids were mostly oxygen-containing compounds and nitrogen compounds of pyrrolic type. 145 refs., 24 figs., 21 tabs.

  7. Neutral dissociation of hydrogen following photoexcitation of HCl at the chlorine K edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.L.; Arrasate, M.E.; Martin, R.; Vanderford, B.; Lindle, D.W.; Cotter, J.; Neill, P.; Fisher, G.R.; Perera, R.C.; Leung, K.T.; Levin, J.C.; Sellin, I.A.; Simon, M.; Simon, M.; Uehara, Y.; Whitfield, S.B.

    1998-04-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectroscopy was used to study the relaxation dynamics of HCl following photoexcitation in the vicinity of the Cl K edge ({approximately}2.8keV) using monochromatic synchrotron radiation. At the lowest resonant excitation to the 6{sigma}{sup {asterisk}} antibonding orbital, almost half of the excited molecules decay by emission of a neutral H atom, mostly in coincidence with a highly charged Cl{sup n+} ion. The present work demonstrates that neutral-atom emission can be a significant decay channel for excited states with very short lifetimes (1 fs). {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Jarosite-water oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionations: preliminary experimental data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, R.O.; Stoffregen, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Stable isotope studies of alunite have added a powerful tool for understanding geochemical processes in the surficial environment. Jarosite [KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6], like alunite, is a common mineral in the weathered portions of many sulfide-bearing ore deposits and mine drainages where its formation reflects acidic conditions produced by the oxidation of sulfides. This paper describes oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionations in jarosite-water experiments over a temperature range of 100?? to 250??C and the extrapolation of the results to surface conditions. It also includes some general observations on the exchange reaction mechanism that are important for evaluating how well natural samples of jarosite retain primary isotopic compositions. -from Authors

  9. Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation during nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation by Methylomirabilis oxyfera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasigraf, Olivia; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Ettwig, Katharina F.

    2012-07-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane coupled to nitrite reduction is a recently discovered methane sink of as yet unknown global significance. The bacteria that have been identified to carry out this process, Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera, oxidize methane via the known aerobic pathway involving the monooxygenase reaction. In contrast to aerobic methanotrophs, oxygen is produced intracellularly and used for the activation of methane by a phylogenetically distinct particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Here we report the fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen during methane oxidation by an enrichment culture of M. oxyfera bacteria. In two separate batch incubation experiments with different absolute biomass and methane contents, the specific methanotrophic activity was similar and the progressive isotope enrichment identical. Headspace methane was consumed up to 98% with rates showing typical first order reaction kinetics. The enrichment factors determined by Rayleigh equations were -29.2 ± 2.6‰ for δ13C (εC) and -227.6 ± 13.5‰ for δ2H (εH), respectively. These enrichment factors were in the upper range of values reported so far for aerobic methanotrophs. In addition, two-dimensional specific isotope analysis (Λ = ( α H - 1 - 1)/( α C - 1 - 1)) was performed and also the determined Λ value of 9.8 was within the range determined for other aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs. The results showed that in contrast to abiotic processes biological methane oxidation exhibits a narrow range of fractionation factors for carbon and hydrogen irrespective of the underlying biochemical mechanisms. This work will therefore facilitate the correct interpretation of isotopic composition of atmospheric methane with implications for modeling of global carbon fluxes.

  10. Adsorption of charged and neutral polymer chains on silica surfaces: The role of electrostatics, volume exclusion, and hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruijt, Evan; Biesheuvel, P. M.; de Vos, Wiebe M.

    2015-01-01

    We develop an off-lattice (continuum) model to describe the adsorption of neutral polymer chains and polyelectrolytes to surfaces. Our continuum description allows taking excluded volume interactions between polymer chains and ions directly into account. To implement those interactions, we use a modified hard-sphere equation of state, adapted for mixtures of connected beads. Our model is applicable to neutral, charged, and ionizable surfaces and polymer chains alike and accounts for polarizability effects of the adsorbed layer and chemical interactions between polymer chains and the surface. We compare our model predictions to data of a classical system for polymer adsorption: neutral poly(N -vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) on silica surfaces. The model shows that PVP adsorption on silica is driven by surface hydrogen bonding with an effective maximum binding energy of about 1.3 kBT per PVP segment at low p H . As the p H increases, the Si-OH groups become increasingly dissociated, leading to a lower capacity for H bonding and simultaneous counterion accumulation and volume exclusion close to the surface. Together these effects result in a characteristic adsorption isotherm, with the adsorbed amount dropping sharply at a critical p H . Using this model for adsorption data on silica surfaces cleaned by either a piranha solution or an O2 plasma, we find that the former have a significantly higher density of silanol groups.

  11. Platelets can neutralize hydrogen peroxide in an acute toxicity model with cells involved in granulation tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Kandler, Barbara; Maitz, Philipp; Fischer, Michael B; Watzek, Georg; Gruber, Reinhard

    2005-04-01

    Platelets play a key role in the replacement of the blood clot with granulation tissue during the early steps of bone regeneration. We hypothesized that activated platelets can neutralize locally produced reactive oxygen species, thereby protecting cells involved in granulation tissue formation. The potential of platelet-released supernatant (PRS) to neutralize hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was tested in an acute toxicity model with osteogenic, inflammatory, and endothelial cells. In the human fetal osteoblastic cell line 1.19 (hFOB), considerable morphological changes, cell shedding, and dysfunction of the respiratory chain were observed when cells were exposed to 3 mM H(2)O(2). Caspase-3 and poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase were not activated, suggesting that cell death occurred by necrosis. Preincubation of osteogenic cells, leukocytes, or endothelial cells with PRS decreased the acute toxicity of H(2)O(2). The capacity of platelets to release H(2)O(2)-detoxifying activity was retained for up to 72 h. Aminotriazole, an inhibitor of catalase, decreased the cytoprotective activity of PRS, whereas blocking of glutathione peroxidase by mercaptosuccinate had no effect. These results suggest that platelet-released catalase can rapidly neutralize cytotoxic amounts of H(2)O(2), a process that may play a role during the early stages of bone regeneration.

  12. Precipitation of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms at Arecibo during a magnetic storm

    SciTech Connect

    Tinsely, B.A.; Burnside, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    The production of ionization at upper E region levels at Arecibo and other low latitude sites during magnetic storms had been previously found to be associated with a few rayleighs of N/sub 2/ /sup +/4278A emission, but it had not been possible to decide between energetic electrons, ions or neutrals as the primary particles involved.

  13. Neutralization and Acid Dissociation of Hydrogen Carbonate Ion: A Thermochemical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koga, Nobuyoshi; Shigedomi, Kana; Kimura, Tomoyasu; Tatsuoka, Tomoyuki; Mishima, Saki

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory inquiry into the thermochemical relationships in the reaction between aqueous solutions of NaHCO[subscript 3] and NaOH is described. The enthalpy change for this reaction, delta[subscript r]H, and that for neutralization of strong acid and NaOH(aq), delta[subscript n]H, are determined calorimetrically; the explanation for the…

  14. Neutralizer options for high energy H/sup -/ beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.H.

    1986-10-01

    A neutralizer converts a negative ion beam into a neutral beam, but it also increases the beamline cost, weight and size while reducing its output power, efficiency and possibly the reliability of the entire system. In addition it scatters the newly formed neutrals, altering the beam current density distribution, causing the beam divergence to get larger and the brightness to go down. In the following, the role of neutralizers for hydrogen ion beams is reviewed, and the problems encountered over a range of beam energies are discussed. Consideration is given to enhancing the goals of the neutral beam application, be they the highest neutral fraction, optimum overall efficiency or maximum beam brightness, etc.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Atlas of Galactic Neutral Hydrogen (Hartmann+, 1997)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, D.; Burton, W. B.

    1999-04-01

    " subdirectory. In addition to the 721 (b,v) FITS files, there is an (l,b) FITS image named TOTAL_HI.FIT, which contains the integrated intensity map over the velocity range -450 km/s <= V_lsr <= +400 km/s. The map units are in [K.km/s] and the FITS header contains comments regarding the conversion to column densities. Included as a visual aid is the GIF image file total_hi.gif, which depicts the velocity-integrated map. The data were originally distributed on a CD-ROM enclosed with the Atlas of Galactic Neutral Hydrogen (reference given above). The CD also contains animations of velocity slices through the data cube. (1 data file).

  16. Seasonal Variations in the Biochemical Fractionation of Hydrogen Isotopes by Spartina alterniflora.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sessions, A. L.

    2005-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios (D/H) of lipids are being intensively explored as a paleoenvironmental proxy, particularly for continental regimes where organic preservation in lakes is generally high. Several studies have already shown good correlations between δD values of lake water and sedimentary (core-top) lipids, but the fractionations indicated by those correlations do not agree well between studies. Moreover, the data cannot be adequately described by a single biochemical fractionation. These difficulties suggest that the relationship between environmental water and plant lipid δD is controlled by multiple environmental and biochemical factors. Understanding these factors will lead to a more robust interpretation of D/H as a paleoclimate proxy. Here we examine seasonal changes in biochemical H-isotopic fractionation by the salt marsh grass Spartina alterniflora. Because S. alterniflora grows partially submerged in a tidal estuary, it has an unlimited and isotopically unvarying source of water for growth. Thus environmental influences on fractionation should be negligible, allowing us to examine seasonal changes in biochemical fractionations. C27 and C29 n-alkanes, β-sitosterol, phytol, and C16 and C18 fatty acids were extracted and analyzed from 35 samples of S. alterniflora harvested from the same location over a period of 18 months. All lipids except β-sitosterol exhibit statistically significant depletions of D during summer months relative to the rest of the year. The magnitude of the isotopic shift is up to 36‰ in the fatty acids (δD values from -130 to -166‰), 31‰ in n-alkanes (-161 to -192‰), and 24‰ in phytol (-252 to -276‰). The shift in D/H ratio is in the opposite direction from that expected due to increased evapotranspiration during the summer months. The largest D-depletions coincide with periods of maximal growth. The observed pattern is interpreted as resulting from increased use of stored carbohydrates as substrates for lipid

  17. Investigation of the hydrogen neutrals in a discharge source used for production of metal hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhinova, I.; Iordanova, S.; Pashov, A.

    2016-03-01

    The paper discusses the possible mechanisms for production of metal hydrides (MH) in a DC discharge source. The results of different experiments suggest that the molecules are sputtered directly from the surface of the cathode, where they are formed after adsorption of atomic hydrogen. This hypothesis allows one to understand the operation of the source studied and to optimize its working conditions.

  18. Supramolecular structure of enterobacterial wild-type lipopolysaccharides (LPS), fractions thereof, and their neutralization by Pep19-2.5.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Klaus; Heinbockel, Lena; Correa, Wilmar; Fukuoka, Satoshi; Gutsmann, Thomas; Zähringer, Ulrich; Koch, Michel H J

    2016-04-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) belong to the strongest immune-modulating compounds known in nature, and are often described as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In particular, at higher concentrations they are responsible for sepsis and the septic shock syndrome associated with high lethality. Since most data are indicative that LPS aggregates are the bioactive units, their supramolecular structures are considered to be of outmost relevance for deciphering the molecular mechanisms of its bioactivity. So far, however, most of the data available addressing this issue, were published only for the lipid part (lipid A) and the core-oligosaccharide containing rough LPS, representing the bioactive unit. By contrast, it is well known that most of the LPS specimen identified in natural habitats contain the smooth-form (S-form) LPS, which carry additionally a high-molecular polysaccharide (O-chain). To fill this lacuna and going into a more natural system, here various wild-type (smooth form) LPS including also some LPS fractions were investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering with synchrotron radiation to analyze their aggregate structure. Furthermore, the influence of a recently designed synthetic anti-LPS peptide (SALP) Pep19-2.5 on the aggregate structure, on the binding thermodynamics, and on the cytokine-inducing activity of LPS were characterized, showing defined aggregate changes, high affinity binding and inhibition of cytokine secretion. The data obtained are suitable to refine our view on the preferences of LPS for non-lamellar structures, representing the highest bioactive forms which can be significantly influenced by the binding with neutralizing peptides such as Pep19-2.5.

  19. Renewable Hydrogen Carrier - Carbohydrate: Constructing the Carbon-Neutral Carbohydrate Economy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-31

    shortening phosphorylation reaction for producing glucose-1-phosphate (G-1-P) catalyzed by glucan phosphorylase (Equation 2); (ii) generation of...hydrogen from starch (b) [40] or soluble cellodextrin (c) [39]. The enzymes are: GNP, glucan phosphorylase; PGM, phosphoglucomutase; G6PDH, G-6-P...Rollin, J.; Zhang, Y.-H.P. Thermophilic α- glucan phosphorylase from Clostridium thermocellum: Cloning, Characterization and Enhanced thermostability

  20. Biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation during biosynthesis in higher plants reflects carbon metabolism of the plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cormier, Marc-André; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-04-01

    Compound-specific isotope analyses of plant material are frequently applied to understand the response of plants to the environmental changes. As it is generally assume that the main factors controlling δ2H values in plants are the plant's source water and evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water, hydrogen isotope analyses of plant material are mainly applied regarding hydrological conditions at different time scales. However, only few studies have directly addressed the variability of the biochemical hydrogen isotope fractionation occurring during biosynthesis of organic compounds (ɛbio), accounting also for a large part in the δ2H values of plants but generally assumed to be constant. Here we present the results from a climate-controlled growth chambers experiment where tested the sensitivity of ɛbio to different light treatments. The different light treatments were applied to induce different metabolic status (autotrophic vs. heterotrophic) in 9 different plant species that we grew from large storage organs (e.g. tubers or roots). The results show a systematic ɛbio shift (up to 80 ) between the different light treatments for different compounds (i.e. long chain n-alkanes and cellulose). We suggest that this shift is due to the different NADPH pools used by the plants to build up the compounds from stored carbohydrates in heterotrophic or autotrophic conditions. Our results have important implications for the calibration and interpretation of sedimentary and tree rings records in geological studies. In addition, as the δ2H values reflect also strongly the carbon metabolism of the plant, our findings support the idea of δ2H values as an interesting proxy for plant physiological studies.

  1. Hydrogen apparent fractionation between source water and epicuticular waxes of Pinus sylvestris in North East Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberry, S. L.; Grace, J.; Pedentchouk, N.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrogen isotopic composition of plant biomass provides crucial information about plant ecophysiology and local hydrology. Little is known about the apparent fractionation between hydrogen in source water and epicuticular leaf waxes of coniferous tree species that dominate the boreal forest ecosystem exposed to prolonged periods of sunlight during the growing season. In this study, single rope canopy access techniques were used to harvest needle and twig material from the upper, middle and lower crown of north and south facing branches of Pinus sylvestris within the subarctic forest of North East Finland. Samples were collected towards the beginning of the growing season in July and repeated in late September 2010. Leaf and twig waters were extracted cryogenically and analysed for D-enrichment. Individual n-alkanes are currently being quantified and analyzed for 13C/12C and D/H compositions. The molecular and isotopic data are supplemented by long-term in-situ cuvette photosynthetic assimilation measurements as well as relative humidity (RH), air temperature, precipitation and wind speed data collected by Helsinki University (SMEAR I). In addition RH, air temperature, wind speed and incoming solar radiation measurements were made at each individual sample point at the time of harvesting to quantify meteorological and microclimatological variation within individual trees. The outcome of this investigation will provide important insights into plant biochemistry and physiology of a crucial climate sensitive higher plant species subjected to continuous low light throughout the season. Furthermore, this work will expand our understanding of modern and palaeo-hydrology not only in northern Finland but also in other boreal forests around the world.

  2. Cosmology on ultralarge scales with intensity mapping of the neutral hydrogen 21 cm emission: limits on primordial non-Gaussianity.

    PubMed

    Camera, Stefano; Santos, Mário G; Ferreira, Pedro G; Ferramacho, Luís

    2013-10-25

    The large-scale structure of the Universe supplies crucial information about the physical processes at play at early times. Unresolved maps of the intensity of 21 cm emission from neutral hydrogen HI at redshifts z=/~1-5 are the best hope of accessing the ultralarge-scale information, directly related to the early Universe. A purpose-built HI intensity experiment may be used to detect the large scale effects of primordial non-Gaussianity, placing stringent bounds on different models of inflation. We argue that it may be possible to place tight constraints on the non-Gaussianity parameter f(NL), with an error close to σ(f(NL))~1.

  3. Study of neutral hydrogen transport in LHD core plasmas based on high dynamic-range Balmer-α spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.; The LHD Experiment Group

    2015-06-01

    The radial distributions of the neutral hydrogen atom density and pressure in the large helical device (LHD) and their electron density (ne) dependence were studied. The atom density distribution was determined from a detailed analysis of the intensity-calibrated Balmer-α line profile while the pressure distribution was obtained with a simple one-dimensional analytical model. We determined for the first time the atom density at the centre of a fusion-oriented plasma, which is more than three orders smaller than that at the edge. On the contrary, the atom pressure changes only by a factor of 10 from the edge to core regions. Both the atom density and pressure in the core region have negative ne dependence. The smaller drop of the atom pressure profile and the ne dependence of the atom density were discussed based on the diffusion theory.

  4. Comparable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of plant leaf wax n-alkanoic acids in arid and humid subtropical ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li; Zheng, Mei; Fraser, Matthew; Huang, Yongsong

    2014-02-01

    Leaf wax hydrogen isotope proxies have been widely used to reconstruct past hydrological changes. However, published reconstructions have given little consideration for the potentially variable hydrogen isotopic fractionation relative to precipitation (ɛwax-p) under different climate and environmental settings. Chief among various potential factors controlling fractionation is relative humidity, which is known to strongly affect oxygen isotopic ratios of plant cellulose, but its effect on hydrogen isotopic fractionation of leaf waxes is still ambiguous. Analyses of lake surface sediments and individual modern plants have provided valuable information on the variability of ɛwax-p, but both approaches have significant limitations. Here, we present an alternative method to obtain the integrated, time-resolved ecosystem-level ɛwax-p values, by analyzing modern aerosol samples collected weekly from arid (Arizona lowlands) and humid subtropical (Atlanta, Georgia) environments during the main growth season. Because aerosol samples mainly reflect regional leaf wax resources, the extreme contrast in the hydroclimate and associated vegetation assemblages between our study sites allows us to rigorously assess the impact of relative humidity and associated vegetation assemblages on leaf wax hydrogen isotopic fractionation. We show there is only minor difference (mostly <10‰) in the mean ɛwax-p values in the two end-member environments. One possible explanation is that the positive isotopic effects of low relative humidity are offset by progressive replacement of trees with grasses that have a more negative apparent fractionation. Our results represent an important step toward quantitative interpretation of leaf wax hydrogen isotopic records.

  5. HELIOSPHERIC ENERGETIC NEUTRAL HYDROGEN MEASURED WITH ASPERA-3 AND ASPERA-4

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Kollmann, P.; Brandt, P. C.; Bzowski, M.; Sokół, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Grigoriev, A.; Barabash, S.

    2013-09-20

    We re-analyze the signal of non-planetary energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) in the 0.4-5.0 keV range measured with the Neutral Particle Detector (NPD) of the ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 experiments on board the Mars and Venus Express satellites. Due to improved knowledge of sensor characteristics and exclusion of data sets affected by instrument effects, the typical intensity of the ENA signal obtained by ASPERA-3 is an order of magnitude lower than in earlier reports. The ENA intensities measured with ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 now agree with each other. In the present analysis, we also correct the ENA signal for Compton-Getting and for ionization loss processes under the assumption of a heliospheric origin. We find spectral shapes and intensities consistent with those measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). The principal advantage of ASPERA with respect to the IBEX sensors is the two times better spectral resolution. In this study, we discuss the physical significance of the spectral shapes and their potential variation across the sky. At present, these observations are the only independent test of the heliospheric ENA signal measured with IBEX in this energy range. The ASPERA measurements also allow us to check for a temporal variation of the heliospheric signal as they were obtained between 2003 and 2007, whereas IBEX has been operational since the end of 2008.

  6. Heliospheric Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Measured with ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Kollmann, P.; Brandt, P. C.; Bzowski, M.; Sokół, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Grigoriev, A.; Barabash, S.

    2013-09-01

    We re-analyze the signal of non-planetary energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) in the 0.4-5.0 keV range measured with the Neutral Particle Detector (NPD) of the ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 experiments on board the Mars and Venus Express satellites. Due to improved knowledge of sensor characteristics and exclusion of data sets affected by instrument effects, the typical intensity of the ENA signal obtained by ASPERA-3 is an order of magnitude lower than in earlier reports. The ENA intensities measured with ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 now agree with each other. In the present analysis, we also correct the ENA signal for Compton-Getting and for ionization loss processes under the assumption of a heliospheric origin. We find spectral shapes and intensities consistent with those measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). The principal advantage of ASPERA with respect to the IBEX sensors is the two times better spectral resolution. In this study, we discuss the physical significance of the spectral shapes and their potential variation across the sky. At present, these observations are the only independent test of the heliospheric ENA signal measured with IBEX in this energy range. The ASPERA measurements also allow us to check for a temporal variation of the heliospheric signal as they were obtained between 2003 and 2007, whereas IBEX has been operational since the end of 2008.

  7. Energetic Neutral Hydrogen Atoms from the Heliosphere Measured with ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, André; Wurz, Peter; Kollmann, Peter; Brandt, Pontus C.; Bzowski, Maciej; Sokół, Justyna M.; Kubiak, Marzena A.; Grigoriev, Alexander; Barabash, Stas

    2013-04-01

    We re-analyze a residual signal of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) in the 0.4-5.0 keV range across the sky obtained from the Neutral Particle Detector of the ASPERA-3&4 experiments on board the Mars and Venus Express satellites. Due to improved knowledge of sensor characteristics and exclusion of datasets affected by instrument effects, the typical intensity of the ENA signal obtained by ASPERA-3 is an order of magnitude lower than in earlier reports. The discrepancy between ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 no longer exists. We now also correct the non-planetary signal for Compton-Getting and for ionization loss processes under the assumption of a heliospheric origin of the ENAs. We find spectral shapes and intensities (1×103 cm-2 sr-1 s-1) consistent with those measured by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). The principal advantage of ASPERA-3&4 with respect to the IBEX sensors is the higher spectral resolution. In this presentation we discuss the physical significance of the spectral shapes and their potential variation across the sky. At present, these observations are the only independent confirmation of the heliospheric ENAs measured with IBEX in this energy range. The ASPERA-3&4 measurements also allow to check for a temporal variation of the heliospheric signal as they were obtained between 2003 and 2007, whereas IBEX is operational since the end of 2008.

  8. A Highly Active and Robust Copper-Based Electrocatalyst toward Hydrogen Evolution Reaction with Low Overpotential in Neutral Solution.

    PubMed

    Du, Jialei; Wang, Jianying; Ji, Lvlv; Xu, Xiaoxiang; Chen, Zuofeng

    2016-11-09

    Although significant progress has been made recently, copper-based materials have long been considered to be ineffective catalysts toward the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), in most cases, requiring high overpotentials more than 300 mV. We report here that a Cu(0)-based nanoparticle film electrodeposited in situ from a Cu(II) oxime complex can act as a highly active and robust HER electrocatalyst in neutral phosphate buffer solution. The as-prepared nanoparticle film is of poor crystallization, which incorporates significant amounts of oxime ligand residues and buffer anions PO4(3-). The proposed mechanism suggests that the Cu(0)-based nanoparticle film is activated with incorporated or adsorbed PO4(3-) anions and the PO4(3-) anions-anchored sites might serve as the actual catalytic active sites with efficient proton transport mediators. Catalysis occurs with a low onset overpotential (η) of 65 mV, and a current density of 1 mA/cm(2) can be achieved with η = 120 mV. The nanoparticle film shows an excellent catalytic durability with slightly rising current density during electrolysis, presumably due to further incorporation or adsorption of PO4(3-) anions in the process. This electrocatalyst not only forms in situ from earth-abundant materials but also operates in neutral water with low overpotential and high stability.

  9. Electrocatalytic reaction of hydrogen peroxide and NADH based on poly(neutral red) and FAD hybrid film.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuo Chiang; Lin, Yu Ching; Chen, Shen Ming

    2012-01-07

    A simple method to immobilize poly(neutral red) (PNR) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) hybrid film (PNR/FAD) by cyclic voltammetry is proposed. The PNR/FAD hybrid film can be easily prepared on an electrode surface involving electropolymerization of neutral red (NR) monomers and the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged PNR and the negatively charged FAD. It exhibits electroactive, stable, surface-confined, pH-dependent, nano-sized, and compatible properties. It provides good electrocatalytic properties to various species. It shows a sensitivity of 5.4 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) and 21.5 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) for hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) with the linear range of 0.1 μM-39 mM and 5 × 10(-5) to 2.5 × 10(-4) M, respectively. It shows another linear range of 48.8-355.5 mM with the sensitivity of 12.3 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) for H(2)O(2). In particular, the PNR/FAD hybrid film has potential to replace some hemoproteins to be a cathode of biofuel cells and provide the biosensing system for glucose and ethanol.

  10. Absorption of infrared radiation by electrons in the field of a neutral hydrogen atom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical expression for the absorption coefficient is developed from a relationship between the cross-section for inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and the cross-section for electron-atom momentum transfer; it is accurate for those photon frequencies v and temperatures such that hv/kT is small. The determination of the absorption of infrared radiation by free-free transitions of the negative hydrogen ion has been extended to higher temperatures. A simple analytical expression for the absorption coefficient has been derived.

  11. The fractionation factors of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios for VOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, H.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are important precursors of ozone and secondary organic aerosols in the atmosphere, some of which are carcinogenic, teratogenic, or mutagenic. VOCs in ambient air originate from many sources, including vehicle exhausts, gasoline evaporation, solvent use, natural gas emissions, and industrial processes, and undergo intricate chemical reactions in the atmosphere. To develop efficient air pollution remediation strategies, it is important to clearly identify the emission sources and elucidate the reaction mechanisms in the atmosphere. Recently, stable carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of VOCs in some sources and ambient air have been measured by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS). In this study, we measured δ13C and stable hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) of atmospheric VOCs by using the gas chromatography/thermal conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry coupled with a thermal desorption instrument (TD-GC/TC/IRMS). The wider δD differences between sources were found in comparison with the δ13C studies. Therefore, determining δD values of VOCs in ambient air is potentially useful in identifying VOC sources and their reactive behavior in the atmosphere. However, to elucidate the sources and behavior of atmospheric VOCs more accurately, isotopic fractionation during atmospheric reaction must be considered. In this study, we determined isotopic fractionation of the δ13C and δD values for the atmospheric some VOCs under irradiation conditions. As the results, δ13C for target all VOCs and δD for most VOCs were increasing after irradiation. But, the δD values for both benzene and toluene tended to decrease as irradiation time increased. We also estimated the fractionation factors for benzene and toluene, 1.27 and 1.05, respectively, which differed from values determined in previous studies. In summary, we were able to identify an inverse isotope effect for the δD values of benzene and toluene

  12. Fractionation of sulfur and hydrogen isotopes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris with perturbed DsrC expression.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, William D; Venceslau, Sofia S; Pereira, Inês A C; Johnston, David T; Bradley, Alexander S

    2016-10-01

    Dissimilatory sulfate reduction is the central microbial metabolism in global sulfur cycling. Understanding the importance of sulfate reduction to Earth's biogeochemical S cycle requires aggregating single-cell processes with geochemical signals. For sulfate reduction, these signals include the ratio of stable sulfur isotopes preserved in minerals, as well as the hydrogen isotope ratios and structures of microbial membrane lipids preserved in organic matter. In this study, we cultivated the model sulfate reducer, Desulfovibrio vulgaris DSM 644(T), to investigate how these parameters were perturbed by changes in expression of the protein DsrC. DsrC is critical to the final metabolic step in sulfate reduction to sulfide. S and H isotopic fractionation imposed by the wild type was compared to three mutants. Discrimination against (34)S in sulfate, as calculated from the residual reactant, did not discernibly differ among all strains. However, a closed-system sulfur isotope distillation model, based on accumulated sulfide, produced inconsistent results in one mutant strain IPFG09. Lipids produced by IPFG09 were also slightly enriched in (2)H. These results suggest that DsrC alone does not have a major impact on sulfate-S, though may influence sulfide-S and lipid-H isotopic compositions. While intriguing, a mechanistic explanation requires further study under continuous culture conditions.

  13. Probing the molecular hydrogen fraction in diffuse molecular clouds with observations of HCl+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, David

    Using the GREAT instrument, we will observe the Doublet Pi 3/2 J = 5/2 - 3/2 transitions of the H-37Cl+ and (where not already observed in Cycle 4) the H-35Cl+ molecular ions at 1.442 and 1.444 THz, in absorption, toward the bright continuum sources Sgr B2 (M), W31C (G10.6-0.4), W49N, and W51. The observations will yield robust estimates of the HCl+ column densities in diffuse clouds lying along the sight-lines to those sources. Because HCl+ reacts rapidly and exothermically with H2 to yield H2Cl+, the abundance ratio HCl+/H2Cl+ is sensitive to the H2 abundance in the interstellar gas; combining the HCl+ measurements with ones already available for H2Cl+ will thus permit independent estimates of the molecular hydrogen fraction along the proposed sight-lines. This proposal follows up on a successful detection of HCl+ obtained in a pilot program performed in Cycle 4.

  14. Highest Redshift Image of Neutral Hydrogen in Emission: A CHILES Detection of a Starbursting Galaxy at z = 0.376

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Ximena; Gim, Hansung B.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Yun, Min S.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Popping, Attila; Chomiuk, Laura; Hess, Kelley M.; Hunt, Lucas; Kreckel, Kathryn; Lucero, Danielle; Maddox, Natasha; Oosterloo, Tom; Pisano, D. J.; Verheijen, M. A. W.; Hales, Christopher A.; Chung, Aeree; Dodson, Richard; Golap, Kumar; Gross, Julia; Henning, Patricia; Hibbard, John; Jaffé, Yara L.; Donovan Meyer, Jennifer; Meyer, Martin; Sanchez-Barrantes, Monica; Schiminovich, David; Wicenec, Andreas; Wilcots, Eric; Bershady, Matthew; Scoville, Nick; Strader, Jay; Tremou, Evangelia; Salinas, Ricardo; Chávez, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    Our current understanding of galaxy evolution still has many uncertainties associated with the details of the accretion, processing, and removal of gas across cosmic time. The next generation of radio telescopes will image the neutral hydrogen (H i) in galaxies over large volumes at high redshifts, which will provide key insights into these processes. We are conducting the COSMOS H i Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES) with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, which is the first survey to simultaneously observe H i from z = 0 to z ˜ 0.5. Here, we report the highest redshift H i 21 cm detection in emission to date of the luminous infrared galaxy COSMOS J100054.83+023126.2 at z = 0.376 with the first 178 hr of CHILES data. The total H i mass is (2.9 ± 1.0) × 1010 M ⊙ and the spatial distribution is asymmetric and extends beyond the galaxy. While optically the galaxy looks undisturbed, the H i distribution suggests an interaction with a candidate companion. In addition, we present follow-up Large Millimeter Telescope CO observations that show it is rich in molecular hydrogen, with a range of possible masses of (1.8-9.9) × 1010 M ⊙. This is the first study of the H i and CO in emission for a single galaxy beyond z ˜ 0.2.

  15. Hierarchical Ni-Mo-S nanosheets on carbon fiber cloth: A flexible electrode for efficient hydrogen generation in neutral electrolyte

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jianwei; Xiao, Fang-Xing; Yang, Hong Bin; Khoo, Si Yun; Chen, Jiazang; Fan, Zhanxi; Hsu, Ying-Ya; Chen, Hao Ming; Zhang, Hua; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    A unique functional electrode made of hierarchal Ni-Mo-S nanosheets with abundant exposed edges anchored on conductive and flexible carbon fiber cloth, referred to as Ni-Mo-S/C, has been developed through a facile biomolecule-assisted hydrothermal method. The incorporation of Ni atoms in Mo-S plays a crucial role in tuning its intrinsic catalytic property by creating substantial defect sites as well as modifying the morphology of Ni-Mo-S network at atomic scale, resulting in an impressive enhancement in the catalytic activity. The Ni-Mo-S/C electrode exhibits a large cathodic current and a low onset potential for hydrogen evolution reaction in neutral electrolyte (pH ~7), for example, current density of 10 mA/cm2 at a very small overpotential of 200 mV. Furthermore, the Ni-Mo-S/C electrode has excellent electrocatalytic stability over an extended period, much better than those of MoS2/C and Pt plate electrodes. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to understand the formation process and electrocatalytic properties of Ni-Mo-S/C. The intuitive comparison test was designed to reveal the superior gas-evolving profile of Ni-Mo-S/C over that of MoS2/C, and a laboratory-scale hydrogen generator was further assembled to demonstrate its potential application in practical appliances. PMID:26601227

  16. Detection of neutral hydrogen emission and optical nebulosity in the low redshift QSO 0351+026

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, G. D.; Chanan, G. A.; Romanishin, W.; Margon, B.; Schommer, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Spectroscopy, photometry, and imaging of the X-ray source 0351+026 are consistent with an active nucleus with the spectrum of a QSO or type I Seyfert, embedded in a low luminosity host galaxy of colors similar to M31. The H I observations reveal a tremendous amount of neutral gas associated with the system, M(H I)/L(B) = 15 in solar units, and the velocity width of the feature is 1500 km/s. Both parameters substantially exceed those seen in other galaxies and interacting pairs. The unique H I properties of the system combined with the presence of an active nucleus with QSO-like features is a tantalizing, but poorly understood, combination. At slightly larger redshift and thus inferior angular scale, this object would be indistinguishable from a QSO in its optical and X-ray characteristics.

  17. Polarization of Lyman α Emergent from a Thick Slab of Neutral Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sang-Hyeon; Lee, Hee-Won

    2015-06-01

    Star forming galaxies found in the early universe exhibit asymmetric Lyα emission line that results from multiple scattering in a neutral thick medium surrounding the Lyα emission source. It is expected that emergent Lyα will be significantly polarized through a large number of resonance scattering events followed by a number of successive wing scatterings. In this study we adopt a Monte Carlo method to calculate the polarization of Lyα transferred in a very thick static slab of HI. Resonantly scattered radiation associated with transitions between 1S 1/2 - 2P 1/2, 3/2 is only weakly polarized and therefore linear polarization of the emergent Lyα is mainly dependent on the number of off-resonant wing scattering events. The number of wing scattering events just before escape from the slab is determined by the product of the Doppler parameter a and the line center optical depth τ0, which, in turn, determines the behavior of the linear polarization of Lyα. This result is analogous to the study of polarized radiative transfer of Thomson scattered photons in an electron slab, where the emergent photons are polarized in the direction perpendicular to the slab when the scattering optical depth is small and polarized in the parallel direction when the slab is optically thick. Our simulated spectropolarimetry of Lyα shows that the line center is negligibly polarized, the near wing parts polarized in the direction parallel to the slab and the far wing parts are polarized in the direction perpendicular to the slab. We emphasize that the flip of polarization direction in the wing parts of Lyα naturally reflects the diffusive nature of the Lyα transfer process in thick neutral media.

  18. Hydrogen isotope fractionation between C-H-O species in magmatic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foustoukos, D. I.; Mysen, B. O.

    2012-12-01

    Constraining the hydrogen isotope fractionation between H-bearing volatiles (e.g. H2, CH4, hydrocarbons, H2O) as function of temperature and pressure helps to promote our understanding of the isotopic composition of evolved magmatic fluids and the overall mantle-cycling of water and reduced C-O-H volatiles. To describe the thermodynamics of the exchange reactions between the different H/D isotopologues of H2 and CH4 under supercritical water conditions, a novel experimental technique has been developed by combining vibrational Raman spectroscopy with hydrothermal diamond anvil cell designs (HDAC), which offers a method to monitor the in-situ evolution of H/D containing species. To this end, the equilibrium relationship between H2-D2-HD in supercritical fluid was investigated at temperatures ranging from 300 - 800 oC and pressures ~ 0.3 - 1.3 GPa [1]. Experimental results obtained in-situ and ex-situ show a significant deviation from the theoretical values of the equilibrium constant predicted for ideal-gas reference state, and with an apparent negative temperature effect triggered by the enthalpy contributions due to mixing in supercritical water. Here, we present a series of HDAC experiments conducted to evaluate the role of supercritical water on the isotopic equilibrium between H/D methane isotopologues at 600 - 800 oC and 409 - 1622 MPa. In detail, tetrakis-silane (Si5C12H36) was reacted with H2O-D2O aqueous solution in the presence of either Ni or Pt metal catalyst, resulting to the formation of deuterated methane species such as CH3D, CHD3, CH2D2 and CD4. Two distinctly different set of experiments ("gas phase"; "liquid phase") were performed by adjusting the silane/water proportions. By measuring the relative intensities of Raman vibrational modes of species, experimental results demonstrate distinctly different thermodynamic properties for the CH4-CH3D-CHD3-CH2D2 equilibrium in gas and liquid-water-bearing systems. In addition, the D/H molar ratio of

  19. Distribution of metals in acid-base-neutral fractions of Cerro Negro 550-700 degree C distillate and 700 degree C+ residue

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, C.D.; Green, J.A.; Green, J.B.; Anderson, R.P. )

    1989-04-01

    Heavy crude oils generally have high metals content and are difficult to upgrade. Vanadium and nickel are among the most common metals and can cause catalyst poisoning and corrosion during processing. The continuing decrease in reserves of conventional crude oil has made it increasingly important that new techniques be developed for demetallization to permit upgrading and use of these difficult resources. Knowledge of the chemical composition of nickel and vanadium complexes in petroleum will assist the process designer to devise better demetallization processes. This paper describes a new approach to the speciation of metals in crude oils and residues. The Cerro Negro 550-700{degree}C distillate and 700{degree}C+ residue are broken down into acid, base, and neutral fractions and the nickel, vanadium, and iron determined in each fraction. An attempt is made to answer the questions: (1) is distribution governed by the chemical structure of the metalloorganic molecules; (2) within a given chemical fraction, are subfractions present which contain a major portion of the total metal content; (3) does the particular metal (i.e., Ni vs V) affect the separation behavior This paper is the sixth and final chapter in a book describing the development of analytical methodology for the analytical characterization of Cerro Negro Orinoco belt crude oil. Chapters already published address the distillation and determination of routine physical and chemical properties, the separation of acid, base, and neutral fractions and saturate/aromatic split of the neutral fractions, and the detailed separation and analysis of sulfur compounds and aromatic hydrocarbons. The chapters on detailed separation and analysis of acidic and basic compounds are currently being written. They are based on previously reported analytical procedures.

  20. The plasma membrane-enriched fraction proteome response during adaptation to hydrogen peroxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Nuno; Gomes-Alves, Patrícia; Marinho, H Susana; Brito, Verônica B; Boada, Cristina; Antunes, Fernando; Herrero, Enrique; Penque, Deborah; Cyrne, Luísa

    2012-10-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adaptation to hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) decreases plasma membrane permeability to H₂O₂, changes its lipid composition and reorganizes ergosterol-rich microdomains by a still unknown mechanism. Here we show, by a quantitative analysis of the H₂O₂-induced adaptation effect on the S. cerevisiae plasma membrane-enriched fraction proteome, using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, that 44 proteins are differentially expressed. Most of these proteins were regulated at a post-transcriptional level. Fourteen of these proteins contain redox-sensitive cysteine residues and nine proteins are associated with lipid and vesicle traffic. In particular, three proteins found in eisosomes and in the eisosome-associated membrane compartment occupied by Can1p were up-regulated (Pil1p, Rfs1p and Pst2p) during adaptation to H₂O₂. Survival studies after exposure to lethal H₂O₂ doses using yeast strains bearing a gene deletion corresponding to proteins associated to lipid and vesicle traffic demonstrated for the first time that down-regulation of Kes1p, Vps4p and Ynl010wp and up-regulation of Atp1 and Atp2 increases resistance to H₂O₂. Moreover, for the pil1Δ strain, H₂O₂ at low levels produces a hormetic effect by increasing proliferation. In conclusion, these data further confirms the plasma membrane as an active cellular site during adaptation to H₂O₂ and shows that proteins involved in lipid and vesicle traffic are important mediators of H₂O₂ adaptation.

  1. Tracing Dense and Diffuse Neutral Hydrogen in the Halo of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, V. A.; Lockman, F. J.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2017-01-01

    We have combined observations of Galactic high-velocity H i from two surveys: a very sensitive survey from the Green Bank 140 ft Telescope with limited sky coverage, and the less sensitive but complete Galactic All Sky Survey from the 64 m Parkes Radio Telescope. The two surveys preferentially detect different forms of neutral gas due to their sensitivity. We adopt a machine learning approach to divide our data into two populations that separate across a range in column density: (1) a narrow line-width population typical of the majority of bright high velocity cloud components, and (2) a fainter, broad line-width population that aligns well with that of the population found in the Green Bank survey. We refer to these populations as dense and diffuse gas, respectively, and find that diffuse gas is typically located at the edges and in the tails of high velocity clouds, surrounding dense components in the core. A fit to the average spectrum of each type of gas in the Galactic All Sky Survey data reveals the dense population to have a typical line width of ∼20 km s‑1 and brightness temperature of ∼0.3 K, while the diffuse population has a typical line width of ∼30 km s‑1 and a brightness temperature of ∼0.2 K. Our results confirm that most surveys of high velocity gas in the Milky Way halo are missing the majority of the ubiquitous diffuse gas, and that this gas is likely to contribute at least as much mass as the dense gas.

  2. Photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from carbon-neutral oxalate with 2-phenyl-4-(1-naphthyl)quinolinium ion and metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yusuke; Miyahigashi, Takamitsu; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2012-08-14

    Photocatalytic hydrogen evolution has been made possible by using oxalate as a carbon-neutral electron source, metal nanoparticles as hydrogen-evolution catalysts and the 2-phenyl-4-(1-naphthyl)quinolinium ion (QuPh(+)-NA), which forms the long-lived electron-transfer state upon photoexcitation, as a photocatalyst. The hydrogen evolution was conducted in a deaerated mixed solution of an aqueous buffer and acetonitrile (MeCN) [1:1 (v/v)] by photoirradiation (λ > 340 nm). The gas evolved during the photocatalytic reaction contained H(2) and CO(2) in a molar ratio of 1:2, indicating that oxalate acts as a two-electron donor. The hydrogen yield based on the amount of oxalate reached more than 80% under pH conditions higher than 6. Ni and Ru nanoparticles as well as Pt nanoparticles act as efficient hydrogen-evolution catalysts in the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution. The photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution can be used several times without significant deactivation of the catalytic activity. Nanosecond laser flash photolysis measurements have revealed that electron transfer from oxalate to the photogenerated QuPh˙-NA˙(+), which forms a π-dimer radical cation with QuPh(+)-NA [(QuPh˙-NA˙(+))(QuPh(+)-NA)], occurs followed by subsequent electron transfer from QuPh˙-NA to the hydrogen-evolution catalyst in the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution. Oxalate acts as an efficient electron source under a wide range of reaction conditions.

  3. Towards a palaeosalinity proxy: hydrogen isotopic fractionation between source water and lipids produced via different biosynthetic pathways in haptophyte algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chivall, David; M'Boule, Daniela; Heinzelmann, Sandra M.; Kasper, Sebastian; Sinke-Schoen, Daniëlle; Sininnghe-Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2014-05-01

    Palaeosalinity is one of the most important oceanographic parameters that cannot currently be quantified with reasonable accuracy from sedimentary records. Hydrogen isotopic fractionation between water and alkenones is dependent, amongst other factors, upon the salinity in which alkenone-producing haptophyte algae grow and is represented by the fractionation factor, α, increasing with salinity.1 As such, the hydrogen isotopic composition of alkenones is emerging as a palaeosalinity proxy. Understanding the mechanism behind the sensitivity of fractionation to salinity is important for the correct application of the proxy, however this mechanism is currently unknown. Here we present hydrogen isotopic compositions of lipids produced via different biosynthetic pathways from batch cultures of Emiliania huxleyi CCMP 1516 and Isochrysis galbana CCMP 1323 grown over a range of salinities and discuss the possible sources of the sensitivity of hydrogen isotope fractionation to salinity. α for C37 alkenones (produced via an unknown biosynthetic pathway but assumed to be acetogenic; e.g.2) and that for C14:0, C16:0, and C18:1 fatty acids (acetogenic) from exponential growth phase I. galbana show a similar sensitivity to salinity, increasing at 0.0013-0.0019 per salinity unit (S-1). Meanwhile, in exponential growth phase E. huxleyi, α for C37 alkenones and α for brassicasterol (mevalonate pathway) increase at 0.0015-0.0022 S-1, but α for phytol (methylerythritol pathway) shows no significant relationship with salinity. These results suggest that fractionation is sensitive to salinity for lipids formed both in the chloroplast and cytosol. They also suggest that the sensitivity may either originate in glyceralde-3-phosphate or pyruvate but is then lost through hydrogen exchange with cell water during sugar rearrangements in the methylerythritol pathway or sensitivity originates with the production and consumption of acetate. References Schouten, S., Ossebaar, J., Schreiber

  4. Evidence for Neutral-Current Diffractive π0 Production from Hydrogen in Neutrino Interactions on Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, J.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Endress, E.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Mousseau, J.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman,; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Sánchez Falero, S.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wospakrik, M.; Zhang, D.

    2016-09-01

    Here, the MINERvA experiment observes an excess of events containing electromagnetic showers relative to the expectation from Monte Carlo simulations in neutral-current neutrino interactions with mean beam energy of 4.5 GeV on a hydrocarbon target. The excess is characterized and found to be consistent with neutral-current π0 production with a broad energy distribution peaking at 7 GeV and a total cross section of 0.26 $\\pm$ 0.02 (stat) $\\pm$ 0.08 (sys) x $10^{-39} cm^{2}$. The angular distribution, electromagnetic shower energy, and spatial distribution of the energy depositions of the excess are consistent with expectations from neutrino neutral-current diffractive neutral pion production from hydrogen in the hydrocarbon target. These data comprise the first direct experimental observation and constraint for a reaction that poses an important background process in neutrino oscillation experiments searching for $\

  5. Synthesis and characterization of higher amino acid Schiff bases, as monosodium salts and neutral forms. Investigation of the intramolecular hydrogen bonding in all Schiff bases, antibacterial and antifungal activities of neutral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngör, Özlem; Gürkan, Perihan

    2014-09-01

    Schiff bases derived from 5-nitro-salicylaldehyde and 4-aminobutyric acid, 5-aminopentanoic acid and 6-aminohexanoic acid were synthesized both as monosodium salts (1a-3a) and neutral forms (1b-3b). The monosodium-Schiff bases were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H/13C NMR, IR, powder XRD, UV-vis spectra and conductivity measurements. The neutral-Schiff bases were characterized by elemental analysis, 1H/13C NMR, 2D NMR (HMQC), mass, IR, powder XRD, UV-vis spectra and conductivity measurements. The intramolecular hydrogen bonding and related tautomeric equilibria in all the Schiff bases were studied by UV-vis and 1H NMR spectra in solution. Additionally, the neutral-Schiff bases were screened against Staphylococcus aureus-EB18, S. aureus-ATCC 25923, Escherichia coli-ATCC 11230, Candida albicans-M3 and C. albicans-ATCC 16231.

  6. A solid-contact pH-selective electrode based on tridodecylamine as hydrogen neutral ionophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianxin; Guo, Yixuan; Li, Shangjin; Xu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    The solid-state pH electrode has the potential possibility to be used in many extreme situations with satisfactory accuracy and low cost. But its performance is affected by the solid electrolyte, preparation process, and the structure of the sensitive membrane, etc. In this work, the relationships between these factors and the characteristic of the prepared electrode were verified by controlling the preparation conditions with a variety of electrochemical methods. Firstly, the solid electrolyte poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) was electrochemically deposited on the screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) substrate by a potentiostatic method in an aqueous solution containing 0.01 M 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) and 0.1 M polystyrene sulfonic (PSS) acid as the supporting electrolyte. The PEDOT films were then characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in the 0.1 M NaNO3 aqueous solution in order to obtain the optimized polymerization potential and charges where the PEDOT film would have a higher redox capacitance. Finally, the pH electrode was prepared by coating the SPCE/PEDOT(PSS) with a plasticized polyvinyl chloride (PVC) membrane containing tridodecylamine as hydrogen ionophore manually, and experiments were carried out to study the effect of the usage of PVC per square millimeter on the response time and stability of the electrode to optimize the PVC film thickness. The potentiometric response of the pH electrode was studied in the buffer solutions with pH ranging from 5.00 to 10.81 by the open-circuit potential (OCP) method. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the electrode is  -55.7  ±  0.5 mV pH-1 (r 2  >  0.9980) at room temperature (24  ±  1 °C) with pH ranging from 2.00-10.50, approximating to the theoretical nernstian slope (-59.16 mV pH-1),and the response time was less than 10 s. Moreover, it has low impedance, high accuracy and potential stability as well as some

  7. THE COS-HALOS SURVEY: RATIONALE, DESIGN, AND A CENSUS OF CIRCUMGALACTIC NEUTRAL HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Tumlinson, Jason; Thom, Christopher; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Davé, Romeel; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Ford, Amanda Brady; O'Meara, John M.; Peeples, Molly S.; Weinberg, David H.

    2013-11-01

    We present the design and methods of the COS-Halos survey, a systematic investigation of the gaseous halos of 44 z = 0.15-0.35 galaxies using background QSOs observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. This survey has yielded 39 spectra of z{sub em} ≅ 0.5 QSOs with S/N ∼10-15 per resolution element. The QSO sightlines pass within 150 physical kpc of the galaxies, which span early and late types over stellar mass log M{sub *}/M{sub ☉} = 9.5-11.5. We find that the circumgalactic medium exhibits strong H I, averaging ≅ 1 Å in Lyα equivalent width out to 150 kpc, with 100% covering fraction for star-forming galaxies and 75% covering for passive galaxies. We find good agreement in column densities between this survey and previous studies over similar range of impact parameter. There is weak evidence for a difference between early- and late-type galaxies in the strength and distribution of H I. Kinematics indicate that the detected material is bound to the host galaxy, such that ∼> 90% of the detected column density is confined within ±200 km s{sup –1} of the galaxies. This material generally exists well below the halo virial temperatures at T ∼< 10{sup 5} K. We evaluate a number of possible origin scenarios for the detected material, and in the end favor a simple model in which the bulk of the detected H I arises in a bound, cool, low-density photoionized diffuse medium that is generic to all L* galaxies and may harbor a total gaseous mass comparable to galactic stellar masses.

  8. Spatial Variations of Turbulent Properties in Neutral Hydrogen Observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud Using Structure Function Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestingen-Palm, David; Stanimirovic, Snezana; Babler, Brian L.; Gonzalez Casanova, Diego; Jameson, Katherine; Bolatto, Alberto D.

    2017-01-01

    Turbulence is known to play a key role in shaping the many structures and features which make the Interstellar Medium (ISM) so interesting to study. It is still not understood, however, which processes are responsible for the turbulence in the ISM, and the scales at which these processes dominate. In our study, we use the structure function to analyze neutral hydrogen (HI) observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) to search for spacial variations in turbulent properties. Using an estimate of the star formation surface density as a guide, we separate the HI SMC observations into a central region which contains star formation rate (SFR) regions above a certain contour level, and an outer region which has SFR values below the chosen contour level. Our contour level begins at 1e-3 M⊙yr-1kpc-2 and is raised to 5e-3 M⊙yr-1kpc-2 by increments of 1e-4 M⊙yr-1kpc-2. At each contour level, we calculate the HI structure function slope for both the central and outer region by applying the Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) and progressively averaging HI velocity channels. Our preliminary results suggest a difference in the slopes of both velocity and density fields between the inner and outer SMC.

  9. Changes in the Total Lipid, Neutral Lipid, Phospholipid and Fatty Acid Composition of Phospholipid Fractions during Pastırma Processing, a Dry-Cured Meat Product

    PubMed Central

    Aksu, Muhammet Irfan; Dogan, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Pastırma is a dry-cured meat product, produced from whole beef or water buffalo muscles. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of production stages (raw meat, after curing, after 2nd drying and pastırma) on the total lipid, neutral lipid, phospholipid and fatty acid composition of phospholipid fraction of pastırma produced from beef M. Longissimus dorsi muscles. The pH and colour (L*, a* and b*) analyses were also performed in raw meat and pastırma. It was found that pastırma production stages had significant effects (p<0.01) on the total amounts of lipid, neutral lipid and phospholipid, and the highest amounts of lipid, neutral lipid and phospholipid were detected in pastırma. In pastırma, neutral lipid ratio was determined as 79.33±2.06% and phospholipid ratio as 20.67±2.06%. Phospholipids was proportionately lower in pastırma than raw meat. Pastırma production stages affected pentadecanoic acid (15:1) (p<0.01), linoleic acid (18:2n-6) (p<0.05), γ-linoleic acid (18:3n-6) (p<0.05), erucic acid (22:1n-9) (p<0.05), docosapentaenoic acid (22:5n-6) (p<0.05), total unsaturated fatty acid (ΣUSFA) (p<0.05) and total saturated fatty acid (ΣSFA) (p<0.05) ratios of phospholipid fraction and also the moisture content (p<0.01). Pastırma process also affected pH and colour (L*, a* and b*) values (p<0.01), and these values were higher in pastırma than raw meat. PMID:28316467

  10. The effects of neutralized particles on the sampling efficiency of polyurethane foam used to estimate the extrathoracic deposition fraction.

    PubMed

    Tomyn, Ronald L; Sleeth, Darrah K; Thiese, Matthew S; Larson, Rodney R

    2016-01-01

    In addition to chemical composition, the site of deposition of inhaled particles is important for determining the potential health effects from an exposure. As a result, the International Organization for Standardization adopted a particle deposition sampling convention. This includes extrathoracic particle deposition sampling conventions for the anterior nasal passages (ET1) and the posterior nasal and oral passages (ET2). This study assessed how well a polyurethane foam insert placed in an Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) sampler can match an extrathoracic deposition sampling convention, while accounting for possible static buildup in the test particles. In this way, the study aimed to assess whether neutralized particles affected the performance of this sampler for estimating extrathoracic particle deposition. A total of three different particle sizes (4.9, 9.5, and 12.8 µm) were used. For each trial, one particle size was introduced into a low-speed wind tunnel with a wind speed set a 0.2 m/s (∼40 ft/min). This wind speed was chosen to closely match the conditions of most indoor working environments. Each particle size was tested twice either neutralized, using a high voltage neutralizer, or left in its normal (non neutralized) state as standard particles. IOM samplers were fitted with a polyurethane foam insert and placed on a rotating mannequin inside the wind tunnel. Foam sampling efficiencies were calculated for all trials to compare against the normalized ET1 sampling deposition convention. The foam sampling efficiencies matched well to the ET1 deposition convention for the larger particle sizes, but had a general trend of underestimating for all three particle sizes. The results of a Wilcoxon Rank Sum Test also showed that only at 4.9 µm was there a statistically significant difference (p-value = 0.03) between the foam sampling efficiency using the standard particles and the neutralized particles. This is interpreted to mean that static

  11. NEUTRAL HYDROGEN OPTICAL DEPTH NEAR STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z Almost-Equal-To 2.4 IN THE KECK BARYONIC STRUCTURE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rakic, Olivera; Schaye, Joop; Steidel, Charles C.; Rudie, Gwen C.

    2012-06-01

    We study the interface between galaxies and the intergalactic medium by measuring the absorption by neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of star-forming galaxies at z Almost-Equal-To 2.4. Our sample consists of 679 rest-frame UV-selected galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts that have impact parameters <2 (proper) Mpc to the line of sight of one of the 15 bright, background QSOs and that fall within the redshift range of its Ly{alpha} forest. We present the first two-dimensional maps of the absorption around galaxies, plotting the median Ly{alpha} pixel optical depth as a function of transverse and line-of-sight separation from galaxies. The Ly{alpha} optical depths are measured using an automatic algorithm that takes advantage of all available Lyman series lines. The median optical depth, and hence the median density of atomic hydrogen, drops by more than an order of magnitude around 100 kpc, which is similar to the virial radius of the halos thought to host the galaxies. The median remains enhanced, at the >3{sigma} level, out to at least 2.8 Mpc (i.e., >9 comoving Mpc), but the scatter at a given distance is large compared with the median excess optical depth, suggesting that the gas is clumpy. Within 100 (200) kpc, and over {+-}165 km s{sup -1}, the covering fraction of gas with Ly{alpha} optical depth greater than unity is 100{sup +0}{sub -32}% (66% {+-} 16%). Absorbers with {tau}{sub Ly{alpha}} > 0.1 are typically closer to galaxies than random. The mean galaxy overdensity around absorbers increases with the optical depth and also as the length scale over which the galaxy overdensity is evaluated is decreased. Absorbers with {tau}{sub Ly{alpha}} {approx} 1 reside in regions where the galaxy number density is close to the cosmic mean on scales {>=}0.25 Mpc. We clearly detect two types of redshift space anisotropies. On scales <200 km s{sup -1}, or <1 Mpc, the absorption is stronger along the line of sight than in the transverse direction. This 'finger of God

  12. FeP nanoparticles film grown on carbon cloth: an ultrahighly active 3D hydrogen evolution cathode in both acidic and neutral solutions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jingqi; Liu, Qian; Liang, Yanhui; Xing, Zhicai; Asiri, Abdullah M; Sun, Xuping

    2014-12-10

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the direct growth of FeP nanoparticles film on carbon cloth (FeP/CC) through low-temperature phosphidation of its Fe3O4/CC precursor. Remarkably, when used as an integrated 3D hydrogen evolution cathode, this FeP/CC electrode exhibits ultrahigh catalytic activity comparable to commercial Pt/C and good stability in acidic media. This electrode also performs well in neutral solutions. This work offers us the most cost-effective and active 3D cathode toward electrochemical water splitting for large-scale hydrogen fuel production.

  13. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding between neutral transition metal hydrides (eta(5)-C5H5)M(CO)3H (M = Mo, W) and bases.

    PubMed

    Belkova, Natalia V; Gutsul, Evgenii I; Filippov, Oleg A; Levina, Vladislava A; Valyaev, Dmitriy A; Epstein, Lina M; Lledos, Agusti; Shubina, Elena S

    2006-03-22

    The interaction of CpM(CO)3H (M = Mo, W) hydrides as proton donors with different bases (B = pyridine, (n-Oc)3PO, ((CH3)2N)3PO, H3BNEt3) was studied by variable temperature IR spectroscopy and theoretically by DFT/B3LYP calculations. The data obtained show for the first time the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the neutral transition metal hydrides and bases in solutions of low polarity. These M-H...B hydrogen bonds are shown to precede the hydrides' deprotonation.

  14. The effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration and solid loading on the fractionation of biomass in formic acid.

    PubMed

    Dussan, K; Girisuta, B; Haverty, D; Leahy, J J; Hayes, M H B

    2014-10-13

    This study investigated the fractionation of biomass using a decomposing mixture of hydrogen peroxide-formic acid as a pretreatment for the biorefining of Miscanthus × giganteus and of sugarcane bagasse. The main parameters investigated were the hydrogen peroxide concentration (2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 wt%) and biomass loading (5.0 and 10.0 wt%). At the highest hydrogen peroxide concentration used (7.5 wt%), the energy released by the decomposition of the H2O2 could heat the reaction mixture up to 180 °C in a short time (6-16 min). As a result, highly delignified pulps, with lignin removal as high as 92 wt%, were obtained. This delignification process also solubilised a significant amount of pentosan (82-98 wt%) from the initial biomass feedstock, and the resulting pulp had a high cellulosic content (92 wt%). The biomass loading only affected the reaction rate of hydrogen peroxide decomposition. Various analytical methods, including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric and elemental analyses, characterized the lignin obtained.

  15. Associations between Small-scale Structure in Local Galactic Neutral Hydrogen and in the Cosmic Microwave Background Observed by PLANCK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution galactic neutral hydrogen (HI) data obtained with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) over 56 square degrees of sky around l = 132°, b = 25° are compared with small-scale structure in the Cosmic Microwave Background observed by PLANCK, specifically at 143 and 857 GHz, as well as with 100 μm observations from the IRIS survey. The analysis uses data in 13 2° × 2° sub-areas found in the IRSA database at IPAC. The results confirm what has been reported previously; nearby galactic HI features and high-frequency continuum sources believed to be cosmological are in fact clearly associated. While several attempts strongly suggest that the associations are statistically significant, the key to understanding the phenomenon lies in the fact that in any given area HI is associated with cirrus dust at certain HI velocities and with 143 GHz features at different velocities. At the same time, for the 13 sub-areas studied, there is very little overlap between the dust and 143 GHz features. The data do not imply that the HI itself gives rise to the high-frequency continuum emission. Rather, they appear to indicate undiagnosed brightness enhancements indirectly associated with the HI. If low density interstellar electrons concentrated into clumps, or observed in directions where their integrated line-of-sight column densities are greater than the background in a manner similar to the phenomena that give rise to structure in diffuse HI structure, they will profoundly affect attempts to create a foreground electron mask used for processing PLANCK as well as WMAP data.

  16. ASSOCIATIONS BETWEEN SMALL-SCALE STRUCTURE IN LOCAL GALACTIC NEUTRAL HYDROGEN AND IN THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND OBSERVED BY PLANCK

    SciTech Connect

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    2015-11-01

    High-resolution galactic neutral hydrogen (HI) data obtained with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) over 56 square degrees of sky around l = 132°, b = 25° are compared with small-scale structure in the Cosmic Microwave Background observed by PLANCK, specifically at 143 and 857 GHz, as well as with 100 μm observations from the IRIS survey. The analysis uses data in 13 2° × 2° sub-areas found in the IRSA database at IPAC. The results confirm what has been reported previously; nearby galactic HI features and high-frequency continuum sources believed to be cosmological are in fact clearly associated. While several attempts strongly suggest that the associations are statistically significant, the key to understanding the phenomenon lies in the fact that in any given area HI is associated with cirrus dust at certain HI velocities and with 143 GHz features at different velocities. At the same time, for the 13 sub-areas studied, there is very little overlap between the dust and 143 GHz features. The data do not imply that the HI itself gives rise to the high-frequency continuum emission. Rather, they appear to indicate undiagnosed brightness enhancements indirectly associated with the HI. If low density interstellar electrons concentrated into clumps, or observed in directions where their integrated line-of-sight column densities are greater than the background in a manner similar to the phenomena that give rise to structure in diffuse HI structure, they will profoundly affect attempts to create a foreground electron mask used for processing PLANCK as well as WMAP data.

  17. Peripherally hydrogenated neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as carriers of the 3 micron interstellar infrared emission complex: results from single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wagner, D R; Kim, H S; Saykally, R J

    2000-12-20

    Infrared emission spectra of five gas-phase UV laser-excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing aliphatic hydrogens are compared with the main 3.3 microns and associated interstellar unidentified infrared emission bands (UIRs). We show that neutral PAHs can account for the majority of the 3 microns emission complex while making little contribution to the other UIR bands; peripherally hydrogenated PAHs produce a better match to astrophysical data than do those containing methyl side groups; 3.4 microns plateau emission is shown to be a general spectral feature of vibrationally excited PAHs containing aliphatic hydrogens, especially those containing methyl groups; and finally, hot-band and overtone emissions arising from aromatic C-H vibrations are not observed in laboratory emission spectra, and therefore, in contrast to current assignments, are not expected to be observed in the UIRs.

  18. Peripherally hydrogenated neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as carriers of the 3 micron interstellar infrared emission complex: results from single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, D. R.; Kim, H. S.; Saykally, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra of five gas-phase UV laser-excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing aliphatic hydrogens are compared with the main 3.3 microns and associated interstellar unidentified infrared emission bands (UIRs). We show that neutral PAHs can account for the majority of the 3 microns emission complex while making little contribution to the other UIR bands; peripherally hydrogenated PAHs produce a better match to astrophysical data than do those containing methyl side groups; 3.4 microns plateau emission is shown to be a general spectral feature of vibrationally excited PAHs containing aliphatic hydrogens, especially those containing methyl groups; and finally, hot-band and overtone emissions arising from aromatic C-H vibrations are not observed in laboratory emission spectra, and therefore, in contrast to current assignments, are not expected to be observed in the UIRs.

  19. Ultrafiltration by a compacted clay membrane. I - Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation. II - Sodium ion exclusion at various ionic strengths.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coplen, T. B.; Hanshaw, B. B.

    1973-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation of distilled water and of 0.01N NaCl forced to flow at ambient temperature under a hydraulic pressure drop of 100 bars across a montmorillonite disk compacted to a porosity of 35% by a pressure of 330 bars. The ultrafiltrates in both experiments were depleted in D by 2.5% and in O-18 by 0.8% relative to the residual solution. No additional isotopic fractionation due to a salt-filtering mechanism was observed at NaCl concentrations up to 0.01N. Adsorption is most likely the principal mechanism which produces isotopic fractionation, but molecular diffusion may play a minor role. The results suggest that oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of ground water during passage through compacted clayey sediments should be a common occurrence, in accord with published interpretations of isotopic data from the Illinois and Alberta basins. It is shown how it is possible to proceed from the ion exchange capacity of clay minerals and, by means of the Donnan membrane equilibrium concept and the Teorell-Meyer-Siever theory, develop a theory to explain why and to what extent ultrafiltration occurs when solutions of known concentration are forced to flow through a clay membrane.

  20. COMPLETE IONIZATION OF THE NEUTRAL GAS: WHY THERE ARE SO FEW DETECTIONS OF 21 cm HYDROGEN IN HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO GALAXIES AND QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, S. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2012-11-10

    From the first published z {approx}> 3 survey of 21 cm absorption within the hosts of radio galaxies and quasars, Curran et al. found an apparent dearth of cool neutral gas at high redshift. From a detailed analysis of the photometry, each object is found to have a {lambda} = 1216 A continuum luminosity in excess of L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}, a critical value above which 21 cm has never been detected at any redshift. At these wavelengths, and below, hydrogen is excited above the ground state so that it cannot absorb in 21 cm. In order to apply the equation of photoionization equilibrium, we demonstrate that this critical value also applies to the ionizing ({lambda} {<=} 912 A) radiation. We use this to show, for a variety of gas density distributions, that upon placing a quasar within a galaxy of gas, there is always an ultraviolet luminosity above which all of the large-scale atomic gas is ionized. While in this state, the hydrogen cannot be detected or engage in star formation. Applying the mean ionizing photon rate of all of the sources searched, we find, using canonical values for the gas density and recombination rate coefficient, that the observed critical luminosity gives a scale length (3 kpc) similar that of the neutral hydrogen (H I) in the Milky Way, a large spiral galaxy. Thus, this simple yet physically motivated model can explain the critical luminosity (L {sub 912} {approx} L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}), above which neutral gas is not detected. This indicates that the non-detection of 21 cm absorption is not due to the sensitivity limits of current radio telescopes, but rather that the lines of sight to the quasars, and probably the bulk of the host galaxies, are devoid of neutral gas.

  1. Different hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid formation in higher plants: Implications for paleohydrology reconstruction at a global scale

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinzhao; Liu, Weiguo; An, Zhisheng; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Leaf wax δDn-alkane values have shown to differ significantly among plant life forms (e.g., among grasses, shrubs, and trees) in higher plants. However, the underlying causes for the differences in leaf wax δDn-alkane values among different plant life forms remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed that leaf wax δDn-alkane values between major high plant lineages (eudicots versus monocots) differed significantly under the same environmental conditions. Such a difference primarily inherited from different hydrogen biosynthetic fractionations (εwax-lw). Based upon a reanalysis of the available leaf wax δDn-alkane dataset from modern plants in the Northern Hemisphere, we discovered that the apparent hydrogen fractionation factor (εwax-p) between leaf wax δDn-alkane values of major angiosperm lineages and precipitation δD values exhibited distinguishable distribution patterns at a global scale, with an average of −140‰ for monocotyledonous species, −107‰ for dicotyledonous species. Additionally, variations of leaf wax δDn-alkane values and the εwax-p values in gymnosperms are similar to those of dicotyledonous species. Therefore, the data let us believe that biological factors inherited from plant taxonomies have a significant effect on controlling leaf wax δDn-alkane values in higher plants. PMID:26806719

  2. Different hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid formation in higher plants: Implications for paleohydrology reconstruction at a global scale.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinzhao; Liu, Weiguo; An, Zhisheng; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-25

    Leaf wax δDn-alkane values have shown to differ significantly among plant life forms (e.g., among grasses, shrubs, and trees) in higher plants. However, the underlying causes for the differences in leaf wax δDn-alkane values among different plant life forms remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed that leaf wax δDn-alkane values between major high plant lineages (eudicots versus monocots) differed significantly under the same environmental conditions. Such a difference primarily inherited from different hydrogen biosynthetic fractionations (εwax-lw). Based upon a reanalysis of the available leaf wax δDn-alkane dataset from modern plants in the Northern Hemisphere, we discovered that the apparent hydrogen fractionation factor (εwax-p) between leaf wax δDn-alkane values of major angiosperm lineages and precipitation δD values exhibited distinguishable distribution patterns at a global scale, with an average of -140‰ for monocotyledonous species, -107‰ for dicotyledonous species. Additionally, variations of leaf wax δDn-alkane values and the εwax-p values in gymnosperms are similar to those of dicotyledonous species. Therefore, the data let us believe that biological factors inherited from plant taxonomies have a significant effect on controlling leaf wax δDn-alkane values in higher plants.

  3. Different hydrogen isotope fractionations during lipid formation in higher plants: Implications for paleohydrology reconstruction at a global scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinzhao; Liu, Weiguo; An, Zhisheng; Yang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Leaf wax δDn-alkane values have shown to differ significantly among plant life forms (e.g., among grasses, shrubs, and trees) in higher plants. However, the underlying causes for the differences in leaf wax δDn-alkane values among different plant life forms remain poorly understood. In this study, we observed that leaf wax δDn-alkane values between major high plant lineages (eudicots versus monocots) differed significantly under the same environmental conditions. Such a difference primarily inherited from different hydrogen biosynthetic fractionations (εwax-lw). Based upon a reanalysis of the available leaf wax δDn-alkane dataset from modern plants in the Northern Hemisphere, we discovered that the apparent hydrogen fractionation factor (εwax-p) between leaf wax δDn-alkane values of major angiosperm lineages and precipitation δD values exhibited distinguishable distribution patterns at a global scale, with an average of ‑140‰ for monocotyledonous species, ‑107‰ for dicotyledonous species. Additionally, variations of leaf wax δDn-alkane values and the εwax-p values in gymnosperms are similar to those of dicotyledonous species. Therefore, the data let us believe that biological factors inherited from plant taxonomies have a significant effect on controlling leaf wax δDn-alkane values in higher plants.

  4. Studies of quaternary saline lakes-I. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in saline minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matsuo, S.; Friedman, I.; Smith, G.I.

    1972-01-01

    Borax, gaylussite, nahcolite and trona were synthesized in aqueous solution at temperatures ranging from 8?? to 35??C. Except for borax, deuterium was always depleted in these hydrated minerals relative to the solutions from which they were crystallized. In borax, no significant fractionation was found. The fractionation factor of D H for the trona-water system exhibited a marked temperature dependence. By combining the deuterium contents of trona and the solution from which trona was crystallized, the following thermometer scale was obtained: In ( D H) trona ( D H)water = 1.420 ?? 104 T2 + 23.56 T (1). An attempt to establish a geothermometer based on C13 C12 fractionation between carbonate minerals and carbonate ions in aqueous solution was not successful. ?? 1972.

  5. On the meniscus formation and the negative hydrogen ion extraction from ITER neutral beam injection relevant ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Ruf, B.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Minea, T.

    2014-10-01

    The development of a large area (Asource,ITER = 0.9 × 2 m2) hydrogen negative ion (NI) source constitutes a crucial step in construction of the neutral beam injectors of the international fusion reactor ITER. To understand the plasma behaviour in the boundary layer close to the extraction system the 3D PIC MCC code ONIX is exploited. Direct cross checked analysis of the simulation and experimental results from the ITER-relevant BATMAN source testbed with a smaller area (Asource,BATMAN ≈ 0.32 × 0.59 m2) has been conducted for a low perveance beam, but for a full set of plasma parameters available. ONIX has been partially benchmarked by comparison to the results obtained using the commercial particle tracing code for positive ion extraction KOBRA3D. Very good agreement has been found in terms of meniscus position and its shape for simulations of different plasma densities. The influence of the initial plasma composition on the final meniscus structure was then investigated for NIs. As expected from the Child-Langmuir law, the results show that not only does the extraction potential play a crucial role on the meniscus formation, but also the initial plasma density and its electronegativity. For the given parameters, the calculated meniscus locates a few mm downstream of the plasma grid aperture provoking a direct NI extraction. Most of the surface produced NIs do not reach the plasma bulk, but move directly towards the extraction grid guided by the extraction field. Even for artificially increased electronegativity of the bulk plasma the extracted NI current from this region is low. This observation indicates a high relevance of the direct NI extraction. These calculations show that the extracted NI current from the bulk region is low even if a complete ion-ion plasma is assumed, meaning that direct extraction from surface produced ions should be present in order to obtain sufficiently high extracted NI current density. The calculated extracted currents, both ions

  6. Fraction of electrons consumed in electron acceptor reduction and hydrogen thresholds as indicators of halorespiratory physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, F.E.; Tiedje, J.M.; Sanford, R.A.

    1999-09-01

    Measurements of the hydrogen consumption threshold and the tracking of electrons transferred to the chlorinated electron acceptor (f{sub e}) reliably detected chlororespiratory physiology in both mixed cultures and pure cultures capable of using tetrachloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, vinyl chloride, 2-chlorophenol, 3-chlorobenzoate, 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoate, or 1,2-dichloropropane as an electron acceptor. Hydrogen was consumed to significantly lower threshold concentrations of less than 0.4 ppmv compared with the values obtained for the same cultures without a chlorinated compound as an electron acceptor. The f{sub e} values ranged from 0.63 to 0.7, values which are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on the thermodynamics of reductive dechlorination as the terminal electron-accepting process. In contrast, a mixed methanogenic culture that cometabolized 3-chlorophenol exhibited a significantly lower f{sub e} value, 0.012.

  7. A review of dark fermentative hydrogen production from biodegradable municipal waste fractions

    SciTech Connect

    De Gioannis, G.; Muntoni, A.; Polettini, A.; Pomi, R.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: ► A large number of factors affect fermentative hydrogen production. ► Harmonization and systematic comparison of results from different literature sources are needed. ► More than 80 publications on H{sub 2} production from food waste and OFMSW have been examined. ► Experimental data from the reviewed literature were analyzed using statistical tools. ► For a reliable assessment of the process performance, the use of multiple parameters appears to be recommended. - Abstract: Hydrogen is believed to play a potentially key role in the implementation of sustainable energy production, particularly when it is produced from renewable sources and low energy-demanding processes. In the present paper an attempt was made at critically reviewing more than 80 recent publications, in order to harmonize and compare the available results from different studies on hydrogen production from FW and OFMSW through dark fermentation, and derive reliable information about process yield and stability in view of building related predictive models. The review was focused on the effect of factors, recognized as potentially affecting process evolution (including type of substrate and co-substrate and relative ratio, type of inoculum, food/microorganisms [F/M] ratio, applied pre-treatment, reactor configuration, temperature and pH), on the fermentation yield and kinetics. Statistical analysis of literature data from batch experiments was also conducted, showing that the variables affecting the H{sub 2} production yield were ranked in the order: type of co-substrate, type of pre-treatment, operating pH, control of initial pH and fermentation temperature. However, due to the dispersion of data observed in some instances, the ambiguity about the presence of additional hidden variables cannot be resolved. The results from the analysis thus suggest that, for reliable predictive models of fermentative hydrogen production to be derived, a high level of consistency between data is

  8. A review of dark fermentative hydrogen production from biodegradable municipal waste fractions.

    PubMed

    De Gioannis, G; Muntoni, A; Polettini, A; Pomi, R

    2013-06-01

    Hydrogen is believed to play a potentially key role in the implementation of sustainable energy production, particularly when it is produced from renewable sources and low energy-demanding processes. In the present paper an attempt was made at critically reviewing more than 80 recent publications, in order to harmonize and compare the available results from different studies on hydrogen production from FW and OFMSW through dark fermentation, and derive reliable information about process yield and stability in view of building related predictive models. The review was focused on the effect of factors, recognized as potentially affecting process evolution (including type of substrate and co-substrate and relative ratio, type of inoculum, food/microorganisms [F/M] ratio, applied pre-treatment, reactor configuration, temperature and pH), on the fermentation yield and kinetics. Statistical analysis of literature data from batch experiments was also conducted, showing that the variables affecting the H2 production yield were ranked in the order: type of co-substrate, type of pre-treatment, operating pH, control of initial pH and fermentation temperature. However, due to the dispersion of data observed in some instances, the ambiguity about the presence of additional hidden variables cannot be resolved. The results from the analysis thus suggest that, for reliable predictive models of fermentative hydrogen production to be derived, a high level of consistency between data is strictly required, claiming for more systematic and comprehensive studies on the subject.

  9. Hydrogen in diffuse molecular clouds in the Milky Way. Atomic column densities and molecular fraction along prominent lines of sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, B.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Menten, K. M.; Sato, M.; Brunthaler, A.; Wyrowski, F.; Neufeld, D.; Gerin, M.; Indriolo, N.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Recent submillimeter and far-infrared wavelength observations of absorption in the rotational ground-state lines of various simple molecules against distant Galactic continuum sources have opened the possibility of studying the chemistry of diffuse molecular clouds throughout the Milky Way. In order to calculate abundances, the column densities of molecular and atomic hydrogen, H i, must be known. Aims: We aim at determining the atomic hydrogen column densities for diffuse clouds located on the sight lines toward a sample of prominent high-mass star-forming regions that were intensely studied with the HIFI instrument onboard Herschel. Methods: Based on Jansky Very Large Array data, we employ the 21 cm H i absorption-line technique to construct profiles of the H i opacity versus radial velocity toward our target sources. These profiles are combined with lower resolution archival data of extended H i emission to calculate the H i column densities of the individual clouds along the sight lines. We employ Bayesian inference to estimate the uncertainties of the derived quantities. Results: Our study delivers reliable estimates of the atomic hydrogen column density for a large number of diffuse molecular clouds at various Galactocentric distances. Together with column densities of molecular hydrogen derived from its surrogates observed with HIFI, the measurements can be used to characterize the clouds and investigate the dependence of their chemistry on the molecular fraction, for example. The data sets are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/A2

  10. Study of Branching Ratio And Polarization Fraction in Neutral B Meson Decays to Negative Rho Meson Positive Kaon Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Baosen; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-03-07

    We present the preliminary results on the search for B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup -}K*{sup +}. The data sample comprises 122.7 million B{bar B} pairs in the e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation through the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance collected during 1999-2003 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy collider at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). We obtain an upper limit of the branching ratio at 90% confidence level as {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup -}K*{sup +}) < 17.2 x 10{sup -6}. The fitted result on the polarization fraction shows no evidence that the decay is longitudinally dominated as predicted by various theoretical models.

  11. Prediction of the Statistical Robustness of the Measurement of Neutral Hydrogen Mass Functions in the COSMOS H i Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Barrantes, Monica; Henning, Patricia A.; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.; Maddox, Natasha; Hess, Kelley M.; CHILES Team

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen is the fuel for star formation, but relatively little is known about the role of cold gas in galaxy evolution. The COSMOS H I Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES) is an on-going deep H I survey being conducted with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, probing a 0.5 degree region within the COSMOS field in the 21cm line of neutral hydrogen. CHILES is the first survey to observe H I in emission from z=0 to z~0.5, which corresponds to a look-back time of ~ 5 Gyr. This allows us to observe the content, morphology and kinematics of H I in relation to stellar disks, and how it may have evolved over this period. Here, we present a simulation of the galaxy detections that could be made by the survey, based on multi-wavelength data from the COSMOS dataset in the VLA field of view.We use the simulated data to calculate the Neutral Hydrogen Mass Function (HIMF), which describes the space density of galaxies as a function of their H I mass. The HIMF has been studied in the local universe, but seeing how it changes in redshift and environment can constrain current models of galaxy formation. We show the robustness of the HIMF we are capable of deriving for the entire survey and as a function of redshift and environment.

  12. Behaviour and stability of Trivelpiece-Gould modes in non-neutral plasma containing small density fraction of background gas ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yeliseyev, Y. N.

    2013-03-19

    It is shown that the frequencies of Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) modes in non-neutral plasma can get into the low-frequency range due to the Doppler shift caused by plasma rotation in crossed fields. TG modes interact with the ion modes that leads to plasma instability. In paper the frequency spectrum of 'cold' electron plasma completely filling a waveguide and containing small density fraction of ions of background gas is determined numerically. For ions the kinetic description is used. Oscillations having azimuthal number m= 2 are considered. In this case both low- and upper-hybrid TG modes get into the low-frequency range. The spectrum consists of families of 'modified' ion cyclotron (MIC) modes and electron TG modes with the frequencies equal to hybrid frequencies with the Doppler shift. The growth rates of upper-hybrid modes are much faster than the growth rates of low-hybrid and MIC modes.

  13. Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste combining two pretreatment modalities, high temperature microwave and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, Haleh; Warith, Mostafa; Hamoda, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    In order to enhance anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), pretreatment combining two modalities, microwave (MW) heating in presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) were investigated. The main pretreatment variables affecting the characteristics of the OFMSW were temperature (T) via MW irradiation and supplemental water additions of 20% and 30% (SWA20 and SW30). Subsequently, the focus of this study was to evaluate mesophilic batch AD performance in terms of biogas production, as well as changes in the characteristics of the OFMSW post digestion. A high MW induced temperature range (115-175°C) was applied, using sealed vessels and a bench scale MW unit equipped with temperature and pressure controls. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted on the whole OFMSW as well as the liquid fractions. The whole OFMSW pretreated at 115°C and 145°C showed 4-7% improvement in biogas production over untreated OFMSW (control). When pretreated at 175°C, biogas production decreased due to formation of refractory compounds, inhibiting the digestion. For the liquid fraction of OFMSW, the effect of pretreatment on the cumulative biogas production (CBP) was more pronounced for SWA20 at 145°C, with a 26% increase in biogas production after 8days of digestion, compared to the control. When considering the increased substrate availability in the liquid fraction after MW pretreatment, a 78% improvement in biogas production vs. the control was achieved. Combining MW and H(2)O(2) modalities did not have a positive impact on OFMSW stabilization and enhanced biogas production. In general, all samples pretreated with H(2)O(2) displayed a long lag phase and the CBP was usually lower than MW irradiated only samples. First order rate constant was calculated.

  14. Neutral Hydrogen Optical Depth near Star-forming Galaxies at z ≈ 2.4 in the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakic, Olivera; Schaye, Joop; Steidel, Charles C.; Rudie, Gwen C.

    2012-06-01

    We study the interface between galaxies and the intergalactic medium by measuring the absorption by neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of star-forming galaxies at z ≈ 2.4. Our sample consists of 679 rest-frame UV-selected galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts that have impact parameters <2 (proper) Mpc to the line of sight of one of the 15 bright, background QSOs and that fall within the redshift range of its Lyα forest. We present the first two-dimensional maps of the absorption around galaxies, plotting the median Lyα pixel optical depth as a function of transverse and line-of-sight separation from galaxies. The Lyα optical depths are measured using an automatic algorithm that takes advantage of all available Lyman series lines. The median optical depth, and hence the median density of atomic hydrogen, drops by more than an order of magnitude around 100 kpc, which is similar to the virial radius of the halos thought to host the galaxies. The median remains enhanced, at the >3σ level, out to at least 2.8 Mpc (i.e., >9 comoving Mpc), but the scatter at a given distance is large compared with the median excess optical depth, suggesting that the gas is clumpy. Within 100 (200) kpc, and over ±165 km s-1, the covering fraction of gas with Lyα optical depth greater than unity is 100+0 - 32% (66% ± 16%). Absorbers with τLyα > 0.1 are typically closer to galaxies than random. The mean galaxy overdensity around absorbers increases with the optical depth and also as the length scale over which the galaxy overdensity is evaluated is decreased. Absorbers with τLyα ~ 1 reside in regions where the galaxy number density is close to the cosmic mean on scales >=0.25 Mpc. We clearly detect two types of redshift space anisotropies. On scales <200 km s-1, or <1 Mpc, the absorption is stronger along the line of sight than in the transverse direction. This "finger of God" effect may be due to redshift errors, but is probably dominated by gas motions within or very close to

  15. Development of a highly sensitive chemiluminescent assay for hydrogen peroxide under neutral conditions using acridinium ester and its application to an enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hidetoshi; Tsuruoka, Keiko; Ohno, Ken-ichi; Tajima, Noriko; Nagano, Hiromi

    2014-06-01

    We developed a highly sensitive chemiluminescent (CL) assay for hydrogen peroxide using 10-methyl-9-(phenoxycarbonyl) acridinium fluorosulfonate (PMAC) that produced chemiluminescence under neutral conditions and applied it to an enzyme immunoassay (EIA). One picomole of hydrogen peroxide could be detected using the optimized PMAC-CL method and 6.2 × 10(-20) mol β-D-galactosidase (β-gal) could be detected by combining an indoxyl derivative substrate and the proposed PMAC-CL method. This highly sensitive CL β-gal assay was applied to an EIA for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) using β-gal as a label enzyme; 0.02-100.0 μU/mL TSH in human serum could be assayed directly and with high reproducibility.

  16. Measurement of the Branching Fraction, and Bounds on the CP-Violating Asymmetries, of Neutral B Decays to D*±D∓

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Barillari, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; T'jampens, S.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Bernet, R.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Borean, C.; Bozzi, C.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Back, J. J.; Bellodi, G.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Hart, P. A.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Winterton, J.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Pulliam, T.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Buono, L. Del; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Triggiani, G.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, S.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gamba, D.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Liu, R.; Lodovico, F. Di; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2003-06-01

    We present measurements of the branching fraction and CP-violating asymmetries for neutral B decays to D*±D∓. The measurement uses a data sample of approximately 88×106 ϒ(4S)→BB¯ decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+-e- collider. By fully reconstructing the D*±D∓ decay products, we measure the branching fraction to be (8.8±1.0±1.3)×10-4 and the time-integrated CP-violating asymmetry between the rates to D*-D+ and D*+D- to be A=-0.03±0.11±0.05. We also measure the time-dependent CP-violating asymmetry parameters to be S-+=-0.24±0.69±0.12, C-+=-0.22±0.37±0.10 for B→D*-D+ and S+-=-0.82±0.75±0.14, C+-=-0.47±0.40±0.12 for B→D*+D-. In each case, the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  17. 3D-CSIA: carbon, chlorine, and hydrogen isotope fractionation in transformation of TCE to ethene by a Dehalococcoides culture.

    PubMed

    Kuder, Tomasz; van Breukelen, Boris M; Vanderford, Mindy; Philp, Paul

    2013-09-03

    Carbon (C), chlorine (Cl), and hydrogen (H) isotope effects were determined during dechlorination of TCE to ethene by a mixed Dehalococcoides (Dhc) culture. The C isotope effects for the dechlorination steps were consistent with data published in the past for reductive dechlorination (RD) by Dhc. The Cl effects (combined with an inverse H effect in TCE) suggested that dechlorination proceeded through nucleophilic reactions with cobalamin rather than by an electron transfer mechanism. Depletions of (37)Cl in daughter compounds, resulting from fractionation at positions away from the dechlorination center (secondary isotope effects), further support the nucleophilic dechlorination mechanism. Determination of C and Cl isotope ratios of the reactants and products in the reductive dechlorination chain offers a potential tool for differentiation of Dhc activity from alternative transformation mechanisms (e.g., aerobic degradation and reductive dechlorination proceeding via outer sphere mechanisms), in studies of in situ attenuation of chlorinated ethenes. Hydrogenation of the reaction products (DCE, VC, and ethene) showed a major preference for the (1)H isotope. Detection of depleted dechlorination products could provide a line of evidence in discrimination between alternative sources of TCE (e.g., evolution from DNAPL sources or from conversion of PCE).

  18. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation between brucite and aqueous NaCl solutions from 250 to 450°C

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saccocia, Peter J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope fractionation factors between brucite and aqueous NaCl solutions (1000lnαbr-sw) have been calibrated by experiment from 250 to 450°C at 0.5 Kb. For D/H fractionation, 1000lnα br-sw values are as follows: −32 ± 6‰ (250°C, 3.2 wt% NaCl), −21 ± 2‰ (350°C, 10.0 wt% NaCl), and −22 ± 2‰ (450°C, 3.2 wt% NaCl), indicating that brucite is depleted in D relative to coexisting aqueous NaCl solutions. These results are in good agreement with previous D/H fractionation factors determined in the brucite-water system, indicating that any effects of dissolved salt on D/H fractionation are relatively small, particularly in solutions with near seawater salinity. The maximum salt effect (+4‰) was observed in 10.0 wt% NaCl solutions at 350°C, suggesting that the addition of dissolved NaCl increases the amount of deuterium fractionated into mineral structures. For 18O/16O fractionation, 1000lnαbr-sw values in 3.0 wt% NaCl solutions are −6.0 ± 1.3‰, −5.6 ± 0.7‰ and −4.1 ± 0.2‰, at 250, 350, and 450°C, respectively, and −5.8 ± 0.6‰ in 10.0 wt % NaCl at 350°C. These data indicate that brucite is depleted in 18O relative to coexisting aqueous NaCl solutions and that the degree of depletion decreases slightly with increasing temperature and is not strongly dependent on salinity. We calculated 18O/16O brucite-water fractionation factors from available calibrations of the salt-effect on 18O/16O fractionation between coexisting phases. The resulting values were fit to the following equation that is valid from 250 to 450°C 1000ln αbr-w = 9.54 × 106T−2 − 3.53 × 104T−1 + 26.58 where T is temperature in Kelvins. These new data have been used to improve the prediction of 18O/16O fractionation factors in the talc-water and serpentine-water systems by modifying existing empirical bond-water models. The results of this analysis indicate that the δ18O composition of talc-brucite and serpentine

  19. Sulfur isotopic fractionation in vacuum UV photodissociation of hydrogen sulfide and its potential relevance to meteorite analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subrata; Jackson, Teresa L.; Ahmed, Musahid; Thiemens, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Select meteoritic classes possess mass-independent sulfur isotopic compositions in sulfide and organic phases. Photochemistry in the solar nebula has been attributed as a source of these anomalies. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the most abundant gas-phase species in the solar nebula, and hence, photodissociation of H2S by solar vacuum UV (VUV) photons (especially by Lyman-α radiation) is a relevant process. Because of experimental difficulties associated with accessing VUV radiation, there is a paucity of data and a lack of theoretical basis to test the hypothesis of a photochemical origin of mass-independent sulfur. Here, we present multiisotopic measurements of elemental sulfur produced during the VUV photolysis of H2S. Mass-independent sulfur isotopic compositions are observed. The observed isotopic fractionation patterns are wavelength-dependent. VUV photodissociation of H2S takes place through several predissociative channels, and the measured mass-independent fractionation is most likely a manifestation of these processes. Meteorite sulfur data are discussed in light of the present experiments, and suggestions are made to guide future experiments and models. PMID:23431159

  20. Sulfur isotopic fractionation in vacuum UV photodissociation of hydrogen sulfide and its potential relevance to meteorite analysis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Subrata; Jackson, Teresa L; Ahmed, Musahid; Thiemens, Mark H

    2013-10-29

    Select meteoritic classes possess mass-independent sulfur isotopic compositions in sulfide and organic phases. Photochemistry in the solar nebula has been attributed as a source of these anomalies. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the most abundant gas-phase species in the solar nebula, and hence, photodissociation of H2S by solar vacuum UV (VUV) photons (especially by Lyman-α radiation) is a relevant process. Because of experimental difficulties associated with accessing VUV radiation, there is a paucity of data and a lack of theoretical basis to test the hypothesis of a photochemical origin of mass-independent sulfur. Here, we present multiisotopic measurements of elemental sulfur produced during the VUV photolysis of H2S. Mass-independent sulfur isotopic compositions are observed. The observed isotopic fractionation patterns are wavelength-dependent. VUV photodissociation of H2S takes place through several predissociative channels, and the measured mass-independent fractionation is most likely a manifestation of these processes. Meteorite sulfur data are discussed in light of the present experiments, and suggestions are made to guide future experiments and models.

  1. Measurements of neutral hydrogen profiles on the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch from time-resolved ? line emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallander, J.; Hedqvist, A.; Rachlew-Källne, E.

    1998-09-01

    The investigations of the radial distributions of 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission from the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma show that the emission profile varies a lot, even during one plasma discharge. At central electron temperatures of about 150 eV it was expected that the 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission should emerge from the plasma centre. In comparison, 0953-4075/31/17/015/img4 is always observed to radiate from the centre. Our measurements of 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission have, however, shown that this is not always the case, the emission often comes from the plasma edge. The analysis of the measurements has led us to conclude that the edge emission comes from charge-exchange recombination with neutral hydrogen near the carbon first wall. These observations provide a way to estimate the change in neutral hydrogen density during local plasma-wall interaction.

  2. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen-atom collisions with neutral atoms: Theory, comparisons, and application to Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.

    2016-04-01

    A theoretical method is presented for the estimation of cross sections and rates for excitation and charge-transfer processes in low-energy hydrogen-atom collisions with neutral atoms, based on an asymptotic two-electron model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen-atom system. The calculation of potentials and nonadiabatic radial couplings using the method is demonstrated. The potentials are used together with the multichannel Landau-Zener model to calculate cross sections and rate coefficients. The main feature of the method is that it employs asymptotically exact atomic wave functions, which can be determined from known atomic parameters. The method is applied to Li+H , Na+H , and Mg+H collisions, and the results compare well with existing detailed full-quantum calculations. The method is applied to the astrophysically important problem of Ca+H collisions, and rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20 000 K.

  3. Characteristics of a high-power RF source of negative hydrogen ions for neutral beam injection into controlled fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdrashitov, G. F.; Belchenko, Yu. I.; Gusev, I. A.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kondakov, A. A.; Sanin, A. L.; Sotnikov, O. Z.; Shikhovtsev, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    An injector of hydrogen atoms with an energy of 0.5-1 MeV and equivalent current of up to 1.5 A for purposes of controlled fusion research is currently under design at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences. Within this project, a multiple-aperture RF surface-plasma source of negative hydrogen ions is designed. The source design and results of experiments on the generation of a negative ion beam with a current of >1 A in the long-pulse mode are presented.

  4. Electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase is central to hydrogen isotope fractionation during lipid biosynthesis in sulfate reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, W.; Flynn, T. M.; Suess, M.; Bradley, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    A significant range in microbial lipid 2H/1H ratios is observed in modern marine sediments [Li et al. 2009. GCA]. The magnitude of hydrogen isotope fractionation between microbial lipids and growth water (2ɛlipid-H2O) is hypothesized to relate to the central carbon and energy metabolism [Zhang et al. 2009. PNAS]. These observations have raised the intriguing possibility for culture independent identification of the dominant metabolic pathways operating in environments critical to the geological record. One such metabolism we would like to track for its global significance in sedimentary carbon cycling is bacterial sulfate reduction [Jørgensen. 1982. Nature]. To-date, heterotrophic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) have been observed to produce lipids that are depleted in fatty acid H-isotope composition, relative to growth water (2ɛlipid-H2O ~ -125 to -175 ‰), with experiments on different substrates yielding little variability [Campbell et al. 2009. GCA; Osburn. 2013; Dawson et al. 2015. Geobiology]. In stark contrast, aerobic heterotrophs show a wide range in fractionations (2ɛlipid-H2O ~ +300 to -125‰) which seems to scale with the route cellular carbon metabolism [Zhang et al. 2009. PNAS; Heinzelmann et al. 2015. Front Microbio]. Recent work in aerobic methylotrophs [Bradley et al. 2014. AGU] implicates transhydrogenase (TH) activity as a critical control on 2ɛlipid-H2O. This work suggests a specific driving mechanism for this range in fractionation is the ratio of intracellular NADPH/NADH, and more fundamentally, the intracellular redox state. In SRB a key component of energy metabolism is the activity of electron-bifurcating TH [Price et al. 2014. Front Microbio], for which a recent transposon mutant library has generated a number of knockouts in the target gene [Kuehl et al. 2014. mBio] in the model organism Desulfovibrio alaskensis strain G20. In this study we compare growth rates, fatty acid concentrations and 2ɛlipid-H2O from wild type and TH

  5. Neutral pH hydrogen-enriched electrolyzed water achieves tumor-preferential clonal growth inhibition over normal cells and tumor invasion inhibition concurrently with intracellular oxidant repression.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Yasukazu; Okayasu, Hajime; Xiao, Li; Harata, Yoshikazu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2008-01-01

    The properties and effects of neutral pH hydrogen-enriched electrolyzed water (NHE water) on tumor cells were examined. NHE water diminished hydroxyl radicals as demonstrated by ESR in a cell-free system. Human tongue carcinoma cells HSC-4 were inhibited for either colony formation efficiencies or colony sizes by NHE water without significant inhibition to normal human tongue epithelial-like cells DOK. Furthermore, NHE water caused growth inhibition, cell degeneration, and inhibition of invasion through the reconstituted basement membrane to human fibrosarcoma cells HT-1080. Intracellular oxidants such as hydroperoxides and hydrogen peroxides were scavenged in HSC-4 or HT-1080 cells by NHE water. In the human oral cavity, a dissolved hydrogen concentrations (DH) of NHE water was drastically declined from 1.1 to 0.5 ppm, but settled to 0.3-0.4 ppm until 180 s, upon static holding without gargling. Thus, NHE water was shown to achieve tumor-preferential growth inhibition and tumor invasion together with scavenging of intracellular oxidants, and is expected as a preventive material against tumor progression and invasion.

  6. The morphology and kinematics of neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of z = 0 galaxies with Milky Way masses - a study with the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Nelson, Dylan

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the properties of the circumgalactic gas (circumgalactic medium, CGM) around 120 galaxies with stellar and dark matter halo masses similar to that of the Milky Way. We focus on the morphology and kinematics of the neutral hydrogen and how this depends on fg, the ratio of gas-to-stellar mass within the optical radius. In gas-rich galaxies with fg > 0.1, gas temperatures rise slowly from centre of the halo out to the virial radius and average neutral gas column densities remain above 1019 atoms cm-2 out to radii of 50-70 kpc. In gas-poor galaxies with fg < 0.1, gas temperatures rise quickly outside the edge of the disc to ˜106 K, and then remain fixed out to radii of 100 kpc. The column density of neutral gas quickly drops below 1019 atoms cm-2 at radii of 10 kpc. Neutral gas distributions are also more asymmetric in gas-poor galaxies. Most of the differences between gas-poor and gas-rich galaxies in the Illustris simulation can be attributed to the effects of `radio-mode' AGN feedback. In the Illustris simulation, the circumgalactic gas is found to rotate coherently about the centre of the galaxy with a maximum rotational velocity of around 200 km s-1. In gas-rich galaxies, the average coherence length of the rotating gas is 40 kpc, compared to 10 kpc in gas-poor galaxies. In the very most gas-rich systems, the CGM can rotate coherently over scales of 70-100 kpc. We discuss our results in the context of recent observations of the CGM in low-mass galaxies via UV absorption-line spectroscopy and deep 21 cm observations of edge-on spiral galaxies.

  7. The Morphology And Kinematics Of Neutral Hydrogen In The Vicinity Of Z=0 Galaxies With Milky-Way Masses - A Study With The Illustris Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the properties of the circumgalactic gas (CGM) around 120 galaxies with stellar and dark matter halo masses similar to that of the Milky Way. We focus on the morphology and kinematics of the neutral hydrogen component of the CGM and how this depends on the ratio of gas-to-stellar mass within the optical radius. In gas-rich galaxies, gas temperatures rise monotonically from center of the halo out to the virial radius. Average neutral gas column densities remain higher than 10**19 atoms cm-2 all the way from the center of the galaxy out to radii of 50-70 kpc. In gas-poor galaxies with fg < 0.1, gas temperatures remain fixed at 10^6 K from the edge of the disk out to radii of 100 kpc. The column density of neutral gas drops below 1019 atoms cm-2 at radii of 10 kpc. The neutral gas distributions are also more asymmetric in gas-poor galaxies. Most of these trends can be explained by the fact that in the Illustris simulation, gas-poor galaxies with Milky Way masses have massive (108Mo) black holes that accrete at few percent of Eddington, and that energy is being dumped into the halo at large (100 kpc) radii in the form of bubbles of hot gas in these systems. We also find that the circumgalactic gas rotates coherently about the center of the galaxy with a maximum rotational velocity of around 200 km/s. In gas-rich galaxies, the average coherence length of the rotating gas is 40 kpc, compared to 10 kpc in gas-poor galaxies. In the most gas-rich systems, the CGM can rotate coherently over scales of 70-100 kpc. We discuss our results in the context of recent observations of the CGM in low mass galaxies via UV absorption-line spectroscopy and deep 21cm observations of edge-on spiral galaxies.

  8. Isotopic fractionation factor and hydrogenic potential in 2-hydroxy-1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2-penten-4-one

    SciTech Connect

    Kreevoy, M.M.; Ridl, B.A.

    1981-04-02

    The title compound (enol-hexafluoroacetylacetone) has an isotopic fractionation factor of 0.6 +- 0.1. This, and much other information about this compound, can be rationalized if the enolic hydrogen bridges between the two oxygens and is governed by a double minimum potential function with a central maximum of approx. 3000 cm/sup -1/ (8 kcal/mol)(eq 10).

  9. Growth-dependent hydrogen isotopic fractionation of algal lipid biomarkers in hypersaline Isabel Lake (México)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Viana, Lidia; Kienel, Ulrike; Wilkes, Heinz; Sachse, Dirk

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the potential of the hydrogen isotopic composition of algal lipid biomarkers as a proxy for past hydroclimatic variability in hypersaline Isabel Lake, Mexico (Eastern Pacific). We compared rainfall variability recorded in the region over the last 65 years with changes in δD values of the most abundant compounds preserved in the uppermost 16 cm of lake sediment. Changes in δD values of the 1,15-C32 diol (δDdiol), a specific biomarker of algal populations, were related to rainfall variability; specifically, n-alkyl diols were more deuterium-enriched (depleted) during wetter (drier) periods. Strikingly, neither the magnitude of lipid biomarker isotopic changes over interannual timescales (of up to 70-80‰) nor the direction of that variability can be explained by changes in δD values of the water source or salinity fluctuations (approximately 30 on the practical salinity scale) controlled by seasonal rainfall. However, changes in sedimentary biomarker composition, higher total organic carbon content and less negative δ13C values of the 1,15-C32 diol indicate enhanced algal growth during wetter periods. We find that these conditions result in less negative δD values of n-alkyl diols. We hypothesize that due to higher lipid demand during enhanced algal growth, an increasing proportion of hydrogen for lipid synthesis is derived from the cytosol via oxidation of polysaccharides, which may cause a deuterium enrichment of the acetogenic compounds. This study has significant implications for paleohydrological reconstructions using algal lipid δD values, particularly in highly seasonal environments such as Isabel Lake. In such environments, δD values of specific algal lipid biomarkers may not record the full seasonal cycle in source water δD but appear to be mainly controlled by the physiological state of algal populations. Our data provide the first evidence that changes in D/H fractionation due to algal growth conditions can be recorded

  10. Solar Neutral Particles

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows a neutral solar particle's path leaving the sun, following the magnetic field lines out to the heliosheath. The solar particle hits a hydrogen atom, stealing its electron, and ...

  11. Substitution of crude cell wall for neutral detergent fibre in the equations of the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System that predict carbohydrate fractions: application to sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Queiroz, M A A; Fukushima, R S; Gomide, C A; Braga, M R

    2008-07-01

    Prediction of carbohydrate fractions using equations from the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System (CNCPS) is a valuable tool to assess the nutritional value of forages. In this paper, these carbohydrate fractions were predicted using data from three sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cultivars, fresh or as silage. The CNCPS equations for fractions B2 and C include measurement of ash and protein-free neutral detergent fibre (NDF) as one of their components. However, NDF lacks pectin and other non-starch polysaccharides that are found in the cell wall (CW) matrix, so this work compared the use of a crude CW preparation instead of NDF in the CNCPS equations. There were no differences in the estimates of fractions B1 and C when CW replaced NDF; however, there were differences in fractions A and B2. Some of the CNCPS equations could be simplified when using CW instead of NDF. Notably, lignin could be expressed as a proportion of DM, rather than on the basis of ash and protein-free NDF, when predicting CNCPS fraction C. The CNCPS fraction B1 (starch + pectin) values were lower than pectin determined through wet chemistry. This finding, along with the results obtained by the substitution of CW for NDF in the CNCPS equations, suggests that pectin was not part of fraction B1 but present in fraction A. We suggest that pectin and other non-starch polysaccharides that are dissolved by the neutral detergent solution be allocated to a specific fraction (B2) and that another fraction (B3) be adopted for the digestible cell wall carbohydrates.

  12. Time and concentration dependency in the potentially affected fraction of species: the case of hydrogen peroxide treatment of ballast water.

    PubMed

    Smit, Mathijs G D; Ebbens, Eltjo; Jak, Robbert G; Huijbregtst, Mark A J

    2008-03-01

    Transport of large volumes of ballast water contributes greatly to invasions of species. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can be used as a disinfectant to prevent the spread of exotic species via ballast water. Instead of using environmental risk assessment techniques for protecting a certain fraction of the species from being affected, the present study aimed to apply these techniques to define treatment regimes of H2O2 and effectively eliminate as many species as possible. Based on time-dependent dose-response curves for five marine species (Corophium volutator, Artemia salina, Brachionus plicatilis, Dunaliella teriolecta, and Skeletonema costatum), time-dependent species-sensitivity distributions (SSDs) were derived for different effect sizes. The present study showed that H2O2 can be used effectively to treat ballast water but that relatively high concentrations and long treatment durations are required to eliminate the vast majority of species in ballast water. The described toxicant effectiveness approach using SSDs also has other potential fields of application, including short-term application of biocides.

  13. Neutral transition metal hydrides as acids in hydrogen bonding and proton transfer: media polarity and specific solvation effects.

    PubMed

    Levina, Vladislava A; Filippov, Oleg A; Gutsul, Evgenii I; Belkova, Natalia V; Epstein, Lina M; Lledos, Agusti; Shubina, Elena S

    2010-08-18

    Structural, spectroscopic, and electronic features of weak hydrogen-bonded complexes of CpM(CO)(3)H (M = Mo (1a), W (1b)) hydrides with organic bases (phosphine oxides R(3)PO (R = n-C(8)H(17), NMe(2)), amines NMe(3), NEt(3), and pyridine) are determined experimentally (variable temperature IR) and computationally (DFT/M05). The intermediacy of these complexes in reversible proton transfer is shown, and the thermodynamic parameters (DeltaH degrees , DeltaS degrees ) of each reaction step are determined in hexane. Assignment of the product ion pair structure is made with the help of the frequency calculations. The solvent effects were studied experimentally using IR spectroscopy in CH(2)Cl(2), THF, and CH(3)CN and computationally using conductor-like polarizable continuum model (CPCM) calculations. This complementary approach reveals the particular importance of specific solvation for the hydrogen-bond formation step. The strength of the hydrogen bond between hydrides 1 and the model bases is similar to that of the M-H...X hydrogen bond between 1 and THF (X = O) or CH(3)CN (X = N) or between CH(2)Cl(2) and the same bases. The latter competitive weak interactions lower the activities of both the hydrides and the bases in the proton transfer reaction. In this way, these secondary effects shift the proton transfer equilibrium and lead to the counterintuitive hampering of proton transfer upon solvent change from hexane to moderately polar CH(2)Cl(2) or THF.

  14. Neutral Hydrogen Observations of the Extremely Metal-Poor Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy SBS 0335-052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, E.; Pustilnik, S.; Thuan, T. X.; Izotov, Y. I.

    2002-02-01

    We present VLA H I observations of one of the most metal-deficient blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxies known, SBS 0335-052, which sports an oxygen abundance of only 1/40 that of the Sun. We study the structure and dynamics of the neutral gas in this chemically young object at a spatial resolution of 20''×15'' ( 5.4×3.9 kpc at a distance of 54 Mpc), and a velocity resolution of 21.2 kms-1.

  15. Comparison of high energy gamma rays from absolute value of b greater than 30 deg with the galactic neutral hydrogen distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozel, M. E.; Ogelman, H.; Tumer, T.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    High-energy gamma-ray (energy above 35 MeV) data from the SAS 2 satellite have been used to compare the intensity distribution of gamma rays with that of neutral hydrogen (H I) density along the line of sight, at high galactic latitudes (absolute values greater than 30 deg). A model has been constructed for the case where the observed gamma-ray intensity has been assumed to be the sum of a galactic component proportional to the H I distribution plus an isotropic extragalactic emission. A chi-squared test of the model parameters indicates that about 30% of the total high-latitude emission may originate within the Galaxy.

  16. Association of the supernova remnant G 65.3+5.7 with ambient neutral hydrogen and a possible nature of the remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosachinskii, I. V.

    2010-04-01

    The neutral hydrogen at 21 cm has been investigated with the RATAN-600 radio telescope around the supernova remnant G 65.3+5.7, which has the largest angular sizes in the group of shell remnants. An expanding HI shell left after an old supernova explosion with an energy of ˜1051 erg and an age of 440 000 yr coincident in coordinates with the radio and optical remnant has been discovered. Since an X-ray emission from a much younger (27 000 yr) supernova remnant is observed in the same region and the shells detected by nebular lines have probably intermediate ages, we suggest that several successive supernova explosions have occurred here.

  17. Development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system for observation of neutral hydrogen atom density distribution in Large Helical Device core plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K. Atsumi, S.; Watanabe, S.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2014-02-15

    We report development of a high dynamic range spectroscopic system comprising a spectrometer with 30% throughput and a camera with a low-noise fast-readout complementary metal-oxide semiconductor sensor. The system achieves a 10{sup 6} dynamic range (∼20 bit resolution) and an instrumental function approximated by a Voigt profile with Gauss and Lorentz widths of 31 and 0.31 pm, respectively, for 656 nm light. The application of the system for line profile observations of the Balmer-α emissions from high temperature plasmas generated in the Large Helical Device is also presented. In the observed line profiles, emissions are detected in far wings more than 1.0 nm away from the line center, equivalent to neutral hydrogen atom kinetic energies above 1 keV. We evaluate atom density distributions in the core plasma by analyzing the line profiles.

  18. Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste combining two pretreatment modalities, high temperature microwave and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Shahriari, Haleh; Warith, Mostafa; Hamoda, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin J.

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microwave and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment were studied to enhance anaerobic digestion of organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The whole waste pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C or 145 Degree-Sign C had the highest biogas production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biogas production of the whole waste decreased at 175 Degree-Sign C due to formation of refractory compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pretreatment to 145 Degree-Sign C and 175 Degree-Sign C were the best when considering only the free liquid fraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment had a lag phase and the biogas production was not higher than MW pretreated samples. - Abstract: In order to enhance anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), pretreatment combining two modalities, microwave (MW) heating in presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) were investigated. The main pretreatment variables affecting the characteristics of the OFMSW were temperature (T) via MW irradiation and supplemental water additions of 20% and 30% (SWA20 and SW30). Subsequently, the focus of this study was to evaluate mesophilic batch AD performance in terms of biogas production, as well as changes in the characteristics of the OFMSW post digestion. A high MW induced temperature range (115-175 Degree-Sign C) was applied, using sealed vessels and a bench scale MW unit equipped with temperature and pressure controls. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted on the whole OFMSW as well as the liquid fractions. The whole OFMSW pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C and 145 Degree-Sign C showed 4-7% improvement in biogas production over untreated OFMSW (control). When pretreated at 175 Degree-Sign C, biogas production decreased due to formation of refractory compounds, inhibiting the digestion. For the liquid fraction of OFMSW, the effect of pretreatment on the cumulative biogas production (CBP

  19. Fractionation factors and activation energies for exchange of the low barrier hydrogen bonding proton in peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketone complexes of chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Westler, W M; Cleland, W W; Markley, J L; Frey, P A

    1998-12-08

    NMR investigations have been carried out of complexes between bovine chymotrypsin Aalpha and a series of four peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketones, listed here in order of increasing affinity for chymotrypsin: N-Acetyl-L-Phe-CF3, N-Acetyl-Gly-L-Phe-CF3, N-Acetyl-L-Val-L-Phe-CF3, and N-Acetyl-L-Leu-L-Phe-CF3. The D/H fractionation factors (phi) for the hydrogen in the H-bond between His 57 and Asp 102 (His 57-Hdelta1) in these four complexes at 5 degreesC were in the range phi = 0.32-0.43, expected for a low-barrier hydrogen bond. For this series of complexes, measurements also were made of the chemical shifts of His 57-Hepsilon1 (delta2,2-dimethylsilapentane-5-sulfonic acid 8.97-9. 18), the exchange rate of the His 57-Hdelta1 proton with bulk water protons (284-12.4 s-1), and the activation enthalpies for this hydrogen exchange (14.7-19.4 kcal.mol-1). It was found that the previously noted correlations between the inhibition constants (Ki 170-1.2 microM) and the chemical shifts of His 57-Hdelta1 (delta2, 2-dimethylsilapentane-5-sulfonic acid 18.61-18.95) for this series of peptidyl trifluoromethyl ketones with chymotrypsin [Lin, J., Cassidy, C. S. & Frey, P. A. (1998) Biochemistry 37, 11940-11948] could be extended to include the fractionation factors, hydrogen exchange rates, and hydrogen exchange activation enthalpies. The results support the proposal of low barrier hydrogen bond-facilitated general base catalysis in the addition of Ser 195 to the peptidyl carbonyl group of substrates in the mechanism of chymotrypsin-catalyzed peptide hydrolysis. Trends in the enthalpies for hydrogen exchange and the fractionation factors are consistent with a strong, double-minimum or single-well potential hydrogen bond in the strongest complexes. The lifetimes of His 57-Hdelta1, which is solvent shielded in these complexes, track the strength of the hydrogen bond. Because these lifetimes are orders of magnitude shorter than those of the complexes themselves, the enzyme must have a

  20. Rayleigh-based concept to tackle strong hydrogen fractionation in dual isotope analysis-the example of ethylbenzene degradation by Aromatoleum aromaticum.

    PubMed

    Dorer, Conrad; Höhener, Patrick; Hedwig, Normen; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Vogt, Carsten

    2014-05-20

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is a state-of-the-art analytical tool that can be used to establish and quantify biodegradation of pollutants such as BTEX compounds at contaminated field sites. Using isotopes of two elements and characteristic Lambda values (Λ) in dual-isotope-plots can provide insight into reaction mechanisms because kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) of both elements are reflected. However, the concept's validity in the case of reactions that show strong isotope fractionation needs to be examined. The anaerobic ethylbenzene degradation pathway of Aromatoleum aromaticum is initiated by the ethylbenzene dehydrogenase-catalyzed monohydroxylation of the benzylic carbon atom. Measurements of stable isotope ratios revealed highly pronounced hydrogen fractionation, which could not be adequately described by the classical Rayleigh approach. This study demonstrates the nonlinear behavior of hydrogen isotope ratios caused by anaerobic ethylbenzene hydroxylation both mathematically and experimentally, develops alternative dual plots to enable the comparison of reactions by considering the reacting atoms, and illustrates the importance of the stereochemical aspects of substrate and product for the quantification of hydrogen fractionation in an enzymatic reaction. With regard to field application, proposals for an improved CSIA evaluation procedure with respect to pronounced hydrogen enrichment are given.

  1. An Efficient CuxO Photocathode for Hydrogen Production at Neutral pH: New Insights from Combined Spectroscopy and Electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Baran, Tomasz; Wojtyła, Szymon; Lenardi, Cristina; Vertova, Alberto; Ghigna, Paolo; Achilli, Elisabetta; Fracchia, Martina; Rondinini, Sandra; Minguzzi, Alessandro

    2016-08-24

    Light-driven water splitting is one of the most promising approaches for using solar energy in light of more sustainable development. In this paper, a highly efficient p-type copper(II) oxide photocathode is studied. The material, prepared by thermal treatment of CuI nanoparticles, is initially partially reduced upon working conditions and soon reaches a stable form. Upon visible-light illumination, the material yields a photocurrent of 1.3 mA cm(-2) at a potential of 0.2 V vs a reversible hydrogen electrode at mild pH under illumination by AM 1.5 G and retains 30% of its photoactivity after 6 h. This represents an unprecedented result for a nonprotected Cu oxide photocathode at neutral pH. The photocurrent efficiency as a function of the applied potential was determined using scanning electrochemical microscopy. The material was characterized in terms of photoelectrochemical features; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption near-edge structure, fixed-energy X-ray absorption voltammetry, and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analyses were carried out on pristine and used samples, which were used to explain the photoelectrochemical behavior. The optical features of the oxide are evidenced by direct reflectance spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, and Mott-Schottky analysis at different pH values explains the exceptional activity at neutral pH.

  2. The Effect of Temperature and Hydrogen Limited Growth on the Fractionation of Sulfur Isotopes by Thermodesulfatator indicus, a Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, J.; Reysenbach, A.; Habicht, K.; Canfield, D. E.

    2004-12-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria fractionate sulfur isotopes during dissimilatory sulfate reduction, producing sulfide depleted in 34S. Although isotope fractionation during sulfate reduction of pure cultures has been extensively studied, most of the research to date has focused on mesophilic sulfate reducers, particularly for the species Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. Results from these studies show that: 1) fractionations range from 3-46‰ with an average around 18‰ , 2) when organic electron donors are utilized, the extent of fractionation is dependent on the rate of sulfate reduction, with decreasing fractionations observed with higher specific rates, 3) fractionations are suppressed with low sulfate concentrations, and when hydrogen is used as the electron donor. High specific sulfate-reduction rates are encountered when sulfate-reducing bacteria metabolize at their optimal temperature and under non-limiting substrate conditions. Changes in both temperature and substrate availability could shift fractionations from those expressed under optimal growth conditions. Sulfate reducers may frequently experience substrate limitation and sub-optimal growth temperatures in the environment. Therefore it is important to understand how sulfate-reducing bacteria fractionate sulfur isotopes under conditions that more closely resemble the restrictions imposed by the environment. In this study the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by Thermodesulfatator indicus was explored during sulfate reduction under a wide range of temperatures and with both hydrogen-saturating and hydrogen-limited conditions. T. indicus is a thermophilic (temperature optimum = 70° C) chemolithotrophic sulfate-reducing bacterium, which was recently isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent on the Central Indian Ridge. This bacterium represents the type species of a new genus and to date is the most deeply branching sulfate-reducing bacterium known. T. indicus was grown in carbonate-buffered salt-water medium

  3. Discovery of neutral hydrogen 21 centimeter absorption at redshift 0.25 toward PKS 1413+135

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Perlman, Eric S.; Stocke, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A strong H I 21-cm absorption line is identified toward PKS 1413+135 at the redshift of the host galaxy and argued to indicate that the IR-optical cutoff of the BL Lac object's spectrum is caused by extinction. The BL Lac object is shown to have strong neutral 21-cm absorption at the redshift range z = 0.24671 +/- 0.00001, and the implied H I column density is derived. The H I covering factor is assumed to be not more than 0.1, suggesting that a high degree of extinction exists in the galaxy. The host galaxy is theorized to be a spiral of type later than S0 based on the redshift of the H I absorption line and the host. The statistical and observational conclusions are found to support the theories of Stock et al. (1992) regarding the red spectrum of the object.

  4. Binding and photocleavage of a neutral nickel(II) bis(hydrogen pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato) complex to DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingxiang; Li, Wenqi; Liu, Aifeng; Zhang, Bin; Gao, Feng; Li, Shunxing; Liao, Xiaolei

    2011-01-01

    A neutral nickel(II) bis(pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylato) complex, [Ni(Hdipic -) 2] (Hdipic - = monohydricsalt of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid) was synthesized and its interaction with DNA were comprehensively investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy, viscosity, fluorescence, melting temperature and gel electrophoresis measurements in this paper. Spectrophotometric titration suggested that the nickel(II) complex could intercalatively bind to DNA via the planar dipicolinic acid moiety with a moderate binding strength of 1.6 × 10 4 M -1, and these results were further proved by the systematic studies of viscosity, ethidium bromide (EB) displacement and melting temperature experiments. Moreover, agarose gel electrophoresis assays showed that [Ni(Hdipic -) 2] had obvious photocleavage property for the supercoiled plasmid pBR322 DNA under 302 nm irradiation for 30 min, which allow us to postulate the studied complex as a proper candidate for photocleavage reagent.

  5. A silica-supported iron oxide catalyst capable of activating hydrogen peroxide at neutral pH values.

    PubMed

    Pham, Anh Le-Tuan; Lee, Changha; Doyle, Fiona M; Sedlak, David L

    2009-12-01

    Iron oxides catalyze the conversion of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) into oxidants capable of transforming recalcitrant contaminants. Unfortunately, the process is relatively inefficient at circumneutral pH values because of competing reactions that decompose H(2)O(2) without producing oxidants. Silica- and alumina-containing iron oxides prepared by sol-gel processing of aqueous solutions containing Fe(ClO(4))(3), AlCl(3), and tetraethyl orthosilicate efficiently catalyzed the decomposition of H(2)O(2) into oxidants capable of transforming phenol at circumneutral pH values. Relative to hematite, goethite, and amorphous FeOOH, the silica-iron oxide catalyst exhibited a stoichiometric efficiency, defined as the number of moles of phenol transformed per mole of H(2)O(2) consumed, which was 10-40 times higher than that of the iron oxides. The silica-alumina-iron oxide catalyst had a stoichiometric efficiency that was 50-80 times higher than that of the iron oxides. The significant enhancement in oxidant production is attributable to the interaction of Fe with Al and Si in the mixed oxides, which alters the surface redox processes, favoring the production of strong oxidants during H(2)O(2) decomposition.

  6. He II Raman Scattered Line by Neutral Hydrogen in the Bipolar Platenary Nebula M2-9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee-Won; Kang, Young Woon

    2001-06-01

    In the spectrum of the young bipolar planetary nebula M2-9 obtained from the 1.5 m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, we detected the He~II feature at 6545 Å that are proposed to be formed via Raman scattering by atomic hydrogen. However, in the same spectrum, the He~II emission lines at 6527 Å and 6560 Å are absent, which implies that the He~II emission region is hidden from our line of sight and that the H~I scattering region is pretty much extended not to be obscured entirely. We performed photoionization computations to estimate the physical size of the He~II emission line region to be 1016 cm, from which the location and dimension of the obscuring circumstellar region are inferred and the temperature of the central star must exceed 105 K. The angular size of the circumstellar region responsible for the obscuration of the He~II emission region is ~ 1'' with the assumption of the distance 01 kpc to M2-9, which is consistent with the recent image of M2-9 obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  7. A Silica-Supported Iron Oxide Catalyst Capable of Activating Hydrogen Peroxide at Neutral pH Values

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Anh Le-Tuan; Lee, Changha; Doyle, Fiona M.; Sedlak, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Iron oxides catalyze the conversion of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into oxidants capable of transforming recalcitrant contaminants. Unfortunately, the process is relatively inefficient at circumneutral pH values due to competing reactions that decompose H2O2 without producing oxidants. Silica- and alumina-containing iron oxides prepared by sol-gel processing of aqueous solutions containing Fe(ClO4)3, AlCl3 and tetraethyl orthosilicate efficiently catalyzed the decomposition of H2O2 into oxidants capable of transforming phenol at circumneutral pH values. Relative to hematite, goethite and amorphous FeOOH, the silica-iron oxide catalyst exhibited a stoichiometric efficiency, defined as the number of moles of phenol transformed per mole of H2O2 consumed, that was 10 to 40 times higher than that of the iron oxides. The silica-alumina-iron oxide catalyst had a stoichiometric efficiency that was 50 to 80 times higher than that of the iron oxides. The significant enhancement in oxidant production is attributable to the interaction of Fe with Al and Si in the mixed oxides, which alters the surface redox processes, favoring the production of strong oxidants during H2O2 decomposition. PMID:19943668

  8. Formaldehyde and methanol formation from reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen on neutral Fe2S2 clusters in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shi; Wang, Zhechen; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2013-04-07

    Reaction of CO with H2 on neutral FemSn clusters in a fast flow reactor is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Single photon ionization at 118 nm is used to detect neutral cluster distributions through time of flight mass spectrometry. FemSn clusters are generated through laser ablation of a mixed iron-sulfur target in the presence of a pure helium carrier gas. A strong size dependent reactivity of (FeS)m clusters toward CO is characterized. The reaction FeS + CO → Fe + OCS is found for the FeS cluster, and the association product Fe2S2CO is observed for the Fe2S2 cluster. Products Fe2S2(13)COH2 and Fe2S2(13)COH4 are identified for reactions of (13)CO and H2 on Fe2S2 clusters: this suggests that the Fe2S2 cluster has a high catalytic activity for hydrogenation reactions of CO to form formaldehyde and methanol. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed to explore the potential energy surfaces for the two reactions: Fe2S2 + CO + 2H2 → Fe2S2 + CH3OH; and Fe2S2 + CO + H2 → Fe2S2 + CH2O. A barrierless, thermodynamically favorable pathway is obtained for both catalytic processes. Catalytic cycles for formaldehyde and methanol formation from CO and H2 on a Fe2S2 cluster are proposed based on our experimental and theoretical investigations. The various reaction mechanisms explored by DFT are in good agreement with the experimental results. Condensed phase iron sulfide, which contains exposed Fe2S2 units on its surface, is suggested to be a good catalyst for low temperature formaldehyde/methanol synthesis.

  9. Neutral Hydrogen Observations of the Extremely Metal-Poor Blue Compact Dwarf Galaxy SBS 0335-052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinks, E.; Pustilnik, S.; Thuan, T. X.; Lipovetsky, V.; Izotov, Yu. I.

    2000-11-01

    We present VLA HI observations of one of the most metal-deficient blue compa ct dwarf (BCD) galaxies known, SBS 0335-052, which sports an oxygen abundance of only 1/40th that of the Sun. We study the structure and dynamics of the neutral gas in this chemically young object at a spatial resolution of 20'' x 15'' (5.4 x 3.9 kpc at an assumed distance of 54 Mpc), and a velocity resolution of 21.2 km/s. We detected a large HI complex associated with this object with an overall size of about 64 x 21 kpc and elongated in the East-West direction. There are two prominent, slightly resolved peaks visible which are separated by 22 kpc (84''). The eastern peak is nearly coincident with the position of the optical galaxy SBS 0335-052. The western peak is about a factor of 1.3 brighter in the HI line and is identified with a faint blue compact galaxy, SBS 0335-052W, which has an mV = 19, and a metallicity close to the lowest values known for BCDs, about 1/50th that of the Sun. The radial velocities of both systems are similar, suggesting that the two BCDs form a pair of dwarf galaxies embedded in a common HI envelope. Alternatively, the BCDs could be the nuclei of two distinct interacting primordial HI clouds. The estimated total dynamical mass, assuming the BCDs form a bound system, is larger than 7 x 109 Mo. This is to be compared to a total gaseous mass Mgas = 2.0 x 109 Mo, and a total stellar mass Mstar < 108 Mo. Hence, the mass of the SBS 0335-052 system is dominated by dark matter. Because of the disturbed HI velocity field and the presence of what might be tidal tails at either end of the system, we favor the hypothesis that the star formation trigger in this system was provided by a tidal interaction, either with the nearby giant galaxy NGC 1376 or as a result of the mutual gravitational interaction of the two HI clouds proper.

  10. Hydrogen cyanide production due to mid-size impacts in a redox-neutral N2-rich atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Kosuke; Sugita, Seiji; Ishibashi, Ko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Sekine, Yasuhito; Ogawa, Nanako O; Kadono, Toshihiko; Ohno, Sohsuke; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Nagaoka, Yoichi; Matsui, Takafumi

    2013-06-01

    Cyanide compounds are amongst the most important molecules of the origin of life. Here, we demonstrate the importance of mid-size (0.1-1 km in diameter) hence frequent meteoritic impacts to the cyanide inventory on the early Earth. Subsequent aerodynamic ablation and chemical reactions with the ambient atmosphere after oblique impacts were investigated by both impact and laser experiments. A polycarbonate projectile and graphite were used as laboratory analogs of meteoritic organic matter. Spectroscopic observations of impact-generated ablation vapors show that laser irradiation to graphite within an N2-rich gas can produce a thermodynamic environment similar to that produced by oblique impacts. Thus, laser ablation was used to investigate the final chemical products after this aerodynamic process. We found that a significant fraction (>0.1 mol%) of the vaporized carbon is converted to HCN and cyanide condensates, even when the ambient gas contains as much as a few hundred mbar of CO2. As such, the column density of cyanides after carbon-rich meteoritic impacts with diameters of 600 m would reach ~10 mol/m(2) over ~10(2) km(2) under early Earth conditions. Such a temporally and spatially concentrated supply of cyanides may have played an important role in the origin of life.

  11. Neutral hydrogen gas, past and future star formation in galaxies in and around the `Sausage' merging galaxy cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroe, Andra; Oosterloo, Tom; Röttgering, Huub J. A.; Sobral, David; van Weeren, Reinout; Dawson, William

    2015-09-01

    CIZA J2242.8+5301 (z = 0.188, nicknamed `Sausage') is an extremely massive (M200 ˜ 2.0 × 1015 M⊙), merging cluster with shock waves towards its outskirts, which was found to host numerous emission line galaxies. We performed extremely deep Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope H I observations of the `Sausage' cluster to investigate the effect of the merger and the shocks on the gas reservoirs fuelling present and future star formation (SF) in cluster members. By using spectral stacking, we find that the emission line galaxies in the `Sausage' cluster have, on average, as much H I gas as field galaxies (when accounting for the fact cluster galaxies are more massive than the field galaxies), contrary to previous studies. Since the cluster galaxies are more massive than the field spirals, they may have been able to retain their gas during the cluster merger. The large H I reservoirs are expected to be consumed within ˜0.75-1.0 Gyr by the vigorous SF and active galactic nuclei activity and/or driven out by the outflows we observe. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a large fraction of H α emission line cluster galaxies correlates well with the radio broad-band emission, tracing supernova remnant emission. This suggests that the cluster galaxies, all located in post-shock regions, may have been undergoing sustained SFR for at least 100 Myr. This fully supports the interpretation proposed by Stroe et al. and Sobral et al. that gas-rich cluster galaxies have been triggered to form stars by the passage of the shock.

  12. Do Interspecific Differences in the Stable Hydrogen Isotopic Composition of n-Alkanes Reflect Variation in Plant Water Sources or in Biosynthetic Fractionation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. E.; Tipple, B. J.; Ehleringer, J. R.; Betancourt, J. L.; Leavitt, S. W.; Monson, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Normal alkanes (n-alkanes) are long-chain fatty acids that are a component of the leaf cuticle of all terrestrial plants. Since the hydrogen in the n-alkanes is derived from the hydrogen in plants' water sources and is non-exchangeable, the stable hydrogen isotopic composition (δD) of the n-alkanes provides information about the δD of environmental water. At present, it is unclear whether a single biosynthetic fractionation factor can be used to reconstruct the δD of environmental water from the δD of n-alkanes derived from different plant species. To address this question, we studied the translation of the δD signal from environmental water into n-alkanes in a diverse plant community at Tumamoc Hill, Arizona, USA. Over the course of one annual cycle, we monitored δD of atmospheric water vapor, precipitation, soil water, xylem water, leaf water, and n-alkanes. We found that n-alkane δD varied substantially between species that were sampled concurrently, but that the observed range of variation was quantitatively consistent with the predictions of a Craig-Gordon-type model parameterized with a single biosynthetic fractionation factor. These findings indicate that the variability of n-alkane δD between co-occurring species could be primarily attributable to interspecific differences in water sources, rather than interspecific differences in the biosynthetic fractionation factor. Controlled experiments are needed to evaluate whether n-alkane biosynthesis is in fact adequately described by a single biosynthetic fractionation factor across species.

  13. The Star Formation Rate Efficiency of Neutral Atomic-Dominated Hydrogen Gas in the Ooutskirts of Star-Forming Galaxies From z approx. 1 to z approx. 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rafelski, Marc; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Fumagalli, Michele; Neeleman, Marcel; Teplitz, Harry I.; Grogin, Norman; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Scarlata, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Current observational evidence suggests that the star formation rate (SFR)efficiency of neutral atomic hydrogen gas measured in damped Ly(alpha) systems (DLAs) at z approx. 3 is more than 10 times lower than predicted by the Kennicutt-Schmidt (KS)relation. To understand the origin of this deficit, and to investigate possible evolution with redshift and galaxy properties, we measure the SFR efficiency of atomic gas at z approx. 1, z approx. 2, and z approx. 3 around star-forming galaxies. We use new robust photometric redshifts in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field to create galaxy stacks in these three redshift bins, and measure the SFR efficiency by combining DLA absorber statistics with the observed rest-frame UV emission in the galaxies' outskirts. We find that the SFR efficiency of H I gas at z > 1 is approx. 1%-3% of that predicted by the KS relation. Contrary to simulations and models that predict a reduced SFR efficiency with decreasing metallicity and thus with increasing redshift, we find no significant evolution in the SFR efficiency with redshift. Our analysis instead suggests that the reduced SFR efficiency is driven by the low molecular content of this atomic-dominated phase, with metallicity playing a secondary effect in regulating the conversion between atomic and molecular gas. This interpretation is supported by the similarity between the observed SFR efficiency and that observed in local atomic-dominated gas, such as in the outskirts of local spiral galaxies and local dwarf galaxies.

  14. Enhancement in hydrogen production by thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste and sewage sludge--optimization of treatment conditions.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Vinay Kumar; Angériz Campoy, Rubén; Álvarez-Gallego, C J; Romero García, L I

    2014-07-01

    Batch dry-thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion (55°C) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and sewage sludge (SS) for hydrogen production was studied under several sludge combinations (primary sludge, PS; waste activated sludge, WAS; and mixed sludge, MS), TS concentrations (10-25%) and mixing ratios of OFMSW and SS (1:1, 2.5:1, 5:1, 10:1). The co-digestion of OFMSW and SS showed a 70% improvement in hydrogen production rate over the OFMSW fermentation only. The co-digestion of OFMSW with MS showed 47% and 115% higher hydrogen production potential as compared with OFMSW+PS and OFMSW+WAS, respectively. The maximum hydrogen yield of 51 mL H2/g VS consumed was observed at TS concentration of 20% and OFMSW to MS mixing ratio of 5:1, respectively. The acetic and butyric acids were the main acids in VFAs evolution; however, the higher butyric acid evolution indicated that the H2 fermentation was butyrate type fermentation.

  15. Thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with food waste (FW): Enhancement of bio-hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Angeriz-Campoy, Rubén; Álvarez-Gallego, Carlos J; Romero-García, Luis I

    2015-10-01

    Bio-hydrogen production from dry thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion (55°C and 20% total solids) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and food waste (FW) was studied. OFMSW coming from mechanical-biological treatment plants (MBT plants) presents a low organic matter concentration. However, FW has a high organic matter content but several problems by accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and system acidification. Tests were conducted using a mixture ratio of 80:20 (OFSMW:FW), to avoid the aforementioned problems. Different solid retention times (SRTs) - 6.6, 4.4, 2.4 and 1.9 days - were tested. It was noted that addition of food waste enhances the hydrogen production in all the SRTs tested. Best results were obtained at 1.9-day SRT. It was observed an increase from 0.64 to 2.51 L H2/L(reactor) day in hydrogen productivity when SRTs decrease from 6.6 to 1.9 days. However, the hydrogen yield increases slightly from 33.7 to 38 mL H2/gVS(added).

  16. Progress on a 200kW Diagnostic Neutral Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartman, Ethan; Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F.; Kwan, J. W.; Leung, K. N.; Wu, Y.; Vainionpaa, H.

    2009-11-01

    The interaction of neutral beam atoms with a magnetized plasma provides diagnostic access to the interiors of fusion experiments. Parameters which can be measured using neutral beams include ion temperature and velocity, density fluctuations and also local magnetic field direction. Nova Photonics, Inc and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are developing a diagnostic neutral beam for use in fusion experiments which lack neutral heating beams, or on which the heating beam is not suitable for diagnostics. Our apparatus is designed to produce a 1 s duration, 5 x 8 cm elliptical cross section hydrogen beam at energies up to 40 kV and up to 5 A current. Hydrogen ions are produced in a multicusp 13 kW, 13 MHz RF source. The extracted ions have current densities of 100 - 150 mA/cm^2. The proton fraction of the hydrogen ions is 85%. Beams are extracted from the source with a rectangular, multi-aperature grids. Details of the source performance will be presented as well as initial operation of the extraction optics and neutralizer region. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under grant DE-FG02-05ER86256.

  17. Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation in Lipid Biosynthesis of Piezophilic Bacteria - Implications for Studying Microbial Metabolism and Carbon Cycle in Deep Biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, J.; Dasgupta, S.; Zhang, L.; Li, J.; Kato, C.; Bartlett, D.

    2012-12-01

    Piezophiles are pressure-loving microorganisms, which reproduce preferentially or exclusively at pressures greater than atmospheric pressure. In this study, we examined stable carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation in fatty acid biosynthesis of a piezophilic bacterium Moritella japonica DSK1. The bacterium was grown to stationary phase at hydrstatic pressures of 0.1, 10, 20, and 50 MPa (mega-passcal) in media prepared using sterilized natural seawater supplied with glucose as the sole carbon source. Bacterial cell biomass and individual fatty acids exhibited consistent pressure-dependent carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations relative to substrates. Average carbon isotope fractionation (delta(FA-glucose)) at high pressures was much higher than that for surface bacteria: -15.7, -15.3, and -18.3‰ at 10, 20, and 50 MPa, respectively. For deltaD, fatty acids are more depleted in D relative to glucose than to water. Monounsaturated fatty acids are more depleted in D than corresponding saturated fatty acids by as much as 36‰. Polyunsaturated fatty acids are most depleted in D. For example, DHA (22:6omega3) has the most negative hydrogen isotope ratio (-170.91‰) (delta(FA-glucose) = -199, delta(FA-water) = -176). The observed isotope effects can be ascribed to the kinetics of enzymatic reactions that are affected by hydrostatic pressure and to operating of two independent lipid biosynthetic pathways of the piezophilic bacteria. Given that most of the biosphere lives under high pressures, our results have important important implications for studying microbial metabolism and carbon cycle in the deep biosphere.

  18. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  19. Ion-Atom/Argon—Calculation of ionization cross sections by fast ion impact for neutral target atoms ranging from hydrogen to argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSherry, D. M.; O'Rourke, S. F. C.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2003-10-01

    A FORTRAN 90 program is presented which calculates the total cross sections, and the electron energy spectra of the singly and doubly differential cross sections for the single target ionization of neutral atoms ranging from hydrogen up to and including argon. The code is applicable for the case of both high and low Z projectile impact in fast ion-atom collisions. The theoretical models provided for the program user are based on two quantum mechanical approximations which have proved to be very successful in the study of ionization in ion-atom collisions. These are the continuum-distorted-wave (CDW) and continuum-distorted-wave eikonal-initial-state (CDW-EIS) approximations. The codes presented here extend previously published codes for single ionization of target hydrogen [Crothers and McCartney, Comput. Phys. Commun. 72 (1992) 288], target helium [Nesbitt, O'Rourke and Crothers, Comput. Phys. Commun. 114 (1998) 385] and target atoms ranging from lithium to neon [O'Rourke, McSherry and Crothers, Comput. Phys. Commun. 131 (2000) 129]. Cross sections for all of these target atoms may be obtained as limiting cases from the present code. Program summaryTitle of program: ARGON Catalogue identifier: ADSE Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/cpc/summaries/ADSE Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: none Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it is operable: Computers: Four by 200 MHz Pro Pentium Linux server, DEC Alpha 21164; Four by 400 MHz Pentium 2 Xeon 450 Linux server, IBM SP2 and SUN Enterprise 3500 Installations: Queen's University, Belfast Operating systems under which the program has been tested: Red-hat Linux 5.2, Digital UNIX Version 4.0d, AIX, Solaris SunOS 5.7 Compilers: PGI workstations, DEC CAMPUS Programming language used: FORTRAN 90 with MPI directives No. of bits in a word: 64, except on Linux servers 32 Number of processors used: any number Has the

  20. Negative hydrogen ion yields at plasma grid surface in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2015-04-08

    Negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion yield from the plasma grid due to incident hydrogen ions and neutrals has been evaluated with the surface collision cascade model, ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) coupled to a negative surface ionization models. Dependence of negative ion fractions upon the velocity component normal to the surface largely affect the calculation results of the final energy and angular distributions of the H{sup −} ions. The influence is particularly large for H{sup −} ions desorbed from the surface due to less than several eV hydrogen particle implact. The present calculation predicts that H{sup −} ion yield can be maximized by setting the incident angle of hydrogen ions and neutrals to be 65 degree. The Cs thickness on the plasma grid should also affect the yields and mean energies of surface produced H{sup −} ions by back scattering and ion induced desorption processes.

  1. Negative hydrogen ion yields at plasma grid surface in a negative hydrogen ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2015-04-01

    Negative hydrogen (H-) ion yield from the plasma grid due to incident hydrogen ions and neutrals has been evaluated with the surface collision cascade model, ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) coupled to a negative surface ionization models. Dependence of negative ion fractions upon the velocity component normal to the surface largely affect the calculation results of the final energy and angular distributions of the H- ions. The influence is particularly large for H- ions desorbed from the surface due to less than several eV hydrogen particle implact. The present calculation predicts that H- ion yield can be maximized by setting the incident angle of hydrogen ions and neutrals to be 65 degree. The Cs thickness on the plasma grid should also affect the yields and mean energies of surface produced H- ions by back scattering and ion induced desorption processes.

  2. Determining the Effect of Growth Rate on Hydrogen Isotope Fractionation of Algal Lipids in Two North Pacific Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfshorndl, M.; Sachs, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical hydrologic changes have a large effect on global climate, but there does not yet exist a good indicator of rainfall variation in the tropics. Understanding past natural variability of such features as the Intertropical Convergence Zone and El Niño Southern Oscillation provides information about the extent of anthropogenic climate change today. The hydrogen isotopic composition (D/H ratio) of algal lipids has been shown to track the isotopic composition of source water in which the organism grew, providing information about precipitation variability over time. However, culture work has revealed that environmental factors such as salinity, temperature, growth rate, and irradiance also influence algal lipid D/H ratios. Here I present work determining the effect of growth rate and irradiance on the hydrogen isotope composition of alkenone-producing algae in the water column in two North Pacific locations, off the coast of Oregon and near the Hawaii Ocean Time Series site. This work corroborates empirical relationships observed in culture studies and indicates that the effects of growth rate and irradiance should be taken into account when applying the D/H isotope ratio rainfall proxy to reconstruct past climates.

  3. n-Alkane biosynthetic hydrogen isotope fractionation is not constant throughout the growing season in the riparian tree Salix viminalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberry, Sarah L.; Kahmen, Ansgar; Dennis, Paul; Grant, Alastair

    2015-09-01

    Compound-specific δ2H values of leaf wax n-alkanes have emerged as a potentially powerful paleohydrological proxy. Research suggests terrestrial plant n-alkane δ2H values are strongly correlated with meteoric water δ2H values, and may provide information on temperature, relative humidity, evaporation, and precipitation. This is based upon several assumptions, including that biosynthetic fractionation of n-alkanes during synthesis is constant within a single species. Here we present a multi-isotope study of the n-alkanes of riparian Salix viminalis growing in Norwich, UK. We measured n-alkane δ2H, leaf water δ2H, xylem water δ2H, and bulk foliar δ13C and evaluated the variability of n-alkane δ2H values and net biosynthetic fractionation (εlw-wax) over a whole growing season. S. viminalis n-alkane δ2H values decreased by 40‰ between the start of the growing season in April and the time when they stabilized in July. Variation in leaf and xylem water δ2H did not explain this variability. εlw-wax varied from -116‰ during leaf expansion in April to -156‰ during the stable phase. This suggests that differential biosynthetic fractionation was responsible for the strong seasonal trends in S. viminalis n-alkane δ2H values. We suggest that variability in εlw-wax is driven by seasonal differences in the carbohydrate source and thus the NADPH used in n-alkane biosynthesis, with stored carbohydrates utilized during spring and recent occurring growing season assimilates used later in the season. This is further supported by bulk foliar δ13C values, which are 13C-enriched during the period of leaf flush, relative to the end of the growing season. Our results challenge the assumption that biosynthetic fractionation is constant for a given species, and suggest that 2H-enriched stored assimilates are an important source for n-alkane biosynthesis early in the growing season. These findings have implications for the interpretation of sedimentary n-alkanes and call

  4. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation in serpentine-water and talc-water systems from 250 to 450 °C, 50 MPa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saccocia, Peter J.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionation factors in the talc–water and serpentine–water systems have been determined by laboratory experiment from 250 to 450 °C at 50 MPa using the partial exchange technique. Talc was synthesized from brucite + quartz, resulting in nearly 100% exchange during reaction at 350 and 450 °C. For serpentine, D–H exchange was much more rapid than 18O–16O exchange when natural chrysotile fibers were employed in the initial charge. In experiments with lizardite as the starting charge, recrystallization to chrysotile enhanced the rate of 18O–16O exchange with the coexisting aqueous phase. Oxygen isotope fractionation factors in both the talc–water and serpentine–water systems decrease with increasing temperature and can be described from 250 to 450 °C by the relationships: 1000 ln  = 11.70 × 106/T2 − 25.49 × 103/T + 12.48 and 1000 ln  = 3.49 × 106/T2 − 9.48 where T is temperature in Kelvin. Over the same temperature interval at 50 MPa, talc–water D–H fractionation is only weakly dependent on temperature, similar to brucite and chlorite, and can be described by the equation: 1000 ln  = 10.88 × 106/T2 − 41.52 × 103/T + 5.61 where T is temperature in Kelvin. Our D–H serpentine–water fractionation factors calibrated by experiment decrease with temperature and form a consistent trend with fractionation factors derived from lower temperature field calibrations. By regression of these data, we have refined and extended the D–H fractionation curve from 25 to 450 °C, 50 MPa as follows: 1000 ln  = 3.436 × 106/T2 − 34.736 × 103/T + 21.67 where T is temperature in Kelvin. These new data should improve the application of D–H and 18O–16O isotopes to constrain the temperature and origin of hydrothermal fluids responsible for serpentine formation in a variety of geologic settings.

  5. Spectroscopic and NMR identification of novel hydride ions in fractional quantum energy states formed by an exothermic reaction of atomic hydrogen with certain catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R.; Ray, P.; Dhandapani, B.; Good, W.; Jansson, P.; Nansteel, M.; He, J.; Voigt, A.

    2004-10-01

    2K+ to K + K2+ and K to K3+ provide a reaction with a net enthalpy equal to one and three times the potential energy of atomic hydrogen, respectively. The presence of these gaseous ions or atoms with thermally dissociated hydrogen formed a so-called resonance transfer (rt)-plasma having strong VUV emission with a stationary inverted Lyman population. Significant line broadening of the Balmer α , β , and γ lines of 18 eV was observed, compared to 3 4 eV from a hydrogen microwave plasma. Emission from rt-plasmas occurred even when the electric field applied to the plasma was zero. The reaction was exothermic since excess power of 20 mW cm-3 was measured by Calvet calorimetry. An energetic catalytic reaction was proposed involving a resonant energy transfer between hydrogen atoms and 2K+ or K to form very stable novel hydride ions H-(1/p) called hydrino hydrides having a fractional principal quantum numbers p = 2 and p = 4, respectively. Characteristic emission was observed from K2+ and K3+ that confirmed the resonant nonradiative energy transfer of 27.2 eV and 3 × 27.2 eV from atomic hydrogen to 2K+ and K, respectively. The product hydride ion H-(1/4) was observed spectroscopically at 110 nm corresponding to its predicted binding energy of 11.2 eV. The 1H MAS NMR spectrum of novel compound KH*Cl relative to external tetramethylsilane (TMS) showed a large distinct upfield resonance at 4.4 corresponding to an absolute resonance shift of 35.9 ppm that matched the theoretical prediction of p = 4. A novel peak of KH*I at 1.5 ppm relative to TMS corresponding to an absolute resonance shift of 33.0 ppm matched the theoretical prediction of p = 2. The predicted catalyst reactions, position of the upfield-shifted NMR peaks for H-(1/4) and H-(1/2), and spectroscopic data for H-(1/4) were found to be in agreement with the experimental observations as well as previously reported spectroscopic data for H-(1/2) and analysis of KH*Cl and KH*I containing these hydride ions.

  6. Hydrogen Apparent Fractionation between Precipitation and Leaf Wax n-Alkanes from Conifers and Deciduous Angiosperms along a Longitudinal Transect in Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Fisher, Katherine; Wagner, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    D/H composition of individual organic compounds derived from leaf wax may provide a wealth of information regarding plant-water relations in studies of plant ecology and climate change. Extracting that information from the organic D/H signal requires a thorough understanding of hydrogen isotope fractionation between environmental water and organic compounds. The purpose of this project is to investigate the importance of plant types and local climatic conditions on hydrogen apparent fractionation in higher terrestrial plants. We determined D/H composition of n-alkanes derived from leaf wax extracted from several extant plants representing common evergreen and deciduous conifer (Pinus and Larix) and deciduous angiosperm (Betula, Salix, and Sorbus) genera along a longitudinal transect from the UK to central Siberia at 10 different locations. These data were used to calculate the apparent fractionation factor (epsilon) between source water, estimated using the Online Isotopes in Precipitation Calculator, and n-alkanes. Our initial results show the following. First, we found large differences in the epsilon values among different genera at each location, e.g. Betula -63‰ vs. Salix -115‰ in Norwich, UK, and Betula -86‰ vs. Salix -146‰ in Novosibirsk, Russia. Assuming the plants at individual locations utilized soil water of very similar deltaD values, variations in the epsilon values are likely to be explained by differences in plant physiology and biochemistry. Second, we identified extensive shifts in the epsilon values in individual species along the transect from the UK to central Siberia, e.g. Betula -63‰ in Norwich vs. -104‰ in Zotino, Krasnoyarsk Krai, central Siberia and Salix -115‰ in Norwich vs. -164‰ in Sodankyla, Finland. With the exception of Sorbus, there is a positive relationship between the MAT (mean annual temperature) and epsilon values at locations above 2 °C MAT, suggesting a possible climatic effect on isotopic fractionation

  7. Performance of a hydrogen burner to simulate air entering scramjet combustors. [simulation of total temperature, total pressure, and volume fraction of oxygen of air at flight conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russin, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the performance of a hydrogen burner used to produce a test gas that simulates air entering a scramjet combustor at various flight conditions. The test gas simulates air in that it duplicates the total temperature, total pressure, and the volume fraction of oxygen of air at flight conditions. The main objective of the tests was to determine the performance of the burner as a function of the effective exhaust port area. The conclusions were: (1) pressure oscillations of the chugging type were reduced in amplitude to plus or minus 2 percent of the mean pressure level by proper sizing of hydrogen, oxygen, and air injector flow areas; (2) combustion efficiency remained essentially constant as the exhaust port area was increased by a factor of 3.4; (3) the mean total temperature determined from integrating the exit radial gas property profiles was within plus or minus 5 percent of the theoretical bulk total temperature; (4) the measured exit total temperature profile had a local peak temperature more than 30 percent greater than the theoretical bulk total temperature; and (5) measured heat transfer to the burner liner was 75 percent of that predicted by theory based on a flat radial temperature profile.

  8. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  9. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  10. Water-soluble fractions from defatted sesame seeds protect human neuroblast cells against peroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ben Othman, Sana; Katsuno, Nakako; Kitayama, Akemi; Fujimura, Makoto; Kitaguchi, Kohji; Yabe, Tomio

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the development of aging-related diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases. Dietary antioxidants that can protect neuronal cells from oxidative damage play an important role in preventing such diseases. Previously, we reported that water-soluble fractions purified from defatted sesame seed flour exhibit good antioxidant activity in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of white and gold sesame seed water-soluble fractions (WS-wsf and GS-wsf, respectively) against 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced oxidative stress in human neuroblast SH-SY5Y cells. Pretreatment with WS-wsf and GS-wsf did not protect cells against AAPH-induced cytotoxicity, while simultaneous co-treatment with AAPH significantly improved cell viability and inhibited membrane lipid peroxidation. These results suggest that WS-wsf and GS-wsf protect cells from AAPH-induced extracellular oxidative damage via direct scavenging of peroxyl radicals. When oxidative stress was induced by H2O2, pretreatment WS-wsf and GS-wsf significantly enhanced cell viability. These results suggest that in addition to radical scavenging, WS-wsf and GS-wsf enhance cellular resistance to intracellular oxidative stress by activation of the Nrf-2/ARE pathway as confirmed by the increased Nrf2 protein level in the nucleus and increased heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) mRNA expression. The roles of ferulic and vanillic acids as bioactive antioxidants in these fractions were also confirmed. In conclusion, our results indicated that WS-wsf and GS-wsf, which showed antioxidant activity in vitro, are also efficient antioxidants in a cell system protecting SH-SY5Y cells against both extracellular and intracellular oxidative stress.

  11. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope geochemistry of Ascension Island lavas and granites: variation with crystal fractionation and interaction with sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Simon M. F.; Harris, Chris

    1985-09-01

    Lavas and pyroclastics on Ascension Island contain plutonic blocks that include fluid-inclusion-bearing peralkaline-granite. 18O/16O ratios, F and Cl have been analysed on whole rocks and/or minerals for lavas and granites, and D/H ratios and H2O+ for comenditic obsidians and granites. Whole rock 18O/16O ratios of fresh alkali-basalt, hawaiite, trachyandesite, trachyte and comendite range from 6.0 to 6.9‰ with 18O tending to increase with increase in SiO2. The δ 18O values of the granites are from 0.0 to 0.3‰ depleted in 18O relative to the comendites. Comenditic obsidians have δD= -80±4‰ and H2O+ ˜0.3 wt.% while amphiboles from the granites have δD= -56±2‰ The O-isotope trend of the lavas is consistent with a crystal fractionation model. Fresh igneous rocks with δ 18O values greater than 7‰ involve processes in addition to crystal fractionation of a basaltic magma. The D/H ratios and Cl contents (˜ 3,000 ppm) of the H2O-poor comenditic obsidians represent undegassed primary magmatic values. The H-isotope compositions and low H2O and Cl (167 ppm) contents of the granites are consistent with the major degassing (loss of >90% of initial H2O) of an H2Osaturated magma derived from the interaction of sea (or possibly meteoric) water with the H2O-undersaturated comenditic melt. It is proposed that, associated with caldera subsidence and stoping, water was sucked in around the residual magma before the system had time to be sealed up. The H2O-undersaturated magma consumed this H2O with possibly some minor partial dehydration and dewatering of the hydrated volcanic roof blocks, at a pressure of about 1.5 kb. The granites are the plutonic equivalents of rhyolitic pyroclastics and not directly of the comendites. Granites from oceanic islands may, in general, be a result of generating an H2O-saturated acid melt by such direct or indirect crustal water-magma interaction processes.

  12. Flavonoid Fraction of Orange and Bergamot Juices Protect Human Lung Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ferlazzo, Nadia; Visalli, Giuseppa; Smeriglio, Antonella; Cirmi, Santa; Lombardo, Giovanni Enrico; Campiglia, Pietro; Di Pietro, Angela; Navarra, Michele

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that oxidant/antioxidant imbalance triggers cell damage that in turn causes a number of lung diseases. Flavonoids are known for their health benefits, and Citrus fruits juices are one of the main food sources of these secondary plant metabolites. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the flavonoid fraction of bergamot and orange juices, on H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human lung epithelial A549 cells. First we tested the antioxidant properties of both extracts in cell-free experimental models and then we assayed their capability to prevent the cytotoxic effects induced by H2O2. Our results demonstrated that both Citrus juice extracts reduce the generation of reactive oxygen species and membrane lipid peroxidation, improve mitochondrial functionality, and prevent DNA-oxidative damage in A549 cells incubated with H2O2. Our data indicate that the mix of flavonoids present in both bergamot and orange juices may be of use in preventing oxidative cell injury and pave the way for further research into a novel healthy approach to avoid lung disorders. PMID:26221182

  13. Flavonoid Fraction of Orange and Bergamot Juices Protect Human Lung Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Ferlazzo, Nadia; Visalli, Giuseppa; Smeriglio, Antonella; Cirmi, Santa; Lombardo, Giovanni Enrico; Campiglia, Pietro; Di Pietro, Angela; Navarra, Michele

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that oxidant/antioxidant imbalance triggers cell damage that in turn causes a number of lung diseases. Flavonoids are known for their health benefits, and Citrus fruits juices are one of the main food sources of these secondary plant metabolites. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the flavonoid fraction of bergamot and orange juices, on H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human lung epithelial A549 cells. First we tested the antioxidant properties of both extracts in cell-free experimental models and then we assayed their capability to prevent the cytotoxic effects induced by H2O2. Our results demonstrated that both Citrus juice extracts reduce the generation of reactive oxygen species and membrane lipid peroxidation, improve mitochondrial functionality, and prevent DNA-oxidative damage in A549 cells incubated with H2O2. Our data indicate that the mix of flavonoids present in both bergamot and orange juices may be of use in preventing oxidative cell injury and pave the way for further research into a novel healthy approach to avoid lung disorders.

  14. Improved Measurements of Neutral B Decay Branching Fractions to K0s pi+ pi- and the Charge Asymmetry of B0 -> K*+ pi-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-08-26

    The authors analyze the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using a sample of 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. A maximum likelihood fit finds the following branching fractions: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (43.0 {+-} 2.3 {+-} 2.3) x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} f{sub 0}({yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})K{sup 0}) = (5.5 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -6} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = (11.0 {+-} 1.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -6}. For these results, the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third (if present) is due to the effect of interference from other resonances. They also measure the CP-violating charge asymmetry in the decay B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Alpha}{sub K*{pi}} = -0.11 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.05.

  15. Carbon neutral hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Frank S; Keith, David W

    2008-11-13

    Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector may be the most difficult aspect of climate change mitigation. We suggest that carbon neutral hydrocarbons (CNHCs) offer an alternative pathway for deep emission cuts that complement the use of decarbonized energy carriers. Such fuels are synthesized from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon neutral hydrogen. The result is a liquid fuel compatible with the existing transportation infrastructure and therefore capable of a gradual deployment with minimum supply disruption. Capturing the atmospheric CO2 can be accomplished using biomass or industrial methods referred to as air capture. The viability of biomass fuels is strongly dependent on the environmental impacts of biomass production. Strong constraints on land use may favour the use of air capture. We conclude that CNHCs may be a viable alternative to hydrogen or conventional biofuels and warrant a comparable level of research effort and support.

  16. Reorientational dynamics of charged and neutral solutes in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazoilum bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquids: Realization of ionic component of hydrogen bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Prabhat Kumar; Sarkar, Moloy

    2016-05-01

    Role of electrostatic interaction on rotational relaxation dynamics of two charged solutes, sodium 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS), 1-pyrenesulfonic acid sodium salt (1-PSA) and neutral perylene has been studied in two structurally similar but chemically distinguishable imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs). Analysis of the results reveals that rotational relaxation of MPTS is significantly hindered even in the IL where acidic C2-H of the imidazolium moiety is replaced by the methyl group. Moreover, rotational relaxation of neutral perylene is found to be faster than mononegative 1-PSA which is again observed to be faster than that of tri-negative MPTS in the same ILs.

  17. The Influence of Pickup Protons, from Interstellar Neutral Hydrogen, on the Propagation of Interplanetary Shocks from the Halloween 2003 Solar Events to ACE and Ulysses: A 3-D MHD Modeling Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Detman, T. R.; Intriligator, D. S.; Dryer, M.; Sun, W.; Deehr, C. S.; Intriligator, J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe our 3-D, time ]dependent, MHD solar wind model that we recently modified to include the physics of pickup protons from interstellar neutral hydrogen. The model has a time-dependent lower boundary condition, at 0.1 AU, that is driven by source surface map files through an empirical interface module. We describe the empirical interface and its parameter tuning to maximize model agreement with background (quiet) solar wind observations at ACE. We then give results of a simulation study of the famous Halloween 2003 series of solar events. We began with shock inputs from the Fearless Forecast real ]time shock arrival prediction study, and then we iteratively adjusted input shock speeds to obtain agreement between observed and simulated shock arrival times at ACE. We then extended the model grid to 5.5 AU and compared those simulation results with Ulysses observations at 5.2 AU. Next we undertook the more difficult tuning of shock speeds and locations to get matching shock arrival times at both ACE and Ulysses. Then we ran this last case again with neutral hydrogen density set to zero, to identify the effect of pickup ions. We show that the speed of interplanetary shocks propagating from the Sun to Ulysses is reduced by the effects of pickup protons. We plan to make further improvements to the model as we continue our benchmarking process to 10 AU, comparing our results with Cassini observations, and eventually on to 100 AU, comparing our results with Voyager 1 and 2 observations.

  18. Low density of neutral hydrogen and helium in the local interstellar medium: Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer photometry of the Lyman continuum of the hot white dwarfs MCT 0501-2858, MCT 0455-2812, HZ 43, and GD 153.

    PubMed

    Vennes, S; Dupuis, J; Bowyer, S; Fontaine, G; Wiercigroch, A; Jelinsky, P; Wesemael, F; Malina, R

    1994-01-20

    The first comprehensive sky survey of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral range performed by the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) has uncovered a handful of very bright sources at wavelengths longer than the He I 504 angstroms photoionization edge. Among these objects are four white dwarfs with exceptionally low interstellar medium (ISM) column densities along the line of sight. Analysis of EUV photometry of the He-rich DO white dwarf MCT 0501-2858 and the H-rich DA white dwarf MCT 0455-2812 along one line of sight and of the DA white dwarfs HZ 43 and GD 153 near the north Galactic pole indicates that the overall minimum column density of the neutral material centered on the Sun is N(H I)= 0.5-1.0 x 10(18) cm-2. In the case of MCT 0501-2858, EUV photometric measurements provide a clear constraint to the effective temperature (60,000-70,000 K). Given these neutral hydrogen columns, the actual contribution to the density of neutral species from the immediate solar environment (the "local fluff") would only cover a distance of approximately 2-3 pc (assuming an average density n(H I) = 0.1 cm-3) leaving these lines of sight almost entirely within the hot phase of the ISM. A preliminary examination of the complete EUVE long-wavelength survey indicates that these lines of sight are exceptional and set a minimum column density in the solar environment.

  19. Neutral Beam Injection for Plasma and Magnetic FieldDiagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko Hannes; Leung, Ka Ngo; Kwan, Joe W.; Levinton,Fred

    2007-08-01

    At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) adiagnostic neutral beam injection system for measuring plasma parameters,flow velocity, and local magnetic field is being developed. High protonfraction and small divergence is essential for diagnostic neutral beams.In our design, a neutral hydrogen beam with an 8 cm x 11 cm (or smaller)elliptical beam spot at 2.5 m from the end of the extraction column isproduced. The beam will deliver up to 5 A of hydrogen beam to the targetwith a pulse width of ~;1 s, once every 1 - 2 min. The H1+ ion species ofthe hydrogen beamwill be over 90 percent. For this application, we havecompared two types of RF driven multicusp ion sources operating at 13.56MHz. The first one is an ion source with an external spiral antennabehind a dielectric RF-window. The second one uses an internal antenna insimilar ion source geometry. The source needs to generate uniform plasmaover a large (8 cm x 5 cm) extraction area. We expect that the ion sourcewith internal antenna will be more efficient at producing the desiredplasma density but might have the issue of limited antenna lifetime,depending on the duty factor. For both approaches there is a need forextra shielding to protect the dielectric materials from the backstreaming electrons. The source walls will be made of insulator materialsuch as quartz that has been observed to generate plasma with higheratomic fraction than sources with metal walls. The ion beam will beextracted and accelerated by a set of grids with slits, thus forming anarray of 6 sheet-shaped beamlets. The multiple grid extraction will beoptimized using computer simulation programs. Neutralization of the beamwill be done in neutralization chamber, which has over 70 percentneutralization efficiency.

  20. Modulation of Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress in Human Neuronal Cells by Thymoquinone-Rich Fraction and Thymoquinone via Transcriptomic Regulation of Antioxidant and Apoptotic Signaling Genes.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Norsharina; Ismail, Maznah; Azmi, Nur Hanisah; Abu Bakar, Muhammad Firdaus; Basri, Hamidon; Abdullah, Maizaton Atmadini

    2016-01-01

    Nigella sativa Linn. (N. sativa) and its bioactive constituent Thymoquinone (TQ) have demonstrated numerous pharmacological attributes. In the present study, the neuroprotective properties of Thymoquinone-rich fraction (TQRF) and TQ against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced neurotoxicity in differentiated human SH-SY5Y cells were investigated. TQRF was extracted using supercritical fluid extraction while TQ was acquired commercially, and their effects on H2O2 were evaluated using cell viability assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay, morphological observation, and multiplex gene expression. Both TQRF and TQ protected the cells against H2O2 by preserving the mitochondrial metabolic enzymes, reducing intracellular ROS levels, preserving morphological architecture, and modulating the expression of genes related to antioxidants (SOD1, SOD2, and catalase) and signaling genes (p53, AKT1, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK, and NF-κβ). In conclusion, the enhanced efficacy of TQRF over TQ was likely due to the synergism of multiple constituents in TQRF. The efficacy of TQRF was better than that of TQ alone when equal concentrations of TQ in TQRF were compared. In addition, TQRF also showed comparable effects to TQ when the same concentrations were tested. These findings provide further support for the use of TQRF as an alternative to combat oxidative stress insults in neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Key factors affecting on bio-hydrogen production from co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste and kitchen wastewater.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Ahmed; El-Qelish, Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    The effects of sludge residence time (SRT) and dilution ratio (DR) on the continuous H2 production (HP) from co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and kitchen wastewater (KWW) via mesophilic anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was investigated. Increasing DR from 1:2 to 1:3 significantly (P<0.1) increased the H2 yield (HY) from 116.5±76 to 142.5±54 ml H2/g CODremoved d, respectively. However, at a DR of 1:4, the HY was dropped to 114.5±65 ml H2/g CODremoved d. Likewise, HY increased from 83±37 to 95±24 ml H2/g CODremoved d, when SRT increased from 3.6 to 4.0 d. Further increase in HY of 148±42 ml H2/g CODremoved d, was occurred at a SRT of 5.6d. Moreover, hydrogen fermentation facilitated carbohydrate, lipids, protein and volatile solids removal efficiencies of 87±5.8%, 74.3±9.12%, 76.4±11.3% and 84.8±4.1%, respectively.

  2. Dry anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal waste with paperboard mill sludge and gelatin solid waste for enhancement of hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Elsamadony, M; Tawfik, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the bio-H2 production via dry anaerobic co-fermentation of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with protein and calcium-rich substrates such as gelatin solid waste (GSW) and paperboard mill sludge (PMS). Co-fermentation of OFMSW/GSW/PMS significantly enhanced the H2 production (HP) and H2 yield (HY). The maximum HP of 1082.5±91.4 mL and HY of 144.9±9.8 mL/gVSremoved were achieved at a volumetric ratio of 70% OFMSW:20% GSW:10% PMS. COD, carbohydrate, protein and lipids conversion efficiencies were 60.9±4.4%, 71.4±3.5%, 22.6±2.3% and 20.5±1.8% respectively. Co-fermentation process reduced the particle size distribution which is favorably utilized by hydrogen producing bacteria. The mean particle size diameters for feedstock and the digestate were 939.3 and 115.2μm, respectively with reduction value of 8.15-fold in the mixtures. The volumetric H2 production increased from 4.5±0.3 to 7.2±0.6 L(H2)/L(substrate) at increasing Ca(+2) concentrations from 1.8±0.1 to 6.3±0.5 g/L respectively.

  3. The Gaseous Environment of High-z Galaxies: Precision Measurements of Neutral Hydrogen in the Circumgalactic Medium of z ~ 2-3 Galaxies in the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudie, Gwen C.; Steidel, Charles C.; Trainor, Ryan F.; Rakic, Olivera; Bogosavljević, Milan; Pettini, Max; Reddy, Naveen; Shapley, Alice E.; Erb, Dawn K.; Law, David R.

    2012-05-01

    We present results from the Keck Baryonic Structure Survey (KBSS), a unique spectroscopic survey of the distant universe designed to explore the details of the connection between galaxies and intergalactic baryons within the same survey volumes, focusing particularly on scales from ~50 kpc to a few Mpc. The KBSS is optimized for the redshift range z ~ 2-3, combining S/N ~100 Keck/HIRES spectra of 15 of the brightest QSOs in the sky at z ~= 2.5-2.9 with very densely sampled galaxy redshift surveys within a few arcmin of each QSO sightline. In this paper, we present quantitative results on the distribution, column density, kinematics, and absorber line widths of neutral hydrogen (H I) surrounding a subset of 886 KBSS star-forming galaxies with 2.0 <~ z <~ 2.8 and with projected distances <=3 physical Mpc from a QSO sightline. Using Voigt profile decompositions of the full Lyα forest region of all 15 QSO spectra, we compiled a catalog of ~6000 individual absorbers in the redshift range of interest, with 12 <= log (N H I ) <=21. These are used to measure H I absorption statistics near the redshifts of foreground galaxies as a function of projected galactocentric distance from the QSO sightline and for randomly chosen locations in the intergalactic medium (IGM) within the survey volume. We find that N H I and the multiplicity of velocity-associated H I components increase rapidly with decreasing galactocentric impact parameter and as the systemic redshift of the galaxy is approached. The strongest H I absorbers within ~= 100 physical kpc of galaxies have N H I ~3 orders of magnitude higher than those near random locations in the IGM. The circumgalactic zone of most significantly enhanced H I absorption is found within transverse distances of <~ 300 kpc and within ±300 km s-1 of galaxy systemic redshifts. Taking this region as the defining bounds of the circumgalactic medium (CGM), nearly half of absorbers with log(N H I ) > 15.5 are found within the CGM of galaxies

  4. HYDROGENATION OF PAH CATIONS: A FIRST STEP TOWARD H{sub 2} FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Boschman, L.; Cazaux, S.; Spaans, M.; Reitsma, G.; Schlathoelter, T.; Hoekstra, R.; Gonzalez-Magana, O.

    2012-12-20

    Molecular hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in the universe. A large fraction of H{sub 2} forms by association of hydrogen atoms adsorbed on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), where formation rates depend crucially on the H sticking probability. We have experimentally studied PAH hydrogenation by exposing coronene cations, confined in a radio-frequency ion trap, to gas phase atomic hydrogen. A systematic increase of the number of H atoms adsorbed on the coronene with the time of exposure is observed. Odd coronene hydrogenation states dominate the mass spectrum up to 11 H atoms attached. This indicates the presence of a barrier preventing H attachment to these molecular systems. For the second and fourth hydrogenations, barrier heights of 72 {+-} 6 meV and 40 {+-} 10 meV, respectively, are found, which are in good agreement with theoretical predictions for the hydrogenation of neutral PAHs. Our experiments, however, prove that the barrier does not vanish for higher hydrogenation states. These results imply that PAH cations, as their neutral counterparts, exist in highly hydrogenated forms in the interstellar medium. Due to this catalytic activity, PAH cations and neutrals seem to contribute similarly to the formation of H{sub 2}.

  5. Structure, Ionization, and Fragmentation of Neutral and Positively Charged Hydrogenated Carbon Clusters: C(n)H(m)(q+) (n = 1-5, m = 1-4, q = 0-3).

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Juan P; Aguirre, Néstor F; Díaz-Tendero, Sergio; Martín, Fernando; Alcamí, Manuel

    2016-02-04

    In this work we present a systematic theoretical study of neutral and positively charged hydrogenated carbon clusters (C(n)H(m)(q+) with n = 1–5, m = 1–4, and q = 0–3). A large number of isomers and spin states (1490 in total) was investigated. For all of them, we optimized the geometry and computed the vibrational frequencies at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2dp) level of theory; more accurate values of the electronic energy were obtained at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,2dp) level over the geometry previously obtained. From these simulations we evaluated several properties such as relative energies between isomers, adiabatic and vertical ionization potentials, and dissociation energies of several fragmentation channels. A new analysis technique is proposed to evaluate a large number of fragmentation channels in a wide energy range.

  6. Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation experiment is scheduled to be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission. The objective of this experiment is to measure very faint emissions at nighttime arising from fluxes of energetic neutral atoms in the thermosphere. These energetic atoms have energies ranging up to about 50 keV, and arise from ions of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen trapped in the inner magnetosphere. Some of these ions become neutralized in charge exchange reactions with neutral hydrogen in the hydrogen geocorona that extends through the region. The ions are trapped on magnetic field lines which cross the equatorial plane at 2 to 6 earth radii distance, and they mirror at a range of heights on these field lines, extending down to the thermosphere at 500 km altitude. The ATLAS 1 measurements will not be of the neutral atoms themselves but of the optical emission produced by those on trajectories that intersect the thermosphere. The ENAP measurements are to be made using the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) which is being flown on the ATLAS mission primarily for daytime spectral observations, and the ENAP measurements will all be nighttime measurements because of the faintness of the emissions and the relatively low level of magnetic activity expected.

  7. Neutralizing positive charges at the surface of a protein lowers its rate of amide hydrogen exchange without altering its structure or increasing its thermostability.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Bryan F; Arthanari, Haribabu; Narovlyansky, Max; Durazo, Armando; Frueh, Dominique P; Pollastri, Michael P; Lee, Andrew; Bilgicer, Basar; Gygi, Steven P; Wagner, Gerhard; Whitesides, George M

    2010-12-15

    This paper combines two techniques--mass spectrometry and protein charge ladders--to examine the relationship between the surface charge and hydrophobicity of a representative globular protein (bovine carbonic anhydrase II; BCA II) and its rate of amide hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that the sequential acetylation of surface lysine-ε-NH3(+) groups--a type of modification that increases the net negative charge and hydrophobicity of the surface of BCA II without affecting its secondary or tertiary structure--resulted in a linear decrease in the aggregate rate of amide H/D exchange at pD 7.4, 15 °C. According to analysis with MS, the acetylation of each additional lysine generated between 1.4 and 0.9 additional hydrogens that are protected from H/D exchange during the 2 h exchange experiment at 15 °C, pD 7.4. NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that none of the hydrogen atoms which became protected upon acetylation were located on the side chain of the acetylated lysine residues (i.e., lys-ε-NHCOCH3) but were instead located on amide NHCO moieties in the backbone. The decrease in rate of exchange associated with acetylation paralleled a decrease in thermostability: the most slowly exchanging rungs of the charge ladder were the least thermostable (as measured by differential scanning calorimetry). This observation--that faster rates of exchange are associated with slower rates of denaturation--is contrary to the usual assumptions in protein chemistry. The fact that the rates of H/D exchange were similar for perbutyrated BCA II (e.g., [lys-ε-NHCO(CH2)2CH3]18) and peracetylated BCA II (e.g., [lys-ε-NHCOCH3]18) suggests that the electrostatic charge is more important than the hydrophobicity of surface groups in determining the rate of H/D exchange. These electrostatic effects on the kinetics of H/D exchange could complicate (or aid) the interpretation of experiments in which H/D exchange methods are used to probe the structural

  8. Foil optimization for low energy neutral atom imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Barraclough, B.L.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetospheric imaging has been proposed using remote detection of low energy neutral atoms (LENAs) of magnetospheric origin. In the detector, LENAs can be removed from the immense ambient EUV by charge modification (ionization) using a carbon stripping foil and can be subsequently deflected into an E/q analysis section. The detector sensitivity efficiency of LENAs is highly dependent on the ionization probability of neutrals as they transit the carbon foil. In this study, we present equilibrium charge state distributions and scatter distributions for 1-30 keV atomic hydrogen and oxygen transiting 0.5 {mu}g cm{sup {minus}2} carbon foils. The fraction of hydrogen exiting a foil as H{sup +} ranges from approximately 5% at 1 keV to 41% at 30 keV. The fraction of oxygen exiting the foil as O{sup +} ranges from 2% at 10 keV to 8% at 30 keV. Results obtained after coating the exit surface of foils with either aluminum (which forms aluminum oxide when exposed to air) or gold suggests that the exit surface chemistry has no effect on the charge state distributions due to foil contamination from exposure to air. Scattering resulting from the atom-foil interaction is shown to be independent of the charge state distribution, suggesting that the interaction mechanisms resulting in charge exchange and scattering are distinctly different.

  9. The importance of neutral hydrogen for the maintenance of the midlatitude winter nighttime ionosphere: Evidence from IS observations at Kharkiv, Ukraine, and field line interhemispheric plasma model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, D. V.; Richards, P. G.; Bogomaz, O. V.; Chernogor, L. F.; Truhlik, V.; Emelyanov, L. Ya.; Chepurnyy, Ya. M.; Domnin, I. F.

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the causes of nighttime enhancements in ionospheric density that are observed in winter by the incoherent scatter radar at Kharkiv, Ukraine. Calculations with a comprehensive physical model reveal that large downward ion fluxes from the plasmasphere are the main cause of the enhancements. These large fluxes are enabled by large upward H+ fluxes into the plasmasphere from the conjugate summer hemisphere during the daytime. The nighttime downward H+ flux at Kharkiv is sensitive to the thermosphere model H density, which had to be increased by factors of 2 to 3 to obtain model-data agreement for the topside H+ density. Other studies support the need for increasing the thermosphere model H density for all seasons at solar minimum. It was found that neutral winds are less effective than plasmaspheric fluxes for maintaining the nighttime ionosphere. This is partly because increased equatorward winds simultaneously oppose the downward H+ flux. The model calculations also reveal the need for a modest additional heat flow from the plasmasphere in the afternoon. This source could be the quiet time ring current.

  10. Characterization of an atomic hydrogen source for charge exchange experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutenegger, M. A.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Betancourt-Martinez, G. L.; Brown, G. V.; Hell, N.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Magee, E. W.; Porter, F. S.

    2016-11-01

    We characterized the dissociation fraction of a thermal dissociation atomic hydrogen source by injecting the mixed atomic and molecular output of the source into an electron beam ion trap containing highly charged ions and recording the x-ray spectrum generated by charge exchange using a high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer. We exploit the fact that the charge exchange state-selective capture cross sections are very different for atomic and molecular hydrogen incident on the same ions, enabling a clear spectroscopic diagnostic of the neutral species.

  11. Fast imaging measurements and modeling of neutral and impurity density on C-2U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstedt, Erik; Deng, B.; Dettrick, S.; Gupta, D. K.; Osin, D.; Roche, T.; Zhai, K.; TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    The C-2U device employed neutral beam injection and end-biasing to sustain an advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration plasma for 5+ ms, beyond characteristic transport time-scales. Three high-speed, filtered cameras observed visible light emission from neutral hydrogen and impurities, as well as deuterium pellet ablation and compact-toroid injection which were used for auxiliary particle fueling. Careful vacuum practices and titanium gettering successfully reduced neutral recycling from the confinement vessel wall. As a result, a large fraction of the remaining neutrals originate from charge-exchange between the neutral beams and plasma ions. Measured H/D- α emission is used with DEGAS2 neutral particle modeling to reconstruct the strongly non-axissymmetric neutral distribution. This is then used in fast-ion modeling to more accurately estimate their charge-exchange loss rate. Oxygen emission due to electron-impact excitation and charge-exchange recombination has also been measured using fast imaging. Reconstructed emissivity of O4+ is localized on the outboard side of the core plasma near the estimated location of the separatrix inferred by external magnetic measurements. Tri Alpha Energy.

  12. Recent Progress of Neutral Beam Injector and Beam Emission Diagnosis in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsunori, Ikeda; Kenichi, Nagaoka; Yasuhiko, Takeiri; Masaki, Osakabe; Katsuyoshi, Tsumori; Osamu, Kaneko

    2009-08-01

    Large size hydrogen neutral beam injectors (NBI) used a negative ion source (NNBI) as well as a proton source (PNBI) were developed for the large helical device (LHD). The injected power from NNBI and PNBI have reached 16 MW and 6.8 MW, respectively. These injected powers have outstripped the nominal beam powers. A diagnostic system of beam-emitted hydrogen visible spectrum has been installed along the beam injection axis to estimate the energy fraction on PNBI. The full energy beam component is about half which is equivalent to 70% of injected beam power. The attenuation of high energy neutral beam is also observed on NNBI. The peak density distribution is effective to increase beam deposition power.

  13. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jinchoon

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline employing direct energy recovery of unneutralized residual ions is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell, and thus improves the overall neutral beamline efficiency. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beam direction in the neutral izer exit region. The ions which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be loosely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell are reflected onto and collected at an interior wall of the neutralizer formed by the modified end geometry, and thus do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell. Electrons within the neutralizer are prevented from exiting the neutralizer end opening by the action of crossed fields drift (ExB) and are terminated to a collector collar around the downstream opening of the neutralizer. The correct combination of the extended neutralizer end structure and the magnet region is designed so as to maximize the exit of full energy ions and to contain the fractional energy ions.

  14. A search for pure compounds suitable for use as matrix in spectroscopic studies of radiation-produced radical cations. III. A selection of compounds based on the thermochemistry of hydrogen and proton transfer reactions between neutral molecules and their cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, Ann; Ceulemans, Jan

    A systematic investigation is made of the thermochemistry of hydrogen and proton transfer between neutral molecules and their cations covering the entire organic chemistry, with the aim of selecting those compounds that are suitable for use as matrices in spectroscopic studies of radiation-produced radical cations. Compounds that are characterized by positive reaction enthalpies may be considered promising for use as matrices in such studies. Calculations are based on experimentally determined ionization energies and proton affinities and on carbon-hydrogen bond strengths that are arbitrarily taken as 418 kJ.mol -1 (100 kcal.mol -1). Effects of actual deviations from this value are considered. In the aliphatic series of compounds, reaction enthalpies depend strongly on functional groups present. Marked positive reaction enthalpies are obtained for alkenes, alkadienes, thioethers, mercaptans, iodoalkanes and tertiary amines. Non-aromatic cyclic compounds generally behave as their aliphatic counterparts. Thus, positive reaction enthalpies are generally obtained for unsaturated alicyclic hydrocarbons and cyclic thioethers. Positive reaction enthalpies are also obtained for piperidine, quinuclidine, manxine and derivatives. In the homocyclic aromatic series of compounds, reaction enthalpies are generally positive. Thus, positive reaction enthalpies are obtained for aromatic hydrocarbons, fluoro- and chlorobenzenes, aromatic amines (amino group attached directly to the ring) and halo- and methoxyanilines. In the heterocyclic aromatic series of compounds reaction enthalpies are generally negative. This is for instance the case for a large number of pyridine derivatives, di- and triazines and a number of bi- and tricyclic compounds. Positive reaction enthalpies are however obtained for furan and pyrrole.

  15. Reactive formulations for a neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals

    DOEpatents

    Tucker, Mark D.; Betty, Rita G.

    2006-10-24

    Decontamination formulations for neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals, and methods of making and using same. The formulations are effective for neutralizing malathion, hydrogen cyanide, sodium cyanide, butyl isocyanate, carbon disulfide, phosgene gas, capsaicin in commercial pepper spray, chlorine gas, anhydrous ammonia gas; and may be effective at neutralizing hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, methyl bromide, boron trichloride, fluorine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate, phosphorous trichloride, arsine, and tungsten hexafluoride.

  16. Gas cell neutralizers (Fundamental principles)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehrer, B.

    1985-06-01

    Neutralizing an ion-beam of the size and energy levels involved in the neutral-particle-beam program represents a considerable extension of the state-of-the-art of neutralizer technology. Many different mediums (e.g., solid, liquid, gas, plasma, photons) can be used to strip the hydrogen ion of its extra electron. A large, multidisciplinary R and D effort will no doubt be required to sort out all of the ''pros and cons'' of these various techniques. The purpose of this particular presentation is to discuss some basic configurations and fundamental principles of the gas type of neutralizer cell. Particular emphasis is placed on the ''Gasdynamic Free-Jet'' neutralizer since this configuration has the potential of being much shorter than other type of gas cells (in the beam direction) and it could operate in nearly a continuous mode (CW) if necessary. These were important considerations in the ATSU design which is discussed in some detail in the second presentation entitled ''ATSU Point Design''.

  17. Neutral thermospheric temperature from ion concentration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breig, E. L.; Donaldson, J. S.; Hanson, W. B.; Hoffman, J. H.; Power, R. A.; Kayser, D. C.; Spencer, N. W.; Wharton, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for extracting information on neutral temperature from in situ F region measurements of O(+) and H(+) ion concentrations is analyzed and evaluated. Advantage is taken of the condition of charge-exchange equilibrium of these species in the neighborhood of 320 km to infer the associated relative abundances of neutral oxygen and hydrogen. Results are shown to be generally consistent with other concurrent in situ measurements.

  18. Quest for Inexpensive Hydrogen Isotopic Fractionation: Do We Need 2D Quantum Confining in Porous Materials or Are Rough Surfaces Enough? The Case of Ammonia Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Mella, Massimo; Curotto, E

    2016-10-05

    We study the adsorption energetics and quantum properties of the molecular hydrogen isotopes H2, D2, and T2 onto the surface of rigid ammonia nanoclusters with quantum simulations and accurate model potential energy surfaces (PES). A highly efficient diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) algorithm for rigid rotors allowed us to accurately define zero-point adsorption energies for the three isotopes, as well as the degree of translational and rotational delocalization that each affords on the surface. From the data emerges that the quantum adsorption energy (Eads) of T2 can be up to twice the one of H2 at 0 K, suggesting the possibility of exploiting some form of solid ammonia to selectivity separate hydrogen isotopes at low temperatures (≃20 K). This is discussed by focusing on the structural motif that may be more effective for the task. The analysis of the contributions to Eads, however, surprisingly indicates that the average kinetic energy (E(kin)) and rotation energy (Erot(kin)) of T2 can also be, respectively, 2 times and 20 times higher than those of H2; this finding markedly deviates from what is predicted for hydrogen molecules inside carbon nanotubes (CNT) or metallic-organic frameworks (MOF), where E(kin) and Erot(kin) is higher for H2 due to the unavoidable effects of confinement and hindrance to its rotational motion. The rationale for these differences is provided by the geometrical distributions for the rigid rotors, which reveal an increasingly stronger coupling between rotational and translational degrees of freedom upon increasing the isotopic mass. This effect has never been observed before on adsorbing surfaces (e.g., graphite) and is induced by a strongly anisotropic and anharmonic bowl-like potential experienced by the rotors.

  19. Hydrogen and Oxygen Stable Isotope Fractionation in Body Fluid Compartments of Dairy Cattle According to Season, Farm, Breed, and Reproductive Stage

    PubMed Central

    Abeni, Fabio; Petrera, Francesca; Capelletti, Maurizio; Dal Prà, Aldo; Bontempo, Luana; Tonon, Agostino; Camin, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Environmental temperature affects water turnover and isotope fractionation by causing water evaporation from the body in mammals. This may lead to rearrangement of the water stable isotope equilibrium in body fluids. We propose an approach to detect possible variations in the isotope ratio in different body fluids on the basis of different homoeothermic adaptations in varying reproductive stages. Three different reproductive stages (pregnant heifer, primiparous lactating cow, and pluriparous lactating cow) of two dairy cattle breeds (Italian Friesian and Modenese) were studied in winter and summer. Blood plasma, urine, faecal water, and milk were sampled and the isotope ratios of H (2H/1H) and O (18O/16O) were determined. Deuterium excess and isotope-fractionation factors were calculated for each passage from plasma to faeces, urine and milk. The effects of the season, reproductive stages and breed on δ2H and δ18O were significant in all the fluids, with few exceptions. Deuterium excess was affected by season in all the analysed fluids. The correlations between water isotope measurements in bovine body fluids ranged between 0.6936 (urine-milk) and 0.7848 (urine-plasma) for δ2H, and between 0.8705 (urine-milk) and 0.9602 (plasma-milk) for δ18O. The increase in both isotopic δ values in all body fluids during summer is representative of a condition in which fractionation took place as a consequence of a different ratio between ingested and excreted water, which leads to an increased presence of the heavy isotopes. The different body water turnover between adult lactating cattle and non-lactating heifers was confirmed by the higher isotopic δ for the latter, with a shift in the isotopic equilibrium towards values more distant from those of drinking water. PMID:25996911

  20. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M.

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  1. Hydrogen production using ammonia borane

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Charles W; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy A; Shrestha, Roshan P

    2013-12-24

    Hydrogen ("H.sub.2") is produced when ammonia borane reacts with a catalyst complex of the formula L.sub.nM-X wherein M is a base metal such as iron, X is an anionic nitrogen- or phosphorus-based ligand or hydride, and L is a neutral ancillary ligand that is a neutral monodentate or polydentate ligand.

  2. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  3. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between ions and neutrals in a partially ionized plasma are important throughout heliophysics, including near the solar surface in prominences. Understanding how ion-neutral coupling affects formation, support, structure, and dynamics of prominences will advance our physical understanding of magnetized systems involving a transition from a weakly ionized dense gas to a fully ionized tenuous plasma. We address the fundamental physics of prominence support, which is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force, and the implications for observations. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized, it is necessary to consider the support of the both the ionized and neutral components. Support of the neutrals is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material.

  4. Efficient laser production of energetic neutral beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, F.; Antonelli, L.; Flacco, A.; Braenzel, J.; Vauzour, B.; Folpini, G.; Birindelli, G.; Schnuerer, M.; Batani, D.; Malka, V.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-driven ion acceleration by intense, ultra-short, laser pulse has received increasing attention in recent years, and the availability of much compact and versatile ions sources motivates the study of laser-driven sources of energetic neutral atoms. We demonstrate the production of a neutral and directional beam of hydrogen and carbon atoms up to 200 keV per nucleon, with a peak flow of 2.7× {{10}13} atom s-1. Laser accelerated ions are neutralized in a pulsed, supersonic argon jet with tunable density between 1.5× {{10}17} cm-3and 6× {{10}18} cm-3. The neutralization efficiency has been measured by a time-of-flight detector for different argon densities. An optimum is found, for which complete neutralization occurs. The neutralization rate can be explained only at high areal densities (>1× {{10}17} cm-2) by single electron charge transfer processes. These results suggest a new perspective for the study of neutral production by laser and open discussion of neutralization at a lower density.

  5. Towards a Revised Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Surface Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler

    2005-06-09

    The components of the neutral- and plasma-surface interaction model used in the Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS 2 are reviewed. The idealized surfaces and processes handled by that model are inadequate for accurately simulating neutral transport behavior in present day and future fusion devices. We identify some of the physical processes missing from the model, such as mixed materials and implanted hydrogen, and make some suggestions for improving the model.

  6. Optical neutrality: invisibility without cloaking.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Reed; Dean, Cleon; Durach, Maxim

    2017-02-15

    We show that it is possible to design an invisible wavelength-sized metal-dielectric metamaterial object without evoking cloaking. Our approach is an extension of the neutral inclusion concept by Zhou and Hu [Phys. Rev. E74, 026607 (2006)PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.74.026607] to Mie scatterers. We demonstrate that an increase of metal fraction in the metamaterial leads to a transition from dielectric-like to metal-like scattering, which proceeds through invisibility or optical neutrality of the scatterer. Formally this is due to cancellation of multiple scattering orders, similarly to plasmonic cloaking introduced by Alù and Engheta [Phys. Rev. E72, 016623 (2005)PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.72.016623], but without introduction of the separation of the scatterer into cloak and hidden regions.

  7. Lyman-Werner UV escape fractions from primordial haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Anna T. P.; Whalen, Daniel J.; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2015-12-01

    Population III (Pop III) stars can regulate star formation in the primordial Universe in several ways. They can ionize nearby haloes, and even if their ionizing photons are trapped by their own haloes, their Lyman-Werner (LW) photons can still escape and destroy H2 in other haloes, preventing them from cooling and forming stars. LW escape fractions are thus a key parameter in cosmological simulations of early reionization and star formation but have not yet been parametrized for realistic haloes by halo or stellar mass. To do so, we perform radiation hydrodynamical simulations of LW UV escape from 9-120 M⊙ Pop III stars in 105-107 M⊙ haloes with ZEUS-MP. We find that photons in the LW lines (i.e. those responsible for destroying H2 in nearby systems) have escape fractions ranging from 0 to 85 per cent. No LW photons escape the most massive halo in our sample, even from the most massive star. Escape fractions for photons elsewhere in the 11.18-13.6 eV energy range, which can be redshifted into the LW lines at cosmological distances, are generally much higher, being above 60 per cent for all but the least massive stars in the most massive haloes. We find that shielding of H2 by neutral hydrogen, which has been neglected in most studies to date, produces escape fractions that are up to a factor of 3 smaller than those predicted by H2 self-shielding alone.

  8. Apparatus for neutralization of accelerated ions

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.; Frank, Alan M.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for neutralization of a beam of accelerated ions, such as hydrogen negative ions (H.sup.-), using relatively efficient strip diode lasers which emit monochromatically at an appropriate wavelength (.lambda. = 8000 A for H.sup.- ions) to strip the excess electrons by photodetachment. A cavity, formed by two or more reflectors spaced apart, causes the laser beams to undergo multiple reflections within the cavity, thus increasing the efficiency and reducing the illumination required to obtain an acceptable percentage (.about. 85%) of neutralization.

  9. Beam loss by collimation in a neutralizer duct

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, G.W.; Willmann, P.A.

    1980-04-03

    Beam fractions lost by collimation in a neutralizer duct are computed in x-x' phase space by using three examples of slab beam distributions under a broad range of duct dimensions, beam half-widths, and beam divergences. The results can be used to design compact neutralizers and to specify beam requirements. The computer code ILOST can be used under a broad range of beam conditions to compute the fraction lost by collimation.

  10. Hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  11. Hydrogen recovery process

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Richard W.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; He, Zhenjie; Pinnau, Ingo

    2000-01-01

    A treatment process for a hydrogen-containing off-gas stream from a refinery, petrochemical plant or the like. The process includes three separation steps: condensation, membrane separation and hydrocarbon fraction separation. The membrane separation step is characterized in that it is carried out under conditions at which the membrane exhibits a selectivity in favor of methane over hydrogen of at least about 2.5.

  12. Understanding Multiplication of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetland, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Discussed the use of Cuisenaire rods in teaching the multiplication of fractions. Considers whole number times proper fraction, proper fraction multiplied by proper fraction, mixed number times proper fraction, and mixed fraction multiplied by mixed fractions. (JN)

  13. Investigating the role of atomic hydrogen on chloroethene reactions with iron using tafel analysis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiankang; Farrell, James

    2003-09-01

    Metallic iron filings are commonly employed as reducing agents in permeable barriers used for remediating groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents. Reactions of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with zerovalent iron were investigated to determine the role of atomic hydrogen in their reductive dechlorination. Experiments simultaneously measuring dechlorination and iron corrosion rates were performed to determine the fractions of the total current going toward dechlorination and hydrogen evolution. Corrosion rates were determined using Tafel analysis, and dechlorination rates were determined from rates of byproduct generation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to determine the number of reactions that controlled the observed rates of chlorocarbon disappearance, as well as the role of atomic hydrogen in TCE and PCE reduction. Comparison of iron corrosion rates with those for TCE reaction showed that TCE reduction occurred almost exclusively via atomic hydrogen at low pH values and via atomic hydrogen and direct electron transfer at neutral pH values. In contrast, reduction of PCE occurred primarily via direct electron transfer at both low and neutral pH values. At low pH values and micromolar concentrations, TCE reaction rates were faster than those for PCE due to more rapid reduction of TCE by atomic hydrogen. At neutral pH values and millimolar concentrations, PCE reaction rates were faster than those for TCE. This shift in relative reaction rates was attributed to a decreasing contribution of the atomic hydrogen reaction mechanism with increasing halocarbon concentrations and pH values. The EIS data showed that all the rate limitations for TCE and PCE dechlorination occurred during the transfer of the first two electrons. Results from this study show that differences in relative reaction rates of TCE and PCE with iron are dependent on the significance of the reduction pathway involving atomic hydrogen.

  14. Hydrogen systems

    SciTech Connect

    Veziroglu, T.N.; Zhu, Y.; Bao, D.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on hydrogen fuels. Topics considered at the symposium included hydrogen from fossil fuels, electrolysis, photolytic hydrogen generation, thermochemical and photochemical methods of hydrogen production, catalysts, hydrogen biosynthesis, novel and hybrid methods of hydrogen production, storage and handling, metal hydrides and their characteristics, utilization, hydrogen fueled internal combustion engines, hydrogen gas turbines, hydrogen flow and heat transfer, fuel cells, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels, thermal energy transfer, hydrogen purification, research programs, economics, primary energy sources, environmental impacts, and safety.

  15. Observation of mutual neutralization in detached plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akira, Tonegawa; Isao, Shirota; Ken'ichi, Yoshida; Masataka, Ono; Kazutaka, Kawamura; Tuguhiro, Watanabe; Nobuyoshi, Ohyabu; Hajime, Suzuki; Kazuo, Takayama

    2001-10-01

    Mutual neutralization in collisions between negative ions and positive ions in molecular activated recombination (MAR) has been observed in a high density magnetized sheet plasma source TPDSHEET-IV(Test Plasma produced by Directed current for SHEET plasma) device. Measurements of the negative ion density of hydrogen atom, the electron density, electron temperature, and the heat load to the target plate were carried out in hydrogen high density plasma with hydrogen gas puff. A cylindrical probe made of tungsten ( 0.4 x 2 cm) was used to measure the spatial profiles of H- by a probe-assisted laser photodetachment The Balmer spectra of visible light emission from hydrogen or helium atoms were detected in front of the target plate. A small amount of secondary hydrogen gas puffing into a hydrogen plasma reduced strongly the heat flux to the target and increased rapidly the density of negative ions of hydrogen atom in the circumference of the plasma, while the conventional radiative and three-body recombination processes were disappeared. These results can be well explained by taking the charge exchange recombination of MAR in the detached plasma into account.

  16. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.; Haselton, Halsey H.; Stirling, William L.; Whealton, John H.

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  17. Hydrogen donor solvent coal liquefaction process

    DOEpatents

    Plumlee, Karl W.

    1978-01-01

    An indigenous hydrocarbon product stream boiling within a range of from about C.sub.1 -700.degree. F., preferably C.sub.1 -400.degree. F., is treated to produce an upgraded hydrocarbon fuel component and a component which can be recycled, with a suitable donor solvent, to a coal liquefaction zone to catalyze the reaction. In accordance therewith, a liquid hydrocarbon fraction with a high end boiling point range up to about 700.degree. F., preferably up to about 400.degree. F., is separated from a coal liquefaction zone effluent, the separated fraction is contacted with an alkaline medium to provide a hydrocarbon phase and an aqueous extract phase, the aqueous phase is neutralized, and contacted with a peroxygen compound to convert indigenous components of the aqueous phase of said hydrocarbon fraction into catalytic components, such that the aqueous stream is suitable for recycle to the coal liquefaction zone. Naturally occurring phenols and alkyl substituted phenols, found in the aqueous phase, are converted, by the addition of hydroxyl constituents to phenols, to dihydroxy benzenes which, as disclosed in copending Application Ser. Nos. 686,813 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,536; 686,814 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,049,537; 686,827 now U.S. Pat. No. 4,051,012 and 686,828, K. W. Plumlee et al, filed May 17, 1976, are suitable hydrogen transfer catalysts.

  18. Net energy value of two low-digestible carbohydrates, Lycasin HBC and the hydrogenated polysaccharide fraction of Lycasin HBC in healthy human subjects and their impact on nutrient digestive utilization.

    PubMed

    Sinau, S; Montaunier, C; Wils, D; Verne, J; Brandolini, M; Bouteloup-Demange, C; Vermorel, M

    2002-02-01

    The metabolizable energy content of low-digestible carbohydrates does not correspond with their true energy value. The aim of the present study was to determine the tolerance and effects of two polyols on digestion and energy expenditure in healthy men, as well as their digestible, metabolizable and net energy values. Nine healthy men were fed for 32 d periods a maintenance diet supplemented either with dextrose, Lycasin HBC (Roquette Frères, Lestrem, France), or the hydrogenated polysaccharide fraction of Lycasin HBC, at a level of 100 g DM/d in six equal doses per d according to a 3 x 3 Latin square design with three repetitions. After a 20 d progressive adaptation period, food intake was determined for 12d using the duplicate meal method and faeces and urine were collected for 10 d for further analyses. Subjects spent 36 h in one of two open-circuit whole-body calorimeters with measurements during the last 24h. Ingestion of the polyols did not cause severe digestive disorders, except excessive gas emission, and flatulence and gurgling in some subjects. The polyols induced significant increases in wet (+45 and +66% respectively, P<0.01) and dry (+53 and +75 % respectively, P<0.002) stool weight, resulting in a 2% decrease in dietary energy digestibility (P<0.001). They resulted also in significant increases in sleeping (+4.1%, P<0.03) and daily energy expenditure (+2.7 and +2.9% respectively, P<0.02) compared with dextrose ingestion. The apparent energy digestibility of the two polyols was 0.82 and 0.79 respectively, their metabolizable energy value averaged 14.1 kJ/g DM, and their net energy value averaged 10.8 kJ/g DM, that is, 35 % less than those of sucrose and starch.

  19. Surface effects on nitrogen vacancy centers neutralization in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, Arthur N.; Dowdell, Dontray A.; Santamore, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    The performance of nitrogen vacancy (NV-) based magnetic sensors strongly depends on the stability of nitrogen vacancy centers near the diamond surface. The sensitivity of magnetic field detection is diminished as the NV- turns into the neutralized charge state NV0. We investigate the neutralization of NV- and calculate the ratio of NV0 to total NV (NV-+NV0) caused by a hydrogen terminated diamond with a surface water layer. We find that NV- neutralization exhibits two distinct regions: near the surface, where the NV- is completely neutralized, and in the bulk, where the neutralization ratio is inversely proportional to depth following the electrostatic force law. In addition, small changes in concentration can lead to large differences in neutralization behavior. This phenomenon allows one to carefully control the concentration to decrease the NV- neutralization. The presence of nitrogen dopant greatly reduces NV- neutralization as the nitrogen ionizes in preference to NV- neutralization at the same depth. The water layer pH also affects neutralization. If the pH is very low due to cleaning agent residue, then we see a change in the band bending and the reduction of the two-dimensional hole gas region. Finally, we find that dissolved carbon dioxide resulting from direct contact with the atmosphere at room temperature hardly affects the NV- neutralization.

  20. Thermodynamic properties of hydrogen-helium plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. F.

    1971-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of an atomic hydrogen-helium plasma are calculated and tabulated for temperatures from 10,000 to 100,000 K as a function of the mass fraction ratio of atomic hydrogen. The tabulation is for densities from 10 to the minus 10th power to 10 to the minus 6th power gm/cu cm and for hydrogen mass fraction ratios of 0, 0.333, 0.600, 0.800, and 1.0, which correspond to pure helium, 50 percent hydrogen per unit volume, 75 percent hydrogen per unit volume, 89 percent hydrogen per unit volume, and pure hydrogen plasmas, respectively. From an appended computer program, calculations can be made at other densities and mass fractions. The program output agrees well with previous thermodynamic property calculations for limiting cases of pure hydrogen and pure helium plasmas.

  1. Mystery Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  2. Pitch Fractionation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-15

    13 3. Solvent Fractionation Experiments .................................... 15 4. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra for A240 Petrolem Pitch AG 12...34 and Mesophase Pitch AG 164B ............................... 21 5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra ................................... 23 6...compared by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis using a Digilab Model FTS 14 spectrophotometer (Rockwell International, Anaheim, California

  3. Control problems for semilinear neutral differential equations in Hilbert spaces.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin-Mun; Cho, Seong Ho

    2014-01-01

    We construct some results on the regularity of solutions and the approximate controllability for neutral functional differential equations with unbounded principal operators in Hilbert spaces. In order to establish the controllability of the neutral equations, we first consider the existence and regularity of solutions of the neutral control system by using fractional power of operators and the local Lipschitz continuity of nonlinear term. Our purpose is to obtain the existence of solutions and the approximate controllability for neutral functional differential control systems without using many of the strong restrictions considered in the previous literature. Finally we give a simple example to which our main result can be applied.

  4. Neutral pumping rates for a next step tokamak ignition device

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, J.D.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Heifetz, D.

    1985-01-01

    Neutral pumping rates are calculated for pump-limiter and divertor options of a next step tokamak ignition device using a method that accounts for the coupled effects of neutral transport and plasma transport. For both pump limiters and divertors the plasma flow into the channel surrounding the neutralizer plate is greatly reduced by the neutral recycling. The fraction of this flow that is pumped can be large (>50%) but in general is dependent on the particular geometry and plasma conditions. It is estimated that pumping speeds greater than or approximately 10/sup 5/ L/s are adequate for the exhaust requirements in the pump-limiter and the divertor cases.

  5. Control Problems for Semilinear Neutral Differential Equations in Hilbert Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jin-Mun; Cho, Seong Ho

    2014-01-01

    We construct some results on the regularity of solutions and the approximate controllability for neutral functional differential equations with unbounded principal operators in Hilbert spaces. In order to establish the controllability of the neutral equations, we first consider the existence and regularity of solutions of the neutral control system by using fractional power of operators and the local Lipschitz continuity of nonlinear term. Our purpose is to obtain the existence of solutions and the approximate controllability for neutral functional differential control systems without using many of the strong restrictions considered in the previous literature. Finally we give a simple example to which our main result can be applied. PMID:24772022

  6. Equivalent Neutral Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Wenqing

    1996-01-01

    The definition of equivalent neutral wind and the rationale for using it as the geophysical product of a spaceborne scatterometer are reviewed. The differences between equivalent neutral wind and actual wind, which are caused by atmospheric density stratification, are demonstrated with measurements at selected locations. A method of computing this parameter from ship and buoy measurements is described and some common fallacies in accounting for the effects of atmospheric stratification on wind shear are discussed. The computer code for the model to derive equivalent neutral wind is provided.

  7. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  8. Energetic neutral atoms: Imaging the magnetospheric ring current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, Edmond C.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetospheric imaging is a new discipline whose goal is to make pictures of the energetic particle populations trapped in the magnetic field of Earth (or any other planet). This project demonstrated the technical feasibility and scientific validity of magnetospheric imaging using energetic neutral atoms (ENA) with the publication and quantitative analysis of the first ENA images ever obtained from space. ENA's are produced when singly-charged energetic (approximately 100 keV) trapped ions make an atomic collision with the neutral hydrogen atoms which boil of the top of the Earth's atmosphere. These hydrogen atoms suffuse the entire trapping volume of the magnetosphere. The energetic ion steals the electron from the atmospheric hydrogen, so the energetic ion is transformed into an energetic neutral atom with a velocity of several thousands of kilometers/second. Moreover, the new-born ENA preserves the velocity that the trapped ion had at the time of the collision. Consequently, any population of energetic ions emits ENA's.

  9. Fast neutral particle measurements in LHD and CHS

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, T.; Okamura, S.; Zanza, V.

    1996-12-31

    The development of high energy neutral particle measurement system for ion temperature measurements and high energy particle confinement analysis in Large Helical Device is described here. For NBIs, 180 keV hydrogen beams will be used in Phase 1 of LHD experiment schedule and 360 keV deuterium beams will be used in Phase 2. In ICRF heating experiment, the hydrogen and helium-3 will be used as minorities. It is important to observe the pitch angle distribution to investigate the confinement of high energy particles. For this purpose the neutral particle analyzer should have a wide observation energy range above the maximum energy of NBI and an ability to separate the particle species of hydrogen, deuterium and He-3. In Compact Helical System (CHS), the electrostatic neutral particle analyzer is used. They have compared the spectrum obtained from the measurement by a passive method in CHS with that from the calculation by PROCTR code.

  10. Hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlit, J.R.; Denton, W.H.; Sherman, R.H.

    Disclosed is a system of four cryogenic fractional distillation columns interlinked with two equilibrators for separating a DT and hydrogen feed stream into four product streams, consisting of a stream of high purity D/sub 2/, DT, T/sub 2/, and a tritium-free stream of HD for waste disposal.

  11. Hydrogen isotope separation

    DOEpatents

    Bartlit, John R.; Denton, William H.; Sherman, Robert H.

    1982-01-01

    A system of four cryogenic fractional distillation columns interlinked with two equilibrators for separating a DT and hydrogen feed stream into four product streams, consisting of a stream of high purity D.sub.2, DT, T.sub.2, and a tritium-free stream of HD for waste disposal.

  12. 183W NMR Study of Peroxotungstates Involved in the Disproportionation of Hydrogen Peroxide into Singlet Oxygen ((1)O(2), (1)Delta(g)) Catalyzed by Sodium Tungstate in Neutral and Alkaline Water.

    PubMed

    Nardello, V.; Marko, J.; Vermeersch, G.; Aubry, J. M.

    1998-10-19

    The disproportionation of aqueous hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by sodium tungstate has been investigated with regard to the multiplicity of the oxygen molecules released. Trapping experiments and detection of the IR luminescence of (1)O(2) have shown that the yield of (1)O(2) is virtually quantitative. The mono-, di-, and tetraperoxotungstate intermediates W(O(2))(n)()O(4)(-)(n)()(2)(-) (n = 1, 2, 4) have been characterized by UV and (183)W NMR spectroscopies. The diperoxo species is proposed as the precursor of (1)O(2).

  13. Isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A rash of new controversy has emerged around the subject of mass-independent isotope fractionation effects, particularly in the case of the oxygen isotopes. To be sure, the controversy has been around for awhile, but it has been given new impetus by the results of a recent study by Mark H. Thiemens and John E. Heidenreich III of the University of California, San Diego (Science, March 4, 1983).Gustav Arrhenius has been trying to convince the planetary science community that chemical effects in isotope fractionation processes could explain observations in meteorites that appear to be outside of the traditionally understood mass-dependent fractionations (G. Arrhenius, J . L. McCrumb, and N. F. Friedman, Astrophys. Space Sci, 65, 297, 1974). Robert Clayton had made the basic observations of oxygen in carbonaceous chondrites that the slope of the δ17 versus δ18 line was 1 instead of the slope of ½ characteristic of terrestrial rocks and lunar samples (Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 28, 501, 1978). The mass-independent effects were ascribed to the apparent contribution of an ancient presolar system component of O16.

  14. Neutralization Assay for Chikungunya Virus Infection: Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test.

    PubMed

    Azami, Nor Azila Muhammad; Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2016-01-01

    Neutralization assay is a technique that detects and quantifies neutralizing antibody in serum samples by calculating the percentage of reduction of virus activity, as the concentration of virus used is usually constant. Neutralizing antibody titer is conventionally determined by calculating the percentage reduction in total virus infectivity by counting and comparing number of plaques (localized area of infection due to cytopathic effect) with a standard amount of virus. Conventional neutralizing test uses plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT) to determine neutralizing antibody titers against Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Here we describe the plaque reduction neutralization assay (PRNT) using Vero cell lines to obtain neutralizing antibody titers.

  15. Hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  16. Ions and neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncet, A.

    After a short presentation of intensity limitations examples due to trapped ions, the processes of ionization and neutralization build up in particle accelerators and storage rings are briefly reviewed. The tolerable limits in neutralization are then assessed at the light of current theories of incoherent and coherent effects driven by ions. Finally the usual antidotes such as clearing electrodes, missing bunch schemes and beam shaking are presented.

  17. METHOD OF SEPARATING HYDROGEN ISOTOPES

    DOEpatents

    Salmon, O.N.

    1958-12-01

    The process of separating a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and tritium by contacting finely dlvided palladium with the mixture in order to adsorb the gases, then gradually heating the palladium and collecting the evolved fractlons, is described. The fraction first given off is richer in trltium than later fractions.

  18. Hydrogenation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Joseph [Encino, CA; Oberg, Carl L [Canoga Park, CA; Russell, Larry H [Agoura, CA

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation reaction apparatus comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1100.degree. to 1900.degree. C., while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products.

  19. A new technique for pumping hydrogen gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Hardcastle, K.

    1970-01-01

    A system for pumping hydrogen gas without isotopic fractionation has been developed. The pump contains uranium metal, which when heated to about 80??C reacts with hydrogen to form UH3. The UH3 is heated to above 500??C to decompose the hydride and regenerate the hydrogen. ?? 1970.

  20. Variations of Hydrogen in the Thermosphere: Nature and Causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, A. G.; Wang, W.; Qian, L.; Crowley, G.; Thayer, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Neutral hydrogen plays an important role in determining the state of the plasmasphere and its response to forcing from geomagnetic storms. Hydrogen's solar cycle variation is counterintuitive: there is more hydrogen at solar minimum at 300 km that there is at solar maximum. Similarly there is more hydrogen in winter than in summer and hydrogen density maximizes in the morning. In this presentation we describe these variations and consider some possible causes for them.

  1. Water dynamics at neutral and ionic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Emily E; Wong, Daryl B; Fayer, M D

    2009-09-08

    The orientational dynamics of water at a neutral surfactant reverse micelle interface are measured with ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch, and the results are compared to orientational relaxation of water interacting with an ionic interface. The comparison provides insights into the influence of a neutral vs. ionic interface on hydrogen bond dynamics. Measurements are made and analyzed for large nonionic surfactant Igepal CO-520reverse micelles (water nanopool with a 9-nm diameter). The results are compared with those from a previous study of reverse micelles of the same size formed with the ionic surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT). The results demonstrate that the orientational relaxation times for interfacial water molecules in the two types of reverse micelles are very similar (13 ps for Igepal and 18 ps for AOT) and are significantly slower than that of bulk water (2.6 ps). The comparison of water orientational relaxation at neutral and ionic interfaces shows that the presence of an interface plays the dominant role in determining the hydrogen bond dynamics, whereas the chemical nature of the interface plays a secondary role.

  2. Neutral Atom Diffusion in a Partially Ionized Prominence Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The support of solar prominences is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. it is necessary to consider in addition the support of the neutral component of the prominence plasma. This support is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material,

  3. Special conditions for the hydrogenation of heavy hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Schliebener, C.; Wernicke, H.J.

    1982-04-13

    A procedure is claimed for thermally cracking heavy liquid hydrocarbons to produce gaseous olefins comprising a catalytic hydrogenating pretreatment; a separation of the hydrogenation product into a lighter fraction and a heavier fraction; passing the heavier fraction at least in part to a thermal cracking step to produce normally gaseous olefins; and withdrawing the lighter fraction, whereby said lighter fraction has a higher octane number.

  4. Production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, and chemicals from catalytic processing of bio-oils

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, George W; Vispute, Tushar P; Routray, Kamalakanta

    2014-06-03

    Disclosed herein is a method of generating hydrogen from a bio-oil, comprising hydrogenating a water-soluble fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst, and reforming the water-soluble fraction by aqueous-phase reforming in the presence of a reforming catalyst, wherein hydrogen is generated by the reforming, and the amount of hydrogen generated is greater than that consumed by the hydrogenating. The method can further comprise hydrocracking or hydrotreating a lignin fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrocracking catalyst wherein the lignin fraction of bio-oil is obtained as a water-insoluble fraction from aqueous extraction of bio-oil. The hydrogen used in the hydrogenating and in the hydrocracking or hydrotreating can be generated by reforming the water-soluble fraction of bio-oil.

  5. Hybrid approach to calculating proton stopping power in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. J.; Kadyrov, A. S.; Abdurakhmanov, I. B.; Bray, I.

    2017-01-01

    Proton stopping power in hydrogen is calculated using a hybrid method. A two-centre convergent close-coupling method is used for calculations involving the proton fraction of the beam, while the Born approximation is used for the hydrogen fraction. For proton-hydrogen collisions rearrangement processes are explicitly included via a two-centre expansion. Hydrogen-hydrogen collisions are calculated including one- and two-electron processes. Despite using the first-order approximation in the hydrogen-hydrogen channel, overall reasonably good agreement with experiment is seen above 100 keV.

  6. Tautomerism in neutral histidine.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Celina; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2014-10-06

    Histidine is an important natural amino acid, involved in many relevant biological processes, which, because of its physical properties, proved difficult to characterize experimentally in its neutral form. In this work, neutral histidine has been generated in the gas phase by laser ablation of solid samples and its N(ε)H tautomeric form unraveled through its rotational spectrum. The quadrupole hyperfine structure, arising from the existing three (14)N nuclei, constituted a site-specifically probe for revealing the tautomeric form as well as the side chain configuration of this proteogenic amino acid.

  7. Electronic structure of interstitial hydrogen in lutetium oxide from DFT+U calculations and comparison study with μ SR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, E. Lora; Marinopoulos, A. G.; Vieira, R. B. L.; Vilão, R. C.; Alberto, H. V.; Gil, J. M.; Lichti, R. L.; Mengyan, P. W.; Baker, B. B.

    2016-07-01

    The electronic structure of hydrogen impurity in Lu2O3 was studied by first-principles calculations and muonium spectroscopy. The computational scheme was based on two methods which are well suited to treat defect calculations in f -electron systems: first, a semilocal functional of conventional density-functional theory (DFT) and secondly a DFT+U approach which accounts for the on-site correlation of the 4 f electrons via an effective Hubbard-type interaction. Three different types of stable configurations were found for hydrogen depending upon its charge state. In its negatively charged and neutral states, hydrogen favors interstitial configurations residing either at the unoccupied sites of the oxygen sublattice or at the empty cube centers surrounded by the lanthanide ions. In contrast, the positively charged state stabilized only as a bond configuration, where hydrogen binds to oxygen ions. Overall, the results between the two methods agree in the ordering of the formation energies of the different impurity configurations, though within DFT+U the charge-transition (electrical) levels are found at Fermi-level positions with higher energies. Both methods predict that hydrogen is an amphoteric defect in Lu2O3 if the lowest-energy configurations are used to obtain the charge-transition, thermodynamic levels. The calculations of hyperfine constants for the neutral interstitial configurations show a predominantly isotropic hyperfine interaction with two distinct values of 926 MHz and 1061 MHz for the Fermi-contact term originating from the two corresponding interstitial positions of hydrogen in the lattice. These high values are consistent with the muonium spectroscopy measurements which also reveal a strongly isotropic hyperfine signature for the neutral muonium fraction with a magnitude slightly larger (1130 MHz) from the ab initio results (after scaling with the magnetic moments of the respective nuclei).

  8. Comment on "A hydrogen-rich early Earth atmosphere".

    PubMed

    Catling, David C

    2006-01-06

    Tian et al. (Reports, 13 May 2005, p. 1014) proposed a hydrogen-rich early atmosphere with slow hydrogen escape from a cold thermosphere. However, their model neglects the ultraviolet absorption of all gases other than H2. The model also neglects Earth's magnetic field, which affects the temperature and density of ions and promotes nonthermal escape of neutral hydrogen.

  9. The impact of exospheric neutral dynamics on ring current decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, R.; Liemohn, M. W.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Gruntman, M.; Bailey, J. J.; Toth, G.

    2015-12-01

    The geocorona plays an important role in the energy budget of the Earth's inner magnetosphere since charge exchange of energetic ions with exospheric neutrals makes the exosphere act as an energy sink for ring current particles. Long-term ring current decay following a magnetic storm is mainly due to these electron transfer reactions, leading to the formation energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) that leave the ring current system on ballistic trajectories. The number of ENAs emitted from a given region of space depends on several factors, such as the energy and species of the energetic ion population in that region and the density of the neutral gas with which the ions undergo charge exchange. However, the density and structure of the exosphere are strongly dependent on changes in atmospheric temperature and density as well as charge exchange with the ions of plasmaspheric origin, which depletes the geocorona (by having a neutral removed from the system). Moreover, the radiation pressure exerted by solar far-ultraviolet photons pushes the geocoronal hydrogen away from the Earth in an anti-sunward direction to form a tail of neutral hydrogen. TWINS ENA images provide a direct measurement of these ENA losses and therefore insight into the dynamics of the ring current decay through interactions with the geocorona. We assess the influence of geocoronal neutrals on ring current formation and decay by analysis of the predicted ENA emissions using 6 different geocoronal models and simulations from the HEIDI ring current model during storm time. Comparison with TWINS ENA images shows that the location of the peak ENA enhancements is highly dependent on the distribution of geocoronal hydrogen density. We show that the neutral dynamics has a strong influence on the time evolution of the ring current populations as well as on the formation of energetic neutral atoms.

  10. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  11. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  12. Beyond Viral Neutralization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena; Evans, David; Ferrari, Guido; Bournazos, Stylianos; Parsons, Matthew S; Bernard, Nicole F; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-01-13

    It has been known for more than 30 years that Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) infection drives a very potent B cell response resulting in the production of anti-HIV-1 antibodies targeting several viral proteins, particularly its envelope glycoproteins (Env). Env epitopes are exposed on the surfaces of viral particles and infected cells where they are targets of potentially protective antibodies. These antibodies can interdict infection by neutralization and there is strong evidence suggesting that Fc-mediated effector function can also contribute to protection. Current evidence suggests that Fc-mediated effector function plays a role in protection against infection by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) and it might be important for protection by non-neutralizing antibodies. Fc-mediated effector function includes diverse mechanisms that include antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-mediated complement activation (ADC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), antibody-mediated trancytosis inhibition, and antibody-mediated virus opsonization. All these functions could be beneficial in fighting viral infections including HIV-1. In this perspective, we discuss the latest developments for ADCC responses discussed at the HIVR4P satellite session on non-neutralizing antibodies, with emphasis on the mechanisms of ADCC resistance employed by HIV-1, the structural basis of epitopes recognized by antibodies that mediate ADCC, NK-cell education and ADCC, and murine models to study ADCC against HIV-1.

  13. Inelastic processes in ion/surface collisions: Direct recoil ion fractions as a function of kinetic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabalais, J. Wayne; Chen, Jie-Nan

    1986-09-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) spectra of the scattered and recoiled particles resulting from 1-10 keV Ar+ ions impingent on surfaces of MgO, Mg(OH)2, graphite, Si, and SiO2 have been obtained. Measurements of directly recoiled (DR) neutrals plus ions and neutrals only are used to calculate positive and negative ion fractions Y+,- from DR events. These positive and negative ion yields observed for DR of H, C, O, and Si have distinctly different behavior as a function of ion kinetic energy. The Y+ values exhibit a ``threshold-type'' behavior with a steep rise followed by a slowly rising or plateau region at higher energy. The Y- values exhibit a maximum in the low energy region followed by a decreasing yield as energy increases. The Y-/Y+ ratio for C and O is very sensitive to the amount of hydrogen present, with the Y+ yields dropping as hydrogen concentration increases. The recently developed model for electronic transitions in keV ion/surface collisions which considers Auger and resonant transitions along the ion trajectory and electron promotions in the quasidiatomic molecule of the close atomic encounter is extended to include DR events. Analytical expressions for Y+,- are derived for the case of surface atoms in positive, neutral, and negative bonding environments. These model expressions are fitted to the experimental data, allowing determination of the probabilities of ionization in the close atomic encounter and of electron capture along the outgoing trajectory.

  14. Targets for a Neutral Kaon Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    A secondary beam of neutral Kaons is under consideration for Hall D at Jefferson Lab to perform spectroscopic studies of hyperons produced by K 0 L particles scattering from proton and deuteron targets. The proposed physics program would utilize the GlueX detector package currently installed in Hall D. This contribution looks at potential targets for use in the new facility, paying close attention to the existing infrastructure of GlueX and Hall D. Unpolarized cryotargets of liquid hydrogen and deuerium, as well as polarized solid targets of protons and deuterons are examined.

  15. Process for preparing phenolic formaldehyde resole resin products derived from fractionated fast-pyrolysis oils

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Kreibich, Roland E.

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins and adhesive compositions in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenol/neutral fractions extract obtained from fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils.

  16. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Adlhart, O. J.

    1985-04-23

    This disclosure relates to a replaceable cartridge hydrogen generator of the type which relies at least partially on the process of anodic corrosion to produce hydrogen. A drum contains a plurality of the cartridges.

  17. Feasibility study of launch vehicle ground cloud neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderarend, P. C.; Stoy, S. T.; Kranyecz, T. E.

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of hydrogen chloride in the cloud was analyzed as a function of launch pad geometry and rate of rise of the vehicle during the first 24 sec of burn in order to define neutralization requirements. Delivery systems of various types were developed in order to bring the proposed chemical agents in close contact with the hydrogen chloride. Approximately one-third of the total neutralizing agent required can be delivered from a ground installed system at the launch pad; concentrated sodium carbonate solution is the preferred choice of agent for this launch pad system. Two-thirds of the neutralization requirement appears to need delivery by aircraft. Only one chemical agent (ammonia) may be reasonably considered for delivery by aircraft, because weight and bulk of all other agents are too large.

  18. Atomic Transition Probabilities for Neutral Cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, J. E.; den Hartog, E. A.; Wood, M. P.; Nitz, D. E.; Chisholm, J.; Sobeck, J.

    2009-10-01

    The spectra of neutral cerium (Ce I) and singly ionized cerium (Ce II) are more complex than spectra of other rare earth species. The resulting high density of lines in the visible makes Ce ideal for use in metal halide (MH) High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps. Inclusion of cerium-iodide in a lamp dose can improve both the Color Rendering Index and luminous efficacy of a MH-HID lamp. Basic spectroscopic data including absolute atomic transition probabilities for Ce I and Ce II are needed for diagnosing and modeling these MH-HID lamps. Recent work on Ce II [1] is now being augmented with similar work on Ce I. Radiative lifetimes from laser induced fluorescence measurements [2] on neutral Ce are being combined with emission branching fractions from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer. A total of 14 high resolution spectra are being analyzed to determine branching fractions for 2000 to 3000 lines from 153 upper levels in neutral Ce. Representative data samples and progress to date will be presented. [4pt] [1] J. E. Lawler, C. Sneden, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 182, 51-79 (2009). [0pt] [2] E. A. Den Hartog, K. P. Buettner, and J. E. Lawler, J. Phys. B: Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics 42, 085006 (7pp) (2009).

  19. Atomic Transition Probabilities for Neutral Cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, John; Nitz, D.; Sobeck, J.; Den Hartog, E. A.; Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Among the rare earth species, the spectra of neutral cerium (Ce I) and singly ionized cerium (Ce II) are some of the most complex. Like other rare earth species, Ce has many lines in the visible which are suitable for elemental abundance studies. Recent work on Ce II transition probabilities [1] is now being augmented with similar work on Ce I for future studies using such lines from astrophysical sources. Radiative lifetimes from laser induced fluorescence measurements [2] on neutral Ce are being combined with emission branching fractions from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer. A total of 14 high resolution spectra are being analyzed to determine branching fractions for 2500 to 3000 lines from 153 upper levels in neutral Ce. Representative data samples and progress to date will be presented. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program and the Department of Defense's ASSURE program through NSF Award AST-0453442 and NSF Grant CTS0613277. [1] J. E. Lawler, C. Sneden, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 182, 51-79 (2009). [2] E. A. Den Hartog, K. P. Buettner, and J. E. Lawler, J. Phys. B: Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics 42, 085006 (7pp) (2009).

  20. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF THE HEAVY NEUTRAL ATOMS MEASURED BY IBEX

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeewoo; Kucharek, Harald; Möbius, Eberhard; Galli, André; Livadiotis, George; Fuselier, Steve A.; McComas, David J.

    2015-10-15

    We investigate the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere by using heavy neutral maps generated with the IBEX-Lo instrument over three years from 2009 to 2011. The interstellar neutral (ISN) O and Ne gas flow was found in the first-year heavy neutral map at 601 keV and its flow direction and temperature were studied. However, due to the low counting statistics, researchers have not treated the full sky maps in detail. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the statistical significance of each pixel in the heavy neutral maps to get a better understanding of the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere. Here, we examine three statistical analysis methods: the signal-to-noise filter, the confidence limit method, and the cluster analysis method. These methods allow us to exclude background from areas where the heavy neutral signal is statistically significant. These methods also allow the consistent detection of heavy neutral atom structures. The main emission feature expands toward lower longitude and higher latitude from the observational peak of the ISN O and Ne gas flow. We call this emission the extended tail. It may be an imprint of the secondary oxygen atoms generated by charge exchange between ISN hydrogen atoms and oxygen ions in the outer heliosheath.

  1. Statistical Analysis of the Heavy Neutral Atoms Measured by IBEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeewoo; Kucharek, Harald; Möbius, Eberhard; Galli, André; Livadiotis, George; Fuselier, Steve A.; McComas, David J.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere by using heavy neutral maps generated with the IBEX-Lo instrument over three years from 2009 to 2011. The interstellar neutral (ISN) O&Ne gas flow was found in the first-year heavy neutral map at 601 keV and its flow direction and temperature were studied. However, due to the low counting statistics, researchers have not treated the full sky maps in detail. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the statistical significance of each pixel in the heavy neutral maps to get a better understanding of the directional distribution of heavy neutral atoms in the heliosphere. Here, we examine three statistical analysis methods: the signal-to-noise filter, the confidence limit method, and the cluster analysis method. These methods allow us to exclude background from areas where the heavy neutral signal is statistically significant. These methods also allow the consistent detection of heavy neutral atom structures. The main emission feature expands toward lower longitude and higher latitude from the observational peak of the ISN O&Ne gas flow. We call this emission the extended tail. It may be an imprint of the secondary oxygen atoms generated by charge exchange between ISN hydrogen atoms and oxygen ions in the outer heliosheath.

  2. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  3. Facility for intense diagnostic neutral beam (IDNB) development

    SciTech Connect

    Kasik, R.J.; Hinckley, W.B.; Bartsch, R.R.; Rej, D.J.; Henins, I.; Greenly, J.B.

    1993-08-01

    An intense, pulsed neutral beam source is under development for use as a probe beam on hot, burning plasmas such as in the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER) which is presently in the planning stage. A pulsed, neutral hydrogen beam of 10s of kilo amperes of current can have an alpha particle, charge-exchange-recombination-spectroscopy (alpha-CHERS) signal-to-noise ratio of {approximately} 10. This beam would allow the measurement, on a single pulse of a few hundred nanoseconds duration, of the local alpha particle distribution function as well as other features of the tokamak plasma such as current density profile, impurity density, and microturbulence spectrum. The cross-sections for the CHERS diagnostic dictate operation with proton energies greater than {approximately}50keV. A pulsed neutral hydrogen source of this voltage and intensity can be achieved by neutralizing the ion flux from a magnetized ion-diode. The cross-sections for attachment and stripping, when coupled with scaling from Child-Langmiur, space-charge-limited, ion-current flow imply operation below - 100keV for maximum neutral fluence. The development of a flashover-anode, ion source for forthcoming evaluation of a neutralizing section is described below. This source operates in the accelerator voltage range 70 to 100keV. Eventually, the flashover-anode, magnetized ion-diode will be replaced with a plasma-anode, magnetized ion-diode.

  4. Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  5. Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2008-11-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well as the technical challenges and research goals for storing hydrogen on board a vehicle.

  6. Treatment of ammonia contaminated water by ozone and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, F.; Hill, D.O.; Kuo, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    The present research concerns kinetics of oxidation of ammonia by ozone and ozone-hydrogen peroxide mixtures in alkaline solutions. Experiments were carried out at 15 to 35{degrees}C in solutions with pH values varying from 8 to 10 utilizing a stopped-flow spectrophotometer system. Fractions of free ammonia present in acidic and neutral solutions are negligible, and the reaction is very slow. This confirms that only free ammonia can react with ozone in the aqueous phase. The reaction proceeds at moderate rates in the alkaline solutions requiring four moles of ozone to react with each mole of ammonia. The free ammonia is oxidized and converted completely to nitrate in the solutions. The overall reaction between ammonia and ozone is second order with first order in each reactant. The reaction rate constant increases with temperature and pH value of the solution. The average activation energy is 59 Kcal/gmol for all systems investigated at different pH values. The results of the kinetic experiments suggest that the reaction is predominated by the direct oxidation between ammonia and ozone molecules, and that the hydroxyl radical reactions play insignificant roles in the ozonation process. The oxidation rate of ammonia is enhanced considerably in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and ozone mixtures. The formation of hydroxyl radical from interactions between ozone and hydrogen peroxide and the subsequent free radical reactions of ammonia seem important in controlling the destruction rate of free ammonia, as suggested by the results of this study.

  7. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  8. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Fred L.; Blank, Merle L.

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated ether-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood pressure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  9. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  10. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, F.L.; Blank, M.L.

    1984-10-26

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated either-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood presure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  11. Solvent effect on the spectral properties of Neutral Red

    PubMed Central

    Rauf, Muhammad A; Soliman, Ahmed A; Khattab, Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Background The study was aimed at investigating the effect of various solvents on the absorption spectra of Neutral Red, a dye belonging to the quinone-imine class of dyes. The solvents chosen for the study were water, ethanol, acetonitrile, acetone, propan-1-ol, chloroform, nitrobenzene, ethyleneglycol, acetic acid, DMSO and DMF. Results The results have shown that the absorption maxima of dyes are dependent on solvent polarity. In non-hydrogen-bond donating solvents, solvation of dye molecules probably occurs via dipole-dipole interactions, whereas in hydrogen-bond donating solvents the phenomenon is more hydrogen bonding in nature. To estimate the contribution of the different variables on the wave number of the Neutral Red dye, regression analyses using the ECW model were compared with the π* scale model. This showed that the unified scale for estimating the solvent effect on the absorption of the Neutral Red dye is more adopted and more applicable than the π* scale model. Conclusion Absorption maxima of dyes are dependent on solvent polarity. Solvation of dye molecules probably occurs via dipole-dipole interactions in non-hydrogen-bond donating solvents, whereas in hydrogen-bond donating solvents the phenomenon is more hydrogen bonding in nature. The unified scale for estimating the solvent effect on the absorption of Neutral Red dye is more adopted and more applicable than the π* scale model. This may be due to complications from both π-π* charge transfer interactions and incomplete complexation of the solute; these effects are averaged out in the derived β and π parameters and thus limit their applicability. PMID:18799016

  12. Hydrogenation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, J.; Oberg, C. L.; Russell, L. H.

    1981-06-23

    Hydrogenation reaction apparatus is described comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1,100 to 1,900 C, while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products. 2 figs.

  13. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Black, Stuart K.; Diebold, James P.; Kreibich, Roland E.

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  14. Resole resin products derived from fractionated organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-08-10

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde resole resins by fractionating organic and aqueous condensates made by fast-pyrolysis of biomass materials while using a carrier gas to move feed into a reactor to produce phenolic-containing/neutrals in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenolic/neutral fractions extract obtained by fractionation.

  15. Neutrality between Government and Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1996-01-01

    The overall guiding principle of neutrality between government and religion masks a tension that exists between free exercise of religion and establishment of religion. Reviews the development and current status of "Lemon" as a test for neutrality; proposes a new test for neutrality, evenhandedness, that is common to both the Free…

  16. Deuterium Fractionation just after the Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, D.; Sakai, N.; Yamamoto, S.

    2013-10-01

    We have recently conducted a five-point strip observation of the DCO+, H13CO+, DNC, HN13C, and N2H+ lines toward low mass Class I protostar L1551 IRS5, and have evaluated the deuterium fractionation ratios DCO+/HCO+ and DNC/HNC. The DCO+/HCO+ ratio is found to be lower toward the protostar position than those toward the adjacent positions. On the other hand, the DNC/HNC ratio does not show such a decrease toward the protostar position. This suggests that the deuterium fractionation ratio of the neutral species is conserved after the star formation. If so, the deuterium fractionation of the neutral species can be used as a novel tracer to investigate the initial condition of the star formation process.

  17. Atomic hydrogen in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stephen E.; Silverglate, Peter R.; Altschuler, Daniel R.; Giovanardi, Carlo

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched for neutral atomic hydrogen associated with 22 planetary nebulae and three evolved stars in the 21 cm line at the Arecibo Observatory. Objects whose radial velocities permitted discrimination from Galactic H I were chosen for observation. Hydrogen was detected in absorption from IC 4997. From the measurements new low limits are derived to the mass of atomic hydrogen associated with the undetected nebulae. Radio continuum observations were also made of several of the nebulae at 12.6 cm. The authors reexamine previous measurements of H I in planetary nebulae, and present the data on a consistent footing. The question of planetary nebula distances is considered at length. Finally, implications of the H I measurements for nebular evolution are discussed and it is suggested that atomic hydrogen seen in absorption was expelled from the progenitor star during the final 1000 yr prior to the onset of ionization.

  18. Neutralization of H- at Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreshkov, Boyan; Thumm, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    The charge transfer rates and the neutralization probabilities for hydrogen anions colliding with nanostructured (vicinal) surfaces are obtained by direct numerical integration of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for the motion of the active electron in the field of the projectile-surface compound. The electronic structure of the surface is calculated from a Thomas-Fermi - von Weizsaecker statistical model with local density approximation for the exchange-correlation energy. In fixed-ion approximation, the decay rate of the electronic state of the anion in front of the surface is obtained by projecting the density of states of the collision system onto the unperturbed projectile level. The ion neutralization probability is calculated from this static width within a rate equation approach for a set of broken-straight-line collision trajectories for kinetic energies of 1 keV. The dependence of decay rates and neutralization probabilities on the surface morphology and the scattering trajectories, and a comparison of our numerical results with the experiments will be discussed.

  19. Ultracold neutral plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, M.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-01-01

    By photoionizing samples of laser-cooled atoms with laser light tuned just above the ionization limit, plasmas can be created with electron and ion temperatures below 10 K. These ultracold neutral plasmas have extended the temperature bounds of plasma physics by two orders of magnitude. Table-top experiments, using many of the tools from atomic physics, allow for the study of plasma phenomena in this new regime with independent control over the density and temperature of the plasma through the excitation process. Characteristic of these systems is an inhomogeneous density profile, inherited from the density distribution of the laser-cooled neutral atom sample. Most work has dealt with unconfined plasmas in vacuum, which expand outward at velocities of order 100 m/s, governed by electron pressure, and with lifetimes of order 100 μs, limited by stray electric fields. Using detection of charged particles and optical detection techniques, a wide variety of properties and phenomena have been observed, including expansion dynamics, collective excitations in both the electrons and ions, and collisional properties. Through three-body recombination collisions, the plasmas rapidly form Rydberg atoms, and clouds of cold Rydberg atoms have been observed to spontaneously avalanche ionize to form plasmas. Of particular interest is the possibility of the formation of strongly coupled plasmas, where Coulomb forces dominate thermal motion and correlations become important. The strongest impediment to strong coupling is disorder-induced heating, a process in which Coulomb energy from an initially disordered sample is converted into thermal energy. This restricts electrons to a weakly coupled regime and leaves the ions barely within the strongly coupled regime. This review will give an overview of the field of ultracold neutral plasmas, from its inception in 1999 to current work, including efforts to increase strong coupling and effects on plasma properties due to strong coupling.

  20. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Dahl, David A.; Delmore, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  1. Neutral beam injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Duesing, G.; Altmann, H.; Falter, H.; Goede, A.; Haange, R.; Hemsworth, R.S.; Kupschus, P.; Stork, D.; Thompson, E.

    1987-01-01

    The development of the neutral injection (NI) system for the Joint European Torus and its status in 1985 are reported. First the system parameters are discussed and the layout is described, followed by a summary of the physics design calculations, the development, production, and testing of the components and the subsystem assembly. The system commissioning is presented, including a description of the function and the realization of the NI test bed. A summary of performance predictions for 80-keV beam heating experiments, and of the experimental evidence on balanced versus coinjection, is presented. The operational experience with the first injector and the plasma physics results obtained so far are summarized.

  2. Resistance of constructional steel to fracture in hydrogen impregnation and hydrogen sulfide cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Savchenkov, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    This article discusses the resistance of constructional steel to fracture in hydrogen impregnation and hydrogen sulfide cracking. The greater the hydrogen concentration at the crack tip, the lower the failure stress intensity factor. The relationship of the new parameter of hydrogen resistance and the equations of decohesion of the hydrogen impregnated metal is revealed in analysis of the threshold stresses of hydrogen sulfide cracking. The quantitative rules and criteria of fracture of hydrogen impregnated steel established show that the activity of hydrogen, creating ''hydrogen stresses'' and adsorption effects, has primary significance. Results presented show that the harmful influence of hydrogen may be neutralized by selection of appropriate alloying and methods of treatment of the steel to reduce the activity of hydrogen and under certain conditions to even obtain a positive effect from hydrogen impregnation. The author outlines several conclusions and shows that the criterion of failure of constructional steels in hydrogen embrittlement may be represented in clear form through the probability of decohesion, the hydrogen activity and the original crack resistance.

  3. Hydrogen energy progress 5678

    SciTech Connect

    Veziroglu, T.N. )

    1990-01-01

    This book covers the proceedings of the 8th World Hydrogen Energy Conference, and includes: international hydrogen energy programs; hydrogen production; storage of hydrogen; hydrogen transmission and distribution; combustion systems/hydrogen engines; fuel cells; and synfuel production.

  4. Li+-ion neutralization on metal surfaces and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Shen, Jie; Jia, Juanjuan; Kandasamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Bobrov, Kirill; Guillemot, Laurent; Fuhr, Javier. D.; Martiarena, Maria Luz; Esaulov, Vladimir A.

    2011-11-01

    Li+ ions with energies ranging from 0.3 to 2 keV are scattered from Au(110) and Pd(100) surfaces and from ultrathin Ag film grown on Au(111) in order to study electron transfer phenomena. We find that neutralization occurs quite efficiently and find an anomalous ion energy dependence of the neutral fraction for Au(110) and Pd(100) surfaces previously noted for Au(111). The dependence of the neutral fraction on the azimuthal angle of the Au(110) and Pd(100) surfaces is reported. In the case of Ag monolayer on Au(111), results are similar to the case of the Ag(111) surface. To understand the anomalous ion energy dependence, we present a theoretical study using density functional theory (DFT) and a linearized rate equation approach, which allows us to follow the Li charge state evolution for the (111) surfaces of Ag, Au, and Cu, and for the Ag-covered Au(111) surface.

  5. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.R.

    1984-06-19

    A hydrogen generator decomposes water into hydrogen and oxygen, and includes an induction coil which is electrically heated to a temperature sufficient to decompose water passing therethrough. A generator coil is connected in communicating relation to the induction coil, and is positioned in a fire resistant crucible containing ferrous oxide pellets. Oxygen and hydrogen produced by decomposition of water pass through the ferrous oxide pellets where the oxygen reacts with the ferrous oxide and the hydrogen is burned to produce heat for heating a building, such as a conventional home.

  6. [Mutagenicity of 3 organic fractions of atmospheric dust and gas chromatographic analysis of the basic fraction].

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, A; Schleibinger, H; Ketseridis, G; Wullenweber, M; Rüden, H

    1983-01-01

    Suspended particulate matter (PM) with a Dae less than 0.4 micron was collected from July 1981 till January 1982. The ether/benzene soluble extract (EEOM) and the acidic, basic and neutral fractions were determined and investigated for their mutagenic activities in the Ames bioassay. In addition particles (Dae) less than 10.2 micron derived in January were investigated. Five compounds of the basic fraction were determined by gaschromatography. The following results were obtained: Suspended particulate matter (Dae less than 0.4 micron) and the ether/benzene extract increase from July to January. The lowest rates occur in July (PM: 16.9 micron/m3) and August (EEOM: 3.0 micrograms/m3), the highest in January (PM: 48.9 micrograms/m3, EEOM: 10.5 micrograms/m3). The ether/benzene soluble portion of the suspended particulate matter increases from the average rate of 16.3% (July-September) to 22.7% (November-January). The neutral fraction amounts to 44.9%, the acidic fraction to 27.3% and the basic fraction to 3.5% of the organic matter (on an average). In experiments with metabolic activation 99% of the total mutagenicity during the period of July till September can be demonstrated by summing up the mutagenicity of the three fractions on the other hand only 59.7% from November till January. The EEOMs derived from winter exhibit without metabolic activation (250 micrograms/plate) distinctively higher numbers of revertants than the single fractions. Dose-response curves of extracts derived from back-up filters (Dae less than 0.4 micron) in January show that the acidic fraction has a slightly higher mutagenic activity than the neutral fraction (mean values of tests with and without S9-mix). The basic fraction shows no mutagenicity without S9-mix, with activation the mutagenic activity is lower than that of the other fractions. Mutagenicity expressed as rev./m3 air shows, that the neutral fraction is most efficient. The number of revertants per plate reveals-in relation to

  7. Molecular processes in astrophysics: Calculations of hydrogen + hydrogen gas excitation, de-excitation, and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Matthew Thomas

    The implications of H+H2 cooling in astrophysics is important to several applications. One of the most significant and pure applications is its role in cooling in the early universe. Other applications would include molecular dynamics in nebulae and their collapse into stars and astrophysical shocks. Shortly after the big bang, the universe was a hot primordial gas of photons, electrons, and nuclei among other ingredients. By far the most dominant nuclei in the early universe was hydrogen. In fact, in the early universe the matter density was 90 percent hydrogen and only 10 percent helium with small amounts of lithium and deuterium. In order for structure to form in the universe, this primordial gas must form atoms and cool. One of the significant cooling mechanisms is the collision of neutral atomic hydrogen with a neutral diatomic hydrogen molecule. This work performs calculations to determine collisional cooling rates of hydrogen using two potential surfaces.

  8. Wakefields generated by collisional neutrinos in neutral-electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tinakiche, Nouara

    2015-12-15

    A classical fluid description is adopted to investigate nonlinear interaction between an electron-type neutrino beam and a relativistic collisionless unmagnetized neutral-electron-positron-ion plasma. In this work, we consider the collisions of the neutrinos with neutrals in the plasma and study their effect on the generation of wakefields in presence of a fraction of ions in a neutral-electron-positron plasma. The results obtained in the present work are interpreted and compared with previous studies.

  9. Hydrogen Bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  10. Neutral polypropylene laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolfino, Chiara; Lertora, Enrico; Gambaro, Carla

    2016-10-01

    The joining of polymeric materials is a technology used in many industrial applications, from transport to telecommunications and the medical sector. A new technology for the joining of polymers is the laser welding process. In particular, fibre laser welding is a flexible technology which allows high process speed and the realization of good quality joints. Despite its application becoming more widespread in the production of assemblies of high precision, the application of laser technology for the welding of polymers has not been the subject of many studies up to now. This study focused on the welding of neutral polypropylene. The window process parameter was identified, without the use of additives to increase radiation absorption, and a mechanical characterization was conducted in order to evaluate the quality of the joints realized.

  11. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-21

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction.

  12. Neutral hydrogen and optical properties of three amorphous galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Woerden, Hugo Van; Gallagher, John S., III

    1994-01-01

    We present new interferometric H I and optical observations of three amorphous galaxies, systems with a smooth, high surface brightness but an asymmetrical distribution of light. All three galaxies are forming stars and have LMC-like emission-line ratios, low dust content, and high H I velocity dispersions. NGC 1140 has a boxy inner morphology with a hook off one corner. At low light levels unusual extensions of starlight are seen curving to the northwest and southeast. The galaxy contains a very luminous central star-forming region and a small chain of H II regions that coincide with the hook. The central H II region has broad H(alpha) velocity profiles full width at half maximum (FWHM) less than or equal to 140 km/s, and it is a radio continuum source. There is a rotating H I gas disk, 40 kpc in radius, at a position angle 51 deg from the optical major axis. The central gas ridge follows the chain of H II regions, and the H I peak is on the hook. The outer gas on the southeast side curves away from the H I major axis. The central gas density is high, and the surface density declines very slowly with radius. The rotation velocity yields a mass of 1 x 10(exp 11) solar mass at 3.3 Holmberg radii (R(sub H)). NGC 1800 has a hook that coincides with a large H II region, and an r(exp 1/4) luminosity distribution. There are numerous H II regions along the major axis and extraordinary filaments of ionized gas. Emanating from the major axis on either side of the galaxy are H(alpha) fingers approximately 750 pc long. About 2.3 kpc to the north is a web of filaments approximately 3 kpc in extent. H(alpha) profiles of H II regions and filaments are narrow. The H I gas disk has a position angle that is approximately 13 deg different from that of the optical axis. There are two peaks near the center, one of which is near the largest H II region. Beyond the Holmberg radius to the west is a 6 x 10(exp 6) solar mass H I cloud. Its velocity indicates a mass of approximately 6 x 10(exp 9) solar mass for NGC 1800 at 1.5 R(sub H). At approximately R(sub 25) to the east there is a large H I shell. Also at approximately R(sub 25) on both sides the velocity gradient switches by 90 deg, and in the interior the rotation is about the major axis. The central gas density is low and falls off slowly. In the inner regions NGC 4670 resembles an S0/a galaxy seen rather edge-on. It contains a central supergiant H II region with very high velocity widths (FWHM less than or equal to 180 km/s) and complex velocity structures. It is a radio continuum source as well. The H I gas is a single spherical cloud or a disk at low inclination centered on the galaxy with a slight elongation along the optical major axis and rotation about the minor axis. The central gas density is high, and there is a high degree of concentration. The rotation speed indicates a total mass of 5 x 10(exp 10) solar mass at 1.1 R(sub H). We compare these characteristics with properties of gas in the presence of stellar bar potentials, gas warps, and interacting and merging galaxy models. Although there are inconsistencies and uncertainties, we conclude that NGC 1140 is a spiral of low surface brightness that has undergone a merger, while NGC 1800 and NGC 4670 are, respectively, probably an Im system and a spiral that had an encounter of the Noguchi (1988a) kind.

  13. Neutral hydrogen and star formation in irregular galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skillman, Evan D.

    1987-01-01

    The Very Large Array and WSTR H I synthesis observations of seven irregular galaxies are presented. The total H I images of four Local Group dwarf irregular galaxies and three larger more distant irregular galaxies are constructed at the identical resolution of 500 pc. When compared to H II region distributions derived from H alpha images, all galaxies studied show an excellent correlation between the H I surface density and the presence of H II regions. This correlation is most easily interpreted in terms of a requisite threshold H I surface density for massive star formation. This threshold is 1 x 10 to the 21st power H I atoms/sq cm for a resolution of 500 pc. Giant extragalactic H II regions are only found near H I surface densities of a factor of 3 to 5 times this threshold level. The observed threshold implies a Jeans length of 150 pc, which is the same as the size scale at which the structure in the H I complexes correlates well with the H II region distribution. This, combined with the fact that in none of the galaxies observed is there H I above the threshold level with concomitant H II regions, implies an exclusively gravitational origin for the star formation events. That is, there is no need to involve a trigger as in the SSPSF theory (Seiden 1983) or feedback as in Dopita (1985).

  14. The distance to the high velocity clouds of neutral hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Joel N.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project was to determine the distance to high velocity gas clouds. These clouds are believed to lie in the halo of the galaxy, but this is a matter of controversy. The technique was used to look for the effect of absorption by these clouds against the light of stars at various distances along the line of sight to these clouds. This was done in the ultraviolet using the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Absorption at the velocity of the clouds was not found in any of the stars, which have kiloparsec distances. It was concluded that the vertical distance to these clouds is at least 1.5 kpc, putting them firmly in the halo of the galaxy.

  15. Hydrogen carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  16. Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. L.; Rohatgi, N. K.; Demore, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    Absorption cross-sections of hydrogen peroxide vapor and of neutral aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide were measured in the wavelength range from 195 to 350 nm at 296 K. The spectrophotometric procedure is described, and the reported cross-sections are compared with values obtained by other researchers. Photodissociation coefficients of atmospheric H2O2 were calculated for direct absorption of unscattered solar radiation, and the vertical distributions of these coefficients are shown for various solar zenith angles.

  17. Transient Photochemistry of Neutral Red.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    ascorbic acid system to 50 successive flashes, indicating that no ground state neutral red is permanently converted to leuco dye . Since leuco neutral...complete regeneration of ground state neutral red in this pH range in the present study suggests that formation of leuco dye is not significant. The second...radical disproportionation step is followed by a slower step which converts leuco dye to semireduced radical. Because coupling the two steps

  18. Transient ion neutralization by electrons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The nonlinear initial-boundary-value problems describing the lateral neutralization of ion beams for the cases that (1) an auxiliary electric field accelerates the electrons into the ion space, and (2) the electrons are injected into the ion space at a prescribed current density are treated. Analytical solutions are derived which give the position and speed of the neutralization front as a function of time, and the temporal development of the electron density, velocity, and electric fields during the neutralization process.

  19. Modeling of hydrogen diffusion in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, K.; Cao, M.Z.; Wan, X.J.; Shi, C.X.

    1989-02-01

    The study of the diffusion of hydrogen in metals is very important to further understand the hydrogen embrittlement of metals. To describe the diffusion of hydrogen in metals the diffusion equation deduced from Fick's law under an ideal condition has been generally used and the effect of hydrogen trapping in metals has been neglected. In the process of hydrogen diffusion through a metal, hydrogen fills the traps continuously and the fraction of the traps filled by hydrogen, which have only little effect on the diffusion of hydrogen, may be different at different places because the distribution of hydrogen concentration may be different at different places. Thus the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the metal may also be different at different positions, i.e., the diffusion coefficient should be affected by time in a dynamic process of hydrogen diffusion through a metal. But in the previous analyses, the above fact is not considered and the hydrogen diffusion coefficient is generally taken as a constant. In the present paper a new model of hydrogen diffusion in metals in which the effect of time is taken into account is developed.

  20. Constraining the Europa Neutral Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard T.; Mitchell, Donald; mauk, Barry; Johnson, Robert E.; clark, george

    2016-10-01

    "Neutral tori" consist of neutral particles that usually co-orbit along with their source forming a toroidal (or partial toroidal) feature around the planet. The distribution and composition of these features can often provide important, if not unique, insight into magnetospheric particles sources, mechanisms and dynamics. However, these features can often be difficult to directly detect. One innovative method for detecting neutral tori is by observing Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) that are generally considered produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between charged and neutral particles.Mauk et al. (2003) reported the detection of a Europa neutral particle torus using ENA observations. The presence of a Europa torus has extremely large implications for upcoming missions to Jupiter as well as understanding possible activity at this moon and providing critical insight into what lies beneath the surface of this icy ocean world. However, ENAs can also be produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between two ionized particles and in that case cannot be used to infer the presence of neutral particle population. Thus, a detailed examination of all possible source interactions must be considered before one can confirm that likely original source population of these ENA images is actually a Europa neutral particle torus. For this talk, we examine the viability that the Mauk et al. (2003) observations were actually generated from a neutral torus emanating from Europa as opposed to charge particle interactions with plasma originating from Io. These results help constrain such a torus as well as Europa source processes.

  1. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, M.  Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus  C.; Amos, Joshua  D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn  J.; Whitesides, John  F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey  E.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Lu, Xiaozhi; Bonsignori, Mattia; Finzi, Andrés; Vandergrift, Nathan  A.; Alam, S.  Munir; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia  D.; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron  S.; Sam, Noel  E.; Kapiga, Saidi; Gray, Elin S.; Tumba, Nancy  L.; Morris, Lynn; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw  K.; Mascola, John  R.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George  M.; Sodroski, Joseph  G.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C.; Hraber, Peter T.; Korber, Bette T.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the viral envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. In chronic infection, virus escape mutants repopulate the plasma and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tier 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.

  2. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses

    DOE PAGES

    Moody, M.  Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus  C.; ...

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the viral envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. In chronic infection, virus escape mutants repopulate the plasma and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tiermore » 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.« less

  3. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses.

    PubMed

    Moody, M Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Amos, Joshua D; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Lu, Xiaozhi; Bonsignori, Mattia; Finzi, Andrés; Vandergrift, Nathan A; Alam, S Munir; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron S; Sam, Noel E; Kapiga, Saidi; Gray, Elin S; Tumba, Nancy L; Morris, Lynn; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Mascola, John R; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M; Sodroski, Joseph G; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C; Hraber, Peter T; Korber, Bette T; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the HIV-1 envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in infected individuals. In chronic infection, HIV-1 escape mutants repopulate the plasma, and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3 and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tier 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.

  4. Far-ultraviolet florescent molecular hydrogen emission map of the Milky Way Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Young-soo; Seon, Kwang-il; Min, Kyoung-wook; Edelstein, Jerry; Han, Wonyong

    2017-01-01

    We present the far-ultraviolet fluorescent molecular hydrogen (H2) emission map observed with FIMS/SPEAR for ~76% of the sky. The fluorescent H2 emission is found to be saturated by strong dust extinction at the optically thick, Galactic plane region. Nevertheless, the extinction-corrected intensity of the fluorescent H2 emission is found to have strong linear correlations with the well-known tracers of the cold interstellar medium, such as the E(B-V) color excess, neutral hydrogen column density N(HI), Hα emission, and CO J=1→0 emission. The all-sky molecular hydrogen column density map is also obtained using a simple photodissociation region model with interstellar radiation fields derived from UV star catalogs. We also estimate the hydrogen molecular fraction (fH2), CO-to-H2 conversion factor (XCO), and the gas-to-dust ratio of the diffuse interstellar medium. fH2 gradually increases from less than 1% at optically thin regions with E(B-V)<0.1 to ~50% for E(B-V) = 5. XCO also tends to increase with E(B-V), but converges to the Galactic mean value of 1.8×1020 cm-2 K-1 km-1 s at optically thick regions where E(B-V) is larger than 2.0. The estimated gas-to-dust ratio is consistent with the standard value of 5.8×1021 atoms cm-2 mag-1.

  5. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-11-15

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered.

  6. Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Dias, Ranga; Noked, Ori; Salamat, Ashkan; Zaghoo, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    One of the great challenges in condensed matter physics has been to produce metallic hydrogen (MH) in the laboratory. There are two approaches: solid molecular hydrogen can be compressed to high density at extreme pressures of order 5-6 megabars. The transition to MH should take place at low temperatures and is expected to occur as a structural first-order phase transition with dissociation of molecules into atoms, rather than the closing of a gap. A second approach is to produce dense molecular hydrogen at pressures of order 1-2 megabars and heat the sample. With increasing temperature, it was predicted that molecular hydrogen first melts and then dissociates to atomic metallic liquid hydrogen as a first-order phase transition. We have observed this liquid-liquid phase transition to metallic hydrogen, also called the plasma phase transition. In low-temperature studies, we have pressurized HD to over 3 megabars and observed two new phases. Molecular hydrogen has been pressurized to 4.2 megabars. A new phase transition has been observed at 3.55 megabars, but it is not yet metallic.

  7. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in

  8. Neutral beamline with improved ion-energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Haselton, H.H.; Stirling, W.L.; Whealton, J.H.

    1981-04-13

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  9. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  10. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2016-04-27

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established similar to –5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-mu s surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of mu s after the high voltage pulse is applied. Lastly, it is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.

  11. Dynamics of ion beam charge neutralization by ferroelectric plasma sources

    DOE PAGES

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; ...

    2016-04-27

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams, as has been demonstrated on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment NDCX-I and NDCX-II. This article presents experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a plasma produced in a FEPS discharge. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable with sufficiently dense FEPS plasma. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15V before neutralization to 0.3 V,more » implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Measurements of the time-evolution of beam radius show that near-complete charge neutralization is established similar to –5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub-mu s surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS show the existence of electron emission into vacuum, which lasts for tens of mu s after the high voltage pulse is applied. Lastly, it is argued that the beam is neutralized by the plasma produced by this process and not by a surface discharge plasma that is produced at the instant the high-voltage pulse is applied.« less

  12. Is science metaphysically neutral?

    PubMed

    Fry, Iris

    2012-09-01

    This paper challenges the claim that science is metaphysically neutral upheld by contenders of the separation of peacefully co-existent science and religion and by evolutionary theists. True, naturalistic metaphysical claims can neither be refuted nor proved and are thus distinct from empirical hypotheses. However, metaphysical assumptions not only regulate the theoretical and empirical study of nature, but are increasingly supported by the growing empirical body of science. This historically evolving interaction has contributed to the development of a naturalistic worldview that renounces the necessity of a transcendent god and of purposeful design. The thesis presented here differs not only from the claims of the "separatists" and of evolutionary theists. In pointing to the metaphysical aspects of science, I also criticize the failure of some evolutionary naturalists to distinguish between empirical and metaphysical contentions. Most important, based on the examination of science suggested here, creationists' false accusation that science is only a naturalistic dogma is refuted. Finally, the difficulties involved in the position endorsed here for the public support of evolution are acknowledged, taking into account the high religious profile of the American society and the social and political context in the US and in other countries.

  13. Weak neutral current chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R.

    1996-07-01

    Metal cluster organic complexes, neither atomic nor solid but in analogy to atomic nuclei and to mesoscopic systems, have unusual dynamics and catalytic properties. Organo-metal clusters as quintessence prebiotic enzymes could have originated the homochirality of the molecules from achiral precursors, controlled from the atomic-nucleus, with the initial product itself serving subsequently as chiral auxiliary transferring and amplifying the chirality in the autocatalytic process now. High resolution spectroscopic studies of diatomic molecules beginning now may lead to upper estimates of the interaction strength of weak neutral currents (WNG) with valence electrons of metal clusters and suggest kinetic pathways to dynamic symmetry breaking in the asymmetric synthesis of chiral molecules. An estimate of 10{sup {minus}5} kT (thousand times larger than for radiolysis) for the parity violating energy (PVE) could be sufficient to run an entropy driven spin-catalyzed asymmetric synthesis. Expect then, wherever there are metal clusters in interstellar dust or under the sea chiral molecular production. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Weak neutral current chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, R.

    1996-07-01

    Metal cluster organic complexes, neither atomic nor solid but in analogy to atomic nuclei and to mesoscopic systems, have unusual dynamics and catalytic properties. Organo-metal clusters as quintessence prebiotic enzymes could have originated the homochirality of the molecules from achiral precursors, controlled from the atomic-nucleus, with the initial product itself serving subsequently as chiral auxiliary transferring and amplifying the chirality in the autocatalytic process now. High resolution spectroscopic studies of diatomic molecules beginning now may lead to upper estimates of the interaction strength of weak neutral currents (WNG) with valence electrons of metal clusters and suggest kinetic pathways to dynamic symmetry breaking in the asymmetric synthesis of chiral molecules. An estimate of 10-5 kT (thousand times larger than for radiolysis) for the parity violating energy (PVE) could be sufficient to run an entropy driven spin-catalyzed asymmetric synthesis. Expect then, wherever there are metal clusters in interstellar dust or under the sea chiral molecular production.

  15. The neutral upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. N.

    2002-07-01

    After World War II, Professor S.K. Mitra wrote a comprehensive book called The Upper Atmosphere, which dealt with information available from ground-based and balloon-borne experiments. As a result, topics such as day airglow were investigated and further ground-based experiments using incoherent back-scattering were carried out. These activities resulted in important new information on the ozonosphere. The dramatic discovery of ozone holes forms a new and exciting chapter in the discovery of atmospheric processes. While dealing with the limits of the atmosphere, reference may be made to interstellar molecules whose discovery has raised considerable scientific curiosity. Knowledge on the solar-terrestrial relationship advanced a great deal when more information on solar radiation became available by measuring higher energy photons in the UV, EUV, and even X-ray regime. All this information is incorporated in this volume and presented under the title The Neutral Upper Atmosphere. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/0-7923-6434-1

  16. Tempered fractional calculus

    SciTech Connect

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  17. Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements of neutral density in a helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Galante, M. E.; Magee, R. M.; Scime, E. E.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a new diagnostic based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). We use a high intensity (5 MW/cm{sup 2}), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm{sup −1}) laser to probe the ground state of neutral hydrogen, deuterium and krypton with spatial resolution better than 0.2 cm, a time resolution of 10 ns, and a measurement cadence of 20 Hz. Here, we describe proof-of-principle measurements in a helicon plasma source that demonstrate the TALIF diagnostic is capable of measuring neutral densities spanning four orders of magnitude; comparable to the edge neutral gradients predicted in the DIII-D tokamak pedestal. The measurements are performed in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas and absolute calibration is accomplished through TALIF measurements in neutral krypton. The optical configuration employed is confocal, i.e., both light injection and collection are accomplished with a single lens through a single optical port in the vacuum vessel. The wavelength resolution of the diagnostic is sufficient to separate hydrogen and deuterium spectra and we present measurements from mixed hydrogen and deuterium plasmas that demonstrate isotopic abundance measurements are feasible. Time resolved measurements also allow us to explore the evolution of the neutral hydrogen density and temperature and effects of wall recycling. We find that the atomic neutral density grows rapidly at the initiation of the discharge, reaching the steady-state value within 1 ms. Additionally, we find that neutral hydrogen atoms are born with 0.08 eV temperatures, not 2 eV as is typically assumed.

  18. EDITORIAL: Negative ion based neutral beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsworth, R. S.

    2006-06-01

    It is widely recognized that neutral beam injection (NBI), i.e. the injection of high energy, high power, beams of H or D atoms, is a flexible and reliable system that has been the main heating system on a large variety of fusion devices, and NBI has been chosen as one of the three heating schemes of the International Tokomak Reactor (ITER). To date, all the NBI systems but two have been based on the neutralization (in a simple gas target) of positive hydrogen or deuterium ions accelerated to <100 keV/nucleon. Above that energy the neutralization of positive ions falls to unacceptably low values, and higher energy neutral beams have to be created by the neutralization of accelerated negative ions (in a simple gas target), as this remains high (approx60%) up to >1 MeV/nucleon. Unfortunately H- and D- are difficult to create, and the very characteristic that makes them attractive, the ease with which the electron is detached from the ion, means that it is difficult to create high concentrations or fluxes of them, and it is difficult to avoid substantial, collisional, losses in the extraction and acceleration processes. However, there has been impressive progress in negative ion sources and accelerators over the past decade, as demonstrated by the two pioneering, operational, multi-megawatt, negative ion based, NBI systems at LHD (180 keV, H0) and JT-60U (500 keV, D0), both in Japan. Nevertheless, the system proposed for ITER represents a substantial technological challenge as an increase is required in beam energy, to 1 MeV, D0, accelerated ion (D-) current, to 40 A, accelerated current density, 200 A m-2 of D-, and pulse length, to 1 h. At the Fourth IAEA Technical Meeting on Negative Ion Based Neutral Beam Injectors, hosted by the Consorzio RFX, Padova, Italy, 9-11 May 2005, the status of the R&D aimed at the realization of the injectors for ITER was presented. Because of the importance of this development to the success of the ITER project, participants at that

  19. Neutralization tests on the SERT 2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.; Domitz, S.

    1979-01-01

    Neutralization test data obtained on the SERT 2 spacecraft are presented. Tests included ion beam neutralization of a thruster by a close (normal design) neutralizer as well as by a distant (1 meter) neutralizer. Parameters affecting neutralization, such as neutralizer bias voltage, neutralizer anode voltage, local spacecraft plasma density, and solar array voltage configuration were varied and changes in plasma potentials were measured. A plasma model is presented as an approximation of observed results.

  20. The Effects of Plasma-Neutral Interactions on Neutral Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, V.; Thayer, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Plasma-neutral interactions are fundamental to the structure and behavior of the neutral thermosphere. This interaction, primarily through ion-neutral collisions, ties electrodynamics with hydrodynamics requiring a fully coupled ionosphere - thermosphere model to simulate and dissect the sequence of responses that occur in the neutral gas when a change occurs in the ionosphere. In particular, changes in the ion drag force prompt a hydrodynamic response that will alter several properties of the thermosphere, including neutral winds. Here, the fully coupled National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (NCAR TIEGCM) is used to evaluate how changes in mechanical coupling, through the ion drag force, alter thermosphere properties, with a focus on thermospheric neutral winds. The equatorial thermosphere anomaly (ETA) produces a transient wind system, and a dissection of the hydrodynamic processes responsible for its formation will be used to demonstrate the causal structure in neutral gas response to a change in field-aligned ion drag force. This well-behaved response elucidates processes that must be occurring in other regions of the thermosphere where more significant changes in the ion drag force occur.

  1. Production of negative ions of hydrogen isotopes. [Patent application

    SciTech Connect

    Garscadden, A.

    1981-05-14

    A process for generating negative ions of hydrogen isotopes is described which comprises cooling the hydrogen gas below 300K, and preferably to about 200K, vibrationally exciting the molecules of the gas, and then dissociating the molecules by electron impact into neutral hydrogen atoms and negative hydrogen ions. Alternatively, the gas may first be vibrationally excited by heating or the like, and then cooled translationally, for example, by rapid expansion prior to dissociation by electron impact. The processes of this invention are characterized by control of non-equilibrium conditions to obtain large increases in dissociative attachment rates by increasing the population of hydrogen gas molecules having a higher vibrational energy state.

  2. Fraction Sense: Foundational Understandings.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Francis Skip; Karp, Karen

    2016-08-09

    The intent of this commentary is to identify elements of fraction sense and note how the research studies provided in this special issue, in related but somewhat different ways, validate the importance of such understandings. Proficiency with fractions serves as a prerequisite for student success in higher level mathematics, as well as serving as a gateway to many occupations and varied contexts beyond the mathematics classroom. Fraction sense is developed through instructional opportunities involving fraction equivalence and magnitude, comparing and ordering fractions, using fraction benchmarks, and computational estimation. Such foundations are then extended to operations involving fractions and decimals and applications involving proportional reasoning. These components of fraction sense are all addressed in the studies provided in this issue, with particular consideration devoted to the significant importance of the use of the number line as a central representational tool for conceptually understanding fraction magnitude.

  3. TEMPERED FRACTIONAL CALCULUS

    PubMed Central

    MEERSCHAERT, MARK M.; SABZIKAR, FARZAD; CHEN, JINGHUA

    2014-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series. PMID:26085690

  4. Environmental neutralization of polonium-218

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.D.; Hopke, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that two mechanisms of neutralization of the singly charged polonium ion exist. Charged Polonium-218 can be neutralized by reacting with oxygen to form a polonium oxide ion with a higher ionization potential than that of the polonium metal and then accepting an electron transferred from a lower ionization potential gas. In this present work, this mechanism has been verified by determining that the polonium oxide has an ionization potential in the range 10.35-10.53 eV. It was also previously reported that /sup 218/Po can be neutralized, in the absence of oxygen, by the scavenging of electrons by a trace gas such as water or nitrogen dioxide and their diffusion to the polonium ion. To verify this second neutralization mechanism, concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in nitrogen in the range of 50 ppb-1 ppm were examined for their ability to neutralize the polonium ion. Complete neutralization of /sup 218/Po was observed at nitrogen dioxide concentrations greater than 700 ppb. For concentrations below 700 ppb, the degree of neutralization was found to increase smoothly with the nitrogen dioxide concentration.

  5. Fractionation of Diesel Fuel from Petroleum and Paraho Shale Oils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    Maryland 20084 z FRACTIONATION OF DIESEL FUEL FROM PETROLEUM AND PARAHO SHALE OILS by Dr. Charles F. Hammer Department of Chemistry Georgetown University...been develope.-d to separate diesel fuels into neutral water soluhieus. acidic components, basic components, saturated hydro- carhons, substituted...benzenes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and polar neutrals. A samp1jl e of conventitonal petroleum d iesel fuel and a sample o~f di(LSt- fulj der ive

  6. Neutralization of reovirus: the gene responsible for the neutralization antigen

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    The S1 genome segment of reovirus is linked to type specificity as determined by neutralization antibody. This gene segment codes for a minor outer capsid polypeptide (sigma1). Therefore, sigma1 is the peptide responsible for induction of neutralization antibody and confers type specificity. This biologic property of reovirus was defined using hybrid recombinants clones between reovirus types 1 and 3 and 2 and 3. PMID:925604

  7. Storing Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

    2010-05-31

    Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  8. Hydrogen program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gronich, S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  9. Dynamics of Ion Beam Charge Neutralization by Ferroelectric Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Anton D.; Gilson, Erik P.; Grisham, Larry R.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Ji, Qing; Persaud, Arun; Seidl, Peter A.; Schenkel, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Ferroelectric Plasma Sources (FEPSs) can generate plasma that provides effective space-charge neutralization of intense high-perveance ion beams. Here we present experimental results on charge neutralization of a high-perveance 38 keV Ar+ beam by a FEPS plasma. By comparing the measured beam radius with the envelope model for space-charge expansion, it is shown that a charge neutralization fraction of 98% is attainable. The transverse electrostatic potential of the ion beam is reduced from 15 V before neutralization to 0.3 V, implying that the energy of the neutralizing electrons is below 0.3 eV. Near-complete charge neutralization is established 5 μs after the driving pulse is applied to the FEPS, and can last for 35 μs. It is argued that the duration of neutralization is much longer than a reasonable lifetime of the plasma produced in the sub- μs surface discharge. Measurements of current flow in the driving circuit of the FEPS suggest that plasma can be generated for tens of μs after the high voltage pulse is applied. This is confirmed by fast photography of the plasma in the 1-meter long FEPS on NDCX-II, where effective charge neutralization of the beam was achieved with the optimized FEPS timing. This work was supported by the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy under contracts DE-AC0209CH11466 (PPPL) and DE-AC0205CH11231 (LBNL).

  10. U-GAS process for production of hydrogen from coal

    SciTech Connect

    Dihu, R.J.; Patel, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Today, hydrogen is produced mainly from natural gas and petroleum fractions. Tomorrow, because reserves of natural gas and oil are declining while demand continues to increase, they cannot be considered available for long-term, large-scale production of hydrogen. Hydrogen obtained from coal is expected to be the lowest cost, large-scale source of hydrogen in the future. The U-GAS coal gasification process and its potential application to the manufacture of hydrogen is discussed. Pilot plant results, the current status of the process, and economic projections for the cost of hydrogen manufactured are presented.

  11. Neutral particle analyzer diagnostics on the TCV tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Karpushov, Alexander N.; Duval, Basil P.; Schlatter, Christian; Afanasyev, Valery I.; Chernyshev, Fedor V.

    2006-03-15

    Experimental apparatus and data analysis techniques used in neutral particle analyzer (NPA) diagnostics on the Tokamak a Configuration Variable (TCV) are described. Two NPAs are used on TCV to measure the energy spectrum of neutral particle fluxes from the plasma. The 'five-channel energy analyzer of atomic particles' used in double electrical analysis mode with fast voltage sweeping detect particles without atomic mass discrimination in the energy range of 0.6-8.0 keV with a time resolution of 0.5-2.0 ms and an energy resolution of 7%-20%. The 28-channel ''compact neutral particle analyzer'' (CNPA) is an EIIB spectrometer with mass and energy separations designed for medium sized fusion machines featuring a carbon neutral stripping foil, a permanent magnet for dispersion, and channel-electron multiplier detectors. The CNPA simultaneously detects two mass species [hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) or D and helium (He)] in the 0.5-50 keV energy range with a resolution of 60%-10% and a time resolution of 0.5-4.0 ms. The CNPA views the plasma across the path of the diagnostic neutral beam and can perform active charge-exchange NPA measurement. Data analysis procedures and numerical algorithms developed for NPA measurement are routinely used on TCV to obtain information on the plasma ion temperature, ion energy distribution function, plasma isotope ratios, and other plasma characteristics.

  12. Neutral particle analyzer diagnostics on the TCV tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpushov, Alexander N.; Duval, Basil P.; Schlatter, Christian; Afanasyev, Valery I.; Chernyshev, Fedor V.

    2006-03-01

    Experimental apparatus and data analysis techniques used in neutral particle analyzer (NPA) diagnostics on the Tokamak à Configuration Variable (TCV) are described. Two NPAs are used on TCV to measure the energy spectrum of neutral particle fluxes from the plasma. The "five-channel energy analyzer of atomic particles" used in double electrical analysis mode with fast voltage sweeping detect particles without atomic mass discrimination in the energy range of 0.6-8.0keV with a time resolution of 0.5-2.0ms and an energy resolution of 7%-20%. The 28-channel "compact neutral particle analyzer" (CNPA) is an EIIB spectrometer with mass and energy separations designed for medium sized fusion machines featuring a carbon neutral stripping foil, a permanent magnet for dispersion, and channel-electron multiplier detectors. The CNPA simultaneously detects two mass species [hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) or D and helium (He)] in the 0.5-50keV energy range with a resolution of 60%-10% and a time resolution of 0.5-4.0ms. The CNPA views the plasma across the path of the diagnostic neutral beam and can perform active charge-exchange NPA measurement. Data analysis procedures and numerical algorithms developed for NPA measurement are routinely used on TCV to obtain information on the plasma ion temperature, ion energy distribution function, plasma isotope ratios, and other plasma characteristics.

  13. Progress toward hydrogen peroxide micropulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J C; Dittman, M D; Ledebuhr, A G

    1999-07-08

    A new self-pressurizing propulsion system has liquid thrusters and gas jet attitude control without heavy gas storage vessels. A pump boosts the pressure of a small fraction of the hydrogen peroxide, so that reacted propellant can controllably pressurize its own source tank. The warm decomposition gas also powers the pump and is supplied to the attitude control jets. The system has been incorporated into a prototype microsatellite for terrestrial maneuvering tests. Additional progress includes preliminary testing of a bipropellant thruster, and storage of unstabilized hydrogen peroxide in small sealed tanks.

  14. Hydrogen gas purification apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagihara, N.; Gamo, T.; Iwaki, T.; Moriwaki, Y.

    1984-04-24

    A hydrogen gas purification apparatus which includes at least one set of two hydrogen purification containers coupled to each other for heat exchanging therebetween, each of the hydrogen purification containers containing a hydrogen absorbing alloy. The hydrogen gas purification apparatus is so arranged as to cause hydrogen gas to be selectively desorbed from and absorbed into the hydrogen absorbing alloy by the amount of heat produced when the hydrogen gas is selectively absorbed into and desorbed from the hydrogen absorbing alloy.

  15. Neutral Beam Ion Loss Modeling for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mikkelsen; D.S. Darrow; L. Grisham; R. Akers; S. Kaye

    1999-06-01

    A numerical model, EIGOL, has been developed to calculate the loss rate of neutral beam ions from NSTX and the resultant power density on the plasma facing components. This model follows the full gyro-orbit of the beam ions, which can be a significant fraction of the minor radius. It also includes the three-dimensional structure of the plasma facing components inside NSTX. Beam ion losses from two plasma conditions have been compared: {beta} = 23%, q{sub 0} = 0.8, and {beta} = 40%, q{sub 0} = 2.6. Global losses are computed to be 4% and 19%, respectively, and the power density on the rf antenna is near the maximum tolerable levels in the latter case.

  16. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer for fusion reactor ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Krasilnikov, V.; Amosov, V.; Kaschuck, Yu.; Skopintsev, D.

    2014-08-21

    A compact diamond neutral particle spectrometer with digital signal processing has been developed for fast charge-exchange atoms and neutrons measurements at ITER fusion reactor conditions. This spectrometer will play supplementary role for Neutral Particle Analyzer providing 10 ms time and 30 keV energy resolutions for fast particle spectra in non-tritium ITER phase. These data will also be implemented for independent studies of fast ions distribution function evolution in various plasma scenarios with the formation of a single fraction of high-energy ions. In tritium ITER phase the DNPS will measure 14 MeV neutrons spectra. The spectrometer with digital signal processing can operate at peak counting rates reaching a value of 10{sup 6} cps. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer is applicable to future fusion reactors due to its high radiation hardness, fast response and high energy resolution.

  17. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Laura E; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katie J; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J; Euler, Zelda; Burger, Judith A; Seaman, Michael S; Sanders, Rogier W; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Burton, Dennis R

    2015-08-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4) assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs) Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design.

  18. Synthetic gauge potentials for ultracold neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Ju; Spielman, I. B.

    2016-09-01

    Synthetic gauge fields for ultracold neutral atoms—engineered using the interaction between laser fields and the atoms’ internal ‘spin’ degrees of freedom—provide promising techniques for generating the large (synthetic) magnetic fields required to reach the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) limit in quantum gases, bosonic or fermionic alike. Because neutral atoms can move in a nearly disorder-free environment and they have extremely simple contact interactions, the resulting FQH states would be revealed in their most essential form. Moreover, bosonic FQH states represent a new frontier and have never been seen in any setting. Going beyond electromagnetism's conventional scalar gauge field, it is possible to create more general non-Abelian gauge potentials. When these are spatially uniform, they are equivalent to spin-orbit coupling familiar in material systems, and can lead to cold atom analogs of topological insulators and topological superconductors. In this tutorial, we introduce basic concepts underlying these gauge fields, making connections to the Aharonov-Bohm phase and geometric phase. We focus on the system of neutral atoms ‘dressed’ by multiple laser beams, where the eigenstates of the resulting Hamiltonian are known as dressed states. Synthetic gauge potentials arise from the unitary transformation required to express these dressed states in terms of the laser-free eigenstates. We discuss stability of laser-dressed atoms corresponding to the adiabatic condition and the probability of non-adiabatic transitions. Adopting both the semiclassical and quantum mechanical approaches, we demonstrate they agree in the suitable limit. We also analyze using both the conventional adiabatic picture and exact picture, where the kinetic energy is neglected in the former and retained in the latter picture.

  19. DIY Fraction Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Alan; Graham, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Describes a very successful attempt to teach fractions to year 5 pupils based on pupils making their own fraction pack. Children decided for themselves how to make the fractional slices used in the activity using colored cardboard sheets and templates of a paper circle consisting of 24 equal slices. (Author/NB)

  20. Hydrogen: the future energy carrier.

    PubMed

    Züttel, Andreas; Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas; Friedrichs, Oliver

    2010-07-28

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century the limitations of the fossil age with regard to the continuing growth of energy demand, the peaking mining rate of oil, the growing impact of CO2 emissions on the environment and the dependency of the economy in the industrialized world on the availability of fossil fuels became very obvious. A major change in the energy economy from fossil energy carriers to renewable energy fluxes is necessary. The main challenge is to efficiently convert renewable energy into electricity and the storage of electricity or the production of a synthetic fuel. Hydrogen is produced from water by electricity through an electrolyser. The storage of hydrogen in its molecular or atomic form is a materials challenge. Some hydrides are known to exhibit a hydrogen density comparable to oil; however, these hydrides require a sophisticated storage system. The system energy density is significantly smaller than the energy density of fossil fuels. An interesting alternative to the direct storage of hydrogen are synthetic hydrocarbons produced from hydrogen and CO2 extracted from the atmosphere. They are CO2 neutral and stored like fossil fuels. Conventional combustion engines and turbines can be used in order to convert the stored energy into work and heat.

  1. Solar hydrogen for urban trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Provenzano, J.: Scott, P.B.; Zweig, R.

    1997-12-31

    The Clean Air Now (CAN) Solar Hydrogen Project, located at Xerox Corp., El Segundo, California, includes solar photovoltaic powered hydrogen generation, compression, storage and end use. Three modified Ford Ranger trucks use the hydrogen fuel. The stand-alone electrolyzer and hydrogen dispensing system are solely powered by a photovoltaic array. A variable frequency DC-AC converter steps up the voltage to drive the 15 horsepower compressor motor. On site storage is available for up to 14,000 standard cubic feet (SCF) of solar hydrogen, and up to 80,000 SCF of commercial hydrogen. The project is 3 miles from Los Angeles International airport. The engine conversions are bored to 2.9 liter displacement and are supercharged. Performance is similar to that of the Ranger gasoline powered truck. Fuel is stored in carbon composite tanks (just behind the driver`s cab) at pressures up to 3600 psi. Truck range is 144 miles, given 3600 psi of hydrogen. The engine operates in lean burn mode, with nil CO and HC emissions. NO{sub x} emissions vary with load and rpm in the range from 10 to 100 ppm, yielding total emissions at a small fraction of the ULEV standard. Two trucks have been converted for the Xerox fleet, and one for the City of West Hollywood. A public outreach program, done in conjunction with the local public schools and the Department of Energy, introduces the local public to the advantages of hydrogen fuel technologies. The Clean Air Now program demonstrates that hydrogen powered fleet development is an appropriate, safe, and effective strategy for improvement of urban air quality, energy security and avoidance of global warming impact. Continued technology development and cost reduction promises to make such implementation market competitive.

  2. Vendor neutral archive in PACS.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Tapesh Kumar; Sanjeev

    2012-10-01

    An archive is a location containing a collection of records, documents, or other materials of historical importance. An integral part of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) is archiving. When a hospital needs to migrate a PACS vendor, the complete earlier data need to be migrated in the format of the newly procured PACS. It is both time and money consuming. To address this issue, the new concept of vendor neutral archive (VNA) has emerged. A VNA simply decouples the PACS and workstations at the archival layer. This is achieved by developing an application engine that receives, integrates, and transmits the data using the different syntax of a Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) format. Transferring the data belonging to the old PACS to a new one is performed by a process called migration of data. In VNA, a number of different data migration techniques are available to facilitate transfer from the old PACS to the new one, the choice depending on the speed of migration and the importance of data. The techniques include simple DICOM migration, prefetch-based DICOM migration, medium migration, and the expensive non-DICOM migration. "Vendor neutral" may not be a suitable term, and "architecture neutral," "PACS neutral," "content neutral," or "third-party neutral" are probably better and preferred terms. Notwithstanding this, the VNA acronym has come to stay in both the medical IT user terminology and in vendor nomenclature, and radiologists need to be aware of its impact in PACS across the globe.

  3. Prebiotic potential of neutral oligo- and polysaccharides from seed mucilage of Hyptis suaveolens.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Monika; Čavarkapa, Andrea; Unger, Frank M; Viernstein, Helmut; Praznik, Werner

    2017-04-15

    Prebiotics are selectively fermented by the gastrointestinal microflora, resulting in benefits to human health. The seed mucilage of Hyptis suaveolens contains neutral and acidic polysaccharides in a ratio of 1:1. The neutral polysaccharides consist of galactose, glucose and mannose whereas the acidic polysaccharides contain fucose, xylose and 4-O-methylglucuronic acid -residues. The growth of probiotics in the presence of total, acidic or neutral polysaccharides and oligosaccharides was tested using turbidity measurements. The majority (11 out of 14) of the tested probiotic strains significantly grew in the neutral fraction. Growth occurred with some time delay, but may be longer lasting than with other lower molecular prebiotics. The extent of growth increased with neutral polysaccharides from H. suaveolens corresponding to the externally available galactose units (20%). In conclusion, neutral poly- and oligosaccharides from H. suaveolens have a prebiotic potential characterized by a delayed but long lasting effect.

  4. High efficiency stationary hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hynek, S.; Fuller, W.; Truslow, S.

    1995-09-01

    Stationary storage of hydrogen permits one to make hydrogen now and use it later. With stationary hydrogen storage, one can use excess electrical generation capacity to power an electrolyzer, and store the resultant hydrogen for later use or transshipment. One can also use stationary hydrogen as a buffer at fueling stations to accommodate non-steady fueling demand, thus permitting the hydrogen supply system (e.g., methane reformer or electrolyzer) to be sized to meet the average, rather than the peak, demand. We at ADL designed, built, and tested a stationary hydrogen storage device that thermally couples a high-temperature metal hydride to a phase change material (PCM). The PCM captures and stores the heat of the hydriding reaction as its own heat of fusion (that is, it melts), and subsequently returns that heat of fusion (by freezing) to facilitate the dehydriding reaction. A key component of this stationary hydrogen storage device is the metal hydride itself. We used nickel-coated magnesium powder (NCMP) - magnesium particles coated with a thin layer of nickel by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Magnesium hydride can store a higher weight fraction of hydrogen than any other practical metal hydride, and it is less expensive than any other metal hydride. We designed and constructed an experimental NCM/PCM reactor out of 310 stainless steel in the form of a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, with the tube side packed with NCMP and the shell side filled with a eutectic mixture of NaCL, KCl, and MgCl{sub 2}. Our experimental results indicate that with proper attention to limiting thermal losses, our overall efficiency will exceed 90% (DOE goal: >75%) and our overall system cost will be only 33% (DOE goal: <50%) of the value of the delivered hydrogen. It appears that NCMP can be used to purify hydrogen streams and store hydrogen at the same time. These prospects make the NCMP/PCM reactor an attractive component in a reformer-based hydrogen fueling station.

  5. Pitch fractionation. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, V.L.; White, J.L.

    1981-12-15

    Petroleum pitch (Ashland A240) has been subjected to thermal treatment and solvent fractionation to produce refined pitches to be evaluated as impregnants for carbon-carbon composites. The solvent fractions were obtained by sequential Soxhlet extraction with solvents such as hexane, cyclohexane, toluene, and pyridine. The most severe thermal treatment produced a mesophase pitch (approximately 50% mesophase); an appreciable portion of the mesophase was soluble in strong solvents. There were substantial differences in chemical composition and in pyrolysis behavior of the fractions. As the depth of fraction increased, the pyrolysis yield and bloating increased, and the microstructure of the coke became finer until glassy microconstituents were formed in the deepest fractions.

  6. Hydrogen chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen chloride ; CASRN 7647 - 01 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  7. Hydrogen sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 03 / 005 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE ( CAS No . 7783 - 06 - 4 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) June 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been revie

  8. Hydrogen technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    To the non-nonsense engineer, any talk of a hydrogen economy may seem like so much hot air. This paper reports that as legislative, safety and environmental issues continue to tighten, they're promoting hydrogen's chances as an energy source and, more immediately, its prospects as a chemical feedstock. Paradoxically, the environmental demands that are stimulating hydrogen demand are also inhibiting the gas's production. Previously, gasoline was made with benzene, which means that H{sub 2} was rejected. But now that the laws mandate lower aromatic and higher oxygenate levels in gasolines, there's less H{sub 2} available as byproduct. At the same time, H{sub 2} demand is rising in hydrodesulfurization units, since the same laws require refiners to cut sulfur levels in fuels. Supplementary sources for the gas are also shrinking. In the chlor-alkali industry, H{sub 2} output is dropping, as demand for its coproduct chlorine weakens. At the same time, H{sub 2} demand for the making of hydrogen peroxide is growing, as that environmentally safer bleach gains chlorine's market share.

  9. Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  10. Impact of diagnostic neutral beam optimization on active spectroscopy in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiande; Nornberg, Mark. D.; den Hartog, Daniel. J.; Oliva, Steven. P.; Craig, Darren; Univ of Wisconsin, Madison Team; Wheaton College, IL Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam on MST provides local measurements of impurity ion emission through charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS) and of core-localized magnetic field through the motional Stark effect (MSE). The beam has been optimized to operate at 50kV, 4A steady beam current with 20ms beam pulse and 75% primary energy ion fraction. It's achieved by tuning the beam voltage, arc current, fuel line pressure, arc and high voltage module timing, and the magnetic isolation field. Electron density measurements in the ion source revealed that ion extraction is maximized under low density conditions which are thought to affect the shape of the ion sheath at the extraction grid. The sheath may be transitioning from a planar or convex shape at high density to one which is concave which helps focus the ion trajectories and produce higher beam current. With the improvements in beam operation, the CHERS signal is expected to increase by 20%-30%, and the Stark broadening is expected to increase by 10%. These signal increases will help resolve convolved fine-structure components in both analyses. Beam voltage ripple is also measured to better quantify the accuracy of spectral MSE and CHERS measurement. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrogen peroxide is used in these products: Hydrogen peroxide Hair bleach Some contact lens cleaners Note: Household hydrogen peroxide has a 3% concentration. That means it contains 97% water and 3% hydrogen peroxide. Hair ...

  12. Hydrogen forming reaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Marianowski, L.G.; Fleming, D.K.

    1989-03-07

    A hydrogen forming process is described, comprising: conducting in a hydrogen production zone a chemical reaction forming mixed gases comprising molecular hydrogen; contacting one side of a hydrogen ion porous and molecular gas nonporous metallic foil with the mixed gases in the hydrogen production zone; dissociating the molecular hydrogen to ionic hydrogen on the one side of the metallic foil; passing the ionic hydrogen through the metallic foil to its other side; and withdrawing hydrogen from the other side of the metallic foil, thereby removing hydrogen from the hydrogen production zone.

  13. Nanoparticle coagulation in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, Shota; Kondo, Michio; Shiratani, Masaharu; Koga, Kazunori; Watanabe, Yukio

    2008-08-15

    The kinetics of nanoparticle coagulation has been studied in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas. The coagulation occurs when the mutual collision frequency among nanoparticles exceeds their charging and decharging/neutralization frequency. Interestingly, the coagulation is suppressed while a fraction (several percent) of nanoparticles are negatively charged in a plasma, in which stochastic charging plays an important role. A model is developed to predict a phase diagram of the coagulation and its suppression.

  14. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  15. Reduced neutral XLPE cable design

    SciTech Connect

    Valli, G.F.; Zawadzki, J.A.; Orton, H.E. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes the theoretical, laboratory and economic analyses undertaken to determine the optimum metallic concentric neutral design for its single conductor 750 and 500 kcmil aluminum XLPE 15 kV insulated concentric-neutral type feeder cables. The results suggest that reducing the cross-sectional area of this concentric neutral from the currently-recognized industry standard of 20 percent of the central conductor to 7% results in overall present-worth system cost saving of approximately $3 per conductor meter or approximately 22% of the cable first cost. The neutral configuration ultimately chosen to replace the previous standard 37 - number 14 AWG wires was 2 - 1 inch {times} 5 mil tinned copper tapes overlapped by 25%. Line voltage fault test were run in the high-power laboratory on samples with various neutral configurations to confirm they would successfully pass our worst-case fault duty of 10 kA for 20 cycles (i.e., .33 sec) with no reclosing.

  16. Selective neutrality and enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1997-10-01

    This article appeals to a recent theory of enzyme evolution to show that the properties, neutral or adaptive, which characterize the observed allelic variation in natural populations can be inferred from the functional parameters, substrate specificity, and reaction rate. This study delineates the following relations between activity variables, and the forces--adaptive or neutral--determining allelic variation: (1) Enzymes with broad substrate specificity: The observed polymorphism is adaptive; mutations in this class of enzymes can result in increased fitness of the organism and hence be relevant for positive selection. (2) Enzymes with absolute substrate specificity and diffusion-controlled rates: Observed allelic variation will be absolutely neutral; mutations in this class of enzymes will be either deleterious or have no effect on fitness. (3) Enzymes with absolute or group specificity and nondiffusion-controlled rates: Observed variation will be partially neutral; mutants which are selectively neutral may become advantageous under an appropriate environmental condition or different genetic background. We illustrate each of the relations between kinetic properties and evolutionary states with examples drawn from enzymes whose evolutionary dynamics have been intensively studied.

  17. First Results from the Neutral Particle Analyzer at the Madison Symmetric Torus RFP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezonlin, Ephrem; Titus, James; Johnson, Joseph, III; Chernyshev, F. V.

    2010-11-01

    A neutral particle analyzer has been used at the Madison Symmetric Torus to (MST) to study Ti with Neutral Beam Injection (NBI). The Compact Neutral Particle Analyzer (CNPA), formerly on the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) with Hydrogen plasmas, has been modified and calibrated for MST's deuterium plasmas. The new calibration has measured the flux of D^0 atoms emitted by the plasma which strip the neutrals in a stripping cell with Helium gas (10-2 Torr). The ions are focused by two permanent magnets into 25 channels with an energy range from .34 -- 5.2 keV. From the channels in the keV range, Teff (Ti) has been measured to be around 600 eV during sawtooth events and 200 eV in between events. Further Ti studies will compare on and off neutral beam shots.

  18. Signature Biochemical Properties of Broadly Cross-Reactive HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Sajadi, Mohammad M.; Lewis, George K.; Seaman, Michael S.; Guan, Yongjun; Redfield, Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    The common properties of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1 neutralization antibodies found in certain HIV-1-infected individuals holds significant value for understanding natural and vaccine-mediated anti-HIV immunity. Recent efforts have addressed this question by deriving neutralizing monoclonal anti-envelope antibodies from memory B cell pools of selected subjects. However, it has been more difficult to identify whether broadly neutralizing antibodies circulating in plasma possess shared characteristics among individuals. To address this question, we used affinity chromatography and isoelectric focusing to fractionate plasma immunoglobulin from 10 HIV-1-infected subjects (5 subjects with broad HIV-1 neutralizing activity and 5 controls). We find that plasma neutralizing activity typically partitions into at least two subsets of antibodies. Antibodies with restricted neutralization breadth have relatively neutral isoelectric points and preferentially bind to envelope monomers and trimers versus core antigens from which variable loops and other domains have been deleted. In comparison, broadly neutralizing antibodies account for a minor fraction of the total anti-envelope response. They are consistently distinguished by more basic isoelectric points and specificity for epitopes shared by monomeric gp120, gp120 core, or CD4-induced structures. Such biochemical properties might be exploited to reliably predict or produce broad anti-HIV immunity. PMID:22379105

  19. Signature biochemical properties of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Mohammad M; Lewis, George K; Seaman, Michael S; Guan, Yongjun; Redfield, Robert R; DeVico, Anthony L

    2012-05-01

    The common properties of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1 neutralization antibodies found in certain HIV-1-infected individuals holds significant value for understanding natural and vaccine-mediated anti-HIV immunity. Recent efforts have addressed this question by deriving neutralizing monoclonal anti-envelope antibodies from memory B cell pools of selected subjects. However, it has been more difficult to identify whether broadly neutralizing antibodies circulating in plasma possess shared characteristics among individuals. To address this question, we used affinity chromatography and isoelectric focusing to fractionate plasma immunoglobulin from 10 HIV-1-infected subjects (5 subjects with broad HIV-1 neutralizing activity and 5 controls). We find that plasma neutralizing activity typically partitions into at least two subsets of antibodies. Antibodies with restricted neutralization breadth have relatively neutral isoelectric points and preferentially bind to envelope monomers and trimers versus core antigens from which variable loops and other domains have been deleted. In comparison, broadly neutralizing antibodies account for a minor fraction of the total anti-envelope response. They are consistently distinguished by more basic isoelectric points and specificity for epitopes shared by monomeric gp120, gp120 core, or CD4-induced structures. Such biochemical properties might be exploited to reliably predict or produce broad anti-HIV immunity.

  20. Hydrogen scavengers

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, David W.; Salazar, Kenneth V.; Trkula, Mitchell; Sandoval, Cynthia W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented a codeposition process for fabricating hydrogen scavengers. First, a .pi.-bonded allylic organometallic complex is prepared by reacting an allylic transition metal halide with an organic ligand complexed with an alkali metal; and then, in a second step, a vapor of the .pi.-bonded allylic organometallic complex is combined with the vapor of an acetylenic compound, irradiated with UV light, and codeposited on a substrate.

  1. Simulations of neutralized final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to drive an inertial fusion target or study high energy density physics with heavy ion beams, the beam radius must be focused to < 3 mm and the pulse length must be compressed to < 10 ns. The conventional scheme for temporal pulse compression makes use of an increasing ion velocity to compress the beam as it drifts and beam space charge to stagnate the compression before final focus. Beam compression in a neutralizing plasma does not require stagnation of the compression, enabling a more robust method. The final pulse shape at the target can be programmed by an applied velocity tilt. In this paper, neutralized drift compression is investigated. The sensitivity of the compression and focusing to beam momentum spread, plasma, and magnetic field conditions is studied with realistic driver examples. Using the 3D particle-in-cell code, we examine issues associated with self-field generation, stability, and vacuum-neutralized transport transition and focusing.

  2. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  3. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  4. Chiroptical characterization of homopolymeric block fractions in alginates.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gómez, Fabián; Mansilla, Andrés; Matsuhiro, Betty; Matulewicz, María C; Troncoso-Valenzuela, Marcos A

    2016-08-01

    Homopolymannuronic and homopolyguluronic fractions were obtained by partial hydrolysis of the alkaline extracts from the brown seaweeds Ascoseira mirabilis, Desmarestia menziessi, Desmarestia ligulata and Durvillaea sp. collected in southern Chile. Full characterization of the fractions was achieved by FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy. Total hydrolysis with 90% formic acid of the homopolymeric fractions allowed the preparation of mannuronic and guluronic acids. Both monomers and homopolymeric fractions as neutral salts were studied by CD and ORD. Chiroptical spectra were similar in shape and sign to those previously published in the literature, and permitted to assign D configuration to mannuronic acid and L configuration to guluronic acid in alginic acids. Specific optical rotation values at the sodium D light for the homopolymannuronic (∼-100°) and homopolyguluronic (∼-110°) acid fractions were obtained. These high negative values are proposed for the assignment of the absolute configuration of monomers in homopolymeric fractions.

  5. An unexplained 10-40° shift in the location of some diverse neutral atom data at 1 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Moore, Thomas E.; Simpson, David; Roberts, Aaron; Szabo, Adam; Fuselier, Stephen; Wurz, Peter; Lee, Martin A.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.

    2004-01-01

    Four different data sets pertaining to the neutral atom environment at 1 AU are presented and discussed. These data sets include neutral solar wind and interstellar neutral atom data from IMAGE/LENA, energetic hydrogen atom data from SOHO/HSTOF and plasma wave data from the magnetometer on ISEE-3. Surprisingly, these data sets are centered between 262° and 292° ecliptic longitude, ˜10-40° from the upstream interstellar neutral (ISN) flow direction at 254° resulting from the motion of the Sun relative to the local interstellar cloud (LIC). Some possible explanations for this offset, none of which is completely satisfactory, are discussed.

  6. A Re-Examiniation of Phonological Neutralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinnsen, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews research studies that raise serious questions about phonological neutralization, that is, the merger of a contrast in certain contexts. Some findings cast doubt on the very existence of neutralization and the correctness of the theoretical principles that make assumptions based on neutralization. Reanalyzes neutralization in light of these…

  7. Isotopic fractionation of tritium in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Le Goff, Pierre; Fromm, Michel; Vichot, Laurent; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Guétat, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Isotopic fractionation of tritium is a highly relevant issue in radiation protection and requires certain radioecological considerations. Sound evaluation of this factor is indeed necessary to determine whether environmental compartments are enriched/depleted in tritium or if tritium is, on the contrary, isotopically well-distributed in a given system. The ubiquity of tritium and the standard analytical methods used to assay it may induce biases in both the measurement and the signification that is accorded to the so-called fractionation: based on an exhaustive review of the literature, we show how, sometimes large deviations may appear. It is shown that when comparing the non-exchangeable fraction of organically bound tritium (neOBT) to another fraction of tritium (e.g. tritiated water) the preparation of samples and the measurement of neOBT reported frequently led to underestimation of the ratio of tritium to hydrogen (T/H) in the non-exchangeable compartment by a factor of 5% to 50%. In the present study, corrections are proposed for most of the biological matrices studied so far. Nevertheless, the values of isotopic fractionation reported in the literature remain difficult to compare with each other, especially since the physical quantities and units often vary between authors. Some improvements are proposed to better define what should encompass the concepts of exchangeable and non-exchangeable fractions.

  8. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effect of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed. Additional research is required to determine whether hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement are similar or distinct types of embrittlement.

  9. Hydrogen-hydrogen bonds in highly branched alkanes and in alkane complexes: A DFT, ab initio, QTAIM, and ELF study.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Norberto K V; Firme, Caio L

    2014-03-06

    The hydrogen-hydrogen (H-H) bond or hydrogen-hydrogen bonding is formed by the interaction between a pair of identical or similar hydrogen atoms that are close to electrical neutrality and it yields a stabilizing contribution to the overall molecular energy. This work provides new, important information regarding hydrogen-hydrogen bonds. We report that stability of alkane complexes and boiling point of alkanes are directly related to H-H bond, which means that intermolecular interactions between alkane chains are directional H-H bond, not nondirectional induced dipole-induced dipole. Moreover, we show the existence of intramolecular H-H bonds in highly branched alkanes playing a secondary role in their increased stabilities in comparison with linear or less branched isomers. These results were accomplished by different approaches: density functional theory (DFT), ab initio, quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), and electron localization function (ELF).

  10. Hydrogen local vibrational modes in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, Matthew D.

    1997-06-01

    Following, a review of experimental techniques, theory, and previous work, the results of local vibrational mode (LVM) spectroscopy on hydrogen-related complexes in several different semiconductors are discussed. Hydrogen is introduced either by annealing in a hydrogen ambient. exposure to a hydrogen plasma, or during growth. The hydrogen passivates donors and acceptors in semiconductors, forming neutral complexes. When deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. the frequency of the LVM decreases by approximately the square root of two. By varying the temperature and pressure of the samples, the microscopic structures of hydrogen-related complexes are determined. For group II acceptor-hydrogen complexes in GaAs, InP, and GaP, hydrogen binds to the host anion in a bond-centered orientation, along the [111] direction, adjacent to the acceptor. The temperature dependent shift of the LVMs are proportional to the lattice thermal energy U(T), a consequence of anharmonic coupling between the LVM and acoustical phonons. In the wide band gap semiconductor ZnSe, epilayers grown by metalorganic chemical vapor phase epitaxy (MOCVD) and doped with As form As-H complexes. The hydrogen assumes a bond-centered orientation, adjacent to a host Zn. In AlSb, the DX centers Se and Te are passivated by hydrogen. The second, third, and fourth harmonics of the wag modes are observed. Although the Se-D complex has only one stretch mode, the Se-H stretch mode splits into three peaks. The anomalous splitting is explained by a new interaction between the stretch LVM and multi-phonon modes of the lattice. As the temperature or pressure is varied, and anti-crossing is observed between LVM and phonon modes.

  11. Heliospheric energetic neutral atoms observed with SOHO/CELIAS/HSTOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Czechowski, A.; Hsieh, K. C.; Kallenbach, R.

    Energetic hydrogen and helium atoms ENAs have been identified and their fluxes are monitored by the High-Energy Suprathermal Time-of-Flight sensor HSTOF of the Charge Element and Isotope Analysis System CELIAS on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory SOHO near the Lagrangian point L1 Potential sources of ENAs in the heliosphere are CIRs solar energetic particle events pre-accelerated pickup ions as well as low-energy up to few hundred keV anomalous cosmic ray ACR ions in the outer heliosphere close to and beyond the solar wind termination shock ENAs neutralized via charge transfer reactions can penetrate into the inner solar system unaffected by the interplanetary magnetic field The observed ENA fluxes set limits on potential theories of the dominant sources of the energetic neutral atoms and has implications on modeling of the heliosphere

  12. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems (Empson…

  13. An Appetite for Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  14. On fractional programming

    SciTech Connect

    Bajona-Xandri, C.; Martinez-Legaz, J.E.

    1994-12-31

    This paper studies the minimax fractional programming problem, assuming quasiconvexity of the objective function, under the lower subdifferentiability viewpoint. Necessary and sufficient optimality conditions and dual properties are found. We present applications of this theory to find the Pareto efficient solutions of a multiobjective fractional problem and to solve several economic models.

  15. (Carbon isotope fractionation inplants)

    SciTech Connect

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: To develop a theoretical and experimental framework for understanding isotope fractionations in plants; and to develop methods for using this isotope fractionation for understanding the dynamics of CO{sub 2} fixation in plants. Progress is described.

  16. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H. [Livermore, CA; Frank, Alan M. [Livermore, CA

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process.

  17. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, J.H.; Frank, A.M.

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment is disclosed. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process. 2 figs.

  18. Low energy neutral atom imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Funsten, H.O.; Gosling, J.T.; Moore, K.R.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    Energetic neutral atom (ENA) and low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging of space plasmas are emerging new technology which promises to revolutionize the way we view and understand large scale space plasma phenomena and dynamics. ENAs and LENAs are produced in the magnetosphere by charge exchange between energetic and plasma ions and cold geocoronal neutrals. While imaging techniques have been previously developed for observing ENAs, with energies above several tens of keV, most of the ions found in the terrestrial magnetosphere have lower energies. We recently suggested that LENAs could be imaged by first converting the neutrals to ions and then electrostatically analyzing them to reject the UV background. In this paper we extend this work to examine in detail the sensor elements needed to make an LENA imager. These elements are (1) a biased collimator to remove the ambient plasma ions and electrons and set the azimuthal field-of-view; (2) a charge modifier to convert a portion of the incident LENAs to ions; (3) an electrostatic analyzer to reject UV light and set the energy passband; and (4) a coincidence detector to measure converted LENAs while rejecting noise and penetrating radiation. We also examine the issue of LENA imager sensitivity and describe ways of optimizing sensitivity in the various sensor components. Finally, we demonstrate in detail how these general considerations are implemented by describing one relatively straightforward design based on a hemispherical electrostatic analyzer.

  19. MSFC Skylab neutral buoyancy simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of a neutral buoyancy simulator for developing extravehicular activity systems and for training astronauts in weightless activities is discussed. The construction of the facility and the operations are described. The types of tests and the training activities conducted in the simulator are reported. Photographs of the components of the simulator and actual training exercises are included.

  20. Fractional dissipative standard map.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Vasily E; Edelman, M

    2010-06-01

    Using kicked differential equations of motion with derivatives of noninteger orders, we obtain generalizations of the dissipative standard map. The main property of these generalized maps, which are called fractional maps, is long-term memory. The memory effect in the fractional maps means that their present state of evolution depends on all past states with special forms of weights. Already a small deviation of the order of derivative from the integer value corresponding to the regular dissipative standard map (small memory effects) leads to the qualitatively new behavior of the corresponding attractors. The fractional dissipative standard maps are used to demonstrate a new type of fractional attractors in the wide range of the fractional orders of derivatives.

  1. Hydrogen detector

    DOEpatents

    Kanegae, Naomichi; Ikemoto, Ichiro

    1980-01-01

    A hydrogen detector of the type in which the interior of the detector is partitioned by a metal membrane into a fluid section and a vacuum section. Two units of the metal membrane are provided and vacuum pipes are provided independently in connection to the respective units of the metal membrane. One of the vacuum pipes is connected to a vacuum gauge for static equilibrium operation while the other vacuum pipe is connected to an ion pump or a set of an ion pump and a vacuum gauge both designed for dynamic equilibrium operation.

  2. Process and catalyst for the hydrogenation of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Wernicke, H.J.; Zimmerman, H.

    1985-05-07

    Blast furnace flue dust is used as a catalyst in a process for the hydrogenation of coal. A flowable mixture of finely divided coal particles and liquid hydrocarbons is brought to high pressure and to reaction temperature. The mixture is hydrogenated with hydrogen in the presence of blast furnace dust as a hydrogenation catalyst. The cost-effective hydrogenation catalyst is reused profitably subsequent to application in the coal hydrogenation process. Gaseous products are separated from liquid and solid reaction products. Liquid products are vaporized and are fractionated under atmospheric pressure and under vacuum. Hydrogen for use in the hydrogenation is produced by partial oxidation of the residue, and the catalyst is deposited as slag, which is returned to the blast furnace.

  3. Theory of direct scattering of neutral and charged atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franco, V.

    1979-01-01

    The theory for direct elastic and inelastic collisions between composite atomic systems formulated within the framework of the Glauber approximation is presented. It is shown that the phase-shift function is the sum of a point Coulomb contribution and of an expression in terms of the known electron-hydrogen-atom and proton-hydrogen-atom phase shift function. The scattering amplitude is reexpressed, the pure Coulomb scattering in the case of elastic collisions between ions is isolated, and the exact optical profile function is approximated by a first-order expansion in Glauber theory which takes into account some multiple collisions. The approximate optical profile function terms corresponding to interactions involving one and two electrons are obtained in forms of Meijer G functions and as a one-dimensional integral, and for collisions involving one or two neutral atoms, the scattering amplitude is further reduced to a simple closed-form expression.

  4. General methodology for the estimation of common neutral urinary steroids by multi-columin liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, P; Sayegh, J F

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for the estimation of common neutral urinary steroids by multi-column liquid chromatography. Hydrolysis is performed in two steps: enzymatically, using beta-glucuronidase, followed by solvolysis. Initial short column chromatography separates the neutral steroids into three fractions according to polarity: 17-oxosteroids, corticosteriods less polar than cortolones, and cortolones and cortols. The cortolone, cortol fraction is oxidized and the different steroid groups are chromatographed on capillary aluminum oxide and silica gel columns. A computerized, spectrophotometric system is used for the quantitation procedure.

  5. Digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, Saman; Taghizadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment was carried out to determine the digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products. Grapefruit pulp (GP), lemon pulp (LE), lime pulp (LI) and orange pulp (OP) were the test feed. Digestion kinetic of whole citrus by-products and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) fraction and acid detergent fiber (ADF) fractions of citrus by-products were measured using the in vitro gas production technique. Fermentation kinetics of the neutral detergent soluble carbohydrates (NDSC) fraction and hemicelluloses were calculated using a curve subtraction. The fermentation rate of whole was the highest for the LE (p < 0.05). For all citrus by-products lag time was longer for hemicellulose than other carbohydrate fractions. There was no significant difference among potential gas production (A) volumes of whole test feeds (p < 0.16). Dry matter (DM) digestibility contents of LE and LI were the highest (p < 0.02). The NDF digestibility was the highest (p < 0.05) in LI and GP, while the lowest (p < 0.03) values of ADF digestibility were observed in LI and LE. According to the results of the present study, carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products have high potential for degradability. It could also be concluded that carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products have remarkable difference in digestion kinetics and digestive behavior.

  6. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  7. [Fractionation of sulfur isotopes by phototrophic sulfur bacterium Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, M V; Gogotova, G I; Matrosov, A G; Ziakun, A M

    1976-01-01

    Two processes of sulphur isotope fractionation have been found in experiments with the sulphur purple bacterium Ectothiorhodospira shaposhnikovii. As a result, a light isotope, 32S, is concentrated in residual hydrogen sulphide, and a heavy isotope, 34S, in elementary suphur which is deposited outside the cell. The sulphate produced is lighter than elementary sulphur. Fractionation of sulphur isotopes is observed in natural conditions and is confined to places of mass growth of photosynthetic sulphur bacteria.

  8. Mechanochemical hydrogenation of coal

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T.; Smol, Robert; Farber, Gerald; Naphtali, Leonard M.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation of coal is improved through the use of a mechanical force to reduce the size of the particulate coal simultaneously with the introduction of gaseous hydrogen, or other hydrogen donor composition. Such hydrogen in the presence of elemental tin during this one-step size reduction-hydrogenation further improves the yield of the liquid hydrocarbon product.

  9. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against the rapidly evolving porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sally R; Li, Juan; Nelson, Eric A; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2015-05-04

    Neutralizing antibodies are a critical part of the immune armory for defense against viruses, and the mechanism by which many effective vaccines work to protect against viral infections. However, infections by rapidly evolving and genetically diverse viruses are often characterized by ineffective neutralizing antibody responses. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a highly genetically diverse RNA virus that causes PRRS, the most significant disease of pigs worldwide. The prevailing view of immunity to PRRSV is characterized by delayed and ineffectual production of neutralizing antibodies lacking cross-reactivity that is necessary for vaccine efficacy. Using an ELISA-based neutralizing assay developed to analyze PRRSV growth in porcine alveolar macrophages, the naturally permissive cell of PRRSV, we showed that sera from previously infected commercial sows had high levels of neutralizing activity against diverse PRRSV strains, including across distinct genotypes of PRRSV. Fifty percent cross-neutralization titers in excess of 1/1024 were observed. Neutralizing activity was dose-dependent and was maintained in the immunoglobulin fraction. Presence of high-titer, anti-PRRSV antibody activity that cross-neutralizes diverse strains of virus has prompted reevaluation of the role of neutralizing antibodies for cross-protection against PRRSV under field conditions. Understanding conditions that favor development of cross-neutralizing activity will be crucial for improved strategies to enhance cross-protection against PRRSV. More detailed studies are expected to elucidate mechanisms of neutralizing antibody production and maturation and to investigate conserved epitope targets of cross-neutralization in this rapidly evolving virus.

  10. New calculations of neutral atoms release in the Mercury exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borin, Patrizia; Bruno, Marco; Cremonese, Gabriele; Marzari, Francesco

    Meteoroid impacts are an important source of neutral atoms in the exosphere of Mercury. Recent papers attribute to impacting particles smaller than 1 cm most of the contribution to exospheric gases. In this work we calculate the vapour and neutral atoms production rates on Mercury, as due to the impacts of micrometeoroids in the size range between 5-100 µm, that contribute for about 50% of the neutral atoms released by impacts, according to flux obtained by the new dynamical model of Borin et al. (2009). The calculations have been performed taking into account two different calibration sources for the meteoroid flux provided by Love and Brownlee (1993) (as for Borin et al., 2009) and by Grun et al. (1985). Moreover, we give different values of the vapour production rates assuming both asteroidal and cometary sources of the dust particles (Wiegert, 2009; Dermott et al., 2002). Considering three different surface composition and mass fraction of atoms in the regolith of the planet (Cremonese et al. 2005, Goettel 1988, Smith and Marconi 1995) we provide the estimate of neutral atoms production rates, as sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium.

  11. Neutral matter in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.

    1991-01-01

    A review of current studies of neutral envelopes is presented with particular attention given to the use of the envelopes as test cases for understanding the ionization and thermal structure of photodissociation regions. The study of near-IR H2 emission is discussed with detailed spectra given for a few planetary nebulae, and airborne observations of far-IR atomic lines are discussed. These two methods can discern photodissociation regions with warm gas and UV flux is fairly prominent. The use of resonance-absorption-line spectroscopy is also reviewed with respect to the analysis of the Na D lines, and thereby allows the measurement of integrated columns of material through the shell. The methods provide evidence for the notion that planetary nebulae consist of more than just ionized material; large amounts of neutral and molecular material are being confirmed, which has important implications for the mass-loss episode of the nebulae.

  12. Fractional market dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Nick

    2000-12-01

    A new extension of a fractality concept in financial mathematics has been developed. We have introduced a new fractional Langevin-type stochastic differential equation that differs from the standard Langevin equation: (i) by replacing the first-order derivative with respect to time by the fractional derivative of order μ; and (ii) by replacing “white noise” Gaussian stochastic force by the generalized “shot noise”, each pulse of which has a random amplitude with the α-stable Lévy distribution. As an application of the developed fractional non-Gaussian dynamical approach the expression for the probability distribution function (pdf) of the returns has been established. It is shown that the obtained fractional pdf fits well the central part and the tails of the empirical distribution of S&P 500 returns.

  13. Study on space charge compensation in negative hydrogen ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, A. L.; Chen, J. E.; Peng, S. X. Ren, H. T.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, J. F.; Xu, Y.; Guo, Z. Y.

    2016-02-15

    Negative hydrogen ion beam can be compensated by the trapping of ions into the beam potential. When the beam propagates through a neutral gas, these ions arise due to gas ionization by the beam ions. However, the high neutral gas pressure may cause serious negative hydrogen ion beam loss, while low neutral gas pressure may lead to ion-ion instability and decompensation. To better understand the space charge compensation processes within a negative hydrogen beam, experimental study and numerical simulation were carried out at Peking University (PKU). The simulation code for negative hydrogen ion beam is improved from a 2D particle-in-cell-Monte Carlo collision code which has been successfully applied to H{sup +} beam compensated with Ar gas. Impacts among ions, electrons, and neutral gases in negative hydrogen beam compensation processes are carefully treated. The results of the beam simulations were compared with current and emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam from a 2.45 GHz microwave driven H{sup −} ion source in PKU. Compensation gas was injected directly into the beam transport region to modify the space charge compensation degree. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulation results.

  14. Neutral depletion versus repletion due to ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Makrinich, G.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Liard, L.; Rax, J.-M.; Chabert, P.

    2008-05-15

    Recent theoretical analyses which predicted unexpected effects of neutral depletion in both collisional and collisionless plasmas are reviewed. We focus on the depletion of collisionless neutrals induced by strong ionization of a collisionless plasma and contrast this depletion with the effect of strong ionization on thermalized neutrals. The collisionless plasma is analyzed employing a kinetic description. The collisionless neutrals and the plasma are coupled through volume ionization and wall recombination only. The profiles of density and pressure both of the plasma and of the neutral-gas and the profile of the ionization rate are calculated. It is shown that for collisionless neutrals the ionization results in neutral depletion, while when neutrals are thermalized the ionization induces a maximal neutral-density at the discharge center, which we call neutral repletion. The difference between the two cases stems from the relation between the neutral density and pressure. The pressure of the collisionless neutral-gas turns out to be maximal where its density is minimal, in contrast to the case of a thermalized neutral gas.

  15. Catalytic reforming of naphtha fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, K.C.; Vorhis, F.H.

    1980-09-16

    Production of motor gasoline and a btx-enriched reformate by fractionating a naphtha feedstock into a mid-boiling btxprecursor fraction, a relatively high-boiling fraction and a relatively low-boiling fraction; catalytically reforming the btxprecursor fraction in a first reforming zone; combining the relatively high-boiling and low-boiling fractions and catalytically reforming the combined fractions in a second reforming zone.

  16. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  17. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  18. Vendor neutral archive in PACS

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Tapesh Kumar; Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    An archive is a location containing a collection of records, documents, or other materials of historical importance. An integral part of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) is archiving. When a hospital needs to migrate a PACS vendor, the complete earlier data need to be migrated in the format of the newly procured PACS. It is both time and money consuming. To address this issue, the new concept of vendor neutral archive (VNA) has emerged. A VNA simply decouples the PACS and workstations at the archival layer. This is achieved by developing an application engine that receives, integrates, and transmits the data using the different syntax of a Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) format. Transferring the data belonging to the old PACS to a new one is performed by a process called migration of data. In VNA, a number of different data migration techniques are available to facilitate transfer from the old PACS to the new one, the choice depending on the speed of migration and the importance of data. The techniques include simple DICOM migration, prefetch-based DICOM migration, medium migration, and the expensive non-DICOM migration. “Vendor neutral” may not be a suitable term, and “architecture neutral,” “PACS neutral,” “content neutral,” or “third-party neutral” are probably better and preferred terms. Notwithstanding this, the VNA acronym has come to stay in both the medical IT user terminology and in vendor nomenclature, and radiologists need to be aware of its impact in PACS across the globe. PMID:23833411

  19. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  20. Thermodynamics in Fractional Calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meilanov, R. P.; Magomedov, R. A.

    2014-11-01

    A generalization of thermodynamics in the formalism of fractional-order derivatives is given. Results of the traditional thermodynamics of Carnot, Clausius, and Helmholtz are obtained in the particular case where the exponent of a fractional-order derivative is equal to unity. A one-parametric "fractal" equation of state is obtained with account of the second virial coefficient. The application of the resulting equation of state in the case of the gas argon is considered.