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Sample records for neutral non-reacting solute

  1. Hydrodynamic dispersion of a neutral non-reacting solute in electroosmotic flow

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    1999-06-01

    Analytical methods are employed to determine the axial dispersion of a neutral non-reacting solute in an incompressible electroosmotic flow. In contrast to previous approaches, the dispersion is obtained here by solving the time-dependent diffusion-advection equation in transformed spatial and temporal coordinates to obtain the two-dimensional late-time concentration field. The coefficient of dispersion arises as a separation eigenvalue, and its value is obtained as a necessary condition for satisfying all of the required boundary conditions. Solutions based on the Debye-Huckel approximation are presented for both a circular tube and a channel of infinite width. These results recover the well-known solutions for dispersion in pressure-driven flows when the Debye length is very large. In this limit, the axial dispersion is proportional to the square of the Peclet number based on the characteristic transverse dimension of the tube or channel. In the tilt of very small Debye lengths, the authors find that the dispersion varies as the square of the Peclet number based on the Debye length. Simple approximations to the coefficient of dispersion as a function of the Debye length and Peclet number are also presented.

  2. Fundamental Solutions and Optimal Control of Neutral Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai

    In this work, we shall consider standard optimal control problems for a class of neutral functional differential equations in Banach spaces. As the basis of a systematic theory of neutral models, the fundamental solution is constructed and a variation of constants formula of mild solutions is established. Necessary conditions in terms of the solutions of neutral adjoint systems are established to deal with the fixed time integral convex cost problem of optimality. Based on optimality conditions, the maximum principle for time varying control domain is presented.

  3. Comparison of mixing calculations for reacting and non-reacting flows in a cylindrical duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oechsle, V. L.; Mongia, H. C.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    A production 3-D elliptic flow code has been used to calculate non-reacting and reacting flow fields in an experimental mixing section relevant to a rich burn/quick mix/lean burn (RQL) combustion system. A number of test cases have been run to assess the effects of the variation in the number of orifices, mass flow ratio, and rich-zone equivalence ratio on the flow field and mixing rates. The calculated normalized temperature profiles for the non-reacting flow field agree qualitatively well with the normalized conserved variable isopleths for the reacting flow field indicating that non-reacting mixing experiments are appropriate for screening and ranking potential rapid mixing concepts. For a given set of jet momentum-flux ratio, mass flow ratio, and density ratio (J, MR, and DR), the reacting flow calculations show a reduced level of mixing compared to the non-reacting cases. In addition, the rich-zone equivalence ratio has noticeable effect on the mixing flow characteristics for reacting flows.

  4. Asymptotic Growth of Solutions of Neutral Type Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sklyar, G. M. Polak, P.

    2013-06-15

    We consider a differential system of neutral type with distributed delay. We obtain a precise norm estimation of semigroup generated by the operator corresponding to the system in question. Our result is based on a spectral analysis of the operator and some uniform estimation of norms of the exponentials of matrices. We also discuss the stability properties of corresponding solutions and the existence of the fastest growing solution.

  5. Numerical Prediction of Non-Reacting and Reacting Flow in a Model Gas Turbine Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davoudzadeh, Farhad; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2005-01-01

    The three-dimensional, viscous, turbulent, reacting and non-reacting flow characteristics of a model gas turbine combustor operating on air/methane are simulated via an unstructured and massively parallel Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code. This serves to demonstrate the capabilities of the code for design and analysis of real combustor engines. The effects of some design features of combustors are examined. In addition, the computed results are validated against experimental data.

  6. Inactivation of biological agents using neutral oxone-chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Delcomyn, Carrie A; Bushway, Karen E; Henley, Michael V

    2006-04-15

    Bleach solutions containing the active ingredient hypochlorite (OCl-) serve as powerful biological disinfectants but are highly caustic and present a significant compatibility issue when applied to contaminated equipment or terrain. A neutral, bicarbonate-buffered aqueous solution of Oxone (2K2HSO5.KHSO4.K2SO4) and sodium chloride that rapidly generates hypochlorite and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in situ was evaluated as a new alternative to bleach for the inactivation of biological agents. The solution produced a free chlorine (HOCl + OCl-) concentration of 3.3 g/L and achieved > or =5.8-log inactivation of spores of Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Aspergillus niger, and Escherichia coli vegetative cells in 1 min at 22 degrees C. Seawaterwas an effective substitute for solid sodium chloride and inactivated 5 to 8 logs of each organism in 10 min over temperatures ranging from -5 degrees C to 55 degrees C. Sporicidal effectiveness increased as free chlorine concentrations shifted from OCl- to HOCl. Neutrally buffered Oxone-chloride and Oxone-seawater solutions are mitigation alternatives for biologically contaminated equipment and environments that would otherwise be decontaminated using caustic bleach solutions.

  7. Inactivation of biological agents using neutral oxone-chloride solutions.

    PubMed

    Delcomyn, Carrie A; Bushway, Karen E; Henley, Michael V

    2006-04-15

    Bleach solutions containing the active ingredient hypochlorite (OCl-) serve as powerful biological disinfectants but are highly caustic and present a significant compatibility issue when applied to contaminated equipment or terrain. A neutral, bicarbonate-buffered aqueous solution of Oxone (2K2HSO5.KHSO4.K2SO4) and sodium chloride that rapidly generates hypochlorite and hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in situ was evaluated as a new alternative to bleach for the inactivation of biological agents. The solution produced a free chlorine (HOCl + OCl-) concentration of 3.3 g/L and achieved > or =5.8-log inactivation of spores of Bacillus atrophaeus, Bacillus thuringiensis, Aspergillus niger, and Escherichia coli vegetative cells in 1 min at 22 degrees C. Seawaterwas an effective substitute for solid sodium chloride and inactivated 5 to 8 logs of each organism in 10 min over temperatures ranging from -5 degrees C to 55 degrees C. Sporicidal effectiveness increased as free chlorine concentrations shifted from OCl- to HOCl. Neutrally buffered Oxone-chloride and Oxone-seawater solutions are mitigation alternatives for biologically contaminated equipment and environments that would otherwise be decontaminated using caustic bleach solutions. PMID:16683620

  8. Maximum mixing times of methane and air under non-reacting and reacting conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brasoveanu, D.; Gupta, A.K.

    1998-07-01

    Mixing times between methane and air under non-reacting or reacting conditions in the presence of rates of temperature and pressure and velocity gradients are examined using a mixing model based on the ideal gas law and the equation of continuity. The model is valid for low pressure combustors under non-reacting conditions. The model is also valid under reacting conditions for the fresh mixture which contains only trace amounts of combustion products. The effects of initial pressure, temperature and fluid composition on mixing time are also analyzed. In general, the exact mixing time has to be determined numerically. Nevertheless maximum values of mixing times can be determined analytically for a broad range of operational conditions. Results show that under both reacting and non-reacting conditions, the maximum mixing time is directly proportional to the initial pressure and temperature of mixture and inversely proportional to rates of pressure and temperature, and to velocity divergence. Mixing through fuel dispersion into the surrounding air is shown to be faster than via air penetration into the fuel flow. Rates of pressure of less than 1 atm/s acting along provide a mixing time in excess of one second which is unacceptably long for many applications, in particular gas turbine combustion. Rates of temperature produced by flame may provide mixing times shorter than 0.1 s. Mixing times of the order of a few milliseconds for efficient combustion and low emission, require high velocity gradients at the fuel-air boundary. Results show that enhanced mixing is achieved by combining temperature and velocity gradients. This analysis of mixing time is intended to provide important design guidelines for the development of high intensity, high efficiency and low emission combustors.

  9. Laboratory evaluation of limestone and lime neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings solution. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Opitz, B.E.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1984-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate a two-step neutralization scheme for treatment of acidic uranium mill tailings solutions. Tailings solutions from the Lucky Mc Mill and Exxon Highland Mill, both in Wyoming, were neutralized with limestone, CaCO/sub 3/, to an intermediate pH of 4.0 or 5.0, followed by lime, Ca(OH)/sub 2/, neutralization to pH 7.3. The combination limestone/lime treatment methods, CaCO/sub 3/ neutralization to pH 4 followed by neutralization with Ca(OH)/sub 2/ to pH 7.3 resulted in the highest quality effluent solution with respect to EPA's water quality guidelines. The combination method is the most cost-effective treatment procedure tested in our studies. Neutralization experiments to evaluate the optimum solution pH for contaminant removal were performed on the same two tailings solutions using only lime Ca(OH)/sub 2/ as the neutralizing agent. The data indicate solution neutralization above pH 7.3 does not significantly increase removal of pH dependent contaminants from solution. Column leaching experiments were performed on the neutralized sludge material (the precipitated solid material which forms as the acidic tailings solutions are neutralized to pH 4 or above). The sludges were contacted with laboratory prepared synthetic ground water until several effluent pore volumes were collected. Effluent solutions were analyzed for macro ions, trace metals and radionuclides in an effort to evaluate the long term effectiveness of attenuating contaminants in sludges formed during solution neutralization. Neutralized sludge leaching experiments indicate that Ca, Na, Mg, Se, Cl, and SO/sub 4/ are the only constituents which show solution concentrations significantly higher than the synthetic ground water in the early pore volumes of long-term leaching studies.

  10. Measurements of non-reacting and reacting flow fields of a liquid swirl flame burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Cheng Tung; Hochgreb, Simone

    2015-03-01

    The understanding of the liquid fuel spray and flow field characteristics inside a combustor is crucial for designing a fuel efficient and low emission device. Characterisation of the flow field of a model gas turbine liquid swirl burner is performed by using a 2-D particle imaging velocimetry(PIV) system. The flow field pattern of an axial flow burner with a fixed swirl intensity is compared under confined and unconfined conditions, i.e., with and without the combustor wall. The effect of temperature on the main swirling air flow is investigated under open and non-reacting conditions. The result shows that axial and radial velocities increase as a result of decreased flow density and increased flow volume. The flow field of the main swirling flow with liquid fuel spray injection is compared to non-spray swirling flow. Introduction of liquid fuel spray changes the swirl air flow field at the burner outlet, where the radial velocity components increase for both open and confined environment. Under reacting condition, the enclosure generates a corner recirculation zone that intensifies the strength of radial velocity. The reverse flow and corner recirculation zone assists in stabilizing the flame by preheating the reactants. The flow field data can be used as validation target for swirl combustion modelling.

  11. Neutralization of Plutonium and Enriched Uranium Solutions Containing Gadolinium as a Neutron Poison

    SciTech Connect

    BRONIKOWSKI, MG.

    2004-04-01

    Materials currently being dissolved in the HB-Line Facility will result in an accumulated solution containing an estimated uranium:plutonium (U:Pu) ratio of 4.3:1 and an 235U enrichment estimated at 30 per cent The U:Pu ratio and the enrichment are outside the evaluated concentration range for disposition to high level waste (HLW) using gadolinium (Gd) as a neutron poison. To confirm that the solution generated during the current HB-Line dissolving campaign can be poisoned with Gd, neutralized and discarded to the Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW) system without undue nuclear safety concerns the caustic precipitation of surrogate solutions was examined. Experiments were performed with a U/Pu/Gd solution representative of the HB-Line estimated concentration ratio and also a U/Gd solution. Depleted U was used in the experiments as the enrichment of the U will not affect the chemical behavior during neutralization, but will affect the amount of Gd added to the solution. Settling behavior of the neutralized solutions was found to be comparable to previous studies. The neutralized solutions mixed easily and had expected densities of typical neutralized waste. The neutralized solids were found to be homogeneous and less than 20 microns in size. Partially neutralized solids were more amorphous than the fully neutralized solids. Based on the results of these experiments, Gd was found to be a viable poison for neutralizing a U/Pu/Gd solution with a U:Pu mass ratio of 4.3:1 thus extending the U:Pu mass ratio from the previously investigated 0-3:1 to 4.3:1. However, further work is needed to allow higher U concentrations or U:Pu ratios greater than investigated in this work.

  12. Positive periodic solutions for a neutral Lotka-Volterra system with state dependent delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongkun; Zhao, Lili

    2009-04-01

    By using a fixed point theorem of strict-set-contraction, some new criteria are established for the existence of positive periodic solutions of the following periodic neutral Lotka-Volterra system with state dependent delays

  13. Bounded solutions of neutral fermions with a screened Coulomb potential

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Antonio S. de . E-mail: castro@feg.unesp.br

    2005-11-01

    The intrinsically relativistic problem of a fermion subject to a pseudoscalar screened Coulomb plus a uniform background potential in two-dimensional space-time is mapped into a Sturm-Liouville. This mapping gives rise to an effective Morse-like potential and exact bounded solutions are found. It is shown that the uniform background potential determinates the number of bound-state solutions. The behaviour of the eigenenergies as well as of the upper and lower components of the Dirac spinor corresponding to bounded solutions is discussed in detail and some unusual results are revealed. An apparent paradox concerning the uncertainty principle is solved by recurring to the concepts of effective mass and effective Compton wavelength.

  14. A Validation Summary of the NCC Turbulent Reacting/non-reacting Spray Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, M. S.; Liu, N.-S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This pper provides a validation summary of the spray computations performed as a part of the NCC (National Combustion Code) development activity. NCC is being developed with the aim of advancing the current prediction tools used in the design of advanced technology combustors based on the multidimensional computational methods. The solution procedure combines the novelty of the application of the scalar Monte Carlo PDF (Probability Density Function) method to the modeling of turbulent spray flames with the ability to perform the computations on unstructured grids with parallel computing. The calculation procedure was applied to predict the flow properties of three different spray cases. One is a nonswirling unconfined reacting spray, the second is a nonswirling unconfined nonreacting spray, and the third is a confined swirl-stabilized spray flame. The comparisons involving both gas-phase and droplet velocities, droplet size distributions, and gas-phase temperatures show reasonable agreement with the available experimental data. The comparisons involve both the results obtained from the use of the Monte Carlo PDF method as well as those obtained from the conventional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solution. Detailed comparisons in the case of a reacting nonswirling spray clearly highlight the importance of chemistry/turbulence interactions in the modeling of reacting sprays. The results from the PDF and non-PDF methods were found to be markedly different and the PDF solution is closer to the reported experimental data. The PDF computations predict that most of the combustion occurs in a predominantly diffusion-flame environment. However, the non-PDF solution predicts incorrectly that the combustion occurs in a predominantly vaporization-controlled regime. The Monte Carlo temperature distribution shows that the functional form of the PDF for the temperature fluctuations varies substantially from point to point. The results also bring to the fore some of the

  15. NEUTRALIZATIONS OF HIGH ALUMINUM LOW URANIUM USED NUCLEAR FUEL SOLUTIONS CONTAINING GADOLINIUM AS A NEUTRON POISON

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2011-06-08

    H-Canyon will begin dissolving High Aluminum - Low Uranium (High Al/Low U) Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) following approval by DOE which is anticipated in CY2011. High Al/Low U is an aluminum/enriched uranium UNF with small quantities of uranium relative to aluminum. The maximum enrichment level expected is 93% {sup 235}U. The High Al/Low U UNF will be dissolved in H-Canyon in a nitric acid/mercury/gadolinium solution. The resulting solution will be neutralized and transferred to Tank 39H in the Tank Farm. To confirm that the solution generated could be poisoned with Gd, neutralized, and discarded to the Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW) system without undue nuclear safety concerns the caustic precipitation of simulant solutions was examined. Experiments were performed with three simulant solutions representative of the H-Canyon estimated concentrations in the final solutions after dissolution. The maximum U, Gd, and Al concentration were selected for testing from the range of solution compositions provided. Simulants were prepared in three different nitric acid concentrations, ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 M. The simulant solutions were neutralized to four different endpoints: (1) just before a solid phase was formed (pH 3.5-4), (2) the point where a solid phase was obtained, (3) 0.8 M free hydroxide, and (4) 1.2 M free hydroxide, using 50 wt % sodium hydroxide (NaOH). The settling behavior of the neutralized solutions was found to be slower compared to previous studies, with settling continuing over a one week period. Due to the high concentration of Al in these solutions, precipitation of solids was observed immediately upon addition of NaOH. Precipitation continued as additional NaOH was added, reaching a point where the mixture becomes almost completely solid due to the large amount of precipitate. As additional NaOH was added, some of the precipitate began to redissolve, and the solutions neutralized to the final two endpoints mixed easily and had expected

  16. Eco-friendly synthesis for MCM-41 nanoporous materials using the non-reacted reagents in mother liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Eng-Poh; Goh, Jia-Yi; Ling, Tau Chuan; Mukti, Rino R.

    2013-03-01

    Nanoporous materials such as Mobil composite material number 41 (MCM-41) are attractive for applications such as catalysis, adsorption, supports, and carriers. Green synthesis of MCM-41 is particularly appealing because the chemical reagents are useful and valuable. We report on the eco-friendly synthesis of MCM-41 nanoporous materials via multi-cycle approach by re-using the non-reacted reagents in supernatant as mother liquor after separating the solid product. This approach was achieved via minimal requirement of chemical compensation where additional fresh reactants were added into the mother liquor followed by pH adjustment after each cycle of synthesis. The solid product of each successive batch was collected and characterized while the non-reacted reagents in supernatant can be recovered and re-used to produce subsequent cycle of MCM-41. The multi-cycle synthesis is demonstrated up to three times in this research. This approach suggests a low cost and eco-friendly synthesis of nanoporous material since less waste is discarded after the product has been collected, and in addition, product yield can be maintained at the high level.

  17. Preparation of chitosan films using different neutralizing solutions to improve endothelial cell compatibility.

    PubMed

    He, Qing; Ao, Qiang; Gong, Yandao; Zhang, Xiufang

    2011-12-01

    The development of chitosan-based constructs for application in large-size defects or highly vascularized tissues is still a challenging issue. The poor endothelial cell compatibility of chitosan hinders the colonization of vascular endothelial cells in the chitosan-based constructs, and retards the establishment of a functional microvascular network following implantation. The aim of the present study is to prepare chitosan films with different neutralization methods to improve their endothelial cell compatibility. Chitosan salt films were neutralized with either sodium hydroxide (NaOH) aqueous solution, NaOH ethanol solution, or ethanol solution without NaOH. The physicochemical properties and endothelial cell compatibility of the chitosan films were investigated. Results indicated that neutralization with different solutions affected the surface chemistry, swelling ratio, crystalline conformation, nanotopography, and mechanical properties of the chitosan films. The NaOH ethanol solution-neutralized chitosan film (Chi-NaOH/EtOH film) displayed a nanofiber-dominant surface, while the NaOH aqueous solution-neutralized film (Chi-NaOH/H(2)O film) and the ethanol solution-neutralized film (Chi-EtOH film) displayed nanoparticle-dominant surfaces. Moreover, the Chi-NaOH/EtOH films exhibited a higher stiffness as compared to the Chi-NaOH/H(2)O and Chi-EtOH films. Endothelial cell compatibility of the chitosan films was evaluated with a human microvascular endothelial cell line, HMEC-1. Compared with the Chi-NaOH/H(2)O and Chi-EtOH films, HMECs cultured on the Chi-NaOH/EtOH films fully spread and exhibited significantly higher levels of adhesion and proliferation, with retention of the endothelial phenotype and function. Our findings suggest that the surface nanotopography and mechanical properties contribute to determining the endothelial cell compatibility of chitosan films. The nature of the neutralizing solutions can affect the physicochemical properties and

  18. Prediction of Physical Properties of Nanofiltration Membranes for Neutral and Charged Solutes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two commercial nanofiltration (NF) membranes viz., NF 300 MWCO and NF 250 MWCO were used for neutral and charged solute species viz., glucose, sodium chloride and magnesium chloride to investigate their rejection rates using Donnan steric pore model (DSPM) and DSPM-dielectric exc...

  19. Poly(N-vinylimidazole) gels as insoluble buffers that neutralize acid solutions without dissolving.

    PubMed

    Horta, Arturo; Piérola, Inés F

    2009-04-01

    Typical buffers are solutions containing weak acids or bases. If these groups were anchored to insoluble gels, what would be their behavior? Simple thermodynamics is used to calculate the pH in two-phase systems that contain the weak acid or base fixed to only one of the phases and is absent in the other. The experimental reference of such systems are pH sensitive hydrogels and heterogeneous systems of biological interest. It is predicted that a basic hydrogel immersed in slightly acidic solutions should absorb the acid and leave the external solution exactly neutral (pH 7). This is in accordance with experimental results of cross-linked poly(N-vinylimidazole). The pH 7 cannot be obtained if the system were homogeneous; the confinement of the weak base inside the gel phase is a requisite for this neutral pH in the external solution. The solution inside the gel is regulated to a much higher pH, which has important implications in studies on chemical reactions and physical processes taking place inside a phase insoluble but in contact with a solution. PMID:19245223

  20. Positive periodic solutions of periodic neutral Lotka-Volterra system with state dependent delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongkun

    2007-06-01

    By using a fixed point theorem of strict-set-contraction, some new criteria are established for the existence of positive periodic solutions of the following periodic neutral Lotka-Volterra system with state dependent delays where (i,j=1,2,...,n) are [omega]-periodic functions and (i=1,2,...,n) are [omega]-periodic functions with respect to their first arguments, respectively.

  1. Enveloped virus inactivation using neutral arginine solutions and applications in therapeutic protein purification processes.

    PubMed

    McCue, Justin T; Selvitelli, Keith; Cecchini, Doug; Brown, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    For the manufacturing of recombinant protein therapeutics produced from mammalian cell culture, demonstrating the capacity of the purification process to effectively clear infectious viruses is a regulatory requirement. At least two process steps, using different mechanisms of virus removal and/or inactivation, should be validated in support of the regulatory approval process. For example, exposure of the product stream to low pH, detergents or solvent/detergent combinations is commonly incorporated in protein purification processes for the inactivation of lipid-enveloped viruses. However, some proteins have limited stability at low pH or in the presence of the detergents, and alternative techniques for achieving the inactivation of enveloped viruses would be beneficial. We present here an alternative and novel approach for the rapid inactivation of enveloped viruses using pH-neutral buffer solutions containing arginine. The implementation of this approach in a monoclonal antibody or Fc-fusion protein purification process is described and illustrated with several different therapeutic proteins. The use of the neutral pH arginine solution was able to effectively inactivate two enveloped model viruses, with no measurable effect on the product quality of the investigated proteins. Thus, the use of pH-neutral arginine containing buffer solutions provides an alternative means of virus inactivation where other forms of virus inactivation, such as low pH and/or solvent/detergent treatments are not possible or undesirable due to protein stability limitations.

  2. The electrostatic response of water to neutral polar solutes: Implications for continuum solvent modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muddana, Hari S.; Sapra, Neil V.; Fenley, Andrew T.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2013-06-01

    Continuum solvation models are widely used to estimate the hydration free energies of small molecules and proteins, in applications ranging from drug design to protein engineering, and most such models are based on the approximation of a linear dielectric response by the solvent. We used explicit-water molecular dynamics simulations with the TIP3P water model to probe this linear response approximation in the case of neutral polar molecules, using miniature cucurbituril and cyclodextrin receptors and protein side-chain analogs as model systems. We observe supralinear electrostatic solvent responses, and this nonlinearity is found to result primarily from waters' being drawn closer and closer to the solutes with increased solute-solvent electrostatic interactions; i.e., from solute electrostriction. Dielectric saturation and changes in the water-water hydrogen bonding network, on the other hand, play little role. Thus, accounting for solute electrostriction may be a productive approach to improving the accuracy of continuum solvation models.

  3. Periodic solution of neutral Lotka-Volterra system with periodic delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhijun; Chen, Lansun

    2006-12-01

    A nonautonomous n-species Lotka-Volterra system with neutral delays is investigated. A set of verifiable sufficient conditions is derived for the existence of at least one strictly positive periodic solution of this Lotka-Volterra system by applying an existence theorem and some analysis techniques, where the assumptions of the existence theorem are different from that of Gaines and Mawhin's continuation theorem [R.E. Gaines, J.L. Mawhin, Coincidence Degree and Nonlinear Differential Equations, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1977] and that of abstract continuation theory for k-set contraction [W. Petryshyn, Z. Yu, Existence theorem for periodic solutions of higher order nonlinear periodic boundary value problems, Nonlinear Anal. 6 (1982) 943-969]. Moreover, a problem proposed by Freedman and Wu [H.I. Freedman, J. Wu, Periodic solution of single species models with periodic delay, SIAM J. Math. Anal. 23 (1992) 689-701] is answered.

  4. Multiphasic finite element framework for modeling hydrated mixtures with multiple neutral and charged solutes.

    PubMed

    Ateshian, Gerard A; Maas, Steve; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2013-11-01

    Computational tools are often needed to model the complex behavior of biological tissues and cells when they are represented as mixtures of multiple neutral or charged constituents. This study presents the formulation of a finite element modeling framework for describing multiphasic materials in the open-source finite element software febio.1 Multiphasic materials may consist of a charged porous solid matrix, a solvent, and any number of neutral or charged solutes. This formulation proposes novel approaches for addressing several challenges posed by the finite element analysis of such complex materials: The exclusion of solutes from a fraction of the pore space due to steric volume and short-range electrostatic effects is modeled by a solubility factor, whose dependence on solid matrix deformation and solute concentrations may be described by user-defined constitutive relations. These solute exclusion mechanisms combine with long-range electrostatic interactions into a partition coefficient for each solute whose value is dependent upon the evaluation of the electric potential from the electroneutrality condition. It is shown that this electroneutrality condition reduces to a polynomial equation with only one valid root for the electric potential, regardless of the number and valence of charged solutes in the mixture. The equation of charge conservation is enforced as a constraint within the equation of mass balance for each solute, producing a natural boundary condition for solute fluxes that facilitates the prescription of electric current density on a boundary. It is also shown that electrical grounding is necessary to produce numerical stability in analyses where all the boundaries of a multiphasic material are impermeable to ions. Several verification problems are presented that demonstrate the ability of the code to reproduce known or newly derived solutions: (1) the Kedem-Katchalsky model for osmotic loading of a cell; (2) Donnan osmotic swelling of a charged

  5. Magnesium hydroxide as the neutralizing agent for radioactive hydrochloric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, M.J.; Fife, K.W.

    1995-10-01

    The current technology at Los Alamos for removing actinides from acidic chloride waste streams is precipitation with approximately 10 M potassium hydroxide. Although successful, there are many inherent drawbacks to this precipitation technique which will be detailed in this paper. Magnesium hydroxide (K{sub sp} = 1.3 x 10{sup -11}) has limited solubility in water and as a result of the common ion effect, cannot generate a filtrate with a pH greater than 9. At a pH of 9, calcium (K{sub sp} = 5.5 x 10{sup -6}) will not coprecipitate as the hydroxide. This is an important factor since many acidic chloride feeds to hydroxide precipitation contain significant amounts of calcium. In addition, neutralization with Mg(OH){sub 2} produces a more filterable precipitate because neutralization occurs as the Mg(OH){sub 2} is dissolved by the acid rather than as a result of the much faster liquid/liquid reaction of KOH with the waste acid. This slower solid/liquid reaction allows time for crystal growth to occur and produces more easily filterable precipitates. On the other hand, neutralization of spent acid with strong KOH that yields numerous hydroxide ions in solution almost instantaneously forming a much larger volume of small crystallites that result in gelatinous, slow-filtering precipitates. Magnesium hydroxide also offers a safety advantage. Although mildly irritating, it is a weak base and safe and easy to handle. From a waste minimization perspective, Mg(OH){sub 2} offers many advantages. First, the magnesium hydroxide is added as a solid. This step eliminates the diluent water used in KOH neutralizations. Secondly, because the particle size of the precipitate is larger, more actinides are caught on the filter paper resulting in a smaller amount of actinide being transferred to the TA-50 Liquid Waste Treatment Facility. Third, the amount of solids that must be reprocessed is significantly smaller resulting in less waste generation from the downstream processes.

  6. Ionic equilibria in neutral amphiprotic solvents of low dielectric constant: Buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Bosch, E; Rosés, M

    1989-06-01

    The ionic equilibria in neutral amphiprotic solvents (isopropyl and tert-butyl alcohols) have been established, and equations to calculate pH values in solutions of acids, bases, salts or their mixtures, developed. The effect, on the dissociation equilibria, of the presence of small quantities of water or other solvents in the bulk solvent used has been taken into account in the proposed equations. On the basis of these equations some buffer solutions have been studied and recommended for electrode standardization. The results, tested by experimental work, show the importance of the incompleteness of dissociation of salts in these solvents, which decreases the pH of acid buffers and increases the buffer capacity.

  7. An Iron-based Film for Highly Efficient Electrocatalytic Oxygen Evolution from Neutral Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingxing; Wu, Yizhen; Han, Yongzhen; Lin, Xiaohuan; Sun, Junliang; Zhang, Wei; Cao, Rui

    2015-10-01

    An ultrathin Fe-based film was prepared by electrodeposition from an Fe(II) solution through a fast and simple cyclic voltammetry method. The extremely low Fe loading of 12.3 nmol cm(-2) on indium tin oxide electrodes is crucial for high atom efficiency and transparence of the resulted film. This Fe-based film was shown to be a very efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution from neutral aqueous solution with remarkable activity and stability. In a 34 h controlled potential electrolysis at 1.45 V (vs NHE) and pH 7.0, impressive turnover number of 5.2 × 10(4) and turnover frequency of 1528 h(-1) were obtained. To the best of our knowledge, these values represent one of the highest among electrodeposited catalyst films for water oxidation under comparable conditions. The morphology and the composition of the catalyst film was determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which all confirmed the deposition of Fe-based materials with Fe(III) oxidation state on the electrode. This study is significant because of the use of iron, the fast and simple cyclic voltammetry electrodeposition, the extremely low catalyst loading and thus the transparency of the catalyst film, the remarkable activity and stability, and the oxygen evolution in neutral aqueous media. PMID:26368828

  8. Size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Adroher-Benítez, Irene; Maroto-Centeno, José Alberto

    2014-05-28

    In this work, the size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks has been studied through Monte Carlo simulations. Two models that provide user-friendly expressions to predict the partition coefficient have been tested over a wide range of volume fractions: Ogston's model (especially devised for fibrous media) and the pore model. The effects of crosslinking and bond stiffness have also been analyzed. Our results suggest that the fiber model can acceptably account for size-exclusion effects in crosslinked gels. Its predictions are good for large solutes if the fiber diameter is assumed to be the effective monomer diameter. For solutes sizes comparable to the monomer dimensions, a smaller fiber diameter must be used. Regarding the pore model, the partition coefficient is poorly predicted when the pore diameter is estimated as the distance between adjacent crosslinker molecules. On the other hand, our results prove that the pore sizes obtained from the pore model by fitting partitioning data of swollen gels are overestimated. PMID:24880328

  9. Mass transfer of a neutral solute in porous microchannel under streaming potential.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sourav; De, Sirshendu

    2014-03-01

    The mass transport of a neutral solute in a porous wall, under the influence of streaming field, has been analyzed in this study. The effect of the induced streaming field on the electroviscous effect of the fluid for different flow geometries has been suitably quantified. The overall electroosmotic velocity profile and expression for streaming field have been obtained analytically using the Debye-Huckel approximation, and subsequently used in the analysis for the mass transport. The analysis shows that as the solution Debye length increases, the strength of the streaming field and, consequently, the electroviscous effect diminishes. The species transport equation has been coupled with Darcy's law for quantification of the permeation rate across the porous wall. The concentration profile inside the mass transfer boundary layer has been solved using the similarity transformation, and the Sherwood number has been calculated from the definition. In this study, the variation of the permeation rate and solute permeate concentration has been with the surface potential, wall retention factor and osmotic pressure coefficient has been demonstrated for both the circular as well as rectangular channel cross-section. PMID:24339025

  10. Size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Maroto-Centeno, José Alberto; Adroher-Benítez, Irene

    2014-05-28

    In this work, the size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks has been studied through Monte Carlo simulations. Two models that provide user-friendly expressions to predict the partition coefficient have been tested over a wide range of volume fractions: Ogston's model (especially devised for fibrous media) and the pore model. The effects of crosslinking and bond stiffness have also been analyzed. Our results suggest that the fiber model can acceptably account for size-exclusion effects in crosslinked gels. Its predictions are good for large solutes if the fiber diameter is assumed to be the effective monomer diameter. For solutes sizes comparable to the monomer dimensions, a smaller fiber diameter must be used. Regarding the pore model, the partition coefficient is poorly predicted when the pore diameter is estimated as the distance between adjacent crosslinker molecules. On the other hand, our results prove that the pore sizes obtained from the pore model by fitting partitioning data of swollen gels are overestimated.

  11. Size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks: a Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Pérez, Manuel; Adroher-Benítez, Irene; Maroto-Centeno, José Alberto

    2014-05-28

    In this work, the size-exclusion partitioning of neutral solutes in crosslinked polymer networks has been studied through Monte Carlo simulations. Two models that provide user-friendly expressions to predict the partition coefficient have been tested over a wide range of volume fractions: Ogston's model (especially devised for fibrous media) and the pore model. The effects of crosslinking and bond stiffness have also been analyzed. Our results suggest that the fiber model can acceptably account for size-exclusion effects in crosslinked gels. Its predictions are good for large solutes if the fiber diameter is assumed to be the effective monomer diameter. For solutes sizes comparable to the monomer dimensions, a smaller fiber diameter must be used. Regarding the pore model, the partition coefficient is poorly predicted when the pore diameter is estimated as the distance between adjacent crosslinker molecules. On the other hand, our results prove that the pore sizes obtained from the pore model by fitting partitioning data of swollen gels are overestimated.

  12. Mass transfer of a neutral solute in porous microchannel under streaming potential.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sourav; De, Sirshendu

    2014-03-01

    The mass transport of a neutral solute in a porous wall, under the influence of streaming field, has been analyzed in this study. The effect of the induced streaming field on the electroviscous effect of the fluid for different flow geometries has been suitably quantified. The overall electroosmotic velocity profile and expression for streaming field have been obtained analytically using the Debye-Huckel approximation, and subsequently used in the analysis for the mass transport. The analysis shows that as the solution Debye length increases, the strength of the streaming field and, consequently, the electroviscous effect diminishes. The species transport equation has been coupled with Darcy's law for quantification of the permeation rate across the porous wall. The concentration profile inside the mass transfer boundary layer has been solved using the similarity transformation, and the Sherwood number has been calculated from the definition. In this study, the variation of the permeation rate and solute permeate concentration has been with the surface potential, wall retention factor and osmotic pressure coefficient has been demonstrated for both the circular as well as rectangular channel cross-section.

  13. A New Structural Technique for Examining Ion-Neutral Association in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Philip E.; Neilson, George W.; Price, David L.; Saboungi, Marie-Louise; Brady, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The method of intramolecular coordination number concentration invariance (ICNCI) is used on neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution (NDIS) measurements of aqueous solutions to separate the intra- and intermolecular contributions to the total intensities. Molecular dynamics simulations of corresponding systems are then used to interpret the ICNCI function. It is found that the ICNCI function (characterized by two concentration measurements) is sensitive specifically to intermolecular association and that the molecular dynamics can successfully replicate this function in the cases of the neutral species xylose and pyridine in aqueous solution. ICNCI functions can also be obtained by the addition of a cosolute (such as adding GdmCl or Gdm2SO4 to pyridine solutions). In that case it is found that molecular dynamics can replicate the ICNCI function for the addition of GdmCl to pyridine, but fails to successfully replicate the same function for the addition of Gdm2SO4. This result implies that the interaction of pyridine with guanidinium sulfate is over-estimated in MD these simulations, and is of significant importance to the use of molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate an atomic level understanding of the Hofmeister series. PMID:23795499

  14. Corrosion Behavior of Stainless Steels in Neutral and Acidified Sodium Chloride Solutions by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, L. M.; Kolady, M. R.; Vinje, R. D.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the corrosion performance of three alloys by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and to compare the results with those obtained during a two-year atmospheric exposure study.' Three alloys: AL6XN (UNS N08367), 254SM0 (UNS S32154), and 304L (UNS S30403) were included in the study. 304L was included as a control. The alloys were tested in three electrolyte solutions which consisted of neutral 3.55% NaC1, 3.55% NaC1 in 0.lN HC1, and 3.55% NaC1 in 1.ON HC1. These conditions were expected to be less severe, similar, and more severe respectively than the conditions at NASA's Kennedy Space Center launch pads.

  15. Investigation of the neutral-solution etch process for refractive SOE antireflective surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Maish, A.B.

    1991-01-01

    Antireflection of optically clear glass used in photovoltaic concentrator refractive secondary optical elements (SOE's) was investigated using the neutral-solution etch process developed by Schott Glass. Test coupons and SOE's made from barium zinc glass, which does not solarize under ultraviolet exposure, were successfully etched at the center point process variable conditions of 87{degrees}C and 24 hours. Reflectance of the plano-plano dropped from 7.7% to 0.8%, with a corresponding increase in transmission from 91.7% to 98.5%. The etching process uses non-hydrofluoric, relatively non-toxic chemicals in a low-cost process well suited for use by photovoltaic system manufacturers during production. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Osmolyte effects: impact on the aqueous solution around charged and neutral spheres.

    PubMed

    Smiatek, Jens

    2014-01-23

    We have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the solvation characteristics of model spheres for low concentrations of urea and hydroxyectoine in aqueous solution. The spheres are either positively or negatively charged with a valency of one or charge neutral. Our results illustrate that the presence of osmolytes influences the solvation properties of the spheres significantly. We have conducted a detailed investigation of water properties like the mean dipolar relaxation times, water orientation parameters around the spheres, dielectric constants, preferential binding behavior, water self-diffusion coefficients, and free energies of solvation by thermodynamic integration to study the influence of osmolytes in detail. Our findings indicate that several factors like the charge of the spheres as well as the characteristics of the osmolytes significantly influence the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the local water shell and the solvation process with regard to varying enthalpic and entropic contributions. PMID:24354598

  17. The neutral oil in commercial linear alkylbenzenesulfonate and its effect on organic solute solubility in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Kile, D.E.; Rutherford, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Apparent water solubilities of 1,1-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (DDT), 2,4,5,2???,5???-penta-chlorobiphenyl (PCB), and 1,2,3-trichlorobenzene (TCB) were determined at room temperature in aqueous solutions of commercial linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS), oil-free (solvent-extracted) LAS, and single-molecular 4-dodecyl-benzenesulfonate. The extent of solute solubility enhancement by commercial LAS is markedly greater than that by other ionic surfactants below the measured critical micelle concentration (CMC); above the CMC, the enhancement data with LAS are comparable with other surfactants as micelles. The small amount of neutral oils in commercial LAS (1.7%), comprising linear alkylbenzenes (LABs) and bis(alkylphenyl) sulfones, contributes significantly to the enhanced solubility of DDT and PCB below the CMC; the effect is ascribed to formation of oil-surfactant emulsions. The oil-surfactant emulsion formed corresponds to ???9-10% of the commercial LAS below the CMC. The data suggest that discharge of wastewater containing a significant level of oils and surface-active agents could lead to potential mobilization of organic pollutants and LABs in aquatic environments.

  18. Disposable fluorescence optical pH sensor for near neutral solutions.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Luca; Rovati, Luigi; Fabbri, Paola; Pilati, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The design, development and performance evaluation of a fluorescence-based pH sensor for on-line measurements is presented. The pKa of the sensing element has been calculated to be 7.9, thus the sensor is suitable for measurement of near neutral solutions. The sensor consists of a low-cost disposable polymer sensing probe, in contact with the solution under test, interrogated by an optoelectronic transduction system. The pH sensitive dye is based on fluorescein O-methacrylate, which has been covalently linked to a hydrogel matrix, realized through the use of HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), HDDA (1,6-hexanediol diacrylate) and PEGDA (polyethylene glycol diacrylate). The optical interrogation setup, together with the electronics, has been developed to acquire and process the fluorescence signal. The sensor works over a pH range between 6.5 and 9.0. In the range between 7.0 and 8.0, the sensor shows a linear behavior with a maximum linearity error of 5%. Thanks to the good performance of the sensing element and transduction system, the short term drift of the reading (measured over 40 min) is lower than 0.15%. The measuring system also exhibits good performance in terms of response time and reproducibility. PMID:23275084

  19. Utilization of activated CO2-neutralized red mud for removal of arsenate from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ramesh Chandra; Patel, Rajkishore; Ray, Bankim Chandra

    2010-07-15

    A laboratory study was conducted to investigate the ability of activated CO(2)-neutralized red mud (ANRM) for the removal of arsenate from the aqueous solutions. The batch adsorption experiments were conducted with respect to adsorbent dose, equilibrium pH, contact time, initial arsenate concentration, kinetics, Langmuir isotherms. The mechanisms involved in adsorption of arsenate ions on ANRM were characterized by using XRD, FT-IR, UV-vis, SEM/EDX, and chemical methods. The percentage removal was found to increase gradually with decrease of pH and maximum removal was achieved at pH approximately 4. Adsorption kinetic studies revealed that the adsorption process followed pseudo-second-order kinetics and equilibrates within 24 h. FT-IR spectra of ANRM before and after adsorption reveals the binding of arsenate to the adsorbent. The adsorption data were fitted to linearly transformed Langmuir isotherm with R(2) (correlation coefficient)>0.99. Arsenate adsorbed ANRM can be regenerated using NaOH solution at pH 12.0.

  20. Analytical Solutions to the Near-Neutral Atmospheric Surface Energy Balance with and without Heat Storage for Urban Climatological Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tso, C. P.; Chan, B. K.; Hashim, M. A.

    1991-04-01

    Analytical solutions are presented to the near-neutral atmospheric surface energy balance with the new approach of including the participation of heat storage in the building substrate. Analytical solutions are also presented for the first time for the case without heat storage effect. By a linearization process, the governing equations are simplified to a set of time-dependent, linear, first-order equations from which explicit solutions are readily obtainable. The results compare well with those obtained by numerical solutions upon the set without linearization when applied to the tropical city of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

  1. Reactivity of alanylalanine diastereoisomers in neutral and acid aqueous solutions: a versatile stereoselectivity.

    PubMed

    Plasson, Raphaël; Tsuji, Maika; Kamata, Masazumi; Asakura, Kouichi

    2011-10-01

    A good comprehension of the reactivity of peptides in aqueous solution is fundamental in prebiotic chemistry, namely for understanding their stability and behavior in primitive oceans. Relying on the stereoselectivity of the involved reactions, there is a huge interest in amino acid derivatives for explaining the spontaneous emergence of homochirality on primitive Earth. The corresponding kinetic and thermodynamic parameters are however still poorly known in the literature. We studied the reactivity of alanylalanine in acidic to neutral conditions as a model system. The hydrolysis into amino acids, the epimerization of the N-terminal residue, and the cyclization into diketopiperazine could be successfully identified and studied. This kinetic investigation highlighted interesting behaviors. Complex mechanisms were observed in very acidic conditions. The relative kinetic stability of the diastereoisomers of the dipeptide is highly dependent of the pH, with the possibility to dynamically destabilize the thermodynamically more stable diastereoisomers. The existence of the cyclization of dipeptides adds complexity to the system. On one hand it brings additional stereoselectivities; on the other hand fast racemization of heterochiral dipeptides is obtained.

  2. Reactivity of Alanylalanine Diastereoisomers in Neutral and Acid Aqueous Solutions: a Versatile Stereoselectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plasson, Raphaël; Tsuji, Maika; Kamata, Masazumi; Asakura, Kouichi

    2011-10-01

    A good comprehension of the reactivity of peptides in aqueous solution is fundamental in prebiotic chemistry, namely for understanding their stability and behavior in primitive oceans. Relying on the stereoselectivity of the involved reactions, there is a huge interest in amino acid derivatives for explaining the spontaneous emergence of homochirality on primitive Earth. The corresponding kinetic and thermodynamic parameters are however still poorly known in the literature. We studied the reactivity of alanylalanine in acidic to neutral conditions as a model system. The hydrolysis into amino acids, the epimerization of the N-terminal residue, and the cyclization into diketopiperazine could be successfully identified and studied. This kinetic investigation highlighted interesting behaviors. Complex mechanisms were observed in very acidic conditions. The relative kinetic stability of the diastereoisomers of the dipeptide is highly dependent of the pH, with the possibility to dynamically destabilize the thermodynamically more stable diastereoisomers. The existence of the cyclization of dipeptides adds complexity to the system. On one hand it brings additional stereoselectivities; on the other hand fast racemization of heterochiral dipeptides is obtained.

  3. Stability of Cefepime in pH-Neutral Peritoneal Dialysis Solutions Packaged in Dual-Compartment Bags.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Farzana; Zaidi, Syed T R; Wanandy, Troy; Jose, Matthew D; Patel, Rahul P

    2016-01-01

    Intraperitoneal cefepime is used for the treatment of peritoneal dialysis (PD)-associated peritonitis caused by gram-negative bacteria. The current study investigated the stability of cefepime in a pH-neutral PD solution. A reconstituted solution of cefepime was injected into a total of 9 PD bags and stored at 4°C, 25°C or 37°C for various time points. Cefepime retained more than 90% of its initial concentration for 168, 96, and 12 hours at 4°C, 25°C and 37°C, respectively. No apparent physical precipitation or pH change was observed during the study. This study provides crucial information to healthcare professionals on the physical and chemical stability of cefepime in the pH-neutral solution to help them in preparing such admixtures in advance where required. PMID:27385807

  4. An experimental and numerical study of confined non-reacting and reacting turbulent jets to facilitate homogeneous combustion in industrial furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Insu

    Confined non-reacting turbulent jets are ideal for recirculating the hot flue gas back into the furnace from an external exhaust duct. Such jets are also used inside the furnace to internally entrain and recirculate the hot flue gas to preheat and dilute the reactants. Both internal and external implementation of confined turbulent jets increase the furnace thermal efficiency. For external implementation, depending on the circumstances, the exhaust gas flow may be co- or counter-flow relative to the jet flow. Inside the furnaces, fuel and air jets are injected separately. To create a condition which can facilitate near homogeneous combustion, these jets have to first mix with the burned gas inside the furnace and simultaneously being heated and diluted prior to combustion. Clearly, the combustion pattern and emissions from reacting confined turbulent jets are affected by jet interactions, mixing and entrainment of hot flue gas. In this work, the flow and mixing characteristics of a non-reacting and reacting confined turbulent jet are investigated experimentally and numerically. This work consists of two parts: (i) A study of flow and mixing characteristics of non-reacting confined turbulent jets with co- or counter-flowing exhaust/flue gas. Here the axial and radial distributions of temperature, velocity and NO concentration (used as a tracer gas) were measured. FLUENT was used to numerically simulate the experimental results. This work provides the basic understanding of the flow and mixing characteristics of confined turbulent jets and develops some design considerations for recirculating flue gas back into the furnace as expressed by the recirculation zone and the stagnation locations. (ii) Numerical calculations of near homogeneous combustion are performed for the existing furnace. The exact geometry of the furnace in the lab is used and the real dimensional boundary conditions are considered. The parameters such as air nozzle diameter (dair), fuel nozzle

  5. Spiropyran salts and their neutral precursors: synthesis, crystal structure, photochromic transformations in solutions and solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurieva, E. A.; Aldoshin, S. M.

    2015-06-01

    This review covers investigations of spiropyran iodides with N-substituted indoline fragment, and with the pyran cycle being annelated to N-methylated pyridine ring. The schemes of synthesis of iodides and their neutral precursors, as well as results of X-ray analysis and photochemical study of the crystals of the obtained compounds are presented. Based on our and literature data, the relationship between the structure and photochromic properties has been discussed for a series of salts and neutral pyridospiropyrans.

  6. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Process Testing Partitioning of PCBs in Dissolver Solution After Neutralization/Precipitation (Caustic Adjustment)

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A.J.; Thornton, B.M.; Hoppe, E.W.; Mong, G.M.; Silvers, K.L.; Slate, S.O.

    1999-01-04

    The purpose of the work described in this report was to gain a better understanding of how PCB congeners present in a simulated K Basin sludge dissolver solution will partition upon neutralization and precipitation (i.e., caustic adjustment). In a previous study (Mong et al. 1998),the entire series of sludge conditioning steps (acid dissolution, filtration, and caustic adjustment) were examined during integrated testing. In the work described here, the caustic adjustment step was isolated to examine the fate of PCBs in more detail within this processing step. For this testing, solutions of dissolver simulant (containing no solids) with a known initial concentration of PCB congeners were neutralized with caustic to generate a clarified supernatant and a settled sludge phase. PCBs were quantified in each phase (including the PCBs associated with the test vessel rinsates), and material balance information was collected.

  7. Electrophoretic mobilities of neutral analytes and electroosmotic flow markers in aqueous solutions of Hofmeister salts.

    PubMed

    Křížek, Tomáš; Kubíčková, Anna; Hladílková, Jana; Coufal, Pavel; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Small neutral organic compounds have traditionally the role of EOF markers in electrophoresis, as they are expected to have zero electrophoretic mobility in external electric fields. The BGE contains, however, ions that have unequal affinities to the neutral molecules, which in turn results in their mobilization. In this study we focused on two EOF markers-thiourea and DMSO, as well as on N-methyl acetamide (NMA) as a model of the peptide bond. By means of CE and all atom molecular dynamics simulations we explored mobilization of these neutral compounds in large set of Hofmeister salts. Employing a statistical mechanics approach, we were able to reproduce by simulations the experimental electrophoretic mobility coefficients. We also established the role of the chemical composition of marker and the BGE on the measured electrophoretic mobility coefficient. For NMA, we interpreted the results in terms of the relative affinities of cations versus anions to the peptide bond.

  8. A renaissance of soaps? - How to make clear and stable solutions at neutral pH and room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wolfrum, Stefan; Marcus, Julien; Touraud, Didier; Kunz, Werner

    2016-10-01

    Soaps are the oldest and perhaps most natural surfactants. However, they lost much of their importance since "technical surfactants", usually based on sulfates or sulfonates, have been developed over the last fifty years. Indeed, soaps are pH- and salt-sensitive and they are irritant, especially to the eyes. In food emulsions, although authorized, they have a bad taste, and long-chain saturated soaps have a high Krafft temperature. We believe that most or perhaps all of these problems can be solved with modern formulation approaches. We start this paper with a short overview of our present knowledge of soaps and soap formulations. Then we focus on the problem of the lacking soap solubility at neutral pH values. For example, it is well known that with the food emulsifier sodium oleate (NaOl), clear and stable aqueous solutions can only be obtained at pH values higher than 10. A decrease in the pH value leads to turbid and unstable solutions. This effect is not compatible with the formulation of aqueous stable and drinkable formulations with neutral or even acidic pH values. However, the pH value/phase behavior of aqueous soap solutions can be altered by the addition of other surfactants. Such a surfactant can be Rebaudioside A (RebA), a steviol glycoside from the plant Stevia rebaudiana which is used as a natural food sweetener. In a recent paper, we showed the influence of RebA on the apKa value of sodium oleate in a beverage microemulsion and on its clearing temperature. In the present paper, we report on the effect of the edible bio-surfactant RebA, on the macroscopic and microscopic phase behavior of simple aqueous sodium oleate solutions at varying pH values. The macroscopic phase behavior is investigated by visual observation and turbidity measurements. The microscopic phase behavior is analyzed by acid-base titration curves, phase-contrast and electron microscopy. It turned out that even at neutral pH, aqueous NaOl/RebA solutions can be completely clear and

  9. A renaissance of soaps? - How to make clear and stable solutions at neutral pH and room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wolfrum, Stefan; Marcus, Julien; Touraud, Didier; Kunz, Werner

    2016-10-01

    Soaps are the oldest and perhaps most natural surfactants. However, they lost much of their importance since "technical surfactants", usually based on sulfates or sulfonates, have been developed over the last fifty years. Indeed, soaps are pH- and salt-sensitive and they are irritant, especially to the eyes. In food emulsions, although authorized, they have a bad taste, and long-chain saturated soaps have a high Krafft temperature. We believe that most or perhaps all of these problems can be solved with modern formulation approaches. We start this paper with a short overview of our present knowledge of soaps and soap formulations. Then we focus on the problem of the lacking soap solubility at neutral pH values. For example, it is well known that with the food emulsifier sodium oleate (NaOl), clear and stable aqueous solutions can only be obtained at pH values higher than 10. A decrease in the pH value leads to turbid and unstable solutions. This effect is not compatible with the formulation of aqueous stable and drinkable formulations with neutral or even acidic pH values. However, the pH value/phase behavior of aqueous soap solutions can be altered by the addition of other surfactants. Such a surfactant can be Rebaudioside A (RebA), a steviol glycoside from the plant Stevia rebaudiana which is used as a natural food sweetener. In a recent paper, we showed the influence of RebA on the apKa value of sodium oleate in a beverage microemulsion and on its clearing temperature. In the present paper, we report on the effect of the edible bio-surfactant RebA, on the macroscopic and microscopic phase behavior of simple aqueous sodium oleate solutions at varying pH values. The macroscopic phase behavior is investigated by visual observation and turbidity measurements. The microscopic phase behavior is analyzed by acid-base titration curves, phase-contrast and electron microscopy. It turned out that even at neutral pH, aqueous NaOl/RebA solutions can be completely clear and

  10. Single particle and pair dynamics in water-formic acid mixtures containing ionic and neutral solutes: nonideality in dynamical properties.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rini; Chandra, Amalendu

    2008-05-14

    A series of molecular dynamics simulations of water-formic acid mixtures containing either an ionic solute or a neutral hydrophobic solute has been performed to study the extent of nonideality in the dynamics of these solutes for varying composition of the mixtures. The diffusion coefficients of the charged solutes, both cationic and anionic, are found to show nonideal behavior with variation of composition, and similar nonideality is also observed for the diffusion and orientational relaxation of solvent molecules in these mixtures. The diffusion coefficient of a neutral hydrophobic solute, however, decreases monotonically with increase in water concentration. We have also investigated some of the pair dynamical properties such as water-water and water-formic acid hydrogen bond relaxation and residence dynamics of water molecules in water and formic acid hydration shells. The lifetimes of water-water hydrogen bonds are found to be longer than those between formic acid carbonyl oxygen-water hydrogen bonds, whereas the lifetimes of formic acid hydroxyl hydrogen-water hydrogen bonds are longer than those of water-water hydrogen bonds. In general, the hydrogen bond lifetimes for both water-water and water-formic acid hydrogen bonds are found to decrease with increase in water concentration. Residence times of water molecules also show the same trend with increase in formic acid concentration. Interestingly, these pair dynamical properties show a monotonic dependence on composition without any maximum or minimum and behave almost ideally with respect to changes in the composition of the mixtures. The present calculations are performed with fixed-charge nonpolarizable models of the solvent and solute molecules without taking into account many-body polarization effects in an explicit manner. PMID:18532825

  11. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR PREPARATION OF SURROGATE RECOVERY STANDARD AND INTERNAL STANDARD SOLUTIONS FOR NEUTRAL TARGET ANALYTES (SOP-5.25)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This standard operating procedure describes the method used for preparing internal standard, surrogate recovery standard and calibration standard solutions for neutral analytes used for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis.

  12. The biocompatibility of neutral pH, low-GDP peritoneal dialysis solutions: benefit at bench, bedside, or both?

    PubMed

    Perl, Jeffrey; Nessim, Sharon J; Bargman, Joanne M

    2011-04-01

    For patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD), the development of peritonitis, the decline of residual kidney function, and the loss of peritoneal membrane function are central events that affect both patient and technique survival. The use of glucose as the osmotic agent in conventional PD solutions may increase the susceptibility to each of these events. However, its use may also be associated with systemic metabolic perturbations and, in turn, an increase in cardiovascular morbidity. Both in vitro and in vivo evidence suggest that both the local peritoneal and systemic toxicity induced by the use of glucose may be in part mediated by the presence of glucose degradation products (GDPs) coupled with the hyperosmolarity, reduced pH, and use of lactate as the buffer in conventional PD solutions. Therefore, the use of neutral pH, low-GDP (NpHL(GDP)), bicarbonate-buffered PD solutions may represent a promising strategy to attenuate some of these adverse effects. However, the impact of these novel solutions on clinical outcomes remains largely unknown. In this review, we will highlight evidence regarding the biocompatibility of NpHL(GDP) PD solutions, review the utility of current biomarkers in the evaluation of biocompatibility, and discuss the clinical outcome data with these solutions.

  13. Electrostatic Exclusion of Neutral Solutes from Condensed DNA and Other Charged Phases

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Brian A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Motivated by experiments on condensed DNA phases in binary mixtures of water and a low-dielectric solute, we develop a theory for the electrostatic contribution to solute exclusion from a highly charged phase, within the continuum approximation of the medium. Because the electric field is maximum at the surface of each ion, the electrostatic energy is dominated by the Born energy; interactions between charges are of secondary importance. Neglecting interactions and considering only the competition between the Born energy and the free energy of mixing, we predict that low dielectric solutes are excluded from condensed DNA phases in water-cosolvent mixtures. This suggests that the traditional continuum electrostatic approach of modeling binary mixtures with a uniform dielectric constant needs to be modified. The linking of solute exclusion to solute dielectric properties also suggests a mechanism for predicting the electrostatic contribution to preferential hydration of polar and charged surfaces. PMID:19619468

  14. Effect of Stress on Corrosion at Crack Tip on Pipeline Steel in a Near-Neutral pH Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yao; Cheng, Y. Frank

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the local corrosion at crack tip on an API 5L X46 pipeline steel specimens was investigated under various applied loads in a near-neutral pH solution. Electrochemical measurements, including potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, combined with micro-electrochemical technique and surface characterization, were conducted to investigate the effect of stress on local anodic solution of the steel at the crack tip. The stress corrosion cracking of the steel was dominated by an anodic dissolution mechanism, while the effect of hydrogen was negligible. The applied load (stress) increased the corrosion rate at the crack tip, contributing to crack propagation. The deposit of corrosion products at the crack tip could protect somewhat from further corrosion. At sufficiently large applied loads such as 740 N in the work, it was possible to generate separated cathode and anode, further accelerating the crack growth.

  15. A solution of the monoenergetic neutral particle transport equation for adjacent half-spaces with anisotropic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganapol, B. D.; Mostacci, D.; Previti, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present highly accurate solutions to the neutral particle transport equation in a half-space. While our initial motivation was in response to a recently published solution based on Chandrasekhar's H-function, the presentation to follow has taken on a more comprehensive tone. The solution by H-functions certainly did achieved high accuracy but was limited to isotropic scattering and emission from spatially uniform and linear sources. Moreover, the overly complicated nature of the H-function approach strongly suggests that its extension to anisotropic scattering and general sources is not at all practical. For this reason, an all encompassing theory for the determination of highly precise benchmarks, including anisotropic scattering for a variety of spatial source distributions, is presented for particle transport in a half-space. We illustrate the approach via a collection of cases including tables of 7-place flux benchmarks to guide transport methods developers. The solution presented can be applied to a considerable number of one and two half-space transport problems with variable sources and represents a state-of-the-art benchmark solution.

  16. Electrocatalytic and photocatalytic hydrogen production from acidic and neutral-pH aqueous solutions using iron phosphide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Callejas, Juan F; McEnaney, Joshua M; Read, Carlos G; Crompton, J Chance; Biacchi, Adam J; Popczun, Eric J; Gordon, Thomas R; Lewis, Nathan S; Schaak, Raymond E

    2014-11-25

    Nanostructured transition-metal phosphides have recently emerged as Earth-abundant alternatives to platinum for catalyzing the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER), which is central to several clean energy technologies because it produces molecular hydrogen through the electrochemical reduction of water. Iron-based catalysts are very attractive targets because iron is the most abundant and least expensive transition metal. We report herein that iron phosphide (FeP), synthesized as nanoparticles having a uniform, hollow morphology, exhibits among the highest HER activities reported to date in both acidic and neutral-pH aqueous solutions. As an electrocatalyst operating at a current density of -10 mA cm(-2), FeP nanoparticles deposited at a mass loading of ∼1 mg cm(-2) on Ti substrates exhibited overpotentials of -50 mV in 0.50 M H2SO4 and -102 mV in 1.0 M phosphate buffered saline. The FeP nanoparticles supported sustained hydrogen production with essentially quantitative faradaic yields for extended time periods under galvanostatic control. Under UV illumination in both acidic and neutral-pH solutions, FeP nanoparticles deposited on TiO2 produced H2 at rates and amounts that begin to approach those of Pt/TiO2. FeP therefore is a highly Earth-abundant material for efficiently facilitating the HER both electrocatalytically and photocatalytically.

  17. Cooling channels design analysis with chaotic laminar trajectory for closed cathode air-cooled PEM fuel cells using non-reacting numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, W. Mohamed W. A.

    2015-09-01

    The thermal management of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells contributes directly to the overall power output of the system. For a closed cathode PEM fuel cell design, the use of air as a cooling agent is a non-conventional method due to the large heat load involved, but it offers a great advantage for minimizing the system size. Geometrical aspects of the cooling channels have been identified as the basic parameter for improved cooling performance. Numerical investigation using STAR-CCM computational fluid dynamics platform was applied for non-reacting cooling effectiveness study of various channel geometries for fuel cell application. The aspect ratio of channels and the flow trajectory are the parametric variations. A single cooling plate domain was selected with an applied heat flux of 2400 W/m2 while the cooling air are simulated at Reynolds number of 400 that corresponds to normal air flow velocities using standard 6W fans. Three channel designs of similar number of channels (20 channels) are presented here to analyze the effects of having chaotic laminar flow trajectory compared to the usual straight path trajectory. The total heat transfer between the cooling channel walls and coolant were translated into temperature distribution, maximum temperature gradient, average plate temperature and overall cooling effectiveness analyses. The numerical analysis shows that the chaotic flow promotes a 5% to 10% improvement in cooling effectiveness, depending on the single-axis or multi-axis flow paths applied. Plate temperature uniformity is also more realizable using the chaotic flow designs.

  18. Algorithmic Construction of Exact Solutions for Neutral Static Perfect Fluid Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansraj, Sudan; Krupanandan, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Although it ranks amongst the oldest of problems in classical general relativity, the challenge of finding new exact solutions for spherically symmetric perfect fluid spacetimes is still ongoing because of a paucity of solutions which exhibit the necessary qualitative features compatible with observational evidence. The problem amounts to solving a system of three partial differential equations in four variables, which means that any one of four geometric or dynamical quantities must be specified at the outset and the others should follow by integration. The condition of pressure isotropy yields a differential equation that may be interpreted as second-order in one of the space variables or also as first-order Ricatti type in the other space variable. This second option has been fruitful in allowing us to construct an algorithm to generate a complete solution to the Einstein field equations once a geometric variable is specified ab initio. We then demonstrate the construction of previously unreported solutions and examine these for physical plausibility as candidates to represent real matter. In particular we demand positive definiteness of pressure, density as well as a subluminal sound speed. Additionally, we require the existence of a hypersurface of vanishing pressure to identify a radius for the closed distribution of fluid. Finally, we examine the energy conditions. We exhibit models which display all of these elementary physical requirements.

  19. Rotational diffusion of ionic and neutral solutes in mixed micelles: Effect of surfactant to block copolymer mole ratio on solute rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mali, K. S.; Dutt, G. B.; Mukherjee, T.

    2007-10-01

    Rotational diffusion of an ionic solute rhodamine 110 and a neutral solute 2,5-dimethyl-1,4-dioxo-3,6-diphenylpyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DMDPP) has been investigated in aqueous mixtures of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) and poly(ethyleneoxide)20-poly(propyleneoxide)70-poly(ethyleneoxide)20 (P123). The purpose of this work is to understand how an increase in the mole ratio of surfactant to block copolymer from low to high influences the dynamics of ionic and neutral solute molecules. The variation in the mole ratio of CTAC to P123 from low to high has resulted in a drastic increase in the average reorientation time of rhodamine 110. In contrast, an exactly opposite trend has been noticed in the case of DMDPP. In the low mole ratio regime, rhodamine 110 and DMDPP are located at the interface and palisade layer, respectively, of P123 micelle-CTAC complexes. On the other hand, in the high mole ratio regime, both the probes are located in the Stern layer of CTAC-P123 complexes. The enhancement in the average reorientation time of rhodamine 110 with an increase in the mole ratio of surfactant to block copolymer has been rationalized on the basis of formation of rhodamine 110-Cl ion pair, which in turn associates with the cationic head groups of CTAC-P123 complexes. The observed decrease in the average reorientation time of DMDPP with an increase in the mole ratio of CTAC to P123 is a consequence of lower microviscosity of the Stern layer of CTAC-P123 complexes compared to the palisade layer of P123 micelle-CTAC complexes.

  20. Theoretical study of the neutral hydrolysis of hydrogen isocyanate in aqueous solution via assisted-concerted mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tolosa Arroyo, S; Hidalgo Garcia, A; Sansón Martín, J A

    2009-03-01

    A procedure is described for the theoretical study of chemical reactions in solution by means of molecular dynamics simulation, with solute-solvent interaction potentials derived from ab initio quantum calculations. We apply the procedure to the case of neutral hydrogen isocyanate hydrolysis, HNCO + 2 H(2)O --> H(2)NCOOH + H(2)O, in aqueous solution, via the assisted-concerted mechanisms and the two-water model. We used the solvent as a reaction coordinate and the free-energy curves for the calculation of the properties related to the reaction mechanisms, with a particular focus on the reaction and activation energies. The results showed that the mechanism with two water molecules attacking the C=N bond is preferred to the mechanism with three waters forming a ring of eight members. In addition, the aqueous medium significantly reduces the activation barrier (DeltaG(double dagger) = 13.9 kcal/mol) and makes the process more exothermic (DeltaG = -11.1 kcal/mol) relative to the gas-phase reaction, increasing the rate constant of the process to k = 4.25 x 10(5) s(-1). PMID:19209882

  1. Effects of solutions treated with oxygen radicals in neutral pH region on inactivation of microorganism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-09-01

    The inactivation of microorganisms using nonequilbrium atmospheric pressure plasmas has been attracted much attention due to the low temperature processing and high speed treatment. In this study, we have inactivated E. coli suspended in solutions with neutral pH using an atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source which can selectively supply electrically neutral oxygen radicals. E. coli cells were suspended with deionized distilled water (DDW) (pH = 6.8) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (pH = 7.4) or Citrate-Na buffer (pH = 6.5). The treated samples were diluted and spread on nutrient agar (Nutrient Broth). They were cultured at 37° C. The inactivation effects of oxygen radicals on those cells in solutions were evaluated by colony-counting method. O2 diluted by Ar gas were employed as a working gas for the radical source. The total gas flow rate and the gas mixture ratio of O2/(Ar + O2) were set at 5 slm and 0.6%, respectively. The distance between the radical exit and the suspension surface were set at 10 mm. As a result, the D values for DDW(pH = 6.8), PBS(pH = 7.4) and Citrate-Na buffer(pH = 6.5) were estimated to be 1.4 min, 0.9 min and 16.8 min respectively. The inactivation rates in DDW, PBS were significantly different from that in Citrate-Na buffer. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26286072 and project for promoting Research Center in Meijo University.

  2. Ultrasensitive Analysis of Binding Affinity of HIV Receptor and Neutralizing Antibody Using Solution-Phase Electrochemiluminescence Assay

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Hong Nancy; Wen, Zhaoyang; Brownlow, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Binding of a few ligand molecules with its receptors on cell surface can initiate cellular signaling transduction pathways, and trigger viral infection of host cells. HIV-1 infects host T-cells by binding its viral envelope protein (gp120) with its receptor (a glycoprotein, CD4) on T cells. Primary strategies to prevent and treat HIV infection is to develop therapies (e.g., neutralizing antibodies) that can block specific binding of CD4 with gp120. The infection often leads to the lower counts of CD4 cells, which makes it an effective biomarker to monitor the AIDS progression and treatment. Despite research over decades, quantitative assays for effective measurements of binding affinities of protein-protein (ligand-receptor, antigen-antibody) interactions remains highly sought. Solid-phase electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassay has been commonly used to capture analytes from the solution for analysis, which involves immobilization of antibody on solid surfaces (micron-sized beads), but it cannot quantitatively measure binding affinities of molecular interactions. In this study, we have developed solution-phase ECL assay with a wide dynamic range (0–2 nM) and high sensitivity and specificity for quantitative analysis of CD4 at femtomolar level and their binding affinity with gp120 and monoclonal antibodies (MABs). We found that binding affinities of CD4 with gp120 and MAB (Q4120) are 9.5×108 and 1.2×109 M−1, respectively. The results also show that MAB (Q4120) of CD4 can completely block the binding of gp120 with CD4, while MAB (17b) of gp120 can only partially block their interaction. This study demonstrates that the solution-phase ECL assay can be used for ultrasensitive and quantitative analysis of binding affinities of protein-protein interactions in solution for better understating of protein functions and identification of effective therapies to block their interactions. PMID:23565071

  3. Heating of an ovalbumin solution at neutral pH and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Photchanachai, Songsin; Mehta, Alka; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2002-08-01

    The thermal denaturation, aggregation, and degradation of hen egg white ovalbumin dissolved in distilled and deionized water (60 mg/ml, pH 7.5) was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and viscosity measurement. Two independent endothermic peaks were observed up to 180 degrees C by the DSC analysis. The first peak appeared at around 80 degrees C, corresponding to the denaturation temperature of ovalbumin. The second peak occurred around 140 degrees C due to the degradation of protein molecules as judged from the analysis by SDS-PAGE. The viscosity of the ovalbumin solution increased dramatically above 88 degrees C and maintained almost the same value up until heating to 140 degrees C. The increase in viscosity after heating to 88 degrees C was due to the denaturation and subsequent aggregation of ovalbumin molecules as observed by SDS-PAGE. The decrease in viscosity of the samples heated above 150 degrees C appears to have been the result of degradation of the ovalbumin molecules.

  4. Photosensitized formation of singlet oxygen by phycobiliproteins in neutral aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S P; Zhao, J Q; Jiang, L J

    2000-11-01

    Phycobiliproteins (PBPs) are a type of promising sensitizers for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Upon irradiation (lambda>500nm) of an oxygen-saturated aqueous solution of phycobiliproteins, particularly, C-phycocyanin (C-PC), allophycocyanin (APC) or R-phycoerythrin (R-PE), the formation of singlet oxygen (1O2) was detected by using imidazole in the presence of p-nitrosodimethylaniline (RNO). The bleaching of RNO caused by the presence of imidazole in our system showed typical concentration dependence with a maximum at about 8mM imidazole, which is in agreement with the formation of 1O2. In addition, the generation of 1O2 was verified further in the presence of D2O and specific singlet oxygen quencher 1,4-diazabicyclo [2,2,2] octane (DABCO) and sodium azide (NaN3). Our experimental results indicated that APC possesses high ability to generate reactive oxygen species and the relative quantum yields of photogeneration of 1O2 by PBPs are as follows: APC > C-PC > R-PE.

  5. The solubility of Ag sub 2 S in near-neutral aqueous sulfide solutions at 25 to 300 degree C

    SciTech Connect

    Gammons, C.H.; Barnes, H.L. )

    1989-02-01

    The solubility of Ag{sub 2}S (acanthite/argentite) was measured in vapor-saturated aqueous sulfide solutions at 25-300{degree}C, total sulfide = 0.2-1.4 m, and pH{sub 25{degree}} = 5.8-7.3. Although Seward (1976) has shown that considerable silver can be dissolved as chloride complexes, the authors data indicate that Ag(HS){sup {minus}}{sub 2} is the dominant silver species in hydrothermal fluids with near-neutral to alkaline pH, relatively low oxidation state, high total sulfide, and T < 300{degree}C (e.g., Broadlands, N.Z.; Brown, 1986). Silver transported as Ag(HS){sup {minus}}{sub 2} is precipitated in response to a decrease in aqueous sulfide concentration, a change in pH away from the pK{sub 1} for H{sub 2}S or, in the native silver field, a decrease in oxidation state. Cooling is a less important depositional mechanism, particularly for solutions whose pH is buffered by feldspar alteration reactions.

  6. Cysteine as a green corrosion inhibitor for Cu37Zn brass in neutral and weakly alkaline sulphate solutions.

    PubMed

    Radovanović, Milan B; Petrović, Marija B; Simonović, Ana T; Milić, Snežana M; Antonijević, Milan M

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate electrochemical properties of brass in neutral and weakly alkaline solutions in the presence of cysteine as a nontoxic and ecological corrosion inhibitor. Potentiodynamic measurements, open circuit potential measurements, as well as chronoamperometric measurements were the methods used during investigation of the inhibitory effect of cysteine on the corrosion behaviour of brass. Potentiodynamic measurements showed that cysteine behaves as a mixed-type inhibitor in the investigated media. Based on polarization curves for brass in a weakly alkaline solution of sodium sulphate at varying cysteine concentrations, an interaction occurs between Cu(+) ions and the inhibitor, resulting in the formation of a protective complex on the electrode surface. The results of chronoamperometric measurements confirm the results obtained by potentiodynamic measurements. Optical microphotography of the brass surface also confirms the formation of a protective film in the presence of a 1 × 10(-4) mol/dm(3) cysteine. Adsorption of cysteine on the brass surface proceeds according to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm.

  7. Investigation of hydrogen peroxide reduction reaction on graphene and nitrogen doped graphene nanoflakes in neutral solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirfakhri, Seyed Javad; Binny, Dustin; Meunier, Jean-Luc; Berk, Dimitrios

    2014-07-01

    H2O2 reduction reaction (HPRR) is studied on both graphene (GNF) and nitrogen doped graphene nanoflakes in 0.1 M Na2SO4 solution by rotating disk electrode. The XPS results indicate that N-doped graphene nanoflakes with high nitrogen content, 32 at%N (N-GNF32), are synthesised successfully by an inductively-coupled thermal plasma (ICP) reactor. Pyridinic, pyrrolic and graphitic N species contribute up to 67% of the total nitrogen. Kinetic parameters such as Tafel slope and stoichiometric number suggest that HPRR occurs by the same mechanism on both GNF and N-GNF32. Although nitrogen does not change the mechanism of HPRR, the results indicate that the reaction rate of H2O2 reduction is enhanced on N-GNF32. The exchange current density of H2O2 reduction based on the active surface area of N-GNF32 is (8.3 ± 0.3) × 10-9 A cm-2, which is 6 times higher than the value determined for GNF. The apparent number of electrons involved in the process suggests that H2O2 decomposition competes with H2O2 reduction on both catalysts. Evaluation of the apparent heterogeneous reaction rate constant and the Tafel slope indicate that simultaneous reduction of O2 and H2O2 is negligible on the N-GNF32. On the other hand, the reduction of O2 and H2O2 occurs simultaneously on the GNF surface.

  8. Factors affecting acid neutralizing capacity in the Adirondack region of New York: a solute mass balance approach.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mari; Mitchell, Myron J; Driscoll, Charles T; Roy, Karen M

    2005-06-01

    High rates of acidic deposition in the Adirondack region of New York have accelerated acidification of soils and surface waters. Annual input-output budgets for major solutes and acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) were estimated for 43 drainage lake-watersheds in the Adirondacks from 1998 to 2000. Sulfate was the predominant anion on an equivalent basis in both precipitation and drainage export. Calcium ion had the largest cation drainage export, followed by Mg2+. While these watersheds showed net nitrogen (N) retention, the drainage losses of SO4(2-), Cl-, base cations, and ANC exceeded their respective inputs from precipitation. Land cover (forest type and wetlands) affected the export of SO4(2-), N solutes, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The relationships of solute export with elevation (negative for base cations and Cl-, positive for NO3- and H+) suggest the importance of the concomitant changes of biotic and abiotic watershed characteristics associated with elevational gradients. The surface water ANC increased with the sum of base cations and was greatest in the lakes with watersheds characterized by thick deposits of glacial till. The surface water ANC was also higher in the lake-watersheds with lower DOC export. Some variation in lake ANC was associated with variability in acidic deposition. Using a classification system previously developed for Adirondack lakes on the basis primarily of surficial geology, lake-watersheds were grouped into five classes. The calculated ANC fluxes based on the major sinks and sources of ANC were comparable with measured ANC for the thick-till (I) and the medium-till lake-watersheds with low DOC (II). The calculated ANC was overestimated for the medium-till with high DOC (III) and the thin-till with high DOC (V) lake-watersheds, suggesting the importance of naturally occurring organic acids as an ANC sink, which was not included in the calculations. The lower calculated estimates than the measured ANC for the thin-till lake

  9. The solubility of Ag 2S in near-neutral aqueous sulfide solutions at 25 to 300°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammons, Christopher H.; Barnes, H. L.

    1989-02-01

    The solubility of Ag 2S (acanthite/argentite) was measured in vapor-saturated aqueous sulfide solutions at 25-300°C, total sulfide = 0.2-1.4 m, and pH 25° = 5.8-7.3. Under these conditions, Ag 2S was found to dissolve according to the following reaction: 1/2Ag 2S(s) + 1/2H 2S(aq)+HS -= Ag(HS)-2 for which the following log K's were obtained: -3.82 ± 0.10 (25°C), -3.26 ± 0.10 (100°C), -2.91 ± 0.10 (150°C), -2.55 ± 0.10 (200°C), -2.32 ± 0.10 (250°C), and -2.11 ± 0.10 (300°C). These data are in good agreement with previous work at 20°C ( SCHWARZENBACH and WIDMER, 1966), and 100-180°C ( MELENT'YEVet al., 1969), but not with the dinuclear complex stoichiometries recently obtained by SUGAKIet al. (1987). Although SEWARD (1976) has shown that considerable silver can be dissolved as chloride complexes, our data indicate that Ag(HS) 2- is the dominant silver species in hydrothermal fluids with near-neutral to alkaline pH, relatively low oxidation state, high total sulfide, and T < 300°C ( e.g., Broadlands, N.Z.; BROWN, 1986). Silver transported as Ag(HS) 2- is precipitated in response to a decrease in aqueous sulfide concentration, a change in pH away from the p K1 for H 2S, or, in the native silver field, a decrease in oxidation state. Cooling is a less important depositional mechanism, particularly for solutions whose pH is buffered by feldspar alteration reactions.

  10. Kinetics of reduction of plutonium(VI) and neptunium(VI) by sulfide in neutral and alkaline solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nash, K.L.; Cleveland, J.M.; Sullivan, J.C.; Woods, M.

    1986-01-01

    The rate of reduction of plutonium(VI) and neptunium(VI) by bisulfide ion in neutral and mildly alkaline solutions has been investigated by the stopped-flow technique. The reduction of both of these ions to the pentavalent oxidation state appears to occur in an intramolecular reaction involving an unusual actinide(VI)-hydroxide-bisulfide complex. For plutonium the rate of reduction is 27.4 (??4.1) s-1 at 25??C with ??H* = +33.2 (??1.0) kJ/mol and ??S* = -106 (??4) J/(mol K). The apparent stability constant for the transient complex is 4.66 (??0.94) ?? 103 M-1 at 25??C with associated thermodynamic parameters of ??Hc = +27.7 (??0.4) kJ/mol and ??Sc = +163 (??2) J/(mol K). The corresponding rate and stability constants are determined for the neptunium system at 25??C (k3 = 139 (??30) s-1, Kc. = 1.31 (??0.32) ?? 103 M-1), but equivalent parameters cannot be determined at reduced temperatures. The reaction rate is decreased by bicarbonate ion. At pH > 10.5, a second reaction mechanism, also involving a sulfide complex, is indicated. ?? 1986 American Chemical Society.

  11. Existence, uniqueness, and stability of mild solutions for second-order neutral stochastic evolution equations with infinite delay and Poisson jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yong; Sakthivel, R.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we study a class of second-order neutral stochastic evolution equations with infinite delay and Poisson jumps (SNSEEIPs), in which the initial value belongs to the abstract space B. We establish the existence and uniqueness of mild solutions for SNSEEIPs under non-Lipschitz condition with Lipschitz condition being considered as a special case by means of the successive approximation. Furthermore, we give the continuous dependence of solutions on the initial data by means of a corollary of the Bihari inequality. An application to the stochastic nonlinear wave equation with infinite delay and Poisson jumps is given to illustrate the theory.

  12. Global Exponential Stability of Almost Periodic Solution for Neutral-Type Cohen-Grossberg Shunting Inhibitory Cellular Neural Networks with Distributed Delays and Impulses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijun; Jiang, Qi; Gu, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    A kind of neutral-type Cohen-Grossberg shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks with distributed delays and impulses is considered. Firstly, by using the theory of impulsive differential equations and the contracting mapping principle, the existence and uniqueness of the almost periodic solution for the above system are obtained. Secondly, by constructing a suitable Lyapunov functional, the global exponential stability of the unique almost periodic solution is also investigated. The work in this paper improves and extends some results in recent years. As an application, an example and numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the main results. PMID:27190502

  13. Acid neutralizing processes in an alpine watershed front range, Colorado, U.S.A.-1: Buffering capacity of dissolved organic carbon in soil solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iggy, Litaor M.; Thurman, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    Soil interstitial waters in the Green Lakes Valley, Front Range, Colorado were studied to evaluate the capacity of the soil system to buffer acid deposition. In order to determine the contribution of humic substances to the buffering capacity of a given soil, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and pH of the soil solutions were measured. The concentration of the organic anion, Ai-, derived from DOC at sample pH and the concentration of organic anion, Ax- at the equivalence point were calculated using carboxyl contents from isolated and purified humic material from soil solutions. Subtracting Ax- from Ai- yields the contribution of humic substances to the buffering capacity (Aequiv.-). Using this method, one can evaluate the relative contribution of inorganic and organic constituents to the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of the soil solutions. The relative contribution of organic acids to the overall ANC was found to be extremely important in the alpine wetland (52%) and the forest-tundra ecotone (40%), and somewhat less important in the alpine tundra sites (20%). A failure to recognize the importance of organic acids in soil solutions to the ANC will result in erroneous estimates of the buffering capacity in the alpine environment of the Front Range, Colorado. ?? 1988.

  14. Neutralizer optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Mohajeri, Kayhan

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary results of a test program to optimize a neutralizer design for 30 cm xenon ion thrusters are discussed. The impact of neutralizer geometry, neutralizer axial location, and local magnetic fields on neutralizer performance is discussed. The effect of neutralizer performance on overall thruster performance is quantified, for thruster operation in the 0.5-3.2 kW power range. Additionally, these data are compared to data published for other north-south stationkeeping (NSSK) and primary propulsion xenon ion thruster neutralizers.

  15. Enhanced removal of trace Cr(VI) from neutral and alkaline aqueous solution by FeCo bimetallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Qin, Nannan; Zhang, Ya; Zhou, Hongjian; Geng, Zhigang; Liu, Gang; Zhang, Yunxia; Zhao, Huijun; Wang, Guozhong

    2016-06-15

    The reactivity of zero valent iron (Fe(0)) for removing Cr(VI) is self-inhibiting under neutral and alkaline conditions, due to the precipitation of ferrous hydroxide on the surface of Fe(0). To overcome this difficulty, we incorporated a second metal (Co) into Fe(0) to form FeCo bimetallic nanoparticles (FeCo BNPs), which can achieve higher activity and significant improvement in the reaction kinetics for the removal of Cr(VI) compared with Fe(0). The FeCo BNPs were synthesized by a hydrothermal reduction method without using any templates. The characterization analysis indicated that the products were highly uniform in large scale with 120-140 nm size in diameter. The obtained FeCo BNPs exhibited a remarkable removal ability for Cr(VI) in the pH range of 5.3-10.0. Especially, FeCo BNPs were able to reduce trace Cr(VI) (1.0 mg L(-1), pH=7.5) down to about 0.025 mg L(-1) within 1h. XPS analysis confirmed that Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) by FeCo BNPs, while Fe and Co was oxidized, implying a chemical reduction process. The enhanced removal of trace Cr(VI) could be originated from the introduction of Co, which not only served as a protecting agent against surface corrosion by galvanic cell effect, but also enhanced the efficient flow of electron transfer between iron and Cr(VI). All the results primarily imply that FeCo BNPs can be employed as high efficient material for wastewater treatment.

  16. Improvement of activated carbons as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral solutions by ammonia gas treatment and their performance in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Valerie J.; Nieto Delgado, Cesar; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-11-01

    Commercially available activated carbon (AC) powders from different precursor materials (peat, coconut shell, coal, and hardwood) were treated with ammonia gas at 700 °C to improve their performance as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral pH solutions used in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The ammonia treated ACs exhibited better catalytic performance in rotating ring-disk electrode tests than their untreated precursors, with the bituminous based AC most improved, with an onset potential of Eonset = 0.12 V (untreated, Eonset = 0.08 V) and n = 3.9 electrons transferred in oxygen reduction (untreated, n = 3.6), and the hardwood based AC (treated, Eonset = 0.03 V, n = 3.3; untreated, Eonset = -0.04 V, n = 3.0). Ammonia treatment decreased oxygen content by 29-58%, increased nitrogen content to 1.8 atomic %, and increased the basicity of the bituminous, peat, and hardwood ACs. The treated coal based AC cathodes had higher maximum power densities in MFCs (2450 ± 40 mW m-2) than the other AC cathodes or a Pt/C cathode (2100 ± 1 mW m-2). These results show that reduced oxygen abundance and increased nitrogen functionalities on the AC surface can increase catalytic performance for oxygen reduction in neutral media.

  17. Efficacy of Neutral Electrolyzed Water, Quaternary Ammonium and Lactic Acid-Based Solutions in Controlling Microbial Contamination of Food Cutting Boards Using a Manual Spraying Technique.

    PubMed

    Al-Qadiri, Hamzah M; Ovissipour, Mahmoudreza; Al-Alami, Nivin; Govindan, Byju N; Shiroodi, Setareh Ghorban; Rasco, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    Bactericidal activity of neutral electrolyzed water (NEW), quaternary ammonium (QUAT), and lactic acid-based solutions was investigated using a manual spraying technique against Salmonella Typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus that were inoculated onto the surface of scarred polypropylene and wooden food cutting boards. Antimicrobial activity was also examined when using cutting boards in preparation of raw chopped beef, chicken tenders or salmon fillets. Viable counts of survivors were determined as log10 CFU/100 cm(2) within 0 (untreated control), 1, 3, and 5 min of treatment at ambient temperature. Within the first minute of treatment, NEW and QUAT solutions caused more than 3 log10 bacterial reductions on polypropylene surfaces whereas less than 3 log10 reductions were achieved on wooden surfaces. After 5 min of treatment, more than 5 log10 reductions were achieved for all bacterial strains inoculated onto polypropylene surfaces. Using NEW and QUAT solutions within 5 min reduced Gram-negative bacteria by 4.58 to 4.85 log10 compared to more than 5 log10 reductions in Gram-positive bacteria inoculated onto wooden surfaces. Lactic acid treatment was significantly less effective (P < 0.05) compared to NEW and QUAT treatments. A decline in antimicrobial effectiveness was observed (0.5 to <2 log10 reductions were achieved within the first minute) when both cutting board types were used to prepare raw chopped beef, chicken tenders or salmon fillets. PMID:27027449

  18. Laser neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, O.G.

    1986-06-17

    Laser photodetachment of the excess electron to neutralize relativistic ions offers many advantages over the more conventional collisional methods using gases or thin foils as the neutralization agents. Probably the two most important advantages of laser photodetachment are the generation of a compact and low divergence beam, and the production of intense neutral beams at very high efficiency (approximately 90%). The high intensities or high current densities of the neutral beam result from the fixed maximum divergence that can be added to the beam by photodetachment of the charge using laser intensity of fixed wavelength and incident angle. The high neutralization efficiency is possible because there is no theoretical maximum to the neutralization efficiency, although higher efficiencies require higher laser powers and, therefore, costs. Additional advantages include focusability of the laser light onto the ion beam to maximize its efficacy. There certainly is no residual gas left in the particle beam path as is typical with gas neutralizers. The photodetachment process leaves the neutral atoms in the ground state so there is no excited state fluorescence to interfere with the subsequent beam sensing. Finally, since the beams to be neutralized are very high powered, for a large range of neutralization efficiencies the neutral beam can be increased more by increasing the power to the laser neutralizer than by adding an equal amount of power to the primary accelerator. 26 figs.

  19. Halogenated earth abundant metalloporphyrins as photostable sensitizers for visible-light-driven water oxidation in a neutral phosphate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Cheng; Reek, Joost N H; Williams, René M; Brouwer, Albert M

    2016-06-01

    Very photostable tetrachloro-metalloporphyrins were developed as sensitizers for visible-light-driven water oxidation coupled to cobalt based water-oxidation catalysts in concentrated (0.1 M) phosphate buffer solution. Potassium persulfate (K2S2O8) acts as a sacrificial electron acceptor to oxidize the metalloporphyrin photosensitizers in their excited states. The radical cations thus produced drive the cobalt based water-oxidation catalysts: Co4O4-cubane and Co(NO3)2 as pre-catalyst for cobalt-oxide (CoOx) nanoparticles. Two different metalloporphyrins (Cu(ii) and Ni(ii)) both showed very high photostability in the photocatalytic reaction, as compared to non-halogenated analogues. This indicates that photostability primarily depends on the substitution of the porphyrin macrocycle, not on the central metal. Furthermore, our molecular design strategy not only positively increases the electrochemical potential by 120-140 mV but also extends the absorption spectrum up to ∼600 nm. As a result, the solar photon capturing abilities of halogenated metalloporphyrins (Cu(ii) and Ni(ii)) are comparable to that of the natural photosynthetic pigment, chlorophyll a. We successfully demonstrate long-term (>3 h) visible-light-driven water oxidation using our molecular system based on earth-abundant (first-row transition) metals in concentrated phosphate buffer solution.

  20. Halogenated earth abundant metalloporphyrins as photostable sensitizers for visible-light-driven water oxidation in a neutral phosphate buffer solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hung-Cheng; Reek, Joost N H; Williams, René M; Brouwer, Albert M

    2016-06-01

    Very photostable tetrachloro-metalloporphyrins were developed as sensitizers for visible-light-driven water oxidation coupled to cobalt based water-oxidation catalysts in concentrated (0.1 M) phosphate buffer solution. Potassium persulfate (K2S2O8) acts as a sacrificial electron acceptor to oxidize the metalloporphyrin photosensitizers in their excited states. The radical cations thus produced drive the cobalt based water-oxidation catalysts: Co4O4-cubane and Co(NO3)2 as pre-catalyst for cobalt-oxide (CoOx) nanoparticles. Two different metalloporphyrins (Cu(ii) and Ni(ii)) both showed very high photostability in the photocatalytic reaction, as compared to non-halogenated analogues. This indicates that photostability primarily depends on the substitution of the porphyrin macrocycle, not on the central metal. Furthermore, our molecular design strategy not only positively increases the electrochemical potential by 120-140 mV but also extends the absorption spectrum up to ∼600 nm. As a result, the solar photon capturing abilities of halogenated metalloporphyrins (Cu(ii) and Ni(ii)) are comparable to that of the natural photosynthetic pigment, chlorophyll a. We successfully demonstrate long-term (>3 h) visible-light-driven water oxidation using our molecular system based on earth-abundant (first-row transition) metals in concentrated phosphate buffer solution. PMID:27197873

  1. Interaction of Zn(2+) ions with single-stranded polyU and polyC in neutral solutions.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, V A; Usenko, E L; Valeev, V A; Berezniak, Ekaterina G; Andrushchenko, V V

    2015-03-26

    Effect of Zn(2+) ions on the conformation of single-stranded polynucleotides polyU and polyC in a wide temperature range at pH 7 was studied by differential UV spectroscopy and by thermal denaturation. The atoms coordinating Zn(2+) ions were determined (O4 and N3 in polyU and N3 in polyC). A three-dimensional phase diagram and its two-dimensional components were constructed for a polyC-Zn(2+) system. The phase diagram revealed a region in which ordered single-stranded structures, stabilized by Zn(2+)-mediated cross-links involving N3 atom of cytosine, are formed. The phase diagram also demonstrated that the behavior of the polyC-Zn(2+) system is similar to the effect of retrograde condensation observed in some binary solutions of simple liquids. A dependence of Zn(2+)-polyC binding constant on the metal ion concentration was obtained. The reason why zinc-induced transition of the sequences with adenine-uracil (AU) base pairs from A-form geometry to a metallized m-form requires higher pH compared to the sequences comprised of guanine-cytosine (GC) base pairs is explained. This information can be useful for the development of possible technological applications based on m-DNA. PMID:25731666

  2. Ultrafast primary processes of the stable neutral organic radical, 1,3,5-triphenylverdazyl, in liquid solution.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Christoph; Wezisla, Boris; Lindner, Jörg; Vöhringer, Peter

    2015-05-28

    Femtosecond spectroscopy with hyperspectral white-light detection was used to elucidate the ultrafast primary processes of the thermodynamically stable organic radical, 1,3,5-triphenylverdazyl, in liquid acetonitrile solution at room temperature. The radical was excited with optical pulses having a duration of 39 fs and a center wavelength of 800 nm thereby accessing its energetically lowest electronically excited state (D1). The apparent spectrotemporal response is understood in terms of an ultrafast primary D1-to-D0 internal conversion that generates the electronic ground state of the radical in a highly vibrationally excited fashion within a few hundred femtoseconds. The replenished electronic ground state subsequently undergoes vibrational cooling on a time scale of a few picoseconds. The instantaneous absorption spectra of the radical derived from the femtosecond pump-probe data are analyzed within the Sulzer-Wieland formalism for calculating the electronic spectra of "hot" polyatomic molecules. The pump-probe spectra together with transient anisotropy data in the region of the D0 → D1 ground-state bleach gives evidence for an additional transient absorption that arises from a dark excited state, which gains oscillator strength with increasing vibrational excitation of the radical by virtue of vibronic coupling. PMID:25941968

  3. Uptake of atmospheric mercury by deionized water and aqueous solutions of inorganic salts at acidic, neutral and alkaline pH.

    PubMed

    Waite, D T; Snihura, A D; Liu, Y; Huang, G H

    2002-10-01

    Mercury (Hg) is well known as a toxic environmental pollutant that is among the most highly bioconcentrated trace metals in the human food chain. The atmosphere is one of the most important media for the environmental cycling of mercury, since it not only receives mercury emitted from natural sources such as volcanoes and soil and water surfaces but also from anthropogenic sources such as fossil fuel combustion, mining and metal smelting. Although atmospheric mercury exists in different physical and chemical forms, as much as 90% can occur as elemental vapour Hg0, depending on the geographic location and time of year. Atmospheric mercury can be deposited to aquatic ecosystems through both wet (rain or snow) and dry (vapour adsorption and particulate deposition) processes. The purpose of the present study was to measure, under laboratory conditions, the rate of deposition of gaseous, elemental mercury (Hg0) to deionized water and to solutions of inorganic salt species of varying ionic strengths with a pH range of 2-12. In deionized water the highest deposition rates occurred at both low (pH 2) and high (pH 12). The addition of different species of salt of various concentrations for the most part had only slight effects on the absorption and retention of atmospheric Hg0. The low pH solutions of various salt concentrations and the high pH solutions of high salt concentrations tested in this study generally showed a greater tendency to absorb and retain atmospheric Hg0 than those at a pH closer to neutral.

  4. Ion-exchange and hydrophobic interactions affecting selectivity for neutral and charged solutes on three structurally similar agglomerated ion-exchange and mixed-mode stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Kazarian, Artaches A; Taylor, Mark R; Haddad, Paul R; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett

    2013-11-25

    The nature and extent of mixed-mode retention mechanisms evident for three structurally related, agglomerated, particle-based stationary phases were evaluated. These three agglomerated phases were Thermo Fisher ScientificIon PacAS11-HC - strong anion exchange, Thermo Fisher Scientific IonPac CS10--strong cation-exchange PS-DVB, and the Thermo Fisher Scientific Acclaim Trinity P1silica-based substrate, which is commercially marketed as a mixed-mode stationary phase. All studied phases can exhibit zwitterionic and hydrophobic properties, which contribute to the retention of charged organic analytes. A systematic approach was devised to investigate the relative ion-exchange capacities and hydrophobicities for each of the three phases, together with the effect of eluent pH upon selectivity, using a specifically selected range of anionic, cationic and neutral aromatic compounds. Investigation of the strong anion-exchange column and the Trinity P1 mixed-mode substrate, in relation to ion-exchange capacity and pH effects, demonstrated similar retention behaviour for both the anionic and ampholytic solutes, as expected from the structurally related phases. Further evaluation revealed that the ion-exchange selectivity of the mixed-mode phase exhibited properties similar to that of the strong anion-exchange column, with secondary cation-exchange selectivity, albeit with medium to high anion-exchange and cation-exchange capacities, allowing selective retention for each of the anionic, cationic and ampholytic solutes. Observed mixed-mode retention upon the examined phases was found to be a sum of anion- and cation-exchange interactions, secondary ion-exchange and hydrophobic interactions, with possible additional hydrogen bonding. Hydrophobic evaluation of the three phases revealed logP values of 0.38-0.48, suggesting low to medium hydrophobicity. These stationary phases were also benchmarked against traditional reversed-phase substrates namely, octadecylsilica YMC-Pac Pro C18

  5. Electroosmotic fluid motion and late-time solute transport at non-negligible zeta potentials

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Griffiths; R. H. Nilson

    1999-12-01

    Analytical and numerical methods are employed to determine the electric potential, fluid velocity and late-time solute distribution for electroosmotic flow in a tube and channel when the zeta potential is not small. The electric potential and fluid velocity are in general obtained by numerical means. In addition, new analytical solutions are presented for the velocity in a tube and channel in the extremes of large and small Debye layer thickness. The electroosmotic fluid velocity is used to analyze late-time transport of a neutral non-reacting solute. Zeroth and first-order solutions describing axial variation of the solute concentration are determined analytically. The resulting expressions contain eigenvalues representing the dispersion and skewness of the axial concentration profiles. These eigenvalues and the functions describing transverse variation of the concentration field are determined numerically using a shooting technique. Results are presented for both tube and channel geometries over a wide range of the normalized Debye layer thickness and zeta potential. Simple analytical approximations to the eigenvalues are also provided for the limiting cases of large and small values of the Debye layer thickness. The methodology developed here for electroosmotic flow is also applied to the Taylor problem of late-time transport and dispersion in pressure-driven flows.

  6. Transient ion neutralization by electrons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The nonlinear initial-boundary-value problems describing the lateral neutralization of ion beams for the cases that (1) an auxiliary electric field accelerates the electrons into the ion space, and (2) the electrons are injected into the ion space at a prescribed current density are treated. Analytical solutions are derived which give the position and speed of the neutralization front as a function of time, and the temporal development of the electron density, velocity, and electric fields during the neutralization process.

  7. Chemistry of carotenoid neutral radicals.

    PubMed

    Ligia Focsan, A; Magyar, Adam; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-04-15

    Proton loss from the carotenoid radical cations (Car(+)) to form neutral radicals (#Car) was investigated by numerous electrochemical, EPR, ENDOR and DFT studies described herein. The radical cation and neutral radicals were formed in solution electrochemically and stabilized on solid silica-alumina and MCM-41 matrices. Carotenoid neutral radicals were recently identified in Arabidopsis thaliana plant and photosystem II samples. Deprotonation at the terminal ends of a zeaxanthin radical cation could provide a secondary photoprotection pathway which involves quenching excited state chlorophyll by the long-lived zeaxanthin neutral radicals formed. PMID:25687648

  8. Neutral Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Strobel, D. F.; Moses, J. I.; Waite, J. H.; Crovisier, J.; Yelle, R. V.; Bougher, S. W.; Roble, R. G.

    This paper summarizes the understanding of aeronomy of neutral atmospheres in the solar system, discussing most planets as well as Saturn's moon Titan and comets. The thermal structure and energy balance is compared, highlighting the principal reasons for discrepancies amongst the atmospheres, a combination of atmospheric composition, heliocentric distance and other external energy sources not common to all. The composition of atmospheres is discussed in terms of vertical structure, chemistry and evolution. The final section compares dynamics in the upper atmospheres of most planets and highlights the importance of vertical dynamical coupling as well as magnetospheric forcing in auroral regions, where present. It is shown that a first order understanding of neutral atmospheres has emerged over the past decades, thanks to the combined effects of spacecraft and Earth-based observations as well as advances in theoretical modeling capabilities. Key gaps in our understanding are highlighted which ultimately call for a more comprehensive programme of observation and laboratory measurements.

  9. Neutral Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Strobel, D. F.; Moses, J. I.; Waite, J. H.; Crovisier, J.; Yelle, R. V.; Bougher, S. W.; Roble, R. G.

    2008-08-01

    This paper summarizes the understanding of aeronomy of neutral atmospheres in the solar system, discussing most planets as well as Saturn’s moon Titan and comets. The thermal structure and energy balance is compared, highlighting the principal reasons for discrepancies amongst the atmospheres, a combination of atmospheric composition, heliocentric distance and other external energy sources not common to all. The composition of atmospheres is discussed in terms of vertical structure, chemistry and evolution. The final section compares dynamics in the upper atmospheres of most planets and highlights the importance of vertical dynamical coupling as well as magnetospheric forcing in auroral regions, where present. It is shown that a first order understanding of neutral atmospheres has emerged over the past decades, thanks to the combined effects of spacecraft and Earth-based observations as well as advances in theoretical modeling capabilities. Key gaps in our understanding are highlighted which ultimately call for a more comprehensive programme of observation and laboratory measurements.

  10. On abstract degenerate neutral differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Eduardo; O'Regan, Donal

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a new abstract model of functional differential equations, which we call abstract degenerate neutral differential equations, and we study the existence of strict solutions. The class of problems and the technical approach introduced in this paper allow us to generalize and extend recent results on abstract neutral differential equations. Some examples on nonlinear partial neutral differential equations are presented.

  11. Controlling retention, selectivity and magnitude of EOF by segmented monolithic columns consisting of octadecyl and naphthyl monolithic segments--applications to RP-CEC of both neutral and charged solutes.

    PubMed

    Karenga, Samuel; El Rassi, Ziad

    2011-04-01

    Monolithic capillaries made of two adjoining segments each filled with a different monolith were introduced for the control and manipulation of the electroosmotic flow (EOF), retention and selectivity in reversed phase-capillary electrochromatography (RP-CEC). These columns were called segmented monolithic columns (SMCs) where one segment was filled with a naphthyl methacrylate monolith (NMM) to provide hydrophobic and π-interactions, while the other segment was filled with an octadecyl acrylate monolith (ODM) to provide solely hydrophobic interaction. The ODM segment not only provided hydrophobic interactions but also functioned as the EOF accelerator segment. The average EOF of the SMC increased linearly with increasing the fractional length of the ODM segment. The neutral SMC provided a convenient way for tuning EOF, selectivity and retention in the absence of annoying electrostatic interactions and irreversible solute adsorption. The SMCs allowed the separation of a wide range of neutral solutes including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are difficult to separate using conventional alkyl-bonded stationary phases. In all cases, the k' of a given solute was a linear function of the fractional length of the ODM or NMM segment in the SMCs, thus facilitating the tailoring of a given SMC to solve a given separation problem. At some ODM fractional length, the fabricated SMC allowed the separation of charged solutes such as peptides and proteins that could not otherwise be achieved on a monolithic column made from NMM as an isotropic stationary phase due to the lower EOF exhibited by this monolith.

  12. Enthalpies and constants of dissociation of several neutral and cationic acids in aqueous and methanol/water solutions at various temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shoghi, Elham; Romero, Lilian; Reta, Mario; Ràfols, Clara; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2009-05-01

    The acidic dissociation enthalpies and constants of anilinium, protonated tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (HTris(+)), benzoic and acetic acids, have been determined at several temperatures in pure water and in methanol/water mixtures by potentiometry and by isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC). The pK(a) values determined by both techniques are in accordance when the dissociation process involves large amounts of heat. However, for the neutral acids the ITC technique gave slightly lower pK(a) values than those from potentiometry at the highest temperatures studied due to the small amounts of heat involved in the acidic dissociation. The dissociation enthalpies have been determined directly by calorimetry and the obtained values slightly decrease with the increase of temperature. Therefore, only a rough estimation of the dissociation enthalpies can be obtained from potentiometric pK(a) by means of the Van't Hoff approach.

  13. Enthalpies and constants of dissociation of several neutral and cationic acids in aqueous and methanol/water solutions at various temperatures.

    PubMed

    Shoghi, Elham; Romero, Lilian; Reta, Mario; Ràfols, Clara; Bosch, Elisabeth

    2009-05-01

    The acidic dissociation enthalpies and constants of anilinium, protonated tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (HTris(+)), benzoic and acetic acids, have been determined at several temperatures in pure water and in methanol/water mixtures by potentiometry and by isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC). The pK(a) values determined by both techniques are in accordance when the dissociation process involves large amounts of heat. However, for the neutral acids the ITC technique gave slightly lower pK(a) values than those from potentiometry at the highest temperatures studied due to the small amounts of heat involved in the acidic dissociation. The dissociation enthalpies have been determined directly by calorimetry and the obtained values slightly decrease with the increase of temperature. Therefore, only a rough estimation of the dissociation enthalpies can be obtained from potentiometric pK(a) by means of the Van't Hoff approach. PMID:19261425

  14. A Label as a Hidden Persuader: Chemists' Neutralization Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen

    1991-01-01

    Identifies and describes the problems students have with the concept of neutralization. Analysis of over 7,500 students' answers to test questions over neutralization showed that many students understand the concept in its original meaning. Students assumed that in any neutralization reaction a neutral solution is formed, even if a weak acid or…

  15. {sup 13}C and {sup 17}O NMR binding constant studies of uranyl carbonate complexes in near-neutral aqueous solution. Yucca Mountain Project Milestone Report 3351

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.L.; Newton, T.W.; Palmer, P.D.; Zwick, B.D.

    1995-01-01

    Valuable structural information, much of it unavailable by other methods, can be obtained about complexes in solution through NMR spectroscopy. From chemical shift and intensity measurements of complexed species, NMR can serve as a species-specific structural probe for molecules in solution and can be used to validate thermodynamic constants used in geochemical modeling. Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (FT-NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to study the speciation of uranium(VI) ions in aqueous carbonate solutions as a function of pH, ionic strength, carbonate concentration, uranium concentration, and temperature. Carbon-13 and oxygen-17 NMR spectroscopy were used to monitor the fractions, and hence thermodynamic binding constants of two different uranyl species U0{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(CO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 6{minus}} in aqueous solution. Synthetic buffer solutions were prepared under the ionic strength conditions used in the NMR studies in order to obtain an accurate measure of the hydrogen ion concentration, and a discussion of pH = {minus}log(a{sub H}{sup +}) versus p[H] = {minus}log[H+] is provided. It is shown that for quantitative studies, the quantity p[H] needs to be used. Fourteen uranium(VI) binding constants recommended by the OECD NEA literature review were corrected to the ionic strengths employed in the NMR study using specific ion interaction theory (SIT), and the predicted species distributions were compared with the actual species observed by multinuclear NMR. Agreement between observed and predicted stability fields is excellent. This establishes the utility of multinuclear NMR as a species-specific tool for the study of the actinide carbonate complexation constants, and serves as a means for validating the recommendations provided by the OECD NEA.

  16. Synthesis of mesoporous silica helical fibers using a catanionic-neutral ternary surfactant in a highly dilute silica solution: biomimetic silicification.

    PubMed

    Lin, Giung-Ling; Tsai, Yi-Hua; Lin, Hong-Ping; Tang, Chih-Yuan; Lin, Ching-Yen

    2007-04-10

    Mesoporous silica helical fibers in many different shapes have been synthesized in a highly dilute silicate solution at pH approximately 2.0 by using CnTMAB-SDS-P123 (n = 14-18) ternary surfactant as a template. The mesoporous silica helical fibers possess a well-ordered hexagonal mesostructure, high surface area, and large pore volume. Thus, the microtome sections of the helical fibers demonstrate a concentric mesotructure or two hemiconcentric mesostructures. In addition to triblock copolymer, adding the proper amount of 1-butanol or pentanol can promote the yield of the helical fibers as well. The yield of the surfactant-templated helical fibers is also dependent on the water content, reaction temperature, and pH value of the solution. The mesoporous silica helical fiber can be used as a solid template to prepare mesoporous carbon helical fibers via impregnation of phenol-formaldehyde, pyrolysis, and silica removal.

  17. A class of neutral functional differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melvin, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    Formulation and study of the initial value problem for neutral functional differential equations. The existence, uniqueness, and continuation of solutions to this problem are investigated, and an analysis is made of the dependence of the solutions on the initial conditions and parameters, resulting in the derivation of a continuous dependence theorem in which the fundamental mathematical principles underlying the continuous dependence problem for a very general system of nonlinear neutral functional differential equations are separated out.

  18. EFFECTS OF LEAKAGE NEUTRAL PARTICLES ON SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2012-10-20

    In this paper, we investigate effects of neutral particles on shocks propagating into the partially ionized medium. We find that for 120 km s{sup -1} < u {sub sh} < 3000 km s{sup -1} (u {sub sh} is the shock velocity), about 10% of upstream neutral particles leak into the upstream region from the downstream region. Moreover, we investigate how the leakage neutral particles affect the upstream structure of the shock and particle accelerations. Using four-fluid approximations (upstream ions, upstream neutral particles, leakage neutral particles, and pickup ions), we provide analytical solutions of the precursor structure due to leakage neutral particles. It is shown that the upstream flow is decelerated in the precursor region and the shock compression ratio becomes smaller than without leakage neutral particles, but the total compression ratio does not change. Even if leakage of neutral particles is small (a few percent of total upstream particles), this smaller compression ratio of the shock can explain steep gamma-ray spectra from young supernova remnants. Furthermore, leakage neutral particles could amplify the magnetic field and heat the upstream region.

  19. Neutral beam monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.

    1981-08-18

    Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

  20. A Continuous Variation Study of Heats of Neutralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Dennis W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that students study heats of neutralization of a 1 M solution of an unknown acid by 1 M solution of a strong base using the method continuous variation. Reviews results using several common acids. (SK)

  1. On neutral plasma oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Morrison, P.J.

    1993-06-01

    We examine the conditions for the existence of spectrally stable neutral modes in a Vlasov-Poisson plasma and show that for stable equilibria of systems that have unbounded spatial domain, the only possible neutral modes are those with phase velocities that correspond to stationary inflection points of the equilibrium distribution function. It is seen that these neutral modes can possess positive or negative free energy.

  2. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  3. Search for neutral leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1984-12-01

    At present we know of three kinds of neutral leptons: the electron neutrino, the muon neutrino, and the tau neutrino. This paper reviews the search for additional neutral leptons. The method and significance of a search depends upon the model used for the neutral lepton being sought. Some models for the properties and decay modes of proposed neutral leptons are described. Past and present searches are reviewed. The limits obtained by some completed searches are given, and the methods of searches in progress are described. Future searches are discussed. 41 references.

  4. Neutrality in Language Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wee, Lionel

    2010-01-01

    The unavoidability of language makes it critical that language policies appeal to some notion of language neutrality as part of their rationale, in order to assuage concerns that the policies might otherwise be unduly discriminatory. However, the idea of language neutrality is deeply ideological in nature, since it is not only an attempt to treat…

  5. Modeling Neutral Hydrogen in the Heliospheric Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Brand, Pontus

    2010-03-01

    Observational data of neutral atoms provides us with a 1 AU picture of the neutral atom flux in the heliosphere. The large mean free paths of neutrals allow us to infer properties of their distant source, as well as the properties of the intermediary medium. Energetic neutral hydrogen, for example, travels on almost straight trajectories, so that the particles observed coming from a particular direction were created from energetic protons along that line of sight. Similarly, low energy interstellar atoms are attenuated and deflected as they enter the heliosphere, and this deflection tells us something about the structure of the heliospheric interface. Of course, to infer quantitative features of the global heliosphere from neutral atom observations at 1 AU, we need accurate models that capture the 3D structure of the heliosphere. In this paper we present our MHD-plasma/kinetic-neutral model of the heliospheric interface that uses a Lorentzian distribution function to approximate a suprathermal tail on the solar wind proton distribution due to pick-up ions. We investigate the effect the k parameter of the Lorentzian function has on the overall solution and the flux of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). ENA fluxes are also compared to ``pre-IBEX'' spacecraft data.

  6. Neutralization Assay for Chikungunya Virus Infection: Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test.

    PubMed

    Azami, Nor Azila Muhammad; Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2016-01-01

    Neutralization assay is a technique that detects and quantifies neutralizing antibody in serum samples by calculating the percentage of reduction of virus activity, as the concentration of virus used is usually constant. Neutralizing antibody titer is conventionally determined by calculating the percentage reduction in total virus infectivity by counting and comparing number of plaques (localized area of infection due to cytopathic effect) with a standard amount of virus. Conventional neutralizing test uses plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT) to determine neutralizing antibody titers against Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Here we describe the plaque reduction neutralization assay (PRNT) using Vero cell lines to obtain neutralizing antibody titers.

  7. Solar Neutral Particles

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows a neutral solar particle's path leaving the sun, following the magnetic field lines out to the heliosheath. The solar particle hits a hydrogen atom, stealing its electron, and ...

  8. Observed vegetation patterns in tidal environments: neutral vs. non-neutral explanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belluco, E.; Zillio, T.; Silvestri, S.; Maritan, A.; Marani, M.

    2009-12-01

    The quantitative retrieval of vegetation patterns in tidal environments from high-resolution satellite and airborne sensors has recently been shown to be accurate and repeatable. This makes available unprecedentedly accurate observations of competing species distributions over a broad range of spatial scales. Such distributions are here characterized statistically, suggesting the absence of characteristic scales, as revealed by the power-law form of cluster size pdf's. A competition model based on a neutral approach, serving as a reference null hypothesis, reproduces some of the basic observed system properties. It is, however, shown that the availability of spatially-detailed observations allows the development and application of a non-neutral model, which is seen to capture several observed bio-diversity properties (alpha and beta diversity). The non-neutral model developed, based on cloning and seed dispersal processes, is amenable to analytical solution and yields closed-form characterizations of beta-diversity. The validation of the non-neutral model shows a remarkable agreement with observations within the wide observational range of scales explored (0.5 m - 1000 m). We contend the good agreement of the neutral model with the more limited characterization of beta-diversity typical of the neutral theory to be misleading, as the recruitment rates by propagules and by seed dispersal assumed by the neutral model do not reflect known species characteristics and correspond to averages of those obtained under the more general non-neutral hypothesis. We conclude that non-neutral beta-diversity characterizations are required to describe ecosystem dynamics in the presence of species-dependent properties and to successfully relate the observed patterns to the underlying processes. The hypothesis of neutrality, often fostered by the lack of spatially-detailed data, is no longer a necessity, in view of the recent advances in remote-sensing retrievals of vegetation

  9. Tautomerism in neutral histidine.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Celina; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2014-10-01

    Histidine is an important natural amino acid, involved in many relevant biological processes, which, because of its physical properties, proved difficult to characterize experimentally in its neutral form. In this work, neutral histidine has been generated in the gas phase by laser ablation of solid samples and its N(ε)H tautomeric form unraveled through its rotational spectrum. The quadrupole hyperfine structure, arising from the existing three (14)N nuclei, constituted a site-specifically probe for revealing the tautomeric form as well as the side chain configuration of this proteogenic amino acid.

  10. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  11. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  12. Between detection and neutralization.

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Mark Kamerer; Green, Mary Wilson; Adams, Douglas Glenn; Pritchard, Daniel Allison

    2005-08-01

    Security system analytical performance analysis is generally based on the probability of system effectiveness. The probability of effectiveness is a function of the probabilities of interruption and neutralization. Interruption occurs if the response forces are notified in sufficient time to engage the adversary. Neutralization occurs if the adversary attack is defeated after the security forces have actively engaged the adversary. Both depend upon communications of data. This paper explores details of embedded communications functions that are often assumed to be inconsequential. It is the intent of the authors to bring focus to an issue in security system modeling that, if not well understood, has the potential to be a deciding factor in the overall system failure or effectiveness.

  13. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  14. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, F.L.; Blank, M.L.

    1984-10-26

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated either-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood presure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  15. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Fred L.; Blank, Merle L.

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated ether-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood pressure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  16. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  17. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  18. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A diver tests a secondary camera and maneuvering platform in Marshall's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS).The secondary camera will be beneficial for recording repairs and other extra vehicular activities (EVA) the astronuats will perform while making repairs on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The maneuvering platform was developed to give the astronauts something to stand on while performing maintenance tasks. These platforms were developed to be mobile so that the astronauts could move them to accommadate different sites.

  19. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  20. Neutrality between Government and Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1996-01-01

    The overall guiding principle of neutrality between government and religion masks a tension that exists between free exercise of religion and establishment of religion. Reviews the development and current status of "Lemon" as a test for neutrality; proposes a new test for neutrality, evenhandedness, that is common to both the Free Exercise and…

  1. Effectiveness of various methods of formaldehyde neutralization using monoethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Coskey, Andrew; Gest, Thomas R

    2015-05-01

    Formaldehyde is the most commonly used fixative chemical for the preservation of human cadavers used for educational purposes in the United States. Formaldehyde is also a known carcinogenic agent whose exposure level is regulated by guidelines of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Various methods for formaldehyde neutralization exist, yet many donations programs do not take any steps to neutralize the formaldehyde in embalmed donor bodies. The effectiveness of monoethanolamine (MEA) in neutralizing formaldehyde is well documented when used as a final injection during embalming. The purpose of this study is to report the effectiveness of several post-embalming techniques of formaldehyde neutralization. Twenty-four donor bodies were assigned to four experimental groups of six. For the three experimental groups, the techniques tested involve delivery of a 20:1 dilution of deionized water:MEA via recannulization and gravity flow infusion, compartment injection, and alternate wetting solution containing four percent MEA. Our results indicated that spray bottle delivery was not effective in neutralization of formaldehyde compared to the control group, but that formaldehyde levels decreased when recannulization or compartment injection were used. The most effective method of formaldehyde neutralization was compartment injection of MEA solution (P < 0.01). The results of this study indicate that, in situations where MEA is not used as a final infusion during embalming, compartment injection of MEA solution is an effective method of formaldehyde neutralization.

  2. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Dahl, David A.; Delmore, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  3. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, F.L.; Blank, M.L.

    1986-06-17

    A method is described for treating a warm-blooded animal comprising administering to the animal a neutral glycerolipid with a 12 to 20 carbon alkyl group at the sn-1 position, a short carbon chain acyl group at the sn-2 position and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position in an amount sufficient to lower the arterial blood pressure of the animal. A method is also described for treating a warm-blooded animal comprising administering a composition consisting essentially of a 1-alkyl-2-acetyl (or propionyl)-sn glycerol in combination with a 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, wherein the 1-alkyl groups contain 12 to 20 carbon atoms, dissolved in an inert pharmaceutically acceptable solvent in amounts sufficient to lower the arterial blood pressure of the animal.

  4. Expansion of a cold non-neutral plasma slab

    SciTech Connect

    Karimov, A. R.; Yu, M. Y.; Stenflo, L.

    2014-12-15

    Expansion of the ion and electron fronts of a cold non-neutral plasma slab with a quasi-neutral core bounded by layers containing only ions is investigated analytically and exact solutions are obtained. It is found that on average, the plasma expansion time scales linearly with the initial inverse ion plasma frequency as well as the degree of charge imbalance, and no expansion occurs if the cold plasma slab is stationary and overall neutral. However, in both cases, there can exist prominent oscillations on the electron front.

  5. The status of neutral currents

    SciTech Connect

    Zwirner, F.

    1987-11-01

    The situation of particle physics today is quite puzzling. On the one hand, the Standard Model (SM) of strong and electroweak interactions is consistent with all confirmed experimental data but theoretically rather unsatisfactory. On the other hand, none of the many theoretical speculations which try to go beyond the SM has (yet) received the slightest experimental support. The solution to this dilemma can only come from new data: either from the detection of a new particle threshold at high energy colliders, or from the appearance of some small discrepancy in high-precision experiments. A crucial sector for testing the SM and its extensions is that of neutral currents (NC), where an impressive amount of data has been collected in recent years. While waiting for the next generation of experiments, it is certainly useful to take stock of our knowledge, determining the NC parameters as precisely as we can and putting limits on possible deviations from the SM. The present talk contains the results of a recent analysis along these lines: the first part illustrates how a set of 'model-independent' parameters can be extracted from the available NC data, the second part particularizes the analysis to the SM and to some superstring-inspired models with an additional Z' in their low-energy spectrum. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Constraining the Europa Neutral Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard T.; Mitchell, Donald; mauk, Barry; Johnson, Robert E.; clark, george

    2016-10-01

    "Neutral tori" consist of neutral particles that usually co-orbit along with their source forming a toroidal (or partial toroidal) feature around the planet. The distribution and composition of these features can often provide important, if not unique, insight into magnetospheric particles sources, mechanisms and dynamics. However, these features can often be difficult to directly detect. One innovative method for detecting neutral tori is by observing Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) that are generally considered produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between charged and neutral particles.Mauk et al. (2003) reported the detection of a Europa neutral particle torus using ENA observations. The presence of a Europa torus has extremely large implications for upcoming missions to Jupiter as well as understanding possible activity at this moon and providing critical insight into what lies beneath the surface of this icy ocean world. However, ENAs can also be produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between two ionized particles and in that case cannot be used to infer the presence of neutral particle population. Thus, a detailed examination of all possible source interactions must be considered before one can confirm that likely original source population of these ENA images is actually a Europa neutral particle torus. For this talk, we examine the viability that the Mauk et al. (2003) observations were actually generated from a neutral torus emanating from Europa as opposed to charge particle interactions with plasma originating from Io. These results help constrain such a torus as well as Europa source processes.

  7. A proposed neutral line signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doxas, I.; Speiser, T. W.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Horton, W.

    1992-01-01

    An identifying signature is proposed for the existence and location of the neutral line in the magnetotail. The signature, abrupt density, and temperature changes in the Earthtail direction, was first discovered in test particle simulations. Such temperature variations have been observed in ISEE data (Huang et. al. 1992), but their connection to the possible existence of a neutral line in the tail has not yet been established. The proposed signature develops earlier than the ion velocity space ridge of Martin and Speiser (1988), but can only be seen by spacecraft in the vicinity of the neutral line, while the latter can locate a neutral line remotely.

  8. Effects of citrate and NaCl on size, morphology, crystallinity and microstructure of calcium phosphates obtained from aqueous solutions at acidic or near-neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Mekmene, Omar; Rouillon, Thierry; Quillard, Sophie; Pilet, Paul; Bouler, Jean-Michel; Pezennec, Stéphane; Gaucheron, Frédéric

    2012-05-01

    Precipitation of calcium phosphates occurs in dairy products and depending on pH and ionic environment, several salts with different crystallinity can form. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of NaCl and citrate on the characteristics of precipitates obtained from model solutions of calcium phosphate at pH 6·70 maintained constant or left to drift. The ion speciation calculations showed that all the starting solutions were supersaturated with respect to dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) in the order HAP>OCP>DCPD. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses of the precipitates showed that DCPD was formed at drifting pH (acidic final pH) whereas poor crystallised calcium deficient apatite was mainly formed at constant pH (6·70). Laser light scattering measurements and electron microscopy observations showed that citrate had a pronounced inhibitory effect on the crystallisation of calcium phosphates both at drifting and constant pH. This resulted in the decrease of the particle sizes and the modification of the morphology and the microstructure of the precipitates. The inhibitory effect of citrate mainly acted by the adsorption of the citrate molecules onto the surfaces of newly formed nuclei of calcium phosphate, thereby changing the morphology of the growing particles. These findings are relevant for the understanding of calcium phosphate precipitation from dairy byproducts that contain large amounts of NaCl and citrate. PMID:22559064

  9. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in

  10. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  11. Plume rise in a shear layer with neutral stability.

    PubMed

    Overcamp, Thomas J

    2005-05-01

    Several solutions have been published to predict the rise of buoyant plumes in a shear layer with a power-law velocity profile. Each of these solutions is either a special case or is based on oversimplifying assumptions. In this paper, solutions to the plume-rise equations are given for buoyant and nonbuoyant plumes with initial vertical momentum. Solutions are given for both point sources and sources with a finite initial size under neutral stability. For a constant wind speed, these solutions simplify to the conventional plume-rise equations.

  12. Modeling of neutral gas dynamics in high-density plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canupp, Patrick Wellington

    This thesis describes a physical model of chemically reactive neutral gas flow and discusses numerical solutions of this model for the flow in an inductively coupled plasma etch reactor. To obtain these solutions, this research develops an efficient, implicit numerical method. As a result of the enhanced numerical stability of the scheme, large time steps advance the solution from initial conditions to a final steady state in fewer iterations and with less computational expense than simpler explicit methods. This method would incorporate suitably as a module in currently existing large scale plasma simulation tools. In order to demonstrate the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis presents results from two simulations of flows that possess theoretical solutions. The first case is the inviscid flow of a gas through a converging nozzle. A comparison of the numerical solution to isentropic flow theory shows that the numerical technique capably captures the essential flow features of this environment. The second case is the Couette flow of a gas between two parallel plates. The simulation results compare well with the exact solution for this flow. After establishing the accuracy of the numerical technique, this thesis discusses results for the flow of chemically reactive gases in a chlorine plasma etch reactor. This research examines the influence of the plasma on the neutral gas and the dynamics exhibited by the neutral gas in the reactor. This research finds that the neutral gas temperature strongly depends on the rate at which inelastic, electron-impact dissociation reactions occur and on atomic chlorine wall recombination rates. Additionally, the neutral gas Aow in the reactor includes a significant mass flux of etch product from the wafer surface. Resolution of these effects is useful for neutral gas simulation. Finally, this thesis demonstrates that continuum fluid models provide reasonable accuracy for these low pressure reactor flows due to the fact

  13. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is a cutaway illustration of the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC ). The MSFC NBS provided an excellent environment for testing hardware to examine how it would operate in space and for evaluating techniques for space construction and spacecraft servicing. Here, engineers, designers, and astronauts performed various tests to develop basic concepts, preliminary designs, final designs, and crew procedures. The NBS was constructed of welded steel with polyester-resin coating. The water tank was 75-feet (22.9- meters) in diameter, 40-feet (12.2-meters) deep, and held 1.32 million gallons of water. Since it opened for operation in 1968, the NBS had supported a number of successful space missions, such as the Skylab, Solar Maximum Mission Satellite, Marned Maneuvering Unit, Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity/Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (EASE/ACCESS), the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Space Station. The function of the MSFC NBS was moved to the larger simulator at the Johnson Space Center and is no longer operational.

  14. Europa's Neutral Gas Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Mitchell, D. G.; McEntire, R. W.; Paranicas, C. P.; Roelof, E. C.; Williams, D. J.; Krimigis, S. M.; Lagg, A.

    2004-05-01

    In-situ energetic ion measurements from the Galileo spacecraft and remote energetic neutral atom (ENA) images from the Cassini spacecraft have been previously interpreted as revealing an unexpectedly massive torus of gas co-orbiting with Jupiter's moon Europa (Lagg et al., 2003; Mauk et al., 2003). Here we report on the results of detailed modeling of the ENA emission process from the Europa regions. Updates to the distribution and composition of the trapped energetic ion populations are included in the models, as are considerations of the partitioning of the gas products into multiple atomic and molecular species. Comparisons between the models and the Cassini observations reveal a torus with a total gas content equal to (0.5 +/- 0.2) E34 atoms plus molecules. This value is higher than, but within a factor of 3 of, an estimate inferred from a prediction of gas densities derived from Voyager plasma measurements and modeling of the interaction between the plasmas and the gases assumed to be emanating from Europa (Schreier et al., 1993). Lagg, A., N. Krupp, J. Woch, and D. J. Williams, Geophys. Res. Lett., 30, DOI 10.1029/2003GL017214, 2003. Mauk, B. H., D. G. Mitchell, S. M. Krimigs, E. C. Roelof, and C. P. Paranicas, Nature, 241, 920, 2003. Schreier, S., A. Eviatar, V. M. Vasyliunas, and J. D. Richardson, J. Geophys. Res., 98, 21231, 1993.

  15. Neutralization tests on the SERT 2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.; Domitz, S.

    1979-01-01

    Neutralization test data obtained on the SERT 2 spacecraft are presented. Tests included ion beam neutralization of a thruster by a close (normal design) neutralizer as well as by a distant (1 meter) neutralizer. Parameters affecting neutralization, such as neutralizer bias voltage, neutralizer anode voltage, local spacecraft plasma density, and solar array voltage configuration were varied and changes in plasma potentials were measured. A plasma model is presented as an approximation of observed results.

  16. Neutral point detection by satellites. [magnetospheric neutral sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, K.; Ness, N. F.

    1974-01-01

    The concept of a neutral point depends on the physical phenomena described. The regions with B less than about 1 gamma detected by Schindler and Ness may be interpreted as neutral regions for the ion-tearing process. The assumption of the presence of a multiple neutral point structure (with temporal variations) is still the most promising interpretation of the Explorer 34 data. Alternatives suggested by Russell lead to difficulties. Nevertheless, the final answer can come only from multiple satellite systems. A 1-day displacement of the day count in the data discussed by Schindler and Ness is corrected.

  17. Neutral behavior of shared polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew G.

    1997-01-01

    Several cases have been described in the literature where genetic polymorphism appears to be shared between a pair of species. Here we examine the distribution of times to random loss of shared polymorphism in the context of the neutral Wright–Fisher model. Order statistics are used to obtain the distribution of times to loss of a shared polymorphism based on Kimura’s solution to the diffusion approximation of the Wright–Fisher model. In a single species, the expected absorption time for a neutral allele having an initial allele frequency of ½ is 2.77 N generations. If two species initially share a polymorphism, that shared polymorphism is lost as soon as either of two species undergoes fixation. The loss of a shared polymorphism thus occurs sooner than loss of polymorphism in a single species and has an expected time of 1.7 N generations. Molecular sequences of genes with shared polymorphism may be characterized by the count of the number of sites that segregate in both species for the same nucleotides (or amino acids). The distribution of the expected numbers of these shared polymorphic sites also is obtained. Shared polymorphism appears to be more likely at genetic loci that have an unusually large number of segregating alleles, and the neutral coalescent proves to be very useful in determining the probability of shared allelic lineages expected by chance. These results are related to examples of shared polymorphism in the literature. PMID:9223256

  18. Environmental neutralization of polonium-218

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.D.; Hopke, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that two mechanisms of neutralization of the singly charged polonium ion exist. Charged Polonium-218 can be neutralized by reacting with oxygen to form a polonium oxide ion with a higher ionization potential than that of the polonium metal and then accepting an electron transferred from a lower ionization potential gas. In this present work, this mechanism has been verified by determining that the polonium oxide has an ionization potential in the range 10.35-10.53 eV. It was also previously reported that /sup 218/Po can be neutralized, in the absence of oxygen, by the scavenging of electrons by a trace gas such as water or nitrogen dioxide and their diffusion to the polonium ion. To verify this second neutralization mechanism, concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in nitrogen in the range of 50 ppb-1 ppm were examined for their ability to neutralize the polonium ion. Complete neutralization of /sup 218/Po was observed at nitrogen dioxide concentrations greater than 700 ppb. For concentrations below 700 ppb, the degree of neutralization was found to increase smoothly with the nitrogen dioxide concentration.

  19. Prediction of Neutral Salt Elution Profiles for Affinity Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Jack B.; Strottmann, James M.; Stellwagen, Earle

    1981-04-01

    Neutral salts exhibit very marked differences as eluants of proteins from affinity columns. We observe: (i) that the relative potencies of neutral salts as eluants are independent of the protein or the affinity ligand in the systems studied, (ii) that the absolute salt concentration necessary to elute any given protein bound to the affinity matrix is proportional to the algebraic sum of a set of elution coefficients defined herein for the separate ions present in the solution, and (iii) that the proportionality between elution potency and elution coefficient is a function of the affinity of the protein for the immobilized ligand. Given the concentration of one neutral salt required for elution of a protein of interest from an affinity column, the elution capability of any neutral salt at any temperature can be quantitatively predicted for that protein. Accordingly, application and elution protocols for affinity chromatography can be designed to optimize the yield and fold purification of proteins.

  20. Positional nystagmus showing neutral points.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Numata, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    We encountered patients who had their static direction-changing positional nystagmus canceled at about 20-30 degrees yaw head rotation from the supine position. This nystagmus was also canceled when the head was rotated 180 degrees from this position. We call these head positions neutral points. At the neutral points, the cupula of the horizontal semicircular canal of the affected ear is positioned vertical to the gravitational plane and no deflection of the cupula occurs. The positional nystagmus observed (except the neutral points) was thought to occur due to a "heavy cupula" or "light cupula", which may be determined by the specific gravity of its endolymph.

  1. Neutral current interactions in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, Alexandre; /Oxford U.

    2007-07-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) long-baseline experiment has been actively collecting beam data since 2005, having already accumulated 3 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target (POT). The several million neutrinos per year observed at the Near detector may improve the existing body of knowledge of neutrino cross-sections and the Near-Far comparison of the observed energy spectrum neutral current events constrains oscillations into sterile neutrinos. MINOS capabilities of observing neutral current neutrino events are described and the employed methodology for event selection is discussed, along with preliminary results obtained. An outlook on the expected neutral current related contributions from MINOS is also presented.

  2. [Neutral Medical Claim Management Committee].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Mitsuru

    2013-03-01

    The Ibaraki Medical Association established the Committee for Alternative Dispute Resolution called the Neutral Medical Claim Management Committee in 2006. Among 64 claims presented to the committee, 29 were settled through mediation or consultation. Patients were generally satisfied that their claims were considered fairly by the committee and that they were able to talk directly with healthcare professionals. However, some did not consider the committee to be completely neutral. The healthcare professionals involved rated the committee highly because they felt that the processes were neutral and no emotional aspects were involved. PMID:23617190

  3. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Laura E; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katie J; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J; Euler, Zelda; Burger, Judith A; Seaman, Michael S; Sanders, Rogier W; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Burton, Dennis R

    2015-08-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4) assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs) Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design. PMID:26267277

  4. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Laura E; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katie J; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J; Euler, Zelda; Burger, Judith A; Seaman, Michael S; Sanders, Rogier W; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Burton, Dennis R

    2015-08-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4) assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs) Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design.

  5. Compositional design and optimization of dentin adhesive with neutralization capability

    PubMed Central

    Song, Linyong; Ye, Qiang; Ge, Xueping; Spencer, Paulette

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this work was to investigate the polymerization behavior, neutralization capability, and mechanical properties of dentin adhesive formulations with the addition of the tertiary amine co-monomer, 2-N-morpholinoethyl methacrylate (MEMA). Methods A co-monomer mixture based on HEMA/BisGMA (45/55, w/w) was used as a control adhesive. Compared with the control formulation, the MEMA-containing adhesive formulations were characterized comprehensively with regard to water miscibility of liquid resin, water sorption and solubility of cured polymer, real-time photopolymerization kinetics, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC). The neutralization capacity was characterized by monitoring the pH shift of 1 mM lactic acid (LA) solution, in which the adhesive polymers were soaked. Results With increasing MEMA concentrations, experimental copolymers showed higher water sorption, lower glass transition temperature and lower crosslinking density compared to the control. The pH values of LA solution gradually increased from 3.5 to about 6.0–6.5 after 90 days. With the increase in crosslinking density of the copolymers, the neutralization rate was depressed. The optimal MEMA concentration was between 20 and 40 wt%. Conclusions As compared to the control, the results indicated that the MEMA-functionalized copolymer showed neutralization capability. The crosslinking density of the copolymer networks influenced the neutralization rate. PMID:26144189

  6. Neutral and Non-Neutral Evolution of Drosophila Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rand, D. M.; Dorfsman, M.; Kann, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    To test hypotheses of neutral evolution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), nucleotide sequences were determined for 1515 base pairs of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5) gene in the mitochondrial DNA of 29 lines of Drosophila melanogaster and 9 lines of its sibling species Drosophila simulans. In contrast to the patterns for nuclear genes, where D. melanogaster generally exhibits much less nucleotide polymorphism, the number of segregating sites was slightly higher in a global sample of nine ND5 sequences in D. melanogaster (s = 8) than in the nine lines of D. simulans (s = 6). When compared to variation at nuclear loci, the mtDNA variation in D. melanogaster does not depart from neutral expectations. The ND5 sequences in D. simulans, however, show fewer than half the number of variable sites expected under neutrality when compared to sequences from the period locus. While this reduction in variation is not significant at the 5% level, HKA tests with published restriction data for mtDNA in D. simulans do show a significant reduction of variation suggesting a selective sweep of variation in the mtDNA in this species. Tests of neutral evolution based on the ratios of synonymous and replacement polymorphism and divergence are generally consistent with neutral expectations, although a significant excess of amino acid polymorphism within both species is localized in one region of the protein. The rate of mtDNA evolution has been faster in D. melanogaster than in D. simulans and the population structure of mtDNA is distinct in these species. The data reveal how different rates of mtDNA evolution between species and different histories of neutral and adaptive evolution within species can compromise historical inferences in population and evolutionary biology. PMID:7851771

  7. Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation experiment is scheduled to be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission. The objective of this experiment is to measure very faint emissions at nighttime arising from fluxes of energetic neutral atoms in the thermosphere. These energetic atoms have energies ranging up to about 50 keV, and arise from ions of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen trapped in the inner magnetosphere. Some of these ions become neutralized in charge exchange reactions with neutral hydrogen in the hydrogen geocorona that extends through the region. The ions are trapped on magnetic field lines which cross the equatorial plane at 2 to 6 earth radii distance, and they mirror at a range of heights on these field lines, extending down to the thermosphere at 500 km altitude. The ATLAS 1 measurements will not be of the neutral atoms themselves but of the optical emission produced by those on trajectories that intersect the thermosphere. The ENAP measurements are to be made using the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) which is being flown on the ATLAS mission primarily for daytime spectral observations, and the ENAP measurements will all be nighttime measurements because of the faintness of the emissions and the relatively low level of magnetic activity expected.

  8. Spinning of hydroalcoholic chitosan solutions.

    PubMed

    Desorme, Mylène; Montembault, Alexandra; Lucas, Jean-Michel; Rochas, Cyrille; Bouet, Thierry; David, Laurent

    2013-10-15

    We investigated the spinning of hydroalcoholic chitosan solutions. The dope composition was optimized in order to obtain a continuous alcogel fiber by water evaporation on heating the extruded hydroalcoholic solution. This alcogel fiber was then neutralized in aqueous alkali baths and washed in water to eliminate the residual alcohol and salts before final drying. Depending on the alcohol content in the filament at the neutralization step, on specific alcohol-chitosan interactions and on the nature and concentration of the coagulation base, the process yielded semicrystalline chitosan fibers with different proportions of anhydrous and hydrated allomorphs. Contrarily to the classical annealing method, the formation of mainly anhydrous crystals was obtained without significant molecular weight decrease by neutralizing the polymer in hydrophobic conditions. The control of allomorph content was shown to be related to the hydrophobicity of the solvent (alcohol fraction) at the neutralization step.

  9. Modeling of the coupled magnetospheric and neutral wind dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thayer, Jeffrey P.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the progress made in the first year of NASA Grant No. NAGW-3508 entitled 'Modeling of the Coupled Magnetospheric and Neutral Wind Dynamos.' The approach taken has been to impose magnetospheric boundary conditions with either pure voltage or current characteristics and solve the neutral wind dynamo equation under these conditions. The imposed boundary conditions determine whether the neutral wind dynamo will contribute to the high-latitude current system or the electric potential. The semi-annual technical report, dated December 15, 1993, provides further detail describing the scientific and numerical approach of the project. The numerical development has progressed and the dynamo solution for the case when the magnetosphere acts as a voltage source has been evaluated completely using spectral techniques. The simulation provides the field-aligned current distribution at high latitudes due to the neutral wind dynamo. A number of geophysical conditions can be simulated to evaluate the importance of the neutral wind dynamo contribution to the field-aligned current system. On average, field-aligned currents generated by the neutral wind dynamo contributed as much as 30 percent to the large-scale field-aligned current system driven by the magnetosphere. A term analysis of the high-latitude neutral wind dynamo equation describing the field aligned current distribution has also been developed to illustrate the important contributing factors involved in the process. The case describing the neutral dynamo response for a magnetosphere acting as a pure current generator requires the existing spectral code to be extended to a pseudo-spectral method and is currently under development.

  10. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... resolution proceeding. A neutral shall have no official, financial, or personal conflict of interest with... Dispute Resolution § 502.404 Neutrals. (a) A neutral may be a permanent or temporary officer or employee... Maritime Commission Dispute Resolution Specialist will seek to provide a neutral in dispute...

  11. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... resolution proceeding. A neutral shall have no official, financial, or personal conflict of interest with... Dispute Resolution § 502.404 Neutrals. (a) A neutral may be a permanent or temporary officer or employee... Maritime Commission Dispute Resolution Specialist will seek to provide a neutral in dispute...

  12. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... resolution proceeding. A neutral shall have no official, financial, or personal conflict of interest with... Dispute Resolution § 502.404 Neutrals. (a) A neutral may be a permanent or temporary officer or employee... Maritime Commission Dispute Resolution Specialist will seek to provide a neutral in dispute...

  13. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... resolution proceeding. A neutral shall have no official, financial, or personal conflict of interest with... Dispute Resolution § 502.404 Neutrals. (a) A neutral may be a permanent or temporary officer or employee... Maritime Commission Dispute Resolution Specialist will seek to provide a neutral in dispute...

  14. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... resolution proceeding. A neutral shall have no official, financial, or personal conflict of interest with... Dispute Resolution § 502.404 Neutrals. (a) A neutral may be a permanent or temporary officer or employee... Maritime Commission Dispute Resolution Specialist will seek to provide a neutral in dispute...

  15. A Re-Examiniation of Phonological Neutralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinnsen, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews research studies that raise serious questions about phonological neutralization, that is, the merger of a contrast in certain contexts. Some findings cast doubt on the very existence of neutralization and the correctness of the theoretical principles that make assumptions based on neutralization. Reanalyzes neutralization in light of these…

  16. Effect of calcium chloride solution immersion on surface hardness of restorative glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Maho; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Uo, Motohiro

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the concentration of calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution on the surface hardness of restorative glass ionomer cements (GICs). Two high-viscosity GICs, Fuji IX GP and GlasIonomer FX-II, were immersed in several concentrations of CaCl2 solution for 1 day and 1 week. The immersed specimen surfaces were evaluated using microhardness testing, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Immersion in a higher concentration of CaCl2 solution produced a greater increase in the surface hardness. No crystalline substance was observed on the immersed surface. Calcium ions were selectively absorbed in the matrix of the GIC surface after immersion. They reacted with the non-reacted carboxylic acid groups remaining in the cement matrix. These reactions were considered to cause an increase in the surface hardness of the GICs.

  17. Effect of non-reacting gases on the flash methanolysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Mikesell, P.C.; Chandavarkar, A.S.; Rahaman, R.S.

    1985-08-01

    The effects of system pressure, coal particle size, helium and nitrogen concentration in the feed gas, and methane to coal feed ratio on the yields of ethylene and benzen-toluene-xylene (BTX) in the flash methanolysis of coal were investigated. Experiments were conducted in an 8-foot long, 1-inch diameter entrained downflow tubular reactor. Higher ethylene yields were observed at a lower pressure, a smaller coal particle size, and higher methane to coal ratios. Any effect of the addition of nitrogen or helium to the feed gas on ethylene yield was masked by the standard error involved in the experimental procedure. None of the variables studied has a significant effect on BTX yields. The flash methanolysis process is transport limited and not equilibrium controlled. The overall process is exothermic; the heat of reaction correlates with the ratio of methane converted to coal converted. A preliminary economic analysis indicates that the process is not currently viable. 26 refs., 10 figs., 24 tabs.

  18. Computations of non-reacting and reacting viscous blunt body flows, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C. P.

    1973-01-01

    Computer programs for calculating the flow distribution in the nose region of a blunt body at arbitrary speed and altitude are discussed. The programs differ from each other in their ability to consider either thin shock or thick shock conditions and in the use of either ideal, equilibrium air, or nonequilibrium air chemistry. The application of the programs to analyzing the flow distribution around the nose of the shuttle orbiter during reentry is reported.

  19. Simulations of Turbulent Momentum and Scalar Transport in Non-Reacting Confined Swirling Coaxial Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical simulations of confined three-dimensional coaxial water jets. The objectives are to validate the newly proposed nonlinear turbulence models of momentum and scalar transport, and to evaluate the newly introduced scalar APDF and DWFDF equation along with its Eulerian implementation in the National Combustion Code (NCC). Simulations conducted include the steady RANS, the unsteady RANS (URANS), and the time-filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS); both without and with invoking the APDF or DWFDF equation. When the APDF (ensemble averaged probability density function) or DWFDF (density weighted filtered density function) equation is invoked, the simulations are of a hybrid nature, i.e., the transport equations of energy and species are replaced by the APDF or DWFDF equation. Results of simulations are compared with the available experimental data. Some positive impacts of the nonlinear turbulence models and the Eulerian scalar APDF and DWFDF approach are observed.

  20. Gas and drop behavior in reacting and non-reacting air-blast atomizer sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonell, Vincent G.; Samuelsen, Scott

    1991-01-01

    A detailed study of the two-phase flow produced by a gas-turbine air-blast atomizer is performed with the goal of identifying the interaction between the two phases for both nonreacting and reacting conditions. A two-component phase Doppler interferometry is utilized to characterize three flowfields produced by the atomizer: (1) the single-phase flow, (2) the two-phase nonreacting spray, and (3) the two-phase reacting spray. Measurements of the mean and fluctuating axial and azimuthal velocities for each phase are obtained. In addition, the droplet size distribution, volume flux, and concentration are measured. The results reveal the strong influence of the dispersed phase on the gas, and the influence of reaction on both the gas and the droplet field. The presence of the spray significantly alters the inlet condition of the atomizer. With this alteration quantified, it is possible to deduce that the inertia associated with the dispersed phase damps the fluctuating velocities of the gas. Reaction reduces the volume flux of the droplets, broadens the local volume distribution of the droplets in the region of the reaction zone, increases the axial velocities and radial spread of the gas, and increases the anisotropy in the region of the reaction zone.

  1. Comparison of reacting and non-reacting shear layers at a high subsonic Mach number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. T.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.; Jones, R. A.; Smith, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The flow field in a hydrogen-fueled planar reacting shear layer was measured with an LDV system and is compared with a similar air to air case without combustion. Measurements were made with a speed ratio of 0.34 with the highspeed stream at Mach 0.71. They show that the shear layer with reaction grows faster than one without, and both cases are within the range of data scatter presented by the established database. The coupling between the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulence components inside the shear layer is slow, and reaction only increased it slightly. However, a more organized pattern of the Reynolds stress is present in the reacting shear layer, possibly as a result of larger scale structure formation in the layer associated with heat release.

  2. An experimental investigation of the properties of a non-reacting, supersonic shear layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wantuck, P.J.; Tennant, R.E.; Rothstein, A.D.; Watanabe, H.H.

    1990-01-01

    A shear layer formed by the merging of two different mass density and velocity, supersonic, inert gas streams (Ar and He) was investigated using both intrusive (probes) and non-intrusive (laser-based) techniques. Interpretations based upon mean pitot pressure surveys, namely shear layer growth rate and compressibility agree with established data. An aspirating probe in conjunction with a mass spectrometer comprised a gas sampling system for ultimately obtaining concentration profiles. Rapid scanning of such flows is possible with such a technique but additional efforts are required to make quantitative concentration assignments. The technique does, however, provide a means of qualitatively assessing mixing rates. Finally planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to establish spatially and temporally resolved images of the shear layer. Obtained images demonstrate the usefulness of PLIF to qualitatively monitor turbulent mixing phenomena in supersonic flows. 17 refs., 14 figs.

  3. Coarse-Grid Simulation of Reacting and Non-Reacting Gas-Particle Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Loezos, Peter N.; Srivastava, Anuj; Sundaresan, Sankaran

    2001-11-06

    The principal goal of our project, funded under the DOE Vision 21 Virtual Demonstration Initiative is virtual demonstration of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) performance. Virtual demonstration of CFB performance requires modeling and simulation of the entire spectrum of gas-particle flow conditions ranging from dense phase flows in standpipes to dilute phase flow conditions of risers. We had proposed a virtual demonstration tool, which is based on the open-domain Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchange), originally developed at NETL (National Energy Technology Laboratory). MFIX is based on a model framework in which the gas and particle phases are treated as interpenetrating continua. The general structure of Eulerian equations of motion for each of the phases is well understood, although specific constitutive equations describing the rheological behavior of gas-particle suspensions are still being developed. MFIX includes the capability to carry out reactive flow simulations, so the tool that we have set out to develop will permit both cold flow and reactive flow simulations. The principal challenge funded through this grant is to devise and implement in MFIX sound physical models for the rheological characteristics of the gas-particle mixtures. The volume fraction of particles in dense fluidized beds, standpipes and valves is usually sufficiently large that the particles make enduring contact with multiple neighbors. In such instances, stress transmission between particles, and between particles and bounding solid surfaces occurs predominantly through frictional interactions. In this regime of flow, when the strength of frictional interaction between particles becomes sufficiently weak, flow of gas-solid suspension becomes unstable and a bubbly suspension results. Once formed, these bubbles dictate the macroscale flow characteristics, and therefore detailed CFD simulation of suspensions in this regime should account for the dynamics associated with the gas bubbles. This is possible only if frictional stresses are modeled properly. One of the objectives of our research is to develop a robust scheme for capturing the frictional stresses and a methodology to determine experimentally the parameters in such a model. We have now developed and implemented in MFIX a constitutive model for the rheology of granular materials in the dense, friction-dominated regime, and have shown that the key parameters in the frictional model can be estimated from fluidization-defluidization experiments. Such experiments have been performed with many different particle systems to demonstrate the viability of the procedure and the model itself. The second objective of our research is to develop methodologies for practical simulation of gas particle flows in fast-fluidized beds and risers, where the particle concentration is typically in the range of 1-30 vol %. In our past research, we have shown that meso-scale structures that take the form of clusters and streamers, which have been observed in risers, can be captured qualitatively through transient integration of continuum equations for the gas and particle phases. These structures arise as a result of two instability mechanisms, both of which are accounted for in a rheological model deduced in the literature by adapting the kinetic theory of gases to gas-particle mixtures. These meso-scale structures are too small in size to be resolved in simulations of flow in large process vessels, and are invariably invisible in the coarse-grid simulations. Yet, they affect the flow characteristics profoundly; in particular, they alter the effective interaction force that couples the gas and particle phases, and dramatically increase the effective viscosities of the two phases. We had proposed to develop a more practical approach, where we simulate the dynamics of only the large clusters using coarse grids and account for the effects of smaller, unresolved clusters through suitable sub-grid approximations. Specifically, we had proposed to develop such sub-grid models and implement them into our virtual demonstration tool. To this end, we have carried out computational experiments which involve highly resolved simulations of meso-scale structures arising in dilute gas-solid flows, from which we have developed a sub-grid model to capture the effects of these structures in coarse-grid simulations of riser flows. We have also examined the role of meso-scale structures on gas dispersion in gas-particle flows, so that one can begin to interpret tracer gas dispersion data. We found that macro-scale dispersion characteristics are governed by the macro-scale velocity and concentration fluctuations which are resolved in coarse-grid simulations. Consequently, a coarse-grid simulation of flow and dispersion only requires hydrodynamic sub-grid models and the sub-grid correction for the dispersion process only has a small influence.

  4. COARSE-GRID SIMULATION OF REACTING AND NON-REACTING GAS-PARTICLE FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran Sundaresan

    2004-03-01

    The principal goal of this project, funded under the ''DOE Vision 21 Virtual Demonstration Initiative'' is virtual demonstration of circulating fluidized bed performance. We had proposed a ''virtual demonstration tool'', which is based on the open-domain CFD code MFIX. The principal challenge funded through this grant is to devise and implement in this CFD code sound physical models for the rheological characteristics of the gas-particle mixtures. Within the past year, which was the third year of the project, we have made the following specific advances. (a) We have completed a study of the impact of sub-grid models of different levels of detail on the results obtained in coarse-grid simulations of gas-particle flow. (b) We have also completed a study of a model problem to understand the effect of wall friction, which was proved in our earlier work to be very important for stable operation of standpipes in a circulating fluidized bed circuit. These are described in a greater detail in this report.

  5. PDX neutral beam reionization losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Dylla, H.F.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Moore, R.; Schilling, G.; Stuart, L.D.; Von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1982-04-01

    Reionization losses for 1.5 MW H /sup 0/ and 2 MW D /sup 0/ neutral beams injected into the PDX tokamak were studied using pressure gauges, phototransistors, thermocouples, surface shielding, and surface sample analysis. Considerable outgassing of conventionally prepared 304 SS ducts occurred during initial injections and gradually decreased with the cumulative absorption of beam power. Reionization power losses are presently about 5% in the ducts and about 12% total for a beamline including the duct. Present duct pressures are attributed primarily to gas from the ion source and neutralizer with much smaller contributions from residual wall desorption. Physical mechanisms for the observed duct outgassing are discussed.

  6. ATF neutral beam injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Morris, R.N.; Edmonds, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility is a stellarator torsatron being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate improved plasma confinement schemes. Plasmas heating will be carried out predominantly by means of neutral beam injection. This paper describes the basic parameters of the injection system. Numerical calculations were done to optimize the aiming of the injectors. The results of these calculations and their implications on the neutral power to the machine are elaborated. The effects of improving the beam optics and altering the focal length on the power transmitted to the plasma are discussed.

  7. Time reversal violation for entangled neutral mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabeu, J.

    2014-07-23

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique solution for the test of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and φ, Factories. The two quantum effects of the decays as filtering measurements of the meson states and the transfer of information of the first decay to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of “in” and “out” states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system. The perspectives for future additional studies of TRV are discussed.

  8. MSFC Skylab neutral buoyancy simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of a neutral buoyancy simulator for developing extravehicular activity systems and for training astronauts in weightless activities is discussed. The construction of the facility and the operations are described. The types of tests and the training activities conducted in the simulator are reported. Photographs of the components of the simulator and actual training exercises are included.

  9. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, J.H.; Frank, A.M.

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment is disclosed. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process. 2 figs.

  10. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H. [Livermore, CA; Frank, Alan M. [Livermore, CA

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process.

  11. RE: Pedagogy--After Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    I'Anson, John

    2010-01-01

    Within the UK and in many parts of the world, official accounts of what it is to make sense of religion are framed within a rhetorics of neutrality in which such study is premised upon the possibility of dispassionate engagement and analysis. This paper, which is largely theoretical in scope, explores both the affordances and the costs of such an…

  12. Self-neutralized ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Nikolaev, A.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Spaedtke, P.; Yu, K. M.; Brown, I. G.

    2011-10-15

    A vacuum arc ion source provides high current beams of metal ions that have been used both for accelerator injection and for ion implantation, and in both of these applications the degree of space charge neutralization of the beam is important. In accelerator injection application, the beam from the ion source may be accelerated further (post-acceleration), redirected by a bending magnet(s), or focused with magnetic or electrostatic lenses, and knowledge of the beam space charge is needed for optimal design of the optical elements. In ion implantation application, any build-up of positive charge in the insulating targets must be compensated by a simultaneous flux of cold electrons so as to provide overall charge neutrality of the target. We show that in line-of-sight ion implantation using a vacuum arc ion source, the high current ion beam carries along its own background sea of cold electrons, and this copious source of electrons provides a ''self-neutralizing'' feature to the beam. Here we describe experiments carried out in order to demonstrate this effect, and we provide an analysis showing that the beam is space-charge-neutralized to a very high degree.

  13. Electrostatic attraction between overall neutral surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adar, Ram M.; Andelman, David; Diamant, Haim

    2016-08-01

    Two overall neutral surfaces with positively and negatively charged domains ("patches") have been shown in recent experiments to exhibit long-range attraction when immersed in an ionic solution. Motivated by the experiments, we calculate analytically the osmotic pressure between such surfaces within the Poisson-Boltzmann framework, using a variational principle for the surface-averaged free energy. The electrostatic potential, calculated beyond the linear Debye-Hückel theory, yields an overall attraction at large intersurface separations, over a wide range of the system's controlled length scales. In particular, the attraction is stronger and occurs at smaller separations for surface patches of larger size and charge density. In this large patch limit, we find that the attraction-repulsion crossover separation is inversely proportional to the square of the patch-charge density and to the Debye screening length.

  14. Electrostatic attraction between overall neutral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Adar, Ram M; Andelman, David; Diamant, Haim

    2016-08-01

    Two overall neutral surfaces with positively and negatively charged domains ("patches") have been shown in recent experiments to exhibit long-range attraction when immersed in an ionic solution. Motivated by the experiments, we calculate analytically the osmotic pressure between such surfaces within the Poisson-Boltzmann framework, using a variational principle for the surface-averaged free energy. The electrostatic potential, calculated beyond the linear Debye-Hückel theory, yields an overall attraction at large intersurface separations, over a wide range of the system's controlled length scales. In particular, the attraction is stronger and occurs at smaller separations for surface patches of larger size and charge density. In this large patch limit, we find that the attraction-repulsion crossover separation is inversely proportional to the square of the patch-charge density and to the Debye screening length. PMID:27627373

  15. Neutral-current detectors for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Hime, A.; SNO Collaboration

    1997-09-01

    With its heavy water target, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory has the unique opportunity to measure both the {sup 8}B flux of electron neutrinos from the Sun and the flux of all active neutrino species independently, thus offering a direct and model-independent test of a neutrino oscillation solution to the solar neutrino problem. The authors report on the physics intent and design of a discrete method of neutral-current detection in the Sudbury neutrino observatory that will utilize ultra-low background {sup 3}He proportional counters dispersed throughout the heavy water volume. Projections of background in all components of the detector are considered in an analysis of the ability to extract the neutral-current signal and the neutral-current to charged-current ratio.

  16. Wastewater neutralization control based on fuzzy logic: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Adroer, M.; Alsina, A.; Aumatell, J.; Poch, M.

    1999-07-01

    Many industrial wastes contain acidic or alkaline materials that require neutralization of previous discharge into receiving waters or to chemical and biological treatment plants. The control of the wastewater neutralization process is subjected to several difficulties, such as the highly nonlinear titration curve (with special sensitivity around neutrality), the unknown water composition, the variable buffering capacity of the system, and the changes in input loading. To deal with these problems, this study proposes a fixed fuzzy logic controller (FLC) structure coupled with a tuning factor. The versatility and robustness of this controller has been proved when faced with solutions of variable buffering capacity, with acids that cover a wide pK range and with switches between acids throughout the course of a test. Laboratory experiments and simulation runs using the proposed controller were successful in a wide operational range.

  17. Feasibility study of launch vehicle ground cloud neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderarend, P. C.; Stoy, S. T.; Kranyecz, T. E.

    1976-01-01

    The distribution of hydrogen chloride in the cloud was analyzed as a function of launch pad geometry and rate of rise of the vehicle during the first 24 sec of burn in order to define neutralization requirements. Delivery systems of various types were developed in order to bring the proposed chemical agents in close contact with the hydrogen chloride. Approximately one-third of the total neutralizing agent required can be delivered from a ground installed system at the launch pad; concentrated sodium carbonate solution is the preferred choice of agent for this launch pad system. Two-thirds of the neutralization requirement appears to need delivery by aircraft. Only one chemical agent (ammonia) may be reasonably considered for delivery by aircraft, because weight and bulk of all other agents are too large.

  18. Uranium mill tailings neutralization: contaminant complexation and tailings leaching studies

    SciTech Connect

    Opitz, B.E.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1985-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to compare the effectiveness of limestone (CaCO/sub 3/) and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)/sub 2/) for improving waste water quality through the neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings liquor. The experiments were designed to also assess the effects of three proposed mechanisms - carbonate complexation, elevated pH, and colloidal particle adsorption - on the solubility of toxic contaminants found in a typical uranium mill waste solution. Of special interest were the effects each of these possible mechanisms had on the solution concentrations of trace metals such as Cd, Co, Mo, Zn, and U after neutralization. Results indicated that the neutralization of acidic tailings to a pH of 7.3 using hydrated lime provided the highest overall waste water quality. Both the presence of a carbonate source or elevating solution pH beyond pH = 7.3 resulted in a lowering of previously achieved water quality, while adsorption of contaminants onto colloidal particles was not found to affect the solution concentration of any constituent investigated. 24 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs.

  19. Measurement of plasma production and neutralization in gas neutralizers

    SciTech Connect

    Maor, D.; Meron, M.; Johnson, B.; Jones, K.; Agagu, A.; Hu, B.

    1986-06-17

    In order to satisfy the need of experimental data for the designing of gas neutralizers we have started a project aimed at measuring all relevant cross sections for the charge exchange of H/sup -/, H/sup 0/ and H/sup +/ projectiles, as well as the cross sections for the production of ions in the target. The expected results of these latter measurements are shown schematically.

  20. Biological neutralization of chlor-alkali industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rakeshkumar M; Mody, Kalpana H; Keshri, Jitendra; Jha, Bhavanath

    2011-11-01

    The present work reports biological neutralization of chlor-alkali industrial effluent by an alkaliphilic bacterium, isolated from the Gujarat coast, which was identified as Enterococcus faecium strain R-5 on the basis of morphological, biochemical and partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The isolate was capable of bringing down the pH of waste water from 12.0 to 7.0 within 3 h in the presence of carbon and nitrogen sources, with simultaneous reduction in total dissolved solutes (TDS) up to 19-22%. This bacterium produced carboxylic acid, as revealed by FT-IR analysis, which facilitated neutralization of alkaline effluent. The presence of unconventional raw materials viz. Madhuca indica flowers or sugar cane bagasse as carbon and nitrogen sources could effectively neutralize alkaline effluent and thus making the bioremediation process economically viable. The time required for neutralization varied with size of inoculum. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on biological neutralization of a chlor-alkali industrial effluent.

  1. Biological neutralization of chlor-alkali industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rakeshkumar M; Mody, Kalpana H; Keshri, Jitendra; Jha, Bhavanath

    2011-11-01

    The present work reports biological neutralization of chlor-alkali industrial effluent by an alkaliphilic bacterium, isolated from the Gujarat coast, which was identified as Enterococcus faecium strain R-5 on the basis of morphological, biochemical and partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The isolate was capable of bringing down the pH of waste water from 12.0 to 7.0 within 3 h in the presence of carbon and nitrogen sources, with simultaneous reduction in total dissolved solutes (TDS) up to 19-22%. This bacterium produced carboxylic acid, as revealed by FT-IR analysis, which facilitated neutralization of alkaline effluent. The presence of unconventional raw materials viz. Madhuca indica flowers or sugar cane bagasse as carbon and nitrogen sources could effectively neutralize alkaline effluent and thus making the bioremediation process economically viable. The time required for neutralization varied with size of inoculum. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on biological neutralization of a chlor-alkali industrial effluent. PMID:21944194

  2. Proton electroinsertion in self-assembled materials for neutralization pseudocapacitors.

    PubMed

    Facci, Tiago; Gomes, Wellington J A S; Bravin, Bruno; Araújo, Diógenes M; Huguenin, Fritz

    2014-01-14

    We propose novel pseudocapacitors that can store energy related to the partial entropy change associated with proton concentration variations following neutralization reactions. In this situation, it is possible to obtain electrochemical energy after the complete charge/discharge cycle conducted in electrolytic solutions with different proton concentrations. To this end, we prepared modified electrodes from phosphomolybdic acid (PMA), poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS), and polyallylamine (PAH) by the layer-by-layer (LbL) method and investigated their electrochemical behavior, aiming to use them in these neutralization pseudocapacitors. We analyzed the potentiodynamic profile of the current density at several scan rates, to evaluate the reversibility of the proton electroinsertion process, which is crucial to maximum energy storage efficiency. On the basis of the proposed reaction mechanism and by using frequency-domain measurements and models, we determined rate constants at different potentials. Our results demonstrated that the conducting polymer affects the self-assembled matrixes, ensuring that energy storage is high (22.5 kJ mol(-1)). The process involved neutralization of a hydrochloric acid solution from pH = 1 to pH = 6, which corresponds to 40% of the neutralization enthalpy.

  3. Rocket Experiment For Neutral Upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenward, D. R.; Lessard, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from the CHAMP satellite from 2004 show relatively small scale heating in the thermosphere. Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. The RENU 2 rocket mission includes a suite of 14 instruments which will acquire data to help understand processes involved in neutral upwelling in the cusp. Neutral, ion, and electron measurements will be made to provide an assessment of the upwelling process. SUPERDarn measurements of large- scale Joule heating in the cusp during overflight will also be acquired. Small-scale data which could possibly be associated with Alfvén waves, will be acquired using onboard electric field measurements. In-situ measurement of precipitating electrons and all other measurements will be used in thermodynamic and electrodynamic models for comparison to the observed upwelling.

  4. Sq Currents and Neutral Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between ionospheric dynamo currents and neutral winds is examined using the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamic General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM). The simulation is run for May and June 2009 with variable neutral winds but with constant solar and magnetospheric energy inputs, which ensures that day-to-day changes in the solar quiet (Sq) current system arise only from lower atmospheric forcing. The intensity and focus position of the simulated Sq current system exhibit large day-to-day variability, as is also seen in ground magnetometer data. We show how the day-to-day variation of the Sq current system relate to variable winds at various altitudes, latitudes, and longitudes.

  5. Neutral depletion versus repletion due to ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Makrinich, G.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Liard, L.; Rax, J.-M.; Chabert, P.

    2008-05-15

    Recent theoretical analyses which predicted unexpected effects of neutral depletion in both collisional and collisionless plasmas are reviewed. We focus on the depletion of collisionless neutrals induced by strong ionization of a collisionless plasma and contrast this depletion with the effect of strong ionization on thermalized neutrals. The collisionless plasma is analyzed employing a kinetic description. The collisionless neutrals and the plasma are coupled through volume ionization and wall recombination only. The profiles of density and pressure both of the plasma and of the neutral-gas and the profile of the ionization rate are calculated. It is shown that for collisionless neutrals the ionization results in neutral depletion, while when neutrals are thermalized the ionization induces a maximal neutral-density at the discharge center, which we call neutral repletion. The difference between the two cases stems from the relation between the neutral density and pressure. The pressure of the collisionless neutral-gas turns out to be maximal where its density is minimal, in contrast to the case of a thermalized neutral gas.

  6. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  7. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  8. Neutral-current x-distributions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Friedman, J. I.; Kendall, H. W.; Bogert, D.; Burnstein, R.; Fisk, R.; Fuess, S.; Bofill, J.; Busza, W.; Eldridge, T.; Abolins, M.; Brock, R.; et al.

    1984-06-01

    The role of the semi leptonic neutral current interaction as a probe of nucleon structure is examined. Previous measurements of neutral current x-distributions are reviewed, and new results from the Fermilab - MIT - MSU collaboration are presented.

  9. Asymptotic stability of second-order neutral stochastic differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Ren, Yong; Kim, Hyunsoo

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we study the existence and asymptotic stability in pth moment of mild solutions to second-order nonlinear neutral stochastic differential equations. Further, this result is extended to establish stability criterion for stochastic equations with impulsive effects. With the help of fixed point strategy, stochastic analysis technique, and semigroup theory, a set of novel sufficient conditions are derived for achieving the required result. Finally, an example is provided to illustrate the obtained result.

  10. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  11. Simulations of Moist Nearly Neutral Flow over a Ridge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miglietta, M. M.; Rotunno, R.

    2005-05-01

    Although a fairly common atmospheric condition in orographic-rain scenarios, there is relatively little known about moist neutral flows over a ridge from theory and modeling. Presented in this paper are numerical simulations of the orographic-flow modification occurring for a two-dimensional moist nearly neutral flow over a ridge in the regime where the Coriolis force can be neglected. If an initially saturated moist neutral flow were to remain everywhere saturated as it flows over an obstacle, then the expected solution would be the linear solution because the condition for linearity (hill height less than the ambient wind velocity/static stability) is always met. However, for higher mountains, the solutions indicate the development of areas of unsaturated air, with correspondingly larger values of local static stability. This internal switching from small to large values of static stability is an inherent nonlinearity, which has far-reaching consequences for understanding the orographic-flow modification in this regime. The sensitivity of the solution to the mountain height and to the initial cloud water content is analyzed here. The authors find that the solutions fall into three basic categories. If the mountain height is small enough, a saturated flow can be maintained everywhere given sufficient initial cloud water; for tall mountains the atmosphere upwind of the mountain is maintained in a saturated state and transitions to an unsaturated downslope flow on the lee side, which has characteristics associated with downslope windstorms; for mountains of intermediate height, the solutions show the existence of an upwind-propagating disturbance that has the effect of desaturating the atmosphere above the mountain.

  12. Priming Effects for Affective vs. Neutral Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Leslie A.; Rabin, Laura; Wyatt, Gwinne; Frohlich, Jonathan; Vardy, Susan B.; Dimitri, Diana

    2005-01-01

    Affective and Neutral Tasks (faces with negative or neutral content, with different lighting and orientation) requiring reaction time judgments of poser identity were administered to 32 participants. Speed and accuracy were better for the Affective than Neutral Task, consistent with literature suggesting facilitation of performance by affective…

  13. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jinchoon

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline employing direct energy recovery of unneutralized residual ions is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell, and thus improves the overall neutral beamline efficiency. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beam direction in the neutral izer exit region. The ions which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be loosely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell are reflected onto and collected at an interior wall of the neutralizer formed by the modified end geometry, and thus do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell. Electrons within the neutralizer are prevented from exiting the neutralizer end opening by the action of crossed fields drift (ExB) and are terminated to a collector collar around the downstream opening of the neutralizer. The correct combination of the extended neutralizer end structure and the magnet region is designed so as to maximize the exit of full energy ions and to contain the fractional energy ions.

  14. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  15. The Net Neutrality Debate: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Rich

    2006-01-01

    Rich Greenfield examines the basics of today's net neutrality debate that is likely to be an ongoing issue for society. Greenfield states the problems inherent in the definition of "net neutrality" used by Common Cause: "Network neutrality is the principle that Internet users should be able to access any web content they choose and use any…

  16. Relativistic confinement of neutral fermions with a trigonometric tangent potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Luis B.; de Castro, Antonio S.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of neutral fermions subject to a pseudoscalar potential is investigated. Apart from the solutions for E = ±mc2, the problem is mapped into the Sturm-Liouville equation. The case of a singular trigonometric tangent potential (~tan γx) is exactly solved and the complete set of solutions is discussed in some detail. It is revealed that this intrinsically relativistic and true confining potential is able to localize fermions into a region of space arbitrarily small without the menace of particle-antiparticle production.

  17. Microstates of a neutral black hole in M theory.

    PubMed

    Emparan, Roberto; Horowitz, Gary T

    2006-10-01

    We consider vacuum solutions in M theory of the form of a five-dimensional Kaluza-Klein black hole cross T6. In a certain limit, these include the five-dimensional neutral rotating black hole (cross T6). From a type-IIA standpoint, these solutions carry D0 and D6 charges. We show that there is a simple D-brane description which precisely reproduces the Hawking-Bekenstein entropy in the extremal limit, even though supersymmetry is completely broken. PMID:17155239

  18. Nonlinear neutral inclusions: assemblages of coated ellipsoids

    PubMed Central

    Bolaños, Silvia Jiménez; Vernescu, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    The problem of determining nonlinear neutral inclusions in (electrical or thermal) conductivity is considered. Neutral inclusions, inserted in a matrix containing a uniform applied electric field, do not disturb the field outside the inclusions. The well-known Hashin-coated sphere construction is an example of a neutral inclusion. In this paper, we consider the problem of constructing neutral inclusions from nonlinear materials. In particular, we discuss assemblages of coated ellipsoids. The proposed construction is neutral for a given applied field. PMID:26064633

  19. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Joseph

    2010-05-21

    Ion beam emission/neutralization is one of the most fundamental problems in spacecraft plasma interactions and electric propulsion. Although ion beam neutralization is readily achieved in experiments, the understanding of the underlying physical process remains at a rather primitive level. No theoretical or simulation models have convincingly explained the detailed neutralization mechanism, and no conclusions have been reached. This paper presents a fully kinetic simulation of ion beam neutralization and plasma beam propagation and discusses the physics of electron-ion coupling and the resulting propagation of a neutralized mesothermal plasma.

  20. Space station neutral external environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, H.; Leger, L.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular contamination levels arising from the external induced neutral environment of the Space Station (Phase 1 configuration) were calculated using the MOLFLUX model. Predicted molecular column densities and deposition rates generally meet the Space Station contamination requirements. In the doubtful cases of deposition due to materials outgassing, proper material selection, generally excluding organic products exposed to the external environment, must be considered to meet contamination requirements. It is important that the Space Station configuration, once defined, is not significantly modified to avoid introducing new unacceptable contamination sources.

  1. Neutral gas dynamics in fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-06-01

    Fireballs are local discharge phenomena on positively biased electrodes in partially ionized plasmas. Electrons, energized at a double layer, heat neutral gas which expands. The gas pressure exceeds the plasma pressure, hence becomes important to the stability and transport in fireballs. The flow of gas moves the electrode and sensors similar to a mica pendulum. Flow speed and directions are measured. A fireball gun has been developed to partially collimate the flow of hot gas and heat objects in its path. New applications of fireballs are suggested.

  2. Advanced neutral-beam technology

    SciTech Connect

    Berkner, K.H.

    1980-09-01

    Extensive development will be required to achieve the 50- to 75-MW, 175- to 200-keV, 5- to 10-sec pulses of deuterium atoms envisioned for ETF and INTOR. Multi-megawatt injector systems are large (and expansive); they consist of large vacuum tanks with many square meters of cryogenic pumping panels, beam dumps capable of dissipating several megawatts of un-neutralized beam, bending magnets, electrical power systems capable of fast turnoff with low (capacity) stored energy, and, of course, the injector modules (ion sources and accelerators). The technology requirements associated with these components are described.

  3. One-dimensional models of quasi-neutral parallel electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Parallel electric fields can exist in the magnetic mirror geometry of auroral field lines if they conform to the quasineutral equilibrium solutions. Results on quasi-neutral equilibria and on double layer discontinuities were reviewed and the effects on such equilibria due to non-unique solutions, potential barriers and field aligned current flows using as inputs monoenergetic isotropic distribution functions were examined.

  4. Detailed Atomic Structure of Neutral and Near-Neutral Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, Paul; Hibbert, Alan

    2011-05-11

    This paper highlights the issues which need to be addressed in undertaking accurate calculations of multi-electron atoms and ions, particularly at or near the neutral end of an isoelectronic sequence. We illustrate the processes through two calculations--of transitions in Cl I and Sn II--and discuss the convergence of our results as well as updating previous work. In particular, in the case of Cl I, we propose new identifications of the levels involved in certain transitions which are important in determining the abundance of chlorine in the inter-stellar medium (ISM), while in singly ionised tin, our calculations suggest a re-evaluation of the the abundance of tin in the ISM. We also confirm recent identification of Sn II lines seen in tokamak plasmas.

  5. Engineering evaluation of neutralization and precipitation processes applicable to sludge treatment project

    SciTech Connect

    Klem, M.J.

    1998-08-25

    Engineering evaluations have been performed to determine likely unit operations and methods required to support the removal, storage, treatment and disposal of solids/sludges present in the K Basins at the Hanford Site. This evaluation was initiated to select a neutralization process for dissolver product solution resulting from nitric acid treatment of about 50 m{sup 3} of Hanford Site K Basins sludge. Neutralization is required to meet Tank Waste Remediation Waste System acceptance criteria for storage of the waste in the double shell tanks after neutralization, the supernate and precipitate will be transferred to the high level waste storage tanks in 200E Area. Non transuranic (TRU) solids residue will be transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). This report presents an overview of neutralization and precipitation methods previously used and tested. This report also recommends a neutralization process to be used as part of the K Basins Sludge Treatment Project and identifies additional operations requiring further evaluation.

  6. Effect of food on antacid neutralizing capacity in man.

    PubMed

    Halter, F; Huber, R; Häcki, W H; Varga, L; Bachmann, C

    1982-06-01

    In order to estimate their in-vivo reactivity two antacids of equal theoretical neutralizing capacity (approximately 3.9 mol/l at pH 3.5) but of different chemical composition were employed as intragastric titrant (pH 3.5) following a liquid protein meal (oxo) in two groups of five volunteers each. The two antacids chosen (alucol and Camalox) contain different amounts of aluminium hydroxide, magnesium hydroxide and Camalox in addition contains calcium carbonate. The intragastric consumption of these two antacids was much higher than their respective theoretically available neutralizing capacity (Alucol 3.9 times, Camalox 2.4 times). In-vitro studies demonstrated that interaction with oxo reduced the neutralizing capacity of the two antacids at pH 3.5 from 3.9 mol/l to 1.7 mol/l (Alucol) and 2.5 mol/l (Camalox). This potency loss was related to the aluminium hydroxide content of the two antacids. This study indicates that the neutralizing capacity of antacids is not predictable from their reactivity in aqueous solution and is markedly reduced by protein-containing foods.

  7. Particle acceleration near X-type magnetic neutral lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deeg, Hans-Jorg; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Duric, Nebojsa

    1991-01-01

    The behavior of charged particles near X-type magnetic neutral lines is investigated. The magnetic field is taken to be hyperbolic and time stationary, with a uniform electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field. The general properties of the orbits of noninteracting particles in that field geometry are examined. Approximate analytic solutions to the orbit equations are derived by considering a magnetic-insulation picture where there is a hole in the magnetic insulation around the neutral line. Scaling laws for the dependence of the energy gain on strengths of the magnetic and electric fields are derived. The kinetic-energy distribution function for accelerated particles is derived for particles flowing past the neutral line. These analytic derivations are supported by computer simulations, in which the relativistic equations of motion for single test particles are numerically solved and the orbits and kinetic-energy gains of the particles are obtained. A number of simulations were performed and one parameter at a time was varied. Applications of the results to magnetic-neutral-line regions in space physics and astrophysics are possible.

  8. ELECTROLYTIC REDUCTION OF NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Alter, H.W.; Barney, D.L.

    1958-09-30

    A process is presented for the treatment of radioactivc waste nitric acid solutions. The nitric acid solution is neutralized with an alkali metal hydroxide in an amount sufficient to precipitate insoluble hydroxides, and after separation of the precipitate the solution is electrolyzed to convert the alkali nitrate formed, to alkali hydroxide, gaseous ammonla and oxygen. The solution is then reusable after reducing the volume by evaporating the water and dissolved ammonia.

  9. Groundwater leaching of neutralized and untreated acid-leached uranium-mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Begej, C.W.; Campbell, A.C.; Sauter, N.N.; Opitz, B.E.; Sherwood, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Tailings neutralization was examined to determine the effect of neutralization on contaminant release. Column leaching of acid extracted uranium mill tailings from Exxon Highland Mill, Wyoming, Pathfinder Gas Hills Mill, Wyoming, and the Dawn Midnite Mill, Washington, resulted in the flushing of high concentrations of salts in the first four pore volumes of leachate, followed by a steady decrease to the original groundwater salt concentrations. Neutralization decreased the concentration of salts and radionuclides leaching from the tailings and decreased the volume of solution required to return the solution to the groundwater pH and EC. Radium-226 and uranium-238 leached quickly from the tailings in the initial pore volumes of both neutralized and unneutralized tailings, and then decreased significantly. 6 figures, 5 tables.

  10. Use of amine neutralized sulfonated polystyrenes for particle flocculation

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, D.J.; Peiffer, D.G.; Thaler, W.A.; Duvdevani, I.

    1987-10-20

    A process is described for flocculating solid fines selected from the group consisting of coke films, catalyst fines, synthetic fuel fines, coal fines, and shale fines from a solution comprising the solid fines and an organic liquid which comprises the steps of: (a) adding with mixing about 5 to about 10,000 ppm of the water insoluble unneutralized or neutralized sulfonated polystyrene to the solution wherein the sulfonated polystyrene is dissolved in a dissolving organic liquid at a concentration level of about 0.01 to about 20 weight percent, and has about 0.5 to about 100 mole percent of sulfonate groups; and (b) heating at about 25/sup 0/C to about 350/sup 0/C for about 1 to about 45 minutes the mixture of the solution and the unneutralized or neutralized polystyrene wherein the sulfonated polystrene is absorbed on the surface of the solid fines, and the solid fines collide to form agglomerates which precipitate out of the solution.

  11. Ergonomically neutral arm support system

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J; Chung, Jeffrey Y; Dellinges, Steven; Lafever, Robin E

    2005-08-02

    An ergonomic arm support system maintains a neutral position for the forearm. A mechanical support structure attached to a chair or other mounting structure supports the arms of a sitting or standing person. The system includes moving elements and tensioning elements to provide a dynamic balancing force against the forearms. The support structure is not fixed or locked in a rigid position, but is an active dynamic system that is maintained in equipoise by the continuous operation of the opposing forces. The support structure includes an armrest connected to a flexible linkage or articulated or pivoting assembly, which includes a tensioning element such as a spring. The pivoting assembly moves up and down, with the tensioning element providing the upward force that balances the downward force of the arm.

  12. Neutral Hydrogen in Arp 158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Mansie G.; Simpson, Caroline E.; Gottesman, Stephen T.; Malphrus, Benjamin K.

    2004-09-01

    We present 21 cm observations of Arp 158. We have performed a study of the neutral hydrogen (H I) to help us understand the overall formation and evolution of this system. This is a disturbed system with distinct optical knots connected by a linear structure embedded in luminous material. There is also a diffuse spray to the southeast. The H I seems to be made up of three distinct, kinematically separate systems. Arp 158 bears a certain optical resemblance to NGC 520 (Arp 157), which has been identified as a mid-stage merger. From our 21 cm observations of Arp 158, we also see a comparable H I content with NGC 520. These similarities suggest that Arp 158 is also an intermediate-stage merger.

  13. After treatment ends: neutral time.

    PubMed

    Hurt, G J; McQuellon, R P; Barrett, R J

    1994-01-01

    For persons diagnosed with cancer, the remission period may be marked by increased anxiety and distress. While the medical team may view remission as an eagerly anticipated milestone, the decreased medical surveillance during this time can cause a heightened fear of recurrence for the patient. One author has called this period of remission "neutral time," a time characterized by uncertainty. The safety signal hypothesis, developed by Martin Seligman, may help to explain the anxiety experienced by some patients during the remission period. Because cancer is frequently a silent disease with no overt symptoms, patients in remission often have no safety signal to indicate that the disease will not return. A case study is presented and discussed in light of these two concepts.

  14. An accessible heavy neutral lepton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao-Hsi

    1982-09-01

    In the SUL(2) ⊗ SUR(2) ⊗ UB-L(1) model, an accessible heavy neutral lepton may exist owing to the mixing of generations. Based on a rough estimate, it is pointed out that the most hopeful experiments to observe this lepton are ν-production in an emulsion (because the track of a particle with lifetime 10-11-10-13 s could be seen) and e-production. The author thanks Professor J.D. Bjorken, Professor He Zuo-Xiu, Professor R.E. Mashark, Professor S.J. Chang, Professor Zhu Cong-Yuan and Professor M. Dine for helpful discussions and comments. He would like to thank the referee for valuable comments.

  15. High Resolution Neutral Atom Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucay, Igal; Castillo-Garza, Rodrigo; Stratis, Georgios; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a high resolution neutral atom microscope based on metastable atom electron spectroscopy (MAES). When a metastable atom of a noble gas is near a solid, a surface electron will tunnel to an empty energy level of the metastable atom, thereby ejecting the excited electron from the atom. The emitted electrons carry information regarding the local topography and electronic, magnetic, and chemical structures of most hard materials. Furthermore, using a chromatic aberration corrected magnetic hexapole lens we expect to attain a spatial resolution below 10 nm. We will use this microscope to investigate how local phenomena can give rise to macroscopic effects in materials that cannot be probed using a scanning tunneling microscope, namely insulating transition metal oxides.

  16. Phenomenology of neutral heavy leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyniak, P.; Melo, I.

    1997-02-01

    We continue our previous work on the flavor-conserving leptonic decays of the Z boson with neutral heavy leptons (NHL`s) in the loops by considering box, vertex, and self-energy diagrams for the muon decay. By inclusion of these loops (they contribute to the input parameter M{sub W}), we can probe the full parameter space spanned by the so-called flavor-conserving mixing parameters ee{sub mix},{mu}{mu}{sub mix},{tau}{tau}{sub mix}. We show that only two diagrams from each class (box, vertex, and self-energy) are important; further, after renormalization only two box diagrams {open_quotes}survive{close_quotes} as dominant. We compare the results of our analysis with the existing work in this field and conclude that flavor-conserving decays have certain advantages over traditionally considered flavor-violating ones. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Phenomenology of neutral heavy leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyniak, Pat; Melo, I.

    1997-02-01

    We continue our previous work on the flavor-conserving leptonic decays of the Z boson with neutral heavy leptons (NHL's) in the loops by considering box, vertex, and self-energy diagrams for the muon decay. By inclusion of these loops (they contribute to the input parameter MW), we can probe the full parameter space spanned by the so-called flavor-conserving mixing parameters eemix,μμmix,ττmix. We show that only two diagrams from each class (box, vertex, and self-energy) are important; further, after renormalization only two box diagrams ``survive'' as dominant. We compare the results of our analysis with the existing work in this field and conclude that flavor-conserving decays have certain advantages over traditionally considered flavor-violating ones.

  18. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  19. Molecular clock on a neutral network.

    PubMed

    Raval, Alpan

    2007-09-28

    The number of fixed mutations accumulated in an evolving population often displays a variance that is significantly larger than the mean (the overdispersed molecular clock). By examining a generic evolutionary process on a neutral network of high-fitness genotypes, we establish a formalism for computing all cumulants of the full probability distribution of accumulated mutations in terms of graph properties of the neutral network, and use the formalism to prove overdispersion of the molecular clock. We further show that significant overdispersion arises naturally in evolution when the neutral network is highly sparse, exhibits large global fluctuations in neutrality, and small local fluctuations in neutrality. The results are also relevant for elucidating aspects of neutral network topology from empirical measurements of the substitution process.

  20. Charge neutrality breakdown in confined aqueous electrolytes: Theory and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colla, Thiago; Girotto, Matheus; dos Santos, Alexandre P.; Levin, Yan

    2016-09-01

    We study, using Density Functional theory (DFT) and Monte Carlo simulations, aqueous electrolyte solutions between charged infinite planar surfaces, in contact with a bulk salt reservoir. In agreement with recent experimental observations [Z. Luo et al., Nat. Commun. 6, 6358 (2015)], we find that the confined electrolyte lacks local charge neutrality. We show that a DFT based on a bulk-HNC expansion properly accounts for strong electrostatic correlations and allows us to accurately calculate the ionic density profiles between the charged surfaces, even for electrolytes containing trivalent counterions. The DFT allows us to explore the degree of local charge neutrality violation, as a function of plate separation and bulk electrolyte concentration, and to accurately calculate the interaction force between the charged surfaces.

  1. Charge neutrality breakdown in confined aqueous electrolytes: Theory and simulation.

    PubMed

    Colla, Thiago; Girotto, Matheus; Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Levin, Yan

    2016-09-01

    We study, using Density Functional theory (DFT) and Monte Carlo simulations, aqueous electrolyte solutions between charged infinite planar surfaces, in contact with a bulk salt reservoir. In agreement with recent experimental observations [Z. Luo et al., Nat. Commun. 6, 6358 (2015)], we find that the confined electrolyte lacks local charge neutrality. We show that a DFT based on a bulk-HNC expansion properly accounts for strong electrostatic correlations and allows us to accurately calculate the ionic density profiles between the charged surfaces, even for electrolytes containing trivalent counterions. The DFT allows us to explore the degree of local charge neutrality violation, as a function of plate separation and bulk electrolyte concentration, and to accurately calculate the interaction force between the charged surfaces. PMID:27609007

  2. Neutral density filters with Risley prisms: analysis and design.

    PubMed

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Nicolov, Mirela

    2009-05-10

    We achieve the analysis and design of optical attenuators with double-prism neutral density filters. A comparative study is performed on three possible device configurations; only two are presented in the literature but without their design calculus. The characteristic parameters of this optical attenuator with Risley translating prisms for each of the three setups are defined and their analytical expressions are derived: adjustment scale (attenuation range) and interval, minimum transmission coefficient and sensitivity. The setups are compared to select the optimal device, and, from this study, the best solution for double-prism neutral density filters, both from a mechanical and an optical point of view, is determined with two identical, symmetrically movable, no mechanical contact prisms. The design calculus of this optimal device is developed in essential steps. The parameters of the prisms, particularly their angles, are studied to improve the design, and we demonstrate the maximum attenuation range that this type of attenuator can provide.

  3. NEUTRALIZATION OF ACIDIC GROUND WATER NEAR GLOBE, ARIZONA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eychaner, James H.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.; ,

    1985-01-01

    Highly acidic contaminated water is moving through a shallow aquifer and interacting with streams near Globe, Arizona. Dissolved concentrations reach 3,000 mg/L iron, 150 mg/L copper, and 16,400 mg/L total dissloved solids; pH is as low as 3. 6. Samples from 16 PVC-cased observation wells include uncontaminated, contaminated, transition, and neutralized waters. Chemical reaction with sediments and mixing with uncontaminated water neutralizes the acidic water. The reactions form a transition zone where gypsum replaces calcite and most metals precipitate. Ferric hydroxide also precipitates if sufficient oxygen is available. Abundant gypsum crystals and ferric hydroxide coatings have been recovered from well cuttings. Large sulfate concentrations produce sulfate complexes with many metals that inhibit removal of metals from solution.

  4. Charge neutrality breakdown in confined aqueous electrolytes: Theory and simulation.

    PubMed

    Colla, Thiago; Girotto, Matheus; Dos Santos, Alexandre P; Levin, Yan

    2016-09-01

    We study, using Density Functional theory (DFT) and Monte Carlo simulations, aqueous electrolyte solutions between charged infinite planar surfaces, in contact with a bulk salt reservoir. In agreement with recent experimental observations [Z. Luo et al., Nat. Commun. 6, 6358 (2015)], we find that the confined electrolyte lacks local charge neutrality. We show that a DFT based on a bulk-HNC expansion properly accounts for strong electrostatic correlations and allows us to accurately calculate the ionic density profiles between the charged surfaces, even for electrolytes containing trivalent counterions. The DFT allows us to explore the degree of local charge neutrality violation, as a function of plate separation and bulk electrolyte concentration, and to accurately calculate the interaction force between the charged surfaces.

  5. Neutral Vlasov kinetic theory of magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tronci, Cesare; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-02-15

    The low-frequency limit of Maxwell equations is considered in the Maxwell-Vlasov system. This limit produces a neutral Vlasov system that captures essential features of plasma dynamics, while neglecting radiation effects. Euler-Poincaré reduction theory is used to show that the neutral Vlasov kinetic theory possesses a variational formulation in both Lagrangian and Eulerian coordinates. By construction, the new model recovers all collisionless neutral models employed in plasma simulations. Then, comparisons between the neutral Vlasov system and hybrid kinetic-fluid models are presented in the linear regime.

  6. Neutralization of Chlamydia trachomatis in cell culture.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, L V

    1975-01-01

    Neutralization of Chlamydia trachomatis was assayed by the decrease in inclusion-forming units in baby hamster kidney cells grown in culture. Five percent fresh guinea pig sera increased neutralization titers of rabbit antisera 100- to 1,000-fold but had no effect when normal rabbit sera were tested. Neutralization of a type A or B trachoma isolate was strain specific. Neutralization by human eye secretions and sera also was demonstrated when guinea pig sera were included in the test. All of the six human sera tested showed strain specificity against types A or B, in agreement with typing by the fluorescent antibody technique. PMID:1091549

  7. ION SOURCE WITH SPACE CHARGE NEUTRALIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Flowers, J.W.; Luce, J.S.; Stirling, W.L.

    1963-01-22

    This patent relates to a space charge neutralized ion source in which a refluxing gas-fed arc discharge is provided between a cathode and a gas-fed anode to provide ions. An electron gun directs a controlled, monoenergetic electron beam through the discharge. A space charge neutralization is effected in the ion source and accelerating gap by oscillating low energy electrons, and a space charge neutralization of the source exit beam is effected by the monoenergetic electron beam beyond the source exit end. The neutralized beam may be accelerated to any desired energy at densities well above the limitation imposed by Langmuir-Child' s law. (AEC)

  8. Neutral Beams from Blazar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoyan, Armen M.; Dermer, Charles D.

    2003-03-01

    We treat the production of neutrons, photons, and neutrinos through photomeson interactions of relativistic protons with ambient photons in the compact inner jets of blazars. Internal synchrotron and external isotropic radiation due to scattered optical/UV accretion-disk radiation are considered as target photon fields. Protons are assumed to be accelerated to a maximum energy limited by the size scale and magnetic field of the jet, and by competing energy losses. We characterize the conditions when the photomeson interactions of ultrarelativistic protons become effective, and show that the presence of the external radiation field makes possible strong energy losses for protons with energies Ep>~1015 eV. Without this component, effective energy losses of protons begin at Ep>~1018 eV, and would rapidly disappear with expansion of the blob. We develop a model describing the production and escape of neutrons from a comoving spherical blob, which continue to interact with the ambient external radiation field on the parsec-scale broad-line region (BLR). Neutrons may carry ~10% of the overall energy of the accelerated protons with Ep>~1015 eV outside the BLR. Ultra-high-energy gamma rays produced by photomeson interaction of neutrons outside the blob can also escape the BLR. The escaping neutrons, gamma rays, and neutrinos form a collimated neutral beam with a characteristic opening angle θ~1/Γ, where Γ is the bulk Lorentz factor of the inner jet. Energy and momentum is deposited in the extended jet from the decay of neutrons at distances ld(En)~(En/1017eV) kpc, and through pair-production attenuation of gamma rays with energies Eγ>~1015 eV which propagate to ~10-100 kpc distances. In this scenario, neutral beams of ultra-high-energy gamma rays and neutrons can be the reason for straight extended jets, such as in Pictor A. Fluxes of neutrinos detectable with kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes are predicted from flat-spectrum radio quasars such as 3C 279.

  9. Modelling the Neutral Sodium Tails of Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K. S.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Neutral sodium is typically easy to detect in active comets around perihelion, due to the very high efficiency of the sodium D transition, and at some comets a distinct neutral sodium tail is observed. The first distinct neutral sodium tail images were apparent in comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) data taken using CoCam [Cremonese et al, 1997], but since this initial detection similar features have been observed at a number of near-Sun comets using the SOHO/LASCO coronagraph. An understanding of the distribution and evolution of neutral cometary sodium may best be developed using a combination of spectra and images in different filters at multiple times throughout a comet's orbit. At present the source of neutral sodium in comets is unknown, primarily because the evolution of neutral cometary sodium is difficult to intuitively predict due to the Swings and Greenstein effects. Several authors [review presented in Cremonese et al, 1999] have suggested various combinations of sources of neutral sodium in the nuclear region, near-nuclear region, dust tail and ion tail. In order to understand the wide variety of cometary observations of neutral sodium available we have developed the first fully three dimensional, heliocentric distance dependent, versatile Monte Carlo neutral sodium tail model (initially based on a model developed by [Brown et al, 1998]). Our model is known as COMPASS (Cometary Orbital Motion at Perihelion: an Adaptable Sodium Simulation), and incorporates the unintuitive variation in radiation pressure influences on sodium atoms with different heliocentric velocities. We present the initial results of a comparison between COMPASS and observational data. We have found good agreement between the overall morphology of the neutral sodium tail imaged at comet Hale-Bopp and COMPASS, and have begun to extend the study to other comets of interest. We also present a comparison between simulated COMPASS spectra and observations. The versatility of COMPASS allows it to

  10. Neutralization efficiency estimation in a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the optimal conditions of neutral beam generation to maintain a high degree of neutralization and focusing during beam energy variation for a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma with a three-grid ion beam acceleration system. The neutral beam energy distribution was estimated by measuring the energy profiles of ions that 'survived' the neutralization after reflection. The energy measurements of the primary and reflected ions showed narrow distribution functions, each with only one peak. At higher beam energies, both the ratio of the ion energy loss to the primary energy and the degree of energy divergence decreased, confirming the precise alignment of the neutral beam. The neutralization efficiency of the neutral beam source with a three-grid acceleration system was found to be affected mainly by the beam angle divergence rather than by the particle translation energy.

  11. Neutral Models of Microbiome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qinglong; Sukumaran, Jeet; Wu, Steven; Rodrigo, Allen

    2015-01-01

    There has been an explosion of research on host-associated microbial communities (i.e.,microbiomes). Much of this research has focused on surveys of microbial diversities across a variety of host species, including humans, with a view to understanding how these microbiomes are distributed across space and time, and how they correlate with host health, disease, phenotype, physiology and ecology. Fewer studies have focused on how these microbiomes may have evolved. In this paper, we develop an agent-based framework to study the dynamics of microbiome evolution. Our framework incorporates neutral models of how hosts acquire their microbiomes, and how the environmental microbial community that is available to the hosts is assembled. Most importantly, our framework also incorporates a Wright-Fisher genealogical model of hosts, so that the dynamics of microbiome evolution is studied on an evolutionary timescale. Our results indicate that the extent of parental contribution to microbial availability from one generation to the next significantly impacts the diversity of microbiomes: the greater the parental contribution, the less diverse the microbiomes. In contrast, even when there is only a very small contribution from a constant environmental pool, microbial communities can remain highly diverse. Finally, we show that our models may be used to construct hypotheses about the types of processes that operate to assemble microbiomes over evolutionary time. PMID:26200800

  12. The Dubious Value of Value Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    Hard science is properly value neutral. But when that ideological neutrality extends to the whole university, the traditional foundation crumbles. Steve Balch laments the moral vacuum that now substitutes for fundamental principles, because it is impossible to frame a program of education--especially in the humanities and social sciences--without…

  13. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between ions and neutrals in a partially ionized plasma are important throughout heliophysics, including near the solar surface in prominences. Understanding how ion-neutral coupling affects formation, support, structure, and dynamics of prominences will advance our physical understanding of magnetized systems involving a transition from a weakly ionized dense gas to a fully ionized tenuous plasma. We address the fundamental physics of prominence support, which is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force, and the implications for observations. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized, it is necessary to consider the support of the both the ionized and neutral components. Support of the neutrals is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material.

  14. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  15. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  16. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  17. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  18. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  19. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  20. Efficient laser production of energetic neutral beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, F.; Antonelli, L.; Flacco, A.; Braenzel, J.; Vauzour, B.; Folpini, G.; Birindelli, G.; Schnuerer, M.; Batani, D.; Malka, V.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-driven ion acceleration by intense, ultra-short, laser pulse has received increasing attention in recent years, and the availability of much compact and versatile ions sources motivates the study of laser-driven sources of energetic neutral atoms. We demonstrate the production of a neutral and directional beam of hydrogen and carbon atoms up to 200 keV per nucleon, with a peak flow of 2.7× {{10}13} atom s-1. Laser accelerated ions are neutralized in a pulsed, supersonic argon jet with tunable density between 1.5× {{10}17} cm-3and 6× {{10}18} cm-3. The neutralization efficiency has been measured by a time-of-flight detector for different argon densities. An optimum is found, for which complete neutralization occurs. The neutralization rate can be explained only at high areal densities (>1× {{10}17} cm-2) by single electron charge transfer processes. These results suggest a new perspective for the study of neutral production by laser and open discussion of neutralization at a lower density.

  1. Targets for high power neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs.

  2. Topologies for neutral functional differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melvin, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Bounded topologies are considered for functional differential equations of the neutral type in which present dynamics of the system are influenced by its past behavior. A special bounded topology is generated on a collection of absolutely continuous functions with essentially bounded derivatives, and an application to a class of nonlinear neutral functional differential equations due to Driver (1965) is presented.

  3. Types of Neutralization and Types of Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jim; Dodder, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    Neutralization theory was tested with questionnaires administered to a random sample of public high school students (N-298) and institutionalized male delinquents (N-53). Neutralization acceptance technique patterns were similar across subsamples; however, correlations between each technique and each type of delinquency were statistically…

  4. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  5. The neutral curve for stationary disturbances in rotating-disk flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    The neutral curve for stationary vortex disturbances in rotating-disk flow is computed up to a Reynolds number of 10 to the 7th using the sixth-order system of linear stability equations which includes the effects of streamline curvature and Coriolis force. It is found that the neutral curve has two minima: one at R = 285.36 (upper branch) and the other at R = 440.88 (lower branch). At large Reynolds numbers, the upper branch tends to Stuart's asymptotic solution while the lower branch tends to a solution that is associated with the wave angle corresponding to the direction of zero mean wall shear.

  6. Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-12-15

    It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup −3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 μs. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

  7. Bifurcation Analysis for Neural Networks in Neutral Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong-Bing; Sun, Xiao-Ke

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a system of neural networks in neutral form with time delay is investigated. Further, by introducing delay τ as a bifurcation parameter, it is found that Hopf bifurcation occurs when τ is across some critical values. The direction of the Hopf bifurcations and the stability are determined by using normal form method and center manifold theory. Next, the global existence of periodic solution is established by using a global Hopf bifurcation result. Finally, an example is given to support the theoretical predictions.

  8. Local Neutral Networks Help Maintain Inaccurately Replicating Ribozymes

    PubMed Central

    Szilágyi, András; Kun, Ádám; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2014-01-01

    The error threshold of replication limits the selectively maintainable genome size against recurrent deleterious mutations for most fitness landscapes. In the context of RNA replication a distinction between the genotypic and the phenotypic error threshold has been made; where the latter concerns the maintenance of secondary structure rather than sequence. RNA secondary structure is treated as a proxy for function. The phenotypic error threshold allows higher per digit mutation rates than its genotypic counterpart, and is known to increase with the frequency of neutral mutations in sequence space. Here we show that the degree of neutrality, i.e. the frequency of nearest-neighbour (one-step) neutral mutants is a remarkably accurate proxy for the overall frequency of such mutants in an experimentally verifiable formula for the phenotypic error threshold; this we achieve by the full numerical solution for the concentration of all sequences in mutation-selection balance up to length 16. We reinforce our previous result that currently known ribozymes could be selectively maintained by the accuracy known from the best available polymerase ribozymes. Furthermore, we show that in silico stabilizing selection can increase the mutational robustness of ribozymes due to the fact that they were produced by artificial directional selection in the first place. Our finding offers a better understanding of the error threshold and provides further insight into the plausibility of an ancient RNA world. PMID:25299454

  9. Local neutral networks help maintain inaccurately replicating ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Szilágyi, András; Kun, Ádám; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2014-01-01

    The error threshold of replication limits the selectively maintainable genome size against recurrent deleterious mutations for most fitness landscapes. In the context of RNA replication a distinction between the genotypic and the phenotypic error threshold has been made; where the latter concerns the maintenance of secondary structure rather than sequence. RNA secondary structure is treated as a proxy for function. The phenotypic error threshold allows higher per digit mutation rates than its genotypic counterpart, and is known to increase with the frequency of neutral mutations in sequence space. Here we show that the degree of neutrality, i.e. the frequency of nearest-neighbour (one-step) neutral mutants is a remarkably accurate proxy for the overall frequency of such mutants in an experimentally verifiable formula for the phenotypic error threshold; this we achieve by the full numerical solution for the concentration of all sequences in mutation-selection balance up to length 16. We reinforce our previous result that currently known ribozymes could be selectively maintained by the accuracy known from the best available polymerase ribozymes. Furthermore, we show that in silico stabilizing selection can increase the mutational robustness of ribozymes due to the fact that they were produced by artificial directional selection in the first place. Our finding offers a better understanding of the error threshold and provides further insight into the plausibility of an ancient RNA world.

  10. Robust stability and control for uncertain neutral time delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakthivel, R.; Mathiyalagan, K.; Anthoni, S. Marshal

    2012-04-01

    In this article, the problem of robust stability and stabilisation for a class of uncertain neutral systems with discrete and distributed time delays is considered. By utilising a new Lyapunov functional based on the idea of delay partitioning approach, we employ the linear matrix inequality technique to derive delay-dependent criteria which ensures the robust stability of uncertain neutral systems. The obtained stability conditions are formulated in terms of linear matrix inequalities that can easily be solved by using standard software packages. Further, the result is extended to study the robust stabilisation for uncertain neutral systems with parameter uncertainties. A state feedback controller is proposed to guarantee the robust asymptotic stabilisation for uncertain systems and the controller is constructed in terms of the solution to a set of matrix inequalities. Finally, numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and conservatism of the obtained results. It is shown that the results developed in this article can tolerate larger allowable delay than some existing works in the literature. Further, it is proved that the proposed criterion is also computationally less conservative when compared to some existing results.

  11. Fuel neutralization by ozone oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, A. B.; Agthe, R. E.; Smith, I. D.; Mulholland, J. P.

    1988-01-01

    The viability of a hazardous waste disposal system based on ozone oxidation of hydrazine fuels at low aqueous concentrations in the presence of ultraviolet light (UV at 2.537 x 10(exp -7) m or 8.324 x 10(exp -7) ft) excitation was investigated. Important parameters investigated include temperature, solution pH, and ultraviolet light power. Statistically relevant experimentation was done to estimate main factor effects on performance. The best available chemical analysis technology was used to evaluate the performance of the system.

  12. Modeling Neutral Hydrogen in the Heliospheric Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N.

    2009-05-01

    Observational data of neutral atoms provides us with a 1 AU picture of the neutral atom flux in the heliosphere. The large mean free paths of neutrals allow us to infer properties of their distant source, as well as the properties of the intermediary medium. Energetic neutral hydrogen, for example, travels on almost straight trajectories, so that the particles observed coming from a particular direction were created from energetic protons along that line of sight. Similarly, low energy interstellar atoms are attenuated and deflected as they enter the heliosphere, and this deflection tells us something about the structure of the heliospheric interface. Of course, to infer quantitative features of the global heliosphere from neutral atom observations at 1 AU, we need accurate models that capture the 3D structure of the heliosphere. We will present an advanced MHD-neutral model of the heliosphere which is 3D, employs kinetic neutral Hydrogen, and incorporates a suprathermal tail on the solar wind proton distribution to approximate pick-up ions. We will demonstrate that with the help of such a model, we can test various hypotheses regarding the heliospheric boundary via forward modeling and comparison with data.

  13. Through the interaction of neutral and adaptive mutations, evolutionary search finds a way.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tina; Miller, Julian Francis

    2006-01-01

    An evolutionary system that supports the interaction of neutral and adaptive mutations is investigated. Experimental results on a Boolean function and needle-in-haystack problems show that this system enables evolutionary search to find better solutions faster. Through a novel analysis based on the ratio of neutral to adaptive mutations, we identify this interaction as an engine that automatically adjusts the relative amounts of exploration and exploitation to achieve effective search (i.e., it is self-adaptive). Moreover, a hypothesis to describe the search process in this system is proposed and investigated. Our findings lead us to counter the arguments of those who dismiss the usefulness of neutrality. We argue that the benefits of neutrality are intimately related to its implementation, so that one must be cautious about making general claims about its merits or demerits.

  14. 46 CFR 120.376 - Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral grounded. (c) The neutral or each... generator is connected to the bus, except the neutral of an emergency power generation system must be... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded)....

  15. 46 CFR 120.376 - Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral grounded. (c) The neutral or each... generator is connected to the bus, except the neutral of an emergency power generation system must be... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded)....

  16. 46 CFR 120.376 - Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral grounded. (c) The neutral or each... generator is connected to the bus, except the neutral of an emergency power generation system must be... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded)....

  17. Neutral Supersymmetric Higgs Boson Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Stephen Luke

    2008-07-01

    In some Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, including the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the coupling of Higgs bosons to b-quarks is enhanced. This enhancement makes the associated production of the Higgs with b-quarks an interesting search channel for the Higgs and Supersymmetry at D0. The identification of b-quarks, both online and offline, is essential to this search effort. This thesis describes the author's involvement in the development of both types of b-tagging and in the application of these techniques to the MSSM Higgs search. Work was carried out on the Level-3 trigger b-tagging algorithms. The impact parameter (IP) b-tagger was retuned and the effects of increased instantaneous luminosity on the tagger were studied. An extension of the IP-tagger to use the z-tracking information was developed. A new b-tagger using secondary vertices was developed and commissioned. A tool was developed to allow the use of large multi-run samples for trigger studies involving b-quarks. Offline, a neural network (NN) b-tagger was trained combining the existing offline lifetime based b-tagging tools. The efficiency and fake rate of the NN b-tagger were measured in data and MC. This b-tagger was internally reviewed and certified by the Collaboration and now provides the official b-tagging for all analyses using the Run IIa dataset at D0. A search was performed for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a b{bar b} pair and produced in association with one or more b-quarks. Limits are set on the cross-section times the branching ratio for such a process. The limits were interpreted in various MSSM scenarios. This analysis uses the NN b-tagger and was the first to use this tool. The analysis also relies on triggers using the Level-3 IP b-tagging tool described previously. A likelihood discriminant was used to improve the analysis and a neural network was developed to cross-check this technique. The result of the analysis has been submitted to PRL and

  18. Evaluation of smallpox vaccines using variola neutralization.

    PubMed

    Damon, Inger K; Davidson, Whitni B; Hughes, Christine M; Olson, Victoria A; Smith, Scott K; Holman, Robert C; Frey, Sharon E; Newman, Frances; Belshe, Robert B; Yan, Lihan; Karem, Kevin

    2009-08-01

    The search for a 'third'-generation smallpox vaccine has resulted in the development and characterization of several vaccine candidates. A significant barrier to acceptance is the absence of challenge models showing induction of correlates of protective immunity against variola virus. In this light, virus neutralization provides one of few experimental methods to show specific 'in vitro' activity of vaccines against variola virus. Here, we provide characterization of the ability of a modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine to induce variola virus-neutralizing antibodies, and we provide comparison with the neutralization elicited by standard Dryvax vaccination.

  19. Neutral particle beams for space defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botwin, Robert; Favale, Anthony

    Neutral particle beam (NPB) weapons direct highly focused high energy streams of electrically neutral atomic particles traveling at nearly the speed of light, escaping deflection from the earth's magnetic field and acting on the subatomic structure of a target, destroying it from within. The beam's brief contact with a reentry vehicle produces a nuclear reaction in the latter that yields particle emissions; by detecting and identifying those particles, it becomes possible to effectively distinguish warheads from decoys. Attention is given to the NPB program roles to be played by the Beam Experiment Aboard Rocket and Neutral Particle Beam Integrated Space Experiment projects.

  20. Fast Neutral Pressure Measurements in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    R. Raman; H.W. Kugel; T. Provost; R. Gernhardt; T.R. Jarboe; M.G. Bell

    2002-08-06

    Several fast neutral pressure gauges have been installed on NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] to measure the vessel and divertor pressure during inductive and coaxial helicity injected (CHI) plasma operations. Modified, PDX [Poloidal Divertor Experiment]-type Penning gauges have been installed on the upper and lower divertors. Neutral pressure measurements during plasma operations from these and from two shielded fast Micro ion gauges at different toroidal locations on the vessel mid-plane are described. A new unshielded ion gauge, referred to as the In-vessel Neutral Pressure (INP) gauge is under development.

  1. Modeling of the Coupled Magnetospheric and Neutral Wind Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thayer, Jeffrey P.

    1997-01-01

    Over the past four years of funding, SRI, in collaboration with the University of Texas at Dallas, has been involved in assessing the influence of thermospheric neutral winds on the electric field and current systems at high latitudes. The initial direction of the project was to perform a set of numerical experiments concerning the contribution of the magnetospheric and neutral wind dynamo processes, under specific boundary conditions, to the polarization electric field and/or the field-aligned current distribution at high latitudes. To facilitate these numerical experiments we developed a numerical scheme that relied on using output from the NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere General Circulation Model (NCAR-TIGCM), expanding them in the form of spherical harmonics and solving the dynamo equations spectrally. Once initial calculations were completed, it was recognized that the neutral wind contribution could be significant but its actual contribution to the electric field or currents depended strongly on the generator properties of the magnetosphere. Solutions to this problem are not unique because of the unknown characteristics of the magnetospheric generator, therefore the focus was on two limiting cases. One limiting case was to consider the magnetosphere as a voltage generator delivering a fixed voltage to the high-latitude ionosphere and allowing for the neutral wind dynamo to contribute only to the current system. The second limiting case was to consider the magnetosphere as a current generator and allowing for the neutral wind dynamo to contribute only to the generation of polarization electric fields. This work was completed and presented at the l994 Fall AGU meeting. The direction of the project then shifted to applying the Poynting flux concept to the high-latitude ionosphere. This concept was more attractive as it evaluated the influence of neutral winds on the high-latitude electrodynamics without actually having to determine the generator characteristics of

  2. Kinetics of neutralization of Po-218

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, K.D.

    1987-01-01

    In a well-defined experimental system the neutralization of polonium-218 ions was investigated as a function of the physical and chemical properties of the controlled composition atmosphere. The mobilities of Po/sup +/ and PoO/sub 2//sup +/ are determined by combining experimental results with a computer model of the system. Three neutralization mechanisms were individually studied. The small ion recombination rate has been found to be proportional to the square root of radon concentration. The electron scavenging mechanism is responsible for the neutralization of Po/sup +/ in NO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O in nitrogen. When PoO/sub 2//sup +/ is formed, the electron transfer mechanism dominates the neutralization process. The electron is transferred to PoO/sub 2//sup +/ from molecules with lower ionization potentials. The ionization potential of PoO/sub 2//sup +/ is also determined to be 10.44 +/- 0.05 eV.

  3. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, H.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J.; Kucera, T.; Antiochos, S.; Kawashima, R.

    2011-01-01

    Coupling between ions and neutrals in magnetized plasmas is fundamentally important to many aspects of heliophysics, including our ionosphere, the solar chromosphere, the solar wind interaction with planetary atmospheres, and the interface between the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Ion-neutral coupling also plays a major role in the physics of solar prominences. By combining theory, modeling, and observations we are working toward a better understanding of the structure and dynamics of partially ionized prominence plasma. Two key questions are addressed in the present work: 1) what physical mechanism(s) sets the cross-field scale of prominence threads? 2) Are ion-neutral interactions responsible for the vertical flows and structure in prominences? We present initial results from a study investigating what role ion-neutral interactions play in prominence dynamics and structure. This research was supported by NASA.

  4. Neutralized transport of high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Anders, A.; Sharp, W.; Efthimion, P.; Gilson, E.; Welch, D.; Rose, D.

    2003-05-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. A converging ion beam at the exit of the final focus magnetic system is injected into a neutralized drift section. The neutralization is provided by a metal arc source and an RF plasma source. Effects of a ''plasma plug'', where electrons are extracted from a localized plasma in the upstream end of the drift section, and are then dragged along by the ion potential, as well as the ''volumetric plasma'', where neutralization is provided by the plasma laid down along the ion path, are both studied and their relative effects on the beam spot size are compared. Comparisons with 3-D PIC code predictions will also be presented.

  5. Electrostatic interaction of neutral semi-permeable membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Olga I.; Bocquet, Lyderic; Bogdanov, Artem N.; Tsekov, Roumen; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    We consider an osmotic equilibrium between bulk solutions of polyelectrolyte bounded by semi-permeable membranes and separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Although the membranes are neutral, the counter-ions of the polyelectrolyte molecules permeate into the gap and lead to a steric charge separation. This gives rise to a distance-dependent membrane potential, which translates into a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure. From the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions. We then derive an explicit formula for the pressure exerted on the membranes and show that it deviates from the classical van't Hoff expression for the osmotic pressure. This difference is interpreted in terms of a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure originating from the overlap of counterion clouds inside the gap. We also develop a simplified theory based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approach. A comparison with simulation of a primitive model for the electrolyte is provided and does confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions. Beyond the fundamental result that the neutral surfaces can repel, this mechanism not only helps to control the adhesion and long-range interactions of living cells, bacteria, and vesicles, but also allows us to argue that electrostatic interactions should play enormous role in determining behavior and functions of systems bounded by semi-permeable membranes.

  6. Neutral theory and relative species abundance in ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, Igor; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Hubbell, Stephen P.; Maritan, Amos

    2003-08-01

    The theory of island biogeography asserts that an island or a local community approaches an equilibrium species richness as a result of the interplay between the immigration of species from the much larger metacommunity source area and local extinction of species on the island (local community). Hubbell generalized this neutral theory to explore the expected steady-state distribution of relative species abundance (RSA) in the local community under restricted immigration. Here we present a theoretical framework for the unified neutral theory of biodiversity and an analytical solution for the distribution of the RSA both in the metacommunity (Fisher's log series) and in the local community, where there are fewer rare species. Rare species are more extinction-prone, and once they go locally extinct, they take longer to re-immigrate than do common species. Contrary to recent assertions, we show that the analytical solution provides a better fit, with fewer free parameters, to the RSA distribution of tree species on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, than the lognormal distribution.

  7. Electrostatic interaction of neutral semi-permeable membranes.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Olga I; Bocquet, Lyderic; Bogdanov, Artem N; Tsekov, Roumen; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2012-01-21

    We consider an osmotic equilibrium between bulk solutions of polyelectrolyte bounded by semi-permeable membranes and separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Although the membranes are neutral, the counter-ions of the polyelectrolyte molecules permeate into the gap and lead to a steric charge separation. This gives rise to a distance-dependent membrane potential, which translates into a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure. From the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions. We then derive an explicit formula for the pressure exerted on the membranes and show that it deviates from the classical van't Hoff expression for the osmotic pressure. This difference is interpreted in terms of a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure originating from the overlap of counterion clouds inside the gap. We also develop a simplified theory based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approach. A comparison with simulation of a primitive model for the electrolyte is provided and does confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions. Beyond the fundamental result that the neutral surfaces can repel, this mechanism not only helps to control the adhesion and long-range interactions of living cells, bacteria, and vesicles, but also allows us to argue that electrostatic interactions should play enormous role in determining behavior and functions of systems bounded by semi-permeable membranes.

  8. Modeling the neutral sodium tails of comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K.; Jones, G.; Coates, A.

    2014-07-01

    Neutral sodium is typically easy to detect in active comets around perihelion, due to the very high efficiency of the sodium D transition, and, at some comets, a distinct neutral sodium tail is observed. The first distinct neutral sodium tail images were apparent in C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) data taken using CoCam [1], but, since this initial detection, similar features have been observed at near-Sun comets using the LASCO coronagraph on SOHO. A full picture of the distribution and evolution of neutral cometary sodium may best be established using a combination of spectra and images in different filters at multiple times throughout the orbit. The high efficiency of the sodium D transition has allowed it to be detected in systems, even if the column density of sodium is extremely low. In these instances it is sometimes possible to determine some of the system's characteristics from the sodium emission detection, such as in Io's plasma torus [2] and Enceladus's plume [3,4]. It is hoped that a similar approach may be applied to the active cometary environment, but, at present, the production of neutral sodium is unknown. Various authors [5--9, thorough review presented in 10] have suggested various combinations of sources of neutral sodium in the nuclear region, near-nuclear region, dust tail, and ion tail. The morphology and evolution of the neutral cometary sodium tail are difficult to intuitively predict due to the Swings and Greenstein effects. In order to understand the wide variety of cometary observations of neutral sodium available we have developed the first fully three-dimensional, heliocentric-distance-dependent, versatile Monte Carlo neutral sodium tail model, which incorporates the unintuitive variation in radiation pressure influences on sodium atoms with different heliocentric velocities. Our model was initially based on that of Brown et al [7]. We present preliminary results from this model. We have found initial agreement with the overall morphology and

  9. Primary interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Hans R.; Moebius, Eberhard; Bzowski, Maciej; Kubiak, Marzena; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Heerikhuisen, Jacob

    Among other accomplishments, IBEX has detected direct interstellar helium and oxygen. With the help of a 3D MHD/kinetic hydrogen background heliosphere model by Pogorelov and Heerikhuisen, the distributions of primary interstellar neutrals throughout the heliosphere are calculated, identifying contributions from direct and indirect particle trajectories. The results are converted into expected fluxes at IBEX. The comparison of these fluxes to the measurements characterizes the density of neutrals in the pristine interstellar medium, and their filtration in the heliosphere.

  10. Nitrogen-neutrality: a step towards sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leip, Adrian; Leach, Allison; Musinguzi, Patrick; Tumwesigye, Trust; Olupot, Giregon; Tenywa, John Stephen; Mudiope, Joseph; Hutton, Olivia; Cordovil, Claudia M. d. S.; Bekunda, Mateete; Galloway, James

    2014-11-01

    We propose a novel indicator measuring one dimension of the sustainability of an entity in modern societies: Nitrogen-neutrality. N-neutrality strives to offset Nr releases an entity exerts on the environment from the release of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to the environment by reducing it and by offsetting the Nr releases elsewhere. N-neutrality also aims to increase awareness about the consequences of unintentional releases of nitrogen to the environment. N-neutrality is composed of two quantified elements: Nr released by an entity (e.g. on the basis of the N footprint) and Nr reduction from management and offset projects (N offset). It includes management strategies to reduce nitrogen losses before they occur (e.g., through energy conservation). Each of those elements faces specific challenges with regard to data availability and conceptual development. Impacts of Nr releases to the environment are manifold, and the impact profile of one unit of Nr release depends strongly on the compound released and the local susceptibility to Nr. As such, N-neutrality is more difficult to conceptualize and calculate than C-neutrality. We developed a workable conceptual framework for N-neutrality which was adapted for the 6th International Nitrogen Conference (N2013, Kampala, November 2013). Total N footprint of the surveyed meals at N2013 was 66 kg N. A total of US 3050 was collected from the participants and used to offset the conference’s N footprint by supporting the UN Millennium Village cluster Ruhiira in South-Western Uganda. The concept needs further development in particular to better incorporate the spatio-temporal variability of impacts and to standardize the methods to quantify the required N offset to neutralize the Nr releases impact. Criteria for compensation projects need to be sharply defined to allow the development of a market for N offset certificates.

  11. Neutral hydrogen survey of andromeda galaxy.

    PubMed

    Brundage, W D; Kraus, J D

    1966-07-22

    A neutral hydrogen survey of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) has been conducted with the 260-foot (80m) Ohio State University radio telescope. The neutral hydrogen is concentrated in the spiral arm regions, with but relatively small amounts near the center of the galaxy. Similar deficiencies have been found near the center of M33 and our galaxy, suggesting similar evolutionary processes in the three galaxies.

  12. Neutral-particle-beam production and injection

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.; Pyle, R.

    1982-07-01

    This paper is divided into two sections: the first is a discussion of the interactions of neutral beams with confined plasmas, the second is concerned with the production and diagnosis of the neutral beams. In general we are dealing with atoms, molecules, and ions of the isotopes of hydrogen, but some heavier elements (for example, oxygen) will be mentioned. The emphasis will be on single-particle collisions; selected atomic processes on surfaces will be included.

  13. Neutral particle kinetics in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tendler, M.; Heifetz, D.

    1986-05-01

    The theory of neutral particle kinetics treats the transport of mass, momentum, and energy in a plasma due to neutral particles which themselves are unaffected by magnetic fields. This transport affects the global power and particle balances in fusion devices, as well as profile control and plasma confinement quality, particle and energy fluxes onto device components, performance of pumping systems, and the design of diagnostics and the interpretation of their measurements. This paper reviews the development of analytic, numerical, and Monte Carlo methods of solving the time-independent Boltzmann equation describing neutral kinetics. These models for neutral particle behavior typically use adaptations of techniques developed originally for computing neutron transport, due to the analogy between the two phenomena, where charge-exchange corresponds to scattering and ionization to absorption. Progress in the field depends on developing multidimensional analytic methods, and obtaining experimental data for the physical processes of wall reflection, the neutral/plasma interaction, and for processes in fusion devices which are directly related to neutral transport, such as H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission rates, plenum pressures, and charge-exchange emission spectra.

  14. The Phobos neutral and ionized torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Curry, S. M.; Fatemi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Charged particle sputtering, micrometeoroid impact vaporization, and photon-stimulated desorption are fundamental processes operating at airless surfaces throughout the solar system. At larger bodies, such as Earth's Moon and several of the outer planet moons, these processes generate tenuous surface-bound exospheres that have been observed by a variety of methods. Phobos and Deimos, in contrast, are too gravitationally weak to keep ejected neutrals bound and, thus, are suspected to generate neutral tori in orbit around Mars. While these tori have not yet been detected, the distribution and density of both the neutral and ionized components are of fundamental interest. We combine a neutral Monte Carlo model and a hybrid plasma model to investigate both the neutral and ionized components of the Phobos torus. We show that the spatial distribution of the neutral torus is highly dependent on each individual species (due to ionization rates that span nearly 4 orders of magnitude) and on the location of Phobos with respect to Mars. Additionally, we present the flux distribution of torus pickup ions throughout the Martian system and estimate typical pickup ion fluxes. We find that the predicted pickup ion fluxes are too low to perturb the ambient plasma, consistent with previous null detections by spacecraft around Mars.

  15. Fragmentation functions of neutral mesons π0 and k0 with Laplace transform approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavi-Shahri, F.; Tehrani, S. Atashbar; Zarei, M.

    2016-06-01

    With an analytical solutions of DGLAP evolution equations based on the Laplace transform method, we find the fragmentation functions (FFs) of neutral mesons, π0 and k0 at NLO approximation. We also calculated the total fragmentation functions of these mesons and compared them with experimental data and those from global fits. The results show a good agreement between our solutions and other models and they are compatible with experimental data.

  16. Dynamic fluorescence quenching of quinine sulfate dication by chloride ion in ionic and neutral micellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Sunita; Varma Y, Tej Varma; Pant, Debi D.

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescence quenching of Quinine sulfate dication (QSD) by chloride-ion (Cl-) in micellar environments of anionic, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and neutral, triton X-100 (TX-100) in aqueous phase has been investigated by time-resolved and steady- state fluorescence measurements. The quenching follows linear Stern-Volmer relation in micellar solutions and is dynamic in nature.

  17. Neutralization and Acid Dissociation of Hydrogen Carbonate Ion: A Thermochemical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koga, Nobuyoshi; Shigedomi, Kana; Kimura, Tomoyasu; Tatsuoka, Tomoyuki; Mishima, Saki

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory inquiry into the thermochemical relationships in the reaction between aqueous solutions of NaHCO[subscript 3] and NaOH is described. The enthalpy change for this reaction, delta[subscript r]H, and that for neutralization of strong acid and NaOH(aq), delta[subscript n]H, are determined calorimetrically; the explanation for the…

  18. Thermal coupling between neutral hydrogen and protons in the fast solar wind: Models and inferences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Lorraine Ann

    2001-10-01

    In response to the recent Spartan and UVCS/SOHO observations of Ly α spectral line profiles in the inner corona implying large temperature anisotropies and proton temperatures as high as 6 × 106 K [ Kohl et al., 1996, 1997]1, we investigate the thermal coupling between neutral hydrogen atoms and protons in the fast solar wind. We include charge exchange between neutrals and protons, radiative recombination, collisional ionization of the neutrals, and the effects of Alfvén waves, described by a single frequency or a spectrum. We follow the approach developed by Olsen et al. [1994]2 to incorporate the collisional interaction between the neutrals and protons and the resulting wave motion of the neutrals. A fluid approach is used in which the neutrals are treated as test particles in a background electron- proton solar wind driven out from the Sun by thermal and Alfvén wave pressure against gravity. Coulomb collisions and thermal conductivity of the electrons and protons are included, as well as the allowance for non- radially expanding flow tubes and additional heating to the electrons and protons. We study the behavior of the neutral hydrogen in the solar wind for cases with isotropic and anisotropic proton temperatures. Our model solutions show, and we confirm by analytical calculation, that the effective temperature, T⊥H(eff) , incorporating both random and wave motions of the neutral hydrogen, is independent of Alfvén wave frequency. We find that for solutions with either isotropic or anisotropic proton temperatures the proton and neutral hydrogen effective temperatures and outflow velocities are comparable, with a temperature difference less than 5 × 105 K, below 3 Rs. For plasma conditions typical of the fast solar wind, these results imply that the measured Ly α spectral line profiles, from which the neutral hydrogen temperature, anisotropy ratio, and outflow velocity are inferred, are equivalent to measurements of protons below 3 R s. To relate our

  19. Characterization of elusive neutrals and ions by neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Fura, A.

    1992-01-01

    Neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry (NRMS) provides a dilute gas phase environment where a variety of neutral species can be produced and characterized. In NRMS fast neutrals are produced from mass-selected precursor ions. The neutrals can undergo isomerization or dissociation by using a low ionization-energy target for neutralization or by angular resolution. The neutrals are reionized to positive or negative ions that are mass analyzed and detected. Angular resolution is used here to obtain NR spectra of isomeric butenes and N-hexenes. A study of oxirane produced an energy surface of five isomers, showing C-C favored over C-O bond rupture. [center dot]CH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]O[center dot], [sup +]CH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]O[center dot], and the oxirane cation represent bound structures, as do [center dot]CH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]O[sup [minus

  20. Automated facial coding software outperforms people in recognizing neutral faces as neutral from standardized datasets

    PubMed Central

    Lewinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about people’s accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective judge – automated facial coding (AFC) software. I hypothesized that the software would outperform humans in recognizing neutral faces because of the inherently objective nature of computer algorithms. Results confirmed this hypothesis. I provided the first-ever evidence that computer software (90%) was more accurate in recognizing neutral faces than people were (59%). I posited two theoretical mechanisms, i.e., smile-as-a-baseline and false recognition of emotion, as possible explanations for my findings. PMID:26441761

  1. Comparison of JEV neutralization assay using pseudotyped JEV with the conventional plaque-reduction neutralization test.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Min, Kyung-Il; Park, Ki Hoon; Choi, Hyo Jung; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Ahn, Chi-Young; Hong, Young-Jin; Kim, Young Bong

    2014-05-01

    We previously reported the development of a neutralization assay system for evaluating Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) neutralizing antibody (NAb) using pseudotyped-JEV (JEV-PV). JEV-PV-based neutralization assay offers several advantages compared with the current standard plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT), including simplicity, safety, and speed. To evaluate the suitability of the JEV-PV assay as new replacement neutralization assay, we compared its repeatability, reproducibility, specificity, and correlated its results with those obtained using the PRNT. These analyses showed a close correlation between the results obtained with the JEV-PV assay and the PRNT, using the 50% plaque reduction method as a standard for measuring NAb titers to JEV. The validation results met all analytical acceptance criteria. These results suggest that the JEV-PV assay could serve as a safe and simple method for measuring NAb titer against JEV and could be used as an alternative approach for assaying the potency of JEV neutralization.

  2. Modeling Neutral Densities Downstream of a Gridded Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    The details of a model for determining the neutral density downstream of a gridded ion thruster are presented. An investigation of the possible sources of neutrals emanating from and surrounding a NEXT ion thruster determined that the most significant contributors to the downstream neutral density include discharge chamber neutrals escaping through the perforated grids, neutrals escaping from the neutralizer, and vacuum facility background neutrals. For the neutral flux through the grids, near- and far-field equations are presented for rigorously determining the neutral density downstream of a cylindrical aperture. These equations are integrated into a spherically-domed convex grid geometry with a hexagonal array of apertures for determining neutral densities downstream of the ion thruster grids. The neutrals escaping from an off-center neutralizer are also modeled assuming diffuse neutral emission from the neutralizer keeper orifice. Finally, the effect of the surrounding vacuum facility neutrals is included and assumed to be constant. The model is used to predict the neutral density downstream of a NEXT ion thruster with and without neutralizer flow and a vacuum facility background pressure. The impacts of past simplifying assumptions for predicting downstream neutral densities are also examined for a NEXT ion thruster.

  3. Neutralization of adenoviruses: kinetics, stoichiometry, and mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfart, C

    1988-01-01

    Kinetic curves for neutralization of adenovirus type 2 with anti-hexon serum revealed no lag periods even when the serum was highly diluted or when the temperature was lowered to 4 degrees C, thus indicating a single-hit mechanism. Multiplicity curves determined with anti-hexon serum displayed a linear correlation between the degree of neutralization and dilution of antiserum. Neutralization values experimentally obtained under steady-state conditions fully fitted a single-hit model based on Poisson calculations. Quantitation of the amount of 125I-labeled type-specific anti-hexon antibodies needed for full neutralization of adenovirus showed that 1.4 antibodies were attached per virion under such conditions. Virions already attached to HeLa cells at 4 degrees C were, to a large extent, neutralizable by anti-hexon serum, whereas anti-fiber and anti-penton base antisera were negative. It is suggested that adenovirus may be neutralized by two pathways: aggregation of the virions (extracellular neutralization) as performed by anti-fiber antibodies and blocking of virion entrance from the acidic endosomes into the cytoplasm (intracellular neutralization). The latter effect could be obtained by (i) covering of the penton bases, as performed by anti-penton base antibodies, thereby preventing interaction between the penton bases and the endosomal membrane, which results in trapping of virions within endosomes, and (ii) inhibition of the low-pH-induced conformational change of the viral capsid, which seems to occur in the endosomes and is necessary for proper exposure of the penton bases, as performed by anti-hexon antibodies. Images PMID:3373570

  4. New applications of ORNL neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C. C.; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    1998-01-01

    The injection of energetic hydrogen and deuterium atoms has been used to heat plasmas in various fusion experimental devices including tokamaks, mirrors, and stellarators. The neutral beam injection is a proven plasma heating technique for increasing plasma densities, temperatures, and pressures. For this fusion endeavor, scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have developed multimegawatt neutral beam injectors. Various ORNL injectors have been used for studying properties of beam-heated plasmas in Oak Ridge Tokamak (ORMAK), Impurity Study Experiment-B (ISX-B), Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), Princeton Large Torus (PLT), and Princeton Divertor Experiment (PDX) in the United States and in Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak (START) in the United Kingdom. By using a 30-cm and 100-A ion source, each ORNL neutral beam injector is capable of injecting >1.5 MW of hydrogen atoms at 50-keV for a pulse length up to 0.5 s. For increasing plasma densities and raising plasma temperatures in START, one such injector was installed and commissioned during 1995. The initial goal was to provide an injected neutral beam power of more than 0.5 MW at a beam energy of 40 keV for 20 ms. Addition of a getter pump has allowed the beam power to be raised to 1 MW at 33 keV. Recent experiments have demonstrated that neutral beam heating can play a big role in raising plasma pressures to a record volume-average beta value over 30%. ORNL neutral beam injectors have been approved for plasma heating experiments on both the TJ-II stellarator at CIEMAT, Spain, and the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) at Culham Science Centre (Culham). Two proven ORNL NE injectors are being installed at the TJ-II facility. Additional ORNL beam equipment is being used to implement two 5-s NE injectors at the MAST facility. In this paper, we report and discuss the progress and plans for these neutral beam activities.

  5. Energy neutral and low power wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orhan, Oner

    Wireless sensor nodes are typically designed to have low cost and small size. These design objectives impose restrictions on the capacity and efficiency of the transceiver components and energy storage units that can be used. As a result, energy becomes a bottleneck and continuous operation of the sensor network requires frequent battery replacements, increasing the maintenance cost. Energy harvesting and energy efficient transceiver architectures are able to overcome these challenges by collecting energy from the environment and utilizing the energy in an intelligent manner. However, due to the nature of the ambient energy sources, the amount of useful energy that can be harvested is limited and unreliable. Consequently, optimal management of the harvested energy and design of low power transceivers pose new challenges for wireless network design and operation. The first part of this dissertation is on energy neutral wireless networking, where optimal transmission schemes under different system setups and objectives are investigated. First, throughput maximization for energy harvesting two-hop networks with decode-and-forward half-duplex relays is studied. For a system with two parallel relays, various combinations of the following four transmission modes are considered: Broadcast from the source, multi-access from the relays, and successive relaying phases I and II. Next, the energy cost of the processing circuitry as well as the transmission energy are taken into account for communication over a broadband fading channel powered by an energy harvesting transmitter. Under this setup, throughput maximization, energy maximization, and transmission completion time minimization problems are studied. Finally, source and channel coding for an energy-limited wireless sensor node is investigated under various energy constraints including energy harvesting, processing and sampling costs. For each objective, optimal transmission policies are formulated as the solutions of a

  6. Species ages in neutral biodiversity models.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Ryan A; O'Dwyer, James P

    2014-05-01

    Biogeography seeks to understand the mechanisms that drive biodiversity across long temporal and large spatial scales. Theoretical models of biogeography can be tested by comparing their predictions of quantities such as species ages against empirical estimates. It has previously been claimed that the neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography predicts species ages that are unrealistically long. Any improved theory of biodiversity must rectify this problem, but first it is necessary to quantify the problem precisely. Here we provide analytical expressions for species ages in neutral biodiversity communities. We analyse a spatially implicit metacommunity model and solve for both the zero-sum and non-zero-sum cases. We explain why our new expressions are, in the context of biodiversity, usually more appropriate than those previously imported from neutral molecular evolution. Because of the time symmetry of the spatially implicit neutral model, our expressions also lead directly to formulas for species persistence times and species lifetimes. We use our new expressions to estimate species ages of forest trees under a neutral model and find that they are about an order of magnitude shorter than those predicted previously but still unrealistically long. In light of our results, we discuss different models of biogeography that may solve the problem of species ages.

  7. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  8. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.; Haselton, Halsey H.; Stirling, William L.; Whealton, John H.

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  9. Midplane Neutral Density Profiles in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, D. P.; Scotti, F.; Bell, R. E.; Leblanc, B. P.; Raman, R.

    2013-10-01

    The experimental determination of neutral densities in tokamak plasmas from line radiation is only accurate in the narrow region in which both the excitation rate and neutral density are significant; elsewhere the result is dominated by noise. We propose an alternative, simulation based inversion procedure utilizing tools developed in the validation of the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code against Gas Puff Imaging camera data. Here, the Balmer- β emission rate recorded by an absolutely calibrated tangentially viewing camera is used to quantify a simulated, ad hoc neutral gas source at the vacuum vessel wall. This procedure yields absolute radial profiles of deuterium atoms and molecules at midplane. The validity of this characterization of the gas source is confirmed by the similarity of the shapes of the simulated and observed light emission profiles. We also compare the resulting neutral pressures at the vessel walls with data from midplane micro-ion gauges. This work supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  10. Focusing and neutralization of intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Simon S.; Anders, Andre; Bieniosek, F.M.; Eylon, Shmuel; Henestroza, Enrique; Roy, Prabir; Shuman, Derek; Waldron, William; Sharp, William; Rose, Dave; Welch, Dale; Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Eric

    2003-05-01

    In heavy ion inertial confinement fusion systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. Effective plasma neutralization of intense ion beams through the target chamber is essential for the viability of an economically competitive heavy ion fusion power plant. The physics of neutralized drift has been studied extensively with PIC simulations. To provide quantitative comparisons of theoretical predictions with experiment, the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory has completed the construction and has begun experimentation with the NTX (Neutralized Transport Experiment) as shown in Figure 1. The experiment consists of 3 phases, each with physics issues of its own. Phase 1 is designed to generate a very high brightness potassium beam with variable perveance, using a beam aperturing technique. Phase 2 consists of magnetic transport through four pulsed quadrupoles. Here, beam tuning as well as the effects of phase space dilution through higher order nonlinear fields must be understood. In Phase 3, a converging ion beam at the exit of the magnetic section is transported through a drift section with plasma sources for beam neutralization, and the final spot size is measured under various conditions of neutralization. In this paper, we present first results from all 3 phases of the experiment.

  11. Electromarking solution

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jonathan S.; Harper, William L.; Peck, Charles G.

    1976-06-22

    This invention is directed to an aqueous halogen-free electromarking solution which possesses the capacity for marking a broad spectrum of metals and alloys selected from different classes. The aqueous solution comprises basically the nitrate salt of an amphoteric metal, a chelating agent, and a corrosion-inhibiting agent.

  12. Neutral Site Planning Project, Final Report. Volume I: Neutral Site Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Providence School Dept., RI.

    This report documents the process, findings, and support data of the Neutral Site Planning Project (NSPP) regarding a proposed magnet school program in Providence, Rhode Island. The need for a neutral site school that is accessible to a substantial number of students from different racial/ethnic backgrounds in Providence is discussed and an…

  13. When neutral turns significant: brain dynamics of rapidly formed associations between neutral stimuli and emotional contexts.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Bort, Carlos; Löw, Andreas; Wendt, Julia; Dolcos, Florin; Hamm, Alfons O; Weymar, Mathias

    2016-09-01

    The ability to associate neutral stimuli with motivationally relevant outcomes is an important survival strategy. In this study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate brain dynamics of associative emotional learning when participants were confronted with multiple heterogeneous information. Participants viewed 144 different objects in the context of 144 different emotional and neutral background scenes. During each trial, neutral objects were shown in isolation and then paired with the background scene. All pairings were presented twice to compare ERPs in response to neutral objects before and after single association. After single pairing, neutral objects previously encoded in the context of emotional scenes evoked a larger P100 over occipital electrodes compared to objects that were previously paired with neutral scenes. Likewise, larger late positive potentials (LPPs) were observed over parieto-occipital electrodes (450-750 ms) for objects previously associated with emotional relative to neutral contexts. The LPP - but not P100 - enhancement was also related to subjective object/context binding. Taken together, our ERP data provide evidence for fast emotional associative learning, as reflected by heightened perceptual and sustained elaborative processing for neutral information previously encountered in emotional contexts. These findings could assist in understanding binding mechanisms in stress and anxiety, as well as in addiction and eating-related disorders. PMID:27337689

  14. Detection of neutralizing antibodies against Bluetongue virus serotype 8 by an optimized plasma neutralization test.

    PubMed

    Worwa, Gabriella; Chaignat, Valérie; Feldmann, Julia; Thür, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    The neutralization test is used commonly for quantifying neutralizing antibodies and for distinguishing among different virus serotypes (serotyping). Due to the co-circulation of multiple serotypes of Bluetongue virus (BTV), the neutralization test has become an important surveillance method in Europe. However, the existence of different protocols makes test standardization and interpretation of results difficult. The current paper describes the development of a neutralization test using plasma and addresses the factors critical for detection of neutralizing antibodies against BTV serotype 8 (BTV-8), such as virus propagation, stability of virus infectivity and origin of the BTV-8 strain. The results indicated that animals exposed to the Northern European BTV-8 strain developed low neutralizing antibody titers, particularly after vaccination and experimental infection. Although clearly ELISA-positive, these samples often yielded false negative results when tested by the neutralization test using the OIE recommended virus concentration of 100 TCID₅₀/50 μl. The sensitivity of the neutralization test could be improved significantly with retained specificity by using a reduced TCID₅₀ and the homologous European BTV-8 strain instead of the South African reference strain.

  15. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Nick S.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite available antivirals and vaccines, influenza infections continue to be a major cause of mortality worldwide. Vaccination generally induces an effective, but strain-specific antibody response. As the virus continually evolves, new vaccines have to be administered almost annually when a novel strain becomes dominant. Furthermore, the sporadic emerging resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors among circulating strains suggests an urgent need for new therapeutic agents. Recently, several cross-reactive antibodies have been described, which neutralize an unprecedented spectrum of influenza viruses. These broadly neutralizing antibodies generally target conserved functional regions on the major influenza surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). The characterization of their neutralization breadth and epitopes on HA could stimulate the development of new antibody-based antivirals and broader influenza vaccines. PMID:23583287

  16. Landau-like states in neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Ågren, Hans; Balatsky, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    We show the emergence of a new type of dispersion relation for neutral atoms with an interesting similarity to the spectrum of two-dimensional electrons in an applied perpendicular constant magnetic field. These neutral atoms can be confined in toroidal optical traps and give quasi-Landau spectra. In strong contrast to the equidistant infinitely degenerate Landau levels for charged particles, the spectral gap for such two-dimensional neutral particles increases in particular electric-field configurations. The idea in the paper is motivated by the development in cold atom experiments and builds on the seminal paper of Aharonov and Casher [Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 319 (1984), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.53.319].

  17. Methods for neutralizing anthrax or anthrax spores

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, Mark A; Vivekandanda, Jeevalatha; Holwitt, Eric A; Kiel, Johnathan L

    2013-02-26

    The present invention concerns methods, compositions and apparatus for neutralizing bioagents, wherein bioagents comprise biowarfare agents, biohazardous agents, biological agents and/or infectious agents. The methods comprise exposing the bioagent to an organic semiconductor and exposing the bioagent and organic semiconductor to a source of energy. Although any source of energy is contemplated, in some embodiments the energy comprises visible light, ultraviolet, infrared, radiofrequency, microwave, laser radiation, pulsed corona discharge or electron beam radiation. Exemplary organic semiconductors include DAT and DALM. In certain embodiments, the organic semiconductor may be attached to one or more binding moieties, such as an antibody, antibody fragment, or nucleic acid ligand. Preferably, the binding moiety has a binding affinity for one or more bioagents to be neutralized. Other embodiments concern an apparatus comprising an organic semiconductor and an energy source. In preferred embodiments, the methods, compositions and apparatus are used for neutralizing anthrax spores.

  18. Neutral-beam-injection systems for reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Pyle, R.V.

    1983-06-01

    Increasing effort is being put into engineering designs of reactors and reactor-like magnetic confinement experiments. A central question concerns the methods of heating, fueling, and maintaining the plasmas, functions that primarily are now performed by neutral beams. Planning in the USA does not include the use of neutral beams on tokamaks in the 1990's and beyond. Tandem mirrors, however, will use energetic beams (sloshing ion beams) in the end plugs to produce electrostatic potentials that will confine plasma ions. These systems will be based on the production, acceleration, transport, and neutralization of negative hydrogen-ion (D/sup -/), multiampere beams with energies of 200-to 500-keV. In addition, lower-energy D and T beams may be used. These systems must operate steady state, with high reliability, and be compatible with radiation from a D-T burning plasma.

  19. The control of powerful neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Theil, E.; Jacobson, V.

    1986-05-02

    While significant progress has been made in the development of neutral beams for the heating and sustaining of plasmas in large fusion experiments, the control of such devices has largely been a matter of hardware interlocks and operator experience. The need for computer-assisted control becomes more evident, however, with the initiation of multi-beamline experiments. This paper describes a software system that incorporates simple mathematical models coupled to Kalman filters for control of the high power (6 to 8 MW) beams currently under development at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility. Among the principal features of the system are: reduction of a large number of operator variables to just a few (usually one or two); the ability to describe most of the major neutral beams in use and under development; a foundation resting on statistical data analysis and control system principles rather than rules-of-thumb.

  20. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, O.; Wang, J.

    2011-05-20

    Full particle PIC simulations are performed to study the neutralization of an ion beam in the cohesionless, mesothermal regime. Simulations further confirmed that neutralization is achieved through interactions between the trapped electrons and the potential well established by the propagation of the beam front along the beam direction and is not through plasma instabilities as previous studies suggested. In the transverse direction, the process is similar to that of the expansion of mesothermal plasma into vacuum. Parametric simulations are also performed to investigate the effects of beam radius and domain boundary condition on the neutralization process. The results suggests that, while the qualitative behavior may be similar in ground tests, quantitative parameters such as the beam potential will be affected significantly by the vacuum chamber because of the limits imposed on the expansion process by the finite chamber space.

  1. 46 CFR 120.376 - Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 120.376 Grounded distribution systems... distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral grounded. (c) The neutral or each... generator is connected to the bus, except the neutral of an emergency power generation system must...

  2. Neutral naturalness from orbifold Higgs models.

    PubMed

    Craig, Nathaniel; Knapen, Simon; Longhi, Pietro

    2015-02-13

    We present a general class of natural theories in which the Higgs boson is a pseudo-Goldstone boson in an orbifolded gauge theory. The symmetry protecting the Higgs boson at low energies is an accidental global symmetry of the quadratic action, rather than a full continuous symmetry. The lightest degrees of freedom protecting the weak scale carry no standard model (SM) quantum numbers and interact with visible matter principally through the Higgs portal. This opens the door to the systematic study of "neutral naturalness": natural theories with SM-neutral states that are as yet untested by the LHC.

  3. Photoproduction of neutral pions off protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crede, V.; Sparks, N.; Wilson, A.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bantes, R.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Castelijns, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, Chr.; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, P.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kammer, S.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Löhner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V. A.; Novinski, D.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Sokhoyan, V.; Süle, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch.

    2011-11-01

    Photoproduction of neutral pions has been studied with the CBELSA/TAPS detector in the reaction γp→pπ0 for photon energies between 0.85 and 2.50 GeV. The π0 mesons are observed in their dominant neutral decay mode: π0→γγ. For the first time, the differential cross sections cover the very forward region, θc.m.<60∘. A partial-wave analysis of these data within the Bonn-Gatchina framework observes the high-mass resonances G17(2190), D13(2080), and D15(2070).

  4. High-current plasma contactor neutralizer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Williamson, W. S.; Matossian, J. N.; Vourgourakis, E. J.; Burch, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    A plasma-contactor neutralizer system is described, for the stabilizing the Orbiter's potential during flights of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science missions. The plasma contactor neutralizer will include a Xe plasma source that can provide steady-state ion-emission currents of up to 1.5 A. The Orbiter's potential will be maintained near that of the surrounding space plasma during electron-beam accelerator firings through a combination of ion emission from the Xe plasma source and electron collection from the ambient space plasma. Configuration diagrams and block diagrams are presented along with the performance characteristics of the system.

  5. Neutral Beam Ion Confinement in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; S.S. Medley; and A.L. Roquemore

    2001-07-24

    Neutral-beam (NB) heating in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) began in September 2000 using up to 5 MW of 80 keV deuterium (D) beams. An initial assessment of beam ion confinement has been made using neutron detectors, a neutral particle analyzer (NPA), and a Faraday cup beam ion loss probe. Preliminary neutron results indicate that confinement may be roughly classical in quiescent discharges, but the probe measurements do not match a classical loss model. MHD activity, especially reconnection events (REs) causes substantial disturbance of the beam ion population.

  6. Theory of neutral clustering for growing populations.

    PubMed

    Houchmandzadeh, Bahram

    2009-11-01

    The spatial distribution of most species in nature is nonuniform. We have shown recently [B. Houchmandzadeh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 078103 (2008)] on an experimental ecological community of amoeba that the most basic facts of life--birth and death--are enough to cause considerable aggregation which cannot be smoothened by random movements of the organisms. This clustering, termed neutral and always present, is independent of external causes and social interaction. We develop here the theoretical groundwork of this phenomenon by explicitly computing the pair-correlation function and the variance to mean ratio of the above neutral model and its comparison to numerical simulations. PMID:20365019

  7. Theory of neutral clustering for growing populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houchmandzadeh, Bahram

    2009-11-01

    The spatial distribution of most species in nature is nonuniform. We have shown recently [B. Houchmandzadeh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 078103 (2008)] on an experimental ecological community of amoeba that the most basic facts of life—birth and death—are enough to cause considerable aggregation which cannot be smoothened by random movements of the organisms. This clustering, termed neutral and always present, is independent of external causes and social interaction. We develop here the theoretical groundwork of this phenomenon by explicitly computing the pair-correlation function and the variance to mean ratio of the above neutral model and its comparison to numerical simulations.

  8. PDX neutral-beam reionization losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Dylla, H.F.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Moore, R.; Schilling, G.; Stewart, L.D.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1982-02-01

    Reionization losses for 1.5 MW H/sup 0/ and 2 MW D/sup 0/ neutral beams injected into the PDX tokamak were studied using pressure gauges, photo-transistors, thermocouples, surface shielding, and surface sample analysis. Considerable outgassing of conventionally prepared 304SS ducts occurred during initial injections and gradually decreased with the cumulative absorption of beam power. Reionization power losses are presently about 5% in the ducts and about 12% total for a beamline including the duct. Present duct pressures are attributed primarily to gas from the ion source and neutralizer with much smaller contributions from residual wall desorption. Physical mechanisms for the observed duct outgassing are discussed.

  9. Apparatus for neutralization of accelerated ions

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.; Frank, Alan M.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for neutralization of a beam of accelerated ions, such as hydrogen negative ions (H.sup.-), using relatively efficient strip diode lasers which emit monochromatically at an appropriate wavelength (.lambda. = 8000 A for H.sup.- ions) to strip the excess electrons by photodetachment. A cavity, formed by two or more reflectors spaced apart, causes the laser beams to undergo multiple reflections within the cavity, thus increasing the efficiency and reducing the illumination required to obtain an acceptable percentage (.about. 85%) of neutralization.

  10. Weak neutral currents and collapse initiated supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.

    1993-03-19

    Since 1974 the neutrino processes mediated by neutral currents have been a part of supernova (SN) modeling calculations. In this report only present day SN calculations will be discussed. First I will give brief description of the SN computer model and an outline of the explosion process as depicted by that model. Then I will discuss the role weak neutral current (WNC) processes play in this explosion process. Finally, I will discus inelastic scattering of tau neutrinos by heavy elements in WNC or Earth as a mechanism for measuring the mass of tau neutrino.

  11. Neutral reactors on shunt compensated EHV lines

    SciTech Connect

    Atmuri, S.R.; Thallam, R.S.; Gerlach, D.W.; Lundquist, T.G.; Selin, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper examines the applications of a neutral reactor in limiting resonance overvoltages induced on deenergized conductors due to parallel energized circuits and stuck breaker conditions. These applications are demonstrated through the planned 243 mile long Mead-Phoenix 500 kV line running on the same right of way as the existing Mead-Liberty 345 kV line. Reducing the secondary arc current during single pole reclosing is also examined. In addition to its applications, a procedure for sizing, rating and protection of the neutral reactor is explained.

  12. Modelling of the process of fragmentation and vaporization of non-reacting liquid droplets in high-enthalpy gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefyev, K. Yu.; Voronetsky, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    The intensification of the fragmentation and vaporization of liquid droplets in two-phase flows with the gas stagnation temperature Tg = 800-2500 K is an important scientific and technological problem. One should note that despite a high practical importance the mechanism of the vaporization of droplets with their preliminary gas-dynamic fragmentation in high-enthalpy flows has been studied insufficiently completely and requires additional research. The paper presents a mathematical model and the results of the computations of the fragmentation and vaporization of liquid droplets in subsonic and supersonic flows with a high stagnation temperature. A comparison of the obtained data with the experiments of other authors has been done. The extension of the regions of the gas-dynamic fragmentation and droplet vaporization in flow ducts with a variable distribution of parameters has been estimated. The found peculiarities may be used at the design of energy installations of the promising samples of the aerospace technology and gas-dynamic pipes.

  13. Numerical Optimisation in Non Reacting Conditions of the Injector Geometry for a Continuous Detonation Wave Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, T.; Davidenko, D.; Dupoirieux, F.

    2015-06-01

    The paper presents the methodology and the results of a numerical study, which is aimed at the investigation and optimisation of different means of fuel and oxidizer injection adapted to rocket engines operating in the rotating detonation mode. As the simulations are achieved at the local scale of a single injection element, only one periodic pattern of the whole geometry can be calculated so that the travelling detonation waves and the associated chemical reactions can not be taken into account. Here, separate injection of fuel and oxidizer is considered because premixed injection is handicapped by the risk of upstream propagation of the detonation wave. Different associations of geometrical periodicity and symmetry are investigated for the injection elements distributed over the injector head. To analyse the injection and mixing processes, a nonreacting 3D flow is simulated using the LES approach. Performance of the studied configurations is analysed using the results on instantaneous and mean flowfields as well as by comparing the mixing efficiency and the total pressure recovery evaluated for different configurations.

  14. Experimental investigation of water droplet-air flow interaction in a non-reacting PEM fuel cell channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Angelo; Montello, Aaron D.; Guezennec, Yann G.; Pianese, Cesare

    It has been well documented that water production in PEM fuel cells occurs in discrete locations, resulting in the formation and growth of discrete droplets on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) surface within the gas flow channels (GFCs). This research uses a simulated fuel cell GFC with three transparent walls in conjunction with a high speed fluorescence photometry system to capture videos of dynamically deforming droplets. Such videos clearly show that the droplets undergo oscillatory deformation patterns. Although many authors have previously investigated the air flow induced droplet detachment, none of them have studied these oscillatory modes. The novelty of this work is to process and analyze the recorded videos to gather information on the droplets induced oscillation. Plots are formulated to indicate the dominant horizontal and vertical deformation frequency components over the range of sizes of droplets from formation to detachment. The system is also used to characterize droplet detachment size at a variety of channel air velocities. A simplified model to explain the droplet oscillation mechanism is provided as well.

  15. Comparison of sodium hypochlorite and sodium dichloroisocyanurate disinfectants: neutralization by serum.

    PubMed

    Coates, D

    1988-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) solutions containing 0-40% and 0-70% horse serum respectively. The degree of inactivation of NaOCl and of NaDCC solutions by different concentrations of horse serum is expressed in terms of a neutralization coefficient, which demonstrates that NaDCC solutions are less prone to inactivation by serum than are NaOCl solutions, the disparity diverging as serum concentration is increased. In 30% serum an NaDCC solution containing 4000 ppm of available chlorine exhibited similar bactericidal activity to an NaOCl solution containing 17,000 ppm available chlorine. PMID:2895139

  16. Dense Metal Plasma in a Solenoid for Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-10-30

    Space-charge neutralization is required to compress and focus a pulsed, high-current ion beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described approaches to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary space-charge compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means, by an array of movable Langmuir probes, by a small single probe, and by evaluating Stark broadening of the Balmer H beta spectral line. In the main approach described here, the plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. It is shown that the plasma is essentially hollow, as determined by the structure of the magnetic field, though the plasma density exceeds 1014 cm-3 in practically all zones of the solenoid volume if the ring electrode is placed a few centimeters off the center of the solenoid. The plasma is non-uniform and fluctuating, however, since its density exceeds the ion beam density it is believed that this approach could provide a practical solution to the space charge neutralization challenge.

  17. UAS Detection Classification and Neutralization: Market Survey 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Griffin, John Clark; Erdman, Matthew Kelly

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to briefly frame the challenges of detecting low, slow, and small (LSS) unmanned aerial systems (UAS). The conclusion drawn from internal discussions and external reports is the following; detection of LSS UAS is a challenging problem that can- not be achieved with a single detection modality for all potential targets. Classification of LSS UAS, especially classification in the presence of background clutter (e.g., urban environment) or other non-threating targets (e.g., birds), is under-explored. Though information of avail- able technologies is sparse, many of the existing options for UAS detection appear to be in their infancy (when compared to more established ground-based air defense systems for larger and/or faster threats). Companies currently providing or developing technologies to combat the UAS safety and security problem are certainly worth investigating, however, no company has provided the statistical evidence necessary to support robust detection, identification, and/or neutralization of LSS UAS targets. The results of a market survey are included that highlights potential commercial entities that could contribute some technology that assists in the detection, classification, and neutral- ization of a LSS UAS. This survey found no clear and obvious commercial solution, though recommendations are given for further investigation of several potential systems.

  18. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    SciTech Connect

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C.; Grierson, B. A.

    2015-10-15

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  19. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission.

    PubMed

    Chrystal, C; Burrell, K H; Grierson, B A; Pace, D C

    2015-10-01

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  20. Neutralization escape mutants define a dominant immunogenic neutralization site on hepatitis A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, J.T.; Lemon, S.M.

    1987-02-01

    Hepatitis A virus is an hepatotrophic human picornavirus which demonstrates little antigenic variability. To topologically map immunogenic sites on hepatitis A virus which elicit neutralizing antibodies, eight neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were evaluated in competition immunoassays employing radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and HM-175 virus. Whereas two antibodies (K3-4C8 and K3-2F2) bound to intimately overlapping epitopes, the epitope bound by a third antibody (B5-B3) was distinctly different as evidenced by a lack of competition between antibodies for binding to the virus. The other five antibodies variably blocked the binding of both K3-4C8-K3-2F2 and B5-B3, suggesting that these epitopes are closely spaced and perhaps part of a single neutralization immunogenic site. Several combinations of monoclonal antibodies blocked the binding of polyclonal human convalescent antibody by greater than 96%, indicating that the neutralization epitopes bound by these antibodies are immunodominant in humans. Spontaneously arising HM-175 mutants were selected for resistance to monoclonal antibody-mediated neutralization. Neutralization resistance was associated with reduced antibody binding. These results suggest that hepatitis A virus may differ from poliovirus in possessing a single, dominant neutralization immunogenic site and therefore may be a better candidate for synthetic peptide or antiidiotype vaccine development.

  1. Dynamics of evolutionary radiation under ecological neutrality.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takanori Mizuno; Chiba, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    The most spectacular phenomenon of evolutionary biota is the explosive radiation that occurs in depauperate environments in which there are fewer competitors and predators, such as oceanic islands and crater lakes. Adaptation to divergent niches has been proposed as a major cause for this accelerated speciation. Here, we show that neutral mutation, genetic drift, and neutral community dynamics are sufficient to lead to radiation. In addition, these processes yield overshooting dynamics with a decline in species richness in the later stages of radiation. We constructed an ecologically neutral model for a community on an island with a uniform environment. For the speciation process, we introduced a null model with minimal assumptions in which the incompatibilities between alleles in different lineages evolve by a random accumulation of mutations via genetic drift. Our simulations showed that the speciation rate, extinction rate and genetic variation of the species colonizing the island rapidly increased to a sharp peak followed by a decrease that approached zero. Because the extinction rate reached a peak later than the speciation rate, the species richness initially increased, but declined in the later stage, exhibiting "overshooting". The highest species richness was found for the largest island at the largest initial population size. Accordingly, speciation is accelerated by the large population size of depauperate biota, whereas it is decelerated with increasing species richness from the decreasing population size. Explosive radiation without ecological divergence can occur in depauperate environments via neutral stochastic processes. PMID:27297287

  2. OGO-6 neutral atmospheric composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taeusch, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    The continued analysis of data obtained from the neutral atmospheric composition experiment flown on OGO-V6 is discussed. The effort was directed toward the study of five specific areas of interest for which the OGO-V6 data were especially useful.

  3. Absence of neutral alkali atoms in rhodizite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnay, G.; Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Sioda, R.

    1966-01-01

    The formula CsB12Be4Al4O28 has been proposed by others for the mineral rhodizite. Electron-spin-resonance and magnetic susceptibility measurements prove the absence of neutral cesium atoms. An ionic formula CsB11Be4Al4O 26(OH)2is proposed.

  4. Separation of Acids, Bases, and Neutral Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Megumi; Mah, Helen M.; Sgarbi, Paulo W. M.; Lall, Manjinder S.; Ly, Tai Wei; Browne, Lois M.

    2003-01-01

    Separation of Acids, Bases, and Neutral Compounds requires the following software, which is available for free download from the Internet: Netscape Navigator, version 4.75 or higher, or Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 5.0 or higher; Chime plug-in, version compatible with your OS and browser (available from MDL); and Flash player, version 5 or higher (available from Macromedia).

  5. The neutral and ion tori of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, John D.; Smith, Howard T.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetosphere of Saturn is dominated by a large neutral close derived mainly from Enceladus.This cloud is ionized to form the plasma torus. We use a self-consistent model to find the neutralcloud and plasma densities and composition and show how changing source rates modify these parameters.

  6. Ion Acoustic Waves in Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.; McQuillen, P.; Killian, T. C.

    2010-08-06

    We photoionize laser-cooled atoms with a laser beam possessing spatially periodic intensity modulations to create ultracold neutral plasmas with controlled density perturbations. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging reveals that the density perturbations oscillate in space and time, and the dispersion relation of the oscillations matches that of ion acoustic waves, which are long-wavelength, electrostatic, density waves.

  7. If It's Neutral, It's Not Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strate, Lance

    2012-01-01

    Taking a media ecology perspective, this article argues that technology cannot be neutral, because it is a form of change, and it has an inherent bias based on the properties of its materials and methods. Additionally, the application of a technology is an intrinsic part of the technology itself, as is technique, instructions, software, or…

  8. The LIPSS search for light neutral bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev; Oliver K. Baker; Kevin Beard; George Biallas; James Boyce; Minarni Minarni; Roopchan Ramdon; Michelle D. Shinn; Penny Slocum

    2009-07-01

    An overview is presented of the LIPSS experimental search for very light neutral bosons using laser light from Jefferson Lab's Free Electron Laser. This facility provides very high power beams of photons over a large optical range, particularly at infrared wavelengths. Data has been collected in several experimental runs during the course of the past three years, most recently in the Fall of 2009.

  9. Semiconductor etching by hyperthermal neutral beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K. (Inventor); Giapis, Konstantinos P. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An at-least dual chamber apparatus and method in which high flux beams of fast moving neutral reactive species are created, collimated and used to etch semiconductor or metal materials from the surface of a workpiece. Beams including halogen atoms are preferably used to achieve anisotropic etching with good selectivity at satisfactory etch rates. Surface damage and undercutting are minimized.

  10. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  11. TPX Neutral Beam Injection System design

    SciTech Connect

    von Halle, A.; Bowen, O.N.; Edwards, J.W.

    1993-11-01

    The existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Neutral Beam system is proposed to be modified for long pulse operation on the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Day one of TPX will call for one TFTR beamline modified for 1000 second pulse lengths oriented co-directional to the plasma current. The system design will be capable of accommodating an additional co-directional and a single counter directional beamline. For the TPX conceptual design, every attempt was made to use existing Neutral Beam hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary systems, service infrastructure, and control systems. This paper describes the moderate modifications required to the power systems, the ion sources, and the beam impinged surfaces of the ion dumps, the calorimeters, the various beam scrapers, and the neutralizers. Also described are the minimal modifications required to the vacuum, cryogenic, and gas systems and the major modification of replacing the beamline-torus duct in its entirety. Operational considerations for Neutral Beam subsystems over 1000 second pulse lengths will be explored including proposed operating scenarios for full steady state operation.

  12. Neutralization of rainwater acidity at Kanpur, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Sheo Prasad; Sharma, Mukesh

    2010-07-01

    Particulate matter (PM) levels show significant seasonal variability and this can influence the neutralization of rainwater acidity. Months were grouped in two periods: monsoon (July to October) and non-monsoon (November to June) for studying the seasonal variability in PM and rainwater composition. To clearly establish the cause effect relationship of acid rain neutralization, a two tier model was proposed involving source apportionment of particulates at two levels: (i) ambient air and (ii) rainwater particulate interaction. For modelling purpose, PM10 (n = 100), soil (n = 4) and rainwater (n = 83) samples were collected at Kanpur, India during 2000-2002. The collected samples were analysed for metals and water soluble ion composition to employ factor analysis for source identification. Knowledge of statistical correlation and chemistry fundamentals were combined to estimate the sources for acid rain neutralization. NH4+ was a dominating ion responsible for neutralizing the acidity of rainwater in monsoon period and Ca2+ was dominating in non-monsoon period. Components of secondary particles (SO42- and NO3-) showed affinity with NH4+, signifying the major role that ammonia can play if present in excess of stoichiometric requirements.

  13. Method of purifying neutral organophosphorus extractants

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Renato

    1988-01-01

    A method for removing acidic contaminants from neutral mono and bifunctional organophosphorous extractants by contacting the extractant with a macroporous cation exchange resin in the H.sup.+ state followed by contact with a macroporous anion exchange resin in the OH.sup.- state, whereupon the resins take up the acidic contaminants from the extractant, purifying the extractant and improving its extraction capability.

  14. Diagnostics for neutral-beam-heated tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R.J.

    1982-12-01

    Diagnostic techniques for neutral-beam-heated tokamak plasmas fall into three categories: (1) magnetic diagnostics for measurements of gross stored energy, (2) profile diagnostics for measurements of stored thermal and beam energy, impurity content and plasma rotation, and (3) fast time resolution diagnostics to study MHD fluctuations and micro-turbulence.

  15. CP violation in neutral kaon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Buchalla, G.

    1997-05-01

    A brief review of the theoretical status of CP violation in decays of neutral kaons is presented. We focus on three important topics: {epsilon}, {epsilon}`/{epsilon} and K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{anti {nu}}.

  16. Selectionism and Neutralism in Molecular Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nei, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    Charles Darwin proposed that evolution occurs primarily by natural selection, but this view has been controversial from the beginning. Two of the major opposing views have been mutationism and neutralism. Early molecular studies suggested that most amino acid substitutions in proteins are neutral or nearly neutral and the functional change of proteins occurs by a few key amino acid substitutions. This suggestion generated an intense controversy over selectionism and neutralism. This controversy is partially caused by Kimura's definition of neutrality, which was too strict (|2Ns| ≤ 1). If we define neutral mutations as the mutations that do not change the function of gene products appreciably, many controversies disappear because slightly deleterious and slightly advantageous mutations are engulfed by neutral mutations. The ratio of the rate of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution to that of synonymous substitution is a useful quantity to study positive Darwinian selection operating at highly variable genetic loci, but it does not necessarily detect adaptively important codons. Previously, multigene families were thought to evolve following the model of concerted evolution, but new evidence indicates that most of them evolve by a birth-and-death process of duplicate genes. It is now clear that most phenotypic characters or genetic systems such as the adaptive immune system in vertebrates are controlled by the interaction of a number of multigene families, which are often evolutionarily related and are subject to birth-and-death evolution. Therefore, it is important to study the mechanisms of gene family interaction for understanding phenotypic evolution. Because gene duplication occurs more or less at random, phenotypic evolution contains some fortuitous elements, though the environmental factors also play an important role. The randomness of phenotypic evolution is qualitatively different from allele frequency changes by random genetic drift. However, there is

  17. Selectionism and neutralism in molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Nei, Masatoshi

    2005-12-01

    Charles Darwin proposed that evolution occurs primarily by natural selection, but this view has been controversial from the beginning. Two of the major opposing views have been mutationism and neutralism. Early molecular studies suggested that most amino acid substitutions in proteins are neutral or nearly neutral and the functional change of proteins occurs by a few key amino acid substitutions. This suggestion generated an intense controversy over selectionism and neutralism. This controversy is partially caused by Kimura's definition of neutrality, which was too strict (|2Ns|< or =1). If we define neutral mutations as the mutations that do not change the function of gene products appreciably, many controversies disappear because slightly deleterious and slightly advantageous mutations are engulfed by neutral mutations. The ratio of the rate of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution to that of synonymous substitution is a useful quantity to study positive Darwinian selection operating at highly variable genetic loci, but it does not necessarily detect adaptively important codons. Previously, multigene families were thought to evolve following the model of concerted evolution, but new evidence indicates that most of them evolve by a birth-and-death process of duplicate genes. It is now clear that most phenotypic characters or genetic systems such as the adaptive immune system in vertebrates are controlled by the interaction of a number of multigene families, which are often evolutionarily related and are subject to birth-and-death evolution. Therefore, it is important to study the mechanisms of gene family interaction for understanding phenotypic evolution. Because gene duplication occurs more or less at random, phenotypic evolution contains some fortuitous elements, though the environmental factors also play an important role. The randomness of phenotypic evolution is qualitatively different from allele frequency changes by random genetic drift. However, there is

  18. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator.

    PubMed

    Chitarin, G; Agostinetti, P; Marconato, N; Marcuzzi, D; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Sonato, P

    2012-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  19. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chitarin, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Marconato, N.; Marcuzzi, D.; Sartori, E.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.

    2012-02-15

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  20. Compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer with Ion Drifts, Temperatures and Neutral Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    In situ measurements of atmospheric neutral and ion composition and density, temperatures, ion drifts and neutral winds, are in high demand to study the dynamics of the ionosphere-theremosphere-mesosphere system. This paper presents a compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) with impended ion drifts and temperature, and neutral winds capability for in situ measurements of ions and neutrals H, He, N, O, N2, O2. The mass resolution M/dM is approximately 10 at an incoming energy range of 0-20eV. The goal is to resolve ion drifts in the range 0 to 3000m/sec with a resolution better than 50m/sec, and neutral winds in the range of 0 to 1000m/sec with similar resolution. For temperatures the goal is to cover a dynamic range of 0 to 5000K. The INMS is based on front end optics for ions and neutrals, pre acceleration, gated time of flight, top hat ESA, MCP detectors and compact electronics. The instrument is redundant for ions and neutrals with the ion and neutral sensor heads on opposite sides and with full electronics in the middle. The ion front end includes RPA for temperature scanning and neutral front end includes angular modulation and thermionic ionization and ion blocking grids. The electronics include fast electric gating, TOF electronics, TOF binning and C&DH digital electronics. The data package includes 400 mass bins each for ions and neutrals and key housekeeping data for instrument health and calibration. The data sampling can be commanded from 0.1 to 10 sec with 1sec nominal setting. The instrument has significant onboard storage capability and a data compression scheme. The mass spectrometer version of the instrument has been flown on the Exocube mission. The instrument occupied 1.5U volume, weighed only 560 g and required nominal power of 1.6W The ExoCube mission was designed to acquire global knowledge of in-situ densities of [H], [He], [O] and H+, He+, O+ in the upper ionosphere and lower exosphere in combination with incoherent scatter radar and

  1. A field-ionization neutral detector - FIND. [neutral particle mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, C. C.; Hsieh, K. C.; Fan, C. Y.; Swanson, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The field ionization neutral detector FIND operates according to the following principle: Neutral atoms are attracted toward the field ionization tips since they are polarized by the electric field of the tips. The atoms are singly ionized and repelled by the positive potential of the tips toward the detector situated behind a grid at ground potential. The ions deposit in the detector their kinetic energies, typically 26 keV, corresponding to the potential difference between the ionization region and the detector. Laboratory results show that FIND can have the resolution, sensitivities and durability required to perform in situ measurements of neutral H and He fluxes in interplanetary space, cometary halos and exospheres.

  2. Results on intense beam focusing and neutralization from the neutralized beam experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Greenway, W.G.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Vanecek, D.L.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Sefkow, A.B.; Sharp, W.M.

    2003-10-31

    We have demonstrated experimental techniques to provide active neutralization for space-charge dominated beams as well as to prevent uncontrolled ion beam neutralization by stray electrons. Neutralization is provided by a localized plasma injected from a cathode arc source. Unwanted secondary electrons produced at the wall by halo particle impact are suppressed using a radial mesh liner that is positively biased inside a beam drift tube. We present measurements of current transmission, beam spot size as a function of axial position, beam energy and plasma source conditions. Detailed comparisons with theory are also presented.

  3. Applications and implications of neutral versus non-neutral markers in molecular ecology.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Heather; Freeland, Joanna R

    2011-01-01

    The field of molecular ecology has expanded enormously in the past two decades, largely because of the growing ease with which neutral molecular genetic data can be obtained from virtually any taxonomic group. However, there is also a growing awareness that neutral molecular data can provide only partial insight into parameters such as genetic diversity, local adaptation, evolutionary potential, effective population size, and taxonomic designations. Here we review some of the applications of neutral versus adaptive markers in molecular ecology, discuss some of the advantages that can be obtained by supplementing studies of molecular ecology with data from non-neutral molecular markers, and summarize new methods that are enabling researchers to generate data from genes that are under selection.

  4. Thermal Coupling of Protons and Neutral Hydrogen in the Fast Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, L.; Habbal, S. R.

    1997-05-01

    Motivated by the recent Spartan and UVCS observations [Kohl et al. 1996] of hot protons with temperatures exceeding 4 x 10(6) K below 3.5 R_s in coronal holes, as inferred from the measured broadening of the Lyman alpha spectral line profile, we studied the thermal coupling of neutral hydrogen to protons in the presence of Alfven waves in the solar wind. The approach used is adopted from Olsen et al. [1994] in which the neutral hydrogen atoms are treated as test particles in a background electron-proton solar wind. The model computations show that an anisotropy in the neutral hydrogen temperature in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field develops in the inner corona well below 5 R_s for background solar wind solutions consistent with observational constraints of the high speed wind. In particular, we find that the neutral hydrogen temperature parallel to the magnetic field direction remains strongly coupled to the proton temperature, T_p, while the perpendicular neutral hydrogen temperature exceeds this by ~ 10(6) K for a wide range of proton flow speeds, densities and temperatures for a spectrum of Alfven waves. The neutral hydrogen effective temperature, T_{H(eff)}(perpendicular to ) , incorporating both random thermal motion and wave motion of the particles, is found to be independent of frequency and significantly less than the proton effective temperature, T_{p(eff)}, in the inner corona. Thus, without additional information about the waves, which would allow T_H(perpendicular to ) and T_p to be extracted from the models, T_{H(eff)}(perpendicular to ) provides an upper limit on T_p and a lower limit on T_{p(eff)}. However, with increasing proton temperature, the anisotropy in the inner corona decreases, with a temperature difference of < 8 x 10(5) K between the protons and neutrals below 3 R_s when the latter reach 6 x 10(6) K.

  5. Polyelectrolyte Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colby, Ralph H.

    2008-03-01

    Pierre-Gilles de Gennes once described polyelectrolytes as the ``least understood form of condensed matter''. In this talk, I will describe the state of the polyelectrolyte field before and after de Gennes' seminal contributions published 1976-1980. De Gennes clearly explained why electrostatic interactions only stretch the polyelectrolyte chains on intermediate scales in semidilute solution (between the electrostatic blob size and the correlation length) and why the scattering function has a peak corresponding to the correlation length (the distance to the next chain). Despite many other ideas being suggested since then, the simple de Gennes scaling picture of polyelectrolyte conformation in solution has stood the test of time. How that model is used today, including consequences for dynamics in polyelectrolyte solutions, and what questions remain, will clarify the importance of de Gennes' ideas.

  6. Neutral gas compression in the Alcator C-Mod divertor, experimental observations

    SciTech Connect

    Niemczewski, A.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; McCracken, G.

    1994-11-01

    One of the high heat flux solutions envisioned for ITER is the gas target divertor. This scheme requires high neutral pressure to be sustained in the divertor chamber with a minimal effect on the pressure in the main tokamak chamber (i.e. high gas compression). The neutral gas compression has been studied in the Alcator C-Mod closed divertor under various central and edge plasma conditions. The neutral pressure measured by a fast, in-situ, ionization gauge, installed behind the divertor target plate was compared with the midplane pressure, measured by a shielded Bayard-Alpert gauge. Divertor pressures up to 30 mTorr with compression factors p{sub div}/p{sub mid} {le} 70 have been observed. It has been found that the neutral pressure in the divertor does not depend strongly on the fueling location but rather on the core plasma density and the resulting divertor plasma regime. Divertor detachment leads to a considerable drop in the compression ratio, suggesting a partial {open_quotes}unplugging{close_quotes} of the divertor volume. An examination of the local particle flux balance in the divertor indicates that the single most important factor determining divertor pressure and compression is the private-flux plasma channel opacity to neutrals.

  7. ``We're all unisex anyway'': The persistent discourse of gender neutrality in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalves, Allison

    2015-03-01

    Doctoral physics students have stories about the kinds of actions, behaviours and ways of doing physics that enable them to be recognized as physicists. This presentation will illuminate some of these stories through a lens that scrutinizes how discourses about gender can shape both the stories that students tell and the behaviours they practice to achieve recognition in their field. Through observations, photo-elicitation, and life history interviews, eleven men and women shared stories about their experiences with physics, and the contexts that have enabled or constrained their participation in doctoral physics. The results of this study revealed that recognition was often achieved through the reproduction or reworking of persistent discourses of gender norms. This presentation will explore the particularly persistent discourse of gender neutrality in physics. I will explore how this discourse is constructed, how it can be contested, and how it may be constraining for both men and women students. The construction of physics as gender neutral can pose conflicts of identity for students who feel the need to refigure their gender performances in ways that permit recognition as ``physics people.'' This presentation will look at two case studies that demonstrate the conflict students experience between expressions of femininity and doing physics against the backdrop of gender neutrality. I will discuss the problematic of gender neutrality, and I will also discuss some of the creative solutions doctoral students adopt to navigate discourses of gender in this neutral terrain.

  8. Study of electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity into neutral plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, G. Rout, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The major portion of the bulk plasma in magnetospheric space, interplanetary plasma belts and the solar winds contain neutral particles. Evidently these neutral particles undergo binary collisions with the charged particles and among themselves so as to contribute significantly to the transport and diffusion process in a singly charged electron – ion magnetoplasma. The effects of the neutral particles collisions on various diffusion transport coefficients are studied for magnetised electron-ion plasma and appropriately modified coefficients are derived analytically. The results reveal that these coefficients increase significantly owing to the effect of the charge -neutral and neutral-neutral collisions.

  9. Neutralizer options for high energy H/sup -/ beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.H.

    1986-10-01

    A neutralizer converts a negative ion beam into a neutral beam, but it also increases the beamline cost, weight and size while reducing its output power, efficiency and possibly the reliability of the entire system. In addition it scatters the newly formed neutrals, altering the beam current density distribution, causing the beam divergence to get larger and the brightness to go down. In the following, the role of neutralizers for hydrogen ion beams is reviewed, and the problems encountered over a range of beam energies are discussed. Consideration is given to enhancing the goals of the neutral beam application, be they the highest neutral fraction, optimum overall efficiency or maximum beam brightness, etc.

  10. Improved method for extracting lanthanides and actinides from acid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.; Kaplan, L.; Mason, G.W.

    1983-07-26

    A process for the recovery of actinide and lanthanide values from aqueous acidic solutions uses a new series of neutral bi-functional extractants, the alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxides. The process is suitable for the separation of actinide and lanthanide values from fission product values found together in high-level nuclear reprocessing waste solutions.

  11. Precipitation of plutonium from acidic solutions using magnesium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.

    1994-12-05

    Magnesium oxide will be used as a neutralizing agent for acidic plutonium-containing solutions. It is expected that as the magnesium oxide dissolves, the pH of the solution will rise, and plutonium will precipitate. The resulting solid will be tested for suitability to storage. The liquid is expected to contain plutonium levels that meet disposal limit requirements.

  12. The production of low-energy neutral oxygen beams by grazing-incidence neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albridge, R. G.; Haglund, R. F.; Tolk, N. H.; Daech, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University neutral oxygen facility produces beams of low-energy neutral oxygen atoms by means of grazing-incidence collisions between ion beams and metal surfaces. Residual ions are reflected by applied electric fields. This method can utilize initial ion beams of either O(+) or O2(+) since a very large percentage of molecular oxygen ions are dissociated when they undergo grazing-incidence neutralization. The method of neutralization is applicable to low-energy beams and to all ions. Particular emphasis is on O and N2 beams for simulation of the low Earth orbit space environment. Since the beam is a pure O-neutral beam and since measurements of the interaction of the beam with solid surfaces are made spectroscopically, absolute reaction rates can be determined. The technique permits the beams to be used in conjunction with electron and photon irradiation for studies of synergistic effects. Comparisons of optical spectra of Kapton excited by 2.5-keV O, O(+), and O2(+) show significant differences. Optical spectra of Kapton excited by neutral oxygen beams of less than 1 keV have been recorded.

  13. Fast Neutral Pressure Gauges in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    R. Raman; H.W. Kugel; R. Gernhardt; T. Provost; T.R. Jarboe; V. Soukhanovskii

    2004-04-26

    Successful operation in NSTX of two prototype fast-response micro ionization gauges during plasma operations has motivated us to install five gauges at different toroidal and poloidal locations to measure the edge neutral pressure and its dependence on the type of discharge (L-mode, H-mode, CHI) and the fueling method and location. The edge neutral pressure is also used as an input to the transport analysis codes TRANSP and DEGAS-2. The modified PDX-type Penning gauges are well suited for pressure measurements in the NSTX divertor where the toroidal field is relatively high. Behind the NSTX outer divertor plates where the field is lower, an unshielded fast ion gauge of a new design has been installed. This gauge was developed after laboratory testing of several different designs in a vacuum chamber with applied magnetic fields.

  14. Low-energy neutral-atom spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, D.E.; Cohen, S.A.

    1982-04-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of a low energy neutral atom spectrometer are described. Time-of-flight analysis is used to measure the energy spectrum of charge-exchange deuterium atoms emitted from the PLT tokamak plasma in the energy range from 20 to 1000 eV. The neutral outflux is gated on a 1 ..mu..sec time scale by a slotted rotating chopper disc, supported against gravity in vacuum by magnetic levitation, and is detected by secondary electron emission from a Cu-Be plate. The energy dependent detection efficiency has been measured in particle beam experiments and on the tokamak so that the diagnostic is absolutely calibrated, allowing quantitative particle fluxes to be determined with 200 ..mu..sec time resolution. In addition to its present application as a plasma diagnostic, the instrument is capable of making a wide variety of measurements relevant to atomic and surface physics.

  15. EDITORIAL: Negative ion based neutral beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsworth, R. S.

    2006-06-01

    It is widely recognized that neutral beam injection (NBI), i.e. the injection of high energy, high power, beams of H or D atoms, is a flexible and reliable system that has been the main heating system on a large variety of fusion devices, and NBI has been chosen as one of the three heating schemes of the International Tokomak Reactor (ITER). To date, all the NBI systems but two have been based on the neutralization (in a simple gas target) of positive hydrogen or deuterium ions accelerated to <100 keV/nucleon. Above that energy the neutralization of positive ions falls to unacceptably low values, and higher energy neutral beams have to be created by the neutralization of accelerated negative ions (in a simple gas target), as this remains high (approx60%) up to >1 MeV/nucleon. Unfortunately H- and D- are difficult to create, and the very characteristic that makes them attractive, the ease with which the electron is detached from the ion, means that it is difficult to create high concentrations or fluxes of them, and it is difficult to avoid substantial, collisional, losses in the extraction and acceleration processes. However, there has been impressive progress in negative ion sources and accelerators over the past decade, as demonstrated by the two pioneering, operational, multi-megawatt, negative ion based, NBI systems at LHD (180 keV, H0) and JT-60U (500 keV, D0), both in Japan. Nevertheless, the system proposed for ITER represents a substantial technological challenge as an increase is required in beam energy, to 1 MeV, D0, accelerated ion (D-) current, to 40 A, accelerated current density, 200 A m-2 of D-, and pulse length, to 1 h. At the Fourth IAEA Technical Meeting on Negative Ion Based Neutral Beam Injectors, hosted by the Consorzio RFX, Padova, Italy, 9-11 May 2005, the status of the R&D aimed at the realization of the injectors for ITER was presented. Because of the importance of this development to the success of the ITER project, participants at that

  16. Quasi-Neutral Theory of Epidemic Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Oscar A.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Some epidemics have been empirically observed to exhibit outbreaks of all possible sizes, i.e., to be scale-free or scale-invariant. Different explanations for this finding have been put forward; among them there is a model for “accidental pathogens” which leads to power-law distributed outbreaks without apparent need of parameter fine tuning. This model has been claimed to be related to self-organized criticality, and its critical properties have been conjectured to be related to directed percolation. Instead, we show that this is a (quasi) neutral model, analogous to those used in Population Genetics and Ecology, with the same critical behavior as the voter-model, i.e. the theory of accidental pathogens is a (quasi)-neutral theory. This analogy allows us to explain all the system phenomenology, including generic scale invariance and the associated scaling exponents, in a parsimonious and simple way. PMID:21760930

  17. The Neutralization of Ion-Rocket Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Harold R.

    1961-01-01

    The experimental ion-beam behavior obtained without neutralizers is compared with both simple collision theory and plasma-wave theory. This comparison indicates that plasma waves play an important part in beam behavior, although the present state of plasma-wave theory does not permit more than a qualitative comparison. The theories of immersed-emitter and electron-trap neutralizer operation are discussed; and, to the extent permitted by experimental data, the theory is compared with experimental results. Experimental data are lacking completely at the present time for operation in space. The results that might be expected in space and the means of simulating such operation in Earth-bound facilities, however, are discussed.

  18. Political neutrality and international cooperation in medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Merskey, H

    1978-01-01

    International cooperation is an integral part of furthering medical and scientific progress. Many specilist societies exist for that purpose and have written into their constitutions that such cooperation and coordination is their aim. They hope to achieve their aims by exchange, in all languages, of information and by so doing strengthen the relations between individual physicians and scentists as well as between corporate professional bodies from different countries. However, at the same time emphasis is laid on the political neutrality of such organsations. Increasingly, this 'neutrality' is being questioned as doctors and scientists become aware of abuse and distortion of their profession taking place in other countries. H Merskey highlights the problems and offers his opinion on the ethics of maintaining these professional relationships with colleagues abroad who are involved in such abuse and distortion. PMID:671475

  19. Sound Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starkman, Neal

    2007-01-01

    Poor classroom acoustics are impairing students' hearing and their ability to learn. However, technology has come up with a solution: tools that focus voices in a way that minimizes intrusive ambient noise and gets to the intended receiver--not merely amplifying the sound, but also clarifying and directing it. One provider of classroom audio…

  20. Polymer solutions

    DOEpatents

    Krawczyk, Gerhard Erich; Miller, Kevin Michael

    2011-07-26

    There is provided a method of making a polymer solution comprising polymerizing one or more monomer in a solvent, wherein said monomer comprises one or more ethylenically unsaturated monomer that is a multi-functional Michael donor, and wherein said solvent comprises 40% or more by weight, based on the weight of said solvent, one or more multi-functional Michael donor.

  1. Supersymmetric Kerr-anti-de Sitter solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Mirjam; Gao Peng; Simon, Joan

    2005-07-15

    We prove the existence of one quarter supersymmetric type IIB configurations that arise as nontrivial scaling solutions of the standard five-dimensional Kerr-anti-de Sitter black holes by the explicit construction of its Killing spinors. This neutral, spinning solution is asymptotic to the static anti-de Sitter space-time with cosmological constant -(1/l{sup 2}), it has two finite equal angular momenta J{sub 1}={+-}J{sub 2}, mass M=(1/l)(|J{sub 1}|+|J{sub 2}|) and a naked singularity. We also address the scaling limit associated with one-half supersymmetric solution with only one angular momentum.

  2. Flavor changing neutral currents and a Z'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, German

    2013-03-01

    We consider a non-universal Z' that affects primarily the third generation fermions as an example of new physics associated with the top-quark. We first discuss constraints on the mass and coupling strength of such a Z'. We then turn our attention to the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) present in the model. We discuss the experimental constraints and their implications. We propose an ansatz to understand the smallness of the FCNC in terms of the CKM matrix.

  3. Neutralization of HIV by Milk Expressed Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaocong; Pollock, Daniel; Duval, Mark; Lewis, Christopher; Joseph, Kristin; Meade, Harry; Cavacini, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Background In some areas of the world mother-to-child transmission of HIV remains a significant problem in part due to widespread breastfeeding which is essential due to scarce supply of a safe replacement, protection conferred by breast milk against many enteric illnesses, and cultural norms. We propose that sustained, adequate levels of protective antibodies in breast milk will prevent transmission of HIV. Methods The HIV neutralizing human monoclonal antibody b12 (IgG1) has been expressed as an IgA2 in CHO cells and shown to retain full immunoreactivity and neutralizing activity as the parental IgG1. The expression plasmids containing the b12 heavy and light chains were also used to construct milk specific expression vectors using the GTC goat β-casein expression vector to direct expression of linked genes to the mammary gland with subsequent secretion into the milk. Female transgenic mice were generated and following parturition, their milk was tested for antibody immunoreactivity with gp120 and neutralization of HIV. Results When compared to CHO derived b12 IgA2 (or IgG1), immunoreactivity was retained. When tested for neutralization, milk derived b12 IgA2 was at least comparable to CHO derived antibody and in some cases superior to CHO derived antibody. Furthermore, milk that expressed b12 IgA2 was significantly more effective at mediating antibody dependent cell killing. Conclusions These results suggest it is possible to achieve functional HIV-specific mAb in the milk of transgenic mice and further investigations are warranted to explore ways for inducing this type of antibody response in the breast milk of HIV infected women. PMID:23269241

  4. Power threshold for neutral beam current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Politzer, P.A. ); Porter, G.D. )

    1989-10-02

    For fully noninductive current drive in tokamaks using neutral beams, there is a power and density threshold condition, setting a minimum value for P{sup 3/2}/n{sup 2}. If this condition is not met, stationary state cannot occur, and a tokamak discharge will collapse. This is a consequence of the coupling between current and electron temperature, or between current drive efficiency and energy confinement time. 4 figs.

  5. Neutral beam source commercialization study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    King, H.J.

    1980-06-01

    The basic tasks of this Phase II project were to: generate a set of design drawings suitable for quantity production of sources of this design; fabricate a functional neutral beam source incorporating as many of the proposed design changes as proved feasible; and document the procedures and findings developed during the contract. These tasks have been accomplished and represent a demonstrated milestone in the industrialization of this complete device.

  6. The neutral surface layer above rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi; Sahlee, Erik

    2014-05-01

    It is generally accepted that turbulent fluxes (momentum and scalar fluxes) are approx. constant with height above horizontal surfaces with low roughness. But what will happen when the roughness sub-layer is large as found over cities, forests and rough seas? In a study of the kinematic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, Högström, Hunt and Smedman, 2002, it was demonstrated that a model with detached eddies from above the surface layer impinging on to the surface (Hunt and Morison, 2000) could explain some of the observed features in the neutral atmospheric boundary layer. Thus the detached eddy model proved successful in explaining the dynamic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, especially the shape of the spectra of the wind components and scalars and corresponding fluxes. Here we make the hypothesis that the detached-eddy model can also be used to explain the experimental results related to the 3-dimensional turbulence structure above rough surfaces. Measurements are taken both over land (grass and forest) and over sea (Baltic Sea and hurricane Fabian in the Atlantic) above the roughness sub-layer. Analysis of the turbulence structure shows a striking similarity between the different sites. Hunt, J.C.R and Morrison, J.F., 2000: Eddy structure in turbulent boundary layers, Euro. J. Mech. B-Fluids, 19, 673-694. Högström, U., Hunt, J.C.R., and Smedman, A., 2002: Theory and measurements for turbulence spectra and variances in the atmospheric neutral surface layer, Bound.-Layer Meteorol., 103,101-124.

  7. A prototype storage ring for neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Crompvoets, F M; Bethlem, H L; Jongma, R T; Meijer, G

    2001-05-10

    The ability to cool and manipulate atoms with light has yielded atom interferometry, precision spectroscopy, Bose-Einstein condensates and atom lasers. The extension of controlled manipulation to molecules is expected to be similarly rewarding, but molecules are not as amenable to manipulation by light owing to a far more complex energy-level spectrum. However, time-varying electric and magnetic fields have been successfully used to control the position and velocity of ions, suggesting that these schemes can also be used to manipulate neutral particles having an electric or magnetic dipole moment. Although the forces exerted on neutral species are many orders of magnitude smaller than those exerted on ions, beams of neutral dipolar molecules have been successfully slowed down in a series of pulsed electric fields and subsequently loaded into an electrostatic trap. Here we extend the scheme to include a prototype electrostatic storage ring made of a hexapole torus with a circumference of 80 cm. After injection, decelerated bunches of deuterated ammonia molecules, each containing about 106 molecules in a single quantum state and with a translational temperature of 10 mK, travel up to six times around the ring. Stochastic cooling might provide a means to increase the phase-space density of the stored molecules in the storage ring, and we expect this to open up new opportunities for molecular spectroscopy and studies of cold molecular collisions.

  8. Atomic Transition Probabilities for Neutral Cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, J. E.; den Hartog, E. A.; Wood, M. P.; Nitz, D. E.; Chisholm, J.; Sobeck, J.

    2009-10-01

    The spectra of neutral cerium (Ce I) and singly ionized cerium (Ce II) are more complex than spectra of other rare earth species. The resulting high density of lines in the visible makes Ce ideal for use in metal halide (MH) High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps. Inclusion of cerium-iodide in a lamp dose can improve both the Color Rendering Index and luminous efficacy of a MH-HID lamp. Basic spectroscopic data including absolute atomic transition probabilities for Ce I and Ce II are needed for diagnosing and modeling these MH-HID lamps. Recent work on Ce II [1] is now being augmented with similar work on Ce I. Radiative lifetimes from laser induced fluorescence measurements [2] on neutral Ce are being combined with emission branching fractions from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer. A total of 14 high resolution spectra are being analyzed to determine branching fractions for 2000 to 3000 lines from 153 upper levels in neutral Ce. Representative data samples and progress to date will be presented. [4pt] [1] J. E. Lawler, C. Sneden, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 182, 51-79 (2009). [0pt] [2] E. A. Den Hartog, K. P. Buettner, and J. E. Lawler, J. Phys. B: Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics 42, 085006 (7pp) (2009).

  9. Theory of ion neutralization near the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiaki, Muda; Teruo, Hanawa

    1980-07-01

    A one-electron model calculation of the probability of ion neutralization near the surface with an adatom has been made within the model as proposed by Bloss and Hone for ISS. Interaction of the ion with band states of the substrate ("direct resonance neutralization") is treated accurately within the model. The results show that (1) the neutralization probability N critically depends on the orbital energy ɛ0 of the ion with respect to the Fermi level EF: For ɛ0 > EF as in alkali ions on metals, the survival rate Ps = 1 - N is very high (≈1), and for ɛ0 < EF as in noble gas ions on metals, Ps is very small (10 -1-10 -4). (2) In the latter case, Ps versus {1}/{v} shows a relationship like Psα exp(- v0/ v) accompanied by a weak oscillation around it in the case of finite bandwidth, where v is the incident ion velocity. (3) The probability Ps varies by more than one order of magnitude for different substrates (bandwidth and position of the band relative to ɛ 0 have been varied), in agreement with the recent experimental feature. (4) Convergence of Ps with the number of atoms in the substrate is very slow, that is, the behavior of Ps versus {1}/{v} differs strongly for different sizes of the substrate.

  10. Antibody neutralization of retargeted measles viruses.

    PubMed

    Lech, Patrycja J; Pappoe, Roland; Nakamura, Takafumi; Tobin, Gregory J; Nara, Peter L; Russell, Stephen J

    2014-04-01

    The measles virus (MV) vaccine lineage is a promising oncolytic but prior exposure to the measles vaccine or wild-type MV strains limits treatment utility due to the presence of anti-measles antibodies. MV entry can be redirected by displaying a polypeptide ligand on the Hemagglutinin (H) C-terminus. We hypothesized that retargeted MV would escape neutralization by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing the H receptor-binding surface and be less susceptible to neutralization by human antisera. Using chimeric H proteins, with and without mutations that ablate MV receptor binding, we show that retargeted MVs escape mAbs that target the H receptor-binding surface by virtue of mutations that ablate infection via SLAM and CD46. However, C-terminally displayed domains do not mediate virus entry in the presence of human antibodies that bind to the underlying H domain. In conclusion, utility of retargeted oncolytic measles viruses does not extend to evasion of human serum neutralization.

  11. Solar-Driven Neutral Density Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Interstellar neutral hydrogen atoms flowing into the solar system are attracted by the solar gravitational force, repelled by solar hydrogen Ly-alpha radiation pressure, and are ionized, primarily, through charge exchange with the solar wind protons. The solar cycle variation of the radiation pressure causes the net central solar force to fluctuate between attraction and repulsion resulting in the modulation of the neutral hydrogen density about the usual time independent model. The calculation presented here shows that the time dependent downstream density is strongly modulated by a large number of travelling neutral density waves. The waves possess a continuous range of wavelengths as is to be expected for a Maxwellian gas subjected to several eleven year cycle variations during its journey through the solar system. The amplitudes of the density modulation were found to be quite large. The backscattered glow was found to depend on the position of the detector and the phase of the solar cycle. At the most favorable condition a deviation of the order of 25% from the time dependent glow might be observed.

  12. Novel registration technique to register neutral zone

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Kaushal Kishor; Singh, Saumyendra Vikram; Vero, Nugotsov; Alvi, Habib Ahmed; Chand, Pooran; Singh, Kamleshwar; Goel, Prachi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The three dimensional volume of complete dentures optimally occupies an edentulous space that is substantial, in the light of the progressive changes that accompany edentulism and functional dynamics. The paper discusses current knowledge of neutral zone registration and presents a novel technique for this registration. Material and methods Fabricate maxillary and mandibular occlusal rims over conventional record bases using high fusing impression compound. Register the maxillary and mandibular neutral zone separately by swallowing method and after try in of complete denture; remove the wax apical to the tooth surfaces and recording will be completed with putty and light body impression material. Results Complete dentures are a biomechanical device that must be designed in harmony with normal neuromuscular function to get stability and proper function. Improper teeth positioning and polished surface contour will result in compromised stability of denture. Conclusions This article describes a preview of facio-lingual positioning of denture teeth along with a novel approach of recording the neutral zone with an elastomeric impression material. PMID:25737865

  13. Neutral color semitransparent microstructured perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Eperon, Giles E; Burlakov, Victor M; Goriely, Alain; Snaith, Henry J

    2014-01-28

    Neutral-colored semitransparent solar cells are commercially desired to integrate solar cells into the windows and cladding of buildings and automotive applications. Here, we report the use of morphological control of perovskite thin films to form semitransparent planar heterojunction solar cells with neutral color and comparatively high efficiencies. We take advantage of spontaneous dewetting to create microstructured arrays of perovskite "islands", on a length-scale small enough to appear continuous to the eye yet large enough to enable unattenuated transmission of light between the islands. The islands are thick enough to absorb most visible light, and the combination of completely absorbing and completely transparent regions results in neutral transmission of light. Using these films, we fabricate thin-film solar cells with respectable power conversion efficiencies. Remarkably, we find that such discontinuous films still have good rectification behavior and relatively high open-circuit voltages due to the inherent rectification between the n- and p-type charge collection layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ease of "color-tinting" such microstructured perovksite solar cells with no reduction in performance, by incorporation of a dye within the hole transport medium.

  14. New pathways for the rapid formation of N-nitrosamines under neutral and alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Challis, B C; Outram, J R; Shuker, D E

    1980-01-01

    Ethylene glycol, several carbohydrates (sugars) and alkanolamines influence the formation of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines in neutral and alkaline aqueous solutions at 25 degrees C in presence of dissolved nitrosyl gases. These compounds either catalyse or inhibit the reactions (depending on the experimental conditions and reagent reactivities) by forming a nitrite ester intermediate, which reacts readily with secondary amines. The reactions may explain the origin of some N-nitrosamines in vivo and in consumer products, particularly those originating from NOX pollutants. N-Nitrosamines are also formed at ambient temperatures by the gamma-radiolysis of neutral aqueous solutions of either NaNO2 or NaNO3 and secondary amines. With NaNO3, N-nitroamines are in accompanying product. These reactions are considered to proceed via N2O3 and N2O4 intermediates, generated from NaNO2 and NaNO3, respectively.

  15. Two-dimensional finite element multigroup diffusion theory for neutral atom transport in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, M.Z.; Conn, R.W.

    1986-02-01

    Solution of the energy dependent diffusion equation in two dimensions is formulated by multigroup approximation of the energy variable and general triangular mesh, finite element discretization of the spatial domain. Finite element formulation is done by Galerkin's method. Based on this formulation, a two-dimensional multigroup finite element diffusion theory code, FENAT, has been developed for the transport of neutral atoms in fusion plasmas. FENAT solves the multigroup diffusion equation in X-Y cartesian and R-Z cylindrical/toroidal geometries. Use of the finite element method allows solution of problems in which the plasma cross-section has an arbitrary shape. The accuracy of FENAT has been verified by comparing results to those obtained using the two-dimensional discrete ordinate transport theory code, DOT-4.3. Results of application of FENAT to the transport of limiter-originated neutral atoms in a tokamak fusion machine are presented.

  16. Behaviour of some organophosphorus and organochlorine pesticides in potatoes during soaking in different solutions.

    PubMed

    Zohair, A

    2001-07-01

    The efficiencies of acidic solutions (radish, citric acid, ascorbic acid, acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide), neutral solutions (sodium chloride) and alkaline solution (sodium carbonate) as well as tap water in the elimination of organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides from naturally contaminated potatoes were examined. The results indicated that acidic solutions were more effective than neutral and alkaline solutions in the elimination of the organochlorine compounds under investigation, Radish solutions eliminated pesticides completely, except o,p'-DDE (73.1% loss), followed by citric and ascorbic acid solutions. On the other hand, organophosphorus pesticides (pirimphos methyl, malathion and profenofos) were eliminated more by acidic, neutral and alkaline solutions than by organochlorines. The percentage of removal ranged from 98.5 to 100% for pirimphos methyl, 87.9 to 100% for malathion and 100% for profenofos. PMID:11397522

  17. COMSOL Modeling of Transport of Neutral Radicals to Substrate Surfaces Located Downstream from an Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Rokibul; Lekobou, William; Wemlinger, Erik; Pedrow, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    An Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma (APWIP) Reactor generates a significant number of charged particles and neutral radicals. In our work the carrier gas is argon and the precursor molecule is acetylene. The APWIP is generated by corona discharges associated with an array of high voltage metal needles facing a grounded metal screen. Neutral radical transport downstream from the grounded screen to the substrate via diffusion and convection will be modeled with COMSOL, a finite element software package. Substrates will include objects with various shapes and characteristic dimensions that range from nanometers to centimeters. After the model is validated against canonical problems with known solutions, thin film deposition rates will be compared with experimentally measured results. Substrate geometries will include discs, spheres, fibers and highly porous surfaces such as those found on asphalt road surfaces. A single generic neutral radical will be used to represent the entire family of neutral radicals resulting from acetylene bond scission by free electron impact.

  18. Phenolic compounds containing/neutral fractions extract and products derived therefrom from fractionated fast-pyrolysis oils

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-06-29

    A process is described for preparing phenol-formaldehyde novolak resins and molding compositions in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenol/neutral fractions extract obtained from fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils. The fractionation consists of a neutralization stage which can be carried out with aqueous solutions of bases or appropriate bases in the dry state, followed by solvent extraction with an organic solvent having at least a moderate solubility parameter and good hydrogen bonding capacity. Phenolic compounds-containing/neutral fractions extracts obtained by fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils from a lignocellulosic material, is such that the oil is initially in the pH range of 2-4, being neutralized with an aqueous bicarbonate base, and extracted into a solvent having a solubility parameter of approximately 8.4-9.11 [cal/cm[sup 3

  19. Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 111 Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms (Web, free access)   Data for ground state electron configurations and ionization energies for the neutral atoms (Z = 1-104) including references.

  20. 1. NEUTRAL BUOYANCY SIMULATOR BUILDING (NBS) EXTERIOR ELEVATION LOOKING NORTH; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NEUTRAL BUOYANCY SIMULATOR BUILDING (NBS) EXTERIOR ELEVATION LOOKING NORTH; TANK BUILDING TO LEFT, CONTROL ROOM ETC. TO RIGHT OF CONNECTING BAY. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  1. 67. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE NEUTRALIZER BUILDING, LOOKING AT CONDENSERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE NEUTRALIZER BUILDING, LOOKING AT CONDENSERS, NEUTRALIZERS AND STORAGE TANKS, APRIL 11, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  2. 3. WIDE ANGLE OF NEUTRAL BUOYANCY SIMULATOR (NBS) FROM WITHIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. WIDE ANGLE OF NEUTRAL BUOYANCY SIMULATOR (NBS) FROM WITHIN NBS HIGHBAY DOORS. DIVE BELL IN FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. The influence of stray magnetic fields on ion beam neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Y.-C.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental investigation is described of a comparison between the ion beam neutralization characteristics of a local neutralizer (within approximately 5 cm of the beam edge) and those associated with a distant one (approximately 1 meter away from the thruster). The influence of magnetic fields in the vicinity of the neutralizer cathode orifice which are either parallel or normal to the neutralizer axis is assessed. The plasma property profiles which reflect the influence of the magnetic fields are measured. The results suggest that magnetic fields at the region of a neutralizer cathode orifice influence its ability to couple to the ion beam. They reveal that there is a potential jump from the neutralizer cathode orifice to the plasma which exists close to the orifice. This potential drop is found to increase as the axial component of magnetic flux density increases. A magnetic field perpendicular to the neutralizer axis induces a potential rise a few centimeters downstream from the neutralizer cathode.

  4. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) neutral beam design

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.J.; Brook, J.W.; Spampinato, P.T.; Mueller, J.P.; Luzzi, T.E.; Sedgley, D.W. . Space Systems Div.)

    1990-10-01

    This report discusses the following topics on ITER neutral beam design: ion dump; neutralizer and module gas flow analysis; vacuum system; cryogenic system; maintainability; power distribution; and system cost.

  5. Emotionally Neutral Stimuli Are Not Neutral in Schizophrenia: A Mini Review of Functional Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Potvin, Stéphane; Tikàsz, Andràs; Mendrek, Adrianna

    2016-01-01

    Reliable evidence shows that schizophrenia patients tend to experience negative emotions when presented with emotionally neutral stimuli. Similarly, several functional neuroimaging studies show that schizophrenia patients have increased activations in response to neutral material. However, results are heterogeneous. Here, we review the functional neuroimaging studies that have addressed this research question. Based on the 36 functional neuroimaging studies that we retrieved, it seems that the increased brain reactivity to neutral stimuli is fairly common in schizophrenia, but that the regions involved vary considerably, apart from the amygdala. Prefrontal and cingulate sub-regions and the hippocampus may also be involved. By contrasts, results in individuals at risk for psychosis are less consistent. In schizophrenia patients, results are less consistent in the case of studies using non-facial stimuli, explicit processing paradigms, and/or event-related designs. This means that human faces may convey subtle information (e.g., trustworthiness) other than basic emotional expressions. It also means that the aberrant brain reactivity to neutral stimuli is less likely to occur when experimental paradigms are too cognitively demanding as well as in studies lacking statistical power. The main hypothesis proposed to account for this increased brain reactivity to neutral stimuli is the aberrant salience hypothesis of psychosis. Other investigators propose that the aberrant brain reactivity to neutral stimuli in schizophrenia results from abnormal associative learning, untrustworthiness judgments, priming effects, and/or reduced habituation to neutral stimuli. In the future, the effects of antipsychotics on this aberrant brain reactivity will need to be determined, as well as the potential implication of sex/gender. PMID:27445871

  6. Emotionally Neutral Stimuli Are Not Neutral in Schizophrenia: A Mini Review of Functional Neuroimaging Studies.

    PubMed

    Potvin, Stéphane; Tikàsz, Andràs; Mendrek, Adrianna

    2016-01-01

    Reliable evidence shows that schizophrenia patients tend to experience negative emotions when presented with emotionally neutral stimuli. Similarly, several functional neuroimaging studies show that schizophrenia patients have increased activations in response to neutral material. However, results are heterogeneous. Here, we review the functional neuroimaging studies that have addressed this research question. Based on the 36 functional neuroimaging studies that we retrieved, it seems that the increased brain reactivity to neutral stimuli is fairly common in schizophrenia, but that the regions involved vary considerably, apart from the amygdala. Prefrontal and cingulate sub-regions and the hippocampus may also be involved. By contrasts, results in individuals at risk for psychosis are less consistent. In schizophrenia patients, results are less consistent in the case of studies using non-facial stimuli, explicit processing paradigms, and/or event-related designs. This means that human faces may convey subtle information (e.g., trustworthiness) other than basic emotional expressions. It also means that the aberrant brain reactivity to neutral stimuli is less likely to occur when experimental paradigms are too cognitively demanding as well as in studies lacking statistical power. The main hypothesis proposed to account for this increased brain reactivity to neutral stimuli is the aberrant salience hypothesis of psychosis. Other investigators propose that the aberrant brain reactivity to neutral stimuli in schizophrenia results from abnormal associative learning, untrustworthiness judgments, priming effects, and/or reduced habituation to neutral stimuli. In the future, the effects of antipsychotics on this aberrant brain reactivity will need to be determined, as well as the potential implication of sex/gender. PMID:27445871

  7. Acid neutralization of precipitation in Northern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuesi; Yu, Wenpeng; Pan, Yuepeng; Wu, Dan

    2012-02-01

    There is an increasing concern over the impact of human-related emissions on the acid precipitation in China. However, few measurements have been conducted so far to clarify the acid-neutralization of precipitation on a regional scale. Under a network of 10 sites across Northern China operated during a 3-year period from December 2007 to November 2010, a total of 1118 rain and snow samples were collected. Of this total, 28% was acid precipitation with pH < 5.6. Out of these acid samples, 53% were found heavily acidic with pH value below 5.0, indicating significantly high levels of acidification of precipitation. Most of the acidity of precipitation was caused by H2SO4 and HNO3, their relative contribution being 72% and 28%, respectively. However; the contribution of HNO3 to precipitation acidity will be enhanced due to the increasing NO(x) and stable SO2 emissions in future. Neutralization factors for K+, NH4+, Ca2+, Na+, and Mg2+ were estimated as 0.06, 0.71, 0.72, 0.15, and 0.13, respectively. The application of multiple regression analysis further quantified higher NH4+ and Ca2+ contribution to the neutralization process, but the dominant neutralizing agent varied from site to site. The neutralization was less pronounced in the rural than urban areas, probably due to different levels of alkaline species, which strongly buffered the acidity. Presence of high concentrations of basic ions was mainly responsible for high pH of precipitation with annual volume-weighted mean (VWM) values larger than 5.6 at several sites. It was estimated that in the absence of buffering ions, for the given concentration of SO4(2-) and NO3-, the annual VWM pH of precipitation would have been recorded around 3.5 across Northern China. This feature suggested that emissions of particles and gaseous NH3 played very important role in controlling the spatial variations of pH of precipitation in the target areas.

  8. Integrability and supersymmetry of Schroedinger-Pauli equations for neutral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, A. G.

    2012-12-15

    Integrable quantum mechanical systems for neutral particles with spin (1/2) and nontrivial dipole momentum are classified. It is demonstrated that such systems give rise to new exactly solvable problems of quantum mechanics with clear physical content. Solutions for three of them are given in explicit form. The related symmetry algebras and superalgebras are discussed. The presented classification is restricted to two-dimensional systems, which admit matrix integrals of motion linear in momenta.

  9. Neutral theory and the species abundance distribution: recent developments and prospects for unifying niche and neutral perspectives.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Thomas J; Whittaker, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Published in 2001, The Unified Neutral Theory of Biodiversity and Biogeography (UNTB) emphasizes the importance of stochastic processes in ecological community structure, and has challenged the traditional niche-based view of ecology. While neutral models have since been applied to a broad range of ecological and macroecological phenomena, the majority of research relating to neutral theory has focused exclusively on the species abundance distribution (SAD). Here, we synthesize the large body of work on neutral theory in the context of the species abundance distribution, with a particular focus on integrating ideas from neutral theory with traditional niche theory. First, we summarize the basic tenets of neutral theory; both in general and in the context of SADs. Second, we explore the issues associated with neutral theory and the SAD, such as complications with fitting and model comparison, the underlying assumptions of neutral models, and the difficultly of linking pattern to process. Third, we highlight the advances in understanding of SADs that have resulted from neutral theory and models. Finally, we focus consideration on recent developments aimed at unifying neutral- and niche-based approaches to ecology, with a particular emphasis on what this means for SAD theory, embracing, for instance, ideas of emergent neutrality and stochastic niche theory. We put forward the argument that the prospect of the unification of niche and neutral perspectives represents one of the most promising future avenues of neutral theory research.

  10. Neutral theory and the species abundance distribution: recent developments and prospects for unifying niche and neutral perspectives.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Thomas J; Whittaker, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Published in 2001, The Unified Neutral Theory of Biodiversity and Biogeography (UNTB) emphasizes the importance of stochastic processes in ecological community structure, and has challenged the traditional niche-based view of ecology. While neutral models have since been applied to a broad range of ecological and macroecological phenomena, the majority of research relating to neutral theory has focused exclusively on the species abundance distribution (SAD). Here, we synthesize the large body of work on neutral theory in the context of the species abundance distribution, with a particular focus on integrating ideas from neutral theory with traditional niche theory. First, we summarize the basic tenets of neutral theory; both in general and in the context of SADs. Second, we explore the issues associated with neutral theory and the SAD, such as complications with fitting and model comparison, the underlying assumptions of neutral models, and the difficultly of linking pattern to process. Third, we highlight the advances in understanding of SADs that have resulted from neutral theory and models. Finally, we focus consideration on recent developments aimed at unifying neutral- and niche-based approaches to ecology, with a particular emphasis on what this means for SAD theory, embracing, for instance, ideas of emergent neutrality and stochastic niche theory. We put forward the argument that the prospect of the unification of niche and neutral perspectives represents one of the most promising future avenues of neutral theory research. PMID:25360266

  11. Neutral theory and the species abundance distribution: recent developments and prospects for unifying niche and neutral perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Thomas J; Whittaker, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Published in 2001, The Unified Neutral Theory of Biodiversity and Biogeography (UNTB) emphasizes the importance of stochastic processes in ecological community structure, and has challenged the traditional niche-based view of ecology. While neutral models have since been applied to a broad range of ecological and macroecological phenomena, the majority of research relating to neutral theory has focused exclusively on the species abundance distribution (SAD). Here, we synthesize the large body of work on neutral theory in the context of the species abundance distribution, with a particular focus on integrating ideas from neutral theory with traditional niche theory. First, we summarize the basic tenets of neutral theory; both in general and in the context of SADs. Second, we explore the issues associated with neutral theory and the SAD, such as complications with fitting and model comparison, the underlying assumptions of neutral models, and the difficultly of linking pattern to process. Third, we highlight the advances in understanding of SADs that have resulted from neutral theory and models. Finally, we focus consideration on recent developments aimed at unifying neutral- and niche-based approaches to ecology, with a particular emphasis on what this means for SAD theory, embracing, for instance, ideas of emergent neutrality and stochastic niche theory. We put forward the argument that the prospect of the unification of niche and neutral perspectives represents one of the most promising future avenues of neutral theory research. PMID:25360266

  12. Magnetotail equilibrium theory - The general three-dimensional solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.

    1987-01-01

    The general magnetostatic equilibrium problem for the geomagnetic tail is reduced to the solution of ordinary differential equations and ordinary integrals. The theory allows the integration of the self-consistent magnetotail equilibrium field from the knowledge of four functions of two space variables: the neutral sheet location, the total pressure, the magnetic field strength, and the z component of the magnetic field at the neutral sheet.

  13. 19 CFR 113.71 - Bond condition to observe neutrality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bond condition to observe neutrality. 113.71...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Customs Bond Conditions § 113.71 Bond condition to observe neutrality. A bond to observe neutrality shall contain the conditions listed in this section and shall be...

  14. 46 CFR 183.376 - Grounded distribution systems (neutral grounded).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 183.376... propulsion, power, lighting, or distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Grounded distribution systems (neutral grounded)....

  15. 46 CFR 183.376 - Grounded distribution systems (neutral grounded).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 183.376... propulsion, power, lighting, or distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Grounded distribution systems (neutral grounded)....

  16. 46 CFR 183.376 - Grounded distribution systems (neutral grounded).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... propulsion, power, lighting, or distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Grounded distribution systems (neutral grounded). 183... VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems §...

  17. 46 CFR 183.376 - Grounded distribution systems (neutral grounded).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... propulsion, power, lighting, or distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Grounded distribution systems (neutral grounded). 183... VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems §...

  18. 29 CFR 1207.3 - Compensation of neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation of neutrals. 1207.3 Section 1207.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD ESTABLISHMENT OF SPECIAL ADJUSTMENT BOARDS § 1207.3 Compensation of neutrals. (a) Neutrals appointed by the National Mediation Board. All...

  19. Fiscal Neutrality and Local Choice in Public Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, William L.

    1991-01-01

    Extends Feldstein's notion of wealth neutrality to embrace fiscal neutrality, using a representative consumer context. Employs an "ideal" demand system to model school district expenditures in a general equilibrium framework. Rejects constant price and income elasticity demand models. Supports the fiscally neutral elasticity model varying by…

  20. 19 CFR 113.71 - Bond condition to observe neutrality.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bond condition to observe neutrality. 113.71...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Customs Bond Conditions § 113.71 Bond condition to observe neutrality. A bond to observe neutrality shall contain the conditions listed in this section and shall be...

  1. 46 CFR 183.376 - Grounded distribution systems (neutral grounded).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 183.376... propulsion, power, lighting, or distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral... generator to ground before the generator is connected to the bus, except the neutral of an emergency...

  2. 47 CFR 64.617 - Neutral Video Communication Service Platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Neutral Video Communication Service Platform... Related Customer Premises Equipment for Persons With Disabilities § 64.617 Neutral Video Communication... Neutral Video Communication Service Platform to process VRS calls. Each VRS CA service provider shall...

  3. 47 CFR 64.617 - Neutral Video Communication Service Platform.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Neutral Video Communication Service Platform... Related Customer Premises Equipment for Persons With Disabilities § 64.617 Neutral Video Communication... Neutral Video Communication Service Platform to process VRS calls. Each VRS CA service provider shall...

  4. Influence of Neutralization Attitude in Academic Dishonesty among Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Chan Ling; Othman, Jamilah; D'Silva, Jeffrey Lawrence; Omar, Zoharah

    2014-01-01

    Previous literature had proposed that individuals tend to use neutralization to motivate their decisions to engage in deviant behaviours. This indicated that even though students have strong motivations not to cheat may do so anyway after employing neutralizing strategies. Hence, this study attempted to examine the role of neutralization in…

  5. ALCBEAM - Neutral beam formation and propagation code for beam-based plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespamyatnov, I. O.; Rowan, W. L.; Liao, K. T.

    2012-03-01

    ALCBEAM is a new three-dimensional neutral beam formation and propagation code. It was developed to support the beam-based diagnostics installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The purpose of the code is to provide reliable estimates of the local beam equilibrium parameters: such as beam energy fractions, density profiles and excitation populations. The code effectively unifies the ion beam formation, extraction and neutralization processes with beam attenuation and excitation in plasma and neutral gas and beam stopping by the beam apertures. This paper describes the physical processes interpreted and utilized by the code, along with exploited computational methods. The description is concluded by an example simulation of beam penetration into plasma of Alcator C-Mod. The code is successfully being used in Alcator C-Mod tokamak and expected to be valuable in the support of beam-based diagnostics in most other tokamak environments. Program summaryProgram title: ALCBEAM Catalogue identifier: AEKU_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKU_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 66 459 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 7 841 051 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: IDL Computer: Workstation, PC Operating system: Linux RAM: 1 GB Classification: 19.2 Nature of problem: Neutral beams are commonly used to heat and/or diagnose high-temperature magnetically-confined laboratory plasmas. An accurate neutral beam characterization is required for beam-based measurements of plasma properties. Beam parameters such as density distribution, energy composition, and atomic excited populations of the beam atoms need to be known. Solution method: A neutral beam is initially formed as an ion beam which is extracted from

  6. Evaluation of the vesicating properties of neutralized chemical agent identification sets. Final report, November 1995-August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Olajos, E.J.; Salem, H.; Gieseking, J.K.

    1997-08-01

    Vesication and skin irritation studies were conducted in hairless guinea-pigs to determine the vesicant and skin irritation potential of Chemical Agent Identification Sets (CAIS). Guinea-pigs were topically dosed with `test article` NEAT HD, 10% agent/chloroform solutions, or product solutions (wastestreams) and evaluated for skin-damaging effects (gross and light microscopic). Product solutions from the chemical neutralization of neat sulfur mustard resulted in microvesicle formation (vesication). All agent-dosed (agent/chloroform solutions or HD) sites exhibited microblisters, as well as other histopathologic lesions of the skin. Wastestreams from the neutalization of agent (agent/chloroform; agent on charcoal) were devoid of microvesicant activity. Dermal irritant effects (erythema and edema) were consistent with the skin-injurious activity associated with the neutralizing reagent 1,3-dichloro-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (DCDMH).

  7. Elimination of output-current transients in the MFTF sustaining neutral-beam-arc power supplies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanness, H. W.; Mayhall, D. J.; Wilson, J. H.

    1981-10-01

    The twenty-three MFTF sustaining neutral beam arc power supplies were designed to provide 0.3 to 30 second output pulses over a range of 24 to 71 volts and 600 to 4000 amperes at 10 percent duty. For economic reasons, the circuit design consists of a 12 pulse rectifier which is synchronously switched on and off by a three phase electromechanical contactor in the primary ac input. Analysis of the problem, various possible solution considered, and the simple and inexpensive solution adopted for use are described.

  8. The geometry and invariance properties for certain classes of metrics with neutral signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashingwa, Jean J. H.; Bokhari, Ashfaque H.; Kara, A. H.; Zaman, F. D.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study anti-self dual manifolds endowed with metrics of neutral signature. Since the metrics depend on solutions of, in some cases, well-known partial differential equations (PDEs), we determine exact solutions using Lie group methods. This concludes specific forms of the metrics. We then determine the isometries and the variational symmetries of the underlying metrics and corresponding Euler-Lagrange (geodesic) equations, respectively, and establish relationships between the resultant Lie algebras. In some cases, we construct conservation laws via these symmetries or the “multiplier approach”.

  9. Thermodynamic properties of neutral particle in the presence of topological defects in magnetic cosmic string background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanabadi, H.; Hosseinpour, M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we study the covariant form of the non-relativistic Schrödinger-Pauli equation in the space-time generated by a cosmic string and discuss the solutions of this equation in the presence of interaction between the magnetic dipole momentum and electromagnetic field. We study the influence of the topology on this system. We obtain the solution of radial part as well as the energy levels. We consider all thermodynamic properties of a neutral particle in a magnetic cosmic string background by using an approach based on the partition function method.

  10. Communication: Classical threshold law for ion-neutral-neutral three-body recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Pérez-Ríos, Jesús; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-07-28

    A very recently method for classical trajectory calculations for three-body collision [Pérez-Ríos et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044307 (2014)] has been applied to describe ion-neutral-neutral ternary processes for low energy collisions: 0.1 mK–10 mK. As a result, a threshold law for the three-body recombination cross section is obtained and corroborated numerically. The derived threshold law predicts the formation of weakly bound dimers, with binding energies comparable to the collision energy of the collisional partners. In this low energy range, this analysis predicts that molecular ions should dominate over molecular neutrals as the most products formed.

  11. [Case of upper airway stenosis after accidental ingestion of neutral detergent containing cationic surfactant (HDQ Neutral)].

    PubMed

    Nagae, Masaharu; Naito, Hiromichi; Okahara, Shuji; Hikasa, Yukiko; Okada, Daisuke; Hagioka, Shingo; Morimoto, Naoki

    2011-03-01

    We had a case of upper airway stenosis after accidental ingestion of neutral detergent containing cationic surfactant (HDQ Neutral). An 85-year-old man was transported to our hospital by ambulance after ingesting 50 mL of HDQ Neutral. On arrival, he had an edematous buccopharyngeal membrane with bleeding. Laryngeal edema was observed by laryngoscopy, and severe upper airway stenosis occurred. He also had hypoxemia and was therefore intubated and put on mechanical ventilation. After admission, his respiratory condition was stable. On day 3, upper airway edema had improved and extubation was performed. He was cured without other complications. Surfactants generally have low toxicity but can cause damage to the mucous membrane of the respiratory tract and gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, immediate evaluation and treatment are needed for intoxication with them. They can also cause harm to circulation dynamics or the central nerve system, and careful follow-up is therefore needed.

  12. Effects of neutral interactions on velocity-shear-driven plasma waves

    SciTech Connect

    Enloe, C. L.; Tejero, E. M.; Amatucci, W. E.; Crabtree, C.; Ganguli, G.; Sotnikov, V.

    2014-06-15

    In a laboratory experiment, we demonstrate the substantial effects that collisions between charged and neutral particles have on low-frequency (Ω{sub i} ≪ ω ≪ Ω{sub e}) shear-driven electrostatic lower hybrid waves in a plasma. We establish a strong (up to 2.5 kV/m) highly localized electric field with a length scale shorter than the ion gyroradius, so that the ions in the plasma, unlike the electrons, do not develop the full E × B drift velocity. The resulting shear in the particle velocities initiates the electron-ion hybrid (EIH) instability, and we observe the formation of strong waves in the vicinity of the shear with variations in plasma densities of 10% or greater. Our experimental configuration allows us to vary the neutral background density by more than a factor of two while holding the charged particle density effectively constant. Not surprisingly, increasing the neutral density decreases the growth rate/saturation amplitude of the waves and increases the threshold electric field necessary for wave formation, but the presence of neutrals affects the dominant wave frequency as well. We show that a 50% increase in the neutral density decreases the wave frequency by 20% while also suppressing the electric field dependence of the frequency that is observed when fewer neutrals are present. The majority of these effects, as well as the values of the frequencies we observe, closely match the predictions of previously developed linear EIH instability theory, for which we present the results of a numerical solution.

  13. Synthetic gauge potentials for ultracold neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Ju; Spielman, I. B.

    2016-09-01

    Synthetic gauge fields for ultracold neutral atoms—engineered using the interaction between laser fields and the atoms’ internal ‘spin’ degrees of freedom—provide promising techniques for generating the large (synthetic) magnetic fields required to reach the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) limit in quantum gases, bosonic or fermionic alike. Because neutral atoms can move in a nearly disorder-free environment and they have extremely simple contact interactions, the resulting FQH states would be revealed in their most essential form. Moreover, bosonic FQH states represent a new frontier and have never been seen in any setting. Going beyond electromagnetism's conventional scalar gauge field, it is possible to create more general non-Abelian gauge potentials. When these are spatially uniform, they are equivalent to spin-orbit coupling familiar in material systems, and can lead to cold atom analogs of topological insulators and topological superconductors. In this tutorial, we introduce basic concepts underlying these gauge fields, making connections to the Aharonov-Bohm phase and geometric phase. We focus on the system of neutral atoms ‘dressed’ by multiple laser beams, where the eigenstates of the resulting Hamiltonian are known as dressed states. Synthetic gauge potentials arise from the unitary transformation required to express these dressed states in terms of the laser-free eigenstates. We discuss stability of laser-dressed atoms corresponding to the adiabatic condition and the probability of non-adiabatic transitions. Adopting both the semiclassical and quantum mechanical approaches, we demonstrate they agree in the suitable limit. We also analyze using both the conventional adiabatic picture and exact picture, where the kinetic energy is neglected in the former and retained in the latter picture.

  14. Synthetic gauge potentials for ultracold neutral atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Ju; Spielman, I. B.

    2016-09-01

    Synthetic gauge fields for ultracold neutral atoms—engineered using the interaction between laser fields and the atoms’ internal ‘spin’ degrees of freedom—provide promising techniques for generating the large (synthetic) magnetic fields required to reach the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) limit in quantum gases, bosonic or fermionic alike. Because neutral atoms can move in a nearly disorder-free environment and they have extremely simple contact interactions, the resulting FQH states would be revealed in their most essential form. Moreover, bosonic FQH states represent a new frontier and have never been seen in any setting. Going beyond electromagnetism's conventional scalar gauge field, it is possible to create more general non-Abelian gauge potentials. When these are spatially uniform, they are equivalent to spin–orbit coupling familiar in material systems, and can lead to cold atom analogs of topological insulators and topological superconductors. In this tutorial, we introduce basic concepts underlying these gauge fields, making connections to the Aharonov–Bohm phase and geometric phase. We focus on the system of neutral atoms ‘dressed’ by multiple laser beams, where the eigenstates of the resulting Hamiltonian are known as dressed states. Synthetic gauge potentials arise from the unitary transformation required to express these dressed states in terms of the laser-free eigenstates. We discuss stability of laser-dressed atoms corresponding to the adiabatic condition and the probability of non-adiabatic transitions. Adopting both the semiclassical and quantum mechanical approaches, we demonstrate they agree in the suitable limit. We also analyze using both the conventional adiabatic picture and exact picture, where the kinetic energy is neglected in the former and retained in the latter picture.

  15. Exploring potential Pluto-generated neutral tori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard T.; Hill, Matthew; KollMann, Peter; McHutt, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    The NASA New Horizons mission to Pluto is providing unprecedented insight into this mysterious outer solar system body. Escaping molecular nitrogen is of particular interest and possibly analogous to similar features observed at moons of Saturn and Jupiter. Such escaping N2 has the potential of creating molecular nitrogen and N (as a result of molecular dissociation) tori or partial toroidal extended particle distributions. The presence of these features would present the first confirmation of an extended toroidal neutral feature on a planetary scale in our solar system. While escape velocities are anticipated to be lower than those at Enceladus, Io or even Europa, particle lifetimes are much longer in Pluto’s orbit because as a result of much weaker solar interaction processes along Pluto’s orbit (on the order of tens of years). Thus, with a ~248 year orbit, Pluto may in fact be generating an extended toroidal feature along it orbit.For this work, we modify and apply our 3-D Monte Carlo neutral torus model (previously used at Saturn, Jupiter and Mercury) to study/analyze the theoretical possibility and scope of potential Pluto-generated neutral tori. Our model injects weighted particles and tracks their trajectories under the influence of all gravitational fields with interactions with other particles, solar photons and Pluto collisions. We present anticipated N2 and N tori based on current estimates of source characterization and environmental conditions. We also present an analysis of sensitivity to assumed initial conditions. Such results can provide insight into the Pluto system as well as valuable interpretation of New Horizon’s observational data.

  16. Neutralizing antibodies against interferon-Beta.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg

    2008-09-01

    The development of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is a major problem in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with interferon-beta (IFN-ß). Whereas binding antibodies (BAbs) can be demonstrated in the vast majority of patients, only a smaller proportion of patients develop NAbs. The principle in NAb in vitro assays is the utilization of cultured cell lines that are responsive to IFN-ß. The cytopathic effect (CPE) assay measures the capacity of NAbs to neutralize IFN- ß's protective effect on cells challenged with virus and the MxA induction assay measures the ability of NAbs to reduce the IFN-ß-induced expression of MxA, either at the mRNA or the protein level. A titer of >20 neutralizing units/ml traditionally defines NAb posi-tivity. NAbs in high titers completely abrogate the in vivo response to IFN-ß, whereas the effect of low and intermediate titers is unpredictable. As clinically important NAbs appear only after 9-18 months IFN- ß0 therapy, short-term studies of two years or less are unsuitable for evaluation of clinical NAb effects. All long-term trials of three years or more concordantly show evidence of a detrimental effect of NAbs on relapses, disease activity on MRI, or on disease progression. Persistent high titers of NAbs indicate an abrogation of the biological response and, hence, absence of therapeutic efficacy, and this observation should lead to a change of therapy. As low and medium titers are ambiguous treatment decisions in patients with low NAb titres should be guided by determination of in vivo mRNA MxA induction and clinical disease activity.

  17. A Neutral Beam Injector Upgrade for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    T. Stevenson; B McCormack; G.D. Loesser; M. Kalish; S. Ramakrishnan; L. Grisham; J. Edwards; M. Cropper; G. Rossi; A. von Halle; M. Williams

    2002-01-18

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) capability with a Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) capable of 80 kiloelectronvolt (keV), 5 Megawatt (MW), 5 second operation. This 5.95 million dollar upgrade reused a previous generation injector and equipment for technical, cost, and schedule reasons to obtain these specifications while retaining a legacy capability of 120 keV neutral particle beam delivery for shorter pulse lengths for possible future NSTX experiments. Concerns with NBI injection included power deposition in the plasma, aiming angles from the fixed NBI fan array, density profiles and beam shine through, orbit losses of beam particles, and protection of the vacuum vessel wall against beam impingement. The upgrade made use of the beamline and cryo panels from the Neutral Beam Test Stand facility, existing power supplies and controls, beamline components and equipment not contaminated by tritium during DT [deuterium-tritium] experiments, and a liquid Helium refrigerator plant to power and cryogenically pump a beamline and three ion sources. All of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) ion sources had been contaminated with tritium, so a refurbishment effort was undertaken on selected TFTR sources to rid the three sources destined for the NSTX NBI of as much tritium as possible. An interconnecting duct was fabricated using some spare and some new components to attach the beamline to the NSTX vacuum vessel. Internal vacuum vessel armor using carbon tiles was added to protect the stainless steel vacuum vessel from beam impingement in the absence of plasma and interlock failure. To date, the NBI has operated to 80 keV and 5 MW and has injected requested power levels into NSTX plasmas with good initial results, including high beta and strong heating characteristics at full rated plasma current.

  18. Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; O'Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1989-09-01

    Data from an E {parallel} B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. A neutral sampling formula for multiple samples and an 'exact' test of neutrality.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Rampal S

    2007-07-01

    As the utility of the neutral theory of biodiversity is increasingly being recognized, there is also an increasing need for proper tools to evaluate the relative importance of neutral processes (dispersal limitation and stochasticity). One of the key features of neutral theory is its close link to data: sampling formulas, giving the probability of a data set conditional on a set of model parameters, have been developed for parameter estimation and model comparison. However, only single local samples can be handled with the currently available sampling formulas, whereas data are often available for many small spatially separated plots. Here, I present a sampling formula for multiple, spatially separated samples from the same metacommunity, which is a generalization of earlier sampling formulas. I also provide an algorithm to generate data sets with the model and I introduce a general test of neutrality that does not require an alternative model; this test compares the probability of the observed data (calculated using the new sampling formula) with the probability of model-generated data sets. I illustrate this with tree abundance data from three large Panamanian neotropical forest plots. When the test is performed with model parameters estimated from the three plots, the model cannot be rejected; however, when parameter estimates previously reported for BCI are used, the model is strongly rejected. This suggests that neutrality cannot explain the structure of the three Panamanian tree communities on the local (BCI) and regional (Panama Canal Zone) scale simultaneously. One should be aware, however, that aspects of the model other than neutrality may be responsible for its failure. I argue that the spatially implicit character of the model is a potential candidate. PMID:17542939

  20. Mechanism of Neutralization by the Broadly Neutralizing HIV-1 Monoclonal Antibody VRC01▿†

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuxing; O'Dell, Sijy; Walker, Laura M.; Wu, Xueling; Guenaga, Javier; Feng, Yu; Schmidt, Stephen D.; McKee, Krisha; Louder, Mark K.; Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Graham, Barney S.; Haynes, Barton F.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Mascola, John R.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of VRC01 in complex with the HIV-1 gp120 core reveals that this broadly neutralizing CD4 binding site (CD4bs) antibody partially mimics the interaction of the primary virus receptor, CD4, with gp120. Here, we extended the investigation of the VRC01-gp120 core interaction to the biologically relevant viral spike to better understand the mechanism of VRC01-mediated neutralization and to define viral elements associated with neutralization resistance. In contrast to the interaction of CD4 or the CD4bs monoclonal antibody (MAb) b12 with the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env), occlusion of the VRC01 epitope by quaternary constraints was not a major factor limiting neutralization. Mutagenesis studies indicated that VRC01 contacts within the gp120 loop D, the CD4 binding loop, and the V5 region were necessary for optimal VRC01 neutralization, as suggested by the crystal structure. In contrast to interactions with the soluble gp120 monomer, VRC01 interaction with the native viral spike did not occur in a CD4-like manner; VRC01 did not induce gp120 shedding from the Env spike or enhance gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER)-directed antibody binding to the Env spike. Finally, VRC01 did not display significant reactivity with human antigens, boding well for potential in vivo applications. The data indicate that VRC01 interacts with gp120 in the context of the functional spike in a manner distinct from that of CD4. It achieves potent neutralization by precisely targeting the CD4bs without requiring alterations of Env spike configuration and by avoiding steric constraints imposed by the quaternary structure of the functional Env spike. PMID:21715490

  1. TPX/TFTR Neutral Beam energy absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlgren, F.; Wright, K.; Kamperschroer, J.; Grisham, L.; Lontai, L.; Peters, C.; VonHalle, A.

    1993-11-01

    The present beam energy absorbing surfaces on the TFTR Neutral Beams such as Ion Dumps, Calorimeters, beam defining apertures, and scrapers, are simple water cooled copper plates which wee designed to absorb (via their thermal inertia) the incident beam power for two seconds with a five minute coal down interval between pulses. These components are not capable of absorbing the anticipated beam power loading for 1000 second TPX pulses and will have to be replaced with an actively cooled design. While several actively cooled energy absorbing designs were considered,, the hypervapotron elements currently being used on the JET beamlines were chosen due to their lower cooling water demands and reliable performance on JET.

  2. Imaging heliospheric shocks using energetic neutral atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelof, E. C.

    1992-01-01

    In order to explore the feasibility of energetic neutral atom (ENA) imaging of shock-associated energetic proton populations in the heliosphere, computer-simulated ENA images have been generated based on Voyager 1/2 energetic ion measurements. One favorable vantage point for ENA shock imaging is from the Cassini spacecraft's orbit around Saturn at 10 AU. These images, calibrated relative to the measured shock-associated proton fluxes, yield an absolute estimate of ENA fluxes which indicates that useful heliospheric ENA imaging can be accomplished with present technology.

  3. Long Range Interactions Between Neutral Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gattobigio, G. L.; Michaud, F.; Labeyrie, G.; Kaiser, R.; Pohl, T.

    2006-10-18

    In a magneto-otpical trap (MOT) where atoms can be cooled and trapped using quasi-resonant laser light, the effect of rescattered light limits the spatial density of the atoms. Here we draw an analogy between the forces associated to this multiple scattering and a Coulomb type long range interaction. A MOT in the density limited regime can thus be interpreted as a non neutral plasma with weakly charged particles. For very large samples, non linear terms in the cooling and trapping forces can lead to self sustained instabilities via a supercritical Hopf bifurcation.

  4. Collisionless Relaxation in Non-Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Yan; Pakter, Renato; Teles, Tarcisio N.

    2008-02-01

    A theoretical framework is presented which allows us to quantitatively predict the final stationary state achieved by a non-neutral plasma during a process of collisionless relaxation. As a specific application, the theory is used to study relaxation of charged-particle beams. It is shown that a fully matched beam relaxes to the Lynden-Bell distribution. However, when a mismatch is present and the beam oscillates, parametric resonances lead to a core-halo phase separation. The approach developed accounts for both the density and the velocity distributions in the final stationary state.

  5. Statistics of selectively neutral genetic variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, A.; Haubold, B.; Mehlig, B.

    2002-04-01

    Random models of evolution are instrumental in extracting rates of microscopic evolutionary mechanisms from empirical observations on genetic variation in genome sequences. In this context it is necessary to know the statistical properties of empirical observables (such as the local homozygosity, for instance). Previous work relies on numerical results or assumes Gaussian approximations for the corresponding distributions. In this paper we give an analytical derivation of the statistical properties of the local homozygosity and other empirical observables assuming selective neutrality. We find that such distributions can be very non-Gaussian.

  6. Neutral changes during divergent evolution of hemoglobins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jukes, T. H.

    1978-01-01

    A comparison of the mRNAs for rabbit and human beta-hemoglobins shows that synonymous changes in codons have accumulated three times as rapidly as nucleotide replacements that produced changes in amino acids. This agrees with predictions based on the so-called neutral theory. In addition, seven codon changes that appear to be single-base changes (according to maximum parsimony) are actually two-base changes. This indicates that the construction of primordial sequences is of limited significance when based on inferences that assume minimum base changes for amino acid replacements.

  7. Neutral wind results from TIMED Doppler interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killeen, T.; Gablehouse, R.; Gell, D.; Johnson, R.; Niciejewski, R.; Ortland, D.; Wu, Q.; Skinner, W.; Solomon, S.; Kafkalidis, J.

    2003-04-01

    Since the launch of the NASA Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite in December 2001, the TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI) has been collecting lower thermosphere and mesospheric data for over a year. After adjustments to the spectral sampling scheme and operational mode, the instrument has been optimized. Efforts have also been made to improve the instrument performance. Preliminary neutral winds from O2 (0-0) have been analyzed. Tidal features and their seasonal variation are shown clearly in the wind data, which are quantitatively consistent with model prediction. We will report our progress on these efforts.

  8. TFTR neutral-beam power system

    SciTech Connect

    Winje, R.A.

    1982-10-01

    The TFTR Neutral Beam Power System (NBPS) consists of the accelerator grid power supply and the auxiliary power supplies required to operate the TFTR 120-keV ion sources. The current configuration of the NBPS including the 11-MVA accelerator grid power supply and the Arc and Filament power supplies isolated for operation at accelerator grid voltages up to 120 kV, is described. The prototype NBPS has been assembled at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and has been operated. The results of the initial operation and the description and resolution of some of the technical problems encountered during the commissioning tests are presented.

  9. Unitary constraints on neutral pion electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Laget, J. -M.

    2010-11-10

    At large virtuality $Q^2$, the coupling to the vector meson production channels provides us with a natural explanation of the surprisingly large cross section of the neutral pion electroproduction recently measured at Jefferson Laboratory, without destroying the good agreement between the Regge pole model and the data at the real photon point. Lastly, elastic rescattering of the $\\pi^0$ provides us with a way to explain why the node, that appears at $t\\sim -0.5$~GeV$^2$ at the real photon point, disappears as soon as $Q^2$ differs from zero.

  10. Unitary constraints on neutral pion electroproduction

    DOE PAGES

    Laget, J. -M.

    2010-11-10

    At large virtualitymore » $Q^2$, the coupling to the vector meson production channels provides us with a natural explanation of the surprisingly large cross section of the neutral pion electroproduction recently measured at Jefferson Laboratory, without destroying the good agreement between the Regge pole model and the data at the real photon point. Lastly, elastic rescattering of the $$\\pi^0$$ provides us with a way to explain why the node, that appears at $$t\\sim -0.5$$~GeV$^2$ at the real photon point, disappears as soon as $Q^2$ differs from zero.« less

  11. Evaluation of neutralized chemical agent identification sets (CAIS) for skin injury with an overview of the vesicant potential of agent degradation products.

    PubMed

    Olajos, E J; Olson, C T; Salem, H; Singer, A W; Hayes, T L; Menton, R G; Miller, T L; Rosso, T; MacIver, B

    1998-01-01

    Vesication and skin irritation studies were conducted in hairless guinea-pigs to determine the vesicant and skin irritation potential of chemically-neutralized Chemical Agent Identification Sets (CAIS). The CAIS are training items that contain chemical warfare-related material--sulfur mustard (HD), nitrogen mustard (HN) or lewisite (L)--and were declared obsolete in 1971. Animals were dosed topically with 'test article'--neat HD, 10% agent/chloroform solutions or product solutions (waste-streams) from neutralized CAIS--and evaluated for skin-damaging effects (gross and microscopic). Product solutions from the chemical neutralization of neat sulfur mustard resulted in microvesicle formation. All agent-dosed (HD or agent/chloroform solutions) sites manifested microblisters as well as other histopathological lesions of the skin. Waste-streams from the neutralization of agent (agent/chloroform or agent/charcoal) were devoid of vesicant activity. Cutaneous effects (erythema and edema) were consistent with the skin-injurious activity associated with the neutralizing reagent 1,3-dichloro-5,5-dimethylhydantoin (DCDMH). Chemical neutralization of CAIS was effective in eliminating/reducing the vesicant property of CAIS containing agent in chloroform or agent on charcoal but was inefficient in reducing the vesicant potential of CAIS containing neat sulfur mustard.

  12. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers.

    PubMed

    Stagner, L; Heidbrink, W W

    2014-11-01

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, "Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry," J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, "Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes," Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5-11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  13. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Stagner, L.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2014-11-15

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, “Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry,” J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, “Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes,” Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5–11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  14. Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer Measurements from Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. H., Jr.; Niemann, H.; Yelle, R. V.; Kasprzak, W.; Cravens, T.; Luhmann, J.; McNutt, R.; Ip, W.-H.; Gell, D.; Muller-Wordag, I. C. F.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: The Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) aboard the Cassini orbiter has obtained the first in situ composition measurements of the neutral densities of molecular nitrogen, methane, argon, and a host of stable carbon-nitrile compounds in its first flyby of Titan. The bulk composition and thermal structure of the moon s upper atmosphere do not appear to be changed since the Voyager flyby in 1979. However, the more sensitive techniques provided by modern in-situ mass spectrometry also give evidence for large-spatial-scale large-amplitude atmospheric waves in the upper atmosphere and for a plethora of stable carbon-nitrile compounds above 1174 km. Furthermore, they allow the first direct measurements of isotopes of nitrogen, carbon, and argon, which provide interesting clues about the evolution of the atmosphere. The atmosphere was first accreted as ammonia and ammonia ices from the Saturn sub-nebula. Subsequent photochemistry likely converted the atmosphere into molecular nitrogen. The early atmosphere was 1.5 to 5 times more substantial and was lost via escape over the intervening 4.5 billion years due to the reduced gravity associated with the relatively small mass of Titan. Carbon in the form of methane has continued to outgas over time from the interior with much of it being deposited in the form of complex hydrocarbons on the surface and some of it also being lost to space.

  15. Amphiphilic paramagnetic neutral gold dithiolene complexes.

    PubMed

    Perochon, Romain; Piekara-Sady, Lydia; Jurga, Witold; Clérac, Rodolphe; Fourmigué, Marc

    2009-04-28

    The sulfiding of benzils with P(4)S(10) in 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI) as solvent allows for a direct synthesis of neutral radical, gold dithiolene complexes based on 1,2-bis-(4-alkoxy-phenyl)ethylene-1,2-dithiolate ligands with n-butyl, n-octyl and n-dodecyl chains. The three neutral and soluble complexes Au-OC(4), Au-OC(8) and Au-OC(12) exhibit a near infrared (NIR) absorption band around 1.5 mum and EPR characteristics which confirm a strong delocalization of the spin density on the electron-rich dithiolene ligands. X-Ray crystal structures of Au-OC(4) and Au-OC(12) are compared with those of the corresponding nickel complexes. They are characterised by segregation of the alkyl chains into layered structures with a stacking of the radical complexes into alternated spin chains, confirmed by the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility which attests for antiferromagnetic interactions and a singlet ground state. Observations under polarising microscope and DSC experiments do not reveal a thermotropic behaviour for Au-OC(12).

  16. Laser Cooling and Trapping of Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, William D.

    1998-05-01

    Laser cooling was proposed in 1975 and first demonstrated for trapped ions in 1978, but the effective laser cooling of neutral atoms took longer, in part because neutrals are so hard to trap. Laser deceleration and cooling of an atomic beam came in the early 1980s, followed by magnetic trapping of atoms in 1985. In 1988 we discovered that laser cooling results in temperatures far lower than expected from the then-accepted theory. The new understanding, developed in the groups of Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and Steve Chu, of the physical process of laser cooling has allowed us to achieve temperatures below a microkelvin. Today, laser cooling and trapping is being used for applications ranging from atomic clocks to Bose-Einstein condensation. This talk is an adaptation of the Nobel Lecture given in Stockholm, December 1997. Special thanks go to my colleagues at NIST and to the entire laser cooling community. This work was supported by NIST and by the ONR.

  17. Punctualism, non-adaptationism, neutralism and evolution.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, M V

    1987-01-01

    In its further development the theory of evolution will incorporate molecular biology, synergetics and the theory of information. Using a simple model it is shown that speciation can be similar to phase transition. This is a thermodynamical statement which does not say anything concerning the sharpness and kinetic features of transition. Hence there is no contradiction between punctuated equilibrium and phyletic gradualism. The notion of punctualism can be used in the sense of phase transition. Evolution is directional because of constraints of natural selection due to the structure of organisms already existing and to the possible pathways of development. Correspondingly many characters are non-adaptative. Not only are the structures of proteins important for speciation but also the exact answers to the questions: "how much", "where" and "when"? These answers can be obtained as the results of regulation of genes, particularly of homeiotic regulation. The basis features of the structure of proteins are considered and the sense of the neutral theory is discussed in connection with degeneracy of correlation between the primary structure of a protein, its spatial structure and biological function. Informational aspects of evolution are discussed. Punctualism, non-adaptationism and neutralism form the triad of internally connected features of evolution. The Darwinian theory preserves its fundamental significance.

  18. A quirky probe of neutral naturalness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Zackaria; Curtin, David; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the signals arising from top partner pair production at the LHC as a probe of theories of neutral naturalness. We focus on scenarios in which top partners carry electroweak charges, such as folded supersymmetry or the quirky little Higgs. In this class of theories the top partners are pair produced as quirky bound states, since they are charged under a mirror color group whose lightest states are hidden glueballs. The quirks promptly de-excite and annihilate into glueballs, which decay back to Standard Model fermions via Higgs mixing. This can give rise to spectacular signatures at the LHC, such displaced decays, or high-multiplicity prompt production of many hard b ¯b or τ+τ- pairs. We show that signals arising from top partner pair production constitute the primary discovery channel for this class of theories in most regions of parameter space, and might provide the only experimental probe of scenarios with sub-cm glueball decay lengths. The measurement of top partner masses and couplings, which could be used to test the neutral naturalness mechanism directly, is also a tantalizing possibility.

  19. Laboratory simulation of cometary neutral gas ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, T.-F.; Rahman, H. U.; White, R. S.

    1989-05-01

    The laboratory simulation of the interaction of the solar wind with a comet is used to study the cometary neural gas ionization. The experiment is carried out in the UCR T-1 facility with an ice ball as the comet model. Photographs and data are taken with a variety of values of the solar wind velocity, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), and comet configurations. The results show that the cometary neutral gas ionization depends on both the velocity of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field. The plasma cloud surrounding the comet is visible only when the solar wind velocity and IMF are both above certain minimum values. This velocity dependent phenomena is explained by Alfven's critical ionization velocity effect. The critical magnetic field may be explained by assuming two stream lower hybrid instability as a triggering mechanism for the ionization of the neutral gas by plasma flow. Critical upper and lower limits for the magnetic field, required by anomalous ionization, are also derived that satisfy the experimental observations.

  20. Nonplanar solitons collision in ultracold neutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M.; El-Metwally, M.; Sabry, R.; El-Labany, S. K.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2013-09-15

    Collisions between two nonplanar ion-acoustic solitons in strongly coupled ultracold neutral plasmas composed of ion fluid and non-Maxwellian (nonthermal or superthermal) electron distributions are investigated. The extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method is used to obtain coupled nonplanar Kortweg-de Vries equations for describing the system. The nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two solitons are calculated. It is found that the properties of the nonplanar colliding solitons and its corresponding phase shifts are different from those in the planar case. The polarity of the colliding solitons strongly depends on the type of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions. A critical nonthermality parameter β{sub c} is identified. For values of β ≤ β{sub c} solitons with double polarity exist, while this behavior cannot occur for superthermal plasmas. The phase shift for nonthermal plasmas increases below β{sub c} for a positive soliton, but it decreases for β > β{sub c} for a negative soliton. For superthermal plasmas, the phase shift enhances rapidly for low values of spectral index κ and higher values of ions effective temperature ratio σ{sub *}. For 2 ≲ κ<10, the phase shift decreases but does not change for κ > 10. The nonlinear structure, as reported here, is useful for controlling the solitons created in forthcoming ultracold neutral plasma experiments.

  1. On geometric factors for neutral particle analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagner, L.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2014-11-01

    Neutral particle analyzers (NPA) detect neutralized energetic particles that escape from plasmas. Geometric factors relate the counting rate of the detectors to the intensity of the particle source. Accurate geometric factors enable quick simulation of geometric effects without the need to resort to slower Monte Carlo methods. Previously derived expressions [G. R. Thomas and D. M. Willis, "Analytical derivation of the geometric factor of a particle detector having circular or rectangular geometry," J. Phys. E: Sci. Instrum. 5(3), 260 (1972); J. D. Sullivan, "Geometric factor and directional response of single and multi-element particle telescopes," Nucl. Instrum. Methods 95(1), 5-11 (1971)] for the geometric factor implicitly assume that the particle source is very far away from the detector (far-field); this excludes applications close to the detector (near-field). The far-field assumption does not hold in most fusion applications of NPA detectors. We derive, from probability theory, a generalized framework for deriving geometric factors that are valid for both near and far-field applications as well as for non-isotropic sources and nonlinear particle trajectories.

  2. Charge neutralization apparatus for ion implantation system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Kunkel, Wulf B.; Williams, Malcom D.; McKenna, Charles M.

    1992-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for neutralization of a workpiece such as a semiconductor wafer in a system wherein a beam of positive ions is applied to the workpiece. The apparatus includes an electron source for generating an electron beam and a magnetic assembly for generating a magnetic field for guiding the electron beam to the workpiece. The electron beam path preferably includes a first section between the electron source and the ion beam and a second section which is coincident with the ion beam. The magnetic assembly generates an axial component of magnetic field along the electron beam path. The magnetic assembly also generates a transverse component of the magnetic field in an elbow region between the first and second sections of the electron beam path. The electron source preferably includes a large area lanthanum hexaboride cathode and an extraction grid positioned in close proximity to the cathode. The apparatus provides a high current, low energy electron beam for neutralizing charge buildup on the workpiece.

  3. Neutral Beam Power System for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Ramakrishnan, S.; Bowen, O.N.; O`Conner, T.; Edwards, J.; Fromm, N.; Hatcher, R.; Newman, R.; Rossi, G.; Stevenson, T.; von Halle, A.

    1993-11-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) will utilize to the maximum extent the existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) equipment and facilities. This is particularly true for the TFTR Neutral Beam (NB) system. Most of the NB hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary sub-systems, power systems, service infrastructure, and control systems can be used as is. The major changes in the NB hardware are driven by the new operating duty cycle. The TFTR Neutral Beam was designed for operation of the Sources for 2 seconds every 150 seconds. The TPX requires operation for 1000 seconds every 4500 seconds. During the Conceptual Design Phase of TPX every component of the TFTR NB Electrical Power System was analyzed to verify whether the equipment can meet the new operational requirements with our without modifications. The Power System converts 13.8 kV prime power to controlled pulsed power required at the NB sources. The major equipment involved are circuit breakers, auto and rectifier transformers surge suppression components, power tetrodes, HV Decks, and HVDC power transmission to sources. Thermal models were developed for the power transformers to simulate the new operational requirements. Heat runs were conducted for the power tetrodes to verify capability. Other components were analyzed to verify their thermal limitations. This paper describes the details of the evaluation and redesign of the electrical power system components to meet the TPX operational requirements.

  4. Skylab Astronauts' Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    After the end of the Apollo missions, NASA's next adventure into space was the marned spaceflight of Skylab. Using an S-IVB stage of the Saturn V launch vehicle, Skylab was a two-story orbiting laboratory, one floor being living quarters and the other a work room. The objectives of Skylab were to enrich our scientific knowledge of the Earth, the Sun, the stars, and cosmic space; to study the effects of weightlessness on living organisms, including man; to study the effects of the processing and manufacturing of materials utilizing the absence of gravity; and to conduct Earth resource observations. At the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), astronauts and engineers spent hundreds of hours in an MSFC Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) rehearsing procedures to be used during the Skylab mission, developing techniques, and detecting and correcting potential problems. The NBS was a 40-foot deep water tank that simulated the weightlessness environment of space. This photograph shows astronaut Ed Gibbon (a prime crew member of the Skylab-4 mission) during the neutral buoyancy Skylab extravehicular activity training at the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) mockup. One of Skylab's major components, the ATM was the most powerful astronomical observatory ever put into orbit to date.

  5. Cellular uptake of neutral phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Patrick L; Aird, Katherine M; Wu, Rebecca; Morse, Michael M; Devi, Gayathri R

    2009-09-01

    Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMO), which have a neutral chemistry, are extensively being used as tools for selective inhibition of gene expression in cell culture models and are currently in human clinical trials. Unlike phosphorothioates (PS ODN) and other charged oligonucleotides, little is known about the uptake characteristics of neutral oligomers. The purpose of this study was to understand the kinetics of PMO transport in cells and correlate with antisense activity. In contrast to primary cells and some transformed cell lines which were uptake permissive, established cancer cell lines showed very poor uptake with an occasional diffuse intracellular pattern. Differential PMO uptake was also observed in immune cells, with dendritic cells and monocytes showing highest uptake compared to T and B cells. In addition, PMO localization was observed to be heterogeneous within a population of uptake permissive cells. Unassisted PMO delivery targeting specific genes was correlated with functional antisense efficacy in experiments showing correction of pre-mRNA missplicing and inhibition of target enzyme activity in cells in culture. PMO internalization in uptake-permissive cells was identified to be specific, saturable, and energy-dependent, suggesting a receptor mediated uptake mechanism. Understanding PMO transport should facilitate the design of more effective synthetic antisense oligomers as therapeutic agents.

  6. Neutral gas density depletion due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Tynan, George R.; Cattolica, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral gas temperature and total pressure have been measured for pure N2, He/5%N2 and Ar/5%N2 in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor, and a significant rise in the neutral gas temperature has been observed. When thermal transpiration is used to correct total pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Neutral pressure is depleted due to the pressure balance when the plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure) becomes comparable to the neutral pressure in high density plasma. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile was obtained from the neutral gas temperature and the corrected neutral pressure measurements. The results show that the neutral gas density at the centre of the plasma chamber (factor of 2-4 ×) decreases significantly in the presence of a plasma discharge. Significant spatial variation in neutral gas uniformity occurs in such plasmas due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance.

  7. Solvent systems combining neutral and acidic extractants for separating trivalent lanthanides from the transuranic elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, G. J.; Gelis, A. V.; Vandegrift, G. F.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; PNL

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a review of recent publications that have focused on combined extractant systems for separating trivalent actinides from the lanthanides. These mixed solvent systems combine an acidic extractant with a neutral extractant to achieve the actinide/lanthanide separation. Depending on the neutral extractant used, three categorizations of systems can be considered, including combinations of acidic extractants with 1 diamides, 2 carbamoylmethylphosphine oxides, and 3 polydentate nitrogen-donor ligands. This review of relevant publications indicates that, although there is significant potential for practical exploitation of mixed neutral/acidic extractant systems to achieve a single-step separation of trivalent actinides from acidic high-level waste solutions, the fundamental chemistry underlying these combined systems is not yet well understood. For example, although there is strong evidence suggesting that adducts form between the neutral and acidic extractants, the nature of these adducts generally is not known. Likewise, the structures of the mixed complexes formed between the metal ions and the two different extractants are not fully understood. Research into these basic phenomena likely will provide clues about how to design practical mixed-extractant systems that can be used to efficiently separate the transuranic elements from the lanthanides and other components of irradiated fuel.

  8. Single-dose Intramuscular Toxicity of Neutral Natured Blood Stasis Pharmacopuncture in Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, In Ho; Lee, Eun Yong

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was performed to analyze the single-dose toxicity of neutral natured blood stasis pharmacopuncture extracts. Methods: All experiments were conducted at Biotoxtech, an institution authorized to perform non-clinical studies, under the regulations of Good Laboratory Practice (GLP). Sprague-Dawley rats were chosen for the pilot study. Doses of neutral natured blood stasis pharmacopuncture extracts, 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mL, were administered to the experimental group, and the same doses of normal saline solution were administered to the control group. This study was conducted under the approval of the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee. Results: In all 4 groups, no deaths occurred, and the neutral natured blood stasis pharmacopuncture extracts administered by intramuscular (IM) injection was over 1.0 mL/animal. No significant changes in the body weights between the control group and the experimental group were observed. To check for abnormalities in organs and tissues, we used microscopy to examine representative histological sections of each specified organ; the results showed no significant differences in any organs or tissues. Conclusion: The above findings suggest that treatment with neutral natured blood stasis pharmacopuncture extracts is relatively safe. Further studies on this subject should be conducted to yield more concrete evidence. PMID:25780698

  9. Population Growth Enhances the Mean Fixation Time of Neutral Mutations and the Persistence of Neutral Variation

    PubMed Central

    Waxman, D.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental result of population genetics states that a new mutation, at an unlinked neutral locus in a randomly mating diploid population, has a mean time of fixation of ∼4Ne generations, where Ne is the effective population size. This result is based on an assumption of fixed population size, which does not universally hold in natural populations. Here, we analyze such neutral fixations in populations of changing size within the framework of the diffusion approximation. General expressions are derived for the mean and variance of the fixation time in changing populations. Some explicit results are given for two cases: (i) the effective population size undergoes a sudden change, representing a sudden population expansion or a sudden bottleneck; (ii) the effective population changes linearly for a limited period of time and then remains constant. Additionally, a lower bound for the mean time of fixation is obtained for an effective population size that increases with time, and this is applied to exponentially growing populations. The results obtained in this work show, among other things, that for populations that increase in size, the mean time of fixation can be enhanced, sometimes substantially so, over 4Ne,0 generations, where Ne,0 is the effective population size at the time the mutation arises. Such an enhancement is associated with (i) an increased probability of neutral polymorphism in a population and (ii) an enhanced persistence of high-frequency neutral variation, which is the variation most likely to be observed. PMID:22426878

  10. Structural basis of hepatitis C virus neutralization by broadly neutralizing antibody HCV1

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Robbins, Justin B.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun

    2012-10-29

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects more than 2% of the global population and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and end-stage liver diseases. Circulating HCV is genetically diverse, and therefore a broadly effective vaccine must target conserved T- and B-cell epitopes of the virus. Human mAb HCV1 has broad neutralizing activity against HCV isolates from at least four major genotypes and protects in the chimpanzee model from primary HCV challenge. The antibody targets a conserved antigenic site (residues 412-423) on the virus E2 envelope glycoprotein. Two crystal structures of HCV1 Fab in complex with an epitope peptide at 1.8-{angstrom} resolution reveal that the epitope is a {beta}-hairpin displaying a hydrophilic face and a hydrophobic face on opposing sides of the hairpin. The antibody predominantly interacts with E2 residues Leu{sup 413} and Trp{sup 420} on the hydrophobic face of the epitope, thus providing an explanation for how HCV isolates bearing mutations at Asn{sup 415} on the same binding face escape neutralization by this antibody. The results provide structural information for a neutralizing epitope on the HCV E2 glycoprotein and should help guide rational design of HCV immunogens to elicit similar broadly neutralizing antibodies through vaccination.

  11. Solution Leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Tiejun; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jian; He, Zhen

    2014-06-01

    Recovery of alumina from magnetic separation tailings of red mud has been investigated by Na2CO3 solution leaching. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that most of the alumina is present as 12CaO·7Al2O3 and CaO·Al2O3 in the magnetic separation tailings. The shrinking core model was employed to describe the leaching kinetics. The results show that the calculated activation energy of 8.31 kJ/mol is characteristic for an internal diffusion-controlled process. The kinetic equation can be used to describe the leaching process. The effects of Na2CO3 concentration, liquid-to-solid ratio, and particle size on recovery of Al2O3 were examined.

  12. Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. H.; Hodges, R. R.; Duerksen, K. D.

    1979-01-01

    The Pioneer Venus large probe neutral mass spectrometer (LNMS) uses a single focusing magnetic sector field mass analyzer with mass range of 1-208 amu, resolution sufficient to separate the mercury isotopes, and sensitivity sufficient to detect minor constituents in the 1 ppm range relative to the CO2 in the Venus atmosphere. A combination of ion and chemical pumping is used to maintain a vacuum in the mass analyzer and to remove the atmosphere gases which enter the ion source chamber through a special leak. A microprocessor controls the operation of the instrument through a highly efficient peak stepping and data compression program, permitting acquisition of a complete mass spectrum roughly once each minute.

  13. Neutral Beam Ion Loss Modeling for NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mikkelsen; D.S. Darrow; L. Grisham; R. Akers; S. Kaye

    1999-06-01

    A numerical model, EIGOL, has been developed to calculate the loss rate of neutral beam ions from NSTX and the resultant power density on the plasma facing components. This model follows the full gyro-orbit of the beam ions, which can be a significant fraction of the minor radius. It also includes the three-dimensional structure of the plasma facing components inside NSTX. Beam ion losses from two plasma conditions have been compared: {beta} = 23%, q{sub 0} = 0.8, and {beta} = 40%, q{sub 0} = 2.6. Global losses are computed to be 4% and 19%, respectively, and the power density on the rf antenna is near the maximum tolerable levels in the latter case.

  14. Variation and infectivity neutralization in influenza

    PubMed Central

    Knossow, Marcel; Skehel, John J

    2006-01-01

    Worldwide epidemics of influenza are caused by viruses that normally infect other species, particularly waterfowl, and that contain haemagglutinin membrane glycoproteins (HAs) to which the human population has no immunity. Anti-HA immunoglobulins neutralize influenza virus infectivity. In this review we outline structural differences that distinguish the HAs of the 16 antigenic subtypes (H1–16) found in viruses from avian species. We also describe structural changes in HA required for the effective transfer to humans of viruses containing three of them, H1, H2 and H3, in the 1918 (Spanish), the 1957 (Asian) and the 1968 (Hong Kong) pandemics, respectively. In addition, we consider changes that may be required before the current avian H5 viruses could pass from human to human. PMID:16925526

  15. The Statistics of Neutral Density Maxima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. Y.; Gentile, L. C.; Huang, Y.; Su, Y. J.; Sutton, E. K.

    2015-12-01

    We have analyzed neutral density observations from the CHAMP and GRACE spacecraft over the interval from launch in 2001 and 2002, respectively, to 2010 (CHAMP) and 2012 (GRACE). We extract maxima which are 30% above the ambient mean values as indications of localized Joule heating. Our analysis of these maxima shows that they occur predominantly at very high latitudes, with a mean of -74⁰ Magnetic Latitude (MLat) in the Southern Hemisphere, and 78⁰ MLat in the Northern Hemisphere. There is a maximum at 11.5-12 Magnetic Local Time (MLT) but the distribution is widely spread across all MLTs. The frequency of occurrence is correlated with the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and with the SymH index. The implications of these results will be discussed in the context of coupling of the thermosphere to the magnetosphere and ionosphere.

  16. [Neutrality, bisexuality and androgyny of the psychoanalyst].

    PubMed

    Molfino, F

    1993-06-01

    Proceeding from the fact that Western thought is based on Greek philosophy, the author pinpoints a feature specific to psychoanalysis. Unlike other sciences, which are grounded in the central (and latently homosexual) relation of rhetoric and dialogue between teacher and pupil, psychoanalytic dialogue centers around a heterosexual (male/female) relationship. Prototypic for this is the confrontation of the psychoanalyst with the "complex burden of female love". The fascination of philosophy lies in similarity, that of psychoanalysis in difference. The gender question, and more specifically the sex of the analyst, has been given little attention in connection with the transference/countertransference paradigm. With a discussion of the concepts of neutrality (Freud), bisexuality (Freud, Jung) and with reference to literary sources on androgyny (V. Woolf, Balzac, Le Guin) Molfino undertakes the attempt to take the gender discussion in psychoanalytic theory and practice a stage further.

  17. [Neutrality, bisexuality and androgyny of the psychoanalyst].

    PubMed

    Molfino, F

    1993-06-01

    Proceeding from the fact that Western thought is based on Greek philosophy, the author pinpoints a feature specific to psychoanalysis. Unlike other sciences, which are grounded in the central (and latently homosexual) relation of rhetoric and dialogue between teacher and pupil, psychoanalytic dialogue centers around a heterosexual (male/female) relationship. Prototypic for this is the confrontation of the psychoanalyst with the "complex burden of female love". The fascination of philosophy lies in similarity, that of psychoanalysis in difference. The gender question, and more specifically the sex of the analyst, has been given little attention in connection with the transference/countertransference paradigm. With a discussion of the concepts of neutrality (Freud), bisexuality (Freud, Jung) and with reference to literary sources on androgyny (V. Woolf, Balzac, Le Guin) Molfino undertakes the attempt to take the gender discussion in psychoanalytic theory and practice a stage further. PMID:8351399

  18. Neutral pion production in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Chupp, E. L.; Rieger, E.; Cooper, J. F.; Share, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on SMM has detected more than 130 flares with emission approx 300 keV. More than 10 of these flares were detected at photon energies 10 MeV. Although the majority of the emission at 10 MeV must be from electron bremsstrahlung, at least two of the flares have spectral properties 40 MeV that require gamma rays from the decay of neutral pions. It is found that pion production can occur early in the impulsive phase as defined by hard X-rays near 100 keV. It is also found in one of these flares that a significant portion of this high-energy emission is produced well after the impulsive phase. This extended production phase, most clearly observed at high energies, may be a signature of the acceleration process which produces solar energetic particles (SEP's) in space.

  19. Age-abundance relationships for neutral communities.

    PubMed

    Danino, Matan; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2015-10-01

    Neutral models for the dynamics of a system of competing species are often used to describe a wide variety of empirical communities. These models are used in many situations, ranging from population genetics and ecological biodiversity to macroevolution and cancer tumors. One of the main issues discussed within this framework is the relationships between the abundance of a species and its age. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of the age-abundance relationships for fixed-size and growing communities. Explicit formulas for the average and the most likely age of a species with abundance n are given, together with the full probability distribution function. We further discuss the universality of these results and their applicability to the tropical forest community. PMID:26565271

  20. Age-abundance relationships for neutral communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danino, Matan; Shnerb, Nadav M.

    2015-10-01

    Neutral models for the dynamics of a system of competing species are often used to describe a wide variety of empirical communities. These models are used in many situations, ranging from population genetics and ecological biodiversity to macroevolution and cancer tumors. One of the main issues discussed within this framework is the relationships between the abundance of a species and its age. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of the age-abundance relationships for fixed-size and growing communities. Explicit formulas for the average and the most likely age of a species with abundance n are given, together with the full probability distribution function. We further discuss the universality of these results and their applicability to the tropical forest community.

  1. Meson exchange and neutral weak currents

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, D.H.

    1994-04-01

    Measurements of parity-violating electron scattering asymmetries to determine weak neutral currents in nuclei will be effected by the presence of meson exchange currents. Present low momentum transfer calculations, based on a flavor independent framework, show these effects to be small. In general, however, as the momentum transfer increases to values typical of deep-inelastic scattering, fragmentation functions show a clear flavor dependence. It is suggested that a good experimental starting point for understanding the flavor dependence of meson production and exchange currents is the Q{sup 2} dependence of parity-violating asymmetry in inclusive single pion electroproduction. A CEBAF facility with doubled energy is necessary to approach momentum transfers where this process begins to scale.

  2. TFTR neutral beam calorimeter fabrication and instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, E.D.; Brown, G.M.; Dudek, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    The TFTR Neutral Beam Calorimeter were designed by Lawrence Livemore Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, but while the production units were being fabricated by the Plasma Physics Laboratory, several design changes were made. The major alterations included a detailed examination of the braze joints and cooling tubes along with techniques for inspecting the joints, and changing the temperature measurement instrumentation from thermistors to thermocouples. In addition, the water pipes were changed from custom bent pieces to assemblies of off the shelf street elbows and metal bellows, the motor control wiring was reworked to interface with the various TFTR control systems, and a second set of guide rollers was added to the retraction mechanism in order to provide smoother operation. Also, separate blow-out lines for each vee were added in order to increase the reliability of sufficiently purging the cooling systems and provide the capability of draining a single vee should it develop a leak.

  3. Charge neutralization as studied experimentally and theoretically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linson, L. M.

    1982-01-01

    Problems regarding an isolated sphere which emits negative charge are considered. Such a sphere could charge up to large potentials which would inhibit the electron beam from leaving the vicinity of the body. In order to avoid charging to high potentials, a vehicle must attract a return current equal to the emitted current. The present investigation is concerned with theoretical models of some processes believed to be important for the vehicle neutralization problem under various conditions. Attention is given to general time-scale considerations, the low-altitude regime, the high-altitude regime, vehicle-induced discharge, and beam-plasma discharge. The general pattern which emeres as a result of measurements is that below altitudes of approximately 125 + or - 5 km the vehicle potential rarely rises more than several tens of volts.

  4. TFTR neutral-beam test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Turitzin, N.M.; Newman, R.A.

    1981-11-01

    TFTR Neutral Beam System will have thirteen discharge ion sources, each with its own power supply. Twelve of these will be utilized for supplemental heating of the TFTR tokamak plasma, while the thirteenth will be dedicated to an off-machine test chamber for source development and/or conditioning. A test installation for one source was set up using prototype equipment to discover and correct possible deficiencies, and to properly coordinate the equipment. This test facility represents the first opportunity for assembling an integrated system of hardware supplied by diverse vendors, each of whom designed and built his equipment to performance specifications. For the installation and coordination of the different portions of the total system, particular attention was given to personnel safety and safe equipment operation. This paper discusses various system components, their characteristics, interconnection and control. Results of the recently initiated test phase will be reported at a later date.

  5. Neutral particle beam sensing and steering

    DOEpatents

    Maier, II, William B.; Cobb, Donald D.; Robiscoe, Richard T.

    1991-01-01

    The direction of a neutral particle beam (NPB) is determined by detecting Ly.alpha. radiation emitted during motional quenching of excited H(2S) atoms in the beam during movement of the atoms through a magnetic field. At least one detector is placed adjacent the beam exit to define an optical axis that intercepts the beam at a viewing angle to include a volume generating a selected number of photons for detection. The detection system includes a lens having an area that is small relative to the NPB area and a pixel array located in the focal plane of the lens. The lens viewing angle and area pixel array are selected to optimize the beam tilt sensitivity. In one embodiment, two detectors are placed coplanar with the beam axis to generate a difference signal that is insensitive to beam variations other than beam tilt.

  6. Colloquium: Artificial gauge potentials for neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dalibard, Jean; Gerbier, Fabrice; Juzeliunas, Gediminas; Oehberg, Patrik

    2011-10-01

    When a neutral atom moves in a properly designed laser field, its center-of-mass motion may mimic the dynamics of a charged particle in a magnetic field, with the emergence of a Lorentz-like force. In this Colloquium the physical principles at the basis of this artificial (synthetic) magnetism are presented. The corresponding Aharonov-Bohm phase is related to the Berry's phase that emerges when the atom adiabatically follows one of the dressed states of the atom-laser interaction. Some manifestations of artificial magnetism for a cold quantum gas, in particular, in terms of vortex nucleation are discussed. The analysis is then generalized to the simulation of non-Abelian gauge potentials and some striking consequences are presented, such as the emergence of an effective spin-orbit coupling. Both the cases of bulk gases and discrete systems, where atoms are trapped in an optical lattice, are addressed.

  7. Weighing Neutrinos with Cosmic Neutral Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Bull, Philip; Viel, Matteo

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the signatures left by massive neutrinos on the spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen (H i) in the post-reionization era by running hydrodynamic simulations that include massive neutrinos as additional collisionless particles. We find that halos in massive/massless neutrino cosmologies host a similar amount of neutral hydrogen, although for a fixed halo mass, on average, the H i mass increases with the sum of the neutrino masses. Our results show that H i is more strongly clustered in cosmologies with massive neutrinos, while its abundance, ΩH i(z), is lower. These effects arise mainly from the impact of massive neutrinos on cosmology: they suppress both the amplitude of the matter power spectrum on small scales and the abundance of dark matter halos. Modeling the H i distribution with hydrodynamic simulations at z > 3 and a simple analytic model at z < 3, we use the Fisher matrix formalism to conservatively forecast the constraints that Phase 1 of the Square Kilometre Array will place on the sum of neutrino masses, Mν ≡ Σ mν. We find that with 10,000 hr of interferometric observations at 3 ≲ z ≲ 6 from a deep and narrow survey with SKA1-LOW, the sum of the neutrino masses can be measured with an error σ(Mν) ≲ 0.3 eV (95% CL). Similar constraints can be obtained with a wide and deep SKA1-MID survey at z ≲ 3, using the single-dish mode. By combining data from MID, LOW, and Planck, plus priors on cosmological parameters from a Stage IV spectroscopic galaxy survey, the sum of the neutrino masses can be determined with an error σ(Mν) ≃ 0.06 eV (95% CL).

  8. WEIGHING NEUTRINOS WITH COSMIC NEUTRAL HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Bull, Philip E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the signatures left by massive neutrinos on the spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen (H i) in the post-reionization era by running hydrodynamic simulations that include massive neutrinos as additional collisionless particles. We find that halos in massive/massless neutrino cosmologies host a similar amount of neutral hydrogen, although for a fixed halo mass, on average, the H i mass increases with the sum of the neutrino masses. Our results show that H i is more strongly clustered in cosmologies with massive neutrinos, while its abundance, Ω{sub H} {sub i}(z), is lower. These effects arise mainly from the impact of massive neutrinos on cosmology: they suppress both the amplitude of the matter power spectrum on small scales and the abundance of dark matter halos. Modeling the H i distribution with hydrodynamic simulations at z > 3 and a simple analytic model at z < 3, we use the Fisher matrix formalism to conservatively forecast the constraints that Phase 1 of the Square Kilometre Array will place on the sum of neutrino masses, M{sub ν} ≡ Σ m{sub ν}. We find that with 10,000 hr of interferometric observations at 3 ≲ z ≲ 6 from a deep and narrow survey with SKA1-LOW, the sum of the neutrino masses can be measured with an error σ(M{sub ν}) ≲ 0.3 eV (95% CL). Similar constraints can be obtained with a wide and deep SKA1-MID survey at z ≲ 3, using the single-dish mode. By combining data from MID, LOW, and Planck, plus priors on cosmological parameters from a Stage IV spectroscopic galaxy survey, the sum of the neutrino masses can be determined with an error σ(M{sub ν}) ≃ 0.06 eV (95% CL)

  9. Expansion Dynamics of Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killian, Thomas

    2006-05-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas [1], formed by photoionizing laser-cooled atoms near the ionization threshold, stretch the boundaries of traditional neutral plasma physics. The electron temperature in these plasmas is from 1-1000K and the ion temperature is around 1 K. The density can be as high as 10^10 cm-3. Fundamental interest stems from the possibility of creating strongly-coupled plasmas, but recent experimental and theoretical work has focused on the equilibration and expansion dynamics. Using optical absorption imaging [2], we study expansion dynamics during the first 30 microseconds after photoionization. Images record the spatial extent of the plasma, while the Doppler broadened absorption spectrum measures the ion velocity spectrally. The expansion is driven by the pressure of the electron gas, so the ion acceleration depends on the electron temperature. Evidence for terminal ion velocity supports predictions of adiabatic cooling of electrons during expansion [3]. Images confirm the self-similar nature of a Gaussian density distribution. Understanding expansion dynamics is important for plans to laser cool and trap the plasma. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation and David and Lucille Packard Foundation. [1] T. C. Killian, S. Kulin, S. D. Bergeson, L. A. Orozco, C. Orzel, and S. L. Rolston, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4776 (1999). [2] C. E. Simien, Y.C. Chen, P. Gupta, S. Laha, Y. N. Martinez, P. G. Mickelson, S. B. Nagel, T. C. Killian, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 143001 (2004). [3] F. Robicheaux and J. D. Hanson, Phys. Plasmas 10, 2217 (2003), T. Pohl, T. Pattard, and J. M. Rost, Phys. Rev. A 70, 033416 (2004).

  10. S Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dezhi, Zeng; Gang, Tian; Junying, Hu; Zhi, Zhang; Taihe, Shi; Wanying, Liu; Qiang, Lu; Shaobo, Feng

    2014-11-01

    During drilling process, if oil and gas overflow containing H2S enters drilling fluids, the performance of drill pipes will decline significantly within a short time. In this paper, S135 drill pipe specimen was immersed in the saturated solution of H2S at room temperature for 6, 12, 18, and 24 h, respectively. The tensile properties and impact properties of S135 drill pipe were determined before and after immersion for comparison. In addition, the S135 specimens were immersed for 3 days at 80 °C to determine the changes in fatigue performance. The test results indicated that the yield strength of S135 material fluctuated with immersion time increasing and the tensile strength slightly varied with immersion time. But the plasticity index of S135 decreased significantly with the increase in immersion time. The impact energy of S135 steel also fluctuated with the increase in immersion time. After 3-day immersion at 80 °C, the fatigue properties of S135 steel decreased, and fatigue life showed the one order of magnitude difference under the same stress conditions. Moreover, fatigue strength was also decreased by about 10%. The study can guide security management of S135 drill pipe under the working conditions with oil and gas overflow containing H2S, reduce drilling tool failures, and provide technical support for drilling safety.

  11. Life's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2004-11-01

    Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

  12. Life's Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Simon Conway

    2003-09-01

    Life's Solution builds a persuasive case for the predictability of evolutionary outcomes. The case rests on a remarkable compilation of examples of convergent evolution, in which two or more lineages have independently evolved similar structures and functions. The examples range from the aerodynamics of hovering moths and hummingbirds to the use of silk by spiders and some insects to capture prey. Going against the grain of Darwinian orthodoxy, this book is a must read for anyone grappling with the meaning of evolution and our place in the Universe. Simon Conway Morris is the Ad Hominen Professor in the Earth Science Department at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St. John's College and the Royal Society. His research focuses on the study of constraints on evolution, and the historical processes that lead to the emergence of complexity, especially with respect to the construction of the major animal body parts in the Cambrian explosion. Previous books include The Crucible of Creation (Getty Center for Education in the Arts, 1999) and co-author of Solnhofen (Cambridge, 1990). Hb ISBN (2003) 0-521-82704-3

  13. Biodegradation kinetics of neutralized Sarin by two different consortia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Autenrieth, R.L.; Bonner, J.S.; Harvey, S.P.; Wild, J.R.; Rainina, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    Sarin (o-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate), one of the several highly toxic chemical warfare agents, can be readily neutralized in sodium hydroxide solution forming large quantities of brine solution containing IMPA (o-isopropyl methylphosphonic acid) and sodium fluoride that must be further processed and disposed. Two mixed cultures were successfully acclimated to use IMPA as a phosphorus source. The medium formula was chosen to provide the reactors with adequate alternative carbon sources so that the only limiting factor of the bacterial growth is phosphorus. Kinetic studies of the two cultures both in suspended and encapsulated forms were done with the initial IMPA concentrations ranged from 15 mg/L to 1,280 mg/L. Kinetic parameters were estimated based on IMPA and biomass concentrations measured over time using Monod equation and the least square method. For both cultures IMPA was not inhibitive under the tested conditions. For the free cells, n{sub max} was 131.3 mg/l/day for the APG swamp microorganisms and 120.9 mg/l/day for the soil extracted microorganisms. For the encapsulated cells, n{sub max} was 81.7 mg/l/day for the APG swamp microorganisms and 67.1 mg/l/day for the soil extracted microorganisms. The smaller values of n{sub max} for both types of the encapsulated microorganisms were very likely caused by substrate and nutrient transport limitation. For both cultures and both cell forms, it was observed that the degradation of IMPA formed MPA and phosphate sequentially. This led to the proposal of an IMPA biodegradative pathway involving an organophosphate hydrolase catalyzed reaction forming MPA. This would then be followed by C-P lyase catalyzed reaction transforming MPA to orthophosphate.

  14. Brushing abrasion of luting cements under neutral and acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Buchalla, W; Attin, T; Hellwig, E

    2000-01-01

    Four resin based materials (Compolute Aplicap, ESPE; Variolink Ultra, Vivadent; C&B Metabond, Parkell and Panavia 21, Kuraray), two carboxylate cements (Poly-F Plus, Dentsply DeTrey and Durelon Maxicap, ESPE), two glass-ionomer cements (Fuji I, GC and Ketac-Cem Aplicap, ESPE), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, 3M) one polyacid-modified resin composite (Dyract Cem, Dentsply DeTrey) and one zinc phosphate cement (Harvard, Richter & Hoffmann) were investigated according to their brushing resistance after storage in neutral and acidic buffer solutions. For this purpose 24 cylindrical acrylic molds were each filled with the materials. After hardening, the samples were stored for seven days in 100% relative humidity and at 37 degrees C. Subsequently, they were ground flat and polished. Then each specimen was covered with an adhesive tape leaving a 4 mm wide window on the cement surface. Twelve samples of each material were stored for 24 hours in a buffer solution with a pH of 6.8. The remaining 12 samples were placed in a buffer with a pH of 3.0. All specimens were then subjected to a three media brushing abrasion (2,000 strokes) in an automatic brushing machine. Storage and brushing were performed three times. After 6,000 brushing strokes per specimen, the tape was removed. Brushing abrasion was measured with a computerized laser profilometer and statistically analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's Standardized Range Test (p < or = 0.05). The highest brushing abrasion was found for the two carboxylate cements. The lowest brushing abrasion was found for one resin based material, Compolute Aplicap. With the exception of three resin-based materials, a lower pH led to a higher brushing abrasion.

  15. Alloy solution hardening with solute pairs

    DOEpatents

    Mitchell, John W.

    1976-08-24

    Solution hardened alloys are formed by using at least two solutes which form associated solute pairs in the solvent metal lattice. Copper containing equal atomic percentages of aluminum and palladium is an example.

  16. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandri, S.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.; Poggi, C.

    2011-12-01

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  17. Radiation Safety System for SPIDER Neutral Beam Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sandri, S.; Poggi, C.; Coniglio, A.; D'Arienzo, M.

    2011-12-13

    SPIDER (Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF Plasma only) and MITICA (Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advanced) are the ITER neutral beam injector (NBI) testing facilities of the PRIMA (Padova Research Injector Megavolt Accelerated) Center. Both injectors accelerate negative deuterium ions with a maximum energy of 1 MeV for MITICA and 100 keV for SPIDER with a maximum beam current of 40 A for both experiments. The SPIDER facility is classified in Italy as a particle accelerator. At present, the design of the radiation safety system for the facility has been completed and the relevant reports have been presented to the Italian regulatory authorities. Before SPIDER can operate, approval must be obtained from the Italian Regulatory Authority Board (IRAB) following a detailed licensing process. In the present work, the main project information and criteria for the SPIDER injector source are reported together with the analysis of hypothetical accidental situations and safety issues considerations. Neutron and photon nuclear analysis is presented, along with special shielding solutions designed to meet Italian regulatory dose limits. The contribution of activated corrosion products (ACP) to external exposure of workers has also been assessed. Nuclear analysis indicates that the photon contribution to worker external exposure is negligible, and the neutron dose can be considered by far the main radiation protection issue. Our results confirm that the injector has no important radiological impact on the population living around the facility.

  18. Kinetic Re-Evaluation of Fuel Neutralization by AKGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oropeza Cristina; Kosiba, Mike; Davis, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    Baseline characterization testing previously identified alpha-ketoglutaric acid (AKGA) cis a potential alternative to the current standard hydrazine (HZ) family fuel neutralization techniques in use at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Thus far, the reagent shows promise for use in hardware decontamination operations and as a drop-in replacement for the scrubber liquor currently used in KSC four tower vapor scrubbers. Implementation of AKGA could improve process safety and reduce or eliminate generation of hydrazine-Iaden waste streams. This paper focuses on evaluation of the kinetics of these decontamination reactions in solution. Pseudo first order reaction rate constants with respect to the pyridazine products (6-oxo-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyridazine-3-carboxylic acid, (PCA) and 1-methyl-6-oxo-4,5-dihydro-pyridazine-3-carboxylic acid (mPCA)) in the presence of excess AKGA were determined by monitoring product formation using a ultra-violet visible absorption spectroscopy method. The results are presented here in comparison to previous data obtained by monitoring reactant depletion by gas chromatography with nitrogen phosphorus detector (GC-NPD).

  19. Acceleration of neutrals in a nanosecond laser produced nickel plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K.; Philip, Reji

    2014-12-15

    Time of flight dynamics of slow neutrals, fast neutrals, and ions from a nanosecond laser produced nickel (Ni) plasma are investigated. Species arrival times confirm the hypothesis that fast neutrals are formed by the recombination of fast ions with free electrons. Both neutrals and ions are found to accelerate for a short interval immediately after ablation, which is attributed to internal Coulomb forces which create electrostatic potentials resulting in the charged particle acceleration. This process is further enhanced by laser-plasma energy coupling. Emission from neutrals could be measured for longer axial distances in the plume compared to that of ions confirming that the ions recombine to form neutrals as they move away from the target surface.

  20. A theory of ion permeation through membranes with fixed neutral sites.

    PubMed

    Barry, P H; Diamond, J M

    1971-12-01

    Some model membranes and biological membranes behave as if ion permeation were controlled by fixed neutral sites, i.e., by groups that are polar but lack net charge. By solving the boundary conditions and Nernst-Planck flux equations, this paper derives the expected properties of four types of membranes with fixed neutral sites: model 1, a membrane thick enough that microscopic electroneutrality is obeyed; model 2, same as model 1 but with a free-solution shunt in parallel; model 3, a membrane thin enough that microscopic electroneutrality is violated; and model 4, same as model 3 but with a free-solution shunt in parallel. The conductance-concentration relation and the current-voltage relation in symmetrical solutions are approximately linear for all four models. Partial ionic conductances are independent of each other for a thin membrane but not for a thick membrane. Sets of permeability ratios derived from conductances, dilution potentials, or biionic potentials agree with each other in a thin membrane but not in a thick membrane. The current-voltage relation in asymmetrical single-salt solutions is linear for a thick membrane but nonlinear for a thin membrane. Examples of potential and concentration profiles in a thin membrane are calculated to illustrate the meaning of space charge and the electroneutrality condition. The experimentally determined properties (by A. Cass, A. Finkelstein & V. Krespi) of thin lipid membranes containing "pores" of the anion-selective antibiotic nystatin are in reasonable agreement with model 3. Tests are suggested for deciding if a membrane of unknown structure has neutral sites, whether it is thick or thin, and whether the sites are fixed or mobile.

  1. Neutral Particle Analyzer Measurements of Ion Behavior in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. Medley; R.E. Bell; D.S. Darrow; A.L. Roquemore

    2002-02-06

    Initial results obtained with the Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) diagnostic on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) are presented. Magnetohydrodynamic activity and reconnection events cause depletion of the deuterium energetic ion distribution created by neutral-beam injection. Adding High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating to neutral-beam-heated discharges results in the generation of an energetic ion tail above the beam injection energy. NPA measurements of the residual hydrogen ion temperature are in good agreement with those from recombination spectroscopy.

  2. Towards a Revised Monte Carlo Neutral Particle Surface Interaction Model

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler

    2005-06-09

    The components of the neutral- and plasma-surface interaction model used in the Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS 2 are reviewed. The idealized surfaces and processes handled by that model are inadequate for accurately simulating neutral transport behavior in present day and future fusion devices. We identify some of the physical processes missing from the model, such as mixed materials and implanted hydrogen, and make some suggestions for improving the model.

  3. Drift compression of an intense neutralized ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Coleman, J.; Eylon, S.; Greenway, W.G.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Welch, D.R.; Thoma, C.; Sefkow, A.B.; Gilson, E.P.; Efthimion, P.C.; Davidson, R.C.

    2004-10-25

    Longitudinal compression of a tailored-velocity, intense neutralized ion beam has been demonstrated. The compression takes place in a 1-2 m drift section filled with plasma to provide space-charge neutralization. An induction cell produces a head-to-tail velocity ramp that longitudinally compresses the neutralized beam, enhancing the beam peak current by a factor of 50 and producing a pulse duration of about 3 ns. this measurement has been confirmed independently with two different diagnostic systems.

  4. Reactive formulations for a neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Mark D.; Betty, Rita G.

    2006-10-24

    Decontamination formulations for neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals, and methods of making and using same. The formulations are effective for neutralizing malathion, hydrogen cyanide, sodium cyanide, butyl isocyanate, carbon disulfide, phosgene gas, capsaicin in commercial pepper spray, chlorine gas, anhydrous ammonia gas; and may be effective at neutralizing hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, methyl bromide, boron trichloride, fluorine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate, phosphorous trichloride, arsine, and tungsten hexafluoride.

  5. A preliminary model of ion beam neutralization. [in thruster plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, D. E.; Katz, I.

    1979-01-01

    A theoretical model of neutralized thruster ion beam plasmas has been developed. The basic premise is that the beam forms an electrostatic trap for the neutralizing electrons. A Maxwellian spectrum of electron energies is maintained by collisions between trapped electrons and by collective randomization of velocities of electrons injected from the neutralizer into the surrounding plasma. The theory contains the observed barometric law relationship between electron density and electron temperatures and ion beam spreading in good agreement with measured results.

  6. Coherent and neutral pion production results from MINERνA

    SciTech Connect

    Palomino, J. L.; Higuera, A.

    2015-05-15

    MINERνA is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment employing multiple nuclear targets. The experiment is studying neutral pion production due to coherent, resonant and deep-inelastic processes, from both charged current and neutral current reactions. Neutral pions are detected through their two photon decay and the resultant electromagnetic showers. We will describe the analysis for the cross sections of inclusive and exclusive processes.

  7. Full configuration-interaction study of the ionic-neutral curve crossing in LiF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1988-01-01

    Full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations are used to assess the relative ability of methods for truncating the n-particle expansion in describing the ionic-neutral curve crossing between the two lowest Sigma(+) states of LiF. While the FCI calculations yield a smooth dipole moment function, MRCI calculations based on CASSCF orbitals optimized for the lowest state at all r values yield a discontinuous dipole moment function. However, when the orbitals are optimized using a state-averaged CASSCF procedure, with equal weights for the ionic and neutral solutions, both the CASSCF and MRCI dipole moment functions are smooth and in reasonable agreement with the FCI. No single-reference-based method is found to work satisfactorily. Potential curves for the lowest two Sigma(+) states are determined in both the adiabatic and diabatic representations using a large atomic natural orbit Gaussian basis set and a state-averaged CASSCF/MRCI treatment of electron correlation.

  8. Capillary electrochromatography and preconcentration of neutral compounds on poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchips.

    PubMed

    Ro, Kyung Won; Chang, Woo-Jin; Kim, Ho; Koo, Yoon-Mo; Hahn, Jong Hoon

    2003-09-01

    Capillary electrochromatography (CEC) and preconcentration of neutral compounds have been realized on poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchips. The channels are coated with polyelectrolyte multilayers to avoid absorption of hydrophobic analytes into PDMS. The structures of a microchip include an injector and a bead chamber with integrated frits, where the particles of the stationary phase are completely retained. Dimensions of the frit structures are 25 micro mx20 micro m, and the space between the structures is 3 micro m. A neutral compound, BODIPY, that is strongly absorbed into native PDMS, is successfully and selectively retained on octadecylsilane-coated silica beads in the bead chamber with a concentration enhancement of up to 100 times and eluted with elution buffer solution containing 70% acetonitrile. Preconcentrations and CEC separations of coumarins have been conducted with the same device and achieved complete separations in less than 50 s. PMID:14518053

  9. Asymptotic theory of neutral stability curve of the Couette flow of vibrationally excited gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigor'ev, Yu N.; Ershov, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    The asymptotic theory of neutral stability curve of the supersonic plane Couette flow of vibrationally excited gas is constructed. The system of two-temperature viscous gas dynamics equations was used as original mathematical model. Spectral problem for an eighth order linear system of ordinary differential equations was obtained from the system within framework of classical theory of linear stability. Transformations of the spectral problem universal for all shear flows were carried along the classical Dunn — Lin scheme. As a result the problem was reduced to secular algebraic equation with a characteristic division on “inviscid” and “viscous” parts which was solved numerically. The calculated neutral stability curves coincide in limits of 10% with corresponding results of direct numerical solution of original spectral problem.

  10. Scrape-off layer modeling using coupled plasma and neutral transport codes

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D.P.; Coster, D.P.; Ehrdardt, A.B.; Karney, C.F.F.; Petravic, M.; Braams, B.J.

    1992-05-01

    An effort is made to refine the neutral transport model used in the B2 edge plasma code by coupling it to the DEGAS Monte Carlo code. Results are discussed for a simulation of a high recycling divertor. It appears that on the order of 100 iterations between the two codes are required to achieve a converged solution. However, the amount of computer time used in the DEGAS simulations is large, making complete runs impractical for design purposes. On the other hand, the differences in the resulting plasma parameters when compared to the B2 analytic neutrals model indicate that it would be worthwhile to explore techniques for speeding up the control system of codes.

  11. Behavior of aluminum, arsenic, and vanadium during the neutralization of red mud leachate by HCl, gypsum, or seawater.

    PubMed

    Burke, Ian T; Peacock, Caroline L; Lockwood, Cindy L; Stewart, Douglas I; Mortimer, Robert J G; Ward, Michael B; Renforth, Philip; Gruiz, Katalin; Mayes, William M

    2013-06-18

    Red mud leachate (pH 13) collected from Ajka, Hungary is neutralized to < pH 10 by HCl, gypsum, or seawater addition. During acid neutralization >99% Al is removed from solution during the formation of an amorphous boehmite-like precipitate and dawsonite. Minor amounts of As (24%) are also removed from solution via surface adsorption of As onto the Al oxyhydroxides. Gypsum addition to red mud leachate results in the precipitation of calcite, both in experiments and in field samples recovered from rivers treated with gypsum after the October 2010 red mud spill. Calcite precipitation results in 86% Al and 81% As removal from solution, and both are nonexchangeable with 0.1 mol L(-1) phosphate solution. Contrary to As associated with neoformed Al oxyhydroxides, EXAFS analysis of the calcite precipitates revealed only isolated arsenate tetrahedra with no evidence for surface adsorption or incorporation into the calcite structure, possibly as a result of very rapid As scavenging by the calcite precipitate. Seawater neutralization also resulted in carbonate precipitation, with >99% Al and 74% As removed from solution during the formation of a poorly ordered hydrotalcite phase and via surface adsorption to the neoformed precipitates, respectively. Half the bound As could be remobilized by phosphate addition, indicating that As was weakly bound, possibly in the hydrotalcite interlayer. Only 5-16% V was removed from solution during neutralization, demonstrating a lack of interaction with any of the neoformed precipitates. High V concentrations are therefore likely to be an intractable problem during the treatment of red mud leachates.

  12. Simplification of power electronics for ion thruster neutralizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruber, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    A need exists for less complex and lower cost ion thruster systems. Design approaches and the demonstration of neutralizer power electronics for relaxed neutralizer keeper, tip heater, and vaporizer requirements are discussed. The neutralizer circuitry is operated from a 200 to 400 V bus and demonstrates an order of magnitude reduction in parts count. Furthermore, a new technique is described for regulating tip heater power and automatically switching over to provide keeper power with only four additional components. A new design to control the flow rate of the neutralizer with one integrated circuit is also presented.

  13. Quasi-neutral Vlasov theory of magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronci, Cesare; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    The low-frequency limit of Maxwell equations is considered in the Maxwell-Vlasov system. This limit produces a quasi-neutral Vlasov system that captures essential features of plasma dynamics, while neglecting radiation effects. Euler-Poincaré reduction theory is used to show that the quasi-neutral Vlasov theory possesses a variational formulation in both Lagrangian and Eulerian coordinates. By construction, the new model recovers all collisionless neutral models employed in plasma simulations. Then, comparisons between the quasi-neutral Vlasov system and hybrid kinetic-fluid models are presented in the linear regime. Financial support by the Leverhulme Trust Research Project Grant 2014-112 is greatly acknowledged.

  14. Inhibition of Neutral red photolysis with different antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Rimpapa, Zlatan; Sofić, Emin; Sapcanin, Aida; Toromanović, Jasmin; Tahirović, Ismet

    2007-02-01

    Neutral red is a dye the azine structure which has been used as an acido-base indicator and a dye in histochemistry. In 1960 Goldhaber introduced Neutral red into the medium of resorbing bone cultures to localize the osteoclast in the living cultures. Using time-lapse microcinematography in order to follow the osteoclasts, he reported excellent contrast could be obtained with Neutral red due to the avidity of osteoclasts for this dye. Unfortunately, however, the photodynamic effect resulting from subsequent exposure of these cultures to light precluded this approach, and again in 1963. it was observed that the death of the osteoclasts was probably due to a photodynamic effect related to the dye in the cell, the presence of oxygen and the frequent exposure of light by our time-lapse photography. VIS and UV irradiation induced photolysis of Neutral red, and from Neutral red cation produced with photons a Neutral red radical. This Neutral red radical can be inhibited with action of an antioxidant, such as melatonin, glutathione, ascorbic acid, E vitamin, etc. We developed an assay with Neutral red photolysis which utilizes a VIS and UV irradiation technique for quantification the inhibition of photolysis with action of an antioxidant. In this method Neutral red acts double, as a free radical generator and as a photosensitizer.

  15. A tutorial on neutral beam injection into tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidbrink, W. W.

    2014-10-01

    Neutral beam injection heats most magnetic fusion experiments. A typical source injects 2 MW of 80 keV deuterons. Deposition is governed by electron impact ionization and charge exchange with thermal ions. A ``halo'' cloud of thermal neutrals surrounds the ``footprint'' of injected neutrals. After ionizing, the energetic ions are confined by the magnetic field, eventually forming an axisymmetric fast-ion population. Fast ions that orbit through the beam footprint sometimes reneutralize. Escaping neutrals and light emitted by reneutralized fast ions is used to diagnose the fast-ion population. The initial beam deposition and halo cloud are also measured optically. Work supported by the US Department of Energy.

  16. Space charge neutralization in inertial electrostatic confinement plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Evstatiev, E. G.; Nebel, R. A.; Chacon, L.; Park, J.; Lapenta, G.

    2007-04-15

    A major issue for electron injected inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) devices is space charge neutralization. A new formalism is developed that will allow this neutralization to occur for both oscillating and steady-state IEC plasmas. Results indicate that there are limits on the amount of compression that can be achieved by oscillating plasmas while simultaneously maintaining space charge neutralization and parabolic background potential. For steady-state plasmas, there are no such limits and space charge neutralization can be achieved even when the plasma becomes quasineutral.

  17. Intense ion beam neutralization using underdense background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Berdanier, William; Roy, Prabir K.; Kaganovich, Igor

    2015-01-15

    Producing an overdense background plasma for neutralization purposes with a density that is high compared to the beam density is not always experimentally possible. We show that even an underdense background plasma with a small relative density can achieve high neutralization of intense ion beam pulses. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we show that if the total plasma electron charge is not sufficient to neutralize the beam charge, electron emitters are necessary for effective neutralization but are not needed if the plasma volume is so large that the total available charge in the electrons exceeds that of the ion beam. Several regimes of possible underdense/tenuous neutralization plasma densities are investigated with and without electron emitters or dense plasma at periphery regions, including the case of electron emitters without plasma, which does not effectively neutralize the beam. Over 95% neutralization is achieved for even very underdense background plasma with plasma density 1/15th the beam density. We compare results of particle-in-cell simulations with an analytic model of neutralization and find close agreement with the particle-in-cell simulations. Further, we show experimental data from the National Drift Compression experiment-II group that verifies the result that underdense plasma can neutralize intense heavy ion beams effectively.

  18. Associative Electron Stimulated Desorption of Neutral CO Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šutara, F.; Matolín, V.

    2001-11-01

    The Electron Stimulated Desorption (ESD) of neutral CO molecules was studied on polycrystalline Ni surface. Combined ESD and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) measurements were used to observe the variations of neutral ESD yield in dependence on CO coverage, containing direct information about the cross section for ESD of neutral CO molecules in relation to various CO adsorption states. The results show evidence of ESD of neutral CO molecules from dissociative adsorption states. The cross section for this associative ESD process is relatively high in comparison with the CO ESD cross section for molecular CO adsorption.

  19. RELEASE OF CARTILAGE MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDE-DEGRADING NEUTRAL PROTEASE FROM HUMAN LEUKOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Oronsky, A.; Ignarro, L.; Perper, R.

    1973-01-01

    The granule fraction of human leukocytes contains neutral protease capable of degrading the noncollagenous protein mucopolysaccharide matrix of cartilage at neutral pH in physiological salt solution. Cartilage degradation was monitored by quantitating the release of 35S from labeled rabbit ear cartilage. Degradation of cartilage matrix occurs when intact viable human leukocytes are incubated with cartilage opsonized with aggregated human gamma globulin (AHGG). During a similar 4 h incubation period cells did not degrade uncoated cartilage or cartilage coated with nonaggregated gamma globulin. Cells remain viable during the enzyme release process as evidenced by the absence of a cytoplasmic enzyme marker (lactic dehydrogenase) in the supernatant and dye exclusion studies. The release of 35S from labeled cartilage by human leukocytes in the presence of cartilage coated with AHGG (nonphagocytic enzyme release) was compared with the cartilage degrading activity of the supernatant from the same number of cells preincubated with a suspension of AHGG (phagocytic enzyme release). Nonphagocytic enzyme release by 5 x 106 cells provoked two to four times more 35S and β-glucuronidase (β-G) release from cartilage than phagocytic enzyme release conditions. β-glucuronidase was used as an indicator of the release of lysosomal granule enzymes. By the use of selected pharmacological agents it was possible to dissociate the enzyme release process from intrinsic enzyme (neutral protease) activity. Neutral protease and β-G release by human cells in the presence of AHGG-coated cartilage was inhibited by 10–5M colchicine, whereas the protease activity, but not the release process, was inhibited by 10–6M gold thiomalate and 10% human serum. It is suggested that the release of a cartilage degrading neutral protease by viable human cells when exposed to AHGG might be a relevant model for the study of cartilage destruction as it occurs in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:4124211

  20. Structure of colloidal complexes obtained from neutral/poly- electrolyte copolymers and oppositely charged surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berret, J.-F.; Cristobal, G.; Hervé, P.; Oberdisse, J.; Grillo, I.

    2002-11-01

    We report on the phase behavior and scattering properties of colloidal complexes made from block copolymers and surfactants. The copolymer is poly(sodium acrylate)-b-poly(acrylamide), hereafter abbreviated as PANa-PAM, with molecular weight 5000 g/mol for the first block and 30000 g/mol for the second. In aqueous solutions and neutral pH, poly(sodium acrylate) is a weak polyelectrolyte, whereas poly(acrylamide) is neutral and in good-solvent conditions. The surfactant is dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and is of opposite charge with respect to the polyelectrolyte block. Combining dynamical light scattering and small-angle neutron scattering, we show that in aqueous solutions PANa-PAM diblocks and DTAB associate into colloidal complexes. For surfactant-to-polymer charge ratios Z lower than a threshold (Z_C sim 0.3), the complexes are single surfactant micelles decorated by few copolymers. Above the threshold, the colloidal complexes reveal an original core-shell microstructure. We have found that the core of typical radius 100 200 Å is constituted from densely packed surfactant micelles connected by the polyelectrolyte blocks. The outer part of the colloidal complex is a corona and is made from the neutral poly(acrylamide) chains. Typical hydrodynamic sizes for the whole aggregate are around 1000 Å. The aggregation numbers expressed in terms of numbers of micelles and copolymers per complex are determined and found to be comprised between 100 400, depending on the charge ratio Z and on the total concentration. We have also shown that the sizes of the complexes depend on the exact procedure of the sample preparation. We propose that the driving mechanism for the complex formation is similar to that involved in the phase separation of homopolyelectrolyte/surfactant systems. With copolymers, the presence of the neutral blocks prevents the macroscopic phase separation from occurring.