Science.gov

Sample records for neutrino-driven supernova mechanism

  1. ON THE IMPORTANCE OF THE EQUATION OF STATE FOR THE NEUTRINO-DRIVEN SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION MECHANISM

    SciTech Connect

    Suwa, Yudai; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Fischer, Tobias; Liebendoerfer, Matthias; Sato, Katsuhiko

    2013-02-10

    By implementing the widely used equations of state (EOS) from Lattimer and Swesty (LS) and H. Shen et al. (SHEN) in core-collapse supernova simulations, we explore possible impacts of these EOS on the post-bounce dynamics prior to the onset of neutrino-driven explosions. Our spherically symmetric (1D) and axially symmetric (2D) models are based on neutrino radiation hydrodynamics including spectral transport, which is solved by the isotropic diffusion source approximation. We confirm that in 1D simulations neutrino-driven explosions cannot be obtained for any of the employed EOS. Impacts of the EOS on the post-bounce hydrodynamics are more clearly visible in 2D simulations. In 2D models of a 15 M {sub Sun} progenitor using the LS EOS, the stalled bounce shock expands to increasingly larger radii, which is not the case when using the SHEN EOS. Keeping in mind that the omission of the energy drain by heavy-lepton neutrinos in the present scheme could facilitate explosions, we find that 2D models of an 11.2 M {sub Sun} progenitor produce neutrino-driven explosions for all the EOS under investigation. Models using the LS EOS are slightly more energetic compared with those with the SHEN EOS. The more efficient neutrino heating in the LS models coincides with a higher electron antineutrino luminosity and a larger mass that is enclosed within the gain region. The models based on the LS EOS also show a more vigorous and aspherical downflow of accreting matter to the surface of the protoneutron star (PNS). The accretion pattern is essential for the production and strength of outgoing pressure waves, which can push in turn the shock to larger radii and provide more favorable conditions for the explosion. Based on our models, we investigate several diagnostic indicators of the explosion that have been suggested in the literature, e.g., the amplitude of the standing accretion shock instability mode, the mass-weighted average entropy in the gain region, the PNS radius, the

  2. Neutrino-driven Type-II supernova explosions and the role of convection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, H. T.; Mueller, E.

    1995-05-01

    The role of neutrino heating and convection in the explosions of Type-II supernovae is reviewed. The neutrino-driven mechanism of supernova explosions is based upon the fact that high-energetic neutrinos streaming up from the hotter interior must transfer energy to the cooler layers adjacent to the nascent neutron star. While this energy deposition is unavoidable, there is still controversy about the point whether it is able to drive and power a Type-II supernova event or not. To investigate this question one-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations have been performed for the long-time evolution of the collapsed stellar core after the bounce at nuclear matter density and after the associated formation of the supernova shock. In these studies the parameters describing the neutrino emission have been varied and the influence of the temporal contraction of the central part of the nascent neutron star has been tested.

  3. THE DOMINANCE OF NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CONVECTION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolence, Joshua C.; Burrows, Adam E-mail: jdolence@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-07-01

    Multi-dimensional instabilities have become an important ingredient in core-collapse supernova (CCSN) theory. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the driving mechanism of the dominant instability. We compare our parameterized three-dimensional CCSN simulations with other buoyancy-driven simulations and propose scaling relations for neutrino-driven convection. Through these comparisons, we infer that buoyancy-driven convection dominates post-shock turbulence in our simulations. In support of this inference, we present four major results. First, the convective fluxes and kinetic energies in the neutrino-heated region are consistent with expectations of buoyancy-driven convection. Second, the convective flux is positive where buoyancy actively drives convection, and the radial and tangential components of the kinetic energy are in rough equipartition (i.e., K{sub r} {approx} K{sub {theta}} + K{sub {phi}}). Both results are natural consequences of buoyancy-driven convection, and are commonly observed in simulations of convection. Third, buoyant driving is balanced by turbulent dissipation. Fourth, the convective luminosity and turbulent dissipation scale with the driving neutrino power. In all, these four results suggest that in neutrino-driven explosions, the multi-dimensional motions are consistent with neutrino-driven convection.

  4. Nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven, aspherical Population III supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Ono, Masaomi; Kotake, Kei

    2012-09-01

    We investigate explosive nucleosynthesis during neutrino-driven, aspherical supernova (SN) explosion aided by standing accretion shock instability (SASI), based on two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion of 11, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 40M ⊙ stars with zero metallicity. The magnitude and asymmetry of the explosion energy are estimated with simulations, for a given set of neutrino luminosities and temperatures, not as in the previous study in which the explosion is manually and spherically initiated by means of a thermal bomb or a piston and also some artificial mixing procedures are applied for the estimate of abundances of the SN ejecta. By post-processing calculations with a large nuclear reaction network, we have evaluated abundances and masses of ejecta from the aspherical SNe. We find that matter mixing induced via SASI is important for the abundant production of nuclei with atomic number >= 21, in particular Sc, which is underproduced in the spherical models without artificial mixing. We also find that the IMF-averaged abundances are similar to those observed in extremely metal poor stars. However, observed [K/Fe] cannot be reproduced with our aspherical SN models.

  5. Supernova 1987A: neutrino-driven explosions in three dimensions and light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrobin, V. P.; Wongwathanarat, A.; Janka, H.-Th.; Müller, E.

    2015-09-01

    Context. The well-observed and well-studied type IIP Supernova 1987A (SN 1987A), produced by the explosion of a blue supergiant in the Large Magellanic Cloud, is a touchstone for the evolution of massive stars, the simulation of neutrino-driven explosions, and the modeling of light curves and spectra. Aims: In the framework of the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, we study the dependence of explosion properties on the structure of different blue supergiant progenitors and compare the corresponding light curves with observations of SN 1987A. Methods: Three-dimensional (3D) simulations of neutrino-driven explosions are performed with the explicit, finite-volume, Eulerian, multifluid hydrodynamics code Prometheus, using of four available presupernova models as initial data. At a stage of almost homologous expansion, the hydrodynamical and composition variables of the 3D models are mapped to a spherically symmetric configuration, and the simulations are continued with the implicit, Lagrangian radiation-hydrodynamics code Crab to follow the blast-wave evolution into the SN outburst. Results: All of our 3D neutrino-driven explosion models, with explosion energies compatible with SN 1987A, produce 56Ni in rough agreement with the amount deduced from fitting the radioactively powered light-curve tail. Two of our models (based on the same progenitor) yield maximum velocities of around 3000 km s-1 for the bulk of ejected 56Ni, consistent with observational data. In all of our models inward mixing of hydrogen during the 3D evolution leads to minimum velocities of hydrogen-rich matter below 100 km s-1, which is in good agreement with spectral observations. However, the explosion of only one of the considered progenitors reproduces the shape of the broad light curve maximum of SN 1987A fairly well. Conclusions: The considered presupernova models, 3D explosion simulations, and light-curve calculations can explain the basic observational features of SN 1987A, except for those

  6. Aspherical abundance distribution of ejecta from neutrino-driven core collapse supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Shin-Ichiro; Kotake, Kei; Hashimoto, Masa-Aki; Ono, Masaomi; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2010-08-01

    We examine explosive nucleosynthesis during a delayed neutrino-driven, supernova explosion aided by standing accretion shock instability, based on two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion of a 15Msolar progenitor. We find that abundance pattern of the supernova ejecta is similar to that of the solar system, for cases with high explosion energies of ~=1051 ergs. Aspherical distribution of Fe, Si, and O, which is observed in a nearby core-collapse SN remnant such as Cas A, is obtained in spite of the explosion of the non-rotating, spherical progenitor.

  7. Hydrogen-rich supernovae beyond the neutrino-driven core-collapse paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terreran, G.; Pumo, M. L.; Chen, T.-W.; Moriya, T. J.; Taddia, F.; Dessart, L.; Zampieri, L.; Smartt, S. J.; Benetti, S.; Inserra, C.; Cappellaro, E.; Nicholl, M.; Fraser, M.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Udalski, A.; Howell, D. A.; McCully, C.; Valenti, S.; Dimitriadis, G.; Maguire, K.; Sullivan, M.; Smith, K. W.; Yaron, O.; Young, D. R.; Anderson, J. P.; Della Valle, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Gal-Yam, A.; Jerkstrand, A.; Kankare, E.; Pastorello, A.; Sollerman, J.; Turatto, M.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Kozłowski, S.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, D.; Skowron, J.; Soszyński, I.; Szymański, M. K.; Ulaczyk, K.

    2017-09-01

    Type II supernovae are the final stage of massive stars (above 8 M⊙) which retain part of their hydrogen-rich envelope at the moment of explosion. They typically eject up to 15 M⊙ of material, with peak magnitudes of -17.5 mag and energies in the order of 1051 erg, which can be explained by neutrino-driven explosions and neutron star formation. Here, we present our study of OGLE-2014-SN-073, one of the brightest type II supernovae ever discovered, with an unusually broad lightcurve combined with high ejecta velocities. From our hydrodynamical modelling, we infer a remarkable ejecta mass of 60-16+42M⊙ and a relatively high explosion energy of 12 .4-5.9 +13 .0×1 051 erg. We show that this object belongs, along with a very small number of other hydrogen-rich supernovae, to an energy regime that is not explained by standard core-collapse neutrino-driven explosions. We compare the quantities inferred by the hydrodynamical modelling with the expectations of various exploding scenarios and attempt to explain the high energy and luminosity released. We find some qualitative similarities with pair-instability supernovae, although the prompt injection of energy by a magnetar seems to be a viable alternative explanation for such an extreme event.

  8. Hydrogen-rich supernovae beyond the neutrino-driven core-collapse paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terreran, G.; Pumo, M. L.; Chen, T.-W.; Moriya, T. J.; Taddia, F.; Dessart, L.; Zampieri, L.; Smartt, S. J.; Benetti, S.; Inserra, C.; Cappellaro, E.; Nicholl, M.; Fraser, M.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Udalski, A.; Howell, D. A.; McCully, C.; Valenti, S.; Dimitriadis, G.; Maguire, K.; Sullivan, M.; Smith, K. W.; Yaron, O.; Young, D. R.; Anderson, J. P.; Della Valle, M.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Gal-Yam, A.; Jerkstrand, A.; Kankare, E.; Pastorello, A.; Sollerman, J.; Turatto, M.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Kozłowski, S.; Mróz, P.; Pawlak, M.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Poleski, R.; Skowron, D.; Skowron, J.; Soszyński, I.; Szymański, M. K.; Ulaczyk, K.

    2017-10-01

    Type II supernovae are the final stage of massive stars (above 8 M⊙) which retain part of their hydrogen-rich envelope at the moment of explosion. They typically eject up to 15 M⊙ of material, with peak magnitudes of -17.5 mag and energies in the order of 1051 erg, which can be explained by neutrino-driven explosions and neutron star formation. Here, we present our study of OGLE-2014-SN-073, one of the brightest type II supernovae ever discovered, with an unusually broad lightcurve combined with high ejecta velocities. From our hydrodynamical modelling, we infer a remarkable ejecta mass of 60-16+42M⊙ and a relatively high explosion energy of 12 .4-5.9 +13 .0×1 051 erg. We show that this object belongs, along with a very small number of other hydrogen-rich supernovae, to an energy regime that is not explained by standard core-collapse neutrino-driven explosions. We compare the quantities inferred by the hydrodynamical modelling with the expectations of various exploding scenarios and attempt to explain the high energy and luminosity released. We find some qualitative similarities with pair-instability supernovae, although the prompt injection of energy by a magnetar seems to be a viable alternative explanation for such an extreme event.

  9. Light-curve Analysis of Ordinary Type IIP Supernovae Based on Neutrino-driven Explosion Simulations in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrobin, V. P.; Wongwathanarat, A.; Janka, H.-Th.; Müller, E.

    2017-09-01

    Type II-plateau supernovae (SNe IIP) are the most numerous subclass of core-collapse SNe originating from massive stars. In the framework of the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, we study the properties of the SN outburst for a red supergiant progenitor model and compare the corresponding light curves with observations of the ordinary Type IIP SN 1999em. Three-dimensional (3D) simulations of (parametrically triggered) neutrino-driven explosions are performed with the (explicit, finite-volume, Eulerian, multifluid hydrodynamics) code Prometheus, using a presupernova model of a 15 M ⊙ star as initial data. On approaching homologous expansion, the hydrodynamic and composition variables of the 3D models are mapped to a spherically symmetric configuration, and the simulations are continued with the (implicit, Lagrangian, radiation hydrodynamics) code Crab to follow the evolution of the blast wave during the SN outburst. Our 3D neutrino-driven explosion model with an explosion energy of about 0.5× {10}51 erg produces 56Ni in rough agreement with the amount deduced from fitting the radioactively powered light-curve tail of SN 1999em. The considered presupernova model, 3D explosion simulations, and light-curve calculations can explain the basic observational features of SN 1999em, except for those connected to the presupernova structure of the outer stellar layers. Our 3D simulations show that the distribution of 56Ni-rich matter in velocity space is asymmetric with a strong dipole component that is consistent with the observations of SN 1999em. The monotonic decline in luminosity from the plateau to the radioactive tail in ordinary SNe IIP is a manifestation of the intense turbulent mixing at the He/H composition interface.

  10. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CONVECTION IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Radice, David; Ott, Christian D.; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Couch, Sean M.; Haas, Roland; Schnetter, Erik

    2016-03-20

    We present results from high-resolution semiglobal simulations of neutrino-driven convection in core-collapse supernovae. We employ an idealized setup with parameterized neutrino heating/cooling and nuclear dissociation at the shock front. We study the internal dynamics of neutrino-driven convection and its role in redistributing energy and momentum through the gain region. We find that even if buoyant plumes are able to locally transfer heat up to the shock, convection is not able to create a net positive energy flux and overcome the downward transport of energy from the accretion flow. Turbulent convection does, however, provide a significant effective pressure support to the accretion flow as it favors the accumulation of energy, mass, and momentum in the gain region. We derive an approximate equation that is able to explain and predict the shock evolution in terms of integrals of quantities such as the turbulent pressure in the gain region or the effects of nonradial motion of the fluid. We use this relation as a way to quantify the role of turbulence in the dynamics of the accretion shock. Finally, we investigate the effects of grid resolution, which we change by a factor of 20 between the lowest and highest resolution. Our results show that the shallow slopes of the turbulent kinetic energy spectra reported in previous studies are a numerical artifact. Kolmogorov scaling is progressively recovered as the resolution is increased.

  11. Neutrino-driven Convection in Core-collapse Supernovae: High-resolution Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radice, David; Ott, Christian D.; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Couch, Sean M.; Haas, Roland; Schnetter, Erik

    2016-03-01

    We present results from high-resolution semiglobal simulations of neutrino-driven convection in core-collapse supernovae. We employ an idealized setup with parameterized neutrino heating/cooling and nuclear dissociation at the shock front. We study the internal dynamics of neutrino-driven convection and its role in redistributing energy and momentum through the gain region. We find that even if buoyant plumes are able to locally transfer heat up to the shock, convection is not able to create a net positive energy flux and overcome the downward transport of energy from the accretion flow. Turbulent convection does, however, provide a significant effective pressure support to the accretion flow as it favors the accumulation of energy, mass, and momentum in the gain region. We derive an approximate equation that is able to explain and predict the shock evolution in terms of integrals of quantities such as the turbulent pressure in the gain region or the effects of nonradial motion of the fluid. We use this relation as a way to quantify the role of turbulence in the dynamics of the accretion shock. Finally, we investigate the effects of grid resolution, which we change by a factor of 20 between the lowest and highest resolution. Our results show that the shallow slopes of the turbulent kinetic energy spectra reported in previous studies are a numerical artifact. Kolmogorov scaling is progressively recovered as the resolution is increased.

  12. Nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven, aspherical supernovae of population III stars

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Ono, Masaomi; Kotake, Kei

    2012-11-12

    We examine explosive nucleosynthesis during neutrino-driven, aspherical supernovae of Population III stars, based on two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations of the explosion of 11-40M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator} stars with zero metallicity. The magnitude and asymmetry of the explosion energy are estimated with the simulations. By post-processing calculations with a large nuclear reaction network, we have evaluated abundances and masses of ejecta from the aspherical SNe. We find that the evaluated abundance patterns are similar to those observed in extremely metal poor stars, as shown in spherical and 2D models, in which the explosion is manually and spherically initiated. Matter mixing induced via standing accretion shock instability is important for the abundances and masses of the SN ejecta.

  13. Revisiting impacts of nuclear burning for reviving weak shocks in neutrino-driven supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ko; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Nishimura, Nobuya

    2014-02-20

    We revisit potential impacts of nuclear burning on the onset of the neutrino-driven explosions of core-collapse supernovae. By changing the neutrino luminosity and its decay time to obtain parametric explosions in one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D, respectively) models with or without a 13 isotope α network, we study how the inclusion of nuclear burning could affect the postbounce dynamics for 4 progenitor models; 3 for 15.0 M {sub ☉} stars and 1 for an 11.2 M {sub ☉} star. We find that the energy supply due to the nuclear burning of infalling material behind the shock can energize the shock expansion, especially for models that produce only marginal explosions in the absence of nuclear burning. These models are energized by nuclear energy deposition when the shock front passes through the silicon-rich layer and/or later as it touches the oxygen-rich layer. Depending on the neutrino luminosity and its decay time, the diagnostic energy of the explosion increases up to a few times 10{sup 50} erg for models with nuclear burning compared to the corresponding models without. We point out that these features are most remarkable for the Limongi-Chieffi progenitor in both 1D and 2D because the progenitor model possesses a massive oxygen layer, with an inner-edge radius that is smallest among the employed progenitors, which means that the shock can touch the rich fuel on a shorter timescale after bounce. The energy difference is generally smaller (∼0.1-0.2 × 10{sup 51} erg) in 2D than in 1D (at most ∼0.6 × 10{sup 51} erg). This is because neutrino-driven convection and the shock instability in 2D models enhance the neutrino heating efficiency, which makes the contribution of nuclear burning relatively smaller compared to 1D models. Considering uncertainties in progenitor models, our results indicate that nuclear burning should remain one of the important ingredients to foster the onset of neutrino-driven explosions.

  14. PROGENITOR-EXPLOSION CONNECTION AND REMNANT BIRTH MASSES FOR NEUTRINO-DRIVEN SUPERNOVAE OF IRON-CORE PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Ugliano, Marcella; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas; Arcones, Almudena

    2012-09-20

    We perform hydrodynamic supernova (SN) simulations in spherical symmetry for over 100 single stars of solar metallicity to explore the progenitor-explosion and progenitor-remnant connections established by the neutrino-driven mechanism. We use an approximative treatment of neutrino transport and replace the high-density interior of the neutron star (NS) by an inner boundary condition based on an analytic proto-NS core-cooling model, whose free parameters are chosen such that explosion energy, nickel production, and energy release by the compact remnant of progenitors around 20 M{sub Sun} are compatible with SN 1987A. Thus, we are able to simulate the accretion phase, initiation of the explosion, subsequent neutrino-driven wind phase for 15-20 s, and the further evolution of the blast wave for hours to days until fallback is completed. Our results challenge long-standing paradigms. We find that remnant mass, launch time, and properties of the explosion depend strongly on the stellar structure and exhibit large variability even in narrow intervals of the progenitors' zero-age main-sequence mass. While all progenitors with masses below {approx}15 M{sub Sun} yield NSs, black hole (BH) as well as NS formation is possible for more massive stars, where partial loss of the hydrogen envelope leads to weak reverse shocks and weak fallback. Our NS baryonic masses of {approx}1.2-2.0 M{sub Sun} and BH masses >6 M{sub Sun} are compatible with a possible lack of low-mass BHs in the empirical distribution. Neutrino heating accounts for SN energies between some 10{sup 50} erg and {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg but can hardly explain more energetic explosions and nickel masses higher than 0.1-0.2 M{sub Sun }. These seem to require an alternative SN mechanism.

  15. Solar r-process-constrained actinide production in neutrino-driven winds of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goriely, S.; Janka, H.-Th.

    2016-07-01

    Long-lived radioactive nuclei play an important role as nucleo-cosmochronometers and as cosmic tracers of nucleosynthetic source activity. In particular, nuclei in the actinide region like thorium, uranium, and plutonium can testify to the enrichment of an environment by the still enigmatic astrophysical sources that are responsible for the production of neutron-rich nuclei by the rapid neutron-capture process (r-process). Supernovae and merging neutron-star (NS) or NS-black hole binaries are considered as most likely sources of the r-nuclei. But arguments in favour of one or the other or both are indirect and make use of assumptions; they are based on theoretical models with remaining simplifications and shortcomings. An unambiguous observational determination of a production event is still missing. In order to facilitate searches in this direction, e.g. by looking for radioactive tracers in stellar envelopes, the interstellar medium or terrestrial reservoirs, we provide improved theoretical estimates and corresponding uncertainty ranges for the actinide production (232Th, 235, 236, 238U, 237Np, 244Pu, and 247Cm) in neutrino-driven winds of core-collapse supernovae. Since state-of-the-art supernova models do not yield r-process viable conditions - but still lack, for example, the effects of strong magnetic fields - we base our investigation on a simple analytical, Newtonian, adiabatic and steady-state wind model and consider the superposition of a large number of contributing components, whose nucleosynthesis-relevant parameters (mass weight, entropy, expansion time-scale, and neutron excess) are constrained by the assumption that the integrated wind nucleosynthesis closely reproduces the Solar system distribution of r-process elements. We also test the influence of uncertain nuclear physics.

  16. Production of {sup 44}Ti in neutrino-driven aspherical supernova explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Masaomi; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Kotake, Kei

    2014-05-02

    We examine the synthesis of {sup 44}Ti in a neutrino-driven aspherical supernova (SN), focusing on reaction rates related to {sup 44}Ti and rotation of a progenitor. We have performed 2D hydrodynamic simulations of SN of a 15M{sub ⊙} progenitor, whose angular velocity is manually set to be a cylindrical distribution and have followed explosive nucleosynthesis in the ejecta. We find that the faster rates of {sup 40}Ca(α,γ){sup 44}Ti and the slower rate of {sup 44}Ti(α,p){sup 47}V lead to more massive ejection of {sup 44}Ti and {sup 56}Ni and larger ratios <{sup 44}Ti/{sup 56}Ni>. Faster rotation also results in more massive ejection of {sup 44}Ti and {sup 56}Ni. Ratios <{sup 44}Ti/{sup 56}Ni> are however independent from rotation. Large masses of {sup 44}Ti and large ratios observed in SN 1987A and Cas A (> 1O{sup −4}M{sub ⊙} and 1-2 respectively) are not realized in all the models.

  17. Production of 44Ti in neutrino-driven aspherical supernova explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Masaomi; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Kotake, Kei

    2014-05-01

    We examine the synthesis of 44Ti in a neutrino-driven aspherical supernova (SN), focusing on reaction rates related to 44Ti and rotation of a progenitor. We have performed 2D hydrodynamic simulations of SN of a 15M⊙ progenitor, whose angular velocity is manually set to be a cylindrical distribution and have followed explosive nucleosynthesis in the ejecta. We find that the faster rates of 40Ca(α,γ)44Ti and the slower rate of 44Ti(α,p)47V lead to more massive ejection of 44Ti and 56Ni and larger ratios <44Ti/56Ni>. Faster rotation also results in more massive ejection of 44Ti and 56Ni. Ratios <44Ti/56Ni> are however independent from rotation. Large masses of 44Ti and large ratios observed in SN 1987A and Cas A (> 1O-4M⊙ and 1-2 respectively) are not realized in all the models.

  18. A Global Turbulence Model for Neutrino-driven Convection in Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Meakin, Casey

    2011-12-01

    Simulations of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) result in successful explosions once the neutrino luminosity exceeds a critical curve, and recent simulations indicate that turbulence further enables explosion by reducing this critical neutrino luminosity. We propose a theoretical framework to derive this result and take the first steps by deriving the governing mean-field equations. Using Reynolds decomposition, we decompose flow variables into background and turbulent flows and derive self-consistent averaged equations for their evolution. As basic requirements for the CCSN problem, these equations naturally incorporate steady-state accretion, neutrino heating and cooling, non-zero entropy gradients, and turbulence terms associated with buoyant driving, redistribution, and dissipation. Furthermore, analysis of two-dimensional (2D) CCSN simulations validate these Reynolds-averaged equations, and we show that the physics of turbulence entirely accounts for the differences between 1D and 2D CCSN simulations. As a prelude to deriving the reduction in the critical luminosity, we identify the turbulent terms that most influence the conditions for explosion. Generically, turbulence equations require closure models, but these closure models depend upon the macroscopic properties of the flow. To derive a closure model that is appropriate for CCSNe, we cull the literature for relevant closure models and compare each with 2D simulations. These models employ local closure approximations and fail to reproduce the global properties of neutrino-driven turbulence. Motivated by the generic failure of these local models, we propose an original model for turbulence which incorporates global properties of the flow. This global model accurately reproduces the turbulence profiles and evolution of 2D CCSN simulations.

  19. ON THE IMPACT OF THREE DIMENSIONS IN SIMULATIONS OF NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, Sean M.

    2013-09-20

    We present one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical simulations of core-collapse supernovae including a parameterized neutrino heating and cooling scheme in order to investigate the critical core neutrino luminosity (L{sub crit}) required for explosion. In contrast to some previous works, we find that 3D simulations explode later than 2D simulations, and that L{sub crit} at fixed mass accretion rate is somewhat higher in three dimensions than in two dimensions. We find, however, that in two dimensions L{sub crit} increases as the numerical resolution of the simulation increases. In contrast to some previous works, we argue that the average entropy of the gain region is in fact not a good indicator of explosion but is rather a reflection of the greater mass in the gain region in two dimensions. We compare our simulations to semi-analytic explosion criteria and examine the nature of the convective motions in two dimensions and three dimensions. We discuss the balance between neutrino-driven buoyancy and drag forces. In particular, we show that the drag force will be proportional to a buoyant plume's surface area while the buoyant force is proportional to a plume's volume and, therefore, plumes with greater volume-to-surface-area ratios will rise more quickly. We show that buoyant plumes in two dimensions are inherently larger, with greater volume-to-surface-area ratios, than plumes in three dimensions. In the scenario that the supernova shock expansion is dominated by neutrino-driven buoyancy, this balance between buoyancy and drag forces may explain why 3D simulations explode later than 2D simulations and why L{sub crit} increases with resolution. Finally, we provide a comparison of our results with other calculations in the literature.

  20. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN TURBULENT CONVECTION AND STANDING ACCRETION SHOCK INSTABILITY IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Ott, Christian D.; Radice, David; Roberts, Luke F.; Haas, Roland; Reisswig, Christian; Mösta, Philipp; Klion, Hannah; Schnetter, Erik

    2015-07-20

    We conduct a series of numerical experiments into the nature of three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics in the postbounce stalled-shock phase of core-collapse supernovae using 3D general-relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of a 27 M{sub ⊙} progenitor star with a neutrino leakage/heating scheme. We vary the strength of neutrino heating and find three cases of 3D dynamics: (1) neutrino-driven convection, (2) initially neutrino-driven convection and subsequent development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), and (3) SASI-dominated evolution. This confirms previous 3D results of Hanke et al. and Couch and Connor. We carry out simulations with resolutions differing by up to a factor of ∼4 and demonstrate that low resolution is artificially favorable for explosion in the 3D convection-dominated case since it decreases the efficiency of energy transport to small scales. Low resolution results in higher radial convective fluxes of energy and enthalpy, more fully buoyant mass, and stronger neutrino heating. In the SASI-dominated case, lower resolution damps SASI oscillations. In the convection-dominated case, a quasi-stationary angular kinetic energy spectrum E(ℓ) develops in the heating layer. Like other 3D studies, we find E(ℓ) ∝ℓ{sup −1} in the “inertial range,” while theory and local simulations argue for E(ℓ) ∝ ℓ{sup −5/3}. We argue that current 3D simulations do not resolve the inertial range of turbulence and are affected by numerical viscosity up to the energy-containing scale, creating a “bottleneck” that prevents an efficient turbulent cascade.

  1. Neutrino-driven Supernova of a Low-mass Iron-core Progenitor Boosted by Three-dimensional Turbulent Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melson, Tobias; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    We present the first successful simulation of a neutrino-driven supernova explosion in three dimensions (3D), using the Prometheus-Vertex code with an axis-free Yin-Yang grid and a sophisticated treatment of three-flavor, energy-dependent neutrino transport. The progenitor is a nonrotating, zero-metallicity 9.6 {{M}⊙ } star with an iron core. While in spherical symmetry outward shock acceleration sets in later than 300 ms after bounce, a successful explosion starts at ˜130 ms postbounce in two dimensions (2D). The 3D model explodes at about the same time but with faster shock expansion than in 2D and a more quickly increasing and roughly 10% higher explosion energy of >1050 erg. The more favorable explosion conditions in 3D are explained by lower temperatures and thus reduced neutrino emission in the cooling layer below the gain radius. This moves the gain radius inward and leads to a bigger mass in the gain layer, whose larger recombination energy boosts the explosion energy in 3D. These differences are caused by less coherent, less massive, and less rapid convective downdrafts associated with postshock convection in 3D. The less violent impact of these accretion downflows in the cooling layer produces less shock heating and therefore diminishes energy losses by neutrino emission. We thus have, for the first time, identified a reduced mass accretion rate, lower infall velocities, and a smaller surface filling factor of convective downdrafts as consequences of 3D postshock turbulence that facilitate neutrino-driven explosions and strengthen them compared to the 2D case.

  2. SHEDDING NEW LIGHT ON EXPLODING STARS: TERASCALE SIMULATIONS OF NEUTRINO-DRIVEN SUPERNOVAE AND THEIR NUCLEOSYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, Wick

    2012-03-07

    This project was focused on simulations of core-collapse supernovae on parallel platforms. The intent was to address a number of linked issues: the treatment of hydrodynamics and neutrino diffusion in two and three dimensions; the treatment of the underlying nuclear microphysics that governs neutrino transport and neutrino energy deposition; the understanding of the associated nucleosynthesis, including the r-process and neutrino process; the investigation of the consequences of new neutrino phenomena, such as oscillations; and the characterization of the neutrino signal that might be recorded in terrestrial detectors. This was a collaborative effort with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, State University of New York at Stony Brook, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of California at San Diego, University of Tennessee at Knoxville, Florida Atlantic University, North Carolina State University, and Clemson. The collaborations tie together experts in hydrodynamics, nuclear physics, computer science, and neutrino physics. The University of Washington contributions to this effort include the further development of techniques to solve the Bloch-Horowitz equation for effective interactions and operators; collaborative efforts on developing a parallel Lanczos code; investigating the nuclear and neutrino physics governing the r-process and neutrino physics; and exploring the effects of new neutrino physics on the explosion mechanism, nucleosynthesis, and terrestrial supernova neutrino detection.

  3. Impact of eV-mass sterile neutrinos on neutrino-driven supernova outflows

    SciTech Connect

    Tamborra, Irene; Raffelt, Georg G.; Hüdepohl, Lorenz; Janka, Hans-Thomas E-mail: raffelt@mpp.mpg.de E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by recent hints for sterile neutrinos from the reactor anomaly, we study active-sterile conversions in a three-flavor scenario (2 active + 1 sterile families) for three different representative times during the neutrino-cooling evolution of the proto-neutron star born in an electron-capture supernova. In our ''early model'' (0.5 s post bounce), the ν{sub e}-ν{sub s} MSW effect driven by Δm{sup 2} = 2.35eV{sup 2} is dominated by ordinary matter and leads to a complete ν{sub e}-ν{sub s} swap with little or no trace of collective flavor oscillations. In our ''intermediate'' (2.9 s p.b.) and ''late models'' (6.5 s p.b.), neutrinos themselves significantly modify the ν{sub e}-ν{sub s} matter effect, and, in particular in the late model, νν refraction strongly reduces the matter effect, largely suppressing the overall ν{sub e}-ν{sub s} MSW conversion. This phenomenon has not been reported in previous studies of active-sterile supernova neutrino oscillations. We always include the feedback effect on the electron fraction Y{sub e} due to neutrino oscillations. In all examples, Y{sub e} is reduced and therefore the presence of sterile neutrinos can affect the conditions for heavy-element formation in the supernova ejecta, even if probably not enabling the r-process in the investigated outflows of an electron-capture supernova. The impact of neutrino-neutrino refraction is strong but complicated, leaving open the possibility that with a more complete treatment, or for other supernova models, active-sterile neutrino oscillations could generate conditions suitable for the r-process.

  4. The dynamics of neutrino-driven supernova explosions after shock revival in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, B.

    2015-10-01

    We study the growth of the explosion energy after shock revival in neutrino-driven explosions in two and three dimensions (2D/3D) using multi-group neutrino hydrodynamics simulations of an 11.2 M⊙ star. The 3D model shows a faster and steadier growth of the explosion energy and already shows signs of subsiding accretion after one second. By contrast, the growth of the explosion energy in 2D is unsteady, and accretion lasts for several seconds as confirmed by additional long-time simulations of stars of similar masses. Appreciable explosion energies can still be reached, albeit at the expense of rather high neutron star masses. In 2D, the binding energy at the gain radius is larger because the strong excitation of downward-propagating g modes removes energy from the freshly accreted material in the downflows. Consequently, the mass outflow rate is considerably lower in 2D than in 3D. This is only partially compensated by additional heating by outward-propagating acoustic waves in 2D. Moreover, the mass outflow rate in 2D is reduced because much of the neutrino energy deposition occurs in downflows or bubbles confined by secondary shocks without driving outflows. Episodic constriction of outflows and vertical mixing of colder shocked material and hot, neutrino-heated ejecta due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability further hamper the growth of the explosion energy in 2D. Further simulations will be necessary to determine whether these effects are generic over a wider range of supernova progenitors.

  5. Neutrino-driven explosions of ultra-stripped Type Ic supernovae generating binary neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, Yudai; Yoshida, Takashi; Shibata, Masaru; Umeda, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Koh

    2015-12-01

    We study explosion characteristics of ultra-stripped supernovae (SNe), which are candidates of SNe generating binary neutron stars (NSs). As a first step, we perform stellar evolutionary simulations of bare carbon-oxygen cores of mass from 1.45 to 2.0 M⊙ until the iron cores become unstable and start collapsing. We then perform axisymmetric hydrodynamics simulations with spectral neutrino transport using these stellar evolution outcomes as initial conditions. All models exhibit successful explosions driven by neutrino heating. The diagnostic explosion energy, ejecta mass, Ni mass, and NS mass are typically ˜1050 erg, ˜0.1 M⊙, ˜0.01 M⊙, and ≈1.3 M⊙, which are compatible with observations of rapidly evolving and luminous transient such as SN 2005ek. We also find that the ultra-stripped SN is a candidate for producing the secondary low-mass NS in the observed compact binary NSs like PSR J0737-3039.

  6. THE ROLE OF TURBULENCE IN NEUTRINO-DRIVEN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, Sean M.; Ott, Christian D. E-mail: cott@tapir.caltech.edu

    2015-01-20

    The neutrino-heated ''gain layer'' immediately behind the stalled shock in a core-collapse supernova is unstable to high-Reynolds-number turbulent convection. We carry out and analyze a new set of 19 high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) simulations with a three-species neutrino leakage/heating scheme and compare with spherically symmetric (one-dimensional, 1D) and axisymmetric (two-dimensional, 2D) simulations carried out with the same methods. We study the postbounce supernova evolution in a 15 M {sub ☉} progenitor star and vary the local neutrino heating rate, the magnitude and spatial dependence of asphericity from convective burning in the Si/O shell, and spatial resolution. Our simulations suggest that there is a direct correlation between the strength of turbulence in the gain layer and the susceptibility to explosion. 2D and 3D simulations explode at much lower neutrino heating rates than 1D simulations. This is commonly explained by the fact that nonradial dynamics allows accreting material to stay longer in the gain layer. We show that this explanation is incomplete. Our results indicate that the effective turbulent ram pressure exerted on the shock plays a crucial role by allowing multi-dimensional models to explode at a lower postshock thermal pressure and thus with less neutrino heating than 1D models. We connect the turbulent ram pressure with turbulent energy at large scales and in this way explain why 2D simulations are erroneously exploding more easily than 3D simulations.

  7. A Two-parameter Criterion for Classifying the Explodability of Massive Stars by the Neutrino-driven Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertl, T.; Janka, H.-Th.; Woosley, S. E.; Sukhbold, T.; Ugliano, M.

    2016-02-01

    Thus far, judging the fate of a massive star (either a neutron star [NS] or a black hole) solely by its structure prior to core collapse has been ambiguous. Our work and previous attempts find a nonmonotonic variation of successful and failed supernovae with zero-age main-sequence mass, for which no single structural parameter can serve as a good predictive measure. However, we identify two parameters computed from the pre-collapse structure of the progenitor, which in combination allow for a clear separation of exploding and nonexploding cases with only a few exceptions (˜1%-2.5%) in our set of 621 investigated stellar models. One parameter is M4, defining the normalized enclosed mass for a dimensionless entropy per nucleon of s = 4, and the other is {μ }4\\equiv ({dm}/{M}⊙ )/({dr}/1000 {km}){| }s=4, being the normalized mass derivative at this location. The two parameters μ4 and M4μ4 can be directly linked to the mass-infall rate, \\dot{M}, of the collapsing star and the electron-type neutrino luminosity of the accreting proto-NS, {L}{ν e}\\propto {M}{ns}\\dot{M}, which play a crucial role in the “critical luminosity” concept for the theoretical description of neutrino-driven explosions as runaway phenomena of the stalled accretion shock. All models were evolved employing the approach of Ugliano et al. for simulating neutrino-driven explosions in spherical symmetry. The neutrino emission of the accretion layer is approximated by a gray transport solver, while the uncertain neutrino emission of the 1.1 M⊙ proto-NS core is parameterized by an analytic model. The free parameters connected to the core-boundary prescription are calibrated to reproduce the observables of SN 1987A for five different progenitor models.

  8. Failure of a Neutrino-driven Explosion after Core-collapse May Lead to a Thermonuclear Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Doron; Katz, Boaz

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that ∼10 s after the core-collapse of a massive star, a thermonuclear explosion of the outer shells is possible for some (tuned) initial density and composition profiles, assuming that the neutrinos failed to explode the star. The explosion may lead to a successful supernova, as first suggested by Burbidge et al. We perform a series of one-dimensional (1D) calculations of collapsing massive stars with simplified initial density profiles (similar to the results of stellar evolution calculations) and various compositions (not similar to 1D stellar evolution calculations). We assume that the neutrinos escaped with a negligible effect on the outer layers, which inevitably collapse. As the shells collapse, they compress and heat up adiabatically, enhancing the rate of thermonuclear burning. In some cases, where significant shells of mixed helium and oxygen are present with pre-collapsed burning times of ≲100 s (≈10 times the free-fall time), a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited, which unbinds the outer layers of the star, leading to a supernova. The energy released is small, ≲1050 erg, and negligible amounts of synthesized material (including 56Ni) are ejected, implying that these 1D simulations are unlikely to represent typical core-collapse supernovae. However, they do serve as a proof of concept that the core-collapse-induced thermonuclear explosions are possible, and more realistic two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are within current computational capabilities.

  9. FAILURE OF A NEUTRINO-DRIVEN EXPLOSION AFTER CORE-COLLAPSE MAY LEAD TO A THERMONUCLEAR SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Kushnir, Doron; Katz, Boaz

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that ∼10 s after the core-collapse of a massive star, a thermonuclear explosion of the outer shells is possible for some (tuned) initial density and composition profiles, assuming that the neutrinos failed to explode the star. The explosion may lead to a successful supernova, as first suggested by Burbidge et al. We perform a series of one-dimensional (1D) calculations of collapsing massive stars with simplified initial density profiles (similar to the results of stellar evolution calculations) and various compositions (not similar to 1D stellar evolution calculations). We assume that the neutrinos escaped with a negligible effect on the outer layers, which inevitably collapse. As the shells collapse, they compress and heat up adiabatically, enhancing the rate of thermonuclear burning. In some cases, where significant shells of mixed helium and oxygen are present with pre-collapsed burning times of ≲100 s (≈10 times the free-fall time), a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited, which unbinds the outer layers of the star, leading to a supernova. The energy released is small, ≲10{sup 50} erg, and negligible amounts of synthesized material (including {sup 56}Ni) are ejected, implying that these 1D simulations are unlikely to represent typical core-collapse supernovae. However, they do serve as a proof of concept that the core-collapse-induced thermonuclear explosions are possible, and more realistic two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are within current computational capabilities.

  10. Progenitor-dependent Explosion Dynamics in Self-consistent, Axisymmetric Simulations of Neutrino-driven Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summa, Alexander; Hanke, Florian; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Melson, Tobias; Marek, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    We present self-consistent, axisymmetric core-collapse supernova simulations performed with the Prometheus-Vertex code for 18 pre-supernova models in the range of 11-28 M ⊙, including progenitors recently investigated by other groups. All models develop explosions, but depending on the progenitor structure, they can be divided into two classes. With a steep density decline at the Si/Si-O interface, the arrival of this interface at the shock front leads to a sudden drop of the mass-accretion rate, triggering a rapid approach to explosion. With a more gradually decreasing accretion rate, it takes longer for the neutrino heating to overcome the accretion ram pressure and explosions set in later. Early explosions are facilitated by high mass-accretion rates after bounce and correspondingly high neutrino luminosities combined with a pronounced drop of the accretion rate and ram pressure at the Si/Si-O interface. Because of rapidly shrinking neutron star radii and receding shock fronts after the passage through their maxima, our models exhibit short advection timescales, which favor the efficient growth of the standing accretion-shock instability. The latter plays a supportive role at least for the initiation of the re-expansion of the stalled shock before runaway. Taking into account the effects of turbulent pressure in the gain layer, we derive a generalized condition for the critical neutrino luminosity that captures the explosion behavior of all models very well. We validate the robustness of our findings by testing the influence of stochasticity, numerical resolution, and approximations in some aspects of the microphysics.

  11. Probing the core-collapse supernova mechanism with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Christian D.

    2009-10-01

    The mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions must draw on the energy provided by gravitational collapse and transfer the necessary fraction to the kinetic and internal energy of the ejecta. Despite many decades of concerted theoretical effort, the detailed mechanism of core-collapse supernova explosions is still unknown, but indications are strong that multi-D processes lie at its heart. This opens up the possibility of probing the supernova mechanism with gravitational waves, carrying direct dynamical information from the supernova engine deep inside a dying massive star. I present a concise overview of the physics and primary multi-D dynamics in neutrino-driven, magnetorotational, and acoustically driven core-collapse supernova explosion scenarios. Discussing and contrasting estimates for the gravitational-wave emission characteristics of these mechanisms, I argue that their gravitational-wave signatures are clearly distinct and that the observation (or non-observation) of gravitational waves from a nearby core-collapse event could put strong constraints on the supernova mechanism.

  12. EXPLOSIVE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN THE NEUTRINO-DRIVEN ASPHERICAL SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION OF A NON-ROTATING 15 M{sub sun} STAR WITH SOLAR METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Kotake, Kei; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Ono, Masaomi; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2011-09-01

    We investigate explosive nucleosynthesis in a non-rotating 15 M{sub sun} star with solar metallicity that explodes by a neutrino-heating supernova (SN) mechanism aided by both standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and convection. To trigger explosions in our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we approximate the neutrino transport with a simple light-bulb scheme and systematically change the neutrino fluxes emitted from the protoneutron star. By a post-processing calculation, we evaluate abundances and masses of the SN ejecta for nuclei with a mass number {<=}70, employing a large nuclear reaction network. Aspherical abundance distributions, which are observed in nearby core-collapse SN remnants, are obtained for the non-rotating spherically symmetric progenitor, due to the growth of a low-mode SASI. The abundance pattern of the SN ejecta is similar to that of the solar system for models whose masses range between (0.4-0.5) M{sub sun} of the ejecta from the inner region ({<=}10, 000 km) of the precollapse core. For the models, the explosion energies and the {sup 56}Ni masses are {approx_equal} 10{sup 51}erg and (0.05-0.06) M{sub sun}, respectively; their estimated baryonic masses of the neutron star are comparable to the ones observed in neutron-star binaries. These findings may have little uncertainty because most of the ejecta is composed of matter that is heated via the shock wave and has relatively definite abundances. The abundance ratios for Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe observed in the Cygnus loop are reproduced well with the SN ejecta from an inner region of the 15 M{sub sun} progenitor.

  13. The Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Progress in Supernova Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Kazeroni, Rémi; Guilet, Jérôme; Masset, Frédéric; González, Matthias; Krueger, Brendan K.; Novak, Jérôme; Faure, Julien; Martin, Noël; Blottiau, Patrick; Peres, Bruno; Durand, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernova remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydrodynamical and MHD instabilities such as SASI and neutrino-driven convection. The shallow water analogy of shock dynamics is presented as a comparative system where buoyancy effects are absent. This dynamical system can be studied numerically and also experimentally with a water fountain. Lastly, we analyse the potential of this complementary research tool for supernova theory. We also review its potential for public outreach in science museums.

  14. Integrated Nucleosynthesis in Neutrino Driven Winds

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L F; Woosley, S E; Hoffman, R D

    2010-03-26

    Although they are but a small fraction of the mass ejected in core-collapse supernovae, neutrino-driven winds (NDWs) from nascent proto-neutron stars (PNSs) have the potential to contribute significantly to supernova nucleosynthesis. In previous works, the NDW has been implicated as a possible source of r-process and light p-process isotopes. In this paper we present time-dependent hydrodynamic calculations of nucleosynthesis in the NDW which include accurate weak interaction physics coupled to a full nuclear reaction network. Using two published models of PNS neutrino luminosities, we predict the contribution of the NDW to the integrated nucleosynthetic yield of the entire supernova. For the neutrino luminosity histories considered, no true r-process occurs in the most basic scenario. The wind driven from an older 1.4M{sub {circle_dot}} model for a PNS is moderately neutron-rich at late times however, and produces {sup 87}Rb, {sup 88}Sr, {sup 89}Y, and {sup 90}Zr in near solar proportions relative to oxygen. The wind from a more recently studied 1.27M{sub {circle_dot}} PNS is proton-rich throughout its entire evolution and does not contribute significantly to the abundance of any element. It thus seems very unlikely that the simplest model of the NDW can produce the r-process. At most, it contributes to the production of the N = 50 closed shell elements and some light p-nuclei. In doing so, it may have left a distinctive signature on the abundances in metal poor stars, but the results are sensitive to both uncertain models for the explosion and the masses of the neutron stars involved.

  15. The Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Progress in Supernova Theory and Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Kazeroni, Rémi; Guilet, Jérôme; ...

    2015-01-01

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernovamore » remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydrodynamical and MHD instabilities such as SASI and neutrino-driven convection. The shallow water analogy of shock dynamics is presented as a comparative system where buoyancy effects are absent. This dynamical system can be studied numerically and also experimentally with a water fountain. Lastly, we analyse the potential of this complementary research tool for supernova theory. We also review its potential for public outreach in science museums.« less

  16. ASCERTAINING THE CORE COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA MECHANISM: The State of the Art and the Road Ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2005-12-01

    More than four decades have elapsed since modeling of the core collapse supernova mechanism began in earnest. To date, the mechanism remains elusive, at least in detail, although significant progress has been made in understanding these multiscale, multiphysics events. One-, two-, and three-dimensional simulations of or relevant to core collapse supernovae have shown that (a) neutrino transport, (b) fluid instabilities, (c) rotation, and (d) magnetic fields, together with proper treatments of (e) the sub- and super- nuclear density stellar core equation of state, (f) the neutrino interactions, and (g) gravity are all important. The importance of these ingredients applies to both the explosion mechanism and to phenomena directly associated with the mechanism, such as neutron star kicks, supernova neutrino and gravitational wave emission, and supernova spectropolarimetry.Not surprisingly, current two- and three-dimensional models have yet to include (a) (d) with sufficient realism. One-dimensional spherically symmetric models have achieved a significant level of sophistication but, by definition, cannot incorporate (b) (d), except phenomenologically. Fully general relativistic spherically symmetric simulations with Boltzmann neutrino transport do not yield explosions, demonstrating that some combination of (b), (c), and (d) is required to achieve this. Systematic layering of the dimensionality and the physics will be needed to achieve a complete understanding of the supernova mechanism and phenomenology. The past modeling efforts alluded to above have illuminated that core collapse supernovae may be neutrino driven, magnetohydrodynamically (MHD) driven, or both, but uncertainties in the current models prevent us from being able to answer even this most basic question. And it may be that more than one possibility is realized in nature. Nonetheless, if a supernova is neutrino driven, magnetic fields will likely have an impact on the dynamics of the explosion. Similarly

  17. Instabilities and the Supernova Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam; Hayes, John

    1994-12-01

    Core collapse supernovae are thought to be powered not dynamically by the direct piston mechanism of core bounce, but by neutrino heating after the bounce shock has stalled into accretion. The theory we will describe provides a paradigm for understanding the neutrino heating mechanism. Both the critical condition for instability and the explosion energy are very steep functions of the driving neutrino luminosity. We will present recent 1D and 2D hydrodynamic calculations in which the basics of the supernova mechanism are elucidated. The shock wave that stalls within ten milliseconds of its creation during the collapse and bounce of the core of a massive star leaves behind it unstable lepton and entropy profiles that can drive a violent Rayleigh-Taylor overturn. Furthermore, the core neutrino luminosities can establish unstable entropy gradients near the shock 50 milliseconds after bounce. John Hayes, Bruce Fryxell and I have demonstrated the possible existence of a convective boost in the neutrino luminosities due to core lepton overturn that can ignite a supernova explosion and have verified the potential importance of nu -driven ``Bethe'' convection near the shock. Issues that surround the residual neutron star mass, the (56) Ni yields, the supernova energies, the progenitors, and the nucleosynthetic consequences will also be addressed.

  18. PRODUCTION OF LIGHT-ELEMENT PRIMARY PROCESS NUCLEI IN NEUTRINO-DRIVEN WINDS

    SciTech Connect

    Arcones, A.; Montes, F.

    2011-04-10

    We present first comparisons between light-element primary process (LEPP) abundances observed in some ultra metal-poor (UMP) stars and nucleosynthesis calculations based on long-time hydrodynamical simulations of core-collapse supernovae and their neutrino-driven wind. UMP star observations indicate that Z {>=} 38 elements include the contributions of at least two nucleosynthesis components: r-process nuclei that are synthesized by rapid neutron capture in a yet unknown site and LEPP elements (mainly Sr, Y, and Zr). We show that neutrino-driven wind simulations can explain the observed LEPP pattern. We explore in detail the sensitivity of the calculated abundances to the electron fraction, which is a key nucleosynthesis parameter but poorly known due to uncertainties in neutrino interactions and transport. Our results show that the observed LEPP pattern can be reproduced in proton- and neutron-rich winds.

  19. Inferring the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism with gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Jade; Gossan, Sarah E.; Logue, Joshua; Heng, Ik Siong

    2016-12-01

    A detection of a core-collapse supernova (CCSN) gravitational-wave (GW) signal with an Advanced LIGO and Virgo detector network may allow us to measure astrophysical parameters of the dying massive star. GWs are emitted from deep inside the core, and, as such, they are direct probes of the CCSN explosion mechanism. In this study, we show how we can determine the CCSN explosion mechanism from a GW supernova detection using a combination of principal component analysis and Bayesian model selection. We use simulations of GW signals from CCSN exploding via neutrino-driven convection and rapidly rotating core collapse. Previous studies have shown that the explosion mechanism can be determined using one LIGO detector and simulated Gaussian noise. As real GW detector noise is both nonstationary and non-Gaussian, we use real detector noise from a network of detectors with a sensitivity altered to match the advanced detectors design sensitivity. For the first time, we carry out a careful selection of the number of principal components to enhance our model selection capabilities. We show that with an advanced detector network we can determine if the CCSN explosion mechanism is driven by neutrino convection for sources in our Galaxy and rapidly-rotating core collapse for sources out to the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  20. The Magnetar Model of the Superluminous Supernova GAIA16apd and the Explosion Jet Feedback Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2017-04-01

    Under the assumption that jets explode core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) in a negative jet feedback mechanism (JFM), this paper shows that rapidly rotating neutron stars are likely to be formed when the explosion is very energetic. Under the assumption that an accretion disk or an accretion belt around the just-formed neutron star launch jets and that the accreted gas spins-up the just-formed neutron star, I derive a crude relation between the energy that is stored in the spinning neutron star and the explosion energy. This relation is (E NS-spin/E exp) ≈ E exp/1052 erg; It shows that within the frame of the JFM explosion model of CCSNe, spinning neutron stars, such as magnetars, might have significant energy in super-energetic explosions. The existence of magnetars, if confirmed, such as in the recent super-energetic supernova GAIA16apd, further supports the call for a paradigm shift from neutrino-driven to jet-driven CCSN mechanisms.

  1. Final Report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-00ER41149 ''Nuclear Physics of Core-Collapse Supernovae''

    SciTech Connect

    Yong-Zhong Qian

    2004-10-26

    During the funding period from August 15, 2000 to August 14, 2004, the main foci of my research have been implications of abundances in metal-poor stars for nucleosynthetic yields of supernovae and chemical evolution of the universe, effects of neutrino oscillations and neutrino-nucleus interactions on r-process nucleosynthesis, physical conditions in neutrino-driven winds from proto-neutron stars, neutrino driven mechanism of supernova explosion, supernova neutrino signals in terrestrial detectors, and constraints on variations of fundamental couplings and astrophysical conditions from properties of nuclear reactions. Personnel (three graduate students and a postdoctoral research associate) involved in my research are listed in section 2. Completed research projects are discussed in section 3. Publications during the funding period are listed in section 4 and oral presentations in section 5. Remarks about the budget are given in section 6.

  2. The Status of Multi-Dimensional Core-Collapse Supernova Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, B.

    2016-09-01

    Models of neutrino-driven core-collapse supernova explosions have matured considerably in recent years. Explosions of low-mass progenitors can routinely be simulated in 1D, 2D, and 3D. Nucleosynthesis calculations indicate that these supernovae could be contributors of some lighter neutron-rich elements beyond iron. The explosion mechanism of more massive stars remains under investigation, although first 3D models of neutrino-driven explosions employing multi-group neutrino transport have become available. Together with earlier 2D models and more simplified 3D simulations, these have elucidated the interplay between neutrino heating and hydrodynamic instabilities in the post-shock region that is essential for shock revival. However, some physical ingredients may still need to be added/improved before simulations can robustly explain supernova explosions over a wide range of progenitors. Solutions recently suggested in the literature include uncertainties in the neutrino rates, rotation, and seed perturbations from convective shell burning. We review the implications of 3D simulations of shell burning in supernova progenitors for the `perturbations-aided neutrino-driven mechanism,' whose efficacy is illustrated by the first successful multi-group neutrino hydrodynamics simulation of an 18 solar mass progenitor with 3D initial conditions. We conclude with speculations about the impact of 3D effects on the structure of massive stars through convective boundary mixing.

  3. The Role of Waves in the Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossan, Sarah; Fuller, Jim; Roberts, Luke

    2017-01-01

    The core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosion mechanism is not well understood. For garden variety CCSNe, the favored explosion scenario is delayed revival of the stalled shock powered by neutrino-driven convection. Despite huge computational advances, many simulations must use parameterized `light-bulb' models for neutrino heating or mask out inner regions of the proto-neutron star (PNS) for computational efficiency. These approximations can fail to capture hydrodynamical processes in the PNS core where nearly all the binding energy resides, and from which much of the explosion energy may originate. We show that gravity waves excited by core PNS convection may represent a significant heating source for the post-shock region. Using 1D simulations, we calculate the wave heating rate in the post-shock region out to one second after core bounce, showing that wave heating rates in excess of 1051 erg/s may persist for several hundreds of milliseconds, even after neutrino heating rates have decreased. Waves excited by PNS convection may therefore significantly contribute to shock revival and, subsequently, a successful and energetic explosion. We discuss how simulations can miss the effect of waves, and how future simulations can more accurately quantify wave heating rates.

  4. THE PROPAGATION OF NEUTRINO-DRIVEN JETS IN WOLF-RAYET STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nagakura, Hiroki

    2013-02-20

    We numerically investigate the jet propagation through a rotating collapsing Wolf-Rayet star with detailed central engine physics constructed based on the neutrino-driven collapsar model. The collapsing star determines the evolution of the mass accretion rate, black hole mass, and spin, all of which are important ingredients for determining the jet luminosity. We reveal that neutrino-driven jets in rapidly spinning Wolf-Rayet stars are capable of breaking out from the stellar envelope, while those propagating in slower rotating progenitors fail to break out due to insufficient kinetic power. For progenitor models with successful jet breakouts, the kinetic energy accumulated in the cocoon could be as large as {approx}10{sup 51} erg and might significantly contribute to the luminosity of the afterglow emission or to the kinetic energy of the accompanying supernova if nickel production takes place. We further analyze the post-breakout phase using a simple analytical prescription and conclude that the relativistic jet component could produce events with an isotropic luminosity L {sub p(iso)} {approx} 10{sup 52} erg s{sup -1} and isotropic energy E {sub j(iso)} {approx} 10{sup 54} erg. Our findings support the idea of rapidly rotating Wolf-Rayet stars as plausible progenitors of GRBs, while slowly rotational ones could be responsible for low-luminosity or failed GRBs.

  5. Impact of (α, n) reactions on weak r-process in neutrino-driven winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, J.; Arcones, A.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.

    2017-05-01

    After a successful core-collapse supernova, a neutrino-driven wind develops where it is possible to synthesize lighter heavy elements (30 < Z < 45). In the early galaxy, the origin of these elements is associated with the r-process and to an additional process. Here we assume that the additional process corresponds to the weak r-process (sometimes referred to as alpha-process) taking place in neutrino-driven winds. Based on a trajectory obtained from hydrodynamical simulations we study the astrophysics and nuclear physics uncertainties of a weak r-process with our main focus on the (α, n) reactions. These reactions are critical to redistribute the matter and allow it to move from light to heavy elements after nuclear statistical equilibrium freezes out. In this first sensitivity study, we vary all (α, n) reactions by given constant factors which are justified based on the uncertainties of the statistical model and its nuclear physics input, mainly alpha optical potentials for weak r-process conditions. Our results show that (α, n) rate uncertainties are indeed crucial to predict abundances. Therefore, further studies will follow to identify individual critical reactions. Since the nucleosynthesis path is close to stability, these reactions can be measured in the near future. Since much of the other nuclear data for the weak r-process are known, the reduction in nuclear physics uncertainties provided by these experiments will allow astronomical observations to directly constrain the astronomical conditions in the wind.

  6. Neutrino-driven wakefield plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, L. A.; Serbeto, A.

    2003-08-01

    Processos envolvendo neutrinos são importantes em uma grande variedade de fenômenos astrofísicos, como as explosões de supernovas. Estes objetos, assim como os pulsares e as galáxias starburst, têm sido propostos como aceleradores cósmicos de partículas de altas energias. Neste trabalho, um modelo clássico de fluidos é utilizado para estudar a interação não-linear entre um feixe de neutrinos e um plasma não-colisional relativístico de pósitrons e elétrons na presença de um campo magnético. Durante a interação, uma onda híbrida superior de grande amplitude é excitada. Para parâmetros típicos de supernovas, verificamos que partículas carregadas "capturadas" por essa onda podem ser aceleradas a altas energias. Este resultado pode ser importante no estudo de mecanismos aceleradores de partículas em ambientes astrofísicos.

  7. Multidimensional Simulations of Core Collapse Supernovae Using Multigroup Neutrino Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, Alan Clark

    We couple two-dimensional hydrodynamics to realistic one-dimensional multigroup flux-limited diffusion neutrino transport to investigate the role of two types of convection in core collapse supernovae. The types are protoneutron star convection and neutrino-driven convection. Initial conditions, time-dependent boundary conditions, and neutrino distributions for computing neutrino heating, cooling, and deleptonization rates are obtained from one-dimensional simulations that implement multigroup flux-limited diffusion and one-dimensional hydrodynamics. We find that in the presence of neutrino transport, protoneutron star convection velocities are too small relative to bulk inflow velocities to result in any significant convective transport of entropy and leptons. This is evident in our two-dimensional entropy snapshots, which in this case appear spherically symmetric. The peak angle-averaged radial and angular convection velocities are orders of magnitude smaller than they are in the corresponding 'hydrodynamics only' models. A simple analytical model that supports our numerical results is given. We also investigate neutrino-driven convection in core collapse supernovae and its ramifications for the explosion mechanism. We begin with an 'optimistic' 15 M⊙ precollapse model, which is representative of the class of stars with compact iron cores. We find that neutrino-driven convection develops, but our simulations fail to produce explosions. Failure of this 'optimistic' 15 M⊙ Newtonian model leads us to conclude that it is unlikely, at least in our approximation, that neutrino-driven convection will lead to explosions for more massive stars with fatter iron cores or in cases in which general relativity is included.

  8. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  9. The Role of Waves in the Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossan, Sarah; Fuller, Jim; Roberts, Luke

    2017-01-01

    The core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosion mechanism is not well understood. For garden variety CCSNe, the favored scenario for explosion is delayed revival of the stalled shock powered by neutrino-driven convection. Despite tremendous computational advances, many simulations must use parameterized ‘light-bulb’ models for neutrino heating or mask out inner regions of the proto-neutron star (PNS) for computational efficiency. These approximations can fail to capture hydrodynamical processes in the core of the PNS where nearly all the binding energy resides, and from which much of the explosion energy may originate. We show that gravity (buoyancy) waves excited by core PNS convection (within the central 20 km of the PNS) may represent a significant heating source for the post-shock region. The gravity waves propagate out of the PNS and transform into acoustic waves before depositing their energy at the shock, converting a small fraction of the PNS binding energy into explosion energy. Using 1D simulations, we calculate the wave heating rate in the post-shock region out to one second after core bounce, showing that wave heating rates in excess of 1051 erg/s may persist for several hundreds of milliseconds, even after neutrino heating rates have declined to smaller values. Waves excited by PNS convection may therefore significantly contribute to shock revival and, subsequently, a successful and energetic explosion. We discuss how simulations can miss the effect of waves (or have not recognized them), and how future simulations can more accurately quantify wave heating rates.

  10. Cutting-edge issues of core-collapse supernova theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kotake, Kei; Nakamura, Ko; Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2014-05-02

    Based on multi-dimensional neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we report several cutting-edge issues about the long-veiled explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). In this contribution, we pay particular attention to whether three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics and/or general relativity (GR) would or would not help the onset of explosions. By performing 3D simulations with spectral neutrino transport, we show that it is more difficult to obtain an explosion in 3D than in 2D. In addition, our results from the first generation of full general relativistic 3D simulations including approximate neutrino transport indicate that GR can foster the onset of neutrino-driven explosions. Based on our recent parametric studies using a light-bulb scheme, we discuss impacts of nuclear energy deposition behind the supernova shock and stellar rotation on the neutrino-driven mechanism, both of which have yet to be included in the self-consistent 3D supernova models. Finally we give an outlook with a summary of the most urgent tasks to extract the information about the explosion mechanisms from multi-messenger CCSN observables.

  11. Cutting-edge issues of core-collapse supernova theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotake, Kei; Nakamura, Ko; Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2014-05-01

    Based on multi-dimensional neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we report several cutting-edge issues about the long-veiled explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). In this contribution, we pay particular attention to whether three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics and/or general relativity (GR) would or would not help the onset of explosions. By performing 3D simulations with spectral neutrino transport, we show that it is more difficult to obtain an explosion in 3D than in 2D. In addition, our results from the first generation of full general relativistic 3D simulations including approximate neutrino transport indicate that GR can foster the onset of neutrino-driven explosions. Based on our recent parametric studies using a light-bulb scheme, we discuss impacts of nuclear energy deposition behind the supernova shock and stellar rotation on the neutrino-driven mechanism, both of which have yet to be included in the self-consistent 3D supernova models. Finally we give an outlook with a summary of the most urgent tasks to extract the information about the explosion mechanisms from multi-messenger CCSN observables.

  12. The mechanism(s) of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, Sean M.

    2017-09-01

    Core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the explosions that attend the deaths of massive stars. Despite decades of research, several aspects of the mechanism that drives these explosions remain uncertain and the subjects of continued investigation. In this short review, I will give an overview of the CCSN mechanism and current research in the field. In particular, I will focus on recent results from three-dimensional simulations and the impact of turbulence and detailed non-spherical progenitor structure on CCSNe. This contribution is based on a talk given at the `Bridging the Gap' workshop at Chicheley Hall on 2 June 2016. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'.

  13. Towards a synthesis of core-collapse supernova theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam

    1996-02-01

    New insights into the mechanism and character of core-collapse supernova explosions are transforming the approach of theorists to their subject. The universal realization that the direct hydrodynamic mechanism does not work and that a variety of hydrodynamic instabilities can influence the viability of theoretical explosions has ushered in a new era in supernova modeling. In this paper, I discuss the important physical and technical issues that remain. I review the neutrino-driven mechanism, the possible roles of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, questions in neutrino transport, and the various observational constraints within which theorists must operate. However, a consensus has yet to be achieved among active workers concerning many important details and some essential phenomenology. This synopsis is meant to accomplish two things: (i) to focus attention on the interesting problems whose resolution will bring needed progress, and (ii) to assess the current status of the theoretical art.

  14. Multi-D Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions and the Multi-Messenger Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotake, Kei

    Based on multi-dimensional neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we report several cutting-edge issues about the long-veiled explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). In this contribution, we pay particular attention to whether three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics and/or general relativity (GR) would or would not help the onset of explosions. By performing 3D simulations with spectral neutrino transport, we show that it is more difficult to obtain an explosion in 3D than in 2D. In addition, our results from the first generation of full general relativistic 3D simulations including approximate neutrino transport indicate that GR can foster the onset of neutrino-driven explosions. Based on our recent parametric studies using a light-bulb scheme, we discuss impacts of nuclear energy deposition behind the supernova shock and stellar rotation on the neutrino-driven mechanism, both of which have yet to be included in the self-consistent 3D supernova models. Finally we give an outlook with a summary of the most urgent tasks to extract the information about the explosion mechanisms from multi-messenger CCSN observables.

  15. Core-collapse supernova simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae, the deaths of massive stars, are among the most spectacular phenomena in astrophysics: Not only can supernovae outshine their host galaxy for weeks; they are also laboratories for the behavior of matter at supranuclear densities, and one of the few environments where collective neutrino effects can become important. Moreover, supernovae play a central role in the cosmic matter cycle, e.g., as the dominant producers of oxygen in the Universe. Yet the mechanism by which massive stars explode has eluded us for decades, partly because classical astronomical observations across the electromagnetic spectrum cannot directly probe the supernovae ``engine''. Numerical simulations are thus our primary tool for understanding the explosion mechanism(s) of massive stars. Rigorous modeling needs to take a host of important physical ingredients into account, such as the emission and partial reabsorption of neutrinos from the young proto-neutron star, multi-dimensional fluid motions, general relativistic gravity, the equation of state of nuclear matter, and magnetic fields. This is a challenging multi-physics problem that has not been fully solved yet. Nonetheless, as I shall argue in this talk, recent first-principle 3D simulations have gone a long way towards demonstrating the viability of the most popular explosion scenario, the ``neutrino-driven mechanism''. Focusing on successful explosion models of the MPA-QUB-Monash collaboration, I will discuss possible requirements for robust explosions across a wide range of progenitors, such as accurate neutrino opacities, stellar rotation, and seed asymmetries from convective shell burning. With the advent of successful explosion models, supernova theory can also be confronted with astronomical observations. I will show that recent 3D models come closer to matching observed explosion parameters (explosion energies, neutron star kicks) than older 2D models, although there are still discrepancies. This work has

  16. NEW TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODELS OF SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS BY THE NEUTRINO-HEATING MECHANISM: EVIDENCE FOR DIFFERENT INSTABILITY REGIMES IN COLLAPSING STELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Heger, Alexander E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-12-10

    The neutrino-driven explosion mechanism for core-collapse supernovae in its modern flavor relies on the additional support of hydrodynamical instabilities in achieving shock revival. Two possible candidates, convection and the so-called standing accretion shock instability (SASI), have been proposed for this role. In this paper, we discuss new successful simulations of supernova explosions that shed light on the relative importance of these two instabilities. While convection has so far been observed to grow first in self-consistent hydrodynamical models with multi-group neutrino transport, we here present the first such simulation in which the SASI grows faster while the development of convection is initially inhibited. We illustrate the features of this SASI-dominated regime using an explosion model of a 27 M{sub Sun} progenitor, which is contrasted with a convectively dominated model of an 8.1 M{sub Sun} progenitor with subsolar metallicity, whose early post-bounce behavior is more in line with previous 11.2 M{sub Sun} and 15 M{sub Sun} explosion models. We analyze the conditions discriminating between the two different regimes, showing that a high mass-accretion rate and a short advection timescale are conducive for strong SASI activity. We also briefly discuss some important factors for capturing the SASI-driven regime, such as general relativity, the progenitor structure, a nuclear equation of state leading to a compact proto-neutron star, and the neutrino treatment. Finally, we evaluate possible implications of our findings for two-dimensional and three-dimensional supernova simulations.

  17. Neutrino-driven winds from neutron star merger remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, A.; Rosswog, S.; Cabezón, R. M.; Korobkin, O.; Käppeli, R.; Arcones, A.; Liebendörfer, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a detailed, three-dimensional hydrodynamic study of the neutrino-driven winds emerging from the remnant of a neutron star merger. Our simulations are performed with the Newtonian, Eulerian code FISH, augmented by a detailed, spectral neutrino leakage scheme that accounts for neutrino absorption. Consistent with earlier two-dimensional studies, a strong baryonic wind is blown out along the original binary rotation axis within ≈100 ms. From this model, we compute a lower limit on the expelled mass of 3.5 × 10-3 M⊙, relevant for heavy element nucleosynthesis. Because of stronger neutrino irradiation, the polar regions show substantially larger electron fractions than those at lower latitudes. The polar ejecta produce interesting r-process contributions from A ≈ 80 to about 130, while the more neutron-rich, lower latitude parts produce elements up to the third r-process peak near A ≈ 195. We calculate the properties of electromagnetic transients powered by the radioactivity in the wind, in addition to the `macronova' transient stemming from the dynamic ejecta. The polar regions produce ultraviolet/optical transients reaching luminosities up to 1041 erg s-1, which peak around 1 d in optical and 0.3 d in bolometric luminosity. The lower latitude regions, due to their contamination with high-opacity heavy elements, produce dimmer and more red signals, peaking after ˜2 d in optical and infrared.

  18. Neutron Star Kicks by the Gravitational Tug-boat Mechanism in Asymmetric Supernova Explosions: Progenitor and Explosion Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Asymmetric mass ejection in the early phase of supernova (SN) explosions can impart a kick velocity to the new-born neutron star (NS). For neutrino-driven explosions the NS acceleration has been shown to be mainly caused by the gravitational attraction of the anisotropically expelled inner ejecta, while hydrodynamic forces contribute on a subdominant level, and asymmetric neutrino emission plays only a secondary role. Two- and three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations have demonstrated that this gravitational tug-boat mechanism can explain the observed space velocities of young NSs up to more than 1000 km s‑1. Here, we discuss how the NS kick depends on the energy, ejecta mass, and asymmetry of the SN explosion, and what role the compactness of the pre-collapse stellar core plays for the momentum transfer to the NS. We also provide simple analytic expressions for the NS velocity in terms of these quantities. Referring to results of hydrodynamic simulations in the literature, we argue why, within the discussed scenario of NS acceleration, electron-capture SNe, low-mass Fe-core SNe, and ultra-stripped SNe can be expected to have considerably lower intrinsic NS kicks than core-collapse SNe of massive stellar cores. Our basic arguments also remain valid if progenitor stars possess large-scale asymmetries in their convective silicon and oxygen burning layers. Possible scenarios for spin-kick alignment are sketched. Much of our discussion stays on a conceptual and qualitative level, and more work is necessary on the numerical modeling side to determine the dependences of involved parameters, whose prescriptions will be needed for recipes that can be used to better describe NS kicks in binary evolution and population synthesis studies.

  19. INFLUENCE OF MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY ON NEUTRINO HEATING: A NEW MECHANISM FOR WEAKLY MAGNETIZED CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Sawai, Hidetomo; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-03-20

    We investigated the impact of magnetorotational instability (MRI) on the dynamics of weakly magnetized, rapidly rotating core-collapse supernovae by conducting high-resolution axisymmetric MHD simulations with simplified neutrino transfer. We found that an initially sub-magnetar-class magnetic field is drastically amplified by MRI and substantially affects the dynamics thereafter. Although the magnetic pressure is not strong enough to eject matter, the amplified magnetic field efficiently transfers angular momentum from small to large radii and from higher to lower latitudes, which causes the expansion of the heating region due to the extra centrifugal force. This then enhances the efficiency of neutrino heating and eventually leads to neutrino-driven explosion. This is a new scenario of core-collapse supernovae that has never been demonstrated by past numerical simulations.

  20. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, Stephen; Blondin, John

    2014-04-15

    Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  1. Essential Ingredients in Core-collapse Supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Endeve, Eirik; ...

    2014-03-27

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10more » $$^{44}$$ joules of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.« less

  2. Essential Ingredients in Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark L.; Chertkow, Merek A.; Harris, James A.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, S. W.; Blondin, J. M.

    2014-03-27

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{44}$ joules of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  3. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hix, W. Raphael; Lentz, Eric J.; Endeve, Eirik; Baird, Mark; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Bruenn, Stephen; Blondin, John

    2014-04-01

    Carrying 1044 joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  4. Supernovae in Binary Systems: An Application of Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitalas, R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents the supernova explosion in a binary system as an application of classical mechanics. This presentation is intended to illustrate the power of the equivalent one-body problem and provide undergraduate students with a variety of insights into elementary classical mechanics. (HM)

  5. Supernovae in Binary Systems: An Application of Classical Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitalas, R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents the supernova explosion in a binary system as an application of classical mechanics. This presentation is intended to illustrate the power of the equivalent one-body problem and provide undergraduate students with a variety of insights into elementary classical mechanics. (HM)

  6. Nucleosynthesis in Neutrino-Driven Winds in Hypernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujibayashi, Sho; Yoshida, Takashi; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro

    We investigate the nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds blown off from massive proto-neutron stars (mPNSs) temporarily formed in the collapse of the rotating massive stars, which are thought to be progenitors of hypernovae. Such an mPNS formation is indicated in a recent numerical relativity simulation. We construct steady, spherically symmetric wind solutions with large neutrino luminosities of ˜1053 erg s-1 and average energies of electron neutrinos and antineutrinos in the ranges of 9-16 and 11-18 MeV based on the numerical simulation. The winds have much shorter expansion timescale than that of the winds from ordinary PNSs and, depending on the energy of neutrinos, they can be both neutron (n)-rich and proton (p)-rich. In the n-rich wind, the r-process occurs and the abundance distribution of a fiducial wind model gives an approximate agreement with the abundance pattern of a metal-poor weak r star HD 122563, although the third-peak elements are produced only when the antineutrino energy is much larger than the neutrino one. In the p-rich wind, the strong ν p-process occurs and A > 100 nuclides are synthesized. In addition, an interesting nucleosynthesis occur in the wind with Ye ˜ 0.5. In this process, the abundance distribution of heavy nuclei of A > 100 achieves quasi-statistical equilibrium (QSE) at high temperature and the abundance is frozen when the temperature falls. This process can be understood using the "α QSE" abundances we formulated.

  7. Future Detection of Supernova Neutrino Burst and Explosion Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Totani, T.; Sato, K.; Dalhed, H.E.; Wilson, J.R.

    1998-03-01

    Future detection of a supernova neutrino burst by large underground detectors would give important information for the explosion mechanism of collapse-driven supernovae. We studied the statistical analysis for the future detection of a nearby supernova by using a numerical supernova model and realistic Monte Carlo simulations of detection by the Super-Kamiokande detector. We mainly discuss the detectability of the signatures of the delayed explosion mechanism in the time evolution of the {ovr {nu}}{sub e} luminosity and spectrum. For a supernova at 10 kpc away from the Earth, we find not only that the signature is clearly discernible but also that the deviation of the energy spectrum from the Fermi-Dirac (FD) distribution can be observed. The deviation from the FD distribution would, if observed, provide a test for the standard picture of neutrino emission from collapse-driven supernovae. For the {ital D}=50 kpc case, the signature of the delayed explosion is still observable, but statistical fluctuation is too large to detect the deviation from the FD distribution. We also propose a method for statistical reconstruction of the time evolution of {ovr {nu}}{sub e} luminosity and spectrum from data, by which we can get a smoother time evolution and smaller statistical errors than by a simple, time-binning analysis. This method is useful especially when the available number of events is relatively small, e.g., a supernova in the LMC or SMC. A neutronization burst of {nu}{sub {ital e}}`s produces about five scattering events when D=10 kpc, and this signal is difficult to distinguish from {ovr {nu}}{sub e}{ital p} events. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  8. New developments in the mechanism for core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Guidry, M. |

    1994-12-31

    Recent results indicate that the standard type-2 supernova scenario in which the shock wave stagnates but is reenergized by neutrino heating fails to consistently produce supernova explosions having the required characteristics. The authors review the theory of convection and survey some recent calculations indicating the importance of convection operating on millisecond timescales in the protoneutron star. These calculations suggest that such convection is probably generic to the type-2 scenario, that this produces a violet overturn of material below the stalled shock, and that this overturn could lead to significant alterations in the neutrino luminosity and energy. This provides a mechanism that could be effective in reenergizing the stalled shock and producing supernovae explosions having the quantitative characteristics demands by observations. This mechanism implies, in turn, that the convection cannot be adequately described by the 1-dimensional hydrodynamics employed in most simulations. Thus, a full understanding of the supernova mechanism and the resulting heavy element production is likely to require 3-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamics and a comprehensive description of neutrino transport. The prospects for implementing such calculations using a new generation of massively parallel supercomputers and modern scalable algorithms are discussed.

  9. Neutrino-driven electrostatic instabilities in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Fernando; Pascoal, Kellen Alves; Mendonça, José Tito

    2017-07-01

    The destabilizing role of neutrino beams on the Trivelpiece-Gould modes is considered, assuming electrostatic perturbations in a magnetized plasma composed by electrons in a neutralizing ionic background, coupled to a neutrino species by means of an effective neutrino force arising from the electroweak interaction. The magnetic field is found to significantly improve the linear instability growth rate, as calculated for supernova type II environments. On the formal level, for wave vectors parallel or perpendicular to the magnetic field, the instability growth rate is found from the unmagnetized case replacing the plasma frequency by the appropriated Trivelpiece-Gould frequency. The growth rate associated with oblique propagation is also obtained.

  10. Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, Marisa

    2014-03-01

    We live in a Universe that is getting bigger faster. This astonishing discovery of Universal acceleration was made in the late 1990s by two teams who made observations of a special type of exploded star known as a `Supernova Type Ia'. (SNeIa) Since the discovery of the accelerating Universe, one of the biggest questions in modern cosmology has been to determine the cause of that acceleration - the answer to this question will have far reaching implications for our theories of cosmology and fundamental physics more broadly. The two main competing explanations for this apparent late time acceleration of the Universe are modified gravity and dark energy. The Dark Energy Survey (DES) has been designed and commissioned to find to find answers to these questions about the nature of dark energy and modified gravity. The new 570 megapixel Dark Energy Camera is currently operating with the Cerro-Tololo Inter American Observatory's 4m Blanco teleccope, carrying out a systematic search for SNeIa, and mapping out the large scale structure of the Universe by making observations of galaxies. The DES science program program which saw first light in September 2013 will run for five years in total. DES SNeIa data in combination with the other DES observations of large scale structure will enable us to put increasingly accurate constraints on the expansion history of the Universe and will help us distinguish between competing theories of dark energy and modified gravity. As we draw to the close of the first observing season of DES in March 2014, we will report on the current status of the DES supernova survey, presenting first year supernovae data, preliminary results, survey strategy, discovery pipeline, spectroscopic target selection and data quality. This talk will give the first glimpse of the DES SN first year data and initial results as we begin our five year survey in search of dark energy. On behalf of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration.

  11. Neutrino Transport in Black Hole-Neutron Star Binaries: Dynamical Mass Ejection and Neutrino-Driven Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyutoku, K.; Kiuchi, K.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Shibata, M.; Taniguchi, K.

    2016-10-01

    We present our recent results of numerical-relativity simulations of black hole-neutron star binary mergers incorporating approximate neutrino transport. We in particular discuss dynamical mass ejection and neutrino-driven wind.

  12. MISSING BLACK HOLES UNVEIL THE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION MECHANISM

    SciTech Connect

    Belczynski, Krzysztof; Wiktorowicz, Grzegorz; Fryer, Chris L.; Holz, Daniel E.; Kalogera, Vassiliki

    2012-09-20

    It is firmly established that the stellar mass distribution is smooth, covering the range 0.1-100 M{sub Sun }. It is to be expected that the masses of the ensuing compact remnants correlate with the masses of their progenitor stars, and thus it is generally thought that the remnant masses should be smoothly distributed from the lightest white dwarfs to the heaviest black holes (BHs). However, this intuitive prediction is not borne out by observed data. In the rapidly growing population of remnants with observationally determined masses, a striking mass gap has emerged at the boundary between neutron stars (NSs) and BHs. The heaviest NSs reach a maximum of two solar masses, while the lightest BHs are at least five solar masses. Over a decade after the discovery, the gap has become a significant challenge to our understanding of compact object formation. We offer new insights into the physical processes that bifurcate the formation of remnants into lower-mass NSs and heavier BHs. Combining the results of stellar modeling with hydrodynamic simulations of supernovae, we both explain the existence of the gap and also put stringent constraints on the inner workings of the supernova explosion mechanism. In particular, we show that core-collapse supernovae are launched within 100-200 ms of the initial stellar collapse, implying that the explosions are driven by instabilities with a rapid (10-20 ms) growth time. Alternatively, if future observations fill in the gap, this will be an indication that these instabilities develop over a longer (>200 ms) timescale.

  13. Production and Distribution of 44Ti and 56Ni in a Three-dimensional Supernova Model Resembling Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongwathanarat, Annop; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Müller, Ewald; Pllumbi, Else; Wanajo, Shinya

    2017-06-01

    The spatial and velocity distributions of nuclear species synthesized in the innermost regions of core-collapse supernovae can yield important clues about explosion asymmetries and the operation of the still disputed explosion mechanism. Recent observations of radioactive 44Ti with high-energy satellite telescopes (Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array [NuSTAR], INTEGRAL) have measured gamma-ray line details, which provide direct evidence of large-scale explosion asymmetries in SN 1987A and in Cassiopeia A (Cas A) even by mapping of the spatial brightness distribution (NuSTAR). Here we discuss a 3D simulation of a neutrino-driven explosion, using a parameterized neutrino engine, whose 44Ti distribution is mostly concentrated in one hemisphere pointing opposite to the neutron star (NS) kick velocity. Both exhibit intriguing resemblance to the observed morphology of the Cas A remnant, although neither the progenitor nor the explosion was fine-tuned for a perfect match. Our results demonstrate that the asymmetries observed in this remnant can, in principle, be accounted for by a neutrino-driven explosion, and that the high 44Ti abundance in Cas A may be explained without invoking rapid rotation or a jet-driven explosion, because neutrino-driven explosions generically eject large amounts of high-entropy matter. The recoil acceleration of the NS is connected to mass ejection asymmetries and is opposite to the direction of the stronger explosion, fully compatible with the gravitational tugboat mechanism. Our results also imply that Cas A and SN 1987A could possess similarly "one-sided" Ti and Fe asymmetries, with the difference that Cas A is viewed from a direction with large inclination angle to the NS motion, whereas the NS in SN 1987A should have a dominant velocity component pointing toward us.

  14. Type Ia supernova explosion mechanism and implications for cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, K.

    Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) are believed to be thermonuclear explosions of a white dwarf, and are one of the most mature cosmological standardized candles. However, the explosion mechanism has not yet been fully clarified. Furthermore, they show observational diversities which may be a consequence of either the diversity in the explosion physics and/or surrounding environments, an issue yet to be clarified. In this paper, it is argued that an asymmetry in the explosion is likely a generic feature, and that the diversity arising from various viewing angles can be an origin of observational diversities of SNe Ia seen in their spectral features (suspected possible biases in cosmology) and colors (related to the extinction estimate in cosmology). These findings indicate that at least a part of observational diversities are intrinsic, rather than caused by environment effects, and open up a possibility of using SNe Ia as more precise distance indicators than currently employed.

  15. Supernova Explosions and the Birth of Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Janka, H.-Thomas; Marek, Andreas; Mueller, Bernhard; Scheck, Leonhard

    2008-02-27

    We report here on recent progress in understanding the birth conditions of neutron stars and the way how supernovae explode. More sophisticated numerical models have led to the discovery of new phenomena in the supernova core, for example a generic hydrodynamic instability of the stagnant supernova shock against low-mode nonradial deformation and the excitation of gravity-wave activity in the surface and core of the nascent neutron star. Both can have supportive or decisive influence on the inauguration of the explosion, the former by improving the conditions for energy deposition by neutrino heating in the postshock gas, the latter by supplying the developing blast with a flux of acoustic power that adds to the energy transfer by neutrinos. While recent two-dimensional models suggest that the neutrino-driven mechanism may be viable for stars from {approx}8M{sub {center_dot}} to at least 15M{sub {center_dot}}, acoustic energy input has been advocated as an alternative if neutrino heating fails. Magnetohydrodynamic effects constitute another way to trigger explosions in connection with the collapse of sufficiently rapidly rotating stellar cores, perhaps linked to the birth of magnetars. The global explosion asymmetries seen in the recent simulations offer an explanation of even the highest measured kick velocities of young neutron stars.

  16. On Rapidly Rotating Magnetic Core-Collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J R; Mathews, G J; Dalhed, H E

    2004-12-20

    The authors have analyzed magnetic effects which may occur in rapidly rotating core collapse supernovae. They consider effects from both magnetic turbulence and the formation of magnetic bubbles. For magnetic turbulence they have made a perturbative analysis for the spherically symmetric core-collapse supernova model that incorporates the build up of magnetic field energy in the matter accreting onto the proto-neutron star shortly after collapse and bounce. This significantly modifies the pressure profile and increases the heating of the material above the proto-neutron star resulting in an explosion even in rotating stars which would not explode otherwise. Regarding magnetic bubbles it is shown that a model with an initial uniform magnetic field ({approx} 10{sup 8}) gauss and uniform angular velocity of ({approx} 0.1 rad sec{sup -1}) can form magnetic bubbles due to the very non homologous nature of the collapse. It is estimated that the buoyancy of the bubbles causes matter in the proto-neutron star to rise, carrying neutrino-rich material to the neutron-star surface. This increases the neutrino luminosity sufficiently at early times to achieve a successful neutrino-driven explosion. Both magnetic mechanisms thus provide new means for initiating a Type II core-collapse supernova.

  17. A common explosion mechanism for type Ia supernovae.

    PubMed

    Mazzali, Paolo A; Röpke, Friedrich K; Benetti, Stefano; Hillebrandt, Wolfgang

    2007-02-09

    Type Ia supernovae, the thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars composed of carbon and oxygen, were instrumental as distance indicators in establishing the acceleration of the universe's expansion. However, the physics of the explosion are debated. Here we report a systematic spectral analysis of a large sample of well-observed type Ia supernovae. Mapping the velocity distribution of the main products of nuclear burning, we constrain theoretical scenarios. We find that all supernovae have low-velocity cores of stable iron-group elements. Outside this core, nickel-56 dominates the supernova ejecta. The outer extent of the iron-group material depends on the amount of nickel-56 and coincides with the inner extent of silicon, the principal product of incomplete burning. The outer extent of the bulk of silicon is similar in all supernovae, having an expansion velocity of approximately 11,000 kilometers per second and corresponding to a mass of slightly over one solar mass. This indicates that all the supernovae considered here burned similar masses and suggests that their progenitors had the same mass. Synthetic light-curve parameters and three-dimensional explosion simulations support this interpretation. A single explosion scenario, possibly a delayed detonation, may thus explain most type Ia supernovae.

  18. TOPICAL REVIEW: The gravitational-wave signature of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Christian D

    2009-03-01

    We review the ensemble of anticipated gravitational-wave (GW) emission processes in stellar core collapse and postbounce core-collapse supernova evolution. We discuss recent progress in the modeling of these processes and summarize most recent GW signal estimates. In addition, we present new results on the GW emission from postbounce convective overturn and protoneutron star g-mode pulsations based on axisymmetric radiation-hydrodynamic calculations. Galactic core-collapse supernovae are very rare events, but within 3 5 Mpc from Earth, the rate jumps to 1 in ~2 years. Using the set of currently available theoretical gravitational waveforms, we compute upper-limit optimal signal-to-noise ratios based on current and advanced LIGO/GEO600/VIRGO noise curves for the recent SN 2008bk which exploded at ~3.9 Mpc. While initial LIGOs cannot detect GWs emitted by core-collapse events at such a distance, we find that advanced LIGO-class detectors could put significant upper limits on the GW emission strength for such events. We study the potential occurrence of the various GW emission processes in particular supernova explosion scenarios and argue that the GW signatures of neutrino-driven, magneto-rotational, and acoustically-driven core-collapse SNe may be mutually exclusive. We suggest that even initial LIGOs could distinguish these explosion mechanisms based on the detection (or non-detection) of GWs from a galactic core-collapse supernova.

  19. A comparison of two- and three-dimensional neutrino-hydrodynamics simulations of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Suwa, Yudai

    2014-05-10

    We present numerical results on two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic core-collapse simulations of an 11.2 M {sub ☉} star. By changing numerical resolutions and seed perturbations systematically, we study how the postbounce dynamics are different in 2D and 3D. The calculations were performed with an energy-dependent treatment of the neutrino transport based on the isotropic diffusion source approximation scheme, which we have updated to achieve a very high computational efficiency. All of the computed models in this work, including nine 3D models and fifteen 2D models, exhibit the revival of the stalled bounce shock, leading to the possibility of explosion. All of them are driven by the neutrino-heating mechanism, which is fostered by neutrino-driven convection and the standing-accretion-shock instability. Reflecting the stochastic nature of multi-dimensional (multi-D) neutrino-driven explosions, the blast morphology changes from model to model. However, we find that the final fate of the multi-D models, whether an explosion is obtained or not, is little affected by the explosion stochasticity. In agreement with some previous studies, higher numerical resolutions lead to slower onset of the shock revival in both 2D and 3D. Based on the self-consistent supernova models leading to the possibility of explosions, our results systematically show that the revived shock expands more energetically in 2D than in 3D.

  20. Gravitational Wave Emission from Long-Term Self-Consistent Two-dimensional Core-Collapse Supernova Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Eishin; Kotake, Kei; Nakamura, Ko

    We report gravitational-wave (GW) signatures based on two-dimensional (2D) neutrino-radiation hydrodynamics simulations of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). Using multiple progenitor models, we present systematic analysis of the GW emission from the self-consistent 2D models. We find that the total GW energies emitted during the simulation become higher for models with progenitors' high compactness. This is because the high compactness leads to more energetic explosions, where non-spherical hydrodynamic motions associated with neutrino-driven convection and the Standing-Accretion-Shock-Instability develop much more violently. On the other hand, we show that the GW energies become smaller for high-compactness models that fail to explode by the neutrino-driven mechanism. This is because non-spherical motions in the postbounce core get gradually weaker with the decreasing mass accretion rate to the proto-neutron star, which leads to the smaller GW amplitudes in the long postbounce evolution. We discuss the detectability of the GW signals from both the successful and unsuccessful models using the advanced GW detectors including LIGO and KAGRA.

  1. The r-PROCESS IN THE NEUTRINO-DRIVEN WIND FROM A BLACK-HOLE TORUS

    SciTech Connect

    Wanajo, Shinya; Janka, Hans-Thomas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-02-20

    We examine r-process nucleosynthesis in the neutrino-driven wind from the thick accretion disk (or 'torus') around a black hole. Such systems are expected as remnants of binary neutron star or neutron star-black hole mergers. We consider a simplified, analytic, time-dependent evolution model of a 3 M{sub Sun} central black hole surrounded by a neutrino emitting accretion torus with 90 km radius, which serves as basis for computing spherically symmetric neutrino-driven wind solutions. We find that ejecta with modest entropies ({approx}30 per nucleon in units of the Boltzmann constant) and moderate expansion timescales ({approx}100 ms) dominate in the mass outflow. The mass-integrated nucleosynthetic abundances are in good agreement with the solar system r-process abundance distribution if a minimal value of the electron fraction at the charged-particle freezeout, Y{sub e,min} {approx} 0.2, is achieved. In the case of Y{sub e,min} {approx} 0.3, the production of r-elements beyond A {approx} 130 does not reach to the third peak but could still be important for an explanation of the abundance signatures in r-process deficient stars in the early Galaxy. The total mass of the ejected r-process nuclei is estimated to be {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun }. If our model was representative, this demands a Galactic event rate of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} yr{sup -1} for black-hole-torus winds from merger remnants to be the dominant source of the r-process elements. Our result thus suggests that black-hole-torus winds from compact binary mergers have the potential to be a major, but probably not the dominant, production site of r-process elements.

  2. A mechanism for strong shock electron heating in supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cargill, P. J.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that collisionless shock waves propagating away from a supernova may be directly responsible for the 10 keV X-ray emission seen in supernova remnants. A sequence of plasma instabilities (Buneman and ion acoustic) between the reflected and/or transmitted ions and the background electrons at the foot of the shock front can give rise to rapid anomalous heating of electrons. Hybrid simulations of a perpendicular collisionless shock are presented to demonstrate that this heating can arise within a self-consistently computed shock structure.

  3. Explosion mechanism, neutrino burst and gravitational wave in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotake, Kei; Sato, Katsuhiko; Takahashi, Keitaro

    2006-04-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among the most energetic explosions in the universe marking the catastrophic end of massive stars. In spite of rigorous studies for several decades, we still do not understand the explosion mechanism completely. Since they are related to many astrophysical phenomena such as nucleosynthesis, gamma-ray bursts and acceleration of cosmic rays, understanding of their physics has been of wide interest to the astrophysical community. In this paper, we review recent progress in the study of core-collapse supernovae focusing on the explosion mechanism, supernova neutrinos and the gravitational waves. Regarding the explosion mechanism, we present a review paying particular attention to the roles of multidimensional aspects, such as convection, rotation and magnetic fields, on the neutrino heating mechanism. Next, we discuss supernova neutrino, which is a powerful tool to probe not only deep inside the supernovae but also the intrinsic properties of neutrinos. For this purpose, it is necessary to understand neutrino oscillation which has been established recently by many experiments. Gravitational astronomy is also now becoming a reality. We present an extensive review on the physical foundations and the emission mechanism of gravitational waves in detail and discuss the possibility of their detections.

  4. Towards the Core-Collapse Supernova Explosion Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y; Endeve, Eirik; Budiardja, R. D.; Marronetti, Pedro; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are amazing displays of astrohysical fireworks - and the optical emission is only a tiny part of the story. These events involve virtually all branches of physics and spawn phenomena observale by every kind of astronomical observation. This richness of theory and observation presents a formidable challenge to their understanding via computer simulations, but we are entering a new era of realism and maturity in modeling the key processes by collapse and explosion.

  5. Towards the Core-Collapse Supernova Explosion Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardall, C. Y.; Endeve, E.; Budiardja, R. D.; Marronetti, P.; Mezzacappa, A.

    2012-07-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are amazing displays of astrophysical fireworks - and the optical emission is only a tiny part of the story. These events involve virtually all branches of physics and spawn phenomena observable by every kind of astronomical observation. This richness of theory and observation presents a formidable challenge to their understanding via computer simulations, but we are entering a new era of realism and maturity in modeling the key processes of collapse and explosion.

  6. Properties of Neutrino-driven Ejecta from the Remnant of a Binary Neutron Star Merger: Pure Radiation Hydrodynamics Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujibayashi, Sho; Sekiguchi, Yuichiro; Kiuchi, Kenta; Shibata, Masaru

    2017-09-01

    We performed general relativistic, long-term, axisymmetric neutrino radiation hydrodynamics simulations for the remnant formed after a binary neutron star merger, which consists of a massive neutron star and a torus surrounding it. As an initial condition, we employ the result derived in a three-dimensional, numerical relativity simulation for the binary neutron star merger. We investigate the properties of neutrino-driven ejecta. Due to the pair-annihilation heating, the dynamics of the neutrino-driven ejecta are significantly modified. The kinetic energy of the ejecta is about two times larger than that in the absence of pair-annihilation heating. This suggests that the pair-annihilation heating plays an important role in the evolution of merger remnants. The relativistic outflow, which is required for driving gamma-ray bursts, is not observed because the specific heating rate around the rotational axis is not sufficiently high, due to the baryon loading caused by the neutrino-driven ejecta from the massive neutron star. We discuss the condition for launching the relativistic outflow and the nucleosynthesis in the ejecta.

  7. NEUTRINO-DRIVEN WINDS IN THE AFTERMATH OF A NEUTRON STAR MERGER: NUCLEOSYNTHESIS AND ELECTROMAGNETIC TRANSIENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.; Perego, A.; Arcones, A.; Thielemann, F.-K.; Korobkin, O.; Rosswog, S.

    2015-11-01

    We present a comprehensive nucleosynthesis study of the neutrino-driven wind in the aftermath of a binary neutron star merger. Our focus is the initial remnant phase when a massive central neutron star is present. Using tracers from a recent hydrodynamical simulation, we determine total masses and integrated abundances to characterize the composition of unbound matter. We find that the nucleosynthetic yields depend sensitively on both the life time of the massive neutron star and the polar angle. Matter in excess of up to 9 × 10{sup −3} M{sub ⊙} becomes unbound until ∼200 ms. Due to electron fractions of Y{sub e} ≈ 0.2–0.4, mainly nuclei with mass numbers A < 130 are synthesized, complementing the yields from the earlier dynamic ejecta. Mixing scenarios with these two types of ejecta can explain the abundance pattern in r-process enriched metal-poor stars. Additionally, we calculate heating rates for the decay of the freshly produced radioactive isotopes. The resulting light curve peaks in the blue band after about 4 hr. Furthermore, high opacities due to heavy r-process nuclei in the dynamic ejecta lead to a second peak in the infrared after 3–4 days.

  8. Nucleosynthesis in Neutrino-driven Winds. II. Implications for Heavy Element Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, R. D.; Woosley, S. E.; Qian, Y.-Z.

    1997-06-01

    During the first 20 s of its life, the enormous neutrino luminosity of a neutron star drives appreciable mass loss from its surface. This neutrino-driven wind has been previously identified as a likely site for the r-process. Qian & Woosley have derived, both analytically and numerically, the physical conditions relevant for heavy element synthesis in the wind. These conditions include the entropy (S), the electron fraction (Ye), the dynamic timescale, and the mass loss rate. Here we explore the implications of these conditions for nucleosynthesis. We find that the standard wind models derived in that paper are inadequate to make the r-process, though they do produce some rare species above the iron group. We further determine the general restrictions on the entropy, the electron fraction, and the dynamic timescale that are required to make the r-process. In particular, we derive from nuclear reaction network calculations the conditions required to give a sufficient neutron-to-seed ratio for production of the platinum peak. These conditions range from Ye ~ 0.2 and S <~ 100 baryon-1 for reasonable dynamic timescales of ~0.001-0.1 s, to Ye ~ 0.4-0.495 and S >~ 400 baryon-1 for a dynamic timescale of ~0.1 s. These conditions are also derived analytically to illustrate the physics determining the neutron-to-seed ratio.

  9. Aspherical supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kasen, Daniel Nathan

    2004-01-01

    Although we know that many supernovae are aspherical, the exact nature of their geometry is undetermined. Because all the supernovae we observe are too distant to be resolved, the ejecta structure can't be directly imaged, and asymmetry must be inferred from signatures in the spectral features and polarization of the supernova light. The empirical interpretation of this data, however, is rather limited--to learn more about the detailed supernova geometry, theoretical modeling must been undertaken. One expects the geometry to be closely tied to the explosion mechanism and the progenitor star system, both of which are still under debate. Studying the 3-dimensional structure of supernovae should therefore provide new break throughs in our understanding. The goal of this thesis is to advance new techniques for calculating radiative transfer in 3-dimensional expanding atmospheres, and use them to study the flux and polarization signatures of aspherical supernovae. We develop a 3-D Monte Carlo transfer code and use it to directly fit recent spectropolarimetric observations, as well as calculate the observable properties of detailed multi-dimensional hydrodynamical explosion simulations. While previous theoretical efforts have been restricted to ellipsoidal models, we study several more complicated configurations that are tied to specific physical scenarios. We explore clumpy and toroidal geometries in fitting the spectropolarimetry of the Type Ia supernova SN 2001el. We then calculate the observable consequences of a supernova that has been rendered asymmetric by crashing into a nearby companion star. Finally, we fit the spectrum of a peculiar and extraordinarily luminous Type Ic supernova. The results are brought to bear on three broader astrophysical questions: (1) What are the progenitors and the explosion processes of Type Ia supernovae? (2) What effect does asymmetry have on the observational diversity of Type Ia supernovae, and hence their use in cosmology? (3) And

  10. Mechanisms of Core-Collapse Supernovae & Simulation Results from the CHIMERA Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruenn, S. W.; Mezzacappa, A.; Hix, W. R.; Blondin, J. M.; Marronetti, P.; Messer, O. E. B.; Dirk, C. J.; Yoshida, S.

    2009-05-01

    Unraveling the mechanism for core-collapse supernova explosions is an outstanding computational challenge and the problem remains essentially unsolved despite more than four decades of effort. However, much progress in realistic modeling has occurred recently through the availability of multi-teraflop machines and the increasing sophistication of supernova codes. These improvements have led to some key insights which may clarify the picture in the not too distant future. Here we briefly review the current status of the three explosion mechanisms (acoustic, MHD, and neutrino heating) that are currently under active investigation, concentrating on the neutrino heating mechanism as the one most likely responsible for producing explosions from progenitors in the mass range ~10 to ~25Msolar. We then briefly describe the CHIMERA code, a supernova code we have developed to simulate core-collapse supernovae in 1, 2, and 3 spatial dimensions. We finally describe the results of an ongoing suite of 2D simulations initiated from a 12, 15, 20, and 25Msolar progenitor. These have all exhibited explosions and are currently in the expanding phase with the shock at between 5,000 and 10,000 km. We finally very briefly describe an ongoing simulation in 3 spatial dimensions initiated from the 15Msolar progenitor.

  11. Utilizing Supernova Remnants as Probes of Explosion Mechanisms and Progenitor Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milisavljevic, Dan

    2015-08-01

    Theory and observation strongly favor the notion that asymmetric explosions drive core-collapse supernovae. Where and how this asymmetry is introduced is uncertain, in part because of limited constraints on the various processes that may be taking place deep inside massive stars. Observations of extragalactic supernovae have shed some light on the issue. However, distant supernovae, by nature, appear as unresolved point sources, which severely restricts our ability to extract key properties of the explosion dynamics via detailed knowledge of the three-dimensional kinematics of the expanding ejecta. Progress requires an alternative approach, and to this end there have been successful efforts towards understanding core-collapse supernova explosions through studies of their remnants in our own Milky Way galaxy. Such investigations provide information about the explosion-driven mixing of the progenitor star's chemically distinct layers, the star's mass loss history before explosion, and the fate of its remnant core - all at extremely fine scales. Particularly of note are observations of the young supernova remnant Cassiopeia A, which is the descendant of a massive star that was mostly stripped of its hydrogen envelope. Cassiopeia A's debris field has a bubble-like morphology that may have originated from turbulent mixing processes that encouraged the development of outwardly expanding plumes of radioactive 56Ni-rich ejecta. Important aspects of these observations conflict with sophisticated explosion models and we presently do not have a good understanding of how the 56Ni was mixed. Considering Cassiopeia A's kinematic properties are not unique and likely reflect a common phenomenon of core-collapse supernovae, this conflict represents a big problem that cannot be ignored. Unraveling whether the mixing that we see originates from an asymmetric explosion mechanism or is more tightly associated with a turbulent interior structure will be a challenge, but there is hope.

  12. Supernova Simulations with Boltzmann Neutrino Transport: A Comparison of Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Liebendoerfer, M.; Rampp, M.; Janka, H.-Th.; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2005-02-01

    Accurate neutrino transport has been built into spherically symmetric simulations of stellar core collapse and postbounce evolution. The results of such simulations agree that spherically symmetric models with standard microphysical input fail to explode by the delayed, neutrino-driven mechanism. Independent groups implemented fundamentally different numerical methods to tackle the Boltzmann neutrino transport equation. Here we present a direct and detailed comparison of such neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for two codes, AGILE-BOLTZTRAN of the Oak Ridge-Basel group and VERTEX of the Garching group. The former solves the Boltzmann equation directly by an implicit, general relativistic discrete-angle method on the adaptive grid of a conservative implicit hydrodynamics code with second-order TVD advection. In contrast, the latter couples a variable Eddington factor technique with an explicit, moving-grid, conservative high-order Riemann solver with important relativistic effects treated by an effective gravitational potential. The presented study is meant to test our neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics implementations and to provide a data basis for comparisons and verifications of supernova codes to be developed in the future. Results are discussed for simulations of the core collapse and postbounce evolution of a 13 M{sub {circle_dot}} star with Newtonian gravity and a 15 M{sub {circle_dot}} star with relativistic gravity.

  13. The convective engine paradigm for the supernova explosion mechanism and its consequences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herant, M.

    1995-05-01

    The convective engine paradigm for the explosion mechanism in core collapse supernovae is presented in a pedagogical manner. A candid evaluation of its strengths and weaknesses is attempted. The case where the convective mode corresponds to l=1, m=0 (one inflow, one outflow) is explored in more detail. The author also discusses the potential importance of such a convective pattern for neutron star kicks.

  14. YOUNG SUPERNOVAE AS EXPERIMENTAL SITES FOR STUDYING THE ELECTRON ACCELERATION MECHANISM

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Keiichi

    2013-01-10

    Radio emissions from young supernovae ({approx}<1 year after the explosion) show a peculiar feature in the relativistic electron population at a shock wave, where their energy distribution is steeper than typically found in supernova remnants and than that predicted from the standard diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) mechanism. This has been especially established for the case for a class of stripped envelope supernovae (SNe IIb/Ib/Ic), where a combination of high shock velocity and low circumstellar material density makes it easier to derive the intrinsic energy distribution than in other classes of SNe. We suggest that this apparent discrepancy reflects a situation where the low energy electrons, before being accelerated by the DSA-like mechanism, are responsible for the radio synchrotron emission from young SNe, and that studying young SNe sheds light on the still-unresolved electron injection problem in the acceleration theory of cosmic rays. We suggest that the electron's energy distribution could be flattened toward high energy, most likely around 100 MeV, which marks a transition from inefficient to efficient acceleration. Identifying this feature will be a major advance in understanding the electron acceleration mechanism. We suggest two further probes: (1) millimeter/submillimeter observations in the first year after the explosion and (2) X-ray observations at about one year and thereafter. We show that these are reachable by ALMA and Chandra for nearby SNe.

  15. Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y

    2007-01-01

    A nascent neutron star resulting from stellar collapse is a prodigious source of neutrinos of all flavors. While the most basic features of this neutrino emission can be estimated from simple considerations, the detailed simulation of the neutrinos' decoupling from the hot neutron star is not yet computationally tractable in its full glory, being a time-dependent six-dimensional transport problem. Nevertheless, supernova neutrino fluxes are of great interest in connection with the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism and supernova nucleosynthesis, and as a potential probe of the supernova environment and of some of the neutrino mixing parameters that remain unknown; hence, a variety of approximate transport schemes have been used to obtain results with reduced dimensionality. However, none of these approximate schemes have addressed a recent challenge to the conventional wisdom that neutrino flavor mixing cannot impact the explosion mechanism or r-process nucleosynthesis.

  16. Signatures of the late time core-collapse supernova environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Luke Forrest

    The hot and dense proto-neutron star (PNS) born subsequent to core-collapse in a type II supernova explosion is an intense source of neutrinos of all flavors. It emits the 3 - 5 × 1053 ergs of gravitational binding energy gained during collapse as neutrino radiation on a time scale of tens of seconds as it contracts, becomes increasingly neutron-rich and cools. While the supernova explosion mechanism and associated accretion of material is expected to influence the neutrino emission at early time (i.e. t ≲ 1 s post bounce) the late time neutrino signal is shaped by the properties of the PNS, such as the nuclear equation of state (EoS), neutrino opacities in dense matter, and other microphysical properties that affect the cooling timescale by influencing either neutrino diffusion or convection. Detection of significant numbers of late time supernova neutrinos will provide a direct window into the properties of nuclear matter and neutron stars, if the neutrino signal can be modeled accurately. The average emitted neutrino energies also strongly affect nucleosynthesis in the neutrino driven wind, neutrino induced nucleosynthesis further out in the star, and the patterns of neutrino oscillations outside of the PNS. This thesis examines a number of aspects of this environment. First, the equations of spherically symmetric general relativistic radiation hydrodynamics are discussed, a new code for calculating neutrino transport in PNSs is described, and first results from this code are presented. It is found that the NDW is neutron rich for at least a few seconds, in contrast to other recent work. This change in the expected wind electron fraction is traced to the correct treatment of the nucleon dispersion relations in an interacting medium and turns out to be influenced by the sub-nuclear density symmetry energy. Late time convection in PNSs is also studied. It is found that the density dependence of the symmetry energy may affect the duration of

  17. Monte Carlo simulations of the supernova ejection mechanism for the runaway stars

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, P.J.T.; Dewey, R.J.

    1992-08-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of supernova explosions in a realistic population of binary systems have been carried out for the purpose of studying the production of runaway stars. Contrary to previous studies, we find that the lowest mass runaways attain the highest velocities, and that there is no low-mass cutoff in the mass spectrum of the runaways. The vast majority of runaways with masses {ge} 5 M{circle_dot} have velocities < 200 km s{sup {minus}1}. An asymmetric kick during the explosion of 100--200 km s{sup {minus}1} is not enough to disrupt most of the binary systems; thus the majority of the runaways are expected to possess neutron star companions. For runaways with velocities > 50 km s{sup {minus}1}, most of these companions will be in eccentric orbits with periods < 10 days. Only {approx_equal} 1% of the supernova-ejected runaways should be normal binaries consisting of main-sequence stars. Such binaries axe produced when the distant component of a dose triple system is the first star to explode. Finally, only one 0-type runaway with a velocity {ge} 50 km s{sub {minus}1} is produced by every 10 to 15 binaries with O-type primaries, and thus the supernova ejection mechanism predicts that < 10% of all 0-type stars should be runaways.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of the supernova ejection mechanism for the runaway stars

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, P.J.T. ); Dewey, R.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of supernova explosions in a realistic population of binary systems have been carried out for the purpose of studying the production of runaway stars. Contrary to previous studies, we find that the lowest mass runaways attain the highest velocities, and that there is no low-mass cutoff in the mass spectrum of the runaways. The vast majority of runaways with masses {ge} 5 M{circle dot} have velocities < 200 km s{sup {minus}1}. An asymmetric kick during the explosion of 100--200 km s{sup {minus}1} is not enough to disrupt most of the binary systems; thus the majority of the runaways are expected to possess neutron star companions. For runaways with velocities > 50 km s{sup {minus}1}, most of these companions will be in eccentric orbits with periods < 10 days. Only {approx equal} 1% of the supernova-ejected runaways should be normal binaries consisting of main-sequence stars. Such binaries axe produced when the distant component of a dose triple system is the first star to explode. Finally, only one 0-type runaway with a velocity {ge} 50 km s{sub {minus}1} is produced by every 10 to 15 binaries with O-type primaries, and thus the supernova ejection mechanism predicts that < 10% of all 0-type stars should be runaways.

  19. Accreting white dwarf models for type 1 supernovae. 1: Presupernova evolution and triggering mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nomoto, K.

    1981-01-01

    As a plausible explosion model for a Type I supernova, the evolution of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs accreting helium in binary systems was investigated from the onset of accretion up to the point at which a thermonuclear explosion occurs. The relationship between the conditions in the binary system and the triggering mechanism for the supernova explosion is discussed, especially for the cases with relatively slow accretion rate. It is found that the growth of a helium zone on the carbon-oxygen core leads to a supernova explosion which is triggered either by the off-center helium detonation for slow and intermediate accretion rates or by the carbon deflagration for slow and rapid accretion rates. Both helium detonation and carbon deflagration are possible for the case of slow accretion, since in this case the initial mass of the white dwarf is an important parameter for determining the mode of ignition. Finally, various modes of building up the helium zone on the white dwarf, namely, direct transfer of helium from the companion star and the various types and strength of the hydrogen shell flashes are discussed in some detail.

  20. Multi-dimensional hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Jeremiah W.

    Core-collapse supernovae are some of the most energetic events in the Universe, they herald the birth of neutron stars and black holes, are a major site for nucleosynthesis, influence galactic hydrodynamics, and trigger further star formation. As such, it is important to understand the mechanism of explosion. Moreover, observations imply that asymmetries are, in the least, a feature of the mechanism, and theory suggests that multi-dimensional hydrodynamics may be crucial for successful explosions. In this dissertation, we present theoretical investigations into the multi-dimensional nature of the supernova mechanism. It had been suggested that nuclear reactions might excite non-radial g-modes (the [straight epsilon]-mechanism) in the cores of progenitors, leading to asymmetric explosions. We calculate the eigenmodes for a large suite of progenitors including excitation by nuclear reactions and damping by neutrino and acoustic losses. Without exception, we find unstable g-modes for each progenitor. However, the timescales for growth are at least an order of magnitude longer than the time until collapse. Thus, the [straight epsilon]- mechanism does not provide appreciable amplification of non-radial modes before the core undergoes collapse. Regardless, neutrino-driven convection, the standing accretion shock instability, and other instabilities during the explosion provide ample asymmetry. To adequately simulate these, we have developed a new hydrodynamics code, BETHE-hydro that uses the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) approach, includes rotational terms, solves Poisson's equation for gravity on arbitrary grids, and conserves energy and momentum in its basic implementation. By using time-dependent arbitrary grids that can adapt to the numerical challenges of the problem, this code offers unique flexibility in simulating astrophysical phenomena. Finally, we use BETHE-hydro to investigate the conditions and criteria for supernova explosions by the neutrino

  1. Features of the Acoustic Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, A.; Livne, E.; Dessart, L.; Ott, C. D.; Murphy, J.

    2007-01-01

    In the context of 2D, axisymmetric, multigroup, radiation/hydrodynamic simulations of core-collapse supernovae over the full 180° domain, we present an exploration of the progenitor dependence of the acoustic mechanism of explosion. All progenitor models we have tested with our Newtonian code explode. However, some of the cores left behind in our simulations, particularly for the more massive progenitors, have baryon masses that are larger than the canonical ~1.5 Msolar of well-measured pulsars. We investigate the roles of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), the excitation of core g-modes, the generation of core acoustic power, the ejection of matter with r-process potential, the windlike character of the explosion, and the fundamental anisotropy of the blasts. We find that the breaking of spherical symmetry is central to the supernova phenomenon, the delays to explosion can be long, and the blasts, when top-bottom asymmetric, are self-collimating. We see indications that the initial explosion energies are larger for the more massive progenitors and smaller for the less massive progenitors and that the neutrino contribution to the explosion energy may be an increasing function of progenitor mass. However, the explosion energy is still accumulating by the end of our simulations and has not converged to final values. The degree of explosion asymmetry we obtain is completely consistent with that inferred from the polarization measurements of Type Ic supernovae. Furthermore, we calculate for the first time the magnitude and sign of the net impulse on the core due to anisotropic neutrino emission and suggest that hydrodynamic and neutrino recoils in the context of our asymmetric explosions afford a natural mechanism for observed pulsar proper motions.

  2. The jet feedback mechanism (JFM): From supernovae to clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, N.; Akashi, M.; Gilkis, A.; Hillel, S.; Papish, O.; Refaelovich, M.; Tsebrenko, D.

    2013-04-01

    We study the similarities of jet-medium interactions in several quite different astrophysical systems using 2D and 3D hydrodynamical numerical simulations, and find many similarities. The systems include cooling flow (CF) clusters of galaxies, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe), planetary nebulae (PNe), and common envelope (CE) evolution. The similarities include hot bubbles inflated by jets in a bipolar structure, vortices on the sides of the jets, vortices inside the inflated bubbles, fragmentation of bubbles to two and more bubbles, and buoyancy of bubbles. The activity in many cases is regulated by a negative feedback mechanism. In CF clusters we find that heating of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) is done by mixing hot shocked jet gas with the ICM, and not by shocks. Our results strengthen the jet feedback mechanism (JFM) as a common process in many astrophysical objects.

  3. Photon-axion conversion as a mechanism for supernova dimming: Limits from CMB spectral distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Raffelt, Georg G.; Serpico, Pasquale D.

    2005-07-15

    Axion-photon conversion induced by intergalactic magnetic fields has been proposed as an explanation for the dimming of distant supernovae of type Ia (SNe Ia) without cosmic acceleration. The effect depends on the intergalactic electron density n{sub e} as well as the B-field strength and domain size. We show that for n{sub e} < or approx. 10{sup -9} cm{sup -3} the same mechanism would cause excessive spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This small-n{sub e} parameter region had been left open by the most restrictive previous constraints based on the dispersion of quasar (QSO) spectra. The combination of CMB and QSO limits suggests that the photon-axion conversion mechanism can only play a subleading role for SN Ia dimming. A combined analysis of all the observables affected by the photon-axion oscillations would be required to give a final verdict on the viability of this model.

  4. Explaining the Most Energetic Supernovae with an Inefficient Jet-feedback Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilkis, Avishai; Soker, Noam; Papish, Oded

    2016-08-01

    We suggest that the energetic radiation from core-collapse super-energetic supernovae (SESNe) is due to a long-lasting accretion process onto the newly born neutron star (NS), resulting from an inefficient operation of the jet-feedback mechanism (JFM). The jets that are launched by the accreting NS or black hole maintain their axis due to a rapidly rotating pre-collapse core and do not manage to eject core material from near the equatorial plane. The jets are able to eject material from the core along the polar directions and reduce the gravity near the equatorial plane. The equatorial gas expands, and part of it falls back over a timescale of minutes to days to prolong the jet-launching episode. According to the model for SESNe proposed in the present paper, the principal parameter that distinguishes between the different cases of core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosions, such as between normal CCSNe and SESNe, is the efficiency of the JFM. This efficiency, in turn, depends on the pre-collapse core mass, envelope mass, core convection, and, most of all, the angular momentum profile in the core. One prediction of the inefficient JFM for SESNe is the formation of a slow equatorial outflow in the explosion. The typical velocity and mass of this outflow are estimated to be v eq ≈ 1000 km s-1 and M eq ≳ 1 M ⊙, respectively, though quantitative values will have to be checked in future hydrodynamic simulations.

  5. Stochasticity and efficiency of convection-dominated vs. SASI-dominated supernova explosions

    DOE PAGES

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-10-22

    We present an initial report on 160 simulations of a highly simplified model of the post-bounce supernova environment in three position space dimensions (3D). We set different values of a parameter characterizing the impact of nuclear dissociation at the stalled shock in order to regulate the post-shock fluid velocity, thereby determining the relative importance of convection and the stationary accretion shock instability (SASI). While our convection-dominated runs comport with the paradigmatic notion of a `critical neutrino luminosity' for explosion at a given mass accretion rate (albeit with a nontrivial spread in explosion times just above threshold), the outcomes of our SASI-dominated runs are more stochastic: a sharp threshold critical luminosity is `smeared out' into a rising probability of explosion over amore » $$\\sim 20\\%$$ range of luminosity. We also find that the SASI-dominated models are able to explode with 3 to 4 times less efficient neutrino heating, indicating that progenitor properties, and fluid and neutrino microphysics, conducive to the SASI would make the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism more robust.« less

  6. Stochasticity and efficiency of convection-dominated vs. SASI-dominated supernova explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D.

    2015-10-22

    We present an initial report on 160 simulations of a highly simplified model of the post-bounce supernova environment in three position space dimensions (3D). We set different values of a parameter characterizing the impact of nuclear dissociation at the stalled shock in order to regulate the post-shock fluid velocity, thereby determining the relative importance of convection and the stationary accretion shock instability (SASI). While our convection-dominated runs comport with the paradigmatic notion of a `critical neutrino luminosity' for explosion at a given mass accretion rate (albeit with a nontrivial spread in explosion times just above threshold), the outcomes of our SASI-dominated runs are more stochastic: a sharp threshold critical luminosity is `smeared out' into a rising probability of explosion over a $\\sim 20\\%$ range of luminosity. We also find that the SASI-dominated models are able to explode with 3 to 4 times less efficient neutrino heating, indicating that progenitor properties, and fluid and neutrino microphysics, conducive to the SASI would make the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism more robust.

  7. STOCHASTICITY AND EFFICIENCY IN SIMPLIFIED MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y.; Budiardja, Reuben D. E-mail: reubendb@utk.edu

    2015-11-01

    We present an initial report on 160 simulations of a highly simplified model of the post-bounce core-collapse supernova environment in three spatial dimensions (3D). We set different values of a parameter characterizing the impact of nuclear dissociation at the stalled shock in order to regulate the post-shock fluid velocity, thereby determining the relative importance of convection and the stationary accretion shock instability (SASI). While our convection-dominated runs comport with the paradigmatic notion of a “critical neutrino luminosity” for explosion at a given mass accretion rate (albeit with a nontrivial spread in explosion times just above threshold), the outcomes of our SASI-dominated runs are much more stochastic: a sharp threshold critical luminosity is “smeared out” into a rising probability of explosion over a ∼20% range of luminosity. We also find that the SASI-dominated models are able to explode with 3–4 times less efficient neutrino heating, indicating that progenitor properties, and fluid and neutrino microphysics, conducive to the SASI would make the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism more robust.

  8. Physics of Core-Collapse Supernovae in Three Dimensions: A Sneak Preview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, Hans-Thomas; Melson, Tobias; Summa, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Nonspherical mass motions are a generic feature of core-collapse supernovae, and hydrodynamic instabilities play a crucial role in the explosion mechanism. The first successful neutrino-driven explosions could be obtained with self-consistent, first-principles simulations in three spatial dimensions. But three-dimensional (3D) models tend to be less prone to explosion than the corresponding axisymmetric two-dimensional (2D) ones. The reason is that 3D turbulence leads to energy cascading from large to small spatial scales, the inverse of the 2D case, thus disfavoring the growth of buoyant plumes on the largest scales. Unless the inertia to explode simply reflects a lack of sufficient resolution in relevant regions, some important component of robust and sufficiently energetic neutrino-powered explosions may still be missing. Such a deficit could be associated with progenitor properties such as rotation, magnetic fields, or precollapse perturbations, or with microphysics that could cause enhancement of neutrino heating behind the shock. 3D simulations have also revealed new phenomena that are not present in 2D ones, such as spiral modes of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and a stunning dipolar lepton-number emission self-sustained asymmetry (LESA). Both impose time- and direction-dependent variations on the detectable neutrino signal. The understanding of these effects and of their consequences is still in its infancy.

  9. Stochasticity and efficiency of convection-dominated vs. SASI-dominated supernova explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardall, Christian; Budiardja, Reuben

    2016-03-01

    We present an initial report on 160 simulations of a highly simplified model of the post-bounce core-collapse supernova environment in three spatial dimensions (3D). We set different values of a parameter characterizing the impact of nuclear dissociation at the stalled shock in order to regulate the post-shock fluid velocity, thereby determining the relative importance of convection and the stationary accretion shock instability (SASI). While our convection-dominated runs comport with the paradigmatic notion of a `critical neutrino luminosity' for explosion at a given mass accretion rate (albeit with a nontrivial spread in explosion times just above threshold), the outcomes of our SASI-dominated runs are much more stochastic: a sharp threshold critical luminosity is `smeared out' into a rising probability of explosion over a ~ 20 % range of luminosity. We also find that the SASI-dominated models are able to explode with 3 to 4 times less efficient neutrino heating, indicating that progenitor properties, and fluid and neutrino microphysics, conducive to the SASI would make the neutrino-driven explosion mechanism more robust.

  10. The Multi-dimensional Character of Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, W. R.; Lentz, E. J.; Bruenn, S. W.; Mezzacappa, A.; Messer, O. E. B.; Endeve, E.; Blondin, J. M.; Harris, J. A.; Marronetti, P.; Yakunin, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    Core-collapse supernovae, the culmination of massive stellar evolution, are spectacular astronomical events and the principle actors in the story of our elemental origins. Our understanding of these events, while still incomplete, centers around a neutrino-driven central engine that is highly hydrodynamically unstable. Increasingly sophisticated simulations reveal a shock that stalls for hundreds of milliseconds before reviving. Though brought back to life by neutrino heating, the development of the supernova explosion is inextricably linked to multi-dimensional fluid flows. In this paper, the outcomes of three-dimensional simulations that include sophisticated nuclear physics and spectral neutrino transport are juxtaposed to learn about the nature of the three-dimensional fluid flow that shapes the explosion. Comparison is also made between the results of simulations in spherical symmetry from several groups, to give ourselves confidence in the understanding derived from this juxtaposition.

  11. The Multi-Dimensional Character of Core-Collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Bruenn, S. W.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Messer, Bronson; Endeve, Eirik; Blondin, J. M.; Harris, James Austin; Marronetti, Pedro; Yakunin, Konstantin N

    2016-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae, the culmination of massive stellar evolution, are spectacular astronomical events and the principle actors in the story of our elemental origins. Our understanding of these events, while still incomplete, centers around a neutrino-driven central engine that is highly hydrodynamically unstable. Increasingly sophisticated simulations reveal a shock that stalls for hundreds of milliseconds before reviving. Though brought back to life by neutrino heating, the development of the supernova explosion is inextricably linked to multi-dimensional fluid flows. In this paper, the outcomes of three-dimensional simulations that include sophisticated nuclear physics and spectral neutrino transport are juxtaposed to learn about the nature of the three dimensional fluid flow that shapes the explosion. Comparison is also made between the results of simulations in spherical symmetry from several groups, to give ourselves confidence in the understanding derived from this juxtaposition.

  12. The Multi-dimensional Character of Core-collapse Supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Hix, W. R.; Lentz, E. J.; Bruenn, S. W.; ...

    2016-03-01

    Core-collapse supernovae, the culmination of massive stellar evolution, are spectacular astronomical events and the principle actors in the story of our elemental origins. Our understanding of these events, while still incomplete, centers around a neutrino-driven central engine that is highly hydrodynamically unstable. Increasingly sophisticated simulations reveal a shock that stalls for hundreds of milliseconds before reviving. Though brought back to life by neutrino heating, the development of the supernova explosion is inextricably linked to multi-dimensional fluid flows. In this paper, the outcomes of three-dimensional simulations that include sophisticated nuclear physics and spectral neutrino transport are juxtaposed to learn about themore » nature of the three-dimensional fluid flow that shapes the explosion. Comparison is also made between the results of simulations in spherical symmetry from several groups, to give ourselves confidence in the understanding derived from this juxtaposition.« less

  13. A Parametric Study of the Acoustic Mechanism for Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, A.; Nagakura, H.; Iwakami, W.; Yamada, S.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the criterion for the acoustic mechanism to work successfully in core-collapse supernovae. The acoustic mechanism is an alternative to the neutrino-heating mechanism. It was proposed by Burrows et al., who claimed that acoustic waves emitted by g-mode oscillations in proto-neutron stars (PNS) energize a stalled shock wave and eventually induce an explosion. Previous works mainly studied to which extent the g-modes are excited in the PNS. In this paper, on the other hand, we investigate how strong the acoustic wave needs to be if it were to revive a stalled shock wave. By adding the acoustic power as a new axis, we draw a critical surface, which is an extension of the critical curve commonly employed in the context of neutrino heating. We perform both 1D and 2D parametrized simulations, in which we inject acoustic waves from the inner boundary. In order to quantify the power of acoustic waves, we use the extended Myers theory to take neutrino reactions into proper account. We find for the 1D simulations that rather large acoustic powers are required to relaunch the shock wave, since the additional heating provided by the secondary shocks developed from acoustic waves is partially canceled by the neutrino cooling that is also enhanced. In 2D, the required acoustic powers are consistent with those of Burrows et al. Our results seem to imply, however, that it is the sum of neutrino heating and acoustic powers that matters for shock revival.

  14. THE PHYSICS OF THE NEUTRINO MECHANISM OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Pejcha, Ondrej; Thompson, Todd A.

    2012-02-10

    Although it is known that the stalled accretion shock in models of core-collapse supernovae turns into explosion when the neutrino luminosity from the proto-neutron star (PNS) exceeds a critical value (L{sup crit}{sub {nu},core}) (the 'neutrino mechanism'), the physics of L{sup crit}{sub {nu},core} has never been systematically explored. We solve the accretion problem between the PNS surface and the accretion shock. We quantify the deep connection between the general problem of accretion flows with bounding shocks and the neutrino mechanism. In particular, we show that there is a maximum, critical sound speed above which the shock jump conditions cannot be satisfied and steady-state accretion is impossible. This physics is general and does not depend on a specific heating mechanism. For the simple model of pressure-less free fall onto a shock bounding an isothermal accretion flow, we show that shock solutions are possible only for sound speed c{sub T} < c{sup crit}{sub T} and that c{sup 2}{sub T}/v{sub esc}{sup 2} = 3/16 = 0.1875 at c{sup crit}{sub T}. We generalize this result to the supernova problem, showing that the same physics determines L{sup crit}{sub {nu},core}. The critical condition for explosion can be written as c{sup 2}{sub S}/v{sup 2}{sub esc} {approx_equal} 0.19, where c{sub S} is the adiabatic sound speed. This 'antesonic' condition describes L{sup crit}{sub {nu},core} over a broad range of parameters, and other criteria proposed in the literature fail to capture this physics. We show that the accretion luminosity reduces L{sup crit}{sub {nu},core} non-trivially. A larger PNS radius decreases L{sup crit}{sub {nu},core}, implying that a stiff high-density equation of state may be preferred. Finally, using an analytic model, we provide evidence that the reduction of L{sup crit}{sub {nu},core} seen in recent multi-dimensional simulations results from reduced cooling efficiency, rather than an increased heating rate.

  15. Identifying Type Ia Supernova Mechanisms in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies through Analysis of Iron-peak Elemental Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rachel; Xie, Justin Long; Kirby, Evan N.

    2017-01-01

    Through the fusion of nucleons to produce elements heavier than hydrogen and helium, stellar nucleosynthesis produces most of the elements in the universe. Such is the case in a supernova explosion, which creates most of the elements on the periodic table—including iron-peak elements, atomic numbers 21 through 30—through nucleosynthesis and ejects them into the interstellar medium. In this study, we determine the best theoretical supernova model appropriate for the stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor, Fornax, Ursa Minor, and Leo II by calculating the abundances of iron-peak elements in these stars. To determine iron-peak elemental abundances, we compare synthesized spectra with observed spectra from medium-resolution spectroscopy and determine the best-fitting spectrum by way of a chi-squared minimization. Through inspecting the relationship between the iron-peak element abundances and the abundance of iron itself and by comparing them to previously hypothesized supernova model theories, we discover that the near-Chandrasekhar mass “n1” model, as predicted by Seitenzahl et al., most accurately represents the trends and patterns within our data, presenting new insight into Type Ia supernovae mechanisms within the Milky Way and beyond.

  16. New primary mechanisms for the synthesis of rare 9Be in early supernovae.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Projjwal; Qian, Yong-Zhong; Haxton, W C; Heger, Alexander

    2013-04-05

    We present two new primary mechanisms for the synthesis of the rare nucleus (9)Be, both triggered by ν-induced production of (3)H followed by (4)He((3)H,γ)(7)Li in the He shells of core-collapse supernovae. For progenitors of ∼ 8M(⊙), (7)Li((3)H,n(0))(9)Be occurs during the rapid expansion of the shocked He shell. Alternatively, for ultra-metal-poor progenitors of ∼ 11-15 M(⊙), (7)Li(n,γ)(8)Li(n,γ)(9)Li(e(-)ν(e))(9)Be occurs with neutrons produced by (4)He(ν(e),e(+)n)(3)H, assuming a hard effective ν(e) spectrum from oscillations (which also leads to heavy element production through rapid neutron capture) and a weak explosion (so the (9)Be survives shock passage). We discuss the associated production of (7)Li and (11)B, noting patterns in LiBeB production that might distinguish the new mechanisms from others.

  17. Mechanism for spectral break in cosmic ray proton spectrum of supernova remnant W44.

    PubMed

    Malkov, M A; Diamond, P H; Sagdeev, R Z

    2011-02-15

    Recent observations of supernova remnant W44 by the Fermi spacecraft observatory support the idea that the bulk of galactic cosmic rays is accelerated in such remnants by a Fermi mechanism, also known as diffusive shock acceleration. However, the W44 expands into weakly ionized dense gas, and so a significant revision of the mechanism is required. Here, we provide the necessary modifications and demonstrate that strong ion-neutral collisions in the remnant surrounding lead to the steepening of the energy spectrum of accelerated particles by exactly one power. The spectral break is caused by Alfven wave evanescence leading to the fractional particle losses. The gamma-ray spectrum generated in collisions of the accelerated protons with the ambient gas is calculated and successfully fitted to the Fermi Observatory data. The parent proton spectrum is best represented by a classical test particle power law ∝E(-2), steepening to E(-3) at E(br)≈7 GeV due to deteriorated particle confinement.

  18. On the diversity of compact objects within supernova remnants - II. Energy-loss mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Adam; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2017-02-01

    Energy losses from isolated neutron stars are commonly attributed to the emission of electromagnetic radiation from a rotating point-like magnetic dipole in vacuum. This emission mechanism predicts a braking index n = 3, which is not observed in highly magnetized neutron stars. Despite this fact, the assumptions of a dipole field and rapid early rotation are often assumed a priori, typically causing a discrepancy between the characteristic age and the associated supernova remnant (SNR) age. We focus on neutron stars with `anomalous' magnetic fields that have established SNR associations and known ages. Anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) are usually described in terms of the magnetar model that posits a large magnetic field established by dynamo action. The high magnetic field pulsars (HBPs) have extremely large magnetic fields just above quantum electrodynamics scale (but below that of the AXPs and SGRs), and central compact objects (CCOs) may have buried fields that will emerge in the future as nascent magnetars. In the first part of this series, we examined magnetic field growth as a method of uniting the CCOs with HBPs and X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINSs) through evolution. In this work, we constrain the characteristic age of these neutron stars using the related SNR age for a variety of energy-loss mechanisms and allowing for arbitrary initial spin periods. In addition to the SNR age, we also use the observed braking indices and X-ray luminosities to constrain the models.

  19. Neutrino heating, convection, and the mechanism of Type-II supernova explosions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janka, H.-T.; Mueller, E.

    1996-02-01

    The role of neutrino heating and convective processes in the explosion mechanism of Type-II supernovae is investigated by one- and two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of the long-time evolution of the collapsed stellar core after the bounce at nuclear matter density and after the associated formation of the supernova shock. The parameters describing the neutrino emission from the collapsed stellar core are systematically varied. The possibility to obtain explosions turns out to be very sensitive to the physical conditions in and at the protoneutron star, in particular to its contraction and to the neutrino cooling inside of the gain radius. Yet, above a certain threshold for the core neutrino luminosity, stable and energetic explosions can be obtained in spherical symmetry, provided the energy deposition by neutrinos remains strong for a sufficiently long period. The explosion energy and time scale critically depend on the neutrino fluxes during the shock revival phase and on their temporal decay during the first few 100ms after shock formation. The threshold luminosity is a very sensitive function of the shock stagnation radius, because small radii of the stalled prompt shock lead to significantly higher neutrino loss from the hot and compact postshock layers, cause the region of neutrino heating to be very narrow, and reduce the heating time scale of the matter due to the high infall velocity. Repeating the simulations in two dimensions we find that strong convective processes occur in the collapsed stellar core in two spatially separate regions. One region of convection lies inside the neutrinosphere and another one is located in the neutrino-heated layer below the shock front. The convective mixing around the neutrinosphere is mainly driven by the negative lepton gradient, which is maintained by rapid loss of leptons from the semitransparent layers at the neutrinosphere. This considerably speeds up the deleptonization of the outer layers of the collapsed

  20. A new mechanism for gravitational-wave emission in core-collapse supernovae.

    PubMed

    Ott, Christian D; Burrows, Adam; Dessart, Luc; Livne, Eli

    2006-05-26

    We present a new theory for the gravitational-wave signatures of core-collapse supernovae. Previous studies identified axisymmetric rotating core collapse, core bounce, postbounce convection, and anisotropic neutrino emission as the primary processes and phases for the radiation of gravitational waves. Our results, which are based on axisymmetric Newtonian supernova simulations, indicate that the dominant emission process of gravitational waves in core-collapse supernovae may be the oscillations of the protoneutron star core. The oscillations are predominantly of mode character, are excited hundreds of milliseconds after bounce, and typically last for several hundred milliseconds. Our results suggest that even nonrotating core-collapse supernovae should be visible to current LIGO-class detectors throughout the Galaxy, and depending on progenitor structure, possibly out to megaparsec distances.

  1. THE DEPENDENCE OF THE NEUTRINO MECHANISM OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE ON THE EQUATION OF STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, Sean M.

    2013-03-01

    We study the dependence of the delayed neutrino-heating mechanism for core-collapse supernovae on the equation of state (EOS). Using a simplified treatment of the neutrino physics with a parameterized neutrino luminosity, we explore the relationship between explosion time, mass accretion rate, and neutrino luminosity for a 15 M {sub Sun} progenitor in 1D and 2D. We test the EOS most commonly used in core-collapse simulations: the models of Lattimer and Swesty and the model of Shen et al. We find that for a given neutrino luminosity, 'stiffer' EOS, where stiffness is determined by a combination of nuclear matter properties not just incompressibility, K, explode later than 'softer' EOS. The EOS of Shen et al., being the stiffest EOS, by virtue of larger incompressibility and symmetry energy slope, L, explodes later than any of the Lattimer and Swesty EOS models. Amongst the Lattimer and Swesty EOS that all share the same value of L, the explosion time increases with increasing nuclear incompressibility, K. We find that this holds in both 1D and 2D, while for all of the models, explosions are obtained more easily in 2D than in 1D. We argue that this EOS dependence is due in part to a greater amount of acoustic flux from denser proto-neutron star atmospheres that result from a softer EOS. We also discuss the relevance of approximate instability criteria to realistic simulations.

  2. Type Ia Supernovae: Can Coriolis Force Break the Symmetry of the Gravitational Confined Detonation Explosion Mechanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Senz, D.; Cabezón, R. M.; Domínguez, I.; Thielemann, F. K.

    2016-03-01

    Currently the number of models aimed at explaining the phenomena of type Ia supernovae is high and distinguishing between them is a must. In this work we explore the influence of rotation on the evolution of the nuclear flame that drives the explosion in the so-called gravitational confined detonation models. Assuming that the flame starts in a pointlike region slightly above the center of the white dwarf (WD) and adding a moderate amount of angular velocity to the star we follow the evolution of the deflagration using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. We find that the results are very dependent on the angle between the rotational axis and the line connecting the initial bubble of burned material with the center of the WD at the moment of ignition. The impact of rotation is larger for angles close to 90° because the Coriolis force on a floating element of fluid is maximum and its principal effect is to break the symmetry of the deflagration. Such symmetry breaking weakens the convergence of the nuclear flame at the antipodes of the initial ignition volume, changing the environmental conditions around the convergence region with respect to non-rotating models. These changes seem to disfavor the emergence of a detonation in the compressed volume at the antipodes and may compromise the viability of the so-called gravitational confined detonation mechanism.

  3. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: CAN CORIOLIS FORCE BREAK THE SYMMETRY OF THE GRAVITATIONAL CONFINED DETONATION EXPLOSION MECHANISM?

    SciTech Connect

    García-Senz, D.; Cabezón, R. M.; Thielemann, F. K.; Domínguez, I. E-mail: ruben.cabezon@unibas.ch

    2016-03-10

    Currently the number of models aimed at explaining the phenomena of type Ia supernovae is high and distinguishing between them is a must. In this work we explore the influence of rotation on the evolution of the nuclear flame that drives the explosion in the so-called gravitational confined detonation models. Assuming that the flame starts in a pointlike region slightly above the center of the white dwarf (WD) and adding a moderate amount of angular velocity to the star we follow the evolution of the deflagration using a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. We find that the results are very dependent on the angle between the rotational axis and the line connecting the initial bubble of burned material with the center of the WD at the moment of ignition. The impact of rotation is larger for angles close to 90° because the Coriolis force on a floating element of fluid is maximum and its principal effect is to break the symmetry of the deflagration. Such symmetry breaking weakens the convergence of the nuclear flame at the antipodes of the initial ignition volume, changing the environmental conditions around the convergence region with respect to non-rotating models. These changes seem to disfavor the emergence of a detonation in the compressed volume at the antipodes and may compromise the viability of the so-called gravitational confined detonation mechanism.

  4. Determination of acceleration mechanism characteristics directly and nonparametrically from observations: Application to supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahé; Chen, Qingrong

    2014-05-01

    We have developed an inversion method for determination of the characteristics of the acceleration mechanism directly and nonparametrically from observations, in contrast to the usual forward fitting of parametric model variables to observations. In two recent papers [V. Petrosian and Q. Chen, Astrophys. J. 712, L131 (2010); Q. Chen and V. Petrosian, Astrophys. J. 777, 33 (2013)], we demonstrated the efficacy of this inversion method by its application to acceleration of electrons in solar flares based on stochastic acceleration by turbulence. Here we explore its application for determining the characteristics of shock acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) based on the electron spectra deduced from the observed nonthermal radiation from SNRs and the spectrum of the cosmic ray electrons observed near the Earth. These spectra are related by the process of escape of the electrons from SNRs and energy loss during their transport in the Galaxy. Thus, these observations allow us to determine spectral characteristics of the momentum and pitch angle diffusion coefficients, which play crucial roles in both direct acceleration by turbulence and in high Mach number shocks. Assuming that the average electron spectrum deduced from a few well-known SNRs is representative of those in the solar neighborhood, we find interesting discrepancies between our deduced forms for these coefficients and those expected from well-known wave-particle interactions. This may indicate that the standard assumptions made in the treatment of shock acceleration need revision. In particular, the escape of particles from SNRs may be more complex than generally assumed.

  5. Neutrino signal of electron-capture supernovae from core collapse to cooling.

    PubMed

    Hüdepohl, L; Müller, B; Janka, H-T; Marek, A; Raffelt, G G

    2010-06-25

    An 8.8M{⊙} electron-capture supernova was simulated in spherical symmetry consistently from collapse through explosion to essentially complete deleptonization of the forming neutron star. The evolution time (∼9  s) is short because high-density effects suppress our neutrino opacities. After a short phase of accretion-enhanced luminosities (∼200  ms), luminosity equipartition among all species becomes almost perfect and the spectra of ν{e} and ν{μ,τ} very similar, ruling out the neutrino-driven wind as r-process site. We also discuss consequences for neutrino flavor oscillations.

  6. Neutrino Signal of Electron-Capture Supernovae from Core Collapse to Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Huedepohl, L.; Mueller, B.; Janka, H.-T.; Marek, A.; Raffelt, G. G.

    2010-06-25

    An 8.8M{sub {center_dot}}electron-capture supernova was simulated in spherical symmetry consistently from collapse through explosion to essentially complete deleptonization of the forming neutron star. The evolution time ({approx}9 s) is short because high-density effects suppress our neutrino opacities. After a short phase of accretion-enhanced luminosities ({approx}200 ms), luminosity equipartition among all species becomes almost perfect and the spectra of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu},{tau}}very similar, ruling out the neutrino-driven wind as r-process site. We also discuss consequences for neutrino flavor oscillations.

  7. THE DETONATION MECHANISM OF THE PULSATIONALLY ASSISTED GRAVITATIONALLY CONFINED DETONATION MODEL OF Type Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, G. C. IV; Graziani, C.; Weide, K.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q.; Fisher, R. T.; Townsley, D. M.; Meakin, C.; Reid, L. B.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the detonation mechanism composing the 'pulsationally assisted' gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and {sup 56}Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the 'classical' GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

  8. The Detonation Mechanism of the Pulsationally Assisted Gravitationally Confined Detonation Model of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, G. C., IV; Graziani, C.; Fisher, R. T.; Townsley, D. M.; Meakin, C.; Weide, K.; Reid, L. B.; Norris, J.; Hudson, R.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2012-11-01

    We describe the detonation mechanism composing the "pulsationally assisted" gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) model of Type Ia supernovae. This model is analogous to the previous GCD model reported in Jordan et al.; however, the chosen initial conditions produce a substantively different detonation mechanism, resulting from a larger energy release during the deflagration phase. The resulting final kinetic energy and 56Ni yields conform better to observational values than is the case for the "classical" GCD models. In the present class of models, the ignition of a deflagration phase leads to a rising, burning plume of ash. The ash breaks out of the surface of the white dwarf, flows laterally around the star, and converges on the collision region at the antipodal point from where it broke out. The amount of energy released during the deflagration phase is enough to cause the star to rapidly expand, so that when the ash reaches the antipodal point, the surface density is too low to initiate a detonation. Instead, as the ash flows into the collision region (while mixing with surface fuel), the star reaches its maximally expanded state and then contracts. The stellar contraction acts to increase the density of the star, including the density in the collision region. This both raises the temperature and density of the fuel-ash mixture in the collision region and ultimately leads to thermodynamic conditions that are necessary for the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism to produce a detonation. We demonstrate feasibility of this scenario with three three-dimensional (3D), full star simulations of this model using the FLASH code. We characterized the simulations by the energy released during the deflagration phase, which ranged from 38% to 78% of the white dwarf's binding energy. We show that the necessary conditions for detonation are achieved in all three of the models.

  9. THE ORIGIN OF COSMIC RAYS: EXPLOSIONS OF MASSIVE STARS WITH MAGNETIC WINDS AND THEIR SUPERNOVA MECHANISM

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, Peter L.; Becker, Julia K.; Dreyer, Jens; Meli, Athina; Seo, Eun-Suk; Stanev, Todor

    2010-12-10

    One prediction of particle acceleration in the supernova (SN) remnants in the magnetic wind of exploding Wolf-Rayet and red supergiant stars is that the final spectrum is a composition of a spectrum E {sup -7/3} and a polar cap component of E {sup -2} at the source. This polar cap component contributes to the total energy content with only a few percent, but dominates the spectrum at higher energy. The sum of both components gives spectra which curve upward. The upturn was predicted to occur always at the same rigidity. An additional component of cosmic rays from acceleration by SNe exploding into the interstellar medium adds another component for hydrogen and for helium. After transport, the predicted spectra J(E) for the wind-SN cosmic rays are E {sup -8/3} and E {sup -7/3}; the sum leads to an upturn from the steeper spectrum. An upturn has now been seen by the CREAM mission. Here, we test the observations against the predictions and show that the observed properties are consistent with the predictions. Hydrogen can be shown to also have a noticeable wind-SN component. The observation of the upturn in the heavy element spectra being compatible with the same rigidity for all heavy elements supports the magneto-rotational mechanism for these SNe. This interpretation predicts the observed upturn to continue to curve upward and approach the E {sup -7/3} spectrum. If confirmed, this would strengthen the case that SNe of very massive stars with magnetic winds are important sources of Galactic cosmic rays.

  10. Two-dimensional Core-collapse Supernova Simulations with the Isotropic Diffusion Source Approximation for Neutrino Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Liebendörfer, Matthias; Hempel, Matthias; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2016-01-01

    The neutrino mechanism of core-collapse supernova is investigated via non-relativistic, two-dimensional (2D), neutrino radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. For the transport of electron flavor neutrinos, we use the interaction rates defined by Bruenn and the isotropic diffusion source approximation (IDSA) scheme, which decomposes the transported particles into trapped-particle and streaming-particle components. Heavy neutrinos are described by a leakage scheme. Unlike the “ray-by-ray” approach in some other multidimensional supernova models, we use cylindrical coordinates and solve the trapped-particle component in multiple dimensions, improving the proto-neutron star resolution and the neutrino transport in angular and temporal directions. We provide an IDSA verification by performing one-dimensional (1D) and 2D simulations with 15 and 20 M⊙ progenitors from Woosley et al. and discuss the difference between our IDSA results and those existing in the literature. Additionally, we perform Newtonian 1D and 2D simulations from prebounce core collapse to several hundred milliseconds postbounce with 11, 15, 21, and 27 M⊙ progenitors from Woosley et al. with the HS(DD2) equation of state. General-relativistic effects are neglected. We obtain robust explosions with diagnostic energies Edia ≳ 0.1-0.5 B (1 B ≡ 1051 erg) for all considered 2D models within approximately 100-300 ms after bounce and find that explosions are mostly dominated by the neutrino-driven convection, although standing accretion shock instabilities are observed as well. We also find that the level of electron deleptonization during collapse dramatically affects the postbounce evolution, e.g., the neglect of neutrino-electron scattering during collapse will lead to a stronger explosion.

  11. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS WITH THE ISOTROPIC DIFFUSION SOURCE APPROXIMATION FOR NEUTRINO TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kuo-Chuan; Liebendörfer, Matthias; Hempel, Matthias; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    2016-01-20

    The neutrino mechanism of core-collapse supernova is investigated via non-relativistic, two-dimensional (2D), neutrino radiation–hydrodynamic simulations. For the transport of electron flavor neutrinos, we use the interaction rates defined by Bruenn and the isotropic diffusion source approximation (IDSA) scheme, which decomposes the transported particles into trapped-particle and streaming-particle components. Heavy neutrinos are described by a leakage scheme. Unlike the “ray-by-ray” approach in some other multidimensional supernova models, we use cylindrical coordinates and solve the trapped-particle component in multiple dimensions, improving the proto-neutron star resolution and the neutrino transport in angular and temporal directions. We provide an IDSA verification by performing one-dimensional (1D) and 2D simulations with 15 and 20 M{sub ⊙} progenitors from Woosley et al. and discuss the difference between our IDSA results and those existing in the literature. Additionally, we perform Newtonian 1D and 2D simulations from prebounce core collapse to several hundred milliseconds postbounce with 11, 15, 21, and 27 M{sub ⊙} progenitors from Woosley et al. with the HS(DD2) equation of state. General-relativistic effects are neglected. We obtain robust explosions with diagnostic energies E{sub dia} ≳ 0.1–0.5 B (1 B ≡ 10{sup 51} erg) for all considered 2D models within approximately 100–300 ms after bounce and find that explosions are mostly dominated by the neutrino-driven convection, although standing accretion shock instabilities are observed as well. We also find that the level of electron deleptonization during collapse dramatically affects the postbounce evolution, e.g., the neglect of neutrino–electron scattering during collapse will lead to a stronger explosion.

  12. A Monte Carlo Approach to Magnetar-powered Transients. I. Hydrogen-deficient Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liang-Duan; Wang, Shan-Qin; Wang, Ling-Jun; Dai, Zi-Gao; Yu, Hai; Peng, Zong-Kai

    2017-06-01

    In this paper we collect 19 hydrogen-deficient superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) and fit their light curves, temperature evolution, and velocity evolution based on the magnetar-powered model. To obtain the best-fitting parameters, we incorporate the Markov chain Monte Carlo approach. We get rather good fits for seven events (χ 2/dof = 0.24-0.96) and good fits for another seven events (χ 2/dof = 1.37-3.13). We find that the initial periods (P 0) and magnetic strength (B p ) of the magnetars that supposedly power these SLSNe are in the range of ˜1.2-8.3 ms and ˜ (0.2{--}8.8)× {10}14 G, respectively; the inferred masses of the ejecta of these SLSNe are between 1 and 27.6 {M}⊙ , and the values of the gamma-ray opacity {κ }γ are between 0.01 and 0.82 cm2 g-1. We also calculate the fraction of the initial rotational energy of the magnetars harbored in the centers of the remnants of these SLSNe that is converted to the kinetic energy of the ejecta and find that the fraction is ˜19%-97% for different values of P 0 and B p , indicating that the acceleration effect cannot be neglected. Moreover, we find that the initial kinetic energies of most of these SLSNe are so small (≲ 2× {10}51 erg) that they can be easily explained by the neutrino-driven mechanism. These results can help clarify some important issues related to the energy-source mechanisms and explosion mechanisms and reveal the nature of SLSNe.

  13. Supernova Flashback

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-10-01

    The Cassiopeia A supernova first flash of radiation makes six clumps of dust circled in annotated version unusually hot. The supernova remnant is the large white ball in the center. This infrared picture was taken by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

  14. A NEW MULTI-DIMENSIONAL GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NEUTRINO HYDRODYNAMICS CODE FOR CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE. II. RELATIVISTIC EXPLOSION MODELS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas E-mail: thj@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M{sub Sun} progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  15. A New Multi-dimensional General Relativistic Neutrino Hydrodynamics Code for Core-collapse Supernovae. II. Relativistic Explosion Models of Core-collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Marek, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    We present the first two-dimensional general relativistic (GR) simulations of stellar core collapse and explosion with the COCONUT hydrodynamics code in combination with the VERTEX solver for energy-dependent, three-flavor neutrino transport, using the extended conformal flatness condition for approximating the space-time metric and a ray-by-ray-plus ansatz to tackle the multi-dimensionality of the transport. For both of the investigated 11.2 and 15 M ⊙ progenitors we obtain successful, though seemingly marginal, neutrino-driven supernova explosions. This outcome and the time evolution of the models basically agree with results previously obtained with the PROMETHEUS hydro solver including an approximative treatment of relativistic effects by a modified Newtonian potential. However, GR models exhibit subtle differences in the neutrinospheric conditions compared with Newtonian and pseudo-Newtonian simulations. These differences lead to significantly higher luminosities and mean energies of the radiated electron neutrinos and antineutrinos and therefore to larger energy-deposition rates and heating efficiencies in the gain layer with favorable consequences for strong nonradial mass motions and ultimately for an explosion. Moreover, energy transfer to the stellar medium around the neutrinospheres through nucleon recoil in scattering reactions of heavy-lepton neutrinos also enhances the mentioned effects. Together with previous pseudo-Newtonian models, the presented relativistic calculations suggest that the treatment of gravity and energy-exchanging neutrino interactions can make differences of even 50%-100% in some quantities and is likely to contribute to a finally successful explosion mechanism on no minor level than hydrodynamical differences between different dimensions.

  16. On the Nature of Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam; Hayes, John; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1995-09-01

    We investigate in this paper the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism in both one and two dimensions. With a radiation/hydrodynamic code based upon the PPM algorithm, we verify the usefulness of neutrino-driven overturn ("convection") between the shock and the neutrinosphere in igniting the supernova explosion. The two-dimensional simulation of the core of a 15 Msun star that we present here indicates that the breaking of spherical symmetry may be central to the explosion itself and that a multitude of bent and broken fingers is a common feature of the ejecta. As in one dimension, the explosion seems to be a mathematically critical phenomenon, evolving from a steady state to explosion after a critical mass accretion rate through the stalled shock has been reached. In the two-dimensional simulation the preexplosion convective phase lasted ˜30 overturns (˜100 ms) before exploding. The preexplosion steady state in two dimensions is similar to that achieved in one dimension, but in two dimensions, owing to the longer dwell time of matter in the overturning region, the average entropy achieved behind the stalled shock is larger. In addition, the entropy gradient in the convecting region is flatter. These effects, together with the dynamical pressure of the buoyant plumes, serve to increase the steady state shock radius (Rs) over its value in one dimension by 30%-100%. A large Rs enlarges the volume of the gain region, puts shocked matter lower in the gravitational potential well, and lowers the accretion ram pressure at the shock for a given Mdot. The critical condition for explosion is thereby relaxed. Since the "escape" temperature (Tesc) decreases with radius faster than the actual matter temperature (T) behind the shock, a larger Rs puts a larger fraction of the shocked material above its local escape temperature. T > Tesc is the condition for a thermally driven corona to lift off a star. In one, two, or three dimensions, since supernovae are driven by

  17. Explosive Nucleosynthesis of Ultra-Stripped Type Ic Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Suwa, Yudai; Umeda, Hideyuki; Shibata, Masaru; Takahashi, Koh

    We investigate the explosive nucleosynthesis of ultra-stripped Type Ic supernovae (SNe) evolved from 1.45 and 1.5 M ⊙ CO stars. We calculate the SN explosions using two-dimensional neutrino-radiation hydrodynamics code. The explosion energy of these SNe is about 1050 erg and the ejecta mass is about 0.1 M ⊙ . The 56Ni yield is (6-10) × 10-3 M ⊙ . Light curve of ultra-stripped SNe would be fast-fading and subluminous like SN 2005ek. Neutrino-driven winds contain neutron-rich materials and the first-peak r-process elements are produced. Ultra-stripped SNe and sub-energetic SNe evolved from single stars having a small CO core could be sources of light r-elements.

  18. Accelerating Our Understanding of Supernova Explosion Mechanism via Simulations and Visualizations with GenASiS

    SciTech Connect

    Budiardja, R. D.; Cardall, Christian Y; Endeve, Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among the most powerful explosions in the Universe, releasing about 1053 erg of energy on timescales of a few tens of seconds. These explosion events are also responsible for the production and dissemination of most of the heavy elements, making life as we know it possible. Yet exactly how they work is still unresolved. One reason for this is the sheer complexity and cost of a self-consistent, multi-physics, and multi-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulation, which is impractical, and often impossible, even on the largest supercomputers we have available today. To advance our understanding we instead must often use simplified models, teasing out the most important ingredients for successful explosions, while helping us to interpret results from higher fidelity multi-physics models. In this paper we investigate the role of instabilities in the core-collapse supernova environment. We present here simulation and visualization results produced by our code GenASiS.

  19. High-resolution three-dimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae in multiple progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, Sean M.; O'Connor, Evan P.

    2014-04-20

    Three-dimensional (3D) simulations of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are granting new insight into the as-yet-uncertain mechanism that drives successful explosions. While there is still debate about whether explosions are obtained more easily in 3D than in 2D, it is undeniable that there exist qualitative and quantitative differences between the results of 3D and 2D simulations. We present an extensive set of high-resolution 1D, 2D, and 3D CCSN simulations with multispecies neutrino leakage carried out in two different progenitors. Our simulations confirm the results of Couch indicating that 2D explodes more readily than 3D. We argue that this is due to the inadequacies of 2D to accurately capture important aspects of the 3D dynamics. We find that without artificially enhancing the neutrino heating rate, we do not obtain explosions in 3D. We examine the development of neutrino-driven convection and the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and find that, in separate regimes, either instability can dominate. We find evidence for growth of the SASI for both 15 M {sub ☉} and 27 M {sub ☉} progenitors; however, it is weaker in 3D exploding models. The growth rate of both instabilities is artificially enhanced along the symmetry axis in 2D as compared with our axis-free 3D Cartesian simulations. Our work highlights the growing consensus that CCSNe must be studied in 3D if we hope to solve the mystery of how the explosions are powered.

  20. Supernova VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, N.

    2009-08-01

    We review VLBI observations of supernovae over the last quarter century and discuss the prospect of imaging future supernovae with space VLBI in the context of VSOP-2. From thousands of discovered supernovae, most of them at cosmological distances, ˜50 have been detected at radio wavelengths, most of them in relatively nearby galaxies. All of the radio supernovae are Type II or Ib/c, which originate from the explosion of massive progenitor stars. Of these, 12 were observed with VLBI and four of them, SN 1979C, SN 1986J, SN 1993J, and SN 1987A, could be imaged in detail, the former three with VLBI. In addition, supernovae or young supernova remnants were discovered at radio wavelengths in highly dust-obscured galaxies, such as M82, Arp 299, and Arp 220, and some of them could also be imaged in detail. Four of the supernovae so far observed were sufficiently bright to be detectable with VSOP-2. With VSOP-2 the expansion of supernovae can be monitored and investigated with unsurpassed angular resolution, starting as early as the time of the supernova's transition from its opaque to transparent stage. Such studies can reveal, in a movie, the aftermath of a supernova explosion shortly after shock break out.

  1. Supernovae, neutrinos, and nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, Carla

    2014-04-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are the violent explosions at the end of the life of massive stars (≳ 8 - 10 M⊙). In these explosions a wide range of elements are synthesized and ejected: low-mass elements (O and Mg) from the hydrostatic evolution, intermediate-mass elements and Fe-group elements from explosive nucleosynthesis, and elements heavier than iron from the νp-process and potentially an r-process. However, supernova nucleosynthesis predictions are hampered by the not yet fully understood supernova explosion mechanism. In addition, recent progress in observational astronomy paints a fascinating picture for the origin of heavy elements, which is more complicated than the traditional s-, r-, and γ-processes. In this paper, we summarize the status of core-collapse supernova nucleosynthesis.

  2. Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Beacom, John

    2009-11-14

    Supernovae in our Galaxy probably occur about 3 times per century, though 90% of them are invisible optically because of obscuration by dust. However, present solar neutrino detectors are sensitive to core-collapse supernovae anywhere in our Galaxy, and would detect of order 10,000 events from a supernova at a distance of 10 kpc (roughly the distance to the Galactic center). I will describe how this data can be used to understand the supernova itself, as well as to test the properties of neutrinos.

  3. Neutrinos from supernovae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, A. S.

    First, the author presents a short history of supernova neutrino theory. Then, the theory of core collapse supernovae is reviewed. Because of the profound opacity to light of the dense core that experiences collapse, we "see" this core directly only through its neutrino signature. Every bump and wiggle echoes the internal convulsions of the event and can provide clues about both the supernova mechanism and the neutron star that remains. The author discusses the only neutrino observations of a supernova so far, SN 1987A. While the agreement with calculations has been gratifying, there remain, of course, plenty of outstanding issues in supernova theory to be tested. These are high-lighted throughout the text. Since neutrinos give us the only real access to the physics inside the collapse, it is important that observation of these particles continue. In an appendix the author describes some of the available or contemplated neutrino detectors capable of good time resolution and therefore of shedding light on supernova mechanisms.

  4. Handbook of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athem Alsabti, Abdul

    2015-08-01

    Since the discovery of pulsars in 1967, few celestial phenomena have fascinated amateur and professional astronomers, and the public, more than supernovae - dying stars that explode spectacularly and, in so doing, may outshine a whole galaxy. Thousands of research papers, reviews, monographs and books have been published on this subject. These publications are often written either for a highly specific level of expertise or education, or with respect to a particular aspect of supernovae research. However, the study of supernovae is a very broad topic involving many integral yet connected aspects, including physics, mathematics, computation, history, theoretical studies and observation. More specifically, areas of study include historical supernovae, the different types and light curves, nucleosynthesis, explosion mechanisms, formation of black holes, neutron stars, cosmic rays, neutrinos and gravitational waves. Related questions include how supernovae remnants interact with interstellar matter nearby and how do these events affect the formation of new stars or planetary systems? Could they affect existing planetary systems? Closer to home, did any supernovae affect life on earth in the past or could they do so in the future? And on the larger scale, how did supernovae observations help measure the size and expansion of the universe? All these topics, and more, are to be covered in a new reference work, consisting of more than 100 articles and more than 1700 pages. It is intended to cover all the main facets of current supernovae research. It will be pitched at or above the level of a new postgraduate student, who will have successfully studied physics (or a similar scientific subject) to Bachelor degree level. It will be available in both print and electronic (updatable) formats, with the exception of the first section, which will consist of a review of all the topics of the handbook at a level that allows anyone with basic scientific knowledge to grasp the

  5. GR effects in supernova neutrino flavor transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Kneller, James P.

    2017-07-01

    The strong gravitational field around a proto-neutron star can modify the neutrino flavor transformations that occur above the neutrinosphere via three general relativistic (GR) effects: time dilation, energy redshift, and trajectory bending. Depending on the compactness of the central object, the neutrino self-interaction potential is up to three times as large as that without GR principally due to trajectory bending which increases the intersection angles between different neutrino trajectories, and time dilation which changes the fluxes. We determine whether GR effects are important for flavor transformation during the different epochs of a supernova by using multiangle flavor transformation calculations and consider a density profile and neutrino spectra representative of both the accretion and cooling phases. We find the GR effects are smaller during the accretion phase due to low compactness of the proto-neutron star and merely delay the decoherence; the neutrino bipolar oscillations during the cooling phase are also delayed due to the GR effects but the delay may be more important because the delay occurs at radii where it might alter the nucleosynthesis in the neutrino driven wind.

  6. supernovae: Photometric classification of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnock, Tom; Moss, Adam

    2017-05-01

    Supernovae classifies supernovae using their light curves directly as inputs to a deep recurrent neural network, which learns information from the sequence of observations. Observational time and filter fluxes are used as inputs; since the inputs are agnostic, additional data such as host galaxy information can also be included.

  7. White dwarf models for type 1 supernovae and quiet supernovae, and presupernova evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nomoto, K.

    1980-01-01

    Supernova mechanisms in accreting white dwarfs are considered with emphasis on deflagration as a plausible mechanism for producing Type I supernovae and electron captures to form quiet supernovae leaving neutron stars. These outcomes depend on accretion rate of helium, initial mass and composition of the white dwarf. The various types of hydrogen shell burning in the presupernova stage are also discussed.

  8. Critical surface for explosions of rotational core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Iwakami, Wakana; Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamada, Shoichi

    2014-09-20

    The effect of rotation on the explosion of core-collapse supernovae is investigated systematically in three-dimensional simulations. In order to obtain the critical conditions for explosion as a function of mass accretion rate, neutrino luminosity, and specific angular momentum, rigidly rotating matter was injected from the outer boundary with an angular momentum, which is increased every 500 ms. It is found that there is a critical value of the specific angular momentum, above which the standing shock wave revives, for a given combination of mass accretion rate and neutrino luminosity, i.e., an explosion can occur by rotation even if the neutrino luminosity is lower than the critical value for a given mass accretion rate in non-rotational models. The coupling of rotation and hydrodynamical instabilities plays an important role in characterizing the dynamics of shock revival for the range of specific angular momentum that are supposed to be realistic. Contrary to expectations from past studies, the most rapidly expanding direction of the shock wave is not aligned with the rotation axis. Being perpendicular to the rotation axis on average, it can be oriented in various directions. Its dispersion is small when the spiral mode of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) governs the dynamics, while it is large when neutrino-driven convection is dominant. As a result of the comparison between two-dimensional and three-dimensional rotational models, it is found that m ≠ 0 modes of neutrino-driven convection or SASI are important for shock revival around the critical surface.

  9. Supernova models

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the observed properties of Type I supernovae as a consequence of the thermonuclear detonation of white dwarf stars and the ensuing decay of the /sup 56/Ni produced therein is reviewed. Within the context of this model for Type I explosions and the 1978 model for Type II explosions, the expected nucleosynthesis and gamma-line spectra from both kinds of supernovae are presented. Finally, a qualitatively new approach to the problem of massive star death and Type II supernovae based upon a combination of rotation and thermonuclear burning is discussed.

  10. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  11. Constraints on the explosion mechanism and progenitors of Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessart, Luc; Blondin, Stéphane; Hillier, D. John; Khokhlov, Alexei

    2014-06-01

    Observations of SN 2011fe at early times reveal an evolution analogous to a fireball model of constant colour. In contrast, our unmixed delayed detonations of Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs (DDC series) exhibit a faster brightening concomitant with a shift in colour to the blue. In this paper, we study the origin of these discrepancies. We find that strong chemical mixing largely resolves the photometric mismatch at early times, but it leads to an enhanced line broadening that contrasts, for example, with the markedly narrow Si II 6355 Å line of SN 2011fe. We also explore an alternative configuration with pulsational-delayed detonations (PDDEL model series). Because of the pulsation, PDDEL models retain more unburnt carbon, have little mass at high velocity, and have a much hotter outer ejecta after the explosion. The pulsation does not influence the inner ejecta, so PDDEL and DDC models exhibit similar radiative properties beyond maximum. However, at early times, PDDEL models show bluer optical colours and a higher luminosity, even for weak mixing. Their early-time radiation is derived primarily from the initial shock-deposited energy in the outer ejecta rather than radioactive-decay heating. Furthermore, PDDEL models show short-lived C II lines, reminiscent of SN 2013dy. They typically exhibit lines that are weaker, narrower, and of near-constant width, reminiscent of SN 2011fe. In addition to multidimensional effects, varying configurations for such `pulsations' offer a source of spectral diversity amongst Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). PDDEL and DDC models also provide one explanation for low- and high-velocity-gradient SNe Ia.

  12. POST-SHOCK-REVIVAL EVOLUTION IN THE NEUTRINO-HEATING MECHANISM OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yu; Yamada, Shoichi; Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Nagakura, Hiroki

    2013-07-01

    We perform experimental simulations with spherical symmetry and axisymmetry to understand the post-shock-revival evolution of core-collapse supernovae. Assuming that the stalled shock wave is relaunched by neutrino heating and employing the so-called light bulb approximation, we induce shock revival by raising the neutrino luminosity up to the critical value, which is determined by dynamical simulations. A 15 M{sub Sun} progenitor model is employed. We incorporate nuclear network calculations with a consistent equation of state in the simulations to account for the energy release by nuclear reactions and their feedback to hydrodynamics. Varying the shock-relaunch time rather arbitrarily, we investigate the ensuing long-term evolutions systematically, paying particular attention to the explosion energy and nucleosynthetic yields as a function of relaunch time, or equivalently, the accretion rate at shock revival. We study in detail how the diagnostic explosion energy approaches the asymptotic value and which physical processes contribute in what proportions to the explosion energy. Furthermore, we study the dependence of physical processes on the relaunch time and the dimension of dynamics. We find that the contribution of nuclear reactions to the explosion energy is comparable to or greater than that of neutrino heating. In particular, recombinations are dominant over burnings in the contributions of nuclear reactions. Interestingly, one-dimensional (1D) models studied in this paper cannot produce the appropriate explosion energy and nickel mass simultaneously; nickels are overproduced. This problem is resolved in 2D models if the shock is relaunched at 300-400 ms after the bounce.

  13. Supernova and cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    A general overview of supernova astronomy is presented, followed by a discussion of the relationship between SN and galactic cosmic rays. Pre-supernova evolution is traced to core collapse, explosion, and mass ejection. The two types of SN light curves are discussed in terms of their causes, and the different nucleosynthetic processes inside SNs are reviewed. Physical events in SN remnants are discussed. The three main connections between cosmic rays and SNs, the energy requirement, the acceleration mechanism, and the detailed composition of CR, are detailed.

  14. A simple approach to the supernova progenitor-explosion connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Bernhard; Heger, Alexander; Liptai, David; Cameron, Joshua B.

    2016-07-01

    We present a new approach to understand the landscape of supernova explosion energies, ejected nickel masses, and neutron star birth masses. In contrast to other recent parametric approaches, our model predicts the properties of neutrino-driven explosions based on the pre-collapse stellar structure without the need for hydrodynamic simulations. The model is based on physically motivated scaling laws and simple differential equations describing the shock propagation, the contraction of the neutron star, the neutrino emission, the heating conditions, and the explosion energetics. Using model parameters compatible with multi-D simulations and a fine grid of thousands of supernova progenitors, we obtain a variegated landscape of neutron star and black hole formation similar to other parametrized approaches and find good agreement with semi-empirical measures for the `explodability' of massive stars. Our predicted explosion properties largely conform to observed correlations between the nickel mass and explosion energy. Accounting for the coexistence of outflows and downflows during the explosion phase, we naturally obtain a positive correlation between explosion energy and ejecta mass. These correlations are relatively robust against parameter variations, but our results suggest that there is considerable leeway in parametric models to widen or narrow the mass ranges for black hole and neutron star formation and to scale explosion energies up or down. Our model is currently limited to an all-or-nothing treatment of fallback and there remain some minor discrepancies between model predictions and observational constraints.

  15. Surprises in the Theory of Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam; Dessart, Luc; Livne, Eli; Ott, Christian D.

    2007-08-01

    We summarize some provocative new ideas that have emerged from our multidimensional radiation hydrodynamic simulations of the explosions of the cores of massive stars. We see the excitation of core g-modes that emit sufficient acoustic power to energize an anisotropic blast. The core continues to radiate sound as long as it is needed. There is simultaneously accretion on one side and explosion from another. However, the acoustic-powered mechanism requires a significant delay and will be aborted if another mechanism, such as the neutrino-driven mechanism, succeeds earlier. Whether that happens is the subject of vigorous research. Here, first we discuss the current status of the neutrino mechanism and then follow with a summary of the main features of the acoustic mechanism.

  16. Luminous supernovae.

    PubMed

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2012-08-24

    Supernovae, the luminous explosions of stars, have been observed since antiquity. However, various examples of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe; luminosities >7 × 10(43) ergs per second) have only recently been documented. From the accumulated evidence, SLSNe can be classified as radioactively powered (SLSN-R), hydrogen-rich (SLSN-II), and hydrogen-poor (SLSN-I, the most luminous class). The SLSN-II and SLSN-I classes are more common, whereas the SLSN-R class is better understood. The physical origins of the extreme luminosity emitted by SLSNe are a focus of current research.

  17. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS Rotational explosion mechanism for collapsing supernovae and the two-stage neutrino signal from supernova 1987A in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imshennik, Vladimir S.

    2011-02-01

    The two-stage (double) signal produced by the outburst of the close supernova (SN) in the Large Magellanic Cloud, which started on and involved two neutrino signals during the night of 23 February 1987 UT, is theoretically interpreted in terms of a scenario of rotationally exploding collapsing SNs, to whose class the outburst undoubtedly belongs. This scenario consists of a set of hydrodynamic and kinetic models in which key results are obtained by numerically solving non-one-dimensional and nonstationary problems. Of vital importance in this context is the inclusion of rotation effects, their role being particularly significant precisely in terms of the question of the transformation of the original collapse of the presupernova iron core to the explosion of the SN shell, with an energy release on a familiar scale of 1051 erg. The collapse in itself leads to the birth of neutron stars (black holes) emitting neutrino and gravitational radiation signals of gigantic intensity, whose total energy significantly (by a factor of hundreds) exceeds the above-cited SN burst energy. The proposed rotational scenario is described briefly by artificially dividing it into three (or four) characteristic stages. This division is dictated by the physical meaning of the chain of events a rotating iron core of a sufficiently massive (more than 10M) star triggers when it collapses. An attempt is made to quantitatively describe the properties of the associated neutrino and gravitational radiations. The review highlights the interpretation of the two-stage neutrino signal from SN 1987A, a problem which, given the present status of theoretical astrophysics, cannot, in the author's view, be solved without including rotation effects.

  18. Simulating Supernova Light Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Even, Wesley Paul; Dolence, Joshua C.

    2016-05-05

    This report discusses supernova light simulations. A brief review of supernovae, basics of supernova light curves, simulation tools used at LANL, and supernova results are included. Further, it happens that many of the same methods used to generate simulated supernova light curves can also be used to model the emission from fireballs generated by explosions in the earth’s atmosphere.

  19. Astronomical Resources: Supernovae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraknoi, Andrew

    1987-01-01

    Contains a partially annotated, nontechnical bibliography of recent materials about supernovae, including some about the discovery of a supernova in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Includes citations of general books and articles about supernovae, articles about Supernova 1987A, and a few science fiction stories using supernovae. (TW)

  20. Supernova Modeling: Progress and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y

    2012-01-01

    Neutrinos play important roles in the pre-collapse evolution, explosion, and aftermath of core-collapse supernovae. Detected neutrino signals from core-collapse supernovae would provide insight into the explosion mechanism and unknown neutrino mixing parameters. Achieving these goals requires large-scale, multiphysics simulations. For many years, several groups have performed such simulations with increasing realism. Current simulations and plans for future work of the Oak Ridge group are described.

  1. QCD and Supernovas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, T.

    2005-12-01

    In this contribution we briefly summarize aspects of the physics of QCD which are relevant to the supernova problem. The topic of greatest importance is the equation of state (EOS) of nuclear and strongly-interacting matter, which is required to describe the physics of the proto-neutron star (PNS) and the neutron star remnant (NSR) formed during a supernova event. Evaluation of the EOS in the regime of relevance for these systems, especially the NSR, requires detailed knowledge of the spectrum and strong interactions of hadrons of the accessible hadronic species, as well as other possible phases of strongly interacting matter, such as the quark-gluon plasma (QGP). The forces between pairs of baryons (both nonstrange and strange) are especially important in determining the EOS at NSR densities. Predictions for these forces are unfortunately rather model dependent where not constrained by data, and there are several suggestions for the QCD mechanism underlying these short-range hadronic interactions. The models most often employed for determining these strong interactions are broadly of two types, 1) meson exchange models (usually assumed in the existing neutron star and supernova literature), and 2) quark-gluon models (mainly encountered in the hadron, nuclear and heavy-ion literature). Here we will discuss the assumptions made in these models, and discuss how they are applied to the determination of hadronic forces that are relevant to the supernova problem.

  2. Supernova Acceleration Probe: Studying Dark Energy with Type Ia Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, J.; Aldering, G.; Allam, S.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Aumeunier, M.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Besuner, B.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; /Caltech /LBL, Berkeley /Fermilab /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Paris, IN2P3 /Marseille, CPPM /Marseille, Lab. Astrophys. /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Indiana U. /Caltech, JPL /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /American Astron. Society /Chicago U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

    2005-08-08

    compared to give confidence that the results are free from significant systematics. Conversely, analysis between supernova subsets at the same redshift can identify further systematics controls. While theories of the supernova progenitor and explosion mechanism can guide the establishment of subset criteria, such understanding is not required--only comprehensive measurements are--for robustness of the cosmological results. The level of robustness is tied to the quality of data with which supernovae are distinguished. Statistical mission requirements are fundamentally bound by the systematic limitations of the experiment.

  3. Core bounce supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    The gravitational collapse mechanism for Type II supernovae is considered, concentrating on the direct implosion - core bounce - hydrodynamic explosion picture. We examine the influence of the stiffness of the dense matter equation of state and discuss how the shock wave is formed. Its chances of success are determined by the equation of state, general relativistic effects, neutrino transport, and the size of presupernova iron core. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Supernova Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, Alicia M.

    2014-01-01

    For decades, the study of stellar explosions -- supernovae -- have focused almost exclusively on the strong optical emission that dominates the bolometric luminosity in the days following the ultimate demise of the star. Yet many of the leading breakthroughs in our understanding of stellar death have been enabled by obtaining data at other wavelengths. For example, I have shown that 1% of all supernovae give rise to powerful relativistic jets, representing the biggest bangs in the Universe since the Big Bang. My recent serendipitous X-ray discovery of a supernova in the act of exploding (“in flagrante delicto”) revealed a novel technique to discover new events and provide clues on the shock physics at the heart of the explosion. With the advent of sensitive new radio telescopes, my research group combines clues from across the electromagnetic spectrum (radio to gamma-ray), leading us to a holistic study of stellar death, the physics of the explosions, and their role in fertilizing the Universe with new elements, by providing the community with cosmic autopsy reports.

  5. Three-dimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae: from shock revival to shock breakout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongwathanarat, A.; Müller, E.; Janka, H.-Th.

    2015-05-01

    We present three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of core-collapse supernovae (SN) from blast-wave initiation by the neutrino-driven mechanism to shock breakout from the stellar surface, using an axis-free Yin-Yang grid and considering two 15 M⊙ red supergiants (RSG) and two blue supergiants (BSG) of 15 M⊙ and 20 M⊙. We demonstrate that the metal-rich ejecta in homologous expansion still carry fingerprints of asymmetries at the beginning of the explosion, but the final metal distribution is massively affected by the detailed progenitor structure. The most extended and fastest metal fingers and clumps are correlated with the biggest and fastest-rising plumes of neutrino-heated matter, because these plumes most effectively seed the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities at the C+O/He and He/H composition-shell interfaces after the passage of the SN shock. The extent of radial mixing, global asymmetry of the metal-rich ejecta, RT-induced fragmentation of initial plumes to smaller-scale fingers, and maximum Ni and minimum H velocities depend not only on the initial asphericity and explosion energy (which determine the shock and initial Ni velocities), but also on the density profiles and widths of C+O core and He shell and on the density gradient at the He/H transition, which leads to unsteady shock propagation and the formation of reverse shocks. Both RSG explosions retain a large global metal asymmetry with pronounced clumpiness and substructure, deep penetration of Ni fingers into the H-envelope (with maximum velocities of 4000-5000 km s-1 for an explosion energy around 1.5 bethe) and efficient inward H-mixing. While the 15 M⊙ BSG shares these properties (maximum Ni speeds up to ~3500 km s-1), the 20 M⊙ BSG develops a much more roundish geometry without pronounced metal fingers (maximum Ni velocities only ~2200 km s-1) because of reverse-shock deceleration and insufficient time for strong RT growth and fragmentation at the He

  6. Thermonuclear supernova models, and observations of Type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, E.; Garcia-Senz, D.; Badenes, C.

    2005-10-21

    In this paper, we review the present state of theoretical models of thermonuclear supernovae, and compare their predictions with the constraints derived from observations of Type Ia supernovae. The diversity of explosion mechanisms usually found in one-dimensional simulations is a direct consequence of the impossibility to resolve the flame structure under the assumption of spherical symmetry. Spherically symmetric models have been successful in explaining many of the observational features of Type Ia supernovae, but they rely on two kinds of empirical models: one that describes the behaviour of the flame on the scales unresolved by the code, and another that takes account of the evolution of the flame shape. In contrast, three-dimensional simulations are able to compute the flame shape in a self-consistent way, but they still need a model for the propagation of the flame in the scales unresolved by the code. Furthermore, in three dimensions the number of degrees of freedom of the initial configuration of the white dwarf at runaway is much larger than in one dimension. Recent simulations have shown that the sensitivity of the explosion output to the initial conditions can be extremely large. New paradigms of thermonuclear supernovae have emerged from this situation, as the Pulsating Reverse Detonation. The resolution of all these issues must rely on the predictions of observational properties of the models, and their comparison with current Type Ia supernova data, including X-ray spectra of Type Ia supernova remnants.

  7. Presupernova models and supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimoto, D.; Nomoto, K.

    1980-01-01

    The present status of theories of presupernova stellar evolution and the triggering mechanisms of supernova explosions are reviewed. The validity of the single-star approximation for stellar core evolution is considered, and the central density and temperature of the stellar core are discussed. Attention is then given to the results of numerical models of supernova explosions by carbon deflagration of an intermediate mass star, resulting in the total disruption of the star; the photodissociation of iron nuclei in a massive star, resulting in neutron star or black hole formation; and stellar core collapse triggered by electron capture in stars of mass ranging between those of the intermediate mass and massive stars, resulting in neutron star formation despite oxygen deflagration. Helium and carbon combustion and detonation in accreting white dwarfs and the gravitational collapse triggered by electron-pair creation in supermassive stars are also discussed, and problems requiring future investigation are indicated.

  8. Presupernova models and supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugimoto, D.; Nomoto, K.

    1980-01-01

    The present status of theories of presupernova stellar evolution and the triggering mechanisms of supernova explosions are reviewed. The validity of the single-star approximation for stellar core evolution is considered, and the central density and temperature of the stellar core are discussed. Attention is then given to the results of numerical models of supernova explosions by carbon deflagration of an intermediate mass star, resulting in the total disruption of the star; the photodissociation of iron nuclei in a massive star, resulting in neutron star or black hole formation; and stellar core collapse triggered by electron capture in stars of mass ranging between those of the intermediate mass and massive stars, resulting in neutron star formation despite oxygen deflagration. Helium and carbon combustion and detonation in accreting white dwarfs and the gravitational collapse triggered by electron-pair creation in supermassive stars are also discussed, and problems requiring future investigation are indicated.

  9. R-process in Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, T.; Harikae, S.; Yoshida, T.; Nakamura, K.; Aoki, W.

    2010-05-12

    We study r-process nucleosynthesis in neutrino-driven winds of Type II supernovae (SNe), binary neutron-star mergers, and magneto-hydrodynamic jets in view of recent astronomical observations of r-process elements in metal-deficient stars and new nuclear reaction data. Universality in observed abundance pattern and total ejected yields of the r-elements from single episode of each candidate site are used to identify the astrophysical site of the r-process. Neutrinos play the critical roles in light element synthesis as well as r-process. Elemental abundances are affected strongly by neutrino oscillations (MSW effect) through the SN nu-process nucleosynthesis. We find that unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, i.e. mass hierarchy and mixing angle theta{sub 13}, are simultaneously constrained by the Li/B ratio from SN nucleosynthesis. Gamma ray burst (GRB) nucleosynthesis in contrast is expected to be relatively free from thermal neutrino effects because of black hole (BH) formation instead of neutron star. We find that the abundance pattern is totally different from ordinary SN nucleosynthesis.

  10. Supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    John Beacom

    2003-01-23

    We propose that neutrino-proton elastic scattering, {nu} + p {yields} {nu} + p, can be used for the detection of supernova neutrinos. Though the proton recoil kinetic energy spectrum is soft, with T{sub p} {approx_equal} 2E{sub {nu}}{sup 2}/M{sub p}, and the scintillation light output from slow, heavily ionizing protons is quenched, the yield above a realistic threshold is nearly as large as that from {bar {nu}}{sub e} + p {yields} e{sup +} + n. In addition, the measured proton spectrum is related to the incident neutrino spectrum, which solves a long-standing problem of how to separately measure the total energy release and temperature of {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}, {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, and {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. The ability to detect this signal would give detectors like KamLAND and Borexino a crucial and unique role in the quest to detect supernova neutrinos.

  11. SASI Activity in Three-dimensional Neutrino-hydrodynamics Simulations of Supernova Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanke, Florian; Müller, Bernhard; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Marek, Andreas; Janka, Hans-Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The relevance of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) compared to neutrino-driven convection in three-dimensional (3D) supernova-core environments is still highly controversial. Studying a 27 M ⊙ progenitor, we demonstrate, for the first time, that violent SASI activity can develop in 3D simulations with detailed neutrino transport despite the presence of convection. This result was obtained with the PROMETHEUS-VERTEX code with the same sophisticated neutrino treatment so far used only in one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) models. While buoyant plumes initially determine the nonradial mass motions in the postshock layer, bipolar shock sloshing with growing amplitude sets in during a phase of shock retraction and turns into a violent spiral mode whose growth is only quenched when the infall of the Si/SiO interface leads to strong shock expansion in response to a dramatic decrease of the mass accretion rate. In the phase of large-amplitude SASI sloshing and spiral motions, the postshock layer exhibits nonradial deformation dominated by the lowest-order spherical harmonics (l = 1, m = 0, ±1) in distinct contrast to the higher multipole structures associated with neutrino-driven convection. We find that the SASI amplitudes, shock asymmetry, and nonradial kinetic energy in three dimensions can exceed those of the corresponding 2D case during extended periods of the evolution. We also perform parameterized 3D simulations of a 25 M ⊙ progenitor, using a simplified, gray neutrino transport scheme, an axis-free Yin-Yang grid, and different amplitudes of random seed perturbations. They confirm the importance of the SASI for another progenitor, its independence of the choice of spherical grid, and its preferred growth for fast accretion flows connected to small shock radii and compact proto-neutron stars as previously found in 2D setups.

  12. SASI ACTIVITY IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL NEUTRINO-HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATIONS OF SUPERNOVA CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Hanke, Florian; Mueller, Bernhard; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Marek, Andreas; Janka, Hans-Thomas E-mail: bjmuellr@mpa-garching.mpg.de E-mail: amarek@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-06-10

    The relevance of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) compared to neutrino-driven convection in three-dimensional (3D) supernova-core environments is still highly controversial. Studying a 27 M{sub Sun} progenitor, we demonstrate, for the first time, that violent SASI activity can develop in 3D simulations with detailed neutrino transport despite the presence of convection. This result was obtained with the PROMETHEUS-VERTEX code with the same sophisticated neutrino treatment so far used only in one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) models. While buoyant plumes initially determine the nonradial mass motions in the postshock layer, bipolar shock sloshing with growing amplitude sets in during a phase of shock retraction and turns into a violent spiral mode whose growth is only quenched when the infall of the Si/SiO interface leads to strong shock expansion in response to a dramatic decrease of the mass accretion rate. In the phase of large-amplitude SASI sloshing and spiral motions, the postshock layer exhibits nonradial deformation dominated by the lowest-order spherical harmonics (l = 1, m = 0, {+-}1) in distinct contrast to the higher multipole structures associated with neutrino-driven convection. We find that the SASI amplitudes, shock asymmetry, and nonradial kinetic energy in three dimensions can exceed those of the corresponding 2D case during extended periods of the evolution. We also perform parameterized 3D simulations of a 25 M{sub Sun} progenitor, using a simplified, gray neutrino transport scheme, an axis-free Yin-Yang grid, and different amplitudes of random seed perturbations. They confirm the importance of the SASI for another progenitor, its independence of the choice of spherical grid, and its preferred growth for fast accretion flows connected to small shock radii and compact proto-neutron stars as previously found in 2D setups.

  13. Nucleosynthesis in Early Supernova Winds II: The Role of Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Pruet, J; Hoffman, R; Woosley, S; Janka, H; Buras, R

    2005-11-04

    One of the outstanding unsolved riddles of nuclear astrophysics is the origin of the so called ''p-process'' nuclei from A = 92 to 126. Both the lighter and heavier p-process nuclei are adequately produced in the neon and oxygen shells of ordinary Type II supernovae, but the origin of these intermediate isotopes, especially {sup 92,94}Mo and {sup 96,98}Ru, has long been mysterious. Here we explore the production of these nuclei in the neutrino-driven wind from a young neutron star. We consider such early times that the wind still contains a proton excess because the rates for {nu}{sub e} and positron captures on neutrons are faster than those for the inverse captures on protons. Following a suggestion by Froehlich et al. (2005), they also include the possibility that, in addition to the protons, {alpha}-particles, and heavy seed, a small flux of neutrons is maintained by the reaction p({bar {nu}}{sub e}, e{sup +})n. This flux of neutrons is critical in bridging the long waiting points along the path of the rp-process by (n,p) and (n,{gamma}) reactions. Using the unmodified ejecta histories from a recent two-dimensional supernova model by Janka, Buras, and Rampp (2003), they find synthesis of p-rich nuclei up to {sup 102}Pd. However, if the entropy of these ejecta is increased by a factor of two, the synthesis extends to {sup 120}Te. Still larger increases in entropy, that might reflect the role of magnetic fields or vibrational energy input neglected in the hydrodynamical model, result in the production of numerous r-, s-, and p-process nuclei up to A {approx} 170, even in winds that are proton-rich.

  14. Supernovae. Old supernova dust factory revealed at the Galactic center.

    PubMed

    Lau, R M; Herter, T L; Morris, M R; Li, Z; Adams, J D

    2015-04-24

    Dust formation in supernova ejecta is currently the leading candidate to explain the large quantities of dust observed in the distant, early universe. However, it is unclear whether the ejecta-formed dust can survive the hot interior of the supernova remnant (SNR). We present infrared observations of ~0.02 solar masses of warm (~100 kelvin) dust seen near the center of the ~10,000-year-old Sagittarius A East SNR at the Galactic center. Our findings indicate the detection of dust within an older SNR that is expanding into a relatively dense surrounding medium (electron density ~10(3) centimeters(-3)) and has survived the passage of the reverse shock. The results suggest that supernovae may be the dominant dust-production mechanism in the dense environment of galaxies of the early universe.

  15. How Bright Can Supernovae Get?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    and a magnetic field of 2*1013 Gauss deposits energy into ~12 solar masses of ejecta. Click for a closerlook! [Adapted from SukhboldWoosley 2016]The authors find that the maximum luminosity that can be produced by these different supernova models ranges between 5*1043 and 2*1046 erg/s, with total radiated energies of 3*1050 to 4*1052 erg. This places the upper limit on the brightness of a supernova at about 5 trillion times the luminosity of the Sun.The calculations performed by Sukhbold and Woosley confirm that, of the options they explore, the least luminous events are produced by prompt explosions. The brightest events possible are powered by the rotational energy of a newly born magnetar at the heart of the explosion.The energies of observed ultra-luminous supernovae are (just barely) containedwithin the bounds of the mechanisms explored here. This is even true of the extreme ASASSN-15lh which, based on the authors calculations, was almost certainly powered by an embedded magnetar. If we were to observe a supernova more than twice as bright as ASASSN-15lh, however, it would be nearly impossible to explain with current models.CitationTuguldur Sukhbold and S. E. Woosley 2016 ApJ 820 L38. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/820/2/L38

  16. Do We Understand the Origin and Impact of the Neutrino Flux in a Core Collapse Supernova?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebendoerfer, M.; Messer, O. E. B.; Mezzacappa, A.; Hix, W. R.; Bruenn, S. W.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2002-05-01

    General relativistic multi group and multi flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport in spherical symmetry has become available - a new level of sophistication in the modeling of core collapse supernovae.We present postbounce simulations for five type II progenitors with 13-40 solar masses. Core collapse and bounce proceed in a quantitatively similar way, culminating in a rather uniform neutrino burst. At 100ms after bounce the shock stalls 150km radius in all our models. As the outer layers of the progenitors, where the density profiles are more different, fall into the protoneutron star, the neutrino luminosities reflect the individual mass accretion rates. Based on standard input physics, and without considering convection, high infall velocities prevent significant heating for a neutrino-driven supernova in general relativity. We acknowledge funding by the NSF under contract AST-9877130, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Batelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725,the Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, the Swiss National Science Foundation under contract 20-61822.00, NASA under contract NAG5-8405, a DoE HENP PECASE Award, and the DoE HENP SciDAC Program. Our Simulations have been carried out on the NERSC Cray SV-1.

  17. ON THE REQUIREMENTS FOR REALISTIC MODELING OF NEUTRINO TRANSPORT IN SIMULATIONS OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, Eric J.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, W. Raphael; Messer, O. E. Bronson; Liebendoerfer, Matthias; Bruenn, Stephen W. E-mail: mezzacappaa@ornl.gov

    2012-03-01

    We have conducted a series of numerical experiments with the spherically symmetric, general relativistic, neutrino radiation hydrodynamics code AGILE-BOLTZTRAN to examine the effects of several approximations used in multidimensional core-collapse supernova simulations. Our code permits us to examine the effects of these approximations quantitatively by removing, or substituting for, the pieces of supernova physics of interest. These approximations include: (1) using Newtonian versus general relativistic gravity, hydrodynamics, and transport; (2) using a reduced set of weak interactions, including the omission of non-isoenergetic neutrino scattering, versus the current state-of-the-art; and (3) omitting the velocity-dependent terms, or observer corrections, from the neutrino Boltzmann kinetic equation. We demonstrate that each of these changes has noticeable effects on the outcomes of our simulations. Of these, we find that the omission of observer corrections is particularly detrimental to the potential for neutrino-driven explosions and exhibits a failure to conserve lepton number. Finally, we discuss the impact of these results on our understanding of current, and the requirements for future, multidimensional models.

  18. Large Scale Supernova Structure from Pre- and Post-Explosion Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Patrick A.; Vance, Gregory; Ellinger, Carola; Fryer, Chris

    2017-06-01

    We present results of 3D supernova simulations with initial conditions drawn from 3D models of late stage stellar convection. Simulations are performed with the supernova-optimized smooth particle hydrodynamics code SNSPH and postprocessed using a 522 isotope nuclear reaction network. The simulations also have a non-fixed central compact object that is free to accrete momentum from fall back material. It has been established that neutrino-driven convection can produce large asymmetries in the explosion, but the effects caused by convective anisotropies in late burning shells in the progenitor star and time-varying gravitational potential after the explosion are less well explored. We find that convective motions can result in highly asymmetric overturn of deep layers that are not susceptible to large effects from explosion generated Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmeyer-Meshkov instabilities. Such overturn can produce regions with a strong alpha-rich freezeout and high iron abundances morphologically similar to the iron-rich structure in the southeast quadrant of Cassiopeia A.

  19. Gravitational Radiation from Standing Accretion Shock Instability in Core-Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotake, Kei; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Yamada, Shoichi

    2007-01-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments in which we study how asphericities induced by the growth of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) produce gravitational waveforms in the postbounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. To obtain the neutrino-driven explosions, we parameterize the neutrino fluxes emitted from the central proto-neutron star and approximate the neutrino transfer by a light-bulb scheme. We find that the waveforms due to anisotropic neutrino emissions show a monotonic increase with time, whose amplitudes are up to 2 orders of magnitude larger than those from convective matter motions outside proto-neutron stars. We point out that the amplitudes begin to become larger when the growth of the SASI enters the nonlinear phase, in which the deformation of the shocks and the neutrino anisotropy become large. From the spectrum analysis of the waveforms, we find that the amplitudes from the neutrinos are dominant over those from the matter motions at frequencies below ~100 Hz, which should be within the detection limits of next-generation detectors such as LCGT and the advanced LIGO for a supernova at 10 kpc. As a contribution to the gravitational wave background, we show that the amplitudes from this source could be larger at frequencies above ~1 Hz than the primordial gravitational wave backgrounds but, unfortunately, invisible to the proposed space-based detectors.

  20. Supernova Explosions Stay In Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-12-01

    At a very early age, children learn how to classify objects according to their shape. Now, new research suggests studying the shape of the aftermath of supernovas may allow astronomers to do the same. A new study of images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory on supernova remnants - the debris from exploded stars - shows that the symmetry of the remnants, or lack thereof, reveals how the star exploded. This is an important discovery because it shows that the remnants retain information about how the star exploded even though hundreds or thousands of years have passed. "It's almost like the supernova remnants have a 'memory' of the original explosion," said Laura Lopez of the University of California at Santa Cruz, who led the study. "This is the first time anyone has systematically compared the shape of these remnants in X-rays in this way." Astronomers sort supernovas into several categories, or "types", based on properties observed days after the explosion and which reflect very different physical mechanisms that cause stars to explode. But, since observed remnants of supernovas are leftover from explosions that occurred long ago, other methods are needed to accurately classify the original supernovas. Lopez and colleagues focused on the relatively young supernova remnants that exhibited strong X-ray emission from silicon ejected by the explosion so as to rule out the effects of interstellar matter surrounding the explosion. Their analysis showed that the X-ray images of the ejecta can be used to identify the way the star exploded. The team studied 17 supernova remnants both in the Milky Way galaxy and a neighboring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. For each of these remnants there is independent information about the type of supernova involved, based not on the shape of the remnant but, for example, on the elements observed in it. The researchers found that one type of supernova explosion - the so-called Type Ia - left behind relatively symmetric, circular

  1. Supernova frequency estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvetkov, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of the frequency of type I and II supernovae occurring in galaxies of different types are derived from observational material acquired by the supernova patrol of the Shternberg Astronomical Institute.

  2. Supernova neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Scholberg, K.

    2015-07-15

    In this presentation I summarize the main detection channels for neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae, and describe current status of and future prospects for supernova-neutrino-sensitive detectors worldwide.

  3. A SEMI-DYNAMICAL APPROACH TO THE SHOCK REVIVAL IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Yu; Yamada, Shoichi

    2013-03-10

    We develop a new semi-dynamical method to study shock revival by neutrino heating in core-collapse supernovae. Our new approach is an extension of the previous studies that employ spherically symmetric, steady, shocked accretion flows together with the light-bulb approximation. The latter has been widely used in the supernova community for the phenomenological investigation of the criteria for successful supernova explosions. In the present approach, we get rid of the steady-state condition and take into account shock wave motions instead. We have in mind a scenario in which it is not the critical luminosity but the critical fluctuation generated by hydrodynamical instabilities such as standing accretion shock instability and neutrino-driven convection in the post-shock region that determines the onset of shock revival. After confirming that the new approach indeed captures the dynamics of revived shock wave qualitatively, we then apply the method to various initial conditions and find that there is a critical fluctuation for shock revival, which can be well fit by the following formula: f{sub crit} {approx} 0.8 Multiplication-Sign (M{sub in}/1.4 M{sub Sun }) Multiplication-Sign {l_brace}1 - (r{sub sh}/10{sup 8} cm){r_brace}, where f{sub crit} denotes the critical pressure fluctuation normalized by the unperturbed post-shock value. M{sub in} and r{sub sh} stand for the mass of the central compact object and the shock radius, respectively. The critical fluctuation decreases with the shock radius, whereas it increases with the mass of the central object. We discuss the possible implications of our results for three-dimensional effects on shock revival, which is currently controversial in the supernova community.

  4. Neutrino-driven Explosion of a 20 Solar-mass Star in Three Dimensions Enabled by Strange-quark Contributions to Neutrino-Nucleon Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melson, Tobias; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Bollig, Robert; Hanke, Florian; Marek, Andreas; Müller, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    Interactions with neutrons and protons play a crucial role for the neutrino opacity of matter in the supernova core. Their current implementation in many simulation codes, however, is rather schematic and ignores not only modifications for the correlated nuclear medium of the nascent neutron star, but also free-space corrections from nucleon recoil, weak magnetism, or strange quarks, which can easily add up to changes of several 10% for neutrino energies in the spectral peak. In the Garching supernova simulations with the Prometheus-Vertex code, such sophistications have been included for a long time except for the strange-quark contributions to the nucleon spin, which affect neutral-current neutrino scattering. We demonstrate on the basis of a 20 {M}⊙ progenitor star that a moderate strangeness-dependent contribution of {g}{{a}}{{s}}=-0.2 to the axial-vector coupling constant {g}{{a}}≈ 1.26 can turn an unsuccessful three-dimensional (3D) model into a successful explosion. Such a modification is in the direction of current experimental results and reduces the neutral-current scattering opacity of neutrons, which dominate in the medium around and above the neutrinosphere. This leads to increased luminosities and mean energies of all neutrino species and strengthens the neutrino-energy deposition in the heating layer. Higher nonradial kinetic energy in the gain layer signals enhanced buoyancy activity that enables the onset of the explosion at ˜300 ms after bounce, in contrast to the model with vanishing strangeness contributions to neutrino-nucleon scattering. Our results demonstrate the close proximity to explosion of the previously published, unsuccessful 3D models of the Garching group.

  5. The Global Supernova Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew; Global Supernova Project

    2017-06-01

    The Global Supernova Project is worldwide collaboration to study 600 supernovae of all types between May 2017 and July 2020. It is a Key Project at Las Cumbres Observatory, whose global robotic telescope network will provide lightcurves and spectra. Follow-up observations will be obtained on many other facilities, including Swift, VLA, K2, the NTT, IRTF, Keck, and Gemini. Observations are managed by the Supernova Exchange, a combination observatin database and telescope control system run by LCO. Here we report on results from the previous Supernova Key Project, and first results from the Global Supernova Project.

  6. Postexplosion hydrodynamics of supernovae in red supergiants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herant, Marc; Woosley, S. E.

    1994-01-01

    Shock propagation, mixing, and clumping are studied in the explosion of red supergiants as Type II supernovae using a two-dimensional smooth particle hydrodynamic (SPH) code. We show that extensive Rayleigh-Talor instabilities develop in the ejecta in the wake of the reverse shock wave. In all cases, the shell structure of the progenitor is obliterated to leave a clumpy, well-mixed supernova remnant. However, the occurrence of mass loss during the lifetime of the progenitor can significantly reduce the amount of mixing. These results are independent of the Type II supernova explosion mechanism.

  7. VisPort: Web-Based Access to Community-Specific Visualization Functionality [Shedding New Light on Exploding Stars: Visualization for TeraScale Simulation of Neutrino-Driven Supernovae (Final Technical Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M Pauline

    2007-06-30

    The VisPort visualization portal is an experiment in providing Web-based access to visualization functionality from any place and at any time. VisPort adopts a service-oriented architecture to encapsulate visualization functionality and to support remote access. Users employ browser-based client applications to choose data and services, set parameters, and launch visualization jobs. Visualization products typically images or movies are viewed in the user's standard Web browser. VisPort emphasizes visualization solutions customized for specific application communities. Finally, VisPort relies heavily on XML, and introduces the notion of visualization informatics - the formalization and specialization of information related to the process and products of visualization.

  8. Possible effects of collective neutrino oscillations in three-flavor multiangle simulations of supernova ν p processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, H.; Kajino, T.; Takiwaki, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Balantekin, A. B.; Pehlivan, Y.

    2017-08-01

    We study the effects of collective neutrino oscillations on ν p process nucleosynthesis in proton-rich neutrino-driven winds by including both the multiangle 3 ×3 flavor mixing and the nucleosynthesis network calculation. The number flux of energetic electron antineutrinos is raised by collective neutrino oscillations in a 1D supernova model for the 40 M⊙ progenitor. When the gas temperature decreases down to ˜2 - 3 ×109 K , the increased flux of electron antineutrinos promotes the ν p process more actively, resulting in the enhancement of p -nuclei. In the early phase of neutrino-driven wind, blowing at 0.6 s after core bounce, oscillation effects are prominent in inverted mass hierarchy and p -nuclei are synthesized up to 106Cd and 108Cd. On the other hand, in the later wind trajectory at 1.1 s after core bounce, abundances of p -nuclei are increased remarkably by ˜10 - 104 times in normal mass hierarchy and even reaching heavier p -nuclei such as 124Xe, 126Xe and 130Ba. The averaged overproduction factor of p -nuclei is dominated by the later wind trajectories. Our results demonstrate that collective neutrino oscillations can strongly influence the ν p process, which indicates that they should be included in the network calculations in order to obtain precise abundances of p -nuclei. The conclusions of this paper depend on the difference of initial neutrino parameters between electron and nonelectron antineutrino flavors which is large in our case. Further systematic studies on input neutrino physics and wind trajectories are necessary to draw a robust conclusion. However, this finding would help understand the origin of solar-system isotopic abundances of p -nuclei such as Mo,9492 and Ru,9896 .

  9. Core-collapse supernova explosion simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Cardall, Christian Y

    2011-01-01

    Neutrinos play important roles in the pre-collapse evolution, explosion, and aftermath of core-collapse supernovae. Detected neutrino signals from core-collapse supernovae would provide insight into the explosion mechanism and unknown neutrino mixing parameters. Achieving these goals requires large-scale, multiphysics simulations. For many years, several groups have performed such simulations with increasing realism. Current simulations and plans for future work of the Oak Ridge group are described.

  10. Supernovae and mass extinctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenbergh, S.

    1994-01-01

    Shklovsky and others have suggested that some of the major extinctions in the geological record might have been triggered by explosions of nearby supernovae. The frequency of such extinction events will depend on the galactic supernova frequency and on the distance up to which a supernova explosion will produce lethal effects upon terrestrial life. In the present note it will be assumed that a killer supernova has to occur so close to Earth that it will be embedded in a young, active, supernova remnant. Such young remnants typically have radii approximately less than 3 pc (1 x 10(exp 19) cm). Larger (more pessimistic?) killer radii have been adopted by Ruderman, Romig, and by Ellis and Schramm. From observations of historical supernovae, van den Bergh finds that core-collapse (types Ib and II) supernovae occur within 4 kpc of the Sun at a rate of 0.2 plus or minus 0.1 per century. Adopting a layer thickness of 0.3 kpc for the galacitc disk, this corresponds to a rate of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp -4) supernovae pc(exp -3) g.y.(exp -1). Including supernovae of type Ia will increase the total supernovae rate to approximately 1.5 x 10(exp -4) supernovae pc(exp -3) g.y.(exp -1). For a lethal radius of R pc the rate of killer events will therefore be 1.7 (R/3)(exp 3) x 10(exp -2) supernovae per g.y. However, a frequency of a few extinctions per g.y. is required to account for the extinctions observed during the phanerozoic. With R (extinction) approximately 3 pc, the galactic supernova frequency is therefore too low by 2 orders of magnitude to account for the major extinctions in the geological record.

  11. Disentangling the Origin and Heating Mechanism of Supernova Dust: Late-Time Spitzer Spectroscopy of the Type IIn SN 2005ip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Ori D.; Chevalier, Roger A.; Dwek, Eli; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Sugerman, Ben E. K.; Leisenring, Jarron M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents late-time near-infrared and Spitzer mid-infrared photometric and spectroscopic observations of warm dust in the Type IIn SN 2005ip in NGC 2906. The spectra show evidence for two dust components with different temperatures. Spanning the peak of the thermal emission, these observations provide strong constraints on the dust mass, temperature, and luminosity, which serve as critical diagnostics for disentangling the origin and heating mechanism of each component. The results suggest the warmer dust has a mass of approx. 5 x 10(exp -4) Solar Mass and originates from newly formed dust in the ejecta, continuously heated by the circumstellar interaction. By contrast, the cooler component likely originates from a circumstellar shock echo that forms from the heating of a large, pre-existing dust shell approx. 0.01 - 0.05 Solar Mass by the late-time circumstellar interaction. The progenitor wind velocity derived from the blue edge of the He I 1.083 micro P Cygni profile indicates a progenitor eruption likely formed this dust shell approx.100 years prior to the supernova explosion, which is consistent with a Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) progenitor star. Subject

  12. Supernovae neutrino pasta interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zidu; Horowitz, Charles; Caplan, Matthew; Berry, Donald; Roberts, Luke

    2017-01-01

    In core-collapse supernovae, the neutron rich matter is believed to have complex structures, such as spherical, slablike, and rodlike shapes. They are collectively called ``nuclear pasta''. Supernovae neutrinos may scatter coherently on the ``nuclear pasta'' since the wavelength of the supernovae neutrinos are comparable to the nuclear pasta scale. Consequently, the neutrino pasta scattering is important to understand the neutrino opacity in the supernovae. In this work we simulated the ``nuclear pasta'' at different temperatures and densities using our semi-classical molecular dynamics and calculated the corresponding static structure factor that describes ν-pasta scattering. We found the neutrino opacities are greatly modified when the ``pasta'' exist and may have influence on the supernovae neutrino flux and average energy. Our neutrino-pasta scattering effect can finally be involved in the current supernovae simulations and we present preliminary proto neutron star cooling simulations including our pasta opacities.

  13. The Supernova Key Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory is a global network of robotic telescopes specializing in time domain astronomy. It currently has nine 1m telescopes, two 2m telescopes, and seven 0.4m telescopes. The Supernova Key Project is a 3 year program to obtain light curves and spectra of 500 supernovae with Las Cumbres Observatory. Here we show recent results, detail plans for the next Supernova Key Project, and explain how the US community can get involved.

  14. Physical processes in collapse driven supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Mayle, R.W.

    1985-11-01

    A model of the supernova explosion is discussed. The method of neutrino transport is discussed, since the explosive mechanism depends on neutrino heating of the material behind the accretion shock. The core region of these exploding stars becomes unstable to convective motions during the supernova evolution. Convective mixing allows more neutrinos to escape from under the neutrinosphere, and thus increases the amount of heating by neutrinos. An approximate method of incorporating convection is described, and some results of including convection in a computer model is presented. Another phenomena is seen in computer simulations of supernova, oscillations in the neutrino luminosity and mass accretion rate onto the protoneutron star. The last topic discussed in this thesis describes the attempt to understand this oscillation by perturbation of the steady state solution to equations approximating the complex physical processes occurring in the late time supernova. 42 refs., 31 figs.

  15. Impact of Supernova Dynamics on the νp-process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcones, A.; Fröhlich, C.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.

    2012-05-01

    We study the impact of the late-time dynamical evolution of ejecta from core-collapse supernovae on νp-process nucleosynthesis. Our results are based on hydrodynamical simulations of neutrino-driven wind ejecta. Motivated by recent two-dimensional wind simulations, we vary the dynamical evolution during the νp-process and show that final abundances strongly depend on the temperature evolution. When the expansion is very fast, there is not enough time for antineutrino absorption on protons to produce enough neutrons to overcome the β+-decay waiting points and no heavy elements beyond A = 64 are produced. The wind termination shock or reverse shock dramatically reduces the expansion speed of the ejecta. This extends the period during which matter remains at relatively high temperatures and is exposed to high neutrino fluxes, thus allowing for further (p, γ) and (n, p) reactions to occur and to synthesize elements beyond iron. We find that the νp-process starts to efficiently produce heavy elements only when the temperature drops below ~3 GK. At higher temperatures, due to the low alpha separation energy of 60Zn (S α = 2.7 MeV) the reaction 59Cu(p, α)56Ni is faster than the reaction 59Cu(p, γ)60Zn. This results in the closed NiCu cycle that we identify and discuss here for the first time. We also investigate the late phase of the νp-process when the temperatures become too low to maintain proton captures. Depending on the late neutron density, the evolution to stability is dominated by β+ decays or by (n, γ) reactions. In the latter case, the matter flow can even reach the neutron-rich side of stability and the isotopic composition of a given element is then dominated by neutron-rich isotopes.

  16. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  17. SOUSA Supernova Surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    The Swift Optical/Ultraviolet Supernova Archive is an effort to make public the Swift UVOT images and final photometry of as many supernovae as possible. These include many of the nearest, brightest, and most exciting supernovae of the last decade. Hiding within the archive, however, are supernovae you have never heard of, which never the less show extremes in color or luminosity or interesting light curve behavior in the ultraviolet. I will highlight some of the extreme objects of different subtypes and puzzling objects which warrant further study.

  18. Surviving Companions of Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerzendorf, W.

    2016-06-01

    Most supernovae should occur in binaries. Massive stars, the progenitors of core collapse supernovae (SN II/Ib/c), have a very high binarity fraction of 80 percent (on average, they have 1.5 companions). Binary systems are also required to produce thermonuclear supernovae (SN Ia). Understanding the role that binarity plays in pre-supernova evolution is one of the great mysteries in supernova research. Finding and studying surviving companions of supernovae has the power to shed light on some of these mysteries. Searching Galactic and nearby supernova remnants for surviving companions is a particularly powerful technique. This might allow to study the surviving companion in great detail possibly enabling a relatively detailed reconstruction of the pre-supernova evolution. In this talk, I will summarize the multitude of theoretical studies that have simulated the impact of the shockwave on the companion star and the subsequent evolution of the survivor. I will then give an overview of the searches that used these theoretical findings to identify surviving companions in nearby supernova remnants as well as their results. Finally, I will give an outlook of new opportunities in the relatively young field.

  19. Atomic and molecular supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Weihong

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular physics of supernovae is discussed with an emphasis on the importance of detailed treatments of the critical atomic and molecular processes with the best available atomic and molecular data. The observations of molecules in SN 1987A are interpreted through a combination of spectral and chemical modelings, leading to strong constraints on the mixing and nucleosynthesis of the supernova. The non-equilibrium chemistry is used to argue that carbon dust can form in the oxygen-rich clumps where the efficient molecular cooling makes the nucleation of dust grains possible. For Type Ia supernovae, the analyses of their nebular spectra lead to strong constraints on the supernova explosion models.

  20. Formation and progenitor of PSR J0737-3039: New constraints on the supernova explosion forming pulsar B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willems, B.; Kaplan, J.; Fragos, T.; Kalogera, V.; Belczynski, K.

    2006-08-01

    are necessary in the analysis. Moreover, in contrast to earlier claims in the literature, we show that the proximity of the double pulsar to the Galactic plane and the small proper motion do not pose stringent constraints on the kick velocity and progenitor mass of pulsar B at all. Instead, the constraints imposed by the current orbital semimajor axis and eccentricity and the orbital dynamics of asymmetric supernova explosions turn out to be much more restrictive. We conclude that without further knowledge of the priors, the currently available observational constraints cannot be used to unambiguously favor a specific core-collapse and neutron star-formation mechanism. Both electron capture and neutrino-driven supernovae therefore remain viable formation mechanisms for pulsar B.

  1. Interacting supernovae and supernova impostors: Evidence of incoming supernova explosions?

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, L.

    2015-02-24

    Violent eruptions, and consequently major mass loss, are a common feature of the so–called Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) stars. During major eruptive episodes LBVs mimic the behavior of real type IIn supernovae (SNe), showing comparable radiated energy and similar spectroscopic properties. For this reason these events are frequently labelled as SN impostors. Type IIn SN spectra are characterized by the presence of prominent narrow Balmer lines in emission. In most cases, SNe IIn arise from massive stars (M>8{sub ⊙}) exploding in a dense H–rich circumstellar medium (CSM), produced by progenitor’s mass loss prior to the SN explosion. Although the mechanisms triggering these eruptions are still unknown, recently we had direct proofs of the connection between very massive stars, their eruptions and ejecta-CSM interacting SNe. SNe 2006jc, 2010mc, 2011ht and the controversial SN 2009ip are famous cases in which we observed the explosion of the star months to years after major outbursts. In this context, the case of a recent transient event, LSQ13zm, is extremely interesting since we observed an outburst just ∼3 weeks before the terminal SN explosion. All of this may suggest that SN impostors occasionally herald true SN explosions. Nonetheless, there are several cases where major eruptions are followed by a quiescent phase in the LBV life. The impostor SN 2007sv is one of these cases, since it showed a single outburst event. Its photometric (a relatively faint absolute magnitude at the maximum) and spectroscopic properties (low velocity and temperature of the ejecta, and the absence of the typical elements produced in the explosive nucleosynthesis) strongly suggest that SN 2007sv was the giant eruption of an LBV, which has then returned in a quiescent stage.

  2. Interacting supernovae and supernova impostors: Evidence of incoming supernova explosions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, L.

    2015-02-01

    Violent eruptions, and consequently major mass loss, are a common feature of the so-called Luminous Blue Variable (LBV) stars. During major eruptive episodes LBVs mimic the behavior of real type IIn supernovae (SNe), showing comparable radiated energy and similar spectroscopic properties. For this reason these events are frequently labelled as SN impostors. Type IIn SN spectra are characterized by the presence of prominent narrow Balmer lines in emission. In most cases, SNe IIn arise from massive stars (M>8⊙) exploding in a dense H-rich circumstellar medium (CSM), produced by progenitor's mass loss prior to the SN explosion. Although the mechanisms triggering these eruptions are still unknown, recently we had direct proofs of the connection between very massive stars, their eruptions and ejecta-CSM interacting SNe. SNe 2006jc, 2010mc, 2011ht and the controversial SN 2009ip are famous cases in which we observed the explosion of the star months to years after major outbursts. In this context, the case of a recent transient event, LSQ13zm, is extremely interesting since we observed an outburst just ˜3 weeks before the terminal SN explosion. All of this may suggest that SN impostors occasionally herald true SN explosions. Nonetheless, there are several cases where major eruptions are followed by a quiescent phase in the LBV life. The impostor SN 2007sv is one of these cases, since it showed a single outburst event. Its photometric (a relatively faint absolute magnitude at the maximum) and spectroscopic properties (low velocity and temperature of the ejecta, and the absence of the typical elements produced in the explosive nucleosynthesis) strongly suggest that SN 2007sv was the giant eruption of an LBV, which has then returned in a quiescent stage.

  3. EFFECTS OF ROTATION ON STOCHASTICITY OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVES IN THE NONLINEAR PHASE OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kotake, Kei; Iwakami-Nakano, Wakana; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2011-08-01

    By performing three-dimensional (3D) simulations that demonstrate the neutrino-driven core-collapse supernovae aided by the standing accretion shock instability (SASI), we study how the spiral modes of the SASI can impact the properties of the gravitational-wave (GW) emission. To see the effects of rotation in the nonlinear postbounce phase, we give a uniform rotation on the flow advecting from the outer boundary of the iron core, the specific angular momentum of which is assumed to agree with recent stellar evolution models. We compute fifteen 3D models in which the initial angular momentum and the input neutrino luminosities from the protoneutron star are changed in a systematic manner. By performing a ray-tracing analysis, we accurately estimate the GW amplitudes generated by anisotropic neutrino emission. Our results show that the gravitational waveforms from neutrinos in models that include rotation exhibit a common feature; otherwise, they vary much more stochastically in the absence of rotation. The breaking of the stochasticity stems from the excess of the neutrino emission parallel to the spin axis. This is because the compression of matter is more enhanced in the vicinity of the equatorial plane due to the growth of the spiral SASI modes, leading to the formation of the spiral flows circulating around the spin axis with higher temperatures. We point out that recently proposed future space interferometers like Fabry-Perot-type DECIGO would permit the detection of these signals for a Galactic supernova.

  4. Untangling supernova-neutrino oscillations with β-beam data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachowicz, N.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Volpe, C.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, we suggested that low-energy β-beam neutrinos can be very useful for the study of supernova-neutrino interactions. In this article, we examine the use of a such experiment for the analysis of a supernova-neutrino signal. Because supernova neutrinos are oscillating, it is very likely that the terrestrial spectrum of supernova neutrinos of a given flavor will not be the same as the energy distribution with which these neutrinos were first emitted. We demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method for untangling multiple neutrino spectra. This is an essential feature of any model aiming at gaining information about the supernova mechanism, probing proto-neutron star physics, and understanding supernova nucleosynthesis, such as the neutrino process and the r-process. We also consider the efficacy of different experimental approaches including measurements at multiple beam energies and detector configurations.

  5. Degeneracy effects of neutrino mass ejection in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazurek, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    A neutrino mechanism is discussed in order to explain supernovae in massive stars. An argument is presented for supernova mass ejection through leptonic neutrino transport characteristics suppressed by the arbitrary zero chemical potential condition. Results show that lepton conservation effects may be important in supernova neutrino transport. At low temperature and density the diffusion approximation becomes less precise because of the long mean free paths of low energy neutrinos. The amount of equilibrium neutrino spectrum affected here is small over most of the collapsing supernova structure.

  6. Matching Supernovae to Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    One of the major challenges for modern supernova surveys is identifying the galaxy that hosted each explosion. Is there an accurate and efficient way to do this that avoids investing significant human resources?Why Identify Hosts?One problem in host galaxy identification. Here, the supernova lies between two galaxies but though the centroid of the galaxy on the right is closer in angular separation, this may be a distant background galaxy that is not actually near the supernova. [Gupta et al. 2016]Supernovae are a critical tool for making cosmological predictions that help us to understand our universe. But supernova cosmology relies on accurately identifying the properties of the supernovae including their redshifts. Since spectroscopic followup of supernova detections often isnt possible, we rely on observations of the supernova host galaxies to obtain redshifts.But how do we identify which galaxy hosted a supernova? This seems like a simple problem, but there are many complicating factors a seemingly nearby galaxy could be a distant background galaxy, for instance, or a supernovas host could be too faint to spot.The authors algorithm takes into account confusion, a measure of how likely the supernova is to be mismatched. In these illustrations of low (left) and high (right) confusion, the supernova is represented by a blue star, and the green circles represent possible host galaxies. [Gupta et al. 2016]Turning to AutomationBefore the era of large supernovae surveys, searching for host galaxies was done primarily by visual inspection. But current projects like the Dark Energy Surveys Supernova Program is finding supernovae by the thousands, and the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope will likely discover hundreds of thousands. Visual inspection will not be possible in the face of this volume of data so an accurate and efficient automated method is clearly needed!To this end, a team of scientists led by Ravi Gupta (Argonne National Laboratory) has recently

  7. THE LANDSCAPE OF THE NEUTRINO MECHANISM OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE: NEUTRON STAR AND BLACK HOLE MASS FUNCTIONS, EXPLOSION ENERGIES, AND NICKEL YIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Thompson, Todd A. E-mail: thompson@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2015-03-10

    If the neutrino luminosity from the proto-neutron star formed during a massive star core collapse exceeds a critical threshold, a supernova (SN) results. Using spherical quasi-static evolutionary sequences for hundreds of progenitors over a range of metallicities, we study how the explosion threshold maps onto observables, including the fraction of successful explosions, the neutron star (NS) and black hole (BH) mass functions, the explosion energies (E {sub SN}) and nickel yields (M {sub Ni}), and their mutual correlations. Successful explosions are intertwined with failures in a complex pattern that is not simply related to initial progenitor mass or compactness. We predict that progenitors with initial masses of 15 ± 1, 19 ± 1, and ∼21-26 M {sub ☉} are most likely to form BHs, that the BH formation probability is non-zero at solar-metallicity and increases significantly at low metallicity, and that low luminosity, low Ni-yield SNe come from progenitors close to success/failure interfaces. We qualitatively reproduce the observed E {sub SN}-M {sub Ni} correlation, we predict a correlation between the mean and width of the NS mass and E {sub SN} distributions, and that the means of the NS and BH mass distributions are correlated. We show that the observed mean NS mass of ≅ 1.33 M {sub ☉} implies that the successful explosion fraction is higher than 0.35. Overall, we show that the neutrino mechanism can in principle explain the observed properties of SNe and their compact objects. We argue that the rugged landscape of progenitors and outcomes mandates that SN theory should focus on reproducing the wide ranging distributions of observed SN properties.

  8. Pair production of helicity-flipped neutrinos in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, Armando; Gandhi, Raj

    1989-01-01

    The emissivity was calculated for the pair production of helicity-flipped neutrinos, in a way that can be used in supernova calculations. Also presented are simple estimates which show that such process can act as an efficient energy-loss mechanism in the shocked supernova core, and this fact is used to extract neutrino mass limits from SN 1987A neutrino observations.

  9. The condensation of grains in the ejecta of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, G.

    1986-03-01

    The condensation of grains around supernovae is considered. The mechanism by which grains could condense from supernovae ejecta to form a circumstellar dust shell is investigated. It is discovered that the depletion factor of grain forming material from the surrounding gas is important.

  10. A New Gravitational-wave Signature from Standing Accretion Shock Instability in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2016-09-01

    We present results from fully relativistic three-dimensional core-collapse supernova simulations of a non-rotating 15{M}⊙ star using three different nuclear equations of state (EoSs). From our simulations covering up to ˜350 ms after bounce, we show that the development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) differs significantly depending on the stiffness of nuclear EoS. Generally, the SASI activity occurs more vigorously in models with softer EoS. By evaluating the gravitational-wave (GW) emission, we find a new GW signature on top of the previously identified one, in which the typical GW frequency increases with time due to an accumulating accretion to the proto-neutron star (PNS). The newly observed quasi-periodic signal appears in the frequency range from ˜100 to 200 Hz and persists for ˜150 ms before neutrino-driven convection dominates over the SASI. By analyzing the cycle frequency of the SASI sloshing and spiral modes as well as the mass accretion rate to the emission region, we show that the SASI frequency is correlated with the GW frequency. This is because the SASI-induced temporary perturbed mass accretion strikes the PNS surface, leading to the quasi-periodic GW emission. Our results show that the GW signal, which could be a smoking-gun signature of the SASI, is within the detection limits of LIGO, advanced Virgo, and KAGRA for Galactic events.

  11. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS TRIGGERED BY A QUARK-HADRON PHASE TRANSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Nobuya; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl; Hempel, Matthias; Kaeppeli, Roger; Rauscher, Thomas; Winteler, Christian; Fischer, Tobias; Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel; Froehlich, Carla; Sagert, Irina

    2012-10-10

    We explore heavy-element nucleosynthesis in the explosion of massive stars that are triggered by a quark-hadron phase transition during the early post-bounce phase of core-collapse supernovae. The present study is based on general-relativistic radiation hydrodynamics simulations with three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport in spherical symmetry, which utilize a quark-hadron hybrid equation of state based on the MIT bag model for strange quark matter. The quark-hadron phase transition inside the stellar core forms a shock wave propagating toward the surface of the proto-neutron star. This shock wave results in an explosion and ejects neutron-rich matter from the outer accreted layers of the proto-neutron star. Later, during the cooling phase, the proto-neutron star develops a proton-rich neutrino-driven wind. We present a detailed analysis of the nucleosynthesis outcome in both neutron-rich and proton-rich ejecta and compare our integrated nucleosynthesis with observations of the solar system and metal-poor stars. For our standard scenario, we find that a 'weak' r-process occurs and elements up to the second peak (A {approx} 130) are successfully synthesized. Furthermore, uncertainties in the explosion dynamics could barely allow us to obtain the strong r-process which produces heavier isotopes, including the third peak (A {approx} 195) and actinide elements.

  12. HUBBLE PINPOINTS DISTANT SUPERNOVAE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These Hubble Space Telescope images pinpoint three distant supernovae, which exploded and died billions of years ago. Scientists are using these faraway light sources to estimate if the universe was expanding at a faster rate long ago and is now slowing down. Images of SN 1997cj are in the left hand column; SN 1997ce, in the middle; and SN 1997ck, on the right. All images were taken by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The top row of images are wider views of the supernovae. The supernovae were discovered in April 1997 in a ground-based survey at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Once the supernovae were discovered, the Hubble telescope was used to distinguish the supernovae from the light of their host galaxies. A series of Hubble telescope images were taken in May and June 1997 as the supernovae faded. Six Hubble telescope observations spanning five weeks were taken for each supernova. This time series enabled scientists to measure the brightness and create a light curve. Scientists then used the light curve to make an accurate estimate of the distances to the supernovae. Scientists combined the estimated distance with the measured velocity of the supernova's host galaxy to determine the expansion rate of the universe in the past (5 to 7 billion years ago) and compare it with the current rate. These supernovae belong to a class called Type Ia, which are considered reliable distance indicators. Looking at great distances also means looking back in time because of the finite velocity of light. SN 1997ck exploded when the universe was half its present age. It is the most distant supernova ever discovered (at a redshift of 0.97), erupting 7.7 billion years ago. The two other supernovae exploded about 5 billion years ago. SN 1997ce has a redshift of 0.44; SN 1997cj, 0.50. SN 1997ck is in the constellation Hercules, SN 1997ce is in Lynx, just north of Gemini; and SN 1997cj is in Ursa Major, near the Hubble Deep Field

  13. HUBBLE PINPOINTS DISTANT SUPERNOVAE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These Hubble Space Telescope images pinpoint three distant supernovae, which exploded and died billions of years ago. Scientists are using these faraway light sources to estimate if the universe was expanding at a faster rate long ago and is now slowing down. Images of SN 1997cj are in the left hand column; SN 1997ce, in the middle; and SN 1997ck, on the right. All images were taken by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The top row of images are wider views of the supernovae. The supernovae were discovered in April 1997 in a ground-based survey at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Once the supernovae were discovered, the Hubble telescope was used to distinguish the supernovae from the light of their host galaxies. A series of Hubble telescope images were taken in May and June 1997 as the supernovae faded. Six Hubble telescope observations spanning five weeks were taken for each supernova. This time series enabled scientists to measure the brightness and create a light curve. Scientists then used the light curve to make an accurate estimate of the distances to the supernovae. Scientists combined the estimated distance with the measured velocity of the supernova's host galaxy to determine the expansion rate of the universe in the past (5 to 7 billion years ago) and compare it with the current rate. These supernovae belong to a class called Type Ia, which are considered reliable distance indicators. Looking at great distances also means looking back in time because of the finite velocity of light. SN 1997ck exploded when the universe was half its present age. It is the most distant supernova ever discovered (at a redshift of 0.97), erupting 7.7 billion years ago. The two other supernovae exploded about 5 billion years ago. SN 1997ce has a redshift of 0.44; SN 1997cj, 0.50. SN 1997ck is in the constellation Hercules, SN 1997ce is in Lynx, just north of Gemini; and SN 1997cj is in Ursa Major, near the Hubble Deep Field

  14. Supernova neutrinos in SK-Gd and other experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    Now many detectors are waiting for core-collapse supernovae in or near our galaxy. If they occur in our galaxy we will be able to reveal the mechanism of supernova explosions and also be able to access the properties of neutrinos, such as mass hierarchy. Even dark mater detectors can reach them via coherent elastic neutrino nucleus scattering; however no supernova neutrinos have been observed since February 1987. Supernova explosions in our galaxy may be fairly rare, but supernovae themselves are not. On average, there is one supernova somewhere in the universe each second. The neutrinos emitted from all of these supernovae since the onset of stellar formation have suffused the universe. We refer to this unobserved flux as the “relic” supernova neutrinos. Theoretical models vary, but several supernova relic neutrinos (SRNs) per year above 10 MeV are expected to interact in Super-Kamiokande. However, in order to separate these signals from the much more common solar and atmospheric neutrinos and other backgrounds, we need a new detection method. On June 27 2015, the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration approved the SK-Gd project. It is the upgrade of the SK detector via the addition of gadolinium sulfate. This modification will enable it to efficiently identify low energy anti-neutrinos for the world’s first observation of the SRNs via inverse beta decay.

  15. Galaxy Zoo Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. M.; Lynn, S.; Sullivan, M.; Lintott, C. J.; Nugent, P. E.; Botyanszki, J.; Kasliwal, M.; Quimby, R.; Bamford, S. P.; Fortson, L. F.; Schawinski, K.; Hook, I.; Blake, S.; Podsiadlowski, P.; Jönsson, J.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; Bloom, J. S.; Jacobsen, J.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Law, N. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Walters, R.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the first results from a new citizen science project: Galaxy Zoo Supernovae. This proof-of-concept project uses members of the public to identify supernova candidates from the latest generation of wide-field imaging transient surveys. We describe the Galaxy Zoo Supernovae operations and scoring model, and demonstrate the effectiveness of this novel method using imaging data and transients from the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We examine the results collected over the period 2010 April-July, during which nearly 14 000 supernova candidates from the PTF were classified by more than 2500 individuals within a few hours of data collection. We compare the transients selected by the citizen scientists to those identified by experienced PTF scanners and find the agreement to be remarkable - Galaxy Zoo Supernovae performs comparably to the PTF scanners and identified as transients 93 per cent of the ˜130 spectroscopically confirmed supernovae (SNe) that the PTF located during the trial period (with no false positive identifications). Further analysis shows that only a small fraction of the lowest signal-to-noise ratio detections (r > 19.5) are given low scores: Galaxy Zoo Supernovae correctly identifies all SNe with ≥8σ detections in the PTF imaging data. The Galaxy Zoo Supernovae project has direct applicability to future transient searches, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, by both rapidly identifying candidate transient events and via the training and improvement of existing machine classifier algorithms. This publication has been made possible by the participation of more than 10 000 volunteers in the Galaxy Zoo Supernovae project ().

  16. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Douglas Scott

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of ~ 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for γ-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of ~ 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches ~60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  17. Neutrino Nucleosynthesis in Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Takashi; Suzuki, Toshio; Chiba, Satoshi; Kajino, Toshitaka; Yokomakura, Hidekazu; Kimura, Keiichi; Takamura, Akira; Hartmann, Dieter H.

    2009-05-04

    Neutrino nucleosynthesis is an important synthesis process for light elements in supernovae. One important physics input of neutrino nucleosynthesis is cross sections of neutrino-nucleus reactions. The cross sections of neutrino-{sup 12}C and {sup 4}He reactions are derived using new shell model Hamiltonians. With the new cross sections, light element synthesis of a supernova is investigated. The appropriate range of the neutrino temperature for supernovae is constrained to be between 4.3 MeV and 6.5 MeV from the {sup 11}B abundance in Galactic chemical evolution. Effects by neutrino oscillations are also discussed.

  18. Neutrinos and Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Bradley S.

    2008-05-12

    Core-collapse supernovae are one of the few astrophysical environments in which neutrinos play a dominant role. Neutrinos emission is the means by which a newly-born neutron star formed in a core-collapse event cools. Neutrinos may play a significant role in causing the supernova explosion. Finally neutrinos may significantly affect the nucleosynthesis occurring in the layers of the exploding star that are eventually ejected into interstellar space. This paper reviews some interesting neutrino-nucleus processes that may occur in the cores of exploding massive stars and then discusses some effects neutrinos may have on explosive nucleosynthesis in supernovae.

  19. Resonant neutrino spin-flavor precession and supernova shock revival

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedov, E.K.; Lanza, A.; Petcov, S.T.; Sciama, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    A new mechanism of supernova shock revival is proposed which involves the resonant spin-flavor precession of neutrinos with a transition magnetic moment in the magnetic field of the supernova. The mechanism can be operative in supernovae for transition magnetic moments as small as 10{sup {minus}14}{mu}{sub B} provided the neutrino mass squared difference is in the range {Delta}m{sup 2}{approximately}(3 eV){sup 2}{minus}(600eV){sup 2}. It is shown that this mechanism can increase the neutrino-induced shock reheating energy by about 60{percent}. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. SUPERNOVA FALLBACK ONTO MAGNETARS AND PROPELLER-POWERED SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D. E-mail: cott@tapir.caltech.edu

    2011-08-01

    We explore fallback accretion onto newly born magnetars during the supernova of massive stars. Strong magnetic fields ({approx}10{sup 15} G) and short spin periods ({approx}1-10 ms) have an important influence on how the magnetar interacts with the infalling material. At long spin periods, weak magnetic fields, and high accretion rates, sufficient material is accreted to form a black hole, as is commonly found for massive progenitor stars. When B {approx}< 5 x 10{sup 14} G, accretion causes the magnetar to spin sufficiently rapidly to deform triaxially and produces gravitational waves, but only for {approx}50-200 s until it collapses to a black hole. Conversely, at short spin periods, strong magnetic fields, and low accretion rates, the magnetar is in the 'propeller regime' and avoids becoming a black hole by expelling incoming material. This process spins down the magnetar, so that gravitational waves are only expected if the initial protoneutron star is spinning rapidly. Even when the magnetar survives, it accretes at least {approx}0.3 M{sub sun}, so we expect magnetars born within these types of environments to be more massive than the 1.4 M{sub sun} typically associated with neutron stars. The propeller mechanism converts the {approx}10{sup 52} erg of spin energy in the magnetar into the kinetic energy of an outflow, which shock heats the outgoing supernova ejecta during the first {approx}10-30 s. For a small {approx}5 M{sub sun} hydrogen-poor envelope, this energy creates a brighter, faster evolving supernova with high ejecta velocities {approx}(1-3) x 10{sup 4} km s{sup -1} and may appear as a broad-lined Type Ib/c supernova. For a large {approx}> 10 M{sub sun} hydrogen-rich envelope, the result is a bright Type IIP supernova with a plateau luminosity of {approx}> 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} lasting for a timescale of {approx}60-80 days.

  1. Automated search for supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1984-11-15

    This thesis describes the design, development, and testing of a search system for supernovae, based on the use of current computer and detector technology. This search uses a computer-controlled telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to collect images of hundreds of galaxies per night of observation, and a dedicated minicomputer to process these images in real time. The system is now collecting test images of up to several hundred fields per night, with a sensitivity corresponding to a limiting magnitude (visual) of 17. At full speed and sensitivity, the search will examine some 6000 galaxies every three nights, with a limiting magnitude of 18 or fainter, yielding roughly two supernovae per week (assuming one supernova per galaxy per 50 years) at 5 to 50 percent of maximum light. An additional 500 nearby galaxies will be searched every night, to locate about 10 supernovae per year at one or two percent of maximum light, within hours of the initial explosion.

  2. Evolution of a Supernova

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-02-19

    A massive star left, which has created elements as heavy as iron in its interior, blows up in a tremendous explosion middle, scattering its outer layers in a structure called a supernova remnant right.

  3. Nucleosynthesis in Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Claudia, Travaglio; Hix, William Raphael

    2013-01-01

    We review our understanding of the nucleosynthesis that occurs in thermonuclear supernovae and their contribution to Galactic Chemical evolution. We discuss the prospects to improve the modeling of the nucleosynthesis within simulations of these events.

  4. Infrared supernovae in starbursts

    SciTech Connect

    Van Buren, D.; Norman, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of uniquely confirming that the luminosity source of starburst galaxies is a young population of massive stars is considered. Unambiguous detection of the supernova explosion associated with a massive stellar population would provide proof of the starburst hypothesis. High spatial resolution narrow-band infrared imaging of starburst galaxies directly detects the cobalt synthesized in Type II supernova explosions. Coupled with observations of other infrared lines and continuum, progenitor masses can be at least roughly estimated. A statistically large sample of starburst supernovae will lead to an average starburst initial mass function. Standard candles can also be constructed, based on both individual and populations of supernovae. With current and planned instruments, K-band can be found out to cosmological distances. 27 references.

  5. Berkeley automated supernova search

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Muller, R.A.; Mast, T.S.; Crawford, F.S.; Burns, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982.

  6. The physics of core collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swesty, Frank Douglas

    1993-01-01

    I have developed an equation of state (EOS) for hot, dense matter that is intended specifically for use in radiation hydrodynamic simulations of supernovae, proto-neutron star cooling, and neutron stars. This EOS makes use of an adjustable nucleon-nucleon interaction that allows for the input of various nuclear force parameters that are not well determined by laboratory measurements. Properties of the EOS as a function of these input parameters were studied and comparisons were made to another EOS that is currently used in stellar collapse simulations. Using this EOS I have conducted simulations of core collapse supernovae with several ideas in mind. First, I have attempted to delineate role of the incompressibility of dense matter in supernovae. I have conducted a parameter study in which the compression modulous of bulk nuclear matter was varied and have found some new and surprising results. When the EOS is constrained by the observed mass of 1.44M(solar mass) for one of the components of the binary pulsar system PSR1913+16, the 'stiffness' of the EOS no longer plays a role in the shock dynamics of the supernova. Secondly, I varied the symmetry energy coefficients in the EOS to determine the role of these coefficients in supernovae. I have found that the symmetry energy behavior of the EOS has potentially observable effects and may play an important role in determining the efficacy of the late-time heating mechanism for the explosion and the stability of the post-bounce core against convection. Finally, I have developed an implicit, general relativistic, radiation hydrodynamics algorithm for the numerical simulation of supernovae. By allowing simulation timesteps to exceed the Courant timescale, this algorithm makes practical high resolution simulations of supernovae to late times. I discuss this algorithm and the associated computer code along with code verification tests and an example of a late-time calculation.

  7. Resonant spin-flavor conversion of supernova neutrinos: Dependence on electron mole fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Takashi; Takamura, Akira; Kimura, Keiichi; Yokomakura, Hidekazu; Kawagoe, Shio; Kajino, Toshitaka

    2009-12-15

    Detailed dependence of resonant spin-flavor (RSF) conversion of supernova neutrinos on electron mole fraction Y{sub e} is investigated. Supernova explosion forms a hot-bubble and neutrino-driven wind region of which electron mole fraction exceeds 0.5 in several seconds after the core collapse. When a higher resonance of the RSF conversion is located in the innermost region, flavor change of the neutrinos strongly depends on the sign of 1-2Y{sub e}. At an adiabatic high RSF resonance the flavor conversion of {nu}{sub e}{r_reversible}{nu}{sub {mu}}{sub ,{tau}} occurs in Y{sub e}<0.5 and normal mass hierarchy or in Y{sub e}>0.5 and inverted mass hierarchy. In other cases of Y{sub e} values and mass hierarchies, the conversion of {nu}{sub e}{r_reversible}{nu}{sub {mu}}{sub ,{tau}} occurs. The final {nu}{sub e} spectrum is evaluated in the cases of Y{sub e}<0.5 and Y{sub e}>0.5 taking account of the RSF conversion. Based on the obtained result, time variation of the event number ratios of low {nu}{sub e} energy to high {nu}{sub e} energy is discussed. In normal mass hierarchy, an enhancement of the event ratio should be seen in the period when the electron fraction in the innermost region exceeds 0.5. In inverted mass hierarchy, on the other hand, a dip of the event ratio should be observed. Therefore, the time variation of the event number ratio is useful to investigate the effect of the RSF conversion.

  8. Supernova 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, R.; Murdin, P.

    2002-10-01

    Supernova 1987A (SN1987A) in the LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD (LMC) is the brightest supernova to be observed since SN1604 (Kepler), the first to be observed in every band of the ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM and the first to be detected through its initial burst of NEUTRINOS. Although the bolometric luminosity of SN1987A today is ≈10-6 of its value at maximum light (Lmax≈2.5×108L⊙), it ...

  9. Physics of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-12-13

    Presupernova models of massive stars are presented and their explosion by ''delayed neutrino transport'' examined. A new form of long duration Type II supernova model is also explored based upon repeated encounter with the electron-positron pair instability in stars heavier than about 60 Msub solar. Carbon deflagration in white dwarfs is discussed as the probable explanation of Type I supernovae and special attention is paid to the physical processes whereby a nuclear flame propagates through degenerate carbon. 89 refs., 12 figs.

  10. Dust in supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, H.

    In this Review, I will discuss our changing view on supernovae as interstellar dust sources. In particular I will focus on infrared and submillimetre studies of the historical supernova remnants Cassiopeia A, the Crab Nebula, SN 1987A, Tycho and Kepler. In the last decade (and particularly in recent years), SCUBA, Herschel and ALMA have now demonstrated that core-collapse supernovae are prolific dust factories, with evidence of 0.1 - 0.7 M⊙ of dust formed in the ejecta, though there is little evidence (as yet) for significant dust production in Type Ia supernova ejecta. There is no longer any question that dust (and molecule) formation is efficient after some supernova events, though it is not clear how much of this will survive over longer timescales. Current and future instruments will allow us to investigate the spatial distribution of dust within corecollapse ejecta, and whether this component contributes a significant amount to the dust content of the Universe or if supernovae ultimately provide a net loss once dust destruction by shocks is taken into account.

  11. Dark matter triggers of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Peter W.; Rajendran, Surjeet; Varela, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    The transit of primordial black holes through a white dwarf causes localized heating around the trajectory of the black hole through dynamical friction. For sufficiently massive black holes, this heat can initiate runaway thermonuclear fusion causing the white dwarf to explode as a supernova. The shape of the observed distribution of white dwarfs with masses up to 1.25 M⊙ rules out primordial black holes with masses ˜1019- 1020 gm as a dominant constituent of the local dark matter density. Black holes with masses as large as 1024 gm will be excluded if recent observations by the NuStar Collaboration of a population of white dwarfs near the galactic center are confirmed. Black holes in the mass range 1020- 1022 gm are also constrained by the observed supernova rate, though these bounds are subject to astrophysical uncertainties. These bounds can be further strengthened through measurements of white dwarf binaries in gravitational wave observatories. The mechanism proposed in this paper can constrain a variety of other dark matter scenarios such as Q balls, annihilation/collision of large composite states of dark matter and models of dark matter where the accretion of dark matter leads to the formation of compact cores within the star. White dwarfs, with their astronomical lifetimes and sizes, can thus act as large spacetime volume detectors enabling a unique probe of the properties of dark matter, especially of dark matter candidates that have low number density. This mechanism also raises the intriguing possibility that a class of supernova may be triggered through rare events induced by dark matter rather than the conventional mechanism of accreting white dwarfs that explode upon reaching the Chandrasekhar mass.

  12. Dark matter balls help supernovae to explode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froggatt, C. D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2015-10-01

    As a solution to the well-known problem that the shock wave potentially responsible for the explosion of a supernova actually tends to stall, we propose a new energy source arising from our model for dark matter. Our earlier model proposed that dark matter should consist of cm-large white dwarf-like objects kept together by a skin separating two different sorts of vacua. These dark matter balls or pearls will collect in the middle of any star throughout its lifetime. At some stage during the development of a supernova, the balls will begin to take in neutrons and then other surrounding material. By passing into a ball nucleons fall through a potential of order 10 MeV, causing a severe production of heat — of order 10 foe for a solar mass of material eaten by the balls. The temperature in the iron core will thereby be raised, splitting up the iron into smaller nuclei. This provides a mechanism for reviving the shock wave when it arrives and making the supernova explosion really occur. The onset of the heating due to the dark matter balls would at first stop the collapse of the supernova progenitor. This opens up the possibility of there being two collapses giving two neutrino outbursts, as apparently seen in the supernova SN1987A — one in Mont Blanc and one 4 h 43 min later in both IMB and Kamiokande.

  13. Fast evolving pair-instability supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; ...

    2016-10-06

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered the ques- tion of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova commu- nity. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISN), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae, and (3) models in which the su- pernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In themore » cur- rent study we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light curve evolu- tion with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 M⊙ and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z=0.001) do not retain hydro- gen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.« less

  14. Fast evolving pair-instability supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; Frohlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan Thomas; Noebauer, Ulrich M.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley Paul; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2016-10-06

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered the ques- tion of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova commu- nity. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISN), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae, and (3) models in which the su- pernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the cur- rent study we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light curve evolu- tion with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 M⊙ and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z=0.001) do not retain hydro- gen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.

  15. Turbulence in Type Ia Supernovae Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Type Ia supernovae are among the most energetic explosions in the known universe, releasing 10^51 ergs of kinetic energy in their ejecta, with 0.7 solar masses of radioactive Ni-56 synthesized during the explosion. The discovery of the Phillips relation enabled the use of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) as standardizable cosmological candles, and has ushered in a new era of astronomy leading to the discovery of the acceleration of the universe, leading to the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics. The nature of the Type Ia progenitors, as well as their precise explosion mechanism, remains a subject of active investigation, both observationally as well as theoretically. It is known that the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae are near-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarfs in binary systems, though competing models suggest the companion is either a red giant or main sequence star (the so-called ``single-degenerate channel'') or another white dwarf (the ``double-degenerate channel''). In this talk, I will present recent results of three -dimensional models of the single-degenerate channel of Type Ia supernovae. I will also discuss prospects for modeling the double-degenerate channel of Type Ia supernovae, which have recently enjoyed increased favor from observers and theorists.

  16. Fast evolving pair-instability supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; Frohlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan Thomas; Noebauer, Ulrich M.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley Paul; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2016-10-06

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered the ques- tion of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova commu- nity. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISN), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae, and (3) models in which the su- pernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the cur- rent study we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light curve evolu- tion with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 M⊙ and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z=0.001) do not retain hydro- gen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.

  17. Deflagrations and detonations in thermonuclear supernovae.

    PubMed

    Gamezo, Vadim N; Khokhlov, Alexei M; Oran, Elaine S

    2004-05-28

    We study a type Ia supernova explosion using three-dimensional numerical simulations based on reactive fluid dynamics. We consider a delayed-detonation model that assumes a deflagration-to-detonation transition. In contrast with the pure deflagration model, the delayed-detonation model releases enough energy to account for a healthy explosion, and does not leave carbon, oxygen, and intermediate-mass elements in central parts of a white dwarf. This removes the key disagreement between simulations and observations, and makes a delayed detonation the mostly likely mechanism for type Ia supernovae.

  18. Swift X-Ray Telescope Observations of Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kae Batara Olaes, Melanie; Quimby, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe) are a part of an emerging class of exceptionally bright supernovae with peak luminosities 10 times brighter than typical Type Ia supernovae. Similar to supernovae, SLSNe are divided into two subclasses: hydrogen poor SLSN-I and hydrogen rich SLSN-II. However, the luminosity of these events is far too high to be explained by the models for normal supernovae. New models developed to explain SLSNe predict high luminosity X-ray emission at late times. A consistent analysis of incoming SLSNe is essential in order to place constraints on the mechanisms behind these events. Here we present the results of X-ray analysis on SLSNe using a Bayesian method of statistical inference for low count rate events.

  19. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  20. Nucleosynthesis in Early Neutrino Driven Winds

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R; Fisker, J; Pruet, J; Woosley, S; Janka, H; Buras, R

    2008-01-09

    Two recent issues related to nucleosynthesis in early proton-rich neutrino winds are investigated. In the first part we investigate the effect of nuclear physics uncertainties on the synthesis of {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. Based on recent experimental results, we find that the proton rich winds of the model investigated here can not be the only source of the solar abundance of {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. In the second part we investigate the nucleosynthesis from neutron rich bubbles and show that they do not contribute to the nucleosynthesis integrated over both neutron and proton-rich bubbles and proton-rich winds.

  1. Nucleosynthesis in Early Neutrino Driven Winds

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R. D.; Fisker, J. L.; Pruet, J.; Woosley, S. E.; Janka, H.-T.; Buras, R.

    2008-04-17

    Two recent issues realted to nucleosynthesis in early proton-rich neutrino winds are investigated. In the first part we investigate the effect of nuclear physics uncertainties on the synthesis of {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. Based on recent experimental results, we find that the proton rich winds of the model investigated here can not be the only source of the solar abundance of {sup 92}Mo and {sup 94}Mo. In the second part we investigate the nucleosynthesis from neutron rich bubbles and show that they do not contribute to the nucleosynthesis integrated over both neutron and proton-rich bubbles and proton-rich winds.

  2. Thoughts on Core-Collapse Supernova Theory†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrows, Adam; Dessart, Luc; Ott, Christian D.; Livne, Eli; Murphy, Jeremiah

    2008-06-01

    An emerging conclusion of theoretical supernova research is that the breaking of spherical symmetry may be the key to the elusive mechanism of explosion. Such explorations require state-of-the-art multi-dimensional numerical tools and significant computational resources. Despite the thousands of man-years and thousands of CPU-years devoted to date to studying the supernova mystery, both require further evolution. There are many computationally-challenging instabilities in the core, before, during, and after the launch of the shock, and a variety of multi-dimensional mechanisms are now being actively explored. These include the neutrino heating mechanism, the MHD jet mechanism, and an acoustic mechanism. The latter is the most controversial, and, as with all the contenders, requires detailed testing and scrutiny. In this paper, we analyze recent attempts to do so, and suggests methods to improve them.

  3. Supernovae by the Hundreds: the LCOGT Supernova Key Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew; Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano; LCOGT Key Project

    2016-01-01

    The LCOGT Supernova Key Project is a three year project to obtain lightcurves and spectra of 600 supernovae. To do this, it has been awarded 2900 hours per year on the 9 one meter and 2 two meter robotic telescopes of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope network (LCOGT). At the midway point of the Key Project, it is on track to achieving its goals. I will discuss recent insights into supernova progenitors, exotic individual supernovae, and some of the large samples of supernovae studied by the project.

  4. Evolution of clustered supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Evgenii O.; Shchekinov, Yuri A.; Nath, Biman B.

    2017-07-01

    We study the merging and evolution of isolated supernova (SN) remnants in a stellar cluster into a collective superbubble, with the help of 3D hydrodynamic simulations. We particularly focus on the transition stage when the isolated SN remnants gradually combine to form a superbubble. We find that when the SN rate is high (νsn ˜ 10-9 pc-3 yr-1), the merging phase lasts for ˜104 yr, for n = 1-10 cm-3, and the merging phase lasts for a longer time (˜0.1 Myr or more) for lower SN rates (νsn ≤ 10-10 pc-3 yr-1). During this transition phase, the growing superbubble is filled with dense and cool fragments of shells, and most of the energy is radiated away during this merging process. After passing through the intermediate phase, the superbubble eventually settles on to a new power-law wind asymptote that is smaller than estimated in a continuous wind model. This results in a significant (more than several times) underestimation of the mechanical luminosity needed to feed the bubble. We determine the X-ray and H α surface brightnesses as functions of time for such merging SNe in a stellar cluster and find that clusters with high SN rate shine predominantly in soft X-rays and H α. In particular, a low value of the volume-averaged H α-to-H β ratio and its large spread can be a good indicator of the transition phase of merging SNe.

  5. What Shapes Supernova Remnants?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has mounted that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) supernovae (SNe) can have substantial deviations from spherical symmetry; one such piece of evidence is the complex morphologies of supernova remnants (SNRs). However, the relative role of the explosion geometry and the environment in shaping SNRs remains an outstanding question. Recently, we have developed techniques to quantify the morphologies of SNRs, and we have applied these methods to the extensive X-ray and infrared archival images available of Milky Way and Magellanic Cloud SNRs. In this proceeding, we highlight some results from these studies, with particular emphasis on SNR asymmetries and whether they arise from ``nature'' or ``nurture''.

  6. Demonstrating Supernova Remnant Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    We have created a software tool to calculate at display supernova remnant evolution which includes all stages from early ejecta dominated phase to late-time merging with the interstellar medium. The software was created using Python, and can be distributed as Python code, or as an executable file. The purpose of the software is to demonstrate the different phases and transitions that a supernova remnant undergoes, and will be used in upper level undergraduate astrophysics courses as a teaching tool. The usage of the software and its graphical user interface will be demonstrated.

  7. The WFIRST Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Hounsell, Rebekah; Scolnic, Daniel; WFIRST Supernova Science Investigation Team

    2017-01-01

    WFRIST is expected to launch in the mid 2020s. As part of its main mission, it will conduct a survey to measure the Universe's cosmic expansion history with supernovae. I will present the first simulations of this survey. The simulations take into account our current knowledge of the hardware, realistic properties of the supernovae, and our understanding of the relevant systematic uncertainties. I will compare the ultimate dark enegery figures of merit derived from the simulations and discuss future plans. These data will be extremely useful for other science; other transient science and studies of the resulting deep static images will particularly benefit.

  8. Supernova remnant morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, R. N.

    1994-04-01

    The morphology of supernova remnants is principally determined by two components, a shell formed by interaction of the supernova ejecta with the surrounding medium, and a nebula which is powered directly by the associated pulsar. This nebula, often called a 'plerion', is usually located within the shell. These two components appear to evolve independently; in many cases there is no detectable plerion and in a few cases, the Crab Nebula being the most notable example, there is no detectable shell. A 'theoretician's supernova remnant' has spherical symmetry, but observers know that this is rarely the case. There are four main possible sources of non-sphericity, namely, the surrounding interstellar medium, the circumstellar medium, the surpernova explosion, and the associated pulsar. Supernovae often occured in active star formation regions and these regions often have complex networks of cavities blown by strong stellar winds. A supernova remnant expanding in this environment can consist of a several shell-like structure. IC443 is a good example (Braun and Strom, 1986, Astron. Astrophys., 1264, 193). The enhancement of Supernova remnant (SNR) shell brightness toward the Galactic plane (Caswell, 1977, Proc. Astron. Soc. Aust., 3, 130) is further evidence of the influence of the large-scale structure of the interstellar medium. One of the most common forms of non-sphericity is a bilateral symmetry attributed to a barrel-shaped enhancement of the shell (Kesteven and Caswell, 1987, Astron. Astrophys., 183, 118). There is good evidence that this and the associated bi-annular structure often obseved (Manchester, 1987, Astron. Astrophys., 171, 205) ar due to structure in the circumstellar material resulting from mass loss from the pre-supernova star (Storey et al., 1992, Astron. Astrophys., 265, 752). supernova remants (e.g., Tuohy, Clark and Burton, 1982, Astrophys. &J., 260, L65) are evidence that

  9. Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Richard; Li, Hong Wei

    1988-01-01

    Supernova 1987A (February 23, 1987) in the Large Magellanic Cloud is the brightest supernova to be observed since SN 1604 AD (Kepler). Detection of a burst of neutrinos indicates that a neutron star was formed. Radioactive decay of about 0.07 solar mass of Co-56 is responsible for the observed optical light as well as hard X-rays and gamma-ray lines. Ultraviolet, optical, and infrared 'light echoes' and soft X-rays provide information on the distribution of circumstellar matter and the evolution of the progenitor star.

  10. Supernova science with LCOGT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale A.; Valenti, S.; Sand, D. J.; Parrent, J. T.; Arcavi, I.; Graham, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT.net) is a collection of nine robotic one meter telescopes with imagers spaced around the world in longitude, operated as a single network. There are also two robotic FLOYDS spectrographs on the two meter Faulkes telescopes in Siding Spring, Australia, and Haleakala, Hawaii. Here we describe recent supernova lightcurves and spectra with taken with LCOGT after being triggered from Pan-STARRS1, the La Silla-QUEST survey, the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, and the IAU circulars. Since at least one telescope is always in the dark, and the facilities are robotic, LCOGT is uniquely suited to early-time supernova science.

  11. Supernova 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccray, Richard; Li, Hong Wei

    1988-01-01

    Supernova 1987A (February 23, 1987) in the Large Magellanic Cloud is the brightest supernova to be observed since SN 1604 AD (Kepler). Detection of a burst of neutrinos indicates that a neutron star was formed. Radioactive decay of about 0.07 solar mass of Co-56 is responsible for the observed optical light as well as hard X-rays and gamma-ray lines. Ultraviolet, optical, and infrared 'light echoes' and soft X-rays provide information on the distribution of circumstellar matter and the evolution of the progenitor star.

  12. Rapidly Rising Transients in the Supernova - Superluminous Supernova Gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arcavi, Iair; Wolf, William M.; Howell, D. Andrew; Bildsten, Lars; Leloudas, Giorgos; Hardin, Delphine; Prajs, Szymon; Perley, Daniel A.; Svirski, Gilad; Cenko, S. Bradley

    2016-01-01

    We present observations of four rapidly rising (t(sub rise) approximately equals 10 days) transients with peak luminosities between those of supernovae (SNe) and superluminous SNe (M(sub peak) approximately equals -20) - one discovered and followed by the PalomarTransient Factory (PTF) and three by the Supernova Legacy Survey. The light curves resemble those of SN 2011kl, recently shown to be associated with an ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB), though no GRB was seen to accompany our SNe. The rapid rise to a luminous peak places these events in a unique part of SN phase space, challenging standard SN emission mechanisms. Spectra of the PTF event formally classify it as an SN II due to broad H alpha emission, but an unusual absorption feature, which can be interpreted as either high velocity H alpha (though deeper than in previously known cases) or Si II (as seen in SNe Ia), is also observed. We find that existing models of white dwarf detonations, CSM interaction, shock breakout in a wind (or steeper CSM), and magnetar spin down cannot readily explain the observations. We consider the possibility that a Type 1.5 SN scenario could be the origin of our events. More detailed models for these kinds of transients and more constraining observations of future such events should help to better determine their nature.

  13. Gamma-line emission from radioactivities produced in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woosley, S. E.; Timmes, F. X.

    1997-01-01

    The major targets for the gamma ray spectroscopy of supernovae are reviewed. The principle benefit of such observations is the insight provided into the mechanisms of supernova explosions, the distribution and nature of star forming regions in our Galaxy, and the history of the nucleosynthesis of our Galaxy. The emphasis is on two short lived species, Co-56 and Ti-44 which may be seen in individual events and two longer lived species, Al-26 and Fe-60, which can be seen as the cumulative production of many supernovae.

  14. An effective Lagrangian description of supernova-core bounce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, H.; Deavila, V.; Duarte, S. J. B.; Kodama, T.

    1990-08-01

    The global dynamical aspects of a supernova event are studied in terms of an effective Lagrangian formulation. The equation of motion derived from this Lagrangian is solved numerically for different supernova core masses. An equation of state for cold matter is introduced by means of an adiabatic index parametrization which is a smooth function of the matter density. The energy transfer from the inner to the outer core is estimated in the context of the hydrodynamic bounce mechanism. It is found that only a very restricted mass distribution to pre-supernova core configuration generate a strong enough shock wave leading to a prompt bounce ejection.

  15. Inside the supernova: A powerful convective engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herant, Marc; Benz, Willy; Hix, W. Raphael; Fryer, Chris L.; Colgate, Stirling A.

    1994-01-01

    We present an extensive study of the inception of supernova explosions by following the evolution of the cores of two massive stars (15 and 25 Solar mass) in multidimension. Our calculations begin at the onset of core collapse and stop several hundred milliseconds after the bounce, at which time successful explosions of the appropriate magnitude have been obtained. Similar to the classical delayed explosion mechanism of Wilson, the explosion is powered by the heating of the envelope due to neutrinos emitted by the protoneutron star as it radiates the gravitational energy liberated by the collapse. However, as was shown by Herant, Benz, & Colgate, this heating generates strong convection outside the neutrinosphere, which we demonstrate to be critical to the explosion. By breaking a purely stratified hydrostatic equilibrium, convection moves the nascent supernova away from a delicate radiative equilibrium between neutrino emission and absorption, Thus, unlike what has been observed in one-dimensional calculations, explosions are rendered quite insensitive to the details of the physical input parameters such as neutrino cross sections or nuclear equation of state parameters. As a confirmation, our comparative one-dimensional calculations with identical microphysics, but in which convection cannot occur, lead to dramatic failures. Guided by our numerical results, we have developed a paradigm for the supernova explosion mechanism. We view a supernova as an open cycle thermodynamic engine in which a reservoir of low-entropy matter (the envelope) is thermally coupled and physically connected to a hot bath (the protoneutron star) by a neutrino flux, and by hydrodynamic instabilities. This paradigm does not invoke new or modified physics over previous treatments, but relies on compellingly straightforward thermodynamic arguments. It provides a robust and self-regulated explosion mechanism to power supernovae that is effective under a wide range of physical parameters.

  16. Inside the supernova: A powerful convective engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herant, Marc; Benz, Willy; Hix, W. Raphael; Fryer, Chris L.; Colgate, Stirling A.

    1994-01-01

    We present an extensive study of the inception of supernova explosions by following the evolution of the cores of two massive stars (15 and 25 Solar mass) in multidimension. Our calculations begin at the onset of core collapse and stop several hundred milliseconds after the bounce, at which time successful explosions of the appropriate magnitude have been obtained. Similar to the classical delayed explosion mechanism of Wilson, the explosion is powered by the heating of the envelope due to neutrinos emitted by the protoneutron star as it radiates the gravitational energy liberated by the collapse. However, as was shown by Herant, Benz, & Colgate, this heating generates strong convection outside the neutrinosphere, which we demonstrate to be critical to the explosion. By breaking a purely stratified hydrostatic equilibrium, convection moves the nascent supernova away from a delicate radiative equilibrium between neutrino emission and absorption, Thus, unlike what has been observed in one-dimensional calculations, explosions are rendered quite insensitive to the details of the physical input parameters such as neutrino cross sections or nuclear equation of state parameters. As a confirmation, our comparative one-dimensional calculations with identical microphysics, but in which convection cannot occur, lead to dramatic failures. Guided by our numerical results, we have developed a paradigm for the supernova explosion mechanism. We view a supernova as an open cycle thermodynamic engine in which a reservoir of low-entropy matter (the envelope) is thermally coupled and physically connected to a hot bath (the protoneutron star) by a neutrino flux, and by hydrodynamic instabilities. This paradigm does not invoke new or modified physics over previous treatments, but relies on compellingly straightforward thermodynamic arguments. It provides a robust and self-regulated explosion mechanism to power supernovae that is effective under a wide range of physical parameters.

  17. Inside the supernova: A powerful convective engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herant, Marc; Benz, Willy; Hix, W. Raphael; Fryer, Chris L.; Colgate, Stirling A.

    1994-11-01

    We present an extensive study of the inception of supernova explosions by following the evolution of the cores of two massive stars (15 and 25 Solar mass) in multidimension. Our calculations begin at the onset of core collapse and stop several hundred milliseconds after the bounce, at which time successful explosions of the appropriate magnitude have been obtained. Similar to the classical delayed explosion mechanism of Wilson, the explosion is powered by the heating of the envelope due to neutrinos emitted by the protoneutron star as it radiates the gravitational energy liberated by the collapse. However, as was shown by Herant, Benz, & Colgate, this heating generates strong convection outside the neutrinosphere, which we demonstrate to be critical to the explosion. By breaking a purely stratified hydrostatic equilibrium, convection moves the nascent supernova away from a delicate radiative equilibrium between neutrino emission and absorption, Thus, unlike what has been observed in one-dimensional calculations, explosions are rendered quite insensitive to the details of the physical input parameters such as neutrino cross sections or nuclear equation of state parameters. As a confirmation, our comparative one-dimensional calculations with identical microphysics, but in which convection cannot occur, lead to dramatic failures. Guided by our numerical results, we have developed a paradigm for the supernova explosion mechanism. We view a supernova as an open cycle thermodynamic engine in which a reservoir of low-entropy matter (the envelope) is thermally coupled and physically connected to a hot bath (the protoneutron star) by a neutrino flux, and by hydrodynamic instabilities. This paradigm does not invoke new or modified physics over previous treatments, but relies on compellingly straightforward thermodynamic arguments. It provides a robust and self-regulated explosion mechanism to power supernovae that is effective under a wide range of physical parameters.

  18. Theoretical models for supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1981-09-21

    The results of recent numerical simulations of supernova explosions are presented and a variety of topics discussed. Particular emphasis is given to (i) the nucleosynthesis expected from intermediate mass (10sub solar less than or equal to M less than or equal to 100 Msub solar) Type II supernovae and detonating white dwarf models for Type I supernovae, (ii) a realistic estimate of the ..gamma..-line fluxes expected from this nucleosynthesis, (iii) the continued evolution, in one and two dimensions, of intermediate mass stars wherein iron core collapse does not lead to a strong, mass-ejecting shock wave, and (iv) the evolution and explosion of vary massive stars (M greater than or equal to 100 Msub solar of both Population I and III. In one dimension, nuclear burning following a failed core bounce does not appear likely to lead to a supernova explosion although, in two dimensions, a combination of rotation and nuclear burning may do so. Near solar proportions of elements from neon to calcium and very brilliant optical displays may be created by hypernovae, the explosions of stars in the mass range 100 M/sub solar/ to 300 M/sub solar/. Above approx. 300 M/sub solar/ a black hole is created by stellar collapse following carbon ignition. Still more massive stars may be copious producers of /sup 4/He and /sup 14/N prior to their collapse on the pair instability.

  19. Supernova Photometric Lightcurve Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Tayeb; Narayan, Gautham

    2016-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on photometric supernova classification. We first explore the properties of supernova light curves, and attempt to restructure the unevenly sampled and sparse data from assorted datasets to allow for processing and classification. The data was primarily drawn from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) simulated data, created for the Supernova Photometric Classification Challenge. This poster shows a method for producing a non-parametric representation of the light curve data, and applying a Random Forest classifier algorithm to distinguish between supernovae types. We examine the impact of Principal Component Analysis to reduce the dimensionality of the dataset, for future classification work. The classification code will be used in a stage of the ANTARES pipeline, created for use on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope alert data and other wide-field surveys. The final figure-of-merit for the DES data in the r band was 60% for binary classification (Type I vs II).Zaidi was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  20. Supernova Confetti in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2010-11-01

    Chromium has four isotopes, with atomic weights of 50, 52, 53, and 54. In terrestrial rocks the isotopes behave in predictable ways, with their variations in relative abundance governed by geochemical processes. In contrast, some meteorites have deviant abundances of the heaviest (hence the one with the most neutrons) Cr isotope, chromium-54. These anomalies in isotopic composition are almost certainly caused by nuclear reactions in stars that existed before our Sun was formed. However, the mineralogical carrier of the special chromium-54 was not known until Nicolas Dauphas (University of Chicago) and eight colleagues there and at the California Institute of Technology, the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the Universite de Lille (France) made detailed analyses of chemical and physical separates from the Orgueil and Murchison carbonaceous chondrites. They found that the carrier of the isotopically-anomalous Cr is spinel, Cr-bearing oxide grains generally smaller than 100 nanometers. Only supernovae can produce the chromium-54 anomalies, although which specific type of supernova is not clear. An intriguing possibility is that the chromium-54-rich nano-oxide particles were produced in the same supernova that made two other short-lived isotopes, iron-60 and aluminum-26, which also existed in the Solar System when it formed. This suggests that formation of the Solar System was triggered by a supernova explosion.

  1. A Supernova Shockwaves

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-06-13

    Supernovae are the explosive deaths of the universe most massive stars. This false-color composite from NASA Spitzer Space Telescope and NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of N132D, the wispy pink shell of gas at center.

  2. THE ENGINES BEHIND SUPERNOVAE AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    FRYER, CHRISTOPHER LEE

    2007-01-23

    The authors review the different engines behind supernova (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), focusing on those engines driving explosions in massive stars: core-collapse SNe and long-duration GRBs. Convection and rotation play important roles in the engines of both these explosions. They outline the basic physics and discuss the wide variety of ways scientists have proposed that this physics can affect the supernova explosion mechanism, concluding with a review of the current status in these fields.

  3. GRAVITATIONAL FIELD SHIELDING AND SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T. X.

    2010-12-20

    A new mechanism for supernova explosions called gravitational field shielding is proposed, in accord with a five-dimensional fully covariant Kaluza-Klein theory with a scalar field that unifies the four-dimensional Einsteinian general relativity and Maxwellian electromagnetic theory. It is shown that a dense compact collapsing core of a star will suddenly turn off or completely shield its gravitational field when the core collapses to a critical density, which is inversely proportional to the square of mass of the core. As the core suddenly turns off its gravity, the extremely large pressure immediately stops the core collapse and pushes the mantle material of supernova moving outward. The work done by the pressure in the expansion can be the order of energy released in a supernova explosion. The gravity will resume and stop the core from a further expansion when the core density becomes less than the critical density. Therefore, the gravitational field shielding leads a supernova to impulsively explode and form a compact object such as a neutron star as a remnant. It works such that a compressed spring will shoot the oscillator out when the compressed force is suddenly removed.

  4. First stars, hypernovae, and superluminous supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomoto, Ken'Ichi

    2016-07-01

    After the big bang, production of heavy elements in the early universe takes place starting from the formation of the first (Pop III) stars, their evolution, and explosion. The Pop III supernova (SN) explosions have strong dynamical, thermal, and chemical feedback on the formation of subsequent stars and evolution of galaxies. However, the nature of Pop III stars/supernovae (SNe) have not been well-understood. The signature of nucleosynthesis yields of the first SN can be seen in the elemental abundance patterns observed in extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars. We show that the abundance patterns of EMP stars, e.g. the excess of C, Co, Zn relative to Fe, are in better agreement with the yields of hyper-energetic explosions (Hypernovae, (HNe)) rather than normal supernovae. We note the large variation of the abundance patterns of EMP stars propose that such a variation is related to the diversity of the GRB-SNe and posssibly superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). For example, the carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars may be related to the faint SNe (or dark HNe), which could be the explosions induced by relativistic jets. Finally, we examine the various mechanisms of SLSNe.

  5. Supernovae: lights in the darkness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Every year, at the end of the summer, the Section of Physics and Technique of the "Institut Menorquí d'Estudis" and the "Societat Catalana de Física" organize the "Trobades Científiques de la Mediterrània" with the support of several academic institutions. The 2007 edition has been devoted to stellar explosions, the true evolutionary engines of galaxies. Whenever a star explodes, it injects into the interstellar medium a kinetic energy of 1051 erg and between one and several solar masses of newly synthesized elements as a result of the thermonuclear reactions that have taken place within the stellar interior. Two mechanisms are able to provide these enormous amounts of energy: one of them thermonuclear and the other, gravitational. Thermonuclear supernovae are the result of the incineration of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf that is the compact star of a binary stellar system. If the two stars are sufficiently close to each other, the white dwarf accretes matter from its companion, approaches the mass of Chandrasekhar, and ends up exploding. The processes previous to the explosion, the explosion itself, as well as the exact nature of the double stellar system that explodes, are still a matter of discussion. This point is particularly important because these explosions, known as Type Ia Supernovae, are very homogenous and can be used to measure cosmological distances. The most spectacular result obtained, is the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe, but it still feels uncomfortable that such a fundamental result is based on a "measuring system" whose origin and behaviour in time is unknown. At the end of their lives, massive stars generate an iron nucleus that gets unstable when approaching the Chandrasekhar mass. Its collapse gives rise to the formation of a neutron star or a black hole, and the external manifestation of the energy that is released, about a 1053 erg, consists of a Type II or Ib/c supernova, of a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) or even of

  6. Charge transfer in helium-rich supernova plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, Douglas A.

    1994-01-01

    Charge transfer rate coefficients are estimated using Landau-Zener and modified Demkov approximations. The coefficients, augmented by those available from the literature, are used in statistical equilibrium equations describing the state of helium-rich supernova plasma. Such a plasma may describe both Type Ib and Type Ic supernova ejecta. The hypothesis that extensive mixing of metals with helium in Type Ic supernovae may provide a catalyst for rapid charge transfer that weakens the helium line emission by altering the excitation balance is tested. It is shown that charge transfer as a mechanism for suppressing helium line emission is ineffective unless the metal abundance is comparable to or larger than the helium abundance. This result supports an earlier conclusion that Type Ic supernovae must be helium poor relative to Type Ib events.

  7. Impacts of rotation on three-dimensional hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Ko; Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2014-09-20

    We perform a series of simplified numerical experiments to explore how rotation impacts the three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae. For our systematic study, we employ a light-bulb scheme to trigger explosions and a three-flavor neutrino leakage scheme to treat deleptonization effects and neutrino losses from the proto-neutron-star interior. Using a 15 M {sub ☉} progenitor, we compute 30 models in 3D with a wide variety of initial angular momentum and light-bulb neutrino luminosity. We find that the rotation can help the onset of neutrino-driven explosions for the models in which the initial angular momentum is matched to that obtained in recent stellar evolutionary calculations (∼0.3-3 rad s{sup –1} at the center). For the models with larger initial angular momentum, the shock surface deforms to be more oblate due to larger centrifugal force. This not only makes the gain region more concentrated around the equatorial plane, but also makes the mass larger in the gain region. As a result, buoyant bubbles tend to be coherently formed and rise in the equatorial region, which pushes the revived shock toward ever larger radii until a global explosion is triggered. We find that these are the main reasons that the preferred direction of the explosion in 3D rotating models is often perpendicular to the spin axis, which is in sharp contrast to the polar explosions around the axis that were obtained in previous two-dimensional simulations.

  8. Non-radial instabilities and progenitor asphericities in core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, B.; Janka, H.-Th.

    2015-04-01

    Since core-collapse supernova simulations still struggle to produce robust neutrino-driven explosions in 3D, it has been proposed that asphericities caused by convection in the progenitor might facilitate shock revival by boosting the activity of non-radial hydrodynamic instabilities in the post-shock region. We investigate this scenario in depth using 42 relativistic 2D simulations with multigroup neutrino transport to examine the effects of velocity and density perturbations in the progenitor for different perturbation geometries that obey fundamental physical constraints (like the anelastic condition). As a framework for analysing our results, we introduce semi-empirical scaling laws relating neutrino heating, average turbulent velocities in the gain region, and the shock deformation in the saturation limit of non-radial instabilities. The squared turbulent Mach number, , reflects the violence of aspherical motions in the gain layer, and explosive runaway occurs for ≳ 0.3, corresponding to a reduction of the critical neutrino luminosity by ˜ 25 per cent compared to 1D. In the light of this theory, progenitor asphericities aid shock revival mainly by creating anisotropic mass flux on to the shock: differential infall efficiently converts velocity perturbations in the progenitor into density perturbations δρ/ρ at the shock of the order of the initial convective Mach number Maprog. The anisotropic mass flux and ram pressure deform the shock and thereby amplify post-shock turbulence. Large-scale (ℓ = 2, ℓ = 1) modes prove most conducive to shock revival, whereas small-scale perturbations require unrealistically high convective Mach numbers. Initial density perturbations in the progenitor are only of the order of Ma_prog^2 and therefore play a subdominant role.

  9. Binary progenitors of supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, V.

    1984-12-01

    Among the massive stars that are expected to produce Type II, hydrogen-rich supernovae, the presence of a close companion can increase the main sequence mass needed to yield a collapsing core. In addition, due to mass transfer from the primary to the secondary, the companion enhances the stripping of the stellar hydrogen envelope produced by single star winds and thereby makes it harder for the star to give rise to a typical SN II light curve. Among the less massive stars that may be the basis for Type I, hydrogen-free supernovae, a close companion could be an innocent bystander to carbon detonation/deflagration in the primary. It may alternatively be a vital participant which transfers material to a white dwarf primary and drives it to explosive conditions.

  10. Supernova Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Woosley

    2008-05-05

    The Supernova Science Center (SNSC) was founded in 2001 to carry out theoretical and computational research leading to a better understanding of supernovae and related transients. The SNSC, a four-institutional collaboration, included scientists from LANL, LLNL, the University of Arizona (UA), and the University of California at Santa Cruz (UCSC). Intitially, the SNSC was funded for three years of operation, but in 2004 an opportunity was provided to submit a renewal proposal for two years. That proposal was funded and subsequently, at UCSC, a one year no-cost extension was granted. The total operational time of the SNSC was thus July 15, 2001 - July 15, 2007. This document summarizes the research and findings of the SNSC and provides a cummulative publication list.

  11. Superluminous Supernovae hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, M.

    2017-07-01

    We use our radiation hydrodynamic code in order to simulate magnetar powered Superluminous Supernovae (SLSNe). It is assumed that a central rapidly rotating magnetar deposits all its rotational energy into the ejecta where is added to the usual power. The magnetar luminosity and spin-down timescale are adopted as the free parameters of the model. For the case of ASASSN-15lh, which has been claimed as the most luminous supernova ever discovered, we have found physically plausible magnetar parameters can reproduce the overall shape of the bolometric light curve (LC) provided the progenitor mass is ≍ 8M⊙. The ejecta dynamics of this event shows signs of the magnetar energy input which deviates the expansion from the usually assumed homologous behaviour. Our numerical experiments lead us to conclude that the hydrodynamical modeling is necessary in order to derive the properties of powerful magnetars driving SLSNe.

  12. Supernova research with VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, Norbert; Bietenholz, Michael F.

    2016-06-01

    Core-collapse supernovae have been monitored with VLBI from shortly after the explosion to many years thereafter. Radio emission is produced as the ejecta hit the stellar wind left over from the dyingstar. Images show the details of the interaction as the shock front expands into the circumstellar medium. Measurements of the velocity and deceleration of the expansion provide information on both the ejecta and the circumstellar medium. VLBI observations can also search for the stellar remnant of the explosion, a neutron star or a black hole. Combining the transverse expansion rate with the radial expansion rate from optical spectra allows a geometric determination of the distance to the host galaxy. We will present results from recent VLBI observations, focus on their interpretations, and show updated movies of supernovae from soon after their explosion to the present.

  13. Supernova 1987A!

    PubMed

    Woosley, S E; Phillips, M M

    1988-05-06

    Light from the brightest supernova in almost 400 years arrived at Earth on 23 February 1987. Although located 160,000 light years away in a satellite galaxy of our own known as the Large Magellanic Cloud, this supernova's relative proximity compared to all others that have been observed in modern times has allowed observations, which were never possible before, to be made from space, from detectors on the ground and carried by balloons and airplanes, and from neutrino detectors deep underground. What emerges is a greater understanding of one of the most violent events in the universe, the death of a massive star. For the most part, theoretical expectations have been borne out, but some major surprises have made the event all the more fascinating.

  14. Are There Hidden Supernovae?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bregman, Jesse; Harker, David; Dunham, E.; Rank, David; Temi, Pasquale

    1997-02-01

    Ames Research Center and UCSC have been working on the development of a Mid IR Camera for the KAO in order to search for extra galactic supernovae. The development of the camera and its associated data reduction software have been successfully completed. Spectral Imaging of the Orion Bar at 6.2 and 7.8 microns demonstrates the derotation and data reduction software which was developed.

  15. Are There Hidden Supernovae?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse; Harker, David; Dunham, E.; Rank, David; Temi, Pasquale

    1997-01-01

    Ames Research Center and UCSC have been working on the development of a Mid IR Camera for the KAO in order to search for extra galactic supernovae. The development of the camera and its associated data reduction software have been successfully completed. Spectral Imaging of the Orion Bar at 6.2 and 7.8 microns demonstrates the derotation and data reduction software which was developed.

  16. The diffuse supernova neutrino flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunardini, Cecilia

    2011-12-01

    I review the status and perspectives of the research on the diffuse flux of (core collapse) supernova neutrinos (DSNνF). Several upper bounds exist on this flux in different detection channels. The strongest is the limit from SuperKamiokande (SK) of 1.2 electron antineutrinos cm-2s-1 at 90% confidence level above 19.3 MeV of neutrino energy. The predictions of the DSNνF depend on the supernova rate and on the neutrino emission in a individual supernova. Above the SK threshold, they range between 0.05 electron antineutrinos cm-2s-1 up to touching the SK limit. The SK bound constrains part of the parameter space of the supernova rate - and indirectly of the star formation rate - only in models with relatively hard neutrino spectra. Experimentally, a feasible and very important goal for the future is the improvement of background discrimination and the resulting lowering of the detection threshold. Theory instead will benefit from reducing the uncertainties on the supernova neutrino emission (either with more precise numerical modeling or with data from a galactic supernova) and on the supernova rate. The latter will be provided precisely by next generation supernova surveys up to a normalization factor. Therefore, the detection of the DSNνF is likely to be precious chiefly to constrain such normalization and to study the physics of neutrino emission in supernovae.

  17. Supernova Dust Factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Haley; Consortium, MESS; LCOGT

    2013-01-01

    The origin of interstellar dust in galaxies is poorly understood, particularly the relative contribution from supernovae. We present infrared and submillimeter photometry and spectroscopy from the Herschel Space Observatory of the Galactic remnants Tycho, Kepler and the Crab Nebula, taken as part of the Mass Loss from Evolved StarS program (MESS). Although we detect small amounts of dust surrounding Tycho and Kepler (the remnants of Type Ia supernovae), we show this is due to swept-up interstellar and circumstellar material respectively. The lack of dust grains in the ejecta suggests that Type Ia remnants do not produce substantial quantities of iron-rich dust grains and has important consequences for the ‘missing’ iron mass observed in ejecta. After carefully subtracting the synchrotron and line emission from the Crab, the remaining far-infrared continuum originates from 0.1-0.2 solar masses of dust. These observations suggest that the Crab Nebula has condensed most of the relevant refractory elements into dust and that these grains appear well set to survive their journey into the interstellar medium. In summary, our Herschel observations show that significantly less dust forms in the ejecta of Type Ia supernovae than in the remnants of core-collapse explosions, placing stringent constraints on the environments in which dust and molecules can form.

  18. Type IA Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig

    1992-01-01

    Spectral calculations show that a model based on the thermonuclear explosion of a degenerate carbon/oxygen white dwarf provides excellent agreement with observations of Type Ia supernovae. Identification of suitable evolutionary progenitors remains a severe problem. General problems with estimation of supernova rates are outlined and the origin of Type Ia supernovae from double degenerate systems are discussed in the context of new rates of explosion per H band luminosity, the lack of observed candidates, and the likely presence of H in the vicinity of some SN Ia events. Re-examination of the problems of triggering Type Ia by accretion of hydrogen from a companion shows that there may be an avenue involving cataclysmic variables, especially if extreme hibernation occurs. Novae may channel accreting white dwarfs to a unique locus in accretion rate/mass space. Systems that undergo secular evolution to higher mass transfer rates could lead to just the conditions necessary for a Type Ia explosion. Tests involving fluorescence or absorption in a surrounding circumstellar medium and the detection of hydrogen stripped from a companion, which should appear at low velocity inside the white dwarf ejecta, are suggested. Possible observational confirmation of the former is described.

  19. Supernovae and neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Beacom

    2002-09-19

    A long-standing problem in supernova physics is how to measure the total energy and temperature of {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}, {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}, and {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. While of the highest importance, this is very difficult because these flavors only have neutral-current detector interactions. We propose that neutrino-proton elastic scattering, {nu} + p {yields} {nu} + p, can be used for the detection of supernova neutrinos in scintillator detectors. It should be emphasized immediately that the dominant signal is on free protons. Though the proton recoil kinetic energy spectrum is soft, with T{sub p} {approx_equal} 2E{sub {nu}}{sup 2}/M{sub p}, and the scintillation light output from slow, heavily ionizing protons is quenched, the yield above a realistic threshold is nearly as large as that from {bar {nu}}{sub e} + p {yields} e{sup +} + n. In addition, the measured proton spectrum is related to the incident neutrino spectrum. The ability to detect this signal would give detectors like KamLAND and Borexino a crucial and unique role in the quest to detect supernova neutrinos.

  20. Supernova Discoveries from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory)

    DOE Data Explorer

    SNfactory International Collaboration,

    The Nearby Supernova Factory is an experiment designed to collect data on more Type Ia supernovae than have ever been studied in a single project before, and in so doing, to answer some fundamental questions about the nature of the universe. Type Ia supernovae are extraordinarily bright, remarkably uniform objects which make excellent "standard candles" for measuring the expansion rate of the universe. However, such stellar explosions are very rare, occurring only a couple of times per millenium in a typical galaxy, and remaining bright enough to detect only for a few weeks. Previous studies of Type Ia supernovae led to the discovery of the mysterious "dark energy" that is causing the universe to expand at an accelerating rate. To reduce the statistical uncertainties in previous experimental data, extensive spectral and photometric monitoring of more Type Ia supernovae is required. The SNfactory collaboration has built an automated system consisting of specialized software and custom-built hardware that systematically searches the sky for new supernovae, screens potential candidates, then performs multiple spectral and photometric observations on each supernova. These observations are stored in a database to be made available to supernova researchers world-wide for further study and analysis [copied from http://snfactory.lbl.gov/snf/snf-about.html]. Users must register and agree to the open access honor system. Finding charts are in FITS format and may not be accessible through normal browser settings.

  1. Supernova explosions and hydrodynamical instabilities: From core bounce to 90 days

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, W.; Colgate, S.A.; Herant, M.

    1993-01-08

    Since the advent of SN 1987A considerable progress has been made in our understanding of supernova explosions. It is now realized that they are intrinsically multidimensional in nature due to the various hydrodynamical instabilities which take place at almost all stages of the explosion. These instabilities not only modify the observables from the supernova, but are also thought to be at the heart of the supernova mechanism itself, in a way which guarantees robust and self-regulated explosions. In this paper, we review these instabilities placing them into their appropriate context and identifying their role in the genesis of core collapse supernovas.

  2. Radio emission from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, Gloria; Giacani, Elsa

    2015-09-01

    The explosion of a supernova releases almost instantaneously about 10^{51} ergs of mechanic energy, changing irreversibly the physical and chemical properties of large regions in the galaxies. The stellar ejecta, the nebula resulting from the powerful shock waves, and sometimes a compact stellar remnant, constitute a supernova remnant (SNR). They can radiate their energy across the whole electromagnetic spectrum, but the great majority are radio sources. Almost 70 years after the first detection of radio emission coming from an SNR, great progress has been achieved in the comprehension of their physical characteristics and evolution. We review the present knowledge of different aspects of radio remnants, focusing on sources of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds, where the SNRs can be spatially resolved. We present a brief overview of theoretical background, analyze morphology and polarization properties, and review and critically discuss different methods applied to determine the radio spectrum and distances. The consequences of the interaction between the SNR shocks and the surrounding medium are examined, including the question of whether SNRs can trigger the formation of new stars. Cases of multispectral comparison are presented. A section is devoted to reviewing recent results of radio SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, with particular emphasis on the radio properties of SN 1987A, an ideal laboratory to investigate dynamical evolution of an SNR in near real time. The review concludes with a summary of issues on radio SNRs that deserve further study, and analysis of the prospects for future research with the latest-generation radio telescopes.

  3. Gravitational Lensing of Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Olga; Mocioiu, Irina; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    The black hole at the center of the galaxy is a powerful lens for supernova neutrinos. In the very special circumstance of a supernova near the extended line of sight from Earth to the galactic center, lensing could dramatically enhance the neutrino flux at Earth and stretch the neutrino pulse.

  4. Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Huaiyu

    2014-06-24

    In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

  5. Gamma ray lines from buried supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Meyer, P.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation is conducted concerning the possibility that supernovae (SN), located in dense interstellar clouds, might become the sources of gamma ray lines. The SN progenitor, in such a case, has to be an O or B star so that its evolutionary lifetime is short, and an explosion inside the cloud is still possible. It is shown that, in principle, a measurement of the abundances in the ejecta is possible. Attention is given to the characteristics of a model, the expected luminosity of gamma-ray lines, and the study of specific numerical examples for testing the feasibility of the considered mechanism. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that gamma-ray line production by collisional excitation in confined supernovae remnants may be quite important.

  6. Petascale Core-Collapse Supernova Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, Bronson

    2009-11-01

    The advent of petascale computing brings with it the promise of substantial increases in physical fidelity for a host of scientific problems. However, the realities of computing on these resources are daunting, and the architectural features of petascale machines will require considerable innovation for effective use. Nevertheless, there exists a class of scientific problems whose ultimate answer requires the application of petascale (and beyond) computing. One example is ascertaining the core-collapse supernova mechanism and explaining the rich phenomenology associated with these events. These stellar explosions produce and disseminate a dominant fraction of the elements in the Universe; are prodigious sources of neutrinos, gravitational waves, and photons across the electromagnetic spectrum; and lead to the formation of neutron stars and black holes. I will describe our recent multidimensional supernova simulations performed on petascale platforms fielded by the DOE and NSF.

  7. Radiation Transport in Type IA Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, R

    1999-11-16

    It has been said more than once that the critical link between explosion models and observations is the ability to accurately simulate cooling and radiation transport in the expanding ejecta of Type Ia supernovae. It is perhaps frustrating to some of the theorists who study explosion mechanisms, and to some of the observers too, that more definitive conclusions have not been reached about the agreement, or lack thereof, between various Type Ia supernova models and the data. Although claims of superlative accuracy in transport simulations are sometimes made, I will argue here that there are outstanding issues of critical importance and in need of addressing before radiation transport calculations are accurate enough to discriminate between subtly different explosion models.

  8. Impacto ambiental de los remanentes de supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    The explosion of a supernovae (SN) represents the sudden injection of about ergs of thermal and mechanical energy in a small region of space, causing the formation of powerful shock waves that propagate through the interstellar medium at speeds of several thousands of km/s. These waves sweep, compress and heat the interstellar material that they encounter, forming the supernova remnants. Their evolution over thousands of years change forever, irreversibly, not only the physical but also the chemical properties of a vast region of space that can span hundreds of parsecs. This contribution briefly analyzes the impact of these explosions, discussing the relevance of some phenomena usually associated with SNe and their remnants in the light of recent theoretical and observational results.

  9. Pair-instability supernovae in the local universe

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Smidt, Joseph; Heger, Alexander; Hirschi, Raphael; Yusof, Norhasliza; Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L.; Stiavelli, Massimo; Chen, Ke-Jung; Joggerst, Candace C.

    2014-12-10

    The discovery of 150-300 M {sub ☉} stars in the Local Group and pair-instability supernova candidates at low redshifts has excited interest in this exotic explosion mechanism. Realistic light curves for pair-instability supernovae at near-solar metallicities are key to identifying and properly interpreting these events as more are found. We have modeled pair-instability supernovae of 150-500 M {sub ☉} Z ∼ 0.1-0.4 Z {sub ☉} stars. These stars lose up to 80% of their mass to strong line-driven winds and explode as bare He cores. We find that their light curves and spectra are quite different from those of Population III pair-instability explosions, which therefore cannot be used as templates for low-redshift events. Although non-zero metallicity pair-instability supernovae are generally dimmer than their Population III counterparts, in some cases they will be bright enough to be detected at the earliest epochs at which they can occur, the formation of the first galaxies at z ∼ 10-15. Others can masquerade as dim, short duration supernovae that are only visible in the local universe and that under the right conditions could be hidden in a wide variety of supernova classes. We also report for the first time that some pair-instability explosions can create black holes with masses of ∼100 M {sub ☉}.

  10. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Balantekin, A. B.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Kusakabe, M.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Pehlivan, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-06-01

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial 7Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and 7Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like 7Li, 11B, 92Nb, 138La and 180Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ13 with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio 11B/7Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  11. Nuclear astrophysics of supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, I'll give a general introduction to Supernova Theory, beginning with the presupernova evolution and ending with the later stages of the explosion. This will be distilled from a colloquium type of talk. It is necessary to have the whole supernova picture in one's mind's eye when diving into some of its nooks and crannies, as it is quite a mess of contradictory ingredients. We will have some discussion of supernova 1987a, but will keep our discussion more general. Second, we'll look at the infall and bounce of the star, seeing why it goes unstable, what dynamics it follows as it collapses, and how and why it bounces back. From there, we will go on to look at the equation of state (EOS) in more detail. We'll consider the cases T = 0 and T > 0. We'll focus on /rho/ < /rho//sub 0/, and then /rho/ > /rho//sub 0/ and the EOS of neutron stars, and whether or not they contain cores of strange matter. There are many things we could discuss here and not enough time. If I had more lectures, the remaining time would focus on two more questions of special interest to nuclear physicists: the electron capture reactions and neutrino transport. If time permitted, we'd have some discussion of the nucleosynthetic reactions in the explosion's debris as well. However, we cannot cover such material adequately, and I have chosen these topics because they are analytically tractable, pedagogically useful, and rather important. 23 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Cosmological and supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Balantekin, A. B.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Kusakabe, M.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Pehlivan, Y.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-06-24

    The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  13. GALAXY OUTFLOWS WITHOUT SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Sur, Sharanya; Scannapieco, Evan; Ostriker, Eve C. E-mail: sharanya.sur@asu.edu

    2016-02-10

    High surface density, rapidly star-forming galaxies are observed to have ≈50–100 km s{sup −1} line of sight velocity dispersions, which are much higher than expected from supernova driving alone, but may arise from large-scale gravitational instabilities. Using three-dimensional simulations of local regions of the interstellar medium, we explore the impact of high velocity dispersions that arise from these disk instabilities. Parametrizing disks by their surface densities and epicyclic frequencies, we conduct a series of simulations that probe a broad range of conditions. Turbulence is driven purely horizontally and on large scales, neglecting any energy input from supernovae. We find that such motions lead to strong global outflows in the highly compact disks that were common at high redshifts, but weak or negligible mass loss in the more diffuse disks that are prevalent today. Substantial outflows are generated if the one-dimensional horizontal velocity dispersion exceeds ≈35 km s{sup −1}, as occurs in the dense disks that have star-formation rate (SFR) densities above ≈0.1 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} kpc{sup −2}. These outflows are triggered by a thermal runaway, arising from the inefficient cooling of hot material coupled with successive heating from turbulent driving. Thus, even in the absence of stellar feedback, a critical value of the SFR density for outflow generation can arise due to a turbulent heating instability. This suggests that in strongly self-gravitating disks, outflows may be enhanced by, but need not caused by, energy input from supernovae.

  14. ACCELERATING COMPACT OBJECT MERGERS IN TRIPLE SYSTEMS WITH THE KOZAI RESONANCE: A MECHANISM FOR 'PROMPT' TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE, GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, AND OTHER EXOTICA

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Todd A.

    2011-11-10

    White dwarf-white dwarf (WD-WD) and neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) mergers may produce Type Ia supernovae and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), respectively. A general problem is how to produce binaries with semi-major axes small enough to merge in significantly less than the Hubble time (t{sub H}), and thus accommodate the observation that these events closely follow episodes of star formation. I explore the possibility that such systems are not binaries at all, but actually coeval, or dynamical formed, triple systems. The tertiary induces Kozai oscillations in the inner binary, driving it to high eccentricity, and reducing its gravitational wave (GW) merger timescale. This effect significantly increases the allowed range of binary period P such that the merger time is t{sub merge} < t{sub H}. In principle, Chandrasekhar-mass binaries with P {approx} 300 days can merge in {approx}< t{sub H} if they contain a prograde solar-mass tertiary at high enough inclination. For retrograde tertiaries, the maximum P such that t{sub merge} {approx}< t{sub H} is yet larger. In contrast, P {approx}< 0.3 days is required in the absence of a tertiary. I discuss implications of these findings for the production of transients formed via compact object binary mergers. Based on the statistics of solar-type binaries, I argue that many such binaries should be in triple systems affected by the Kozai resonance. If true, expectations for the mHz GW signal from individual sources, the diffuse background, and the foreground for GW experiments like LISA are modified. This work motivates future studies of triples systems of A, B, and O stars, and new types of searches for WD-WD binaries in triple systems.

  15. Supernova ejecta with a relativistic wind from a central compact object: a unified picture for extraordinary supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Akihiro; Maeda, Keiichi

    2017-04-01

    The hydrodynamical interaction between freely expanding supernova ejecta and a relativistic wind injected from the central region is studied in analytic and numerical ways. As a result of the collision between the ejecta and the wind, a geometrically thin shell surrounding a hot bubble forms and expands in the ejecta. We use a self-similar solution to describe the early dynamical evolution of the shell and carry out a two-dimensional special relativistic hydrodynamic simulation to follow further evolution. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability inevitably develops at the contact surface separating the shocked wind and ejecta, leading to the complete destruction of the shell and the leakage of hot gas from the hot bubble. The leaking hot materials immediately catch up with the outermost layer of the supernova ejecta and thus different layers of the ejecta are mixed. We present the spatial profiles of hydrodynamical variables and the kinetic energy distributions of the ejecta. We stop the energy injection when a total energy of 1052 erg, which is 10 times larger than the initial kinetic energy of the supernova ejecta, is deposited into the ejecta and follow the subsequent evolution. From the results of our simulations, we consider expected emission from supernova ejecta powered by the energy injection at the centre and discuss the possibility that superluminous supernovae and broad-lined Ic supernovae could be produced by similar mechanisms.

  16. Radio Emission from Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, Kurt W.; Panagia, Nino; Sramek, Richard A.; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Stockdale, Christopher J.; Kelley, Matthew T.

    2009-05-03

    Study of radio supernovae over the past 27 years includes more than three dozen detected objects and more than 150 upper limits. From this work it is possible to identify classes of radio properties, demonstrate conformance to and deviations from existing models, estimate the density and structure of the circumstellar material and, by inference, the evolution of the presupernova stellar wind, and reveal the last stages of stellar evolution before explosion. It is also possible to detect ionized hydrogen along the line of sight, to demonstrate binary properties of the presupernova stellar system, and to detect dumpiness of the circumstellar material.

  17. CRTS Supernova Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Graham, M. J.; Williams, R.; Mahabal, A.; Beshore, E. C.; Larson, S. M.; Hill, R.; Catelan, M.; Christensen, E.

    2008-09-01

    We have detected a likely supernova in CSS images from 24 Sep 2008 UT. The object has the following parameters:

    CSS080924:044524+182425 2008-09-24 UT 11:17:06 RA 04:45:24.00 Dec 18:24:25.1 Mag 17.5 Type SN
    The object is near the edge of galaxy LCSB L0250N (z=0.0155).

  18. Supernova 2002hi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooley, D.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    2003-01-01

    D. Pooley and W. H. G. Lewin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, on behalf of a larger collaboration, report the detection of X-ray emission at the position of the type-IIn supernova (SN) 2002hi (IAUC 8006) with the Chandra X-ray observatory: An ACIS-S3 observation of 10 ks was made on Dec. 10.73. In the 0.5-10 keV range, we searched a 2x2 pixel region (approx. 1" by 1") around the reported position of the SN and detected 2 counts.

  19. Uncertainties in Supernova Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Patrick A.; Fryer, C. L.

    2006-12-01

    Theoretical nucleosynthetic yields from supernovae are sensitive to both the details of the progenitor star and the explosion calculation. We attempt to comprehensively identify the sources of uncertainties in these yields. In this poster we concentrate on the variations in yields from a single progenitor arising from common 1-dimensional methods of approximating a supernova explosion. 3-dimensional effects in the explosion and the progenitor and improved physics in the progenitor evolution are also given preliminary consideration. For the 1-dimensional explosions we find that both elemental and isotopic yields for Si and heavier elements are a sensitive function of explosion energy. Also, piston-driven and thermal bomb type explosions have different yields for the same explosion energy. Yields derived from 1-dimensional explosions are non-unique. Bulk yields of common elements can vary by factors of several depending upon the assumptions of the calculation. This work was carried out in part under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy at Los Alamos National Laboratory and supported by Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396, by a DOE SciDAC grant DE-FC02-01ER41176, an NNSA ASC grant, and a subcontract to the ASCI FLASH Center at the University of Chicago.

  20. Cassiopeia A supernova

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA's Fermi Closes on Source of Cosmic Rays New images from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope show where supernova remnants emit radiation a billion times more energetic than visible light. The images bring astronomers a step closer to understanding the source of some of the universe's most energetic particles -- cosmic rays. This composite shows the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant across the spectrum: Gamma rays (magenta) from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope; X-rays (blue, green) from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory; visible light (yellow) from the Hubble Space Telescope; infrared (red) from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope; and radio (orange) from the Very Large Array near Socorro, N.M. Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration, CXC/SAO/JPL-Caltech/Steward/O. Krause et al., and NRAO/AUI For more information: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/GLAST/news/cosmic-rays-source.... NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  1. Automated Supernova Discovery (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) We are developing a system of robotic telescopes for automatic recognition of Supernovas as well as other transient events in collaboration with the Puckett Supernova Search Team. At the SAS2014 meeting, the discovery program, SNARE, was first described. Since then, it has been continuously improved to handle searches under a wide variety of atmospheric conditions. Currently, two telescopes are used to build a reference library while searching for PSN with a partial library. Since data is taken every night without clouds, we must deal with varying atmospheric and high background illumination from the moon. Software is configured to identify a PSN, reshoot for verification with options to change the run plan to acquire photometric or spectrographic data. The telescopes are 24-inch CDK24, with Alta U230 cameras, one in CA and one in NM. Images and run plans are sent between sites so the CA telescope can search while photometry is done in NM. Our goal is to find bright PSNs with magnitude 17.5 or less which is the limit of our planned spectroscopy. We present results from our first automated PSN discoveries and plans for PSN data acquisition.

  2. The LCOGT Supernova Key Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew; Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano; Lcogt Supernova Key Project

    2015-01-01

    I present first results from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) Supernova Key Project. LCOGT is a network of 11 robotic one and two meter telescopes spaced around the globe with imaging and spectroscopic capabilities. The supernova key project is a 3 year program to obtain lightcurves and spectra of at least 450 supernovae. About half are expected to be core-collapse supernovae, and half thermonuclear. We will start light curves and spectroscopy within hours of discovery, and focus on those SNe caught soon after explosion. The goals are fivefold: (1) observe supernovae soon after explosion to search for signs of their progenitors, (2) obtain a large homogeneous sample of supernovae for next generation cosmological studies, (3) obtain a large sample of supernovae for statistical studies comparing groups that are split into different populations, (4) obtain some of the first large samples of the recently discovered classes of rare and exotic explosions, (5) obtain the optical light curves and spectroscopy in support of studies at other wavelengths and using other facilities including UV observations, IR imaging and spectroscopy, host galaxy studies, high resolution spectroscopy, and late-time spectroscopy with large telescopes.

  3. Turbulent Combustion in Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Aaron P.; Townsley, D. M.; Calder, A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Despite their use as standardizable candles that led to the (Nobel-prize winning) discovery of the accelerating Universe, we still do not understand the mechanism by which type Ia supernovae explode. Some of the most successful proposed scenarios involve a centrally-ignited deflagration of a massive C-O white dwarf. Due to vigorous convection prior to ignition and the subsequent fluid instabilities that develop, the details of turbulent combustion are critically important to capture the evolution of the explosion. The relatively slow and extremely non-linear progression of the deflagration phase provides a link between expected ignition conditions and gross properties of the supernova. In order to provide a physical understanding of how variations in the properties of the white dwarf (or host galaxy) affect the explosion outcome, numerical investigations must be performed in 3D with a detailed treatment of turbulence-flame interaction (TFI). We present initial results from incorporating a new treatment of TFI in 3D simulations of type Ia supernovae. This work was supported in part by NASA under grant No. NNX09AD19G. The author's present address is at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  4. THREE-DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVA SIMULATIONS FOR AN 11.2 M{sub Sun} STAR WITH SPECTRAL NEUTRINO TRANSPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Takiwaki, Tomoya; Kotake, Kei; Suwa, Yudai

    2012-04-20

    We present numerical results on three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic core-collapse simulations of an 11.2 M{sub Sun} star. By comparing one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) results with those of 3D, we study how the increasing spacial multi-dimensionality affects the postbounce supernova dynamics. The calculations were performed with an energy-dependent treatment of the neutrino transport that is solved by the isotropic diffusion source approximation scheme. In agreement with previous study, our 1D model does not produce explosions for the 11.2 M{sub Sun} star, while the neutrino-driven revival of the stalled bounce shock is obtained in both the 2D and 3D models. The standing accretion-shock instability (SASI) is observed in the 3D models, in which the dominant mode of the SASI is bipolar (l = 2) with its saturation amplitudes being slightly smaller than 2D. By performing a tracer-particle analysis, we show that the maximum residency time of material in the gain region becomes longer in 3D than in 2D due to non-axisymmetric flow motions, which is one of advantageous aspects of 3D models to obtain neutrino-driven explosions. Our results show that convective matter motions below the gain radius become much more violent in 3D than in 2D, making the neutrino luminosity larger for 3D. Nevertheless, the emitted neutrino energies are made smaller due to the enhanced cooling. Our results indicate whether these advantages for driving 3D explosions could or could not overwhelm the disadvantages is sensitive to the employed numerical resolutions. An encouraging finding is that the shock expansion tends to become more energetic for models with finer resolutions. To draw a robust conclusion, 3D simulations with much higher numerical resolutions and with more advanced treatment of neutrino transport and of gravity are needed, which could be practicable by utilizing forthcoming Petaflops-class supercomputers.

  5. Supernova 1987A: The Supernova of a Lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirshner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Supernova 1987A, the brightest supernova since Kepler's in 1604, was detected 30 years ago at a distance of 160 000 light years in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. Visible with the naked eye and detected with the full range of technology constructed since Kepler's time, SN 1987A has continued to be a rich source of empirical information to help understand supernova explosions and their evolution into supernova remnants. While the light output has faded by a factor of 10 000 000 over those 30 years, instrumentation, like the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array has continued to improve so that this supernova continues to be visible in X-rays, ultraviolet light, visible light, infrared light and in radio emission. In this review, I will sketch what has been learned from these observations about the pre-supernova star and its final stages of evolution, the explosion physics, the energy sources for emission, and the shock physics as the expanding debris encounters the circumstellar ring that was created about 20 000 years before the explosion. Today, SN 1987A is making the transition to a supernova remnant- the energetics are no longer dominated by the radioactive elements produced in the explosion, but by the interaction of the expanding debris with the surrounding gas. While we are confident that the supernova explosion had its origin in gravitational collapse, careful searches for a compact object at the center of the remnant place upper limits of a few solar luminosities on that relic. Support for HST GO programs 13401 and 13405 was provided by NASA through grants from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  6. Polarisation Spectral Synthesis For Type Ia Supernova Explosion Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulla, Mattia

    2017-02-01

    Despite their relevance across a broad range of astrophysical research topics, Type Ia supernova explosions are still poorly understood and answers to the questions of when, why and how these events are triggered remain unclear. In this respect, polarisation offers a unique opportunity to discriminate between the variety of possible scenarios. The observational evidence that Type Ia supernovae are associated with rather low polarisation signals (smaller than a few per cent) places strong constraints for models and calls for modest asphericities in the progenitor system and/or explosion mechanism.The goal of this thesis is to assess the validity of contemporary Type Ia supernova explosion models by testing whether their predicted polarisation signatures can account for the small signals usually observed. To this end, we have implemented and tested an innovative Monte Carlo scheme in the radiative transfer code artis. Compared to previous Monte Carlo approaches, this technique produces synthetic observables (light curves, flux and polarisation spectra) with a substantial reduction in the Monte Carlo noise and therefore in the required computing time. This improvement is particularly crucial for our study as we aim to extract very weak polarisation signals, comparable to those detected in Type Ia supernovae. We have also demonstrated the applicability of this method to other classes of supernovae via a preliminary study of the first spectropolarimetry observations of superluminous supernovae.Using this scheme, we have calculated synthetic spectropolarimetry for three multi-dimensional explosion models recently proposed as promising candidates to explain Type Ia supernovae. Our findings highlight the power of spectropolarimetry in testing and discriminating between different scenarios. While all the three models predict light curves and flux spectra that are similar to each others and reproduce those observed in Type Ia supernovae comparably well, polarisation does

  7. Supernova Candidate from CSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, A. J.; Mahabal, A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Williams, R.; Graham, M. J.; Christensen, E.; Beshore, E. C.; Larson, S. M.

    2008-06-01

    We have detected a likely Supernova in Catalina Sky Survey images from 11 Jun 2008 UT. The object has the following parameters:

    CSS080611:121642+410211 2008-06-11 UT 04:52:41 RA 12:16:41.53 Dec 41:02:11.2 Mag 17.7 Type SN
    The object is near the edge of galaxy SDSSJ121642.18+410223.7 (z = 0.039, mags: g~ 17.9, r~17.6, i~17.3, z~17.5).

  8. The Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, John C.

    We wish to obtain both emission and absorption line observations of the Vela Supernova remnant. The filament we wish to study in emission is the brightest filament in the SNR, so it will provide a spectrum twice the quality of any in existence. It is also located at the edge of an unusual bulge in the SNR, and it can be used to test the level of departure from pressure equilibrium in the remnant, which is useful as a test of evaporative models of SNR evolution. The absorption line studies will look for evidence of the drastically unstable behavior of shocks above 150 km/s predicted by Innes and Giddings. Four of the stars studied by Jenkins, Silk and Wallerstein showed marginal evidence for two positive or two negative high velocity components. If these multiple velocity components are confirmed, they support the secondary shock predictions of Innes and Giddings.

  9. Pulsars and supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, R.; Schaudt, K.J.

    1988-02-01

    With the recent discovery of the pulsar PSR 1951 + 22 in CTB 80, four pulsars are now known in supernova remnants (SNRs) of the plerion and composite classes. It is argued that this success rate of pulsar detections implies that young fast pulsars have long fan-beams that enable them to be seen from most directions. Based on calculations that use a pulsar luminosity model and allow for selection effects, it is suggested that the best SNRs for future pulsar searches are 3C 58, MSH 11-62, G24.7 + 0.6, and MSH 15-56. It is also concluded that the failure to detect pulsars in shell SNRs implies either that there are no pulsars in these SNRs or that the pulsars are unusually weak, possibly due to slow rotation or weak magnetic fields. 25 references.

  10. Variety in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turatto, Massimo; Benetti, Stefano; Cappellaro, Enrico

    Detailed observations of a growing number of supernovae have determined a bloom of new peculiar events. In this paper we take a short tour through the SN diversity and discuss some important, physical issues related to it. Because of the role of SN Ia in determining the cosmological parameters, it is crucial to understand the physical origin of even subtle, observed differences. An important issue is also the reddening correction. We believe that the measure of interstellar lines on medium resolution spectra of SNe can be used to derive lower limits on the interstellar extinction. A few physical parameters of the progenitor, namely radius, mass, density structure and angular momentum, may explain most of the diversity of core-collapse events. In addition, if the ejecta expand into a dense circumstellar medium the ejecta-CSM interaction may dominate the observed outcome and provide a mean to probe the mass loss history of the SN progenitor in the last stages of its evolution.

  11. Dimming supernovae without cosmic acceleration.

    PubMed

    Csáki, Csaba; Kaloper, Nemanja; Terning, John

    2002-04-22

    We present a simple model where photons propagating in extragalactic magnetic fields can oscillate into very light axions. The oscillations may convert some of the photons, departing a distant supernova, into axions, making the supernova appear dimmer and hence more distant than it really is. Averaging over different configurations of the magnetic field we find that the dimming saturates at about one-third of the light from the supernovae at very large redshifts. This results in a luminosity distance versus redshift curve almost indistinguishable from that produced by the accelerating Universe, if the axion mass and coupling scale are m approximately 10(-16) eV, M approximately 4 x 10(11) GeV. This phenomenon may be an alternative to the accelerating Universe for explaining supernova observations.

  12. Supernova olivine from cometary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P.; Lauretta, Dante S.

    2005-01-01

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (<0.8 times solar), indicative of formation from a type II supernova. The aggregate contains olivine (forsterite 83) grains <100 nanometers in size, with microstructures that are consistent with minimal thermal alteration. This unusually iron-rich olivine grain could have formed by equilibrium condensation from cooling supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  13. Hardy Star Survives Supernova Blast

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-03-20

    This composite image contains data from Chandra (purple) that provides evidence for the survival of a companion star from the blast of a supernova explosion. Chandra's X-rays reveal a point-like source in the supernova remnant at the location of a massive star. The data suggest that mass is being pulled away from the massive star towards a neutron star or a black hole companion. If confirmed, this would be only the third binary system containing both a massive star and a neutron star or black hole ever found in the aftermath of a supernova. This supernova remnant is found embedded in clouds of ionized hydrogen, which are shown in optical light (yellow and cyan) from the MCELS survey, along with additional optical data from the DSS (white).

  14. Supernova Remnant in 3-D

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-01-06

    For the first time, a multiwavelength three-dimensional reconstruction of a supernova remnant has been created. This visualization of Cassiopeia A, or Cas A, the result of an explosion approximately 330 years ago, uses data from several NASA telescopes.

  15. Supernova olivine from cometary dust.

    PubMed

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay P; Lauretta, Dante S

    2005-07-29

    An interplanetary dust particle contains a submicrometer crystalline silicate aggregate of probable supernova origin. The grain has a pronounced enrichment in 18O/16O (13 times the solar value) and depletions in 17O/16O (one-third solar) and 29Si/28Si (<0.8 times solar), indicative of formation from a type II supernova. The aggregate contains olivine (forsterite 83) grains <100 nanometers in size, with microstructures that are consistent with minimal thermal alteration. This unusually iron-rich olivine grain could have formed by equilibrium condensation from cooling supernova ejecta if several different nucleosynthetic zones mixed in the proper proportions. The supernova grain is also partially encased in nitrogen-15-rich organic matter that likely formed in a presolar cold molecular cloud.

  16. Spectroscopic classification of supernova candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkin, S. T.; Hall, A.; Fraser, M.; Campbell, H.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Pietro, N.

    2014-09-01

    We report the spectroscopic classification of four supernovae at the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph and the R300V grating (3500-8000 Ang; ~6 Ang resolution).

  17. Fritz Zwicky: Novae Become Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, T.

    2005-12-01

    The Swiss physicist Fritz Zwicky (1898-1974) dabbled in a plethora of disciplines, including astronomy and astrophysics. His dabblings were with vested interest and he has left quite an impact. His first great success was his nova research. In the early 1930s, while supermarkets and Superman were flying, he labelled the distinctly brighter nova Supernova. It had been believed that novae were the collision of two stars, but Zwicky came to recognize supernovae as a phenomenon quite distinct from novae. He and Walter Baade explained supernova by melding astronomy and physics and in this aim they created neutron stars, explained the origin of cosmic rays, initiated the first sky survey, and confirmed that a number of historical novae were indeed supernovae. This was truly an important work in the history of astrophysics.

  18. Simulation of Kepler Supernova Explosion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This video shows a simulation of the Kepler supernova as it interacts with material expelled by the giant star companion to the white dwarf before the latter exploded. It was assumed that the bulk ...

  19. Ozone Depletion from Nearby Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Laird, Claude M.; Jackman, Charles H.; Cannizzo, John K.; Mattson, Barbara J.; Chen, Wan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Estimates made in the 1970's indicated that a supernova occurring within tens of parsecs of Earth could have significant effects on the ozone layer. Since that time improved tools for detailed modeling of atmospheric chemistry have been developed to calculate ozone depletion, and advances have been made also in theoretical modeling of supernovae and of the resultant gamma ray spectra. In addition, one now has better knowledge of the occurrence rate of supernovae in the galaxy, and of the spatial distribution of progenitors to core-collapse supernovae. We report here the results of two-dimensional atmospheric model calculations that take as input the spectral energy distribution of a supernova, adopting various distances from Earth and various latitude impact angles. In separate simulations we calculate the ozone depletion due to both gamma rays and cosmic rays. We find that for the combined ozone depletion from these effects roughly to double the 'biologically active' UV flux received at the surface of the Earth, the supernova must occur at approximately or less than 8 parsecs.

  20. Stellar core collapse and supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.; Mayle, R.; Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.

    1985-04-01

    Massive stars that end their stable evolution as their iron cores collapse to a neutron star or black hole long been considered good candidates for producing Type II supernovae. For many years the outward propagation of the shock wave produced by the bounce of these iron cores has been studied as a possible mechanism for the explosion. For the most part, the results of these studies have not been particularly encouraging, except, perhaps, in the case of very low mass iron cores or very soft nuclear equations of state. The shock stalls, overwhelmed by photodisintegration and neutrino losses, and the star does not explode. More recently, slow late time heating of the envelope of the incipient neutron star has been found to be capable of rejuvenating the stalled shock and producing an explosion after all. The present paper discusses this late time heating and presents results from numerical calculations of the evolution, core collapse, and subsequent explosion of a number of recent stellar models. For the first time they all, except perhaps the most massive, explode with reasonable choices of input physics. 39 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  1. SUPERNOVA FEEDBACK KEEPS GALAXIES SIMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborti, Sayan

    2011-05-10

    Galaxies evolve continuously under the influence of self-gravity, rotation, accretion, mergers, and feedback. The currently favored cold dark matter cosmological framework suggests a hierarchical process of galaxy formation, wherein the present properties of galaxies are decided by their individual histories of being assembled from smaller pieces. However, recent studies have uncovered surprising correlations among the properties of galaxies, to the extent of forming a one-parameter set lying on a single fundamental line. It has been argued in the literature that such simplicity is hard to explain within the paradigm of hierarchical galaxy mergers. One of the puzzling results is the simple linear correlation between the neutral hydrogen mass and the surface area, implying that widely different galaxies share very similar neutral hydrogen surface densities. In this work, we show that self-regulated star formation, driven by the competition between gravitational instabilities and mechanical feedback from supernovae, can explain the nearly constant neutral hydrogen surface density across galaxies. We therefore recover the simple scaling relation observed between the neutral hydrogen mass and surface area. This result furthers our understanding of the surprising simplicity in the observed properties of diverse galaxies.

  2. First supernova companion star found

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Supernova 1993J exploding hi-res Size hi-res: 222 kb Credits: ESA and Justyn R. Maund (University of Cambridge) Supernova 1993J exploding (artist’s impression) New observations with the Hubble Space Telescope allow a look into a supernova explosion under development. In this artist’s view the red supergiant supernova progenitor star (left) is exploding after having transferred about 10 solar masses of hydrogen gas to the blue companion star (right). This interaction process happened over about 250 years and affected the supernova explosion to such an extent that SN 1993J was later known as one of the most peculiar supernovae ever seen. Supernova 1993J exploding hi-res Size hi-res: 4200 kb Credits: ESA and Justyn R. Maund (University of Cambridge) The site of the Supernova 1993J explosion A virtual journey into one of the spiral arms of the grand spiral Messier 81 (imaged with the Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, left) reveals the superb razor-sharp imaging power of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (Hubble’s WFPC2 instrument, below). The close-up (with Hubble’s ACS, to the right) is centred on the newly discovered companion star to Supernova 1993J that itself is no longer visible. The quarter-circle around the supernova companion is a so-called light echo originating from sheets of dust in the galaxy reflecting light from the original supernova explosion. Supernova 1993J explosing site hi-res Size hi-res: 1502 kb Credits: ESA and Justyn R. Maund (University of Cambridge) Close-up of the Supernova 1993J explosion site (ACS/HRC image) This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows the area in Messier 81 where Supernova 1993J exploded. The companion to the supernova ‘mother star’ that remains after the explosion is seen in the centre of the image. The image is taken with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys and is a combination of four exposures taken with ACS’ High Resolution Camera. The exposures were taken through two near-UV filters (250W

  3. Shocked Clouds in the Vela Supernova Remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, Joy S.; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2004-01-01

    Unusually strong high-excitation C I has been detected in eleven lines of sight through the Vela supernova remnant by means of UV absorption-line studies of IUE data. Most of these lines of sight lie near the western edge of the X-ray bright region of the supernova remnant in a spatially distinct band approximately 1deg by 4deg oriented approximately north/south. The high-excitation C I (denoted C I*) is interpreted as evidence of a complex of shocked dense clouds inside the supernova remnant, due to the high pressures indicated in this region. To further analyze the properties of this region of C I*, we present new HIRES-processed IRAS data of the entire Vela SNR. A temperature map calculated from the HIRES IRAS data, based on a two-component dust model, reveals the signature of hot dust at several locations in the SNR. The hot dust is anti-correlated spatially with X-ray emission as revealed by ROSAT, as would be expected for a dusty medium interacting with a shock wave. The regions of hot dust are strongly correlated with optical filaments, supporting a scenario of dense clouds interior to the SNR that have been shocked and are now cooling behind the supernova blast wave. With few exceptions, the lines of sight to the strong C I* pass through regions of hot dust and optical filaments. Possible mechanisms for the production of the anomalously large columns of C I and C I* are discussed. Dense clouds on the back western hemisphere of the remnant may explain the relatively low X-ray emission in the western portion of the Vela supernova remnant due to the slower forward shock velocity in regions where the shock has encountered the dense clouds. An alternate explanation for the presence of neutral, excited state, and ionized species along the same line of sight may be a magnetic precusor that heats and compresses the gas ahead of the shock.

  4. Supernovae, neutron stars and biomolecular chirality.

    PubMed

    Bonner, W A; Rubenstein, E

    1987-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental investigations of the origin of biomolecular chirality are reviewed briefly. Biotic and abiotic theories are evaluated critically with the conclusion that asymmetric photochemical processes with circulary polarized light (CPL), particularly asymmetric photolyses, constitute the most viable mechanisms. Solar CPL sources appear too weak and random to be effective. We suggest an alternative CPL source, namely, the synchrotron radiation from the neutron star remnants of supernova explosions. This could asymmetrically process racemic compounds in the organic mantles of the dust grains in interstellar clouds, and the resulting chiral molecules could be transferred to Earth by cold accretion as the solar system periodically traverses these interstellar clouds.

  5. Supernova Remnants with Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caragiulo, M.; Di Venere, L.

    2017-03-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), on-board the Fermi satellite, proved to be, after 8 years of data taking, an excellent instrument to detect and observe Supernova Remnants (SNRs) in a range of energies running from few hundred MeV up to few hundred GeV. It provides essential information on physical processes that occur at the source, involving both accelerated leptons and hadrons, in order to understand the mechanisms responsible for the primary Cosmic Ray (CR) acceleration. We show the latest results in the observation of Galactic SNRs by Fermi-LAT.

  6. The velocity and composition of supernova ejecta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1971-01-01

    In case of the Gum nebula, a pulsar - a presumed neutron star - is believed to be a relic of the supernova explosion. Regardless of the mechanism of the explosion, the velocity distribution and composition of the ejected matter will be roughly the same. The reimploding mass fraction is presumed to be neutron rich. The final composition is thought to be roughly 1/3 iron and 2/3 silicon, with many small fractions of elements from helium to iron. The termination of helium shell burning occurs because the shell is expanded and cooled by radiation stress. The mass fraction of the helium burning shell was calculated.

  7. Simulations of stripped core-collapse supernovae in close binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimoldi, Alex; Portegies Zwart, Simon; Rossi, Elena Maria

    2016-03-01

    We perform smoothed-particle hydrodynamical simulations of the explosion of a helium star in a close binary system, and study the effects of the explosion on the companion star as well as the effect of the presence of the companion on the supernova remnant. By simulating the mechanism of the supernova from just after core bounce until the remnant shell passes the stellar companion, we are able to separate the various phenomena leading to the final system parameters. In the final system, we measure the mass stripping and ablation from, and the additional velocity imparted to, the companion stars. Our results agree with recent work showing smaller values for these quantities compared to earlier estimates. We do find some differences, however, particularly in the velocity gained by the companion, which can be explained by the different ejecta structure that naturally results from the explosion in our simulations. These results indicate that predictions based on extrapolated Type Ia simulations should be revised. We also examine the structure of the supernova ejecta shell. The presence of the companion star produces a conical cavity in the expanding supernova remnant, and loss of material from the companion causes the supernova remnant to be more metal-rich on one side and more hydrogen-rich (from the companion material) around the cavity. Following the impact of the shell, we examine the state of the companion after being heated by the shock.

  8. Multidimensional and Radiation Hydrodynamics Simulations of Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J.

    2013-10-01

    We propose to perform multi-parameter, multi-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations of superluminous supernova progenitor models; in particular, pair instability supernovae and violent supernova ejecta - circumstellar matter interactions. Non-local thermodynamic equillibrium radiative transfer calculations will be used to post-process the simulation data to provide us with model spectra and light curves to be directly compared to observations of superluminous supernovae. This work will include a parameteric study of evolutionary models of massive progenitor stars that include the effects of rotation and magnetic fields and will be used as initial models for the hydrodynamics simulations. Our extensive modeling of the radiative properties of mechanisms that could power superluminous supernovae will provide insight on the issue of their observed striking photometric and spectroscopic diversity and also on the role of these extraordinary explosions in enriching the primeval Universe with metals, setting the stage for future generations of stars to form. Such primordial explosions from the first stars are relevant to the HST New Frontiers Program and a key target of upcoming NASA missions such as the JWST and WFIRST.

  9. Monte Carlo study of neutrino acceleration in supernova shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.; Ellison, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The first order Fermi acceleration mechanism of cosmic rays in shocks may be at work for neutrinos in supernova shocks when the latter are at densities greater than 10 to the 13th g/cu cm, at which the core material is opaque to neutrinos. A Monte Carlo approach to study this effect is employed, and the emerging neutrino power law spectra are presented. The increased energy acquired by the neutrinos may facilitate their detection in supernova explosions and provide information about the physics of collapse.

  10. Monte Carlo study of neutrino acceleration in supernova shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.; Ellison, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The first order Fermi acceleration mechanism of cosmic rays in shocks may be at work for neutrinos in supernova shocks when the latter are at densities greater than 10 to the 13th g/cu cm, at which the core material is opaque to neutrinos. A Monte Carlo approach to study this effect is employed, and the emerging neutrino power law spectra are presented. The increased energy acquired by the neutrinos may facilitate their detection in supernova explosions and provide information about the physics of collapse.

  11. Pulsar recoil by large-scale anisotropies in supernova explosions.

    PubMed

    Scheck, L; Plewa, T; Janka, H-Th; Kifonidis, K; Müller, E

    2004-01-09

    Assuming that the neutrino luminosity from the neutron star core is sufficiently high to drive supernova explosions by the neutrino-heating mechanism, we show that low-mode (l=1,2) convection can develop from random seed perturbations behind the shock. A slow onset of the explosion is crucial, requiring the core luminosity to vary slowly with time, in contrast to the burstlike exponential decay assumed in previous work. Gravitational and hydrodynamic forces by the globally asymmetric supernova ejecta were found to accelerate the remnant neutron star on a time scale of more than a second to velocities above 500 km s(-1), in agreement with observed pulsar proper motions.

  12. SPECTRUM OF THE SUPERNOVA RELIC NEUTRINO BACKGROUND AND METALLICITY EVOLUTION OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Nakazato, Ken’ichiro; Mochida, Eri; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Niino, Yuu

    2015-05-01

    The spectrum of the supernova relic neutrino (SRN) background from past stellar collapses including black hole formation (failed supernovae) is calculated. The redshift dependence of the black hole formation rate is considered on the basis of the metallicity evolution of galaxies. Assuming the mass and metallicity ranges of failed supernova progenitors, their contribution to SRNs is quantitatively estimated for the first time. Using this model, the dependences of SRNs on the cosmic star formation rate density (CSFRD), shock revival time, and equation of state (EOS) are investigated. The shock revival time is introduced as a parameter that should depend on the still unknown explosion mechanism of core collapse supernovae. The dependence on EOS is considered for failed supernovae, whose collapse dynamics and neutrino emission are certainly affected. It is found that the low-energy spectrum of SRNs is mainly determined by the CSFRD. These low-energy events will be observed in the Super-Kamiokande experiment with gadolinium-loaded water.

  13. Neutrinos and nucleosynthesis in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Fröhlich, C.; Casanova, J.; Hempel, M.; Liebendörfer, M.; Melton, C. A.; Perego, A.

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars (M > 8-10 M{sub ⊙}) undergo core collapse at the end of their life and explode as supernova with ~ 10⁵¹ erg of kinetic energy. While the detailed supernova explosion mechanism is still under investigation, reliable nucleosynthesis calculations based on successful explosions are needed to explain the observed abundances in metal-poor stars and to predict supernova yields for galactic chemical evolution studies. To predict nucleosynthesis yields for a large number of progenitor stars, computationally efficient explosion models are required. We model the core collapse, bounce and subsequent explosion of massive stars assuming spherical symmetry and using detailed microphysics and neutrino physics combined with a novel method to artificially trigger the explosion (PUSH). We discuss the role of neutrinos, the conditions in the ejecta, and the resulting nucleosynthesis.

  14. Superluminous Supernovae and Other Transients from iPTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunnan, Ragnhild; Quimby, Robert; Yan, Lin; De Cia, Annalisa; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Vreeswijk, Paul; Leloudas, Giorgos; Perley, Daniel A.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Arguably one of the biggest science contributions from wide-field surveys like iPTF have been the discovery of new classes of transients across the luminosity-timescale phase space (“Zwicky Diagram”). One such class is “superluminous" supernovae (SLSNe), with peak luminosites 10-100 times those of ordinary core-collapse and Type Ia SNe. The physical origin of these enormous luminosities is still debated, requiring either a distinct explosion mechanism and/or an additional energy source compared to ordinary core-collapse supernovae. In this talk, I will review iPTF results on superluminous supernovae, including both studies of the sample as a whole, and of individual, exciting objects. I will also highlight results on other rare classes of transients across the Zwicky Diagram.

  15. The Search for Lensed Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae that have multiple images due to gravitational lensing can provide us with a wealth of information both about the supernovae themselves and about our surrounding universe. But how can we find these rare explosions?Clues from Multiple ImagesWhen light from a distant object passes by a massive foreground galaxy, the galaxys strong gravitational pull can bend the light, distorting our view of the backgroundobject. In severe cases, this process can cause multiple images of the distant object to appear in the foreground lensing galaxy.An illustration of gravitational lensing. Light from the distant supernova is bent as it passes through a giant elliptical galaxy in the foreground, causing multiple images of the supernova to appear to be hosted by the elliptical galaxy. [Adapted from image by NASA/ESA/A. Feild (STScI)]Observations of multiply-imaged Type Ia supernovae (explosions that occur when white dwarfs in binary systems exceed their maximum allowed mass) could answer a number of astronomical questions. Because Type Ia supernovae are standard candles, distant, lensed Type Ia supernovae can be used to extend the Hubble diagram to high redshifts. Furthermore, the lensing time delays from the multiply-imaged explosion can provide high-precision constraints on cosmological parameters.The catch? So far, weve only found one multiply-imaged Type Ia supernova: iPTF16geu, discovered late last year. Were going to need a lot more of them to develop a useful sample! So how do we identify themutiply-imaged Type Ias among the many billions of fleeting events discovered in current and future surveys of transients?Searching for AnomaliesAbsolute magnitudes for Type Ia supernovae in elliptical galaxies. None are expected to be above -20 in the B band, so if we calculate a magnitude for a Type Ia supernova thats larger than this, its probably not hosted by the galaxy we think it is! [Goldstein Nugent 2017]Two scientists from University of California, Berkeley and

  16. The ESSENCE Supernova Survey: Survey Optimization, Observations, and Supernova Photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Miknaitis, Gajus; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Smith, R.C.; Stubbs, C.W.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Foley, R.J.; Matheson, T.; Tonry, J.L.; Aguilera, C.; Blackman, J.W.; Becker, A.C.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Garg, A.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Fermilab /Chile U., Catolica /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /NOAO, Tucson /Inst. Astron., Honolulu /Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Bohr Inst. /Notre Dame U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Texas A-M /European Southern Observ. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Stockholm U.

    2007-01-08

    We describe the implementation and optimization of the ESSENCE supernova survey, which we have undertaken to measure the equation of state parameter of the dark energy. We present a method for optimizing the survey exposure times and cadence to maximize our sensitivity to the dark energy equation of state parameter w = P/{rho}c{sup 2} for a given fixed amount of telescope time. For our survey on the CTIO 4m telescope, measuring the luminosity distances and redshifts for supernovae at modest redshifts (z {approx} 0.5 {+-} 0.2) is optimal for determining w. We describe the data analysis pipeline based on using reliable and robust image subtraction to find supernovae automatically and in near real-time. Since making cosmological inferences with supernovae relies crucially on accurate measurement of their brightnesses, we describe our efforts to establish a thorough calibration of the CTIO 4m natural photometric system. In its first four years, ESSENCE has discovered and spectroscopically confirmed 102 type Ia SNe, at redshifts from 0.10 to 0.78, identified through an impartial, effective methodology for spectroscopic classification and redshift determination. We present the resulting light curves for the all type Ia supernovae found by ESSENCE and used in our measurement of w, presented in Wood-Vasey et al. (2007).

  17. A non-spherical core in the explosion of supernova SN 2004dj.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Douglas C; Filippenko, Alexei V; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Serduke, Franklin J D; Li, Weidong; Swift, Brandon J; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Foley, Ryan J; Fox, Derek B; Park, Sung; Hoffman, Jennifer L; Wong, Diane S

    2006-03-23

    An important and perhaps critical clue to the mechanism driving the explosion of massive stars as supernovae is provided by the accumulating evidence for asymmetry in the explosion. Indirect evidence comes from high pulsar velocities, associations of supernovae with long-soft gamma-ray bursts, and asymmetries in late-time emission-line profiles. Spectropolarimetry provides a direct probe of young supernova geometry, with higher polarization generally indicating a greater departure from spherical symmetry. Large polarizations have been measured for 'stripped-envelope' (that is, type Ic; ref. 7) supernovae, which confirms their non-spherical morphology; but the explosions of massive stars with intact hydrogen envelopes (type II-P supernovae) have shown only weak polarizations at the early times observed. Here we report multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of a classic type II-P supernova that reveals the abrupt appearance of significant polarization when the inner core is first exposed in the thinning ejecta (approximately 90 days after explosion). We infer a departure from spherical symmetry of at least 30 per cent for the inner ejecta. Combined with earlier results, this suggests that a strongly non-spherical explosion may be a generic feature of core-collapse supernovae of all types, where the asphericity in type II-P supernovae is cloaked at early times by the massive, opaque, hydrogen envelope.

  18. Superluminous Extragalactic Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H. R.; Chu, Y.-H.

    1998-12-01

    Extragalactic supernova remnants (SNRs) are conventionally surveyed by optical emission-line images, using the [S II]/Hα line ratio to diagnose SNRs. The majority of the optically identified extragalactic SNRs are too faint to be confirmed at X-ray or radio wavelengths. Conversely, extragalactic SNRs that are initially identified by X-ray or radio observations are all superluminous, e.g., the X-ray SNR in NGC 6946 (Blair & Fesen 1994, ApJ, 424, L103) and the radio SNR in NGC 5471 (Skillman 1985, ApJ, 290, 449). NGC 5471 is a giant H II region in M101. Optical echelle observations of the SNR in NGC 5471 have detected high-velocity gas with a FWZI of at least 350 km/s. Decomposing the narrow H II component and the broad SNR component in the Hα velocity profile, Chu & Kennicutt (1986) derived a total mass of 6500+/-3000 M_sun and a kinetic energy of a few *E(50) ergs. Using archival ROSAT X-ray observations, Williams & Chu (1995) measured an X-ray luminosity of ~ 1 x 10(38) ergs/s for NGC 5471. Apparently, the SNR in NGC 5471 is superluminous at all wavelengths. To determine the physical conditions and nature of the superluminous SNR in NGC 5471, we have obtained HST WFPC2 images of NGC 5471 in the Hα and [S II] lines and two continuum bands. These high-resolution images reveal a [S II]-enhanced shell with a diameter of ~ 60 pc. A recent 180-ks ROSAT High Resolution Imager image of M101 shows that the X-ray emission from NGC 5471 peaks at this SNR shell. We are thus confident in the identification of the superluminous SNR in NGC 5471. Are superluminous SNRs produced by particularly powerful supernova explosions? Are they associated with gamma-ray bursters? Are their luminosities caused by dense interstellar environment? We will report the detailed physical properties of the SNR in NGC 5471, compare it to the other superluminous SNRs, and address these questions.

  19. Measuring the Universe with Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirshner, Robert

    1996-05-01

    Supernova explosions lead to luminous optical objects which can be used to measure distances in the Universe. Supernova 1987A in the nearby Large Magellanic Cloud provides a direct geometric distance to this galaxy, and a check on the Cepheid variable star distance scale. Using observations of SN 1987A with the Hubble Space Telescope, we find a distance of 51 ± 3 kiloparsec which is consistent with the Cepheid scale. Type II supernovae, which result from the core collapse of a massive star, emit a spectrum which can be accurately modeled. Based on understanding of the radiation transport through the expanding atmospheres, observations of SN II provide distances to 18 galaxies at redshifts up to 14500 km s-1. These distances agree within the errors with distances found from Cepheids, and correspond to a value of the Hubble Contant of 72 ± 7 km s-1Mpc-1. Finally, the Type Ia supernovae, thought to arise from the thermonuclear incineration of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, provide the best and the brightest tools for measuring extragalactic distances. Careful study shows that these supernovae are not identical, but that there is a well-determined relation between the supernova luminosity and the time history of its light emission: the supernova light curve. Recent work on the ``Multicolor Light Curve Shape Method'' accounts for this effect in an optimal way, and allows an independent determination of the absorption by dust along the line of sight for each object. Using a sample of 20 SN Ia, and calibrating this with distances determined by Hubble Space Telescope observations of Cepheids yields a Hubble Constant of 65 ± 6 km s-1Mpc-1. This corresponds to an age of the Universe (for Ω = 0 ) of about 15 billion years, which is consistent with the age of the elements and the age of globular cluster stars.

  20. Light-echo spectroscopy of historic Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Oliver

    Young Galactic supernova remnants are unique laboratories for supernova physics. Due to their proximity they provide us with the most detailed view of the outcome of a supernova. However, the exact spectroscopic types of their original explosions have been undetermined so far -hindering to link the wealth of multi-wavelength knowledge about their remnants with the diverse population of supernovae. Light echoes, reflektions of the brilliant supernova burst of light by interstellar dust, provide a unique opportunity to reobserve today -with powerful scientific instruments of the 21st century -historic supernova exlosions even after hundreds of years and to conclude on their nature. We report on optical light-echo spectroscopy of two famous Galactic supernovae: Tycho Brahe's SN 1572 and the supernova that created the Cassiopeia A remnant around the year 1680. These observations finally recovered the missing spectroscopic classifications and provide new constraints on explosion models for future studies.

  1. Open Supernova Catalog objects subsample characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khyzhniak, E. V.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Lyapin, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    The homogeneous subsample characteristics understanding is necessary for the investigation of any astrophysical objects redshift distribution, for example, gamma-ray bursts. The type Ia supernovae considered as a homogeneous subsample because of suggestion that these luminous events might be used as standard candles for cosmological measurements occurs since the earliest studies of supernovae in 1938. The parameters of our Metagalaxy Ω and Λ were determine due sample of Ia supernovae from the Supernova Cosmology Project analysis in 1998. Since then more than 4000 supernovae were added. The results of the redshift distribution analysis for supernova from the two catalogues (Asiago Supernova Catalogue and Open Supernova Catalog) are presented in this work. The ability to use an analyzed dataset as homogeneous subsample also is discussed

  2. Discovery of Three ASAS-SN Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Brown, J. S.; Vallely, P.; Stanek, K. Z.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shields, J.; Thompson, T. A.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Dong, Subo; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Conseil, E.; Marples, P.; Stone, G.

    2017-09-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN, Shappee et al. 2014), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered three new transient sources, most likely supernovae.

  3. Supernovae - Still a challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, F.

    1983-12-01

    Historical data on supernovae (SN) occurrences are surveyed, together with present models for the physical processes occurring during the events. Type I SN feature low intensity hydrogen lines, while the hydrogen lines are prominant in Type II phenomena. Only Type I events seem to occur in elliptical galaxies, implying that the Type I events involve relatively old, low-mass objects. Both types occur in spatial galaxies, although the Type II objects are usually located in gas-rich stellar nurseries of the spiral arms, suggesting the Type II SN progenitor stars are only a few million years old. The light curves of Type I SN maintain a peak brightness significantly longer than do Type II SN, whose brightness declines irregularly. The incineration of a white dwarf that could account for observations of nickel abundances in a Type I burst, which may be confined to binary systems, is outlined. Processes that occur in a core bounce in a Type II SN, when a massive star collapses and gravitational energy abruptly changes into expansive energy, are discussed.

  4. Supernova Remnants And GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Slane, Patrick; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2011-11-29

    It has long been speculated that supernova remnants represent a major source of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Observations over the past decade have ceremoniously unveiled direct evidence of particle acceleration in SNRs to energies approaching the knee of the cosmic ray spectrum. Nonthermal X-ray emission from shell-type SNRs reveals multi-TeV electrons, and the dynamical properties of several SNRs point to efficient acceleration of ions. Observations of TeV gamma-ray emission have confirmed the presence of energetic particles in several remnants as well, but there remains considerable debate as to whether this emission originates with high energy electrons or ions. Equally uncertain are the exact conditions that lead to efficient particle acceleration. Based on the catalog of EGRET sources, we know that there is a large population of Galactic gamma-ray sources whose distribution is similar to that of SNRs.With the increased resolution and sensitivity of GLAST, the gamma-ray SNRs from this population will be identified. Their detailed emission structure, along with their spectra, will provide the link between their environments and their spectra in other wavebands to constrain emission models and to potentially identify direct evidence of ion acceleration in SNRs. Here I summarize recent observational and theoretical work in the area of cosmic ray acceleration by SNRs, and discuss the contributions GLAST will bring to our understanding of this problem.

  5. A Supernova's Shockwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Supernovae are the explosive deaths of the universe's most massive stars. In death, these volatile creatures blast tons of energetic waves into the cosmos, destroying much of the dust surrounding them.

    This false-color composite from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of one such explosion. The remnant, called N132D, is the wispy pink shell of gas at the center of this image. The pinkish color reveals a clash between the explosion's high-energy shockwaves and surrounding dust grains.

    In the background, small organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are shown as tints of green. The blue spots represent stars in our galaxy along this line of sight.

    N132D is located 163,000 light-years away in a neighboring galaxy called, the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    In this image, infrared light at 4.5 microns is mapped to blue, 8.0 microns to green and 24 microns to red. Broadband X-ray light is mapped purple. The infrared data were taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer, while the X-ray data were captured by Chandra.

  6. A Supernova's Shockwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Supernovae are the explosive deaths of the universe's most massive stars. In death, these volatile creatures blast tons of energetic waves into the cosmos, destroying much of the dust surrounding them.

    This false-color composite from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of one such explosion. The remnant, called N132D, is the wispy pink shell of gas at the center of this image. The pinkish color reveals a clash between the explosion's high-energy shockwaves and surrounding dust grains.

    In the background, small organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are shown as tints of green. The blue spots represent stars in our galaxy along this line of sight.

    N132D is located 163,000 light-years away in a neighboring galaxy called, the Large Magellanic Cloud.

    In this image, infrared light at 4.5 microns is mapped to blue, 8.0 microns to green and 24 microns to red. Broadband X-ray light is mapped purple. The infrared data were taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer, while the X-ray data were captured by Chandra.

  7. The Shape of Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What causes the tremendous explosions of superluminous supernovae? New observations reveal the geometry of one such explosion, SN 2015bn, providing clues as to its source.A New Class of ExplosionsImage of a type Ia supernova in the galaxy NGC 4526. [NASA/ESA]Supernovae are powerful explosions that can briefly outshine the galaxies that host them. There are several different classifications of supernovae, each with a different physical source such as thermonuclear instability in a white dwarf, caused by accretion of too much mass, or the exhaustion of fuel in the core of a massive star, leading to the cores collapse and expulsion of its outer layers.In recent years, however, weve detected another type of supernovae, referred to as superluminous supernovae. These particularly energetic explosions last longer months instead of weeks and are brighter at their peaks than normal supernovae by factors of tens to hundreds.The physical cause of these unusual explosions is still a topic of debate. Recently, however, a team of scientists led by Cosimo Inserra (Queens University Belfast) has obtained new observations of a superluminous supernova that might help address this question.The flux and the polarization level (black lines) along the dominant axis of SN 2015bn, 24 days before peak flux (left) and 28 days after peak flux (right). Blue lines show the authors best-fitting model. [Inserra et al. 2016]Probing GeometryInserra and collaborators obtained two sets of observations of SN 2015bn one roughly a month before and one a month after the superluminous supernovas peak brightness using a spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope in Chile. These observations mark the first spectropolarimetric data for a superluminous supernova.Spectropolarimetry is the practice of obtaining information about the polarization of radiation from an objects spectrum. Polarization carries information about broken spatial symmetries in the object: only if the object is perfectly symmetric can it

  8. empiriciSN: Supernova parameter generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holoien, Thomas W.-S.; Marshall, Philip J.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2017-08-01

    empiriciSN generates realistic supernova parameters given photometric observations of a potential host galaxy, based entirely on empirical correlations measured from supernova datasets. It is intended to be used to improve supernova simulation for DES and LSST. It is extendable such that additional datasets may be added in the future to improve the fitting algorithm or so that additional light curve parameters or supernova types may be fit.

  9. Supernova explosions in the Universe.

    PubMed

    Burrows, A

    2000-02-17

    During the lifetime of our Milky Way galaxy, there have been something like 100 million supernova explosions, which have enriched the Galaxy with the oxygen we breathe, the iron in our cars, the calcium in our bones and the silicon in the rocks beneath our feet. These exploding stars also influence the birth of new stars and are the source of the energetic cosmic rays that irradiate us on the Earth. The prodigious amount of energy (approximately 10(51), or approximately 2.5 x 10(28) megatonnes of TNT equivalent) and momentum associated with each supernova may even have helped to shape galaxies as they formed in the early Universe. Supernovae are now being used to measure the geometry of the Universe, and have recently been implicated in the decades-old mystery of the origin of the gamma-ray bursts. Together with major conceptual advances in our theoretical understanding of supernovae, these developments have made supernovae the centre of attention in astrophysics.

  10. Simulation of the spherically symmetric stellar core collapse, bounce, and postbounce evolution of a star of 13 solar masses with boltzmann neutrino transport, and its implications for the supernova mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mezzacappa, A; Liebendörfer, M; Messer, O E; Hix, W R; Thielemann, F K; Bruenn, S W

    2001-03-05

    With exact three-flavor Boltzmann neutrino transport, we simulate the stellar core collapse, bounce, and postbounce evolution of a 13M star in spherical symmetry, the Newtonian limit, without invoking convection. In the absence of convection, prior spherically symmetric models, which implemented approximations to Boltzmann transport, failed to produce explosions. We consider exact transport to determine if these failures were due to the transport approximations made and to answer remaining fundamental questions in supernova theory. The model presented here is the first in a sequence of models beginning with different progenitors. In this model, a supernova explosion is not obtained.

  11. Theory and phenomenology of supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia

    2015-07-15

    The theory and phenomenology of supernova neutrinos is reviewed, with focus on the most recent advancements on the neutrino flux predicted by supernova numerical models, on neutrino oscillations inside the star and in the Earth, and on the physics of the diffuse supernova neutrino background. Future directions of research are briefly summarized.

  12. Asymmetric supernovae and gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, J. Craig; Akiyama, Shizuka

    2010-03-01

    Spectropolarimetry of core collapse supernovae has shown that they are asymmetric and often, but not universally, bi-polar. Jet-induced supernova models give a typical jet/torus structure that is reminiscent of some objects like the Crab nebula, SN 1987A and Cas A. Asymmetry in the strength of polar jets is a plausible mechanism to produce substantial pulsar "kick" velocities. Jets may arise from the intrinsic rotation and magnetic fields that are expected to accompany core collapse. We summarize the potential importance of the magneto-rotational instability (MRI) for the core collapse problem in the context of the non-monotonic behavior expected: increasing centrifugal support will lead to a maximum rotation and magnetic field production as a function of the initial rotation of the iron core. Non-axisymmetric instabilities are predicted for differentially rotating proto-neutron stars with values of the ratio of rotational kinetic energy to binding energy, T/∣ W∣≳0.01. The non-axisymmetric instabilities are likely to drive magnetosonic waves into the surrounding time-dependent density structure. These waves represent a mechanism of the dissipation of the rotational energy of the proto-neutron star, and the outward deposition of this energy may play a role in the supernova explosion process. The phase of deleptonization and contraction of the proto-neutron star lasting several seconds is likely to be an important phase of magnetic non-axisymmetric evolution. In the special circumstance that the proto-neutron star is born sufficiently rapidly rotating that it is subject to bar-mode instabilities on secular timescales, a possible outcome is that the deleptonizing neutron star will evolve along the locus T/∣ W∣˜0.14 releasing a significant fraction of its binding energy as MHD power sufficient to account for a GRB. This power will be provided over an extended time, 10 s, that is strongly reminiscent of the timescale of long GRBs and is also comparable to the

  13. Core collapse supernova remnants with ears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grichener, Aldana; Soker, Noam

    2017-06-01

    We study the morphologies of core collapse supernova remnants (CCSNRs) and find that about third of CCSNRs in our sample have two opposite 'ears' protruding from their main shell. We assume that the ears are formed by jets, and argue that these properties are compatible with the expectation from the explosion jet feedback mechanism. Based on previous studies of ears in CCSNRs and the similarity of some ears to those found in planetary nebulae, we assume that the ears are inflated by jets that are launched during the explosion, or a short time after it. Under simple geometrical assumptions, we find that the extra kinetic energy of the ears is in the range of 1-10 per cent of the explosion energy. As not all of the kinetic energy of the jets ends in the ears, we estimate that the typical kinetic energy in the jets that inflated the ears, under our assumptions, is about 5-15 per cent of the explosion energy. This study supports a serious consideration of jet-driven core-collapse supernova mechanisms.

  14. Red supergiants as supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ben

    2017-09-01

    It is now well-established from pre-explosion imaging that red supergiants (RSGs) are the direct progenitors of Type-IIP supernovae. These images have been used to infer the physical properties of the exploding stars, yielding some surprising results. In particular, the differences between the observed and predicted mass spectrum has provided a challenge to our view of stellar evolutionary theory. However, turning what is typically a small number of pre-explosion photometric points into the physical quantities of stellar luminosity and mass requires a number of assumptions about the spectral appearance of RSGs, as well as their evolution in the last few years of life. Here I will review what we know about RSGs, with a few recent updates on how they look and how their appearance changes as they approach supernova. This article is part of the themed issue 'Bridging the gap: from massive stars to supernovae'.

  15. Dynamics of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Blondin, John M.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of Kepler's SNR have revealed a strong interaction with the ambient medium, far in excess of that expected at a distance of about 600 pc away from the Galactic plane where Kepler's SNR is located. This has been interpreted as a result of the interaction of supernova ejecta with the dense circumstellar medium (CSM). Based on the bow-shock model of Bandiera (1985), we study the dynamics of this interaction. The CSM distribution consists of an undisturbed stellar wind of a moving supernova progenitor and a dense shell formed in its interaction with a tenuous interstellar medium. Supernova ejecta drive a blast wave through the stellar wind which splits into the transmitted and reflected shocks upon hitting this bow-shock shell. We identify the transmitted shock with the nonradiative, Balmer-dominated shocks found recently in Kepler's SNR. The transmitted shock most probably penetrated the shell in the vicinity of the stagnation point.

  16. Featured Image: Modeling Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    This image shows a computer simulation of the hydrodynamics within a supernova remnant. The mixing between the outer layers (where color represents the log of density) is caused by turbulence from the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an effect that arises when the expanding core gas of the supernova is accelerated into denser shell gas. The past standard for supernova-evolution simulations was to perform them in one dimension and then, in post-processing, manually smooth out regions that undergo Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence (an intrinsically multidimensional effect). But in a recent study, Paul Duffell (University of California, Berkeley) has explored how a 1D model could be used to reproduce the multidimensional dynamics that occur in turbulence from this instability. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationPaul C. Duffell 2016 ApJ 821 76. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/76

  17. Dynamics of Kepler's supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Blondin, John M.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of Kepler's SNR have revealed a strong interaction with the ambient medium, far in excess of that expected at a distance of about 600 pc away from the Galactic plane where Kepler's SNR is located. This has been interpreted as a result of the interaction of supernova ejecta with the dense circumstellar medium (CSM). Based on the bow-shock model of Bandiera (1985), we study the dynamics of this interaction. The CSM distribution consists of an undisturbed stellar wind of a moving supernova progenitor and a dense shell formed in its interaction with a tenuous interstellar medium. Supernova ejecta drive a blast wave through the stellar wind which splits into the transmitted and reflected shocks upon hitting this bow-shock shell. We identify the transmitted shock with the nonradiative, Balmer-dominated shocks found recently in Kepler's SNR. The transmitted shock most probably penetrated the shell in the vicinity of the stagnation point.

  18. Software Based Supernova Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Stephen M.

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes software for detecting Supernova (SN) in images. The software can operate in real-time to discover SN while data is being collected so the instrumentation can immediately be re-tasked to perform spectroscopy or photometry of a discovery. Because the instrumentation captures two images per minute, the realtime budget is constrained to 30 seconds per target, a challenging goal. Using a set of two to four images, the program creates a "Reference" (REF) image and a "New" (NEW) image where all images are used in both NEW and REF but any SN survives the combination process only in the NEW image. This process produces good quality images having similar noise characteristics but without artifacts that might be interpreted as SN. The images are then adjusted for seeing and brightness differences using a variant of Tomaney and Crotts method of Point Spread Function (PSF) matching after which REF is subtracted from NEW to produce a Difference (DIF) image. A Classifier is then trained on a grid of artificial SN to estimate the statistical properties of four attributes and used in a process to mask false positives that can be clearly identified as such. Further training to avoid any remaining false positives sets the range, in standard deviations for each attribute, that the Classifier will accept as a valid SN. This training enables the Classifier to discriminate between SN and most subtraction residue. Lastly, the DIF image is scanned and measured by the Classifier to find locations where all four properties fall within their acceptance ranges. If multiple locations are found, the one best conforming to the training estimates is chosen. This location is then declared as a Candidate SN, the instrumentation re-tasked and the operator notified.

  19. Tidally-Induced Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Rosswog, S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the results of 3D simulations of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by moderate-mass black holes as they may exist in the cores of globular clusters or dwarf galaxies. Our simulations follow self-consistently the hydrodynamic and nuclear evolution from the initial parabolic orbit over the disruption to the build-up of an accretion disk around the black hole. For strong enough encounters (pericentre distances smaller than about 1/3 of the tidal radius) the tidal compression is reversed by a shock and finally results in a thermonuclear explosion. These explosions are not restricted to progenitor masses close to the Chandrasekhar limit, we find exploding examples throughout the whole white dwarf mass range. There is, however, a restriction on the masses of the involved black holes: black holes more massive than 2x105M{circle_dot} swallow a typical 0.6M{circle_dot} white dwarf before their tidal forces can overwhelm the star's selfgravity. Therefore, this mechanism is characteristic for black holes of moderate masses. The material that remains bound to the black hole settles into an accretion disk and produces an Xray flare close to the Eddington limit of L{sub Edd} {approx} 10{sup 41}erg/s (Mbh/1000M{circle_dot}), typically lasting for a few months. The combination of a peculiar thermonuclear supernova together with an X-ray flare thus whistle-blows the existence of such moderate-mass black holes. The next generation of wide field space-based instruments should be able to detect such events.

  20. Nature of type 1 Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shklovskiy, I. S.

    1980-01-01

    The nature of type 1 supernovae (SN 1) is discussed through a comparison of observational evidence and theoretical perspectives relating to both type 1 and 2 supernovae. In particular two hypotheses relating to SN 1 phenomenon are examined: the first proposing that SN 1 are components of binary systems in which, at a comparatively late stage of evolution, overflow of the mass occurs; the second considers pre-SN 1 to be recently evolved stars with a mass greater than 1.4 solar mass (white dwarfs). In addition, an explanation of the reduced frequency of flares of SN 1 in spiral galaxies as related to that in elliptical galaxies is presented.

  1. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-10-20

    An explanation is given of the low value of R lambda triple bond A lambda/E(B - V), the ratio of absolute to selective extinction deduced from Type Ia supernova observations. The idea involves scattering by dust clouds located in the circumstellar environment, or at the highest velocity shells of the supernova ejecta. The scattered light tends to reduce the effective R lambda in the optical, but has an opposite effect in the ultraviolet. The presence of circumstellar dust can be tested by ultraviolet to near infrared observations and by multi-epoch spectropolarimetry of SNe Ia.

  2. Educational Resources on Supernovae for Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, James T.

    The National Science Education Standards (1996, National Academy Press) suggest mention of objects like the ``sun, moon, stars" in grades K-4 and element formation in grades 9-12. Children's librarians and some astronomy librarians should know about some of the resources for children on supernovae not only because supernovae are critical to higher element formation, but also to educate others about the universe's expansion and stars. In addition, basic bibliometrics on these resources yields lessons on the importance of using many indexes, the pattern of literature for children on supernovae, the types of resources on supernovae, and the scattering of resources/information for children on supernovae.

  3. Magnetar-Powered Supernovae in Two Dimensions. I. Superluminous Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, S. E.; Sukhbold, Tuguldur

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the radiation emitted by a rapidly rotating magnetar embedded in a young supernova can greatly amplify its luminosity. These one-dimensional studies have also revealed the existence of an instability arising from the piling up of radiatively accelerated matter in a thin dense shell deep inside the supernova. Here, we examine the problem in two dimensions and find that, while instabilities cause mixing and fracture this shell into filamentary structures that reduce the density contrast, the concentration of matter in a hollow shell persists. The extent of the mixing depends upon the relative energy input by the magnetar and the kinetic energy of the inner ejecta. The light curve and spectrum of the resulting supernova will be appreciably altered, as will the appearance of the supernova remnant, which will be shellular and filamentary. A similar pile up and mixing might characterize other events where energy is input over an extended period by a centrally concentrated source, e.g., a pulsar, radioactive decay, a neutrino-powered wind, or colliding shells. The relevance of our models to the recent luminous transient ASASSN-15lh is briefly discussed.

  4. Real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Tanaka, H.; Tomura, T.; Ueno, K.; Wendell, R. A.; Yokozawa, T.; Irvine, T.; Kajita, T.; Kametani, I.; Kaneyuki, K.; Lee, K. P.; McLachlan, T.; Nishimura, Y.; Richard, E.; Okumura, K.; Labarga, L.; Fernandez, P.; Berkman, S.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tobayama, S.; Gustafson, J.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Goldhaber, M.; Carminati, G.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Weatherly, P.; Renshaw, A.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Takhistov, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Hill, J.; Keig, W. E.; Hong, N.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Akiri, T.; Himmel, A.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Jang, J. S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S. N.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Bronner, C.; Hirota, S.; Huang, K.; Ieki, K.; Kikawa, T.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Takahashi, S.; Tateishi, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Mitsuka, G.; Mijakowski, P.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C. K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Wilking, M. J.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Yamaguchi, R.; Yano, T.; Kuno, Y.; Tacik, R.; Kim, S. B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Suda, Y.; Totsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Vagins, M. R.; Martin, J. F.; de Perio, P.; Konaka, A.; Chen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Connolly, K.; Wilkes, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande (SK). Detecting supernova explosions by neutrinos in real time is crucial for giving a clear picture of the explosion mechanism. Since the neutrinos are expected to come earlier than light, a fast broadcasting of the detection may give astronomers a chance to make electromagnetic radiation observations of the explosions right at the onset. The role of the monitor includes a fast announcement of the neutrino burst detection to the world and a determination of the supernova direction. We present the online neutrino burst detection system and studies of the direction determination accuracy based on simulations at SK.

  5. Are supernovae recorded in indigenous astronomical traditions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.

    2014-07-01

    Novae and supernovae are rare astronomical events that would have had an influence on the skywatching peoples who witnessed them. Although several bright novae/supernovae have been visible during recorded human history, there are many proposed but no confirmed accounts of supernovae in indigenous oral traditions or material culture. Criteria are established for confirming novae/supernovae in oral traditions and material culture, and claims from around the world are discussed to determine if they meet these criteria. Aboriginal Australian traditions are explored for possible descriptions of novae/supernovae. Although representations of supernovae may exist in Aboriginal traditions, there are currently no confirmed accounts of supernovae in Indigenous Australian oral or material traditions.

  6. The difficulty of ultraviolet emssion from supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1971-01-01

    There are certain conceptual difficulties in the theory of the generation of ultraviolet radiation which is presumed for the creation of the optical fluorescence mechanism of supernova light emission and ionization of a nebula as large as the Gum nebula. Requirements concerning the energy distribution of the ultraviolet photons are: 1) The energy of the greater part of the photons must be sufficient to cause both helium fluorescence and hydrogen ionization. 2) If the photons are emitted in an approximate black body spectrum, the fraction of energy emitted in the optical must be no more than what is already observed. Ultraviolet black body emission depends primarily on the energy source. The probability that the wide mixture of elements present in the interstellar medium and supernova ejecta results in an emission localized in a limited region with less than 0.001 emission in the visible, for either ionization or fluorescence ultraviolet, is remote. Therefore transparent emission must be excluded as unlikely, and black body or at least quasi-black-body emission is more probable.

  7. Radio studies of extragalactic supernovae.

    PubMed

    Weiler, K W; Sramek, R A; Panagia, N

    1986-03-14

    Some exploding stars (supernovae) are powerful emitters of centimeter radio radiation. Detailed observations have shown that these supernovae quickly become detectable in the radio range, first at shorter wavelengths (higher frequencies) and later at progressively longer and longer wavelengths (lower frequencies). This part of the phenomenon appears to be well explained by a monotonic decrease in the amount of ionized material surrounding the radio-emitting regions as the shock from the explosion travels outward. The radio emission itself is of a nonthermal, synchrotron origin, as is the case in most bright cosmic radio sources. Once the absorption effects become negligible, the radio intensity declines with time until reaching the detection limit of the telescope. Models suggest that the absorbing material originates in a dense wind of matter lost by the supernova progenitor star, or by its companion if it is in a binary system, in the last stages of evolution before the explosion. The synchrotron radio emission can be generated either externally by the shock wave from the explosion propagating through this same high density stellar wind or internally by a rapidly rotating neutron star, which is the collapsed core of the exploded star. Present results appear to favor the former model for at least the first several years after the supernova explosion, although the latter model remains viable.

  8. Cosmology from High Redshift Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnavich, Peter

    The discovery of a correlation between the light curve shape and intrinsic b rightness has made Type Ia supernovae exceptionally accurate distance indicators out to cosmologically interesting redshifts. Ground-based searches and follow-up as well as Hubble S pace Telescope observations of Type Ia supernovae have produced a significant number of object s with redshifts between 0.3 and 1.0. The distant SNe, when combined with a local samp le analyzed in the same way, provide reliable constraints on the deceleration and age of th e Universe. Early this year, an analysis of a handful of Type Ia events indicated that the deceleration was too small for gravitating matter alone to make a flat Universe. A larger sa mple of supernovae gives the surprising result that the Universe is accelerating, implying the exi stence of a cosmological constant or some other exotic form of energy. The success of this research has depended on the development of algorithms and software to register, scale and subtract CCD images taken weeks apart and to search for var iable objects. A good fraction of the point-sources identified are asteroids, variable stars, or AGN, so spectra are needed to confirm the identification as a Type Ia supernova and obt ain a redshift. The best candidates are followed photometrically to construct light curves. The steps to transform the observed light curves into cosmologically interestin g results will also be described.

  9. Nonstandard neutrino interactions in supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapleford, Charles J.; Väänänen, Daavid J.; Kneller, James P.; McLaughlin, Gail C.; Shapiro, Brandon T.

    2016-11-01

    Nonstandard interactions (NSI) of neutrinos with matter can significantly alter neutrino flavor evolution in supernovae with the potential to impact explosion dynamics, nucleosynthesis, and the neutrinos signal. In this paper, we explore, both numerically and analytically, the landscape of neutrino flavor transformation effects in supernovae due to NSI and find a new, heretofore unseen transformation processes can occur. These new transformations can take place with NSI strengths well below current experimental limits. Within a broad swath of NSI parameter space, we observe symmetric and standard matter-neutrino resonances for supernovae neutrinos, a transformation effect previously only seen in compact object merger scenarios; in another region of the parameter space we find the NSI can induce neutrino collective effects in scenarios where none would appear with only the standard case of neutrino oscillation physics; and in a third region the NSI can lead to the disappearance of the high density Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein resonance. Using a variety of analytical tools, we are able to describe quantitatively the numerical results allowing us to partition the NSI parameter according to the transformation processes observed. Our results indicate nonstandard interactions of supernova neutrinos provide a sensitive probe of beyond the Standard Model physics complementary to present and future terrestrial experiments.

  10. The supernova: A stellar spectacle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    The life of a star, the supernova, related objects and their importance in astronomy and science in general are discussed. Written primarily for science teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth sciences, the booklet contains a glossary, reference sources, suggested topics for discussion, and projects for individual or group assignment.

  11. Supernova neutrinos and explosive nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Cheoun, M.-K.; Hayakawa, T.; Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S.; Mathews, G. J.; Nakamura, K.; Suzuki, T.

    2014-05-09

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos. We studied the explosive nucleosyn-thesis in supernovae and found that several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta as well as r-process nuclei are affected by the neutrino interactions. The abundance of these isotopes therefore depends strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We discuss first how to determine the neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the effects of neutrino oscillation on their abundances, and propose a novel method to determine the still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and θ{sub 13}, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced light elements {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on θ{sub 13}, we show that our method sug-gests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  12. The Supernova - A Stellar Spectacle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, W. C.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. The following topics concerning supernovae are included: the outburst as observed and according to theory, the stellar remnant, the nebular remnant, and a summary…

  13. Pulsational Pair-instability Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woosley, S. E.

    2017-02-01

    The final evolution of stars in the mass range 70-140 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ is explored. Depending upon their mass loss history and rotation rates, these stars will end their lives as pulsational pair-instability supernovae (PPISN) producing a great variety of observational transients with total durations ranging from weeks to millennia and luminosities from 1041 to over 1044 erg s-1. No nonrotating model radiates more than 5× {10}50 erg of light or has a kinetic energy exceeding 5× {10}51 erg, but greater energies are possible, in principle, in magnetar-powered explosions, which are explored. Many events resemble SNe Ibn, SNe Icn, and SNe IIn, and some potential observational counterparts are mentioned. Some PPISN can exist in a dormant state for extended periods, producing explosions millennia after their first violent pulse. These dormant supernovae contain bright Wolf-Rayet stars, possibly embedded in bright X-ray and radio sources. The relevance of PPISN to supernova impostors like Eta Carinae, to superluminous supernovae, and to sources of gravitational radiation is discussed. No black holes between 52 and 133 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ are expected from stellar evolution in close binaries.

  14. Neutrino Reactions on Two-Nucleon System and Core-Collapse Supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Nasu, Shota

    2011-10-21

    The neutrino reactions on nucleon and nucleus play important role in core-collapse supernova. Recently it is pointed that light nuclei(A = 2,3) can be abundant at the various stage of supernova environment. As an important mechanism of neutrino reaction on a few nucleon system, we study the neutrino emissivity on neutron fusion reaction nn{yields}de{sup -}{nu}-bar{sub e}.

  15. Model light curves of linear Type II supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, D.A.; Wheeler, J.C.; Harkness, R.P. )

    1991-06-01

    Light curves computed from hydrodynamic models of supernova are compared graphically with the average observed B and V-band light curves of linear Type II supernovae. Models are based on the following explosion scenarios: carbon deflagration within a C + O core near the Chandrasekhar mass, electron-capture-induced core collapse of an O-Ne-Mg core of the Chandrasekhar mass, and collapse of an Fe core in a massive star. A range of envelope mass, initial radius, and composition is investigated. Only a narrow range of values of these parameters are consistent with observations. Within this narrow range, most of the observed light curve properties can be obtained in part, but none of the models can reproduce the entire light curve shape and absolute magnitude over the full 200 day comparison period. The observed lack of a plateau phase is explained in terms of a combination of small envelope mass and envelope helium enhancement. The final cobalt tail phase of the light curve can be reproduced only if the mass of explosively synthesized radioactive Ni-56 is small. The results presented here, in conjunction with the observed homogeneity among individual members of the supernova subclass, argue favorably for the O-Ne-Mg core collapse mechanism as an explanation for linear Type II supernovae. The Crab Nebula may arisen from such an explosion. Carbon deflagrations may lead to brighter events like SN 1979C. 62 refs.

  16. Very low energy supernovae from neutrino mass loss

    SciTech Connect

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Woosley, S. E.

    2013-06-01

    It now seems likely that some percentage of more massive supernova progenitors do not explode by any of the currently discussed explosion mechanisms. This has led to speculation concerning the observable transients that might be produced if such a supernova fails. Even if a prompt outgoing shock fails to form in a collapsing presupernova star, one must still consider the hydrodynamic response of the star to the abrupt loss of mass via neutrinos as the core forms a protoneutron star. Following a suggestion by Nadezhin, we calculate the hydrodynamical responses of typical supernova progenitor stars to the rapid loss of approximately 0.2-0.5 M {sub ☉} of gravitational mass from their centers. In a red supergiant star, a very weak supernova with total kinetic energy ∼10{sup 47} erg results. The binding energy of a large fraction of the hydrogen envelope before the explosion is of the same order and, depending upon assumptions regarding the maximum mass of a neutron star, most of it is ejected. Ejection speeds are ∼100 km s{sup –1} and luminosities ∼10{sup 39} erg s{sup –1} are maintained for about a year. A significant part of the energy comes from the recombination of hydrogen. The color of the explosion is extremely red and the events bear some similarity to 'luminous red novae', but have much lower speeds.

  17. Neutrino event counts from Type Ia supernova models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraj, Gautam; Scholberg, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae (SNe) are widely known to be among the universe's primary neutrino factories, releasing ˜99% of their energy, or ˜1053 ergs, in the form of the tiny leptons. On the other hand, less than 4% of the energy of Type Ia SNe is released via neutrinos, hence making Ia SNe impossible to detect (through neutrino observations) at typical supernova distances. For this reason, neutrino signatures from these explosions have very rarely been modeled. We ran time-sliced fluences from non-oscillation pure deflagration and delayed detonation (DDT) Ia models by Odrzywolek and Plewa (2011) through SNOwGLoBES, a software that calculates event rates and other observed quantities of supernova neutrinos in various detectors. We determined Ia neutrino event rates in Hyper-K, a proposed water Cherenkov detector, JUNO, a scintillator detector under construction, and DUNE, a proposed argon detector, and identified criteria to distinguish between the two models (pure deflagration and DDT) based on data from a real supernova (statistically represented by a Poisson distribution around the expected result). We found that up to distances of 8.00, 1.54, and 2.37 kpc (subject to change based on oscillation effects and modified detector efficiencies), we can discern the explosion mechanism with ≥90% confidence in Hyper-K, JUNO, and DUNE, respectively, thus learning more about Ia progenitors.

  18. Very Low Energy Supernovae from Neutrino Mass Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Woosley, S. E.

    2013-06-01

    It now seems likely that some percentage of more massive supernova progenitors do not explode by any of the currently discussed explosion mechanisms. This has led to speculation concerning the observable transients that might be produced if such a supernova fails. Even if a prompt outgoing shock fails to form in a collapsing presupernova star, one must still consider the hydrodynamic response of the star to the abrupt loss of mass via neutrinos as the core forms a protoneutron star. Following a suggestion by Nadezhin, we calculate the hydrodynamical responses of typical supernova progenitor stars to the rapid loss of approximately 0.2-0.5 M ⊙ of gravitational mass from their centers. In a red supergiant star, a very weak supernova with total kinetic energy ~1047 erg results. The binding energy of a large fraction of the hydrogen envelope before the explosion is of the same order and, depending upon assumptions regarding the maximum mass of a neutron star, most of it is ejected. Ejection speeds are ~100 km s-1 and luminosities ~1039 erg s-1 are maintained for about a year. A significant part of the energy comes from the recombination of hydrogen. The color of the explosion is extremely red and the events bear some similarity to "luminous red novae," but have much lower speeds.

  19. Detectability and Uncertainties of the Supernova Relic Neutrino Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakazato, Ken'ichiro; Mochida, Eri; Niino, Yuu; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    The spectrum of the supernova relic neutrino (SRN) background from past stellar core collapses is calculated and its detectability at SK-Gd (Super-Kamiokande experiment with gadolinium-loaded water) is investigated. Several uncertainties on the flux of SRNs are considered. The core collapse rate at each redshift depends on the cosmic star formation rate, initial mass function and mass range of progenitors that end with a core collapse. The shock revival time is introduced as a parameter that should depend on the still unknown explosion mechanism of core collapse supernovae. Furthermore, since the neutrino luminosity of black-hole-forming failed supernovae is higher than that of ordinary supernovae, their contribution to SRNs is quantitatively estimated. Assuming the mass and metallicity ranges of their progenitors, the redshift dependence of the black hole formation rate is considered on the basis of the metallicity evolution of galaxies. As a result, it is found that the expected event rate of SRNs is comparable with other backgrounds at SK-Gd. Therefore, the required observation time to detect SRNs at SK-Gd depends strongly on the core collapse rate and it is 10-300 years.

  20. Unmasking the Supernova Impostors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, C. S.; Szczygieł, D. M.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2012-10-01

    The canonical picture of a supernova impostor is a short (~months) -11 <~ MV <~ -14 optical transient from a massive (M * >~ 40 M ⊙) star during which the star ejects a dense shell of material. Dust formed in the ejecta then obscures the star. In this picture, the geometric expansion of the shell leads to clear predictions for the evolution of the optical depths and hence the evolution of the optical through mid-IR emissions. Here, we review the theory of this standard model and then examine the impostors SN 1954J, SN 1997bs, SN 1999bw, SN 2000ch, SN 2001ac, SN 2002bu, SN 2002kg, and SN 2003gm, as well as the potential archetype η Carinae. SN 1999bw, SN 2000ch, SN 2001ac, SN 2002bu, and SN 2003gm all show mid-IR emission indicative of dust, and the luminosities of SN 1999bw, SN 2001ac, SN 2002bu, and SN 2003gm are dominated by dust emission. We find only upper limits on dust emission from SN 1954J, SN 1997bs, and SN 2002kg. The properties of these sources are, however, broadly inconsistent with the predictions of the canonical model. Based on their mid-IR properties, there are at least three classes of objects being labeled as "impostors." The first class, containing the luminous blue variable (LBV) SN 2002kg and the non-LBV SN 2000ch, consists of variable stars with little or no dust formation as a consequence of the transient. The second class contains the "classical" impostors SN 1954J, SN 1997bs, and (maybe) SN 2003gm that may be weaker analogs of η Carinae. However, if these sources are stellar eruptions, the visual transient is simply a signal that the star is entering a phase with high mass-loss rates and dust formation that must last far longer than the observed optical transient. The third class consists of the SN 2008S-like transients, SN 1999bw, SN 2001ac, SN 2002bu, and (maybe) SN 2003gm, which are obscured by dust re-forming in a pre-existing wind after it was destroyed by an explosive transient. For all three classes of source, there are no cases

  1. Finding Distances to Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Type Ia supernovae are known as standard candles due to their consistency, allowing us to measure distances based on their brightness. But what if these explosions arent quite as consistent as we thought? Due scientific diligence requires careful checks, so a recent study investigates whether the metallicity of a supernovas environment affects the peak luminosity of the explosion.Metallicity Dependence?Type Ia supernovae are incredibly powerful tools for determining distances in our universe. Because these supernovae are formed by white dwarfs that explode when they reach a uniform accreted mass, the supernova peak luminosity is thought to be very consistent. This consistency allows these supernovae to be used as standard candles to measure distances to their host galaxies.But what if that peak luminosity is affected by a factor that we havent taken into account? Theorists have proposed that the luminosities of Type Ia supernovae might depend on the metallicity of their environments with high-metallicity environments suppressing supernova luminosities. If this is true, then we could be systematically mis-measuring cosmological distances using these supernovae.Testing AbundancesSupernova brightnesses vs. the metallicity of their environments. Low-metallicity supernovae (blue shading) and high-metallicity supernovae (red shading) have an average magnitude difference of ~0.14. [Adapted from Moreno-Raya et al. 2016]A team led by Manuel Moreno-Raya, of the Center for Energy, Environment and Technology (CIEMAT) in Spain, has observed 28 Type Ia supernovae in an effort to test for such a metallicity dependence. These supernovae each have independent distance measurements (e.g., from Cepheids or the Tully-Fisher relation).Moreno-Raya and collaborators used spectra from the 4.2-m William Herschel Telescope to estimate oxygen abundances in the region where each of these supernovae exploded. They then used these measurements to determine if metallicity of the local region

  2. Gravitational lensing statistics of amplified supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linder, Eric V.; Wagoner, Robert V.; Schneider, P.

    1988-01-01

    Amplification statistics of gravitationally lensed supernovae can provide a valuable probe of the lensing matter in the universe. A general probability distribution for amplification by compact objects is derived which allows calculation of the lensed fraction of supernovae at or greater than an amplification A and at or less than an apparent magnitude. Comparison of the computed fractions with future results from ongoing supernova searches can lead to determination of the mass density of compact dark matter components with masses greater than about 0.001 solar mass, while the time-dependent amplification (and polarization) of the expanding supernovae constrain the individual masses. Type II supernovae are found to give the largest fraction for deep surveys, and the optimum flux-limited search is found to be at approximately 23d magnitude, if evolution of the supernova rate is neglected.

  3. Improvements to type Ia supernova models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Clare M.

    Type Ia Supernovae provided the first strong evidence of dark energy and are still an important tool for measuring the accelerated expansion of the universe. However, future improvements will be limited by systematic uncertainties in our use of Type Ia supernovae as standard candles. Using Type Ia supernovae for cosmology relies on our ability to standardize their absolute magnitudes, but this relies on imperfect models of supernova spectra time series. This thesis is focused on using data from the Nearby Supernova Factory both to understand current sources of uncertainty in standardizing Type Ia supernovae and to develop techniques that can be used to limit uncertainty in future analyses. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  4. Preview of a Forthcoming Supernova

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Supernova Supernovae can occur one of two ways. The first occurs when a white dwarf—the vestigial ember of a dead star—passes so close to a living star that its matter leaks into the white dwarf. This causes a catastrophic explosion. However most people understand supernovae as the death of a massive star. When the star runs out of fuel toward the end of its life, the gravity at its heart sucks the surrounding mass into its center. At temperatures rocketing above 100 billion degrees Fahrenheit, all the layers of the star abruptly explode outward. The explosions produced by supernovae are so brilliant that astronomers use their luminosity to measure the distance between galaxies, the scale of the universe and the effects of dark energy. For a short period of time, one dying star can appear to shine as brightly as an entire galaxy. Supernovae are relatively common events, one occurring in our own galaxy once every 100 years. In 2014, a person could see the supernova M82 with a pair of binoculars. The cosmologist Tycho Brahe’s observation of a supernova in 1572 allowed him to disprove Aristotle’s theory that the heavens never changed. After a supernova, material expelled in the explosion can form a nebula—an interstellar pile of gas and dust. Over millions of years, gravity pulls the nebula’s materials into a dense orb called a protostar, which will become a new star. Within a few million years, this new star could go supernova as well. ------------------------------ Original Caption: NASA image release Feb. 24, 2012 At the turn of the 19th century, the binary star system Eta Carinae was faint and undistinguished. In the first decades of the century, it became brighter and brighter, until, by April 1843, it was the second brightest star in the sky, outshone only by Sirius (which is almost a thousand times closer to Earth). In the years that followed, it gradually dimmed again and by the 20th century was totally invisible to the naked eye. The star has

  5. DARK MATTER ADMIXED TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, S.-C.; Chu, M.-C.; Lin, L.-M. E-mail: mcchu@phy.cuhk.edu.hk

    2015-10-20

    We perform two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations for the thermonuclear explosion of Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarfs with dark matter (DM) cores in Newtonian gravity. We include a 19-isotope nuclear reaction network and make use of the pure turbulent deflagration model as the explosion mechanism in our simulations. Our numerical results show that the general properties of the explosion depend quite sensitively on the mass of the DM core M {sub DM}: a larger M {sub DM} generally leads to a weaker explosion and a lower mass of synthesized iron-peaked elements. In particular, the total mass of produced can drop from about 0.3 to 0.03 M {sub ⊙} as M {sub DM} increases from 0.01 to 0.03 M {sub ⊙}. We have also constructed the bolometric light curves obtained from our simulations and found that our results match well with the observational data of sub-luminous Type Ia supernovae.

  6. La supernova galattica è in ritardo?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2005-06-01

    After 400 years we are still waiting to see a galactic supernova. A simple galactic model based upon interstellar absorption is shown in order to explain the rate of observed galactic supernovae. The history of variable stars observations in modern epoch is sketched and the hypothesis for Bethlehem Star made by Kepler in occasion of the last galactic supernova, exploded in Ophiuchus on 9 October 1604, is also presented.

  7. Magnetares como fuentes para potenciar supernovas superluminosas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bersten, M. C.; Benvenuto, O. G.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetars have been proposed as one of the possible sources to power the light curve of super-luminous supernovae. We have included the energy deposited by a hypothetical magnetar in our one-dimensional hydrodynamical code, and analyzed the dynamical effect on the supernova ejecta. In particular, we present a model for SN 2011kl, the first object associated with a ultra-long-duration gamma-ray burst. Finally, we show its effect on the light curves of hydrogen rich supernovae.

  8. Fast neutrino flavor conversions near the supernova core with realistic flavor-dependent angular distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Sen, Manibrata

    2017-02-01

    It has been recently pointed out that neutrino fluxes from a supernova can show substantial flavor conversions almost immediately above the core. Using linear stability analyses and numerical solutions of the fully nonlinear equations of motion, we perform a detailed study of these fast conversions, focussing on the region just above the supernova core. We carefully specify the instabilities for evolution in space or time, and find that neutrinos travelling towards the core make fast conversions more generic, i.e., possible for a wider range of flux ratios and angular asymmetries that produce a crossing between the zenith-angle spectra of νe and bar nue. Using fluxes and angular distributions predicted by supernova simulations, we find that fast conversions can occur within tens of nanoseconds, only a few meters away from the putative neutrinospheres. If these fast flavor conversions indeed take place, they would have important implications for the supernova explosion mechanism and nucleosynthesis.

  9. Connecting supernovae with their environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbany, L.

    2017-03-01

    We present MUSE observations of galaxy NGC 7469 from its Science Verification to show how powerful is the combination of high-resolution wide-field integral field spectroscopy with both photometric and spectroscopic observations of supernova (SN) explosions. Using STARLIGHT and H II explorer, we selected all H II regions of the galaxy and produced 2-dimensional maps of the Hα equivalent width, average luminosity-weighted stellar age, and oxygen abundance. We measured deprojected galactocentric distances for all H II regions, and radial gradients for all above-mentioned parameters. We positioned the type Ia SN2008ec in the Branch et al. diagram, and finally discussed the characteristics of the SN parent H II region compared to all other H II regions in the galaxy. In a near future, the AMUSING survey will be able to reproduce this analysis and construct statistical samples to enable the characterization of the progenitors of different supernova types.

  10. The Union3 Supernova Ia Compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, David; Aldering, Greg Scott; Amanullah, Rahman; Barbary, Kyle H.; Bruce, Adam; Chappell, Greta; Currie, Miles; Dawson, Kyle S.; Deustua, Susana E.; Doi, Mamoru; Fakhouri, Hannah; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Gibbons, Rachel A.; Goobar, Ariel; Hsiao, Eric; Huang, Xiaosheng; Ihara, Yutaka; Kim, Alex G.; Knop, Robert A.; Kowalski, Marek; Krechmer, Evan; Lidman, Chris; Linder, Eric; Meyers, Joshua; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nordin, Jakob; Perlmutter, Saul; Ripoche, Pascal; Rykoff, Eli S.; Saunders, Clare; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Suzuki, Nao; Takanashi, Naohiro; Yasuda, Naoki; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2015-01-01

    High-redshift supernovae observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are crucial for constraining any time variation in dark energy. In a forthcoming paper (Rubin+, in prep), we will present a cosmological analysis incorporating existing supernovae with improved calibrations, and new HST-observed supernovae. We combine these data with most of the world's current literature data, and fit using SALT2-4 to create the Union3 Supernova compilation. We present a new analysis framework that allows non-linear light-curve width and color corrections, direct modeling of color dispersion, and a redshift-dependent host-mass correction.

  11. Dust production in supernovae and AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Mikako

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, the role of supernovae on dust has changed; it has been long proposed that supernovae are dust destroyers, but now recent observations show that core-collapse supernovae can become dust factories. Theoretical models of dust evolution in galaxies have predicted that core-collapse supernovae can be an important source of dust in galaxies, if these supernovae can form a significant mass of dust (0.1-1 solar masses). The Herschel Space Observatory and ALMA detected dust in the ejecta of Supernova 1987A. They revealed an estimated 0.5 solar masses of dust. Herschel also found nearly 0.1 solar masses of dust in historical supernovae remnants, namely Cassiopeia A and the Crab Nebula. If dust grains can survive future interaction with the supernova winds and ambient interstellar medium, core-collapse supernovae can be an important source of dust in the interstellar media of galaxies. We further discuss the total dust mass injected by AGB stars and SNe into the interstellar medium of the Magellanic Clouds.

  12. FUZZY SUPERNOVA TEMPLATES. I. CLASSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney, Steven A.; Tonry, John L. E-mail: jt@ifa.hawaii.ed

    2009-12-20

    Modern supernova (SN) surveys are now uncovering stellar explosions at rates that far surpass what the world's spectroscopic resources can handle. In order to make full use of these SN data sets, it is necessary to use analysis methods that depend only on the survey photometry. This paper presents two methods for utilizing a set of SN light-curve templates to classify SN objects. In the first case, we present an updated version of the Bayesian Adaptive Template Matching program (BATM). To address some shortcomings of that strictly Bayesian approach, we introduce a method for Supernova Ontology with Fuzzy Templates (SOFT), which utilizes fuzzy set theory for the definition and combination of SN light-curve models. For well-sampled light curves with a modest signal-to-noise ratio (S/N >10), the SOFT method can correctly separate thermonuclear (Type Ia) SNe from core collapse SNe with >=98% accuracy. In addition, the SOFT method has the potential to classify SNe into sub-types, providing photometric identification of very rare or peculiar explosions. The accuracy and precision of the SOFT method are verified using Monte Carlo simulations as well as real SN light curves from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the SuperNova Legacy Survey. In a subsequent paper, the SOFT method is extended to address the problem of parameter estimation, providing estimates of redshift, distance, and host galaxy extinction without any spectroscopy.

  13. Supernova 2009ig Has Brightened

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2009-09-01

    The Type-Ia Supernova 2009ig in NGC 1015 has brightened from its discovery magnitude of 17.5 on Aug. 20.48 UT (I. Kleiser, S. B. Cenko, W. Li, and A. V. Filippenko, University of California; LOSS discovery on unfiltered KAIT images) to unfiltered CCD magnitude 14.0 on Sep. 20.646 UT (Yoshiteru Matsuura, Nada-ku, Kobe, Japan). H. Navasardyan, E. Cappellaro, and S. Benetti, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, report that a spectrogram obtained on Aug. 21.08 UT with the Asiago 1.82-m telescope indicates that the object is a type-Ia supernova caught soon after explosion. They note some similarity to early spectra of SN 2002bo (Benetti et al. 2004, MNRAS 348, 261), although Si II 597.2-nm and S II 564.0-nm are not yet present. Instructions for CCD observing are given in accordance with AAVSO policy on the observation of Type-Ia supernovae brighter than magnitude 15.0. Data should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database; FITS images should be uploaded to ftp.aavso.org.

  14. Tycho Brahe's 1572 supernova as a standard typeIa as revealed by its light-echo spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Oliver; Tanaka, Masaomi; Usuda, Tomonori; Hattori, Takashi; Goto, Miwa; Birkmann, Stephan; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2008-12-01

    TypeIa supernovae are thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars in close binary systems. They play an important role as cosmological distance indicators and have led to the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Among the most important unsolved questions about supernovae are how the explosion actually proceeds and whether accretion occurs from a companion or by the merging of two white dwarfs. Tycho Brahe's supernova of 1572 (SN1572) is thought to be one of the best candidates for a typeIa supernova in the Milky Way. The proximity of the SN1572 remnant has allowed detailed studies, such as the possible identification of the binary companion, and provides a unique opportunity to test theories of the explosion mechanism and the nature of the progenitor. The determination of the hitherto unknown spectroscopic type of this supernova is crucial in relating these results to the diverse population of typeIa supernovae. Here we report an optical spectrum of Tycho's supernova near maximum brightness, obtained from a scattered-light echo more than four centuries after the direct light from the explosion swept past the Earth. We find that SN1572 belongs to the majority class of normal typeIa supernovae.

  15. Tycho Brahe's 1572 supernova as a standard type Ia as revealed by its light-echo spectrum.

    PubMed

    Krause, Oliver; Tanaka, Masaomi; Usuda, Tomonori; Hattori, Takashi; Goto, Miwa; Birkmann, Stephan; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2008-12-04

    Type Ia supernovae are thermonuclear explosions of white dwarf stars in close binary systems. They play an important role as cosmological distance indicators and have led to the discovery of the accelerated expansion of the Universe. Among the most important unsolved questions about supernovae are how the explosion actually proceeds and whether accretion occurs from a companion or by the merging of two white dwarfs. Tycho Brahe's supernova of 1572 (SN 1572) is thought to be one of the best candidates for a type Ia supernova in the Milky Way. The proximity of the SN 1572 remnant has allowed detailed studies, such as the possible identification of the binary companion, and provides a unique opportunity to test theories of the explosion mechanism and the nature of the progenitor. The determination of the hitherto unknown spectroscopic type of this supernova is crucial in relating these results to the diverse population of type Ia supernovae. Here we report an optical spectrum of Tycho's supernova near maximum brightness, obtained from a scattered-light echo more than four centuries after the direct light from the explosion swept past the Earth. We find that SN 1572 belongs to the majority class of normal type Ia supernovae.

  16. Cygnus Loop Supernova Blast Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This is an image of a small portion of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, which marks the edge of a bubble-like, expanding blast wave from a colossal stellar explosion, occurring about 15,000 years ago. The HST image shows the structure behind the shock waves, allowing astronomers for the first time to directly compare the actual structure of the shock with theoretical model calculations. Besides supernova remnants, these shock models are important in understanding a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, from winds in newly-formed stars to cataclysmic stellar outbursts. The supernova blast is slamming into tenuous clouds of insterstellar gas. This collision heats and compresses the gas, causing it to glow. The shock thus acts as a searchlight revealing the structure of the interstellar medium. The detailed HST image shows the blast wave overrunning dense clumps of gas, which despite HST's high resolution, cannot be resolved. This means that the clumps of gas must be small enough to fit inside our solar system, making them relatively small structures by interstellar standards. A bluish ribbon of light stretching left to right across the picture might be a knot of gas ejected by the supernova; this interstellar 'bullet' traveling over three million miles per hour (5 million kilometres) is just catching up with the shock front, which has slowed down by ploughing into interstellar material. The Cygnus Loop appears as a faint ring of glowing gases about three degrees across (six times the diameter of the full Moon), located in the northern constellation, Cygnus the Swan. The supernova remnant is within the plane of our Milky Way galaxy and is 2,600 light-years away. The photo is a combination of separate images taken in three colors, oxygen atoms (blue) emit light at temperatures of 30,000 to 60,000 degrees Celsius (50,000 to 100,000 degrees Farenheit). Hydrogen atoms (green) arise throughout the region of shocked gas. Sulfur atoms (red) form when the gas cools to

  17. See Change: the Supernova Sample from the Supernova Cosmology Project High Redshift Cluster Supernova Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Brian; Perlmutter, Saul; Boone, Kyle; Nordin, Jakob; Rubin, David; Lidman, Chris; Deustua, Susana E.; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Aldering, Greg Scott; Brodwin, Mark; Cunha, Carlos E.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jee, James; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hoekstra, Henk; Santos, Joana; Stanford, S. Adam; Stern, Daniel; Fassbender, Rene; Richard, Johan; Rosati, Piero; Wechsler, Risa H.; Muzzin, Adam; Willis, Jon; Boehringer, Hans; Gladders, Michael; Goobar, Ariel; Amanullah, Rahman; Hook, Isobel; Huterer, Dragan; Huang, Xiaosheng; Kim, Alex G.; Kowalski, Marek; Linder, Eric; Pain, Reynald; Saunders, Clare; Suzuki, Nao; Barbary, Kyle H.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Meyers, Joshua; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Sofiatti, Caroline; Wilson, Gillian; Rozo, Eduardo; Hilton, Matt; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Luther, Kyle; Yen, Mike; Fagrelius, Parker; Dixon, Samantha; Williams, Steven

    2017-01-01

    The Supernova Cosmology Project has finished executing a large (174 orbits, cycles 22-23) Hubble Space Telescope program, which has measured ~30 type Ia Supernovae above z~1 in the highest-redshift, most massive galaxy clusters known to date. Our SN Ia sample closely matches our pre-survey predictions; this sample will improve the constraint by a factor of 3 on the Dark Energy equation of state above z~1, allowing an unprecedented probe of Dark Energy time variation. When combined with the improved cluster mass calibration from gravitational lensing provided by the deep WFC3-IR observations of the clusters, See Change will triple the Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit. With the primary observing campaign completed, we present the preliminary supernova sample and our path forward to the supernova cosmology results. We also compare the number of SNe Ia discovered in each cluster with our pre-survey expectations based on cluster mass and SFR estimates. Our extensive HST and ground-based campaign has already produced unique results; we have confirmed several of the highest redshift cluster members known to date, confirmed the redshift of one of the most massive galaxy clusters at z~1.2 expected across the entire sky, and characterized one of the most extreme starburst environments yet known in a z~1.7 cluster. We have also discovered a lensed SN Ia at z=2.22 magnified by a factor of ~2.7, which is the highest spectroscopic redshift SN Ia currently known.

  18. Gamma-ray constraints on supernova nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leising, Mark D.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy holds great promise for probing nucleosynthesis in individual supernova explosions via short-lived radioactivity, and for measuring current global Galactic supernova nucleosynthesis with longer-lived radioactivity. It was somewhat surprising that the former case was realized first for a Type II supernova, when both Co-56 and Co-57 were detected in SN 1987A. These provide unprecedented constraints on models of Type II explosions and nucleosynthesis. Live Al-26 in the Galaxy might come from Type II supernovae, and if it is eventually shown to be so, can constrain massive star evolution, supernova nucleosynthesis, and the Galactic Type II supernova rate. Type Ia supernovae, thought to be thermonuclear explosions, have not yet been detected in gamma-rays. This is somewhat surprising given current models and recent Co-56 detection attempts. Ultimately, gamma-ray measurements can confirm their thermonuclear nature, probe the nuclear burning conditions, and help evaluate their contributions to Galactic nucleosynthesis. Type Ib/c supernovae are poorly understood. Whether they are core collapse or thermonuclear events might be ultimately settled by gamma-ray observations. Depending on details of the nuclear processing, any of these supernova types might contribute to a detectable diffuse glow of Fe-60 gamma-ray lines. Previous attempts at detection have come very close to expected emission levels. Remnants of any type of age less that a few centuries might be detectable as individual spots of Ti-44 gamma-ray line emission. It is in fact quite surprising that previous surveys have not discovered such spots, and the constraints on the combination of nucleosynthesis yields and supernova rates are very interesting. All of these interesting limits and possibilities mean that the next mission, International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), if it has sufficient sensitivity, is very likely to lead to the realization of much of the great potential

  19. Chandra Maps Vital Elements From Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-12-01

    composition of the various knots and filaments of stellar material visible in Cas A. Not only could the astronomers determine the composition of many knots in the remnant from the Chandra data, they were also able to infer where in the exploding star the knots had originated. For example, the most compact and brightest knots were composed mostly of silicon and sulfur, with little or no iron. This pointed to an origin deep in the star's interior where the temperatures had reached three billion degrees during the collapse and resulting supernova. Elsewhere, they found fainter features that contained significant amounts of iron as well as some silicon and sulfur. This material was produced even deeper in the star, where the temperatures during the explosion had reached higher values of four to five billion degrees. When Hughes and his collaborators compared where the compact silicon-rich knots and fainter iron-rich features were located in Cas A, they discovered that the iron-rich features from deepest in the star were near the outer edge of the remnant. This meant that they had been flung the furthest by the explosion that created Cas A. Even now this material appears to be streaming away from the site of the explosion with greater speed than the rest of the remnant. By studying the Cas A Chandra data further, astronomers hope to identify which of the several processes proposed by theoretical studies is likely to be the correct mechanism for explaining supernova explosions, both in terms of the dynamics and elements they produce. "In addition to understanding how iron and the other elements are produced in stars, we also want to learn how it gets out of stars and into the interstellar medium. This is why the study of supernovas and supernova remnants is so important," said Hughes. "Once released from stars, newly-created elements can then participate in the formation of new stars and planets in a great cycle that has gone on numerous times already. It is remarkable to realize

  20. The Carnegie Supernova Project: Intrinsic colors of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Christopher R.; Persson, S. E.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, M. M.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Boldt, Luis; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Morrell, Nidia; Salgado, Francisco; Folatelli, Gaston; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.

    2014-07-01

    We present an updated analysis of the intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) using the latest data release of the Carnegie Supernova Project. We introduce a new light-curve parameter very similar to stretch that is better suited for fast-declining events, and find that these peculiar types can be seen as extensions to the population of 'normal' SNe Ia. With a larger number of objects, an updated fit to the Lira relation is presented along with evidence for a dependence on the late-time slope of the B – V light-curves with stretch and color. Using the full wavelength range from u to H band, we place constraints on the reddening law for the sample as a whole and also for individual events/hosts based solely on the observed colors. The photometric data continue to favor low values of R{sub V} , though with large variations from event to event, indicating an intrinsic distribution. We confirm the findings of other groups that there appears to be a correlation between the derived reddening law, R{sub V} , and the color excess, E(B – V), such that larger E(B – V) tends to favor lower R{sub V} . The intrinsic u-band colors show a relatively large scatter that cannot be explained by variations in R{sub V} or by the Goobar power-law for circumstellar dust, but rather is correlated with spectroscopic features of the supernova and is therefore likely due to metallicity effects.

  1. Search for gamma ray lines from supernovae and supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Suri, A. N.; Adams, R.; Tsai, C.

    1974-01-01

    A gamma ray monitor with a NaI crystal shielded with a cup-shaped CsI cover was contained in the rotating wheel compartment of the OSO-7 spacecraft for measuring the gamma ray spectra from 0.3 to 10 MeV in search for gamma ray lines from a possible remnant in the Gum Nebula and the apparent Type I supernovae in NGC5253. A brief analysis of data yielded no positive indications for X-rays, gamma ray lines, or continuum from these sources.

  2. Two possible active supernovae in IC 2150

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Stu; Bock, Greg; Marples, Peter; Drescher, Colin; Pearl, Patrick; BOSS Team; Contreras, Carlos; Phillips, Mark; Morrell, Nidia; Hsiao, Eric; Carnegie Supernova Project

    2016-03-01

    Stu Parker and the BOSS team report the discovery of a rare event involving two possible active supernovae in IC 2150 (z=0.010404; NED) which were recorded in images obtained by Stu Parker during the ongoing program by the Backyard Observatory Supernova Search (BOSS) team.

  3. Single Degenerate Progenitors of Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bours, Madelon; Toonen, Silvia; Nelemans, Gijs

    2013-01-01

    There is a general agreement that Type Ia supernovae correspond to the thermonuclear runaway of a white dwarf (WD) in a compact binary. The details of these progenitor systems are still unclear. Using the population synthesis code SeBa and several assumption for the WD retention efficiency, we estimate the delay times and supernova rates for the single degenerate scenario.

  4. Gamma line radiation from supernovae. [nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    Recent calculations of core collapse or massive stars result in explosive ejection of the mantle by a reflected shock. These hydrodynamic results are important for predictions of explosive nucleosynthesis and gamma-ray line emission from supernovae. Previous estimates, based on simple parameterized models or the nucleosynthesis in an average supernova, are compared with these latest results.

  5. Discovery of Several ASAS-SN Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brimacombe, J.; Post, R. S.; Stone, G.; Wiethoff, W.; Brown, J. S.; Stanek, K. Z.; Dong, Subo; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kochanek, C. S.; Shields, J.; Thompson, T. A.; Shappee, B. J.; Prieto, J. L.; Bersier, D.; Bose, S.; Chen, Ping; Cacella, P.

    2017-07-01

    During the ongoing All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN, Shappee et al. 2014), using data from the quadruple 14-cm "Brutus" telescope in Haleakala, Hawaii and the 14-cm "Cassius" telescope in Cerro Tololo, Chile, we discovered several new transient sources most likely associated with recent supernovae.

  6. Neutrinos from type Ia supernovae: The gravitationally confined detonation scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Warren P.; Kneller, James P.; Ohlmann, Sebastian T.; Röpke, Friedrich K.; Scholberg, Kate; Seitenzahl, Ivo R.

    2017-02-01

    Despite their use as cosmological distance indicators and their importance in the chemical evolution of galaxies, the unequivocal identification of the progenitor systems and explosion mechanism of normal type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) remains elusive. The leading hypothesis is that such a supernova is a thermonuclear explosion of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf, but the exact explosion mechanism is still a matter of debate. Observation of a galactic SN Ia would be of immense value in answering the many open questions related to these events. One potentially useful source of information about the explosion mechanism and progenitor is the neutrino signal because the neutrinos from the different mechanisms possess distinct spectra as a function of time and energy. In this paper, we compute the expected neutrino signal from a gravitationally confined detonation (GCD) explosion scenario for a SN Ia and show how the flux at Earth contains features in time and energy unique to this scenario. We then calculate the expected event rates in the Super-K, Hyper-K, JUNO, DUNE, and IceCube detectors and find both Hyper-K and IceCube will see a few events for a GCD supernova at 1 kpc or closer, while Super-K, JUNO, and DUNE will see events if the supernova is closer than ˜0.3 kpc . The distance and detector criteria needed to resolve the time and spectral features arising from the explosion mechanism, neutrino production, and neutrino oscillation processes are also discussed. The neutrino signal from the GCD is then compared with the signal from a deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) explosion model computed previously. We find the overall event rate is the most discriminating feature between the two scenarios followed by the event rate time structure. Using the event rate in the Hyper-K detector alone, the DDT can be distinguished from the GCD at 2 σ if the distance to the supernova is less than 2.3 kpc for a normal mass ordering and 3.6 kpc for an inverted ordering.

  7. Gamma Ray Bursts and Their Links With Supernovae and Cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, Peter; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, whose origin and mechanism is the focus of intense interest. They appear connected to supernova remnants from massive stars or the merger of their remnants, and their brightness makes them temporarily detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. After pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with observations from the recently launched Fermi satellite, as well as the prospect of detections or limits from large neutrino and gravitational wave detectors. The interplay between such observations and theoretical models of gamma-ray bursts is reviewed, as well as their connections to supernovae and cosmology.

  8. Supernovae and the chirality of the amino acids.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R N; Kajino, T; Onaka, T

    2010-06-01

    A mechanism for creating amino acid enantiomerism that always selects the same large-scale chirality is identified, and subsequent chemical replication and galactic mixing that would populate the Galaxy with the predominant species is described. This involves (1) the spin of the 14N in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules from which amino acids might be formed, that couples to the chirality of the molecules; (2) the neutrinos emitted from the supernova, together with the magnetic field from the nascent neutron star or black hole formed from the supernova, which selectively destroy one orientation of the 14N and thus select the chirality associated with the other 14N orientation; (3) chemical evolution, by which the molecules replicate and evolve to more complex forms of a single chirality on a relatively short timescale; and (4) galactic mixing on a longer timescale that mixes the selected molecules throughout the Galaxy.

  9. SN 1991T - Gamma-Ray Observatory's first supernova?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, Adam; Shankar, Anurag; Van Riper, Kenneth A.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to the explosion of the Type Ia supernova SN 1991T in the nearby galaxy NGC 4527 detected in gamma-ray lines by the recently launched GRO. The dominant gamma-line and continuum features of the new 'delayed detonation' model FDEFA1 are calculated and compared to those for standard deflagration models W7 and cdtg7. It is shown that there are many useful hard photon discriminants of the Type Ia explosion mechanism that can, in principle, be detected by the OSSE and COMPTEL instruments on the GRO. Either SN 1991T, if bright enough, or one of the several Type Ia supernovae expected to be within the GRO's range during its active life, may make it possible to settle the detonation/deflagration debate, verify the generic thermonuclear white dwarf model of Type Ia explosions, and calibrate the Type Ia B(max)/847 keV line flux ratio.

  10. Supernovae, Neutrinos and the Chirality of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Richard N.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Onaka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A mechanism for creating an enantioenrichment in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one handedness by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is defined. The chiral selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the 14N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. It also requires an asymmetric distribution of neutrinos emitted from the supernova. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth’s proteinaceous amino acids. PMID:21747686

  11. Supernovae, neutrinos and the chirality of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Richard N; Kajino, Toshitaka; Onaka, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A mechanism for creating an enantioenrichment in the amino acids, the building blocks of the proteins, that involves global selection of one handedness by interactions between the amino acids and neutrinos from core-collapse supernovae is defined. The chiral selection involves the dependence of the interaction cross sections on the orientations of the spins of the neutrinos and the (14)N nuclei in the amino acids, or in precursor molecules, which in turn couple to the molecular chirality. It also requires an asymmetric distribution of neutrinos emitted from the supernova. The subsequent chemical evolution and galactic mixing would ultimately populate the Galaxy with the selected species. The resulting amino acids could either be the source thereof on Earth, or could have triggered the chirality that was ultimately achieved for Earth's proteinaceous amino acids.

  12. Kinematics of Supernova Remnants: Status of X-Ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, Daniel

    2010-12-01

    A supernova (SN) explosion drives stellar debris into the circumstellar material (CSM) filling a region on a scale of parsecs with X-ray emitting plasma. The velocities involved in supernova remnants (SNRs), thousands of km s-1, can be directly measured with medium and high-resolution X-ray spectrometers and add an important dimension to our understanding of the last stages of the progenitor, the explosion mechanism, and the physics of strong shocks. After touching on the ingredients of SNR kinematics, I present a summary of the still-growing measurement results from SNR X-ray observations. Given the advances in 2D/3D hydrodynamics, data analysis techniques, and especially X-ray instrumentation, it is clear that our view of SNRs will continue to deepen in the decades ahead.

  13. SN 1991T - Gamma-Ray Observatory's first supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, A.; Shankar, A.; Van riper, K.A. Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM )

    1991-09-01

    Consideration is given to the explosion of the Type Ia supernova SN 1991T in the nearby galaxy NGC 4527 detected in gamma-ray lines by the recently launched GRO. The dominant gamma-line and continuum features of the new 'delayed detonation' model FDEFA1 are calculated and compared to those for standard deflagration models W7 and cdtg7. It is shown that there are many useful hard photon discriminants of the Type Ia explosion mechanism that can, in principle, be detected by the OSSE and COMPTEL instruments on the GRO. Either SN 1991T, if bright enough, or one of the several Type Ia supernovae expected to be within the GRO's range during its active life, may make it possible to settle the detonation/deflagration debate, verify the generic thermonuclear white dwarf model of Type Ia explosions, and calibrate the Type Ia B(max)/847 keV line flux ratio. 53 refs.

  14. Supernovae and neutron stars: playgrounds of dense matter and neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke

    2017-06-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are vital as the birthplace of compact objects, where one expects various phases of the dense matter. The current status of supernova studies with the nuclear data for dense matter and neutrino reactions is overviewed with a focus on recent progress of the neutrino-radiation hydrodynamics in two- an three-dimensions and remaining mysteries. In addition to its importance for the explosion mechanism, the equation of state is also essential to predict the neutrino bursts, which can be used to probe deep inside the compact objects. It is valuable to discuss variations of the extreme conditions for hyperons and quarks in central objects during explosive phenomena by looking into the pattern of neutrino signals in relation with dynamics and dense matter.

  15. Theoretical models for Type I and Type II supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Recent theoretical progress in understanding the origin and nature of Type I and Type II supernovae is discussed. New Type II presupernova models characterized by a variety of iron core masses at the time of collapse are presented and the sensitivity to the reaction rate /sup 12/C(..cap alpha..,..gamma..)/sup 16/O explained. Stars heavier than about 20 M/sub solar/ must explode by a ''delayed'' mechanism not directly related to the hydrodynamical core bounce and a subset is likely to leave black hole remnants. The isotopic nucleosynthesis expected from these massive stellar explosions is in striking agreement with the sun. Type I supernovae result when an accreting white dwarf undergoes a thermonuclear explosion. The critical role of the velocity of the deflagration front in determining the light curve, spectrum, and, especially, isotopic nucleosynthesis in these models is explored. 76 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Formation of giant H II regions following supernova explosions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sartori, L.

    1971-01-01

    The principal optical properties of type I supernovae are summarized. These include the light curve and the spectrum. The spectra consist of broad bands with very little continuum. According to the theory presented, the observed light is principally fluorescence, excited in the medium surrounding the supernova by ultraviolet radiation originating from the explosion. It is proposed that the spectrum that impinges on the fluorescent medium while emission is taking place must fall abruptly across the Lyman edge of He II. Such a filtering action is plausibly provided by a much denser internal region, rich in helium, immediately surrounding the exploding object. This will form a Stromgren sphere during the time the intense UV pulse is passing through it. The dense region also slows down the photons below the edge by Thomson scattering, thereby spreading out the UV pulse in time. Various proposed mechanisms for the production of ionization in the Gum nebula are discussed.

  17. NEUTRINO EMISSIVITIES FROM DEUTERON BREAKUP AND FORMATION IN SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Nasu, S.; Nakamura, S. X.; Sato, T.; Sumiyoshi, K.; Myhrer, F.; Kubodera, K. E-mail: nakamura@kern.phys.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp E-mail: sumi@numazu-ct.ac.jp E-mail: kubodera@physics.sc.edu

    2015-03-10

    Neutrino emissions from electron/positron capture on the deuteron and the nucleon-nucleon fusion processes in a supernova core are studied. These weak processes are evaluated in an approach which consists of one-nucleon and two-nucleon meson-exchange currents and nuclear wave functions generated by a high precision nucleon-nucleon potential. In addition to the cross sections for these processes involving the deuteron, we present neutrino emissivities due to these processes calculated for typical profiles of core-collapsed supernovae. These novel neutrino emissivities are compared with the standard neutrino-emission mechanisms. We find that the electron-type neutrino emissivity due to electron capture on the deuteron is comparable to that on the proton in the deuteron abundant region. The electron-type antineutrino emissivity due to positron capture on the deuteron is much smaller than that on the neutron. The neutrino emissivity through deuteron formation is smaller than the conventional processes, but may be important in a situation where the nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung is important. The implications of the new channels involving deuterons for the supernova mechanism are discussed.

  18. Amplification of magnetic fields by supernova-driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Balsara, D. S.

    2006-06-01

    Observations of μG magnetic fields in radio galaxies at cosmological epochs as early as around z=2 have shortened the available time for dynamo action. This fact suggests that the mean-field dynamo mechanism in a global galactic scale either is too slow to amplify a seed field generated by the Biermann battery effect to the level of the observed field strength at z˜2 or needs much stronger seed fields of an order of 10-10 G. A ``contamination'' picture that amplified magnetic fields in smaller objects, such as stars or AGNs, within a relatively shorter timescale spread out through supernova ejecta, stellar winds, and AGN jets to nearby environments is gaining momentum. In line with this picture, we demonstrate, through three-dimensional numerical experiments, that magnetic fields can be amplified by supernova-driven turbulence with two orders of magnitude smaller e-folding timescale than that of the mean-field dynamo mechanism. Therefore, supernova-driven turbulence may play an important role in amplifying small-scale B-fields in any astrophysical systems that have harbored massive stars.

  19. PULSATING REVERSE DETONATION MODELS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE. II. EXPLOSION

    SciTech Connect

    Bravo, Eduardo; Garcia-Senz, Domingo; Cabezon, Ruben M.; DomInguez, Inmaculada E-mail: domingo.garcia@upc.edu E-mail: inma@ugr.es

    2009-04-20

    Observational evidences point to a common explosion mechanism of Type Ia supernovae based on a delayed detonation of a white dwarf (WD). However, all attempts to find a convincing ignition mechanism based on a delayed detonation in a destabilized, expanding, white dwarf have been elusive so far. One of the possibilities that has been invoked is that an inefficient deflagration leads to pulsation of a Chandrasekhar-mass WD, followed by formation of an accretion shock that confines a carbon-oxygen rich core, while transforming the kinetic energy of the collapsing halo into thermal energy of the core, until an inward moving detonation is formed. This chain of events has been termed Pulsating Reverse Detonation (PRD). In this work, we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of PRD models from the time of detonation initiation up to homologous expansion. Different models characterized by the amount of mass burned during the deflagration phase, M {sub defl}, give explosions spanning a range of kinetic energies, K {approx} (1.0-1.2) x 10{sup 51} erg, and {sup 56}Ni masses, M({sup 56}Ni) {approx} 0.6-0.8 M {sub sun}, which are compatible with what is expected for typical Type Ia supernovae. Spectra and light curves of angle-averaged spherically symmetric versions of the PRD models are discussed. Type Ia supernova spectra pose the most stringent requirements on PRD models.

  20. UV Spectroscopy of a Peculiar White Dwarf Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCully, Curtis

    2012-10-01

    While type Ia supernovae {SNe Ia} have been extremely useful for studying the cosmic expansion history, their explosion mechanism and progenitor system remain unsolved problems. Moreover, as large samples of SNe are observed, the diversity among these explosions has grown: not all exploding white dwarfs look like normal SNe Ia. Understanding why these "peculiar" objects are different from the normal ones can help explain the standard SN Ia scenario, as well as give us a better understanding of the many endpoints of stellar evolution. Connecting observations to physical models has been difficult for both normal and peculiar white dwarf supernovae. The ultraviolet is an unexplored wavelength region for peculiar SNe Ia; the high opacity in the UV from typical thermonuclear burning products means that the UV flux in white dwarf supernovae is very sensitive to the outermost layers of ejecta. This material is the least processed, and is thus an ideal place to look for clues to progenitors and explosion mechanisms. Here we propose target-of-opportunity UV spectroscopy of a peculiar white dwarf SN using the STIS NUV-MAMA instrument to add a unique piece of the puzzle connecting peculiar SNe Ia and their progenitors.

  1. Fast evolving pair-instability supernova models: evolution, explosion, light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyreva, Alexandra; Gilmer, Matthew; Hirschi, Raphael; Fröhlich, Carla; Blinnikov, Sergey; Wollaeger, Ryan T.; Noebauer, Ulrich M.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Heger, Alexander; Even, Wesley P.; Waldman, Roni; Tolstov, Alexey; Chatzopoulos, Emmanouil; Sorokina, Elena

    2017-01-01

    With an increasing number of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) discovered, the question of their origin remains open and causes heated debates in the supernova community. Currently, there are three proposed mechanisms for SLSNe: (1) pair-instability supernovae (PISNe), (2) magnetar-driven supernovae and (3) models in which the supernova ejecta interacts with a circumstellar material ejected before the explosion. Based on current observations of SLSNe, the PISN origin has been disfavoured for a number of reasons. Many PISN models provide overly broad light curves and too reddened spectra, because of massive ejecta and a high amount of nickel. In the current study, we re-examine PISN properties using progenitor models computed with the GENEC code. We calculate supernova explosions with FLASH and light-curve evolution with the radiation hydrodynamics code STELLA. We find that high-mass models (200 and 250 M⊙) at relatively high metallicity (Z = 0.001) do not retain hydrogen in the outer layers and produce relatively fast evolving PISNe Type I and might be suitable to explain some SLSNe. We also investigate uncertainties in light-curve modelling due to codes, opacities, the nickel-bubble effect and progenitor structure and composition.

  2. Rates and progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Wood-Vasey, William Michael

    2004-01-01

    The remarkable uniformity of Type Ia supernovae has allowed astronomers to use them as distance indicators to measure the properties and expansion history of the Universe. However, Type Ia supernovae exhibit intrinsic variation in both their spectra and observed brightness. The brightness variations have been approximately corrected by various methods, but there remain intrinsic variations that limit the statistical power of current and future observations of distant supernovae for cosmological purposes. There may be systematic effects in this residual variation that evolve with redshift and thus limit the cosmological power of SN Ia luminosity-distance experiments. To reduce these systematic uncertainties, we need a deeper understanding of the observed variations in Type Ia supernovae. Toward this end, the Nearby Supernova Factory has been designed to discover hundreds of Type Ia supernovae in a systematic and automated fashion and study them in detail. This project will observe these supernovae spectrophotometrically to provide the homogeneous high-quality data set necessary to improve the understanding and calibration of these vital cosmological yardsticks. From 1998 to 2003, in collaboration with the Near-Earth Asteroid Tracking group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a systematic and automated searching program was conceived and executed using the computing facilities at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the National Energy Research Supercomputing Center. An automated search had never been attempted on this scale. A number of planned future large supernovae projects are predicated on the ability to find supernovae quickly, reliably, and efficiently in large datasets. A prototype run of the SNfactory search pipeline conducted from 2002 to 2003 discovered 83 SNe at a final rate of 12 SNe/month. A large, homogeneous search of this scale offers an excellent opportunity to measure the rate of Type Ia supernovae. This thesis presents a new method for

  3. Four Papers by the Supernova Cosmology Project

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, S.; et al.

    1995-06-01

    Our search for high-redshift Type Ia supernovae discovered, in its first years, a sample of seven supernovae. Using a 'batch' search strategy, almost all were discovered before maximum light and were observed over the peak of their light curves. The spectra and light curves indicate that almost all were Type Ia supernovae at redshifts z = 0.35 - 0.5. These high-redshift supernovae can provide a distance indicator and 'standard clock' to study the cosmological parameters q{sub 0}, {Lambda}, {Omega}{sub 0}, and H{sub 0}. This presentation and the following presentations of Kim et al. (1996), Goldhaber et al. (1996), and Pain et al. (1996) will discuss observation strategies and rates, analysis and calibration issues, the sources of measurement uncertainty, and the cosmological implications, including bounds on q{sub 0}, of these first high-redshift supernovae from our ongoing search.

  4. On relative supernova rates and nucleosynthesis roles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. David; Schramm, David N.; Truran, James W.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that the Ni-56-Fe-56 observed in SN 1987A argues that core collapse supernovae may be responsible for more that 50 percent of the iron in the galaxy. Furthermore it is argued that the time averaged rate of thermonuclear driven Type I supernovae may be at least an order of magnitude lower than the average rate of core collapse supernovae. The present low rate of Type II supernovae (below their time averaged rate of approx. 1/10 yr) is either because the past rate was much higher because many core collapse supernovae are dim like SN 1987A. However, even in this latter case they are only an order of magnitude dimmer that normal Type II's due to the contribution of Ni-56 decay to the light curve.

  5. Supernovae and cosmology with future European facilities.

    PubMed

    Hook, I M

    2013-06-13

    Prospects for future supernova surveys are discussed, focusing on the European Space Agency's Euclid mission and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT), both expected to be in operation around the turn of the decade. Euclid is a 1.2 m space survey telescope that will operate at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, and has the potential to find and obtain multi-band lightcurves for thousands of distant supernovae. The E-ELT is a planned, general-purpose ground-based, 40-m-class optical-infrared telescope with adaptive optics built in, which will be capable of obtaining spectra of type Ia supernovae to redshifts of at least four. The contribution to supernova cosmology with these facilities will be discussed in the context of other future supernova programmes such as those proposed for DES, JWST, LSST and WFIRST.

  6. On relative supernova rates and nucleosynthesis roles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnett, W. David; Schramm, David N.; Truran, James W.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that the Ni-56-Fe-56 observed in SN 1987A argues that core collapse supernovae may be responsible for more than 50 percent of the iron in the galaxy. Furthermore it is argued that the time averaged rate of thermonuclear driven Type I supernovae may be at least an order of magnitude lower than the average rate of core collapse supernovae. The present low rate of Type II supernovae (below their time averaged rate of approx. 1/10 yr) is either because the past rate was much higher because many core collapse supernovae are dim like SN 1987A. However, even in this latter case they are only an order of magnitude dimmer that normal Type II's due to the contribution of Ni-56 decay to the light curve.

  7. Supernova shock breakout from a red supergiant.

    PubMed

    Schawinski, Kevin; Justham, Stephen; Wolf, Christian; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Steenbrugge, Katrien C; Bell, Tony; Röser, Hermann-Josef; Walker, Emma S; Astier, Pierre; Balam, Dave; Balland, Christophe; Carlberg, Ray; Conley, Alex; Fouchez, Dominique; Guy, Julien; Hardin, Delphine; Hook, Isobel; Howell, D Andrew; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris; Regnault, Nicolas; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2008-07-11

    Massive stars undergo a violent death when the supply of nuclear fuel in their cores is exhausted, resulting in a catastrophic "core-collapse" supernova. Such events are usually only detected at least a few days after the star has exploded. Observations of the supernova SNLS-04D2dc with the Galaxy Evolution Explorer space telescope reveal a radiative precursor from the supernova shock before the shock reached the surface of the star and show the initial expansion of the star at the beginning of the explosion. Theoretical models of the ultraviolet light curve confirm that the progenitor was a red supergiant, as expected for this type of supernova. These observations provide a way to probe the physics of core-collapse supernovae and the internal structures of their progenitor stars.

  8. Catching Supernova Impostors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias-Rosa, Nancy

    2015-08-01

    Given the heterogeneity of the type IIn SNe (SN that show strong interaction with the circumstellar medium), sometimes sneak cases of powerful eruptions of luminous blue variables (LBV) copy the true appearance of a SN explosion. These cases are commonly known as ``SN impostors". Although the mechanisms triggering these eruptions are still unknown, recently we had direct proofs of the connection between very massive stars, their eruptions and type IIn SNe, such as the case of the controversial SN 2009ip. Even if these objects are quite rare, their number has increased in the last couple of years. In this poster I will summarise my work on this topic, showing the most recent object of study and the conclusions from their analysis.

  9. OXYGEN-RICH SUPERNOVA REMNANT IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the tattered debris of a star that exploded 3,000 years ago as a supernova. This supernova remnant, called N132D, lies 169,000 light-years away in the satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. A Hubble Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 image of the inner regions of the supernova remnant shows the complex collisions that take place as fast moving ejecta slam into cool, dense interstellar clouds. This level of detail in the expanding filaments could only be seen previously in much closer supernova remnants. Now, Hubble's capabilities extend the detailed study of supernovae out to the distance of a neighboring galaxy. Material thrown out from the interior of the exploded star at velocities of more than four million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second) plows into neighboring clouds to create luminescent shock fronts. The blue-green filaments in the image correspond to oxygen-rich gas ejected from the core of the star. The oxygen-rich filaments glow as they pass through a network of shock fronts reflected off dense interstellar clouds that surrounded the exploded star. These dense clouds, which appear as reddish filaments, also glow as the shock wave from the supernova crushes and heats the clouds. Supernova remnants provide a rare opportunity to observe directly the interiors of stars far more massive than our Sun. The precursor star to this remnant, which was located slightly below and left of center in the image, is estimated to have been 25 times the mass of our Sun. These stars 'cook' heavier elements through nuclear fusion, including oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, iron etc., and the titanic supernova explosions scatter this material back into space where it is used to create new generations of stars. This is the mechanism by which the gas and dust that formed our solar system became enriched with the elements that sustain life on this planet. Hubble spectroscopic observations will be used to determine the exact

  10. OXYGEN-RICH SUPERNOVA REMNANT IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the tattered debris of a star that exploded 3,000 years ago as a supernova. This supernova remnant, called N132D, lies 169,000 light-years away in the satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. A Hubble Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 image of the inner regions of the supernova remnant shows the complex collisions that take place as fast moving ejecta slam into cool, dense interstellar clouds. This level of detail in the expanding filaments could only be seen previously in much closer supernova remnants. Now, Hubble's capabilities extend the detailed study of supernovae out to the distance of a neighboring galaxy. Material thrown out from the interior of the exploded star at velocities of more than four million miles per hour (2,000 kilometers per second) plows into neighboring clouds to create luminescent shock fronts. The blue-green filaments in the image correspond to oxygen-rich gas ejected from the core of the star. The oxygen-rich filaments glow as they pass through a network of shock fronts reflected off dense interstellar clouds that surrounded the exploded star. These dense clouds, which appear as reddish filaments, also glow as the shock wave from the supernova crushes and heats the clouds. Supernova remnants provide a rare opportunity to observe directly the interiors of stars far more massive than our Sun. The precursor star to this remnant, which was located slightly below and left of center in the image, is estimated to have been 25 times the mass of our Sun. These stars 'cook' heavier elements through nuclear fusion, including oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, iron etc., and the titanic supernova explosions scatter this material back into space where it is used to create new generations of stars. This is the mechanism by which the gas and dust that formed our solar system became enriched with the elements that sustain life on this planet. Hubble spectroscopic observations will be used to determine the exact

  11. Models for Type I supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Woosley, S.E.; Weaver, T.A.; Taam, R.E.

    1980-06-17

    Two rather disjoint scenarios for Type I supernovae are presented. One is based upon mass accretion by a white dwarf in a binary system. The second involves a star having some 8 to 10 times the mass of the sun which may or may not be a solitary star. Despite the apparent dissimilarities in the models it may be that each occurs to some extent in nature for they both share the possibility of producing substantial quantities of /sup 56/Ni and explosions in stars devoid of hydrogen envelopes. These are believed to be two properties that must be shared by any viable Type I model.

  12. Petascale Supernova Simulation with CHIMERA

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, Bronson; Bruenn, S. W.; Blondin, J. M.; Mezzacappa, Anthony; Hix, William Raphael; Dirk, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    CHIMERA is a multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code designed to study core-collapse supernovae. The code is made up of three essentially independent parts: a hydrodynamics module, a nuclear burning module, and a neutrino transport solver combined within an operator-split approach. We describe some ma jor algorithmic facets of the code and briefly discuss some recent results. The multi-physics nature of the problem, and the specific implementation of that physics in CHIMERA, provide a rather straightforward path to effective use of multi-core platforms in the near future.

  13. The LCOGT Supernova Key Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Dale Andrew; Arcavi, Iair; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; McCully, Curtis; Valenti, Stefano; LCOGT Supernova Key Project

    2016-06-01

    We highlight results from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT) Supernova Key Project -- a 3 year program to obtain lightcurves and spectra of approximately 500 low-redshift SNe. LCOGT is a robotic network of elevent one and two meter telescopes spaced around the globe. We are involved in a variety of surveys, including the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, LaSilla Quest, PESSTO, and KMTNet. Recent results include analysis of large samples of core-collaspe SNe, the largest sample of SNe Ibn, evidence of the progenitors of SNe Ia from companion shocking, and new findings about superluminious SNe.

  14. SNRPy: Supernova remnant evolution modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Denis A.; Williams, Jacqueline

    2017-03-01

    SNRPy (Super Nova Remnant Python) models supernova remnant (SNR) evolution and is useful for understanding SNR evolution and to model observations of SNR for obtaining good estimates of SNR properties. It includes all phases for the standard path of evolution for spherically symmetric SNRs and includes alternate evolutionary models, including evolution in a cloudy ISM, the fractional energy loss model, and evolution in a hot low-density ISM. The graphical interface takes in various parameters and produces outputs such as shock radius and velocity vs. time, SNR surface brightness profile and spectrum.

  15. Photometric monitoring of bright supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, D. Yu.; Pavlyuk, N. N.; Volkov, I. M.; Shugarov, S. Yu.

    2014-03-01

    The program of CCD photometric monitoring of bright supernovae (SNe) is carried out at 0.4 — 1.0 meter telescopes of the Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Crimean Astrophysical Observatory and Stará Lesná Observatory since 1998. We have observed more than 250 SNe of different types. We present the results of observations of SNe Ia 2003du, 2009nr and 2011fe, type IIb SNe 2008ax, 2011dh, type II SNe 2004ek and 2005kd and discuss physical parameters of the explosions. %

  16. A doubly robotic telescope - The Berkeley Automated Supernova Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlmutter, Saul; Muller, Richard A.; Newberg, Heidi J. M.; Pennypacker, Carlton R.; Sasseen, Timothy P.; Smith, Craig K.

    1992-01-01

    We have designed, built, and are successfully using a completely robotic supernova search, with an automated observatory and automated real-time analysis and scheduling. This system has detected 20 supernovae so far, resulting in early supernova observations, surprising supernova rates, and new evidence against a true 'inclination effect' in galaxies.

  17. How supernovae launch galactic winds?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Drummond; Quataert, Eliot; Martizzi, Davide; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André

    2017-09-01

    We use idealized three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of global galactic discs to study the launching of galactic winds by supernovae (SNe). The simulations resolve the cooling radii of the majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) and thus self-consistently capture how SNe drive galactic winds. We find that SNe launch highly supersonic winds with properties that agree reasonably well with expectations from analytic models. The energy loading (η _E= \\dot{E}_wind/ \\dot{E}_SN) of the winds in our simulations are well converged with spatial resolution while the wind mass loading (η _M= \\dot{M}_wind/\\dot{M}_\\star) decreases with resolution at the resolutions we achieve. We present a simple analytic model based on the concept that SNRs with cooling radii greater than the local scaleheight break out of the disc and power the wind. This model successfully explains the dependence (or lack thereof) of ηE (and by extension ηM) on the gas surface density, star formation efficiency, disc radius and the clustering of SNe. The winds our simulations are weaker than expected in reality, likely due to the fact that we seed SNe preferentially at density peaks. Clustering SNe in time and space substantially increases the wind power.

  18. Runaway Stars in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannicke, Anna; Neuhaeuser, Ralph; Dinçel, Baha

    2016-07-01

    Half of all stars and in particular 70 % of the massive stars are a part of a multiple system. A possible development for the system after the core collapse supernova (SN) of the more massive component is as follows: The binary is disrupted by the SN. The formed neutron star is ejected by the SN kick whereas the companion star either remains within the system and is gravitationally bounded to the neutron star, or is ejected with a spatial velocity comparable to its former orbital velocity (up to 500 km/s). Such stars with a large peculiar space velocity are called runaway stars. We present our observational results of the supernova remnants (SNRs) G184.6-5.8, G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2. The focus of this project lies on the detection of low mass runaway stars. We analyze the spectra of a number of candidates and discuss their possibility of being the former companions of the SN progenitor stars. The spectra were obtained with INT in Tenerife, Calar Alto Astronomical Observatory and the University Observatory Jena. Also we investigate the field stars in the neighborhood of the SNRs G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2 and calculate more precise distances for these SNRs.

  19. Runaway Stars in Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannicke, A.; Dincel, B.; Neuhauser, R.

    2016-06-01

    Half of all stars and in particular 70 percent of the massive stars are part of a multiple system. A possible development for the system after the core collapse supernova (SN) of the more massive component is as follows: The binary is disrupted by the SN. The formed neutron star is ejected by the SN kick whereas the companion star either remains within the system and is gravitationally bounded to the neutron star, or is ejected with a spatial velocity comparable to its former orbital velocity (up to 500 km/s). Such stars with a large peculiar space velocity are called runaway stars. We present our observational results of the supernova remnants (SNRs) G184.6-5.8, G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2. The focus of this project lies on the detection of low mass runaway stars. We analyze the spectra of a number of candidates and discuss their possibility of being the former companions of the SN progenitor stars. The spectra were obtained with INT in Tenerife, Calar Alto Astronomical Observatory and the University Observatory Jena. Also, we investigate the field stars in the neighborhood of the SNRs G74.0-8.5 and G119.5+10.2 and calculate more precise distances for these SNRs.

  20. Supernova Remnants in High Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick; Badenes, Carles; Freyer, Chris; Hughes, Jack; Lee, Herman Shiu-Hang; Lopez, Laura; Patnaude, Daniel; Reynolds, Steve; Temim, Tea; Williams, Brian; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2015-10-01

    As the observable products of explosive stellar death, supernova remnants reveal some of the most direct information on the physics of the explosions, the properties of the progenitor systems, and the demographics of compact objects formed in the supernova events. High sensitivity X-ray observations have allowed us to probe the properties of the shocked plasma, providing constraints on abundances and ionization states that connect directly progenitor masses and metallicities, the nature of the explosions (core-collapse vs. thermonuclear), and the physics of shock heating and particle acceleration in fast shocks. Studies of SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds have provided information on source demographics in a low metallicity environment, and deep searches for point sources in Galactic SNRs imply that many remnants contain rapidly cooling neutron stars or black holes. Based on Chandra observations, we know that crucial measurements required to advance our knowledge in these areas are possible only with much more sensitive observations at high angular resolution. From identifying the effects of particle acceleration on the post-shock gas in young SNRs like Tycho to obtaining spatially resolved spectra - and identifying compact objects - for young SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, the capabilities of a facility like the X-ray Surveyor are required. Here I present a summary of recent advances brought about by spectral investigations of SNRs, and discuss particular examples of new advances that will be enabled by X-ray Surveyor capabilities.

  1. The Supernova Remnant CTA 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seward, Frederick D.

    1996-01-01

    The supernova remnants G327.1-1.1 and G327.4+0.4 (Kes 27) are located 1.5 deg apart in the constellation Norma. In 1980, Einstein IPC observations discovered that both were irregular filled-center X-ray sources with possible point sources superposed. This paper describes new ROSAT position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) observations which both map the diffuse structure and clearly show several unresolved sources in each field. Both remnants have bright emitting regions inside the limb which might indicate the presence of high energy electrons accelerated by a pulsar. The interior region is more prominent in G327.1-1.1 than in Kes 27. The spectra are relatively strongly absorbed, as expected from distant remnants close to the galactic plane. Comparison of the X-ray and radio maps of each remnant allows us to attribute some emission to a shell and some to the interior. With this information, a blast-wave model is used to derive approximate ages and energy release. Indications are that the Kes 27 supernova deposited approximately 10(exp 51) ergs in the surrounding medium. The G327.1-1.1 event probably deposited a factor of 3-10 less.

  2. Gamma ray constraints on the Galactic supernova rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, D.; The, L.-S.; Clayton, Donald D.; Leising, M.; Mathews, G.; Woosley, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations of the expected gamma ray signatures of Galactic supernovae of all types to estimate the significance of the lack of a gamma ray signal due to supernovae occurring during the last millenium. Using recent estimates of the nuclear yields, we determine mean Galactic supernova rates consistent with the historic supernova record and the gamma ray limits. Another objective of these calculations of Galactic supernova histories is their application to surveys of diffuse Galactic gamma ray line emission.

  3. Energetic Supernovae from the Cosmic Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke-Jung

    2013-04-01

    We present the results from our 3D supernova simulations by using CASTRO, a new radiation-hydrodynamics code. The first generation of stars in the universe ended the cosmic dark age by shining the first light. But what was the fate of these stars? Based on the stellar evolution models, the fate of stars depends on their masses. Modern cosmological simulations suggest that the first stars could be very massive, with a typical mass scale over 50 solar masses. We look for the possible supernovae from the death of the first stars with masses over 50 solar masses. Besides the iron-core collapse supernovae, we find energetic thermonuclear supernovae, including two types of pair-instability supernovae and one type of general-relativity instability supernovae. Our models capture all explosive burning and follow the explosion until the shock breaks out from the stellar surface. We will discuss the energetics, nucleosynthesis, and possible observational signatures for these primordial supernovae that will be the prime targets for future large telescopes such as the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).

  4. Future GLAST Observations of Supernova Remnants And Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, S.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-09-26

    Shell-type Supernova remnants (SNRs) have long been known to harbour a population of ultra-relativistic particles, accelerated in the Supernova shock wave by the mechanism of diffusive shock acceleration. Experimental evidence for the existence of electrons up to energies of 100 TeV was first provided by the detection of hard X-ray synchrotron emission as e.g. in the shell of the young SNR SN1006. Furthermore using theoretical arguments shell-type Supernova remnants have long been considered as the main accelerator of protons - Cosmic rays - in the Galaxy; definite proof of this process is however still missing. Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWN) - diffuse structures surrounding young pulsars - are another class of objects known to be a site of particle acceleration in the Galaxy, again through the detection of hard synchrotron X-rays such as in the Crab Nebula. Gamma-rays above 100 MeV provide a direct access to acceleration processes. The GLAST Large Area telescope (LAT) will be operating in the energy range between 30 MeV and 300 GeV and will provide excellent sensitivity, angular and energy resolution in a previously rather poorly explored energy band. We will describe prospects for the investigation of these Galactic particle accelerators with GLAST.

  5. The shocking development of lithium (and boron) in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearborn, David S. P.; Schramm, David N.; Steigman, Gary; Truran, James

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that significant amounts of Li-7 and B-11 are produced in Type 2 supernovae. The synthesis of these rare elements occurs as the supernova shock traverses the base of the hydrogen envelope burning He-3 to masses 7 and 11 via alpha capture. The yields in this process are sufficient to account for the difference in lithium abundance observed between Pop 2 and Pop 1 stars. Since lithium (and boron) would, in this manner, be created in the same stars that produce the bulk of the heavy elements, the lithium abundance even in old Pop 1 stars would be high (as observed). The B-11 production may remedy the long-standing problem of the traditional spallation scenario to account for the observed isotopic ratio of boron. Observational consequences of this mechanism are discussed, including the evolution of lithium and boron isotope ratios in the Galaxy and the possible use of the boron yields to constrain the number of blue progenitor Type 2 supernovae.

  6. The shocking development of lithium (and boron) in supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearborn, David S. P.; Schramm, David N.; Steigman, Gary; Truran, James

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that significant amounts of Li-7 and B-11 are produced in Type 2 supernovae. The synthesis of these rare elements occurs as the supernova shock traverses the base of the hydrogen envelope burning He-3 to masses 7 and 11 via alpha capture. The yields in this process are sufficient to account for the difference in lithium abundance observed between Pop 2 and Pop 1 stars. Since lithium (and boron) would, in this manner, be created in the same stars that produce the bulk of the heavy elements, the lithium abundance even in old Pop 1 stars would be high (as observed). The B-11 production may remedy the long-standing problem of the traditional spallation scenario to account for the observed isotopic ratio of boron. Observational consequences of this mechanism are discussed, including the evolution of lithium and boron isotope ratios in the Galaxy and the possible use of the boron yields to constrain the number of blue progenitor Type 2 supernovae.

  7. Type Ia Supernova Modeling with Spectrophotometric Data from the Nearby Supernova Factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Clare; Nearby Supernova Factory

    2017-01-01

    Type Ia supernova cosmology is currently limited by dispersion in standardized magnitudes, driven by a combination of calibration uncertainty and so-called ‘intrinsic dispersion.' This intrinsic dispersion is caused by supernova behavior that the current lightcurve fitters do not account for, and it can involve systematic trends. Using data from the Nearby Supernova Factory, we have developed an empirical model that captures a wider range of Type Ia supernova behavior and can be used to improve standardized magnitude dispersion. To do this, Gaussian Processes and Expectation Maximization Factor Analysis are used to generate spectral time series templates that can be combined linearly. Variations of this model are optimized, alternatively for supernova standardization or for maximum accuracy in the description of supernova spectral features. We present these models along with interpretation of the model components. Methods are discussed for the most efficient application of the models in cosmological surveys.

  8. Supernova remnants in the very-high-energy gamma-ray domain: the role of the Cherenkov telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristofari, P.; Gabici, S.; Humensky, T. B.; Santander, M.; Terrier, R.; Parizot, E.; Casanova, S.

    2017-10-01

    Supernova remnants are often presented as the most probable sources of Galactic cosmic rays. This idea is supported by the accumulation of evidence that particle acceleration is happening at supernova remnant shocks. Observations in the TeV range have especially contributed to increase the understanding of the mechanisms, but many aspects of the particle acceleration at supernova remnant shocks are still debated. The Cherenkov telescope array is expected to lead to the detection of many new supernova remnants in the TeV and multi-TeV range. In addition to the individual study of each, the study of these objects as a population can help constrain the parameters describing the acceleration of particles and increase our understanding of the mechanisms involved.

  9. The Low-Redshift Carnegie Supernova Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, M. M.; Hamuy, M.; Freedman, W. L.; Persson, S. E.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Folatelli, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Krzeminski, W.; Morrell, N.; Murphy, D.; Roth, M.; Li, W.; Filippenko, A.; Carlberg, R.; Maza, J.; Pinto, P.

    2004-12-01

    The Carnegie Supernova Program (CSP) is a 5-year program designed to 1) provide a precise calibration of Type Ia supernova luminosity distances based on observations of nearby Type Ia and II supernovae, and 2) use this calibration to set constraints on the nature of the dark energy from restframe I-band photometry of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae. In this paper, we describe the low-redshift portion of the CSP, the major goal of which is to generate a fundamental dataset of precise u'BVg'r'i'YJHK light curves and optical spectrophotometry for 100 Type Ia supernovae (z < 0.07) and 100 Type II supernovae (z < 0.05). These data will be used to refine techniques for obtaining distances and reddenings to both types of supernovae, and to study possible evolutionary effects in Type Ia events. An important component of the low-z CSP is the near-IR photometry, which offers the promise of improving the precision of distance determinations due to the reduced effects of dust extinction and (for Type Ia supernovae) the smaller intrinsic variation in the peak luminosities at these wavelengths. The combination of optical and near-IR photometry should also yield much more reliable dust extinction corrections than can be obtained from optical data alone. The low-z CSP began taking data in Sept. 2004, and is projected to run through May 2009. Preliminary light curves and spectra for the first few supernovae observed are presented, as is a brief description of the various data reduction pipelines. This project is supported by NSF grant AST-0306969.

  10. An Open Catalog for Supernova Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillochon, James; Parrent, Jerod; Kelley, Luke Zoltan; Margutti, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    We present the Open Supernova Catalog, an online collection of observations and metadata for presently 36,000+ supernovae and related candidates. The catalog is freely available on the web (https://sne.space), with its main interface having been designed to be a user-friendly, rapidly searchable table accessible on desktop and mobile devices. In addition to the primary catalog table containing supernova metadata, an individual page is generated for each supernova, which displays its available metadata, light curves, and spectra spanning X-ray to radio frequencies. The data presented in the catalog is automatically rebuilt on a daily basis and is constructed by parsing several dozen sources, including the data presented in the supernova literature and from secondary sources such as other web-based catalogs. Individual supernova data is stored in the hierarchical, human- and machine-readable JSON format, with the entirety of each supernova’s data being contained within a single JSON file bearing its name. The setup we present here, which is based on open-source software maintained via git repositories hosted on github, enables anyone to download the entirety of the supernova data set to their home computer in minutes, and to make contributions of their own data back to the catalog via git. As the supernova data set continues to grow, especially in the upcoming era of all-sky synoptic telescopes, which will increase the total number of events by orders of magnitude, we hope that the catalog we have designed will be a valuable tool for the community to analyze both historical and contemporary supernovae.

  11. Simulated Radio Images and Light Curves of Young Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwarkadas, V. V.; Mioduszewski, A. J.; Ball, L.

    2002-12-01

    We present calculations of the radio emission from supernovae based on high-resolution simulations of the hydrodynamics and radiation transfer, using simple energy density relations which link the properties of the radiating electrons and the magnetic field to the hydrodynamics. As a specific example we model the emission from SN1993J, which cannot be adequately fitted with the often-used analytic mini-shell model, and present a good fit to the radio evolution at a single frequency. Both free-free absorption and synchrotron self-absorption are needed to fit the light curve at early times and a circumstellar density profile of ρ ~ r -1.7 provides the best fit to the later data. We discuss the use of high-resolution radio images of supernovae to distinguish between different absorption mechanisms and determine the origin of specific light curve features. Comparisons of VLBI images of SN1993J with synthetic model images suggest that internal free-free absorption completely obscures emission at 8.4 GHz passing through the center of the supernova for the first few tens of years after explosion. We predict that at 8.4 GHz the internal free-free absorption is currently declining, and that over the next ~ 40 years the surface brightness of the center of the source should increase relative to the bright ring of emission seen in VLBI images. Similar absorption in a nearby supernova would make the detection of a radio pulsar at 1 GHz impossible for ~ 150 years after explosion. VVD is supported by the US. Department of Energy under grant number B341495 to the ASCI Flash Center at the University of Chicago.

  12. Hot Dust! Late-Time Infrared Emission From Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Ori; Skrutskie, M. F.; Chevalier, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    Supernovae light curves typically peak and fade in the course of several months. Some supernovae , however, exhibit late-time infrared emission that in some cases can last for several years. These supernovae tend to be of the Type IIn subclass, which is defined by narrow hydrogen and helium emission lines arising from a dense, pre-existing circumstellar medium excited by the supernova radiation. Such a late-time ``IR excess'' with respect to the optical blackbody counterpart typically indicates the presence of warm dust. The origin and heating mechanism of the dust is not, however, always well constrained. In this talk, I will explore several scenarios that explain the observed late-time emission. In particular, I will discuss the case of the Type IIn SN 2005ip, which has displayed an ``IR excess'' for over 3 years. The results allow us to interpret the progenitor system and better understand the late stages of stellar evolution. Much of the data used for this analysis were obtained with TripleSpec, a medium-resolution near-infrared spectrograph located at Apache Point Observatory, NM, and FanCam, a JHK imager located at Fan Mountain Observatory, just outside of Charlottesville, VA. These two instruments were designed, fabricated, built, and commissioned by our instrumentation group at the University of Virginia. I will also spend some time discussing these instruments. I would like to thank the following for financial support of this work throughout my graduate career: NASA GSRP, NSF AAG-0607737, Spitzer PID 50256, Achievement Reward for College Scientists (ARCS), and the Virginia Space Grant Consortium.

  13. Diffuse neutrino flux from failed supernovae.

    PubMed

    Lunardini, Cecilia

    2009-06-12

    I study the diffuse flux of electron antineutrinos from stellar collapses with direct black hole formation (failed supernovae). This flux is more energetic than that from successful supernovae, and therefore it might contribute substantially to the total diffuse flux above realistic detection thresholds. The total flux might be considerably higher than previously thought, and approach the sensitivity of Super-Kamiokande. For more conservative values of the parameters, the flux from failed supernovae dominates for antineutrino energies above 30-45 MeV, with potential to give an observable spectral distortion at megaton detectors.

  14. Supernovae effects on the terrestrial atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.; Chandra, S.; Stecher, T. P.

    1980-01-01

    The first effects of a nearby (10 parsec) supernova on the earth's atmosphere will be caused by ultraviolet radiation dissociating molecular oxygen. The event will be of about one month's duration. Several months later nuclear gamma radiation may arrive, causing a decrease in atmospheric ozone. Cosmic radiation from the supernova remnant will not intercept the earth for at least 1000 years at which time ozone will be seriously depleted. Supernova ultraviolet radiation increases column ozone and atomic oxygen. Atmospheric thermal structure is modified with a large temperature increase in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere and a decrease at higher altitudes caused by enhanced heat loss due to atomic oxygen radiation and conduction.

  15. Object Classification at the Nearby Supernova Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Bailey, Stephen; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Romano, Raquel; Thomas, Rollin C.; Weaver, B. A.; Wong, D.

    2007-12-21

    We present the results of applying new object classification techniques to the supernova search of the Nearby Supernova Factory. In comparison to simple threshold cuts, more sophisticated methods such as boosted decision trees, random forests, and support vector machines provide dramatically better object discrimination: we reduced the number of nonsupernova candidates by a factor of 10 while increasing our supernova identification efficiency. Methods such as these will be crucial for maintaining a reasonable false positive rate in the automated transient alert pipelines of upcoming large optical surveys.

  16. Chiral transport of neutrinos in supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2017-03-01

    The conventional neutrino transport theory for core-collapse supernovae misses one key property of neutrinos: the left-handedness. The chirality of neutrinos modifies the hydrodynamic behavior at the macroscopic scale and leads to topological transport phenomena. We argue that such transport phenomena should play important roles in the evolution of core-collapse supernovae, and, in particular, lead to a tendency toward the inverse energy cascade from small to larger scales, which may be relevant to the origin of the supernova explosion.

  17. 3 New Supernova Discoveries/Classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, Peter; Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D. Andrew

    2009-08-01

    The Type Ia supernova science working group of the Palomar Transient Factory (ATEL#1964) reports the discovery of three nearby supernova. Confirmation spectra were taken on the Double Beam Spectrograph on the Palomar Hale telescope on August 19 UT by R. Ellis and J. Cooke. Classification of the spectra were carried out using Superfit (Howell et al. 2005). As all three are quite young, STIS/UV spectroscopic observations on the Hubble Space Telescope were triggered by the ToO program "Verifying the Utility of Type Ia Supernovae as Cosmological Probes: Evolution and Dispersion in the Ultraviolet Spectra " (PI: R.

  18. Supernovae data and perturbative deviation from homogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Enqvist, Kari; Mattsson, Maria; Rigopoulos, Gerasimos E-mail: maria.ronkainen@helsinki.fi

    2009-09-01

    We show that a spherically symmetric perturbation of a dust dominated Ω = 1 FRW universe in the Newtonian gauge can lead to an apparent acceleration of standard candles and provide a fit to the magnitude-redshift relation inferred from the supernovae data, while the perturbation in the gravitational potential remains small at all scales. We also demonstrate that the supernovae data does not necessarily imply the presence of some additional non-perturbative contribution by showing that any Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi model fitting the supernovae data (with appropriate initial conditions) will be equivalent to a perturbed FRW spacetime along the past light cone.

  19. Light-Echo Spectrum Reveals the Type of Tycho Brahe's 1572 Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usuda, T.; Krause, O.; Tanaka, M.; Hattori, T.; Goto, M.; Birkmann, S. M.; Nomoto, K.

    2013-01-01

    We successfully obtained the first optical spectra of the faint light echoes around Cassiopeia A and Tycho Brahe's supernova remnants (SNRs) with FOCAS and the Subaru Telescope. We conclude that Cas A and Tycho's SN 1572 belong to the Type IIb and normal Type Ia supernovae, respectively. Light echo spectra are important in order to obtain further insight into the supernova explosion mechanism of Tycho's SN 1572: how the Type Ia explosion actually proceeds, and whether accretion occurs from a companion or by the merging of two white dwarfs. The proximity of the SN 1572 remnant has allowed detailed studies, such as the possible identification of the binary companion, and provides a unique opportunity to test theories of the explosion mechanism and the nature of the progenitor. Future light-echo spectra, obtained in different spatial directions of SN 1572, will enable to construct a three-dimensional spectroscopic view of the explosion.

  20. SPECTROSCOPY OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE BY THE CARNEGIE SUPERNOVA PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Folatelli, Gaston; Morrell, Nidia; Phillips, Mark M.; Hsiao, Eric; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos; Castellon, Sergio; Roth, Miguel; Hamuy, Mario; Anderson, Joseph P.; Krzeminski, Wojtek; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Burns, Christopher R.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Murphy, David; Persson, S. E.; Prieto, Jose L.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Krisciunas, Kevin; and others

    2013-08-10

    This is the first release of optical spectroscopic data of low-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) by the Carnegie Supernova Project including 604 previously unpublished spectra of 93 SNe Ia. The observations cover a range of phases from 12 days before to over 150 days after the time of B-band maximum light. With the addition of 228 near-maximum spectra from the literature, we study the diversity among SNe Ia in a quantitative manner. For that purpose, spectroscopic parameters are employed such as expansion velocities from spectral line blueshifts and pseudo-equivalent widths (pW). The values of those parameters at maximum light are obtained for 78 objects, thus providing a characterization of SNe Ia that may help to improve our understanding of the properties of the exploding systems and the thermonuclear flame propagation. Two objects, namely, SNe 2005M and 2006is, stand out from the sample by showing peculiar Si II and S II velocities but otherwise standard velocities for the rest of the ions. We further study the correlations between spectroscopic and photometric parameters such as light-curve decline rate and color. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the pW of Si II absorption features are very good indicators of light-curve decline rate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that parameters such as pW2 (Si II 4130) and pW6 (Si II 5972) provide precise calibrations of the peak B-band luminosity with dispersions of Almost-Equal-To 0.15 mag. In the search for a secondary parameter in the calibration of peak luminosity for SNe Ia, we find a Almost-Equal-To 2{sigma}-3{sigma} correlation between B-band Hubble residuals and the velocity at maximum light of S II and Si II lines.

  1. Supernova Relic Neutrinos and the Supernova Rate Problem: Analysis of Uncertainties and Detectability of ONeMg and Failed Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Grant J.; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Jyutaro

    2014-08-01

    Direct measurements of the core collapse supernova rate (R SN) in the redshift range 0 <= z <= 1 appear to be about a factor of two smaller than the rate inferred from the measured cosmic massive star formation rate (SFR). This discrepancy would imply that about one-half of the massive stars that have been born in the local observed comoving volume did not explode as luminous supernovae. In this work, we explore the possibility that one could clarify the source of this "supernova rate problem" by detecting the energy spectrum of supernova relic neutrinos with a next generation 106 ton water Čerenkov detector like Hyper-Kamiokande. First, we re-examine the supernova rate problem. We make a conservative alternative compilation of the measured SFR data over the redshift range 0 <=z <= 7. We show that by only including published SFR data for which the dust obscuration has been directly determined, the ratio of the observed massive SFR to the observed supernova rate R SN has large uncertainties {\\sim }1.8^{+1.6}_{-0.6} and is statistically consistent with no supernova rate problem. If we further consider that a significant fraction of massive stars will end their lives as faint ONeMg SNe or as failed SNe leading to a black hole remnant, then the ratio reduces to {\\sim }1.1^{+1.0}_{-0.4} and the rate problem is essentially solved. We next examine the prospects for detecting this solution to the supernova rate problem. We first study the sources of uncertainty involved in the theoretical estimates of the neutrino detection rate and analyze whether the spectrum of relic neutrinos can be used to independently identify the existence of a supernova rate problem and its source. We consider an ensemble of published and unpublished core collapse supernova simulation models to estimate the uncertainties in the anticipated neutrino luminosities and temperatures. We illustrate how the spectrum of detector events might be used to establish the average neutrino temperature and

  2. Supernova relic neutrinos and the supernova rate problem: Analysis of uncertainties and detectability of ONeMg and failed supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, Grant J.; Hidaka, Jun; Kajino, Toshitaka; Suzuki, Jyutaro

    2014-08-01

    Direct measurements of the core collapse supernova rate (R{sub SN}) in the redshift range 0 ≤ z ≤ 1 appear to be about a factor of two smaller than the rate inferred from the measured cosmic massive star formation rate (SFR). This discrepancy would imply that about one-half of the massive stars that have been born in the local observed comoving volume did not explode as luminous supernovae. In this work, we explore the possibility that one could clarify the source of this 'supernova rate problem' by detecting the energy spectrum of supernova relic neutrinos with a next generation 10{sup 6} ton water Čerenkov detector like Hyper-Kamiokande. First, we re-examine the supernova rate problem. We make a conservative alternative compilation of the measured SFR data over the redshift range 0 ≤z ≤ 7. We show that by only including published SFR data for which the dust obscuration has been directly determined, the ratio of the observed massive SFR to the observed supernova rate R{sub SN} has large uncertainties ∼1.8{sub −0.6}{sup +1.6} and is statistically consistent with no supernova rate problem. If we further consider that a significant fraction of massive stars will end their lives as faint ONeMg SNe or as failed SNe leading to a black hole remnant, then the ratio reduces to ∼1.1{sub −0.4}{sup +1.0} and the rate problem is essentially solved. We next examine the prospects for detecting this solution to the supernova rate problem. We first study the sources of uncertainty involved in the theoretical estimates of the neutrino detection rate and analyze whether the spectrum of relic neutrinos can be used to independently identify the existence of a supernova rate problem and its source. We consider an ensemble of published and unpublished core collapse supernova simulation models to estimate the uncertainties in the anticipated neutrino luminosities and temperatures. We illustrate how the spectrum of detector events might be used to establish the average

  3. Supernova 1993J as a spectroscopic link between type II and type Ib supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, D. A.; Clocchiatti, A.; Benjamin, R.; Lester, D. F.; Wheeler, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    Supernova 1993J in the nearby galaxy M81 is one of the closest - and hence brightest - supernovae to be witnessed this century. The early spectrum of SN1993J showed the characteristic hydrogen signature of type II supernovae, but its subsequent evolution is atypical for this class of supernova. Here we present optical and infrared spectra of SN1993J up to 43 days after outburst, which reveal the onset of the helium absorption and emission features more commonly associated with hydrogen-free type Ib supernovae. Corresponding model spectra show that the progenitor star must have possessed an unusually thin (for type II supernovae) hydrogen-rich envelope overlying a helium-rich mantle. Moreover, the supernova ejecta must have remained compositionally stratified, with little transport of the hydrogen-rich material down into the underlying helium layer or mixing of heavier elements outwards. SN1993J therefore represents a transition object between hydrogen-dominated type II supernovae, and hydrogen-free, helium-dominated type Ib supernovae.

  4. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: a different view of supernova explosions.

    PubMed

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-04-20

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent datasets accumulated on young, ejecta-dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first decade of Chandra and the impact that these results have had on open issues in supernova research.

  5. Radio Supernovae: Circum-Stellar Investigation (C.S.I.) of Supernova Progenitor Stars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-24

    ar X iv :0 90 2. 40 59 v1 [ as tr o- ph .H E ] 2 4 Fe b 20 09 Radio Supernovae : Circum-Stellar Investigation (C.S.I.) of Supernova Progenitor...FEB 2009 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radio Supernovae : Circum-Stellar Investigation (C.S.I...of Supernova Progenitor Stars 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f

  6. X-ray studies of supernova remnants: A different view of supernova explosions

    PubMed Central

    Badenes, Carles

    2010-01-01

    The unprecedented spatial and spectral resolutions of Chandra have revolutionized our view of the X-ray emission from supernova remnants. The excellent datasets accumulated on young, ejecta-dominated objects like Cas A or Tycho present a unique opportunity to study at the same time the chemical and physical structure of the explosion debris and the characteristics of the circumstellar medium sculpted by the progenitor before the explosion. Supernova remnants can thus put strong constraints on fundamental aspects of both supernova explosion physics and stellar evolution scenarios for supernova progenitors. This view of the supernova phenomenon is completely independent of, and complementary to, the study of distant extragalactic supernovae at optical wavelengths. The calibration of these two techniques has recently become possible thanks to the detection and spectroscopic follow-up of supernova light echoes. In this paper, I review the most relevant results on supernova remnants obtained during the first decade of Chandra and the impact that these results have had on open issues in supernova research. PMID:20404206

  7. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z.; Vagins, Mark R.

    2013-12-01

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (≅ 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (≅ 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (∼3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub −2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub −0.8}{sup +1.4} per

  8. GENERAL-RELATIVISTIC SIMULATIONS OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Christian D.; Abdikamalov, Ernazar; Moesta, Philipp; Haas, Roland; Drasco, Steve; O'Connor, Evan P.; Reisswig, Christian; Meakin, Casey A.; Schnetter, Erik

    2013-05-10

    We study the three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics of the post-core-bounce phase of the collapse of a 27 M{sub Sun} star and pay special attention to the development of the standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and neutrino-driven convection. To this end, we perform 3D general-relativistic simulations with a three-species neutrino leakage scheme. The leakage scheme captures the essential aspects of neutrino cooling, heating, and lepton number exchange as predicted by radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The 27 M{sub Sun} progenitor was studied in 2D by Mueller et al., who observed strong growth of the SASI while neutrino-driven convection was suppressed. In our 3D simulations, neutrino-driven convection grows from numerical perturbations imposed by our Cartesian grid. It becomes the dominant instability and leads to large-scale non-oscillatory deformations of the shock front. These will result in strongly aspherical explosions without the need for large-scale SASI shock oscillations. Low-l-mode SASI oscillations are present in our models, but saturate at small amplitudes that decrease with increasing neutrino heating and vigor of convection. Our results, in agreement with simpler 3D Newtonian simulations, suggest that once neutrino-driven convection is started, it is likely to become the dominant instability in 3D. Whether it is the primary instability after bounce will ultimately depend on the physical seed perturbations present in the cores of massive stars. The gravitational wave signal, which we extract and analyze for the first time from 3D general-relativistic models, will serve as an observational probe of the postbounce dynamics and, in combination with neutrinos, may allow us to determine the primary hydrodynamic instability.

  9. Happy birthday, supernova. [1987A

    SciTech Connect

    Schorn, R.A.

    1988-02-01

    The advances in understanding that have been made concerning SN 1987A in the year since it appeared are reviewed. The rapidity of the initial rise in brightness and the relatively faint absolute magnitude during the first few weeks have been found to be due to the progenitor star's being a blue giant, relatively small compared to a red giant. The nitrogen lines in the spectrum are evidence that the star was once a red giant whose stellar wind was so strong that the resulting loss of material converted the star into a blue giant. The variations in the light curve of the supernova are explained in terms of the radioactive decay of Ni-56 and Co-56 and the interaction of the resulting gamma rays with the debris cloud. Some of the remaining unanswered questions are summarized.

  10. Progenitors of Supernovae Type Ia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toonen, S.; Nelemans, G.; Bours, M.; Portegies Zwart, S.; Claeys, J.; Mennekens, N.; Ruiter, A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the significance of Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) in many fields in astrophysics, SNeIa lack a theoretical explanation. The standard scenarios involve thermonuclear explosions of carbon/oxygen white dwarfs approaching the Chandrasekhar mass; either by accretion from a companion or by a merger of two white dwarfs. We investigate the contribution from both channels to the SNIa rate with the binary population synthesis (BPS) code SeBa in order to constrain binary processes such as the mass retention efficiency of WD accretion and common envelope evolution. We determine the theoretical rates and delay time distribution of SNIa progenitors and in particular study how assumptions affect the predicted rates.

  11. ANTIPROTONS PRODUCED IN SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T.

    2014-08-20

    We present the energy spectrum of an antiproton cosmic ray (CR) component calculated on the basis of the nonlinear kinetic model of CR production in supernova remnants (SNRs). The model includes the reacceleration of antiprotons already existing in the interstellar medium as well as the creation of antiprotons in nuclear collisions of accelerated protons with gas nuclei and their subsequent acceleration by SNR shocks. It is shown that the production of antiprotons in SNRs produces a considerable effect in their resultant energy spectrum, making it essentially flatter above 10 GeV so that the spectrum at TeV energies increases by a factor of 5. The calculated antiproton spectrum is consistent with the PAMELA data, which correspond to energies below 100 GeV. As a consistency check, we have also calculated within the same model the energy spectra of secondary nuclei and show that the measured boron-to-carbon ratio is consistent with the significant SNR contribution.

  12. Cosmic Chandlery with thermonuclear supernovae

    DOE PAGES

    Calder, Alan C.; Krueger, Brendan K.; Jackson, A. P.; ...

    2017-05-30

    Thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae are bright stellar explosions, the light curves of which can be calibrated to allow for use as "standard candles" for measuring cosmological distances. Contemporary research investigates how the brightness of an event may be influenced by properties of the progenitor system that follow from properties of the host galaxy such as composition and age. The goals are to better understand systematic effects and to assess the intrinsic scatter in the brightness, thereby reducing uncertainties in cosmological studies. We present the results from ensembles of simulations in the single-degenerate paradigm addressing the influence of age and metallicitymore » on the brightness of an event and compare our results to observed variations of brightness that correlate with properties of the host galaxy. As a result, we also present results from "hybrid" progenitor models that incorporate recent advances in stellar evolution.« less

  13. Cosmic Chandlery with Thermonuclear Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, A. C.; Krueger, B. K.; Jackson, A. P.; Willcox, D. E.; Miles, B. J.; Townsley, D. M.

    2017-05-01

    Thermonuclear (Type Ia) supernovae are bright stellar explosions, the light curves of which can be calibrated to allow for use as “standard candles” for measuring cosmological distances. Contemporary research investigates how the brightness of an event may be influenced by properties of the progenitor system that follow from properties of the host galaxy such as composition and age. The goals are to better understand systematic effects and to assess the intrinsic scatter in the brightness, thereby reducing uncertainties in cosmological studies. We present the results from ensembles of simulations in the single-degenerate paradigm addressing the influence of age and metallicity on the brightness of an event and compare our results to observed variations of brightness that correlate with properties of the host galaxy. We also present results from “hybrid” progenitor models that incorporate recent advances in stellar evolution.

  14. Evidence for nearby supernova explosions.

    PubMed

    Benítez, Narciso; Maíz-Apellániz, Jesús; Canelles, Matilde

    2002-02-25

    Supernova (SN) explosions are one of the most energetic---and potentially lethal---phenomena in the Universe. We show that the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, a group of young stars currently located at approximately 130 pc from the Sun, has generated 20 SN explosions during the last 11 Myr, some of them probably as close as 40 pc to our planet. The deposition on Earth of (60)Fe atoms produced by these explosions can explain the recent measurements of an excess of this isotope in deep ocean crust samples. We propose that approximately 2 Myr ago, one of the SNe exploded close enough to Earth to seriously damage the ozone layer, provoking or contributing to the Pliocene-Pleistocene boundary marine extinction.

  15. Supernovae and the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John

    2003-01-01

    Orbiting high above the turbulence of the earth's atmosphere, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has provided breathtaking views of astronomical objects never before seen in such detail. The steady diffraction-limited images allow this medium-size telescope to reach faint galaxies of 30th stellar magnitude. Some of these galaxies are seen as early as 2 billion years after the Big Bang in a 15 billion year old universe. Up until recently, astronomers assumed that all of the laws of physics and astronomy applied back then as they do today. Now, using the discovery that certain supernovae are standard candles, astronomers have found that the universe is expanding faster today than it was back then: the universe is accelerating in its expansion.

  16. Radio emision from supernova remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubner, G.

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of supernova remnants (SNRs) in our Galaxy and nearby galaxies have been discovered through radio observations, and only a very small number of the SNRs catalogued in the Milky Way have not been detected in the radio band, or are poorly defined by current radio observations. The study of the radio emission from SNRs is an excellent tool to investigate morphological characteristics, marking the location of shock fronts and contact discontinuities; the presence, orientation and intensity of the magnetic field; the energy spectrum of the emitting particles; and the dynamical consequences of the interaction with the circumstellar and interstellar medium. I will review the present knowledge of different important aspects of radio remnants and their impact on the interstellar gas. Also, new radio studies of the Crab Nebula carried out with the Karl Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) at 3 GHz and with ALMA at 100 GHz, will be presented.

  17. Supernova 1987A at 30

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyromilio, J.; Leibundgut, B.; Fransson, C.; Larsson, J.; Migotto, K.; Girard, J.

    2017-03-01

    Thirty years on, SN 1987A continues to develop and, over the last decade in particular, has: revealed the presence of a large centrally concentrated reservoir of dust; shown the presence of molecular species within the ejecta; expanded such that the ejecta structure is angularly resolved; begun the destruction of the circumstellar ring and transitioned to being dominated by energy sources external to the ejecta. We are participating in a live experiment in the creation of a supernova remnant and here the recent progress is briefly overviewed. Exciting developments can be expected as the ejecta and the reverse shock continue their interaction, the X-rays penetrate into the cold molecular core and we observe the return of the material into the interstellar medium. We anticipate that the nature of the remnant of the leptonisation event in the centre will also be revealed.

  18. Supernovae and the Accelerating Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, H. John

    2003-01-01

    Orbiting high above the turbulence of the earth's atmosphere, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has provided breathtaking views of astronomical objects never before seen in such detail. The steady diffraction-limited images allow this medium-size telescope to reach faint galaxies of 30th stellar magnitude. Some of these galaxies are seen as early as 2 billion years after the Big Bang in a 15 billion year old universe. Up until recently, astronomers assumed that all of the laws of physics and astronomy applied back then as they do today. Now, using the discovery that certain supernovae are standard candles, astronomers have found that the universe is expanding faster today than it was back then: the universe is accelerating in its expansion.

  19. Mass extinctions and supernova explosions.

    PubMed Central

    Crutzen, P J; Brühl, C

    1996-01-01

    In a recent contribution to this journal Ellis and Schramm [Ellis, J. & Schramm, D. N. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 235-238] claim that supernova explosions can cause massive biological extinctions as a result of strongly enhanced stratospheric NOx (NO + NO2) production by accompanying galactic cosmic rays. They suggested that these NOx productions which would last over several centuries and occur once every few hundred million years would result in ozone depletions of about 95%, leading to vastly increased levels of biologically damaging solar ultraviolet radiation. Our detailed model calculations show, however, substantially smaller ozone depletions ranging from at most 60% at high latitudes to below 20% at the equator. PMID:11607631

  20. The Union3 Supernova Ia Compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, David; Aldering, Greg Scott; Amanullah, Rahman; Barbary, Kyle H.; Bruce, Adam; Chappell, Greta; Currie, Miles; Dawson, Kyle S.; Deustua, Susana E.; Doi, Mamoru; Fakhouri, Hannah; Fruchter, Andrew S.; Gibbons, Rachel A.; Goobar, Ariel; Hsiao, Eric; Huang, Xiaosheng; Ihara, Yutaka; Kim, Alex G.; Knop, Robert A.; Kowalski, Marek; Krechmer, Evan; Lidman, Chris; Linder, Eric; Meyers, Joshua; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nordin, Jakob; Perlmutter, Saul; Ripoche, Pascal; Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar; Rykoff, Eli S.; Saunders, Clare; Spadafora, Anthony L.; Suzuki, Nao; Takanashi, Naohiro; Yasuda, Naoki; Supernova Cosmology Project

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift supernovae observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) are crucial for constraining any time variation in dark energy. In a forthcoming paper (Rubin+, in prep), we will present a cosmological analysis incorporating existing supernovae with improved calibrations, and new HST-observed supernovae (six above z=1). We combine these data with current literature data, and fit them using SALT2-4 to create the Union3 Supernova compilation. We build on the Unified Inference for Type Ia cosmologY (UNITY) framework (Rubin+ 2015b), incorporating non-linear light-curve width and color relations, a model for unexplained dispersion, an outlier model, and a redshift-dependent host-mass correction.

  1. CSP spectroscopic classification of two supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stritzinger, M.; Hsiao, E.; Taddia, F.; Morrell, N.

    2015-01-01

    On behalf of the Carnegie Supernova Project, we report spectroscopic classification of PSN J08293820-1717473 and ASASSN-14my (ATel#6860), based on visual-wavelength spectra obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope (+Alfosc).

  2. The Supernova Impostor SN 2010da

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Breanna A.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Kong, Albert K. H.; Plucinsky, Paul P.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    Supernova impostors are optical transients that, despite being assigned a supernova designation, do not signal the death of a massive star or accreting white dwarf. Instead, many impostors are thought to be major eruptions from luminous blue variables. Although the physical cause of these eruptions is still debated, tidal interactions from a binary companion has recently gained traction as a possible explanation for observations of some supernova impostors. In this talk, I will discuss the particularly interesting impostor SN 2010da, which exhibits high-luminosity, variable X-ray emission. The X-ray emission is consistent with accretion onto a neutron star, making SN 2010da a likely high mass X-ray binary in addition to a supernova impostor. SN 2010da is a unique laboratory for understanding both binary interactions as drivers of massive star eruptions and the evolutionary processes that create high mass X-ray binaries.

  3. Understanding the Ultraviolet Flux from Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    The conversion of observed magnitudes into flux densities for the creation of spectral energy distributions or integrating bolometric fluxes depends on the spectral shape of the source and the characteristics of the filters. Such details are often neglected, though the effects can be significant. We demonstrate the complexities of conversion as they relate to ultraviolet observations of supernovae, though the principles have broader application. These complexities include spectral model testing, the meaning of effective wavelengths, the endpoints of integration, and extinction corrections. Using data from the Swift Optical Ultraviolet Supernova Archive (SOUSA) we will present integrated luminosity curves from example supernovae of all types. We will also show the unprecedented ultraviolet luminosity of ASASSN-15lh/SN2015L. The creation of ultraviolet/optical spectral energy distributions is helpful in predicting the observed brightness and detectability of these supernovae at higher redshifts with optical telescopes such as the Dark Energy Survey and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  4. Classification of 17 DES supernovae by SALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, E.; Bassett, B.; Crawford, S.; Childress, M.; D'Andrea, C.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.; Maartens, R.; Gupta, R.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.; Spinka, H.; Ahn, E.; Finley, D. A.; Frieman, J.; Marriner, J.; Wester, W.; Aldering, G.; Kim, A. G.; Thomas, R. C.; Barbary, K.; Bloom, J. S.; Goldstein, D.; Nugent, P.; Perlmutter, S.; Foley, R. J.; Pan, Y.-C.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Desai, S.; Paech, K.; Smith, R. C.; Schubnell, M.; Kessler, R.; Lasker, J.; Scolnic, D.; Brout, D. J.; Gladney, L.; Sako, M.; Wolf, R. C.; Brown, P. J.; Krisciunas, K.; Suntzeff, N.; Nichol, R.; Papadopoulos, A.

    2016-02-01

    We report optical spectroscopy of 17 supernovae discovered by the Dark Energy Survey (ATel #4668). The spectra (380-820nm) were obtained using the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) on the South African Large Telescope (SALT).

  5. Supernova cooling in a dark matter smog

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yue

    2014-11-27

    A light hidden gauge boson with kinetic mixing with the usual photon is a popular setup in theories of dark matter. The supernova cooling via radiating the hidden boson is known to put an important constraint on the mixing. I consider the possible role dark matter, which under reasonable assumptions naturally exists inside supernova, can play in the cooling picture. Because the interaction between the hidden gauge boson and DM is likely unsuppressed, even a small number of dark matter compared to protons inside the supernova could dramatically shorten the free streaming length of the hidden boson. A picture of a dark matter “smog” inside the supernova, which substantially relaxes the cooling constraint, is discussed in detail.

  6. How to See a Recently Discovered Supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Berkeley Lab scientist Peter Nugent discusses a recently discovered supernova that is closer to Earth — approximately 21 million light-years away — than any other of its kind in a generation. Astronomers believe they caught the supernova within hours of its explosion, a rare feat made possible with a specialized survey telescope and state-of-the-art computational tools. The finding of such a supernova so early and so close has energized the astronomical community as they are scrambling to observe it with as many telescopes as possible, including the Hubble Space Telescope. More info on how to see it: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/08/31/glimpse-cosmic-explosion/ News release: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/08/25/supernova/

  7. An LSST Deep Supernova Cosmology Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, P. A.; Smith, C. R.; Garnavich, P. M.

    2004-12-01

    Because of its rapid observing cadence and large aperture, the LSST presents an ideal tool for studying type Ia supernovae and exploiting them as cosmological tools to redshifts near unity. We present a series of simulations of an observing program which would use the LSST in a different mode from it usual cadence. It would use a small fraction of each night to do a deep supernova search in a ``staring mode," with 10-20 minutes total exposure per day on each of several ten-square-degree fields. Assuming no evolution in the type Ia supernova rate, a year-long campaign will yield close to 2000 supernovae in each field with a mean redshift near 0.75, with 60-100 photometric points per lightcurve in five photometric bands. We discuss the use of this dataset for constraining the dark energy equation of state and especially any variation it might have with direction on the sky.

  8. Astrophysics: Echo from an ancient supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, Andrea; Patat, Ferdinando

    2008-12-01

    Light reflected off a dust cloud in the vicinity of the relic of Tycho Brahe's supernova, whose light first swept past Earth more than four centuries ago, literally sheds light on the nature of this cosmic explosion.

  9. How to See a Recently Discovered Supernova

    ScienceCinema

    Nugent, Peter

    2016-07-12

    Berkeley Lab scientist Peter Nugent discusses a recently discovered supernova that is closer to Earth — approximately 21 million light-years away — than any other of its kind in a generation. Astronomers believe they caught the supernova within hours of its explosion, a rare feat made possible with a specialized survey telescope and state-of-the-art computational tools. The finding of such a supernova so early and so close has energized the astronomical community as they are scrambling to observe it with as many telescopes as possible, including the Hubble Space Telescope. More info on how to see it: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/08/31/glimpse-cosmic-explosion/ News release: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/08/25/supernova/

  10. Type Ia Supernova Rate from SDSS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krughoff, K. Simon; Connolly, A. J.; Scranton, R.; Frieman, J.; SubbaRao, M.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the evolution of the Type Ia supernova rate is essential to our understanding of the star formation history of the Universe. Lately, high redshift measurements of the Type Ia rate have been receiving a lot of publicity, but understanding supernovae in the local universe is also important.In particular, comparison of detection methods and the associated rate measurements at low redshift can improve methods at higher redshift. We present a novel approach for detecting Type Ia supernovae in single epoch spectroscopic observations. Application of this method to the SDSS spectroscopic sample finds 100 supernovae resulting in a luminosity weighted rate of 0.24±0.01 SNu at z=0.1. Our measurement is in good agreement with others at low redshift. We discuss the application of this method to high redshift spectroscopic samples. This work was funded by the NSF through grant 0851007.

  11. Supernova Classification Using Swift UVOT Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Madison; Brown, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    With the great influx of supernova discoveries over the past few years, the observation time needed to acquire the spectroscopic data needed to classify supernova by type has become unobtainable. Instead, using the photometry of supernovae could greatly reduce the amount of time between discovery and classification. For this project we looked at the relationship between colors and supernova types through machine learning packages in Python. Using data from the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT), each photometric point was assigned values corresponding to colors, absolute magnitudes, and the relative times from the peak brightness in several filters. These values were fed into three classifying methods, the nearest neighbors, decision tree, and random forest methods. We will discuss the success of these classification systems, the optimal filters for photometric classification, and ways to improve the classification.

  12. An ''archaeological'' quest for galactic supernova neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Lazauskas, Rimantas; Volpe, Cristina E-mail: Cecilia.Lunardini@asu.edu

    2009-04-15

    We explore the possibility to observe the effects of electron neutrinos from past galactic supernovae, through a geochemical measurement of the amount of Technetium 97 produced by neutrino-induced reactions in a Molybdenum ore. The calculations we present take into account the recent advances in our knowledge of neutrino interactions, of neutrino oscillations inside a supernova, of the solar neutrino flux at Earth and of possible failed supernovae. The predicted Technetium 97 abundance is of the order of 10{sup 7} atoms per 10 kilotons of ore, which is close to the current geochemical experimental sensitivity. Of this, {approx} 10-20% is from supernovae. Considering the comparable size of uncertainties, more precision in the modeling of neutrino fluxes as well as of neutrino cross sections is required for a meaningful measurement.

  13. Supernovae at the Highest Angular Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyk, S. Van; Weiler, K.; Sramek, R.; Panagia, N.; Lacey, C.; Montes, M.; Mercaide, J.; Lewin, W.; Fox, D.; Filippenko, A.; Peng, C.

    2000-01-01

    The study of supernovae (SNe) and their environments in host galaxies at the highest possible angular resolution in a number of wavelength regimes is providing vital clues to the nature of their progenitor stars.

  14. Optical spectrosopy of HiTS supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J.; Forster, F.; Smith, C.; Vivas, K.; Pignata, G.; Olivares, F.; Hamuy, M.; Martin, J. San; Maureira, J. C.; Cabrera, G.; Gonzalez-Gaitan, S.; Galbany, L.; Bufano, F.; de Jaeger, T.; Hsiao, E.; Munoz, R.; Vera, E.

    2015-04-01

    We report optical wavelength spectroscopy obtained using the Goodman instrument mounted on the SOAR at CTIO on UT 2015-03-30, for two supernovae discovered by HiTS, the High Cadence Transient Survey (see ATELs #7289, #7290).

  15. SN 1054: A pulsar-powered supernova?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shao-Ze; Yu, Yun-Wei; Huang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    The famous ancient supernova SN 1054 could have been too bright to be explained in the “standard” radioactive-powered supernova scenario. As an alternative attempt, we demonstrate that the spin-down of the newly born Crab pulsar could provide a sufficient energy supply to make SN 1054 visible at daytime for 23 days and at night for 653 days, where a one-zone semi-analytical model is employed. Our results indicate that SN 1054 could be a “normal” cousin of magnetar-powered superluminous supernovae. Therefore, SN 1054-like supernovae could be a probe to uncover the properties of newly born neutron stars, which provide initial conditions for studies on neutron star evolutions.

  16. Detecting supernovae neutrino with Earth matter effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wei

    2016-12-01

    We study Earth matter effect in oscillations of supernovae neutrinos. We show that detecting Earth matter effect gives an independent measurement of spectra of supernovae neutrinos, i.e., the flavor difference of the spectra of supernovae neutrinos. We study the effect of energy resolution and angular resolution of a final electron or positron on detecting the signal of Earth matter effect. We show that varying the widths of energy bins in analysis can change the signal strength of Earth matter effect and the statistical fluctuation. A reasonable choice of energy bins can both suppress the statistical fluctuation and make a good signal strength relative to the statistical fluctuation. Neutrino detectors with good energy resolution and good angular resolution are therefore preferred so that there is more freedom to vary energy bins and to optimize the signal of Earth matter effect in analyzing events of supernovae neutrinos.

  17. Stellar astrophysics: Supernovae in the neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melott, Adrian L.

    2016-04-01

    Detailed measurements of radioisotopes in deep-sea deposits, plus modelling of how they reached Earth, indicate that many supernovae have occurred near enough to have potentially influenced evolution. See Letters p.69 & p.73

  18. Shock Heated Dust in Young Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, R.; Strom, R. G.; van der Laan, H.; Greidanus, H.

    Infrared emission in young supernova remnants is interpreted as coming from shock-heated dust. Using models and data from other wavelength regimes, many physical parameters of the remnants can accurately be derived.

  19. Fermi Proves Supernova Remnants Make Cosmic Rays

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The husks of exploded stars produce some of the fastest particles in the cosmos. New findings by NASA's Fermi show that two supernova remnants accelerate protons to near the speed of light. The pro...

  20. A Quick Look at Supernova 1987A

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-24

    On February 24, 1987, astronomers in the southern hemisphere saw a supernova in the Large Magellanic Cloud. This new object was dubbed “Supernova 1987A” and was the brightest stellar explosion seen in over four centuries. Chandra has observed Supernova 1987A many times and the X-ray data reveal important information about this object. X-rays from Chandra have shown the expanding blast wave from the original explosion slamming into a ring of material expelled by the star before it exploded. The latest Chandra data reveal the blast wave has moved beyond the ring into a region that astronomers do not know much about. These observations can help astronomers learn how supernovas impact their environments and affect future generations of stars and planets.