Science.gov

Sample records for neutron activation experiments

  1. SuperCDMS SNOLAB Experiment and Active Neutron Veto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu

    2014-03-01

    The SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment will attempt direct detection of the most promising candidate for dark matter, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) using cryogenically cooled germanium and silicon semiconductors that provide sub-keV thresholds and excellent rejection of most radioactivity or cosmic-ray-induced backgrounds. An active neutron veto with high efficiency for tagging neutron-induced backgrounds will not only directly reduce the neutron background rate, but also provide an in-situ measurement of the neutron activity near the dark matter target. This active veto will consist of liquid scintillator doped with an isotope with high neutron-capture cross section. I will present a brief overview of the experiment, and report in detail on the current status of simulation and prototyping of this neutron veto.

  2. Activation experiment for concrete blocks using thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Koichi; Tanaka, Seiichiro

    2017-09-01

    Activation experiments for ordinary concrete, colemanite-peridotite concrete, B4C-loaded concrete, and limestone concrete are carried out using thermal neutrons. The results reveal that the effective dose for gamma rays from activated nuclides of colemanite-peridotite concrete is lower than that for the other types of concrete. Therefore, colemanite-peridotite concrete is useful for reducing radiation exposure for workers.

  3. Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN): Active Nuclear Experiment Onboard NASA Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V. I.

    2005-03-01

    In our presentation we describe instrument DAN based on neutron activation technique and selected for NASA/MSL mission. The main task of this experiment is local measuruments of water distribution in martian subsurface around MSL rover.

  4. Studies of neutron cross-sections important for spallation experiments using the activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrzalová, J.; Chudoba, P.; Krása, A.; Majerle, M.; Suchopár, M.; Svoboda, O.; Wagner, V.

    2014-09-01

    A series of experiments devoted to studies of neutron cross-sections by activation method was carried out. The cross-sections of various threshold reactions were studied by means of different quasi-monoenergetic neutron sources with energies from 14 MeV up to 100 MeV. Threshold reactions in various materials are among other used to measure fast neutron fields produced during accelerator driven system studies. For this reason our measurements of neutron cross-sections are crucial. At present, neither experimental nor evaluated data above 30 MeV are available for neutron threshold reactions in Au, I and In published in this proceedings. We studied materials in the form of thin foils and compared our data with the calculations preformed using the deterministic code TALYS 1.4.

  5. Neutron Activation Diagnostics in Deuterium Gas-Puff Experiments on the 3 MA GIT-12 Z-Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cikhardt, J.; Klir, D.; Rezac, K.; Cikhardtova, B.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Sila, O.; Shishlov, A. V.; Cherdizov, R. K.; Fursov, F. I.; Kokshenev, V. A.; Kurmaev, N. E.; Labetsky, A. Yu; Ratakhin, N. A.; Dudkin, G. N.; Garapatsky, A. A.; Padalko, V. N.; Varlachev, V. A.; Turek, K.

    2016-10-01

    The experiments with a deuterium z-pinch on the GIT-12 generator at IHCE in Tomsk were performed in the frame of the Czech-Russian agreement. A set of neutron diagnostics included scintillation time-of-flight detectors, bubble detectors, and several kinds of threshold nuclear activation detectors in the order to obtain information about the yield, anisotropy, and spectrum of the neutrons produced by a deuterium gas-puff. The average neutron yield in these experiments was of the order of 1012 neutrons per a single shot. The energy spectrum of the produced neutrons was evaluated using neutron time-of-flight detectors and a set of neutron activation detectors. Because the deuterons in the pinch achieve multi-MeV energies, non-DD neutrons are produced by nuclear reactions of deuterons with a stainless steel vacuum chamber and aluminum components of diagnostics inside the chamber. An estimated number of the non-DD was of the order of 1011. GACR (Grant No. 16-07036S), CME (Grant Nos. LD14089, LG13029, and LH13283), MESRF (Grant No. RFMEFI59114X0001), IAEA (Grant No. RC17088), CTU (Grant No. SGS 16/223/OHK3/3T/13).

  6. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Eddy L.

    1981-01-01

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5 Mev neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  7. Arsenic activation neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, E.L.

    1980-01-28

    A detector of bursts of neutrons from a deuterium-deuteron reaction includes a quantity of arsenic adjacent a gamma detector such as a scintillator and photomultiplier tube. The arsenic is activated by the 2.5-MeV neutrons to release gamma radiation which is detected to give a quantitative representation of detected neutrons.

  8. Data processing of the active neutron experiment DAN for a Martian regolith investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanin, A. B.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Lisov, D. I.; Starr, R.; Boynton, W.; Behar, A.; DeFlores, L.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Hardgrove, C.; Harshman, K.; Jun, I.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Malakhov, A.; Milliken, R.; Mischna, M.; Moersch, J.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Nikiforov, S.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Tate, C.; Tret'yakov, V. I.; Vostrukhin, A.

    2015-07-01

    Searching for water in the soil of Gale Crater is one of the primary tasks for the NASA Mars Science Laboratory rover named Curiosity. The primary task of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment on board the rover is to investigate and qualitatively characterize the presence of water along the rover's traverse across Gale Crater. The water depth distribution may be found from measurements of neutrons generated by the Pulsing Neutron Generator (PNG) included in the DAN instrument, scattered by the regolith and returned back to the detectors. This paper provides a description of the data processing of such measurements and data products of DAN investigation.

  9. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  10. Neutron background in underground particle astrophysics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, V. A.

    2007-03-01

    Neutron background for the high-sensitivity underground particle astrophysics experiments, such as dark matter searches, double-beta decay detectors, low-energy neutrino physics and astrophysics, is discussed. Neutron production via spontaneous fission and (α,n) reactions from U and Th, and by cosmic-ray muons is considered. We describe the method of calculating neutron spectra from radioactivity and effects produced in the detectors. The requirements for passive neutron shielding are given and the efficiency of an active veto system is discussed. It is shown that muon-induced neutrons require complex and accurate simulations where any simplification may lead to a significant error in the result.

  11. Experiments with neutron Schroedinger waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Muhammad

    1986-09-01

    Four neutron Schroedinger wave interference experiments are described: (1) null Fizeau effect for thermal neutrons in thermal matter; (2) precision measurements of the energy dependent scattering length of U-235; (3) gravitationally induced quantum interference; and (4) investigation of incident beam coherence questions in dynamical diffraction experiments. In the Fizeau effect experiment it was verified that a neutron de Broglie wave is not affected by the state of motion of matter within fixed boundaries through which the neutron is propagating. Upper limits for the energy dependence of the neutron optical potential and the wavelength dependence of s-wave neutron scattering lengths were deduced. Using the neutron interferometric technique the energy dependent bound coherent scattering lengths of U-235 were directly measured in the energy range of 30 to 92 meV with an error of 0.3%. In the gravity induced quantum interference experiments (COW), the results showed that the observed loss of contrast of the interference pattern is caused in part by the bending of the perfect crystal neutron interferometer. Lastly, mathematical and numerical calculation techniques are presented to investigate the effect of wavefront modulation and transverse coherence of an incident neutron beam in dynamical diffraction experiments. Experimental and theoretical pendelloesung interference patterns in perfect silicon crystal were obtained and compared.

  12. Calculation of self-shielding factor for neutron activation experiments using GEANT4 and MCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Barrientos, Jaime; Molina, F.; Aguilera, Pablo; Arellano, H. F.

    2016-07-01

    The neutron self-shielding factor G as a function of the neutron energy was obtained for 14 pure metallic samples in 1000 isolethargic energy bins from 1.10-5eV to 2.107eV using Monte Carlo simulations in GEANT4 and MCNP6. The comparison of these two Monte Carlo codes shows small differences in the final self-shielding factor mostly due to the different cross section databases that each program uses.

  13. Experiment Design and Analysis Guide - Neutronics & Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Misti A Lillo

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide a consistent, standardized approach to performing neutronics/physics analysis for experiments inserted into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This document provides neutronics/physics analysis guidance to support experiment design and analysis needs for experiments irradiated in the ATR. This guide addresses neutronics/physics analysis in support of experiment design, experiment safety, and experiment program objectives and goals. The intent of this guide is to provide a standardized approach for performing typical neutronics/physics analyses. Deviation from this guide is allowed provided that neutronics/physics analysis details are properly documented in an analysis report.

  14. Calculation of self–shielding factor for neutron activation experiments using GEANT4 and MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Romero–Barrientos, Jaime; Molina, F.; Aguilera, Pablo; Arellano, H. F.

    2016-07-07

    The neutron self–shielding factor G as a function of the neutron energy was obtained for 14 pure metallic samples in 1000 isolethargic energy bins from 1·10{sup −5}eV to 2·10{sup 7}eV using Monte Carlo simulations in GEANT4 and MCNP6. The comparison of these two Monte Carlo codes shows small differences in the final self–shielding factor mostly due to the different cross section databases that each program uses.

  15. PINEX (Pinhold Neutron Experiment) fluor characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, H.; Kammeraad, J.; Davis, B.; Burns, E.

    1988-07-01

    This report will describe recent experiments to characterize four fluors: BC-400, 408, 422, 430. Each fluor sample was 0.5 cm thick commensurate with our standard Electronic Pinhole Neutron Experiment (EL-PINEX) fluors. The important results are that the neutron-gamma sensitivity ratios did not change significantly, although the absolute gamma and neutron sensitivities decreased. 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Neutron activation for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Loughlin, M.J.; Nishitani, Takeo

    1996-04-29

    There are three primary goals for the Neutron Activation system for ITER: maintain a robust relative measure of fusion power with stability and high dynamic range (7 orders of magnitude); allow an absolute calibration of fusion power (energy); and provide a flexible and reliable system for materials testing. The nature of the activation technique is such that stability and high dynamic range can be intrinsic properties of the system. It has also been the technique that demonstrated (on JET and TFTR) the highest accuracy neutron measurements in DT operation. Since the gamma-ray detectors are not located on the tokamak and are therefore amenable to accurate characterization, and if material foils are placed very close to the ITER plasma with minimum scattering or attenuation, high overall accuracy in the fusion energy production (7--10%) should be achievable on ITER. In the paper, a conceptual design is presented. A system is shown to be capable of meeting these three goals, also detailed design issues remain to be solved.

  17. Reality in neutron interference experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, H. )

    1993-01-01

    The wave-particle dualism becomes very obvious in matter wave interference experiments. Neutron interferometers based on wave front and amplitude division have been developed in the past. Most experiments have been performed with the perfect crystal neutron interferometer, which provides widely separated coherent beams allowing new experiments in the field of fundamental, nuclear, and solid-state physics. A nondispersive sample arrangement and the difference of stochastic and deterministic absorption have been investigated. In case of a deterministic absorption process the attenuation of the interference pattern is proportional to the beam attenuation, whereas in case of stochastic absorption it is proportional to the square root of the attenuation. This permits the formulation of Bell-like inequalities which will be discussed in detail. The verification of the 4[pi] symmetry of spinors and of the quantum mechanical spin-superposition experiment on a macroscopic scale are typical examples of interferometry in spin space. These experiments were continued with two resonance coils in the beams, where the results showed that coherence persists, even it an energy exchange between the neutron and the resonator system occurs with certainty. A quantum beat effect was observed when slightly different resonance frequencies were applied to both beams. In this case, the extremely high energy sensitivity of 2.7 [times] 10[sup [minus]19] eV was achieved. This effect can be interpreted as a magnetic Josephson-effect analog. Phase echo systems and experiments with pulsed beams show how interference phenomena can be made visible by a proper beam handling inside and behind the interferometer. All the results obtained until now are in agreement with the formalism of quantum mechanics but stimulate the discussion about the interpretation of this basic theory.

  18. A review of recent fusion neutronics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maekawa, Hiroshi; Oyama, Yukio; Ikeda, Yujiro

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews experimental activities in fusion neutronics experiments since the last International Conference on Nuclear Data. Many experiments have been carried out in Japan at FNS/JAERI, OKTAVIAN /Osaka University and KURRI/Kyoto University. Experiments on Be were performed at INEL/USA, KfK/FRG, SINPC/PRC, OKTAVIAN/Japan and several institutes in CIS, Czech Republic and Ukraine. A new series of shielding experiments have been started at FNS, ENEA/Frascati, TUD and Russian institutes for ITER/EDA R&D program.

  19. Detection of spallation neutrons and protons using the (nat)Cd activation technique in transmutation experiments at Dubna.

    PubMed

    Manolopoulou, M; Stoulos, S; Fragopoulou, M; Brandt, R; Westmeier, W; Krivopustov, M; Sosnin, A; Zamani, M

    2006-07-01

    Various spallation sources have been used to transmute long-lived radioactive waste, mostly making use of the wide energy neutron fluence. In addition to neutrons, a large number of protons and gamma rays are also emitted from these sources. In this paper (nat)Cd is proved to be a useful activation detector for determining both thermal-epithermal neutron as well as secondary proton fluences. The fluences measured with (nat)Cd compared with other experimental data and calculations of DCM-DEM code were found to be in reasonable agreement. An accumulation of thermal-epithermal neutrons around the center of the target (i.e. after approx. 10 cm) and of secondary protons towards the end of the target is observed.

  20. Neutron Transport Simulations for NIST Neutron Lifetime Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangchen; BL2 Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Neutrons in stable nuclei can exist forever; a free neutron lasts for about 15 minutes on average before it beta decays to a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino. Precision measurements of the neutron lifetime test the validity of weak interaction theory and provide input into the theory of the evolution of light elements in the early universe. There are two predominant ways of measuring the neutron lifetime: the bottle method and the beam method. The bottle method measures decays of ultracold neutrons that are stored in a bottle. The beam method measures decay protons in a beam of cold neutrons of known flux. An improved beam experiment is being prepared at the National Institute of Science and Technology (Gaithersburg, MD) with the goal of reducing statistical and systematic uncertainties to the level of 1 s. The purpose of my studies was to develop computer simulations of neutron transport to determine the beam collimation and study the neutron distribution's effect on systematic effects for the experiment, such as the solid angle of the neutron flux monitor. The motivation for the experiment and the results of this work will be presented. This work was supported, in part, by a Grant to Gettysburg College from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program.

  1. A neutron activation spectrometer and neutronic experimental platform for the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeamans, C. B.; Gharibyan, N.

    2016-11-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, the diagnostic instrument manipulator-based neutron activation spectrometer is used as a diagnostic of implosion performance for inertial confinement fusion experiments. Additionally, it serves as a platform for independent neutronic experiments and may be connected to fast recording systems for neutron effect tests on active electronics. As an implosion diagnostic, the neutron activation spectrometers are used to quantify fluence of primary DT neutrons, downscattered neutrons, and neutrons above the primary DT neutron energy created by reactions of upscattered D and T in flight. At a primary neutron yield of 1015 and a downscattered fraction of neutrons in the 10-12 MeV energy range of 0.04, the downscattered neutron fraction can be measured to a relative uncertainty of 8%. Significant asymmetries in downscattered neutrons have been observed. Spectrometers have been designed and fielded to measure the tritium-tritium and deuterium-tritium neutron outputs simultaneously in experiments using DT/TT fusion ratio as a direct measure of mix of ablator into the gas.

  2. Neutron counter based on beryllium activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowska, B.; Prokopowicz, R.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Paducha, M.; Scholz, M.; Igielski, A.; Karpinski, L.; Pytel, K.

    2014-08-21

    The fusion reaction occurring in DD plasma is followed by emission of 2.45 MeV neutrons, which carry out information about fusion reaction rate and plasma parameters and properties as well. Neutron activation of beryllium has been chosen for detection of DD fusion neutrons. The cross-section for reaction {sup 9}Be(n, α){sup 6}He has a useful threshold near 1 MeV, which means that undesirable multiple-scattered neutrons do not undergo that reaction and therefore are not recorded. The product of the reaction, {sup 6}He, decays with half-life T{sub 1/2} = 0.807 s emitting β{sup −} particles which are easy to detect. Large area gas sealed proportional detector has been chosen as a counter of β–particles leaving activated beryllium plate. The plate with optimized dimensions adjoins the proportional counter entrance window. Such set-up is also equipped with appropriate electronic components and forms beryllium neutron activation counter. The neutron flux density on beryllium plate can be determined from the number of counts. The proper calibration procedure needs to be performed, therefore, to establish such relation. The measurements with the use of known β–source have been done. In order to determine the detector response function such experiment have been modeled by means of MCNP5–the Monte Carlo transport code. It allowed proper application of the results of transport calculations of β{sup −} particles emitted from radioactive {sup 6}He and reaching proportional detector active volume. In order to test the counter system and measuring procedure a number of experiments have been performed on PF devices. The experimental conditions have been simulated by means of MCNP5. The correctness of simulation outcome have been proved by measurements with known radioactive neutron source. The results of the DD fusion neutron measurements have been compared with other neutron diagnostics.

  3. Experiments with neutron beams for the astrophysical s process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, C.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dressler, R.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; Ganesan, S.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Koehler, P.; Kokkoris, M.; Korschinek, G.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Leeb, H.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Mallick, A.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Pignatari, M.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego, A.; Robles, M. S.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Weiβ, C.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron capture cross sections are the key nuclear physics input to study the slow neutron capture process, which is responsible for forming about half of the elemental abundances above Fe. Stellar neutron capture cross section can be measured by the time-of-flight technique, or by activation. Both techniques will be discussed and recent experiments in the Fe/Ni mass region will be presented.

  4. Neutron Analysis - Skylab Student Experiment ED-76

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The rate of neutron flow is commonly referred to as a flux. The measurement of neutron fluxes in Skylab was the subject of a proposal by Terry Quist of San Antonio, Texas. This chart describes Quist's experiment, Neutron Analysis, Skylab student experiment ED-76. These measurements were considered important not only by NASA but also by the scientific community for four reasons. High energy neutrons can be harmful to human tissue if they are present in significant quantities. Fluxes of neutrons can damage film and other sensitive experimental equipment in a marner similar to those produced by x-rays or other radiation. Furthermore, neutron fluxes can be used as a calibration source for other space-oriented particle physics experiments. Finally, neutron fluxes can affect sensitive x-ray and gamma-ray astronomy observations. Quist's objectives were to measure the neutron fluxes present in Skylab and, with the assistance of NASA and other physicists, to attempt determination of their origin as well as their energy range or spectrum. This experiment had stimulated interest in further studies of neutron phenomena in space. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  5. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Bond, E. M.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Haslett, R. J.; Henderson, R. A.

    2009-01-28

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for {sup 241}Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for {sup 243}Am for neutron energies between 10 eV and 250 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on {sup 242m}Am will be presented where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, a Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in the center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,{gamma}) events from (n,f) events. The first direct observation of neutron capture on {sup 242m}Am in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.

  6. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, Marian

    2008-01-01

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for {sup 241}Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for {sup 243}Am for neutron energies between 35 eV and 200 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on {sup 242m}Am will be presented, where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, the Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in the center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,{gamma}) from (n,f) events. The first evidence of neutron capture on {sup 242m}Am in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.

  7. Neutron activated switch

    DOEpatents

    Barton, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A switch for reacting quickly to a neutron emission. A rod consisting of fissionable material is located inside a vacuum tight body. An adjustable contact is located coaxially at an adjustable distance from one end of the rod. Electrical leads are connected to the rod and to the adjustable contact. With a vacuum drawn inside the body, a neutron bombardment striking the rod causes it to heat and expand longitudinally until it comes into contact with the adjustable contact. This circuit closing occurs within a period of a few microseconds.

  8. Enhanced NIF neutron activation diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Yeamans, C B; Bleuel, D L; Bernstein, L A

    2012-10-01

    The NIF neutron activation diagnostic suite relies on removable activation samples, leading to operational inefficiencies and a fundamental lower limit on the half-life of the activated product that can be observed. A neutron diagnostic system measuring activation of permanently installed samples could remove these limitations and significantly enhance overall neutron diagnostic capabilities. The physics and engineering aspects of two proposed systems are considered: one measuring the (89)Zr/(89 m)Zr isomer ratio in the existing Zr activation medium and the other using potassium zirconate as the activation medium. Both proposed systems could improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the current system by at least a factor of 5 and would allow independent measurement of fusion core velocity and fuel areal density.

  9. Enhanced NIF neutron activation diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Yeamans, C. B.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.

    2012-10-15

    The NIF neutron activation diagnostic suite relies on removable activation samples, leading to operational inefficiencies and a fundamental lower limit on the half-life of the activated product that can be observed. A neutron diagnostic system measuring activation of permanently installed samples could remove these limitations and significantly enhance overall neutron diagnostic capabilities. The physics and engineering aspects of two proposed systems are considered: one measuring the {sup 89}Zr/{sup 89m}Zr isomer ratio in the existing Zr activation medium and the other using potassium zirconate as the activation medium. Both proposed systems could improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the current system by at least a factor of 5 and would allow independent measurement of fusion core velocity and fuel areal density.

  10. Neutron and proton activation measurements from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radioactivity induced by high-energy protons and secondary neutrons (from nuclear interactions) in various samples returned from different locations in Skylab was measured directly by gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of decay gamma rays from the samples. Incident fluxes were derived from the activation measurements, using known nuclear cross-section. Neutron and proton flux values were found to range from 0.2 to 5 particles/sq cm-sec, depending on the energy range and location in Skylab. The thermal neutron flux was less than 0.07 neutrons/sq cm-sec. The results are useful for data analysis and planning of future high-energy astronomy experiments.

  11. Neutron storage time measurement for the neutron EDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. Clark; Ito, Takeyasu; Ramsey, John; Makela, Mark; Clayton, Steven; Hennings-Yeomans, Raul; Saidur Rahaman, M.; Currie, Scott; Womack, Todd; Sondheim, Walter; Cooper, Martin

    2010-11-01

    A new experiment to search for the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) is under development for installation at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oakridge National Laboratory. The experiment will use ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) stored in superfluid helium, along with ^3He atoms acting as a neutron spin analyzer and comagnetometer. One crucial factor affecting the ultimate sensitivity of the experiment is the neutron storage time that can be obtained in the acrylic measurement cell. The acrylic cell walls will be coated with deuterated polystyrene (dPS), which is expected to give a wall loss factor of ˜< 10-5 per bounce when cooled below the point where upscattering by hydrogen impurities contribute to UCN losses. We are currently preparing a measurement at Los Alamos to verify that a 10-5 wall loss factor can be achieved in a dPS coated acrylic test cell. The planned measurement will investigate the temperature dependence of the UCN storage time in the dPS coated test cell between room temperature and below 20 K.

  12. Photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium.

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W. L.; Goulding, C. A.; Hollas, C. L.; Moss, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    The physics of photon and neutron active interrogation of highly enriched uranium (HEU) using the delayed neutron reinterrogation method is described in this paper. Two sets of active interrogation experiments were performed using a set of subcritical configurations of cocentric HEU metal hemishells. One set of measurements utilized a pulsed 14-MeV neutron generator as the active source. The second set of measurements utilized a linear accelerator-based bremsstrahlung photon source as an active interrogation source. The neutron responses were measured for both sets of experiments. The operational details and results for both measurement sets are described.

  13. Neutron-proton bremsstrahlung experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.E.; Nelson, R.O.; Schillaci, M.E.; Wender, S.A.; Mayo, D.; Brady, F.P.; Romero, J.; Krofcheck, D.; Blann, M.; Anthony, P.; Brown, V.R.; Hansen, L.; Pohl, B.; Sangster, T.C.; Nifenecker, H.; Pinston, J.A.

    1992-12-01

    It is well known that charged particles emit bremsstrahlung radiation when they are accelerated. Classical electron bremsstrahlung occurs when a photon is emitted by an electron accelerated in the field of a nucleus. The bremsstrahlung process also occurs in the scattering of nucleons, for which it is the lowest energy inelastic process that can occur. Like electron bremsstrahlung, nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung also requires the exchange of a virtual particle to conserve energy and momentum. In electron bremsstrahlung a virtual photon is exchanged but with two nucleons a meson can be exchanged. Unlike electron bremsstrahlung, in nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung the photon can originate from the exchanged meson. This exchange contribution has been shown in calculations to be a significant fraction of bremsstrahlung events. Thus bremsstrahlung serves as a probe of exchange currents in the nucleon-nucleon interaction. Because of a lack of a free neutron target or an intense neutron beam, few measurements of neutron-proton bremsstrahlung exist, each having poor statistical accuracy and poor energy resolution. The white neutron source at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) target area at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) produces neutrons with energies from below 50 to above 400 MeV. Using time-of-flight techniques and a liquid hydrogen target, we are measuring the outgoing photons of energies up to 250 MeV at gamma ray angles of around 90{degree} relative to the incident beam. Protons scattered at very forward angles are also detected in coincidence with the gamma rays.

  14. High-Energy Neutron Backgrounds for Underground Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Direct dark matter detection experiments usually have excellent capability to distinguish nuclear recoils, expected interactions with Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) dark matter, and electronic recoils, so that they can efficiently reject background events such as gamma-rays and charged particles. However, both WIMPs and neutrons can induce nuclear recoils. Neutrons are then the most crucial background for direct dark matter detection. It is important to understand and account for all sources of neutron backgrounds when claiming a discovery of dark matter detection or reporting limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross section. One type of neutron background that is not well understood is the cosmogenic neutrons from muons interacting with the underground cavern rock and materials surrounding a dark matter detector. The Neutron Multiplicity Meter (NMM) is a water Cherenkov detector capable of measuring the cosmogenic neutron flux at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, which has an overburden of 2090 meters water equivalent. The NMM consists of two 2.2-tonne gadolinium-doped water tanks situated atop a 20-tonne lead target. It detects a high-energy (>~ 50 MeV) neutron via moderation and capture of the multiple secondary neutrons released when the former interacts in the lead target. The multiplicity of secondary neutrons for the high-energy neutron provides a benchmark for comparison to the current Monte Carlo predictions. Combining with the Monte Carlo simulation, the muon-induced high-energy neutron flux above 50 MeV is measured to be (1.3 ± 0.2) ~ 10-9 cm-2s-1, in reasonable agreement with the model prediction. The measured multiplicity spectrum agrees well with that of Monte Carlo simulation for multiplicity below 10, but shows an excess of approximately a factor of three over Monte Carlo prediction for multiplicities ~ 10 - 20. In an effort to reduce neutron backgrounds for the dark matter experiment SuperCDMS SNO- LAB, an active neutron veto was developed

  15. Overview of Ignitor Neutronics and Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollet, S.; Batistoni, P.; Forrest, R.

    1999-11-01

    The Ignitor experiment is designed to produce D-T plasmas where ignition can take place and the physics of α-particles can be studied. After a first period of operation without significant neutron production, a second phase in deuterium with 2.5 MeV neutron production rate up to 10^17 n/s is planned. This will be followed by operations at increasing percentages of tritium, leading to short, but intense 14 MeV neutron production, up to ≈ 3 × 10^19 n/s. To calculate the neutron fluxes in all the machine components, including the streaming through the ports, a detailed description of the actual Ignitor machine is implemented in the MCNP-4B Monte Carlo code. These fluxes are then used as input for the FISPACT-97 code for the analysis of the activation at the end of life (EOL) and at intermediate times for safety assessment purposes. The estimated neutron emission pulse results in rather modest neutron fluences (≈ 10^18 n/cm^2 on the first wall at EOL). Therefore, radiation damage in the device components is not a concern, with the possible exception of the toroidal magnet insulator. On the other hand, the neutron flux on the first wall can be as high as that of a demonstration reactor (≈ 10^14 n/s/cm^2), inducing, in the absence of a blanket, considerable activation. The shielding strategy and possible solutions to prevent/reduce the activation of the cryostat are presented.

  16. Neutron activation system for spectral measurements of pulsed ion diode neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, D.L.; Kruse, L.W.

    1980-02-01

    A neutron energy spectrometer has been developed to study intense ion beam-target interactions in the harsh radiation environment of a relativistic electron beam source. The main component is a neutron threshold activation system employing two multiplexed high efficiency Ge(Li) detectors, an annihilation gamma coincidence system, and a pneumatic sample transport. Additional constraints on the neutron spectrum are provided by total neutron yield and time-of-flight measurements. A practical lower limit on the total neutron yield into 4..pi.. required for a spectral measurement with this system is approx. 10/sup 10/ n where the neutron yield is predominantly below 4 MeV and approx. 10/sup 8/ n when a significant fraction of the yield is above 4 MeV. Applications of this system to pulsed ion diode neutron production experiments on Hermes II are described.

  17. Materials performance experience at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.

    1995-10-01

    There is a growing, but not yet substantial, data base for materials performance at spallation neutron sources. Specially designed experiments using medium energy protons (650 MeV) have been conducted at the Proton Irradiation Experiment (PIREX) facility at the Swiss Nuclear Institute accelerator (SIN). Specially designed experiments using 760-800 MeV copper target have been completed at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). An extensive material testing program was initiated at LASREF in support of the German spallation neutron source (SNQ) project, before it terminated in 1985.

  18. Replica neutron guides for experiments with ultracold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrov, A. P.; Vasil'ev, A. V.; Lasakov, M. S.; Siber, E. V.; Murashkin, A. N.; Egorov, A. I.; Fomin, A. K.; Sbitnev, S. V.; Geltenbort, P.; Zimmer, O.

    2017-01-01

    The method for producing neutron guides for ultracold neutrons based on the replica method has been described. A comparative analysis of the quality of replica neutron guides, neutron guides made from polished anode-mechanical steel tubes, and neutron guides from electropolished tubes has been given.

  19. Neutron Scattering Experiment Automation with Python

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierczuk, Piotr A; Riedel, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory currently holds the Guinness World Record as the world most powerful pulsed spallation neutron source. Neutrons scattered off atomic nuclei in a sample yield important information about the position, motions, and magnetic properties of atoms in materials. A neutron scattering experiment usually involves sample environment control (temperature, pressure, etc.), mechanical alignment (slits, sample and detector position), magnetic field controllers, neutron velocity selection (choppers) and neutron detectors. The SNS Data Acquisition System (DAS) consists of real-time sub-system (detector read-out with custom electronics, chopper interface), data preprocessing (soft real-time) and a cluster of control and ancillary PCs. The real-time system runs FPGA firmware and programs running on PCs (C++, LabView) typically perform one task such as motor control and communicate via TCP/IP networks. PyDas is a set of Python modules that are used to integrate various components of the SNS DAS system. It enables customized automation of neutron scattering experiments in a rapid and flexible manner. It provides wxPython GUIs for routine experiments as well as IPython command line scripting. Matplotlib and numpy are used for data presentation and simple analysis. We will present an overview of SNS Data Acquisition System and PyDas architectures and implementation along with the examples of use. We will also discuss plans for future development as well as the challenges that have to be met while maintaining PyDas for 20+ different scientific instruments.

  20. Improved Fission Neutron Data Base for Active Interrogation of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzi, Sara; Czirr, J. Bart; Haight, Robert; Kovash, Michael; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-11-06

    This project will develop an innovative neutron detection system for active interrogation measurements. Many active interrogation methods to detect fissionable material are based on the detection of neutrons from fission induced by fast neutrons or high-energy gamma rays. The energy spectrum of the fission neutrons provides data to identify the fissionable isotopes and materials such as shielding between the fissionable material and the detector. The proposed path for the project is as follows. First, the team will develop new neutron detection systems and algorithms by Monte Carlo simulations and bench-top experiments. Next, They will characterize and calibrate detection systems both with monoenergetic and white neutron sources. Finally, high-fidelity measurements of neutron emission from fissions induced by fast neutrons will be performed. Several existing fission chambers containing U-235, Pu-239, U-238, or Th-232 will be used to measure the neutron-induced fission neutron emission spectra. The challenge for making confident measurements is the detection of neutrons in the energy ranges of 0.01 – 1 MeV and above 8 MeV, regions where the basic data on the neutron energy spectrum emitted from fission is least well known. In addition, improvements in the specificity of neutron detectors are required throughout the complete energy range: they must be able to clearly distinguish neutrons from other radiations, in particular gamma rays and cosmic rays. The team believes that all of these challenges can be addressed successfully with emerging technologies under development by this collaboration. In particular, the collaboration will address the area of fission neutron emission spectra for isotopes of interest in the advanced fuel cycle initiative (AFCI).

  1. Active Neutron-Based Interrogation System with D-D Neutron Source for Detection of Special Nuclear Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Misawa, T.; Yagi, T.; Pyeon, C. H.; Kimura, M.; Masuda, K.; Ohgaki, H.

    2015-10-01

    The detection of special nuclear materials (SNM) is an important issue for nuclear security. The interrogation systems used in a sea port and an airport are developed in the world. The active neutron-based interrogation system is the one of the candidates. We are developing the active neutron-based interrogation system with a D-D fusion neutron source for the nuclear security application. The D-D neutron source is a compact discharge-type fusion neutron source called IEC (Inertial-Electrostatic Confinement fusion) device which provides 2.45 MeV neutrons. The nuclear materials emit the highenergy neutrons by fission reaction. High-energy neutrons with energies over 2.45 MeV amount to 30% of all the fission neutrons. By using the D-D neutron source, the detection of SNMs is considered to be possible with the attention of fast neutrons if there is over 2.45 MeV. Ideally, neutrons at En>2.45 MeV do not exist if there is no nuclear materials. The detection of fission neutrons over 2.45 MeV are hopeful prospect for the detection of SNM with a high S/N ratio. In the future, the experiments combined with nuclear materials and a D-D neutron source will be conducted. Furthermore, the interrogation system will be numerically investigated by using nuclear materials, a D-D neutron source, and a steel container.

  2. Neutron Activation Analysis of Water - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, John D.

    1971-01-01

    Recent developments in this field are emphasized. After a brief review of basic principles, topics discussed include sources of neutrons, pre-irradiation physical and chemical treatment of samples, neutron capture and gamma-ray analysis, and selected applications. Applications of neutron activation analysis of water have increased rapidly within the last few years and may be expected to increase in the future.

  3. Neutron Activation Analysis of Water - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, John D.

    1971-01-01

    Recent developments in this field are emphasized. After a brief review of basic principles, topics discussed include sources of neutrons, pre-irradiation physical and chemical treatment of samples, neutron capture and gamma-ray analysis, and selected applications. Applications of neutron activation analysis of water have increased rapidly within the last few years and may be expected to increase in the future.

  4. Mineral exploration and soil analysis using in situ neutron activation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Hoyte, A.F.

    1966-01-01

    A feasibility study has been made to operate by remote control an unshielded portable positive-ion accelerator type neutron source to induce activities in the ground or rock by "in situ" neutron irradiation. Selective activation techniques make it possible to detect some thirty or more elements by irradiating the ground for periods of a few minutes with either 3-MeV or 14-MeV neutrons. The depth of penetration of neutrons, the effect of water content of the soil on neutron moderation, gamma ray attenuation in the soil and other problems are considered. The analysis shows that, when exploring for most elements of economic interest, the reaction 2H(d,n)3He yielding ??? 3-MeV neutrons is most practical to produce a relatively uniform flux of neutrons of less than 1 keV to a depth of 19???-20???. Irradiation with high energy neutrons (??? 14 MeV) can also be used and may be better suited for certain problems. However, due to higher background and lower sensitivity for the heavy minerals, it is not a recommended neutron source for general exploration use. Preliminary experiments have been made which indicate that neutron activation in situ is feasible for a mineral exploration or qualititative soil analysis. ?? 1976.

  5. Experiments with neutron-rich isomeric beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rykaczewski, K. |; Grzywacz, R. |; Lewitowicz, M.; Pfuetzner, M.; Grawe, H.

    1998-01-01

    A review of experimental results obtained on microsecond-isomeric states in neutron-rich nuclei produced in fragmentation reactions and studied with SISSI-Alpha-LISE3 spectrometer system at GANIL Caen is given. The perspectives of experiments based on secondary reactions with isomeric beams are presented.

  6. PLANS FOR A NEUTRON EDM EXPERIMENT AT SNS

    SciTech Connect

    ITO, TAKEYASU

    2007-01-31

    The electric dipole moment of the neutron, leptons, and atoms provide a unique window to Physics Beyond the Standard Model. They are currently developing a new neutron EDM experiment (the nEDM Experiment). This experiment, which will be run at the 8.9 {angstrom} Neutron Line at the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FNPB) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, will search for the neutron EDM with a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than the present limit. In this paper, the motivation for the experiment, the experimental method, and the present status of the experiment are discussed.

  7. Neutronics activities for next generation devices

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Neutronic activities for the next generation devices are the subject of this paper. The main activities include TFCX and FPD blanket/shield studies, neutronic aspects of ETR/INTOR critical issues, and neutronics computational modules for the tokamak system code and tandem mirror reactor system code. Trade-off analyses, optimization studies, design problem investigations and computational models development for reactor parametric studies carried out for these activities are summarized.

  8. Bulk Hydrogen Content OF High-Silica Rocks in Gale Crater With the Active Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, T. S. J.; Hardgrove, C.; Litvak, M.; Mitrofanov, I.; Boynton, W. V.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Jun, I.; Mischna, M.; Tate, C. G.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover recently traversed over plateaus of mafic aeolian sandstones (the 'Stimson' formation) that overlie mudstones (the 'Murray' formation). Within the Stimson formation we observed many lighter-toned, halo-forming features, that are potentially indicative of fluid alteration (see Fig. 1). These halo features extend for tens of meters laterally and are approx.1 meter wide. The halo features were characterized by Curiosity's geochemical instruments: Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS), Chemin, Chemcam and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM). With respect to the host (unaltered) Stimson rocks, fracture halos were significantly enriched in silicon and low in iron [1]. Changes in hydrogen abundance (due to its large neutron scattering cross section) greatly influence the magnitude of the thermal neutron response from the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument [2]. There are also some elemental species, e.g. chlorine, iron, and nickel, that have significant microscopic neutron absorption cross sections. These elements can be abundant and variable results provide a useful estimate of the lower bound for bulk hydrogen content (assuming a homogeneous distribution).

  9. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT 1 MW

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D

    2011-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) has been operating at the MW level for about one year. Experience in beam loss control and machine activation at this power level is presented. Also experience with machine protection systems is reviewed, which is critical at this power level. One of the most challenging operational aspects of high power operation has been attaining high availability, which is also discussed

  10. Cryogen free cryostat for neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Down, R. B. E.; Manuel, P.; Keeping, J.; Bowden, Z. A.

    2014-12-01

    Most very low temperature (below 1K) experiments at advanced neutron facilities are based on dilution and 3He refrigerator inserts used with Orange cryostats, or similar systems. However recent increases in the cost of liquid helium caused by global helium supply problems, has raised significant concern about the affordability of such cryostats. Here we present the design and test results of a cryogen free top-loading cryostat with a standard KelvinoxVT® dilution refrigerator insert which provides sample environment for neutron scattering experiments in the temperature range 35 mK - 300 K. The dilution refrigerator insert operates in a continuous regime. The cooling time of the insert is similar to one operated in the Orange cryostat. The main performance criteria such as base temperature, cooling power, and circulation rate are compatible with the technical specification of a standard dilution refrigerator. In fact the system offers operating parameters very similar to those of an Orange cryostat, but without the complication of cryogens. The first scientific results obtained in ultra-low temperature neutron scattering experiment with this system are also going to be discussed.

  11. Initial Neutron Burn Truncation Experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenty, P. W.; Keck, R. L.; Kremens, R. L.; Kearney, K. J.; Verdon, C. P.; Zuegel, J. D.; Cable, M. D.; Ognibene, T. J.; Lerche, R. A.; Griffith, R. L.

    1997-11-01

    The recent deployment of the neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) on OMEGA has enabled us to perform a series of experiments that will serve as a base line in understanding the effects of various levels of irradiation nonuniformities on neutron burn rates. These experiments were performed using doped and undoped plastic microballoons imploded with 30 kJ of 351-nm (UV) light. Precise control of laser focusing on OMEGA allowed for on-target laser perturbations to be varied from 0.1 to 1.0 μ*m rms. The targets were designed for moderate convergence ( ~*10) and spanned a range of growth factor from ~*50 to 500 ( ~*4 to 6 total e-foldings). Results will be presented depicting the experimental Y*ield O*ver C*lean (YOC) one-dimensionally predicted yield as a function of the calculated distortion fraction and an appraisal of the experimental fuel areal density. Both of these will be evaluated using information gained from the examination of the NTD neutron burn curves. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  12. Planetary Geochemistry Using Active Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsed Neutron Generator-Gamma Ray And Neutron Detector (PNG-GRAND) experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth, The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is to bring the PNG-GRAND instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asterOIds, comets and the satellites of the outer planets, Gamma-Ray Spectrometers have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions and, especially in the case of Mars Odyssey, have contributed detailed maps of the elemental composition over the entire surface of Mars, Neutron detectors have also been placed onboard orbital missions such as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and Lunar Prospector to measure the hydrogen content of the surface of the moon, The DAN in situ experiment on the Mars Science Laboratory not only includes neutron detectors, but also has its own neutron generator, However, no one has ever combined the three into one instrument PNG-GRAND combines a pulsed neutron generator (PNG) with gamma ray and neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument that can determine subsurface elemental composition without drilling. We are testing PNG-GRAND at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility recently constructed at NASA/GSFC that consists of a 2 m x 2 m x 1 m granite structure in an empty field, We will present data from the operation of PNG-GRAND in various experimental configurations on a known sample in a geometry that is identical to that which can be achieved on a planetary surface. We will also compare the material composition results inferred from our experiments to both an independent laboratory elemental composition analysis and MCNPX computer modeling results,

  13. Calibration of the neutron detectors for the cluster fusion experiment on the Texas Petawatt Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Dyer, G.; Rougk, J.; Kim, I.; McCormick, M.; Bernstein, A. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2012-06-15

    Three types of neutron detectors (plastic scintillation detectors, indium activation detectors, and CR-39 track detectors) were calibrated for the measurement of 2.45 MeV DD fusion neutron yields from the deuterium cluster fusion experiment on the Texas Petawatt Laser. A Cf-252 neutron source and 2.45 MeV fusion neutrons generated from laser-cluster interaction were used as neutron sources. The scintillation detectors were calibrated such that they can detect up to 10{sup 8} DD fusion neutrons per shot in current mode under high electromagnetic pulse environments. Indium activation detectors successfully measured neutron yields as low as 10{sup 4} per shot and up to 10{sup 11} neutrons. The use of a Cf-252 neutron source allowed cross calibration of CR-39 and indium activation detectors at high neutron yields ({approx}10{sup 11}). The CR-39 detectors provided consistent measurements of the total neutron yield of Cf-252 when a modified detection efficiency of 4.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} was used. The combined use of all three detectors allowed for a detection range of 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 11} neutrons per shot.

  14. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Reifarth, R.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Rundberg, R.S.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Fowler, M.M.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.; Kaeppeler, F.; Heil, M.; Chamberlin, E.P.

    2003-08-26

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 159-element 4{pi} barium fluoride array designed to study neutron capture on small quantities, 1 mg or less, of radioactive nuclides. It is being built on a 20 m neutron flight path which views the 'upper tier' water moderator at the Manuel J. Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The detector design is based on Monte Carlo calculations which have suggested ways to minimize backgrounds due to neutron scattering events. A data acquisition system based on fast transient digitizers is being implemented.

  15. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-08-01

    We have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. The technique, termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND), follows a method used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. We have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. Results are preliminary but promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly; it also appears resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be non-thermal and penetrating. Work remains to fully explore relevant physics and optimize instrument design.

  16. Neutron activation analysis of Etruscan pottery

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.; Silverman, A.; Ouellet, C.G.; Clark, D.D.; Hossain, T.Z

    1992-07-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) has been widely used in archaeology for compositional analysis of pottery samples taken from sites of archaeological importance. Elemental profiles can determine the place of manufacture. At Cornell, samples from an Etruscan site near Siena, Italy, are being studied. The goal of this study is to compile a trace element concentration profile for a large number of samples. These profiles will be matched with an existing data bank in an attempt to understand the place of origin for these samples. The 500 kW TRIGA reactor at the Ward Laboratory is used to collect NAA data for these samples. Experiments were done to set a procedure for the neutron activation analysis with respect to sample preparation, selection of irradiation container, definition of activation and counting parameters and data reduction. Currently, we are able to analyze some 27 elements in samples of mass 500 mg with a single irradiation of 4 hours and two sequences of counting. Our sensitivity for many of the trace elements is better than 1 ppm by weight under the conditions chosen. In this talk, details of our procedure, including quality assurance as measured by NIST standard reference materials, will be discussed. In addition, preliminary results from data treatment using cluster analysis will be presented. (author)

  17. DT neutron measurements and experience on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W. |; Duong, H.H. |; Jassby, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    Through semi-independent absolute calibrations of multiply redundant neutron detector systems, the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFIR) has achieved {+-}7% (one-sigma) accuracy in its fusion power measurements. This has required careful attention to the linearity of detectors up to the present highest fusion power levels achieved on TFTR of over 10 MW. The extended duration of the DT program on TFTR has also tested the stability of the detector systems. These issues of calibration, linearity, and stability are reviewed for the TFTR experience and how it can be applied to plans for ITER.

  18. Head phantom experiment and calculation for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Aizawa, O

    1988-06-01

    Head phantom experiments with various neutron beams and calculations were carried out in order to provide useful information for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Thermal neutron beams for thermal neutron capture therapy were used for phantom experiments with various neutron collimator aperture sizes. The filtered beam neutrons of 24 and 144 keV generated with iron and silicon filters were also used to investigate the possible application of BNCT in the treatment of deep-seated cancers. Thermal neutron fluence and induced capture gamma dose distributions within the phantom were calculated with a transport code DOT 3.5 and compared with the experimental results. The results showed that the calculation used was consistent with the experimental results and provided useful information on BNCT. The filtered beam neutron may be very useful for the treatment of deep or widespread cancer, if there were a high power research reactor constructed for this purpose.

  19. Magnetic field homogeneity for neutron EDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Melissa

    2016-09-01

    The neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) is an observable which, if non-zero, would violate time-reversal symmetry, and thereby charge-parity symmetry of nature. New sources of CP violation beyond those found in the standard model of particle physics are already tightly constrained by nEDM measurements. Our future nEDM experiment seeks to improve the precision on the nEDM by a factor of 30, using a new ultracold neutron (UCN) source that is being constructed at TRIUMF. Systematic errors in the nEDM experiment are driven by magnetic field inhomogeneity and instability. The goal field inhomogeneity averaged over the experimental measurement cell (order of 1 m) is 1 nT/m, at a total magnetic field of 1 microTesla. This equates to roughly 10-3 homogeneity. A particularly challenging aspect of the design problem is that nearby magnetic materials will also affect the magnetic inhomogeneity, and this must be taken into account in completing the design. This poster will present the design methodology and status of the main coil for the experiment where we use FEA software (COMSOL) to simulate and analyze the magnetic field. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

  20. Neutron coincidence imaging for active and passive neutron assays

    SciTech Connect

    Estep, R. J.; Brunson, G. S.; Melton, S. G.

    2001-01-01

    Neutron multiplicity assay algorithms for {sup 240}Pu assume a point source of fission neutrons that are detected in a single detector channel. The {sup 240}Pu in real waste, however, is more likely to be distributed throughout the container in some random way. For different reasons, this leads to significant errors when using either multiplicity or simpler coincidence analyses. Reduction of these errors can be achieved using tomographic imaging. In this talk we report on our results from using neutron singles and coincidence data between tagged detector pairs to provide enhanced tomographic imaging capabilities to a crate nondestructive assay system. Only simulated passive coincidence data is examined here, although the higher signal rates from active coincidence counting hold more promise for waste management. The active coincidence approach has significantly better sensitivity than the passive and is not significantly perturbed by (alpha,n) contributions. Our study was based primarily on simulated neutron pulse trains derived from the Los Alamos SIM3D software, which were subjected to analysis using the Los Alamos CTEN-FIT and TGS-FIT software. We found significantly improved imaging capability using the coincidence and singles rate data than could be obtained using the singles rate alone.

  1. Neutronic aspects of a DHCE experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Tsai, H.; Smith, D.L.

    1998-03-01

    The DHCE (Dynamic Helium Charging Experiment) irradiation experiment was conceived to simulate fusion-relevant helium production in a fission reactor irradiation. The main objective is to maintain the Helium-to-DPA ratio at, roughly, the same level as expected in a fusion environment. The problem in fission reactor irradiation is that Helium production is very low, because the fission neutrons, for basically all structural materials relevant for fusion applications, do not have enough energy to trigger the Helium producing reactions. A DHCE experiment involves the decay of Tritium to Helium-3 to produce the required Helium during irradiation. This paper describes an analysis of the most important aspects of a DHCE experiment and compares different types of fission reactors and their suitability for performing such an experiment. It is concluded that DHCE experiments are feasible in a certain class of mixed-spectrum fission reactors, but a careful and detailed evaluation, for each facility and condition, must be performed to ensure the success of the experiment.

  2. Determining Yankee Nuclear Power Station neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Heider, K.J.; Morrissey, K.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The Yankee nuclear power station located in Rowe, Massachusetts, permanently ceased power operations on February 26, 1992, after 31 yr of operation. Yankee has since initiated decommissioning planning activities. A significant component of these activities is a determination of the extent of radiological contamination of the Yankee site. Included in this effort was determination of the extent of neutron activation of plant components. This paper describes the determination of the neutron activation of the Yankee reactor vessel, associated internals, and surrounding structures. The Yankee reactor vessel is a 600-MW(thermal) stainless steel-lined, carbon steel vessel with stainless steel internal components designed by Westinghouse. The reactor vessel is surrounded and supported by a carbon steel neutron shield tank that was filled with chromated water during plant operation. A 5-ft-thick concrete biological shield wall surrounds the neutron shield tank. A project is under way to remove the reactor vessel internals from the reactor vessel.

  3. Comparison of fast neutron rates for the NEOS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Y. J.; Jang, C. H.; Siyeon, Kim; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, H. S.; Seo, K. M.; Han, B. Y.; Sun, G. M.; Jeon, E. J.; Lee, Jaison; Lee, M. H.; Oh, Y. M.; Park, K. S.; Joo, K. K.; Kim, B. R.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, Y. D.; Park, H. K.; Park, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    The fast neutron rates are compared at the site of the NEOS (Neutrino Experiment Oscillation Short baseline) experiment, a short-baseline neutrino experiment located in a tendon gallery of a commercial nuclear power plant using a 0.78-liter liquid scintillator detector. A pulse shape discrimination technique is used to identify neutron signals. The measurements are performed during the nuclear reactor-on and -off periods, and the fast neutron rates are found to be consistent with each other. The fast neutron rate is also measured at an overground site with a negligible overburden and is found to be 100 times higher than that at the site of the NEOS experiment.

  4. Neutron activation analysis of a penny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard E.

    2000-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis has been used for many years as an analysis tool and as an educational tool to teach students about nuclear properties. This article presents an exercise in the neutron activation analysis of a penny which, due to the simplicity of the resulting gamma-ray spectra, is appropriate for general physics classes. Students express a great deal of interest both in seeing the reactor in use as well as determining the composition of something that is familiar to them.

  5. Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Sudowe, Ralf; Folden, Charles M., III; Nitsche, Heino; Hoffman, Darleane C.

    2005-01-15

    The overall objective of this project is the measurement of neutron capture cross sections of importance to stewardship science and astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis, while at the same time helping to train the next generation of scientists with expertise relevant to U.S. national nuclear security missions and to stewardship science. A primary objective of this project is to study neutron capture cross sections for various stable and unstable isotopes that will contribute to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program by providing improved data for modeling and interpretation of nuclear device performance. Much of the information obtained will also be important in astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis. Measurements of these neutron capture cross sections are being conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility using the unique Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). In our early discussions with the DANCE group, decisions were made on the first cross sections to be measured and how our expertise in target preparation, radiochemical separations chemistry, and data analysis could best be applied. The initial emphasis of the project was on preparing suitable targets of both natural and separated stable europium isotopes in preparation for the ultimate goal of preparing a sufficiently large target of radioactive 155Eu (t1/2 = 4.7 years) and other radioactive and stable species for neutron cross-section measurements at DANCE. Our Annual Report, ''Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei'' by J. M. Schwantes, R. Sudowe, C. M. Folden III, H. Nitsche, and D. C. Hoffman, submitted to NNSA in December 2003, gives details about the initial considerations and scope of the project. During the current reporting period, electroplated targets of natural Eu together with valuable, stable, and isotopically pure 151Eu and 153Eu, and isotopically separated 154Sm were measured for

  6. A Freon-filled bubble chamber for neutron detection in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghilea, M. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.

    2011-03-01

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron-Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 1013 emitted from deuterium-tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  7. A Freon-filled bubble chamber for neutron detection in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghilea, M. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.

    2011-03-15

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron-Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 10{sup 13} emitted from deuterium-tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  8. A Freon-filled bubble chamber for neutron detection in inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Ghilea, M C; Meyerhofer, D D; Sangster, T C

    2011-03-01

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron-Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 10(13) emitted from deuterium-tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  9. BL3: A Next Generation Beam Neutron Lifetime Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wietfeldt, F. E.; Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Snow, W. M.; Liu, C.-Y.; Crawford, C. B.; Korsch, W.; Plaster, B.; Jones, G. L.; Collett, B.; Dewey, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    BL3 (Beam Lifetime 3) is a proposed next generation neutron lifetime experiment using the beam method. It continues a program, spanning more than three decades, of experiments at the ILL (France) and the NIST Center for Neutron Research that achieved the most precise beam method neutron lifetime measurements to date. A collimated cold neutron beam passes through a quasi-Penning trap where recoil protons from neutron decay are trapped. Periodically the trap is opened and these protons follow a bend in the magnetic field to a silicon detector. The same neutron beam passes through a thin-foil neutron counter that measures the neutron density. The ratio of neutron and proton count rates, along with efficiency factors, gives the neutron lifetime. The main goal of BL3 is to thoroughly investigate and test systematic effects in the beam method in an effort to address the current 4 σ discrepancy between the beam and bottle methods. It will employ a much larger, higher flux neutron beam, a large area position-sensitive proton detector, and an improved magnet design, with a proton trapping rate 100 times higher than past experiments. National Science Foundation, U.S. Dept. of Energy Office of Science.

  10. Neutron Activation Analysis, A Titanium Material Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dresser, Charles

    2011-04-01

    In order to obtain faster and more accurate measurements of radioactive contaminates within a sample of titanium we expose it to a neutron flux. This flux will activate the stable and quasi stable (those with extremely long half lives) isotopes into resultant daughter cells that are unstable which will result in shorter half lives on the order of minutes to days. We measured the resulting decays in the Germanium Crystal Detector and obtained a complex gamma spectrum. A mathematical model was used to recreate the production of the measured isotopes in the neutron flux and the resultant decays. Using this model we calculated the mass percent of the contaminate isotopes inside our titanium sample. Our mathematical model accounted for two types of neutron activation, fast or thermal activation, since this would determine which contaminate was the source of our signals. By looking at the percent abundances, neutron absorption cross-sections and the resulting mass percents of each contaminate we are able to determine the exact source of our measured signals. Additionally we implemented a unique ratio method to cross check the mathematical model. Our results have verified that for fast neutron activation and thermal neutron activation the method is accurate.

  11. Neutron diffraction experiments with 40T pulsed magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohoyama, K.; Katoh, N.; Nojiri, H.; Matsuda, Y. H.; Hiraka, H.; Ikeda, K.; Shimizu, H. M.

    2006-11-01

    Aiming at realising neutron scattering experiments under B = 40T magnetic fields, we are developing diffusive techniques for neutron diffraction with a long pulse magnet. For the present experiments, we succeeded in observing the spin-flop transition of the antiferromagnet MnF2 around B = 10T using a 20T pulsed magnet on a neutron spectrometer installed at a reactor. 35T pulsed magnetic fields were also successfully generated.

  12. Relativistic neutrons in active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Rudak, Bronislaw

    1989-01-01

    The acceleration of protons to relativistic energies in active galactic nuclei leads to the creation of relativistic neutrons which escape from the central engine. The neutrons decay at distances of up to 1-100 pc, depositing their energies and momenta in situ. Energy deposition by decaying neutrons may inhibit spherical accretion and drive a wind, which could be responsible for the velocity fields in emission-line regions and the outflow of broad absorption line systems. Enhanced pressure in the neutron decay region may also help to confine emission line clouds. A fraction of the relativistic proton energy is radiated in gamma-rays with energies which may be as large as about 100,000 GeV.

  13. Industrial Application Experiments on the Neutron Imaging Instrument DINGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbe, Ulf; Ahuja, Yogita; Ibrahim, Ralph; Li, Huijun; Aldridge, Laurie; Salvemini, Filomena; Paradowska, Anna Ziara

    The new neutron radiography / tomography / imaging instrument DINGO is operational since October 2014 to support the area of neutron imaging research at ANSTO. The instrument is designed for a diverse community in areas like defense, industrial, cultural heritage and archaeology applications. In the field of industrial application it provides a useful tool for studying cracking and defects in concrete or other structural material. Since being operational we gathered experience with industrial applications and commercial customers demanding beam time on DINGO. The instrument is a high flux facility with is 5.3 × 107 [n/(cm2s)] (confirmed by gold foil activation) for an L/D of approximately 500 at HB-2. A special feature of DINGO is the in-pile collimator position in front of the main shutter at HB-2. The collimator offers two pinholes with a possible L/D of 500 and 1000. A secondary collimator separates the two beams by blocking one and positions another aperture for the other beam. The neutron beam size can be adjusted to the sample size from 50 × 50 mm2 to 200 × 200 mm2 with a resulting pixel size from 27 μm to ∼100 μm. The whole instrument operates in two different positions, one for high resolution and one for high speed. We would like to present our first experience with commercial customers, scientific proposals with industrial applications and how to be customer ready.

  14. Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Jon M. Schwantes; Ralf Sudowe; Heino Nitsche; Darleane C. Hoffman

    2003-12-16

    A primary objective of this project is to study neutron capture cross sections for various stable and unstable isotopes that will contribute to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program by providing improved data for modeling and interpretation of nuclear device performance. The information obtained will also be important in astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis. During this reporting period, the emphasis has been on preparing a radioactive target of {sup 155}Eu (half-life = 4.7 years), and several stable targets, including isotopically separated {sup 154}Sm, {sup 151}Eu, and {sup 153}Eu. Measurements of their neutron capture cross sections will be conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). A suitable backing material (beryllium) for the targets has been selected after careful calculations of its contribution to the background of the measurements. In addition, a high voltage plating procedure has been developed and optimized. Stable targets of {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu and a target of natural Eu ({approx}50% {sup 151}Eu and {approx}50% {sup 153}Eu) have each been plated to a mass thickness of >1 mg/cm{sup 2} and delivered to the DANCE collaboration at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Natural Eu targets will be tested first to confirm that the target dimensions and backing are appropriate prior to performing measurements on the extremely valuable targets of separated isotopes. In order to prepare a target of the radioactive {sup 155}Eu, it must first be separated from the {sup 154}Sm target material that was irradiated in a very high neutron flux of 1.5x1015 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/s for 50 days. The reaction is {sup 154}Sm (n,f){sup 155}Sm (half-life = 22 minutes) {sup 155}Eu. Considerable progress has been made in developing a suitable high-yield and high-purity separation method for separating Eu from targets

  15. Effects of geochemical composition on neutron die-away measurements: Implications for Mars Science Laboratory's Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C.; Moersch, J.; Drake, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment, part of the scientific payload of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission, will have the ability to assess both the abundance and the burial depth of subsurface hydrogen as the rover traverses the Martian surface. DAN will employ a method of measuring neutron fluxes called “neutron die-away” that has not been used in previous planetary exploration missions. This method requires the use of a pulsed neutron generator that supplements neutrons produced via spallation in the subsurface by the cosmic ray background. It is well established in neutron remote sensing that low-energy (thermal) neutrons are sensitive not only to hydrogen content, but also to the macroscopic absorption cross-section of near-surface materials. To better understand the results that will be forthcoming from DAN, we model the effects of varying abundances of high absorption cross-section elements that are likely to be found on the Martian surface (Cl, Fe) on neutron die-away measurements made from a rover platform. Previously, the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) Spirit and Opportunity found that elevated abundances of these two elements are commonly associated with locales that have experienced some form of aqueous activity in the past, even though hydrogen-rich materials are not necessarily still present. By modeling a suite of H and Cl compositions, we demonstrate that (for abundance ranges reasonable for Mars) both the elements will significantly affect DAN thermal neutron count rates. Additionally, we show that the timing of thermal neutron arrivals at the detector can be used together with the thermal neutron count rates to independently determine the abundances of hydrogen and high neutron absorption cross-section elements (the most important being Cl). Epithermal neutron die-away curves may also be used to separate these two components. We model neutron scattering in actual Martian compositions that were determined by the MER Alpha

  16. Activation Experiments for Nuclear Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnabend, K.; Mueller, S.; Pietralla, N.; Savran, D.; Schnorrenberger, L.; Hasper, J.; Zilges, A.

    2009-01-28

    The study of ({gamma},n) reactions can be used to constrain the theoretical predictions of the neutron capture cross sections of short-lived branching points in the s process. The usability of the activation technique to study these ({gamma},n) reactions is discussed as one example of an activation experiment in nuclear astrophysics. Two photon sources using bremsstrahlung and laser-Compton backscattered photons where such experiments were carried out are compared.

  17. Crystal activation experiment MA-151

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, J. I.; Eller, E. L.; Schmadebeck, R. L.; Dyer, C. S.; Reedy, R. C.; Barr, D. W.; Gilmore, J. S.; Prestwood, R. J.; Bayhurst, B. P.; Perry, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    The crystal activation experiment consisted of two sample packages that were flown in the command module and returned to earth for analysis of the radioactivity induced in them during the flight. The objective of the experiment was to define the background caused by detector activation that interferes when gamma radiation is measured in the 0.02- to 10-megaelectronvolt range from earth orbit. Preliminary results show that the activation of the NaI(Tl) crystal was a factor of 3 below that from a similar measurement on Apollo 17. The identification of certain species and the level of activation observed show an important contribution from the interactions of thermal and energetic neutrons produced as secondaries in the spacecraft. That the activation was reduced by only a factor of 3 compared with the Apollo 17 experiment, despite the geomagnetically shielded orbit, possibly indicates more efficient secondary neutron production by the more energetic cosmic rays.

  18. Cosmogenic Neutron Production at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, I.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutrons are an important background for underground experiments studying neutrino oscillations, neutrino-less double-beta decay, dark matter, and other rare-event signals. The poster will present the status of a study of neutron production by cosmogenic muons at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. The experiments configuration of multiple identical detectors at varying depths gives us the ability to measure neutron yield for different values of average muon energy within the same experiment. The current status of our study and future prospects will be discussed.

  19. Improved neutron activation prediction code system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saqui, R. M.

    1971-01-01

    Two integrated neutron activation prediction code systems have been developed by modifying and integrating existing computer programs to perform the necessary computations to determine neutron induced activation gamma ray doses and dose rates in complex geometries. Each of the two systems is comprised of three computational modules. The first program module computes the spatial and energy distribution of the neutron flux from an input source and prepares input data for the second program which performs the reaction rate, decay chain and activation gamma source calculations. A third module then accepts input prepared by the second program to compute the cumulative gamma doses and/or dose rates at specified detector locations in complex, three-dimensional geometries.

  20. Miniature Neutron-Alpha Activation Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Edgar; Holloway, James Paul; He, Zhong; Goldsten, John

    2002-10-01

    We are developing a miniature neutron-alpha activation spectrometer for in-situ analysis of chem-bio samples, including rocks, fines, ices, and drill cores, suitable for a lander or Rover platform for Mars or outer-planet missions. In the neutron-activation mode, penetrating analysis will be performed of the whole sample using a γ spectrometer and in the α-activation mode, the sample surface will be analyzed using Rutherford-backscatter and x-ray spectrometers. Novel in our approach is the development of a switchable radioactive neutron source and a small high-resolution γ detector. The detectors and electronics will benefit from remote unattended operation capabilities resulting from our NEAR XGRS heritage and recent development of a Ge γ detector for MESSENGER. Much of the technology used in this instrument can be adapted to portable or unattended terrestrial applications for detection of explosives, chemical toxins, nuclear weapons, and contraband.

  1. A Freon-Filled Bubble Chamber for Neutron Detection in Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ghilea, M.C.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Sangster, T.C.

    2011-03-24

    Neutron imaging is one of the main methods used in inertial confinement fusion experiments to measure the core symmetry of target implosions. Previous studies have shown that bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-to-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. A bubble chamber for neutron imaging with Freon 115 as the active medium was designed and built for the OMEGA laser system. Bubbles resulting from spontaneous nucleation were recorded. Bubbles resulting from neutron–Freon interactions were observed at neutron yields of 1013 emitted from deuterium–tritium target implosions on OMEGA. The measured column bubble density was too low for neutron imaging on OMEGA but agreed with the model of bubble formation. The recorded data suggest that neutron bubble detectors are a promising technology for the higher neutron yields expected at National Ignition Facility.

  2. Proposed neutron activation analysis facilities in the Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, L.; Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    A number of analytical chemistry experimental facilities are being proposed for the Advanced Neutron Source. Experimental capabilities will include gamma-ray analysis and neutron depth profiling. This paper describes the various systems proposed and some of their important characteristics.

  3. Simulations towards optimization of a neutron/anti-neutron oscillation experiment at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Matthew; Kamyshkov, Yuri; Castellanos, Luis; Klinkby, Esben; US NNbar Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The observation of Neutron/Anti-neutron oscillation would prove the existence of Baryon Number Violation (BNV), and thus an explanation for the dominance of matter over anti-matter in the universe. The latest experiments have shown the oscillation time to be greater than 8.6 x 107 seconds, whereas current theoretical predictions suggest times on the order of 108 to 109 seconds. A neutron oscillation experiment proposed at the European Spallation Source (ESS) would provide sensitivity of more than 1000 times previous experiments performed, thus providing a result well-suited to confirm or deny current theory. A conceptual design of the proposed experiment will be presented, as well as the optimization of key experiment components using Monte-Carlo simulation methods, including the McStas neutron ray-trace simulation package. This work is supported by the Organized Research Units Program funded by The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Office of Research and Engagement.

  4. Results from neutron imaging of ICF experiments at NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, F. E.; Danly, C. R.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    In 2011 a neutron imaging diagnostic was commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system has been used to collect neutron images to measure the size and shape of the burning DT plasma and the surrounding fuel assembly. The imaging technique uses a pinhole neutron aperture placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two-dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic collects two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically one image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons, and the other image measures the distribution of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core. Images have been collected for the majority of the experiments performed as part of the ignition campaign. Results from this data have been used to estimate a burn-averaged fuel assembly as well as providing performance metrics to gauge progress towards ignition. This data set and our interpretation are presented.

  5. Enhancing the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; ...

    2015-05-28

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We, thus, report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. Furthermore, the upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  6. Enhancing the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-05-28

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  7. Neutron-scattering experiment on solid 3He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mat'aš, S.; Bat'ko, I.; Boyko, V.; Schöttl, S.; Siemensmeyer, K.; Raasch, S.; Radulov, I.; Adams, E. D.; Scherline, T. E.

    The central aim of our work is the characterisation of magnetic and crystallographic properties of solid 3He on a microscopic scale. This can only be achieved using neutron-diffraction techniques. The potential of neutron methods in magnetism and their application to nuclear magnetism is well known. They were very successful in the recent investigation of spontaneous nuclear order in copper and silver. The high neutron absorption cross section makes the application of neutron diffraction in solid 3He very difficult - but a careful feasibility study of diffraction experiments shows that new results of fundamental importance in the field of magnetism may be gained.

  8. Enhancing the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  9. Neutron calibration sources in the Daya Bay experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, J.; Carr, R.; Dwyer, D. A.; ...

    2015-07-09

    We describe the design and construction of the low rate neutron calibration sources used in the Daya Bay Reactor Anti-neutrino Experiment. Such sources are free of correlated gamma-neutron emission, which is essential in minimizing induced background in the anti-neutrino detector. Thus, the design characteristics have been validated in the Daya Bay anti-neutrino detector.

  10. Neutron calibration sources in the Daya Bay experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Carr, R.; Dwyer, D. A.; Gu, W. Q.; Li, G. S.; McKeown, R. D.; Qian, X.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Wu, F. F.; Zhang, C.

    2015-07-09

    We describe the design and construction of the low rate neutron calibration sources used in the Daya Bay Reactor Anti-neutrino Experiment. Such sources are free of correlated gamma-neutron emission, which is essential in minimizing induced background in the anti-neutrino detector. Thus, the design characteristics have been validated in the Daya Bay anti-neutrino detector.

  11. Calculated analysis of experiments in fast neutron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, V. K. Kalugina, K. M.; Gomin, E. A.

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the results of computational simulation of experiments with the MK-I core of the JOYO fast neutron sodium-cooled reactor are presented. The MCU-KS code based on the Monte Carlo method was used for calculations. The research was aimed at additional verification of the MCU-KS code for systems with a fast neutron spectrum.

  12. Extraction of polychromatic thermal neutrons by Bragg diffraction to use for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, S. H.; Choi, H. D.; Jun, B. J.; Kim, M. S.

    2000-07-01

    Extraction method of thermal neutron beam by Bragg diffraction is investigated. A thermal neutron beam is used for the Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis system at HANARO, a 30 MW research reactor in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. Polychromatic beam including all orders of diffraction is obtained by setting a pair of pyrolytic graphite crystals with a Bragg angle of 45° on a horizontal white beam line. Diffracted neutron flux at the sample position is calculated by considering the integrated reflectivity and mosaic spread of crystals. Due to the divergence effect, the mosaic spread of crystals is optimized to give the maximum and flat flux at the sample position. An experiment has been performed to verify the reflectivities for high order diffractions from pyrolytic graphite. When the focusing technique of bending the crystals is adopted, a design value of 1.0×108n/cm2s is expected at the sample position. Hence Bragg diffraction is a promising method of extracting thermal neutrons for PGNAA.

  13. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krticka, M.; Becvar, F.

    2009-03-31

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF{sub 2} scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  14. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.

    2009-03-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF2 scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  15. GRIF-1 experiment on board the SPEKTR/MIR orbital complex: Study of solar X-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron flares and correlation of magnetosphere-charged particle fluxes with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, M. I.; Pankov, V. M.; Bogomolov, A. V.; Denisov, Yu. I.; Kolesov, G. Ya.; Logachev, Yu. I.; Svertilov, S. I.

    1996-11-01

    The SPEKTR module of the MIR orbital station was launched in May 1995. The multipurpose experiment was based on the GRIF-1 research complex consisting of an oriented X-ray spectrometer, a spectrometer of gamma-quanta and neutrons, a spectrometer of electrons and protons with a large geometrical factor, and a spectrometer of electrons, protons, and nuclei with a small geometrical factor. The solar geophysical aspects of the experiment included the measurements of spectral and temporal parameters of solar hard electromagnetic (0.01 50 MeV) and neutron (>20 MзB) radiation, the study of spectral, temporal, and spatial characteristics of energetic electrons (0.04 1.5 MeV), protons, and nuclei (1 200 MeV/nucleon) in the circumterrestrial space, as well as the correlations of these parameters with solar activity phenomena.

  16. Continued development of the Combined Pulsed Neutron Experiment (CPNE) for lunar and planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandler, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Current progress is reported on the inelastic scattering, capture, and activation gamma ray portions of the Combined Pulsed Neutron Experiment (CPNE). Experiments are described which have enabled a reduction in weight of the experimental probe to 7.3 kg. Parametric studies are described which enabled the optimization of experimental parameters (e.g., gate time settings, neutron pulse rate, etc.). Estimated detection sensitivities using this light weight probe and the optimized experimental parameters are discussed.

  17. Active helium target: Neutron scalar polarizability extraction via Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Meg Hornidge, David; Annand, John; Strandberg, Bruno

    2015-12-31

    Precise measurement of the neutron scalar polarizabilities has been a lasting challenge because of the lack of a free-neutron target. Led by the University of Glasgow and the Mount Allison University groups of the A2 collaboration in Mainz, Germany, preparations have begun to test a recent theoretical model with an active helium target with the hope of determining these elusive quantities with small statistical, systematic, and model-dependent errors. Apparatus testing and background-event simulations have been carried out, with the full experiment projected to run in 2015. Once determined, these values can be applied to help understand quantum chromodynamics in the nonperturbative region.

  18. Towards neutron scattering experiments with sub-millisecond time resolution

    DOE PAGES

    Adlmann, F. A.; Gutfreund, Phillip; Ankner, John Francis; ...

    2015-02-01

    Neutron scattering techniques offer several unique opportunities in materials research. However, most neutron scattering experiments suffer from the limited flux available at current facilities. This limitation becomes even more severe if time-resolved or kinetic experiments are performed. A new method has been developed which overcomes these limitations when a reversible process is studied, without any compromise on resolution or beam intensity. We demonstrate that, by recording in absolute time the neutron detector events linked to an excitation, information can be resolved on sub-millisecond timescales. Specifically, the concept of the method is demonstrated by neutron reflectivity measurements in time-of-flight mode atmore » the Liquids Reflectometer located at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, USA, combined with in situ rheometry. Finally, the opportunities and limitations of this new technique are evaluated by investigations of a micellar polymer solution offering excellent scattering contrast combined with high sensitivity to shear.« less

  19. Towards neutron scattering experiments with sub-millisecond time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Adlmann, F. A.; Gutfreund, Phillip; Ankner, John Francis; Browning, James F.; Parizzi, Andre A.; Vacaliuc, Bogdan; Halbert, Candice E.; Rich, J. P.; Dennison, A. J. C.; Wolff, Max

    2015-02-01

    Neutron scattering techniques offer several unique opportunities in materials research. However, most neutron scattering experiments suffer from the limited flux available at current facilities. This limitation becomes even more severe if time-resolved or kinetic experiments are performed. A new method has been developed which overcomes these limitations when a reversible process is studied, without any compromise on resolution or beam intensity. We demonstrate that, by recording in absolute time the neutron detector events linked to an excitation, information can be resolved on sub-millisecond timescales. Specifically, the concept of the method is demonstrated by neutron reflectivity measurements in time-of-flight mode at the Liquids Reflectometer located at the Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, USA, combined with in situ rheometry. Finally, the opportunities and limitations of this new technique are evaluated by investigations of a micellar polymer solution offering excellent scattering contrast combined with high sensitivity to shear.

  20. Geochemical applications for prompt gamma neutron activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glascock, M. D.; Coveney, R. M.; Tittle, C. W.; Gartner, M. L.; Murphy, R. D.

    1985-05-01

    Neutron-capture (prompt) gamma-ray neutron activation techniques are finding increasing application for both laboratory and in situ measurement of geological materials. Prompt gamma rays can be used to measure abundances for most light mass elements and several heavier mass elements which are more difficult by other techniques. These elements include many of those routinely measured in rocks and minerals. Geochemical abundance data provide information useful for determining rock and ore genesis, porosity, moisture content, salinity, and the detection of formerly oxidizing or reducing environments. Some of the applications include development of petrogenetic models, exploration and development of oil and mineral deposits, and process control in the mining industry.

  1. Nondestructive examination using neutron activated positron annihilation

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.; Denison, Arthur B.

    2001-01-01

    A method is provided for performing nondestructive examination of a metal specimen using neutron activated positron annihilation wherein the positron emitter source is formed within the metal specimen. The method permits in situ nondestructive examination and has the advantage of being capable of performing bulk analysis to determine embrittlement, fatigue and dislocation within a metal specimen.

  2. Neutron Yield Measurements via Aluminum Activation

    SciTech Connect

    1999-12-08

    Neutron activation of aluminum may occur by several neutron capture reactions. Four such reactions are described here: {sup 27}Al + n = {sup 28}Al, {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na, {sup 27}Al(n, 2n){sup 26}Al and {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg. The radioactive nuclei {sup 28}Al, {sup 24}Na, and {sup 27}Mg, which are produced via the {sup 27}Al + n = {sup 28}Al, {sup 27}Al(n,{alpha}){sup 24}Na and {sup 27}Al(n,p){sup 27}Mg neutron reactions, beta decay to excited states of {sup 28}Si, {sup 24}Mg and {sup 27}Al respectively. These excited states then emit gamma rays as the nuclei de-excite to their respective ground states.

  3. Standard Model and Beyond with Neutron Beta Decay Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianglai

    2010-11-01

    The underlying charge-current weak interaction of the neutron beta decay connects together the Fermi constant GF, CKM matrix element Vud, the nucleon axial weak coupling constant gA, and the free neutron life time τn. Consequently, the combination of direct measurements of these provides stringent constraints to the Standard Model. At present, GF and Vud have been measured to a precision of 5 ppm and 225 ppm, respectively, whereas the data in gA and τn are less precise, and both exhibit significant inconsistency among measurements. With polarized neutrons, gA can be determined by measuring the angular correlation of the decay electrons with the neutron spin (so-called β-asymmetry). In the past, β-asymmetry have been measured in the cold neutron beam experiments, yielding a range of results much wider than the reported uncertainties. A new β-asymmetry measurement, UCNA (Ultracold Neutron Asymmetry), has been developed using the solid deuterium pulse spallation ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, where UCN are transported in a guide system, fully polarized, then loaded into a decay trap within a solenoidal beta spectrometer. Utilizing UCN give this experiment very different systematics compared to cold neutron experiments. In this talk, I will give a brief review of the neutron beta decay measurements on the angular correlations as well as the life time. The main focus of this talk will be on the UCNA experiment. I will discuss the experimental techniques, and present the new results from the data in 2008 and 2009. The implication of the new results, combined with the world data on β-asymmetry, Vud, and τn, will also be discussed.

  4. Neutron Emission Characteristics of Two Mixed-Oxide Fuels: Simulations and Initial Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; S. A. Pozzi; J. L. Dolan; M. Flaska; J. T. Johnson; E. H. Seabury; E. M. Gantz

    2009-07-01

    Simulations and experiments have been carried out to investigate the neutron emission characteristics of two mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These activities are part of a project studying advanced instrumentation techniques in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cycle Research and Development program and it's Materials Protection, Accounting, and Control for Transmutation (MPACT) campaign. This analysis used the MCNP-PoliMi Monte Carlo simulation tool to determine the relative strength and energy spectra of the different neutron source terms within these fuels, and then used this data to simulate the detection and measurement of these emissions using an array of liquid scintillator neutron spectrometers. These calculations accounted for neutrons generated from the spontaneous fission of the actinides in the MOX fuel as well as neutrons created via (alpha,n) reactions with oxygen in the MOX fuel. The analysis was carried out to allow for characterization of both neutron energy as well as neutron coincidences between multiple detectors. Coincidences between prompt gamma rays and neutrons were also analyzed. Experiments were performed at INL with the same materials used in the simulations to benchmark and begin validation tests of the simulations. Data was collected in these experiments using an array of four liquid scintillators and a high-speed waveform digitizer. Advanced digital pulse-shape discrimination algorithms were developed and used to collect this data. Results of the simulation and modeling studies are presented together with preliminary results from the experimental campaign.

  5. Development of the methods for simulating the neutron spectrometers and neutron-scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoshin, S. A.; Belushkin, A. V.; Ioffe, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    Reviewed are the results of simulating the neutron scattering instruments with the program package VITESS upgraded by the routines for treating the polarized neutrons, as developed by the authors. The reported investigations have been carried out at the Frank Laboratory for Neutron Physics at JINR in collaboration with the Juelich research center (Germany). The performance of the resonance and gradient adiabatic spin flippers, the Drabkin resonator, the classical and resonance spin-echo spectrometers, the spin-echo diffractometer for the small-angle neutron scattering, and the spin-echo spectrometer with rotating magnetic fields is successfully modeled. The methods for using the 3D map of the magnetic field from the input file, either mapped experimentally or computed using the finite-elements technique, in the VITESS computer code, are considered in detail. The results of neutron-polarimetry experiments are adequately reproduced by our simulations.

  6. Prototyping an active neutron veto for SuperCDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-01

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  7. Prototyping an active neutron veto for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  8. Prototyping an Active Neutron Veto for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  9. Benchmark experiments on neutron streaming through JET Torus Hall penetrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batistoni, P.; Conroy, S.; Lilley, S.; Naish, J.; Obryk, B.; Popovichev, S.; Stamatelatos, I.; Syme, B.; Vasilopoulou, T.; contributors, JET

    2015-05-01

    Neutronics experiments are performed at JET for validating in a real fusion environment the neutronics codes and nuclear data applied in ITER nuclear analyses. In particular, the neutron fluence through the penetrations of the JET torus hall is measured and compared with calculations to assess the capability of state-of-art numerical tools to correctly predict the radiation streaming in the ITER biological shield penetrations up to large distances from the neutron source, in large and complex geometries. Neutron streaming experiments started in 2012 when several hundreds of very sensitive thermo-luminescence detectors (TLDs), enriched to different levels in 6LiF/7LiF, were used to measure the neutron and gamma dose separately. Lessons learnt from this first experiment led to significant improvements in the experimental arrangements to reduce the effects due to directional neutron source and self-shielding of TLDs. Here we report the results of measurements performed during the 2013-2014 JET campaign. Data from new positions, at further locations in the South West labyrinth and down to the Torus Hall basement through the air duct chimney, were obtained up to about a 40 m distance from the plasma neutron source. In order to avoid interference between TLDs due to self-shielding effects, only TLDs containing natural Lithium and 99.97% 7Li were used. All TLDs were located in the centre of large polyethylene (PE) moderators, with natLi and 7Li crystals evenly arranged within two PE containers, one in horizontal and the other in vertical orientation, to investigate the shadowing effect in the directional neutron field. All TLDs were calibrated in the quantities of air kerma and neutron fluence. This improved experimental arrangement led to reduced statistical spread in the experimental data. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to calculate the air kerma due to neutrons and the neutron fluence at detector positions, using a JET model validated up to the

  10. Design of a laboratory for experiments with a pulsed neutron source.

    PubMed

    Memoli, G; Trusler, J P M; Ziver, A K

    2009-06-01

    We present the results of a neutron shielding design and optimisation study performed to reduce the exposure to radiological doses arising from a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator (PNG) having a maximum emission strength of 2.0 x 10(8) neutrons s(-1). The source was intended to be used in a new irradiation facility for the realisation of an experiment on acoustical cavitation in liquids. This paper describes in detail how the facility was designed to reduce both neutron and gamma-ray dose rates to acceptable levels, taking into account the ALARP principle in following the steps of optimisation. In particular, this work compares two different methods of optimisation to assess neutron dose rates: the use of analytical methods and the use of Monte Carlo simulations (MCNPX 2.4). The activation of the surrounding materials during operation was estimated using the neutron spectra as input to the FISPACT 3.0 code. The limitations of a first-order analytical model to determine the neutron activation levels are highlighted. The impact that activation has on the choice of the materials to be used inside the laboratory and on the waiting time before anyone can safely enter the room after the neutron source is switched off is also discussed.

  11. Fast neutron activation analysis by means of low voltage neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M. E.

    A description of D-T neutron generator (NG) is presented. This machine can be used for fast neutron activation analysis applied to determine some selected elements, especially light elements, in different materials. Procedure of neutron flux determination and efficiency calculation is described. Examples of testing some Egyptian natural cosmetics are given.

  12. Experience in estimating neutron poison worths

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, R.T.; Congdon, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    Gadolinia, {sup 135}Xe, {sup 149}Sm, control rod, and soluble boron are five neutron poisons that may appear in light water reactor assemblies. Reliable neutron poison worth estimation is useful for evaluating core operating strategies, fuel cycle economics, and reactor safety design. Based on physical presence, neutron poisons can be divided into two categories: local poisons and global poisons. Gadolinia and control rod are local poisons, and {sup 135}Xe, {sup 149}Sm, and soluble boron are global poisons. The first-order perturbation method is commonly used to estimate nuclide worths in fuel assemblies. It is well known, however, that the first-order perturbation method was developed for small perturbations, such as the perturbation due to weak absorbers, and that neutron poisons are not weak absorbers. The authors have developed an improved method to replace the first-order perturbation method, which yields very poor results, for estimating local poison worths. It has also been shown that the first-order perturbation method seems adequate to estimate worths for global poisons caused by flux compensation.

  13. Neutron activation for semiconductor materials characterization at Eastman Kodak Company

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, T.Z.

    1988-01-01

    Several neutron activation analysis (NAA) procedures have been used to establish process parameters in the manufacture of semiconductor devices. In addition to instrumental NAA (INAA), techniques such as neutron depth profiling and neutron-activated accelerator mass spectrometry have been used to obtain depth distribution of elements of interest.

  14. Background and Source Term Identification in Active Neutron Interrogation Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-24

    theory section, ring detector tallies (f5 – MCNP) provided both neutron and photon fluences [particles/cm2] as functions of their energies. Figure 19...BACKGROUND AND SOURCE TERM IDENTIFICATION IN ACTIVE NEUTRON INTERROGATION METHODS THESIS...M01 BACKGROUND AND SOURCE TERM IDENTIFICATION IN ACTIVE NEUTRON INTERROGATION METHODS THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of

  15. The muon-induced neutron indirect detection EXperiment, MINIDEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Carissimo, C.; Gooch, C.; Kneißl, R.; Langford, J.; Liu, X.; Majorovits, B.; Palermo, M.; Schulz, O.; Vanhoefer, L.

    2017-04-01

    A new experiment to quantitatively measure neutrons induced by cosmic-ray muons in selected high-Z materials is introduced. The design of the Muon-Induced Neutron Indirect Detection EXperiment, MINIDEX, and the results from its first data taking period are presented as well as future plans. Neutron production in high-Z materials is of particular interest as such materials are used for shielding in low-background experiments. The design of next-generation large-scale experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay or direct interactions of dark matter requires reliable Monte Carlo simulations of background induced by muon interactions. The first five months of operation already provided a valuable data set on neutron production and neutron transport in lead. A first round of comparisons between MINIDEX data and Monte Carlo predictions obtained with a GEANT4-based package for two different sets of physics models of relevance for neutron production by muons is presented. The rate of muon-induced events is overall a factor three to four higher in data than predicted by the Monte Carlo packages. In addition, the time evolution of the muon-induced signal is not well described by the simulations.

  16. Neutron flux and spectrum variation in a MOX fuel experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, G.S.; Rogers, J.W.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    In support of potential licensing of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium and depleted uranium for use in US reactors, an experiment containing WG-MOX fuel has been designed and is being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. A simple, uninstrumented, test assembly containing nine MOX fuel capsules with neutron monitor wires was inserted into the ATR. Important neutronics parameters were computed using novel Monte Carlo methods. The purpose is to show that neutron monitor measurements have validated the new methodology.

  17. New generation non-stationary portable neutron generators for biophysical applications of Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Marchese, N; Cannuli, A; Caccamo, M T; Pace, C

    2017-01-01

    Neutron sources are increasingly employed in a wide range of research fields. For some specific purposes an alternative to existing large-scale neutron scattering facilities, can be offered by the new generation of portable neutron devices. This review reports an overview for such recently available neutron generators mainly addressed to biophysics applications with specific reference to portable non-stationary neutron generators applied in Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA). The review reports a description of a typical portable neutron generator set-up addressed to biophysics applications. New generation portable neutron devices, for some specific applications, can constitute an alternative to existing large-scale neutron scattering facilities. Deuterium-Deuterium pulsed neutron sources able to generate 2.5MeV neutrons, with a neutron yield of 1.0×10(6)n/s, a pulse rate of 250Hz to 20kHz and a duty factor varying from 5% to 100%, when combined with solid-state photon detectors, show that this kind of compact devices allow rapid and user-friendly elemental analysis. "This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazù and Dr. Federica Migliardo". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. High-resolution neutron radiography with microchannel plates: Proof-of-principle experiments at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; McPhate, J. B.; Vallerga, J. V.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Hull, J. S.; Feller, W. B.; Lehmann, E.

    2009-06-01

    With the appearance of highly collimated and intense neutron beamlines, the resolution of radiographic experiments is often limited by the parameters of the neutron imaging detector. Neutron-sensitive microchannel plates (MCPs) proved to be very efficient for conversion of a thermal or cold neutron into an electron pulse of up to 10 6 electrons preserving location of the neutron absorption within ˜15 μm. In this paper, we present the results of preliminary measurements performed with neutron-sensitive MCPs coupled with a Medipix2/Timepix active pixel sensor. A set of test objects was imaged at both thermal and cold neutron imaging beamlines of Paul Scherrer Institute. The spatial resolution of the detector operating at high counting rate mode was confirmed to be limited by the 55 μm pixel size of the Medipix2 readout. At the same time, event centroiding applied to the charge values measured with Timepix readout allowed individual neutron counting with spatial resolution on the scale of MCP pore spacing (11 μm in the present measurements). The ongoing improvement of the speed of the readout electronics should eliminate the low counting rate limitation of the latter high-resolution imaging.

  19. Fusion-neutron-yield, activation measurements at the Z accelerator: design, analysis, and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Hahn, K D; Cooper, G W; Ruiz, C L; Fehl, D L; Chandler, G A; Knapp, P F; Leeper, R J; Nelson, A J; Smelser, R M; Torres, J A

    2014-04-01

    We present a general methodology to determine the diagnostic sensitivity that is directly applicable to neutron-activation diagnostics fielded on a wide variety of neutron-producing experiments, which include inertial-confinement fusion (ICF), dense plasma focus, and ion beam-driven concepts. This approach includes a combination of several effects: (1) non-isotropic neutron emission; (2) the 1/r(2) decrease in neutron fluence in the activation material; (3) the spatially distributed neutron scattering, attenuation, and energy losses due to the fielding environment and activation material itself; and (4) temporally varying neutron emission. As an example, we describe the copper-activation diagnostic used to measure secondary deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron yields on ICF experiments conducted on the pulsed-power Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Using this methodology along with results from absolute calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that for the diagnostic configuration on Z, the diagnostic sensitivity is 0.037% ± 17% counts/neutron per cm(2) and is ∼ 40% less sensitive than it would be in an ideal geometry due to neutron attenuation, scattering, and energy-loss effects.

  20. Space experiment BTN-NEUTRON on INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION - CURRENT STATUS and future stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretyakov, V. I.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Laygushin, V. I.; Litvak, M. L.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Pronin, M. A.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Sanin, A. B.

    2009-04-01

    Space experiment BTN (Board Telescope of Neutrons) was suggested in 1997 for the Russian segment of International Space Station. The first stage of this experiment was started in February 2007 with instrumentation BTN-M1, which contain two separate units: 1) the electronics unit for commanding and data handling, which is installed inside the Station; 2) the detector unit, which is installed at the outer surface of Russian Service Module "Zvezda". The total mass of this instrument without cables is about 15 kg and total power consumption is about 18 Watts. Detector unit of BTN-M1 has the set of four neutron detectors: three proportional counters of epithermal neutrons with 3He covered by cadmium shields and polyethylene moderators with different thickness and stylbene scintillator for fast neutrons at the energy range 0.4 Mev - 10 Mev. There are three sources of neutrons in the near-Earth space. Permanent flux of neutrons is produced due to interaction of energetic particles of galactic and solar cosmic rays with the upper atmosphere of the Earth ("natural neutrons") and with the body of the spacecraft ("technogenic neutrons"). The third transient sources of neutrons are active regions of the Sun, which may sporadically emit energetic neutrons during strong flares. Some of these particles have sufficiently high energy to neutrons cover the distance to the Earth before decay Data from BTN-M1 after 2 years of space operations is sufficient for preliminary estimation of neutron component of radiation environment in the near-Earth space. BTN-M1 detector unit is equal to the Russian instrument HEND, which also operates now onboard NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter since May 2001. Simultaneous measurements of neutron radiation on orbits around Mars and Earth give the unique opportunity to compare neutron radiation environment around two planets. The technogenic component of neutron background may be estimated by analysis of data for different stages of flight. After evaluation

  1. A Computerized Library and Evaluation System for Integral Neutron Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Viktor E.; And Others

    A computerized library of references to integral neutron experiments has been developed at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Livermore. This library serves as a data base for the systematic retrieval of documents describing diverse critical and bulk nuclear experiments. The evaluation and reduction of the physical parameters of the experiments…

  2. A Computerized Library and Evaluation System for Integral Neutron Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Viktor E.; And Others

    A computerized library of references to integral neutron experiments has been developed at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Livermore. This library serves as a data base for the systematic retrieval of documents describing diverse critical and bulk nuclear experiments. The evaluation and reduction of the physical parameters of the experiments…

  3. Comparison of two experiments on radiative neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Khafizov, R. U.; Tolokonnikov, S. V.; Solovei, V. A.; Kolhidashvili, M. R.

    2009-12-15

    Over 10 years ago we proposed an experiment on measuring the characteristics of radiative neutron decay in papers [1, 2]. At the same time we had published the theoretical spectrum of radiative gamma quanta, calculated within the framework of the electroweak interactions, on the basis of which we proposed the methodology for the future experiment [3, 4]. However, because we were denied beam time on the intensive cold neutron beam at ILL (Grenoble, France) for a number of years, we could only conduct the experiment in 2005 on the newly opened FRMII reactor of Technical University of Muenchen. The main result of this experiment was the discovery of radiative neutron decay and the measurement of its relative intensity B.R. = (3.2 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup -3} with C.L. = 99.7% for radiative gamma quanta with energy over 35 kev [5, 6]. Over a year after our first announcement about the results of the conducted experiment, 'Nature' [7] published a letter asserting that its authors have also measured the branching ratio of radiative neutron decay B.R. = (3.13 {+-} 0.34) x 10{sup -3} with c.l. = 68% and gamma quanta energy from 15 to 340 kev. This article aims to compare these two experiments. It is shown that the use of strong magnetic fields in the NIST (Washington, USA) experiment methodology not only prevents any exact measurement of the branching ratio and identification of radiative neutron decay events, but also makes registration of ordinary neutron decay events impossible.

  4. Simulation of a complete inelastic neutron scattering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, H.; Lefmann, K.; Lake, B.; Nielsen, K.; Skaarup, P.

    A simulation of an inelastic neutron scattering experiment on the high-temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 is presented. The complete experiment, including sample, is simulated using an interface between the experiment control program and the simulation software package (McStas) and is compared with the experimental data. Simulating the entire experiment is an attractive alternative to the usual method of convoluting the model cross section with the resolution function, especially if the resolution function is nontrivial.

  5. A γ-ray detector with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout for neutron diffraction experiments at spallation neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Festa, G.; Pietropaolo, A.; Reali, E.; Grazzi, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.

    2010-03-01

    Standard detectors for neutron diffraction experiments are typically 3He filled proportional counters. Indeed, in the near future the 3He availability will be greatly reduced, so the R&D activity on alternative neutron counters is a very important issue to be addressed. Scintillator detectors could be considered as one of these alternatives. In this context, a prototype thermal neutron counter composed of a yttrium-aluminium-perovskite scintillator crystal coupled to a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) and a standard photomultiplier tube (PMT) was used in time of flight neutron diffraction experiments on the INES spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. Neutron detection was realized by attaching the crystal to a natural cadmium sheet, used as a (n, γ) converter. Results show that the SiPM-based readout detection system has promising performances with respect to that based on a standard PMT. Diffraction patterns recorded with the 3He tubes' neutron counters in use on INES allowed a comparative assessment of the SiPM-based device for time of flight neutron diffraction experiments, with respect to the standard detection technique.

  6. Eulogy for a neutron activation analysis facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lepel, E.A.

    2000-07-01

    A relatively inexpensive facility for neutron activation analysis (NAA) was developed in the early 1970s at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). With the availability of large {sup 252}Cf sources, a subcritical facility was designed that could contain up to 100 mg of {sup 252}Cf (T{sub 1/2} = 2.645 yr and a spontaneous fission yield of 2.34 x 10{sup 9} n/s{center_dot}mg{sup {minus}1}). The {sup 252}Cf source was surrounded by a hexagonal array of {sup 235}U enriched fuel rods, which provided a 10- to 20-fold multiplication of the neutrons emitted from the {sup 252}Cf source. This assembly was located near the bottom of a 1.52-m-diam x 6.10-m-deep water-filled pool. The Neutron Multiplier Facility (NMF) was operational from November 1977 to April 1998--a period of 20.4 yr. The NMF began operation with {approximately}100 mg of {sup 252}Cf, and because of decay of the {sup 252}Cf, it had decreased to 0.34 mg at the time of shutdown. Decommissioning of the NMF began April 1998 and was completed in October 1999.

  7. Ship Effect Neutron Measurements And Impacts On Low-Background Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-10-01

    The primary particles entering the upper atmosphere as cosmic rays create showers in the atmosphere that include a broad spectrum of secondary neutrons, muons and protons. These cosmic-ray secondaries interact with materials at the surface of the Earth, yielding prompt backgrounds in radiation detection systems, as well as inducing long-lived activities through spallation events, dominated by the higher-energy neutron secondaries. For historical reasons, the multiple neutrons produced in spallation cascade events are referred to as “ship effect” neutrons. Quantifying the background from cosmic ray induced activities is important to low-background experiments, such as neutrino-less double beta decay. Since direct measurements of the effects of shielding on the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum are not available, Monte Carlo modeling is used to compute such effects. However, there are large uncertainties (orders of magnitude) in the possible cross-section libraries and the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum for the energy range needed in such calculations. The measurements reported here were initiated to validate results from Monte Carlo models through experimental measurements in order to provide some confidence in the model results. The results indicate that the models provide the correct trends of neutron production with increasing density, but there is substantial disagreement between the model and experimental results for the lower-density materials of Al, Fe and Cu.

  8. Spin flip loss in magnetic confinement of ultracold neutrons for neutron lifetime experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyerl, A.; Leung, K. K. H.; Kaufman, C.; Müller, G.; Malik, S. S.

    2017-03-01

    We analyze the spin flip loss for ultracold neutrons in magnetic bottles of the type used in experiments aiming at a precise measurement of the neutron lifetime, extending the one-dimensional field model used previously by Steyerl et al. [Phys. Rev. C 86, 065501 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.065501] to two dimensions for cylindrical multipole fields. We also develop a general analysis applicable to three dimensions. Here we apply it to multipole fields and to the bowl-type field configuration used for the Los Alamos UCN τ experiment. In all cases considered the spin flip loss calculated exceeds the Majorana estimate by many orders of magnitude but can be suppressed sufficiently by applying a holding field of appropriate magnitude to allow high-precision neutron lifetime measurements, provided other possible sources of systematic error are under control.

  9. Mock-up experiment at Birmingham University for BNCT project of Osaka University--Neutron flux measurement with gold foil.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, S; Sakai, M; Yoshihashi, S; Manabe, M; Zushi, N; Murata, I; Hoashi, E; Kato, I; Kuri, S; Oshiro, S; Nagasaki, M; Horiike, H

    2015-12-01

    Mock-up experiment for development of accelerator based neutron source for Osaka University BNCT project was carried out at Birmingham University, UK. In this paper, spatial distribution of neutron flux intensity was evaluated by foil activation method. Validity of the design code system was confirmed by comparing measured gold foil activities with calculations. As a result, it was found that the epi-thermal neutron beam was well collimated by our neutron moderator assembly. Also, the design accuracy was evaluated to have less than 20% error.

  10. Development of high flux thermal neutron generator for neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko H.; Chen, Allan X.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K.; Jones, Glenn; Pantell, Richard H.

    2015-05-01

    The new model DD110MB neutron generator from Adelphi Technology produces thermal (<0.5 eV) neutron flux that is normally achieved in a nuclear reactor or larger accelerator based systems. Thermal neutron fluxes of 3-5 · 107 n/cm2/s are measured. This flux is achieved using four ion beams arranged concentrically around a target chamber containing a compact moderator with a central sample cylinder. Fast neutron yield of ∼2 · 1010 n/s is created at the titanium surface of the target chamber. The thickness and material of the moderator is selected to maximize the thermal neutron flux at the center. The 2.5 MeV neutrons are quickly thermalized to energies below 0.5 eV and concentrated at the sample cylinder. The maximum flux of thermal neutrons at the target is achieved when approximately half of the neutrons at the sample area are thermalized. In this paper we present simulation results used to characterize performance of the neutron generator. The neutron flux can be used for neutron activation analysis (NAA) prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for determining the concentrations of elements in many materials. Another envisioned use of the generator is production of radioactive isotopes. DD110MB is small enough for modest-sized laboratories and universities. Compared to nuclear reactors the DD110MB produces comparable thermal flux but provides reduced administrative and safety requirements and it can be run in pulsed mode, which is beneficial in many neutron activation techniques.

  11. Total body nitrogen analysis. [neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of two potential in vivo neutron activation methods for determining total and partial body nitrogen in animals and humans are described. A method using the CO-11 in the expired air as a measure of nitrogen content was found to be adequate for small animals such as rats, but inadequate for human measurements due to a slow excretion rate. Studies on the method of measuring the induced N-13 in the body show that with further development, this method should be adequate for measuring muscle mass changes occurring in animals or humans during space flight.

  12. Neutron Generation Simulations of Collisionless Shock Experiments on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilks, S. C.; Higginson, D. P.; Weber, S. V.; Ryutov, D. D.; Ross, J. S.; Park, H.-S.; Fiuza, F.

    2015-11-01

    A series of simulations that model recent collisionless shock experiments at the NIF will be presented. In these experiments, two opposing CD plasmas flow into each other, both plasmas arising from lasers hitting planar CD targets separated by 6, 8, and 10mm. Where the plasma flows overlap, a symmetric peak of neutron generation was observed about the mid-plane. When one of the CD foils was replaced by CH, neutron generation was still observed, but with an asymmetry about the mid-plane. The hybrid PIC code LSP is used to model this interaction. Neutron yields, temporal profiles and burn widths obtained from simulation compare favorably with experimental measurements from NTOF and PTOF diagnostics. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675193.

  13. Search for reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grim, Gary; Rundberg, Robert; Tonchev, Anton; Fowler, Malcolm; Wilhelmy, Jerry; Archuleta, Tom; Bionta, Richard; Boswell, Mitzi; Gostic, Julie; Griego, Jeff; Knittel, Kenn; Klein, Andi; Moody, Ken; Shaughnessy, Dawn; Wilde, Carl; Yeamans, Charles

    2013-10-01

    We report on measurements of reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons at the National Ignition Facility. RIF neutrons are produced in cryogenically layered implision by up-scattered deuterium, or tritium ions that undergo subsequent fusion reactions. The rate of RIF neutron production is proportional to the fuel areal density (| | R) and ion-stopping length in the dense fuel assembly. Thus, RIF neutrons provide information on charge particle stopping in a strongly coupled plasma, where perturbative modeling breaks down. To measure RIF neutrons, a set of thulium activation foils was placed 50 cm from layered cryogenic implosions at the NIF. The reaction 169Tm(n,3n)167Tm has a neutron kinetic energy threshold of 14.96 MeV. We will present results from initial experiments performed during the spring of 2013. Prepared by LANL under Contract DE-AC-52-06-NA25396, TSPA, LA-UR-13-22085.

  14. Complete Monte Carlo Simulation of Neutron Scattering Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drosg, M.

    2011-12-01

    In the far past, it was not possible to accurately correct for the finite geometry and the finite sample size of a neutron scattering set-up. The limited calculation power of the ancient computers as well as the lack of powerful Monte Carlo codes and the limitation in the data base available then prevented a complete simulation of the actual experiment. Using e.g. the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNPX [1], neutron scattering experiments can be simulated almost completely with a high degree of precision using a modern PC, which has a computing power that is ten thousand times that of a super computer of the early 1970s. Thus, (better) corrections can also be obtained easily for previous published data provided that these experiments are sufficiently well documented. Better knowledge of reference data (e.g. atomic mass, relativistic correction, and monitor cross sections) further contributes to data improvement. Elastic neutron scattering experiments from liquid samples of the helium isotopes performed around 1970 at LANL happen to be very well documented. Considering that the cryogenic targets are expensive and complicated, it is certainly worthwhile to improve these data by correcting them using this comparatively straightforward method. As two thirds of all differential scattering cross section data of 3He(n,n)3He are connected to the LANL data, it became necessary to correct the dependent data measured in Karlsruhe, Germany, as well. A thorough simulation of both the LANL experiments and the Karlsruhe experiment is presented, starting from the neutron production, followed by the interaction in the air, the interaction with the cryostat structure, and finally the scattering medium itself. In addition, scattering from the hydrogen reference sample was simulated. For the LANL data, the multiple scattering corrections are smaller by a factor of five at least, making this work relevant. Even more important are the corrections to the Karlsruhe data due to the

  15. Neutron activation analysis in archaeological chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Harbottle, G.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis has proven to be a convenient way of performing the chemical analysis of archaeologically-excavated artifacts and materials. It is fast and does not require tedious laboratory operations. It is multielement, sensitive, and can be made nondestructive. Neutron activation analysis in its instrumental form, i.e., involving no chemical separation, is ideally suited to automation and conveniently takes the first step in data flow patterns that are appropriate for many taxonomic and statistical operations. The future will doubtless see improvements in the practice of NAA in general, but in connection with archaeological science the greatest change will be the filling, interchange and widespread use of data banks based on compilations of analytical data. Since provenience-oriented data banks deal with materials (obsidian, ceramics, metals, semiprecious stones, building materials and sculptural media) that participated in trade networks, the analytical data is certain to be of interest to a rather broad group of archaeologists. It is to meet the needs of the whole archaeological community that archaeological chemistry must now turn.

  16. A militarily fielded thermal neutron activation sensor for landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, E. T. H.; McFee, J. E.; Ing, H.; Andrews, H. R.; Tennant, D.; Harper, E.; Faust, A. A.

    2007-08-01

    The Canadian Department of National Defence has developed a teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multi-sensor system to detect anti-tank landmines on roads and tracks in peacekeeping operations. A key part of the system is a thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensor which is placed above a suspect location to within a 30 cm radius and confirms the presence of explosives via detection of the 10.835 MeV gamma ray associated with thermal neutron capture on 14N. The TNA uses a 100 μg252Cf neutron source surrounded by four 7.62 cm×7.62 cm NaI(Tl) detectors. The system, consisting of the TNA sensor head, including source, detectors and shielding, the high-rate, fast pulse processing electronics and the data processing methodology are described. Results of experiments to characterize detection performance are also described. The experiments have shown that anti-tank mines buried 10 cm or less can be detected in roughly a minute or less, but deeper mines and mines significantly displaced horizontally take considerably longer time. Mines as deep as 30 cm can be detected for long count times (1000 s). Four TNA detectors are now in service with the Canadian Forces as part of the four multi-sensor systems, making it the first militarily fielded TNA sensor and the first militarily fielded confirmation sensor for landmines. The ability to function well in adverse climatic conditions has been demonstrated, both in trials and operations.

  17. Coincidence Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. gandner; C.W. Mayo; W.A. Metwally; W. Zhang; W. Guo; A. Shehata

    2002-11-10

    The normal prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis for either bulk or small beam samples inherently has a small signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio due primarily to the neutron source being present while the sample signal is being obtained. Coincidence counting offers the possibility of greatly reducing or eliminating the noise generated by the neutron source. The present report presents our results to date on implementing the coincidence counting PGNAA approach. We conclude that coincidence PGNAA yields: (1) a larger signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, (2) more information (and therefore better accuracy) from essentially the same experiment when sophisticated coincidence electronics are used that can yield singles and coincidences simultaneously, and (3) a reduced (one or two orders of magnitude) signal from essentially the same experiment. In future work we will concentrate on: (1) modifying the existing CEARPGS Monte Carlo code to incorporate coincidence counting, (2) obtaining coincidence schemes for 18 or 20 of the common elements in coal and cement, and (3) optimizing the design of a PGNAA coincidence system for the bulk analysis of coal.

  18. Large Searching for Higher Dimensional Gravity with Neutron Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Alejandro

    2007-10-26

    N-dimensional gravity is analized in the context of recent work on 'large' supplementary dimensions. A simple derivation of the compactification radii for additional dimensions in the universe is made, as a function of the Planck and the electro-weak scales. It is argued that the modified gravitational force would give rise to effects that might be within the detection range of dedicated neutron experiments. An analysis suggests that neutron scattering off atomic nuclei with null spin may provide an experimental test for these ideas.

  19. ASIC for Small Angle Neutron Scattering Experiments at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Fried, Jack; Smith, Graham C.; Yu, Bo; Vernon, Emerson; Britton, Charles L.; Bryan, William L.; Clonts, Lloyd G.; Frank, Shane S.

    2007-06-01

    We present an ASIC for a 3He gas detector to be used in small angle neutron scattering experiments at the spallation neutron source in oak ridge. The ASIC is composed of 64 channels with low noise charge amplification, filtering, timing and amplitude measurement circuits, where an innovative current-mode peak-detector and digitizer (PDAD) is adopted. The proposed PDAD provides at the same time peak detection and A/D conversion in real time, at low power, and without requiring a clock signal. The channels share an efficient data sparsification and derandomization scheme, a 30-bit 256 deep FIFO, and low voltage differential signaling.

  20. Diffusion cooling of thermal neutrons in basic rock minerals by Monte Carlo simulation of the pulsed neutron experiments.

    PubMed

    Drozdowicz, K; Krynicka, E; Dabrowska, J

    2003-06-01

    The pulsed neutron experiment (the variable geometric buckling experiment) in spherical geometry has been simulated using the MCNP code. The time decay of the thermal neutron flux has been observed as a function of the sample size. The thermal neutron diffusion cooling coefficient C with the correction F has been determined for three basic rock minerals (quartz, calcite, dolomite) at the given specific densities. The corresponding density-removed parameters have also been obtained.

  1. Magnetic Field R&D for the neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammei, Russell R.

    2014-09-01

    The neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF aims to constrain the EDM with a precision of 1 ×10-27 e-cm by 2018. The experiment will use a spallation ultracold neutron (UCN) source employing superfluid helium coupled to a room-temperature EDM apparatus. In the previous best experiment, conducted at ILL, effects related to magnetic field homogeneity and instability were found to dominate the systematic error. This presentation will cover our R&D efforts on passive and active magnetic shielding, magnetic field generation within shielded volumes, and precision magnetometry. The neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF aims to constrain the EDM with a precision of 1 ×10-27 e-cm by 2018. The experiment will use a spallation ultracold neutron (UCN) source employing superfluid helium coupled to a room-temperature EDM apparatus. In the previous best experiment, conducted at ILL, effects related to magnetic field homogeneity and instability were found to dominate the systematic error. This presentation will cover our R&D efforts on passive and active magnetic shielding, magnetic field generation within shielded volumes, and precision magnetometry. Supported by the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and the Canada Research Chairs program.

  2. Chemical weapons detection by fast neutron activation analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, P.; Ma, J. L.; Froment, D.; Jaureguy, J. C.

    1993-06-01

    A neutron diagnostic experimental apparatus has been tested for nondestructive verification of sealed munitions. Designed to potentially satisfy a significant number of van-mobile requirements, this equipment is based on an easy to use industrial sealed tube neutron generator that interrogates the munitions of interest with 14 MeV neutrons. Gamma ray spectra are detected with a high purity germanium detector, especially shielded from neutrons and gamma ray background. A mobile shell holder has been used. Possible configurations allow the detection, in continuous or in pulsed modes, of gamma rays from neutron inelastic scattering, from thermal neutron capture, and from fast or thermal neutron activation. Tests on full scale sealed munitions with chemical simulants show that those with chlorine (old generation materials) are detectable in a few minutes, and those including phosphorus (new generation materials) in nearly the same time.

  3. Maximizing Macromolecule Crystal Size for Neutron Diffraction Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, R. A.; Kephart, R.; Leardi, R.; Myles, D. A.; Snell, E. H.; vanderWoerd, M.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A challenge in neutron diffraction experiments is growing large (greater than 1 cu mm) macromolecule crystals. In taking up this challenge we have used statistical experiment design techniques to quickly identify crystallization conditions under which the largest crystals grow. These techniques provide the maximum information for minimal experimental effort, allowing optimal screening of crystallization variables in a simple experimental matrix, using the minimum amount of sample. Analysis of the results quickly tells the investigator what conditions are the most important for the crystallization. These can then be used to maximize the crystallization results in terms of reducing crystal numbers and providing large crystals of suitable habit. We have used these techniques to grow large crystals of Glucose isomerase. Glucose isomerase is an industrial enzyme used extensively in the food industry for the conversion of glucose to fructose. The aim of this study is the elucidation of the enzymatic mechanism at the molecular level. The accurate determination of hydrogen positions, which is critical for this, is a requirement that neutron diffraction is uniquely suited for. Preliminary neutron diffraction experiments with these crystals conducted at the Institute Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France) reveal diffraction to beyond 2.5 angstrom. Macromolecular crystal growth is a process involving many parameters, and statistical experimental design is naturally suited to this field. These techniques are sample independent and provide an experimental strategy to maximize crystal volume and habit for neutron diffraction studies.

  4. Maximizing Macromolecule Crystal Size for Neutron Diffraction Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, R. A.; Kephart, R.; Leardi, R.; Myles, D. A.; Snell, E. H.; vanderWoerd, M.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A challenge in neutron diffraction experiments is growing large (greater than 1 cu mm) macromolecule crystals. In taking up this challenge we have used statistical experiment design techniques to quickly identify crystallization conditions under which the largest crystals grow. These techniques provide the maximum information for minimal experimental effort, allowing optimal screening of crystallization variables in a simple experimental matrix, using the minimum amount of sample. Analysis of the results quickly tells the investigator what conditions are the most important for the crystallization. These can then be used to maximize the crystallization results in terms of reducing crystal numbers and providing large crystals of suitable habit. We have used these techniques to grow large crystals of Glucose isomerase. Glucose isomerase is an industrial enzyme used extensively in the food industry for the conversion of glucose to fructose. The aim of this study is the elucidation of the enzymatic mechanism at the molecular level. The accurate determination of hydrogen positions, which is critical for this, is a requirement that neutron diffraction is uniquely suited for. Preliminary neutron diffraction experiments with these crystals conducted at the Institute Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France) reveal diffraction to beyond 2.5 angstrom. Macromolecular crystal growth is a process involving many parameters, and statistical experimental design is naturally suited to this field. These techniques are sample independent and provide an experimental strategy to maximize crystal volume and habit for neutron diffraction studies.

  5. A new instrument for activation analysis - The cold neutron irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.D.; Hossain, T.Z. )

    1993-01-01

    As part of a program of developing analytical applications of cold neutrons, the authors are undertaking optimization studies of a novel design that exploits the combination of the superior analytical properties of cold neutrons with the simplicity and portability of isotopic neutron sources such as [sup 252]Cf. The basic concept is simple: The capabilities of the usual design in which the neutron source is surrounded with a moderator block with access ports and throughports can be enhanced by cooling the moderator to cryogenic temperatures. A proposed name for the device, which is suitable for both neutron activation analysis (NAA) and prompt gamma NAA (PGNAA), is the cold neutron irradiator (CNI). Results from initial scoping studies are summarized. Comparisons are primarily with a room temperature isotopic source and in some respects with thermal reactors. The most obvious advantage is that neutron reaction cross sections, being proportional to 1/v, are, for example, more than eight times larger for cold neutrons corresponding to the temperature of liquid helium than for room temperature neutrons. Cold neutrons are more readily collimated, guided, focused, filtered, and shielded than thermal neutrons. It is therefore easier to achieve a low ambient gamma-ray background and to decrease the distances between source, sample, and detector to obtain further increases in counting rates or to tailor the geometry to suit differing experimental requirements.

  6. Arrangement of high-energy neutron irradiation field and shielding experiment using 4 m concrete at KENS.

    PubMed

    Nakao, N; Yashima, H; Kawai, M; Oishi, K; Nakashima, H; Masumoto, K; Matsumura, H; Sasaki, S; Numajiri, M; Sanami, T; Wang, Q; Toyoda, A; Takahashi, K; Iijima, K; Eda, K; Ban, S; Hirayama, H; Muto, S; Nunomiya, T; Yonai, S; Rasolonjatovo, D R H; Terunuma, K; Yamauchi, K; Sarkar, P K; Kim, E; Nakamura, T; Maruhashi, A

    2005-01-01

    An irradiation field of high-energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from a thick tungsten target bombarded by 500 MeV protons was arranged at the KENS spallation neutron source facility. In this facility, shielding experiment was performed with an ordinary concrete shield of 4 m thickness assembled in the irradiation room, 2.5 m downstream from the target centre. Activation detectors of bismuth, aluminium, indium and gold were inserted into eight slots inside the shield and attenuations of neutron reaction rates were obtained by measurements of gamma-rays from the activation detectors. A MARS14 Monte Carlo simulation was also performed down to thermal energy, and comparisons between the calculations and measurements show agreements within a factor of 3. This neutron field is useful for studies of shielding, activation and radiation damage of materials for high-energy neutrons, and experimental data are useful to check the accuracies of the transmission and activation calculation codes.

  7. Experimental neutronics tests for a neutron activation system for the European ITER TBM

    SciTech Connect

    Klix, A.; Fischer, U.; Gehre, D.; Kleizer, G.; Raj, P.; Rovni, I.; Ruecker, Tom

    2014-08-21

    We are investigating methods for neutron flux measurement in the ITER TBM. In particular we have tested sets of activation materials leading to induced gamma activities with short half-lives of the order of tens of seconds up to minutes and standard activation materials. Packages of activation foils have been irradiated with the intense neutron generator of Technical University of Dresden in a pure DT neutron field as well as in a neutronics mock-up of the European ITER HCLL TBM. An important aim was to check whether the gamma activity induced in the activation foils in these packages could be measured simultaneously. It was indeed possible to identify gamma lines of interest in gamma-ray measurements immediately after extraction from the irradiation.

  8. Neutron-activation analysis for thorium in zircon.

    PubMed

    Desai, H B; Parthasarathy, R; Das, M S

    1972-03-01

    The thorium content of zircons and standard rock samples was determined by neutron-activation analysis. The 310-keV photopeak activity of (233)Pa was enhanced by a prior chemical separation which removed interfering induced activities.

  9. Measurement cell development for the neutron EDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. C.; Clayton, S. M.; Cooper, M. D.; Currie, S. A.; Ito, T. M.; Makela, M. F.; Ramsey, J. C.; Saunders, A.

    2012-10-01

    An experimental search for the neutron electric dipole moment is under development for installation at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source. The experiment will use ultracold neutrons (UCN) produced in superfluid helium, along with ^3He that will act as a neutron spin analyzer and comagnetometer. The measurement will take place in two 3-liter rectangular acrylic cells coated with deuterated tetraphenyl butadiene (dTPB) in a deuterated polystyrene (dPS) matrix. It is crucial for the ultimate sensitivity of the experiment that UCN survive many (˜10^5) wall collisions without being lost. We are currently testing the UCN storage properties of dPS+dTPB coated acrylic cells at the LANSCE solid deuterium UCN source. The test cell is filled with UCN through a 1 cm diameter opening, sealed with a valve carefully designed to have very low UCN losses, and then after waiting for between 20-1000 seconds the valve is opened and the remaining UCN are counted. Measurements are carried out from room temperature to below 20 K to determine the temperature dependence of the UCN wall losses. We will discuss cell construction techniques and present recent UCN storage measurements. This work is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy.

  10. Neutron activation analysis at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Smith, E.H.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Marsh, D.L.; Zhao, L.

    1997-12-01

    The Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science has been established to provide {sup 252}Cf-based neutron irradiation services and research capabilities including neutron activation analysis (NAA). A major advantage of the CUF is its accessibility and controlled experimental conditions compared with those of a reactor environment The CUF maintains the world`s largest inventory of compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources. Neutron source intensities of {le} 10{sup 11} neutrons/s are available for irradiations within a contamination-free hot cell, capable of providing thermal and fast neutron fluxes exceeding 10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} at the sample. Total flux of {ge}10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} is feasible for large-volume irradiation rabbits within the {sup 252}Cf storage pool. Neutron and gamma transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP to estimate irradiation fluxes available for sample activation within the hot cell and storage pool and to design and optimize a prompt gamma NAA (PGNAA) configuration for large sample volumes. Confirmatory NAA irradiations have been performed within the pool. Gamma spectroscopy capabilities including PGNAA are being established within the CUF for sample analysis.

  11. Layered shielding design for an active neutron interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    The use of source and detector shields in active neutron interrogation can improve detector signal. In simulations, a shielded detector with a source rotated π/3 rad relative to the opening decreased neutron flux roughly three orders of magnitude. Several realistic source and detector shield configurations were simulated. A layered design reduced neutron and secondary photon flux in the detector by approximately one order of magnitude for a deuterium-tritium source. The shield arrangement can be adapted for a portable, modular design.

  12. Precision Neutron Decay Studies with the Nab and UCNB Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprow, Aaron; Nab Collaboration; UCNB Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Precision neutron decay correlation experiments are a sensitive means to study the standard model and probe for beyond the standard model physics. Nab and UCNB are two such experiments that will measure the neutrino-electron correlation term, a, and the neutrino asymmetry, B, respectively. Thick, highly-segmented silicon detectors will be used to directly measure the proton and electron from each decay event in coincidence, leading to the extraction of these angular correlations. Preliminary work to understand the systematic uncertainties associated with these experiments, as well as the early analysis of data taken from the 2015-2016 beam time at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be presented.

  13. Target Operational Experience at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Janney, Jim G; Kaminskas, Saulius; McClintock, David A; Rosenblad, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has operated at unprecedented power levels for a short-pulse spallation source. Target operations have been successful but not without difficulties. Three targets out of the eight used to date have ended life unexpectedly causing interruptions to the neutron science users. The first of a kind mercury target design experiences beam-pulse induced cavitation damage that is suspected in one of the target leaks. The two other targets suffered early failures due to defective welds. Diagnosing the causes of target leaks and understanding of the progression of cavitation erosion and radiation damage effects has made use of post-irradiation examination (PIE) capabilities. As a result of PIE, review of quality assurance practices and related investigations, design changes are being implemented and manufacturing oversight improved. This paper describes SNS target operating experience, including the more important observations and lessons learned.

  14. A dosimetry study of deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowers, Daniel A.

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator which produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 x 108 +/-30% s-1. A moderator/reflector/shielding (5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite & 5.7 cm borated HDPE) assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and photon dose by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10 min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 +/- 0.8 mSv for neutron and 4.2 +/- 0.2 mSv for photon for 10 mins; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  15. A Dosimetry Study of Deuterium-Deuterium Neutron Generator-based In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Daniel; Liu, Yingzi; Mostafaei, Farshad; Blake, Scott; Nie, Linda H

    2015-12-01

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator that produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 × 10(8) ± 30% s(-1). A moderator/reflector/shielding [5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite and 5.7 cm borated (HDPE)] assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeters (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and the photon dose was measured by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10-min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 ± 0.8 mSv for neutrons and 4.2 ± 0.2 mSv for photons for 10 min; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  16. Active Neutron Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2009-05-01

    Portable electronic neutron generators (ENGs) may be used to interrogate suspicious items to detect, characterize, and quantify the presence fissionable material based upon the measurement of prompt and/or delayed emissions of neutrons and/or photons resulting from fission. The small size (<0.2 m3), light weight (<12 kg), and low power consumption (<50 W) of modern ENGs makes them ideally suited for use in field situations, incorporated into systems carried by 2-3 individuals under rugged conditions. At Idaho National Laboratory we are investigating techniques and portable equipment for performing active neutron interrogation of moderate sized objects less than ~2-4 m3 to detect shielded fissionable material. Our research in this area relies upon the use of pulsed deuterium-tritium ENGs and the measurement of die-away prompt fission neutrons and other neutron signatures in-between neutron pulses from the ENG and after the ENG is turned off.

  17. Criticality experiments to provide benchmark data on neutron flux traps

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, S.R.

    1988-06-01

    The experimental measurements covered by this report were designed to provide benchmark type data on water moderated LWR type fuel arrays containing neutron flux traps. The experiments were performed at the US Department of Energy Hanford Critical Mass Laboratory, operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The experimental assemblies consisted of 2 /times/ 2 arrays of 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel rods, uniformly arranged in water on a 1.891 cm square center-to-center spacing. Neutron flux traps were created between the fuel units using metal plates containing varying amounts of boron. Measurements were made to determine the effect that boron loading and distance between the fuel and flux trap had on the amount of fuel required for criticality. Also, measurements were made, using the pulse neutron source technique, to determine the effect of boron loading on the effective neutron multiplications constant. On two assemblies, reaction rate measurements were made using solid state track recorders to determine absolute fission rates in /sup 235/U and /sup 238/U. 14 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Determining Absolute Polarization of Ultracold Neutrons in the UCNA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dees, Eric; UCNA Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The UCNA experiment uses the decay of trapped ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure the angular correlation A between the emitted electron's momentum and the direction of the neutron's spin. For a precision measurement of A, a similarly precise determination of the equilibrium neutron polarization is required. By utilizing UCN, transport through a large (7T) B field provides 100 % polarization, and a spin flipper allows state selection during loading phases. This spin flipper also measures the equilibrium polarization of the UCN population present in the spectrometer, after each hour-long beta-counting cycle. By including a neutron reflecting shutter the leading uncertainty in polarimetry measurements prior to 2011, resulting from the residual background population, was reduced to near zero. However, this modification also introduces new systematic corrections, requiring new run types to quantify. Among these corrections are effects from the spin flipper efficiency, spectral velocity conditioning, and depolarization feeding. We will review the analytic underpinning for these contributions, discuss additional measurements required to quantify these parameters, and present a Monte-Carlo analysis to determine the corrected depolarized fraction, and associated uncertainty. Supported by NSF and DOE.

  19. Measurement cells of the Spallation Neutron Source neutron Electric Dipole Moment experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Kent; SNS nEDM Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) neutron Electric Dipole Moment (nEDM) experiment will use 3 L rectangular measurement cells filled with superfluid helium at 0.3 - 0.5 K with a 10-10 fraction of polarized 3He. These cells are made from 0.5 in thick PMMA plates, coated with a mixture of deuterated polystyrene and deuterated tetraphenyl butadiene and then glued together with deuterated acrylic cement. The experiment requires the cells to be: non-magnetic, non-conducting, fluorescent at the inner surface for VUV photons, optically transparent, cryogenic-friendly, polarized 3He friendly, and have long ultracold neutron (UCN) storage times. The successful production of full-sized cells and how these cells address each of the above requirements, will be presented. Focus will be given on recent UCN storage tests of several cells measured between 90 K to 20 K. These results demonstrate the cryogenic robustness of these cells and UCN loss f-factors of 2 ×10-5 , better than beryllium at low temperatures. A previous problem of gaps or uncovered patches exposed on the inside of the cell has been resolved. Exploratory work on new polymer coatings that could improve our cells further will also be presented. DE-FG02-97ER41042.

  20. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of sectioned hair strands for arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Guinn, V.P.

    1996-12-31

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) is a valuable and proven method for the quantitative analysis of sectioned human head hair specimens for arsenic - and, if arsenic is found to be present at high concentrations, the approximate times when it was ingested. Reactor-flux thermal-neutron activation of the hair samples produces 26.3-h {sup 76}As, which is then detected by germanium gamma-ray spectrometry, measuring the 559.1-keV gamma-ray peak of {sup 76}As. Even normal levels of arsenic in hair, in the range of <1 ppm up to a few parts per million of arsenic can be measured - and the far higher levels associated with large internal doses of arsenic, levels approaching or exceeding 100 ppm arsenic, are readily and accurately measurable. However, all phases of forensic investigations of possible chronic (or in some cases, acute) arsenic poisoning are important, i.e., not just the analysis phase. All of these phases are discussed in this paper, based on the author`s experience and the experience of others, in criminal cases. Cases of chronic arsenic poisoning often reveal a series of two to four doses, perhaps a few months apart, with increasing doses.

  1. Complete Monte Carlo Simulation of Neutron Scattering Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Drosg, M.

    2011-12-13

    In the far past, it was not possible to accurately correct for the finite geometry and the finite sample size of a neutron scattering set-up. The limited calculation power of the ancient computers as well as the lack of powerful Monte Carlo codes and the limitation in the data base available then prevented a complete simulation of the actual experiment. Using e.g. the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNPX [1], neutron scattering experiments can be simulated almost completely with a high degree of precision using a modern PC, which has a computing power that is ten thousand times that of a super computer of the early 1970s. Thus, (better) corrections can also be obtained easily for previous published data provided that these experiments are sufficiently well documented. Better knowledge of reference data (e.g. atomic mass, relativistic correction, and monitor cross sections) further contributes to data improvement. Elastic neutron scattering experiments from liquid samples of the helium isotopes performed around 1970 at LANL happen to be very well documented. Considering that the cryogenic targets are expensive and complicated, it is certainly worthwhile to improve these data by correcting them using this comparatively straightforward method. As two thirds of all differential scattering cross section data of {sup 3}He(n,n){sup 3}He are connected to the LANL data, it became necessary to correct the dependent data measured in Karlsruhe, Germany, as well. A thorough simulation of both the LANL experiments and the Karlsruhe experiment is presented, starting from the neutron production, followed by the interaction in the air, the interaction with the cryostat structure, and finally the scattering medium itself. In addition, scattering from the hydrogen reference sample was simulated. For the LANL data, the multiple scattering corrections are smaller by a factor of five at least, making this work relevant. Even more important are the corrections to the Karlsruhe data

  2. In-situ soil composition and moisture measurement by surface neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waring, C.; Smith, C.; Marks, A.

    2009-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis is widely known as a laboratory technique dependent upon a nuclear reactor to provide the neutron flux and capable of precise elemental analysis. Less well known in-situ geochemical analysis is possible with isotopic (252Cf & 241Am) or compact accelerator (D-T, D-D fusion reaction) neutron sources. Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) geophysical borehole logging has been applied to mining issues for >15 years (CSIRO) using isotopic neutron sources and more recently to environmental and hydro-geological applications by ANSTO. Similarly, sophisticated geophysical borehole logging equipment based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS) has been applied in the oil and gas industry by large oilfield services companies to measure oil saturation indices (carbon/oxygen) using accelerator neutron sources. Recent advances in scintillation detector spectral performance has enabled improved precision and detection limits for elements likely to be present in soil profiles (H, Si, Al, Fe, Cl) and possible detection of many minor to trace elements if sufficiently abundant (Na, K, Mg, Ca, S, N, + ). To measure carbon an accelerator neutron source is required to provide fast neutrons above 4.8 MeV. CSIRO and ANSTO propose building a soil geochemical analysis system based on experience gained from building and applying PGNA borehole logging equipment. A soil geochemical analysis system could effectively map the 2D geochemical composition of the top 50cm of soil by dragging the 1D logging equipment across the ground surface. Substituting an isotopic neutron source for a D-T accelerator neutron source would enable the additional measurement of elemental carbon. Many potential ambiguities with other geophysical proxies for soil moisture may be resolved by direct geochemical measurement of H. Many other applications may be possible including time series in-situ measurements of soil moisture for differential drainage, hydrology, land surface

  3. Activities on Nuclear Data Measurements at Pohang Neutron Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Guinyun

    2009-03-01

    We report the activities of the Pohang Neutron Facility which consists of an electron linear accelerator, a water-cooled Ta target, and a 12-m time-of-flight path. It has been equipped with a four-position sample changer controlled remotely by a CAMAC data acquisition system, which allows simultaneous accumulation of the neutron time of flight spectra from 4 different detectors. It can be possible to measure the neutron total cross-sections in the neutron energy range from 0.1 eV to few hundreds eV by using the neutron time-of-flight method. A 6LiZnS(Ag) glass scintillator was used as a neutron detector. The neutron flight path from the water-cooled Ta target to the neutron detector was 12.1 m. The background level was determined by using notch-filters of Co, In, Ta, and Cd sheets. In order to reduce the gamma rays from bremsstrahlung and those from neutron capture, we employed a neutron-gamma separation system based on their different pulse shapes. The present measurements of several samples (Ta, Mo) are in general agreement with the evaluated data in ENDF/B-VI. We measured the thermal neutron capture cross-sections and the resonance integrals of the 186W(n,γ)187W reaction and the 98Mo(n,γ)99Mo reaction by the activation method using the 197Au(n,γ)198Au monitor reaction as a single comparator. We also report the isomeric yield ratios for the 44 m, gSc isomeric pairs produced from four different photonuclear reactions 45Sc(γ,n)44m,gSc, natTi(γ,xn1p)44m,gSc, natFe(γ,xn5p)52m,gMn, and 103Rh(γ,4n)99m,gRh by using the activation method.

  4. Neutron activation analysis of some building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salagean, M. N.; Pantelica, A. I.; Georgescu, I. I.; Muntean, M. I.

    1999-01-01

    Concentrations of As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mo, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sr, Ta, Tb, Th, U. Yb, W and Zn in seven Romanian building materials were determined by the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) method using the VVR-S Reactor of NIPNE- Bucharest. Raw matarials used in cement obtaining ≈ 75% of limestone and ≈ 25% of clay, cement samples from three different factories, furnace slag, phosphogypsum, and a type of brick have been analyzed. The brick was compacted from furnace slay, fly coal ash, phosphogypsum, lime and cement. The U, Th and K concentrations determined in the brick are in agreement with the natural radioactivity measurements of226Ra,232Th and40K. These specific activities were found about twice and 1.5 higher than the accepted levels in the case of226Ra and232Th, as well as40K, respectively. By consequence, the investigated brick is considered a radioactive waste. The rather high content of Co, Cr, K, Th, and Zh in the brick is especially due to the slag and fly ash, the main componets. The presence of U, Th and K in slag is mainly correlated with the limestone and dolomite as fluxes in matallurgy.

  5. Thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for large sample instrumental neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzika, F.; Stamatelatos, I. E.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal neutron self-shielding within large samples was studied using the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. The code enabled a three-dimensional modeling of the actual source and geometry configuration including reactor core, graphite pile and sample. Neutron flux self-shielding correction factors derived for a set of materials of interest for large sample neutron activation analysis are presented and evaluated. Simulations were experimentally verified by measurements performed using activation foils. The results of this study can be applied in order to determine neutron self-shielding factors of unknown samples from the thermal neutron fluxes measured at the surface of the sample.

  6. The synchronous active neutron detection system for spent fuel assay

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-10-01

    The authors have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit the unique operating features of a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. This generator and a novel detection system will be applied to the direct measurement of the fissile material content in spent fuel in place of the indirect measures used at present. The technique they are investigating is termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND). It closely follows a method that has been used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in the presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed {open_quotes}lock-in{close_quotes} amplifiers. The authors have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. This approach is possible because the Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. The results to date are preliminary but quite promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly. It also appears to be quite resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be nonthermal and penetrating. Although a significant amount of work remains to fully explore the relevant physics and optimize the instrument design, the underlying concept appears sound.

  7. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ∼2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner∼1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  8. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Gomez, M. R.; Slutz, S.; Sefkow, A. B.; Sinars, D. B.; Hansen, S. B.; Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Awe, T. J.; Geissel, M.; Rovang, D. C.; Torres, J. A.; Bur, J. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Glebov, V. Yu; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Herrman, M. C.; Hess, M. H.; Johns, O.; Jones, B.; Lamppa, D. C.; Lash, J. S.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K. J.; Porter, J. L.; Reneker, J.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Smith, I. C.; Styron, J. D.; Vesey, R. A.

    2016-05-26

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ~2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner ~ 1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Furthermore, plans to improve and expand the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.

  9. SWAN - Detection of explosives by means of fast neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierlik, M.; Borsuk, S.; Guzik, Z.; Iwanowska, J.; Kaźmierczak, Ł.; Korolczuk, S.; Kozłowski, T.; Krakowski, T.; Marcinkowski, R.; Swiderski, L.; Szeptycka, M.; Szewiński, J.; Urban, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we report on SWAN, the experimental, portable device for explosives detection. The device was created as part of the EU Structural Funds Project "Accelerators & Detectors" (POIG.01.01.02-14-012/08-00), with the goal to increase beneficiary's expertise and competencies in the field of neutron activation analysis. Previous experiences and budged limitations lead toward a less advanced design based on fast neutron interactions and unsophisticated data analysis with the emphasis on the latest gamma detection and spectrometry solutions. The final device has been designed as a portable, fast neutron activation analyzer, with the software optimized for detection of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. SWAN's performance in the role of explosives detector is elaborated in this paper. We demonstrate that the unique features offered by neutron activation analysis might not be impressive enough when confronted with practical demands and expectations of a generic homeland security customer.

  10. Using Electronic Neutron Generators in Active Interrogation to Detect Shielded Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2008-10-01

    Experiments have been performed at Idaho National Laboratory to study methodology and instrumentation for performing neutron active interrogation die-away analyses for the purpose of detecting shielded fissionable material. Here we report initial work using a portable DT electronic neutron generator with a He-3 fast neutron detector to detect shielded fissionable material including >2 kg quantities of enriched uranium and plutonium. Measurements have been taken of bare material as well as of material hidden within a large plywood cube. Results from this work have demonstrated the efficacy of the die-away neutron measurement technique for quickly detecting the presence of special nuclear material hidden within plywood shields by analyzing the time dependent neutron signals in-between neutron generator pulses. Using a DT electronic neutron generator operating at 300 Hz with a yield of approximately 0.36 x 10**8 neutrons per second, 2.2 kg of enriched uranium hidden within a 0.60 m x 0.60 m x 0.70 m volume of plywood was positively detected with a measurement signal 2-sigma above the passive background within 1 second. Similarly, for a 500 second measurement period a lower detection limit of approaching the gram level could be expected with the same simple set-up.

  11. Industrial Materials Characterization Using Neutron Activation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    S. Yusuf; W. Rigot; M. Buchmann; T. Quinn

    2000-06-04

    For more than 30 yr now, we have applied neutron activation analysis (NAA) in material characterization by stressing the fundamentals, namely, understanding the nuclear reactions, characterizing the irradiation facility, and establishing a stable counting system. When these three aspects are treated properly, then Eq. (1), A{sub 0} = {lambda}Ce{sup {lambda}t{sub 1}}/(1-e{sup -{lambda}{Delta}})(1-e{sup {lambda}{tau}})={epsilon}{gamma}({theta}mN{sub A}/M){integral}{sub E=0}{sup E={infinity}}{Phi}(E){sigma}(E)dE, is applicable with negligible errors. The quantities in Eq. (1) are all known except for the quantities under the integral and the counting efficiency. It is the treatment of the integral in Eq. (1) that raises a question and is the topic in numerous theses. The object of this paper is to show how the shape-independent approach can be used to cut down time and cost of analysis without compromising accuracy.

  12. Neutrons and Granite: Transport and Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bedrossian, P J

    2004-04-13

    In typical ground materials, both energy deposition and radionuclide production by energetic neutrons vary with the incident particle energy in a non-monotonic way. We describe the overall balance of nuclear reactions involving neutrons impinging on granite to demonstrate these energy-dependencies. While granite is a useful surrogate for a broad range of soil and rock types, the incorporation of small amounts of water (hydrogen) does alter the balance of nuclear reactions.

  13. Neutron Polarization Measurements with a 3He Spin Filter for the NPDGamma Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musgrave, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    The Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FNPB) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) provides a pulsed beam of polarized cold neutrons for the NPDGamma experiment which intends to measure the parity violating asymmetry in the emitted gamma rays from the capture of polarized neutrons on protons in a para-hydrogen target. The neutrons are polarized by a multi-channel super mirror polarizer, and the polarization of each neutron pulse can be flipped with an RF spin rotator. The accuracy of the NPDGamma experiment and various commissioning experiments is dependent on the polarization of the neutron beam and the efficiency of the RF spin rotator. These parameters are measured with a polarized 3He spin filter at multiple points in the beam cross section and with multiple 3He polarizations. The measured neutron polarization is compared to a McStas model to validate our results and our beam averaging technique. The analysis methods, background effects, and results will be discussed.

  14. Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dolinski, Michelle Jean

    2008-10-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0vDBD) is a lepton-number violating process that can occur only for a massive Majorana neutrino. The search for 0vDBD is currently the only practical experimental way to determine whether neutrinos are identical to their own antiparticles (Majorana neutrinos) or have distinct particle and anti-particle states (Dirac neutrinos). In addition, the observation of 0vDBD can provide information about the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The Cuoricino experiment was a sensitive search for 0vDBD, as well as a proof of principle for the next generation experiment, CUORE. CUORE will search for 0vDBD of 130Te with a ton-scale array of unenriched TeO2 bolometers. By increasing mass and decreasing the background for 0vDBD, the half-life sensitivity of CUORE will be a factor of twenty better than that of Cuoricino. The site for both of these experiments is the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, an underground laboratory with 3300 meters water equivalent rock overburden and a cosmic ray muon attenuation factor of 10-6. Because of the extreme low background requirements for CUORE, it is important that all potential sources of background in the 0vDBD peak region at 2530 keV are well understood. One potential source of background for CUORE comes from neutrons, which can be produced underground both by (α,n) reactions and by fast cosmic ray muon interactions. Preliminary simulations by the CUORE collaboration indicate that these backgrounds will be negligible for CUORE. However, in order to accurately simulate the expected neutron background, it is important to understand the cross sections for neutron interactions with detector materials. In order to help refine these simulations, I have measured the gamma-ray production cross sections for interactions of neutrons on the abundant stable isotopes of Te using the GEANIE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. In addition, I have used the GEANIE

  15. Thermal neutron imaging in an active interrogation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier,P.E.; Forman, L., and Norman, D.R.

    2009-03-10

    We have developed a thermal-neutron coded-aperture imager that reveals the locations of hydrogenous materials from which thermal neutrons are being emitted. This imaging detector can be combined with an accelerator to form an active interrogation system in which fast neutrons are produced in a heavy metal target by means of xcitation by high energy photons. The photo-induced neutrons can be either prompt or delayed, depending on whether neutronemitting fission products are generated. Provided that there are hydrogenous materials close to the target, some of the photo-induced neutrons slow down and emerge from the surface at thermal energies. These neutrons can be used to create images that show the location and shape of the thermalizing materials. Analysis of the temporal response of the neutron flux provides information about delayed neutrons from induced fission if there are fissionable materials in the target. The combination of imaging and time-of-flight discrimination helps to improve the signal-to-background ratio. It is also possible to interrogate the target with neutrons, for example using a D-T generator. In this case, an image can be obtained from hydrogenous material in a target without the presence of heavy metal. In addition, if fissionable material is present in the target, probing with fast neutrons can stimulate delayed neutrons from fission, and the imager can detect and locate the object of interest, using appropriate time gating. Operation of this sensitive detection equipment in the vicinity of an accelerator presents a number of challenges, because the accelerator emits electromagnetic interference as well as stray ionizing radiation, which can mask the signals of interest.

  16. Determination of neutron energy spectrum at KAMINI shielding experiment location.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sujoy; Bagchi, Subhrojit; Prasad, R R; Venkatasubramanian, D; Mohanakrishnan, P; Keshavamurty, R S; Haridas, Adish; Arul, A John; Puthiyavinayagam, P

    2016-09-01

    The neutron spectrum at KAMINI reactor south beam tube end has been determined using multifoil activation method. This beam tube is being used for characterizing neutron attenuation of novel shield materials. Starting from a computed guess spectrum, the spectrum adjustment/unfolding procedure makes use of minimization of a modified constraint function representing (a) least squared deviations between the measured and calculated reaction rates, (b) a measure of sharp fluctuations in the adjusted spectrum and (c) the square of the deviation of adjusted spectrum from the guess spectrum. The adjusted/unfolded spectrum predicts the reaction rates accurately. The results of this new procedure are compared with those of widely used SAND-II code.

  17. Neutron activation studies and the effect of exercise on osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    A technique is described to measure calcium content by in vivo neutron activation analysis of the trunk and upper thighs. In postmenopausal women, estrogen and calcium or fluoride reversed osteoporosis.

  18. Neutron-activation analysis applied to copper ores and artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linder, N. F.

    1970-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis is used for quantitative identification of trace metals in copper. Establishing a unique fingerprint of impurities in Michigan copper would enable identification of artifacts made from this copper.

  19. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Multivariate Statistics for Pottery Provenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glascock, M. D.; Neff, H.; Vaughn, K. J.

    2004-06-01

    The application of instrumental neutron activation analysis and multivariate statistics to archaeological studies of ceramics and clays is described. A small pottery data set from the Nasca culture in southern Peru is presented for illustration.

  20. Elemental analysis of combustion products by neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Heft, R.E.; Koszykowski, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the neutron activation analysis method, which is being used to determine the elemental profile of combustion products from coal-fired power plants, oil shale retorting, and underground coal gasification. (DLC)

  1. Analysing neutron scattering data using McStas virtual experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udby, L.; Willendrup, P. K.; Knudsen, E.; Niedermayer, Ch.; Filges, U.; Christensen, N. B.; Farhi, E.; Wells, B. O.; Lefmann, K.

    2011-04-01

    With the intention of developing a new data analysis method using virtual experiments we have built a detailed virtual model of the cold triple-axis spectrometer RITA-II at PSI, Switzerland, using the McStas neutron ray-tracing package. The parameters characterising the virtual instrument were carefully tuned against real experiments. In the present paper we show that virtual experiments reproduce experimentally observed linewidths within 1-3% for a variety of samples. Furthermore we show that the detailed knowledge of the instrumental resolution found from virtual experiments, including sample mosaicity, can be used for quantitative estimates of linewidth broadening resulting from, e.g., finite domain sizes in single-crystal samples.

  2. Neutron Measurements in Small MagLIF Experiments on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Barnak, D. H.; Davies, J. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Betti, R.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Campbell, E. M.

    2016-10-01

    The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) is participating in laser-driven magnetized linear inertial fusion (MagLIF) research on the OMEGA Laser System in partnership with Sandia as part of ARPA-E's ALPHA Program. In the current OMEGA setup, a CH cylindrical tube filled with D2 gas is compressed by 40 laser beams, preheated by one of the beams, and an axial magnetic field is applied to limit electron heat loss. Two copper coils provide 10-T magnetic fields. A neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector has been designed, fabricated, and calibrated to diagnose primary D-D fusion neutron yield in the range of 1 ×107 to 5 ×109 and ion temperature from 2 to 8 keV. The design details and calibration results of these nTOF detectors will be presented together with neutron measurement results from recent laser-driven MagLIF experiments on OMEGA. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000568, and the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Developments in Ultracold Neutron Measurement for the UCN τ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Nathan; UCNTau Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The UCN τ experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has constructed and tested a new iteration of its β particle detectors for its in-situ vanadium-based neutron detector as well as tested a novel scintillating Ultracold Neutron (UCN) monitor. This talk will discuss developments and results since 2013. Previously the β detector used scintillating paddles coupled to acrylic lightguides of comparable volume and a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The volume of light guide was reduced by using edge-coupled wavelength shifting fibers, providing three benefits: better-shielded PMTs, reduction of background from the light guides, and reduction of dark counts due to smaller PMTs. Data will be presented to characterize these improvements. A novel UCN detector for monitoring was also tested. The new detectors consist of a thin layer of boron coated zinc sulfide scintillator coupled to an acrylic lightguide and a PMT. Boron has a negative material potential, a large cross-section for neutron capture, and decays promptly into an α and a Li ion, allowing high efficiency absorption and detection and low background. Tests to determine the optimal thickness of the boron layer will be discussed as well as comparisons to existing UCN detector performance.

  4. Neutron threshold activation detectors (TAD) for the detection of fissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi; Stevenson, John; King, Michael J.

    2011-10-01

    Prompt fission neutrons are one of the strongest signatures of the fission process. Depending on the fission inducing radiation, their average number ranges from 2.5 to 4 neutrons per fission. They are more energetic and abundant, by about 2 orders of magnitude, than the delayed neutrons (≈3 vs. ≈0.01) that are commonly used as indicators for the presence of fissionable materials. The detection of fission prompt neutrons, however, has to be done in the presence of extremely intense probing radiation that stimulated them. During irradiation, the fission stimulation radiation, X-rays or neutrons, overwhelms the neutron detectors and temporarily incapacitate them. Consequently, by the time the detectors recover from the source radiation, fission prompt neutrons are no longer emitted. In order to measure the prompt fission signatures under these circumstances, special measures are usually taken with the detectors such as heavy shielding with collimation, use of inefficient geometries, high pulse height bias and gamma-neutron separation via pulse-shape discrimination with an appropriate organic scintillator. These attempts to shield the detector from the flash of radiation result in a major loss of sensitivity. It can lead to a complete inability to detect the fission prompt neutrons. In order to overcome the blinding induced background from the source radiation, the detection of prompt fission neutrons needs to occur long after the fission event and after the detector has fully recovered from the source overload. A new approach to achieve this is to detect the delayed activation induced by the fission neutrons. The approach demonstrates a good sensitivity in adverse overload situations (gamma and neutron "flash") where fission prompt neutrons could normally not be detected. The new approach achieves the required temporal separation between the detection of prompt neutrons and the detector overload by the neutron activation of the detector material. The technique

  5. High pressure gas spheres for neutron and photon experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupp, G.; Petrich, D.; Käppeler, F.; Kaltenbaek, J.; Leugers, B.; Reifarth, R.

    2009-09-01

    High pressure gas spheres have been designed and successfully used in several nuclear physics experiments on noble gases. The pros and cons of this solution are the simple design and the high reliability versus the fact that the density is limited to 40-60% of liquid or solid gas samples. Originally produced for neutron capture studies at keV energies, the comparably small mass of the gas spheres were an important advantage, which turned out to be of relevance for other applications as well. The construction, performance, and operation of the spheres are described and examples for their use are presented.

  6. Virtual experiments: Combining realistic neutron scattering instrument and sample simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhi, E.; Hugouvieux, V.; Johnson, M. R.; Kob, W.

    2009-08-01

    A new sample component is presented for the Monte Carlo, ray-tracing program, McStas, which is widely used to simulate neutron scattering instruments. The new component allows the sample to be described by its material dynamic structure factor, which is separated into coherent and incoherent contributions. The effects of absorption and multiple scattering are treated and results from simulations and previous experiments are compared. The sample component can also be used to treat any scattering material which may be close to the sample and therefore contaminates the total, measured signal.

  7. In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

  8. Proposed experiment to measure {gamma}-rays from the thermal neutron capture of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Takatomi; Ou, I.; Izumi, T.; Yamaguchi, R.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.

    2012-11-12

    Gadolinium-157 ({sup 157}Gd) has the largest thermal neutron capture cross section among any stable nuclei. The thermal neutron capture yields {gamma}-ray cascade with total energy of about 8 MeV. Because of these characteristics, Gd is applied for the recent neutrino detectors. Here, we propose an experiment to measure the multiplicity and the angular correlation of {gamma}-rays from the Gd neutron capture. With these information, we expect the improved identification of the Gd neutron capture.

  9. Simulation and calibration of an active neutron dosemeter.

    PubMed

    Bergmeier, F; Volnhals, M; Wielunski, M; Rühm, W

    2014-10-01

    Here the latest development stages of the HMGU active neutron dosemeter are presented. This work includes the comparison of the dosemeter's response function, calculated with Geant4, and the measurements in monoenergetic neutron fields at the Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig, Germany. These results were used to match the response function and the count-to-dose conversion factors of the dosemeter to the Hp(10) personal dose equivalent.

  10. Active Neutron and Gamma-Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, A.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development of an instrument capable of detailed in situ bulk geochemical analysis of the surface of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets. This instrument technology uses a pulsed neutron generator to excite the solid materials of a planet and measures the resulting neutron and gamma-ray emission with its detector system. These time-resolved neutron and gamma-ray data provide detailed information about the bulk elemental composition, chemical context, and density distribution of the soil within 50 cm of the surface. While active neutron scattering and neutron-induced gamma-ray techniques have been used extensively for terrestrial nuclear well logging applications, our goal is to apply these techniques to surface instruments for use on any solid solar system body. As described, experiments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center use a prototype neutron-induced gamma-ray instrument and the resulting data presented show the promise of this technique for becoming a versatile, robust, workhorse technology for planetary science, and exploration of any of the solid bodies in the solar system. The detection of neutrons at the surface also provides useful information about the material. This paper focuses on the data provided by the gamma-ray detector.

  11. Active Neutron and Gamma-Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, A.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development of an instrument capable of detailed in situ bulk geochemical analysis of the surface of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets. This instrument technology uses a pulsed neutron generator to excite the solid materials of a planet and measures the resulting neutron and gamma-ray emission with its detector system. These time-resolved neutron and gamma-ray data provide detailed information about the bulk elemental composition, chemical context, and density distribution of the soil within 50 cm of the surface. While active neutron scattering and neutron-induced gamma-ray techniques have been used extensively for terrestrial nuclear well logging applications, our goal is to apply these techniques to surface instruments for use on any solid solar system body. As described, experiments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center use a prototype neutron-induced gamma-ray instrument and the resulting data presented show the promise of this technique for becoming a versatile, robust, workhorse technology for planetary science, and exploration of any of the solid bodies in the solar system. The detection of neutrons at the surface also provides useful information about the material. This paper focuses on the data provided by the gamma-ray detector.

  12. Benchmarking of activation reaction distribution in an intermediate energy neutron field.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Morev, Mikhail N; Hirota, Masahiro; Abe, Takuya; Koike, Yuya; Iwai, Satoshi; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-07-01

    Neutron-induced reaction rate depth profiles inside concrete shield irradiated by intermediate energy neutron were calculated using a Monte-Carlo code and compared with an experiment. An irradiation field of intermediate neutron produced in the forward direction from a thick (stopping length) target bombarded by 400 MeV nucleon(-1) carbon ions was arranged at the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba. Ordinary concrete shield of 90 cm thickness was installed 50 cm downstream the iron target. Activation detectors of aluminum, gold and gold covered with cadmium were inserted at various depths. Irradiated samples were extracted after exposure and gamma-ray spectrometry was performed for each sample. Comparison of experimental and calculated shows good agreement for both low- and high-energy neutron-induced reaction except for (27)Al(n,X)(24)Na reaction at the surface.

  13. Addressing Different Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures from Fissionable Material

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Chichester; E. H. Seabury

    2009-10-01

    In a continuing effort to examine portable methods for implementing active neutron interrogation for detecting shielded fissionable material research is underway to investigate the utility of analyzing multiple time-correlated signatures. Time correlation refers here to the existence of unique characteristics of the fission interrogation signature related to the start and end of an irradiation, as well as signatures present in between individual pulses of an irradiating source. Traditional measurement approaches in this area have typically worked to detect die-away neutrons after the end of each pulse, neutrons in between pulses related to the decay of neutron emitting fission products, or neutrons or gamma rays related to the decay of neutron emitting fission products after the end of an irradiation exposure. In this paper we discus the potential weaknesses of assessing only one signature versus multiple signatures and make the assertion that multiple complimentary and orthogonal measurements should be used to bolster the performance of active interrogation systems, helping to minimize susceptibility to the weaknesses of individual signatures on their own. Recognizing that the problem of detection is a problem of low count rates, we are exploring methods to integrate commonly used signatures with rarely used signatures to improve detection capabilities for these measurements. In this paper we will discuss initial activity in this area with this approach together with observations of some of the strengths and weaknesses of using these different signatures.

  14. The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment for NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Litvak, M L; Mitrofanov, I G; Barmakov, Yu N; Behar, A; Bitulev, A; Bobrovnitsky, Yu; Bogolubov, E P; Boynton, W V; Bragin, S I; Churin, S; Grebennikov, A S; Konovalov, A; Kozyrev, A S; Kurdumov, I G; Krylov, A; Kuznetsov, Yu P; Malakhov, A V; Mokrousov, M I; Ryzhkov, V I; Sanin, A B; Shvetsov, V N; Smirnov, G A; Sholeninov, S; Timoshenko, G N; Tomilina, T M; Tuvakin, D V; Tretyakov, V I; Troshin, V S; Uvarov, V N; Varenikov, A; Vostrukhin, A

    2008-06-01

    We present a summary of the physical principles and design of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument onboard NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The DAN instrument will use the method of neutron-neutron activation analysis in a space application to study the abundance and depth distribution of water in the martian subsurface along the path of the MSL rover.

  15. The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) Experiment for NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Barmakov, Yu. N.; Behar, A.; Bitulev, A.; Bobrovnitsky, Yu.; Bogolubov, E. P.; Boynton, W. V.; Bragin, S. I.; Churin, S.; Grebennikov, A. S.; Konovalov, A.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Kurdumov, I. G.; Krylov, A.; Kuznetsov, Yu. P.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Smirnov, G. A.; Sholeninov, S.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Tomilina, T. M.; Tuvakin, D. V.; Tretyakov, V. I.; Troshin, V. S.; Uvarov, V. N.; Varenikov, A.; Vostrukhin, A.

    2008-06-01

    We present a summary of the physical principles and design of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument onboard NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The DAN instrument will use the method of neutron-neutron activation analysis in a space application to study the abundance and depth distribution of water in the martian subsurface along the path of the MSL rover.

  16. Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

    2007-12-01

    An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

  17. Extending neutron activation analysis to materials with high concentrations of neutron absorbing elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilian, Cornelia

    The purpose of this study was to investigate epithermal neutron self-shielding for all nuclides used in Neutron Activation Analysis, NAA. The study started with testing the theory and measuring the nuclear factors characterizing thermal and epithermal self-shielding for 1 mL cylindrical samples containing the halogens Cl, Br and I irradiated in a mixed thermal and epithermal neutron spectrum. For mono-element samples, both thermal and epithermal experimental self-shielding factors were well fitted by sigmoid functions. As a result, to correct thermal neutron self-shielding, the sigmoid uses a single parameter, mth, which can be directly calculated for any element from the sample size, the weighted sum of the thermal absorption cross-sections, sigmaabs, of the elements in the sample and a constant kth characteristic of the irradiation site. However, to correct epithermal self-shielding, the parameter mep, a function of sample geometry and composition, irradiation conditions and nuclear characteristics, needs to be measured for each activated nuclide. Since the preliminary tests were positive and showed that self-shielding, as high as 30%, could be corrected with an accuracy of about 1%, except in cases with significant epithermal shielding of one element by another, we pursued the study with the verification of two additional aspects. First, the dependency of the self-shielding parameters mth, and mep, on the properties of the irradiation site was evaluated using three different irradiation sites of a SLOWPOKE reactor, and it was concluded that the amount of both thermal and epithermal self-shielding varied by less than 10% from one site to another. Second, the variation of the self-shielding parameters, mth, and mep, with the size of the cylinder, as r( r+h), was tested for h/r ratios from 0.02 to 6.0, and this geometry dependence was confirmed even in slightly non-isotropic neutron fields. These results allowed separating from the mep parameter the amount of

  18. Present and Future Activities on Neutron Imaging in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglione, Aureliano; Blostein, Jerónimo; Cantargi, Florencia; Marín, Julio; Baruj, Alberto; Meyer, Gabriel; Santisteban, Javier; Sánchez, Fernando

    We present here a short review of the main work which has been done in the latest years in neutron imaging in Argentina, and the future plans for the development of this technique in the country, mainly focused in the design of a new neutron imaging instrument to be installed in the future research reactor RA10. We present here the results of the implementation of the technique in samples belonging to the Argentinean cultural heritage and experiments related with hydrogen storage. At the same time, the Argentinean RA10 project for the design and construction of a 30 MW multipurpose research reactor is rapidly progressing. It started to be designed by the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) and the technology company INVAP SE, both from Argentina, in June 2010. The construction will start in the beginning of 2015 in the Ezeiza Atomic Center, at 36 km from Buenos Aires City, and is expected to be finished by 2020. One of the main aims of the project is to offer to the Argentinean scientific and technology system new capabilities based on neutron techniques. We present here the conceptual design of a neutron imaging facility which will use one of the cold neutron beams, and will be installed in the reactor hall. Preliminary simulation results show that at the farthest detection position, at about 17 m from the cold source, a uniform neutron beam on a detection screen with an intensity of about 108 n/cm2/s is expected.

  19. NaI detector neutron activation spectra for PGNAA applications

    PubMed

    Gardner; El; Zheng; Hayden; Mayo

    2000-10-01

    When NaI detectors are used in prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis devices, they are activated by neutrons that penetrate the detector. While thermal neutron filters like boron or lithium can be used to reduce this activation, it can never be completely eliminated by this approach since high energy neutrons can penetrate the detector and thermalize inside it. This activation results in the emission of prompt gamma rays from both the I and Na and the production of the radioisotopes 128I and 24Na that subsequently decay and emit their characteristic beta particles and gamma rays. The resulting three spectra represent a background for this measurement. An experimental method for obtaining these three spectra is described and results are reported for 2" x 2", 5" x 5", 6" x 6", and 1" x 6" NaI detectors using the thermal neutron beam of the NCSU PULSTAR nuclear reactor. In addition, Monte Carlo simulation programs have been developed and used for simulating these spectra. Good results have been obtained by the Monte Carlo method for the two radioisotope spectra, and it is anticipated that good results will also be obtained for the prompt gamma-ray spectrum when the I and Na coincidence schemes are known.

  20. The comparison of four neutron sources for Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) in vivo detections of boron.

    PubMed

    Fantidis, J G; Nicolaou, G E; Potolias, C; Vordos, N; Bandekas, D V

    A Prompt Gamma Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system, incorporating an isotopic neutron source has been simulated using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In order to improve the signal to noise ratio different collimators and a filter were placed between the neutron source and the object. The effect of the positioning of the neutron beam and the detector relative to the object has been studied. In this work the optimisation procedure is demonstrated for boron. Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to compare the performance of the proposed PGNAA system using four different neutron sources ((241)Am/Be, (252)Cf, (241)Am/B, and DT neutron generator). Among the different systems the (252)Cf neutron based PGNAA system has the best performance.

  1. Calibration of the delayed-gamma neutron activation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, R.; Zhao, X.; Rarback, H.M.; Yasumura, S.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Moore, R.I.; Lo Monte, A.F.; Vodopia, K.A.; Liu, H.B.; Economos, C.D.; Nelson, M.E.; Aloia, J.F.; Vaswani, A.N.; Weber, D.A.; Pierson, R.N. Jr.; Joel, D.D.

    1996-02-01

    The delayed-gamma neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory was originally calibrated using an anthropomorphic hollow phantom filled with solutions containing predetermined amounts of Ca. However, 99{percent} of the total Ca in the human body is not homogeneously distributed but contained within the skeleton. Recently, an artificial skeleton was designed, constructed, and placed in a bottle phantom to better represent the Ca distribution in the human body. Neutron activation measurements of an anthropomorphic and a bottle (with no skeleton) phantom demonstrate that the difference in size and shape between the two phantoms changes the total body calcium results by less than 1{percent}. To test the artificial skeleton, two small polyethylene jerry-can phantoms were made, one with a femur from a cadaver and one with an artificial bone in exactly the same geometry. The femur was ashed following the neutron activation measurements for chemical analysis of Ca. Results indicate that the artificial bone closely simulates the real bone in neutron activation analysis and provides accurate calibration for Ca measurements. Therefore, the calibration of the delayed-gamma neutron activation system is now based on the new bottle phantom containing an artificial skeleton. This change has improved the accuracy of measurement for total body calcium. Also, the simple geometry of this phantom and the artificial skeleton allows us to simulate the neutron activation process using a Monte Carlo code, which enables us to calibrate the system for human subjects larger and smaller than the phantoms used as standards. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.}

  2. Luminescent and scintillating properties of lanthanum fluoride nanocrystals in response to gamma/neutron irradiation: codoping with Ce activator, Yb wavelength shifter, and Gd neutron captor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, J. M.; Blostein, J. J.; Sidelnik, I.; Rondón Brito, D.; Rodríguez Palomino, L. A.; Mayer, R. E.

    2016-09-01

    A novel concept for gamma radiation detection and spectroscopy, and detection of thermal neutrons based on co-doped lanthanum fluoride nanocrystals containing gadolinium is presented. The trends of colloidal synthesis of the mentioned material, LaF3 co-doped with Ce3+ as the activator, Yb3+ as the wavelength-shifter and Gd3+ as the neutron captor, is reported. Nanocrystals of the mentioned material were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction, energy dispersive X ray spectroscopy, optical absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Gamma detection and its potential spectroscopy feature have been confirmed. The neutron detection capability has been confirmed by experiments performed using a 252Cf neutron source.

  3. Neutron activation analysis for antimetabolites. [in food samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Determination of metal ion contaminants in food samples is studied. A weighed quantity of each sample was digested in a concentrated mixture of nitric, hydrochloric and perchloric acids to affect complete solution of the food products. The samples were diluted with water and the pH adjusted according to the specific analysis performed. The samples were analyzed by neutron activation analysis, polarography, and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The solid food samples were also analyzed by neutron activation analysis for increased sensitivity and lower levels of detectability. The results are presented in tabular form.

  4. A new facility for rapid neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zeisler, R.; Makarewicz, M.; Grass, F.; Casta, J.

    1996-12-31

    Many research groups have undertaken efforts on the utilization of short-lived nuclides in a broad spectrum of neutron activation analysis (NAA) applications. The advantages of these approaches are obvious because the information on the sample can be extracted more rapidly. In addition to its other advantages, NAA can become extremely competitive in price and analysis time. Nevertheless, NAA with short-lived nuclides has not gained broad popularity, perhaps because of some difficulties in accuracy and the availability of suitable irradiation facilities. This report discusses the ASTRA reactor for neutron activation analysis capabilities.

  5. The role of neutron activation analysis in nutritional biomonitoring programs

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, V.

    1988-01-01

    Nutritional biomonitoring is a multidisciplinary task and an integral part of a more general bioenvironmental surveillance. In its comprehensive form, it is a combination of biological, environmental, and nutrient monitoring activities. Nutrient monitoring evaluates the input of essential nutrients required to maintain vital bodily functions; this includes vigilance over extreme fluctuations of nutrient intake in relation to the recommended dietary allowances and estimated safe and adequate daily dietary intakes and adherence to the goals of provisional tolerance limits. Environmental monitoring assesses the external human exposure via ambient pathways, namely, air, water, soil, food, etc. Biological monitoring quantifies a toxic agent and its metabolites in representative biologic specimens of an exposed organ to identify health effects. In practice, coordinating all three components of a nutritional biomonitoring program is complex, expensive, and tedious. Experience gained from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys demonstrates the problems involved. By far the most critical challenge faced here is the question of analytical quality control, particularly when trace element determinations are involved. Yet, measures to ensure reliability of analytical data are mandatory, and there are no short-cuts to this requirement. The purpose of this presentation is to elucidate the potential of neutron activation analysis (NAA) in nutritional biomonitoring activities.

  6. Analysis of Neutron Induced Gamma Activity in Lowbackground Ge - Spectroscopy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovančević, Nikola; Krmar, Midrag

    Neutron interactions with materials of Ge-spectroscopy systems are one of the main sources of background radiation in low-level gamma spectroscopy measurements. Because of that detailed analysis of neutron induced gamma activity in low-background Ge-spectroscopy systems was done. Two HPGe detectors which were located in two different passive shields: one in pre-WW II made iron and the second in commercial low background lead were used in the experiment. Gamma lines emitted after neutron capture, as well as after inelastic scattering on the germanium crystal and shield materials (lead, iron, hydrogen, NaI) were detected and then analyzed. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes were calculated and their values were compared for the two different kinds of detector shield. The relative intensities of several gamma lines emitted after the inelastic scattering of neutrons (created by cosmic muons) in 56Fe were report. These relative intensities of detected gamma lines of 56Fe are compared with the results collected in the same iron shield by the use of the 252Cf neutrons.

  7. Magnetic susceptibility and neutron diffraction experiments on nuclear ordering in copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyrkkio, Teppo

    Experimental curves of entropy and susceptibility versus temperature for copper nuclear spins down to the ordered state were obtained. Impurities and anomalous spin-lattice relaxation in copper at submilli-Kelvin temperatures were observed. Phase diagrams for spontaneous nuclear ordering in copper were derived. Nuclear antiferromagnetic ordering in copper was investigated. The feasibility of neutron diffraction experiments on ordered copper nuclei at nano-Kelvin temperature was studied. Neutron scattering experiments on nuclear magnets were carried out. Calibration and applications of polarized neutron thermometry at milli- and micro-Kelvin temperatures is described.Observation of nuclear antiferromagnetic order in copper by neutron diffraction at nano-Kelvin temparatures is reported.

  8. Improved thermal neutron activation sensor for detection of bulk explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Faust, Anthony A.; Andrews, H. Robert; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Mosquera, Cristian M.

    2012-06-01

    Defence R&D Canada - Suffield and Bubble Technology Industries have been developing thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensors for detection of buried bulk explosives since 1994. First generation sensors, employing an isotopic source and NaI(Tl) gamma ray detectors, were deployed by Canadian Forces in 2002 as confirmation sensors on the ILDS teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multi-sensor anti-tank landmine detection systems. The first generation TNA could detect anti-tank mines buried 10 cm or less in no more than a minute, but deeper mines and those significantly displaced horizontally required considerably longer times. Mines as deep as 30 cm could be detected with long counting times (1000 s). The second generation TNA detector is being developed with a number of improvements aimed at increasing sensitivity and facilitating ease of operation. Among these are an electronic neutron generator to increase sensitivity for deeper and horizontally displaced explosives; LaBr3(Ce) scintillators, to improve time response and energy resolution; improved thermal and electronic stability; improved sensor head geometry to minimize spatial response nonuniformity; and more robust data processing. This improved sensitivity can translate to either decreased counting times, decreased minimum detectable explosive quantities, increased maximum sensor-to-target displacement, or a trade off among all three. Experiments to characterize the performance of the latest generation TNA in detecting buried landmines and IEDs hidden in culverts were conducted during 2011. This paper describes the second generation system. The experimental setup and methodology are detailed and preliminary comparisons between the performance of first and second generation systems are presented.

  9. Triton burnup measurements in KSTAR using a neutron activation system

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Jungmin; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Chung, Kyoung-Jae Hwang, Y. S.; Cheon, MunSeong; Rhee, T.; Kim, Junghee; Kim, Jun Young; Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.

    2016-11-15

    Measurements of the time-integrated triton burnup for deuterium plasma in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) have been performed following the simultaneous detection of the d-d and d-t neutrons. The d-d neutrons were measured using a {sup 3}He proportional counter, fission chamber, and activated indium sample, whereas the d-t neutrons were detected using activated silicon and copper samples. The triton burnup ratio from KSTAR discharges is found to be in the range 0.01%–0.50% depending on the plasma conditions. The measured burnup ratio is compared with the prompt loss fraction of tritons calculated with the Lorentz orbit code and the classical slowing-down time. The burnup ratio is found to increase as plasma current and classical slowing-down time increase.

  10. Triton burnup measurements in KSTAR using a neutron activation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Jungmin; Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Jun Young; Rhee, T.; Kim, Junghee; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of the time-integrated triton burnup for deuterium plasma in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) have been performed following the simultaneous detection of the d-d and d-t neutrons. The d-d neutrons were measured using a 3He proportional counter, fission chamber, and activated indium sample, whereas the d-t neutrons were detected using activated silicon and copper samples. The triton burnup ratio from KSTAR discharges is found to be in the range 0.01%-0.50% depending on the plasma conditions. The measured burnup ratio is compared with the prompt loss fraction of tritons calculated with the Lorentz orbit code and the classical slowing-down time. The burnup ratio is found to increase as plasma current and classical slowing-down time increase.

  11. Hafnium Resonance Parameter Analysis Using Neutron Capture and Transmission Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Trbovich, M J; Barry, D P; Slovacek, R E; Danon, Y; Block, R C; Francis, N C; Lubert, M; Burke, J A; Drindak, N J; Lienweber, G; Ballad, R

    2007-02-06

    The focus of this work is to determine the resonance parameters for stable hafnium isotopes in the 0.005 - 200 eV region, with special emphasis on the overlapping {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf resonances near 8 eV. Accurate hafnium cross sections and resonance parameters are needed in order to quantify the effects of hafnium found in zirconium, a metal commonly used in reactors. The accuracy of the cross sections and the corresponding resonance parameters used in current nuclear analysis tools are rapidly becoming the limiting factor in reducing the overall uncertainty on reactor physics calculations. Experiments measuring neutron capture and transmission are routinely performed at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) LINAC using the time-of flight technique. {sup 6}Li glass scintillation detectors were used for transmission experiments at flight path lengths of 15 and 25 m, respectively. Capture experiments were performed using a sixteen section NaI multiplicity detector at a flight path length of 25 m. These experiments utilized several thicknesses of metallic and isotope-enriched liquid Hf samples. The liquid Hf samples were designed to provide information on the {sup 176}Hf and {sup 178}Hf contributions to the 8 eV doublet without saturation. Data analyses were performed using the R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. A combined capture and transmission data analysis yielded resonance parameters for all hafnium isotopes from 0.005 - 200 eV. Additionally, resonance integrals were calculated, along with errors for each hafnium isotope, using the NJOY and INTER codes. The isotopic resonance integrals calculated were significantly different than previous values. The {sup 176}Hf resonance integral, based on this work, is approximately 73% higher than the ENDF/B-VI value. This is due primarily to the changes to resonance parameters in the 8 eV resonance, the neutron width presented in this work is more than twice that of the previous value. The calculated elemental

  12. The Monte Carlo code CEARCPG for coincidence prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaogang; Gardner, Robin P.

    2007-10-01

    Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is widely used to determine the elemental composition of bulk samples. The detection sensitivities of PGNAA are often restricted by the inherent poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). There are many sources of noise (background) including the natural background, neutron activation of the detector, gamma-rays associated with the neutron source and prompt gamma-rays from the structural materials of the analyzer. Results of the prompt gamma-ray coincidence technique show that it could greatly improve the SNR by removing almost all of the background interferences. The first specific Monte Carlo code (CEARCPG) for coincidence PGNAA has been developed at the Center for Engineering Application of Radioisotopes (CEAR) to explore the capabilities of this technique. Benchmark bulk sample experiments have been performed with coal, sulfur, and mercury samples and indicate that the code is accurate and will be very useful in the design of coincidence PGNAA devices.

  13. Development of a new deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergaoui, K; Reguigui, N; Gary, C K; Brown, C; Cremer, J T; Vainionpaa, J H; Piestrup, M A

    2014-12-01

    A new deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator has been developed by Adelphi Technology for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), neutron activation analysis (NAA), and fast neutron radiography. The generator makes an excellent fast, intermediate, and thermal neutron source for laboratories and industrial applications that require the safe production of neutrons, a small footprint, low cost, and small regulatory burden. The generator has three major components: a Radio Frequency Induction Ion Source, a Secondary Electron Shroud, and a Diode Accelerator Structure and Target. Monoenergetic neutrons (2.5MeV) are produced with a yield of 10(10)n/s using 25-50mA of deuterium ion beam current and 125kV of acceleration voltage. The present study characterizes the performance of the neutron generator with respect to neutron yield, neutron production efficiency, and the ionic current as a function of the acceleration voltage at various RF powers. In addition the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) simulation code was used to optimize the setup with respect to thermal flux and radiation protection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Activation of high- Tc superconductors with neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Makito; Ogikubo, Kouji; Terai, Takayuki; Yamawaki, Michio; Hoshiya, Taiji

    2002-10-01

    Activation due to nuclear transmutation is a very important factor for feasibility evaluation on the improvement of superconducting property by neutron irradiation. In this paper, the activation of Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8+ x (Bi-2212) superconductor was evaluated by the activation analysis and calculation using ORIGEN-JR computer code. The activation analysis was carried out to determine the composition and impurity concentrations of the specimen. Then, based on the data about impurities, the contribution of the impurities and the decay of radioactivity after irradiation were calculated. Main elements for activation were Sr as a component of Bi-2212, and Co, Zn and Fe as impurities. Activation caused by the impurities occupied 40% 1 year after irradiation. When thermal neutron flux was reduced by 80% using a Cd filter, the total activation was reduced to about 30%.

  15. Active Interrogation of Sensitive Nuclear Material Using Laser Driven Neutron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Roth, Markus

    2015-05-01

    An investigation of the viability of a laser-driven neutron source for active interrogation is reported. The need is for a fast, movable, operationally safe neutron source which is energy tunable and has high-intensity, directional neutron production. Reasons for the choice of neutrons and lasers are set forth. Results from the interrogation of an enriched U sample are shown.

  16. Measurement of Neutrons in Different Pb/U Setups Irradiated by Relativistic Protons and Deuterons by means of Activation Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, V.; Svoboda, O.; Vrzalová, J.; Suchopár, M.; Geier, B.; Kugler, A.; Honusek, M.; the Collaboration Energy; Radioactive Waste, Transmutation of

    2012-05-01

    The collaboration Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Waste uses different setups consisting of lead, uranium and graphite irradiated by relativistic protons and deuterons to study transmutation of radioactive materials by produced neutrons. Our group measured spatial distribution of neutrons by means of activation samples during the assembly irradiation by the JINR Nuclotron beams. We also present results of simulations using MCNPX code and their comparison with obtained experimental data. We use Au, Al, Bi, In and Ta foils as activation detectors, but unfortunately almost no experimental cross-section data for observed threshold (n,xn) reactions are available for higher neutron energies. Therefore we carried out series experiments devoted to determination of neutron cross-sections of various threshold reactions using different quasi-monoenergetic neutron sources.

  17. High-precision neutron spectrometry, using diffraction focusing. Test experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, I. A.; Berdnikov, Ya. A.; Berdnikov, A. Ya.; Borisov, Yu. V.; Braginetz, Yu. P.; Fedorov, V. V.; Lasitsa, M. V.; Semenikhin, S. Yu.; Khorina, M. L.; Voronin, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of double-crystal neutron focusing, using Laue diffraction in large perfect crystals was studied. The observed effect allows reach the angular resolution better than 0.03", that is ~ 10-2 of the Bragg reflection width. This fact makes it possible to create a new ultraprecise method for neutron spectrometry combining the spin-echo small angle neutron scattering with Laue diffraction.

  18. The progress in the neutron diagnostics in the Fast Ignition experiment with GEKKO XII and LFEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arikawa, Yasunobu; Nagai, Takahiro; Abe, Yuki; Kojima, Sadaoki; Sakata, Shohei; Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Sarukura, Nobuhiko; Nakai, Mitsuo; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi

    2012-10-01

    In the fast ignitor experiment the neutron diagnostics is very challenging due to too large backgrounds originated from hard X ray. In the Fast Ignition integrated experimental campaign held in 2010 in GEKKO XII and LFEX facility in Institute of Laser Engineering Osaka (ILE), the Xylen based new liquid scintillator coupled with the gated photomultiplier tube has successfully recorded neutron signal with heating the energy of up to 400 J. However there was significant large background in the signal originated from neutrons via (γ,n) reaction from the target chamber wall. The neutron collimator was developed and implemented to suppress these neutron backgrounds. We succeeded to record a very clear neutron signals in every shot in the fast ignitor experimental campaign held in July 2012 with the heating laser energy of around 1000 J with the pulse width of 2.2 ps. The details of the detector and the result of the fast ignition experiment will be presented.

  19. BOREHOLE NEUTRON ACTIVATION: THE RARE EARTHS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mikesell, J.L.; Senftle, F.E.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron-induced borehole gamma-ray spectroscopy has been widely used as a geophysical exploration technique by the petroleum industry, but its use for mineral exploration is not as common. Nuclear methods can be applied to mineral exploration, for determining stratigraphy and bed correlations, for mapping ore deposits, and for studying mineral concentration gradients. High-resolution detectors are essential for mineral exploration, and by using them an analysis of the major element concentrations in a borehole can usually be made. A number of economically important elements can be detected at typical ore-grade concentrations using this method. Because of the application of the rare-earth elements to high-temperature superconductors, these elements are examined in detail as an example of how nuclear techniques can be applied to mineral exploration.

  20. Borehole neutron activation: The rare earths

    SciTech Connect

    Mikesell, J.L.; Senftle, F.E.

    1988-02-01

    Neutron-induced borehole gamma-ray spectroscopy has been widely used as a geophysical exploration technique by the petroleum industry, but its use for mineral exploration is not as common. Nuclear methods offer the mining geologist techniques for mineral exploration, for determining stratigraphy and bed correlations, for mapping ore deposits, and for studying mineral concentration gradients. High-resolution detectors are essential for mineral exploration, and by using them as analysis of the major element concentrations in a borehole can usually be made. A number of economically important elements can be detected at typical ore-grade concentrations using this method. Because of the new application of the rare-earth elements to high-temperature superconductors, these elements are examined in detail as an example of how nuclear techniques can assist the mining geologist.

  1. Development of a new electronic personal neutron dosemeter using a CMOS active pixel sensor.

    PubMed

    Trocmé, M; Higueret, S; Husson, D; Nourreddine, A; Lê, T D

    2007-01-01

    A CMOS active pixel sensor, originally designed for the tracking of minimum ionising charged particles in high-energy physics, has been recently used for the detection of fast neutrons. Data were taken at the IRSN Cadarache facility with a (241)Am-Be ISO source and a polyethylene radiator. A high-intrinsic efficiency (1.2 x 10(-3)) has been obtained. It is in good agreement with both calculations and a MCNPX Monte Carlo simulation. This experiment paves the way for a fully electronic personal neutron dosemeter.

  2. High-fidelity MCNP modeling of a D-T neutron generator for active interrogation of special nuclear material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katalenich, Jeff; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.; Hartman, Michael R.

    2011-10-01

    Fast and robust methods for interrogation of special nuclear material (SNM) are of interest to many agencies and institutions in the United States. It is well known that passive interrogation methods are typically sufficient for plutonium identification because of a relatively high neutron production rate from 240Pu [1]. On the other hand, identification of shielded uranium requires active methods using neutron or photon sources [2]. Deuterium-deuterium (2.45 MeV) and deuterium-tritium (14.1 MeV) neutron-generator sources have been previously tested and proven to be relatively reliable instruments for active interrogation of nuclear materials [3,4]. In addition, the newest generators of this type are small enough for applications requiring portable interrogation systems. Active interrogation techniques using high-energy neutrons are being investigated as a method to detect hidden SNM in shielded containers [4,5]. Due to the thickness of some containers, penetrating radiation such as high-energy neutrons can provide a potential means of probing shielded SNM. In an effort to develop the capability to assess the signal seen from various forms of shielded nuclear materials, the University of Michigan Neutron Science Laboratory's D-T neutron generator and its shielding were accurately modeled in MCNP. The generator, while operating at nominal power, produces approximately 1×10 10 neutrons/s, a source intensity which requires a large amount of shielding to minimize the dose rates around the generator. For this reason, the existing shielding completely encompasses the generator and does not include beam ports. Therefore, several MCNP simulations were performed to estimate the yield of uncollided 14.1-MeV neutrons from the generator for active interrogation experiments. Beam port diameters of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm were modeled to assess the resulting neutron fluxes. The neutron flux outside the beam ports was estimated to be approximately 2×10 4 n/cm 2 s.

  3. Current Status of the Experiment on Direct Measurement of Neutron-Neutron Scattering Length at the Reactor YAGUAR

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, W. I.; Muzichka, A. Yu.; Lychagin, E. V.; Nekhaev, G. V.; Sharapov, E. I.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Strelkov, A. V.; Crawford, B. E.; Stephenson, S. L.; Howell, C. R.; Tornow, W.; Kandiev, Ya.; Levakov, B. G.; Litvin, V. I.; Lyzhin, A. E.; Tchernukhin, Yu. I.; Mitchell, G. E.

    2009-03-31

    A new experiment was proposed in 2002 to perform the first direct measurement of neutron-neutron scattering on the powerful pulsed reactor YAGUAR located at Snezhinsk, Ural region, Russia. Extensive efforts were made to model the background conditions and to optimize the set-up design. To make the experiment feasible it was necessary to suppress the background from various origins by more than 16 orders of magnitude for thermal neutrons and 14 orders of magnitude for fast neutrons. In 2003 a channel was drilled under the reactor and equipped for time-of-flight measurements. During the next two years at this channel there were carried out a series of test experiments aimed at verifying the accuracy of the background modeling. Good agreement of the measured results with the calculated values enabled us to make the final design of the full scale set-up. During 2005-2006 the experimental system was manufactured. After vacuum tests at JINR the set-up was mounted at the YAGUAR reactor hall. In 2006-2007 calibration measurements with noble gases were performed. The results confirmed the validity of the modeling of the full scale experiment and verified the calibration. The first preliminary experiments for nn-scattering were performed in April 2008. These recent results are discussed.

  4. Geometry Survey of the Time-of-Flight Neutron-Elastic Scattering (Antonella) Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Oshinowo, Babatunde O.; Izraelevitch, Federico

    2016-10-17

    The Antonella experiment is a measurement of the ionization efficiency of nuclear recoils in silicon at low energies [1]. It is a neutron elastic scattering experiment motivated by the search for dark matter particles. In this experiment, a proton beam hits a lithium target and neutrons are produced. The neutron shower passes through a collimator that produces a neutron beam. The beam illuminates a silicon detector. With a certain probability, a neutron interacts with a silicon nucleus of the detector producing elastic scattering. After the interaction, a fraction of the neutron energy is transferred to the silicon nucleus which acquires kinetic energy and recoils. This kinetic energy is then dissipated in the detector producing ionization and thermal energy. The ionization produced is measured with the silicon detector electronics. On the other hand, the neutron is scattered out of the beam. A neutron-detector array (made of scintillator bars) registers the neutron arrival time and the scattering angle to reconstruct the kinematics of the neutron-nucleus interaction with the time-of-flight technique [2]. In the reconstruction equations, the energy of the nuclear recoil is a function of the scattering angle with respect to the beam direction, the time-of-flight of the neutron and the geometric distances between components of the setup (neutron-production target, silicon detector, scintillator bars). This paper summarizes the survey of the different components of the experiment that made possible the off-line analysis of the collected data. Measurements were made with the API Radian Laser Tracker and I-360 Probe Wireless. The survey was completed at the University of Notre Dame, Indiana, USA in February 2015.

  5. Feasibility of culvert IED detection using thermal neutron activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Anthony A.; McFee, John E.; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Andrews, Hugh Robert; Mosquera, Cristian; Roberts, William C.

    2012-06-01

    Bulk explosives hidden in culverts pose a serious threat to the Canadian and allied armies. Culverts provide an opportunity to conceal insurgent activity, avoid the need for detectable surface disturbances, and limit the applicability of conventional sub-surface sensing techniques. Further, in spite of the large masses of explosives that can be employed, the large sensor{target separation makes detection of the bulk explosive content challeng- ing. Defence R&D Canada { Sueld and Bubble Technology Industries have been developing thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensors for detection of buried bulk explosives for over 15 years. The next generation TNA sensor, known as TNA2, incorporates a number of improvements that allow for increased sensor-to-target dis- tances, making it potentially feasible to detect large improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in culverts using TNA. Experiments to determine the ability of TNA2 to detect improvised explosive devices in culverts are described, and the resulting signal levels observed for relevant quantities of explosives are presented. Observations conrm that bulk explosives detection using TNA against a culvert-IED is possible, with large charges posing a detection challenge at least as dicult as that of a deeply buried anti-tank landmine. Because of the prototype nature of the TNA sensor used, it is not yet possible to make denitive statements about the absolute sensitivity or detection time. Further investigation is warranted.

  6. Japanese experience with clinical trials of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiation with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoast's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast neutron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons of 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. The results also indicate that local control and relief of the symptom related to Pancoast's tumor of the lung seemed to be better with neutrons than with photons. For patients suffering from osteosarcoma, the surgical procedures preserving the function of the leg and arm were studied according to the better local control rate of the tumor following fast neutron beam therapy.

  7. Status report of CPHS and neutron activities at Tsinghua University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Xing, Q.; Zheng, S.; Yang, Y.; Gong, H.; Xiao, Y.; Wu, H.; Guan, X.; Du, T.

    2016-11-01

    The Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) project that was launched in September 2009 at Tsinghua University has reached a first commissioning stage in conjunction with ongoing activities to fulfill the eventual design goal of a ˜ 1013 n/s epithermal-to-cold neutron yield for education, instrumentation development, and industrial applications. Here, we report the latest progress on the commissioning and applications of 3MeV proton and neutron beam lines in the last one and half years, and the design, fabrication, engineering of the 13MeV/16kW proton accelerator system.

  8. Active neutron multiplicity analysis and Monte Carlo calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, M. S.; Ensslin, N.; Langner, D. G.; Miller, M. C.; Siebelist, R.; Stewart, J. E.; Ceo, R. N.; May, P. K.; Collins, L. L., Jr.

    Active neutron multiplicity measurements of high-enrichment uranium metal and oxide samples have been made at Los Alamos and Y-12. The data from the measurements of standards at Los Alamos were analyzed to obtain values for neutron multiplication and source-sample coupling. These results are compared to equivalent results obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. An approximate relationship between coupling and multiplication is derived and used to correct doubles rates for multiplication and coupling. The utility of singles counting for uranium samples is also examined.

  9. Application of neutron-activation analysis to geological materials

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Wogman, N.A.

    1980-12-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is an extremely sensitive, selective, and precise method, which yields a wealth of elemental information from even a small-sized sample. By varying neutron fluxes, irradiation times, decay and counting intervals in instrumental NAA, it is possible to accurately determine about 35 elements in a geological aliquot. When INAA is coupled with coincidence-noncoincidence Ge(Li)-Na(Tl) counting, it enhances the sensitivities of various elements by order of magnitude. The attractive features of INAA are that it is fast, nondestructive and economical.

  10. Neutron Field Measurements in Phantom with Foil Activation Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-29

    jI25 Ii III uumu ullli~ S....- - Lb - w * .qJ’ AD-A 192 122 ulJ. IL (pj DNA-TR-87- 10 N EUTRON FIELD MEASUREMENTS IN PHANTOM WITH FOIL ACTIVATION...SAND II Measurements in Phantom 6 4 The 5-Foil Neutron Dosimetry Method 29 5 Comparison of SAND II and Simple 5-Foil Dosimetry Method 34 6 Thermal ...quite reasonable. The monkey phantom spectrum differs from the NBS U-235 fission spectrum in that the former has a I/E tail plus thermal -neutron peak

  11. Compilation of detection sensitivities in thermal-neutron activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlgren, M. A.; Wing, J.

    1967-01-01

    Detection sensitivities of the chemical elements following thermal-neutron activation have been compiled from the available experimental cross sections and nuclear properties and presented in a concise and usable form. The report also includes the equations and nuclear parameters used in the calculations.

  12. PIXE and neutron activation methods in human hair material analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bǎdicǎ, T.; Ciortea, C.; Cojocaru, V.; Ivaşcu, M.; Petrovici, A.; Popa, A.; Popescu, I.; Sǎlǎgean, M.; Spiridon, S.

    1984-04-01

    In order to compare some of the nuclear methods in human hair material analysis, proton induced X-ray excitation and variant techniques of neutron activation analysis have been used. The elemental concentrations are compared with the IAEA-Vienna certified values. The efficiency and reliability of the methods used are briefly discussed.

  13. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  14. Neutron activation analysis; A sensitive test for trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, T.Z. . Ward Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses neutron activation analysis (NAA), an extremely sensitive technique for determining the elemental constituents of an unknown specimen. Currently, there are some twenty-five moderate-power TRIGA reactors scattered across the United States (fourteen of them at universities), and one of their principal uses is for NAA. NAA is procedurally simple. A small amount of the material to be tested (typically between one and one hundred milligrams) is irradiated for a period that varies from a few minutes to several hours in a neutron flux of around 10{sup 12} neutrons per square centimeter per second. A tiny fraction of the nuclei present (about 10{sup {minus}8}) is transmuted by nuclear reactions into radioactive forms. Subsequently, the nuclei decay, and the energy and intensity of the gamma rays that they emit can be measured in a gamma-ray spectrometer.

  15. On-Line Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Proctor; M. J. Hurwitz

    2000-06-04

    Prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) has become an important method for performing elemental analysis for on-line process control. A major advantage of PGNAA is that neutrons are a very penetrating radiation (200 mm), little influenced by the molecular form, temperature, or physical properties of the process materials being measured. The neutrons reacting with the process materials produce the gamma rays 'promptly' (in picoseconds), and the majority of the gamma rays have good penetrability (300 mm). This offers the advantage of very large analysis volumes, and unlike all other analytical methods, PGNAA has the ability to analyze the entire flow of material. PGNAA analyzers deliver rapid, sampling free, elemental analysis on large top-size, bulk materials moving at many metres per second on conveyor belts or in pipes or chutes. This paper describes some applications of PGNAA, the analysis method, sensitivities, and instrumentation.

  16. Experience with position-sensitive neutron detectors at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, R. K.; Haumann, J. R.; Epperson, J. E.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Schultz, A. J.; Felcher, G. P.; Montague, D. G.; Dejus, R. J.

    1990-12-01

    At the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory, pulses of protons accelerated in a synchrotron produce pulses of fast neutrons via the spallation process in an enriched uranium target. After moderation, the resulting pulses of slow neutrons are directed into beams which serve a variety of neutron-scattering instruments. Currently there are thirteen neutron-scattering instruments in operation or under development at IPNS, and six of these use position-sensitive neutron detectors (PSDs). These PSDs are: a 30 cm × 30 cm, ˜3 mm resolution, neutron Anger camera area PSD with 6Li-glass scintillator; a 2.5 cm diameter, ˜0.7 mm resolution, microchannel-plate area PSD with 6Li-glass scintillator; a 20 cm × 20 cm, ˜5 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter area PSD; a 40 cm × 40 cm, ˜4 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter area PSD; a flat 20 cm long, ˜1.6 mm resolution, 3He proportional-counter linear PSD; and 160 cylindrical 3He proportional-counter linear PSDs, each of which is 1.27 cm in diameter and 60 cm long and has ˜14 mm resolution. These detectors, in addition to being position-sensitive, resolve the time of the neutron capture with ˜1 μs precision for neutron time-of-flight measurements. This paper will discuss these various PSDs with emphasis on the instrumental specifications and the reasons for the selection of the different types of PSDs, and will also discuss the observed performances of these PSDs.

  17. Experience with position sensitive neutron detectors at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, R.K.; Haumann, J.R.; Schultz, A.J.; Felcher, G.P.; Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Montague, D.G.; Dejus, R.J.

    1990-05-07

    At the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) pulses of protons accelerated in a synchrotron produce pulses of fast neutrons via the spallation process in an enriched uranium target. After moderation, the resulting pulses of slow neutrons are directed into beams which serve a variety of neutron scattering instruments. Currently there are thirteen neutron scattering instruments in operation or under development at IPNS, and six of these use position-sensitive neutron detectors (PSDs). These PSDs are: a 30 cm {times} 30 cm, {approximately}3 mm resolution, neutron Anger camera area PSD with {sup 6}Li-glass scintillator; a 2.5 cm dia, {approximately}0.7 mm resolution, microchannel-plate area PSD with {sup 6}Li-glass scintillator; a 20 cm {times} 20 cm, {approximately}5 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter area PSD; a 40 cm {times} 40 cm, {approximately}4 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter area PSD; a flat 20 cm long, {approximately}1.6 mm resolution, {sup 3}He proportional counter linear PSD; and 160 cylindrical {sup 3}He proportional counter linear PSDs, each of which is 1.27 cm in dia 60 cm long and has {approximately}14 mm resolution. These detectors, in addition to being position-sensitive, resolve the time of the neutron capture with {approximately}1 {mu}s precision for neutron time-of-flight measurements. This paper will discuss these various PSDs with emphasis on the instrumental specifications and the reasons for the selection of the different types of PSDs, and will also discuss the observed performances of these PSDs. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Radiation damage caused by cold neutrons in boron doped CMOS active pixel sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnik, B.; Bus, T.; Deveaux, M.; Doering, D.; Kudejova, P.; Wagner, F. M.; Yazgili, A.; Stroth, J.

    2017-05-01

    CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are considered as an emerging technology in the field of charged particle tracking. They will be used in the vertex detectors of experiments like STAR, CBM and ALICE and are considered for the ILC and the tracker of ATLAS. In those applications, the sensors are exposed to sizeable radiation doses. While the tolerance of MAPS to ionizing radiation and fast hadrons is well known, the damage caused by low energy neutrons was not studied so far. Those slow neutrons may initiate nuclear fission of 10B dopants found in the B-doped silicon active medium of MAPS. This effect was expected to create an unknown amount of radiation damage beyond the predictions of the NIEL (Non Ionizing Energy Loss) model for pure silicon. We estimate the impact of this effect by calculating the additional NIEL created by this fission. Moreover, we show first measured data for CMOS sensors which were irradiated with cold neutrons. The empirical results contradict the prediction of the updated NIEL model both, qualitatively and quantitatively: the sensors irradiated with slow neutrons show an unexpected and strong acceptor removal, which is not observed in sensors irradiated with MeV neutrons.

  19. Active Interrogation Using Electronic Neutron Generators for Nuclear Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Edward H. Seabury

    2008-08-01

    Active interrogation, a measurement technique which uses a radiation source to probe materials and generate unique signatures useful for characterizing those materials, is a powerful tool for assaying special nuclear material. The most commonly used technique for performing active interrogation is to use an electronic neutron generator as the probe radiation source. Exploiting the unique operating characteristics of these devices, including their monoenergetic neutron emissions and their ability to operate in pulsed modes, presents a number of options for performing prompt and delayed signature analyses using both photon and neutron sensors. A review of literature in this area shows multiple applications of the active neutron interrogation technique for performing nuclear nonproliferation measurements. Some examples include measuring the plutonium content of spent fuel, assaying plutonium residue in spent fuel hull claddings, assaying plutonium in aqueous fuel reprocessing process streams, and assaying nuclear fuel reprocessing facility waste streams to detect and quantify fissile material. This paper discusses the historical use of this technique and examines its context within the scope and challenges of next-generation nuclear fuel cycles and advanced concept nuclear fuel cycle facilities.

  20. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; ...

    2015-11-12

    For a long time, neutron time-of-flight diagnostics been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d+t→n+α (DT) and d+d→n+³He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, which is also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (Tion) and cold fuel areal density. We explain such novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent Tion and DSR.

  1. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Knauer, J. P.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Munro, D. H.

    2015-11-12

    For a long time, neutron time-of-flight diagnostics been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d+t→n+α (DT) and d+d→n+³He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, which is also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (Tion) and cold fuel areal density. We explain such novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent Tion and DSR.

  2. Neutron Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nico, J. S.

    2006-11-01

    Precision measurements of neutron beta decay address basic questions in nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. As the simplest semileptonic decay system, the free neutron plays an important role in understanding the physics of the weak interaction, and improving the precision of the neutron lifetime is fundamental to testing the validity of the theory. The neutron lifetime also directly affects the relative abundance of primordial helium in big bang nucleosynthesis. There are two distinct strategies for measuring the lifetime. Experiments using cold neutrons measure the absolute specific activity of a beam of neutrons by counting decay protons; experiments using confined, ultracold neutrons determine the lifetime by counting neutrons that remain after some elapsed time. The status of the recent lifetime measurements using both of these techniques is discussed.

  3. Neutron Lifetime Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, J. S.

    2006-11-17

    Precision measurements of neutron beta decay address basic questions in nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. As the simplest semileptonic decay system, the free neutron plays an important role in understanding the physics of the weak interaction, and improving the precision of the neutron lifetime is fundamental to testing the validity of the theory. The neutron lifetime also directly affects the relative abundance of primordial helium in big bang nucleosynthesis. There are two distinct strategies for measuring the lifetime. Experiments using cold neutrons measure the absolute specific activity of a beam of neutrons by counting decay protons; experiments using confined, ultracold neutrons determine the lifetime by counting neutrons that remain after some elapsed time. The status of the recent lifetime measurements using both of these techniques is discussed.

  4. Precision Measurement of Parity Violation in Polarized Cold Neutron Capture on the Proton: the NPDGamma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Lauss; J.D. Bowman; R. Carlini; T.E. Chupp; W. Chen; S. Corvig; M. Dabaghyan; D. Desai; S.J. Freeman; T.R. Gentile; M.T. Gericke; R.C. Gillis; G.L. Greene; F.W. Hersman; T. Ino; T. Ito; G.L. Jones; M. Kandes; M. Leuschner; B. Lozowski; R. Mahurin; M. Mason; Y. Masuda; J. Mei; G.S. Mitchell; S. Muto; H. Nann; S.A. Page; S.I. Penttila; W.D. Ramsay; S. Santra; P.-N. Seo; E.I. Sharapov; T.B. Smith; W.M. Snow; W.S. Wilburn; V. Yuan; H. Zhu

    2005-10-24

    The NPD{gamma} experiment at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is dedicated to measure with high precision the parity violating asymmetry in the {gamma} emission after capture of spin polarized cold neutrons in para-hydrogen. The measurement will determine unambiguously the weak pion-nucleon-nucleon ({pi} NN) coupling constant (line integral){sub {pi}}{sup l}.

  5. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center LANSCE experiment reports 1989 run cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hyer, D.K.; DiStravolo, M.A.

    1990-10-01

    This report contains a listing and description of experiments carried on at the LANSCE neutron scattering facility in the following areas: High Density Powder Diffraction; Neutron Powder Diffractometer, (NPD); Single Crystal Diffractometer, (SCD); Low-Q Diffractometer, (LQD); Surface Profile Analysis Reflectometer, (SPEAR); Filter Difference Spectrometer, (FDS); and Constant-Q Spectrometer.

  6. Fusion-neutron measurements for magnetized liner inertial fusion experiments on the Z accelerator

    DOE PAGES

    Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; ...

    2016-05-26

    Several magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) experiments have been conducted on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories since late 2013. Measurements of the primary DD (2.45 MeV) neutrons for these experiments suggest that the neutron production is thermonuclear. Primary DD yields up to 3e12 with ion temperatures ~2-3 keV have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary DT (14 MeV) neutrons indicate that the fuel is significantly magnetized. Measurements of down-scattered neutrons from the beryllium liner suggest ρRliner ~ 1g/cm2. Neutron bang times, estimated from neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) measurements, coincide with peak x-ray production. Furthermore, plans to improve and expandmore » the Z neutron diagnostic suite include neutron burn-history diagnostics, increased sensitivity and higher precision nTOF detectors, and neutron recoil-based yield and spectral measurements.« less

  7. D-D Neutron Generator Calibrations and Hardware in the LUX-ZEPLIN Dark Matter Search Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Will; Lux-Zeplin Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The LUX-ZEPLIN (LZ) dark matter search experiment will be a two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber with 7 tonnes of active liquid xenon (LXe) located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. LZ will utilize an in-situ, absolute calibration of nuclear recoils (NR) in LXe using mono-energetic 2.45 MeV neutrons produced by a D-D neutron generator. This technique was used in the LUX detector to measured the NR charge yield in LXe (Qy) to 0.7 keV recoil energy and the NR light yield in LXe (Ly) to recoil energies of 1.1 keV - both of which were the lowest energy measurements achieved in the field. These absolute, ultra-low energy calibrations of the NR signal yields in LXe provide clear measurements of the detector response used for the WIMP search analysis. The improvements made for LZ will include shorter neutron pulse times, multiple neutron conduit configurations, and lower energy neutrons. The upgrades allow for even lower energy measurements of the nuclear recoil response in LXe and an independent measurement of Ly, as well as providing less uncertainty in energy reconstruction. In addition to discussing the physics of the neutron calibrations, I will describe the hardware systems used to implement them.

  8. Validation of the MCNP computational model for neutron flux distribution with the neutron activation analysis measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiyapun, K.; Chimtin, M.; Munsorn, S.; Somchit, S.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate the method for validating the predication of the calculation methods for neutron flux distribution in the irradiation tubes of TRIGA research reactor (TRR-1/M1) using the MCNP computer code model. The reaction rate using in the experiment includes 27Al(n, α)24Na and 197Au(n, γ)198Au reactions. Aluminium (99.9 wt%) and gold (0.1 wt%) foils and the gold foils covered with cadmium were irradiated in 9 locations in the core referred to as CT, C8, C12, F3, F12, F22, F29, G5, and G33. The experimental results were compared to the calculations performed using MCNP which consisted of the detailed geometrical model of the reactor core. The results from the experimental and calculated normalized reaction rates in the reactor core are in good agreement for both reactions showing that the material and geometrical properties of the reactor core are modelled very well. The results indicated that the difference between the experimental measurements and the calculation of the reactor core using the MCNP geometrical model was below 10%. In conclusion the MCNP computational model which was used to calculate the neutron flux and reaction rate distribution in the reactor core can be used for others reactor core parameters including neutron spectra calculation, dose rate calculation, power peaking factors calculation and optimization of research reactor utilization in the future with the confidence in the accuracy and reliability of the calculation.

  9. The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) Experiment for NASA Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Maxim; Mitrofanov, Igor; Kozyrev, S. Alexander; Boynton, William V.; Malakhov, Alexey; Mokrousov, Maxim; Varenikov, Alexey; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Golovin, Dmitrij; Behar, Alberto

    We present a summary of the physical principles, design and results of first tests of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument onboard NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. This instrument will use the method of neutron-neutron activation analysis in a space application to study the abundance and depth distribution of water in Martian subsurface along the path of the MSL rover.

  10. Japanese experience with clinical trails of fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Arai, T.; Morita, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Aoki, Y.; Takada, N.; Kamata, S.

    1982-12-01

    Between November, 1975 and November, 1981, 825 patients were treated with 30 MeV (d-Be) neutrons at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba. At the Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo, 302 patients were referred to the Radiation Therapy department and were treated with 16 MeV (d-Be) neutrons. The emphasis of these clinical trials with fast neutrons was placed on the estimation of the effect of fast neutrons for locally advanced cancers or radioresistant cancers, and on evaluation of the rate of complication of normal tissues following irradiaton with fast neutrons. Results were evaluated for patients with previously untreated cancer; local control of the tumor was observed in 59.1%. Complications requiring medical care developed in only 32 patients. Patients who had received pre- or postoperative irradiation were excluded from this evaluation. Late reaction of soft tissue seemed to be more severe than that observed with photon beams. The results also suggest that for carcinoma of the larynx, esophagus, uterine cervix, Pancoasts's tumor of the lung and osteosarcoma, fast neutrons were considered to be effectively applied in this randomized clinical trial. For carcinoma of the larynx, a fast nuetron boost was effectively delivered, although an interstitial implant was necessarily combined with fast neutrons for carcinoma of the tongue. The cumulative survival rate of the patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated with fast neutrons was 26% compared to the survival rate of 10.5% obtained using photons. This was supported by evidence from the pathological studies that showed that the tumor cells which had deeply invaded into the esophagus were effectively destroyed when fast neutrons were applied.

  11. A simulation-based study of the neutron backgrounds for NaI dark matter experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, E. J.; Kim, Y. D.

    2016-01-01

    Among the direct search experiments for weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter, the DAMA experiment observed an annual modulation signal interpreted as WIMP interactions with a significance of 9.2σ. Recently, Jonathan Davis claimed that the DAMA modulation may be interpreted on the basis of the neutron scattering events induced by the muons and neutrinos together. We tried to simulate the neutron backgrounds at the Gran Sasso and Yangyang laboratory with and without the polyethylene shielding to quantify the effects of the ambient neutrons on the direct detection experiments based on the crystals.

  12. Neutron activation and prompt gamma intensity in Ar/CO2-filled neutron detectors at the European Spallation Source.

    PubMed

    Dian, E; Kanaki, K; Hall-Wilton, R J; Zagyvai, P; Czifrus, Sz

    2017-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP6.1 were performed to study the effect of neutron activation in Ar/CO2 neutron detector counting gas. A general MCNP model was built and validated with simple analytical calculations. Simulations and calculations agree that only the (40)Ar activation can have a considerable effect. It was shown that neither the prompt gamma intensity from the (40)Ar neutron capture nor the produced (41)Ar activity have an impact in terms of gamma dose rate around the detector and background level. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Activation Counter Using Liquid Light-Guide for Dosimetry of Neutron Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Mitsunobu; Kawarabayashi, Jun; Tomita, Hideki; Asai, Keisuke; Maeda, Shigetaka; Tsuji, Hiroki; Iguchi, Tetsuo

    2009-08-01

    A novel activation counter is proposed using a liquid light-guide (LLG) and a suitable group of activation foils for dosimetry of neutron burst. The LLG that works as a position sensitive radiation detector, has been covered with appropriate activation materials whose threshold energies are different to each other, with a distance of a few tens of cm between them. Since the induced activities of activation foils irradiated by neutrons are detected independently by the LLG, the neutron energy distribution and its flux can be derived from the activities and their neutron cross-sections by numerical de-convolution calculation. The proposed activation counter would be suitable for the dosimetry of intense neutron burst including fast neutrons because the LLG and the activation foils have a high tolerance for radiation damage. We have designed the system configuration of the proposed activation counter. The preliminary results of the responses due to thermal and fast neutrons have been obtained successfully.

  14. Recent activities of the International Group on Research Reactors (IGORR) and of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS). [Advanced Neutron Source Project

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    The International Group on Research Reactors (IGORR) was formed in 1990 to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. The Advanced Neutron Source Project expects to complete conceptual design in mid-1992. In the present design concept, the neutron source is a heavy-water-cooled, moderated, and reflected reactor of about 350 MW(f) power. 7 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. An improved prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility using a focused diffracted neutron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Kent J.; Harling, Otto K.

    1998-09-01

    The performance of the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility at the MIT Research Reactor has been improved by a series of modifications. These modifications have increased the flux by a factor of three at the sample position to 1.7 × 10 7 n/cm 2 s, and have increased the sensitivity, on average, by a factor of 2.5. The background for many samples of interest is dominated by unavoidable neutron interactions that occur in or near the sample. Other background components comprise only 20% of the total background count rate. The implementation of fast electronics has helped to keep dead time reasonable, in spite of the increased count rates. The PGNAA facility at the MIT Research Reactor continues to serve as a major analytical tool for quantifying 10B in biological samples for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research. The sensitivity for boron-10 in water is 18 750 cps/mg. The sensitivity for pure elements suitable for PGNAA analysis is reported. Possible further improvements are discussed.

  16. Overview of Neutron Beta Correlation Parameter Analysis from the UCNA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuan; UCNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The UCNA experiment, operated at the Ultracold Neutron Facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, uses ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure the free-neutron β-decay correlation parameter, A, between the neutron spin direction and β momentum direction. Measurements of A presently provide the most precise value of gA /gV , the ratio of the axial-vector and vector coupling constants of the nucleon weak interaction. The UCNA experiment has previously analyzed and reported on a measurement of A from a 2010 dataset. Additional datasets were also taken in 2011-2012 and 2012-2013. Improvements in energy calibrations, polarimetry, and statistics are expected to provide a more precise measurement of A from the later datasets. We provide a review of the experimental apparatus and give an updated overview on the state of the 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 dataset analysis with respect to the A measurement.

  17. Calculation of thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for aqueous bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Jalali, M.; Mohammadi, A.

    2007-10-01

    In this work thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing materials is studied using bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) with the MCNP code. The code was used to perform three dimensional simulations of a neutron source, neutron detector and sample of various material compositions. The MCNP model was validated against experimental measurements of the neutron flux performed using a BF 3 detector. Simulations were performed to predict thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing solutes. In practice, the MCNP calculations are combined with experimental measurements of the relative thermal neutron flux over the sample's surface, with respect to a reference water sample, to derive the thermal neutron self-shielding within the sample. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the average thermal neutron flux within the sample volume is required.

  18. Tripartite entanglement in single-neutron interferometer experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erdösi, Daniel; Hasegawa, Yuji; Huber, Marcus; Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.

    2014-12-04

    We present experimental evidence of the generation of distinct types of genuine multipartite entanglement between the spin, energy, and path degrees of freedom within single-neutron quantum systems. This is achieved via the development of new spin manipulation apparatuses for neutron interferometry and the entanglement is detected via appropriately designed and optimized non-linear witnesses. We demonstrate the extraordinarily high controllability and fidelity of the generated entangled states.

  19. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  20. Neutron-multiplicity experiments for enhanced fission modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adili, Ali; Tarrío, Diego; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Göök, Alf; Jansson, Kaj; Solders, Andreas; Rakapoulos, Vasileios; Gustavsson, Cecilia; Lantz, Mattias; Mattera, Andrea; Oberstedt, Stephan; Prokofiev, Alexander V.; Sundén, Erik A.; Vidali, Marzio; Österlund, Michael; Pomp, Stephan

    2017-09-01

    The nuclear de-excitation process of fission fragments (FF) provides fundamental information for the understanding of nuclear fission and nuclear structure in neutron-rich isotopes. The variation of the prompt-neutron multiplicity, ν(A), as a function of the incident neutron energy (En) is one of many open questions. It leads to significantly different treatments in various fission models and implies that experimental data are analyzed based on contradicting assumptions. One critical question is whether the additional excitation energy (Eexc) is manifested through an increase of ν(A) for all fragments or for the heavy ones only. A systematic investigation of ν(A) as a function of En has been initiated. Correlations between prompt-fission neutrons and fission fragments are obtained by using liquid scintillators in conjunction with a Frisch-grid ionization chamber. The proof-of-principle has been achieved on the reaction 235U(nth,f) at the Van De Graff (VdG) accelerator of the JRC-Geel using a fully digital data acquisition system. Neutrons from 252Cf(sf) were measured separately to quantify the neutron-scattering component due to surrounding shielding material and to determine the intrinsic detector efficiency. Prelimenary results on ν(A) and spectrum in correlation with FF properties are presented.

  1. BARYON LOADING OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS MEDIATED BY NEUTRONS

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, K.; Takahara, F.

    2012-08-01

    Plasmas of geometrically thick, black hole (BH) accretion flows in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are generally collisionless for protons, and involve magnetic field turbulence. Under such conditions a fraction of protons can be accelerated stochastically and create relativistic neutrons via nuclear collisions. These neutrons can freely escape from the accretion flow and decay into protons in the dilute polar region above the rotating BH to form relativistic jets. We calculate geometric efficiencies of the neutron energy and mass injections into the polar region, and show that this process can deposit luminosity as high as L{sub j}{approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M-dot c{sup 2} and mass loading M-dot{sub j}{approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} M-dot for the case of the BH mass M {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }, where M-dot is the mass accretion rate. The terminal Lorentz factors of the jets are {Gamma} {approx} 3, and they may explain the AGN jets having low luminosities. For higher luminosity jets, which can be produced by additional energy inputs such as Poynting flux, the neutron decay still can be a dominant mass loading process, leading to, e.g., {Gamma} {approx} 50 for L{sub j,tot}{approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} M-dot c{sup 2}.

  2. Factors affecting the measurement accuracy of ITER neutron activation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, M. S.; Ahn, Y. H.; Pak, S.; Seon, C.; Krasilnikov, V.; Bertalot, L.

    2017-08-01

    One of the main purposes of the ITER2 neutron activation system (NAS) is to evaluate the total neutron production rate from all over the plasma. The measurement accuracy depends on the position and profile of the plasma and the material in front of the irradiation end. It is required to minimize the amount of material and its density variation across the field of view between the plasma and the irradiation end. Due to the radiation and thermal environment of the ITER in-vessel, however, the measurement from ITER NAS cannot avoid the strong influence from in-vessel materials such as the diagnostic first wall, blanket modules, and divertor cassettes, those are located near the irradiation ends. In order to improve the reliability of the measurement in such environment, special cutouts in the diagnostic first wall are introduced near the irradiation end structures located in the port plugs. The effect of the materials and the position and profile of the neutron source in the plasma are evaluated for these irradiation locations, as well as the ones under the divertor cassettes and between blanket modules, by the neutron transport calculation. Calculation results show that simultaneous measurements at upper port and divertor location can provide highly accurate results even without a position or profile correction from other diagnostics.

  3. Optimization of Neutron Activation of Carbon at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padalino, S.; Polsin, D.; Russ, M.; Sangster, T.; LLE Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    To determine the rhoR of ignition scale targets at the NIF, a carbon activation diagnostic is being developed to measure tertiary neutron yield. It has been shown theoretically that the ratio of the tertiary yield to the primary yield is directly related to rhoR and is nearly independent of hot-spot electron temperature. Due to carbon's 20.3 MeV reaction threshold, it is insensitive to 14.7 MeV primary neutrons which are measured by other means and allows for an unambiguous determination of the tertiary to primary ratio. The energy distribution of the 20 to 30 MeV DT neutrons folded with the (n,2n) cross section in this energy region determines the degree in which carbon will be activated. However, the published 12C(n,2n) cross sections in this energy range are bifurcated. To set upper and lower limits on the sensitivity of the activation diagnostic, a finite element calculation was used to determine the limits of the method's usefulness at differing primary yields and solid angles for the NIF chamber. It was further used to verify MCNPX activation calculations. This work was funded in part by the USDOE through LLE.

  4. Investigating Coincidence Techniques in Biomedical Applications of Neutron Activation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, P.; Gramer, R.; Tandel, S. K.; Reinhardt, C. J.

    2004-05-01

    While neutron activation analysis has been widely used in biomedical applications for some time, the use of non-radioactive tracer techniques, to monitor, for example, organ blood flow, is more recent. In these studies, pre-clinical animal models are injected with micro-spheres labeled with stable isotopes of elements that have a high neutron absorption cross-section. Subsequently, samples of blood and/or tissue from different locations in the body are subjected to neutron activation analysis to measure the propagation of the labeled micro-spheres through the body. Following irradiation, the counting (with high-resolution Ge detectors) is typically delayed by a few days to dissipate short-lived activity in the samples and improve signal-to-noise for the peaks of interest in the activation spectrum. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether coincidence techniques (for isotopes which decay via two-photon cascades) could improve signal-to-noise and turn-around times. The samples were irradiated at the 1 MW research reactor at the UMass Lowell Radiation Laboratory. The analysis of the multi-parameter coincidence data recorded in event-mode will be presented and compared with the standard method of recording singles spectra.

  5. Fusion neutron detector for time-of-flight measurements in z-pinch and plasma focus experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Rezac, K.; Litseva, E.; Tomaszewski, K.; Karpinski, L.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M.

    2011-03-15

    We have developed and tested sensitive neutron detectors for neutron time-of-flight measurements in z-pinch and plasma focus experiments with neutron emission times in tens of nanoseconds and with neutron yields between 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 12} per one shot. The neutron detectors are composed of a BC-408 fast plastic scintillator and Hamamatsu H1949-51 photomultiplier tube (PMT). During the calibration procedure, a PMT delay was determined for various operating voltages. The temporal resolution of the neutron detector was measured for the most commonly used PMT voltage of 1.4 kV. At the PF-1000 plasma focus, a novel method of the acquisition of a pulse height distribution has been used. This pulse height analysis enabled to determine the single neutron sensitivity for various neutron energies and to calibrate the neutron detector for absolute neutron yields at about 2.45 MeV.

  6. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  7. Fusion neutron source blanket: requirements for calculation accuracy and benchmark experiment precision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhirkin, A. V.; Alekseev, P. N.; Batyaev, V. F.; Gurevich, M. I.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Kuteev, B. V.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, Yu. E.; Titarenko, A. Yu.

    2017-06-01

    In this report the calculation accuracy requirements of the main parameters of the fusion neutron source, and the thermonuclear blankets with a DT fusion power of more than 10 MW, are formulated. To conduct the benchmark experiments the technical documentation and calculation models were developed for two blanket micro-models: the molten salt and the heavy water solid-state blankets. The calculations of the neutron spectra, and 37 dosimetric reaction rates that are widely used for the registration of thermal, resonance and threshold (0.25-13.45 MeV) neutrons, were performed for each blanket micro-model. The MCNP code and the neutron data library ENDF/B-VII were used for the calculations. All the calculations were performed for two kinds of neutron source: source I is the fusion source, source II is the source of neutrons generated by the 7Li target irradiated by protons with energy 24.6 MeV. The spectral indexes ratios were calculated to describe the spectrum variations from different neutron sources. The obtained results demonstrate the advantage of using the fusion neutron source in future experiments.

  8. Neutron imaging experiments at E-12 beam-line of CIRUS

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Ashish; Kashyap, Yogesh; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-05

    Neutron imaging beam-line at E-12 beam port of CIRUS reactor India has been developed to implement Neutron tomography, phase contrast imaging and dynamic imaging techniques for various applications. Several experiments on these techniques have been carried out successfully. Neutron radiography and tomography has been used to study blisters formation in pressure tube along with many other applications. Similarly phase contrast imaging has been used to study its feasibility for better contrast in radiographic images. Dynamic imaging has been applied to study the melting of pure and impure lead under heat. In this paper we report the details of various experiments performed at this beam-line.

  9. Magnetic field non-uniformity challenges in neutron electric dipole moment experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Nima

    A new neutron Electric Dipole Moment (nEDM) experiment will be performed at the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The underlying theme of this experiment (first conceived by Golub and Lamoreaux in 1994 [1]) is the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The experiment has the potential to reveal new sources of time reversal (T) and charge conservation and parity (CP) violation. The discovery of a non-zero nEDM would be of revolutionary importance to physics. This provides evidence for new-beyond-the-Standard-Model physics, which required for a resolution to the unresolved puzzle of why the universe is dominated by matter, as opposed to anti-matter. The basic principle upon which experimental searches for a neutron EDM employing stored ultracold neutrons (UCN) are based concerns measurements of the neutrons' Larmor spin precession frequencies nu+/- in parallel (+) and anti-parallel (-) magnetic ([special character omitted]) and electric ([special character omitted]) fields. A value for, or a limit on, the neutron EDM is then deduced from a comparison of the measured values of nu+ and nu-. However, the experiment bound is limited by different systematic effects such as magnetic-field. A central problem to all neutron EDM experiments concerns the challenge of real-time determination of the magnetic field vector components present within some interior region of the experimental apparatus (UCN container) over which it is impossible to directly measure the field components during the operation of the experiment. This is essential for the optimization of several experimental parameters directly related to the statistical sensitivity, and for monitoring various systematic errors. A first demonstration of a new magnetic field monitoring system for a neutron electric dipole moment experiment is presented. The system is designed to reconstruct the vector

  10. Neutron imaging experiments at E-12 beam-line of CIRUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Ashish; Kashyap, Yogesh; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-01

    Neutron imaging beam-line at E-12 beam port of CIRUS reactor India has been developed to implement Neutron tomography, phase contrast imaging and dynamic imaging techniques for various applications. Several experiments on these techniques have been carried out successfully. Neutron radiography and tomography has been used to study blisters formation in pressure tube along with many other applications. Similarly phase contrast imaging has been used to study its feasibility for better contrast in radiographic images. Dynamic imaging has been applied to study the melting of pure and impure lead under heat. In this paper we report the details of various experiments performed at this beam-line.

  11. Nondestructive neutron activation analysis of volcanic samples: Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Zoller, W.H.; Finnegan, D.L.; Crowe, B.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of volcanic emissions have been collected between and during eruptions of both Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes during the last three years. Airborne particles have been collected on Teflon filters and acidic gases on base-impregnated cellulose filters. Chemically neutral gas-phase species are collected on charcoal-coated cellulose filters. The primary analytical technique used is nondestructive neutron activation analysis, which has been used to determine the quantities of up to 35 elements on the different filters. The use of neutron activation analysis makes it possible to analyze for a wide range of elements in the different matrices used for the collection and to learn about the distribution between particles and gas phases for each of the elements.

  12. A practical beryllium activation detector for measuring DD neutron yield from ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.J.

    1996-06-01

    A neutron activation detector based on the reaction {sup 9}Be(n,{alpha}){sup 6}He({beta}{sup {minus}}){sup 6}Li has been designed which could potentially allow DD yield determinations within a few minutes after an ICF implosion or other pulsed neutron event with precision comparable to methods currently in use in ICF experiments. The detector is based on previous work, but has been redesigned to allow use in a reentrant tube less than six inches in diameter, and to increase detection efficiency. The detector consists of beryllium rods imbedded in plastic scintillator and coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Neutrons interact with the beryllium to produce {sup 6}He, which decays by emission of a {beta}{sup {minus}} particle with a maximum energy of 3.51 MeV with a half life of 808 ms. The {beta}{sup {minus}} particles are counted, and a neutron yield is determined for the total activity produced. The short half life of {sup 6}He will result in high specific activity and allow quick determination of the amount of {sup 6}He produced.

  13. Neutron electric dipole moment and possibilities of increasing accuracy of experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Serebrov, A. P. Kolomenskiy, E. A.; Pirozhkov, A. N.; Krasnoshchekova, I. A.; Vasiliev, A. V.; Polyushkin, A. O.; Lasakov, M. S.; Murashkin, A. N.; Solovey, V. A.; Fomin, A. K.; Shoka, I. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M.; Aleksandrov, E. B.; Dmitriev, S. P.; Dovator, N. A.; Geltenbort, P.; Ivanov, S. N.; Zimmer, O.

    2016-01-15

    The paper reports the results of an experiment on searching for the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM), performed on the ILL reactor (Grenoble, France). The double-chamber magnetic resonance spectrometer (Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI)) with prolonged holding of ultra cold neutrons has been used. Sources of possible systematic errors are analyzed, and their influence on the measurement results is estimated. The ways and prospects of increasing accuracy of the experiment are discussed.

  14. Study of concrete activation with IFMIF-like neutron irradiation: Status of EAF and TENDL neutron activation cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Mauricio; Sauvan, Patrick; García, Raquel; Ogando, Francisco; Sanz, Javier

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to check the performance of last versions of EAF and TENDL libraries (EAF2007, EAF2010, and TENDL2014) in the prediction of concrete activation under the neutron irradiation environment expected in IFMIF, an accelerator-based neutron source conceived for fusion materials testing. For this purpose Activity and dose rate responses of three types of concrete (ITER-Bioshield kind, barite and magnetite concretes) have been studied. For these quantities, dominant nuclides and production pathways have been determined and, then, a qualitative analysis of the relevant activation cross-sections involved has been performed by comparing data from mentioned libraries with experimental data from EXFOR database. Concrete activation studies have been carried out with IFMIF-like neutron irradiation conditions using the ACAB code and EAF and TENDL libraries. The cooling times assessed are related to safety and maintenance operations, specifically 1 hour, 1 day and 12 days. Final conclusions are focused on the recommendations for the activation library to be used among those analyzed and cross-section data to be improved.

  15. Determination of indium in standard rocks by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Johansen, O; Steinnes, E

    1966-08-01

    A rapid neutron activation method for the determination of indium in rocks, based on 54 min (116m)In, is described. The method has been applied to a series of geochemical standards including granite G-1 and diabase W-1. The precision is better than +/- 5% for samples containing more than 5 x 10(-10)g indium. Good agreement with previously published values for G-1 and W-1 has been obtained.

  16. Obsidian sources characterized by neutron-activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Gordus, A A; Wright, G A; Griffin, J B

    1968-07-26

    Concentrations of elements such as manganese, scandium, lanthanum, rubidium, samarium, barium, and zirconium in obsidian samples from different flows show ranges of 1000 percent or more, whereas the variation in element content in obsidian samples from a single flow appears to be less than 40 percent. Neutron-activation analysis of these elements, as well as of sodium and iron, provides a means of identifying the geologic source of an archeological artifact of obsidian.

  17. Diagnostic Application of Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis in Hematology

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, C.B.; Oliveira, L.C.; Dalaqua, L. Jr.

    2004-10-03

    The Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis (ANAA) technique was used to determine element concentrations of Cl and Na in blood of healthy group (male and female blood donators), select from Blood Banks at Sao Paulo city, to provide information which can help in diagnosis of patients. This study permitted to perform a discussion about the advantages and limitations of using this nuclear methodology in hematological examinations.

  18. Active Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsed Neutron Generator-Gamma Ray And Neutron Detectors (PNG-GRAND) experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA-GSFC) is to bring the PNG-GRAND instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Menus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets. Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (GRS) have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions and, especially its the case of the Mars Odyssey GRS, have contributed detailed maps of the elemental composition over the entire surface of Mars. However, orbital gamma ray measurements have low spatial sensitivity (100's of km) due to their low surface emission rates from cosmic rays and subsequent need to be averaged over large surface areas. PNG-GRAND overcomes this impediment by incorporating a powerful neutron excitation source that permits high sensitivity surface and subsurface measurements of bulk elemental compositions. PNG-GRAND combines a pulsed neutron generator (PNG) with gamma ray and neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument to determine subsurface elemental composition without needing to drill into a planet's surface a great advantage in mission design. We are currently testing PNG-GRAND prototypes at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility recently constructed at NASA/GSFC that consists of a 2 m x 2 in x 1 m granite structure placed outdoors in an empty field. Because an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on the material, this granite sample is a known standard with which to compare both Monte Carlo simulations and our experimentally measured elemental composition data. We will present data from operating PNG-GRAND in various experimental configurations on a

  19. Monte Carlo studies on neutron interactions in radiobiological experiments.

    PubMed

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Hau, Tak Cheong; Krstic, D; Nikezic, D; Yu, K N

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo method was used to study the characteristics of neutron interactions with cells underneath a water medium layer with varying thickness. The following results were obtained. (1) The fractions of neutron interaction with 1H, 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei in the cell layer were studied. The fraction with 1H increased with increasing medium thickness, while decreased for 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei. The bulges in the interaction fractions with 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei were explained by the resonance spikes in the interaction cross-section data. The interaction fraction decreased in the order: 1H > 16O > 12C > 14N. (2) In general, as the medium thickness increased, the number of "interacting neutrons" which exited the medium and then further interacted with the cell layer increased. (3) The area under the angular distributions for "interacting neutrons" decreased with increasing incident neutron energy. Such results would be useful for deciphering the reasons behind discrepancies among existing results in the literature.

  20. Report of the first United States conference on utility experience with neutron noise analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, D.N.; Horne, G.P.; Mayo, C.W.

    1984-01-01

    An informal meeting was held in Washington, D.C. on April 3 and 4, 1984, to discuss the current state of the art and experiences with neutron noise analysis in US pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The meeting was attended by 33 persons representing 11 utilities and 3 PWR reactor vendors as well as consultants, universities, and research laboratories. Presentations at the meeting covered several applications of neutron noise for diagnosing such things as vibrations induced by baffle jetting, detection of mechanical degradation of thermal shield supports, and electrical degradation of nuclear instrumentation channels. Twenty-one responses were obtained from a questionnaire circulated to all participants requesting their viewpoints and experiences regarding neutron noise analysis. The meeting participants concluded that a working group on neutron noise analysis should be formed to (1) establish a baseline library of neutron noise data, (2) provide a forum for communicating experiences with neutron noise surveillance, and (3) develop good practices and quality assurance procedures for neutron noise measurement and interpretation.

  1. A high-field adiabatic fast passage ultracold neutron spin flipper for the UCNA experiment.

    PubMed

    Holley, A T; Broussard, L J; Davis, J L; Hickerson, K; Ito, T M; Liu, C-Y; Lyles, J T M; Makela, M; Mammei, R R; Mendenhall, M P; Morris, C L; Mortensen, R; Pattie, R W; Rios, R; Saunders, A; Young, A R

    2012-07-01

    The UCNA collaboration is making a precision measurement of the β asymmetry (A) in free neutron decay using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN). A critical component of this experiment is an adiabatic fast passage neutron spin flipper capable of efficient operation in ambient magnetic fields on the order of 1 T. The requirement that it operate in a high field necessitated the construction of a free neutron spin flipper based, for the first time, on a birdcage resonator. The design, construction, and initial testing of this spin flipper prior to its use in the first measurement of A with UCN during the 2007 run cycle of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's 800 MeV proton accelerator is detailed. These studies determined the flipping efficiency of the device, averaged over the UCN spectrum present at the location of the spin flipper, to be ̅ε=0.9985(4).

  2. A high-field adiabatic fast passage ultracold neutron spin flipper for the UCNA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley, A. T.; Broussard, L. J.; Davis, J. L.; Hickerson, K.; Ito, T. M.; Liu, C.-Y.; Lyles, J. T. M.; Makela, M.; Mammei, R. R.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Morris, C. L.; Mortensen, R.; Pattie, R. W.; Rios, R.; Saunders, A.; Young, A. R.

    2012-07-01

    The UCNA collaboration is making a precision measurement of the β asymmetry (A) in free neutron decay using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN). A critical component of this experiment is an adiabatic fast passage neutron spin flipper capable of efficient operation in ambient magnetic fields on the order of 1 T. The requirement that it operate in a high field necessitated the construction of a free neutron spin flipper based, for the first time, on a birdcage resonator. The design, construction, and initial testing of this spin flipper prior to its use in the first measurement of A with UCN during the 2007 run cycle of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's 800 MeV proton accelerator is detailed. These studies determined the flipping efficiency of the device, averaged over the UCN spectrum present at the location of the spin flipper, to be overline{ɛ }=0.9985(4).

  3. Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) Experiment Onboard NASA's Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Varenikov, A. B.; Barmakov, Y. N.; Behar, A.; Bobrovnitsky, Y. I.; Bogolubov, E. P.; Boynton, W. V.; Harshman, K.; Kan, E.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Ponomareva, S. N.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Smirnov, G. A.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Tomilina, T. M.; Tret'yakov, V. I.; Vostrukhin, A. A.

    2012-09-01

    The description of Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment is presented, as a part of the NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission onboard the mars rover Curiosity. The instrument DAN includes Pulsing Neutron Generator (PNG) producing pulses of 14.1 MeV neutrons for irradiation of subsurface material below the rover, and Detectors and Electronics (DE) unit, which operates the instrument itself and measures the die-away time profiles of epithermal and thermal neutrons following each neutron pulse. It is shown that the DAN investigation will measure a content of hydrogen along the path of the MSL rover, and it will also provide information about a depth distribution of hydrogen at 10-20 regions selected for the detailed studies and sampling analysis.

  4. Data Driven Study of Neutron Response Using Quasielastic Neutrino Scattering in the Minerva Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Evan; Minerva Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how particles behave in detectors is a critical part of analyzing data from neutrino experiments, but neutral particles are difficult to characterize. The purpose of this project was to calibrate the neutron response in Quasielastic antineutrino scattering (QE) events in the Minerva detector. We applied quasi-elastic assumptions to estimate the outgoing neutron kinematics in QE scattering, and then added modifications to improve the model's predictions for neutron response in data. We compared these kinematic predictions of neutron energy and angle to Monte Carlo simulations of QE scattering and to the behavior of reconstructed energy ``blobs'' that characterize neutral particle behavior in simulated and real Minerva data. Filtering events for neutron energy, angle, and distance from the interaction vertex, we derive calibration functions for both the simulation and real data. Future work will include potential changes to the blobbing algorithms and refinement of the calibration technique using rigorous statistical methods.

  5. Detection system for neutron β decay correlations in the UCNB and Nab experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broussard, L. J.; Zeck, B. A.; Adamek, E. R.; Baeßler, S.; Birge, N.; Blatnik, M.; Bowman, J. D.; Brandt, A. E.; Brown, M.; Burkhart, J.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Crawford, C.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S.; Dees, E. B.; Ding, X.; Fomin, N.; Frlez, E.; Fry, J.; Gray, F. E.; Hasan, S.; Hickerson, K. P.; Hoagland, J.; Holley, A. T.; Ito, T. M.; Klein, A.; Li, H.; Liu, C.-Y.; Makela, M. F.; McGaughey, P. L.; Mirabal-Martinez, J.; Morris, C. L.; Ortiz, J. D.; Pattie, R. W.; Penttilä, S. I.; Plaster, B.; Počanić, D.; Ramsey, J. C.; Salas-Bacci, A.; Salvat, D. J.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Sprow, A. P.; Tang, Z.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Vorndick, B.; Wang, Z.; Wei, W.; Wexler, J.; Wilburn, W. S.; Womack, T. L.; Young, A. R.

    2017-03-01

    We describe a detection system designed for precise measurements of angular correlations in neutron β decay. The system is based on thick, large area, highly segmented silicon detectors developed in collaboration with Micron Semiconductor, Ltd. The prototype system meets specifications for β electron detection with energy thresholds below 10 keV, energy resolution of ∼3 keV FWHM, and rise time of ∼50 ns with 19 of the 127 detector pixels instrumented. Using ultracold neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, we have demonstrated the coincident detection of β particles and recoil protons from neutron β decay. The fully instrumented detection system will be implemented in the UCNB and Nab experiments to determine the neutron β decay parameters B, a, and b.

  6. Detection system for neutron β decay correlations in the UCNB and Nab experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Broussard, L. J.; Zeck, B. A.; Adamek, E. R.; Baeßler, S.; Birge, N.; Blatnik, M.; Bowman, J. D.; Brandt, A. E.; Brown, M.; Burkhart, J.; Callahan, N. B.; Clayton, S. M.; Crawford, C.; Cude-Woods, C.; Currie, S.; Dees, E. B.; Ding, X.; Fomin, N.; Frlez, E.; Fry, J.; Gray, F. E.; Hasan, S.; Hickerson, K. P.; Hoagland, J.; Holley, A. T.; Ito, T. M.; Klein, A.; Li, H.; Liu, C. -Y.; Makela, M. F.; McGaughey, P. L.; Mirabal-Martinez, J.; Morris, C. L.; Ortiz, J. D.; Pattie, R. W.; Penttilä, S. I.; Plaster, B.; Počanić, D.; Ramsey, J. C.; Salas-Bacci, A.; Salvat, D. J.; Saunders, A.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sjue, S. K. L.; Sprow, A. P.; Tang, Z.; Vogelaar, R. B.; Vorndick, B.; Wang, Z.; Wei, W.; Wexler, J.; Wilburn, W. S.; Womack, T. L.; Young, A. R.

    2016-12-19

    Here, we describe a detection system designed to precisely measure multiple correlations in neutron β decay. Furthermore, the system is based on thick, large area, highly segmented silicon detectors developed in collaboration with Micron Semiconductor, Ltd. The prototype system meets specifications of energy thresholds below 10 keV, energy resolution of ~3 keV FWHM, and rise time of ~50 ns with 19 of the 127 detector pixels instrumented. We have demonstrated the coincident detection of β particles and recoil protons from neutron β decay, using ultracold neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, . The fully instrumented detection system will be implemented in the UCNB and Nab experiments, to determine the neutron β decay parameters B, a, and b.

  7. Detection system for neutron β decay correlations in the UCNB and Nab experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Broussard, L. J.; Oak Ridge National Lab.; Zeck, B. A.; ...

    2016-12-19

    Here, we describe a detection system designed to precisely measure multiple correlations in neutron β decay. Furthermore, the system is based on thick, large area, highly segmented silicon detectors developed in collaboration with Micron Semiconductor, Ltd. The prototype system meets specifications of energy thresholds below 10 keV, energy resolution of ~3 keV FWHM, and rise time of ~50 ns with 19 of the 127 detector pixels instrumented. We have demonstrated the coincident detection of β particles and recoil protons from neutron β decay, using ultracold neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, . The fully instrumented detection system willmore » be implemented in the UCNB and Nab experiments, to determine the neutron β decay parameters B, a, and b.« less

  8. Neutron focusing system for the Texas Cold Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehring, Bernard W.; Kim, Jong-Youl; Ünlü, Kenan

    1994-12-01

    A "converging neutron guide" focusing system located at the end of the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) "curved neutron guide" would increase the neutron flux for neutron capture experiments. Our design for a converging guide is based on using several rectangular truncated cone sections. Each rectangular truncated cone consists of four 20-cm long Si plates coated with NiC-Ti supermirrors. Dimensions of each section were determined by a three-dimensional Monte Carlo optimization calculation. The two slant angles of the truncated cones were varied to optimize the neutron flux at the focal area of the focusing system. Different multielement converging guides were designed and their performance analyzed. From the performance results and financial considerations, we selected a four-section 80-cm long converging guide focusing system for construction and use with the TCNS. The focused cold neutron beam will be used for neutron capture experiment, e.g., prompt gamma activation analysis and neutron depth profiling.

  9. Neutron-induced nucleation inside bubble chambers using Freon 115 as the active medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghilea, M. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.

    2011-08-01

    Neutron imaging is used in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments to measure the core symmetry of imploded targets. Liquid bubble chambers have the potential to obtain higher resolution images of the targets for a shorter source-target distance than typical scintillator arrays. Due to the fact that nucleation models used in gel detectors research cannot always give correct estimates for the neutron-induced bubble density inside a liquid bubble chamber, an improved theoretical model to describe the mechanism of bubble formation for Freon 115 as the active medium has been developed. It shows that the size of the critical radius for the nucleation process determines the mechanism of bubble formation and the sensitivity of the active medium to the 14.1-MeV incident neutrons resulting from ICF implosions. The bubble-growth mechanism is driven by the excitation of the medium electronic levels and not by electrons ejected from the medium's atoms as happens for the bubble chambers used to detect charged particles. The model accurately predicts the neutron-induced bubble density measured on OMEGA with both liquid bubble chambers and gel detectors.

  10. Mercury mass measurement in fluorescent lamps via neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viererbl, L.; Vinš, M.; Lahodová, Z.; Fuksa, A.; Kučera, J.; Koleška, M.; Voljanskij, A.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury is an essential component of fluorescent lamps. Not all fluorescent lamps are recycled, resulting in contamination of the environment with toxic mercury, making measurement of the mercury mass used in fluorescent lamps important. Mercury mass measurement of lamps via instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) was tested under various conditions in the LVR-15 research reactor. Fluorescent lamps were irradiated in different positions in vertical irradiation channels and a horizontal channel in neutron fields with total fluence rates from 3×108 cm-2 s-1 to 1014 cm-2 s-1. The 202Hg(n,γ)203Hg nuclear reaction was used for mercury mass evaluation. Activities of 203Hg and others induced radionuclides were measured via gamma spectrometry with an HPGe detector at various times after irradiation. Standards containing an Hg2Cl2 compound were used to determine mercury mass. Problems arise from the presence of elements with a large effective cross section in luminescent material (europium, antimony and gadolinium) and glass (boron). The paper describes optimization of the NAA procedure in the LVR-15 research reactor with particular attention to influence of neutron self-absorption in fluorescent lamps.

  11. Neutron Activation Analysis of Trace Elements in Lava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, R. E.; Sabella, J. L.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Guillamon, P. V.; Goldman, I. D.; Smith, A. R.

    2012-10-01

    The elemental compositions of lavas vary with the locations of the volcanoes from which they emerged. We have used neutron activation analysis to measure the abundances of approximately 32 different elements in lava samples collected from three different Hawaiian islands and from the summit of Mt. Kilimanjaro. Two different neutron irradiations were performed at the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center to optimize our sensitivities to both short- and long-lived radioisotopes. Gamma-ray counting was done at McClellan, UC Berkeley, and LBNL using large-volume high-purity Ge detectors. Results from the measurements will be presented and comparisons will be made between the trace-element compositions of the lavas from these different sites.

  12. Neutron radiation tolerance of Au-activated silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, W. T.

    1987-01-01

    Double injection devices prepared by the introduction of deep traps, using the Au activation method have been found to tolerate gamma irradiation into the Gigarad (Si) region without significant degradation of operating characteristics. Silicon double injection devices, using deep levels creacted by Au diffusion, can tolerate fast neutron irradiation up to 10 to the 15th n/sq cm. Significant parameter degradation occurs at 10 to the 16th n/sq cm. However, since the actual doping of the basic material begins to change as a result of the transmutation of silicon into phosphorus for neutron fluences greater than 10 to the 17th/sq cm, the radiation tolerance of these devices is approaching the limit possible for any device based on initially doped silicon.

  13. Neutron radiation tolerance of Au-activated silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, W. T.

    1987-01-01

    Double injection devices prepared by the introduction of deep traps, using the Au activation method have been found to tolerate gamma irradiation into the Gigarad (Si) region without significant degradation of operating characteristics. Silicon double injection devices, using deep levels creacted by Au diffusion, can tolerate fast neutron irradiation up to 10 to the 15th n/sq cm. Significant parameter degradation occurs at 10 to the 16th n/sq cm. However, since the actual doping of the basic material begins to change as a result of the transmutation of silicon into phosphorus for neutron fluences greater than 10 to the 17th/sq cm, the radiation tolerance of these devices is approaching the limit possible for any device based on initially doped silicon.

  14. Benchmark Experiments of Thermal Neutron and Capture Gamma-Ray Distributions in Concrete Using {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Yoshihiro; Sugita, Takeshi; Hirose, Hideyuki; Suzaki, Takenori

    2005-10-15

    The distributions of thermal neutrons and capture gamma rays in ordinary concrete were investigated by using {sup 252}Cf. Two subjects are considered. One is the benchmark experiments for the thermal neutron and the capture gamma-ray distributions in ordinary concrete. The thermal neutron and the capture gamma-ray distributions were measured by using gold-foil activation detectors and thermoluminescence detectors. These were compared with the simulations by using the discrete ordinates code ANISN with two different group structure types of cross-section library of a new Japanese version, JENDL-3.3, showing reasonable agreement with both fine and rough structure groups of thermal neutron energy. The other is a comparison of the simulations with two different cross-section libraries, JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VI, for the deep penetration of neutrons in the concrete, showing close agreement in 0- to 100-cm-thick concrete. However, the differences in flux grow with an increase in concrete thickness, reaching up to approximately eight times near 4-m thickness.

  15. Benchmark experiments for cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Yonai, S; Itoga, T; Baba, M; Nakamura, T; Yokobori, H; Tahara, Y

    2004-11-01

    In the previous study, we found the feasibility of a cyclotron-based BNCT using the Ta(p,n) neutrons at 90 degrees bombarded by 50 MeV protons, and the iron, AlF(3), Al and (6)LiF moderators by simulations using the MCNPX code. In order to validate the simulations to realize the cyclotron-based BNCT, we measured the epithermal neutron energy spectrum passing through the moderators with our new spectrometer consisting of a (3)He gas counter covered with a silicon rubber loaded with (nat)B and polyethylene moderator and the depth distribution of the reaction rates of (197)Au(n,gamma)(198)Au in an acrylic phantom set behind the rear surface of the moderators. The measured results were compared with the calculations using the MCNPX code. We obtained the good agreement between the calculations and measurements within approximately 10% for the neutron energy spectra and within approximately 20% for the depth distribution of the reaction rates of (197)Au(n,gamma)(198)Au in the phantom. The comparison clarified a good accuracy of the calculation of the neutron energy spectrum passing through the moderator and the thermalization in a phantom. These experimental results will be a good benchmark data to evaluate the accuracy of the calculation code.

  16. Large-Animal Neutron-Gamma Irradiation Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1958-05-01

    Eighty-eight burros were exposed to prompt neutron and gamma radiation from a nuclear detonation. Shielded from heat and missiles the animals were...determine the median lethality response of the burro to the radiation described; (2) normalize the effect in the burro to that in the monkey; (3) compare

  17. Experience with fast neutron therapy for locally advanced sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Salinas, R.; Hussey, D.H.; Fletcher, G.H.; Lindberg, R.D.; Martin, R.G.; Peters, L.J.; Sinkovics, J.G.

    1980-03-01

    Between October 1972 and April 1978, 34 patients with locally advanced sarcomas were treated with fast neutrons using the Texas A and M variable energy cyclotron. The clinical material included 29 patients with soft tissue sarcomas, 4 with chondrosarcomas, and one with an osteosarcoma. The best results were achieved for patients with soft tissue sarcomas; 69% (20/29) had local control of their tumor. Only one of 4 patients with chondrosarcomas was classified as having local tumor control, and one patient with osteosarcoma had persistent disease. With most fractionation schedules, local tumor control was superior for patients who received doses greater than 6500 rad/sub eq/ (2100 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons). The incidence of major complications was notably increased when maximum radiation doses of 7500 rad/sub eq/ or greater were administered (2400 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons). In patients who underwent subsequent surgery, healing was satisfactory if the maximum radiation dose was limited to 4500 to 5500 rad/sub eq/(1450 to 1775 rad/sub n..gamma../ with 50 MeV/sub d ..-->.. Be/ neutrons).

  18. MFE/ACT: a TRS-80 code for calculating neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, D.W.

    1982-10-01

    The MFE/ACT code, written to run on the TRS-80, can be used to calculate the neutron activation of materials used in fission and fusion reactors. Input data include the specific isotopes to be calculated, the neutron fluxes, the neutron cross sections, and the nuclear decay half-lives.

  19. A new experiment to measure the electric dipole moment of the neutron?

    SciTech Connect

    Lamoreaux, Steve; Cooper, Martin; Greene, Geoffrey; Penttilae, Seppo; Espy, Michelle; Marek, Larry; Tupa, Dale; Krause, Robert; Doyle, John; Golub, Robert

    1997-05-20

    For nearly fifty years, the limits on the electric dipole moment of the neutron have provided information of great importance in our understanding of the fundamental symmetries of nature. Current experiments using bottled Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) provide the best experimental limits on the neutron EDM. While modest improvements may be expected by extension of current methods, major reductions in the experimental error appear unlikely due to statistical sensitivity and systematic effects. This situation is unfortunate as several theoretical notions (supersymmetry and the origin of the baryon asymmetry) suggest a magnitude for the neutron EDM which may be only one or two orders of magnitude below the current limit. Recently, Golub and Lamoreaux (1) have suggested a new method for the measurement of the neutron EDM that uses a novel feature of the interaction between low energy neutron and superfluid {sup 4}He to provide a very high density of UCN in an experimental volume. The proposed method also promises a significant reduction in the dominant systematic effect using a polarized {sup 3}He co-magnetometer in the same volume. Their careful analysis suggests that an improvement of two orders of magnitude in the uncertainty of the neutron EDM may be possible. A review of the current experimental situation is given and the prospects for the realization of such a new experiment are discussed.

  20. Install active/passive neutron examination and assay (APNEA)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1996-04-01

    This document describes activities pertinent to the installation of the prototype Active/Passive Neutron Examination and Assay (APNEA) system built in Area 336 into its specially designed trailer. It also documents the basic theory of operation, design and protective features, basic personnel training, and the proposed characterization site location at Lockheed Martin Specialty Components, Inc., (Specialty Components) with the estimated 10 mrem/year boundary. Additionally, the document includes the Preventive Change Analysis (PCA) form, and a checklist of items for verification prior to unrestricted system use.

  1. Determination of europium content in Li2SiO3(Eu) by neutron activation analysis using Am-Be neutron source.

    PubMed

    Naik, Yeshwant; Tapase, Anant Shamrao; Mhatre, Amol; Datrik, Chandrashekhar; Tawade, Nilesh; Kumar, Umesh; Naik, Haladhara

    2016-12-01

    Circulardiscs of Li2SiO3 doped with europium were prepared and a new activation procedure for the neutron dose estimation in a breeder blanket of fusion reactor is described. The amount of europium in the disc was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA) using an isotopic neutron source. The average neutron absorption cross section for the reaction was calculated using neutron distribution of the Am-Be source and available neutron absorption cross section data for the (151)Eu(n,γ)(152m)Eu reaction, which was used for estimation of europium in the pallet. The cross section of the elements varies with neutron energy, and the flux of the neutrons in each energy range seen by the nuclei under investigation also varies. Neutron distribution spectrum of the Am-Be source was worked out prior to NAA and the effective fractional flux for the nuclear reaction considered for the flux estimation was also determined.

  2. Distributed data processing and analysis environment for neutron scattering experiments at CSNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H. L.; Zhang, J. R.; Yan, L. L.; Tang, M.; Hu, L.; Zhao, D. X.; Qiu, Y. X.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhuang, J.; Du, R.

    2016-10-01

    China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is the first high-performance pulsed neutron source in China, which will meet the increasing fundamental research and technique applications demands domestically and overseas. A new distributed data processing and analysis environment has been developed, which has generic functionalities for neutron scattering experiments. The environment consists of three parts, an object-oriented data processing framework adopting a data centered architecture, a communication and data caching system based on the C/S paradigm, and data analysis and visualization software providing the 2D/3D experimental data display. This environment will be widely applied in CSNS for live data processing.

  3. Verification of the weak equivalence principle with Laue diffracting neutrons: Test experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vezhlev, E. O.; Voronin, V. V.; Kuznetsov, I. A.; Semenikhin, S. Yu.; Fedorov, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    We propose a novel experiment to test the weak equivalence principle (WEP) for the Laue diffracting neutron. Our experiment is based on an essential magnification of an external affect on neutron diffracting by Laue for the Bragg angles close to the right one in couple with additional enhancement factor which exists due to the delay of the Laue diffracting neutron at such Bragg angles. This enhancement phenomena is proposed to be utilized for measuring the force which deviates from zero if WEP is violated. The accuracy of measuring inertial to gravitational neutron masses ratio for the introduced setup can reach ˜10-5, which is more than one order superior to the best present-day result.

  4. Probing the braneworld hypothesis with a neutron-shining-through-a-wall experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrazin, Michaël; Pignol, Guillaume; Lamblin, Jacob; Petit, Fabrice; Terwagne, Guy; Nesvizhevsky, Valery V.

    2015-04-01

    The possibility for our visible world to be a 3-brane embedded in a multidimensional bulk is at the heart of many theoretical edifices in high-energy physics. Probing the braneworld hypothesis is thus a major experimental challenge. Following recent theoretical works showing that matter swapping between braneworlds can occur, we propose a neutron-shining-through-a-wall experiment. We first show that an intense neutron source such as a nuclear reactor core can induce a hidden neutron flux in an adjacent hidden braneworld. We then describe how a low-background detector can detect neutrons arising from the hidden world and quantify the expected sensitivity to the swapping probability. As a proof of concept, a constraint is derived from previous experiments.

  5. RADSAT Benchmarks for Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.; Gesh, Christopher J.

    2011-07-01

    The accurate and efficient simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems is necessary for several important radiation detection applications. Examples include the detection of nuclear threats concealed in cargo containers and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for nondestructive determination of elemental composition of unknown samples. High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers are used in these applications to measure the spectrum of the emitted photon flux, which consists of both continuum and characteristic gamma rays with discrete energies. Monte Carlo transport is the most commonly used simulation tool for this type of problem, but computational times can be prohibitively long. This work explores the use of multi-group deterministic methods for the simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems. The main purpose of this work is to benchmark several problems modeled with RADSAT and MCNP to experimental data. Additionally, the cross section libraries for RADSAT are updated to include ENDF/B-VII cross sections. Preliminary findings show promising results when compared to MCNP and experimental data, but also areas where additional inquiry and testing are needed. The potential benefits and shortcomings of the multi-group-based approach are discussed in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency.

  6. Thermal neutron activation system for confirmatory nonmetallic land mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Cousins, Thomas; Jones, Trevor; Brisson, Jean R.; Jamieson, Terry; Waller, Ed; LeMay, Francois; Ing, Harry; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Selkirk, Barkley

    1998-09-01

    To detect and locate buried landmines, the Canadian Department of National Defence (DND) is developing a teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multisensor system called ILDP. In operation, a suite of 4 detectors scan ahead of the vehicle. Their outputs are combined through data fusion to indicate the possibility of a mine at a particular location, within a 30 cm radius. A thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensor, mounted behind the vehicle, is used to confirm the presence of explosives via detection of the 10.83 MeV gamma-ray associated with neutron capture on 14N. The TNA system developed for this uses a 100 microgram 252Cf neutron source surrounded by four 7.62 cm X 7.62 cm NaI(Tl) detectors. A combination of the use of state-of-the art radiation transport codes for design, judicious choice of specialized shielding materials and development of high-rate, fast pulse processing electronics has led to a system which can; (1) confirm the presence of all surface-laid or shallowly-buried anti-tank mines in a few seconds to a minute (depending on mass of explosive) (2) confirm the presence of anti-tank mines down to 20 cm depth in less than 5 minutes. (3) confirm the presence of large (greater than 100 g Nitrogen) anti-personnel mines in less than five minutes (4) operate in adverse climatic conditions. These results have been verified in field trials using the prototype sensor. Work is now ongoing to miniaturize the electronics, make the system robust and easy to use and investigate the use of an electronic neutron generator expected to enter service by the year 2000.

  7. Coarse-scaling adjustment of fine-group neutron spectra for epithermal neutron beams in BNCT using multiple activation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan-Hao; Nievaart, Sander; Tsai, Pi-En; Liu, Hong-Ming; Moss, Ray; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2009-01-01

    In order to provide an improved and reliable neutron source description for treatment planning in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), a spectrum adjustment procedure named coarse-scaling adjustment has been developed and applied to the neutron spectrum measurements of both the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor (THOR) epithermal neutron beam in Taiwan and the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in The Netherlands, using multiple activation detectors. The coarse-scaling adjustment utilizes a similar idea as the well-known two-foil method, which adjusts the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes according to the Maxwellian distribution for thermal neutrons and 1/ E distribution over the epithermal neutron energy region. The coarse-scaling adjustment can effectively suppress the number of oscillations appearing in the adjusted spectrum and provide better smoothness. This paper also presents a sophisticated 9-step process utilizing twice the coarse-scaling adjustment which can adjust a given coarse-group spectrum into a fine-group structure, i.e. 640 groups, with satisfactory continuity and excellently matched reaction rates between measurements and calculation. The spectrum adjustment algorithm applied in this study is the same as the well-known SAND-II.

  8. A study of neutron radiation quality with a tissue-equivalent proportional counter for a low-energy accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation facility.

    PubMed

    Aslam; Waker, A J

    2011-02-01

    The accelerator-based in vivo neutron activation facility at McMaster University has been used successfully for the measurement of several minor and trace elements in human hand bones due to their importance to health. Most of these in vivo measurements have been conducted at a proton beam energy (E(p)) of 2.00 MeV to optimise the activation of the selected element of interest with an effective dose of the same order as that received in chest X rays. However, measurement of other elements at the same facility requires beam energies other than 2.00 MeV. The range of energy of neutrons produced at these proton beam energies comes under the region where tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs) are known to experience difficulty in assessing the quality factor and dose equivalent. In this study, the response of TEPCs was investigated to determine the quality factor of neutron fields generated via the (7)Li(p, n)(7)Be reaction as a function of E(p) in the range 1.884-2.56 MeV at the position of hand irradiation in the facility. An interesting trend has been observed in the quality factor based on ICRP 60, Q(ICRP60), such that the maximum value was observed at E(p)=1.884 MeV (E(n)=33±16 keV) and then continued to decline with increasing E(p) until achieving a minimum value at E(p)=2.0 MeV despite a continuous increase in the mean neutron energy with E(p). This observation is contrary to what has been observed with direct fast neutrons where the quality factor was found to increase continuously with an increase in E(p) (i.e. increasing E(n)). The series of measurements conducted with thermal and fast neutron fields demonstrate that the (14)N(n, p)(14)C produced 580 keV protons in the detector play an important role in the response of the counter under 2.0 MeV proton energy (E(n) ≤ 250 keV). In contrast to the lower response of TEPCs to low-energy neutrons, the quality factor is overestimated in the range 1-2 depending on beam energy <2.0 MeV. This study provides

  9. Neutron activation analysis of certified samples by the absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadem, F.; Belouadah, N.; Idiri, Z.

    2015-07-01

    The nuclear reactions analysis technique is mainly based on the relative method or the use of activation cross sections. In order to validate nuclear data for the calculated cross section evaluated from systematic studies, we used the neutron activation analysis technique (NAA) to determine the various constituent concentrations of certified samples for animal blood, milk and hay. In this analysis, the absolute method is used. The neutron activation technique involves irradiating the sample and subsequently performing a measurement of the activity of the sample. The fundamental equation of the activation connects several physical parameters including the cross section that is essential for the quantitative determination of the different elements composing the sample without resorting to the use of standard sample. Called the absolute method, it allows a measurement as accurate as the relative method. The results obtained by the absolute method showed that the values are as precise as the relative method requiring the use of standard sample for each element to be quantified.

  10. A multi-layered active target for the study of neutron-unbound nuclides at NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Jessica; Gueye, Paul; Redpath, Thomas; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics of neutron-unbound nuclides were investigated using a multi-layered Si/Be active target designed for use with the MoNA/LISA setup at the National Superconducting Cyclotron (NSCL). The setup consists of the MoNA/LISA arrays (for neutron detection) and a superconducting sweeper magnet (for charged separation) to identify products following the decay of neutron unbound states. The segmented target consisted of three 700 mg/cm2 beryllium targets and four 0.14 mm thick 62x62 mm2 silicon detectors. As a commissioning experiment for the target the decay of two-neutron unbound 26O populated in a one-proton removal reaction from a radioactive 27F beam was performed. The 27F secondary radioactive beam from the NSCL's Coupled Cyclotron Facility was produced from the fragmentation of a 140 MeV/u 48Ca beam incident on a thick beryllium target and then cleanly selected by the A1900 fragment separator. The energy loss and position spectra of the incoming beam and reaction products were used to calibrate the Silicon detectors to within 1.5% in both energy and position. A dedicated Geant4 model of the target was developed to simulate the energy loss within the target. A description of the experimental setup, simulation work, and energy and position calibration will be presented. DoE/NNSA - DE-NA0000979.

  11. Measurement of the argon-38(n,2n)argon-37 and calcium- 40(n,alpha)argon-37 cross sections, and National Ignition Facility concrete activation using the rotating target neutron source. The design of an experiment to measure the beryllium-9(n,gamma)beryllium-10 cross section at 14 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belian, Anthony Paul

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS) was used in experiments to measure neutron induced cross sections at 14 MeV, and the activation properties of a specific mix of concrete. The RTNS is an accelerator based DT fusion neutron source located at the University of California, Berkeley. Two of the experiments performed for this thesis were specifically of interest for the construction and operation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), they were the 38Ar(n,2n)37Ar cross section measurement, and the concrete activation measurement. The NIF is a large multi-beam laser facility that will study the effects of age on the nation's stockpile of nuclear weapons. The NIF, when fully operational, will focus the energy of 192 Neodymium glass lasers onto a 1 mm diameter pellet filled with deuterium and tritium fuel. This pellet is compressed by the laser energy giving some of the individual atoms of deuterium and tritium enough kinetic energy to overcome the coulomb barrier and fuse. The energy output from these pellet implosions will be in the range of tens of mega-joules (MJ). The 38Ar(n,2n)37Ar reaction will be useful to NIF scientists to measure important parameters such as target energy yield and areal density. In order to make these measurements precise, an accurate 38Ar(n,2n)37Ar cross section was necessary. The cross sections measured were: 74.9 +/- 3.8 millibarns (mb) at 13.3 +/- 0.01 MeV, 89.2 +/- 4.0 mb at 14.0 +/- 0.03 MeV, and 123.57 +/- 6.4 mb at 15.0 +/- 0.06 MeV. With anticipated energy yields in the tens of mega-joules per pellet implosion, the number of neutrons released is in the range of 1019 to 1020 neutrons per implosion. With such a large number of neutrons, minimizing the activation of the surrounding structure is very much of interest for the sake of personnel radiation safety. To benchmark the computer codes used to calculate the anticipated neutron activation of target bay concrete, samples were irradiated at the RTNS. Dose rates from each sample

  12. Ultracold neutron detectors based on (10)B converters used in the qBounce experiments.

    PubMed

    Jenke, Tobias; Cronenberg, Gunther; Filter, Hanno; Geltenbort, Peter; Klein, Martin; Lauer, Thorsten; Mitsch, Kevin; Saul, Heiko; Seiler, Dominik; Stadler, David; Thalhammer, Martin; Abele, Hartmut

    2013-12-21

    Gravity experiments with very slow, so-called ultracold neutrons connect quantum mechanics with tests of Newton's inverse square law at short distances. These experiments face a low count rate and hence need highly optimized detector concepts. In the frame of this paper, we present low-background ultracold neutron counters and track detectors with micron resolution based on a (10)B converter. We discuss the optimization of (10)B converter layers, detector design and concepts for read-out electronics focusing on high-efficiency and low-background. We describe modifications of the counters that allow one to detect ultracold neutrons selectively on their spin-orientation. This is required for searches of hypothetical forces with spin-mass couplings. The mentioned experiments utilize a beam-monitoring concept which accounts for variations in the neutron flux that are typical for nuclear research facilities. The converter can also be used for detectors, which feature high efficiencies paired with high spatial resolution of [Formula: see text]. They allow one to resolve the quantum mechanical wave function of an ultracold neutron bound in the gravity potential above a neutron mirror.

  13. Monte Carlo studies on neutron interactions in radiobiological experiments

    PubMed Central

    Shahmohammadi Beni, Mehrdad; Hau, Tak Cheong; Krstic, D.; Nikezic, D.

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo method was used to study the characteristics of neutron interactions with cells underneath a water medium layer with varying thickness. The following results were obtained. (1) The fractions of neutron interaction with 1H, 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei in the cell layer were studied. The fraction with 1H increased with increasing medium thickness, while decreased for 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei. The bulges in the interaction fractions with 12C, 14N and 16O nuclei were explained by the resonance spikes in the interaction cross-section data. The interaction fraction decreased in the order: 1H > 16O > 12C > 14N. (2) In general, as the medium thickness increased, the number of “interacting neutrons” which exited the medium and then further interacted with the cell layer increased. (3) The area under the angular distributions for “interacting neutrons” decreased with increasing incident neutron energy. Such results would be useful for deciphering the reasons behind discrepancies among existing results in the literature. PMID:28704557

  14. Measurement of gamma-ray production from thermal neutron capture on gadolinium for neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Takatomi

    2017-02-01

    Recently, several scientific applications of gadolinium are found in neutrino physics experiments. Gadolinium-157 is the nucleus, which has the largest thermal neutron capture cross-section among all stable nuclei. Gadolinium-155 also has the large cross-section. These neutron capture reactions provide the gamma-ray cascade with the total energy of about 8 MeV. This reaction is applied for several neutrino experiments, e.g. reactor neutrino experiments and Gd doped large water Cherenkov detector experiments, to recognize inverse-beta-decay reaction. A good Gd(n,γ) simulation model is needed to evaluate the detection efficiency of the neutron capture reaction, i.e. the efficiency of IBD detection. In this presentation, we will report the development and study status of a Gd(n,γ) calculation model and comparison with our experimental data taken at ANNRI/MLF beam line, J-PARC.

  15. New generation of cryogen free advanced superconducting magnets for neutron scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichek, O.; Brown, J.; Adroja, D. T.; Manuel, P.; Kouzmenko, G.; Bewley, R. I.; Wotherspoon, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in superconducting technology and cryocooler refrigeration have resulted in a new generation of advanced superconducting magnets for neutron beam applications. These magnets have outstanding parameters such as high homogeneity and stability at highest magnetic fields possible, a reasonably small stray field, low neutron scattering background and larger exposure to neutron detectors. At the same time the pulse tube refrigeration technology provides a complete re-condensing regime which allows to minimise the requirements for cryogens without introducing additional noise and mechanical vibrations. The magnets can be used with dilution refrigerator insert which expands the temperature range from 20mK to 300K. Here we are going to present design, test results and the operational data of the 14T magnet for neutron diffraction and the 9T wide angle chopper magnet for neutron spectroscopy developed by Oxford Instruments in collaboration with ISIS neutron source. First scientific results obtained from the neutron scattering experiments with these magnets are also going to be discussed.

  16. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R. Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Munro, D. H.; Knauer, J. P.

    2015-11-14

    Neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have long been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d + t → n + α (DT) and d + d → n + {sup 3}He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (T{sub ion}) and cold fuel areal density. We report on novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent T{sub ion}, and DSR. These methods invoke a single temperature, static fluid model to describe the neutron peaks from DD and DT reactions and a spline description of the DT spectrum to determine the DSR. Both measurements are performed using a forward modeling technique that includes corrections for line-of-sight attenuation and impulse response of the detection system. These methods produce typical uncertainties for DT T{sub ion} of 250 eV, 7% for DSR, and 9% for the DT neutron yield. For the DD values, the uncertainties are 290 eV for T{sub ion} and 10% for the neutron yield.

  17. Analysis of the neutron time-of-flight spectra from inertial confinement fusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatarik, R.; Sayre, D. B.; Caggiano, J. A.; Phillips, T.; Eckart, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Cerjan, C.; Grim, G. P.; Hartouni, E. P.; Knauer, J. P.; Mcnaney, J. M.; Munro, D. H.

    2015-11-01

    Neutron time-of-flight diagnostics have long been used to characterize the neutron spectrum produced by inertial confinement fusion experiments. The primary diagnostic goals are to extract the d + t → n + α (DT) and d + d → n + 3He (DD) neutron yields and peak widths, and the amount DT scattering relative to its unscattered yield, also known as the down-scatter ratio (DSR). These quantities are used to infer yield weighted plasma conditions, such as ion temperature (Tion) and cold fuel areal density. We report on novel methodologies used to determine neutron yield, apparent Tion, and DSR. These methods invoke a single temperature, static fluid model to describe the neutron peaks from DD and DT reactions and a spline description of the DT spectrum to determine the DSR. Both measurements are performed using a forward modeling technique that includes corrections for line-of-sight attenuation and impulse response of the detection system. These methods produce typical uncertainties for DT Tion of 250 eV, 7% for DSR, and 9% for the DT neutron yield. For the DD values, the uncertainties are 290 eV for Tion and 10% for the neutron yield.

  18. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculation for the JP-10, 11, 13, and 16 experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint U.S./Japanese experiments JP-10, 11, 13, and 16 in the target of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL). These experiments were irradiated at 85 MW for 238.5 EFPD. The maximum fast neutron fluence >0.1 MeV was about 2.1E + 22 n/cm{sup 2} for all of the experiments resulting in about 17.3 dpa in 316 stainless steel.

  19. Skylab neutron environment experiment (Science Demonstration SD-34 (TV108)). Description and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Neutron and proton induced radioactivity at various locations within Skylab were measured. Samples of five metals were formed into activation packets and deployed at the following locations on the Skylab 4 mission: orbital workshop film vault, water storage tank, and two opposing orbital workshop internal locations. Radioactive nuclides were produced in the packets by nuclear interactions of high-energy protons and secondary neutrons within Skylab. Low-level gamma ray spectroscopy measurements were made on the returned packets to determine the incident neutron and proton fluxes and spectra and their variations with mass distribution.

  20. Neutron activation analysis of total diet food composites for iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Allegrini, M.; Boyer, K.W.; Tanner, J.T.

    1981-09-01

    The iodine content of Total Diet food composites was measured using neutron activation analysis. The interfering element chlorine was separated using a modified combustion and gas phase procedure. The average recovery was 94.8% (standard deviation 2.9) for the 10 matrices that were tested. In addition, iodine was measured in National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Materials, which have no certified values for this element. Preliminary findings of iodine content of adult Total Diet market baskets collected during Fiscal Year 1980 in different regions of the United States ranged from 292 to 901 ..mu..g/day for a 2900 kcal intake.

  1. Neutron distribution and induced activity inside a Linac treatment room.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Miró, R; Verdú, G; Díez, S; Campayo, J M

    2015-01-01

    Induced radioactivity and photoneutron contamination inside a radiation therapy bunker of a medical linear accelerator (Linac) is investigated in this work. The Linac studied is an Elekta Precise electron accelerator which maximum treatment photon energy is 15 MeV. This energy exceeds the photonuclear reaction threshold (around 7 MeV for high atomic number metals). The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 has been used for quantifying the neutron contamination inside the treatment room for different gantry rotation configuration. Walls activation processes have also been simulated. The approach described in this paper is useful to prevent the overexposure of patients and medical staff.

  2. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of archaeological ceramics: scale and interpretation.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Ronald L; Blackman, M James

    2002-08-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis has become a standard technique for the study of the production and distributional patterns of archaeological pottery. Questions once framed within the context of long distance exchange are now focused on issues of subregional and even intrasite levels. The increasing specificity at which these questions are poised requires a high level of analytical precision as we seek to observe statistically and archaeologically significant differences among groups of pottery produced from geographically closely spaced resources or the compositional differences that arise from production behaviors of the producers of the pottery.

  3. Evaluation of Am-Li neutron spectra data for active well type neutron multiplicity measurements of uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Braden; Croft, Stephen; Lousteau, Angela; Peerani, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Safeguarding nuclear material is an important and challenging task for the international community. One particular safeguards technique commonly used for uranium assay is active neutron correlation counting. This technique involves irradiating unused uranium with (α, n) neutrons from an Am-Li source and recording the resultant neutron pulse signal which includes induced fission neutrons. Although this non-destructive technique is widely employed in safeguards applications, the neutron energy spectra from an Am-Li sources is not well known. Several measurements over the past few decades have been made to characterize this spectrum; however, little work has been done comparing the measured and theoretical spectra of various Am-Li sources to each other. This paper examines fourteen different Am-Li spectra, focusing on how these spectra affect simulated neutron multiplicity results using the code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). Two measurement and simulation campaigns were completed using Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) detectors and uranium standards of varying enrichment. The results of this work indicate that for standard AWCC measurements, the fourteen Am-Li spectra produce similar doubles and triples count rates. The singles count rates varied by as much as 20% between the different spectra, although they are usually not used in quantitative analysis, being dominated by scattering which is highly dependent on item placement.

  4. Evaluation of Am–Li neutron spectra data for active well type neutron multiplicity measurements of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Braden; Croft, Stephen; Lousteau, Angela; Peerani, Paolo

    2016-05-25

    Safeguarding nuclear material is an important and challenging task for the international community. One particular safeguards technique commonly used for uranium assay is active neutron correlation counting. This technique involves irradiating unused uranium with ( α,n) neutrons from an Am-Li source and recording the resultant neutron pulse signal which includes induced fission neutrons. Although this non-destructive technique is widely employed in safeguards applications, the neutron energy spectra from an Am-Li sources is not well known. Several measurements over the past few decades have been made to characterize this spectrum; however, little work has been done comparing the measured spectra of various Am-Li sources to each other. This paper examines fourteen different Am-Li spectra, focusing on how these spectra affect simulated neutron multiplicity results using the code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). Two measurement and simulation campaigns were completed using Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) detectors and uranium standards of varying enrichment. The results of this work indicate that for standard AWCC measurements, the fourteen Am-Li spectra produce similar doubles and triples count rates. Finally, the singles count rates varied by as much as 20% between the different spectra, although they are usually not used in quantitative analysis.

  5. Evaluation of Am–Li neutron spectra data for active well type neutron multiplicity measurements of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Braden; Croft, Stephen; Lousteau, Angela; Peerani, Paolo

    2016-05-25

    Safeguarding nuclear material is an important and challenging task for the international community. One particular safeguards technique commonly used for uranium assay is active neutron correlation counting. This technique involves irradiating unused uranium with ( α,n) neutrons from an Am-Li source and recording the resultant neutron pulse signal which includes induced fission neutrons. Although this non-destructive technique is widely employed in safeguards applications, the neutron energy spectra from an Am-Li sources is not well known. Several measurements over the past few decades have been made to characterize this spectrum; however, little work has been done comparing the measured spectra of various Am-Li sources to each other. This paper examines fourteen different Am-Li spectra, focusing on how these spectra affect simulated neutron multiplicity results using the code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). Two measurement and simulation campaigns were completed using Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) detectors and uranium standards of varying enrichment. The results of this work indicate that for standard AWCC measurements, the fourteen Am-Li spectra produce similar doubles and triples count rates. Finally, the singles count rates varied by as much as 20% between the different spectra, although they are usually not used in quantitative analysis.

  6. Evaluation of Am–Li neutron spectra data for active well type neutron multiplicity measurements of uranium

    DOE PAGES

    Goddard, Braden; Croft, Stephen; Lousteau, Angela; ...

    2016-05-25

    Safeguarding nuclear material is an important and challenging task for the international community. One particular safeguards technique commonly used for uranium assay is active neutron correlation counting. This technique involves irradiating unused uranium with ( α,n) neutrons from an Am-Li source and recording the resultant neutron pulse signal which includes induced fission neutrons. Although this non-destructive technique is widely employed in safeguards applications, the neutron energy spectra from an Am-Li sources is not well known. Several measurements over the past few decades have been made to characterize this spectrum; however, little work has been done comparing the measured spectra ofmore » various Am-Li sources to each other. This paper examines fourteen different Am-Li spectra, focusing on how these spectra affect simulated neutron multiplicity results using the code Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). Two measurement and simulation campaigns were completed using Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) detectors and uranium standards of varying enrichment. The results of this work indicate that for standard AWCC measurements, the fourteen Am-Li spectra produce similar doubles and triples count rates. Finally, the singles count rates varied by as much as 20% between the different spectra, although they are usually not used in quantitative analysis.« less

  7. Activation of high- Tc superconductors due to neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitamichi, T.; Nakano, M.; Terai, T.; Yamawaki, M.; Hoshiya, T.

    2003-10-01

    For actual application of high- Tc superconductors (HTSC), the improvement of Jc is required. It has been reported that pinning centers in the HTSC increase Jc. Particle beam irradiation is one of the most effective methods to introduce strong pinning centers into HTSC for Jc enhancement. In particular, neutron irradiation is very effective for bulk materials, although the activation might be an important problem. In this study, activation of HTSCs was analysed by using the computer code, ORIGEN-II. The contribution of impurities in Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O 8+ x (Bi-2212) to 1 cm dose equivalent occupies about 15%. In RE-123 family, Y, La, Nd, Sm. Gd, Dy, Ho and Yb gave low activation. In the case of U-doped Y-123, about 75% of the activity is from the contribution of the fission products.

  8. A Complex-Geometry Validation Experiment for Advanced Neutron Transport Codes

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Anthony W. LaPorta; Joseph W. Nielsen; James Parry; Mark D. DeHart; Samuel E. Bays; William F. Skerjanc

    2013-11-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has initiated a focused effort to upgrade legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols used for support of core fuel management and experiment management in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its companion critical facility (ATRC) at the INL.. This will be accomplished through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate new Verification and Validation (V&V) protocols, over the next 12-18 months. Stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and nuclear data packages that support this effort include MCNP5[1], SCALE/KENO6[2], HELIOS[3], SCALE/NEWT[2], and ATTILA[4]. Furthermore, a capability for sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI[5] system has also been implemented. Finally, we are also evaluating the Serpent[6] and MC21[7] codes, as additional verification tools in the near term as well as for possible applications to full three-dimensional Monte Carlo based fuel management modeling in the longer term. On the experimental side, several new benchmark-quality code validation measurements based on neutron activation spectrometry have been conducted using the ATRC. Results for the first four experiments, focused on neutron spectrum measurements within the Northwest Large In-Pile Tube (NW LIPT) and in the core fuel elements surrounding the NW LIPT and the diametrically opposite Southeast IPT have been reported [8,9]. A fifth, very recent, experiment focused on detailed measurements of the element-to-element core power distribution is summarized here and examples of the use of the measured data for validation of corresponding MCNP5, HELIOS, NEWT, and Serpent computational models using modern least-square adjustment methods are provided.

  9. Studies on osteoporosis. V. Comparison of methods of evaluation of osteoporosis and study of chromosome changes induced by neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Robin, J.C.; Sirianni, S.R.; Pragay, D.A.; Ambrus, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    In vivo activation analysis was compared with ashing and atomic absorption spectrophotometry for the determination of total skeletal calcium content in mice. The results were close to identical. The possible mutagenic-carcinogenic effect of repeated exposure to whole body neutron irradiation was studied by chromosome analysis. Under the conditions of these experiments, no significant chromosome changes were seen.

  10. Estimation of the Performance of Multiple Active Neutron Interrogation Signatures for Detecting Shielded HEU

    SciTech Connect

    David L. Chichester; Scott J. Thompson; Scott M. Watson; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive modeling study has been carried out to evaluate the utility of multiple active neutron interrogation signatures for detecting shielded highly enriched uranium (HEU). The modeling effort focused on varying HEU masses from 1 kg to 20 kg; varying types of shields including wood, steel, cement, polyethylene, and borated polyethylene; varying depths of the HEU in the shields, and varying engineered shields immediately surrounding the HEU including steel, tungsten, and cadmium. Neutron and gamma-ray signatures were the focus of the study and false negative detection probabilities versus measurement time were used as a performance metric. To facilitate comparisons among different approaches an automated method was developed to generate receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for different sets of model variables for multiple background count rate conditions. This paper summarizes results or the analysis, including laboratory benchmark comparisons between simulations and experiments. The important impact engineered shields can play towards degrading detectability and methods for mitigating this will be discussed.

  11. Delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy combined with active neutron interrogation for nuclear security and safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Mitsuo; Rossi, Fabiana; Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Takamine, Jun; Seya, Michio; Bogucarska, Tatjana; Crochemore, Jean-Michel; Varasano, Giovanni; Abbas, Kamel; Pederson, Bent; Kureta, Masatoshi; Heyse, Jan; Paradela, Carlos; Mondelaers, Willy; Schillebeeckx, Peter

    2017-09-01

    For the purpose of nuclear security and safeguards, an active neutron interrogation non-destructive assay technique, Delayed Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (DGS), is under development. The technique of DGS uses the detection of decay γ rays from fission products to determine ratios of fissile nuclides in a sample. A proper evaluation of such γ-ray spectra requires integration of nuclear data such as fission cross-sections, fission yields, half-lives, decay-chain patterns, and decay γ-ray yields. Preliminary DGS experiments with the Pulsed Neutron Interrogation Test Assembly, named PUNITA, of the European Commissions' Joint Research Center have been performed. Signals of delayed γ ray from nuclear materials were successfully observed.

  12. Performance of an improved thermal neutron activation detector for buried bulk explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, J. E.; Faust, A. A.; Andrews, H. R.; Clifford, E. T. H.; Mosquera, C. M.

    2013-06-01

    First generation thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensors, employing an isotopic source and NaI(Tl) gamma ray detectors, were deployed by Canadian Forces in 2002 as confirmation sensors on multi-sensor landmine detection systems. The second generation TNA detector is being developed with a number of improvements aimed at increasing sensitivity and facilitating ease of operation. Among these are an electronic neutron generator to increase sensitivity for deeper and horizontally displaced explosives; LaBr3(Ce) scintillators, to improve time response and energy resolution; improved thermal and electronic stability; improved sensor head geometry to minimize spatial response nonuniformity; and more robust data processing. The sensor is described, with emphasis on the improvements. Experiments to characterize the performance of the second generation TNA in detecting buried landmines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) hidden in culverts are described. Performance results, including comparisons between the performance of the first and second generation systems are presented.

  13. The Accelerator Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE) Front Anti-Coincidence Counter (FACC) Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingqian

    The searching for proton decay (PDK) is going on current Water Cherenkov (WCh) detectors such as Super-Kamiokande. However, PDK-like backgrounds produced by the neutrino interactions will limit the sensitivity of the detectors. The Accelerator Neutrino Neutron Interaction Experiment (ANNIE) is going to measure the neutron yield of neutrino interactions in gadolinium-loaded water by the Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) with known characteristics. In this thesis, neutrino, neutrino oscillations, Dirac neutrino and Majorana neutrino and neutrino interactions are introduced. ANNIE experiment is also introduced. And two modes of proton decays are discussed. The ANNIE experiment requires detection of the neutrons produced by the BNB interactions with water. However, dirt muons produced by the interaction of the BNB with the rock and dirt upstream of the ANNIE hall will cause a correlated background. Therefore, the Front Anti-Coincidence Counter (FACC) was built to measure the rock muons. This thesis details the design, installation, and commissioning of the ANNIE FACC.

  14. Neutronics Experiments Using Small Partial Mockups of the ITER Test Blanket Module with a Solid Breeder

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Satoshi; Verzilov, Yury; Nakao, Makoto; Ochiai, Kentaro; Wada, Masayuki; Nishitani, Takeo

    2005-05-15

    In order to evaluate the impacts of the incident neutron spectrum and the tungsten armor on the tritium production, integral experiments have been performed with small partial mockups relevant to the ITER test blanket module using DT neutrons at FNS of JAERI. The Monte Carlo calculation results for the integrated tritium productions agree well with the experimental data within 2 and 11 % for the mockups without the armor in the experiments without and with the neutron reflector, respectively. It is clarified that the tritium production can be very accurately predicted in the experiment without the reflector. In the mockups with the 12.6 and 25.2 mm thick tungsten armors, it is experimentally clarified that the integrated tritium productions are reduced by 3 and 6 % relative to the case without the armor, respectively.

  15. Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis system design: Effects of D-T versus D-D neutron generator source selection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prompt-gamma neutron activation (PGNA) analysis is used for the non-invasive measurement of human body composition. Advancements in portable, compact neutron generator design have made those devices attractive as neutron sources. Two distinct generators are available: D-D with 2.5 MeV and D-T with...

  16. Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis system design: effects of D-T versus D-D neutron generator source selection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prompt-gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is used for the non-invasive measurement of human body composition. Advancements in portable, compact neutron generator design have made those devices attractive as neutron sources. Two distinct generators are available: D-D with 2.5 MeV, and D-T wi...

  17. Activation of cobalt by neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, G.D.; Dyer, F.F.; Emery, J.F.; Pace, J.V. III ); Brodzinski, R.L. ); Marcum, J. )

    1990-02-01

    A study has been completed of cobalt activation in samples from two new locations in Hiroshima. The samples consisted of a piece of steel from a bridge located at a distance of about 1300 m from the hypocenter and pieces of both steel and concrete from a building located at approximately 700 m. The concrete was analyzed to obtain information needed to calculate the cobalt activation in the two steel samples. Close agreement was found between calculated and measured values for cobalt activation of the steel sample from the building at 700 m. It was found, however, that the measured values for the bridge sample at 1300 m were approximately twice the calculated values. Thus, the new results confirm the existence of a systematic error in the transport calculations for neutrons from the Hiroshima bomb. 52 refs., 32 figs., 16 tabs.

  18. Response in thermal neutrons intensity on the activation of seismic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, Valentina; Chubenko, Alexandr; Kryukov, Sergey; Lutsenko, Vadim

    2017-04-01

    Results of study of thermal and high-energy neutrons intensity during the activation of seismic activity are presented. Installations are located close to the fault of the earth's crust at the high-altitude station of cosmic rays (3340 m above sea level, 20 km from Almaty) in the mountains of Northern Tien-Shan. High correlation and similarity of responses to changes of space and geophysical conditions in the absence of seismic activity are obtained between data of thermal neutron detectors and data of the standard neutron monitor, recording the intensity of high-energy particles. These results confirm the genetic connection of thermal neutrons at the Earth's surface with high-energy neutrons of the galactic origin and suggest same sources of disturbances of their flux. However, observations and analysis of experimental data during the activation of seismic activity showed the frequent breakdown of the correlation between the intensity of thermal and high-energy neutrons and the absence of similarity between variations during these periods. We suppose that the cause of this phenomenon is the additional thermal neutron flux of the lithospheric origin, which appears under these conditions. Method of separating of thermal neutron intensity variations of the lithospheric origin from neutrons variations generated in the atmosphere is proposed. We used this method for analysis of variations of thermal neutrons intensity during earthquakes (with intensity ≥ 3b) in the vicinity of Almaty which took place in 2006-2015. The increase of thermal neutrons flux of the lithospheric origin during of seismic processes activation was observed for 60% of events. However, before the earthquake the increase of thermal neutron flux is only observed for 25-30% of events. It is shown that the amplitude of the additional thermal neutron flux from the Earth's crust is equal to 5-7% of the background level.

  19. Neutron-Activated Gamma-Emission: Technology Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    scattering. ..............................4 Figure 3. Neutron cross section (barns) for materials with best stopping power. Gd has the largest known cross ... section of 1x107 barns. Cross section for capture of neutrons is generally reduced as the energy of the neutron increases...D and D-T reactions. .........18 Figure 9. Cross section for the interaction in units of neutrons generated per mC thrown at a target

  20. Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis of the Asian Herbal Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Baljinnyam, N.; Frontasyeva, M. V.; Ostrovnaya, T. M.; Pavlov, S. S.; Jugder, B.; Norov, N.

    2011-06-28

    Asian medicinal herbs Chrysanthemum (Spiraea aquilegifolia Pall.) and Red Sandalwood (Pterocarpus Santalinus) are widely used in folk and Ayurvedic medicine for healing and preventing some diseases. The modern medical science has proved that the Chrysanthemum (Spiraea aquilegifolia Pall.) possesses the following functions: reducing blood press, dispelling cancer cell, coronary artery's expanding and bacteriostating and Red Sandalwood (Pterocarpus Santalinus) is recommended against headache, toothache, skin diseases, vomiting and sometimes it is taken for treatment of diabetes. Species of Chrysanthemums were collected in the north-eastern and central Mongolia, and the Red Sandalwood powder was imported from India. Samples of Chrysanthemums (branches, flowers and leaves)(0.5 g) and red sandalwood powder (0.5 g) were subjected to the multi-element instrumental neutron activation analysis using epithermal neutrons (ENAA) at the IBR-2 reactor, Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (FLNP) JINR, Dubna. A total of 41 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, La, Hf, Ta, W, Sb, Au, Hg, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Yb, Th, U, Lu) were determined. For the first time such a large group of elements was determined in the herbal plants used in Mongolia. The quality control of the analytical results was provided by using certified reference material Bowen Cabbage. The results obtained are compared to the ''Reference plant? data (B. Markert, 1992) and interpreted in terms of excess of such elements as Se, Cr, Ca, Fe, Ni, Mo, and rare earth elements.

  1. Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis of the Asian Herbal Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baljinnyam, N.; Jugder, B.; Norov, N.; Frontasyeva, M. V.; Ostrovnaya, T. M.; Pavlov, S. S.

    2011-06-01

    Asian medicinal herbs Chrysanthemum (Spiraea aquilegifolia Pall.) and Red Sandalwood (Pterocarpus Santalinus) are widely used in folk and Ayurvedic medicine for healing and preventing some diseases. The modern medical science has proved that the Chrysanthemum (Spiraea aquilegifolia Pall.) possesses the following functions: reducing blood press, dispelling cancer cell, coronary artery's expanding and bacteriostating and Red Sandalwood (Pterocarpus Santalinus) is recommended against headache, toothache, skin diseases, vomiting and sometimes it is taken for treatment of diabetes. Species of Chrysanthemums were collected in the north-eastern and central Mongolia, and the Red Sandalwood powder was imported from India. Samples of Chrysanthemums (branches, flowers and leaves) (0.5 g) and red sandalwood powder (0.5 g) were subjected to the multi-element instrumental neutron activation analysis using epithermal neutrons (ENAA) at the IBR-2 reactor, Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (FLNP) JINR, Dubna. A total of 41 elements (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, Cs, Ba, La, Hf, Ta, W, Sb, Au, Hg, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Yb, Th, U, Lu) were determined. For the first time such a large group of elements was determined in the herbal plants used in Mongolia. The quality control of the analytical results was provided by using certified reference material Bowen Cabbage. The results obtained are compared to the "Reference plant» data (B. Markert, 1992) and interpreted in terms of excess of such elements as Se, Cr, Ca, Fe, Ni, Mo, and rare earth elements.

  2. Estimation of the activity generated by neutron activation in control rods of a BWR.

    PubMed

    Ródenas, José; Gallardo, Sergio; Abarca, Agustín; Juan, Violeta

    2010-01-01

    Control rods are activated by neutron reactions into the reactor. The activation is produced mainly in stainless steel and its impurities. The dose produced by this activity is not important inside the reactor, but it has to be taken into account when the rod is withdrawn from the reactor. Activation reactions produced have been modelled by the MCNP5 code based on the Monte Carlo method. The code gives the number of reactions that can be converted into activity.

  3. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the JP-17, 18 and 19 experiments in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US-Japanese experiments JP-17, 18, and 19 in the target of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These experiments were irradiated at 85 MW for two cycles resulting in 43.55 EFPD for JP-17 and 42.06 EFPD for JP-18 and 19. The maximum fast neutron fluence > 0.1 MeV was about 3.7E + 21 n/cm{sup 2} for all three irradiations, resulting in about 3 dpa in 316 stainless steel.

  4. The DOS 1 neutron dosimetry experiment at the HB-4-A key 7 surveillance site on the HFIR pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, K.; Kam, F.B.; Baldwin, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive neutron dosimetry experiment was made at one of the prime surveillance sites at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel to aid radiation embrittlement studies of the vessel and to benchmark neutron transport calculations. The thermal neutron flux at the key 7, position 5 site was found, from measurements of radioactivation of four cobalt wires and four silver wires, to be 2.4 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}. The thermal flux derived from two helium accumulation monitors was 2.3 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}{sup {minus}1}. The thermal flux estimated by neutron transport calculations was 3.7 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. The fast flux, >1 MeV, determined from two nickel activation wires, was 1.5 {times} 10{sup 12} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s{sup {minus}1}, in keeping with values obtained earlier from stainless steel surveillance monitors and with a computed value of 1.2 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}{sup {minus}1}. The fast fluxes given by two reaction-product-type monitors, neptunium-237 and beryllium, were 2.6 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}{center_dot}s {sup {minus}1} and 2.2 {times} 10{sup 13} n{center_dot}m{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Follow-up experiments indicate that these latter high values of fast flux are reproducible but are false; they are due to the creation of greater levels of reaction products by photonuclear events induced by an exceptionally high ratio of gamma flux to fast neutron flux at the vessel.

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF A THIN SILICON SENSOR FOR ACTIVE NEUTRON PERSONAL DOSEMETERS.

    PubMed

    Takada, M; Nunomiya, T; Nakamura, T; Matsumoto, T; Masuda, A

    2016-09-01

    A thin silicon sensor has been developed for active neutron personal dosemeters for use by aircrews and first responders. This thin silicon sensor is not affected by the funneling effect, which causes detection of cosmic protons and over-response to cosmic neutrons. There are several advantages to the thin silicon sensor: a decrease in sensitivity to gamma rays, an improvement of the energy detection limit for neutrons down to 0.8 MeV and an increase in the sensitivity to fast neutrons. Neutron response functions were experimentally obtained using 2.5 and 5 MeV monoenergy neutron beams and a (252)Cf neutron source. Simulation results using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code agree quite well with the experimental ones when an energy deposition region shaped like a circular truncated cone is used in place of a cylindrical region.

  6. Active detection of shielded SNM with 60-keV neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Hagmann, C; Dietrich, D; Hall, J; Kerr, P; Nakae, L; Newby, R; Rowland, M; Snyderman, N; Stoeffl, W

    2008-07-08

    Fissile materials, e.g. {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu, can be detected non-invasively by active neutron interrogation. A unique characteristic of fissile material exposed to neutrons is the prompt emission of high-energy (fast) fission neutrons. One promising mode of operation subjects the object to a beam of medium-energy (epithermal) neutrons, generated by a proton beam impinging on a Li target. The emergence of fast secondary neutrons then clearly indicates the presence of fissile material. Our interrogation system comprises a low-dose 60-keV neutron generator (5 x 10{sup 6}/s), and a 1 m{sup 2} array of scintillators for fast neutron detection. Preliminary experimental results demonstrate the detectability of small quantities (370 g) of HEU shielded by steel (200 g/cm{sup 2}) or plywood (30 g/cm{sup 2}), with a typical measurement time of 1 min.

  7. Pulsed neutrons: one year of experience with the new source at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lander, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source based on a 500-MeV proton accelerator operating at 30 Hz and with an average proton current of approx. 10 ..mu..A. Neutron-scattering instruments for elastic scattering include two powder diffractometers, a single-crystal diffractometer based on the Laue method and employing a large (30 x 30 cm) position-sensitive scintillation detector, a small-angle diffractometer using a position-sensitive detector, and a polarized-neutron diffractometer which will utilize the spin-refrigerator device to obtain a beam of white polarized neutrons. For inelastic scattering, we presently have the crystal-analyzer spectrometer and two chopper spectrometers capable of providing monoenergetic incident neutron beams of between 100 and 600 MeV. From its inception IPNS has been operating in a user mode and the selection of experiments is made by a Program Committee twice a year on the basis of the scientific merit of submitted proposals.

  8. Position-sensitive ``movie'' in situ neutron detector for the UCN τ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Hannah; UCNTau Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Precision measurements of neutron β-decay parameters provide tests of fundamental theories in elementary particle physics and cosmology such as the Standard Model and Big Bang nucleosynthesis. In particular, the UCN τ experiment aims to measure the mean lifetime of ultracold neutrons confined in an asymmetric magneto-gravitational trap using an in situ neutron detector. This detector consists of a 20 nm film of 10B on top of a ZnS:Ag scintillating screen. The screen is readout using two photomultipliers which view an array of wavelength shifting fibers optically coupled to the scintillator. When the detector is lowered into the loaded trap, light is emitted due to the charged particles recoiling into the ZnS:Ag when neutrons absorb on the 10B. Phase space evolution in the stored neutron population can lead to apparent shifts in the measured neutron lifetime with the detector height. In order to quantify this systematic uncertainty, we are implementing a supplemental 64-channel position-sensitive PMT module with high quantum efficiency and fast time response to image the entire detector in situ during measurements. We have characterized a prototype using a ZnS screen and an α-particle source along with a prototype lens system and will report the results and future plans.

  9. Neutron Activation Analysis for the Demonstration of Amphibolite Rock-Weathering Activity of a Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Rades-Rohkohl, E.; Hirsch, P.; Fränzle, O.

    1979-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis was employed in a survey of weathering abilities of rock surface microorganisms. A yeast isolated from an amphibolite of a megalithic grave was found actively to concentrate, in media and in or on cells, iron and other elements when grown in the presence of ground rock. This was demonstrated by comparing a spectrum of neutron-activated amphibolite powder (particle size, 50 to 100 μm) with the spectra of neutron-activated, lyophilized yeast cells which had grown with or without amphibolite powder added to different media. The most active yeast (IFAM 1171) did not only solubilize Fe from the rock powder, but significant amounts of Co, Eu, Yb, Ca, Ba, Sc, Lu, Cr, Th, and U were also mobilized. The latter two elements occurred as natural radioactive isotopes in this amphibolite. When the yeast cells were grown with neutron-activated amphibolite, the cells contained the same elements. Furthermore, the growth medium contained Fe, Co, and Eu which had been solubilized from the amphibolite. This indicates the presence, in this yeast strain, of active rockweathering abilities as well as of uptake mechanisms for solubilized rock components. PMID:16345472

  10. Neutron activation analysis for the demonstration of amphibolite rock-weathering activity of a yeast.

    PubMed

    Rades-Rohkohl, E; Hirsch, P; Fränzle, O

    1979-12-01

    Neutron activation analysis was employed in a survey of weathering abilities of rock surface microorganisms. A yeast isolated from an amphibolite of a megalithic grave was found actively to concentrate, in media and in or on cells, iron and other elements when grown in the presence of ground rock. This was demonstrated by comparing a spectrum of neutron-activated amphibolite powder (particle size, 50 to 100 mum) with the spectra of neutron-activated, lyophilized yeast cells which had grown with or without amphibolite powder added to different media. The most active yeast (IFAM 1171) did not only solubilize Fe from the rock powder, but significant amounts of Co, Eu, Yb, Ca, Ba, Sc, Lu, Cr, Th, and U were also mobilized. The latter two elements occurred as natural radioactive isotopes in this amphibolite. When the yeast cells were grown with neutron-activated amphibolite, the cells contained the same elements. Furthermore, the growth medium contained Fe, Co, and Eu which had been solubilized from the amphibolite. This indicates the presence, in this yeast strain, of active rockweathering abilities as well as of uptake mechanisms for solubilized rock components.

  11. Measurements of the neutron activation cross sections for Bi and Co at 386 MeV.

    PubMed

    Yashima, H; Sekimoto, S; Ninomiya, K; Kasamatsu, Y; Shima, T; Takahashi, N; Shinohara, A; Matsumura, H; Satoh, D; Iwamoto, Y; Hagiwara, M; Nishiizumi, K; Caffee, M W; Shibata, S

    2014-10-01

    Neutron activation cross sections for Bi and Co at 386 MeV were measured by activation method. A quasi-monoenergetic neutron beam was produced using the (7)Li(p,n) reaction. The energy spectrum of these neutrons has a high-energy peak (386 MeV) and a low-energy tail. Two neutron beams, 0° and 25° from the proton beam axis, were used for sample irradiation, enabling a correction for the contribution of the low-energy neutrons. The neutron-induced activation cross sections were estimated by subtracting the reaction rates of irradiated samples for 25° irradiation from those of 0° irradiation. The measured cross sections were compared with the findings of other studies, evaluated in relation to nuclear data files and the calculated data by Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System code.

  12. Experiment for synthesis of neutron-deficient protactinium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huabin; Ma, Long; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Yu, Lin; Jia, Guobin; Huang, Minghui; Gan, Zaiguo; Huang, Tianheng; Li, Guangshun; Wu, Xiaolei; Fang, Yongde; Wang, Zhigang; Gao, Bingshui; Hua, Wei

    2014-10-01

    The complete fusion reaction 40Ca+175Lu was studied at a beam energy of 5.1 MeV u-1. Evaporation residues recoiled from the target were separated from the primary beam by the gas-filled recoil separator SHANS and then implanted into the focal plane detection system. Based on the energy-position-time correlation measurement, neutron-deficient nuclei 208-213Ac, 212Pa and 211Th produced in this reaction were identified. Previously reported decay properties of the ground state in 212Pa were confirmed and improved values of 5.1_{-1.7}^{+5.1} ms and 8.250(20) MeV for the half-life and α-particle energy of 212Pa were obtained. No correlated decay chain arising from 211Pa was observed and an upper limit for the cross section of 211Pa was estimated.

  13. Measurement of residual 60Co activity induced by atomic-bomb neutrons in Nagasaki and background contribution by environmental neutrons.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi; Oka, Takamitsu; Shimazaki, Tatsuya; Okumura, Yutaka; Fujita, Shoichiro; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2002-12-01

    Residual 60Co activity in five steel samples induced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb has been measured within about 1000 m from the hypocenter. The chemical separation of cobalt and nickel from steel samples was performed, and cobalt-enriched samples were prepared for all samples. Gamma-ray measurements were carried out with a low-background well-type germanium detector. The gamma-ray spectra for five samples were compared with the spectrum of a control sample to ensure that the observed 60Co was actually induced by A-bomb neutrons. The activation of cobalt by environmental neutrons was also investigated. It has been shown that the present 60Co data are consistent with earlier Hashizume's data.

  14. The COHERENT Experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Steven Ray

    2015-09-30

    The COHERENT collaboration's primary objective is to measure coherent elastic neutrino- nucleus scattering (CEvNS) using the unique, high-quality source of tens-of-MeV neutrinos provided by the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In spite of its large cross section, the CEvNS process has never been observed, due to tiny energies of the resulting nuclear recoils which are out of reach for standard neutrino detectors. The measurement of CEvNS has now become feasible, thanks to the development of ultra-sensitive technology for rare decay and weakly-interacting massive particle (dark matter) searches. The CEvNS cross section is cleanly predicted in the standard model; hence its measurement provides a standard model test. It is relevant for supernova physics and supernova-neutrino detection, and enables validation of dark-matter detector background and detector-response models. In the long term, precision measurement of CEvNS will address questions of nuclear structure. COHERENT will deploy multiple detector technologies in a phased approach: a 14-kg CsI[Na] scintillating crystal, 15 kg of p-type point-contact germanium detectors, and 100 kg of liquid xenon in a two-phase time projection chamber. Following an extensive background measurement campaign, a location in the SNS basement has proven to be neutron-quiet and suitable for deployment of the COHERENT detector suite. The simultaneous deployment of the three COHERENT detector subsystems will test the N=2 dependence of the cross section and ensure an unambiguous discovery of CEvNS. This document describes concisely the COHERENT physics motivations, sensitivity and plans for measurements at the SNS to be accomplished on a four-year timescale.

  15. Shielding experiment of heavy-ion produced neutrons using a tissue-equivalent proportional counter.

    PubMed

    Nunomiya, T; Yonai, S; Takada, M; Fukumura, A; Nakamura, T

    2003-01-01

    A shielding experiment was performed at the HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba), of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), to measure neutron dose using a spherical TEPC (tissue-equivalent proportional counter) of 12.55 cm inner diameter. Neutrons are produced from a 5 cm thick stopping length Cu target bombarded by 400 MeV/nucleon C6+ ions and penetrate concrete or iron shields of various thicknesses at 0 degree to the beam direction. From this shielding experiment. y-distribution, mean lineal energy, absorbed dose, dose equivalent and mean-quality factor were obtained behind the shield as a function of shield thickness. The neutron dose attenuation lengths were also obtained as 126 g cm(-2) for concrete and 211 g cm(-2) for iron. The measured results were compared with the calculated results using the MARS Monte Carlo code.

  16. An investigation of the neutron flux in bone-fluorine phantoms comparing accelerator based in vivo neutron activation analysis and FLUKA simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; McNeill, F. E.; Chettle, D. R.; Matysiak, W.; Bhatia, C.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have tested the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for its ability to assist in the development of a better system for the in vivo measurement of fluorine. We used it to create a neutron flux map of the inside of the in vivo neutron activation analysis irradiation cavity at the McMaster Accelerator Laboratory. The cavity is used in a system that has been developed for assessment of fluorine levels in the human hand. This study was undertaken to (i) assess the FLUKA code, (ii) find the optimal hand position inside the cavity and assess the effects on precision of a hand being in a non-optimal position and (iii) to determine the best location for our γ-ray detection system within the accelerator beam hall. Simulation estimates were performed using FLUKA. Experimental measurements of the neutron flux were performed using Mn wires. The activation of the wires was measured inside (1) an empty bottle, (2) a bottle containing water, (3) a bottle covered with cadmium and (4) a dry powder-based fluorine phantom. FLUKA was used to simulate the irradiation cavity, and used to estimate the neutron flux in different positions both inside, and external to, the cavity. The experimental results were found to be consistent with the Monte Carlo simulated neutron flux. Both experiment and simulation showed that there is an optimal position in the cavity, but that the effect on the thermal flux of a hand being in a non-optimal position is less than 20%, which will result in a less than 10% effect on the measurement precision. FLUKA appears to be a code that can be useful for modeling of this type of experimental system.

  17. A setup for active neutron analysis of the fissile material content in fuel assemblies of nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushuev, A. V.; Kozhin, A. F.; Aleeva, T. B.; Zubarev, V. N.; Petrova, E. V.; Smirnov, V. E.

    2016-12-01

    An active neutron method for measuring the residual mass of 235U in spent fuel assemblies (FAs) of the IRT MEPhI research reactor is presented. The special measuring stand design and uniform irradiation of the fuel with neutrons along the entire length of the active part of the FA provide high accuracy of determination of the residual 235U content. AmLi neutron sources yield a higher effect/background ratio than other types of sources and do not induce the fission of 238U. The proposed method of transfer of the isotope source in accordance with a given algorithm may be used in experiments where the studied object needs to be irradiated with a uniform fluence.

  18. Use of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis to investigate the distribution of trace elements among subsamples of solid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, G.; Bergamaschi, L.; Giordani, L.; Oddone, M.; Kipphardt, H.; Richter, S.

    2014-02-01

    The results of analytical measurements performed with solid-sampling techniques are affected by the distribution of the analytes within the matrix. The effect becomes significant in the case of determination of trace elements in small subsamples. In this framework we propose a measurement model based on Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis to determine the relative variability of the amount of an analyte among subsamples of a material. The measurement uncertainty is evaluated and includes the counting statistics, the full-energy gamma peak efficiency and the spatial gradient of the neutron flux at the irradiation position. The data we obtained in a neutron activation experiment and showing the relative variability of As, Au, Ir, Sb and W among subsamples of a highly pure Rh foil are also presented.

  19. A setup for active neutron analysis of the fissile material content in fuel assemblies of nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bushuev, A. V.; Kozhin, A. F. Aleeva, T. B.; Zubarev, V. N.; Petrova, E. V.; Smirnov, V. E.

    2016-12-15

    An active neutron method for measuring the residual mass of {sup 235}U in spent fuel assemblies (FAs) of the IRT MEPhI research reactor is presented. The special measuring stand design and uniform irradiation of the fuel with neutrons along the entire length of the active part of the FA provide high accuracy of determination of the residual {sup 235}U content. AmLi neutron sources yield a higher effect/background ratio than other types of sources and do not induce the fission of {sup 238}U. The proposed method of transfer of the isotope source in accordance with a given algorithm may be used in experiments where the studied object needs to be irradiated with a uniform fluence.

  20. Low-dose neutron dose response of zebrafish embryos obtained from the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Konishi, T.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Cheng, S. H.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-09-01

    The dose response of embryos of the zebrafish, Danio rerio, irradiated at 5 h post fertilization (hpf) by 2-MeV neutrons with ≤100 mGy was determined. The neutron irradiations were made at the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. A total of 10 neutron doses ranging from 0.6 to 100 mGy were employed (with a gamma-ray contribution of 14% to the total dose), and the biological effects were studied through quantification of apoptosis at 25 hpf. The responses for neutron doses of 10, 20, 25, and 50 mGy approximately fitted on a straight line, while those for neutron doses of 0.6, 1 and 2.5 mGy exhibited neutron hormetic effects. As such, hormetic responses were generically developed by different kinds of ionizing radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) values. The responses for neutron doses of 70 and 100 mGy were significantly below the lower 95% confidence band of the best-fit line, which strongly suggested the presence of gamma-ray hormesis.

  1. Background studies for the COHERENT experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markoff, Diane M.; COHERENT Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The COHERENT experiment is designed for a first measurement and N2 dependence study of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) at the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). CEvNS is a standard model process that is important in understanding supernova neutrinos, the structure of the weak interaction and backgrounds for dark matter searches. The COHERENT collaboration is placing a suite of detector technologies in a basement location at the SNS: 14 kg CsI[Na] crystals; 185 kg NaI crystals; 35 kg single-phase LAr; 10kg high-purity, point contact Ge. Previous attempts to measure the CEvNS process have grappled with very high background rates. One class of troublesome backgrounds is accelerator-correlated neutrons because a simple accelerator on/off background subtraction procedure fails to remove these events. The collaboration has completed a comprehensive background study in the basement region where the experiments are located. We conclude from these studies that the neutron background is sufficiently low for successful CEvNS measurement in the SNS basement region. Neutron measurements from the Indiana University SciBath detector and the Sandia Neutron Scatter Camera are presented here.

  2. In situ characterization of hazardous contaminants using prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, F.H.; Congedo, T.V.; Seidel, J.G.; Gonzalez, J.L.; Weigle, D.H.

    1993-12-31

    Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) has been developed for real-time, in situ measurements of contaminant elements in soil. Pulsed neutron activation coupled with state-of-the-art high count rate throughput electronics and time-sequenced gamma ray energy analysis have been used to obtain sensitivities at the trace level for uranium in soil. The results of detailed neutron dosimetry and prompt neutron-induced gamma ray transport measurements carried out using a soil test matrix will be reported. Initial field deployment of the PGNAA system at a former solution uranium mine in Bruni, Texas will also be described.

  3. The analysis of C 60 and C 70 fullerenes by prompt gamma neutron activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Révay, Zs.; Belgya, T.; Molnár, G. L.; Rausch, H.; Braun, T.

    2006-06-01

    The capabilities of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGAA) are examined for fullerene samples. As shown PGAA is a promising instrumental technique for the determination of the light elements of the periodic table. These elements (C, H, O, N and B) were inaccessible by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) as done by the authors in previous publications.

  4. A compact in vivo neutron activation analysis system to quantify manganese in human hand bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yingzi

    As an urgent issue of correlating cumulative manganese (Mn) exposure to neurotoxicity, bone has emerged as an attractive biomarker for long-term Mn deposition and storage. A novel Deuterium-Deuterium (DD) neutron generator irradiation system has been simulated and constructed, incorporating moderator, reflector and shielding. This neutron activation analysis (NAA) irradiation assembly presents several desirable features, including high neutron flux, improved detection limit and acceptable neutron & photon dose, which would allow it be ready for clinical measurement. Key steps include simulation modeling and verifying, irradiation system design, detector characterization, and neutron flux and dose assessment. Activation foils were also analyzed to reveal the accurate neutron spectrum in the irradiation cave. The detection limit with this system is 0.428 ppm with 36 mSv equivalent hand dose and 52 microSv whole body effective dose.

  5. Measurement of cold neutron spectrum by multi-foil activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikawa, Tatsuya; Canada-Japan UCN Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    In 2016, we will start commissioning the ultracold neutron (UCN) source at TRIUMF: the proton beamline including the spallation target, as well as the cold neutron moderators will be tested. In order to gain a better understanding of the UCN production, a measurement of the cold neutron flux in the UCN source is needed. However, a measurement with the time-of-flight (TOF) method is not adaptable to our geometry. Thus, we are planning to measure the cold neutron spectrum using multiple neutron activation foils with unfolding technique. We will place special foils in the (empty) UCN production volume to measure the neutron spectrum; their activities will be measured by Ge detectors after the activation. The neutron spectrum is reconstructed from the measured activities by an unfolding analysis. This technique has been conventionally used for the measurement of the fast neutron spectrum. In this presentation, we will explain the application of this technique to the measurement of cold neutron spectrum and the status of preparations for the measurement at TRIUMF.

  6. Reconstruction of Time-Resolved Neutron Energy Spectra in Z-Pinch Experiments Using Time-of-flight Method

    SciTech Connect

    Rezac, K.; Klir, D.; Kubes, P.; Kravarik, J.

    2009-01-21

    We present the reconstruction of neutron energy spectra from time-of-flight signals. This technique is useful in experiments with the time of neutron production in the range of about tens or hundreds of nanoseconds. The neutron signals were obtained by a common hard X-ray and neutron fast plastic scintillation detectors. The reconstruction is based on the Monte Carlo method which has been improved by simultaneous usage of neutron detectors placed on two opposite sides from the neutron source. Although the reconstruction from detectors placed on two opposite sides is more difficult and a little bit inaccurate (it followed from several presumptions during the inclusion of both sides of detection), there are some advantages. The most important advantage is smaller influence of scattered neutrons on the reconstruction. Finally, we describe the estimation of the error of this reconstruction.

  7. Preliminary experiments on apparatus for in situ studies of microwave-driven reactions by small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittaker, A. G.; Harrison, A.; Oakley, G. S.; Youngson, I. D.; Heenan, R. K.; King, S. M.

    2001-01-01

    In this article we describe apparatus for the study of the microwave-driven growth of particles in solution by in situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS). This apparatus has enabled the first preliminary experiments using microwave-activated in situ diffraction. We take iron oxide as the prototype system, but the technique may be extended to a wide variety of chemical reactions that deposit solids from solution. The key features of the apparatus are a microwave cavity with a modular construction that may be adapted to the geometric constraints of the diffractometer, and a computer-controlled microwave generator that may be set to maintain either constant pressure or temperature in the reaction vessel. In this particular piece of equipment the reaction vessel is adapted so that part of the sample fills a cell of identical construction to those commonly used in SANS measurements for optimal transmission of the neutron beam.

  8. Determination of hydrogen in niobium by cold neutron prompt gamma ray activation analysis and neutron incoherent scattering

    SciTech Connect

    R.L. Paul; H.H. Cheu-Maya; G.R. Myneni

    2002-11-01

    The presence of trace amounts of hydrogen in niobium is believed to have a detrimental effect on the mechanical and superconducting properties. Unfortunately, few techniques are capable of measuring hydrogen at these levels. We have developed two techniques for measuring hydrogen in materials. Cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) has proven useful for the determination of hydrogen and other elements in a wide variety of materials. Neutron incoherent scattering (NIS), a complementary tool to PGAA, has been used to measure trace hydrogen in titanium. Both techniques were used to study the effects of vacuum heating and chemical polishing on the hydrogen content of superconducting niobium.

  9. Detectors for on-line prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Ray; Yusuf, Siaka; Miller, Jim; Scott, Clark

    1999-02-01

    The uncertainty of the elemental analysis is one of the major factors governing the utility of on-line prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) in the blending and sorting of bulk materials. In this paper, a method for quantifying the relative uncertainty from full spectrum analysis on complex materials is presented. The method was applied to three different detector types, NaI, HPGe, and BGO. The results show that the 5-10 times higher detection efficiency of a large size scintillation detector can often outweigh the resolution superiority of a HPGe detector for simple to medium complex bulk materials. The better detector resolution of sodium iodide gave a significantly lower analysis uncertainty than BGO for equal efficiency detectors.

  10. Neutron activation analysis of biological materials by the monostandard method.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, T; Shinogi, M

    1979-12-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis by the monostandard method has been applied to the analyses of biological NBS standard reference materials; 1571 Orchard Leaves and 1577 Bovine Liver. Aluminum foils containing 0.100% gold or 2.00% cobalt were used as the monostandards. The gamma-ray spectral data were recorded on punched paper tape and were analyzed by a computer assisted data processing. The following 25 elements were determined: Al, Ca, Cl Cu, Mg, Mn, V (by short period irradiation), As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hg, K, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm and Zn (by long period irradiation). The results were compared with the certified values by NBS and the reported values in literatures to prove the reliability and accuracy of the monostandard method.

  11. In-vivo neutron activation analysis: principles and clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress. It seems likely that by the end of this century there will have been significant progress with this research tool, and exciting insights obtained into the nature and dynamics of human body composition.

  12. Clinical applications of in vivo neutron-activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress.

  13. Neutron activation analysis detection limits using {sup 252}Cf sources

    SciTech Connect

    DiPrete, D.P.; Sigg, R.A.

    2000-07-01

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) developed a neutron activation analysis (NAA) facility several decades ago using low-flux {sup 252}Cf neutron sources. Through this time, the facility has addressed areas of applied interest in managing the Savannah River Site (SRS). Some applications are unique because of the site's operating history and its chemical-processing facilities. Because sensitivity needs for many applications are not severe, they can be accomplished using an {approximately}6-mg {sup 252}Cf NAA facility. The SRTC {sup 252}Cf facility continues to support applied research programs at SRTC as well as other SRS programs for environmental and waste management customers. Samples analyzed by NAA include organic compounds, metal alloys, sediments, site process solutions, and many other materials. Numerous radiochemical analyses also rely on the facility for production of short-lived tracers, yielding by activation of carriers and small-scale isotope production for separation methods testing. These applications are more fully reviewed in Ref. 1. Although the flux [{approximately}2 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s] is low relative to reactor facilities, more than 40 elements can be detected at low and sub-part-per-million levels. Detection limits provided by the facility are adequate for many analytical projects. Other multielement analysis methods, particularly inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, can now provide sensitivities on dissolved samples that are often better than those available by NAA using low-flux isotopic sources. Because NAA allows analysis of bulk samples, (a) it is a more cost-effective choice when its sensitivity is adequate than methods that require digestion and (b) it eliminates uncertainties that can be introduced by digestion processes.

  14. Experiments to increase the parameters of the vacuum insulation tandem accelerator for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatov, D. A.; Kolesnikov, J. A.; Koshkarev, A. M.; Kuznetsov, A. S.; Makarov, A. N.; Sokolova, E. O.; Sorokin, I. N.; Sycheva, T. V.; Taskaev, S. Yu.; Shchudlo, I. M.

    2016-12-01

    An epithermal neutron source that is based on a vacuum insulation tandem accelerator (VITA) and lithium target was created in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for the development of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A stationary proton beam with 2 MeV energy and 1.6 mA current has been obtained. To carry out BNCT, it is necessary to increase the beam parameters up to 2.3 MeV and 3 mA. Ways to increase the parameters of the proton beam have been proposed and discussed in this paper. The results of the experiments are presented.

  15. Development of Monte Carlo code for coincidence prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaogang

    Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) offers a non-destructive, relatively rapid on-line method for determination of elemental composition of bulk and other samples. However, PGNAA has an inherently large background. These backgrounds are primarily due to the presence of the neutron excitation source. It also includes neutron activation of the detector and the prompt gamma rays from the structure materials of PGNAA devices. These large backgrounds limit the sensitivity and accuracy of PGNAA. Since most of the prompt gamma rays from the same element are emitted in coincidence, a possible approach for further improvement is to change the traditional PGNAA measurement technique and introduce the gamma-gamma coincidence technique. It is well known that the coincidence techniques can eliminate most of the interference backgrounds and improve the signal-to-noise ratio. A new Monte Carlo code, CEARCPG has been developed at CEAR to simulate gamma-gamma coincidence spectra in PGNAA experiment. Compared to the other existing Monte Carlo code CEARPGA I and CEARPGA II, a new algorithm of sampling the prompt gamma rays produced from neutron capture reaction and neutron inelastic scattering reaction, is developed in this work. All the prompt gamma rays are taken into account by using this new algorithm. Before this work, the commonly used method is to interpolate the prompt gamma rays from the pre-calculated gamma-ray table. This technique works fine for the single spectrum. However it limits the capability to simulate the coincidence spectrum. The new algorithm samples the prompt gamma rays from the nucleus excitation scheme. The primary nuclear data library used to sample the prompt gamma rays comes from ENSDF library. Three cases are simulated and the simulated results are benchmarked with experiments. The first case is the prototype for ETI PGNAA application. This case is designed to check the capability of CEARCPG for single spectrum simulation. The second

  16. Development of the neutron electric dipole moment experiment at the SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Martin D.

    2009-10-01

    The nEDM Collaboration is preparing an experiment to run at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to search for the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) experiment with a sensitivity of <10-27 e.cm based on the scheme of Golub and Lamoreaux. The collaboration has been pursuing a R&D program to establish the technical feasibility of the design. Many results have been obtained from independent experiments that demonstrate the EDM experiment should work. The data from a number of these preparatory measurements will be presented and discussed in terms of their importance to the final design. The engineering of the project is now ready to produce shop drawings, so a comprehensive picture of the apparatus can be presented.

  17. Tables for simplifying calculations of activities produced by thermal neutrons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Champion, W.R.

    1954-01-01

    The method of calculation described is useful for the types of work of which examples are given. It is also useful in making rapid comparison of the activities that might be expected from several different elements. For instance, suppose it is desired to know which of the three elements, cobalt, nickel, or vanadium is, under similar conditions, activated to the greatest extent by thermal neutrons. If reference is made to a cross-section table only, the values may be misleading unless properly interpreted by a suitable comparison of half-lives and abundances. In this table all the variables have been combined and the desired information can be obtained directly from the values of A 3??, the activity produced per gram per second of irradiation, under the stated conditions. Hence, it is easily seen that, under similar circumstances of irradiation, vanadium is most easily activated even though the cross section of one of the cobalt isotopes is nearly five times that of vanadium and the cross section of one of the nickel isotopes is three times that of vanadium. ?? 1954 Societa?? Italiana di Fisica.

  18. Integral experiments on thorium assemblies with D-T neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Yang, Yiwei; Feng, Song; Zheng, Lei; Lai, Caifeng; Lu, Xinxin; Wang, Mei; Jiang, Li

    2017-09-01

    To validate nuclear data and code in the neutronics design of a hybrid reactor with thorium, integral experiments in two kinds of benchmark thorium assemblies with a D-T fusion neutron source have been performed. The one kind of 1D assemblies consists of polyethylene and depleted uranium shells. The other kind of 2D assemblies consists of three thorium oxide cylinders. The capture reaction rates, fission reaction rates, and (n, 2n) reaction rates in 232Th in the assemblies are measured by ThO2 foils. The leakage neutron spectra from the ThO2 cylinders are measured by a liquid scintillation detector. The experimental uncertainties in all the results are analyzed. The measured results are compared to the calculated ones with MCNP code and ENDF/B-VII.0 library data.

  19. aCORN: An experiment to measure the electron-antineutrino correlation in neutron decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wietfeldt, F. E.; Byrne, J.; Collett, B.; Dewey, M. S.; Jones, G. L.; Komives, A.; Laptev, A.; Nico, J. S.; Noid, G.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stern, I.; Trull, C.; Yerozolimsky, B. G.

    2009-12-01

    The aCORN experiment is designed to make a precision ( <1%) measurement of the electron-antineutrino angular correlation ( a-coefficient) in neutron beta decay. It uses a new method proposed in 1996 by Yerozolimsky and Mostovoy. Electrons and recoil protons from neutron decay in a cold beam are detected in coincidence. The momenta of the particles are selected so that the protons form two kinematically distinct time-of-flight groups as a function of electron energy. The count rate asymmetry in these two groups is proportional to the a-coefficient. Precision spectroscopy of the protons is not required. The apparatus is currently under construction. It will be integrated and tested at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) and then moved to the NIST Center for Neutron Research for the initial physics run.

  20. Neutron skin of (208)Pb, nuclear symmetry energy, and the parity radius experiment.

    PubMed

    Roca-Maza, X; Centelles, M; Viñas, X; Warda, M

    2011-06-24

    A precise determination of the neutron skin Δr(np) of a heavy nucleus sets a basic constraint on the nuclear symmetry energy (Δr(np) is the difference of the neutron and proton rms radii of the nucleus). The parity radius experiment (PREX) may achieve it by electroweak parity-violating electron scattering (PVES) on (208)Pb. We investigate PVES in nuclear mean field approach to allow the accurate extraction of Δr(np) of (208)Pb from the parity-violating asymmetry A(PV) probed in the experiment. We demonstrate a high linear correlation between A(PV) and Δr(np) in successful mean field forces as the best means to constrain the neutron skin of (208)Pb from PREX, without assumptions on the neutron density shape. Continuation of the experiment with higher precision in A(PV) is motivated since the present method can support it to constrain the density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy to new accuracy.

  1. Phase I measurements for the HTGR bottom reflector and Core Support Block Neutron-Streaming Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.; Holland, L.B.; Hull, J.L.; Manning, J.J.

    1984-07-01

    This report presents the Phase I measurements of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Bottom Reflector and Core Support Neutron Streaming Experiment conducted at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility during FY-1983. In this phase the first four of eight segments that comprise the full experimental mockup were utilized. These were: (1) an upper boron pin layer (graphite matrix) followed by a boral shroud; (2) a graphite reflector layer; (3) a graphite coolant crossover layer; and (4) a graphite follow-on layer, all containing coolant holes. A collimated beam from the Tower Shielding Reactor II was used as the neutron source. In order to obtain a spectrum of neutrons more nearly like the spectrum expected from the HTGR, an iron and graphite spectrum modifier was inserted in the TSR-II beam ahead of the experimental mockup. The various experimental configurations tested resulted from the successive addition of the four graphite layers to the mockup. Neutron energy spectra were measured behind the spectrum modifier and the boron pin layer and integral neutron fluxes were measured behind the spectrum modifier and behind each of the four layers. The measurements were divided into two Parts, the two parts differing in the composition of the boron pin layer. During part I, a reference pin pattern was used which consisted of a combination of graphite and boronated graphite pins. During part II, a full pattern of boronated graphite pins was used. The experimental data are presented in both tabular and graphical form.

  2. Quantum beat experiments and their applications using cold neutron spin interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Dai; Ebisawa, Toru; Kawai, Takeshi; Tasaki, Seiji; Hino, Masahiro; Akiyoshi, Tsunekazu; Achiwa, Norio

    We have carried out quantum beat experiments using cold neutron spin interferometers installed at KURRI and JAERI. Quantum beat profiles (time-dependent interference fringe) with frequencies from 20 μHz to 34 kHz were observed, which correspond to energy difference 8.271 × 10 -20and 1.406 × 10 -10eV. Delayed choice experiment using quantum beat are proposed as an application.

  3. A fast neutron spectrum unfolding method using activation measurements and its application to restoration of a thermonuclear reactor blanket neutron spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, V. M.; Shkurpelov, A. A.; Zagryadsky, V. A.; Chuvilin, D. Yu.; Shmonin, Yu. V.

    1982-12-01

    This article describes a fast neutron spectrum unfolding program. The program takes into account a priori information about the neutron spectrum, the experimental values of activation integrals errors and activation detector cross sections errors. The usefulness of the unfolding program was demonstrated by its application to the determination of neutron spectra from 1 to 14 MeV in the molten-salt blanket model of a thermonuclear reactor.

  4. Analysis of a laboratory experiment on neutron generation by discharges in the open atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, L. P.

    2015-10-01

    A recently reported laboratory experiment with a high-voltage long discharge in the open atmosphere producing neutrons "…up to energies above 10 MeV…" [Agafonov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 115003 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.115003] is critically analyzed. Known elementary processes, namely, nuclear synthesis 2H(2H,n )3He and 2H(14N,n )15O , photonuclear, electrodisintegration Anm(e-,n )mprescripts>m n -1 and opposite to the β-decay e-(p+,n ) νe reactions, as well as unconventional mechanisms and the hypothetical increase in the nuclear synthesis cross sections are not capable of accounting for the neutron generation under conditions of the experiment analyzed. In particular, total energy yields of reactions 2H(2H,n )3He and 2H(14N,n )15O are less than the claimed neutron energy above 10 MeV. Trustworthiness of the neutron measurements on the basis of the available study of the C-39 track detectors behavior carried out by Faccini et al. [Eur. Phys. J. C 74, 2894 (2014), 10.1140/epjc/s10052-014-2894-3] in connection with claimed observations of neutron emission in electrolytic cells is discussed. Real-time measurements of x-ray and neutron pulses by Agafonov et al. are commented on using the thorough study of the x-ray emissions by discharges under similar conditions [Kochkin et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 45, 425202 (2012), 10.1088/0022-3727/45/42/425202].

  5. YALINA-booster subcritical assembly pulsed-neutron experiments : data processing and spatial corrections.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-11

    The YALINA-Booster experiments and analyses are part of the collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory of USA and the Joint Institute for Power & Nuclear Research - SOSNY of Belarus for studying the physics of accelerator driven systems for nuclear energy applications using low enriched uranium. The YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly is utilized for studying the kinetics of accelerator driven systems with its highly intensive D-T or D-D pulsed neutron source. In particular, the pulsed neutron methods are used to determine the reactivity of the subcritical system. This report examines the pulsed-neutron experiments performed in the YALINA-Booster facility with different configurations for the subcritical assembly. The 1141 configuration with 90% U-235 fuel and the 1185 configuration with 36% or 21% U-235 fuel are examined. The Sjoestrand area-ratio method is utilized to determine the reactivities of the different configurations. The linear regression method is applied to obtain the prompt neutron decay constants from the pulsed-neutron experimental data. The reactivity values obtained from the experimental data are shown to be dependent on the detector locations inside the subcritical assembly and the types of detector used for the measurements. In this report, Bell's spatial correction factors are calculated based on a Monte Carlo model to remove the detector dependences. The large differences between the reactivity values given by the detectors in the fast neutron zone of the YALINA-Booster are reduced after applying the spatial corrections. In addition, the estimated reactivity values after the spatial corrections are much less spatially dependent.

  6. Real-Time Active Cosmic Neutron Background Reduction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray-induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the low-energy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of man-made neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  7. Nondestructive assay of spent boiling water reactor fuel by active neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeman, E.D.; Ricker, C.W.; Ragan, G.L.; Difilippo, F.C.; Slaughter, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    Spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel from Dresden I was assayed for total fissile mass, using the active neutron interrogation method. The nondestructive assay (NDA) system used has four Sb-Be sources for interrogation of the fuels; the induced fission neutrons from the fuel are counted by four lead-shielded methane-filled proportional counters biased above the energy of the source neutrons. Spent fuel rods containing 9 kg of heavy metal were chopped into 5-cm segments and loaded into three 1-liter cans. The three cans were assayed in seven combinations of one, two, or three cans, enabling an evaluation of the precision and accuracy of the NDA system for different amounts of fissile material. The fissile mass in each combination was determined by comparing the induced-fission-neutron counts with the counts obtained from a known standard comprising chopped segments of unirradiated Dresden fuel. These masses were compared to the masses determined by chemical analyses of the spent fuel. The results from the nondestructive assays agreed with results from the chemical analyses to within 2 to 3%. Similar agreement was obtained when two combinations of canned spent fuel were used as standards for the nondesctuctive assays. The assay of BWR spent fuel served as a test of the NDA system which was developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the assay of spent liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fuel subassemblies at the heat-end of a reprocessing plant. Results of previous experiments and calculations reported earlier using simulated LMFBR fuel subassemblies indicated that the NDA system can measure the fissile masses of spent fuel subassemblies to within an accuracy of 3%. Results of the assays of spent BWR fuel reported herein support this conclusion.

  8. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  9. Neutronics analysis of the DHCE experiment in ATR-ITV

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.; Tsai, H.

    1997-08-01

    The preliminary analysis of the DHCE experiments in the ITV and ATR was performed and its was concluded that such a vehicle is suitable for this kind of experiment. It is recommended to place an extra filter material in the thermocouple sleeve (such as B-10), to improve the helium to dpa ratio profile during irradiation. Also, it was concluded that a preliminary estimation of period of time for replacement of the external filter would be around 5 dps`s.

  10. Validation of multigroup neutron cross sections and calculational methods for the advanced neutron source against the FOEHN critical experiments measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.A.; Gallmeier, F.X.; Gehin, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    The FOEHN critical experiment was analyzed to validate the use of multigroup cross sections and Oak Ridge National Laboratory neutronics computer codes in the design of the Advanced Neutron Source. The ANSL-V 99-group master cross section library was used for all the calculations. Three different critical configurations were evaluated using the multigroup KENO Monte Carlo transport code, the multigroup DORT discrete ordinates transport code, and the multigroup diffusion theory code VENTURE. The simple configuration consists of only the fuel and control elements with the heavy water reflector. The intermediate configuration includes boron endplates at the upper and lower edges of the fuel element. The complex configuration includes both the boron endplates and components in the reflector. Cross sections were processed using modules from the AMPX system. Both 99-group and 20-group cross sections were created and used in two-dimensional models of the FOEHN experiment. KENO calculations were performed using both 99-group and 20-group cross sections. The DORT and VENTURE calculations were performed using 20-group cross sections. Because the simple and intermediate configurations are azimuthally symmetric, these configurations can be explicitly modeled in R-Z geometry. Since the reflector components cannot be modeled explicitly using the current versions of these codes, three reflector component homogenization schemes were developed and evaluated for the complex configuration. Power density distributions were calculated with KENO using 99-group cross sections and with DORT and VENTURE using 20-group cross sections. The average differences between the measured values and the values calculated with the different computer codes range from 2.45 to 5.74%. The maximum differences between the measured and calculated thermal flux values for the simple and intermediate configurations are {approx} 13%, while the average differences are < 8%.

  11. Active airborne linescan experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan, Roger D.; Huckridge, David A.; Nash, Cedric R.; Vaughan, J. Michael

    1994-10-01

    A coherent lidar system based on a 3W cw CO2 laser has been installed on an aircraft positioned to look forward and down. A monostatic optical geometry is employed and the optical system incorporates a scanning mechanism that generates a line scan in the horizontal plane perpendicular to the aircraft. This scan pattern, coupled with the aircraft motion, produces a 2D coverage of the ground. The laser reflections from terrain features are collected and 2D images of the ground generated based on the amplitude of the return signals. A flight program has been conducted and active images of a range of natural terrain and man made objects collected. This paper describes the coherent laser system, its aircraft installation, signal processing, and results obtained from the flight trial program.

  12. Active Neutron Interrogation of Non-Radiological Materials with NMIS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Mark E; Mihalczo, John T

    2012-02-01

    The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), although primarily designed for analyzing special nuclear material, is capable of identifying nonradiological materials with a wide range of measurement techniques. This report demonstrates four different measurement methods, complementary to fast-neutron imaging, which can be used for material identification: DT transmission, DT scattering, californium transmission, and active time-tagged gamma spectroscopy. Each of the four techniques was used to evaluate how these methods can be used to identify four materials: aluminum, polyethylene, graphite, and G-10 epoxy. While such measurements have been performed individually in the past, in this project, all four measurements were performed on the same set of materials. The results of these measurements agree well with predicted results. In particular, the results of the active gamma spectroscopy measurements demonstrate the technique's applicability in a future version of NMIS which will incorporate passive and active gamma-ray spectroscopy. This system, designated as a fieldable NMIS (FNMIS), is under development by the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Verification.

  13. Characterization of indoor cooking aerosol using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Landsberger, S.; Larson, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Suspended particles in air are potentially harmful to human health, depending on their sizes and chemical composition. Residential indoor particles mainly come from (a) outdoor sources that are transported indoors, (b) indoor dust that is resuspended, and (c) indoor combustion sources, which include cigarette smoking, cooking, and heating. Jedrychowski stated that chronic phlegm in elderly women was strongly related to the cooking exposure. Kamens et al. indicated that cooking could generate small particles (<0.1 [mu]m), and cooking one meal could contribute [approximately]5 to 18% of total daytime particle volume exposure. Although cooking is a basic human activity, there are not many data available on the properties of particles generated by this activity. Some cooking methods, such as stir-frying and frying, which are the most favored for Chinese and other Far East people, generate a large quantity of aerosols. This research included the following efforts: 1. investigating particle number concentrations, distributions, and their variations with four different cooking methods and ventilation conditions; 2. measuring the chemical composition of cooking aerosol samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

  14. Neutron transport calculation for Activation Evaluation for Decommissioning of PET cyclotron Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobuhara, Fumiyoshi; Kuroyanagi, Makoto; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Hajime; Toyoda, Akihiro; Takahashi, Katsuhiko

    2017-09-01

    In order to evaluate the state of activation in a cyclotron facility used for the radioisotope production of PET diagnostics, we measured the neutron flux by using gold foils and TLDs. Then, the spatial distribution of neutrons and induced activity inside the cyclotron vault were simulated with the Monte Calro calculation code for neutron transport and DCHAIN-SP for activation calculation. The calculated results are in good agreement with measured values within factor 3. Therefore, the adaption of the advanced evaluation procedure for activation level is proved to be important for the planning of decommissioning of these facilities.

  15. Measurements of activation induced by environmental neutrons using ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Martínez Canet, M J; Hult, M; Köhler, M; Johnston, P N

    2000-03-01

    The flux of environmental neutrons is being studied by activation of metal discs of selected elements. Near the earth's surface the total neutron flux is in the order of 10(-2) cm(-2)s(-1), which gives induced activities of a few mBq in the discs. Initial results from this technique, involving activation at ground level for several materials (W, Au, Ta, In, Re, Sm, Dy and Mn) and ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry in an underground laboratory located at 500 m.w.e., are presented. Diffusion of environmental neutrons in water is also measured by activation of gold at different depths.

  16. FY16 Status Report on NEAMS Neutronics Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C. H.; Shemon, E. R.; Smith, M. A.; Jung, Y. S.

    2016-09-30

    The goal of the NEAMS neutronics effort is to develop a neutronics toolkit for use on sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) which can be extended to other reactor types. The neutronics toolkit includes the high-fidelity deterministic neutron transport code PROTEUS and many supporting tools such as a cross section generation code MC2-3, a cross section library generation code, alternative cross section generation tools, mesh generation and conversion utilities, and an automated regression test tool. The FY16 effort for NEAMS neutronics focused on supporting the release of the SHARP toolkit and existing and new users, continuing to develop PROTEUS functions necessary for performance improvement as well as the SHARP release, verifying PROTEUS against available existing benchmark problems, and developing new benchmark problems as needed. The FY16 research effort was focused on further updates of PROTEUS-SN and PROTEUS-MOCEX and cross section generation capabilities as needed.

  17. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-15

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He{sup 4} nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T{sup 3}.

  18. Detection sensitivities in 3-8 MeV neutron activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlgren, M. A.; Wing, J.

    1968-01-01

    Study of detection sensitivities of 73 radioactive elements using fast unmoderated neutrons includes experiments for irradiation, cooling and counting conditions. The gamma ray emission spectra is used to identify the unknown material.

  19. Stability evaluation and correction of a pulsed neutron generator prompt gamma activation analysis system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Source output stability is important for accurate measurement in prompt gamma neutron activation. This is especially true when measuring low-concentration elements such as in vivo nitrogen (~2.5% of body weight). We evaluated the stability of the compact DT neutron generator within an in vivo nitrog...

  20. Hiroshima and Nagasaki initial radiations: delayed neutron contributions and comparison of calculated and measured cobalt activations

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W.E.

    1985-03-01

    Calculated estimates of neutron doses received by atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki have not included contributions from delayed neutrons emitted by fission products in the debris cloud, although the possibility of a significant contribution from this source has been suggested. In the present work, an established model accounting for gamma-ray kermas from these fission products is adapted to provide the desired neutron kerma estimates. Adaptations include use of explicit time dependence of neutron emitters, properly folded with the time-dependent phenomenology of the explosion itself, and detailed air-over-ground neutron transport with a source having an energy spectrum characteristic of these delayed neutrons. Results show that delayed neutrons are indeed negligible contributors to atomic-bomb survivor dosimetry, as well as to neutron activations at Hiroshima. About half the activation at Nagasaki, however, is due to the delayed component. Calculated activation of cobalt, a revision of previous estimates, is compared to measured values at Hiroshima and at Nagasaki. The causes of the substantial discrepancies are discussed and compared to previously reported discrepancies for sulfur activation. Additional investigation is recommended.

  1. Neutron Spallation Measurements And Impacts On Low Background Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2014-09-01

    Ultra-low background experiments, such as neutrinoless double beta decay, carried out deep underground to escape cosmic ray backgrounds can nonetheless be limited in sensitivity by cosmogenically induced signals. This limit can either be produced directly during operation from cosmic muon events in the detector volume, or can be produced by radioactive decay of cosmogenically generated radionuclides created while the detector materials were above ground. An accurate knowledge of the production of the latter source of background is of paramount importance in order to be able to interpret the results of low-background experiments.

  2. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, F.; Gugiu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Petrone, C.; Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; Risca, M.; Toma, M.; Turcu, E.; Ursescu, D.

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  3. Fission foil measurements of neutron and proton fluences in the A0015 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. V.; Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1995-01-01

    Results are given from sets of fission foil detectors (FFD's) (Ta-181, Bi-209, Th-232, U-238) which were included in the A0015 experiment to measure combined proton/neutron fluences. Use has been made of recent FFD high energy proton calibrations for improved accuracy of response. Comparisons of track density measurements have been made with the predictions of environmental modeling based on simple 1-D (slab) geometry. At 1 g/cm(exp 2) (trailing edge) the calculations were approximately 25 percent lower than measurements; at 13 g/cm(exp 2) (Earthside) calculations were more than a factor of 2 lower. A future 3-D modeling of the experiment is needed for a more meaningful comparison. Approximate mission proton doses and neutron dose equivalents were found. At Earthside (13 g/cm(exp 2) the dose was 171 rad and dose equivalent was 82 rem. At the trailing edge (1 g/cm(exp 2) dose was 315 rad and dose equivalent was 33 rem. The proton doses are less than expected from TLD doses by 16 percent and 37 percent, respectively. These differences can be explained by uncertainties in the proton and neutron spectra and in the method used to separate proton and neutron contributions to the measurements.

  4. Principle and Uncertainty Quantification of an Experiment Designed to Infer Actinide Neutron Capture Cross-Sections

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatorre; G. Imel; R. Pardo; F. Kondev; M. Paul

    2010-01-01

    An integral reactor physics experiment devoted to infer higher actinide (Am, Cm, Bk, Cf) neutron cross sections will take place in the US. This report presents the principle of the planned experiment as well as a first exercise aiming at quantifying the uncertainties related to the inferred quantities. It has been funded in part by the DOE Office of Science in the framework of the Recovery Act and has been given the name MANTRA for Measurement of Actinides Neutron TRAnsmutation. The principle is to irradiate different pure actinide samples in a test reactor like INL’s Advanced Test Reactor, and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The precise characterization of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation allows the energy integrated neutron cross-sections to be inferred since the relation between the two are the well-known neutron-induced transmutation equations. This approach has been used in the past and the principal novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined with the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) facility located at ANL. While AMS facilities traditionally have been limited to the assay of low-to-medium atomic mass materials, i.e., A < 100, there has been recent progress in extending AMS to heavier isotopes – even to A > 200. The detection limit of AMS being orders of magnitude lower than that of standard mass spectroscopy techniques, more transmutation products could be measured and, potentially, more cross-sections could be inferred from the irradiation of a single sample. Furthermore, measurements will be carried out at the INL using more standard methods in order to have another set of totally uncorrelated information.

  5. DrSPINE - New approach to data reduction and analysis for neutron spin echo experiments from pulsed and reactor sources

    SciTech Connect

    Monkenbusch, Michael; Holderer, Olaf; Ohl, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neutron spin echo (NSE) method at a pulsed neutron source presents new challenges to the data reduction and analysis as compared to the instruments installed at reactor sources. The main advantage of the pulsed source NSE is the ability to resolve the neutron wavelength and collect neutrons over a wider bandwidth. This allows us to more precisely determine the symmetry phase and measure the data for several Q-values at the same time. Based on the experience gained at the SNS NSE - the first, and to date the only one, NSE instrument installed at a pulsed spallation source, we propose a novel and unified approach to the NSE data processing.

  6. A benchmarked MCNP model of the in vivo detection of gadolinium by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräfe, J. L.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Chettle, D. R.; Noseworthy, M. D.

    2010-08-01

    Gadolinium (Gd)-based contrast agents are a valuable diagnostic aid for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The amount of free Gd deposited in tissues following contrast enhanced MRI is of toxicological concern. The McMaster University in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis facility has been adapted for the detection of Gd in the kidney, liver, and the leg muscle. A simple model of the HPGe detector used for detection of the prompt γ-rays following Gd neutron capture has been created using Monte Carlo simulation. A separate simulation describing the neutron collimation and shielding apparatus has been modified to determine the neutron capture rate in the Gd phantoms. The MCNP simulation results have been confirmed by experimental measurement. The deviations between MCNP and the experiment were between 1% and 18%, with an average deviation of 3.8 ± 6.7%. The validated MCNP model is to be used to improve the Gd in vivo measurement sensitivity by determining the best neutron moderator/reflector arrangement.

  7. Phosphorus activation neutron dosimetry and its application to an 18-MV radiotherapy accelerator.

    PubMed

    Bading, J R; Zeitz, L; Laughlin, J S

    1982-01-01

    Neutron fluxes and dose rates in and near the 18-MV x-ray beam of a Therac-20 accelerator were determined with measured activities from the nuclear reactions 31P(n, rho)31Si (fast neutrons) and 31P(n, gamma)32P (thermal neutrons), published cross sections, and neutron energy spectra from Monte Carlo calculations. Measurements were made in the patient plane in air and at a 10-cm depth in a tissue-similar phantom, and in a plane containing the x-ray target. Orthophosphoric acid solution was identified as a suitable and convenient phosphorus dosimeter material. In the 31P activation method, fluxes and dose rates are determined as the product of measured saturation activity per 31P atom and a conversion factor, which depends on the shape of the assumed neutron spectrum. For fast neutrons, which deliver most of the dose, the accuracy error in the saturation activity determinations was shown to be approximately less than 25%. An inconsistency resulting from neglect of the accelerator's adjustable collimator in the Monte Carlo calculations was demonstrated between the measured saturation activities and the theoretical neutron spectra. The maximum neutron dose equivalent rate observed was 5.9 mSv/Gy of x-ray absorbed dose at the accelerator calibration point. Surface dose equivalent rates of the present study are less than those of fluxmeter and remmeter studies at sites outside Therac-20 treatment fields by as much as factors of 2.4 and 2.8, respectively. The phantom study showed that at 18 MV internally produced neutrons have a negligible effect on the neutron field within the patient.

  8. Design of a backscatter 14-MeV neutron time-of-flight spectrometer for experiments at ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Dzysiuk, N.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Skiba, M.

    2014-08-21

    Neutron energy spectrometry diagnostics play an important role in present-day experiments related to fusion energy research. Measurements and thorough analysis of the neutron emission from the fusion plasma give information on a number of basic fusion performance quantities, on the condition of the neutron source and plasma behavior. Here we discuss the backscatter Time-of-Flight (bTOF) spectrometer concept as a possible instrument for performing high resolution measurements of 14 MeV neutrons. The instrument is based on two sets of scintillators, a first scatterer exposed to a collimated neutron beam and a second detector set placed in the backward direction. The scintillators of the first set are enriched in deuterium to achieve neutron backscattering. The energy resolution and efficiency of a bTOF instrument have been determined for various geometrical configurations. A preliminary design of optimal geometry for the two scintillator sets has been obtained by Monte Carlo simulations based on the MCNPX code.

  9. Measurement of residual 152Eu activity induced by atomic bomb neutrons in Nagasaki and the contribution of environmental neutrons to this activity.

    PubMed

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu; Takada, Jun; Ishikawa, Masayori; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi; Oka, Takamitsu; Fujita, Shoichiro; Watanabe, Tadaaki; Yamashita, Tomoaki; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2003-06-01

    Residual 152Eu activities induced by neutrons from the Nagasaki atomic bomb were measured for nine mineral samples located up to 1,061 m in the slant range and one control sample at 2,850 m from the hypocenter. A chemical separation to prepare europium-enriched samples was performed for all samples, and gamma ray measurements were carried out with a low background well-type germanium detector. In this paper, the measured specific activities of 152Eu are compared with activation calculations based on the DS86 neutron fluence and the 93Rev one. The calculated-to-measured ratios are also compared with those of 60Co and 36Cl. The present results indicate that the measurements agree to the calculation within a factor of three as observed in the nuclear tests at Nevada. The activation level of environmental neutrons and the detection limit for 152Eu are also discussed.

  10. Neutron intensity monitor with activation foil for p-Li neutron source for BNCT--Feasibility test of the concept.

    PubMed

    Murata, Isao; Otani, Yuki; Sato, Fuminobu

    2015-12-01

    Proton-lithium (p-Li) reaction is being examined worldwide as a candidate nuclear production reaction for accelerator based neutron source (ABNS) for BNCT. In this reaction, the emitted neutron energy is not so high, below 1 MeV, and especially in backward angles the energy is as low as about 100 keV. The intensity measurement was thus known to be difficult so far. In the present study, a simple method was investigated to monitor the absolute neutron intensity of the p-Li neutron source by employing the foil activation method based on isomer production reactions in order to cover around several hundreds keV. As a result of numerical examination, it was found that (107)Ag, (115)In and (189)Os would be feasible. Their features found out are summarized as follows: (107)Ag: The most convenient foil, since the half life is short. (115)In: The accuracy is the best at 0°, though it cannot be used for backward angles. And (189)Os: Suitable nuclide which can be used in backward angles, though the gamma-ray energy is a little too low. These would be used for p-Li source monitoring depending on measuring purposes in real BNCT scenes.

  11. Event Recording Data Acquisition System and Experiment Data Management System for Neutron Experiments at MLF, J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, T.; Inamura, Y.; Moriyama, K.; Ito, T.; Muto, S.; Otomo, T.

    Neutron scattering can be a powerful probe in the investigation of many phenomena in the materials and life sciences. The Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is a leading center of experimental neutron science and boasts one of the most intense pulsed neutron sources in the world. The MLF currently has 18 experimental instruments in operation that support a wide variety of users from across a range of research fields. The instruments include optical elements, sample environment apparatus and detector systems that are controlled and monitored electronically throughout an experiment. Signals from these components and those from the neutron source are converted into a digital format by the data acquisition (DAQ) electronics and recorded as time-tagged event data in the DAQ computers using "DAQ-Middleware". Operating in event mode, the DAQ system produces extremely large data files (˜GB) under various measurement conditions. Simultaneously, the measurement meta-data indicating each measurement condition is recorded in XML format by the MLF control software framework "IROHA". These measurement event data and meta-data are collected in the MLF common storage and cataloged by the MLF Experimental Database (MLF EXP-DB) based on a commercial XML database. The system provides a web interface for users to manage and remotely analyze experimental data.

  12. Manufacture and properties of erythromycin beads containing neutron-activated erbium-171

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, A.F.; Digenis, G.A.; Sandefer, E.P.; Ghebre-Sellassie, I.; Iyer, U.; Nesbitt, R.U.; Scheinthal, B.M. )

    1990-03-01

    To evaluate the effects of a neutron activation radiolabeling technique on an enteric-coated multiparticulate formulation of erythromycin, test quantities were produced under industrial pilot scale conditions. The pellets contained the stable isotope erbium oxide (Er-170), which was later converted by neutron activation into the short-lived gamma ray-emitting radionuclide, erbium-171. In vitro studies indicated that the dissolution profile, acid resistance, and enteric-coated surface of the pellets were minimally affected by the irradiation procedure. Antimicrobial potency was also unaffected, as determined by microbiological assay. Neutron activation thus appears to simplify the radiolabeling of complex pharmaceutical dosage forms for in vivo study by external gamma scintigraphy.

  13. An Analysis Technique for Active Neutron Multiplicity Measurements Based on First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William S; Peerani, Paolo

    2012-08-13

    Passive neutron multiplicity counting is commonly used to quantify the total mass of plutonium in a sample, without prior knowledge of the sample geometry. However, passive neutron counting is less applicable to uranium measurements due to the low spontaneous fission rates of uranium. Active neutron multiplicity measurements are therefore used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in a sample. Unfortunately, there are still additional challenges to overcome for uranium measurements, such as the coupling of the active source and the uranium sample. Techniques, such as the coupling method, have been developed to help reduce the dependence of calibration curves for active measurements on uranium samples; although, they still require similar geometry known standards. An advanced active neutron multiplicity measurement method is being developed by Texas A&M University, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in an attempt to overcome the calibration curve requirements. This method can be used to quantify the {sup 235}U mass in a sample containing uranium without using calibration curves. Furthermore, this method is based on existing detectors and nondestructive assay (NDA) systems, such as the LANL Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC). This method uses an inexpensive boron carbide liner to shield the uranium sample from thermal and epithermal neutrons while allowing fast neutrons to reach the sample. Due to the relatively low and constant fission and absorption energy dependent cross-sections at high neutron energies for uranium isotopes, fast neutrons can penetrate the sample without significant attenuation. Fast neutron interrogation therefore creates a homogeneous fission rate in the sample, allowing for first principle methods to be used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in the sample. This paper discusses the measurement method concept and development, including measurements and simulations performed to date, as well as the potential

  14. Neutron energy spectra unfolding from foil activation detector measurements with MINUIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghour, A.; Seghour, F. Z.

    2005-12-01

    A method for unfolding neutron energy spectra from foil activation measurements using the multiparameter function minimisation routine MINUIT of Cernlib has been developed. It is based on the expansion of the neutron energy distribution on a set of parameters that are fitted to minimise the square sum of differences between the measured and calculated activities under smoothness and shape constraints. A modified square sum of differences expression weighted by each activation detector response contribution over the whole neutron energy range is proposed and compared with the classical square sum formulation. The proposed unfolding procedure is first illustrated by a set of 15 detectors to simulate reaction rates calculated using a typical neutron reactor energy spectrum. The demonstration of the proposed method is next achieved using measured reaction rates of the Arkansas Nuclear One power plant (ANO) benchmark spectrum of the Neutron Metrology File (NMF-90). Results of the proposed method were compared with those obtained by STAYNL and MSANDB unfolding codes using the same input data and were found in good agreement with the measured activities. The developed procedure is found to have an interesting advantage in unfolding neutron energy distribution in cases of a lack of information on the a priori solution. This has been illustrated by unfolding the JOYO MK-II fast breeder reactor neutron spectrum, using a set of experimental activation rates without a guess solution.

  15. The A-711 high yield neutron generator and automated pneumatic transfer system for fast neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, James D.; Chichester, D. L.; Hill, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    To make fast neutron activation analysis (FNAA) of samples with short half-lives easier, Thermo Electron has updated and modernized its automatic pneumatic transfer system for activation laboratories. For example, with a separation of 10 m from the counting station and a transit speed of 15 m/s, oxygen can be analyzed with improved accuracy. The fast transit time is needed due to the short half-lives of 16N and 19O, 7 s and 27 s respectively, and oxygen-free polyethylene sample bottles are used to allow prompt counting and decrease background counts. Incorporating a dual-axis rotator at the irradiation station for sample and standard, the transfer system also incorporates stations for sample loading, disposal and counting as well as a station to incorporate a chemical neutron source such as Cf-252.

  16. Investigation of a 129Xe magnetometer for the Neutron Electric Dipole Moment Experiment at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Michael; Nedm At Triumf Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    A non-zero neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) would signify a previously unknown source of CP (or T) violation. New sources of CP violation are believed to be required to explain the baryon asymmetry of the universe. Employing a newly developed high-density UCN source, an experiment at TRIUMF aims to measure the nEDM to the level of 10-27 e . cm in its initial phase. Precession frequency differences for UCN stored in a bottle subject to parallel and anti-parallel E and B fields signify a permanent nEDM. Magnetic field instability and inhomogeneity, as well as field changes resulting from leakage currents (correlated with E fields) are the dominant systematic effects in nEDM measurements. To address this, passive and active magnetic shielding are in development along with a dual species (129Xe and 199Hg) atomic comagnetometer. Simultaneously introducing both atomic species into the UCN cell, the comagnetometer can mitigate false EDMs. 199Hg precession will be detected by Faraday rotation spectroscopy, and 129Xe precession will measured via two-photon excitation and emission. The present comagnetometer progress will be discussed, with focus on polarized 129Xe production and delivery. Work supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  17. Development and application of setup for ac magnetic field in neutron scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Klimko, Sergey; Zhernenkov, Kirill; Toperverg, Boris P; Zabel, Hartmut

    2010-10-01

    We report on a new setup developed for neutron scattering experiments in periodically alternating magnetic fields at the sample position. The assembly consisting of rf generator, amplifier, wide band transformer, and resonance circuit. It allows to generate homogeneous ac magnetic fields over a volume of a few cm(3) and variable within a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. The applicability of the device is exemplified by ac polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR): a new method established to probe remagnetization kinetics in soft ferromagnetic films. Test experiments with iron films demonstrate that the ac field within the accessible range of frequencies and amplitudes produces a dramatic effect on the PNR signal. This shows that the relevant ac field parameters generated by the device match well with the scales involved in the remagnetization processes. Other possible applications of the rf unit are briefly discussed.

  18. Self-triggering readout system for the neutron lifetime experiment PENeLOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaisbauer, D.; Konorov, I.; Steffen, D.; Paul, S.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of PENeLOPE (Precision Experiment on Neutron Lifetime Operating with Proton Extraction) at the Forschungsreaktor München II is a high-precision measurement of the neutron lifetime and thereby an improvement of the parameter's precision by one order of magnitude. In order to achieve a higher accuracy, modern experiments naturally require state-of-the-art readout electronics, as well as high-performance data acquisition systems. This paper presents the self-triggering readout system designed for PENeLOPE which features a continuous pedestal tracking, configurable signal detection logic, floating ground up to 30 kV, cryogenic environment and the novel Switched Enabling Protocol (SEP). The SEP is a time-division multiplexing transport level protocol developed for a star network topology.

  19. A Neutron Activation Gamma Ray spectrometer for Planetary Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, J. G.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Truax, J. A.; Rice, A.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1994-01-01

    A pulsed DT neutron generator system, similar to that used in commercial well logging, offers the possibility of performing accurate elemental analyses to depths of tens of centimeters in a few seconds with the probe on the body's surface.

  20. A neutron activation technique for manganese measurements in humans.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, C; Byun, S H; Chettle, D R; Inskip, M J; Prestwich, W V

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element for humans, animals, and plants and is required for growth, development, and maintenance of health. Studies show that Mn metabolism is similar to that of iron, therefore, increased Mn levels in humans could interfere with the absorption of dietary iron leading to anemia. Also, excess exposure to Mn dust, leads to nervous system disorders similar to Parkinson's disease. Higher exposure to Mn is essentially related to industrial pollution. Thus, there is a benefit in developing a clean non-invasive technique for monitoring such increased levels of Mn in order to understand the risk of disease and development of appropriate treatments. To this end, the feasibility of Mn measurements with their minimum detection limits (MDL) has been reported earlier from the McMaster group. This work presents improvement to Mn assessment using an upgraded system and optimized times of irradiation and counting for induced gamma activity of Mn. The technique utilizes the high proton current Tandetron accelerator producing neutrons via the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction at McMaster University and an array of nine NaI (Tl) detectors in a 4 π geometry for delayed counting of gamma rays. The neutron irradiation of a set of phantoms was performed with protocols having different proton energy, current and time of irradiation. The improved MDLs estimated using the upgraded set up and constrained timings are reported as 0.67 μgMn/gCa for 2.3 MeV protons and 0.71 μgMn/gCa for 2.0 MeV protons. These are a factor of about 2.3 times better than previous measurements done at McMaster University using the in vivo set-up. Also, because of lower dose-equivalent and a relatively close MDL, the combination of: 2.0 MeV; 300 μA; 3 min protocol is recommended as compared to 2.3 MeV; 400 μA; 45 s protocol for further measurements of Mn in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Neutron activation analysis: A primary method of measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Robert R.; Bode, Peter; De Nadai Fernandes, Elisabete A.

    2011-03-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA), based on the comparator method, has the potential to fulfill the requirements of a primary ratio method as defined in 1998 by the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière — Métrologie en Chimie (CCQM, Consultative Committee on Amount of Substance — Metrology in Chemistry). This thesis is evidenced in this paper in three chapters by: demonstration that the method is fully physically and chemically understood; that a measurement equation can be written down in which the values of all parameters have dimensions in SI units and thus having the potential for metrological traceability to these units; that all contributions to uncertainty of measurement can be quantitatively evaluated, underpinning the metrological traceability; and that the performance of NAA in CCQM key-comparisons of trace elements in complex matrices between 2000 and 2007 is similar to the performance of Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS), which had been formerly designated by the CCQM as a primary ratio method.

  2. Response of thunderstorm activity in data of neutron monitoring at Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonova, Valentina; Kryukov, Sergey; Lutsenko, Vadim

    2015-04-01

    We present results of the study of data of the monitoring of high-energy and thermal neutrons at Tien Shan at different stages of thunderstorm activity. The data of the neutron monitoring were used taking into account the barometric effect. The intensity of the neutron component of cosmic rays is recorded in seven energy ranges. The electric field has values of ~ 100 V/m under fair weather conditions. Standard deviation of minute values of the neutron monitor data at the high altitude station does not exceed 0.5-0.6 %. Found that the standard deviation of the data during thunderstorms always exceeds these values. We selected events during the passage of thunderstorm clouds over the high altitude station without lightning discharges or with a small number of them. It was found that the particle rate of the neutron monitor changes in antiphase with the electric field changes. Atmospheric electric field of positive polarity decreases the count rate of the neutron monitor, and negative polarity - increases. Change of the count rate occurs at values of electric field ≥ 10-15 kV/m and reaches 2 %. The neutron monitor at the high-altitude station has the ability to measure the energy of recorded particles through determination of their multiplicity. We experimentally established that the sensitivity of the detected particles to change in Ez increases with decreasing their energy. The upper energy threshold of sensitivity of neutrons to change electric field is ~10 GeV. The physical mechanism of effect is based on lead nucleus capture of soft negative muons with the subsequent generation of neutrons. It is known that 7% of the neutron monitor count rate caused by negative muons. Absence of this effect in thermal neutrons data confirms the conclusion since the main difference of the thermal neutrons detector from the neutron monitor is the absence of the lead. In the active phase of a thunderstorm in the formed thundercloud the picture of distribution of charges is

  3. 129Xe two-photon spectroscopy towards the neutron EDM experiment at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Altiere, Emily; Miller, Eric; Wienands, Joshua; Jones, David; Madison, Kirk; Momose, Takamasa

    2016-09-01

    Neutron EDM experiments are highly sensitive to fluctuations and inhomogeneities of magnetic fields inside neutron trap chambers. Precise measurements of magnetic fields are essential to measure small EDM frequency shifts of neutrons. In order to suppress these effects, we will introduce a Xe-Hg dual co-magnetometer to operate in the measurement cell. 129Xe was selected because it has a smaller neutron capture cross section than Hg, it is easy to control density, and it has two-photon excitation wavelengths close to Hg one-photon transition. We are planning to detect magnetic fluctuations by monitoring 823 nm and 895 nm emission intensity following a 252 nm two photon transition from 5p6(1S0) to 5p5(2P3/2) 6p. We have observed this two photon transition and emission previously using a pulsed laser, and have recently constructed an intense 252 nm CW laser light source with the necessary hyperfine state resolution for the co-magnetometer operation. A UV enhancement cavity has been constructed to increase the excitation probability as well as to perform Doppler free spectroscopy of two-photon absorption. An avalanche photodiode (APD) is used to detect emission efficiently. We will report the present status of this measurement.

  4. A position-sensitive twin ionization chamber for fission fragment and prompt neutron correlation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Geerts, W.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.; Vidali, M.; Zeynalov, Sh.

    2016-09-01

    A twin position-sensitive Frisch grid ionization chamber, intended as a fission fragment detector in experiments to study prompt fission neutron correlations with fission fragment properties, is presented. Fission fragment mass and energies are determined by means of the double kinetic energy technique, based on conservation of mass and linear momentum. The position sensitivity is achieved by replacing each anode plate in the standard twin ionization chamber by a wire plane and a strip anode, both readout by means of resistive charge division. This provides information about the fission axis orientation, which is necessary to reconstruct the neutron emission process in the fully accelerated fragment rest-frame. The energy resolution compared to the standard twin ionization chamber is found not to be affected by the modification. The angular resolution of the detector relative to an arbitrarily oriented axis is better than 7° FWHM. Results on prompt fission neutron angular distributions in 235U(n,f) obtained with the detector in combination with an array of neutron scintillation detectors is presented as a proof of principle.

  5. Background Studies at the Spallation Neutron Source for the COHERENT Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Matthew; Coherent Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The COHERENT experiment is attempting a first measurement of coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (CEvNS) at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Lab. CEvNS is a standard model process that is important in understanding supernova neutrinos, the structure of the weak interaction, and as a background for dark matter searches. COHERENT is placing a suite of four detector technologies in a basement location at the SNS: point contact germanium detectors, CsI[Na] crystals, NaI[Tl] crystals, and single phase liquid argon. Previous attempts to measure the CEvNS process have grappled with very high rates of backgrounds due to the low energy thresholds required. Accelerator-correlated neutrons are the most troublesome background for COHERENT because a simple accelerator on/off background subtraction procedure fails to remove them. To understand these backgrounds, COHERENT features measurements from the SciBath detector and the Sandia Neutron Scatter Camera (NSC). Important neutron measurements from both SciBath and the NSC, as well as gamma measurements from the SNS basement location where the four detector technologies for COHERENT will be placed will be discussed. COHERENT collaborators are supported by the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Science, the National Science Foundation, NASA, and the Sloan Foundation.

  6. Direct comparison of elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments with molecular dynamics simulations of DMPC phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Bachir; Pellegrini, Eric; Trapp, Marcus; Natali, Francesca; Cantù, Laura; Brocca, Paola; Gerelli, Yuri; Demé, Bruno; Marek Koza, Michael; Johnson, Mark; Peters, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been employed to investigate 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) and deposited, stacked multilamellar-bilayers (MLBs), covering transitions from the gel to the liquid phase. Neutron diffraction was used to characterise the samples in terms of transition temperatures, whereas elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) demonstrates that the dynamics on the sub-macromolecular length-scale and pico- to nano-second time-scale are correlated with the structural transitions through a discontinuity in the observed elastic intensities and the derived mean square displacements. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in parallel focussing on the length-, time- and temperature-scales of the neutron experiments. They correctly reproduce the structural features of the main gel-liquid phase transition. Particular emphasis is placed on the dynamical amplitudes derived from experiment and simulations. Two methods are used to analyse the experimental data and mean square displacements. They agree within a factor of 2 irrespective of the probed time-scale, i.e. the instrument utilized. Mean square displacements computed from simulations show a comparable level of agreement with the experimental values, albeit, the best match with the two methods varies for the two instruments. Consequently, experiments and simulations together give a consistent picture of the structural and dynamical aspects of the main lipid transition and provide a basis for future, theoretical modelling of dynamics and phase behaviour in membranes. The need for more detailed analytical models is pointed out by the remaining variation of the dynamical amplitudes derived in two different ways from experiments on the one hand and simulations on the other.

  7. Background evaluation for the neutron sources in the Daya Bay experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, W. Q.; Cao, G. F.; Chen, X. H.; Ji, X. P.; Li, G. S.; Ling, J. J.; Liu, J.; Qian, X.; Wang, W.

    2016-10-01

    We present an evaluation of the background induced by 241Am-13C neutron calibration sources in the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. As a significant background for electron-antineutrino detection at 0.26 ± 0.12 per detector per day on average, it has been estimated by a Monte Carlo simulation that was benchmarked by a special calibration data set. This dedicated data set also provides the energy spectrum of the background.

  8. Probing light sterile neutrino signatures at reactor and Spallation Neutron Source neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmas, T. S.; Papoulias, D. K.; Tórtola, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the impact of a fourth sterile neutrino at reactor and Spallation Neutron Source neutrino detectors. Specifically, we explore the discovery potential of the TEXONO and COHERENT experiments to subleading sterile neutrino effects through the measurement of the coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering event rate. Our dedicated χ2-sensitivity analysis employs realistic nuclear structure calculations adequate for high purity sub-keV threshold Germanium detectors.

  9. Background evaluation for the neutron sources in the Daya Bay experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Gu, W. Q.; Cao, G. F.; Chen, X. H.; ...

    2016-07-06

    Here, we present an evaluation of the background induced by 241Am–13C neutron calibration sources in the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. Furthermore, as a significant background for electron-antineutrino detection at 0.26 ± 0.12 detector per day on average, it has been estimated by a Monte Carlo simulation that was benchmarked by a special calibration data set. This dedicated data set also provides the energy spectrum of the background.

  10. Direct comparison of elastic incoherent neutron scattering experiments with molecular dynamics simulations of DMPC phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Aoun, Bachir; Pellegrini, Eric; Trapp, Marcus; Natali, Francesca; Cantù, Laura; Brocca, Paola; Gerelli, Yuri; Demé, Bruno; Koza, Michael Marek; Johnson, Mark; Peters, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Neutron scattering techniques have been employed to investigate 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine (DMPC) membranes in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) and deposited, stacked multilamellar-bilayers (MLBs), covering transitions from the gel to the liquid phase. Neutron diffraction was used to characterise the samples in terms of transition temperatures, whereas elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS) demonstrates that the dynamics on the sub-macromolecular length-scale and pico- to nano-second time-scale are correlated with the structural transitions through a discontinuity in the observed elastic intensities and the derived mean square displacements. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed in parallel focussing on the length-, time- and temperature-scales of the neutron experiments. They correctly reproduce the structural features of the main gel-liquid phase transition. Particular emphasis is placed on the dynamical amplitudes derived from experiment and simulations. Two methods are used to analyse the experimental data and mean square displacements. They agree within a factor of 2 irrespective of the probed time-scale, i.e. the instrument utilized. Mean square displacements computed from simulations show a comparable level of agreement with the experimental values, albeit, the best match with the two methods varies for the two instruments. Consequently, experiments and simulations together give a consistent picture of the structural and dynamical aspects of the main lipid transition and provide a basis for future, theoretical modelling of dynamics and phase behaviour in membranes. The need for more detailed analytical models is pointed out by the remaining variation of the dynamical amplitudes derived in two different ways from experiments on the one hand and simulations on the other.

  11. Internal exposure to neutron-activated (56)Mn dioxide powder in Wistar rats: part 1: dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Valeriy; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Otani, Keiko; Endo, Satoru; Satoh, Kenichi; Kawano, Noriyuki; Shichijo, Kazuko; Nakashima, Masahiro; Takatsuji, Toshihiro; Sakaguchi, Aya; Kato, Hiroaki; Onda, Yuichi; Fujimoto, Nariaki; Toyoda, Shin; Sato, Hitoshi; Dyussupov, Altay; Chaizhunusova, Nailya; Sayakenov, Nurlan; Uzbekov, Darkhan; Saimova, Aisulu; Shabdarbaeva, Dariya; Skakov, Mazhin; Vurim, Alexandr; Gnyrya, Vyacheslav; Azimkhanov, Almas; Kolbayenkov, Alexander; Zhumadilov, Kasym; Kairikhanova, Yankar; Kaprin, Andrey; Galkin, Vsevolod; Ivanov, Sergey; Kolyzhenkov, Timofey; Petukhov, Aleksey; Yaskova, Elena; Belukha, Irina; Khailov, Artem; Skvortsov, Valeriy; Ivannikov, Alexander; Akhmedova, Umukusum; Bogacheva, Viktoria; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2017-03-01

    There were two sources of ionizing irradiation after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki: (1) initial gamma-neutron irradiation at the moment of detonation and (2) residual radioactivity. Residual radioactivity consisted of two components: radioactive fallout containing fission products, including radioactive fissile materials from nuclear device, and neutron-activated radioisotopes from materials on the ground. The dosimetry systems DS86 and DS02 were mainly devoted to the assessment of initial radiation exposure to neutrons and gamma rays, while only brief considerations were given for the estimation of doses caused by residual radiation exposure. Currently, estimation of internal exposure of atomic bomb survivors due to dispersed radioactivity and neutron-activated radioisotopes from materials on the ground is a matter of some interest, in Japan. The main neutron-activated radionuclides in soil dust were (24)Na, (28)Al, (31)Si, (32)P, (38)Cl, (42)K, (45)Ca, (46)Sc, (56)Mn, (59)Fe, (60)Co, and (134)Cs. The radionuclide (56)Mn (T 1/2 = 2.58 h) is known as one of the dominant beta- and gamma emitters during the first few hours after neutron irradiation of soil and other materials on ground, dispersed in the form of dust after a nuclear explosion in the atmosphere. To investigate the peculiarities of biological effects of internal exposure to (56)Mn in comparison with external gamma irradiation, a dedicated experiment with Wistar rats exposed to neutron-activated (56)Mn dioxide powder was performed recently by Shichijo and coworkers. The dosimetry required for this experiment is described here. Assessment of internal radiation doses was performed on the basis of measured (56)Mn activity in the organs and tissues of the rats and of absorbed fractions of internal exposure to photons and electrons calculated with the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo using a mathematical rat phantom. The first results of this international multicenter study show that the internal

  12. Neutron skins and neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Piekarewicz, J.

    2013-11-07

    The neutron-skin thickness of heavy nuclei provides a fundamental link to the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, and hence to the properties of neutron stars. The Lead Radius Experiment ('PREX') at Jefferson Laboratory has recently provided the first model-independence evidence on the existence of a neutron-rich skin in {sup 208}Pb. In this contribution we examine how the increased accuracy in the determination of neutron skins expected from the commissioning of intense polarized electron beams may impact the physics of neutron stars.

  13. Event-based simulation of neutron experiments: interference, entanglement and uncertainty relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michielsen, Kristel; De Raedt, Hans

    2014-04-01

    We discuss a discrete-event simulation approach, which has been shown to give a unified cause-and-effect description of many quantum optics and single-neutron interferometry experiments. The event-based simulation algorithm does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system, yet reproduces the corresponding statistical distributions by generating detection events one-by-one. It is showm that single-particle interference and entanglement, two important quantum phenomena, emerge via information exchange between individual particles and devices such as beam splitters, polarizers and detectors. We demonstrate this by reproducing the results of several single-neutron interferometry experiments, including one that demonstrates interference and one that demonstrates the violation of a Bell-type inequality. We also present event-based simulation results of a single neutron experiment designed to test the validity of Ozawa's universally valid error-disturbance relation, an uncertainty relation derived using the theory of general quantum measurements.

  14. The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1993 run cycle. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Farrer, R.; Longshore, A.

    1995-06-01

    This year the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) ran an informal user program because the US Department of Energy planned to close LANSCE in FY1994. As a result, an advisory committee recommended that LANSCE scientists and their collaborators complete work in progress. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and a associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can Iter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. This year, a total of 127 proposals were submitted. The proposed experiments involved 229 scientists, 57 of whom visited LANSCE to participate in measurements. In addition, 3 (nuclear physics) participating research teams, comprising 44 scientists, carried out experiments at LANSCE. Instrument beam time was again oversubscribed, with 552 total days requested an 473 available for allocation.

  15. Ultra Sensitive Neutron Activation Measurements of {sup 232}Th in Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Clemenza, M.; Previtali, E.; Borio di Tigliole, A.; Salvini, A.

    2011-04-27

    Copper, thanks to its low content in radioactive contaminations, is a material widely used for shielding, holders and other objects close to the sensitive parts of the detectors in many experiments in rare event physics. This implies that tools able to reach sensitivity of the order of <10{sup -12} gram of contaminants per gram of copper are of crucial importance. A methodology based in Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) has been developed to obtain an extremely high sensitivity in the analysis of {sup 232}Th in copper samples. A detection limit of 5x10{sup -13} g {sup 232}Th/g Cu has been achieved through the irradiation of 200 g of copper sample which subsequently was radio-chemically concentrated using nitric acid and then actinide resin from Eichrom Inc. Several elutions were performed with various inorganic acids to concentrate the {sup 232}Th activation product ({sup 233}Pa) from the copper matrix and to also eliminate the radioactive background induced by the neutron bombardment to reach higher sensitivity.

  16. Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) for Elemental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Robin P. Gardner

    2006-04-11

    This research project was to improve the prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) measurement approach for bulk analysis, oil well logging, and small sample thermal enutron bean applications.

  17. Active mode calibration of the combined thermal epithermal neutron (CTEN) system

    SciTech Connect

    Veilleux, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    The Combined Thermal Epithermal Neutron (CTEN) system was developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform active and passive neutron interrogation of waste. The higher energy epithermal neutrons are able to penetrate further into the matrix and active material, thus reducing matrix attenuation and self-shielding effects compared to a thermal neutron pulse alone. The developmental unit was installed in 2001 at the Los Alamos Non-Destructive Assay (NDA) facility to characterize waste for the TRU Waste Characterization Project (TWCP). This paper summarizes the active mode certification results. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable standards were used to determine the system response as a function of mass. Finally, NIST-traceable verification standards were used to verify the calibration in the range 30 milligrams to 25 g of weapons grade plutonium although self-shielding limits the upper active interrogation to 10 g.

  18. Neutron activation analysis traces copper artifacts to geographical point of origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, M.; Fields, P.; Friedman, A.; Kastner, M.; Metta, D.; Milsted, J.; Olsen, E.

    1967-01-01

    Impurities remaining in the metallic copper are identified and quantified by spectrographic and neutron activation analysis. Determination of the type of ore used for the copper artifact places the geographic point of origin of the artifact.

  19. Analysis of body calcium (regional changes in body calcium by in vivo neutron activation analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suki, W.; Johnson, P. C.; Leblanc, A.; Evans, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of space flight on urine and fecal calcium loss was documented during the three long-term Skylab flights. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine regional calcium loss. Various designs for regional analysis were investigated.

  20. Neutronics experiments for uncertainty assessment of tritium breeding in HCPB and HCLL blanket mock-ups irradiated with 14 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batistoni, P.; Angelone, M.; Fischer, U.; Klix, A.; Kodeli, I.; Leichtle, D.; Pillon, M.; Pohorecki, W.; Villari, R.

    2012-08-01

    Two neutronics experiments have been carried out at 14 MeV neutron sources on mock-ups of the helium cooled pebble bed (HCBP) and the helium cooled lithium lead (HCLL) variants of ITER test blanket modules (TBMs). These experiments have provided an experimental validation of the calculations of the tritium production rate (TPR) in the two blanket concepts and an assessment of the uncertainties due to the uncertainties on nuclear data. This paper provides a brief summary of the HCPB experiment and then focuses in particular on the final results of the HCLL experiment. The TPR has been measured in the HCLL mock-up irradiated for long times at the Frascati 14 MeV Neutron Generator (FNG). Redundant and well-assessed experimental techniques have been used to measure the TPR by different teams for inter-comparison. Measurements of the neutron and gamma-ray spectra have also been performed. The analysis of the experiment, carried out by the MCNP code with FENDL-2.1 and JEFF-3.1.1 nuclear data libraries, and also including sensitivity/uncertainty analysis, shows good agreement between measurements and calculations, within the total uncertainty of 5.9% at 1σ level.

  1. Determination of boron in materials by cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Rick L

    2005-01-01

    An instrument for cold neutron prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), located at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR), has proven useful for the measurement of boron in a variety of materials. Neutrons, moderated by passage through liquid hydrogen at 20 K, pass through a (58)Ni coated guide to the PGAA station in the cold neutron guide hall of the NCNR. The thermal equivalent neutron fluence rate at the sample position is 9 x 10(8) cm(-2) s(-1). Prompt gamma rays are measured by a cadmium- and lead-shielded high-purity germanium detector. The instrument has been used to measure boron mass fractions in minerals, in NIST SRM 2175 (Refractory Alloy MP-35-N) for certification of boron, and most recently in semiconductor-grade silicon. The limit of detection for boron in many materials is <10 ng g(-1).

  2. Scattered neutron dose equivalent from an active scanning proton beam delivery system.

    PubMed

    Hecksel, Draik; Sandison, George A; Farr, Jonathan B; Edwards, Andrew C

    2007-12-01

    A study of neutron production from a novel active scanning proton beam delivery system at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute (MPRI) has been performed. The neutron dose equivalent was determined using a neutron rem (roentgen equivalent in man) detector which has an upper energy limit of 10 MeV. Measurement were taken at 0, 45, and 90 degrees from the proton beam central axis and for various proton beam energies (127-208 MeV) and scanned field sizes (25-144 cm2). The maximum neutron dose observed was 0.43 mSv / (proton treatment Gy) at 90 degrees from the beam axis for a beam energy of 208.4 MeV and a scanned field size of 144 cm2. It is still possible to further mitigate this secondary neutron dose during treatment by optimizing parameters within the treatment nozzle and using shielding.

  3. Improved mesh based photon sampling techniques for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Relson, E.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Biondo, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    The design of fusion power systems requires analysis of neutron activation of large, complex volumes, and the resulting particles emitted from these volumes. Structured mesh-based discretization of these problems allows for improved modeling in these activation analysis problems. Finer discretization of these problems results in large computational costs, which drives the investigation of more efficient methods. Within an ad hoc subroutine of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, we implement sampling of voxels and photon energies for volumetric sources using the alias method. The alias method enables efficient sampling of a discrete probability distribution, and operates in 0(1) time, whereas the simpler direct discrete method requires 0(log(n)) time. By using the alias method, voxel sampling becomes a viable alternative to sampling space with the 0(1) approach of uniformly sampling the problem volume. Additionally, with voxel sampling it is straightforward to introduce biasing of volumetric sources, and we implement this biasing of voxels as an additional variance reduction technique that can be applied. We verify our implementation and compare the alias method, with and without biasing, to direct discrete sampling of voxels, and to uniform sampling. We study the behavior of source biasing in a second set of tests and find trends between improvements and source shape, material, and material density. Overall, however, the magnitude of improvements from source biasing appears to be limited. Future work will benefit from the implementation of efficient voxel sampling - particularly with conformal unstructured meshes where the uniform sampling approach cannot be applied. (authors)

  4. Preliminary engineering assessment of the HCLL and HCPB Neutron Activation System

    SciTech Connect

    Calderoni, Pattrick; Leichtle, Dieter; Angelone, Maurizio; Klix, Axel

    2015-07-01

    The Neutron Activation System (NAS) is one of the four types of neutronics sensors considered for the testing of the HCLL and HCPB Test Blanket Module (TBM) in ITER. It measures the absolute neutron flux intensity with information on the neutron spectrum in selected positions of the TBM. The working principle of the NAS is as follows: the system moves small activation probes (capsules) into selected positions in the TBM (irradiation ends) by means of pneumatic transport with pressurized helium gas; the capsules are irradiated for a selected period, depending on their materials composition (several tens of seconds up to the full plasma pulse length); immediately after the irradiation they are extracted and transported to a gamma spectrometer by means of the same pneumatic transport system; the gamma spectrometer determines the induced gamma activity; the neutron flux and neutron fluence is calculated from the measured gamma activity and the known activation cross section of the materials in the activation probe; after the measurement the capsule is sent either to a disposal or storage (for later measurement). This paper summarizes the results of the feasibility assessment of the TBM NAS in the conceptual design phase, including design justification, identification of requirements based on the expected operating conditions in ITER and preliminary engineering assessment of the activation materials, irradiation ends integration in the modules design and the counting station. (authors)

  5. Stable labeled microspheres to measure perfusion: validation of a neutron activation assay technique.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, C P; Dalhberg, S; Tries, M A; Marcel, R; Leppo, J A

    2001-01-01

    Neutron activation is an accurate analytic method in which trace quantities of isotopes of interest in a sample are activated and the emitted radiation is measured with high-resolution detection equipment. This study demonstrates the application of neutron activation for the measurement of myocardial perfusion using stable isotopically labeled microspheres. Stable labeled and standard radiolabeled microspheres (15 microm) were coinjected in an in vivo rabbit model of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. Radiolabeled microspheres were detected with a standard gamma-well counter, and stable labeled microspheres were detected with a high-resolution Ge detection after neutron activation of the myocardial and reference blood samples. Regional myocardial blood flow was calculated from the deposition of radiolabeled and stable labeled microspheres. Both sets of microspheres gave similar measurements of regional myocardial blood flow over a wide range of flow with a high linear correlation (r = 0.95-0.99). Neutron activation is capable of detecting a single microsphere in an intact myocardial sample while providing simultaneous quantitative measurements of multiple isotope labels. This high sensitivity and capability for measuring perfusion in intact tissue are advantages over other techniques, such as optical detection of microspheres. Neutron activation also can provide an effective method for reducing the production of low-level radioactive waste generated from biomedical research. Further applications of neutron activation offer the potential for measuring other stable labeled compounds, such as fatty acids and growth factors, in conjunction with microsphere measured flow, providing the capability for simultaneous measurement of regional metabolism and perfusion.

  6. Comparison of IUPAC k0 Values and Neutron Cross Sections to Determine a Self-consistent Set of Data for Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; Revay, Zsolt

    2009-12-01

    Independent databases of nuclear constants for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) have been independently maintained by the physics and chemistry communities for many year. They contain thermal neturon cross sections s0, standardization values k0, and transition probabilities Pg. Chemistry databases tend to rely upon direct measurements of the nuclear constants k0 and Pg which are often published in chemistry journals while the physics databases typically include evaluated s0 and Pg data from a variety of experiments published mainly in physics journals. The IAEA/LBNL Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File (EGAF) also contains prompt and delayed g-ray cross sections sg from Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis (PGAA) measurements that can also be used to determine k0 and s0 values. As a result several independent databases of fundamental constants for NAA have evolved containing slightly different and sometimes discrepant results. An IAEA CRP for a Reference Database for Neutron Activation Analysis was established to compare these databases and investigate the possibilitiy of producing a self-consistent set of s0, k0, sg, and Pg values for NAA and other applications. Preliminary results of this IAEA CRP comparison are given in this paper.

  7. NOTE: Total body-calcium measurements: comparison of two delayed-gamma neutron activation facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, R.; Ellis, K. J.; Yasumura, S.; Shypailo, R. J.; Pierson, R. N., Jr.

    1999-06-01

    This study compares two independently calibrated delayed-gamma neutron activation (DGNA) facilities, one at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, New York, and the other at the Children's Nutrition Research Center (CNRC), Houston, Texas that measure total body calcium (TBCa). A set of BNL phantoms was sent to CNRC for neutron activation analysis, and a set of CNRC phantoms was measured at BNL. Both facilities showed high precision (<2%), and the results were in good agreement, within 5%.

  8. Determination of (n,γ) Cross Sections of 241Am by Cold Neutron Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genreith, C.; Rossbach, M.; Révay, Zs.; Kudejova, P.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate cross section data of actinides are crucial for criticality calculations of GEN IV reactors and transmutation but also for analytical purposes such as nuclear waste characterization, decommissioning of nuclear installations and safeguard applications. Tabulated data are inconsistent and sometimes associated with large uncertainties. Neutron activation with external cold neutron beams from high flux reactors offers a chance for determination of accurate capture cross sections scalable to the whole 1/√{E}-region even for isotopes with low-lying resonances like 241Am. Preparation of 241Am samples for irradiation at the PGAA station of the FRM II in Garching has been optimized together with PTB in Braunschweig. Two samples were irradiated together with gold flux monitors to extract the thermal neutron capture cross section after appropriate corrections for attenuation of neutrons and photons in the sample. For one sample, the thermal ground state neutron capture cross section was measured as 663.0 ± 28.8 b. The thermal neutron capture cross section was calculated to 725.4 ± 34.4 b. For the other sample, a ground state neutron capture cross section of 649.9 ± 28.2 b was measured and a thermal neutron capture cross section of 711.1 ± 33.9 b was derived.

  9. Ultracold neutron detection with 6Li-doped glass scintillators. NANOSC: A fast ultracold neutron detector for the nEDM experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, G.; Bison, G.; Bodek, K.; Chowdhuri, Z.; Geltenbort, P.; Griffith, W. C.; Hélaine, V.; Henneck, R.; Kasprzak, M.; Kermaidic, Y.; Kirch, K.; Komposch, S.; Koss, P. A.; Kozela, A.; Krempel, J.; Lauss, B.; Lefort, T.; Lemière, Y.; Mtchedlishvili, A.; Musgrave, M.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Piegsa, F. M.; Pierre, E.; Pignol, G.; Quéméner, G.; Rawlik, M.; Ries, D.; Rebreyend, D.; Roccia, S.; Rogel, G.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P.; Severijns, N.; Wursten, E.; Zejma, J.; Zsigmond, G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper summarizes the results from measurements aiming to characterize ultracold neutron detection with 6Li-doped glass scintillators. Single GS10 or GS20 scintillators, with a thickness of 100-200μm, fulfill the ultracold neutron detection requirements with an acceptable neutron-gamma discrimination. This discrimination is clearly improved with a stack of two scintillators: a 6Li-depleted glass bonded to a 6Li-enriched glass. The technique of optical contact bonding is used between the two glasses in order to eliminate the need for optical glue or grease between them. Relative to a 3He Strelkov gas detector, the scintillator's detection efficiency is lower for UCN energies close to the scintillator's Fermi potential (85-100 neV), but becomes larger at higher UCN energies. Coupled to a digital data acquisition system, counting rates up to a few 105 counts/s can be handled. A detector based on such a scintillator stack arrangement was built and has been used in the neutron electric dipole moment experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute since 2010. Its response for routine runs of the neutron electric dipole moment experiment is presented.

  10. Predicting Activation of Experiments Inside the Annular Core Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Joseph Isaac

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this thesis is to create a program to quickly estimate the radioactivity and decay of experiments conducted inside of the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories and eliminate the need for users to write code. This is achieved by model the neutron fluxes in the reactor’s central cavity where experiments are conducted for 4 different neutron spectra using MCNP. The desired neutron spectrum, experiment material composition, and reactor power level are then input into CINDER2008 burnup code to obtain activation and decay information for every isotope generated. DREAD creates all of the files required for CINDER2008 through user selected inputs in a graphical user interface and executes the program for the user and displays the resulting estimation for dose rate at various distances. The DREAD program was validated by weighing and measuring various experiments in the different spectra and then collecting dose rate information after they were irradiated and comparing it to the dose rates that DREAD predicted. The program provides results with an average of 17% higher estimates than the actual values and takes seconds to execute.

  11. Radiolabeling of intact dosage forms by neutron activation: effects on in vitro performance

    SciTech Connect

    Parr, A.; Jay, M.

    1987-12-01

    Compressed tablets containing various quantities of stable isotopes of Ba, Er, and Sm for use in neutron activation studies were evaluated for the effect of stable isotope incorporation on tablet hardness and disintegration times. At concentrations likely to be used in scintigraphic studies employing neutron activation as a radiolabeling method, no significant effect on in vitro parameters were observed. While the incorporation of stable isotopes influenced tablet hardness to a greater degree than disintegration time, irradiation of tablets in a neutron flux of 4.4 x 10(13) n/cm2 sec had a direct effect on tablet disintegration time. Thus, future neutron activation studies should focus on minimizing the amount of stable isotope to be incorporated with the formulation while using the shortest feasible irradiation time.

  12. Cryogen Free Ultra-Low Temperature Cryostat for Neutron Scattering Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downa, R. B. E.; Kirichek, O.; Manuel, P.; Keeping, J.; Bowden, Z. A.

    Most ultra-low temperature (below 1K) experiments at advanced neutron facilities are based on dilution and 3He refrigerator inserts used with Orange cryostats, or similar systems. However recent increases in liquid helium costs; caused by global helium supply problems, has raised significant concern about the affordability of such cryostats. Here we present the design and test results of a cryogen free top-loading cryostat which provides neutron scattering sample environment within the temperature range 1.25 - 300 K. The high cooling power of the cryostat 0.23 W at 1.9 K enables the operation of a dilution refrigerator insert in a continuous regime; which expands the low temperature margin of the temperature range to 35 mK. The cooling time of the dilution refrigerator insert is similar to one operated in an Orange cryostat. The main performance criteria such as base temperature, cooling power, and circulation rate are compatible with the technical specification of a standard dilution refrigerator. In fact the system offers operating parameters very similar to those of an Orange cryostat, but without the complication of cryogens. The first scientific results obtained in an ultra-low temperature neutron scattering experiment with this system are also going to be discussed.

  13. Event-by-event simulation of single-neutron experiments to test uncertainty relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    2014-12-01

    Results from a discrete-event simulation of a recent single-neutron experiment that tests Ozawa's generalization of Heisenberg's uncertainty relation are presented. The event-based simulation algorithm reproduces the results of the quantum theoretical description of the experiment but does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation, nor does it rely on detailed concepts of quantum theory. In particular, the data from these non-quantum simulations satisfy uncertainty relations derived in the context of quantum theory. Invited paper presented at QTAP-6.

  14. Neutron inelastic scattering in natural Cu as a background in neutrinoless double-β decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, M. S.; Elliott, S. R.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Devlin, M.; Fotiades, N.; Nelson, R. O.; Kawano, T.; Guiseppe, V. E.

    2013-06-01

    Background: Experiments designed to study rare processes, such as neutrinoless double-β decay (0νββ), are crucial tests for physics beyond the standard model. These experiments rely on reducing the intrinsic radioactive background to unprecedented levels, while adequately shielding the detectors from external sources of radioactivity.Purpose: The purpose of this work is focused on understanding the background rates from neutron interactions in Cu shielding in regions around the Q values of many candidate 0νββ decay isotopes, as well as providing data for benchmarking Monte Carlo simulations of background events.Methods: Using the broad-spectrum neutron beam at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, we have measured γ rays emitted from inelastic neutron scattering on natCu.Results: We extracted the level cross sections from the γ-production cross section for 46 energy levels in natCu. These level cross sections were compared with the available experimental data, as well as the ENDF/B-VII evaluation for discrete levels.Conclusions: For energy levels above 2 MeV we found significant discrepancies between the suggested level cross sections for both nuclei and our data. We found reasonable agreement between our measurement and the ENDF/B-VII evaluation for the total neutron inelastic cross section in 63Cu. Our measurement of the total neutron inelastic scattering cross section in 65Cu was 30% lower than the ENDF/B-VII evaluations, which we attribute to unobserved transitions in 65Cu. Furthermore, we found that the implementation of the ENDF/B-VII evaluation in simulations did not properly model the decay properties of the nucleus to the degree necessary for estimating backgrounds in rear-event searches. Finally, we examined the potential implications of our measurements on 0νββ measurements and found that many of the commonly studied 0νββ isotopes had Q values below the cutoff for ENDF/B-VII evaluated discrete levels in either Cu nucleus.

  15. Small Angle Neutron Scattering experiments on ``side-on fixed"" liquid crystal polyacrylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, N.; Keller, P.; Achard, M. F.; Noirez, L.; Hardouin, F.

    1993-08-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering experiments were carried out on liquid crystalline “side-on fixed” polyacrylates : we observe that the polymer backbone adopts a prolate conformation in the nematic phase. Such anisotropy of the global backbone is larger for smaller spacer length. In every case we measure at low temperatures a large chain extension as previously described in polysiloxanes. Par diffusion des neutrons aux petits angles nous observons que la chaîne de polyacrylates “en haltère” adopte une conformation type prolate en phase nématique. Son anisotropie est d'autant plus grande que l'espaceur est plus court. Dans tous les cas, nous retrouvons à basse température la forte extension de la chaîne polymère qui fut d'abord révélée dans les polysiloxanes.

  16. Neutron scattering experiments on well-staged graphite - FeCl/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Axe, J.D.; Majkrzak, C.F.; Passell, L.; Satija, S.K.; Dresselhaus, G.; Mazurek, H.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reports results of a neutron diffraction study on both the magnetic and the lattice dynamic structure of graphite-FeCl/sub 3/. The FeCl/sub 3/ system was selected for this study because of the interesting magnetic properties previously reported for this system. Of particular interest is the low temperature magnetic phase transition, which has been shown to be stage dependent. Special emphasis was given to the study of the low temperature magnetic state of the Fe/sup 3 +/ spins and to the longitudinal phonon modes for k/sub z/ axis acoustic branches. All experiments reported here were carried out on a stage 2 sample of graphite-FeCl/sub 3/. The sample was prepared by a two-zone vapor growth technique and was characterized by (00l) x-ray and neutron diffraction patterns to be > 95% stage 2, with only minor inclusions of other stages.

  17. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing.

    PubMed

    Iwatani, K; Hoshi, M; Shizuma, K; Hiraoka, M; Hayakawa, N; Oka, T; Hasai, H

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate 152Eu and 60Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated 252Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen.

  18. Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: Indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazuo; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hiraoka, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Norihiko; Oka, Takamitsu

    1994-10-01

    A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate {sup 152}Eu and {sup 60}Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. 18 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments: A 4{pi} BaF2 Detector for Neutron Capture Measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Reifarth, R.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Alpizar, A.; Hatarik, R.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Kronenberg, A.; Rundberg, R.S.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Folden, C.M.; Hoffman, D.C.; Greife, U.; Schwantes, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.

    2005-05-24

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 162-element 4{pi} BaF2 array designed to make neutron capture cross-section measurements on rare or radioactive targets with masses as little as one milligram. Accurate capture cross sections are needed in many research areas, including stellar nucleosynthesis, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, waste transmutation, and other applied programs. These cross sections are difficult to calculate accurately and must be measured. The design and initial performance results of DANCE is discussed.

  20. DT neutron generator as a source for a thermal neutron activation system for confirmatory land mine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haslip, Dean S.; Cousins, Thomas; Andrews, H. Robert; Chen, Jing; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Ing, Harry; McFee, John E.

    2001-12-01

    A DT neutron generator has been integrated into the Canadian Improved Landmine Detection Program's Thermal Neutron Activation sensor. The generator has been redesigned from a commercial version, and the moderator structure around the generator has been completely redesigned. These developments allow the DT generator and its moderator structure to be placed interchangeably into the location currently occupied by a 252Cf source and its moderator structure. Experimental and calculational studies have helped to define the optimal operating parameters for the neutron generator in this application. Performance comparisons between the old californium-based system and the new DT-generator-based system have demonstrated that the new system out-performs the old in all tested scenarios, particularly when the mine is deeply buried or when the source is not directly over the explosive. This is in excellent agreement with calculations performed in the design phase of this system. Combined with the myriad other benefits associated with DT generators over isotopic sources, these results demonstrate the desirability of using a DT generator in a TNA land mine detection system.

  1. Medical applications of in vivo neutron inelastic scattering and neutron activation analysis: Technical similarities to detection of explosives and contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, J. J.

    2001-07-01

    Nutritional status of patients can be evaluated by monitoring changes in elemental body composition. Fast neutron activation (for N and P) and neutron inelastic scattering (for C and O) are used in vivo to assess elements characteristic of specific body compartments. There are similarities between the body composition techniques and the detection of hidden explosives and narcotics. All samples have to be examined in depth and the ratio of elements provides a "signature" of the chemical of interest. The N/H and C/O ratios measure protein and fat content in the body. Similarly, a high C/O ratio is characteristic of narcotics and a low C/O together with a strong presence of N is a signature of some explosives. The available time for medical applications is about 20 min—compared to a few seconds for the detection of explosives—but the permitted radiation exposure is limited. In vivo neutron analysis is used to measure H, O, C, N, P, Na, Cl, and Ca for the study of the mechanisms of lean tissue depletion with aging and wasting diseases, and to investigate methods of preserving function and quality of life in the elderly.

  2. Nondestructive assay of spent boiling-water-reactor fuel by active neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeman, E.D.; Ricker, C.W.; Ragan, G.L.; Difilippo, F.C.; Slaughter, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    Spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel from Dresden I was assayed for total fissile mass, using the active neutron interrogation method. The nondestructive assay (NDA) system used has four Sb-Be sources for interrogation of the fuels; the induced fission neutrons from the fuel are counted by four lead-shielded methane-filled proportional counters biased above the energy of the source neutrons. Results agreed with results from the chemical analyses to within 2 to 3%. Similar agreement was obtained when two combinations of canned spent fuel were used as standards for the nondestructive assays.

  3. Detection and depth profiling of hazardous elements using N-SCAN prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, F.H.; Congedo, T.V.; Dulloo, A.R.

    1995-12-31

    A low-background method of prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) has been developed and demonstrated. This method employs a pulsed electronic neutron generator, a high resolution, high purity germanium detector, and microsecond coordination of neutron pulsing and gamma detection through a computer-controlled acquisition interface module. The system has been used to detect trace amounts of hazardous elements in concretes and soils to provide depth profiles of contaminant burden down to nearly 1 ft in packed soil, and also to perform rapid identification of the contents of munitions bearing simulants of chemical weapons agents.

  4. Energy and angular dependence of active-type personal dosemeter for high-energy neutron.

    PubMed

    Rito, Hirotaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Oda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to develop an active-type personal dosemeter having suitable sensitivity to high-energy neutrons, the characteristic response of silicon surface barrier detector has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. An agreement of the shape of pulse-height distribution, its change with radiator thickness and the relative sensitivity was confirmed between the calculated and experimental results for 14.8-MeV neutrons. The angular dependence was estimated for other neutron energies, and found that the angular dependence decreased with the incident energy. The reason was also discussed with regard to the radiator thickness relative to maximum range of recoil protons.

  5. Active-Interrogation Measurements of Induced-Fission Neutrons from Low-Enriched Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    J. L. Dolan; M. J. Marcath; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester; A. Tomanin; P. Peerani; G. Nebbia

    2012-07-01

    Protection and control of nuclear fuels is paramount for nuclear security and safeguards; therefore, it is important to develop fast and robust controlling mechanisms to ensure the safety of nuclear fuels. Through both passive- and active-interrogation methods we can use fast-neutron detection to perform real-time measurements of fission neutrons for process monitoring. Active interrogation allows us to use different ranges of incident neutron energy to probe for different isotopes of uranium. With fast-neutron detectors, such as organic liquid scintillation detectors, we can detect the induced-fission neutrons and photons and work towards quantifying a sample’s mass and enrichment. Using MCNPX-PoliMi, a system was designed to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238. Measurements were then performed in the summer of 2010 at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. Fissions were induced with an associated particle D-T generator and an isotopic Am-Li source. The fission neutrons, as well as neutrons from (n, 2n) and (n, 3n) reactions, were measured with five 5” by 5” EJ-309 organic liquid scintillators. The D-T neutron generator was available as part of a measurement campaign in place by Padova University. The measurement and data-acquisition systems were developed at the University of Michigan utilizing a CAEN V1720 digitizer and pulse-shape discrimination algorithms to differentiate neutron and photon detections. Low-enriched uranium samples of varying mass and enrichment were interrogated. Acquired time-of-flight curves and cross-correlation curves are currently analyzed to draw relationships between detected neutrons and sample mass and enrichment. In the full paper, the promise of active-interrogation measurements and fast-neutron detection will be assessed through the example of this proof-of-concept measurement campaign. Additionally, MCNPX-PoliMi simulation results will be compared to the measured data to validate the MCNPX-PoliMi code

  6. Passive and Active Fast-Neutron Imaging in Support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Safeguards Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Blackston, Matthew A; Hausladen, Paul

    2010-04-01

    Results from safeguards-related passive and active coded-aperture fast-neutron imaging measurements of plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) material configurations performed at Idaho National Laboratory s Zero Power Physics Reactor facility are presented. The imaging measurements indicate that it is feasible to use fast neutron imaging in a variety of safeguards-related tasks, such as monitoring storage, evaluating holdup deposits in situ, or identifying individual leached hulls still containing fuel. The present work also presents the first demonstration of imaging of differential die away fast neutrons.

  7. Development of the prototype pneumatic transfer system for ITER neutron activation systema)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, M. S.; Seon, C. R.; Pak, S.; Lee, H. G.; Bertalot, L.

    2012-10-01

    The neutron activation system (NAS) measures neutron fluence at the first wall and the total neutron flux from the ITER plasma, providing evaluation of the fusion power for all operational phases. The pneumatic transfer system (PTS) is one of the key components of the NAS for the proper operation of the system, playing a role of transferring encapsulated samples between the capsule loading machine, irradiation stations, counting stations, and disposal bin. For the validation and the optimization of the design, a prototype of the PTS was developed and capsule transfer tests were performed with the developed system.

  8. Project of the borehole neutron generator for the direct determination of oxygen and carbon by activation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanovich, B. Yu; Vovchenko, E. D.; Iliinskiy, A. V.; Isaev, A. A.; Kozlovskiy, K. I.; Nesterovich, A. V.; Senyukov, V. A.; Shikanov, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    The paper deals with application features of borehole neutron generator (BNG) based on the vacuum accelerating tube (AT) with laser-plasma ion source for determination of oxygen isotope 16O and carbon isotope 12C by direct activation. The project of pulsed BNG for realization of an activation method in the conditions of natural presence of productive hydrocarbons is offered. The diode system with radial acceleration, magnetic electron insulation and laser-plasma source of deuterons at the anode in a sealed-off vacuum accelerating tube is applied. The permanent NdFeB magnet with induction about 0.5 T for produce the insulating magnetic field in the diode gap is proposed. In the experiments on the model of BNG with the accelerating voltage source (≈350 kV), performed by the scheme of Arkadiev-Marx generator, the output of (d, d) neutrons was ∼107 pulse-1.

  9. Neutron activation analysis via nuclear decay kinetics using gamma-ray spectroscopy at SFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, Thomas; Chester, Aaron; Starosta, Krzysztof; Williams, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool used in a variety of fields including nuclear and analytical chemistry, environmental science, and health risk management. At SFU, the Germanium detector for Elemental Analysis and Radiation Studies (GEARS), a low-background shielded high-purity germanium gamma-ray detector, has been used recently in all of the above fields. The current project aims to expand upon the number of applications for which GEARS can be used while enhancing its current functionality. A recent addition to the SFU Nuclear Science laboratory is the Thermo Scientific P 385 neutron generator. This device provides a nominal yield of 3 ×108 neutrons/s providing the capacity for neutron activation analysis, opening a major avenue of research at SFU which was previously unavailable. The isotopes created via neutron activation have a wide range of half-lives. To measure and study isotopes with half-lives above a second, a new analogue data acquisition system has been installed on GEARS allowing accurate measurements of decay kinetics. This new functionality enables identification and quantification of the products of neutron activation. Results from the neutron activation analysis of pure metals will be presented.

  10. Validation Analyses of IEAF-2001 Activation Cross-Section Data for SS-316 and F82H Steels Irradiated in a White d-Li Neutron Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, S. P.; Fischer, U.; v. Möllendorff, U.; Schmuck, I.; Tsige-Tamirat, H.; Wilson, P. P. H.

    2005-05-01

    The evaluated intermediate-energy activation cross-section library IEAF-2001 has been tested against integral experiments with SS-316 and F82H steels exposed to a white neutron flux spectrum extending up to 55 MeV. By making use of the ALARA inventory code the expected γ-active product nuclide inventories were calculated and compared with the measured one. It was found that IEAF-2001 reasonably agrees with experimental data for most of the detected radioisotopes. The reasons for some larger disagreements were found to be the uncertainty of the sample elemental composition, non-validated neutron activation reaction cross sections, and sequential charge particle reactions.

  11. Comparison of Impurities in Charcoal Sorbents Found by Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Doll, Charles G.; Finn, Erin C.; Cantaloub, Michael G.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Kephart, Jeremy; Kephart, Rosara F.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Neutron activation of gas samples in a reactor often requires a medium to retain sufficient amounts of the gas for analysis. Charcoal is commonly used to adsorb gas and hold it for activation; however, the amount of activated sodium in the charcoal after irradiation swamps most signals of interest. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) was performed on several commonly available charcoal samples in an effort to determine the activation background. The results for several elements, including the dominant sodium element, are reported. It was found that ECN charcoal had the lowest elemental background, containing sodium at 2.65 ± 0.05 ppm, as well as trace levels of copper and tungsten.

  12. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, LANSCE experiment reports: 1990 Run Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    DiStravolo, M.A.

    1991-10-01

    This year was the third in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each six-month LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred thirty-four proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic nature to the Laboratory. Our definition of beam availability is when the proton current from the PSR exceeds 50% of the planned value. The PSR ran at 65{mu}A current (average) at 20 Hz for most of 1990. All of the scheduled experiments were performed and experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods.

  13. Mono-energetic mono-directional resonance neutron activation of natural indium metal target

    SciTech Connect

    Ertek, C.; Oigawa, Hiroyuki

    1994-12-31

    The mono-energetic neutrons of 1.456eV energy are obtained from 2 MWth TR-I swimming pool type research reactor using double collimated beams and BRAGG reflection of pure Beryllium mono-crystal with extremely fine energy resolution. Foil thickness for 3 foils were 26., 28, and 44.10-4 cm and they were perpendicular to the beam of mono-energetic neutrons and were irradiated in sandwich form. After irradiation, the saturation activities were obtained using Phillips two-pie special beta-ray detector in a well controlled and shielded geometry. Counting reproducibility was excellent (better than 0.1%). Special Attention was paid to the irradiated (side A) and non-irradiated (side B) sides of the foils. Usual irradiation and decay corrections were applied to obtain the saturation activities. In this work, the preliminary calculations of reaction rates using Nakazawa M. et al., JENDL Dosimetry file, JAERI 1325, (1992) were performed. Considerable differences are found between the calculations and experiment and possible reasons are still under investigation. The preliminary calculations of reaction rates using ENDFB/VI are in agreement with JENDL-3 estimates. Absolute reaction rate estimates are not yet ready. Considerable numbers of research centers are interested in the experiment and very constructive inputs are expressed and obtained from Hiroyuki Oigawa, Shigeaki Okajima and T. Mukaiyama, JAERI, Japan; N.P. Baumann and K.O. Ott, USA; E. Zsolnay and E. Szondy, Hungary; M.C. Lopes and J. Molina, Portugal; F. Bensch, H. Boeck Austria; and M. Turgut and A. Isyar, Turkey. Investigations using collision theory, multiple scattering and monte-carlo techniques have been undertaken.

  14. Neutron and X-ray diagnostics for SZP experiments at Zebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, T.; McGee, E.; Covington, A.; Dutra, E.; Wessel, F. J.; Ruskov, E.; Rahman, H. U.; Valenzuela, J. C.; Conti, F.

    2016-10-01

    The Zebra pulsed-power generator at the Nevada Terawatt Facility (NTF) of the University of Nevada produces current pulses of up to a megaamp with a rise time of 70 ns. By passing this current through a structured gas jet target, such as the Staged-Z-pinch (SZP), the project hopes to approach near energy gain conditions from fusion reactions in a pinched plasma. This article describes the setup and instrumentation at Zebra for detecting the neutron and x-ray output of the pinch and the procedures for reducing these signals to a quantitative measurement of the yields. Scintillation detectors with fast PMT detectors and activation decay measurements are the primary neutron diagnostics. These measurements are of prime importance in determining the parameters required to optimize the gas jet conditions for fusion. Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy, DE-AR0000569.

  15. Progress in obtaining an absolute calibration of a total deuterium-tritium neutron yield diagnostic based on copper activation.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, C L; Chandler, G A; Cooper, G W; Fehl, D L; Hahn, K D; Leeper, R J; McWatters, B R; Nelson, A J; Smelser, R M; Snow, C S; Torres, J A

    2012-10-01

    The 350-keV Cockroft-Walton accelerator at Sandia National laboratory's Ion Beam facility is being used to calibrate absolutely a total DT neutron yield diagnostic based on the (63)Cu(n,2n)(62)Cu(β+) reaction. These investigations have led to first-order uncertainties approaching 5% or better. The experiments employ the associated-particle technique. Deuterons at 175 keV impinge a 2.6 μm thick erbium tritide target producing 14.1 MeV neutrons from the T(d,n)(4)He reaction. The alpha particles emitted are measured at two angles relative to the beam direction and used to infer the neutron flux on a copper sample. The induced (62)Cu activity is then measured and related to the neutron flux. This method is known as the F-factor technique. Description of the associated-particle method, copper sample geometries employed, and the present estimates of the uncertainties to the F-factor obtained are given.

  16. Development of the large neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Kime, S.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.

    2012-03-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires a high resolution ({approx}10 {mu}m) neutron imaging system to observe deuterium and tritium (DT) core implosion asymmetries. A new large (150 mm entrance diameter: scaled for Laser MegaJoule [P. A. Holstein, F. Chaland, C. Charpin, J. M. Dufour, H. Dumont, J. Giorla, L. Hallo, S. Laffite, G. Malinie, Y. Saillard, G. Schurtz, M. Vandenboomgaerde, and F. Wagon, Laser and Particle Beams 17, 403 (1999)]) neutron imaging detector has been developed for such ICF experiments. The detector has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source. A penumbral aperture was used to observe DT-gas-filled target implosions performed on the OMEGA laser facility. [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] Neutron core images of 14 MeV with a resolution of 15 {mu}m were obtained and are compared to x-ray images of comparable resolution.

  17. Development of the large neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Caillaud, T; Landoas, O; Briat, M; Kime, S; Rossé, B; Thfoin, I; Bourgade, J L; Disdier, L; Glebov, V Yu; Marshall, F J; Sangster, T C

    2012-03-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires a high resolution (~10 μm) neutron imaging system to observe deuterium and tritium (DT) core implosion asymmetries. A new large (150 mm entrance diameter: scaled for Laser MégaJoule [P. A. Holstein, F. Chaland, C. Charpin, J. M. Dufour, H. Dumont, J. Giorla, L. Hallo, S. Laffite, G. Malinie, Y. Saillard, G. Schurtz, M. Vandenboomgaerde, and F. Wagon, Laser and Particle Beams 17, 403 (1999)]) neutron imaging detector has been developed for such ICF experiments. The detector has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a (60)Co γ-ray source. A penumbral aperture was used to observe DT-gas-filled target implosions performed on the OMEGA laser facility. [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] Neutron core images of 14 MeV with a resolution of 15 μm were obtained and are compared to x-ray images of comparable resolution.

  18. Advances in personnel neutron dosimetry: part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Vallario, E.; Faust, L.

    1983-08-01

    A continuation of the advances in personnel neutron dosimetry research programs and technology transfer reviews work on active dosimeters, electronic devices that determine the dose equivalent to a worker during an exposure to neutron radiation. Active dosemeters are routinely used for gamma radiation dosimetry. Experience with neutron-sensitive pocket rem-meters at several DOE laboratories covers three prototypes. Pocket rem-meters work well for detecting neutrons over a wide energy range. They give instantaneous readout of the accumulated neutron dose-equivalent. 1 figure.

  19. Analysis of improved neutron activation technique using thick foils for application on medical LINAC environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagena, E.; Stoulos, S.; Manolopoulou, M.

    2016-01-01

    An improved neutron activation technique is analyzed that can be used for the characterization of the neutron field in low neutron flux environments, such as medical Linacs. Due to the much lower neutron fluence rates, thick materials instead of thin have been used. The study is focused on the calculations of basic components of the neutron activation analysis that are required for accurate results, such as the efficiency of the gamma detector used for γ-spectrometry as well as crucial correction factors that are required when dealing with thick samples in different geometries and forms. A Monte Carlo detector model, implemented by Geant4 MC Code was adjusted in accordance to results from various measurements performed. Moreover, regarding to estimate the self-shielding correction factors a new approach using both Monte Carlo and analytical approach was presented. This improvement gives more accurate results, which are important for both activation and shielding studies that take place in many facilities. A quite good agreement between the neutron fluxes is achieved; according to the data obtained a mean value of (2.13±0.34)×105 ncm-2 s-1 is representative for the isocenter of the specific Linac that corresponds to fluence of (5.53±0.94)×106 ncm-2 Gy-1. Comparable fluencies reported in the literature for similar Linacs operating with photon beams at 15 MeV.

  20. Parity violation in neutron-proton capture—The NPDGamma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gericke, Michael; Page, S.; Ramsay, D.; Alarcon, R.; Balascuta, S.; Barron, L.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R. D.; Chen, W.; Chupp, T. E.; Crawford, C.; Covrig, S.; Dabaghyan, M.; Freedman, S. J.; Gentile, T. R.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hersman, F. W.; Ino, T.; Jones, G. L.; Lauss, B.; Leuschner, M.; Losowki, B.; Mahurin, R.; Masuda, Y.; Mei, J.; Mitchell, G. S.; Muto, S.; Nann, H.; Penttilä, S. I.; Salas-Bacci, A.; Santra, S.; Seo, P.-N.; Sharapov, E.; Sharma, M.; Smith, T.; Snow, W. M.; Wilburn, W. S.; Yuan, V.

    2009-12-01

    The NPDGamma collaboration has recently completed the first phase of a measurement to determine the size of the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction from cold neutron capture on a liquid hydrogen target. In the framework of the nearly 30 year old DDH model [B. Desplanques, J.F. Donoghue, B.R. Holstein, Annals of Physics 124 (1980) 449], the measured process is explained in terms of the weak pion-nucleon coupling, while the framework of modern effective field theory parameterizes the measured process in terms of the S13-P13, long range transition (essentially the Danilov parameter ρt) [S.L. Zhu et al., Nuclear Physics A 748 (2005) 435; C.-P. Liu, Phys. Rev. C 75 (2007) 065501]. The couplings in terms of either model are directly proportional to the parity violating up-down asymmetry in the angular distribution of gamma rays with respect to the neutron spin direction in the reaction n⇒+p→d+γ. The asymmetry has a predicted size of 5×10-8 and the aim of the NPDGamma collaboration is to measure it to 20%. The first phase of the measurement was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Neutron Science Center Spallation Source with a preliminary result of (-1.1±2.1 stat.±0.2 sys.)×10-7. Here, we report on the measurements and the results obtained so far. The experiment is currently being installed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for the remainder of its run time.

  1. Parity Violation in Neutron-Proton Capture -- The NPD Gamma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gericke, M. T.; Bowman, James D; Greene, G. L.; Penttila, Seppo I; Collaboration, NPDGamma

    2009-01-01

    The NPDGamma collaboration has recently completed the first phase of a measurement to determine the size of the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction from cold neutron capture on a liquid hydrogen target. In the framework of the nearly 30 year old DDH model [B. Desplanques, J.F. Donoghue, B.R. Holstein, Annals of Physics 124 (1980) 449], the measured process is explained in terms of the weak pion-nucleon coupling, while the framework of modern effective field theory parameterizes the measured process in terms of the {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}P{sub 1}, long range transition (essentially the Danilov parameter {rho}{sub t}) [S.L. Zhu et al., Nuclear Physics A 748 (2005) 435; C.-P. Liu, Phys. Rev. C 75 (2007) 065501]. The couplings in terms of either model are directly proportional to the parity violating up-down asymmetry in the angular distribution of gamma rays with respect to the neutron spin direction in the reaction {rvec n} + p {yields} d + {gamma}. The asymmetry has a predicted size of 5 x 10{sup -8} and the aim of the NPDGamma collaboration is to measure it to 20%. The first phase of the measurement was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Neutron Science Center Spallation Source with a preliminary result of (-1.1 {+-} 2.1 stat. {+-} 0.2 sys.) x 10{sup -7}. Here, we report on the measurements and the results obtained so far. The experiment is currently being installed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for the remainder of its run time.

  2. Simultaneous usage of pinhole and penumbral apertures for imaging small scale neutron sources from inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Guler, N; Volegov, P; Danly, C R; Grim, G P; Merrill, F E; Wilde, C H

    2012-10-01

    Inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to understand the basic principles of creating self-sustaining fusion reactions by laser driven compression of deuterium-tritium (DT) filled cryogenic plastic capsules. The neutron imaging diagnostic provides information on the distribution of the central fusion reaction region and the surrounding DT fuel by observing neutron images in two different energy bands for primary (13-17 MeV) and down-scattered (6-12 MeV) neutrons. From this, the final shape and size of the compressed capsule can be estimated and the symmetry of the compression can be inferred. These experiments provide small sources with high yield neutron flux. An aperture design that includes an array of pinholes and penumbral apertures has provided the opportunity to image the same source with two different techniques. This allows for an evaluation of these different aperture designs and reconstruction algorithms.

  3. Studies of Neutron and Proton Nuclear Activation in Low-Earth Orbit 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, C. E.

    1983-01-01

    The study of neutron and proton nuclear activation in low-Earth orbit reported in NASA CR-162051 has been continued with increasing emphasis given to primary and secondary neutron activation. The previously reported activation due to protons has been modified to include: (1) flux attenuation caused by all inelastic reactions; (2) the modification of the proton flux distribution caused by sample covering material; and (3) the activation of the sample as a function of the distance into the sample from the surface of incidence. A method has been developed for including the effects on the activation of the finite width and length of the samples. The reactant product spectra produced by proton-induced reactions has been studied. Cross sections needed for neutron induced reactions leading to long-lived (half-life 1 day) radioisotopes have been identified and, in some cases, compiled.

  4. The Manuel Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) experiment reports 1992 run cycle. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    DiStravolo, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    This year was the fifth in which LANSCE ran a formal user program. A call for proposals was issued before the scheduled run cycles, and experiment proposals were submitted by scientists from universities, industry, and other research facilities around the world. An external program advisory committee, which LANSCE shares with the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), Argonne National Laboratory, examined the proposals and made recommendations. At LANSCE, neutrons are produced by spallation when a pulsed, 800-MeV proton beam impinges on a tungsten target. The proton pulses are provided by the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) accelerator and an associated Proton Storage Ring (PSR), which can alter the intensity, time structure, and repetition rate of the pulses. The LAMPF protons of Line D are shared between the LANSCE target and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, which results in LANSCE spectrometers being available to external users for unclassified research about 80% of each annual LAMPF run cycle. Measurements of interest to the Los Alamos National Laboratory may also be performed and may occupy up to an additional 20% of the available beam time. These experiments are reviewed by an internal program advisory committee. One hundred sixty-seven proposals were submitted for unclassified research and twelve proposals for research of a programmatic interest to the Laboratory; six experiments in support of the LANSCE research program were accomplished during the discretionary periods. Oversubscription for instrument beam time by a factor of three was evident with 839 total days requested and only 371 available for allocation.

  5. Implementation of an enhanced, permanently installed neutron activation diagnostic hardware for NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovec, Donald R.; Edwards, Ellen R.; Carrera, Jorge A.; Yeamans, Charles B.

    2015-08-01

    Neutron activation diagnostics are commonly employed as baseline neutron yield and relative spatial flux measurement instruments. Much insight into implosion performance has been gained by deployment of up to 19 identical activation diagnostic samples distributed around the target chamber at unique angular locations. Their relative simplicity and traceability provide neutron facilities with a diagnostic platform that is easy to implement and verify. However, the current National Ignition Facility (NIF) implementation relies on removable activation samples, creating a 1-2 week data turn-around time and considerable labor costs. The system described here utilizes a commercially-available lanthanum bromide (cerium-doped) scintillator with an integrated MCA emulator as the counting system and a machined zirconium-702 cap as the activation medium. The device is installed within the target bay and monitored remotely. Additionally, this system allows the placement of any activation medium tailored to the specific measurement needs. We discuss the design and function of a stand-alone and permanently installed neutron activation detector unit to measure the yield and average energy of a nominal 14 MeV neutron source with a pulse length less than one nanosecond.

  6. Apollo experience report: Safety activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, C. N.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of the flight safety experiences gained during the Apollo Program and safety, from the viewpoint of program management, engineering, mission planning, and ground test operations was discussed. Emphasis is placed on the methods used to identify the risks involved in flight and in certain ground test operations. In addition, there are discussions on the management and engineering activities used to eliminate or reduce these risks.

  7. SQUIDs as Detectors in a New Experiment to Measure the Neutron Electric Dipole Moment

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Cooper, M.; Lamoreaux, S.; Kraus, R.H., Jr.; Matlachov, A.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-09-13

    A new experiment has been proposed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) to 4x10{sup {minus}28} ecm, a factor of 250 times better than the current experimental limit. Such a measure of the neutron EDM would challenge the theories of supersymmetry and time reversal violation as the origin of the observed cosmological asymmetry in the ratio of baryons to antibaryons. One possible design for this new experiment includes the use of LTC SQUIDs coupled to large ({approximately}100 cm{sup 2}) pick-up coils to measure the precession frequency of the spin-polarized {sup 3}He atoms that act as polarizer, spin analyzer, detector, and magnetometer for the ultra-cold neutrons used in the experiment. The method of directly measuring the {sup 3}He precession signal eliminates the need for very uniform magnetic fields (a major source of systematic error in these types of experiments). It is estimated that a flux of {approximately}2x10{sup {minus}16} Tm{sup 2} (0.1 F{sub 0}) will be coupled into the pick-up coils. To achieve the required signal-to-noise ratio one must have a flux resolution of d F{sub SQ}=2x10{sup {minus}6} F{sub 0}/{radical}Hz at 10 Hz. While this is close to the sensitivity available in commercial devices, the effects of coupling to such a large pick-up coil and flux noise from other sources in the experiment still need to be understood. To determine the feasibility of using SQUIDs in such an application we designed and built a superconducting test cell, which simulates major features of the proposed EDM experiment, and we developed a two-SQUID readout system that will reduce SQUID noise in the experiment. We present an overview of the EDM experiment with SQUIDs, estimations of required SQUID parameters and experimental considerations. We also present the measured performance of a single magnetometer in the test cell as well as the performance of the two SQUID readout technique

  8. SQUIDs as detectors in a new experiment to measure the neutron electric dipole moment

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, M.A.; Cooper, M.; Lamoreaux, S.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Matlachov, A.; Ruminer, P.

    1998-12-31

    A new experiment has been proposed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM) to 4{times}10{sup {minus}28} ecm, a factor of 250 times better than the current experimental limit. Such a measure of the neutron EDM would challenge the theories of supersymmetry and time reversal violation as the origin of the observed cosmological asymmetry in the ratio of baryons to antibaryons. One possible design for this new experiment includes the use of LTC SQUIDs coupled to large ({approximately}100 cm{sup 2}) pick-up coils to measure the precision frequency of the spin-polarized {sup 3}He atoms that act as polarizer, spin analyzer, detector, and magnetometer for the ultra-cold neutrons used in the experiment. The method of directly measuring the {sup 3}He precession signal eliminates the need for very uniform magnetic fields (a major source of systematic error in these types of experiments). It is estimated that a flux of {approximately}2{times}10{sup {minus}16} Tm{sup 2} (0.1 {Phi}{sub 0}) will be coupled into the pick-up coils. To achieve the required signal-to-noise ratio one must have a flux resolution of d{Phi}{sub SQ} = 2{times}10{sup {minus}6}{Phi}{sub 0}/{radical}Hz at 10 Hz. While this is close to the sensitivity available in commercial devices, the effects of coupling to such a large pick-up coil and flux noise from other sources in the experiment still need to be understood. To determine the feasibility of using SQUIDs in such an application the authors designed and built a superconducting test cell, which simulates major features of the proposed EDM experiment, and they developed a two-SQUID readout system that will reduce SQUID noise in the experiment. They present an overview of the EDM experiment with SQUIDs, estimations of required SQUID parameters and experimental considerations. The authors also present the measured performance of a single magnetometer in the test cell as well as the performance of the two SQUID

  9. Neutron tomography experiments for the study of trapped flux distributions in high- T c superconducting ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, V. T.; Gordeev, G. P.; Toperverg, B. P.; Rekveldt, T.; Roest, W.; Cser, L.; Rosta, L.; Torok, Gy.

    1995-02-01

    We describe a new version of Neutron Spin Echo, for the study of magnetic flux in high- Tc superconductors, which is based on the evolution of the echo group in the specimen which is installed in the third precession region. The polarization of the transmitted beam reflects the spin rotation in the internal field which can be found by Fourier transforming the data. It is required for example, in research on the flux self-organization in the critical state. Experiments on Y sbnd Ba sbnd Cu sbnd O ceramics are discussed.

  10. Examination of total cross section resonance structure of niobium and silicon in neutron transmission experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianova, Olga; Lomakov, Gleb; Manturov, Gennady

    2017-09-01

    The neutron transmission experiments are one of the main sources of information about the neutron cross section resonance structure and effect in the self-shielding. Such kind of data for niobium and silicon nuclides in energy range 7 keV to 3 MeV can be obtained from low-resolution transmission measurements performed earlier in Russia (with samples of 0.027 to 0.871 atom/barn for niobium and 0.076 to 1.803 atom/barn for silicon). A significant calculation-to-experiment discrepancy in energy range 100 to 600 keV and 300 to 800 keV for niobium and silicon, respectively, obtained using the evaluated nuclear data library ROSFOND, were found. The EVPAR code was used for estimation the average resonance parameters in energy range 7 to 600 keV for niobium. For silicon a stochastic optimization method was used to modify the resolved resonance parameters in energy range 300 to 800 keV. The improved ROSFOND evaluated nuclear data files were tested in calculation of ICSBEP integral benchmark experiments.

  11. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Negoita, F. Gugiu, M. Petrascu, H. Petrone, C. Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  12. An experiment for the precision measurement of the radiative decay mode of the neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, R. L.; Bass, C. D.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Byrne, J.; Chupp, T. E.; Coakley, K. J.; Dewey, M. S.; Fisher, B. M.; Fu, C.; Gentile, T. R.; McGonagle, M.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.; Thompson, A. K.; Wietfeldt, F. E.

    2009-12-01

    The familiar neutron decay into a proton, electron, and antineutrino can be accompanied by photons with sufficient energy to be detected. We recently reported the first observation of the radiative beta decay branch for the free neutron with photons of energy 15-340 keV. We performed the experiment in the bore of a superconducting magnet where electron, proton, and photon signals were measured. A bar of bismuth germanate scintillating crystal coupled to an avalanche photodiode served as the photon detector that operated in the cryogenic, high magnetic field environment. The branching ratio for this energy region was measured and is consistent with the theoretical calculation. An experiment is under way to measure the branching ratio with an improved precision of 1% relative standard uncertainty and to measure the photon energy spectrum. In this paper, the apparatus modifications to reduce the systematic uncertainties will be described. Central to these improvements is the development of a 12-element detector based on the original photon detector design that will improve the statistical sensitivity. During data acquisition, a detailed calibration program will be performed to improve the systematic uncertainties. The development of these modifications is currently under way, and the second run of the experiment commenced in July 2008.

  13. Fission and activation of uranium by fusion-plasma neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid reactors are discussed in terms of two main purposes: to breed fissile materials (Pu 233 and Th 233 from U 238 or Th 232) for use in low-reactivity breeders, and to produce tritium from lithium to refuel fusion plasma cores. Neutron flux generation is critical for both processes. Various methods for generating the flux are described, with attention to new geometries for multiple plasma focus arrays, e.g., hypocycloidal pinch and staged plasma focus devices. These methods are evaluated with reference to their applicability to D-D fusion reactors, which will ensure a virtually unlimited energy supply. Accurate observations of the neutron flux from such schemes are obtained by using different target materials in the plasma focus.

  14. Neutron Activation Analysis of Trace Elements in Lava

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Ross; Sabella, Jordan; Thomas, Keenan; Norman, Eric; Guillamon, P.; Goldman, I.; Smith, A.

    2012-10-01

    The elemental compositions of lavas vary with the locations of the volcanoes from which they emerged. We have used neutron activa- tion analysis to measure the abundances of approximately 32 different elements in lava samples collected from three different Hawaiian islands and from the summit of Mt. Kilimanjaro. Two different neutron ir- radiations were performed at the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center to optimize our sensitivities to both short- and long-lived radioisotopes. Gamma-ray counting was done at McClellan, UC Berkeley, and LBNL using large-volume high-purity Ge detectors. Results from the mea- surements will be presented and comparisons will be made between the trace-element compositions of the lavas from these different sites.

  15. Fission and activation of uranium by fusion-plasma neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid reactors are discussed in terms of two main purposes: to breed fissile materials (Pu 233 and Th 233 from U 238 or Th 232) for use in low-reactivity breeders, and to produce tritium from lithium to refuel fusion plasma cores. Neutron flux generation is critical for both processes. Various methods for generating the flux are described, with attention to new geometries for multiple plasma focus arrays, e.g., hypocycloidal pinch and staged plasma focus devices. These methods are evaluated with reference to their applicability to D-D fusion reactors, which will ensure a virtually unlimited energy supply. Accurate observations of the neutron flux from such schemes are obtained by using different target materials in the plasma focus.

  16. 14 MeV neutron activation analysis of geological and lunar samples

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Wogman, N.A.

    1981-04-01

    14 MeV neutron activation analysis (NAA) is ideal for accurately determining Oxygen and Silicon contents in geological and lunar materials. It is fast, nondestructive, economical, and can be used on a routine basis in a laboratory. Although 14 MeV NAA is particularly suited to light elements, its use has been extended to measure other elements as well such as Aluminum, Magnesium, Iron, Calcium, Titanium, Strontium, Nickel, Yttrium, Zirconium, Niobium and Cerium. Thus, the use of 14 MeV neutrons is of considerable importance in NAA. The disadvantages of the method are that interference reactions are common because of high neutron energy; the flux is nonuniform in longer irradiation due to depletion of the target in the neutron generator. Overall, 14 MeV NAA is ideal for short irradiations and when supplemented with thermal NAA provides the maximum elemental information in small aliquants of geological and lunar materials.

  17. 3D neutronic calculations: CAD-MCNP methodology applied to vessel activation in KOYO-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herreras, Y.; Lafuente, A.; Sordo, F.; Cabellos, O.; Perlado, J. M.

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology for 3D neutronic calculations suitable for complex and extensive geometries. The geometry of the system design is first fully modelled with a CAD program, and subsequently processed through a MCNP-CAD interface in order to generate an MCNP geometry file. Neutronic irradiation results are finally achieved running the MCNPX program, where the geometry input card used is directly the MCNP-CAD interface output. This methodology enables accurate neutronic calculations for complex geometries characterised by high detail levels. This procedure will be applied to the Fast Ignition Fusion Reactor KOYO-F to determine first neutron fluxes calculations along the blanket as well as the material activation in the reduced martensitic 9Cr-1Mo steel vessel.

  18. 252Cf fission-neutron spectrum using a simplified time-of-flight setup: An advanced teaching laboratory experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.; Febbraro, M.; Torres-Isea, R.; Ojaruega, M.; Baum, L.

    2013-02-01

    The removal of PuBe and AmBe neutron sources from many university teaching laboratories (due to heightened security issues) has often left a void in teaching various aspects of neutron physics. We have recently replaced such sources with sealed 252Cf oil-well logging sources (nominal 10-100 μCi), and developed several experiments using them as neutron sources. This includes a fission-neutron time-of-flight experiment using plastic scintillators, which utilizes the prompt γ rays emitted in 252Cf spontaneous fission as a fast timing start signal. The experiment can be performed with conventional nuclear instrumentation and a 1-D multi-channel pulse-height analyzer, available in most advanced teaching laboratories. Alternatively, a more sophisticated experiment using liquid scintillators and n/γ pulse-shape discrimination can be performed. Several other experiments using these neutron sources are also feasible. The experiments can introduce students to the problem of detecting the dark matter thought to dominate the universe and to the techniques used to detect contraband fissionable nuclear materials.

  19. Calculations to support JET neutron yield calibration: Modelling of neutron emission from a compact DT neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čufar, Aljaž; Batistoni, Paola; Conroy, Sean; Ghani, Zamir; Lengar, Igor; Milocco, Alberto; Packer, Lee; Pillon, Mario; Popovichev, Sergey; Snoj, Luka

    2017-03-01

    At the Joint European Torus (JET) the ex-vessel fission chambers and in-vessel activation detectors are used as the neutron production rate and neutron yield monitors respectively. In order to ensure that these detectors produce accurate measurements they need to be experimentally calibrated. A new calibration of neutron detectors to 14 MeV neutrons, resulting from deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas, is planned at JET using a compact accelerator based neutron generator (NG) in which a D/T beam impinges on a solid target containing T/D, producing neutrons by DT fusion reactions. This paper presents the analysis that was performed to model the neutron source characteristics in terms of energy spectrum, angle-energy distribution and the effect of the neutron generator geometry. Different codes capable of simulating the accelerator based DT neutron sources are compared and sensitivities to uncertainties in the generator's internal structure analysed. The analysis was performed to support preparation to the experimental measurements performed to characterize the NG as a calibration source. Further extensive neutronics analyses, performed with this model of the NG, will be needed to support the neutron calibration experiments and take into account various differences between the calibration experiment and experiments using the plasma as a source of neutrons.

  20. LANL sunnyside experiment: Study of neutron production in accelerator-driven targets

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, G.; Butler, G.; Cappiello, M.

    1995-10-01

    Measurements have been made of the neutron production in prototypic targets for accelerator driven systems. Studies were conducted on four target assemblies containing lead, lithium, tungsten, and a thorium-salt mixture. Integral data on total neutron production were obtained as well as more differential data on neutron leakage and neutron flux profiles in the blanket/moderator region. Data analysis on total neutron production is complete and shows excellent agreement with calculations using the LAHET/MCNP code system.