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Sample records for neutron capture producao

  1. Neutron capture therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Shefer, Ruth E.; Klinkowstein, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  2. Neutron capture therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.

    1999-11-02

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  3. Iodine neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kazi Fariduddin

    A new technique, Iodine Neutron Capture Therapy (INCT) is proposed to treat hyperthyroidism in people. Present thyroid therapies, surgical removal and 131I treatment, result in hypothyroidism and, for 131I, involve protracted treatment times and excessive whole-body radiation doses. The new technique involves using a low energy neutron beam to convert a fraction of the natural iodine stored in the thyroid to radioactive 128I, which has a 24-minute half-life and decays by emitting 2.12-MeV beta particles. The beta particles are absorbed in and damage some thyroid tissue cells and consequently reduce the production and release of thyroid hormones to the blood stream. Treatment times and whole-body radiation doses are thus reduced substantially. This dissertation addresses the first of the several steps needed to obtain medical profession acceptance and regulatory approval to implement this therapy. As with other such programs, initial feasibility is established by performing experiments on suitable small mammals. Laboratory rats were used and their thyroids were exposed to the beta particles coming from small encapsulated amounts of 128I. Masses of 89.0 mg reagent-grade elemental iodine crystals have been activated in the ISU AGN-201 reactor to provide 0.033 mBq of 128I. This activity delivers 0.2 Gy to the thyroid gland of 300-g male rats having fresh thyroid tissue masses of ˜20 mg. Larger iodine masses are used to provide greater doses. The activated iodine is encapsulated to form a thin (0.16 cm 2/mg) patch that is then applied directly to the surgically exposed thyroid of an anesthetized rat. Direct neutron irradiation of a rat's thyroid was not possible due to its small size. Direct in-vivo exposure of the thyroid of the rat to the emitted radiation from 128I is allowed to continue for 2.5 hours (6 half-lives). Pre- and post-exposure blood samples are taken to quantify thyroid hormone levels. The serum T4 concentration is measured by radioimmunoassay at

  4. Neutron capture reactions at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredeweg, T. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 4π BaF2 array consisting of 160 active detector elements. The primary purpose of the array is to perform neutron capture cross section measurements on small (>~100 μg) and/or radioactive (<~100 mCi) species. The measurements made possible with this array will be useful in answering outstanding questions in the areas of national security, threat reduction, nuclear astrophysics, advanced reactor design and accelerator transmutation of waste. Since the commissioning of DANCE we have performed neutron capture cross section measurements on a wide array of medium to heavy mass nuclides. Measurements to date include neutron capture cross sections on 241,243Am, neutron capture and neutron-induced fission cross sections and capture-to-fission ratio (α = σγ/σf) for 235U using a new fission-tagging detector as well as neutron capture cross sections for several astrophysics branch-point nuclei. Results from several of these measurements will be presented along with a discussion of additional physics information that can be extracted from the DANCE data.

  5. Neutron capture reactions at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bredeweg, T. A.

    2008-05-12

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} array consisting of 160 active detector elements. The primary purpose of the array is to perform neutron capture cross section measurements on small (> or approx.100 {mu}g) and/or radioactive (< or approx. 100 mCi) species. The measurements made possible with this array will be useful in answering outstanding questions in the areas of national security, threat reduction, nuclear astrophysics, advanced reactor design and accelerator transmutation of waste. Since the commissioning of DANCE we have performed neutron capture cross section measurements on a wide array of medium to heavy mass nuclides. Measurements to date include neutron capture cross sections on {sup 241,243}Am, neutron capture and neutron-induced fission cross sections and capture-to-fission ratio ({alpha} = {sigma}{sub {gamma}}/{sigma}{sub f}) for {sup 235}U using a new fission-tagging detector as well as neutron capture cross sections for several astrophysics branch-point nuclei. Results from several of these measurements will be presented along with a discussion of additional physics information that can be extracted from the DANCE data.

  6. Neutron field for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kanda, K.; Kobayashi, T.

    1986-01-01

    Recently, the development of an epithermal neutron source has been required by medical doctors for deeper neutron penetrations, which is to be used for deep tumor treatment and diagnosis of metastasis. Several attempts have already been made to realize an epithermal neutron field, such as the undermoderated neutron beam, the filtered neutron beam, and the use of a fission plate. At present, these facilities can not be used for actual therapy. For the treatment of deep tumor, another method has been also proposed in normal water in the body is replaced by heavy water to attain a deeper neutron penetration. At Kyoto University's Research Reactor Institute, almost all physics problems have been settled relative to thermal neutron capture therapy that has been used for treating brain tumors and for biological experiments on malignant melanoma. Very recently feasibility studies to use heavy water have been started both theoretically and experimentally. The calculation shows the deeper penetration of neutrons as expected. Two kinds of experiments were done by using the KUR guide tube: 1. Thermal neutron penetration measurement. 2. Heavy water uptake in vitro sample. In addition to the above experiment using heavy water, the development of a new epithermal neutron source using a large fission plate is in progress, which is part of a mockup experiment of an atomic bomb field newly estimated.

  7. Capturing the Future: Direct and Indirect Probes of Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, Aaron Joseph

    2016-08-31

    This report documents aspects of direct and indirect neutron capture. The importance of neutron capture rates and methods to determine them are presented. The following conclusions are drawn: direct neutron capture measurements remain a backbone of experimental study; work is being done to take increased advantage of indirect methods for neutron capture; both instrumentation and facilities are making new measurements possible; more work is needed on the nuclear theory side to understand what is needed furthest from stability.

  8. Neutron dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Miola, U.J.; Ettinger, K.V.

    1981-01-01

    The recent development of various borated compounds and the utilization of one of these (Na/sub 2/B/sub 12/H/sub 11/SH) to treat brain tumors in clinical studies in Japan has renewed interest in neutron capture therapy. In these procedures thermal neutrons interact with /sup 10/B in boron containing cells through the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction producing charged particles with a maximum range of approx. 10..mu..m in tissue. Borated analogs of chlorpromazine, porphyrin, thiouracil and deoxyuridine promise improved tumor uptake and blood clearance. The therapy beam from the Medical Research Reactor in Brookhaven contains neutrons from a modified and filtered fission spectrum and dosimetric consequences of the use of the above mentioned compounds in conjunction with thermal and epithermal fluxes are discussed in the paper. One of the important problems of radiation dosimetry in capture therapy is determination of the flux profile and, hence, the dose profile in the brain. This has been achieved by constructing a brain phantom made of TE plastic. The lyoluminescence technique provides a convenient way of monitoring the neutron flux distributions; the detectors for this purpose utilize /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B compounds. Such compounds have been synthesized specially for the purpose of dosimetry of thermal and epithermal beams. In addition, standard lyoluminescent phosphors, like glutamine, could be used to determine the collisional component of the dose as well as the contribution of the /sup 14/N(n,p)/sup 14/C reaction. Measurements of thermal flux were compared with calculations and with measurements done with activation foils.

  9. Neutron beam design, development, and performance for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A. ); Zamenhof, R.G. )

    1990-01-01

    The report presents topics presented at a workshop on neutron beams and neutron capture therapy. Topics include: neutron beam design; reactor-based neutron beams; accelerator-based neutron beams; and dosimetry and treatment planning. Individual projects are processed separately for the databases. (CBS)

  10. Workshop on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    Potentially optimal conditions for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) may soon be in hand due to the anticipated development of band-pass filtered beams relatively free of fast neutron contaminations, and of broadly applicable biomolecules for boron transport such as porphyrins and monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, a number of groups in the US are now devoting their efforts to exploring NCT for clinical application. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring these groups together to exchange views on significant problems of mutual interest, and to assure a unified and effective approach to the solutions. Several areas of preclinical investigation were deemed to be necessary before it would be possible to initiate clinical studies. As neither the monomer nor the dimer of sulfhydryl boron hydride is unequivocally preferable at this time, studies on both compounds should be continued until one is proven superior.

  11. Benchmarking a surrogate reaction for neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, A. M.; O'Malley, P. D.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Escher, J. E.; Lesher, S. R.; Gibelin, J.; Phair, L.; Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.; Goldblum, B. L.; Swan, T.; Wiedeking, M.

    2010-01-15

    {sup 171,173}Yb(d,p{gamma}) reactions are measured, with the goal of extracting the neutron capture cross-section ratio as a function of the neutron energy using the external surrogate ratio method. The cross-section ratios obtained are compared to the known neutron capture cross sections. Although the Weisskopf-Ewing limit is demonstrated not to apply for these low neutron energies, a prescription for deducing surrogate cross sections is presented. The surrogate cross-section ratios deduced from the {sup 171,173}Yb(d,p{gamma}) measurements agree with the neutron capture results within 15%.

  12. Neutron capture therapy for melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Glass, J.D.; Micca, P.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The development of boron-containing compounds which localize selectively in tumor may require a tumor-by-tumor type of approach that exploits any metabolic pathways unique to the particular type of tumor. Melanin-producing melanomas actively transport and metabolize aromatic amino acids for use as precursors in the synthesis of the pigment melanin. It has been shown that the boron-containing amino acid analog p-borono-phenylalanine (BPA) is selectively accumulated in melanoma tissue, producing boron concentrations in tumor that are within the range estimated to be necessary for successful boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). We report here the results of therapy experiments carried out at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Neutron captures and the r-process

    SciTech Connect

    Farouqi, K.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2006-03-13

    In order to study possible neutron-capture effects during an r-process, it is necessary to perform fully dynamical simulations. We have performed such calculations within the model of an adiabatically expanding high-entropy bubble of a SN II, using temperature-dependent reaction rates including the NON-SMOKER neutron-capture rates of Rauscher et al.

  14. Measurement of neutron capture on 136Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, J. B.; Daugherty, S. J.; Johnson, T. N.; O'Conner, T.; Kaufman, L. J.; Couture, A.; Ullmann, J. L.; Krtička, M.

    2016-09-01

    136Xe is a 0 ν β β decay candidate isotope, and is used in multiple experiments searching for this hypothetical decay mode. These experiments require precise information about neutron capture for their background characterization and minimization. Thermal and resonant neutron capture on 136Xe have been measured at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. A neutron beam ranging from thermal energy to greater than 100 keV was incident on a gas cell filled with isotopically pure 136Xe. The relative neutron capture cross sections for neutrons at thermal energies and the first resonance at 2.154 keV have been measured, yielding a new absolute measurement of 0.238 ±0.019 b for the thermal neutron capture cross section. Additionally, the γ cascades for captures at both energies have been measured, and cascade models have been developed which may be used by 0 ν β β experiments using 136Xe.

  15. Capture-Gated Fast Neutron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumm, H. P.; Abdurashitov, J. N.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Gavrin, V. N.; Heimbach, C. R.; Langford, T. J.; Mendenhall, M.; Nico, J. S.; Shikhin, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    We present recent developments in fast neutron detection using segmented spectrometers based on the principle of capture-gating. Our approach employs an organic scintillator to detect fast neutrons through their recoil interaction with protons in the scintillator. The neutrons that thermalize and are captured produce a signal indicating that the event was due to a neutron recoil and that the full energy of the neutron was deposited. The delayed neutron capture also serves to discriminate against uncorrelated background events. The segmentation permits reconstruction of the initial neutron energy despite the nonlinear response of the scintillator. We have constructed spectrometers using both He-3 proportional counters and Li-6 doping as capture agents in plastic and liquid organic scintillators. We discuss the operation of the spectrometers for the measurement of low levels of fast neutrons for several applications, including the detection of very low-activity neutron sources and the characterization of the flux and spectrum of fast neutrons at the Earth's surface and in the underground environment.

  16. Neutron capture in the r-process

    SciTech Connect

    Surman, Rebecca; Mclaughlin, Gail C; Mumpower, Matthew; Hix, William Raphael; Jones, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have shown that neutron capture rates on nuclei near stability significantly influence the r-process abundance pattern. We discuss the different mechanisms by which the abundance pattern is sensitive to the capture rates and identify key nuclei whose rates are of particular im- portance. Here we consider nuclei in the A = 130 and A = 80 regions.

  17. Boron neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, R.E.; Soloway, A.H. ); Fairchild, R.G. State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook )

    1990-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) bring together two components that when kept separate have only minor effects on normal cells. The first component is a stable isotope of boron (boron 10) that can be concentrated in tumor cells. The second is a beam of low-energy neutrons that produces short-range radiation when absorbed, or captured, by the boron. The combination of these two conditions at the site of a tumor releases intense radiation that can destroy malignant tissues. BNCT is based on the nuclear reaction that occurs when boron 10 is irradiated with an absorbs neutrons. The neutrons that it takes up are called thermal, or slow, neutrons. They are of such low energy that they cause little tissue damage as compared with other forms of radiation such as protons, gamma rays and fast neutrons. When an atom of boron 10 captures a neutron, an unstable isotope, boron 11, forms. The boron 11 instantly fissions, yielding lithium 7 nuclei and energetic alpha particles. These heavy particles, which carry 2.79 million electron volts of energy, are a highly lethal form of radiation. If the treatment proceeds as intended, the destructive effects of the capture reaction would occur primarily in those cancer cells that have accumulated boron 10. Normal cells with low concentrations of boron would be spared.

  18. Chandra Captures Neutron Star Action

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows a fast moving jet of particles produced by a rapidly rotating neutron star, and may provide new insight into the nature of some of the densest...

  19. Approach to magnetic neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A. . E-mail: spod@sky.chph.ras.ru; Podoynitsyn, Sergey N.; Filippov, Victor I.; Komissarova, Lubov Kh.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: The method of magnetic neutron capture therapy can be described as a combination of two methods: magnetic localization of drugs using magnetically targeted carriers and neutron capture therapy itself. Methods and Materials: In this work, we produced and tested two types of particles for such therapy. Composite ultradispersed ferro-carbon (Fe-C) and iron-boron (Fe-B) particles were formed from vapors of respective materials. Results: Two-component ultradispersed particles, containing Fe and C, were tested as magnetic adsorbent of L-boronophenylalanine and borax and were shown that borax sorption could be effective for creation of high concentration of boron atoms in the area of tumor. Kinetics of boron release into the physiologic solution demonstrate that ultradispersed Fe-B (10%) could be applied for an effective magnetic neutron capture therapy. Conclusion: Both types of the particles have high magnetization and magnetic homogeneity, allow to form stable magnetic suspensions, and have low toxicity.

  20. Neutron capture by hook or by crook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, Shea

    2016-03-01

    The neutron capture reaction is a topic of fundamental interest for both heavy element (A>60) nucleosynthesis and applications in such fields as nuclear energy and defense. The full suite of interesting isotopes ranges from stable nuclei to the most exotic, and it is not possible to directly measure all the relevant reaction rates. The DANCE instrument at Los Alamos provides direct access to the neutron capture reaction for stable and long-lived nuclei, while Apollo coupled to HELIOS at Argonne has been developed as an indirect probe for cases where a direct measurement is impossible. The basic techniques and their implications will be presented, and the status of ongoing experimental campaigns to address neutron capture in the A=60 and A=100 mass regions will be discussed.

  1. Neutron capture cross section of Am241

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Clement, R. R.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Kawano, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Parker, W. E.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.

    2008-09-01

    The neutron capture cross section of Am241 for incident neutrons from 0.02 eV to 320 keV has been measured with the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The thermal neutron capture cross section was determined to be 665±33 b. Our result is in good agreement with other recent measurements. Resonance parameters for En<12 eV were obtained using an R-matrix fit to the measured cross section. The results are compared with values from the ENDF/B-VII.0, Mughabghab, JENDL-3.3, and JEFF-3.1 evaluations. Γn neutron widths for the first three resonances are systematically larger by 5-15% than the ENDF/B-VII.0 values. The resonance integral above 0.5 eV was determined to be 1553±7 b. Cross sections in the resolved and unresolved energy regions above 12 eV were calculated using the Hauser-Feshbach theory incorporating the width-fluctuation correction of Moldauer. The calculated results agree well with the measured data, and the extracted averaged resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those for the resolved resonances.

  2. Direct-Semidirect Thermal Neutron Capture Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Arbanas, G; Dietrich, F S; Kerman, A K

    2005-12-20

    A method for computing direct-semidirect (DSD) neutron radiative capture is presented and applied to thermal neutron capture on {sup 19}F, {sup 27}Al, {sup 28,29.30}Si, {sup 35,37}Cl, {sup 39,41}K, {sup 56}Fe, and {sup 238}U, in support of data evaluation effort at the O.R.N.L. The DSD method includes both direct and semidirect capture; the latter is a core-polarization term in which the giant dipole resonance is formed. We study the effects of a commonly used ''density'' approximation to the EM operator and find it to be unsatisfactory for the nuclei considered here. We also study the magnitude of semidirect capture relative to the pure direct capture. Furthermore, we compare our results with those obtained from another direct capture code (Tedca [17]). We also compare our results with those obtained from analytical expression for external capture derived by Lane and Lynn [3], and its extension to include internal capture [7]. To estimate the effect of nuclear deformation on direct capture, we computed direct thermal capture on {sup 238}U with and without imposition of spherical symmetry. Direct capture for a spherically symmetric {sup 238}U was approximately 6 mb, while a quadrupole deformation of 0.215 on the shape of {sup 238}U lowers this cross section down to approximately 2 mb. This result suggests that effects of nuclear deformation on direct capture warrant a further study. We also find out that contribution to the direct capture on {sup 238}U from the nuclear interior significantly cancels that coming from the exterior region, and hence both contributions must be taken into account. We reproduced a well known discrepancy between the computed and observed branching ratios in {sup 56}Fe(n,{gamma}). This will lead us to revisit the concept of doorway states in the particle-hole model.

  3. Design of multidirectional neutron beams for boron neutron capture synovectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.

    1997-12-01

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) is a potential application of the {sup 10}B(n, a) {sup 7}Li reaction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The target of therapy is the synovial membrane. Rheumatoid synovium is greatly inflamed and is the source of the discomfort and disability associated with the disease. The BNCS proposes to destroy the synovium by first injecting a boron-labeled compound into the joint space and then irradiating the joint with a neutron beam. This study discusses the design of a multidirectional neutron beam for BNCS.

  4. A Compact Neutron Source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Razin, S. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Skalyga, V. A.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a neutron generator scheme based on a high-current ion source with electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating by high-power millimeter-wave gyrotron radiation. The most promising application of this neutron generator is a medical one, namely, boron neutron capture therapy of oncological diseases. A possibility for using a multi-aperture extraction system for high-current ion beam generation to increase the total current is studied. It is shown that the parameters of the plasma flow leaving a magnetic trap permit the effective use of multi-aperture systems without a significant loss in the ion beam current density. Thus, the use of multi-aperture systems in the ion source of a neutron generator can significantly increase the total neutron yield.

  5. Porphyrins for boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Gabel, Detlef

    1990-01-01

    Novel compounds for treatment of brain tumors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy are disclosed. A method for preparing the compounds as well as pharmaceutical compositions containing said compounds are also disclosed. The compounds are water soluble, non-toxic and non-labile boronated porphyrins which show significant uptake and retention in tumors.

  6. Microdosimetry for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, R.L.; Kota, C.

    2000-09-05

    The specific aims of the research proposal were as follows: (1) To design and construct small volume tissue equivalent proportional counters for the dosimetry and microdosimetry of high intensity thermal and epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT, and of modified fast neutron beams designed for boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). (2) To develop analytical methods for estimating the biological effectiveness of the absorbed dose in BNCT and BNCEFNT based on the measured microdosimetric spectra. (3) To develop an analytical framework for comparing the biological effectiveness of different epithermal neutron beams used in BNCT and BNCEFNT, based on correlated sets of measured microdosimetric spectra and radiobiological data. Specific aims (1) and (2) were achieved in their entirety and are comprehensively documented in Jay Burmeister's Ph.D. dissertation entitled ''Specification of physical and biologically effective absorbed dose in radiation therapies utilizing the boron neutron capture reaction'' (Wayne State University, 1999). Specific aim (3) proved difficult to accomplish because of a lack of sufficient radiobiological data.

  7. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy - A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Nedunchezhian, Kavitaa; Thiruppathy, Manigandan; Thirugnanamurthy, Sarumathi

    2016-01-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiation science which is emerging as a hopeful tool in treating cancer, by selectively concentrating boron compounds in tumour cells and then subjecting the tumour cells to epithermal neutron beam radiation. BNCT bestows upon the nuclear reaction that occurs when Boron-10, a stable isotope, is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield α particles (Helium-4) and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. A large number of 10 Boron (10B) atoms have to be localized on or within neoplastic cells for BNCT to be effective, and an adequate number of thermal neutrons have to be absorbed by the 10B atoms to maintain a lethal 10B (n, α) lithium-7 reaction. The most exclusive property of BNCT is that it can deposit an immense dose gradient between the tumour cells and normal cells. BNCT integrates the fundamental focusing perception of chemotherapy and the gross anatomical localization proposition of traditional radiotherapy. PMID:28209015

  8. Thermal-neutron capture in light nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Jurney, E.T.; Lynn, J.E.

    1996-10-01

    We have made considerable progress toward the goal of carrying out thermal-neutron capture {gamma}-ray measurements on all stable isotopes below A=60. Information processed till now has significantly augmented the existing knowledge on the detailed nuclear level structure of many light nuclides. Most of this knowledge comes from our {gamma}-ray energies, level placements, and branching ratios of secondary transitions between low-lying states. Spectroscopic information is also contained in the cross sections of the primary transitions originating from the capturing state. This is deduced from the success of ``direct`` theories of neutron capture for many nuclides, especially those of light and near closed-shell character. 23 refs, 1 tab, 3 figs.

  9. Neutron transmission and capture of 241Am

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampoudis, C.; Kopecky, S.; Plompen, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.; Gunsing, F.; Sage, C.; Bouland, O.; Noguere, G.

    2013-03-01

    A set of neutron transmission and capture experiments based on the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique, were performed in order to determine the 241Am capture cross section in the energy range from 0.01 eV to 1 keV. The GELINA facility of the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) served as the neutron source. A pair of C6D6 liquid scintillators was used to register the prompt gamma rays emerging from the americium sample, while a Li-glass detector was used in the transmission setup. Results from the capture and transmission data acquired are consistent with each other, but appear to be inconsistent with the evaluated data files. Resonance parameters have been derived for the data up to the energy of 100 eV.

  10. Review of the fundamentals of the neutron-capture reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty years of research into the nature of the radiative capture reaction mechanisms is briefly summarized. A variety of such mechanisms is exploited to explain neutron capture over nine decades of neutron energy.

  11. Recent advances in neutron capture therapy (NCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction to cancer radiotherapy (Neutron Capture therapy, or NCT) has intrigued investigators since the discovery of the neutron. This paper briefly summarizes data describing recently developed boronated compounds with evident tumor specificity and extended biological half-lives. The implication of these compounds to NCT is evaluated in terms of Therapeutic Gain (TG). The optimization of NCT using band-pass filtered beams is described, again in terms of TG, and irradiation times with these less intense beams are estimated. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. The accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatov, D.; Koshkarev, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Makarov, A.; Ostreinov, Yu; Shchudlo, I.; Sorokin, I.; Sycheva, T.; Taskaev, S.; Zaidi, L.

    2016-11-01

    The accelerator based epithermal neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is proposed, created and used in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. In 2014, with the support of the Russian Science Foundation created the BNCT laboratory for the purpose to the end of 2016 get the neutron flux, suitable for BNCT. For getting 3 mA 2.3 MeV proton beam, was created a new type accelerator - tandem accelerator with vacuum isolation. On this moment, we have a stationary proton beam with 2.3 MeV and current 1.75 mA. Generation of neutrons is carried out by dropping proton beam on to lithium target as a result of threshold reaction 7Li(p,n)7Be. Established facility is a unique scientific installation. It provides a generating of neutron flux, including a monochromatic energy neutrons, gamma radiation, alpha-particles and positrons, and may be used by other research groups for carrying out scientific researches. The article describes an accelerator neutron source, presents and discusses the result of experiments and declares future plans.

  13. Neutron tube design study for boron neutron capture therapy application

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1999-05-06

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  14. Neutron capture cross section of 102Pd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, C. L.; Krane, K. S.

    2005-05-01

    The cross sections for radiative neutron capture by 102Pd have been deduced from a measurement of the γ rays emitted by 17.0-d 103Pd. The thermal cross section has been determined to be σ=1.82±0.20 b, and the effective resonance integral is I=23±4 b. We also report thermal and resonance capture cross sections for 108Pd and note possible inconsistencies with the presently accepted values of the 110Pd cross sections.

  15. Accelerator-driven boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgecock, Rob

    2014-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is a binary treatment for certain types of cancer. It works by loading the cancerous cells with a boron-10 carrying compound. This isotope has a large cross-section for thermal neutrons, the reaction producing a lithium nucleus and alpha particle that kill the cell in which they are produced. Recent studies of the boron carrier compound indicate that the uptake process works best in particularly aggressive cancers. Most studied is glioblastoma multiforme and a trial using a combination of BNCT and X-ray radiotherapy has shown an increase of nearly a factor of two in mean survival over the state of the art. However, the main technical problem with BNCT remains producing a sufficient flux of neutrons for a reasonable treatment duration in a hospital environment. This paper discusses this issue.

  16. Non-Statistical Effects in Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, P. E.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Guber, K. H.; Harvey, J. A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wiarda, D.; Wouters, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    There have been many reports of non-statistical effects in neutron-capture measurements. However, reports of deviations of reduced-neutron-width (Γn0) distributions from the expected Porter-Thomas (PT) shape largely have been ignored. Most of these deviations have been reported for odd-A nuclides. Because reliable spin (J) assignments have been absent for most resonances for such nuclides, it is possible that reported deviations from PT might be due to incorrect J assignments. We recently developed a new method for measuring spins of neutron resonances by using the DANCE detector at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measurements made with a 147Sm sample allowed us to determine spins of almost all known resonances below 1 keV. Furthermore, analysis of these data revealed that the Γn0 distribution was in good agreement with PT for resonances below 350 eV, but in disagreement with PT for resonances between 350 and 700 eV. Our previous (n,α) measurements had revealed that the α strength function also changes abruptly at this energy. There currently is no known explanation for these two non-statistical effects. Recently, we have developed another new method for determining the spins of neutron resonances. To implement this technique required a small change (to record pulse-height information for coincidence events) to a much simpler apparatus: A pair of C6D6 γ-ray detectors which we have employed for many years to measure neutron-capture cross sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). Measurements with a 95Mo sample revealed that not only does the method work very well for determining spins, but it also makes possible parity assignments. Taken together, these new techniques at LANSCE and ORELA could be very useful for further elucidation of non-statistical effects.

  17. Non-Statistical Effects in Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, P. E.; Guber, K. H.; Harvey, J. A.; Wiarda, D.; Bredeweg, T. A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Reifarth, R.

    2009-01-28

    There have been many reports of non-statistical effects in neutron-capture measurements. However, reports of deviations of reduced-neutron-width ({gamma}{sub n}{sup 0}) distributions from the expected Porter-Thomas (PT) shape largely have been ignored. Most of these deviations have been reported for odd-A nuclides. Because reliable spin (J) assignments have been absent for most resonances for such nuclides, it is possible that reported deviations from PT might be due to incorrect J assignments. We recently developed a new method for measuring spins of neutron resonances by using the DANCE detector at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measurements made with a {sup 147}Sm sample allowed us to determine spins of almost all known resonances below 1 keV. Furthermore, analysis of these data revealed that the {gamma}{sub n}{sup 0} distribution was in good agreement with PT for resonances below 350 eV, but in disagreement with PT for resonances between 350 and 700 eV. Our previous (n,{alpha}) measurements had revealed that the {alpha} strength function also changes abruptly at this energy. There currently is no known explanation for these two non-statistical effects. Recently, we have developed another new method for determining the spins of neutron resonances. To implement this technique required a small change (to record pulse-height information for coincidence events) to a much simpler apparatus: A pair of C{sub 6}D{sub 6}{gamma}-ray detectors which we have employed for many years to measure neutron-capture cross sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). Measurements with a {sup 95}Mo sample revealed that not only does the method work very well for determining spins, but it also makes possible parity assignments. Taken together, these new techniques at LANSCE and ORELA could be very useful for further elucidation of non-statistical effects.

  18. Non-Statistical Effects in Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Paul Edward; Bredeweg, t a; Guber, Klaus H; Harvey, John A; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wiarda, Dorothea; Wouters, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    There have been many reports of non-statistical effects in neutron-capture measurements. However, reports of deviations of reduced-neutron-width ({Gamma}n{sup 0}) distributions from the expected Porter-Thomas (PT) shape largely have been ignored. Most of these deviations have been reported for odd-A nuclides. Because reliable spin (J) assignments have been absent for most resonances for such nuclides, it is possible that reported deviations from PT might be due to incorrect J assignments. We recently developed a new method for measuring spins of neutron resonances by using the DANCE detector at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measurements made with a 147Sm sample allowed us to determine spins of almost all known resonances below 1 keV. Furthermore, analysis of these data revealed that the {Gamma}n{sup 0} distribution was in good agreement with PT for resonances below 350 eV, but in disagreement with PT for resonances between 350 and 700 eV. Our previous (n,{alpha}) measurements had revealed that the {alpha} strength function also changes abruptly at this energy. There currently is no known explanation for these two non-statistical effects. Recently, we have developed another new method for determining the spins of neutron resonances. To implement this technique required a small change (to record pulse-height information for coincidence events) to a much simpler apparatus: A pair of C6D6 ?-ray detectors which we have employed for many years to measure neutron-capture cross sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). Measurements with a 95Mo sample revealed that not only does the method work very well for determining spins, but it also makes possible parity assignments. Taken together, these new techniques at LANSCE and ORELA could be very useful for further elucidation of non-statistical effects.

  19. Neutron producing target for accelerator based neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayanov, B.; Belov, V.; Taskaev, S.

    2006-05-01

    Pilot innovative accelerator based neutron source for neutron capture therapy of cancer is under construction now at the Budker Institute. One of the main elements of the facility is lithium target producing neutrons via threshold 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction at 10 mA proton beam with energies of 1.915 MeV or 2.5 MeV. In the present report, choice of target was substantiated. The main problems of lithium target were determined to be: 7Be radioactive isotope activation, keeping lithium layer solid, presence of photons resulted from proton inelastic scattering on lithium nuclei, and radiation blistering. The results of thermal testing of target prototype, investigation of radiation blistering and several simulations are presented. It becomes clear that water is preferable for cooling this target, and that the lithium target 10 cm in diameter is able to run up to 25 kW proton beam before melting. The conception of optimal target is proposed: thin and easy to detach metal disk 10 cm in diameter, evaporated with thin layer of pure lithium from the side of proton beam exposure: its back is intensively cooled with turbulent water flow to maintain lithium layer solid. Design of target for the neutron source constructed at BINP is shown. Conceptions of radiation protection and neutrons, γ-rays and α- particles diagnostics are presented. The immediate plans on obtaining epithermal neutron beam are declared.

  20. Thermal Neutron Capture y's (CapGam)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) presents two tables showing energy and photon intensity with uncertainties of gamma rays as seen in thermal-neutron capture.  One table is organized in ascending order of gamma energy, and the second is organized by Z, A of the target. In the energy-ordered table the three strongest transitions are indicated in each case. The nuclide given is the target nucleus in the capture reaction. The gamma energies given are in keV. The gamma intensities given are relative to 100 for the strongest transition. %Iγ (per 100 n-captures) for the strongest transition is given, where known. All data are taken from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), a computer file of evaluated nuclear structure data and from the eXperimental Unevaluated Nuclear Data List (XUNDL). (Specialized Interface)

  1. Neutronic effects on tungsten-186 double neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Marc Alan

    Rhenium-188, a daughter product of tungsten-188, is an isotope of great interest in therapeutic nuclear medicine, being used in dozens of laboratory and clinical investigations worldwide. Applications include various cancer therapy strategies, treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, prevention of restenosis following coronary artery angioplasty, and palliation of bone pain associated with cancer metastases. With its half-life of 17 hours, 2.12 MeV (maximum) beta-particle emission, chemical similarity to technetium-99m (the most widely used diagnostic radioisotope), and its availability in a convenient tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator system, rhenium-188 is a superb candidate for a broad range of applications. Production of 188W is typically via double neutron capture by 186W in a high flux nuclear reactor, predominantly the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. Experience at HFIR has shown that production yields (measured in Ci of 188W produced per g of 186W target) decrease considerably as target size increases. While the phenomenon of neutron resonance self-shielding would be expected to produce such an effect, temperature effects on neutron flux distribution and neutron capture rates may also be involved. Experimental investigations of these phenomena have not been previously performed. The work presented in this thesis evaluates the factors that contribute to the decrease in 188W yield from both theoretical and experimental standpoints. Neutron self-shielding and temperature effects were characterized to develop a strategy for target design that would optimize production yield, an important factor in minimizing health care costs. It was determined that decrease in yield due to neutron self-shielding can be attributed to depletion of epithermal neutrons at resonant energies, most significantly within the initial 0.4 mm depth of the target. The results from these studies further show that 188W yield in the interior of the

  2. Liposomal boron delivery for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Tumor cell destruction in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between (10)B and thermal neutrons. The thermal neutrons have an energy of 0.025 eV, clearly below the threshold energy required to ionize tissue components. However, neutron capture by (10)B produces lithium ion and helium (alpha-particles), which are high linear energy transfer (LET) particles, and dissipate their kinetic energy before traveling one cell diameter (5-9 microm) in biological tissues, ensuring their potential for precise cell killing. BNCT has been applied clinically for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, malignant melanoma, head and neck cancer, and hepatoma using two boron compounds: sodium borocaptate (Na(2)(10)B(12)H(11)SH; Na(2)(10)BSH) and l-p-boronophenylalanine (l-(10)BPA). These low molecular weight compounds are cleared easily from the cancer cells and blood. Therefore, high accumulation and selective delivery of boron compounds into tumor tissues are most important to achieve effective BNCT and to avoid damage of adjacent healthy cells. Much attention has been focused on the liposomal drug delivery system (DDS) as an attractive, intelligent technology of targeting and controlled release of (10)B compounds. Two approaches have been investigated for incorporation of (10)B into liposomes: (1) encapsulation of (10)B compounds into liposomes and (2) incorporation of (10)B-conjugated lipids into the liposomal bilayer. Our laboratory has developed boron ion cluster lipids for application of the latter approach. In this chapter, our boron lipid liposome approaches as well as recent developments of the liposomal boron delivery system are summarized.

  3. Neutron Capture Cross Section of 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, S.; Arnold, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Ullmann, J. L.; Chyzh, A.; Henderson, R.; Kwan, E.; Wu, C. Y.

    2014-09-01

    The 239Pu(n,γ) cross section has been measured over the energy range 10 eV - 10 keV using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) as part of a campaign to produce precision (n,γ) measurements on 239Pu in the keV region. Fission coincidences were measured with a PPAC and used to characterize the prompt fission γ-ray spectrum in this region. The resulting spectra will be used to better characterize the fission component of another experiment with a thicker target to extend the (n,γ) cross section measurement well into the keV region.

  4. Neutron Capture Cross Section of 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, S.; Arnold, C.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chyzh, A.; Couture, A.; Henderson, R.; Jandel, M.; Kwan, E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Ullmann, J. L.; Wu, C. Y.

    2014-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used to measure the 239Pu(n,γ) cross section from 10 eV to the keV region. Three experimental run conditions were used to characterize the prompt fission γ-ray spectrum across the entire energy regime, measure the cross section in the resolved resonance region, and obtain necessary count rate well into the keV region. The preliminary cross sections are in good agreement with current evaluations from 10 eV to 80 keV.

  5. Research needs for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    Key issues and questions addressed by the workshop related to optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), in general, and to the possibility of success of the present BNCT trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in particular. Both trials use nuclear fission reactors as neutron sources for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme (BNL) and of deep seated melanoma (MIT). Presentations and discussions focussed on optimal boron-labeled compounds, mainly for brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme, and the best mode of compound delivery to the tumor. Also, optimizing neutron irradiation with dose delivery to the tumor cells and the issues of dosimetry of BNCT especially in the brain were discussed. Planning of treatment and of follow-up of patients, coordination of BNCT at various treatment sites, and the potential of delivering BNCT to various types of cancer with an appropriately tailored protocol were additional issues. The need for multicentric interdisciplinary cooperation among the different medical specialties was highlighted.

  6. Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Sudowe, Ralf; Folden, Charles M., III; Nitsche, Heino; Hoffman, Darleane C.

    2005-01-15

    The overall objective of this project is the measurement of neutron capture cross sections of importance to stewardship science and astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis, while at the same time helping to train the next generation of scientists with expertise relevant to U.S. national nuclear security missions and to stewardship science. A primary objective of this project is to study neutron capture cross sections for various stable and unstable isotopes that will contribute to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program by providing improved data for modeling and interpretation of nuclear device performance. Much of the information obtained will also be important in astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis. Measurements of these neutron capture cross sections are being conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility using the unique Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). In our early discussions with the DANCE group, decisions were made on the first cross sections to be measured and how our expertise in target preparation, radiochemical separations chemistry, and data analysis could best be applied. The initial emphasis of the project was on preparing suitable targets of both natural and separated stable europium isotopes in preparation for the ultimate goal of preparing a sufficiently large target of radioactive 155Eu (t1/2 = 4.7 years) and other radioactive and stable species for neutron cross-section measurements at DANCE. Our Annual Report, ''Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei'' by J. M. Schwantes, R. Sudowe, C. M. Folden III, H. Nitsche, and D. C. Hoffman, submitted to NNSA in December 2003, gives details about the initial considerations and scope of the project. During the current reporting period, electroplated targets of natural Eu together with valuable, stable, and isotopically pure 151Eu and 153Eu, and isotopically separated 154Sm were measured for

  7. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Reifarth, R.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Rundberg, R.S.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Fowler, M.M.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.; Kaeppeler, F.; Heil, M.; Chamberlin, E.P.

    2003-08-26

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 159-element 4{pi} barium fluoride array designed to study neutron capture on small quantities, 1 mg or less, of radioactive nuclides. It is being built on a 20 m neutron flight path which views the 'upper tier' water moderator at the Manuel J. Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The detector design is based on Monte Carlo calculations which have suggested ways to minimize backgrounds due to neutron scattering events. A data acquisition system based on fast transient digitizers is being implemented.

  8. Neutron capture therapy with deep tissue penetration using capillary neutron focusing

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.

    1997-01-01

    An improved method for delivering thermal neutrons to a subsurface cancer or tumor which has been first doped with a dopant having a high cross section for neutron capture. The improvement is the use of a guide tube in cooperation with a capillary neutron focusing apparatus, or neutron focusing lens, for directing neutrons to the tumor, and thereby avoiding damage to surrounding tissue.

  9. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.

    2009-03-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF2 scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  10. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krticka, M.; Becvar, F.

    2009-03-31

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF{sub 2} scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  11. Head phantom experiment and calculation for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, T; Aizawa, O

    1988-06-01

    Head phantom experiments with various neutron beams and calculations were carried out in order to provide useful information for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Thermal neutron beams for thermal neutron capture therapy were used for phantom experiments with various neutron collimator aperture sizes. The filtered beam neutrons of 24 and 144 keV generated with iron and silicon filters were also used to investigate the possible application of BNCT in the treatment of deep-seated cancers. Thermal neutron fluence and induced capture gamma dose distributions within the phantom were calculated with a transport code DOT 3.5 and compared with the experimental results. The results showed that the calculation used was consistent with the experimental results and provided useful information on BNCT. The filtered beam neutron may be very useful for the treatment of deep or widespread cancer, if there were a high power research reactor constructed for this purpose.

  12. Detecting energy dependent neutron capture distributions in a liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmer, Matthew J. I.; Gamage, Kelum A. A.; Taylor, Graeme C.

    2015-03-01

    A novel technique is being developed to estimate the effective dose of a neutron field based on the distribution of neutron captures in a scintillator. Using Monte Carlo techniques, a number of monoenergetic neutron source energies and locations were modelled and their neutron capture response was recorded. Using back propagation Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) the energy and incident direction of the neutron field was predicted from the distribution of neutron captures within a 6Li-loaded liquid scintillator. Using this proposed technique, the effective dose of 252Cf, 241AmBe and 241AmLi neutron fields was estimated to within 30% for four perpendicular angles in the horizontal plane. Initial theoretical investigations show that this technique holds some promise for real-time estimation of the effective dose of a neutron field.

  13. Progress in neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.; Harrington, B.V. ); Moore, D.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Prognosis for some cancers is good, but for others, few patients will survive 12 months. This latter group of cancers is characterised by a proclivity to disseminate malignant cells in the host organ. In some cases systemic metastases occur, but in other cases, failure to achieve local control results in death. First among these cancers are the high grade brain tumours, astrocytoma 3,4 and glioblastoma multiforme. Local control of these tumors should lead to cure. Other cancers melanoma metastatic to the brain, for which a useful palliative therapy is not yet available, and pancreatic cancer for which localised control at an early stage could bring about improved prognosis. Patients with these cancers have little grounds for hope. Our primary objective is to reverse this situation with Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT). The purpose of this fourth symposium is to hasten the day whereby patients with these cancers can reasonably hope for substantial remissions.

  14. Progress in neutron capture therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.; Harrington, B.V.; Moore, D.E.

    1992-09-01

    Prognosis for some cancers is good, but for others, few patients will survive 12 months. This latter group of cancers is characterised by a proclivity to disseminate malignant cells in the host organ. In some cases systemic metastases occur, but in other cases, failure to achieve local control results in death. First among these cancers are the high grade brain tumours, astrocytoma 3,4 and glioblastoma multiforme. Local control of these tumors should lead to cure. Other cancers melanoma metastatic to the brain, for which a useful palliative therapy is not yet available, and pancreatic cancer for which localised control at an early stage could bring about improved prognosis. Patients with these cancers have little grounds for hope. Our primary objective is to reverse this situation with Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT). The purpose of this fourth symposium is to hasten the day whereby patients with these cancers can reasonably hope for substantial remissions.

  15. Dose prescription in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.M.S.; Gahbauer, R.A. ); Blue, T.E. ); Wambersie, A. )

    1994-03-30

    The purpose of this paper is to address some aspects of the many considerations that need to go into a dose prescription in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for brain tumors; and to describe some methods to incorporate knowledge from animal studies and other experiments into the process of dose prescription. Previously, an algorithm to estimate the normal tissue tolerance to mixed high and low linear energy transfer radiations in BNCT was proposed. The authors have developed mathematical formulations and computational methods to represent this algorithm. Generalized models to fit the central axis dose rate components for an epithermal neutron field were also developed. These formulations and beam fitting models were programmed into spreadsheets to simulate two treatment techniques which are expected to be used in BNCT: a two-field bilateral scheme and a single-field treatment scheme. Parameters in these spreadsheets can be varied to represent the fractionation scheme used, the [sup 10]B microdistribution in normal tissue, and the ratio of [sup 10]B in tumor to normal tissue. Most of these factors have to be determined for a given neutron field and [sup 10]B compound combination from large animal studies. The spreadsheets have been programmed to integrate all of the treatment-related information and calculate the location along the central axis where the normal tissue tolerance is exceeded first. This information is then used to compute the maximum treatment time allowable and the maximum tumor dose that may be delivered for a given BNCT treatment. The effect of different treatment variables on the treatment time and tumor dose has been shown to be very significant. It has also been shown that the location of D[sub max] shifts significantly, depending on some of the treatment variables-mainly the fractionation scheme used. These results further emphasize the fact that dose prescription in BNCT is very complicated and nonintuitive. 11 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Boron thermal/epithermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The development of various particle beams for radiotherapy represents an attempt to improve dose distribution, and to provide high LET radiations which are less sensitive to ambient physical and radiobiological factors such as oxygen tension, cell cycle, and dose rate. In general, a compromise is necessary as effective RBE is reduced in order to spread the dose distribution over the anticipated tumor volume. The approach of delivering stable non-toxic isotopes to tumor, and then activating these atoms subsequently via an external radiation beam has mator advantages; problems associated with high uptake of these isotopes in competing cell pools are obviated, and the general tumor volume can be included in the treatment field of the activating beam. As long as the normal tissues supporting tumor show a low uptake of the isotope to be activated, and as long as the range of the reaction products is short, dose will be restricted to tumor, with a consequent high therapeutic ratio. Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) is generally carried out by activating boron-10 with low energy neutrons. The range of the high LET, low OER particles from the /sup 10/B(n, ..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is approx. 10..mu.., or one cell diameter, a situation that is optimal for cell killing. Significant advantages may be gained by using the NCT procedure in conjunction with improved tissue penetration provided with epithermal or filtered beams, and new compounds showing physiological binding to tumor.

  17. Neutron induced capture and fission discrimination using calorimetric shape decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrapiço, C.; Berthoumieux, E.; Dridi, W.; Gonçalves, I. F.; Gunsing, F.; Lampoudis, C.; Vaz, P.; n TOF Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    The neutron capture and fission cross-sections of 233U have been measured at the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN in the energy range from 1 eV to 1 keV using a high performance 4π BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC) as a detection device. In order to separate the contributions of neutron capture and neutron induced fission in the TAC, a methodology called Calorimetric Shape Decomposition (CSD) was developed. The CSD methodology is based on the study of the TAC's energy response for all competing reactions, allowing to discriminate between γ s originating from neutron induced fission and those from neutron capture reactions without the need for fission tagging or any additional detection system. In this article, the concept behind the CSD is explained in detail together with the necessary analysis to obtain the TAC's response to neutron capture and neutron induced fission. The discrimination between capture and fission contributions is shown for several neutron energies. A comparison between the 233U neutron capture and fission yield extraction with ENDF/B-VII v1. library data is also provided.

  18. Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, L.E.

    1991-12-16

    This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven's Medical Research Center program.

  19. Neutron Capture Cross Sections of 236U and 234U

    SciTech Connect

    Rundberg, R. S.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Bond, E. M.; Haight, R. C.; Hunt, L. F.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Schwantes, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Kronenberg, A.

    2006-03-13

    Accurate neutron capture cross sections of the actinide elements at neutron energies up to 1 MeV are needed to better interpret archived nuclear test data, for post-detonation nuclear attribution, and the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. The Detector for Advance Neutron Capture Experiments, DANCE, has unique capabilities that allow the differentiation of capture gamma rays from fission gamma rays and background gamma rays from scattered neutrons captured by barium isotopes in the barium fluoride scintillators. The DANCE array has a high granularity, 160 scintillators, high efficiency, and nearly 4-{pi} solid angle. Through the use of cuts in cluster multiplicity and calorimetric energy the capture gamma-rays are differentiated from other sources of gamma rays. The preliminary results for the capture cross sections of 236U are in agreement with the ENDF/B-VI evaluation. The preliminary results for 234U lower are than ENDF/B-VI evaluation and are closer to older evaluations.

  20. Neutron Capture Experiments on Unstable Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Jon M. Schwantes; Ralf Sudowe; Heino Nitsche; Darleane C. Hoffman

    2003-12-16

    A primary objective of this project is to study neutron capture cross sections for various stable and unstable isotopes that will contribute to the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS) program by providing improved data for modeling and interpretation of nuclear device performance. The information obtained will also be important in astrophysical modeling of nucleosynthesis. During this reporting period, the emphasis has been on preparing a radioactive target of {sup 155}Eu (half-life = 4.7 years), and several stable targets, including isotopically separated {sup 154}Sm, {sup 151}Eu, and {sup 153}Eu. Measurements of their neutron capture cross sections will be conducted in collaboration with researchers at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). A suitable backing material (beryllium) for the targets has been selected after careful calculations of its contribution to the background of the measurements. In addition, a high voltage plating procedure has been developed and optimized. Stable targets of {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu and a target of natural Eu ({approx}50% {sup 151}Eu and {approx}50% {sup 153}Eu) have each been plated to a mass thickness of >1 mg/cm{sup 2} and delivered to the DANCE collaboration at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Natural Eu targets will be tested first to confirm that the target dimensions and backing are appropriate prior to performing measurements on the extremely valuable targets of separated isotopes. In order to prepare a target of the radioactive {sup 155}Eu, it must first be separated from the {sup 154}Sm target material that was irradiated in a very high neutron flux of 1.5x1015 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/s for 50 days. The reaction is {sup 154}Sm (n,f){sup 155}Sm (half-life = 22 minutes) {sup 155}Eu. Considerable progress has been made in developing a suitable high-yield and high-purity separation method for separating Eu from targets

  1. Neutron Capture Reactions on lu Isotopes at Dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, O.; Meot, V.; Daugas, J.-M.; Morel, P.; Jandel, M.; Vieira, D. J.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Wouters, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    The DANCE1 (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) array at LANSCE spallation neutron source in Los Alamos has been used to obtain the neutron radiative capture cross sections for 175Lu and 176Lu with neutron energies from thermal up to 100 keV. Both isotopes are of current interest for the nucleosynthesis s-process.2,3 Three targets were used to perform these measurements. One was natural Lu foil of 31 mg/cm2 and the other two were isotope-enriched targets of 175Lu and 176Lu. Firstly, the cross sections were obtained by normalizing yield to a well-known cross section at the thermal neutron energy. Now, we want to obtain absolute cross sections of radiative capture through a precise neutron flux determination, an accurate target mass measurement and an efficiency determination of the DANCE array.

  2. Radiative neutron capture cross sections on 176Lu at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, O.; Jandel, M.; Méot, V.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    The cross section of the neutron capture reaction 176Lu(n ,γ ) has been measured for a wide incident neutron energy range with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The thermal neutron capture cross section was determined to be (1912 ±132 ) b for one of the Lu natural isotopes, 176Lu. The resonance part was measured and compared to the Mughabghab's atlas using the R -matrix code, sammy. At higher neutron energies the measured cross sections are compared to ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2, and BRC evaluated nuclear data. The Maxwellian averaged cross sections in a stellar plasma for thermal energies between 5 keV and 100 keV were extracted using these data.

  3. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  4. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  5. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  6. Experimental Neutron Capture Rate Constraint Far from Stability.

    PubMed

    Liddick, S N; Spyrou, A; Crider, B P; Naqvi, F; Larsen, A C; Guttormsen, M; Mumpower, M; Surman, R; Perdikakis, G; Bleuel, D L; Couture, A; Crespo Campo, L; Dombos, A C; Lewis, R; Mosby, S; Nikas, S; Prokop, C J; Renstrom, T; Rubio, B; Siem, S; Quinn, S J

    2016-06-17

    Nuclear reactions where an exotic nucleus captures a neutron are critical for a wide variety of applications, from energy production and national security, to astrophysical processes, and nucleosynthesis. Neutron capture rates are well constrained near stable isotopes where experimental data are available; however, moving far from the valley of stability, uncertainties grow by orders of magnitude. This is due to the complete lack of experimental constraints, as the direct measurement of a neutron-capture reaction on a short-lived nucleus is extremely challenging. Here, we report on the first experimental extraction of a neutron capture reaction rate on ^{69}Ni, a nucleus that is five neutrons away from the last stable isotope of Ni. The implications of this measurement on nucleosynthesis around mass 70 are discussed, and the impact of similar future measurements on the understanding of the origin of the heavy elements in the cosmos is presented.

  7. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  8. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  9. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  10. Neutron capture therapy research in Australia.

    PubMed

    Allen, B J

    1989-01-01

    Neutron capture therapy research in Australia has continued to grow since the first Australia-Japan workshop in April, 1986. The support base has broadened and the wide range of contributing laboratories includes universities, research institutes, and hospitals. Considerable progress has been made in boron chemistry--an accurate boron assay technique has been developed, boron analogues of chlorpromazine and thiouracil have been synthesised or nearly so, and decaborane conjugation with monoclonal antibodies has been achieved to the required loadings. In vitro cell survival experiments are proceeding in the Moata reactor using human melanoma and mouse cell lines incubated with enriched boronophenylalanine and boron tetraphenyl porphyrins. Electron microscopy examination of radiation damaged morphology shows considerable differences between cell lines. Progress with the nude mouse human melanoma model has been slow because of the lack of a reliable in vivo melanotic melanoma line, and the B16 mouse line is found to be more efficacious. Tailored beam calculations for the 10 MW HIFAR reactor indicate the difficulty of obtaining a suitable therapeutic beam because of the generated gamma dose in the beam filters. A new approach to NCT utilises the enormous cross section of 157Gd and the induced-Auger effect which has been shown to cause double strand breaks in circular DNA.

  11. Neutron capture therapy research in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.

    1989-07-01

    Neutron capture therapy research in Australia has continued to grow since the first Australia-Japan workshop in April, 1986. The support base has broadened and the wide range of contributing laboratories includes universities, research institutes, and hospitals. Considerable progress has been made in boron chemistry--an accurate boron assay technique has been developed, boron analogues of chlorpromazine and thiouracil have been synthesised or nearly so, and decaborane conjugation with monoclonal antibodies has been achieved to the required loadings. In vitro cell survival experiments are proceeding in the Moata reactor using human melanoma and mouse cell lines incubated with enriched boronophenylalanine and boron tetraphenyl porphyrins. Electron microscopy examination of radiation damaged morphology shows considerable differences between cell lines. Progress with the nude mouse human melanoma model has been slow because of the lack of a reliable in vivo melanotic melanoma line, and the B16 mouse line is found to be more efficacious. Tailored beam calculations for the 10 MW HIFAR reactor indicate the difficulty of obtaining a suitable therapeutic beam because of the generated gamma dose in the beam filters. A new approach to NCT utilises the enormous cross section of 157Gd and the induced-Auger effect which has been shown to cause double strand breaks in circular DNA. 34 references.

  12. Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Libraries for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sleaford, B W; Firestone, R B; Summers, N; Escher, J; Hurst, A; Krticka, M; Basunia, S; Molnar, G; Belgya, T; Revay, Z; Choi, H D

    2010-11-04

    The neutron capture reaction is useful in identifying and analyzing the gamma-ray spectrum from an unknown assembly as it gives unambiguous information on its composition. this can be done passively or actively where an external neutron source is used to probe an unknown assembly. There are known capture gamma-ray data gaps in the ENDF libraries used by transport codes for various nuclear applications. The Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation file (EGAF) is a new thermal neutron capture database of discrete line spectra and cross sections for over 260 isotopes that was developed as part of an IAEA Coordinated Research project. EGAF is being used to improve the capture gamma production in ENDF libraries. For medium to heavy nuclei the quasi continuum contribution to the gamma cascades is not experimentally resolved. The continuum contains up to 90% of all the decay energy and is modeled here with the statistical nuclear structure code DICEBOX. This code also provides a consistency check of the level scheme nuclear structure evaluation. The calculated continuum is of sufficient accuracy to include in the ENDF libraries. This analysis also determines new total thermal capture cross sections and provides an improved RIPL database. For higher energy neutron capture there is less experimental data available making benchmarking of the modeling codes more difficult. They are investigating the capture spectra from higher energy neutrons experimentally using surrogate reactions and modeling this with Hauser-Feshbach codes. This can then be used to benchmark CASINO, a version of DICEBOX modified for neutron capture at higher energy. This can be used to simulate spectra from neutron capture at incident neutron energies up to 20 MeV to improve the gamma-ray spectrum in neutron data libraries used for transport modeling of unknown assemblies.

  13. Enhancing the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N.; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  14. Enhancing the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, A.; Mosby, S.; Baramsai, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Jandel, M.; Macon, K.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rusev, G.; Taddeucci, T. N; Ullmann, J. L.; Walker, C. L.

    2015-05-28

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) has been used for extensive studies of neutron capture, gamma decay, photon strength functions, and prompt and delayed fission-gamma emission. Despite these successes, the potential measurements have been limited by the data acquisition hardware. We report on a major upgrade of the DANCE data acquisition that simultaneously enables strait-forward coupling to auxiliary detectors, including high-resolution high-purity germanium detectors and neutron tagging array. The upgrade will enhance the time domain accessible for time-of-flight neutron measurements as well as improve the resolution in the DANCE barium fluoride crystals for photons.

  15. Neutron capture therapy with deep tissue penetration using capillary neutron focusing

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, A.J.

    1997-08-19

    An improved method is disclosed for delivering thermal neutrons to a subsurface cancer or tumor which has been first doped with a dopant having a high cross section for neutron capture. The improvement is the use of a guide tube in cooperation with a capillary neutron focusing apparatus, or neutron focusing lens, for directing neutrons to the tumor, and thereby avoiding damage to surrounding tissue. 1 fig.

  16. Neutron detection by measuring capture gammas in a calorimetric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausch, Guntram; Herbach, Claus-Michael; Kong, Yong; Lentering, Ralf; Plettner, Cristina; Roemer, Katja; Scherwinski, Falko; Stein, Juergen; Schotanus, Paul; Wilpert, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    The neutron capture detector (NCD) is introduced as a novel detection scheme for thermal and epithermal neutrons that could provide large-area neutron counters by using common detector materials and proven technologies. The NCD is based on the fact that neutron captures are usually followed by prompt gamma cascades, where the sum energy of the gammas equals to the total excitation energy of typically 6-9 MeV. This large sum energy is measured in a calorimetric approach and taken as the signature of a neutron capture event. An NCD consists of a neutron converter, comprising of constituents with large elemental neutron capture cross-section like cadmium or gadolinium, which is embedded in common scintillator material. The scintillator must be large and dense enough to absorb with reasonable probability a portion of the sum energy that exceeds the energy of gammas emitted by common (natural, medical, industrial) radiation sources. An energy window, advantageously complemented with a multiplicity filter, then discriminates neutron capture signals against background. The paper presents experimental results obtained at the cold-neutron beam of the BER II research reactor, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, and at other neutron sources with a prototype NCD, consisting of four BGO crystals with embedded cadmium sheets, and with a benchmark configuration consisting of two separate NaI(Tl) detectors. The detector responses are in excellent agreement with predictions of a simulation model developed for optimizing NCD configurations. NCDs could be deployed as neutron detectors in radiation portal monitors (RPMs). Advanced modular scintillation detector systems could even combine neutron and gamma sensitivity with excellent background suppression at minimum overall expense.

  17. Cross section expansion for direct neutron radiative capture

    SciTech Connect

    Baye, D.

    2004-07-01

    Cross sections for neutron radiative capture multiplied by the relative velocity can be expressed as a Taylor expansion in powers of the relative energy. The coefficients of this expansion are expressed in the potential model as integrals involving solutions of the radial Schroedinger equation and of its inhomogeneous energy derivatives calculated at zero energy. Similarities and differences with charged-particle capture are emphasized. The {sup 12}C(n,{gamma}){sup 13}C capture reaction is treated as an example. The coefficients of the Taylor expansion lead to simple parametrizations of the experimental partial cross sections for neutron capture to each {sup 13}C bound state.

  18. Neutron Capture Reactions for Stockpile Stewardship and Basic Science

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J; Wilk, P; Wu, C; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Haight, R; Jandel, M; O'Donnell, J; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R; Ullmann, J; Vieira, D; Wouters, J; Sheets, S; Mitchell, G; Becvar, F; Krticka, M

    2007-08-04

    The capture process is a nuclear reaction in which a target atom captures an incident projectile, e.g. a neutron. The excited-state compound nucleus de-excites by emitting photons. This process creates an atom that has one more neutron than the target atom, so it is a different isotope of the same element. With low energy (slow) neutron projectiles, capture is the dominant reaction, other than elastic scattering. However, with very heavy nuclei, fission competes with capture as a method of de-excitation of the compound nucleus. With higher energy (faster) incident neutrons, additional reactions are also possible, such as emission of protons or emission of multiple neutrons. The probability of a particular reaction occurring (such as capture) is referred to as the cross section for that reaction. Cross sections are very dependent on the incoming neutron's energy. Capture reactions can be studied either using monoenergetic neutron sources or 'white' neutron sources. A 'white' neutron source has a wide range of neutron energies in one neutron beam. The advantage to the white neutron source is that it allows the study of cross sections as they depend on neutron energies. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, located at Los Alamos National Laboratory, provides an intense white neutron source. Neutrons there are created by a high-energy proton beam from a linear accelerator striking a heavy metal (tungsten) target. The neutrons range in energy from subthermal up to very fast - over 100 MeV in energy. Low-energy neutron reaction cross sections fluctuate dramatically from one target to another, and they are very difficult to predict by theoretical modeling. The cross sections for particular capture reactions are important for defense sciences, advanced reactor concepts, transmutation of radioactive wastes and nuclear astrophysics. We now have a strong collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, North Carolina State

  19. Neutron capture therapy: Years of experimentation---Years of reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Farr, L.E.

    1991-12-16

    This report describes early research on neutron capture therapy over a number of years, beginning in 1950, speaking briefly of patient treatments but dwelling mostly on interpretations of our animal experiments. This work carried out over eighteen years, beginning over forty years ago. Yet, it is only fitting to start by relating how neutron capture therapy became part of Brookhaven`s Medical Research Center program.

  20. FAST NEUTRON SPECTROMETER USING SPACED SEMICONDUCTORS FOR MEASURING TOTAL ENERGY OF NEUTRONS CAPTURED

    DOEpatents

    Love, T.A.; Murray, R.B.

    1964-04-14

    A fast neutron spectrometer was designed, which utilizes a pair of opposed detectors having a layer of /sup 6/LiF between to produce alpha and T pair for each neutron captured to provide signals, which, when combined, constitute a measure of neutron energy. (AEC)

  1. Cosmogenic neutron-capture-produced nuclides in stony meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spergel, M. S.; Reedy, R. C.; Lazareth, O. W.; Levy, P. W.; Slatest, L. A.

    1986-01-01

    The complete neutron-flux results and production rates for Cl-36, Ni-59, and Co-60 in stony meteorites of various radii and composition are presented. The relative neutron source strengths and neutron production-versus-depth profiles were determined by using calculated H-3 production rates. The absolute source strengths were normalized to that determined for the moon by Woolum et al. (1975). The energy spectrum of the source neutrons and the neutron transport calculations, which employed the ANISN computer code, were similar to those used for the moon by Lingenfelter et al. (1972). The production rates of the three radionuclides were determined as a function of depth in various spherical meteoroids from the calculated equilibrium neutron-flux distributions and from energy-dependent neutron-capture cross sections. Rates for producing these radionuclides by spallation reactions were also calculated.

  2. Proton linacs for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J. |

    1993-08-01

    Recent advances in the ability to deliver boron-containing drugs to brain tumors have generated interest in {approximately}4 MeV linacs as sources of epithermal neutrons for radiation therapy. In addition, fast neutron therapy facilities have been studying methods to moderate their beams to take advantage of the high cross section for epithermal neutrons on boron-10. This paper describes the technical issues involved in each approach and presents the motivation for undertaking such studies using the Fermilab linac. the problems which must be solved before therapy can begin are outlined. Status of preparatory work and results of preliminary measurements are presented.

  3. In Vivo Boron Uptake Determination for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Binello, Emanuela; Shortkroff, Sonya; Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    1999-06-06

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) has been proposed as a new application of the boron neutron capture reaction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. In BNCS, a boron compound is injected into the joint space, where it is taken up by the synovium. The joint is then irradiated with neutrons of a desired energy range, inducing the boron neutron capture reaction in boron-loaded cells. Boron uptake by the synovium is an important parameter in the assessment of the potential of BNCS and in the determination of whether to proceed to animal irradiations for the testing of therapeutic efficacy. We present results from an investigation of boron uptake in vivo by the synovium.

  4. Neutron sources for a neutron capture therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    Recent advances in the development of boron pharmaceuticals have reopened the possibility of using epithermal neutrons to treat brain tumors containing boron-10. This paper summarizes the approaches being used to generate the neutron sources and identifies specific areas where more research and development are needed.

  5. Measurement of internal conversion electrons from Gd neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandlakunta, P.; Cao, L. R.; Mulligan, P.

    2013-03-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) is a suitable material for neutron conversion because of its superior neutron absorption cross-section. However, the principal secondary particles that generate electron-hole pairs in a semiconductor detector after Gd neutron capture are low-energy internal conversion (IC) electrons. We measured the IC electron spectrum due to Gd neutron capture by using a thermal neutron beam and a digitizer-based multidetector spectroscopy. We also discussed the effective use of the IC electrons in the context of a twin-detector design and the associated gamma-ray rejection issues. Extensive simulations of the spectra of IC electrons and gamma rays agreed well with the experimental results; both types of results support the feasibility of the proposed n-γ separation method.

  6. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  7. An improved method for estimating the neutron background in measurements of neutron capture reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žugec, P.; Bosnar, D.; Colonna, N.; Gunsing, F.

    2016-08-01

    The relation between the neutron background in neutron capture measurements and the neutron sensitivity related to the experimental setup is examined. It is pointed out that a proper estimate of the neutron background may only be obtained by means of dedicated simulations taking into account the full framework of the neutron-induced reactions and their complete temporal evolution. No other presently available method seems to provide reliable results, in particular under the capture resonances. An improved neutron background estimation technique is proposed, the main improvement regarding the treatment of the neutron sensitivity, taking into account the temporal evolution of the neutron-induced reactions. The technique is complemented by an advanced data analysis procedure based on relativistic kinematics of neutron scattering. The analysis procedure allows for the calculation of the neutron background in capture measurements, without requiring the time-consuming simulations to be adapted to each particular sample. A suggestion is made on how to improve the neutron background estimates if neutron background simulations are not available.

  8. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, Marian

    2008-01-01

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for {sup 241}Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for {sup 243}Am for neutron energies between 35 eV and 200 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on {sup 242m}Am will be presented, where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, the Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in the center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,{gamma}) from (n,f) events. The first evidence of neutron capture on {sup 242m}Am in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.

  9. Neutron capture and neutron-induced fission experiments on americium isotopes with DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Bond, E. M.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Stoyer, M. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Haslett, R. J.; Henderson, R. A.

    2009-01-28

    Neutron capture cross section data on Am isotopes were measured using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The neutron capture cross section was determined for {sup 241}Am for neutron energies between thermal and 320 keV. Preliminary results were also obtained for {sup 243}Am for neutron energies between 10 eV and 250 keV. The results on concurrent neutron-induced fission and neutron-capture measurements on {sup 242m}Am will be presented where the fission events were actively triggered during the experiments. In these experiments, a Parallel-Plate Avalanche Counter (PPAC) detector that surrounds the target located in the center of the DANCE array was used as a fission-tagging detector to separate (n,{gamma}) events from (n,f) events. The first direct observation of neutron capture on {sup 242m}Am in the resonance region in between 2 and 9 eV of the neutron energy was obtained.

  10. Thermal-neutron capture for A=36-44

    SciTech Connect

    Chunmei, Z.; Firestone, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    The prompt gamma-ray data of thermal- neutron captures fornuclear mass number A=26-35 had been evaluated and published in "ATOMICDATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES, 26, 511 (1981)". Since that time the manyexperimental data of the thermal-neutron captures have been measured andpublished. The update of the evaluated prompt gamma-ray data is verynecessary for use in PGAA of high-resolution analytical prompt gamma-rayspectroscopy. Besides, the evaluation is also very needed in theEvaluated Nuclear Structure Data File, ENSDF, because there are no promptgamma-ray data in ENSDF. The levels, prompt gamma-rays and decay schemesof thermal-neutron captures fornuclides (26Mg, 27Al, 28Si, 29Si, 30Si,31P, 32S, 33S, 34S, and 35Cl) with nuclear mass number A=26-35 have beenevaluated on the basis of all experimental data. The normalizationfactors, from which absolute prompt gamma-ray intensity can be obtained,and necessary comments are given in the text. The ENSDF format has beenadopted in this evaluation. The physical check (intensity balance andenergy balance) of evaluated thermal-neutron capture data has been done.The evaluated data have been put into Evaluated Nuclear Structure DataFile, ENSDF. This evaluation may be considered as an update of the promptgamma-ray from thermal-neutron capture data tables as published in"ATOMIC DATA AND NUCLEAR DATA TABLES, 26, 511 (1981)".

  11. Theoretical and experimental physical methods of neutron-capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, G. I.

    2011-09-01

    This review is based to a substantial degree on our priority developments and research at the IR-8 reactor of the Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute. New theoretical and experimental methods of neutron-capture therapy are developed and applied in practice; these are: A general analytical and semi-empiric theory of neutron-capture therapy (NCT) based on classical neutron physics and its main sections (elementary theories of moderation, diffuse, reflection, and absorption of neutrons) rather than on methods of mathematical simulation. The theory is, first of all, intended for practical application by physicists, engineers, biologists, and physicians. This theory can be mastered by anyone with a higher education of almost any kind and minimal experience in operating a personal computer.

  12. Progress on the Europium Neutron-Capture Study using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Macri, R A; Parker, W; Wilk, P; Wu, C Y; Bredeweg, T A; Esch, E; Haight, R C; O'Donnell, J M; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R S; Schwantes, J M; Ullmann, J L; Vieira, D J; Wilhelmy, J B; Wouters, J M; Mitchell, G E; Sheets, S A; Becvar, F; Krticka, M

    2006-09-05

    The accurate measurement of neutron-capture cross sections of the Eu isotopes is important for many reasons including nuclear astrophysics and nuclear diagnostics. Neutron capture excitation functions of {sup 151,153}Eu targets were measured recently using a 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter array DANCE located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for E{sub n} = 0.1-100 keV. The progress on the data analysis efforts is given in the present paper. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distributions for the Eu targets and Be backing are significantly different. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution is found to be the same for different neutron energies for both {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu. The statistical simulation to model the {gamma}-ray decay cascade is summarized.

  13. Neutron capture cross section of {sup 241}Am

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Clement, R. R.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Kawano, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Parker, W. E.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.

    2008-09-15

    The neutron capture cross section of {sup 241}Am for incident neutrons from 0.02 eV to 320 keV has been measured with the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The thermal neutron capture cross section was determined to be 665{+-}33 b. Our result is in good agreement with other recent measurements. Resonance parameters for E{sub n}<12 eV were obtained using an R-matrix fit to the measured cross section. The results are compared with values from the ENDF/B-VII.0, Mughabghab, JENDL-3.3, and JEFF-3.1 evaluations. {gamma}{sub n} neutron widths for the first three resonances are systematically larger by 5-15% than the ENDF/B-VII.0 values. The resonance integral above 0.5 eV was determined to be 1553{+-}7 b. Cross sections in the resolved and unresolved energy regions above 12 eV were calculated using the Hauser-Feshbach theory incorporating the width-fluctuation correction of Moldauer. The calculated results agree well with the measured data, and the extracted averaged resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those for the resolved resonances.

  14. [Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Heikki; Kankaanranta, Leena; Tenhunen, Mikko; Saarilahti, Kauko

    2011-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy leads to a strong local radiotherapy effect. The efficacy of the method in cancer therapy requires sufficient accumulation of boron into and a fairly superficial location of the tumor. The efficacy and tolerability of this therapy has been investigated in Finland especially in locally recurring head and neck cancer. These tumors have responded favorably to boron neutron capture therapy and the treatment has been relatively well tolerated, although most cancers have recurred locally with few cases of durable complete remission.

  15. Thermal Neutron Capture Cross Section of {sup 22}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Belgya, T.; Uberseder, E.; Petrich, D.; Kaeppeler, F.

    2009-01-28

    The radiative thermal neutron capture cross section of the astrophysically important {sup 22}Ne nucleus has been measured at the guided cold neutron beam of the Budapest Research Reactor. High-pressure gas-bottles filled with mixtures of enriched {sup 22}Ne and CH{sub 4} were used. The cross section was determined by means of the comparator method, and an improved decay-scheme obtained in this work. The new value for the thermal neutron cross section is 52.7{+-}0.7 mb, 18% larger than the accepted value. The influence of the new cross section on the astrophysical reaction rate is under investigation.

  16. Neutron capture cross section standards for BNL 325, Fourth Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1981-01-01

    This report evaluates the experimental data and recommends values for the thermal neutron cross sections and resonance integrals for the neutron capture reactions: /sup 55/Mn(n,..gamma..), /sup 59/Co(n,..gamma..) and /sup 197/Au(n,..gamma..). The failure of lithium and boron as standards due to the natural variation of the absorption cross sections of these elements is discussed. The Westcott convention, which describes the neutron spectrum as a thermal Maxwellian distribution with an epithermal component, is also discussed.

  17. A capture-gated fast neutron detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Yang, Yi-Gang; Tai, Yang; Zhang, Zhi

    2016-07-01

    To address the problem of the shortage of neutron detectors used in radiation portal monitors (RPMs), caused by the 3He supply crisis, research on a cadmium-based capture-gated fast neutron detector is presented in this paper. The detector is composed of many 1 cm × 1 cm × 20 cm plastic scintillator cuboids covered by 0.1 mm thick film of cadmium. The detector uses cadmium to absorb thermal neutrons and produce capture γ-rays to indicate the detection of neutrons, and uses plastic scintillator to moderate neutrons and register γ-rays. This design removes the volume competing relationship in traditional 3He counter-based fast neutron detectors, which hinders enhancement of the neutron detection efficiency. Detection efficiency of 21.66% ± 1.22% has been achieved with a 40.4 cm × 40.4 cm × 20 cm overall detector volume. This detector can measure both neutrons and γ-rays simultaneously. A small detector (20.2 cm × 20.2 cm × 20 cm) demonstrated a 3.3 % false alarm rate for a 252Cf source with a neutron yield of 1841 n/s from 50 cm away within 15 s measurement time. It also demonstrated a very low (<0.06%) false alarm rate for a 3.21×105 Bq 137Cs source. This detector offers a potential single-detector replacement for both neutron and the γ-ray detectors in RPM systems. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175098, 11375095)

  18. Neutron Capture Reactions on Fe and Ni Isotopes for the Astrophysical s-process

    SciTech Connect

    Lederer, C.; Giubrone, G.; Massimi, C.; Žugec, P.; Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Käppeler, F.; Tain, J.L.; Altstadt, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bečvář, F.; and others

    2014-06-15

    Neutron capture cross sections in the keV neutron energy region are the key nuclear physics input to study the astrophysical slow neutron capture process. In the past years, a series of neutron capture cross section measurements has been performed at the neutron time-of-flight facility n{sub T}OF at CERN focussing on the Fe/Ni mass region. Recent results and future developments in the neutron time-of-flight technique are discussed.

  19. Neutron transfer reactions: Surrogates for neutron capture for basic and applied nuclear science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Adekola, Aderemi S; Allen, J.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Becker, J.; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Erikson, Luke; Gaddis, A. L.; Harlin, Christopher W; Hatarik, Robert; Howard, Joshua A; Jandel, M.; Johnson, Micah; Kapler, R.; Krolas, W.; Liang, J Felix; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Matei, Catalin; Matthews, C.; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Patterson, N. P.; Paulauskas, Stanley; Pelham, T.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Rogers, J.; Schmitt, Kyle; Shapira, Dan; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Smith, Michael Scott; Swan, T. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, Gemma L

    2009-04-01

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

  20. A fundamental study on hyper-thermal neutrons for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Y; Kobayashi, T; Kanda, K

    1994-12-01

    The utilization of hyper-thermal neutrons, which have an energy spectrum with a Maxwellian distribution at a higher temperature than room temperature (300 K), was studied in order to improve the thermal neutron flux distribution at depth in a living body for neutron capture therapy. Simulation calculations were carried out using a Monte Carlo code 'MCNP-V3' in order to investigate the characteristics of hyper-thermal neutrons, i.e. (i) depth dependence of the neutron energy spectrum, and (ii) depth distribution of the reaction rate in a water phantom for materials with 1/v neutron absorption. It is confirmed that hyper-thermal neutron irradiation can improve the thermal neutron flux distribution in the deeper areas in a living body compared with thermal neutron irradiation. When hyper-thermal neutrons with a 3000 K Maxwellian distribution are incident on a body, the reaction rates of 1/v materials such as 14N, 10B etc are about twice that observed for incident thermal neutrons at 300 K, at a depth of 5 cm. The limit of the treatable depth for tumours having 30 ppm 10B is expected to be about 1.5 cm greater by utilizing hyper-thermal neutrons at 3000 K compared with the incidence of thermal neutrons at 300 K.

  1. Neutron capture studies on /sup 189/Os

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, A.M.; Colvin, G.G.; Gelletly, W.; Warner, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    An extensive study of the level structure of /sup 189/Os has been carried out using the (n,..gamma..) and (n,e-) reactions. The use of the Average Resonance Capture technique ensures that the complete set of 1/2-, 3/2- states has been established up to 1500 keV in excitation energy and secondary ..gamma..-rays have been measured in singles and coincidence to build up the detailed level scheme. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Accelerator Based Neutron Beams for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2003-04-11

    The DOE-funded accelerator BNCT program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has resulted in the only operating accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam facility capable of generating significant dose rates in the world. With five separate beamlines and two different epithermal neutron beam assemblies installed, we are currently capable of treating patients with rheumatoid arthritis in less than 15 minutes (knee joints) or 4 minutes (finger joints) or irradiating patients with shallow brain tumors to a healthy tissue dose of 12.6 Gy in 3.6 hours. The accelerator, designed by Newton scientific Incorporated, is located in dedicated laboratory space that MIT renovated specifically for this project. The Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications consists of an accelerator room, a control room, a shielded radiation vault, and additional laboratory space nearby. In addition to the design, construction and characterization of the tandem electrostatic accelerator, this program also resulted in other significant accomplishments. Assemblies for generating epithermal neutron beams were designed, constructed and experimentally evaluated using mixed-field dosimetry techniques. Strategies for target construction and target cooling were implemented and tested. We demonstrated that the method of submerged jet impingement using water as the coolant is capable of handling power densities of up to 6 x 10(sup 7) W/m(sup 2) with heat transfer coefficients of 10(sup 6)W/m(sup 2)-K. Experiments with the liquid metal gallium demonstrated its superiority compared with water with little effect on the neutronic properties of the epithermal beam. Monoenergetic proton beams generated using the accelerator were used to evaluate proton RBE as a function of LET and demonstrated a maximum RBE at approximately 30-40 keV/um, a finding consistent with results published by other researchers. We also developed an experimental approach to biological intercomparison of epithermal beams and

  3. Thermal Neutron Capture onto the Stable Tungsten Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, A. M.; Firestone, R. B.; Sleaford, B. W.; Summers, N. C.; Revay, Zs.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Belgya, T.; Basunia, M. S.; Capote, R.; Choi, H.; Dashdorj, D.; Escher, J.; Krticka, M.; Nichols, A.

    2012-02-01

    Thermal neutron-capture measurements of the stable tungsten isotopes have been carried out using the guided thermal-neutron beam at the Budapest Reactor. Prompt singles spectra were collected and analyzed using the HYPERMET γ-ray analysis software package for the compound tungsten systems 183W, 184W, and 187W, prepared from isotopically-enriched samples of 182W, 183W, and 186W, respectively. These new data provide both confirmation and new insights into the decay schemes and structure of the tungsten isotopes reported in the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File based upon previous elemental analysis. The experimental data have also been compared to Monte Carlo simulations of γ-ray emission following the thermal neutron-capture process using the statistical-decay code DICEBOX. Together, the experimental cross sections and modeledfeeding contribution from the quasi continuum, have been used to determine the total radiative thermal neutron-capture cross sections for the tungsten isotopes and provide improved decay-scheme information for the structural- and neutron-data libraries.

  4. Direct Neutron Capture Calculations with Covariant Density Functional Theory Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Sheng; Peng, Jin-Peng; Smith, Michael S.; Arbanas, Goran; Kozub, Ray L.

    2014-09-01

    Predictions of direct neutron capture are of vital importance for simulations of nucleosynthesis in supernovae, merging neutron stars, and other astrophysical environments. We calculate the direct capture cross sections for E1 transitions using nuclear structure information from a covariant density functional theory as input for the FRESCO coupled-channels reaction code. We find good agreement of our predictions with experimental cross section data on the double closed-shell targets 16O, 48Ca, and 90Zr, and the exotic nucleus 36S. Extensions of the technique for unstable nuclei and for large-scale calculations will be discussed. Predictions of direct neutron capture are of vital importance for simulations of nucleosynthesis in supernovae, merging neutron stars, and other astrophysical environments. We calculate the direct capture cross sections for E1 transitions using nuclear structure information from a covariant density functional theory as input for the FRESCO coupled-channels reaction code. We find good agreement of our predictions with experimental cross section data on the double closed-shell targets 16O, 48Ca, and 90Zr, and the exotic nucleus 36S. Extensions of the technique for unstable nuclei and for large-scale calculations will be discussed. Supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics.

  5. Proceedings of the first international symposium on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Brownell, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    This meeting was arranged jointly by MIT and BNL in order to illuminate progress in the synthesis and targeting of boron compounds and to evaluate and document progress in radiobiological and dosimetric aspects of neutron capture therapy. It is hoped that this meeting will facilitate transfer of information between groups working in these fields, and encourage synergistic collaboration.

  6. Neutron-capture nucleosynthesis in the first stars

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Sneden, Christopher

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that metal-poor stars enhanced in carbon but containing low levels of neutron-capture elements may have been among the first to incorporate the nucleosynthesis products of the first generation of stars. We have observed 16 stars with enhanced carbon or nitrogen using the MIKE Spectrograph on the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory and the Tull Spectrograph on the Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We present radial velocities, stellar parameters, and detailed abundance patterns for these stars. Strontium, yttrium, zirconium, barium, europium, ytterbium, and other heavy elements are detected. In four stars, these heavy elements appear to have originated in some form of r-process nucleosynthesis. In one star, a partial s-process origin is possible. The origin of the heavy elements in the rest of the sample cannot be determined unambiguously. The presence of elements heavier than the iron group offers further evidence that zero-metallicity rapidly rotating massive stars and pair instability supernovae did not contribute substantial amounts of neutron-capture elements to the regions where the stars in our sample formed. If the carbon- or nitrogen-enhanced metal-poor stars with low levels of neutron-capture elements were enriched by products of zero-metallicity supernovae only, then the presence of these heavy elements indicates that at least one form of neutron-capture reaction operated in some of the first stars.

  7. Radiative neutron capture: Hauser Feshbach vs. statistical resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochman, D.; Goriely, S.; Koning, A. J.; Ferroukhi, H.

    2017-01-01

    The radiative neutron capture rates for isotopes of astrophysical interest are commonly calculated on the basis of the statistical Hauser Feshbach (HF) reaction model, leading to smooth and monotonically varying temperature-dependent Maxwellian-averaged cross sections (MACS). The HF approximation is known to be valid if the number of resonances in the compound system is relatively high. However, such a condition is hardly fulfilled for keV neutrons captured on light or exotic neutron-rich nuclei. For this reason, a different procedure is proposed here, based on the generation of statistical resonances. This novel technique, called the "High Fidelity Resonance" (HFR) method is shown to provide similar results as the HF approach for nuclei with a high level density but to deviate and be more realistic than HF predictions for light and neutron-rich nuclei or at relatively low sub-keV energies. The MACS derived with the HFR method are systematically compared with the traditional HF calculations for some 3300 neutron-rich nuclei and shown to give rise to significantly larger predictions with respect to the HF approach at energies of astrophysical relevance. For this reason, the HF approach should not be applied to light or neutron-rich nuclei. The Doppler broadening of the generated resonances is also studied and found to have a negligible impact on the calculated MACS.

  8. Advancements in Tumor Targeting Strategies for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Luderer, Micah John; de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-09-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a promising cancer therapy modality that utilizes the nuclear capture reaction of epithermal neutrons by boron-10 resulting in a localized nuclear fission reaction and subsequent cell death. Since cellular destruction is limited to approximately the diameter of a single cell, primarily only cells in the neutron field with significant boron accumulation will be damaged. However, the emergence of BNCT as a prominent therapy has in large part been hindered by a paucity of tumor selective boron containing agents. While L-boronophenylalanine and sodium borocaptate are the most commonly investigated clinical agents, new agents are desperately needed due to their suboptimal tumor selectivity. This review will highlight the various strategies to improve tumor boron delivery including: nucleoside and carbohydrate analogs, unnatural amino acids, porphyrins, antibody-dendrimer conjugates, cationic polymers, cell-membrane penetrating peptides, liposomes and nanoparticles.

  9. [Minimally invasive cytoselective radiation therapy using boron neutron capture reaction].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2010-12-01

    The cell-killing effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction of two essentially nontoxic species, boron-10 ((10)B) and thermal neutrons, whose destructive effect is well observed in boron-loaded tissues. High accumulation and selective delivery of boron into tumor tissue are the most important requirements to achieve efficient neutron capture therapy of cancers. This review focuses on liposomal boron delivery system (BDS) as a recent promising approach that meet these requirements for BNCT. BDS involves two strategies: (1) encapsulation of boron in the aqueous core of liposomes and (2) accumulation of boron in the liposomal bilayer. In this review, recent development of liposomal boron delivery system is summarized.

  10. Neutron capture measurements on unstable nuclei at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J. L.; Haight, R. C.; Fowler, M. M.; Miller, G. G.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    1999-06-10

    Although neutron capture by stable isotopes has been extensively measured, there are very few measurements on unstable isotopes. The intense neutron flux at the Manual Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE enables us to measure capture on targets with masses of about 1 mg over the energy range from 1 eV to 100 keV. These measurements are important not only for understanding the basic physics, but also for calculations of stellar nucleosynthesis and Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship. Preliminary measurements on {sup 169}Tm and {sup 171}Tm have been made with deuterated benzene detectors. A new detector array at the Lujan center and a new radioactive isotope separator will combine to give Los Alamos a unique capability for making these measurements.

  11. Misassigned neutron resonances of 142Nd and stellar neutron capture cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Matsuhashi, Taihei; Terada, Kazushi; Igashira, Masayuki; Mizumoto, Motoharu; Hirose, Kentaro; Kimura, Atsushi; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Hara, Kaoru Y.; Harada, Hideo; Hori, Jun-ichi; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kino, Koichi; Kitatani, Fumito; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Shoji; Toh, Yosuke

    2015-03-01

    Time-of-flight spectra of the neutron capture events of 142Nd were measured using a spallation neutron source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. The first six resonances of 142Nd reported in a previous work were not observed. The experimental results and cross-search of resonance energies in nuclear data libraries suggested that resonances of the impurity nuclide 141Pr have been mistakenly assigned as 142Nd in the previous experiment. To investigate the impact of the nonexistence of the resonances on the s -process nucleosynthesis model, the Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross sections with and without the misassigned resonances were compared.

  12. Moderated 252Cf neutron energy spectra in brain tissue and calculated boron neutron capture dose.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Mark J; Zamenhof, Robert G

    2004-11-01

    While there is significant clinical experience using both low- and high-dose (252)Cf brachytherapy, combination therapy using (10)B for neutron capture therapy-enhanced (252)Cf brachytherapy has not been performed. Monte Carlo calculations were performed in a brain phantom (ICRU 44 brain tissue) to evaluate the dose enhancement predicted for a range of (10)B concentrations over a range of distances from a clinical (252)Cf source. These results were compared to experimental measurements and calculations published in the literature. For (10)B concentrations neutron capture dose enhancement was small in comparison to the (252)Cf fast neutron dose.

  13. The radiation biology of boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Coderre, J A; Morris, G M

    1999-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a targeted radiation therapy that significantly increases the therapeutic ratio relative to conventional radiotherapeutic modalities. BNCT is a binary approach: A boron-10 (10B)-labeled compound is administered that delivers high concentrations of 10B to the target tumor relative to surrounding normal tissues. This is followed by irradiation with thermal neutrons or epithermal neutrons which become thermalized at depth in tissues. The short range (5-9 microm) of the alpha and 7Li particles released from the 10B(n,alpha)7Li neutron capture reaction make the microdistribution of 10B of critical importance in therapy. The radiation field in tissues during BNCT consists of a mixture of components with differing LET characteristics. Studies have been carried out in both normal and neoplastic tissues to characterize the relative biological effectiveness of each radiation component. The distribution patterns and radiobiological characteristics of the two 10B delivery agents in current clinical use, the amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) and the sulfhydryl borane (BSH), have been evaluated in a range of normal tissues and tumor types. Considered overall, BSH-mediated BNCT elicits proportionately less damage to normal tissue than does BNCT mediated with BPA. However, BPA exhibits superior in vivo tumor targeting and has proven much more effective in the treatment of brain tumors in rats. In terms of fractionation effects, boron neutron capture irradiation modalities are comparable with other high-LET radiation modalities such as fast-neutron therapy. There was no appreciable advantage in increasing the number of daily fractions of thermal neutrons beyond two with regard to sparing of normal tissue in the rat spinal cord model. The experimental studies described in this review constitute the radiobiological basis for the new BNCT clinical trials for glioblastoma at Brookhaven National Laboratory, at the Massachusetts Institute of

  14. Target studies for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.R.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1996-03-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron ``filter``, which has a deep ``window`` in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is reaccelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator -- target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production -- resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons -- while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current.

  15. Tissue composition effect on dose distribution in neutron brachytherapy/neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Farhood, Bagher; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Hamzian, Nima; Moghaddam, Homa Rezaei; Davenport, David

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to assess the effect of the compositions of various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials on dose distribution in neutron brachytherapy/neutron capture therapy. Background Neutron brachytherapy and neutron capture therapy are two common radiotherapy modalities. Materials and methods Dose distributions were calculated around a low dose rate 252Cf source located in a spherical phantom with radius of 20.0 cm using the MCNPX code for seven soft tissues and three tissue-equivalent materials. Relative total dose rate, relative neutron dose rate, total dose rate, and neutron dose rate were calculated for each material. These values were determined at various radial distances ranging from 0.3 to 15.0 cm from the source. Results Among the soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials studied, adipose tissue and plexiglass demonstrated the greatest differences for total dose rate compared to 9-component soft tissue. The difference in dose rate with respect to 9-component soft tissue varied with compositions of the materials and the radial distance from the source. Furthermore, the total dose rate in water was different from that in 9-component soft tissue. Conclusion Taking the same composition for various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent media can lead to error in treatment planning in neutron brachytherapy/neutron capture therapy. Since the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) recommends that the total dosimetric uncertainty in dose delivery in radiotherapy should be within ±5%, the compositions of various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials should be considered in dose calculation and treatment planning in neutron brachytherapy/neutron capture therapy. PMID:26900352

  16. Review of Livermore-Led Neutron Capture Studies Using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W; Sheets, S; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J; Becvar, F; Bredeweg, T; Clement, R; Couture, A; Esch, E; Haight, R; Jandel, M; Krticka, M; Mitchell, G; Macri, R; O'Donnell, J; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R; Schwantes, J; Ullmann, J; Vieira, D; Wouters, J; Wilk, P

    2007-05-11

    We have made neutron capture cross-section measurements using the white neutron source at the Los Alamos Science Center, the DANCE detector array (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) and targets important for basic science and stockpile stewardship. In this paper, we review results from (n,{gamma}) reactions on {sup 94,95}Mo, {sup 152,154,157,160,nat}Gd, {sup 151,153}Eu and {sup 242m}Am for neutron energies from < 1eV up to {approx} 20 keV. We measured details of the {gamma}-ray cascade following neutron capture, for comparison with results of statistical model simulations. We determined the neutron energy dependent (n,{gamma}) cross section and gained information about statistical decay properties, including the nuclear level density and the photon strength function. Because of the high granularity of the detector array, it is possible to look at gamma cascades with a specified number of transitions (a specific multiplicity). We simulated {gamma}-ray cascades using a combination of the DICEBOX/GEANT computer codes. In the case of the deformed nuclei, we found evidence of a scissors-mode resonance. For the Eu, we also determined the (n,{gamma}) cross sections. For the {sup 94,95}Mo, we focused on the spin and parity assignments of the resonances and the determination of the photon strength functions for the compound nuclei {sup 95,96}Mo. Future plans include measurements on actinide targets; our immediate interest is in {sup 242m}Am.

  17. Proposed experiment to measure {gamma}-rays from the thermal neutron capture of gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Takatomi; Ou, I.; Izumi, T.; Yamaguchi, R.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.

    2012-11-12

    Gadolinium-157 ({sup 157}Gd) has the largest thermal neutron capture cross section among any stable nuclei. The thermal neutron capture yields {gamma}-ray cascade with total energy of about 8 MeV. Because of these characteristics, Gd is applied for the recent neutrino detectors. Here, we propose an experiment to measure the multiplicity and the angular correlation of {gamma}-rays from the Gd neutron capture. With these information, we expect the improved identification of the Gd neutron capture.

  18. Research in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at MIT LABA

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Howard, W.B.; Song, H.; Blackburn, B.; Binello, E.

    1997-02-01

    A 4.1 MeV tandem electrostatic accelerator designed for research into Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has recently been installed in the MIT Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (LABA). This accelerator uses a very high current switch mode high voltage power supply in conjunction with a multi-cusp negative ion source to supply the multimilliampere current required for clinical BNCT applications. A number of individual research projects aimed at evaluating the potential of this accelerator design as a hospital-based neutron source for radiation therapy of both tumors and rheumatoid arthritis are described here. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Neutron radiative capture methods for surface elemental analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trombka, J.I.; Senftle, F.; Schmadebeck, R.

    1970-01-01

    Both an accelerator and a 252Cf neutron source have been used to induce characteristic gamma radiation from extended soil samples. To demonstrate the method, measurements of the neutron-induced radiative capture and activation gamma rays have been made with both Ge(Li) and NaI(Tl) detectors, Because of the possible application to space flight geochemical analysis, it is believed that NaI(Tl) detectors must be used. Analytical procedures have been developed to obtain both qualitative and semiquantitative results from an interpretation of the measured NaI(Tl) pulse-height spectrum. Experiment results and the analytic procedure are presented. ?? 1970.

  20. Neutron capture cross section of {sup 102}Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, C.L.; Krane, K.S.

    2005-05-01

    The cross sections for radiative neutron capture by {sup 102}Pd have been deduced from a measurement of the {gamma} rays emitted by 17.0-d {sup 103}Pd. The thermal cross section has been determined to be {sigma}=1.82{+-}0.20 b, and the effective resonance integral is I=23{+-}4 b. We also report thermal and resonance capture cross sections for {sup 108}Pd and note possible inconsistencies with the presently accepted values of the {sup 110}Pd cross sections.

  1. Evaluation of absorbed dose in Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullaeva, Gayane; Djuraeva, Gulnara; Kim, Andrey; Koblik, Yuriy; Kulabdullaev, Gairatulla; Rakhmonov, Turdimukhammad; Saytjanov, Shavkat

    2015-02-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy (GdNCT) is used for treatment of radioresistant malignant tumors. The absorbed dose in GdNCT can be divided into four primary dose components: thermal neutron, fast neutron, photon and natural gadolinium doses. The most significant is the dose created by natural gadolinium. The amount of gadolinium at the irradiated region is changeable and depends on the gadolinium delivery agent and on the structure of the location where the agent is injected. To de- fine the time dependence of the gadolinium concentration ρ(t) in the irradiated region the pharmacokinetics of gadolinium delivery agent (Magnevist) was studied at intratumoral injection in mice and intramuscular injection in rats. A polynomial approximation was applied to the experimental data and the influence of ρ(t) on the relative change of the absorbed dose of gadolinium was studied.

  2. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    MIYATAKE, Shin-Ichi; KAWABATA, Shinji; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; KUROIWA, Toshihiko; SUZUKI, Minoru; KONDO, Natsuko; ONO, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  3. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kawabata, Shinji; Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kondo, Natsuko; Ono, Koji

    2016-07-15

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting.

  4. Strategic planning workshop on research needs for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Feinendegen, L E

    1997-05-01

    The workshop 'Research Needs for Neutron Capture Therapy', held in Williamsburg, VA, May 9-12. 1995 addressed key issues and questions related to optimization of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), in general, and to the possibility of success of the present BNCT trials at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in particular. Both trials use nuclear fission reactors as neutron sources for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme (BNL) and of deep seated melanoma (MIT). Presentations and discussions focussed on optimal boron-labeled compounds, mainly for brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme, and the best mode of compound delivery to the tumor. Also, optimizing neutron irradiation with dose delivery to the tumor cells and the issues of dosimetry of BNCT especially in the brain were discussed. Planning of treatment and of follow-up of patients, coordination of BNCT at various treatment sites, and the potential of delivery BNCT to various types of cancer with an appropriately tailored protocol were additional issues. The need for multicentric interdisciplinary cooperation among the different medical specialties was highlighted.

  5. Stellar neutron capture cross sections of the Lu isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wisshak, K.; Voss, F.; Kaeppeler, F.; Kazakov, L.

    2006-01-15

    The neutron capture cross sections of {sup 175}Lu and {sup 176}Lu have been measured in the energy range 3-225 keV at the Karlsruhe 3.7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. Neutrons were produced via the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction by bombarding metallic Li targets with a pulsed proton beam, and capture events were registered with the Karlsruhe 4{pi} barium fluoride detector. The cross sections were determined relative to the gold standard using isotopically enriched as well as natural lutetium oxide samples. Overall uncertainties of {approx}1% could be achieved in the final cross section ratios to the gold standard, about a factor of 5 smaller than in previous works. Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross sections were calculated for thermal energies between kT = 8 and 100 keV. These values are systematically larger by {approx}7% than those reported in recent evaluations. These results are of crucial importance for the assessment of the s-process branchings at A 175/176.

  6. Stellar neutron capture cross sections of the tin isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wisshak, K.; Voss, F.; Theis, C.; Kaeppeler, F.; Guber, K.; Kazakov, L.; Kornilov, N.; Reffo, G.

    1996-09-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of {sup 114}Sn, {sup 115}Sn, {sup 116}Sn, {sup 117}Sn, {sup 118}Sn, and {sup 120}Sn were measured in the energy range from 3 to 225 keV at the Karlsruhe 3.75 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. Neutrons were produced via the {sup 7}Li({ital p},{ital n}){sup 7}Be reaction using a pulsed proton beam. Capture events were registered with the Karlsruhe 4{pi} barium fluoride detector. The experiment was complicated by the small ({ital n},{gamma}) cross sections of the proton magic tin isotopes and by the comparably low enrichment of the rare isotopes {sup 114}Sn and {sup 115}Sn. Despite significant corrections for capture of scattered neutrons and for isotopic impurities, the high efficiency and the spectroscopic quality of the BaF{sub 2} detector allowed the determination of the cross-section ratios with overall uncertainties of 1{endash}2{percent}, five times smaller compared to existing data. Based on these results, Maxwellian averaged ({ital n},{gamma}) cross sections were calculated for thermal energies between {ital kT}=10 and 100 keV. These data are used for a discussion of the solar tin abundance and for an improved determination of the isotopic {ital s}- and {ital r}-process components. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  7. Modern alchemy: Fred Hoyle and element building by neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbidge, E. Margaret

    Fred Hoyle's fundamental work on building the chemical elements by nuclear processes in stars at various stages in their lives began with the building of elements around iron in the very dense hot interiors of stars. Later, in the paper by Burbidge, Burbidge, Fowler and Hoyle, we four showed that Hoyle's "equilibrium process" is one of eight processes required to make all of the isotopes of all the elements detected in the Sun and stars. Neutron capture reactions, which Fred had not considered in his epochal 1946 paper, but for which experimental data were just becoming available in 1957, are very important, in addition to the energy-generating reactions involving hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen, for building all of the elements. They are now providing clues to the late stages of stellar evolution and the earliest history of our Galaxy. I describe here our earliest observational work on neutron capture processes in evolved stars, some new work on stars showing the results of the neutron capture reactions, and data relating to processes ending in the production of lead, and I discuss where this fits into the history of stars in our own Galaxy.

  8. Neutron capture and (n,2n) measurements on 241Am

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, D; Jandel, M; Bredeweg, T; Bond, E; Clement, R; Couture, A; Haight, R; O'Donnell, J; Reifarth, R; Ullmann, J; Wilhelmy, J; Wouters, J; Tonchev, A; Hutcheson, A; Angell, C; Crowell, A; Fallin, B; Hammond, S; Howell, C; Karowowski, H; Kelley, J; Pedroni, R; Tornow, W; Macri, R; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J; Dashdorj, D; Stoyer, M; Wu, C

    2007-07-18

    We report on a set of neutron-induced reaction measurements on {sup 241}Am which are important for nuclear forensics and advanced nuclear reactor design. Neutron capture measurements have been performed on the DANCE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering CEnter (LANSCE). In general, good agreement is found with the most recent data evaluations up to an incident neutron energy of {approx} 300 keV where background limits the measurement. Using mono-energetic neutrons produced in the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction at Triangle University Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL), we have measured the {sup 241}Am(n,2n) excitation function from threshold (6.7 MeV) to 14.5 MeV using the activation method. Good agreement is found with previous measurements, with the exception of the three data points reported by Perdikakis et al. around 11 MeV, where we obtain a much lower cross section that is more consistent with theoretical estimates.

  9. Thermal neutron capture cross sections of the potassium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.; Krtička, M.; Révay, Zs.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Belgya, T.

    2013-02-01

    Precise thermal neutron capture γ-ray cross sections σγ for 39,40,41K were measured on a natural potassium target with the guided neutron beam at the Budapest Reactor. The cross sections were internally standardized using a stoichiometric KCl target with well-known 35Cl(n,γ) γ-ray cross sections [Révay and Molnár, Radiochimica ActaRAACAP0033-823010.1524/ract.91.6.361.20027 91, 361 (2003); Molnár, Révay, and Belgya, Nucl. Instrum. Meth. Phys. Res. BNIMBEU0168-583X10.1016/S0168-583X(03)01529-5 213, 32 (2004)]. These data were combined with γ-ray intensities from von Egidy [von Egidy, Daniel, Hungerford, Schmidt, Lieb, Krusche, Kerr, Barreau, Borner, Brissot , J. Phys. G. Nucl. Phys.JPHGBM0305-461610.1088/0305-4616/10/2/013 10, 221 (1984)] and Krusche [Krusche, Lieb, Ziegler, Daniel, von Egidy, Rascher, Barreau, Borner, and Warner, Nucl. Phys. ANUPABL0375-947410.1016/0375-9474(84)90506-2 417, 231 (1984); Krusche, Winter, Lieb, Hungerford, Schmidt, von Egidy, Scheerer, Kerr, and Borner, Nucl. Phys. ANUPABL0375-947410.1016/0375-9474(85)90429-4 439, 219 (1985)] to generate nearly complete capture γ-ray level schemes. Total radiative neutron cross sections were deduced from the total γ-ray cross section feeding the ground state, σ0=Σσγ(GS) after correction for unobserved statistical γ-ray feeding from levels near the neutron capture energy. The corrections were performed with Monte Carlo simulations of the potassium thermal neutron capture decay schemes using the computer code dicebox where the simulated populations of low-lying levels are normalized to the measured cross section depopulating those levels. Comparisons of the simulated and experimental level feeding intensities have led to proposed new spins and parities for selected levels in the potassium isotopes where direct reactions are not a significant contribution. We determined the total radiative neutron cross sections σ0(39K)=2.28±0.04 b, σ0(40K)=90±7 b, and σ0(41K)=1.62±0.03 b from the

  10. Neutron Capture Measurements on Tl-isotopes at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Esch, E.-I.; Jandel, M.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.

    2006-10-01

    The thallium isotopes play an important role in the s-process nucleosynthesis at the s-process endpoint. Furthermore, ^204Tl is one of few branch point isotopes in the endpoint region. The understanding of branch point isotopes provides modeling constraints on the temperatures during which the process takes place. The production of s-only ^204Pb is controlled entirely by ^204Tl. Measurements of the capture cross-sections of the stable Tl isotopes have recently been made using the DANCE 4-π array at LANSCE. This provides needed resonance information in the region as well as preparing the way for measurements of as yet unmeasured capture cross-section of the unstable ^204Tl. The neutron capture data for the stable isotopes as well as the plan for future measurements will be discussed.

  11. Design of a boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhonglu

    2006-12-01

    The use of boron neutron capture to boost tumor dose in fast neutron therapy has been investigated at several fast neutron therapy centers worldwide. This treatment is termed boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy (BNCEFNT). It is a combination of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and fast neutron therapy (FNT). It is believed that BNCEFNT may be useful in the treatment of some radioresistant brain tumors, such as glioblastoma multiform (GBM). A boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy assembly has been designed for the Fermilab Neutron Therapy Facility (NTF). This assembly uses a tungsten filter and collimator near the patient's head, with a graphite reflector surrounding the head to significantly increase the dose due to boron neutron capture reactions. The assembly was designed using Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP version 5 for a standard 20x20 cm2 treatment beam. The calculated boron dose enhancement at 5.7-cm depth in a water-filled head phantom in the assembly with a 5x5 cm2 collimation was 21.9% per 100-ppm 10B for a 5.0-cm tungsten filter and 29.8% for a 8.5-cm tungsten filter. The corresponding dose rate for the 5.0-cm and 8.5-cm thick filters were 0.221 and 0.127 Gy/min, respectively; about 48.5% and 27.9% of the dose rate of the standard 10x10 cm2 fast neutron treatment beam. To validate the design calculations, a simplified BNCEFNT assembly was built using four lead bricks to form a 5x5 cm2 collimator. Five 1.0-cm thick 20x20 cm2 tungsten plates were used to obtain different filter thicknesses and graphite bricks/blocks were used to form a reflector. Measurements of the dose enhancement of the simplified assembly in a water-filled head phantom were performed using a pair of tissue-equivalent ion chambers. One of the ion chambers is loaded with 1000-ppm natural boron (184-ppm 10B) to measure dose due to boron neutron capture. The measured

  12. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, Woo Y.; Jones, James L.; Nigg, David W.; Harker, Yale D.

    1999-01-01

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0.times.10.sup.9 neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use.

  13. Accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and method

    DOEpatents

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L.; Nigg, D.W.; Harker, Y.D.

    1999-05-11

    A source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) comprises a body of photoneutron emitter that includes heavy water and is closely surrounded in heat-imparting relationship by target material; one or more electron linear accelerators for supplying electron radiation having energy of substantially 2 to 10 MeV and for impinging such radiation on the target material, whereby photoneutrons are produced and heat is absorbed from the target material by the body of photoneutron emitter. The heavy water is circulated through a cooling arrangement to remove heat. A tank, desirably cylindrical or spherical, contains the heavy water, and a desired number of the electron accelerators circumferentially surround the tank and the target material as preferably made up of thin plates of metallic tungsten. Neutrons generated within the tank are passed through a surrounding region containing neutron filtering and moderating materials and through neutron delimiting structure to produce a beam or beams of epithermal neutrons normally having a minimum flux intensity level of 1.0{times}10{sup 9} neutrons per square centimeter per second. Such beam or beams of epithermal neutrons are passed through gamma ray attenuating material to provide the required epithermal neutrons for BNCT use. 3 figs.

  14. Towards epithermal Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.J.

    1994-12-31

    Progress in the treatment of local disseminating cancer such as high grade brain tumours is poor, and the ability to kill individual cancer cells in the midst of normal cells has not been achieved. Binary therapies hold the most promise of this, and of these Boron Neutron Capture Therapy is the most advanced. Epithermal neutron beams are essential for outpatient treatment of high grade brain tumours and these are now installed and being characterised in Europe and the USA, and are at the design stage in Australia. These beams would allow the bilateral irradiation of the entire brain, and as such are ideally suited for the prophylactic therapy of subclinical metastases. When coupled with appropriate cancer affined boron compounds, therapeutic ratios of 2-3 should be achieved. At present the only source of an epithermal neutron beam is a nuclear reactor. The Euratom reactor at Petten and the Brookhaven Medical Reactor have been retrofitted with filters to produce an epithermal neutron beam. These beams have been characterised and used in dose escalation studies with dogs to study normal tissue tolerance using borocaptate (BSH). Another beam is available at the MIT medical research reactor. Clinical trials at Petten for glioblastoma with BSH and at MIT using boronophenylalanine for melanoma metastases to the extremities are expected to commence this year. The state of the art of reactor based BNCT is reviewed and the potential for a major change in the prognosis of local control of disseminating cancer is explored.

  15. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  16. A Sealed-Accelerator-Tube Neutron Generator for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Application

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.-N.; Leung, K.N.; Lee, Y.; Verbeke, J.M.; Vurjic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-06-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator applications. By using a 2.5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source and a computer designed 100 keV accelerator column, peak extractable hydrogen current exceeding 1 A from a 3-mm-diameter aperture, together with H{sup +} yields over 94% have been achieved. These experimental findings together with recent moderator design will enable one to develop compact 14 MeV neutron generators based on the D-T fusion reaction. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without pumping. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, it is estimated that a treatment time of {approx} 45 minutes is needed for boron neutron capture therapy.

  17. Improved monitoring system of neutron flux during boron-neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harasawa, S.; Nakamoto, A.; Hayakawa, Y.; Egawa, J.

    1981-10-01

    Continuous and simultaneous monitoring of neutron flux in the course of a boron-neutron capture operation on a brain tumor has been achieved using a new monitoring system. A silicon surface barrier diode mounted with /sup 6/LiF instead of the previously reported borax is used to sense neutrons. The pulse heights of /sup 3/H and ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 6/Li(n, ..cap alpha..)/sup 2/H reaction are sufficiently high and well separated from noises due to ..gamma.. rays. The effect of pulse-height reduction due to the radiation damage of the diode thus becomes smaller, permitting continuous monitoring. The relative error of the monitoring is within 2% over 5 hr for a neutron-flux density of 2 x 10/sup 9/ n/cm/sup 2/ sec.

  18. Production of Molybdenum-99 using Neutron Capture Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, James J; Greenwood, Lawrence R; Soderquist, Chuck Z; Wittman, Richard S; Pierson, Bruce D; Burns, Kimberly A; Lavender, Curt A; Painter, Chad L; Love, Edward F; Wall, Donald E

    2011-01-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), operated by Battelle, has identified a reference process for the production of molybdenum-99 (99Mo) for use in a chromatographic generator to separate the daughter product, technetium-99m (99mTc). The reference process uses the neutron capture reaction of natural or enriched molybdenum oxide via the reaction 98Mo(n,γ)99Mo. The irradiated molybdenum is dissolved in an alkaline solution, whereby the molybdenum, dissolved as the molybdate anion, is loaded on a proprietary ion exchange material in the chromatographic generator. The approach of this investigation is to provide a systematic collection of technologies to make the neutron capture method for Mo-99 production economically viable. This approach would result in the development of a technetium Tc99m generator and a new type of target. The target is comprised of molybdenum, either natural or enriched, and is tailored to the design of currently operating U.S. research reactors. The systematic collection of technologies requires evaluation of new metallurgical methods to produce the target, evaluation of target geometries tailored to research reactors, and chemical methods to dissolve the irradiated target materials for use in a chromatographic generator. A Technical specification for testing the target and neutron capture method in a research reactor is also required. This report includes identification of research and demonstration activities needed to enable deployment of neutron capture production method, including irradiations of prototypic targets, chemical processing of irradiated targets, and loading and extraction tests of Mo99 and Tc99m on the sorbent material in a prototypic generator design. The prototypical generator design is based on the proprietary method and systems for isotope product generation. The proprietary methods and systems described in this report are clearly delineated with footnotes. Ultimately, the Tc-99m generator solution provided by

  19. Scissors Mode of 162Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baramsai, B.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-05-01

    Multi-step cascade γ-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions, (n,γ) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (γ,γ') reactions.

  20. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): A radiation oncology perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID )

    1994-03-30

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) offers considerable promise in the search for the ideal cancer therapy, a therapy which selectively and maximally damages malignant cells while sparing normal tissue. This bimodal treatment modality selectivity concentrates a boron compound in malignant cells, and then [open quotes]activates[close quotes] this compound with slow neutrons resulting in a highly lethal event within the cancer cell. This article reviews this treatment modality from a radiation oncology, biology, and physics perspective. The remainder of the articles in this special issue provide a survey of the current [open quotes]state-of-the-art[close quotes] in this rapidly expanding field, including information with regard to boron compounds and their localization. 118 refs., 3 figs.

  1. The heavy element yields of neutron capture nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1982-01-01

    Consideration of the contribution made to the abundances of the heavy element isotopes by the S- and R-processes of nucleosynthesis has led to the determination that the previous assumption concerning the exclusive alignment of isobars to one or the other of these processes is probably in error. If the relatively small odd and even mass number abundance fluctuations characterizing R-process abundances are always the case, as assumed by this study, S-process contributions to the abundances of R-process isobars are substantial, consistent with transient flashing episodes in the S-process neutron production processes. A smooth and monotonically-decreasing curve of the abundance of the S-process yields times the neutron capture cross-section versus mass number is therefore the primary tool for the separation of the abundances due to the two processes.

  2. Scissors Mode of 162 Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    DOE PAGES

    Baramsai, B.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; ...

    2015-05-28

    Multi-step cascade γ-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions,more » (n,γ) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (γ,γ’) reactions.« less

  3. Large animal normal tissue tolerance with boron neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, P.R.; Swartz, C.D. ); Kraft, S.L. ); Briebenow, M.L. ); DeHaan, C.E.

    1994-03-30

    Normal tissue tolerance of boron neutron capture irradiation using borocaptate sodium (NA[sub 2]B[sub 12]H[sub 11]SH) in an epithermal neutron beam was studied. Large retriever-type dogs were used and the irradiations were performed by single dose, 5 [times] 10 dorsal portal. Fourteen dogs were irradiated with the epithermal neutron beam alone and 35 dogs were irradiated following intravenous administration of borocaptate sodium. Total body irradiation effect could be seen from the decreased leukocytes and platelets following irradiation. Most values returned to normal within 40 days postirradiation. Severe dermal necrosis occurred in animals given 15 Gy epithermal neutrons alone and in animals irradiated to a total peak physical dose greater than 64 Gy in animals following borocaptate sodium infusion. Lethal brain necrosis was seen in animals receiving between 27 and 39 Gy. Lethal brain necrosis occurred at 22-36 weeks postirradiation. A total peak physical dose of approximately 27 Gy and blood-boron concentrations of 25-50 ppm resulted in abnormal magnetic resonance imaging results in 6 months postexamination. Seven of eight of these animals remained normal and the lesions were not detected at the 12-month postirradiation examination. The bimodal therapy presents a complex challenge in attempting to achieve dose response assays. The resultant total radiation dose is a composite of low and high LET components. The short track length of the boron fission fragments and the geometric effect of the vessels causes much of the intravascular dose to miss the presumed critical target of the endothelial cells. The results indicate a large dose-sparing effect from the boron capture reactions within the blood. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Neutron Tube Design Study for Boron Neutron Capture TherapyApplication

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, J.M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M.D.; Wu, L.K.; Zahir, N.

    1998-01-04

    Radio-frequency (RF) driven ion sources are being developed in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for sealed-accelerator-tube neutron generator application. By using a 5-cm-diameter RF-driven multicusp source H{sup +} yields over 95% have been achieved. These experimental findings will enable one to develop compact neutron generators based on the D-D or D-T fusion reactions. In this new neutron generator, the ion source, the accelerator and the target are all housed in a sealed metal container without external pumping. Recent moderator design simulation studies have shown that 14 MeV neutrons could be moderated to therapeutically useful energy ranges for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The dose near the center of the brain with optimized moderators is about 65% higher than the dose obtained from a typical neutron spectrum produced by the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), and is comparable to the dose obtained by other accelerator-based neutron sources. With a 120 keV and 1 A deuteron beam, a treatment time of {approx}35 minutes is estimated for BNCT.

  5. Gyrotron-driven high current ECR ion source for boron-neutron capture therapy neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Sidorov, A.; Maslennikova, A.; Volovecky, A.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O.

    2014-12-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a perspective treatment method for radiation resistant tumors. Unfortunately its development is strongly held back by a several physical and medical problems. Neutron sources for BNCT currently are limited to nuclear reactors and accelerators. For wide spread of BNCT investigations more compact and cheap neutron source would be much more preferable. In present paper an approach for compact D-D neutron generator creation based on a high current ECR ion source is suggested. Results on dense proton beams production are presented. A possibility of ion beams formation with current density up to 600 mA/cm2 is demonstrated. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron target bombarded by such deuteron beams would theoretically yield a neutron flux density up to 6·1010 cm-2/s. Thus, neutron generator based on a high-current deuteron ECR source with a powerful plasma heating by gyrotron radiation could fulfill the BNCT requirements significantly lower price, smaller size and ease of operation in comparison with existing reactors and accelerators.

  6. Radiative neutron capture as a counting technique at pulsed spallation neutron sources: a review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Schooneveld, E M; Pietropaolo, A; Andreani, C; Perelli Cippo, E; Rhodes, N J; Senesi, R; Tardocchi, M; Gorini, G

    2016-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are attracting an increasing interest from scientists in various research fields, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and archaeometry. The success of these neutron scattering applications is stimulated by the development of higher performance instrumentation. The development of new techniques and concepts, including radiative capture based neutron detection, is therefore a key issue to be addressed. Radiative capture based neutron detectors utilize the emission of prompt gamma rays after neutron absorption in a suitable isotope and the detection of those gammas by a photon counter. They can be used as simple counters in the thermal region and (simultaneously) as energy selector and counters for neutrons in the eV energy region. Several years of extensive development have made eV neutron spectrometers operating in the so-called resonance detector spectrometer (RDS) configuration outperform their conventional counterparts. In fact, the VESUVIO spectrometer, a flagship instrument at ISIS serving a continuous user programme for eV inelastic neutron spectroscopy measurements, is operating in the RDS configuration since 2007. In this review, we discuss the physical mechanism underlying the RDS configuration and the development of associated instrumentation. A few successful neutron scattering experiments that utilize the radiative capture counting techniques will be presented together with the potential of this technique for thermal neutron diffraction measurements. We also outline possible improvements and future perspectives for radiative capture based neutron detectors in neutron scattering application at pulsed neutron sources.

  7. Radiative neutron capture as a counting technique at pulsed spallation neutron sources: a review of current progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schooneveld, E. M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Rhodes, N. J.; Senesi, R.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-09-01

    Neutron scattering techniques are attracting an increasing interest from scientists in various research fields, ranging from physics and chemistry to biology and archaeometry. The success of these neutron scattering applications is stimulated by the development of higher performance instrumentation. The development of new techniques and concepts, including radiative capture based neutron detection, is therefore a key issue to be addressed. Radiative capture based neutron detectors utilize the emission of prompt gamma rays after neutron absorption in a suitable isotope and the detection of those gammas by a photon counter. They can be used as simple counters in the thermal region and (simultaneously) as energy selector and counters for neutrons in the eV energy region. Several years of extensive development have made eV neutron spectrometers operating in the so-called resonance detector spectrometer (RDS) configuration outperform their conventional counterparts. In fact, the VESUVIO spectrometer, a flagship instrument at ISIS serving a continuous user programme for eV inelastic neutron spectroscopy measurements, is operating in the RDS configuration since 2007. In this review, we discuss the physical mechanism underlying the RDS configuration and the development of associated instrumentation. A few successful neutron scattering experiments that utilize the radiative capture counting techniques will be presented together with the potential of this technique for thermal neutron diffraction measurements. We also outline possible improvements and future perspectives for radiative capture based neutron detectors in neutron scattering application at pulsed neutron sources.

  8. Stellar neutron capture cross sections of the Ba isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, F.; Wisshak, K.; Guber, K.; Käppeler, F.; Reffo, G.

    1994-11-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of 134Ba, 135Ba, 136Ba, and 137Ba were measured in the energy range from 5 to 225 keV at the Karlsruhe 3.75 MV Van de Graaff accelerator. Neutrons were produced via the 7Li (p,n)7 Be reaction by bombarding metallic Li targets with a pulsed proton beam. Capture events were registered with the Karlsruhe 4π barium fluoride detector. The cross section ratios were determined with an overall uncertainty of ~3%, an improvement by factors of 5 to 8 compared to existing data. Severe discrepancies were found with respect to previous results. As a new possibility in time of flight experiments, isomeric cross section ratios could be determined for 135Ba, 136Ba, and 137Ba. Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross sections were calculated for thermal energies between kT=10 keV and 100 keV. These stellar cross sections were used in an s-process analysis. For the s-only isotopes 134Ba and 136Ba the Ns<σ> ratio was determined to 0.875+/-0.025. Hence, a significant branching of the s-process path at 134Cs can be claimed for the first time, in contrast to predictions from the classical approach. This branching yields information on the s-process temperature, indicating values around T8=2. The new cross sections are also important for the interpretation of barium isotopic anomalies, which were recently discovered in SiC grains of carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Together with the results from previous experiments on tellurium and samarium, a general improvement of the Ns<σ> systematics in the mass range A=120-150 is achieved. This yields a more reliable separation of s- and r-process contributions for comparison with stellar observations, but reveals a 20% discrepancy with respect to the solar barium abundance.

  9. Is (d,p{gamma}) a surrogate for neutron capture?

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R.; Cizewski, J. A.; O'Malley, P. D.; Bernstein, L. A.; Burke, J. T.; Lesher, S. R.; Gibelin, J. D.; Phair, L. W.; Swan, T.

    2008-04-17

    To benchmark the validity of using the (d,p{gamma}) reaction as a surrogate for (n,{gamma}), the {sup 171,173}Yb(d,p{gamma}) reactions were measured and compared with the neutron capture cross sections measured by Wisshak et al. The (d,p{gamma}) ratios were measured using an 18.5 MeV deuteron beam from the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Preliminary results comparing the surrogate ratios with the known (n,{gamma}) cross sections are discussed.

  10. Modification of the University of Washington Neutron Radiotherapy Facility for optimization of neutron capture enhanced fast-neutron therapy.

    PubMed

    Nigg, D W; Wemple, C A; Risler, R; Hartwell, J K; Harker, Y D; Laramore, G E

    2000-02-01

    A modified neutron production target assembly has been developed to provide improved performance of the proton-cyclotron-based neutron radiotherapy facility at the University of Washington for applications involving neutron capture enhanced fast-neutron therapy. The new target produces a neutron beam that yields essentially the same fast-neutron physical depth-dose distribution as is produced by the current UW clinical system, but that also has an increased fraction of BNCT enhancement relative to the total therapeutic dose. The modified target is composed of a 5-millimeter layer of beryllium, followed by a 2.5-millimeter layer of tungsten, with a water-cooled copper backing. Measurements of the free-field neutron spectrum of the beam produced by the new target were performed using activation foils with a direct spectral unfolding technique. Water phantom measurements were performed using a tissue-equivalent ion chamber to characterize the fast-neutron depth-dose curve and sodium activation in soda-lime glass beads to characterize the thermal-neutron flux (and thus the expected neutron capture dose enhancement) as a function of depth. The results of the various measurements were quite consistent with expectations based on the design calculations for the modified target. The spectrum of the neutron beam produced by the new target features an enhanced low-energy flux component relative to the spectrum of the beam produced by the standard UW target. However, it has essentially the same high-energy neutron flux, with a reduced flux component in the mid-range of the energy spectrum. As a result, the measured physical depth-dose curve in a large water phantom has the same shape compared to the case of the standard UW clinical beam, but approximately twice the level of BNCT enhancement per unit background neutron dose at depths of clinical interest. In-vivo clinical testing of BNCT-enhanced fast-neutron therapy for canine lung tumors using the new beam was recently

  11. Accelerator-based epithermal neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blue, Thomas E; Yanch, Jacquelyn C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of low-energy light ion accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs) for the treatment of brain tumors through an intact scalp and skull using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A major advantage of an ABNS for BNCT over reactor-based neutron sources is the potential for siting within a hospital. Consequently, light-ion accelerators that are injectors to larger machines in high-energy physics facilities are not considered. An ABNS for BNCT is composed of: (1) the accelerator hardware for producing a high current charged particle beam, (2) an appropriate neutron-producing target and target heat removal system (HRS), and (3) a moderator/reflector assembly to render the flux energy spectrum of neutrons produced in the target suitable for patient irradiation. As a consequence of the efforts of researchers throughout the world, progress has been made on the design, manufacture, and testing of these three major components. Although an ABNS facility has not yet been built that has optimally assembled these three components, the feasibility of clinically useful ABNSs has been clearly established. Both electrostatic and radio frequency linear accelerators of reasonable cost (approximately 1.5 M dollars) appear to be capable of producing charged particle beams, with combinations of accelerated particle energy (a few MeV) and beam currents (approximately 10 mA) that are suitable for a hospital-based ABNS for BNCT. The specific accelerator performance requirements depend upon the charged particle reaction by which neutrons are produced in the target and the clinical requirements for neutron field quality and intensity. The accelerator performance requirements are more demanding for beryllium than for lithium as a target. However, beryllium targets are more easily cooled. The accelerator performance requirements are also more demanding for greater neutron field quality and intensity. Target HRSs that are based on submerged-jet impingement and

  12. Epithermal neutron beams from the 7 Li(p,n) reaction near the threshold for neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porras, I.; Praena, J.; Arias de Saavedra, F.; Pedrosa, M.; Esquinas, P.; L. Jiménez-Bonilla, P.

    2016-11-01

    Two applications for neutron capture therapy of epithermal neutron beams calculated from the 7Li ( p , n reaction are discussed. In particular, i) for a proton beam of 1920 keV of a 30 mA, a neutron beam of adequate features for BNCT is found at an angle of 80° from the forward direction; and ii) for a proton beam of 1910 keV, a neutron beam is obtained at the forward direction suitable for performing radiobiology experiments for the determination of the biological weighting factors of the fast dose component in neutron capture therapy.

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy for malignant melanoma: An experimental approach

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, B.S.; Larsson, B.; Roberto, A. )

    1989-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that some thioamides, e.g., thiouracil, are incorporated as false precursors into melanin during its synthesis. If boronated analogs of the thioamides share this property, the melanin of melanotic melanomas offers a possibility for specific tumoural uptake and retention of boron as a basis for neutron capture therapy. We report on the synthesis of boronated 1H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol (B-TZT), boronated 5-carboxy-2-thiouracil (B-CTU), and boronated 5-diethylaminomethyl-2-thiouracil (B-DEAMTU) and the localization of these substances in melanotic melanomas transplanted to mice. The distribution in the mice was studied by boron neutron capture radiography. B-TZT and B-CTU showed the highest tumour:normal tissue concentration ratios, with tumour:liver ratios of about 4 and tumour:muscle ratios of about 14; B-DEAMTU showed corresponding ratios of 1.4 and 5, respectively. The absolute concentration of boron in the tumours, however, was more than three times higher in the mice injected with B-TZT, compared with B-CTU. The results suggest that B-TZT may be the most promising compound of the three tested with regard to possible therapy of melanotic melanomas.

  14. Carborane derivative development for boron neutron capture therapy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Barnum, Beverly A.; Yan Hao; Moore, Roger; Hawthorne, M. Frederick; Baum, Kurt

    1999-04-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy [BNCT] is a binary method of cancer therapy based on the capture of neutrons by a boron-10 atom [{sup 10}B]. Cytotoxic {sup 7}Li nuclei and {alpha}-particles are emitted, with a range in tissue of 9 and 5 {micro}m, respectively, about one cell diameter. The major obstacle to clinically viable BNCT is the selective localization of 5-30 ppm {sup 10}B in tumor cells required for effective therapy. A promising approach to BNCT is based on hydrophilic boron-rich oligomeric phosphate diesters, or ''trailers'' that have been shown to concentrate selectively in tumor tissue. Examples of these compounds were prepared previously at high cost using an automated DNA synthesizer. Direct synthesis methods are needed for the production of gram-scale quantities for further biological evaluation. The work accomplished as a result of the collaboration between Fluorochem, Inc. and UCLA demonstrates that short oligomers containing at least five carborane units with four phosphodiester linkages can be prepared in substantial quantities. This work was accomplished by the application of standard phosphoramidite coupling chemistry.

  15. Treatment Planning for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Maria S.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    Glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma are frequent brain tumors in adults and presently still incurable diseases. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a promising alternative for this kind of pathologies. Accelerators have been proposed for BNCT as a way to circumvent the problem of siting reactors in hospitals and for their relative simplicity and lower cost among other advantages. Considerable effort is going into the development of accelerator-based BNCT neutron sources in Argentina. Epithermal neutron beams will be produced through appropriate proton-induced nuclear reactions and optimized beam shaping assemblies. Using these sources, computational dose distributions were evaluated in a real patient with diagnosed glioblastoma treated with BNCT. The simulated irradiation was delivered in order to optimize dose to the tumors within the normal tissue constraints. Using Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations, dose distributions were generated for brain, skin and tumor. Also, the dosimetry was studied by computing cumulative dose-volume histograms for volumes of interest. The results suggest acceptable skin average dose and a significant dose delivered to tumor with low average whole brain dose for irradiation times less than 60 minutes, indicating a good performance of an accelerator-based BNCT treatment.

  16. Computational Dosimetry and Treatment Planning Considerations for Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nigg, David Waler

    2003-03-01

    Specialized treatment planning software systems are generally required for neutron capture therapy (NCT) research and clinical applications. The standard simplifying approximations that work well for treatment planning computations in the case of many other modalities are usually not appropriate for application to neutron transport. One generally must obtain an explicit three-dimensional numerical solution of the governing transport equation, with energy-dependent neutron scattering completely taken into account. Treatment planning systems that have been successfully introduced for NCT applications over the past 15 years rely on the Monte Carlo stochastic simulation method for the necessary computations, primarily because of the geometric complexity of human anatomy. However, historically, there has also been interest in the application of deterministic methods, and there have been some practical developments in this area. Most recently, interest has turned toward the creation of treatment planning software that is not limited to any specific therapy modality, with NCT as only one of several applications. A key issue with NCT treatment planning has to do with boron quantification, and whether improved information concerning the spatial biodistribution of boron can be effectively used to improve the treatment planning process. Validation and benchmarking of computations for NCT are also of current developmental interest. Various institutions have their own procedures, but standard validation models are not yet in wide use.

  17. Measurement of the 242Pu neutron capture cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Chyzh, A.; Dance Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Precision (n,f) and (n, γ) cross sections are important for the network calculations of the radiochemical diagnostic chain for the U.S. DOE's Stockpile Stewardship Program. 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is relevant to the network calculations of Pu and Am. Additionally, new reactor concepts have catalyzed considerable interest in the measurement of improved cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on key actinides. To date, little or no experimental data has been reported on 242Pu(n, γ) for incident neutron energy below 50 keV. A new measurement of the 242Pu(n, γ) reaction was performed with the DANCE together with an improved PPAC for fission-fragment detection at LANSCE during FY14. The relative scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section spans four orders of magnitude for incident neutron energies from thermal to ~ 30 keV. The absolute scale of the 242Pu(n, γ) cross section is set according to the measured 239Pu(n,f) resonance at 7.8 eV; the target was spiked with 239Pu for this measurement. The absolute 242Pu(n, γ) neutron capture cross section is ~ 30% higher than the cross section reported in ENDF for the 2.7 eV resonance. Latest results to be reported. Funded by U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-AC52-06NA25396 (LANL). U.S. DOE/NNSA Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development. Isotopes (ORNL).

  18. Borehole parametric study for neutron induced capture gamma-ray spectrometry using the MCNP code.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, M; Sohrabpour, M

    2000-01-01

    The MCNP Monte Carlo code has been used to simulate neutron transport from an Am-Be source into a granite formation surrounding a borehole. The effects of the moisture and the neutron poison on the thermal neutron flux distribution and the capture by the absorbing elements has been calculated. Thermal and nonthermal captures for certain absorbers having resonance structures in the epithermal and fast energy regions such as W and Si were performed. It is shown that for those absorbers having large resonances in the epithermal regions when they are present in dry formation or when accompanied by neutron poisons the resonance captures may be significant compared to the thermal captures.

  19. A NEW SINGLE-CRYSTAL FILTERED THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Brockman; David W. Nigg; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2008-09-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The calculated and measured thermal neutron flux produced at the irradiation location is on the order of 9.5x108 neutrons/cm2-s, with a measured cadmium ratio (Au foils) of 105, indicating a well-thermalized spectrum.

  20. Neutron capture therapy (NCT) enhancement of fast neutron radiotherapy: Application to non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laramore, G. E.; Stelzer, K. J.; Risler, R.; Schwartz, J. L.; Douglas, J. J.; Einck, J. P.; Nigg, D. W.; Wemple, C. A.; Hartwell, J. K.; Harker, Y. D.; Gavin, P. R.; Hawthorne, M. F.

    2001-07-01

    Fast neutron radiotherapy utilizes neutrons in the energy range of several millions to several tens of millions of eV to treat human malignancies. These fast neutron beams produce a small cloud of "slow" neutrons as they penetrate the body. If one can selectively attach isotopes having large neutron capture cross sections (such as 10B) to cancer cells, these "slow" neutrons can be used to enhance the killing of tumors. We describe a multidisciplinary effort to apply this technique to the treatment of patients with inoperable, non-small cell lung cancers. Problems in target design, compound development, beam optimization, and radiobiological experiments are discussed.

  1. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-03-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 10(5) n/cm(2)/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources.

  2. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  3. Neutron single particle structure in 131Sn and direct neutron capture cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kozub, R. L.; Arbanas, Goran; Adekola, A. S.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Blackmon, Jeffery C; Chae, Kyung Yuk; Chipps, K.; Cizewski, J. A.; Erikson, Luke; Hatarik, Robert; Hix, William Raphael; Jones, K. L.; Krolas, W.; Liang, J Felix; Ma, Z.; Matei, Catalin; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; Pain, Steven D; Shapira, Dan; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Smith, Michael Scott; Swan, T. P.

    2012-01-01

    Recent calculations suggest that the rate of neutron capture by 130Sn has a significant impact on late-time nucleosynthesis in the r-process. Direct capture into low-lying bound states is expected to be significant in neutron capture near the N=82 closed shell, so r- process reaction rates may be strongly impacted by the properties of neutron single particle states in this region. In order to investigate these properties, the (d, p) reaction has been studied in inverse kinematics using a 630 MeV beam of 130Sn (4.8 MeV/u) and a (CD2)n target. An array of Si strip detectors, including SIDAR and an early implementation of the ORRUBA, was used to detect reaction products. Results for the 130Sn(d, p)131Sn reaction are found to be very similar to those from the previously reported 132Sn(d, p)133Sn reaction. Direct-semidirect (n, ) cross section calculations, based for the first time on experimental data, are presented. The uncertainties in these cross sections are thus reduced by orders of magnitude from previous estimates.

  4. Continuum quasiparticle random-phase approximation for astrophysical direct neutron capture reactions on neutron-rich nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Masayuki

    2015-03-01

    I formulate a many-body theory to calculate the cross section of direct radiative neutron capture reaction by means of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field model and the continuum quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). A focus is put on very-neutron-rich nuclei and low-energy neutron kinetic energy in the range from 1 keV to several MeV, which is relevant to the rapid neutron capture process of nucleosynthesis. I begin with the photoabsorption cross section and the E 1 strength function. Next, in order to apply the reciprocity theorem, I decompose the cross section into partial cross sections corresponding to different channels of one- and two-neutron emission decays of photo-excited states. A numerical example is shown for the photo-absorption of 142Sn and the neutron capture of 141Sn .

  5. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): implications of neutron beam and boron compound characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, F J; Nigg, D W; Capala, J; Watkins, P R; Vroegindeweij, C; Auterinen, I; Seppälä, T; Bleuel, D

    1999-07-01

    The potential efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant glioma is a significant function of epithermal-neutron beam biophysical characteristics as well as boron compound biodistribution characteristics. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to evaluate the relative significance of these factors on theoretical tumor control using a standard model. The existing, well-characterized epithermal-neutron sources at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR), and the Finnish Research Reactor (FiR-1) were compared. Results for a realistic accelerator design by the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) are also compared. Also the characteristics of the compound p-Boronophenylaline Fructose (BPA-F) and a hypothetical next-generation compound were used in a comparison of the BMRR and a hypothetical improved reactor. All components of dose induced by an external epithermal-neutron beam fall off quite rapidly with depth in tissue. Delivery of dose to greater depths is limited by the healthy-tissue tolerance and a reduction in the hydrogen-recoil and incident gamma dose allow for longer irradiation and greater dose at a depth. Dose at depth can also be increased with a beam that has higher neutron energy (without too high a recoil dose) and a more forward peaked angular distribution. Of the existing facilities, the FiR-1 beam has the better quality (lower hydrogen-recoil and incident gamma dose) and a penetrating neutron spectrum and was found to deliver a higher value of Tumor Control Probability (TCP) than other existing beams at shallow depth. The greater forwardness and penetration of the HFR the FiR-1 at greater depths. The hypothetical reactor and accelerator beams outperform at both shallow and greater depths. In all cases, the hypothetical compound provides a significant improvement in efficacy but it is shown that the full benefit of improved compound is not realized until the neutron beam is fully

  6. Neutron dosimetry, moderated energy spectrum, and neutron capture therapy for californium-252 medical sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivard, Mark Joseph

    Examination of neutron dosimetry for 252Cf has been conducted using calculative and experimental means. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code was used in a distributed computing environment as a parallel virtual machine (PVM) to determine the absorbed neutron dose and neutron energy spectrum from 252Cf in a variety of clinically relevant materials. Herein, a Maxwellian spectrum was used to model the 252Cf neutron emissions within these materials. 252Cf mixed-field dosimetry of Applicator Tube (AT) type sources was measured using 1.0 and 0.05 cm3 tissue-equivalent ion chambers and a miniature GM counter. A dosimetry protocol was formulated similar that of ICRU 45. The 252Cf AT neutron dosimetry was determined in the cylindrical coordinate system formalism recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43. These results demonstrated the overwhelming dependence of dosimetry on the source geometry factor as there was no significant neutron attenuation within the source or encapsulation. Gold foils and TLDs were used to measure the thermal flux in the vicinity of 252Cf AT sources to compare with the results calculated using MCNP. As the fast neutron energy spectrum did not markedly changed at increasing distances from the AT source, neutron dosimetry results obtained with paired ion chambers using fixed sensitivity factors agreed well with MCNP results and those in the literature. Calculations of moderated 252Cf neutron energy spectrum with various loadings of 10B and 157Gd were performed, in addition to analysis of neutron capture therapy dosimetry with these isotopes. Radiological concerns such as personnel exposure and shielding of 252Cf emissions were examined. Feasibility of a high specific-activity 252Cf HDR source was investigated through radiochemical and metallurgical studies using stand-ins such as Tb, Gd and 249Cf. Issues such as capsule burst strength due to helium production for a variety of proposed HDR sources were addressed. A recommended 252Cf source

  7. PGNAA of human arthritic synovium for boron neutron capture synovectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Binello, E.; Yanch, J.C.; Shortkroff, S.

    1997-12-01

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS), is a proposed new therapy modality for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease afflicting the joints. The synovium, which is the membrane lining the joint, becomes inflamed and represents the target tissue for therapy. When a joint is unresponsive to drug treatment, physical removal of the synovium, termed synovectomy, becomes necessary. Existing options include surgery and radiation synovectomy. BNCS has advantages over these options in that it is noninvasive and does not require the administration of radioactive substances. Previous studies have shown that the uptake of {sup 10}B by human arthritic synovium ex vivo is high, ranging from 194 to 545 ppm with an unenriched boron compound. While tissue samples remain viable up to 1 week, ex vivo conditions do not accurately reflect those in vivo. This paper presents results from experiments assessing the washout of boron from the tissue and examines the implications for in vivo studies.

  8. Uncertainties in Hauser-Feshbach Neutron Capture Calculations for Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolli, M.G. Kawano, T.; Little, H.

    2014-06-15

    The calculation of neutron capture cross sections in a statistical Hauser-Feshbach method has proved successful in numerous astrophysical applications. Of increasing interest is the uncertainty associated with the calculated Maxwellian averaged cross sections (MACS). Aspects of a statistical model that introduce a large amount of uncertainty are the level density model, γ-ray strength function parameter, and the placement of E{sub low} – the cut-off energy below which the Hauser-Feshbach method is not applicable. Utilizing the Los Alamos statistical model code CoH3 we investigate the appropriate treatment of these sources of uncertainty via systematics of nuclei in a local region for which experimental or evaluated data is available. In order to show the impact of uncertainty analysis on nuclear data for astrophysical applications, these new uncertainties will be propagated through the nucleosynthesis code NuGrid.

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy for the prevention of restenosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Delfaus, M.L.

    1997-12-01

    The potential application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the prevention of restenosis following angioplasty is under investigation at Massachusetts Institute of Technology`s Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications. The process of Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty involves the insertion of a balloon dilation catheter into the occluded artery. The balloon is then inflated for several minutes to dilate the artery. The blockage is decreased, and blood flow through the artery is improved. This procedure is, initially, very successful. However, 30 to 60% of patients treated also show restenosis within 6 months. Although many physiological processes may contribute to restenosis, the primary mechanism is thought to be abnormal proliferation of the smooth muscle cells in the treated artery.

  10. Scissors mode of Gd nuclei studied from resonance neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; and others

    2012-10-20

    Spectra of {gamma} rays following the neutron capture at isolated resonances of stable Gd nuclei were measured. The objectives were to get new information on photon strength of {sup 153,155-159}Gd with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of the data obtained clearly indicates that the scissors mode is coupled not only to the ground state, but also to all excited levels of the nuclei studied. The specificity of our approach ensures unbiasedness in estimating the sumed scissors-mode strength {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow}, even for odd product nuclei, for which conventional nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements yield only limited information. Our analysis indicates that for these nuclei the sum {Sigma}B(M1){up_arrow} increases with A and for {sup 157,159}Gd it is significantly higher compared to {sup 156,158}Gd.

  11. Neutron Capture Cross Section Calculations with the Statistical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Mary; Uberseder, Ethan; Wiescher, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Hauser-Feshbach (HF) cross sections are of enormous importance for a wide range of applications, from waste transmutation and nuclear technologies, to medical applications, and nuclear astrophysics. It is a well observed result that different nuclear input models sensitively affect HF cross section calculations. Less well-known however are the effects on calculations originating from model-specific implementation details (such as level density parameter, matching energy, backshift and giant dipole parameters), as well as effects from non-model aspects, such as experimental data truncation and transmission function energy binning. To investigate the effects or these various aspects, Maxwellian-averaged neutron capture cross sections have been calculated for approximately 340 nuclei. The relative effects of these model details will be discussed.

  12. Measurement of the neutron-neutron scattering length using the π-d capture reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Howell, C. R.; Carman, T. S.; Gibbs, W. R.; Gibson, B. F.; Hussein, A.; Kiser, M. R.; Mertens, G.; Moore, C. F.; Morris, C.; Obst, A.; Pasyuk, E.; Roper, C. D.; Salinas, F.; Setze, H. R.; Slaus, I.; Sterbenz, S.; Tornow, W.; Walter, R. L.; Whiteley, C. R.; Whitton, M.

    2008-05-01

    We have determined a value for the 1S0 neutron-neutron scattering length (ann) from high-precision measurements of time-of-flight spectra of neutrons from the H2(π-,nγ)n capture reaction. The measurements were done at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility by the E1286 Collaboration. The high spatial resolution of our γ-ray detector enabled us to make a detailed assessment of the systematic uncertainties in our techniques. The value obtained in the present work is ann=-18.63±0.10 (statistical) ± 0.44 (systematic) ± 0.30 (theoretical) fm. This result is consistent with previous determinations of ann from the π-d capture reaction. We found that the analysis of the data with calculations that use a relativistic phase-space factor gives a more negative value for ann by 0.33 fm over the analysis done using a nonrelativistic phase-space factor. Combining the present result with the previous ones from π-d capture gives ann=-18.63±0.27(expt)±0.30 fm (theory). For the first time the combined statistical and systematic experimental uncertainty in ann is smaller than the theoretical uncertainty and comparable to the uncertainty in the proton-proton 1S0 scattering length (app). This average value of ann when corrected for the magnetic-moment interaction of the two neutrons becomes -18.9 ± 0.4 fm, which is 1.6 ± 0.5 fm different from the recommended value of app, thereby confirming charge symmetry breaking at the 1% confidence level.

  13. Gadolinium as an element for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.M.; Liu, H.B.; Laster, B.H.; Gordon, C.R.; Greenberg, D.D.; Warkentien, L.S.

    1992-12-31

    At BNL, preparations are being made to test in vitro compounds containing Gd and compare their response to the response of GD-DTPA to determine if one or several compounds can be located that enter the cells and enhance the Auger effect. Two similar rotators with positions for cell vials that have been constructed for these tests. The first rotator is made of only paraffin which simulates healthy tissue and provides control curves. The second rotator has 135 ppM of Gd-157 in the paraffin to simulate a Gd loaded tumor. Cells are irradiated in vials in the paraffin rotator and in the Gd-paraffin rotator at the epithermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). This produces an irradiation similar to what a patient would receive In an actual treatment. A combination of irradiations are made with both rotators; with no Gd compound or IdUrd In the cell media, with only Gd compound in the cell media and with both Gd compound and IdUrd in the cell media. The first set shows the effects of gamma rays from the H(n,gamma) reaction and the prompt gamma rays from capture of neutrons by Gd. The second set shows if there is any effect of Gd being in the cell media or inside the cells, i.e., an Auger effect. The third set shows the effect of enhancement by the IdUrd produced by the gamma rays from neutrons captured by either H or Gd. The fourth set combines all of the reactions and enhancements. Preliminary calculations and physical measurements of the doses that the cells will receive In these rotators have been made.

  14. Gadolinium as an element for neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Brugger, R.M.; Liu, H.B.; Laster, B.H.; Gordon, C.R.; Greenberg, D.D.; Warkentien, L.S.

    1992-01-01

    At BNL, preparations are being made to test in vitro compounds containing Gd and compare their response to the response of GD-DTPA to determine if one or several compounds can be located that enter the cells and enhance the Auger effect. Two similar rotators with positions for cell vials that have been constructed for these tests. The first rotator is made of only paraffin which simulates healthy tissue and provides control curves. The second rotator has 135 ppM of Gd-157 in the paraffin to simulate a Gd loaded tumor. Cells are irradiated in vials in the paraffin rotator and in the Gd-paraffin rotator at the epithermal beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). This produces an irradiation similar to what a patient would receive In an actual treatment. A combination of irradiations are made with both rotators; with no Gd compound or IdUrd In the cell media, with only Gd compound in the cell media and with both Gd compound and IdUrd in the cell media. The first set shows the effects of gamma rays from the H(n,gamma) reaction and the prompt gamma rays from capture of neutrons by Gd. The second set shows if there is any effect of Gd being in the cell media or inside the cells, i.e., an Auger effect. The third set shows the effect of enhancement by the IdUrd produced by the gamma rays from neutrons captured by either H or Gd. The fourth set combines all of the reactions and enhancements. Preliminary calculations and physical measurements of the doses that the cells will receive In these rotators have been made.

  15. Fission, total and neutron capture cross section measurements at ORELA

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Spencer, R.R.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, D.C.; Dos Santos, G.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1998-08-01

    In support of the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program established in response to the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 93-2, time-of-flight (TOF) measurements of the fission cross sections of {sup 233}U in the neutron energy range from 0.36 eV to several hundred keV have been initiated at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). Also total and capture cross sections of Al, Cl, and K in the energy range from about 100 eV to several hundred keV have been measured or are under way. The goal is to derive accurate cross section representations for the materials involved in criticality calculations of fuel storage, transportation, etc., configurations. Additional high-resolution measurements of the total cross sections of {sup 233}U below a few keV neutron energy are being planned for 1998, as well as for the other involved material. Evaluated data files in ENDF-6 format will be processed into formats for use in criticality analysis and utilized in benchmark data testing. Finally the data will be submitted for inclusion in ENDF/B.

  16. Malignant melanoma cure by selective thermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, Y.; Ichihashi, M.; Hatta, S.

    1986-01-01

    Thermal neutrons are easily absorbed by the nonradioactive isotope /sup 10/B, resulting in the emission of alpha particles and lithium atoms, which release an energy of 2.33 MeV for up to a 14-..mu..m-diam melanoma cell. Thus, if /sup 10/B can be selectively accumulated in melanoma, it can be destroyed without injury to the surrounding normal tissues by concentrating high linear energy transfer particles. The authors have synthesized seven melanoma-seeking /sup 10/B compounds, two of which, /sup 10/B12-chlorpromazine(/sup 10/B/sup 12/-CPZ) and /sup 10/B/sub 1/-p-boronophenylalanine(/sup 10/B/sub 1/-BPA), are found to be highly effective. The enhanced melanoma-killing effect of the /sup 10/B compounds is found by in vitro radiobiological analysis. A chemical assay and alpha-track analysis 28 h after systemic administration to melanoma-bearing hamsters reveals a /sup 10/B melanoma/blood ratio of 11.5 and a melanoma/liver ratio of 15. Establishment of a clinical therapeutic method for curing human melanoma without failure is underway by correlating biophysical, biochemical, biological, and therapeutic data analysis. Recently, the authors have also been working to develop neutron capture therapy using /sup 10/B-monoclonal antibodies for melanoma and were able to make some /sup 10/B conjugates with the specific m259-0 antibody.

  17. First platinum moderated positron beam based on neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Kögel, G.; Repper, R.; Schreckenbach, K.; Sperr, P.; Triftshäuser, W.

    2002-12-01

    A positron beam based on absorption of high energy prompt γ-rays from thermal neutron capture in 113Cd was installed at a neutron guide of the high flux reactor at the ILL in Grenoble. Measurements were performed for various source geometries, dependent on converter mass, moderator surface and extraction voltages. The results lead to an optimised design of the in-pile positron source which will be implemented at the Munich research reactor FRM-II. The positron source consists of platinum foils acting as γ-e +e --converter and positron moderator. Due to the negative positron work function moderation in heated platinum leads to emission of monoenergetic positrons. The positron work function of polycrystalline platinum was determined to 1.95(5) eV. After acceleration to several keV by four electrical lenses the beam was magnetically guided in a solenoid field of 7.5 mT leading to a NaI-detector in order to detect the 511 keV γ-radiation of the annihilating positrons. The positron beam with a diameter of less than 20 mm yielded an intensity of 3.1×10 4 moderated positrons per second. The total moderation efficiency of the positron source was about ɛ=1.06(16)×10 -4. Within the first 20 h of operation a degradation of the moderation efficiency of 30% was observed. An annealing procedure at 873 K in air recovers the platinum moderator.

  18. Boron neutron capture therapy: Moving toward targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid Reza; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Salehi, Rasoul; Nahand, Javid Sadri; Karimi, Ehsan; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Mirzaei, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) occurs when a stable isotope, boton-10, is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield stripped down helium-4 nuclei and lithium-7 nuclei. It is a binary therapy in the treatment of cancer in which a cytotoxic event is triggered when an atom placed in a cancer cell. Here, we provide an overview on the application of BNCT in cancer therapy as well as current preclinical and clinical evidence on the efficacy of BNCT in the treatment of melanoma, brain tumors, head and neck cancer, and thyroid cancer. Several studies have shown that BNCT is effective in patients who had been treated with a full dose of conventional radiotherapy, because of its selectivity. In addition, BNCT is dependent on the normal/tumor tissue ratio of boron distribution. Increasing evidence has shown that BNCT can be combined with different drug delivery systems to enhance the delivery of boron to cancer cells. The flexibility of BNCT to be used in combination with different tumor-targeting approaches has made this strategy a promising option for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide a state-of-the-art overview of the recent advances in the use of BNCT for targeted therapy of cancer.

  19. Use of Neutron Transfer Reactions to Indirectly Determine Neutron Capture Cross Sections on Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    McCleskey, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Tribble, R. E.; Simmons, E.; Spiridon, A.; Banu, A.; Roeder, B.; Goldberg, V.; Trache, L.; Chen, X. F.; Lui, Y.-W.

    2010-03-01

    {sup 14}C(n,gamma){sup 15}C is being used as a test case in the development of an indirect method to determine neutron capture cross sections on neutron-rich unstable nuclei at astrophysical energies. Our approach makes use of two reactions: one peripheral used to find the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) and a second non-peripheral reaction to determine the spectroscopic factor. The ANC for {sup 15}C has been determined using a HI neutron transfer reaction with a 12 MeV/nucleon {sup 14}C beam on a {sup 13}C target. The spectroscopic factor will be determined using {sup 14}C(d,p) in forward kinematics with an incident deuteron energy of 60 MeV. Both experiments were performed using the MDM high-resolution spectrometer at Texas A and M University.

  20. Production of heavy and superheavy neutron-rich nuclei in neutron capture processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrebaev, V. I.; Karpov, A. V.; Mishustin, I. N.; Greiner, Walter

    2011-10-01

    The neutron capture process is considered as an alternative method for production of superheavy (SH) nuclei. Strong neutron fluxes might be provided by nuclear reactors and nuclear explosions in the laboratory frame and by supernova explosions in nature. All these cases are discussed in the paper. There are two gaps of short-lived nuclei (one is the well-known fermium gap and the other one is located in the region of Z=106-108 and N˜170) which impede the formation of SH nuclei by rather weak neutron fluxes realized at available nuclear reactors. We find that in the course of multiple (rather “soft”) nuclear explosions these gaps may be easily bypassed, and thus, a measurable amount of the neutron-rich long-living SH nuclei located at the island of stability may be synthesized. Existing pulsed reactors do not allow one to bypass these gaps. We formulate requirements for the pulsed reactors of the next generation that could be used for production of long-living SH nuclei. Natural formation of SH nuclei (in supernova explosions) is also discussed. The yield of SH nuclei relative to lead is estimated to be about 10-12, which is not beyond the experimental sensitivity for a search of SH elements in cosmic rays.

  1. Thermal neutron irradiation field design for boron neutron capture therapy of human explanted liver.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2007-12-01

    The selective uptake of boron by tumors compared to that by healthy tissue makes boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an extremely advantageous technique for the treatment of tumors that affect a whole vital organ. An example is represented by colon adenocarcinoma metastases invading the liver, often resulting in a fatal outcome, even if surgical resection of the primary tumor is successful. BNCT can be performed by irradiating the explanted organ in a suitable neutron field. In the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor at Pavia University, a facility was created for this purpose and used for the irradiation of explanted human livers. The neutron field distribution inside the organ was studied both experimentally and by means of the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP). The liver was modeled as a spherical segment in MCNP and a hepatic-equivalent solution was used as an experimental phantom. In the as-built facility, the ratio between maximum and minimum flux values inside the phantom ((phi(max)/phi(min)) was 3.8; this value can be lowered to 2.3 by rotating the liver during the irradiation. In this study, the authors proposed a new facility configuration to achieve a uniform thermal neutron flux distribution in the liver. They showed that a phi(max)/phi(min) ratio of 1.4 could be obtained without the need for organ rotation. Flux distributions and dose volume histograms were reported for different graphite configurations.

  2. Design of a californium-based epithermal neutron beam for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Yanch, J C; Kim, J K; Wilson, M J

    1993-08-01

    The potential of the spontaneously fissioning isotope, 252Cf, to provide epithermal neutrons for use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. The Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to design an assembly composed of a 26 cm long, 11 cm radius cylindrical D2O moderator followed by a 64 cm long Al filter. Lithium filters are placed between the moderator and the filter and between the Al and the patient. A reflector surrounding the moderator/filter assembly is required in order to maintain adequate therapy flux at the patient position. An ellipsoidal phantom composed of skull- and brain-equivalent material was used to determine the dosimetric effect of this beam. It was found that both advantage depths and advantage ratios compare very favourably with reactor and accelerator epithermal neutron sources. The dose rate obtainable, on the other hand, is 4.1 RBE cGy min-1, based on a very large (1.0 g) source of 252Cf. This dose rate is two to five times lower than those provided by existing reactor beams and can be viewed as a drawback of using 252Cf as a neutron source. Radioisotope sources, however, do offer the advantage of in-hospital installation.

  3. Muon capture on the deuteron and the neutron-neutron scattering length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcucci, L. E.; Machleidt, R.

    2014-11-01

    Background: We consider the muon capture reaction μ-+2H→νμ+n +n , which presents a "clean" two-neutron (n n ) system in the final state. We study here its capture rate in the doublet hyperfine initial state (ΓD). The total capture rate for the muon capture μ-+3He→νμ+3H (Γ0) is also analyzed, although, in this case, the n n system is not so clean anymore. Purpose: We investigate whether ΓD (and Γ0) could be sensitive to the n n S -wave scattering length (an n), and we check on the possibility to extract an n from an accurate measurement of ΓD. Method: The muon capture reactions are studied with nuclear potentials and charge-changing weak currents, derived within chiral effective field theory. The next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order chiral potential with cutoff parameter Λ =500 MeV is used, but the low-energy constant (LEC) determining an n is varied so as to obtain an n=-18.95 ,-16.0 ,-22.0 , and +18.22 fm. The first value is the present empirical one, while the last one is chosen such as to lead to a di-neutron bound system with a binding energy of 139 keV. The LEC's cD and cE, present in the three-nucleon potential and axial-vector current (cD), are constrained to reproduce the A =3 binding energies and the triton Gamow-Teller matrix element. Results: The capture rate ΓD is found to be 399 (3 ) s-1 for an n=-18.95 and -16.0 fm; and 400 (3 ) s-1 for an n=-22.0 fm. However, in the case of an n=+18.22 fm, the result of 275 (3 ) s-1 [ 135 (3 ) s-1 ] is obtained, when the di-neutron system in the final state is unbound (bound). The total capture rate Γ0 for muon capture on 3He is found to be 1494(15), 1491(16), 1488(18), and 1475(16) s-1 for an n=-18.95 ,-16.0 ,-22.0 , and +18.22 fm, respectively. All the theoretical uncertainties are due to the fitting procedure and radiative corrections. Conclusions: Our results seem to exclude the possibility of constraining a negative an n with an uncertainty of less than ˜±3 fm through an accurate

  4. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments: A 4{pi} BaF2 Detector for Neutron Capture Measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Reifarth, R.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Alpizar, A.; Hatarik, R.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Kronenberg, A.; Rundberg, R.S.; Vieira, D.J.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Folden, C.M.; Hoffman, D.C.; Greife, U.; Schwantes, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.

    2005-05-24

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 162-element 4{pi} BaF2 array designed to make neutron capture cross-section measurements on rare or radioactive targets with masses as little as one milligram. Accurate capture cross sections are needed in many research areas, including stellar nucleosynthesis, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, waste transmutation, and other applied programs. These cross sections are difficult to calculate accurately and must be measured. The design and initial performance results of DANCE is discussed.

  5. MCNP speed advances for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goorley, J.T.; McKinney, G.; Adams, K.; Estes, G.

    1998-04-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment planning process of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center-M.I.T team relies on MCNP to determine dose rates in the subject`s head for various beam orientations. In this time consuming computational process, four or five potential beams are investigated. Of these, one or two final beams are selected and thoroughly evaluated. Recent advances greatly decreased the time needed to do these MCNP calculations. Two modifications to the new MCNP4B source code, lattice tally and tracking enhancements, reduced the wall-clock run times of a typical one million source neutrons run to one hour twenty five minutes on a 200 MHz Pentium Pro computer running Linux and using the GNU FORTRAN compiler. Previously these jobs used a special version of MCNP4AB created by Everett Redmond, which completed in two hours two minutes. In addition to this 30% speedup, the MCNP4B version was adapted for use with Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) on personal computers running the Linux operating system. MCNP, using PVM, can be run on multiple computers simultaneously, offering a factor of speedup roughly the same as the number of computers used. With two 200 MHz Pentium Pro machines, the run time was reduced to forty five minutes, a 1.9 factor of improvement over the single Linux computer. While the time of a single run was greatly reduced, the advantages associated with PVM derive from using computational power not already used. Four possible beams, currently requiring four separate runs, could be run faster when each is individually run on a single machine under Windows NT, rather than using Linux and PVM to run one after another with each multiprocessed across four computers. It would be advantageous, however, to use PVM to distribute the final two beam orientations over four computers.

  6. Boron neutron capture therapy at the crossroads: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Barth, Rolf F

    2009-07-01

    Over the past 25 years research on boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has progressed relatively slowly but steadily with the greatest progress in the field of clinical studies. These specifically have included the use of BNCT to treat a variety of malignancies other than high grade gliomas and melanomas. However, there are a number of key areas where little, if any, significant progress has been made. First and foremost among these has been the lack of new boron delivery agents. Improvement in drug delivery and the development of the best dosing paradigms for both boronophenylalanine (BPA) and sodium borocaptate (BSH) are of major importance and these still have not been optimized. Dosimetry for BNCT is still imprecise and is based on treating to normal tissue tolerance, based on blood boron values, rather than any real-time information on the boron content of the residual tumor that is to be irradiated. Another major problem has been the total dependence on nuclear reactors as neutron sources for BNCT. However, this will change in the near future when a clinically useful accelerator comes into use in 2009. Like it or not, in order to gain the credibility of a broad community of physicians who treat brain tumor patients, there will have to be a randomized clinical trial. Finally, BNCT will have to compete with new therapeutic approaches that are less costly and more effective for the treatment of brain tumors. These challenges notwithstanding, BNCT can fill an important niche for those malignancies, whether primary or recurrent, for which there is currently no effective therapy.

  7. Effect of diameter of nanoparticles and capture cross-section library on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Farhood, Bagher

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is evaluation of the effect of diameter of 10B nanoparticles and various neutron capture cross-section libraries on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Material and methods MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used for simulation of a 252Cf source, a soft tissue phantom and a tumor containing 10B nanoparticles. Using 252Cf as a neutron source, macroscopic dose enhancement factor (MDEF) and total dose rate in tumor in the presence of 100, 200, and 500 ppm of 10B nanoparticles with 25 nm, 50 nm, and 100 nm diameters were calculated. Additionally, the effect of ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, and CENDL neutron capture cross-section libraries on MDEF was evaluated. Results There is not a linear relationship between the average MDEF value and nanoparticles’ diameter but the average MDEF grows with increased concentration of 10B nanoparticles. There is an increasing trend for average MDEF with the tumor distance. The average MDEF values were obtained the same for various neutron capture cross-section libraries. The maximum and minimum doses that effect on the total dose in tumor were neutron and secondary photon doses, respectively. Furthermore, the boron capture related dose component reduced in some extent with increase of diameter of 10B nanoparticles. Conclusions Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that from physical point of view, various nanoparticle diameters have no dominant effect on average MDEF value in tumor. Furthermore, it is concluded that various neutron capture cross-section libraries are resulted to the same macroscopic dose enhancements. However, it is predicted that taking into account the biological effects for various nanoparticle diameters will result in different dose enhancements. PMID:25834582

  8. Measurements of neutron distribution in neutrons-gamma-rays mixed field using imaging plate for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2010-01-01

    The imaging plate (IP) technique is tried to be used as a handy method to measure the spatial neutron distribution via the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction for neutron capture therapy (NCT). For this purpose, IP is set in a water phantom and irradiated in a mixed field of neutrons and gamma-rays. The Hiroshima University Radiobiological Research Accelerator is utilized for this experiment. The neutrons are moderated with 20-cm-thick D(2)O to obtain suitable neutron field for NCT. The signal for IP doped with Gd as a neutron-response enhancer is subtracted with its contribution by gamma-rays, which was estimated using IP without Gd. The gamma-ray response of Gd-doped IP to non-Gd IP is set at 1.34, the value measured for (60)Co gamma-rays, in estimating the gamma-ray contribution to Gd-doped IP signal. Then measured distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate agrees within 10% with the calculated value based on the method that has already been validated for its reproducibility of Au activation. However, the evaluated distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate is so sensitive to gamma-ray energy, e.g. the discrepancy of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate between measurement and calculation becomes 30% for the photon energy change from 33keV to 1.253MeV.

  9. Radioactivity induced by neutrons: Enrico Fermi and a thermodynamic approach to radiative capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gregorio, Alberto

    2006-07-01

    When Fermi learned that slow neutrons are much more effective than fast ones in inducing radioactivity, he explained this phenomenon by mentioning the well-known scattering cross section between neutrons and protons. At this early stage, he did not refer to the capture cross section by target nuclei. At the same time a thermodynamic approach to neutron-proton capture was being discussed by physicists: neutron capture was interpretated as the reverse of deuteron photodissociation and detailed balance among neutrons, protons, deuterons, and radiation was invoked. This thermodynamic approach might underlie Fermi's early explanation of the great efficiency of slow neutrons. Fermi repeatedly used a thermodynamic approach that had been used in describing some of the physical properties of conductors by Richardson and had been influential in Fermi's youth.

  10. Monte Carlo based dosimetry for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Lilia; Belgaid, Mohamed; Khelifi, Rachid

    2016-11-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a biologically targeted, radiation therapy for cancer which combines neutron irradiation with a tumor targeting agent labeled with a boron10 having a high thermal neutron capture cross section. The tumor area is subjected to the neutron irradiation. After a thermal neutron capture, the excited 11B nucleus fissions into an alpha particle and lithium recoil nucleus. The high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) emitted particles deposit their energy in a range of about 10μm, which is of the same order of cell diameter [1], at the same time other reactions due to neutron activation with body component are produced. In-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution is very important for BNCT planning validation. Determination of total absorbed dose requires complex calculations which were carried out using the Monte Carlo MCNP code [2].

  11. Gamma spectrum following neutron capture in {sup 167}Er

    SciTech Connect

    Visser, D.; Khoo, T.L.; Lister, C.J.

    1995-08-01

    Statistical decay from a highly excited state samples all the lower-lying states and, hence, provides a sensitive measure of the level density. Pairing has a major impact on the level density, e.g. creating a pair gap between the 0- and 2-quasiparticle configurations. Hence the shape of the statistical spectrum contains information on pairing, and can be used to provide information on the reduction of pairing with thermal excitation energy. For this reason, we measured the complete spectrum of {gamma}rays following thermal neutron capture in {sup 167}Er. The experiment was performed at the Brookhaven reactor using Compton-suppressed Ge detectors from TESSA. The spectrum, which was corrected for detector response and efficiency, reveals primary (first-step, high-energy) transitions up to nearly 8 MeV, secondary (last-step, lower-energy) transitions, as we as a continuous statistical component. Effort was expanded to identify all lines from contaminant sources and an upper limit of 5% was tentatively set for their contributions. The spectral shape of the statistical spectrum will be compared with theoretical spectra obtained from a calculation of pairing which accounts for a stepwise reduction of the pair correlations as the number of quasiparticles increases. The primary lines which decay directly to the near-yrast states will also be used to deduce the level densities.

  12. Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement on $^{238}$Pu at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Chyzh, A; Wu, C Y

    2011-02-14

    The proposed neutron capture measurement for {sup 238}Pu was carried out in Nov-Dec, 2010, using the DANCE array at LANSCE, LANL. The total beam-on-target time is about 14 days plus additional 5 days for the background measurement. The target was prepared at LLNL with the new electrplating cell capable of plating the {sup 238}Pu isotope simultaneously on both sides of the 3-{micro}m thick Ti backing foil. A total mass of 395 {micro}g with an activity of 6.8 mCi was deposited onto the area of 7 mm in diameter. The {sup 238}Pu sample was enriched to 99.35%. The target was covered by 1.4 {micro}m double-side aluminized mylar and then inserted into a specially designed vacuum-tight container, shown in Fig. 1, for the {sup 238}Pu containment. The container was tested for leaks in the vacuum chamber at LLNL. An identical container without {sup 238}Pu was made as well and used as a blank for the background measurement.

  13. Boron neutron capture irradiation: setting up a clinical programme in Nice.

    PubMed

    Pignol, J P; Chauvel, P; Paquis, P; Courdi, A; Iborra-Brassart, N; Lonjon, M; Lebrun-Frenay, C; Frenay, M; Grellier, P; Chatel, M; Hérault, J; Bensadoun, R J; Milano, G; Nepveu, F; Patau, J P; Demard, F; Breteau, N

    1996-01-01

    Neutron capture irradiation aims to selectively destroy tumor cells using 10B(n,alpha)7Li nuclear reactions produced within themselves. Following the capture reaction, an alpha particle and a, 7Li ion are emitted. Carrying an energy of 2.79 MeV, they destroy all molecular structures along their path close to 10 microns. These captures, used exclusively with a 'slow' neutron irradiation, provide a neutron capture therapy (BNCT). If they are used in addition to a fast neutron beam irradiation, they provide a neutron capture potentiation (NCP). The Centre Antoine-Lacassagne in Nice is actively involved in the European Demonstration Project for BNCT of grade IV glioblastomas (GBM) after surgical excision and BSH administration. Taking into account the preliminary results obtained in Japan, work on an 'epithermal' neutron target compatible with various cyclotron beams is in progress to facilitate further developments of this technique. For NCP, thermalized neutron yield has been measured in phantoms irradiated in the fast neutron beam of the biomedical cyclotron in Nice. A thermal peak appears after 5 cm depth in the tissues, delayed after the fast neutron peak at 1.8 cm depth. Thus, a physical overdosage of 10% may be obtained if 100 ppm of 10B are assumed in the tissues. Our results using CAL 58 GBM cell line demonstrate a dose modification factor (DMF) of 1.19 when 100 ppm of boric acid are added to the growth medium. Thus for the particles, issued from neutron capture, a biological efficiency at least twice that of fast neutrons can be derived. These results, compared with historical data on fast neutron irradiation of glioblastoma, suggest that a therapeutic window may be obtained for GBM.

  14. (A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors)

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes progress made in refining of neutron-induced alpha tract autoradiography, in designing epithermal neutron bean at MITR-II and in planning treatment dosimetry using Monte Carlo techniques.

  15. Neutron Capture and Neutron Total Cross Sections Measurements for {sup 27}Al at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Koehler, P.E.; Leal, L.C.; Sayer, R.O.; Spencer, R.R.; Wright, R.Q.

    1999-08-30

    We have used the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure neutron total and capture cross sections of {sup 27}Al in the energy range from 100 eV to {approximately}400 keV. We report the resonance parameters as well as the Maxwellian average capture cross sections.

  16. Recent Research with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (dance) at the LOS Alamos Neutron Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.

    2014-09-01

    The DANCE detector at Los Alamos is a 160 element, nearly 4π BaF2 detector array designed to make measurements of neutron capture on rare or radioactive nuclides. It has also been used to make measurements of gamma-ray multiplicity following capture and gamma-ray output from fission. Several examples of measurements are briefly discussed.

  17. DANCE : a 4[pi] barium fluoride detector for measuring neutron capture on unstable nuclei /.

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J. L.; Haight, Robert C.; Hunt, L. F.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Miller, G. G.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Chamberlin, E. P.

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of neutron capture on unstable nuclei are important for studies of s-process nucleosynthesis, nuclear waste transmutation, and stewardship science. A 160-element, 4{pi} barium fluoride detector array, and associated neutron flight path, is being constructed to make capture measurements at the moderated neutron spallation source at LANSCE. Measurements can be made on as little as 1 mg of sample material over energies from near thermal to near 100 keV. The design of the DANCE array is described and neutron flux measurements from flight path commissioning are shown. The array is expected to be complete by the end of 2002.

  18. Initial Performance Characterization for a Thermalized Neutron Beam for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at Washington State University

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; P.E> Sloan; J.R. Venhuizen; C.A. Wemple

    2005-11-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Washington State University (WSU) have constructed a new epithermal-neutron beam for collaborative Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) preclinical research at the WSU TRIGATM research reactor facility1. More recently, additional beamline components were developed to permit the optional thermalization of the beam for certain types of studies where it is advantageous to use a thermal neutron source rather than an epithermal source. This article summarizes the results of some initial neutronic performance measurements for the thermalized system, with a comparison to the expected performance from the design computations.

  19. Development and construction of a neutron beam line for accelerator-based boron neutron capture synovectomy.

    PubMed

    Gierga, D P; Yanch, J C; Shefer, R E

    2000-01-01

    A potential application of the 10B(n, alpha)7Li nuclear reaction for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, termed Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), is under investigation. In an arthritic joint, the synovial lining becomes inflamed and is a source of great pain and discomfort for the afflicted patient. The goal of BNCS is to ablate the synovium, thereby eliminating the symptoms of the arthritis. A BNCS treatment would consist of an intra-articular injection of boron followed by neutron irradiation of the joint. Monte Carlo radiation transport calculations have been used to develop an accelerator-based epithermal neutron beam line for BNCS treatments. The model includes a moderator/reflector assembly, neutron producing target, target cooling system, and arthritic joint phantom. Single and parallel opposed beam irradiations have been modeled for the human knee, human finger, and rabbit knee joints. Additional reflectors, placed to the side and back of the joint, have been added to the model and have been shown to improve treatment times and skin doses by about a factor of 2. Several neutron-producing charged particle reactions have been examined for BNCS, including the 9Be(p,n) reaction at proton energies of 4 and 3.7 MeV, the 9Be(d,n) reaction at deuteron energies of 1.5 and 2.6 MeV, and the 7Li(p,n) reaction at a proton energy of 2.5 MeV. For an accelerator beam current of 1 mA and synovial boron uptake of 1000 ppm, the time to deliver a therapy dose of 10,000 RBEcGy ranges from 3 to 48 min, depending on the treated joint and the neutron producing charged particle reaction. The whole-body effective dose that a human would incur during a knee treatment has been estimated to be 3.6 rem or 0.75 rem, for 1000 ppm or 19,000 ppm synovial boron uptake, respectively, although the shielding configuration has not yet been optimized. The Monte Carlo design process culminated in the construction, installation, and testing of a dedicated BNCS beam line on the high

  20. Capture-gated Spectroscopic Measurements of Monoenergetic Neutrons with a Composite Scintillation Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Nattress, Jason; Mayer, M.; Foster, A.; Barhoumi Meddeb, A.; Trivelpiece, C.; Ounaies, Z.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-04-01

    Abstract—We report on the measurements of Monoenergetic neutrons from DD and DT fusion reactions by use of the capture gating method in a heterogeneous plastic-glass composite scintillation detector. The cylindrical detector is 5.08 cm in diameter and 5.05 cm in height and was fabricated using 1-mm diameter Li-doped glass rods(GS20) and scintillating polyvinyl toluene (EJ-290). Different scintillation decay constants are used to identify energy depositions in two materials constituting the composite scintillator. Geant4 simulations of the neutron thermalization and capture process were conducted, finding a mean capture time of approximately 2.6 ms for both DD and DT neutrons. A capture gating time acceptance window based on simulation results was used to identify the neutron thermalization pulses. The total scintillation light yield produced in neutron thermalization was measured and found to show consistency on event-by-event basis despite the variety of neutron thermalization histories prior to capture. The ratio of light yields from thermalization of 14.1 MeV and 2.45 MeV neutrons in the EJ-290 scintillator was determined to be 14.6, and the light output from 2.45 MeV neutrons was also correlated to its electron equivalent, obtaining a value of 0.58*0.05 MeVee.

  1. Carboranyl Nucleosides & Oligonucleotides for Neutron Capture Therapy Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2004-12-01

    This proposal enabled us to synthesize and develop boron-rich nucleosides and oligonucleotide analogues for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and the treatment of various malignancies. First, we determined the relationship between structure, cellular accumulation and tissue distribution of 5-o-carboranyl-2'-deoxyuridine (D-CDU) and its derivatives D-ribo-CU and 5-o-carboranyluracil (CU), to potentially target brain and other solid tumors for neutron capture therapy. Synthesized carborane containing nucleoside derivatives of CDU, D- and L-enantiomers of CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU were used. We measured tissue disposition in xenografted mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors xenografts and in rats bearing 9L gliosarcoma isografts in their flanks and intracranially. The accumulation of D-CDU, 1-({beta}-L-arabinosyl)-5-o-carboranyluracil, D-ribo-CU, and CU were also studied in LnCap human prostate tumor cells and their retention was measured in male nude mice bearing LnCap and 9479 human prostate tumor xenografts. D-CDU, D-ribo-CU and CU levels were measured after administration in mice bearing 9479 human prostate tumors in their flanks. D-CDU achieved high cellular concentrations in LnCap cells and up to 2.5% of the total cellular compound was recovered in the 5'-monophosphorylated form. D-CDU cellular concentrations were similar in LnCap and 9479 tumor xenografts. Studies in tumor bearing animals indicated that increasing the number of hydroxyl moieties in the sugar constituent of the carboranyl nucleosides lead to increased rate and extent of renal elimination, a decrease in serum half-lives and an increased tissue specificity. Tumor/brain ratios were greatest for CDU and D-ribo-CU, while tumor/prostate ratios were greatest with CU. CDU and D-ribo-CU have potential for BNCT of brain malignancies, while CU may be further developed for prostate cancer. A method was developed for the solid phase synthesis of oligonucleotides containing (ocarboran-1-yl

  2. New compounds for neutron capture therapy (NCT) and their significance

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1982-01-01

    Clearly the most effective tumor therapy would be obtained by the selective targeting of cytotoxic agents to tumor cells. Although many biomolecules are known to be taken up in tumors, the targeting of cytotoxic agents to tumors is limited by the fact that other essential cell pools compete with equal or even greater effectiveness. The approach of delivering stable non-toxic isotopes to tumor, with activation by means of an external radiation beam, is advantageous for two reasons: (1) it obviates problems associated with high uptake of isotopes in normal tissues, as these cell pools can be excluded from the radiation field, and (2) the general tumor area can be included in the activating beam field; thus, the possibility exists that all microscopic tumor extensions can be irradiated. As long as range of reaction products is short, dose will be restricted to the tumor, with a resultant high therapeutic ratio. This method can be accomplished with either photon activation therapy (PAT) or Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), the latter will be emphasized here. The range of the high LET, low OER particles from the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is approx. 10 ..mu..m, or one cell diameter; hence this reaction is optimal for cell killing. A number of biomolecules have been investigated as possible vehicles for transport of boron to tumors, including phenothiazines, thiouracils, porphyrins, nucleosides, and amino acids. Biodistributions of these compounds show selective concentration in tumor adequate for therapy. The biological halflives are in the order of days, allowing the possibility of fractionated or protracted irradiations. The radiobiological and physical implication of these parameters on NCT are discussed. The possibility of using an approximately-monoenergetic, scandium-filtered beam of about 2 keV, to reduce the dose from background radiations by about 85%, is also discussed. (ERB)

  3. High-Current Experiments for Accelerator-Based Neutron Capture Therapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gierga, D.P.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Hughey, B.H.; Shefer, R.E.; Yanch, J.C.; Blackburn, B.W.

    1999-06-06

    Several accelerator-based neutron capture therapy applications are under development. These applications include boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiform and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) for rheumatoid arthritis. These modalities use accelerator-based charged-particle reactions to create a suitable neutron source. Neutrons are produced using a high-current, 2-MV terminal tandem accelerator. For these applications to be feasible, high accelerator beam currents must be routinely achievable. An effort was undertaken to explore the operating regime of the accelerator in the milliampere range. In preparation for high-current operation of the accelerator, computer simulations of charged-particle beam optics were performed to establish high-current operating conditions. Herein we describe high beam current simulations and high beam current operation of the accelerator.

  4. Exploration of direct neutron capture with covariant density functional theory inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shi-Sheng; Peng, Jin-Peng; Smith, M. S.; Arbanas, G.; Kozub, R. L.

    2015-04-01

    Predictions of direct neutron capture are of vital importance for simulations of nucleosynthesis in supernovae, merging neutron stars, and other astrophysical environments. We calculated direct capture cross sections using nuclear structure information obtained from a covariant density functional theory as input for the fresco coupled reaction channels code. We investigated the impact of pairing, spectroscopic factors, and optical potentials on our results to determine a robust method to calculate cross sections of direct neutron capture on exotic nuclei. Our predictions agree reasonably well with experimental cross section data for the closed shell nuclei 16O and 48Ca, and for the exotic nucleus 36S . We then used this approach to calculate the direct neutron capture cross section on the doubly magic unstable nucleus 132Sn which is of interest for the astrophysical r-process.

  5. Thiourea derivatives, methods of their preparation and their use in neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma

    DOEpatents

    Gabel, D.

    1991-06-04

    The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy. No Drawings

  6. Boron containing compounds and their preparation and use in neutron capture therapy

    DOEpatents

    Gabel, D.

    1992-09-01

    The present invention pertains to boron containing thiouracil derivatives, their method of preparations, and their use in the therapy of malignant melanoma using boron neutron capture therapy. No Drawings

  7. Feasibility of a boron loaded scintillation detector for dose measurements related to boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Don-Soo; Egan, James J.; Kegel, Gunter H. R.; Desimone, David

    2002-04-01

    The feasibility of the use of a boron loaded scintillation detector in a head phantom for boron neutron capture therapy dose estimates was evaluated. Several monoenergetic neutron groups were produced via the ^7Li(p,n)^7Be reaction in a metallic lithium target using the Van de Graaff accelerator at University of Massachusetts Lowell. The pulse-height spectra were taken from a natural boron loaded (10205-, 304-, 407-, 507-, 570-, 702-, and 780-keV incident neutrons. The results shows that a boron loaded scintillator could be used to distinguish the doses from different radiation sources in boron neutron capture therapy. This detector may be used in the estimation of doses due to fast neutrons, alpha particles and recoil lithium from ^10B(n,α)^7Li, and photons at the same time during neutron irradiation procedures.

  8. A study on the optimum fast neutron flux for boron neutron capture therapy of deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2015-02-01

    High-energy neutrons, named fast neutrons which have a number of undesirable biological effects on tissue, are a challenging problem in beam designing for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, BNCT. In spite of this fact, there is not a widely accepted criterion to guide the beam designer to determine the appropriate contribution of fast neutrons in the spectrum. Although a number of researchers have proposed a target value for the ratio of fast neutron flux to epithermal neutron flux, it can be shown that this criterion may not provide the optimum treatment condition. This simulation study deals with the determination of the optimum contribution of fast neutron flux in the beam for BNCT of deep-seated tumors. Since the dose due to these high-energy neutrons damages shallow tissues, delivered dose to skin is considered as a measure for determining the acceptability of the designed beam. To serve this purpose, various beam shaping assemblies that result in different contribution of fast neutron flux are designed. The performances of the neutron beams corresponding to such configurations are assessed in a simulated head phantom. It is shown that the previously used criterion, which suggests a limit value for the contribution of fast neutrons in beam, does not necessarily provide the optimum condition. Accordingly, it is important to specify other complementary limits considering the energy of fast neutrons. By analyzing various neutron spectra, two limits on fast neutron flux are proposed and their validity is investigated. The results show that considering these limits together with the widely accepted IAEA criteria makes it possible to have a more realistic assessment of sufficiency of the designed beam. Satisfying these criteria not only leads to reduction of delivered dose to skin, but also increases the advantage depth in tissue and delivered dose to tumor during the treatment time. The Monte Carlo Code, MCNP-X, is used to perform these simulations.

  9. Dose evaluation of boron neutron capture synovectomy using the THOR epithermal neutron beam: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jay; Chang, Shu-Jun; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Hsueh, Yen-Wan; Yeh, Kuan-Chuan; Wang, Jeng-Ning; Tsai, Wen-Pin

    2007-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common epidemic diseases in the world. For some patients, the treatment with steroids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not effective, thus necessitating physical removal of the inflamed synovium. Alternative approaches other than surgery will provide appropriate disease control and improve the patient's quality of life. In this research, we evaluated the feasibility of conducting boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) with the Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) as a neutron source. Monte Carlo simulations were performed with arthritic joint models and uncertainties were within 5%. The collimator, reflector and boron concentration were optimized to reduce the treatment time and normal tissue doses. For the knee joint, polyethylene with 40%-enriched Li2CO3 was used as the collimator material, and a rear reflector of 15 cm thick graphite and side reflector of 10 cm thick graphite were chosen. The optimized treatment time was 5.4 min for the parallel-opposed irradiation. For the finger joint, polymethyl methacrylate was used as the reflector material. The treatment time can be reduced to 3.1 min, while skin and bone doses can be effectively reduced by approximately 9% compared with treatment using the graphite reflector. We conclude that using THOR as a treatment modality for BNCS could be a feasible alternative in clinical practice.

  10. Neutron capture measurement on {sup 173}Lu at LANSCE with DANCE detector

    SciTech Connect

    Theroine, C.; Ebran, A.; Meot, V.; Roig, O.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Nortier, F. M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Taylor, W. A.; Ullmann, J. L.; Viera, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.

    2013-06-10

    The (n,{gamma}) cross section on the unstable {sup 173}Lu(t{sub 1/2} = 1.37y) has been measured from thermal energy up to 200 eV at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) with The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiements (DANCE). The main aim of this study is to validate and optimize reaction models for unstable nucleus. A preliminary capture yield will be presented in this paper.

  11. Nominal effective radiation doses delivered during clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Diaz, A.Z.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary system that, in theory, should selectively deliver lethal, high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to tumor cells dispersed within normal tissues. It is based on the nuclear reaction 10-B(n, {alpha})7-Li, which occurs when the stable nucleus of boron-10 captures a thermal neutron. Due to the relatively high cross-section of the 10-B nucleus for thermal neutron capture and short ranges of the products of this reaction, tumor cells in the volume exposed to thermal neutrons and containing sufficiently high concentration of 10-B would receive a much higher radiation dose than the normal cells contained within the exposed volume. Nevertheless, radiation dose deposited in normal tissue by gamma and fast neutron contamination of the neutron beam, as well as neutron capture in nitrogen, 14-N(n,p)14-C, hydrogen, 1-H(n,{gamma})2-H, and in boron present in blood and normal cells, limits the dose that can be delivered to tumor cells. It is, therefore, imperative for the success of the BNCT the dosed delivered to normal tissues be accurately determined in order to optimize the irradiation geometry and to limit the volume of normal tissue exposed to thermal neutrons. These are the major objectives of BNCT treatment planning.

  12. The Ubiquity of the Rapid Neutron-capture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Cowan, John J.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Kratz, Karl-Ludwig; Lugaro, Maria; Simmerer, Jennifer; Farouqi, Khalil; Sneden, Christopher

    2010-12-01

    To better characterize the abundance patterns produced by the r-process, we have derived new abundances or upper limits for the heavy elements zinc (Zn, Z= 30), yttrium (Y, Z= 39), lanthanum (La, Z= 57), europium (Eu, Z= 63), and lead (Pb, Z= 82). Our sample of 161 metal-poor stars includes new measurements from 88 high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with the Tull Spectrograph on the 2.7 m Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory, and other abundances are adopted from the literature. We use models of the s-process in asymptotic giant branch stars to characterize the high Pb/Eu ratios produced in the s-process at low metallicity, and our new observations then allow us to identify a sample of stars with no detectable s-process material. In these stars, we find no significant increase in the Pb/Eu ratios with increasing metallicity. This suggests that s-process material was not widely dispersed until the overall Galactic metallicity grew considerably, perhaps even as high as [Fe/H] =-1.4, in contrast with earlier studies that suggested a much lower mean metallicity. We identify a dispersion of at least 0.5 dex in [La/Eu] in metal-poor stars with [Eu/Fe] <+0.6 attributable to the r-process, suggesting that there is no unique "pure" r-process elemental ratio among pairs of rare earth elements. We confirm earlier detections of an anti-correlation between Y/Eu and Eu/Fe bookended by stars strongly enriched in the r-process (e.g., CS 22892-052) and those with deficiencies of the heavy elements (e.g., HD 122563). We can reproduce the range of Y/Eu ratios using simulations of high-entropy neutrino winds of core-collapse supernovae that include charged-particle and neutron-capture components of r-process nucleosynthesis. The heavy element abundance patterns in most metal-poor stars do not resemble that of CS 22892-052, but the presence of heavy elements such as Ba in nearly all metal-poor stars without s-process enrichment suggests that the r

  13. THE UBIQUITY OF THE RAPID NEUTRON-CAPTURE PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.; Sneden, Christopher; Cowan, John J.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Kratz, Karl-Ludwig; Lugaro, Maria; Simmerer, Jennifer; Farouqi, Khalil

    2010-12-01

    To better characterize the abundance patterns produced by the r-process, we have derived new abundances or upper limits for the heavy elements zinc (Zn, Z= 30), yttrium (Y, Z= 39), lanthanum (La, Z= 57), europium (Eu, Z= 63), and lead (Pb, Z= 82). Our sample of 161 metal-poor stars includes new measurements from 88 high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra obtained with the Tull Spectrograph on the 2.7 m Smith Telescope at the McDonald Observatory, and other abundances are adopted from the literature. We use models of the s-process in asymptotic giant branch stars to characterize the high Pb/Eu ratios produced in the s-process at low metallicity, and our new observations then allow us to identify a sample of stars with no detectable s-process material. In these stars, we find no significant increase in the Pb/Eu ratios with increasing metallicity. This suggests that s-process material was not widely dispersed until the overall Galactic metallicity grew considerably, perhaps even as high as [Fe/H] =-1.4, in contrast with earlier studies that suggested a much lower mean metallicity. We identify a dispersion of at least 0.5 dex in [La/Eu] in metal-poor stars with [Eu/Fe] <+0.6 attributable to the r-process, suggesting that there is no unique 'pure' r-process elemental ratio among pairs of rare earth elements. We confirm earlier detections of an anti-correlation between Y/Eu and Eu/Fe bookended by stars strongly enriched in the r-process (e.g., CS 22892-052) and those with deficiencies of the heavy elements (e.g., HD 122563). We can reproduce the range of Y/Eu ratios using simulations of high-entropy neutrino winds of core-collapse supernovae that include charged-particle and neutron-capture components of r-process nucleosynthesis. The heavy element abundance patterns in most metal-poor stars do not resemble that of CS 22892-052, but the presence of heavy elements such as Ba in nearly all metal-poor stars without s-process enrichment suggests that the r

  14. Experimental verification of improved depth-dose distribution using hyper-thermal neutron incidence in neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Y; Kobayashi, T

    2001-01-01

    We have proposed the utilization of 'hyper-thermal neutrons' for neutron capture therapy (NCT) from the viewpoint of the improvement in the dose distribution in a human body. In order to verify the improved depth-dose distribution due to hyper-thermal neutron incidence, two experiments were carried out using a test-type hyper-thermal neutron generator at a thermal neutron irradiation field in Kyoto University Reactor (KUR), which is actually utilized for NCT clinical irradiation. From the free-in-air experiment for the spectrum-shift characteristics, it was confirmed that the hyper-thermal neutrons of approximately 860 K at maximum could be obtained by the generator. From the phantom experiment, the improvement effect and the controllability for the depth-dose distribution were confirmed. For example, it was found that the relative neutron depth-dose distribution was about 1 cm improved with the 860 K hyper-thermal neutron incidence, compared to the normal thermal neutron incidence.

  15. IMPROVED COMPUTATIONAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE THERMAL NEUTRON SOURCE FOR NEUTRON CAPTURE THERAPY RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart R. Slattery; David W. Nigg; John D. Brockman; M. Frederick Hawthorne

    2010-05-01

    Parameter studies, design calculations and initial neutronic performance measurements have been completed for a new thermal neutron beamline to be used for neutron capture therapy cell and small-animal radiobiology studies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. The beamline features the use of single-crystal silicon and bismuth sections for neutron filtering and for reduction of incident gamma radiation. The computational models used for the final beam design and performance evaluation are based on coupled discrete-ordinates and Monte Carlo techniques that permit detailed modeling of the neutron transmission properties of the filtering crystals with very few approximations. This is essential for detailed dosimetric studies required for the anticipated research program.

  16. Gamma-Ray Strength Function Method:. Away from Photoneutron Emission to Radiative Neutron Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, H.; Akimune, H.; Yamagata, T.; Iwamoto, C.; Goriely, S.; Daoutidis, I.; Toyokawa, H.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Iwamoto, N.; Lui, Y. W.; Arteaga, D. P.; Hilaire, S.; Koning, A. J.

    2013-03-01

    Radiative neutron capture cross sections are of direct relevance for the synthesis of heavy elements referred to as the s-process and the r-process in nuclear astrophysics and constitute basic data in the field of nuclear engineering. The surrogate reaction technique is in active use to indirectly determine radiative neutron capture cross sections for unstable nuclei. We have devised an indirect method alternative to the surrogate reaction technique on the basis of the γ-ray strength function (γSF), a nuclear statistical quantity that interconnects photoneutron emission and radiative neutron capture in the Hauser-Feshbach model calculation. We outline the γSF method and show applications of the method to tin, palladium, and zirconium isotopes. In the application of the γSF method, it is important to use γSF's that incorporate extra strengths of PDR and/or M1 resonance emerging around neutron threshold.

  17. Thermal neutron capture cross section for the K isomer {sup 177}Lu{sup m}

    SciTech Connect

    Belier, G.; Roig, O.; Daugas, J.-M.; Giarmana, O.; Meot, V.; Letourneau, A.; Marie, F.; Foucher, Y.; Aupiais, J.; Abt, D.; Jutier, Ch.; Le Petit, G.; Bettoni, C.; Gaudry, A.; Veyssiere, Ch.; Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Trama, J.-Ch.

    2006-01-15

    The thermal neutron radiative capture cross section for the K isomeric state in {sup 177}Lu has been measured for the first time. Several {sup 177}Lu{sup m} targets have been prepared and irradiated in various neutron fluxes at the Lauee Langevin Institute in Grenoble and at the CEA reactors OSIRIS and ORPHEE in Saclay. The method consists of measuring the {sup 178}Lu activity by {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The values obtained in four different neutron spectra have been used to calculate the resonance integral of the radiative capture cross section for {sup 177}Lu{sup m}. In addition, an indirect method leads to the determination of the {sup 177}Lu{sup g} neutron radiative capture cross section.

  18. Measurement of Neutron Capture Cross Section of 62Ni in the keV-Region

    SciTech Connect

    Alpizar-Vicente, A. M.; Hatarik, R.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Greife, U.

    2006-03-13

    The neutron capture cross section of 62Ni, relative to gold as a standard, was determined in the energy range from 250 eV to 100 keV. This energy range covers the region between 5 keV to 20 keV, which is not available in ENDF. Capture events are detected with the 160-fold 4{pi} BaF2 Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. One of the challenges was to process the high count rate of 4 MHz, which required an optimization of the data acquisition software. The neutron energy was determined by the time-of-flight technique using a flight path of 20.25 m. The sample mass of the 96% enriched 62Ni target was 210 mg and it was mounted in a 1.5 {mu}m thick Mylar foil.

  19. Development and characteristics of the HANARO neutron irradiation facility for applications in the boron neutron capture therapy field.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myong-Seop; Lee, Byung-Chul; Hwang, Sung-Yul; Kim, Heonil; Jun, Byung-Jin

    2007-05-07

    The HANARO neutron irradiation facility for various applications in the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) field was developed, and its characteristics were investigated. In order to obtain the sufficient thermal neutron flux with a low level of contamination by fast neutrons and gamma rays, a radiation filtering method was adopted. The radiation filter was designed by using a silicon single crystal, cooled by liquid nitrogen, and a bismuth crystal. The installation of the main components of the irradiation facility and the irradiation room was finished. Neutron beam characteristics were measured by using bare and cadmium-covered gold foils and wires. The in-phantom neutron flux distribution was measured for flux mapping inside the phantom. The gamma-ray dose was determined by using TLD-700 thermoluminescence dosimeters. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes and the gamma-ray dose were calculated by using the MCNP code, and they were compared with experimental data. The thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio available at this facility were confirmed to be 1.49 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) and 152, respectively. The maximum neutron flux inside the phantom was measured to be 2.79 x 10(9) n cm(-2) s(-1) at a depth of 3 mm in the phantom. The two-dimensional in-phantom neutron flux distribution was determined, and significant neutron irradiation was observed within 20 mm from the phantom surface. The gamma-ray dose rate for the free beam condition was expected to be about 80 cGy h(-1). These experimental results were reasonably well supported by calculation using the facility design code. This HANARO thermal neutron facility can be used not only for clinical trials, but also for various pre-clinical studies in the BNCT field.

  20. Investigation of the Statistical Properties of Stable Eu Nuclei using Neutron-Capture Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Agvaanluvsan, U; Alpizar-Vicente, A; Becker, J A; Becvar, F; Bredeweg, T A; Clement, R; Esch, E; Folden, III, C M; Hatarik, R; Haight, R C; Hoffman, D C; Krticka, M; Macri, R A; Mitchell, G E; Nitsche, H; O'Donnell, J M; Parker, W; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R S; Schwantes, J M; Sheets, S A; Ullmann, J L; Vieira, D J; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilk, P; Wouters, J M; Wu, C Y

    2005-10-04

    Neutron capture for incident neutron energies <1eV up to 100 keV has been measured for {sup 151,153}Eu targets. The highly efficient DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) array coupled with the intense neutron beam at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is used for the experiment. Stable Eu isotopes mass separated and electroplated on Be backings were used. Properties of well-resolved, strong resonances in two Eu nuclei are examined. The parameters for most of these resonances are known. Detailed multiplicity information for each resonance is obtained employing the high granularity of the DANCE array. The radiative decay cascades corresponding to each resonance are obtained in the experiment. The measurements are compared to simulation of these cascades which calculated with various models for the radiative strength function. Comparison between the experimental data and simulation provides an opportunity to investigate the average quantities.

  1. Data evaluation methods and improvements to the neutron-capture γ-ray spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, A. M.; Firestone, R. B.; Summers, N. C.; Sleaford, B. W.; Revay, Zs.; Krtička, M.; Belgya, T.; Basunia, M. S.; Capote, R.; Choi, H.; Dashdorj, D.; Escher, J. E.; Nichols, A.; Szentmiklósi, L.

    2011-06-01

    Improved neutron-capture γ-ray spectra, not only of interest to the nuclear structure and reactions communities, are needed in a variety of applied and non-proliferation programs. This requires an evaluation of the existing experimental capture-γ data. Elemental neutron-capture data taken from direct measurements at the Budapest Reactor have been used to collate the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File, a database of capture γ-ray cross sections. These cross sections are then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of γ-ray emission following the thermal neutron-capture process using the statistical-decay code DICEBOX. The aim of this procedure is to obtain the total radiative neutron-capture cross section and confidently increase the number of levels and γ rays that can be assigned to a given isotope in the neutron data libraries. To achieve these goals and provide as complete information as possible in the neutron data libraries, it is also necessary to remain current with recent advances in nuclear structure physics and ensure that the latest data in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File has been taken into consideration. This way an optimal level scheme can be derived by comparison with simulations and available experimental data. New information derived from this study can then be used to improve the nuclear structure and reactions databases with more-complete level schemes, and indeed, provide reliable and accurate input to a variety of applications which require this information. Recent results from neutron capture on the stable tungsten isotopes 182,183,184,186W are presented to illustrate the evaluation process.

  2. Measurements of neutron capture cross section for {sup 207,208}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Segawa, M.; Toh, Y.; Harada, H.; Kitatani, F.; Koizumi, M.; Fukahori, T.; Iwamoto, N.; Iwamoto, O.; Oshima, M.; Hatsukawa, Y.; Nagai, Y.; Igashira, M.; Kamada, S.; Tajika, M.

    2014-05-02

    The neutron capture cross sections for {sup 207,208}Pb have been measured in the neutron energy region from 10 to 110 keV. The γ-rays cascaded from a capture state to the ground state or low-lying states of {sup 208,209}Pb were observed for the first time, using an anti-Compton Nal(Tl) spectrometer and a TOF method. The observed discrete γ-ray energy spectra enabled us to determine neutron capture cross sections for {sup 207,208}Pb with small systematic errors, since we could distinguish γ-ray of {sup 207,208}Pb(n,γ) reactions from background γ-ray with use of the γ-ray spectra. The obtained cross sections include both contributions of resonance and direct capture components different from the previous TOF measurements.

  3. Characterization of a 10B-doped liquid scintillator as a capture-gated neutron spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, S.; Iliadis, C.; Longland, R.

    2016-03-01

    We use a 250 MHz digitizer to characterize the pulse shape discrimination of a BC-523A 10B-doped liquid scintillator with capture-gating capabilities. Our results are compared to recent work claiming pulse shape discrimination between fast and thermal neutron signals. The capture event is identified, and we explain the origin of signals that are often misinterpreted. We use the time-of-flight method to measure the detector energy resolution for fast incident monoenergetic neutrons and the intrinsic neutron detection efficiency. Monte Carlo simulations are performed and we find agreement between measured and simulated results. These steps are important for understanding 10B-doped capture-gated spectroscopy in mixed radiation environments, as efficiencies using capture-gating are rarely reported in the literature.

  4. A neutron resonance capture analysis experimental station at the ISIS spallation source.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Antonino; Gorini, Giuseppe; Festa, Giulia; Reali, Enzo; Grazzi, Francesco; Schooneveld, Erik M

    2010-09-01

    Neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) is a nuclear technique that is used to determine the elemental composition of materials and artifacts (e.g., bronze objects) of archaeological interest. NRCA experiments are mostly performed at the GELINA facility in Belgium, a pulsed neutron source operating with an electron linear accelerator. Very intense fluxes of epithermal neutrons are also provided by spallation neutron sources, such as the ISIS spallation neutron source in the United Kingdom. In the present study, the suitability of the Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) beam line for NRCA measurements is assessed using a compact (n, γ) resonance detector made of a Yttrium-Aluminum-Perovskite (YAP) scintillation crystal coupled with a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) readout. The measurements provided a qualitative recognition of the composition of the standard sample, a lower limit for the sensitivity for NRCA for almost-in-traces elements, and an estimation of the relative isotopic concentration in the sample.

  5. Carbon-Enhanced Metal-Poor Stars and the Need for an Intermediate Neutron Capture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancliffe, Richard J.; Hampel, Melanie; Lugaro, Maria; Meyer, Bradley S.

    Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in the Galactic Halo display enrichments in heavy elements associated with either the s (slow) or the r (rapid) neutron-capture process (e.g., barium and europium respectively), and in some cases they display evidence of both. The abundance patterns of these CEMP-s/r stars, which show both Ba and Eu enrichment, are particularly puzzling since the s and the r processes require neutron densities that are more than ten orders of magnitude apart, and hence are thought to occur in very different stellar sites. We investigate whether the abundance patterns of CEMP-s/r stars can arise from the nucleosynthesis of the intermediate neutron-capture process (the i process), which is characterised by neutron densities between those of the s and the r processes. Using nuclear network calculations, we study neutron capture nucleosynthesis at different constant neutron densities n ranging from 107 to 1015 cm-3. Neutron densities on the highest side of this range result in abundance patterns that show an increased production of heavy s- and r-process elements but similar levels of the light s-process elements. With our i-process model, we are able to reproduce the abundance patterns of 20 CEMP-s/r stars that could not be explained by s-process nucleosynthesis.

  6. Measurement of the keV-neutron capture cross section and capture gamma-ray spectrum of isotopes around N=82 region

    SciTech Connect

    Katabuchi, Tatsuya; Igashira, Masayuki

    2012-11-12

    The keV-neutron capture cross section and capture {gamma}-ray spectra of nuclides with a neutron magic number N= 82, {sup 139}La and {sup 142}Nd, were newly measured by the time-of-flight method. Capture {gamma}-rays were detected with an anti-Compton NaI(T1) spectrometer, and the pulse-height weighting technique was applied to derive the neutron capture cross section. The results were provided with our previous measurements of other nuclides around N= 82, {sup 140}Ce, {sup 141}Pr, {sup 143}Nd and {sup 145}Nd.

  7. Diversity of Abundance Patterns of Light Neutron-capture Elements in Very-metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Misa; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Aoki, Wako; Wanajo, Shinya

    2017-03-01

    We determine the abundances of neutron-capture elements from Sr to Eu for five very-metal-poor stars (-3 < [{Fe}/{{H}}] < -2) in the Milky Way halo to reveal the origin of light neutron-capture elements. Previous spectroscopic studies have shown evidence of at least two components in the r-process; one referred to as the “main r-process” and the other as the “weak r-process,” which is mainly responsible for producing heavy and light neutron-capture elements, respectively. Observational studies of metal-poor stars suggest that there is a universal pattern in the main r-process, similar to the abundance pattern of the r-process component of solar-system material. Still, it is uncertain whether the abundance pattern of the weak r-process shows universality or diversity, due to the sparseness of measured light neutron-capture elements. We have detected the key elements, Mo, Ru, and Pd, in five target stars to give an answer to this question. The abundance patterns of light neutron-capture elements from Sr to Pd suggest a diversity in the weak r-process. In particular, scatter in the abundance ratio between Ru and Pd is significant when the abundance patterns are normalized at Zr. Our results are compared with the elemental abundances predicted by nucleosynthesis models of supernovae with parameters such as electron fraction or proto-neutron-star mass, to investigate sources of such diversity in the abundance patterns of light neutron-capture elements. This paper presents that the variation in the abundances of observed stars can be explained with a small range of parameters, which can serve as constraints on future modeling of supernova models. Study based on data collected with the Subaru Telescope, operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  8. Excitations of one-valence-proton, one-valence-neutron nucleus {sup 210}Bi from cold-neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Cieplicka-Oryńczak, N.; Fornal, B.; Szpak, B.; Leoni, S.; Bottoni, S.; Bazzacco, D.; Blanc, A.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Soldner, T.; Bocchi, G.; France, G. de; Simpson, G.; Urban, W.

    2015-10-15

    The low-spin structure of one-proton, one-neutron {sup 210}Bi nucleus was investigated in cold-neutron capture reaction on {sup 209}Bi. The γ-coincidence measurements were performed with use of EXILL array consisted of 16 HPGe detectors. The experimental results were compared to shell-model calculations involving valence particles excitations. The {sup 210}Bi nucleus offers the potential to test the effective proton-neutron interactions because most of the states should arise from the proton-neutron excitations. Additionally, it was discovered that a few states should come from the couplings of valence particles to the 3{sup −} octupole vibration in {sup 208}Pb which provides also the possibility of testing the calculations involving the core excitations.

  9. (A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors)

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This document briefly describes recent advances in the author's laboratory. Topics described include neutron beam design, high- resolution autoradiography, boronated phenylalanine (BPA) distribution and survival studies in glioma bearing mice, computer- aided treatment planning, prompt gamma boron 10 analysis facility at MITI-II, non-rodent BPA toxicity studies, and preparations for clinical studies.

  10. (A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors)

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes accomplishments by this laboratory concerning development of high-resolution alpha-autoradiography design of an optimized epithermal neutron beam dosimetry and treatment planning Using Monte Carlo techniques development of a prompt-gamma {sup 10}B analysis facility.

  11. A new NCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability: a tool for neutron detector design

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A; Hendricks, John S; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen

    2011-01-13

    The existing Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNPX) particle tracking (PTRAC) coincidence capture file allows a full list of neutron capture events to be recorded in any simulated detection medium. The originating event history number (e.g. spontaneous fission events), capture time, location and source particle number are tracked and output to file for post-processing. We have developed a new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability to aid detector design studies. New features include the ability to track the nuclides that emitted the detected neutrons as well as induced fission chains in mixed samples before detection (both generation number and nuclide that underwent induced fission). Here, the power of this tool is demonstrated using a detector design developed for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. Individual capture time distributions have been generated for neutrons originating from Curium-244 source spontaneous fission events and induced fission events in fissile nuclides of interest: namely Plutonium-239, Plutonium-241, and Uranium-235. Through this capability, a full picture for the attribution of neutron capture events in the detector can be simulated.

  12. A new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability: a tool for neutron detector design

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A; Hendricks, John S; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen

    2010-12-14

    The existing MCNPX{trademark} PTRAC coincidence capture file allows a full list of neutron capture events to be recorded in any simulated detection medium. The originating event history number (e.g. spontaneous fission events), capture time, location and source particle number are tracked and output to file for post-processing. We have developed a new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability to aid detector design studies. New features include the ability to track the isotopes that emitted the detected neutrons as well as induced fission chains in mixed samples before detection (both generation number and isotope). Here, the power of this tool is demonstrated using a detector design that has been developed for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. Individual capture time distributions have been generated for neutrons originating from Curium-244 source spontaneous fission events and induced fission events in fissile isotopes of interest: namely Plutonium-239, Plutonium-241, and Uranium-235. Through this capability, a full picture for the attribution of neutron capture events in the detector can be simulated.

  13. A new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability: a tool for neutron detector design

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A; Hendricks, John S; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Tobin, Stephen J; Croft, Stephen

    2011-02-16

    The existing Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNPX) particle tracking (PTRAC) coincidence capture file allows a full list of neutron capture events to be recorded in any simulated detection medium. The originating event history number (e.g. spontaneous fission events), capture time, location and source particle number are tracked and output to file for post-processing. We have developed a new MCNPX PTRAC coincidence capture file capability to aid detector design studies. New features include the ability to track the nuclides that emitted the detected neutrons as well as induced fission chains in mixed samples before detection (both generation number and nuclide that underwent induced fission). Here, the power of this tool is demonstrated using a detector design developed for the non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel. Individual capture time distributions have been generated for neutrons originating from Curium-244 source spontaneous fission events and induced fission events in fissile nuclides of interest: namely Plutonium-239, Plutonium-241, and Uranium-235. Through this capability, a full picture for the attribution of neutron capture events in the detector can be simulated.

  14. Experimental Transport Benchmarks for Physical Dosimetry to Support Development of Fast-Neutron Therapy with Neutron Capture Augmentation

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Nigg; J. K. Hartwell; J. R. Venhuizen; C. A. Wemple; R. Risler; G. E. Laramore; W. Sauerwein; G. Hudepohl; A. Lennox

    2006-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the University of Washington (UW) Neutron Therapy Center, the University of Essen (Germany) Neutron Therapy Clinic, and the Northern Illinois University(NIU) Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab have been collaborating in the development of fast-neutron therapy (FNT) with concurrent neutron capture (NCT) augmentation [1,2]. As part of this effort, we have conducted measurements to produce suitable benchmark data as an aid in validation of advanced three-dimensional treatment planning methodologies required for successful administration of FNT/NCT. Free-beam spectral measurements as well as phantom measurements with Lucite{trademark} cylinders using thermal, resonance, and threshold activation foil techniques have now been completed at all three clinical accelerator facilities. The same protocol was used for all measurements to facilitate intercomparison of data. The results will be useful for further detailed characterization of the neutron beams of interest as well as for validation of various charged particle and neutron transport codes and methodologies for FNT/NCT computational dosimetry, such as MCNP [3], LAHET [4], and MINERVA [5].

  15. Neutron capture effects in lunar gadolinium and the irradiation histories of some lunar rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugmair, G. W.; Marti, K.

    1971-01-01

    The Gd isotopic composition in 19 lunar rock and soil samples from three Apollo sites is reported. The analytical techniques and the high precision mass spectrometric measurements are discussed. Enrichments in the Gd-158 oxide to G-157 oxide ratio due to neutron capture range up to 0.75%. Integrated 'thermal' neutron fluxes derived from the isotopic anomalies of Gd are compared with spallation Kr data from aliquot samples to construct a model which gives both average cosmic-ray irradiation depths and effective neutron exposure ages for some rocks. Rock 14310 is the first lunar sample where Kr anomalies due to resonance neutron capture in Br are observed. A Kr-81/Kr exposure age of 262 (plus or minus 7)m.y. is calculated for this rock.

  16. Early clinical experience of boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Bergland, R.; Capala, J.

    1995-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary treatment modality that can selectively irradiate tumor tissue. BNCT uses drugs containing a stable isotope of boron. {sup 10}B, to sensitize tumor cells to irradiation by low energy (thermal) neutrons. The interaction of the {sup 10}B with a thermal neutron (neutron capture) causes the {sup 10}B nucleus to split, releasing an alpha particle and a lithium nucleus. These products of the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction are very damaging to cells but have a combined path length in tissue of approximately 14 {mu}m, or roughly the diameter of one or two cells. Thus, most of the ionizing energy imparted to tissue is localized to {sup 10}B-loaded cells.

  17. Neutron-capture gamma-ray data for obtaining elemental abundances from planetary spectra.

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, Robert; Frankle, S. C.

    2001-01-01

    Determination of elemental abundances is a top scientific priority of most planetary missions. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is an excellent method to determine elemental abundances using gamma rays made by nuclear reactions induced by cosmic-ray particles and by the decay of radioactive nuclides [Re73,Re78]. Many important planetary gamma rays are made by neutron-capture reactions. However, much of the data for the energies and intensities of neutron-capture gamma rays in the existing literature [e.g. Lo81] are poor [RF99,RF00]. With gamma-ray spectrometers having recently returned data from Lunar Prospector and NEAR and soon to be launch to Mars, there is a need for good data for neutron-capture gamma rays.

  18. Measurement of gamma-ray production from thermal neutron capture on gadolinium for neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Takatomi

    2017-02-01

    Recently, several scientific applications of gadolinium are found in neutrino physics experiments. Gadolinium-157 is the nucleus, which has the largest thermal neutron capture cross-section among all stable nuclei. Gadolinium-155 also has the large cross-section. These neutron capture reactions provide the gamma-ray cascade with the total energy of about 8 MeV. This reaction is applied for several neutrino experiments, e.g. reactor neutrino experiments and Gd doped large water Cherenkov detector experiments, to recognize inverse-beta-decay reaction. A good Gd(n,γ) simulation model is needed to evaluate the detection efficiency of the neutron capture reaction, i.e. the efficiency of IBD detection. In this presentation, we will report the development and study status of a Gd(n,γ) calculation model and comparison with our experimental data taken at ANNRI/MLF beam line, J-PARC.

  19. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy program for cancer treatment, Volume 4, No. 7

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.

    1990-07-01

    This report discusses the monthly progress of the Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNLT) program for cancer treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during July 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross boron analysis in tissue, blood, and urine; noninvasive boron quantitative determination; analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT; large animal model studies; neutron source and facility preparation; administration and common support and PBF operations.

  20. Power Burst Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Program for cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, A.L.; Dorn, R.V. III.

    1990-08-01

    This report discusses monthly progress in the Power Boron Facility/Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (PBF/BNCT) Program for Cancer Treatment. Highlights of the PBF/BNCT Program during August 1990 include progress within the areas of: Gross Boron Analysis in Tissue, Blood, and Urine, boron microscopic (subcellular) analytical development, noninvasive boron quantitative determination, analytical radiation transport and interaction modeling for BNCT, large animal model studies, neutron source and facility preparation, administration and common support and PBF operations.

  1. Isomeric ratio measurements for the radiative neutron capture 176Lu(n,γ) at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis-Petit, D.; Roig, O.; Méot, V.; Jandel, M.; Vieira, D. J.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    The isomeric ratio for the neutron capture reaction 176Lu(n,γ) on the Jπ= 5/2-, 761.7 keV, T1/2=32.8 ns level of 177mLu, has been determined in the neutron energy range 8.5 eV-100 keV for the first time using the DANCE array at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  2. On the capture of dark matter by neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Güver, Tolga; Erkoca, Arif Emre; Sarcevic, Ina; Reno, Mary Hall E-mail: aeerkoca@gmail.com E-mail: ina@physics.arizona.edu

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the number of dark matter particles that a neutron star accumulates over its lifetime as it rotates around the center of a galaxy, when the dark matter particle is a self-interacting boson but does not self-annihilate. We take into account dark matter interactions with baryonic matter and the time evolution of the dark matter sphere as it collapses within the neutron star. We show that dark matter self-interactions play an important role in the rapid accumulation of dark matter in the core of the neutron star. We consider the possibility of determining an exclusion region of the parameter space for dark matter mass and dark matter interaction cross section with the nucleons as well as dark matter self-interaction cross section, based on the observation of old neutron stars. We show that for a dark matter density of 10{sup 3} GeV/cm{sup 3}and dark matter mass m{sub χ} ∼< 10 GeV, there is a potential exclusion region for dark matter interactions with nucleons that is three orders of magnitude more stringent than without self-interactions. The potential exclusion region for dark matter self-interaction cross sections is many orders of magnitude stronger than the current Bullet Cluster limit. For example, for high dark matter density regions, we find that for m{sub χ} ∼ 10 GeV when the dark matter interaction cross section with the nucleons ranges from σ{sub χn} ∼ 10{sup −52} cm{sup 2} to σ{sub χn} ∼ 10{sup −57} cm{sup 2}, the dark matter self-interaction cross section limit is σ{sub χχ} ∼< 10{sup −33} cm{sup 2}, which is about ten orders of magnitude stronger than the Bullet Cluster limit.

  3. On the capture of dark matter by neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güver, Tolga; Emre Erkoca, Arif; Hall Reno, Mary; Sarcevic, Ina

    2014-05-01

    We calculate the number of dark matter particles that a neutron star accumulates over its lifetime as it rotates around the center of a galaxy, when the dark matter particle is a self-interacting boson but does not self-annihilate. We take into account dark matter interactions with baryonic matter and the time evolution of the dark matter sphere as it collapses within the neutron star. We show that dark matter self-interactions play an important role in the rapid accumulation of dark matter in the core of the neutron star. We consider the possibility of determining an exclusion region of the parameter space for dark matter mass and dark matter interaction cross section with the nucleons as well as dark matter self-interaction cross section, based on the observation of old neutron stars. We show that for a dark matter density of 103 GeV/cm3and dark matter mass mχ lesssim 10 GeV, there is a potential exclusion region for dark matter interactions with nucleons that is three orders of magnitude more stringent than without self-interactions. The potential exclusion region for dark matter self-interaction cross sections is many orders of magnitude stronger than the current Bullet Cluster limit. For example, for high dark matter density regions, we find that for mχ ~ 10 GeV when the dark matter interaction cross section with the nucleons ranges from σχn ~ 10-52 cm2 to σχn ~ 10-57 cm2, the dark matter self-interaction cross section limit is σχχ lesssim 10-33 cm2, which is about ten orders of magnitude stronger than the Bullet Cluster limit.

  4. Neutron Resonance Parameters of 55Mn from Reich-Moore Analysis of Recent Experimental Neutron Transmission and Capture Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M; Guber, Klaus H; Wiarda, Dorothea; Arbanas, Goran

    2008-01-01

    High-resolution neutron capture cross section measurements of 55Mn were recently performed at GELINA by Schillebeeckx et al. (2005) and at ORELA by Guber et al. (2007). The analysis of the experimental data was performed with the computer code SAMMY using the Bayesian approach in the resonance parameters representation of the cross sections. The neutron transmission data taken in 1988 by Harvey et al. (2007) and not analyzed before were added to the SAMMY experimental data base. More than 95% of the s-wave resonances and more than 85% of the p-wave resonances were identified in the energy range up to 125 keV, leading to the neutron strength functions S0 = (3.90 0.78) x 10-4 and S1 = (0.45 0.08) x 10-4. About 25% of the d-wave resonances were identified with a possible strength function of S2 = 1.0 x 10-4. The capture cross section calculated at 0.0253 eV is 13.27 b, and the capture resonance integral is 13.52 0.30 b. In the energy range 15 to 120 keV, the average capture cross section is 12% lower than Lerigoleur value and 25% smaller than Macklin value. GELINA and ORELA experimental capture cross sections show a background cross section not described by the Reich-Moore resonance parameters. Part of this background could be due to a direct capture component and/or to the missing d-wave resonances. The uncertainty of 10% on the average capture cross section above 20 keV is mainly due to the inaccuracy in the calculation of the background components.

  5. DANCEing with the Stars: Measuring Neutron Capture on Unstable Isotopes with DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couture, A.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Baker, J. D.; Bayarbadrahk, B.; Becker, J. A.; Bond, E.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Fowler, M.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    Isotopes heavier than iron are known to be produced in stars through neutron capture processes. Two major processes, the slow (s) and rapid (r) processes are each responsible for 50% of the abundances of the heavy isotopes. The neutron capture cross sections of the isotopes on the s process path reveal information about the expected abundances of the elements as well as stellar conditions and dynamics. Until recently, measurements on unstable isotopes, which are most important for determining stellar temperatures and reaction flow, have not been experimentally feasible. The Detector for Advance Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) was designed to perform time-of-flight neutron capture measurements on unstable isotopes for nuclear astrophysics, stockpile stewardship, and reactor development. DANCE is a 4-π BaF2 scintillator array which can perform measurements on sub-milligram samples of isotopes with half-lives as short as a few hundred days. These cross sections are critical for advancing our understanding of the production of the heavy isotopes.

  6. DANCEing with the Stars: Measuring Neutron Capture on Unstable Isotopes with DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, A.; Bond, E.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Baker, J. D.; Bayarbadrahk, B.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Reifarth, R.

    2009-03-10

    Isotopes heavier than iron are known to be produced in stars through neutron capture processes. Two major processes, the slow (s) and rapid (r) processes are each responsible for 50% of the abundances of the heavy isotopes. The neutron capture cross sections of the isotopes on the s process path reveal information about the expected abundances of the elements as well as stellar conditions and dynamics. Until recently, measurements on unstable isotopes, which are most important for determining stellar temperatures and reaction flow, have not been experimentally feasible. The Detector for Advance Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) was designed to perform time-of-flight neutron capture measurements on unstable isotopes for nuclear astrophysics, stockpile stewardship, and reactor development. DANCE is a 4-{pi}BaF{sub 2} scintillator array which can perform measurements on sub-milligram samples of isotopes with half-lives as short as a few hundred days. These cross sections are critical for advancing our understanding of the production of the heavy isotopes.

  7. Neutron Capture and the Antineutrino Yield from Nuclear Reactors.

    PubMed

    Huber, Patrick; Jaffke, Patrick

    2016-03-25

    We identify a new, flux-dependent correction to the antineutrino spectrum as produced in nuclear reactors. The abundance of certain nuclides, whose decay chains produce antineutrinos above the threshold for inverse beta decay, has a nonlinear dependence on the neutron flux, unlike the vast majority of antineutrino producing nuclides, whose decay rate is directly related to the fission rate. We have identified four of these so-called nonlinear nuclides and determined that they result in an antineutrino excess at low energies below 3.2 MeV, dependent on the reactor thermal neutron flux. We develop an analytic model for the size of the correction and compare it to the results of detailed reactor simulations for various real existing reactors, spanning 3 orders of magnitude in neutron flux. In a typical pressurized water reactor the resulting correction can reach ∼0.9% of the low energy flux which is comparable in size to other, known low-energy corrections from spent nuclear fuel and the nonequilibrium correction. For naval reactors the nonlinear correction may reach the 5% level by the end of cycle.

  8. Astrophysical quests for neutron capture data of unstable nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Käppeler, F.

    2016-11-01

    The abundances of the chemical elements heavier than iron can be attributed in about equal parts to the r and to the s process, which are taking place in supernova explosions and during the He and C burning phases of stellar evolution, respectively. So far, quantitative studies on the extremely short-lived neutron-rich nuclei constituting the ( n, γ) network of the r process are out of reach. On the contrary, the situation for the s -process is far advanced, as the reaction path of the s process from 12C to the Pb/Bi region is located within the valley of stability. Accordingly, a comprehensive database of experimental ( n, γ) cross sections has been established. While for many stable isotopes the necessary accuracy is still to be reached, reliable cross sections for the involved unstable isotopes are almost completely missing. Because of the intrinsic γ background of radioactive samples, successful time-of-flight measurements are depending on intense pulsed neutron sources. Such data are fundamental for our understanding of branchings in the s -process reaction path, which carry important model-independent information on neutron flux and temperature in the deep stellar interior.

  9. Neutron emission following muon capture in Ce-142, Ce-140, Ba-138, and Sn-120.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, G. R., Jr.; Martin, P.; Welsh, R. E.; Jenkins, D. A.; Powers, R. J.; Kunselman, A. R.; Miller, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Branching ratios to excited nuclear states formed after muon capture have been measured with Ge(Li) detectors. The delayed gamma rays were observed in studies of muonic Ce-142, Ce-140, Ba-138, and Sn-120, using separated isotopes. The resulting isotopes formed indicate at least a 60% probability of neutron emission upon muon capture, with the most likely product resulting from single-neutron emission. No evidence for delayed proton emission with a probability higher than 2% was found. Using our more precise energies for the observed nuclear transitions, we present revised energy levels schemes for La-141, La-139, Cs-137, and In-119.

  10. NIFTI and DISCOS: New concepts for a compact accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, J.; Ludewig, H.; Todosow, M.; Reich, M.

    1995-06-01

    Two new concepts, NIFTI and DISCOS, are described. These concepts enable the efficient production of epithermal neutrons for BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) medical treatment, utilizing a low current, low energy proton beam impacting on a lithium target. The NIFTI concept uses fluoride compounds, such as lead or beryllium fluoride, to efficiently degrade high energy neutrons from the lithium target to the lower energies required for BNCT. The fluoride compounds are in turn encased in an iron layer that strongly impedes the transmission of neutrons with energies above 24 KeV. Lower energy neutrons readily pass through this iron filter, which has a deep window in its scattering cross section at 24 KeV. The DISCOS concept uses a rapidly rotating, high g disc to create a series of thin ({approximately} 1 micron thickness) liquid lithium targets in the form of continuous films or sheets of discrete droplets--through which the proton beam passes. The average energy lost by a proton as it passes through a single target is small, approximately 10 KeV. Between the targets, the proton beam is re-accelerated by an applied DC electric field. The DISCOS approach enables the accelerator--target facility to operate with a beam energy only slightly above the threshold value for neutron production--resulting in an output beam of low-energy epithermal neutrons--while achieving a high yield of neutrons per milliamp of proton beam current. Parametric trade studies of the NIFTI and DISCOS concepts are described. These include analyses of a broad range of NIFTI designs using the Monte carlo MCNP neutronics code, as well as mechanical and thermal-hydraulic analyses of various DISCOS designs.

  11. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Jr., Thomas Dean

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 x 108 n/cm2 • s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 x 10-11cGy•cm2/nepi and 20 x 10-11 cGy•cm2/nepi , respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  12. Monte Carlo calculations of lung dose in ORNL phantom for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Krstic, D; Markovic, V M; Jovanovic, Z; Milenkovic, B; Nikezic, D; Atanackovic, J

    2014-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate dose for possible treatment of cancers by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The computational model of male Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) phantom was used to simulate tumours in the lung. Calculations have been performed by means of the MCNP5/X code. In this simulation, two opposite neutron beams were considered, in order to obtain uniform neutron flux distribution inside the lung. The obtained results indicate that the lung cancer could be treated by BNCT under the assumptions of calculations.

  13. Thermal neutron radiative capture cross-section of 186W(n, γ)187W reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, V. H.; Son, P. N.

    2016-06-01

    The thermal neutron radiative capture cross section for 186W(n, γ)187W reaction was measured by the activation method using the filtered neutron beam at the Dalat research reactor. An optimal composition of Si and Bi, in single crystal form, has been used as neutron filters to create the high-purity filtered neutron beam with Cadmium ratio of Rcd = 420 and peak energy En = 0.025 eV. The induced activities in the irradiated samples were measured by a high resolution HPGe digital gamma-ray spectrometer. The present result of cross section has been determined relatively to the reference value of the standard reaction 197Au(n, γ)198Au. The necessary correction factors for gamma-ray true coincidence summing, and thermal neutron self-shielding effects were taken into account in this experiment by Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. Dodecaborate lipid liposomes as new vehicles for boron delivery system of neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Manabu; Ban, Hyun Seung; Nakai, Kei; Inomata, Ryu; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Matsumura, Akira; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2010-05-01

    Closo-dodecaborate lipid liposomes were developed as new vehicles for boron delivery system (BDS) of neutron capture therapy. The current approach is unique because the liposome shell itself possesses cytocidal potential in combination with neutron irradiation. The liposomes composed of closo-dodecaborate lipids DSBL and DPBL displayed high cytotoxicity with thermal neutron irradiation. The closo-dodecaborate lipid liposomes were taken up into the cytoplasm by endocytosis without degradation of the liposomes. Boron concentration of 22.7 ppm in tumor was achieved by injection with DSBL-25% PEG liposomes at 20mg B/kg. Promising BNCT effects were observed in the mice injected with DSBL-25% PEG liposomes: the tumor growth was significantly suppressed after thermal neutron irradiation (1.8 x 10(12)neutrons/cm(2)).

  15. Neutron capture nuclei-containing carbon nanoparticles for destruction of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kuo Chu; Lai, Po Dong; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Wang, Pei-Jen; Yuan, Chiun-Jye

    2010-11-01

    HeLa cells were incubated with neutron capture nuclei (boron-10 and gadolinium)-containing carbon nanoparticles, followed by irradiation of slow thermal neutron beam. Under a neutron flux of 6 x 10(11) n/cm(2) (or 10 min irradiation at a neutron flux of 1 x 10(9) n/cm(2) s), the percentages of acute cell death at 8 h after irradiation are 52, 55, and 28% for HeLa cells fed with BCo@CNPs, GdCo@CNPs, and Co@CNPs, respectively. The proliferation capability of the survived HeLa cells was also found to be significantly suppressed. At 48 h after neutron irradiation, the cell viability further decreases to 35 +/- 5% as compared to the control set receiving the same amount of neutron irradiation dose but in the absence of carbon nanoparticles. This work demonstrates "proof-of-concept" examples of neutron capture therapy using (10)B-, (157)Gd-, and (59)Co-containing carbon nanoparticles for effective destruction of cancer cells. It will also be reported the preparation and surface functionalization of boron or gadolinium doped core-shell cobalt/carbon nanoparticles (BCo@CNPs, GdCo@CNPs and Co@CNPs) using a modified DC pulsed arc discharge method, and their characterization by various spectroscopic measurements, including TEM, XRD, SQUID, FT-IR, etc. Tumor cell targeting ability was introduced by surface modification of these carbon nanoparticles with folate moieties.

  16. Combination of boron and gadolinium compounds for neutron capture therapy. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, A; Zhang, T; Nakai, K; Endo, K; Kumada, H; Yamamoto, T; Yoshida, F; Sakurai, Y; Yamamoto, K; Nose, T

    2005-03-01

    In neutron capture therapy, the therapeutic effect of the boron compound is based on alpha particles produced by the B(n, alpha) reaction while with the gadolinium compound the main radiation effect is from gamma rays derived from the Gd(n, gamma) reaction. The uptake and distribution within the tumor may be different among these compounds. Thus, the combination of the boron and gadolinium compounds may be beneficial for enhancing the radiation dose to the tumor. Chinese hamster fibroblast V79 cells were used. For the neutron targeting compounds, 10B (BSH) at 0, 5, 10, and 15 ppm, and 157Gd (Gd-BOPTA) at 0, 800, 1600, 2400, 3200, and 4800 ppm, were combined. The neutron irradiation was performed with thermal neutrons for 30 min. (neutron flux: 0.84 x 10(8) n/cm2/s in free air). The combination of the boron and gadolinium compounds showed an additive effect when the gadolinium concentration was lower than 1600 ppm. This additive effect decreased as a function of gadolinium concentration at 2400 ppm and resulted in no additive effect at more than 3200 ppm of gadolinium. In conclusion, the combination of the boron and gadolinium compounds can enhance the therapeutic effect with an optimum concentration ratio. When the gadolinium concentration is too high, it may weaken the boron neutron capture reaction due to the high cross-section of gadolinium compound against neutrons.

  17. Boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Joel, D.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.

    1996-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiation therapy for cancer. The first component of this treatment is the preferential localization of the stable isotope {sup 10}B in tumor cells by targeting with boronated compounds. The tumor and surrounding tissue is then irradiated with a neutron beam resulting in thermal neutron/{sup 10}B reactions ({sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li) resulting in the production of localized high LET radiation from alpha and {sup 7}Li particles. These products of the neutron capture reaction are very damaging to cells, but of short range so that the majority of the ionizing energy released is microscopically confined to the vicinity of the boron-containing compound. In principal it should be possible with BNCT to selectively destroy small nests or even single cancer cells located within normal tissue. It follows that the major improvements in this form of radiation therapy are going to come largely from the development of boron compounds with greater tumor selectivity, although there will certainly be advances made in neutron beam quality as well as the possible development of alternative sources of neutron beams, particularly accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams.

  18. In-phantom two-dimensional thermal neutron distribution for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Matsumura, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Kumada, H.; Shibata, Y.; Nose, T.

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in-phantom thermal neutron distribution derived from neutron beams for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT). Gold activation wires arranged in a cylindrical water phantom with (void-in-phantom) or without (standard phantom) a cylinder styrene form placed inside were irradiated by using the epithermal beam (ENB) and the mixed thermal-epithermal beam (TNB-1) at the Japan Research Reactor No 4. With ENB, we observed a flattened distribution of thermal neutron flux and a significantly enhanced thermal flux delivery at a depth compared with the results of using TNB-1. The thermal neutron distribution derived from both the ENB and TNB-1 was significantly improved in the void-in-phantom, and a double high dose area was formed lateral to the void. The flattened distribution in the circumference of the void was observed with the combination of ENB and the void-in-phantom. The measurement data suggest that the ENB may provide a clinical advantage in the form of an enhanced and flattened dose delivery to the marginal tissue of a post-operative cavity in which a residual and/or microscopically infiltrating tumour often occurs. The combination of the epithermal neutron beam and IOBNCT will improve the clinical results of BNCT for brain tumours.

  19. In-phantom two-dimensional thermal neutron distribution for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Matsumura, A; Yamamoto, K; Kumada, H; Shibata, Y; Nose, T

    2002-07-21

    The aim of this study was to determine the in-phantom thermal neutron distribution derived from neutron beams for intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT). Gold activation wires arranged in a cylindrical water phantom with (void-in-phantom) or without (standard phantom) a cylinder styrene form placed inside were irradiated by using the epithermal beam (ENB) and the mixed thermal-epithermal beam (TNB-1) at the Japan Research Reactor No 4. With ENB, we observed a flattened distribution of thermal neutron flux and a significantly enhanced thermal flux delivery at a depth compared with the results of using TNB-1. The thermal neutron distribution derived from both the ENB and TNB-1 was significantly improved in the void-in-phantom, and a double high dose area was formed lateral to the void. The flattened distribution in the circumference of the void was observed with the combination of ENB and the void-in-phantom. The measurement data suggest that the ENB may provide a clinical advantage in the form of an enhanced and flattened dose delivery to the marginal tissue of a post-operative cavity in which a residual and/or microscopically infiltrating tumour often occurs. The combination of the epithermal neutron beam and IOBNCT will improve the clinical results of BNCT for brain tumours.

  20. Thermal Neutron Capture and Thermal Neutron Burn-up of K isomeric state of 177mLu: a way to the Neutron Super-Elastic Scattering cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Roig, O.; Belier, G.; Meot, V.; Daugas, J.-M.; Romain, P.

    2006-03-13

    Thermal neutron radiative capture and burn-up measurements of the K isomeric state in 177Lu form part of an original method to indirectly obtain the neutron super-elastic scattering cross section at thermal energy. Neutron super-elastic scattering, also called neutron inelastic acceleration, occurs during the neutron collisions with an excited nuclear level. In this reaction, the nucleus could partly transfer its excitation energy to the scattered neutron.

  1. FY07 LDRD Final Report Neutron Capture Cross-Section Measurements at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W; Agvaanluvsan, U; Wilk, P; Becker, J; Wang, T

    2008-02-08

    We have measured neutron capture cross sections intended to address defense science problems including mix and the Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU), and provide details about statistical decay of excited nuclei. A major part of this project included developing the ability to produce radioactive targets. The cross-section measurements were made using the white neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, the detector array called DANCE (The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) and targets important for astrophysics and stockpile stewardship. DANCE is at the leading edge of neutron capture physics and represents a major leap forward in capability. The detector array was recently built with LDRD money. Our measurements are a significant part of the early results from the new experimental DANCE facility. Neutron capture reactions are important for basic nuclear science, including astrophysics and the statistics of the {gamma}-ray cascades, and for applied science, including stockpile science and technology. We were most interested in neutron capture with neutron energies in the range between 1 eV and a few hundred keV, with targets important to basic science, and the s-process in particular. Of particular interest were neutron capture cross-section measurements of rare isotopes, especially radioactive isotopes. A strong collaboration between universities and Los Alamos due to the Academic Alliance was in place at the start of our project. Our project gave Livermore leverage in focusing on Livermore interests. The Lawrence Livermore Laboratory did not have a resident expert in cross-section measurements; this project allowed us to develop this expertise. For many radionuclides, the cross sections for destruction, especially (n,{gamma}), are not well known, and there is no adequate model that describes neutron capture. The modeling problem is significant because, at low energies where capture reactions are important, the neutron

  2. Boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of cerebral gliomas. I. Theoretical evaluation of the efficacy of various neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Zamenhof, R G; Murray, B W; Brownell, G L; Wellum, G R; Tolpin, E I

    1975-01-01

    The technique of boron neutron capture therapy in the treatment of cerebral gliomas depends upon the selective loading of the tumor with a 10B-enriched compound and subsequent irradiation of the brain with low-energy neutrons. The charged particles produced in the 10B (n,alpha) 7Li reaction have ranges in tissue of less than 10 mum so that the dose distribution closely follows the 10B distribution even to the cellular level. The effectiveness of this therapy procedure is dependent not only on the 10B compound but on the spectral characteristics of the neutron source as well. Hence, an optimization of these characteristics will increase the chances of therapeutic success. Transport calculations using a neutral particle transport code have been made to determine the dose-depth distributions within a simple head phantom for five different incident neutron beams. Comparison of these beams to determine their relative therapeutic efficacy was made by the use of a maximum useable depth criterion. In particular, with presently available compounds, the MIT reactor (MITR) therapy beam (a) is not inferior to a pure thermal neutron beam, (b) would be marginally improved if its gamma-ray contamination were eliminated, (c) is superior to a partially 10B-filtered MITR beam, and (d) produces a maximum useable depth which is strongly dependent upon the tumor-to-blood ratio of 10B concentrations and weakly dependent upon the absolute 10B concentration in tumor. A pure epithermal neutron beam with a mean energy of 37 eV is shown to have close to the optimal characteristics for boron neutron capture therapy. Futhermore, these optimal characteristics can be approximated by a judiciously D2O moderated and 10B-filtered 252Cf neutron source. This tailored 252Cf source would have at least a 1.5 cm greater maximum useable depth than the MITR therapy beam for realistic 10B concentrations. However, at least one gram of 252Cf would be needed to make this a practical therapy source. If the

  3. Gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB), a new treatment method for intravascular brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Enger, Shirin A.; Rezaei, Arash; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-01-15

    Restenosis is a major problem after balloon angioplasty and stent implantation. The aim of this study is to introduce gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB) as a suitable modality for treatment of stenosis. The utility of GdNCB in intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) of stent stenosis is investigated by using the GEANT4 and MCNP4B Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. To study capture rate, Kerma, absorbed dose and absorbed dose rate around a Gd-containing stent activated with neutrons, a 30 mm long, 5 mm diameter gadolinium foil is chosen. The input data is a neutron spectrum used for clinical neutron capture therapy in Studsvik, Sweden. Thermal neutron capture in gadolinium yields a spectrum of high-energy gamma photons, which due to the build-up effect gives an almost flat dose delivery pattern to the first 4 mm around the stent. The absorbed dose rate is 1.33 Gy/min, 0.25 mm from the stent surface while the dose to normal tissue is in order of 0.22 Gy/min, i.e., a factor of 6 lower. To spare normal tissue further fractionation of the dose is also possible. The capture rate is relatively high at both ends of the foil. The dose distribution from gamma and charge particle radiation at the edges and inside the stent contributes to a nonuniform dose distribution. This will lead to higher doses to the surrounding tissue and may prevent stent edge and in-stent restenosis. The position of the stent can be verified and corrected by the treatment plan prior to activation. Activation of the stent by an external neutron field can be performed days after catherization when the target cells start to proliferate and can be expected to be more radiation sensitive. Another advantage of the nonradioactive gadolinium stent is the possibility to avoid radiation hazard to personnel.

  4. The Intermediate Neutron-capture Process and Carbon-enhanced Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Melanie; Stancliffe, Richard J.; Lugaro, Maria; Meyer, Bradley S.

    2016-11-01

    Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars in the Galactic Halo display enrichments in heavy elements associated with either the s (slow) or the r (rapid) neutron-capture process (e.g., barium and europium, respectively), and in some cases they display evidence of both. The abundance patterns of these CEMP-s/r stars, which show both Ba and Eu enrichment, are particularly puzzling, since the s and the r processes require neutron densities that are more than ten orders of magnitude apart and, hence, are thought to occur in very different stellar sites with very different physical conditions. We investigate whether the abundance patterns of CEMP-s/r stars can arise from the nucleosynthesis of the intermediate neutron-capture process (the i process), which is characterized by neutron densities between those of the s and the r processes. Using nuclear network calculations, we study neutron capture nucleosynthesis at different constant neutron densities n ranging from 107-1015 cm-3. With respect to the classical s process resulting from neutron densities on the lowest side of this range, neutron densities on the highest side result in abundance patterns, which show an increased production of heavy s-process and r-process elements, but similar abundances of the light s-process elements. Such high values of n may occur in the thermal pulses of asymptotic giant branch stars due to proton ingestion episodes. Comparison to the surface abundances of 20 CEMP-s/r stars shows that our modeled i-process abundances successfully reproduce observed abundance patterns, which could not be previously explained by s-process nucleosynthesis. Because the i-process models fit the abundances of CEMP-s/r stars so well, we propose that this class should be renamed as CEMP-i.

  5. Neutron capture cross section measurement of 151Sm at the CERN neutron time of flight facility (n_TOF).

    PubMed

    Abbondanno, U; Aerts, G; Alvarez-Velarde, F; Alvarez-Pol, H; Andriamonje, S; Andrzejewski, J; Badurek, G; Baumann, P; Becvár, F; Benlliure, J; Berthoumieux, E; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Capote, R; Cennini, P; Chepel, V; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Cortes, G; Cortina, D; Couture, A; Cox, J; Dababneh, S; Dahlfors, M; David, S; Dolfini, R; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Embid-Segura, M; Ferrant, L; Ferrari, A; Ferreira-Marques, R; Frais-Koelbl, H; Furman, W; Goncalves, I; Gallino, R; Gonzalez-Romero, E; Goverdovski, A; Gramegna, F; Griesmayer, E; Gunsing, F; Haas, B; Haight, R; Heil, M; Herrera-Martinez, A; Isaev, S; Jericha, E; Käppeler, F; Kadi, Y; Karadimos, D; Kerveno, M; Ketlerov, V; Koehler, P; Konovalov, V; Krticka, M; Lamboudis, C; Leeb, H; Lindote, A; Lopes, I; Lozano, M; Lukic, S; Marganiec, J; Marrone, S; Martinez-Val, J; Mastinu, P; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Molina-Coballes, A; Moreau, C; Mosconi, M; Neves, F; Oberhummer, H; O'Brien, S; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Pavlopoulos, P; Perlado, J M; Perrot, L; Pignatari, M; Plag, R; Plompen, A; Plukis, A; Poch, A; Policarpo, A; Pretel, C; Quesada, J; Raman, S; Rapp, W; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Rosetti, M; Rubbia, C; Rudolf, G; Rullhusen, P; Salgado, J; Soares, J C; Stephan, C; Tagliente, G; Tain, J; Tassan-Got, L; Tavora, L; Terlizzi, R; Vannini, G; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Villamarin, D; Vincente, M C; Vlachoudis, V; Voss, F; Wendler, H; Wiescher, M; Wisshak, K

    2004-10-15

    The151Sm(n,gamma)152Sm cross section has been measured at the spallation neutron facility n_TOF at CERN in the energy range from 1 eV to 1 MeV. The new facility combines excellent resolution in neutron time-of-flight, low repetition rates, and an unsurpassed instantaneous luminosity, resulting in rather favorable signal/background ratios. The 151Sm cross section is of importance for characterizing neutron capture nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars. At a thermal energy of kT=30 keV the Maxwellian averaged cross section of this unstable isotope (t(1/2)=93 yr) was determined to be 3100+/-160 mb, significantly larger than theoretical predictions.

  6. Evaluation of an iron-filtered epithermal neutron beam for neutron-capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Musolino, S V; McGinley, P H; Greenwood, R C; Kliauga, P; Fairchild, R G

    1991-01-01

    An epithermal neutron filter using iron, aluminum, and sulfur was evaluated to determine if the therapeutic performance could be improved with respect to aluminum-sulfur-based filters. An empirically optimized filter was developed that delivered a 93% pure beam of 24-keV epithermal neutrons. It was expected that a thick filter using iron with a density thickness greater than 200 g/cm2 would eliminate the excess gamma contamination found in Al-S filters. This research showed that prompt gamma production from neutron interactions in iron was the dominant dose component. Dosimetric parameters of the beam were determined from the measurement of absorbed dose in air, thermal neutron flux in a head phantom, neutron and gamma spectroscopy, and microdosimetry.

  7. Comet assay study of DNA damage and repair of tumour cells following boron neutron capture irradiation with fast d(14) + Be neutrons.

    PubMed

    Pöller, F; Bauch, T; Sauerwein, W; Böcker, W; Wittig, A; Streffer, C

    1996-11-01

    We compared the amount of radiation-induced DNA damage and the extent of DNA repair in human melanoma cells (MeWo) using the 'comet assay' after neutron, boron neutron capture and X-irradiation. Using a colony-forming assay it was shown earlier that lethal effects in tumour cells treated with fast neutrons may be increased by the neutron capture reaction 10B(n, alpha)7Li. The effectiveness of boron neutron capture in killing tumour cells depends on the number of 10B atoms delivered to the tumour, the subcellular distribution of 10B and the thermal neutron fluence at the side of the tumour. Using the 'comet assay' the DNA damage of fast neutrons (mean energy 5.8 MeV) was shown to be significantly greater than for the same absorbed dose of X-rays. The presence of 600 ppm 10B (boric acid H5 10BO3) in the cell medium during irradiation with d(14) + Be neutrons in a phantom enhances the DNA damage by 20% compared with neutron irradiation alone. After DNA damage induction by neutrons and neutron capture of boron, the DNA repair capacity of the MeWo cells is significantly reduced in comparison with X-irradiation resulting in proportionally more residual DNA damage after 180 min of repair time.

  8. An accelerator-based epithermal photoneutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Hannah E.

    1996-04-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary cancer radiotherapy modality in which a boronated pharmaceutical that preferentially accumulates in malignant tissue is first administered, followed by exposing the tissue in the treatment volume to a thermal neutron field. Current usable beams are reactor-based but a viable alternative is the production of an epithermal neutron beam from an accelerator. Current literature cites various proposed accelerator-based designs, most of which are based on proton beams with beryllium or lithium targets. This dissertation examines the efficacy of a novel approach to BNCT treatments that incorporates an electron linear accelerator in the production of a photoneutron source. This source may help to resolve some of the present concerns associated with accelerator sources, including that of target cooling. The photoneutron production process is discussed as a possible alternate source of neutrons for eventual BNCT treatments for cancer. A conceptual design to produce epithermal photoneutrons by high photons (due to bremsstrahlung) impinging on deuterium targets is presented along with computational and experimental neutron production data. A clinically acceptable filtered epithermal neutron flux on the order of 107 neutrons per second per milliampere of electron current is shown to be obtainable. Additionally, the neutron beam is modified and characterized for BNCT applications by employing two unique moderating materials (an Al/AlF3 composite and a stacked Al/Teflon design) at various incident electron energies.

  9. Improvement of dose distribution by central beam shielding in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Ono, Koji

    2007-12-21

    Since boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with epithermal neutron beams started at the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) in June 2002, nearly 200 BNCT treatments have been carried out. The epithermal neutron irradiation significantly improves the dose distribution, compared with the previous irradiation mainly using thermal neutrons. However, the treatable depth limit still remains. One effective technique to improve the limit is the central shield method. Simulations were performed for the incident neutron energies and the annular components of the neutron source. It was clear that thermal neutron flux distribution could be improved by decreasing the lower energy neutron component and the inner annular component of the incident beam. It was found that a central shield of 4-6 cm diameter and 10 mm thickness is effective for the 12 cm diameter irradiation field. In BNCT at KUR, the depth dose distribution can be much improved by the central shield method, resulting in a relative increase of the dose at 8 cm depth by about 30%. In addition to the depth dose distribution, the depth dose profile is also improved. As the dose rate in the central area is reduced by the additional shielding, the necessary irradiation time, however, increases by about 30% compared to normal treatment.

  10. Using {sup 171,173}Yb(d,p{gamma}) to Benchmark a Surrogate Reaction for Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R.; Cizewski, J. A.; Hatarik, A. M.; O'Malley, P. D.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Burke, J. T.; Lesher, S. R.; Gibelin, J.; Phair, L.; Swan, T.

    2009-03-10

    The {sup 171,173}Yb(d,p{gamma}) reactions have been measured to determine the efficacy of this reaction as a surrogate for neutron capture on radioactive nuclei. Preliminary results for the surrogate cross section ratios, with gating conditions that best mimic the spin distribution of neutron capture, reproduce the Wisshak et al., (n,{gamma}) cross section ratios within 15%.

  11. New measurement of θ13 via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    DOE PAGES

    F. P. An

    2016-04-21

    This article reports an improved independent measurement of neutrino mixing angle θ13 at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. Electron antineutrinos were identified by inverse β-decays with the emitted neutron captured by hydrogen, yielding a data set with principally distinct uncertainties from that with neutrons captured by gadolinium. With the final two of eight antineutrino detectors installed, this study used 621 days of data including the previously reported 217-day data set with six detectors. The dominant statistical uncertainty was reduced by 49%. Intensive studies of the cosmogenic muon-induced 9Li and fast neutron backgrounds and the neutron-capture energy selection efficiency, resultedmore » in a reduction of the systematic uncertainty by 26%. The deficit in the detected number of antineutrinos at the far detectors relative to the expected number based on the near detectors yielded sin22θ13 = 0.071 ± 0.011 in the three-neutrino-oscillation framework. As a result, the combination of this result with the gadolinium-capture result is also reported.« less

  12. A beam-modification assembly for experimental neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, D.N.; Kalef-Ezra, J.A.; Saraf, S.K.; Joel, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    Recent attempts to treat intracerebral rat gliomas by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) have been somewhat disappointing, perhaps in part because of excessive whole-body and nasopharyngeal irradiation. Intracerebral rat gliomas were treated by BNCT with more success using a new beam-modification assembly. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Determination of the neutron-capture rate of 17C for r -process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, M.; Typel, S.; Wu, M.-R.; Adachi, T.; Aksyutina, Y.; Alcantara, J.; Altstadt, S.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ashwood, N.; Atar, L.; Aumann, T.; Avdeichikov, V.; Barr, M.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Benlliure, J.; Bertulani, C. A.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Burgunder, G.; Caamano, M.; Caesar, C.; Casarejos, E.; Catford, W.; Cederkäll, J.; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, M.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Crespo, R.; Datta Pramanik, U.; Diaz Fernandez, P.; Dillmann, I.; Elekes, Z.; Enders, J.; Ershova, O.; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Freer, M.; Freudenberger, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubev, P.; Gonzalez Diaz, D.; Hagdahl, J.; Heftrich, T.; Heil, M.; Heinz, A.; Henriques, A.; Holl, M.; Ickert, G.; Ignatov, A.; Jakobsson, B.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Knöbel, R.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, N.; Labiche, M.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Lepyoshkina, O.; Lindberg, S.; Machado, J.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Maroussov, V.; Mostazo, M.; Movsesyan, A.; Najafi, A.; Neff, T.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Perea, A.; Petri, M.; Pietri, S.; Plag, R.; Prochazka, A.; Rahaman, A.; Rastrepina, G.; Reifarth, R.; Ribeiro, G.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Rigollet, C.; Riisager, K.; Röder, M.; Rossi, D.; Sanchez del Rio, J.; Savran, D.; Scheit, H.; Simon, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stoica, V.; Streicher, B.; Taylor, J. T.; Tengblad, O.; Terashima, S.; Thies, R.; Togano, Y.; Uberseder, E.; Van de Walle, J.; Velho, P.; Volkov, V.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Weigand, M.; Wheldon, C.; Wilson, G.; Wimmer, C.; Winfield, J. S.; Woods, P.; Yakorev, D.; Zhukov, M. V.; Zilges, A.; Zuber, K.; R3B Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    With the R 3B -LAND setup at GSI we have measured exclusive relative-energy spectra of the Coulomb dissociation of 18C at a projectile energy around 425 A MeV on a lead target, which are needed to determine the radiative neutron-capture cross sections of 17C into the ground state of 18C. Those data have been used to constrain theoretical calculations for transitions populating excited states in 18C. This allowed to derive the astrophysical cross section σnγ * accounting for the thermal population of 17C target states in astrophysical scenarios. The experimentally verified capture rate is significantly lower than those of previously obtained Hauser-Feshbach estimations at temperatures T9≤ 1 GK. Network simulations with updated neutron-capture rates and hydrodynamics according to the neutrino-driven wind model as well as the neutron-star merger scenario reveal no pronounced influence of neutron capture of 17C on the production of second- and third-peak elements in contrast to earlier sensitivity studies.

  14. Monte-Carlo Quantum Chemistry of Biogene Amines. Laser and Neutron Capture Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, A. V.; Malinovskaya, S. V.; Khetselius, O. Yu.; Loboda, A. V.

    2009-03-01

    Monte-Carlo quantum calculation of the cluster consisting of the serotonine ST (histamine HM) molecules and 100 molecules of water is carried out. It is found that the zwitterion appears as expected to be strongly favoured with respect to neutral molecule. The perspective possibilities of laser and neutron capture action on different biomolecules are indicated.

  15. Monte-Carlo Quantum Chemistry of Biogene Amines. Laser and Neutron Capture Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.; Malinovskaya, S. V.; Khetselius, O. Yu.; Loboda, A. V.

    2009-03-09

    Monte-Carlo quantum calculation of the cluster consisting of the serotonine ST (histamine HM) molecules and 100 molecules of water is carried out. It is found that the zwitterion appears as expected to be strongly favoured with respect to neutral molecule. The perspective possibilities of laser and neutron capture action on different biomolecules are indicated.

  16. New measurement of θ13 via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    SciTech Connect

    F. P. An

    2016-04-21

    This article reports an improved independent measurement of neutrino mixing angle θ13 at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. Electron antineutrinos were identified by inverse β-decays with the emitted neutron captured by hydrogen, yielding a data set with principally distinct uncertainties from that with neutrons captured by gadolinium. With the final two of eight antineutrino detectors installed, this study used 621 days of data including the previously reported 217-day data set with six detectors. The dominant statistical uncertainty was reduced by 49%. Intensive studies of the cosmogenic muon-induced 9Li and fast neutron backgrounds and the neutron-capture energy selection efficiency, resulted in a reduction of the systematic uncertainty by 26%. The deficit in the detected number of antineutrinos at the far detectors relative to the expected number based on the near detectors yielded sin213 = 0.071 ± 0.011 in the three-neutrino-oscillation framework. As a result, the combination of this result with the gadolinium-capture result is also reported.

  17. Spermidinium closo-dodecaborate-encapsulating liposomes as efficient boron delivery vehicles for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, Shoji; Miyoshi, Tatsuro; Koganei, Hayato; El-Zaria, Mohamed E; Viñas, Clara; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-21

    closo-Dodecaborate-encapsulating liposomes were developed as boron delivery vehicles for neutron capture therapy. The use of spermidinium as a counter cation of closo-dodecaborates was essential not only for the preparation of high boron content liposome solutions but also for efficient boron delivery to tumors.

  18. Stellar Neutron Capture Cross Sections of the Lu and Hf Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wisshak, K.; Voss, F.; Kaeppeler, F.; Kazakov, L.; Krticka, M.

    2005-05-24

    The neutron capture cross sections of 175,176Lu and 176,177,178,179,180Hf have been measured in the energy range from 3 to 225 keV at the Karlsruhe 3.7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator relative to the gold standard. Neutrons were produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction and capture events were detected by the Karlsruhe 4{pi}BaF2 detector. The cross section ratios could be determined with uncertainties between 0.9 and 1.8% about a factor of five more accurate than previous data. A strong population of isomeric states was found in neutron capture of the Hf isotopes, which are only partially explained by CASINO/GEANT simulations based on the known level schemes.Maxwellian averaged neutron capture cross sections were calculated for thermal energies between kT = 8 keV and 100 keV. Severe differences up to40% were found to the data of a recent evaluation based on existing experimental results. The new data allow for a much more reliable analysis of the important branching in the s-process synthesis path at 176Lu which can be interpreted as an s-process thermometer.

  19. New measurement of θ13 via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Cao, D.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Cen, W. R.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J. H.; Cheng, J.-H.; Cheng, J.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cheng, Z. K.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Chukanov, A.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, X. F.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolgareva, M.; Dove, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Gill, R.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Grassi, M.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, L.; Guo, R. P.; Guo, X. H.; Guo, Z.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, R.; Hans, S.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Higuera, A.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H. X.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Huo, W.; Hussain, G.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Joshi, J.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kohn, S.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Langford, T. J.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. H. C.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, J. K. C.; Li, C.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, S.; Li, S. C.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, S.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, J. J.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Loh, C. W.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Lu, J. S.; Luk, K. B.; Lv, Z.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; Malyshkin, Y.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McDonald, K. T.; McKeown, R. D.; Mitchell, I.; Mooney, M.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevskiy, A.; Pan, H.-R.; Park, J.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tang, W.; Taychenachev, D.; Konstantin, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Tull, C. E.; Viaux, N.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, C.-H.; Wu, Q.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yan, J.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, H.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Ye, Z.; Yeh, M.; Young, B. L.; Yu, G. Y.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, X. T.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y. F.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    This article reports an improved independent measurement of neutrino mixing angle θ13 at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment. Electron antineutrinos were identified by inverse β -decays with the emitted neutron captured by hydrogen, yielding a data set with principally distinct uncertainties from that with neutrons captured by gadolinium. With the final two of eight antineutrino detectors installed, this study used 621 days of data including the previously reported 217-day data set with six detectors. The dominant statistical uncertainty was reduced by 49%. Intensive studies of the cosmogenic muon-induced 9Li and fast neutron backgrounds and the neutron-capture energy selection efficiency, resulted in a reduction of the systematic uncertainty by 26%. The deficit in the detected number of antineutrinos at the far detectors relative to the expected number based on the near detectors yielded sin22 θ13=0.071 ±0.011 in the three-neutrino-oscillation framework. The combination of this result with the gadolinium-capture result is also reported.

  20. New Neutron-capture Measurements in 23 Open Clusters. I. The r-Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overbeek, Jamie C.; Friel, Eileen D.; Jacobson, Heather R.

    2016-06-01

    Neutron-capture elements, those with Z > 35, are the least well understood in terms of nucleosynthesis and formation environments. The rapid neutron-capture, or r-process, elements are formed in the environments and/or remnants of massive stars, while the slow neutron-capture, or s-process, elements are primarily formed in low-mass AGB stars. These elements can provide much information about Galactic star formation and enrichment, but observational data are limited. We have assembled a sample of 68 stars in 23 open clusters that we use to probe abundance trends for six neutron-capture elements (Eu, Gd, Dy, Mo, Pr, and Nd) with cluster age and location in the disk of the Galaxy. In order to keep our analysis as homogeneous as possible, we use an automated synthesis fitting program, which also enables us to measure multiple (3-10) lines for each element. We find that the pure r-process elements (Eu, Gd, and Dy) have positive trends with increasing cluster age, while the mixed r- and s-process elements (Mo, Pr, and Nd) have insignificant trends consistent with zero. Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, and Dy have similar, slight (although mostly statistically significant) gradients of ˜0.04 dex kpc-1. The mixed elements also appear to have nonlinear relationships with R GC.

  1. Photoneutron and Photofission Cross Sections for URANIUM-238 and THORIUM-232 Using Neutron Capture Gamma Rays.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varhue, Walter John

    The photofission and total photoneutron cross sections of ('238)U and ('232)Th have been measured as a function of energy between 4 and 11 Mev. The photons used were those produced in the neutron capture reaction in the Tangential Beam Port Facility of the University of Virginia Reactor. The capture gamma ray sources used were the following; Al, Cr, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, S, and Ti. A computer code was used to calculate the spectrum of each capture gamma ray beam used in the irradiations. This calculation accounted for the attenuation in the beam and the contribution from neutron capture in Al and H. A second code iteratively solved for the best fit cross section curve for the experimentally obtained yield data. In the total photoneutron measurement, the neutrons were counted with a Halpern type detector containing 4 BF(,3) tubes. The intensity of the beam was determined with LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters. The results agree very well with those of previous studies. In the photofission measurement, fission fragments were counted in Lexan polycarbonate, a solid state nuclear track detector. The efficiency of this counting system has been determined analytically as a function of energy with the aid of published experimental measurements of the angular distribution of fission fragments and the etching properties of Lexan. In general the technique has proved to be successful in producing differential photonuclear cross section results. Resolution of the unfolding technique is limited by the density of principal gamma ray lines available from the capture targets. An obvious improvement would be the use of more capture targets. The results and conclusions of previous studies using neutron capture gamma rays have been placed in doubt due to the nature of calculations used to obtain cross values.

  2. Preparation of iridium targets by electrodeposition for neutron capture cross section measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Bond, Evelyn M.; Moody, W. Allen; Arnold, Charles; ...

    2016-03-01

    Here, the preparation of 191Ir and 193Ir electrodeposits for neutron capture cross-section measurements at the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments located at the at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is described. The electrodeposition of iridium in the desired thickness of 0.4–1 mg/cm2 is challenging. Better yields and thicknesses were obtained using electrodeposition from isopropyl alcohol solutions than from ammonium sulfate solutions. 191Ir and 193Ir targets were initially prepared using the standard single-sided electrodeposition cell. Iridium electrodepositions using a double-sided electrodeposition cell were developed and were optimized, resulting in thick, uniform iridium deposits. LA UR 15-22475.

  3. Preparation of iridium targets by electrodeposition for neutron capture cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Evelyn M.; Moody, W. Allen; Arnold, Charles; Bredeweg, Todd A.; Jandel, Marian; Rusev, Gencho Y.

    2016-03-01

    Here, the preparation of 191Ir and 193Ir electrodeposits for neutron capture cross-section measurements at the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments located at the at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is described. The electrodeposition of iridium in the desired thickness of 0.4–1 mg/cm2 is challenging. Better yields and thicknesses were obtained using electrodeposition from isopropyl alcohol solutions than from ammonium sulfate solutions. 191Ir and 193Ir targets were initially prepared using the standard single-sided electrodeposition cell. Iridium electrodepositions using a double-sided electrodeposition cell were developed and were optimized, resulting in thick, uniform iridium deposits. LA UR 15-22475.

  4. Two-step γ cascades following thermal neutron capture in Gd,157155

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenta, S.; Bečvář, F.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Tomandl, I.

    2015-12-01

    Spectra of two-step γ cascades following neutron capture in Gd,157155 are measured using the two-Ge-detector facility installed at the thermal neutron beam of the research reactor LVR-15 at Řež. The main objective of this experiment is to obtain new information on photon strength functions, with the emphasis on the role of M 1 scissors-mode vibration. An analysis of accumulated γ -ray spectra, made within the statistical model, leads to the conclusion that the scissors mode significantly affects γ decay of all states of studied nuclei. Experimental data are compared to photon strength functions deduced from other experiments. Agreement of our results with those obtained from DANCE measurement of γ spectra following resonance neutron capture is obtained.

  5. [Development of the method of magnetic neutron capture therapy of cancer].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A A; Podoĭnitsyn, S N; Filippov, V I; Komissarova, L Kh

    2005-01-01

    The method of magnetic neutron capture therapy (MNTC) of cancer can be described as a combination of two methods: the targeted delivery of drugs using magnetic carriers and the proper neutron capture therapy which consists in tumor irradiation with thermal neutrons following the delivery of 10B compounds to the tumor site. Two-component ultradispersed particles containing Fe and C were tested as magnetic adsorbents of boron phenylalanine and borax. The quantities of absorbed borax proved sufficient for high concentration of boron atoms at the tumor site. The kinetics of boron release to saline substantiates the application of Fe-B (10%) ultradispersed particles for efficient MNTC. Both particle types have high magnetization and magnetic homogeneity, can form stable magnetic suspensions, and have low toxicity.

  6. Coupled-Channel Computation of Direct Neutron Capture on Non-Spherical Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbanas, Goran; Thompson, Ian; Escher, Jutta; Nunes, Filomena; Elster, Charlotte; Zhang, Shi-Sheng

    2014-09-01

    Models of direct neutron capture of neutrons have so far accounted for the effects of non-spherical nuclei either in the incoming wave functions (via non-spherical optical model potentials), or in the final bound states (via non-spherical real potential wells), but not in both. Since it is known that spherical optical potentials do not give a good reproduction of low energy neutron-scattering observables of deformed nuclei, we have performed calculations in which the initial and final states are both treated in a self-consistent, non-spherical-nucleus picture. We have done this in the coupled-channels model of nuclear reactions implemented in the FRESCO code by using the same deformation-length for the couplings to the rotational-band states in the incoming and the final state configurations. We compute direct capture using this method for even-mass calcium isotopes 40 , 42 , 44 , 46 , 48Ca to study the effect across the two closed neutron shells, for neutron-rich even-mass tin isotopes relevant to models of astrophysical nucleosynthesis, and for 56Fe that is an important structural material used in nuclear applications. Models of direct neutron capture of neutrons have so far accounted for the effects of non-spherical nuclei either in the incoming wave functions (via non-spherical optical model potentials), or in the final bound states (via non-spherical real potential wells), but not in both. Since it is known that spherical optical potentials do not give a good reproduction of low energy neutron-scattering observables of deformed nuclei, we have performed calculations in which the initial and final states are both treated in a self-consistent, non-spherical-nucleus picture. We have done this in the coupled-channels model of nuclear reactions implemented in the FRESCO code by using the same deformation-length for the couplings to the rotational-band states in the incoming and the final state configurations. We compute direct capture using this method for even

  7. Neutron-capture Cross Sections from Indirect Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Burke, J T; Dietrich, F S; Ressler, J J; Scielzo, N D; Thompson, I J

    2011-10-18

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions play an important role in models of astrophysical environments and simulations of the nuclear fuel cycle. Providing reliable cross section data remains a formidable task, and direct measurements have to be complemented by theoretical predictions and indirect methods. The surrogate nuclear reactions method provides an indirect approach for determining cross sections for reactions on unstable isotopes, which are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise. Current implementations of the method provide useful cross sections for (n,f) reactions, but need to be improved upon for applications to capture reactions.

  8. Implications for clinical treatment from the micrometer site dosimetric calculations in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Trent L; Kabalka, George W; Miller, Laurence F; McCormack, Michael T; Johnson, Andrew

    2009-07-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy has now been used for several malignancies. Most clinical trials have addressed its use for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. A few trials have focused on the treatment of malignant melanoma with brain metastases. Trial results for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme have been encouraging, but have not achieved the success anticipated. Results of trials for the treatment of malignant melanoma have been very promising, though with too few patients for conclusions to be drawn. Subsequent to these trials, regimens for undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma, hepatic metastases from adenocarcinoma of the colon, and head and neck malignancies have been developed. These tumors have also responded well to boron neutron capture therapy. Glioblastoma is an infiltrative tumor with distant individual tumor cells that might create a mechanism for therapeutic failure though recurrences are often local. The microdosimetry of boron neutron capture therapy can provide an explanation for this observation. Codes written to examine the micrometer scale energy deposition in boron neutron capture therapy have been used to explore the effects of near neighbor cells. Near neighbor cells can contribute a significantly increased dose depending on the geometric relationships. Different geometries demonstrate that tumors which grow by direct extension have a greater near neighbor effect, whereas infiltrative tumors lose this near neighbor dose which can be a significant decrease in dose to the cells that do not achieve optimal boron loading. This understanding helps to explain prior trial results and implies that tumors with small, closely packed cells that grow by direct extension will be the most amenable to boron neutron capture therapy.

  9. Final Stage in the Design of a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy facility at CEADEN, Cuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabal, F. Padilla; Martín, G.

    2008-08-01

    A neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Two figures-of-merit, the therapeutic gain and the neutron fluence are utilized as beam assessment parameters. An irradiation cavity is used instead of a parallel beam port for the therapy. Calculations are performed using the MCNP5 code. After the optimization of our beam-shaper a study of the dose distribution in the head, neck, tyroids, lungs and upper and middle spine had been made. The therapeutic gain is increased while the current required for one hour treatment is decreased in comparison with the trading prototypes of NG used for BNCT

  10. Final Stage in the Design of a Boron Neutron Capture Therapy facility at CEADEN, Cuba

    SciTech Connect

    Cabal, F. Padilla; Martin, G.

    2008-08-11

    A neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). Two figures-of-merit, the therapeutic gain and the neutron fluence are utilized as beam assessment parameters. An irradiation cavity is used instead of a parallel beam port for the therapy. Calculations are performed using the MCNP5 code. After the optimization of our beam-shaper a study of the dose distribution in the head, neck, tyroids, lungs and upper and middle spine had been made. The therapeutic gain is increased while the current required for one hour treatment is decreased in comparison with the trading prototypes of NG used for BNCT.

  11. Neutron capture on Zr94: Resonance parameters and Maxwellian-averaged cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliente, G.; Milazzo, P. M.; Fujii, K.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Bisterzo, S.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Furman, W.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2011-07-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of the Zr isotopes play an important role in nucleosynthesis studies. The s-process reaction flow between the Fe seed and the heavier isotopes passes through the neutron magic nucleus Zr90 and through Zr91,92,93,94, but only part of the flow extends to Zr96 because of the branching point at Zr95. Apart from their effect on the s-process flow, the comparably small isotopic (n,γ) cross sections make Zr also an interesting structural material for nuclear reactors. The Zr94 (n,γ) cross section has been measured with high resolution at the spallation neutron source n_TOF at CERN and resonance parameters are reported up to 60 keV neutron energy.

  12. Parametrization of low-energy cross sections for nonresonant neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chengbin; Cisse, Ousmane I.; Baye, Daniel

    2009-09-15

    The nonresonant component of radiative neutron capture reactions is parametrized at low energies by a polynomial of second degree. The potential model is first used to reproduce experimental data below 1 MeV with the help of spectroscopic factors. The fits are found sensitive to the scattering length of the initial s or p waves. The coefficients of a Taylor expansion are then calculated by resolution of the Schroedinger equation and its energy derivatives at energy zero. Such theory-guided parametrizations are derived for neutron capture by {sup 7}Li, {sup 12}C, {sup 14}C, {sup 16}O, and {sup 18}O. When the capture proceeds from the s wave to a weakly bound state, a Pade-like parametrization better approximates the potential-model results.

  13. Status of the Neutron Capture Measurement on 237Np with the DANCE Array at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esch, E.-I.; Alpizar-Vicente, A.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Glover, S. E.; Greife, U.; Haight, R. C.; Hatarik, R.; Kronenberg, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Pitcher, E. J.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wender, S. A.; Wouters, J. M.

    2005-05-01

    Neptunium-237 is a major constituent of spent nuclear fuel. Estimates place the amount of 237Np bound for the Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository at 40 metric tons. The Department of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program is evaluating methods for transmuting the actinide waste that will be generated by future operation of commercial nuclear power plants. The critical parameter that defines the transmutation efficiency of actinide isotopes is the neutron fission-to-capture ratio for the particular isotope in a given neutron spectrum. The calculation of transmutation efficiency therefore requires accurate fission and capture cross sections. Current 237Np evaluations available for transmuter system studies show significant discrepancies in both the fission and capture cross sections in the energy regions of interest. Herein we report on 237Np (n,γ) measurements using the recently commissioned DANCE array.

  14. Status of the Neutron Capture Measurement on 237Np with the DANCE Array at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, E.-I.; Bond, E.M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Glover, S. E.; Haight, R. C.; Kronenberg, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Pitcher, E. J.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wender, S. A.; Wouters, J. M.; Alpizar-Vicente, A.; Greife, U.; Hatarik, R.

    2005-05-24

    Neptunium-237 is a major constituent of spent nuclear fuel. Estimates place the amount of 237Np bound for the Yucca Mountain high-level waste repository at 40 metric tons. The Department of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program is evaluating methods for transmuting the actinide waste that will be generated by future operation of commercial nuclear power plants. The critical parameter that defines the transmutation efficiency of actinide isotopes is the neutron fission-to-capture ratio for the particular isotope in a given neutron spectrum. The calculation of transmutation efficiency therefore requires accurate fission and capture cross sections. Current 237Np evaluations available for transmuter system studies show significant discrepancies in both the fission and capture cross sections in the energy regions of interest. Herein we report on 237Np (n,{gamma}) measurements using the recently commissioned DANCE array.

  15. Development of a dual phantom technique for measuring the fast neutron component of dose in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, Yoshinori Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Research and development of various accelerator-based irradiation systems for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is underway throughout the world. Many of these systems are nearing or have started clinical trials. Before the start of treatment with BNCT, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the fast neutrons (over 10 keV) incident to the irradiation field must be estimated. Measurements of RBE are typically performed by biological experiments with a phantom. Although the dose deposition due to secondary gamma rays is dominant, the relative contributions of thermal neutrons (below 0.5 eV) and fast neutrons are virtually equivalent under typical irradiation conditions in a water and/or acrylic phantom. Uniform contributions to the dose deposited from thermal and fast neutrons are based in part on relatively inaccurate dose information for fast neutrons. This study sought to improve the accuracy in the dose estimation for fast neutrons by using two phantoms made of different materials in which the dose components can be separated according to differences in the interaction cross sections. The development of a “dual phantom technique” for measuring the fast neutron component of dose is reported. Methods: One phantom was filled with pure water. The other phantom was filled with a water solution of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) capitalizing on the absorbing characteristics of lithium-6 (Li-6) for thermal neutrons. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the ideal mixing ratio of Li-6 in LiOH solution. Changes in the depth dose distributions for each respective dose component along the central beam axis were used to assess the LiOH concentration at the 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 wt. % levels. Simulations were also performed with the phantom filled with 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution for 95%-enriched Li-6. A phantom was constructed containing 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution based on the simulation results. Experimental characterization of the

  16. Dosimetric implications of new compounds for neutron capture therapy (NCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Systemic application of radiolabeled or cytotoxic agents should allow targeting of primary and metastatic neoplasms on a cellular level. In fact, drug uptake in non-target cell pools often exceeds toxic levels before sufficient amounts are delivered to tumor. In addition, at the large concentration of molecules necessary for therapy, effects of saturation are often found. Application of NCT can circumvent problems associated with high uptake in competing non-target cell pools, as the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction is activated only within the radiation field. A comparison with other modes of particle therapy indicated that NCT provides significant advantages. It is however, difficult to obtain vehicles for boron transport which demonstrate both the tumor specificity and concentration requisite for NCT. A number of biomolecules have been investigated which show both the necessary concentration and specificity. These include chlorpromazine, thiouracil, porphyrins, amino acids, and nucleosides. However, these analogs have yet to be made available for NCT. Dosimetric implications of binding sites are considered, as well as alternate neutron sources. (ERB)

  17. Commercial Clinical Application of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1999-09-03

    CRADA No. 95-CR-09 among the LITCO--now Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC; a private company, Neutron Therapies Limited Liability Company, NTL formerly Ionix Corporation; and Washington State University was established in 1996 to further the development of BNCT. NTL has established a laboratory for the synthesis, under US FDA approved current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) guidelines, of key boron intermediates and final boron agents for BNCT. The company has focused initially on the development of the compound GB-10 (Na{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 10}) as the first boron agent of interest. An Investigational New Drug (IND) application for GB-10 has been filed and approved by the FDA for a Phase I human biodistribution trial in patients with non-small cell lung cancer and glioblastoma multiforme at UW under the direction of Professor Keith Stelzer, Principal Investigator (PI). These trials are funded by NTL under a contract with the UW, Department of Radiation Oncology, and the initial phases are nearing completion. Initial results show that boron-10 concentrations on the order of 100 micrograms per gram (100 ppm) can be achieved and maintained in blood with no indication of toxicity.

  18. Neutron-capture Element Abundances in Magellanic Cloud Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashburn, A. L.; Sterling, N. C.; Madonna, S.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Roederer, I. U.; Geballe, T. R.

    2016-11-01

    We present near-infrared spectra of 10 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC), acquired with the FIRE and GNIRS spectrometers on the 6.5 m Baade and 8.1 m Gemini South Telescopes, respectively. We detect Se and/or Kr emission lines in eight of these objects, the first detections of n-capture elements in Magellanic Cloud PNe. Our abundance analysis shows large s-process enrichments of Kr (0.6-1.3 dex) in the six PNe in which it was detected, and Se is enriched by 0.5-0.9 dex in five objects. We also estimate upper limits to Rb and Cd abundances in these objects. Our abundance results for the LMC are consistent with the hypothesis that PNe with 2-3 M ⊙ progenitors dominate the bright end of the PN luminosity function in young gas-rich galaxies. We find no significant correlations between s-process enrichments and other elemental abundances, central star temperature, or progenitor mass, though this is likely due to our small sample size. We determine S abundances from our spectra and find that [S/H] agrees with [Ar/H] to within 0.2 dex for most objects, but is lower than [O/H] by 0.2-0.4 dex in some PNe, possibly due to O enrichment via third dredge-up. Our results demonstrate that n-capture elements can be detected in PNe belonging to nearby galaxies with ground-based telescopes, allowing s-process enrichments to be studied in PN populations with well-determined distances. This paper includes data obtained with the 6.5-m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile, and with the Gemini-South Telescope at Cerro Pachon, Chile.

  19. Calculation of dose components in head phantom for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ademir X; Crispim, Verginia R

    2002-11-01

    Application of neutrons to cancer treatment has been a subject of considerable clinical and research interest since the discovery of the neutron by Chadwick in 1932 (3). Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a technique of radiation oncology which is used in treating brain cancer (glioblastoma multiform) or melanoma and that consists of preferentially loading a compound containing 10B into the tumor location, followed by the irradiation of the patient with a beam of neutron. Dose distribution for BNCT is mainly based on Monte Carlo simulations. In this work, the absorbed dose spatial distribution resultant from an idealized neutron beam incident upon ahead phantom is investigated using the Monte Carlo N-particles code, MCNP 4B. The phantom model used is based on the geometry of a circular cylinder on which sits an elliptical cylinder capped by half an ellipsoid representing the neck and head, both filled with tissue-equivalent material. The neutron flux and the contribution of individual absorbed dose components, as a function of depths and of radial distance from the beam axis (dose profiles) in phantom model, is presented and discussed. For the studied beam the maximum thermal neutron flux is at a depth of 2 cm and the maximum gamma dose at a depth of 4 cm.

  20. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    DOE PAGES

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; ...

    2016-04-21

    Here, the absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈ 6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n,γ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the crossmore » section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section at the En,R = 2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4% of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30% lower than the evaluated data at En ≈ 1 keV and are approximately 2σ away from the previous measurement at En ≈ 20 keV.« less

  1. Stellar neutron capture cross sections of 41K and 45Sc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heil, M.; Plag, R.; Uberseder, E.; Bisterzo, S.; Käppeler, F.; Mengoni, A.; Pignatari, M.

    2016-05-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of light nuclei (A <56 ) are important for s -process scenarios since they act as neutron poisons. We report on measurements of the neutron capture cross sections of 41K and 45Sc, which were performed at the Karlsruhe 3.7 MV Van de Graaff accelerator via the activation method in a quasistellar neutron spectrum corresponding to a thermal energy of k T =25 keV. Systematic effects were controlled by repeated irradiations, resulting in overall uncertainties of less than 3%. The measured spectrum-averaged data have been used to normalize the energy-dependent (n ,γ ) cross sections from the main data libraries JEFF-3.2, JENDL-4.0, and ENDF/B-VII.1, and a set of Maxwellian averaged cross sections was calculated for improving the s -process nucleosynthesis yields in AGB stars and in massive stars. At k T =30 keV, the new Maxwellian averaged cross sections of 41K and 45Sc are 19.2 ±0.6 mb and 61.3 ±1.8 mb, respectively. Both values are 20% lower than previously recommended. The effect of neutron poisons is discussed for nuclei with A <56 in general and for the investigated isotopes in particular.

  2. Thermal neutron capture cross section for 56Fe(n ,γ )

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firestone, R. B.; Belgya, T.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.; Szentmikloṡi, L.; Tomandl, I.

    2017-01-01

    The 56Fe(n ,γ ) thermal neutron capture cross section and the 57Fe level scheme populated by this reaction have been investigated in this work. Singles γ -ray spectra were measured with an isotopically enriched 56Fe target using the guided cold neutron beam at the Budapest Reactor, and γ γ -coincidence data were measured with a natural Fe target at the LWR-15 research reactor in Řež, Czech Republic. A detailed level scheme consisting of 448 γ rays populating/depopulating 97 levels and the capture state in 57Fe has been constructed, and ≈99 % of the total transition intensity has been placed. The transition probability of the 352-keV γ ray was determined to be Pγ(352 ) =11.90 ±0.07 per 100 neutron captures. The 57Fe level scheme is substantially revised from earlier work and ≈33 previously assigned levels could not be confirmed while a comparable number of new levels were added. The 57Feγ -ray cross sections were internally calibrated with respect to 1H and 32Sγ -ray cross section standards using iron(III) acetylacetonate (C15H21FeO6) and iron pyrite (FeS2) targets. The thermal neutron cross section for production of the 352-keV γ -ray cross section was determined to be σγ(352 ) =0.2849 ±0.015 b. The total 56Fe(n ,γ ) thermal radiative neutron cross section is derived from the 352-keV γ -ray cross section and transition probability as σ0=2.394 ±0.019 b. A least-squares fit of the γ rays to the level scheme gives the 57Fe neutron separation energy Sn=7646.183 ±0.018 keV.

  3. Rates for neutron-capture reactions on tungsten isotopes in iron meteorites. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masarik, J.; Reedy, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    High-precision W isotopic analyses by Harper and Jacobsen indicate the W-182/W-183 ratio in the Toluca iron meteorite is shifted by -(3.0 +/- 0.9) x 10(exp -4) relative to a terrestrial standard. Possible causes of this shift are neutron-capture reactions on W during Toluca's approximately 600-Ma exposure to cosmic ray particles or radiogenic growth of W-182 from 9-Ma Hf-182 in the silicate portion of the Earth after removal of W to the Earth's core. Calculations for the rates of neutron-capture reactions on W isotopes were done to study the first possibility. The LAHET Code System (LCS) which consists of the Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) code and the Monte Carlo N-Particle(MCNP) transport code was used to numerically simulate the irradiation of the Toluca iron meteorite by galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles and to calculate the rates of W(n, gamma) reactions. Toluca was modeled as a 3.9-m-radius sphere with the composition of a typical IA iron meteorite. The incident GCR protons and their interactions were modeled with LAHET, which also handled the interactions of neutrons with energies above 20 MeV. The rates for the capture of neutrons by W-182, W-183, and W-186 were calculated using the detailed library of (n, gamma) cross sections in MCNP. For this study of the possible effect of W(n, gamma) reactions on W isotope systematics, we consider the peak rates. The calculated maximum change in the normalized W-182/W-183 ratio due to neutron-capture reactions cannot account for more than 25% of the mass 182 deficit observed in Toluca W.

  4. Experimental evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy of human breast carcinoma implanted on nude mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Satya Ranjan

    2000-06-01

    An in-pool small animal irradiation neutron tube (SAINT) facility was designed, constructed and installed at the University of Virginia Nuclear Research Reactor (UVAR). Thermal neutron flux profiles were measured by foil activation analysis (gold) and verified with DORT and MCNP computer code models. The gamma-ray absorbed dose in the neutron-gamma mixed field was determined from TLD measurements. The SAINT thermal neutron flux was used to investigate the well characterized human breast cancer cell line MCF-7B on both in-vitro samples and in- vivo animal subjects. Boronophenylalanine (BPA enriched in 95% 10B) was used as a neutron capturing agent. The in-vitro response of MCF-7B human breast carcinoma cells to BPA in a mixed field of neutron-gamma radiation or pure 60Co gamma radiation was investigated. The best result (lowest surviving fraction) was observed in cell cultures pre-incubated with BPA and given the neutron irradiation. The least effective treatment consisted of 60Co irradiation only. Immunologically deficient nude mice were inoculated subcutaneously with human breast cancer MCF-7B cells and estradiol pellets (to support tumor growth). The tumor volume in the mouse control group increased over time, as expected. The group of mice exposed only to neutron treatment exhibited initial tumor volume reduction lasting until 35 days following the treatment, followed by renewed tumor growth. Both groups given BPA plus neutron treatment showed continuous reduction in tumor volume over the 55-day observation period. The group given the higher BPA concentration showed the best tumor reduction response. The results on both in-vitro and in-vivo studies showed increased cell killing with BPA, substantiating the incorporation of BPA into the tumor or cell line. Therefore, BNCT may be a possible choice for the treatment of human breast carcinoma. However, prior to the initiation of any clinical studies, it is necessary to determine the therapeutic efficacy in a large

  5. Diversity of abundance patterns of neutron-capture elements in very metal-poor stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Misa; Aoki, Wako; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Wanajo, Shinya

    2014-05-01

    Observations of Very Metal-Poor stars indicate that there are at least two sites to r-process; "weak r-process" and "main r-process". A question is whether these two are well separated or there exists a variation in the r-process. We present the results of abundance analysis of neutron-capture elements in the two Very Metal-Poor stars HD107752 and HD110184 in the Milky Way halo observed with the Subaru Telescope HDS. The abundance patterns show overabundace at light n-capture elements (e.g. Sr, Y), inferring the element yielding of weak r-process, while heavy neutron-capture elements (e.g. Ba, Eu) are deficient; however, the overabundance of light ones is not as significant as that previously found in stars representing the weak r-process (e.g. HD122563; Honda et al. 2006). Our study show diversity in the abundance patterns from light to heavy neutron-capture elements in VMP stars, suggesting a variation in r-process, which may depend on electron fraction of environment.

  6. Testing the electron-capture supernova scenario using universal relations between neutron star properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, William

    2017-01-01

    8-10 solar mass stars may end their lives in electron-capture supernovae (ECSNe), in which ONeMg cores are destabilized by electron captures onto Neon and Magnesium. Strong circumstantial evidence exists that the Crab pulsar and PSR J0737-3039b were formed in ECSNe. Evidence for the existence of the ECSN mechanism has important implications for the rate of production of Be/X-ray binaries and the rate of binary neutron star mergers.I will discuss how supernova modeling suggests that neutron stars formed via the electron-capture mechanism have a specific gravitational binding energy. Recently, universal relations between neutron star properties including their binding energy, moment of inertia, quadrupole moments and tidal polarizability have been carefully examined. I will show how these relations, coupled with measurements of the post-Newtonian parameters of the PSR J0737-3039 system and of the acceleration of the Crab supernova remnant, can provide evidence for or against the electron-capture supernova formation scenario.

  7. Diversity of abundance patterns of neutron-capture elements in very metal-poor stars

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Misa; Ishimaru, Yuhri; Aoki, Wako; Wanajo, Shinya

    2014-05-02

    Observations of Very Metal-Poor stars indicate that there are at least two sites to r-process; “weak r-process” and “main r-process”. A question is whether these two are well separated or there exists a variation in the r-process. We present the results of abundance analysis of neutron-capture elements in the two Very Metal-Poor stars HD107752 and HD110184 in the Milky Way halo observed with the Subaru Telescope HDS. The abundance patterns show overabundace at light n-capture elements (e.g. Sr, Y), inferring the element yielding of weak r-process, while heavy neutron-capture elements (e.g. Ba, Eu) are deficient; however, the overabundance of light ones is not as significant as that previously found in stars representing the weak r-process (e.g. HD122563; Honda et al. 2006). Our study show diversity in the abundance patterns from light to heavy neutron-capture elements in VMP stars, suggesting a variation in r-process, which may depend on electron fraction of environment.

  8. A simple method for the analysis of neutron resonance capture spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Clarijs, Martijn C.; Bom, Victor R.; Eijk, Carel W. E. van

    2009-03-15

    Neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) is a method used to determine the bulk composition of various kinds of objects and materials. It is based on analyzing direct capture resonance peaks. However, the analysis is complicated by scattering followed by capture effects in the object itself. These effects depend on the object's shape and size. In this paper the new Delft elemental analysis program (DEAP) is presented which can automatically and quickly analyze multiple NRCA spectra in a practical and simple way, yielding the elemental bulk composition of an object, largely independent of its shape and size. The DEAP method is demonstrated with data obtained with a Roman bronze water tap excavated in Nijmegen (The Netherlands). DEAP will also be used in the framework of the Ancient Charm project as data analysis program for neutron resonance capture imaging (NRCI) experiments. NRCI provides three-dimensional visualization and quantification of the internal structure of archaeological objects by performing scanning measurements with narrowly collimated neutron beams on archaeological objects in computed tomography based experimental setups. The large amounts (hundreds to thousands) of spectra produced during a NRCI experiment can automatically and quickly be analyzed by DEAP.

  9. Resonance neutron-capture cross sections of stable magnesium isotopes and their astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massimi, C.; Koehler, P.; Bisterzo, S.; Colonna, N.; Gallino, R.; Gunsing, F.; Käppeler, F.; Lorusso, G.; Mengoni, A.; Pignatari, M.; Vannini, G.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Barbagallo, M.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Bennett, M.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Herwig, F.; Hirschi, R.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Konovalov, V.; Kopecky, S.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lederer, C.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Losito, R.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Mastinu, P.; Mendoza, E.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rockefeller, G.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Sarmento, R.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2012-04-01

    We have measured the neutron capture cross sections of the stable magnesium isotopes 24,25,26Mg in the energy range of interest to the s process using the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN. Capture events from a natural metal sample and from samples enriched in 25Mg and 26Mg were recorded using the total energy method based on C62H6 detectors. Neutron resonance parameters were extracted by a simultaneous resonance shape analysis of the present capture data and existing transmission data on a natural isotopic sample. Maxwellian-averaged capture cross sections for the three isotopes were calculated up to thermal energies of 100 keV and their impact on s-process analyses was investigated. At 30 keV the new values of the stellar cross section for 24Mg, 25Mg, and 26Mg are 3.8±0.2 mb, 4.1±0.6 mb, and 0.14±0.01 mb, respectively.

  10. The measurements of parity violation in resonant neutron-capture reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapov, E.I.; Popov, Y.P. ); Wender, S.A.; Seestrom, S.J.; Bowman, C.D. ); Postma, H. ); Gould, C.R. ); Wasson, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The study of parity violation in total (n,{gamma}) cross sections on {sup 139}La and {sup 117}Sn targets was performed at the LANSCE pulsed neutron source using longitudinally polarized neutrons and a BaF{sub 2} detector. The effect of parity nonconservation in the {sup 139}La(n,{gamma}) reaction for the resonance at E{sub n}=0.73 eV was confirmed. New results for p-wave resonances in the {sup 117}Sn(n, {gamma}) reaction were obtained. A comparison between the capture and transmission techniques is presented. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The Radiative Strength Function Using the Neutron-Capture Reaction on 151,153Eu

    SciTech Connect

    Agvaanluvsan, U; Alpizar-Vicente, A; Becker, J A; Becvar, F; Bredeweg, T A; Clement, R; Esch, E; Folden, C M; Hatarik, R; Haight, R C; Hoffman, D C; Krticka, M; Macri, R A; Mitchell, G E; Nitsche, H; O'Donnell, J M; Parker, W; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R S; Schwantes, J M; Sheets, S A; Ullmann, J L; Vieira, D J; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilk, P; Wouters, J M; Wu, C Y

    2005-10-04

    Radiative strength functions in {sup 152,154}Eu nuclei for {gamma}-ray energies below 6 MeV have been investigated. Neutron capture for incident neutron energies <1eV up to 100 keV has been measured for {sup 151,153}Eu targets. Properties of resonances in these two nuclei are examined. The measurements are compared to simulation of cascades performed with various models for the radiative strength function. Comparison between experimental data and simulation suggests an existence of the low-energy resonance in these two nuclei.

  12. [Possibilities of boron neutron capture therapy in the treatment of malignant brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Kanygin, V V; Kichigin, A I; Gubanova, N V; Taskaev, S Yu

    2015-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) that is of the highest attractiveness due to its selective action directly on malignant tumor cells is a promising approach to treating cancers. Clinical interest in BNCT focuses in neuro-oncology on therapy for gliomas, glioblastoma in particular, and BNCT may be used in brain metastatic involvement. This needs an epithermal neutron source that complies with the requirements for BNCT, as well as a 10B-containing agent that will selectively accumulate in tumor tissue. The introduction of BNCT into clinical practice to treat patients with glial tumors will be able to enhance therapeutic efficiency.

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in Finland: technological and physical prospects after 20 years of experiences.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, Sauli; Kortesniemi, Mika; Timonen, Marjut; Reijonen, Vappu; Kuusela, Linda; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Salli, Eero; Koivunoro, Hanna; Seppälä, Tiina; Lönnroth, Nadja; Välimäki, Petteri; Hyvönen, Heini; Kotiluoto, Petri; Serén, Tom; Kuronen, Antti; Heikkinen, Sami; Kosunen, Antti; Auterinen, Iiro

    2013-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a binary radiotherapy method developed to treat patients with certain malignant tumours. To date, over 300 treatments have been carried out at the Finnish BNCT facility in various on-going and past clinical trials. In this technical review, we discuss our research work in the field of medical physics to form the groundwork for the Finnish BNCT patient treatments, as well as the possibilities to further develop and optimize the method in the future. Accordingly, the following aspects are described: neutron sources, beam dosimetry, treatment planning, boron imaging and determination, and finally the possibilities to detect the efficacy and effects of BNCT on patients.

  14. Tandem-ESQ for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Kreiner, A. J.; Kwan, J. W.; Henestroza, E.; Burlon, A. A.; Di Paolo, H.; Minsky, D.; Debray, M.; Valda, A.; Somacal, H. R.

    2007-02-12

    A folded tandem, with 1.25 MV terminal voltage, combined with an ElectroStatic Quadrupole (ESQ) chain is being proposed as a machine for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT). The machine is shown to be capable of accelerating a 30 mA proton beam to 2.5 MeV. These are the specifications needed to produce sufficiently intense and clean epithermal neutron beams, based on the on the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, to perform BNCT treatment for deep seated tumors in less than an hour.

  15. Experiments to increase the parameters of the vacuum insulation tandem accelerator for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatov, D. A.; Kolesnikov, J. A.; Koshkarev, A. M.; Kuznetsov, A. S.; Makarov, A. N.; Sokolova, E. O.; Sorokin, I. N.; Sycheva, T. V.; Taskaev, S. Yu.; Shchudlo, I. M.

    2016-12-01

    An epithermal neutron source that is based on a vacuum insulation tandem accelerator (VITA) and lithium target was created in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics for the development of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A stationary proton beam with 2 MeV energy and 1.6 mA current has been obtained. To carry out BNCT, it is necessary to increase the beam parameters up to 2.3 MeV and 3 mA. Ways to increase the parameters of the proton beam have been proposed and discussed in this paper. The results of the experiments are presented.

  16. Preliminary treatment planning and dosimetry for a clinical trial of neutron capture therapy using a fission converter epithermal neutron beam.

    PubMed

    Kiger, W S; Lu, X Q; Harling, O K; Riley, K J; Binns, P J; Kaplan, J; Patel, H; Zamenhof, R G; Shibata, Y; Kaplan, I D; Busse, P M; Palmer, M R

    2004-11-01

    A Phase I/II clinical trial of neutron capture therapy (NCT) was conducted at Harvard-MIT using a fission converter epithermal neutron beam. This epithermal neutron beam has nearly ideal performance characteristics (high intensity and purity) and is well-suited for clinical use. Six glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients were treated with NCT by infusion of the tumor-selective amino acid boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) at a dose of 14.0 g/m(2) body surface area over 90 min followed by irradiation with epithermal neutrons. Treatments were planned using NCTPlan and an accelerated version of the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP 4B. Treatments were delivered in two fractions with two or three fields. Field order was reversed between fractions to equalize the average blood boron concentration between fields. The initial dose in the dose escalation study was 7.0 RBEGy, prescribed as the mean dose to the whole brain volume. This prescription dose was increased by 10% to 7.7 RBEGy in the second cohort of patients. A pharmacokinetic model was used to predict the blood boron concentration for determination of the required beam monitor units with good accuracy; differences between prescribed and delivered doses were 1.5% or less. Estimates of average tumor doses ranged from 33.7 to 83.4 RBEGy (median 57.8 RBEGy), a substantial improvement over our previous trial where the median value of the average tumor dose was 25.8 RBEGy.

  17. Sublethal and potentially lethal damage repair on thermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Ichihashi, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Elkind, M.M. )

    1989-07-01

    Tonicity shock or caffeine postirradiation treatment makes evident fast-type potentially lethal damage (PLD). Caffeine expresses fast-type PLD more efficiently than tonicity shock in X-irradiated B-16 mouse melanoma cells, compared with V79 Chinese hamster cells. The survival curves of thermal neutrons for either V79 or B-16 cells exhibit no shoulder. Neither V79 nor B-16 cells show the sublethal damage (SLD) repair of thermal neutrons. Caffeine-sensitive fast-type PLD repairs exist in X-irradiated B-16 cells, as well as V79 cells. The fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells exposed to thermal neutrons alone is rather less than that of X-irradiated cells. Furthermore, an extremely low level of fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells with 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine (BPA) preincubation (20 hours) followed by thermal neutron irradiation indicated that 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction effectively eradicates actively growing melanoma cells. The plateau-phase B-16 cells are well able to repair the slow-type PLD of X-rays. However, cells can not repair the slow-type PLD induced by thermal neutron irradiation with or without 10B1-BPA preincubation. These results suggest that thermal neutron capture therapy can effectively kill radioresistant melanoma cells in both proliferating and quiescent phases.

  18. A theoretical model for the production of Ac-225 for cancer therapy by neutron capture transmutation of Ra-226.

    PubMed

    Melville, G; Melville, P

    2013-02-01

    Radium needles that were once implanted into tumours as a cancer treatment are now obsolete and constitute a radioactive waste problem, as their half-life is 1600 years. We are investigating the reduction of radium by transmutation by bombarding Ra-226 with high-energy neutrons from a neutron source to produce Ra-225 and hence Ac-225, which can be used as a generator to produce Bi-213 for use in 'Targeted Alpha Therapy' for cancer. This paper examines the possibility of producing Ac-225 by neutron capture using a theoretical model in which neutron energy is convoluted with the corresponding neutron cross sections of Ra-226. The total integrated yield can then be obtained. This study shows that an intense beam of high-energy neutrons could initiate neutron capture on Ra-226 to produce Ra-225 and hence practical amounts of Ac-225 and a useful reduction of Ra-226.

  19. Interplay of direct and compound-nucleus mechanisms in neutron capture by light nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Kahane, S.; Lynn, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss the direct-capture theory pertaining to primary electric-dipole (E1) transitions following slow-neutron capture. For approximately 20 light nuclides that we have studied, estimates of direct-capture cross sections using optical-model potentials with physically realistic parameters are in reasonable agreement with the data. Minor disagreements that exist are consistent with extrapolations to light nuclides of generally accepted formulations of compound-nucleus capture. In dealing with nuclei soft to vibrations, we have considered the possible effects of coupling of the collective motion with the optical potential in the framework of R-matrix theory. In such cases, we find that the inclusion of inelastic channels results in systematic changes in the calculated cross sections.

  20. Boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors: an emerging therapeutic modality.

    PubMed

    Barth, R F; Soloway, A H; Goodman, J H; Gahbauer, R A; Gupta, N; Blue, T E; Yang, W; Tjarks, W

    1999-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction that occurs when boron-10, a stable isotope, is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. For BNCT to be successful, a large number of 10B atoms must be localized on or preferably within neoplastic cells, and a sufficient number of thermal neutrons must be absorbed by the 10B atoms to sustain a lethal 10B (n, alpha) lithium-7 reaction. There is a growing interest in using BNCT in combination with surgery to treat patients with high-grade gliomas and possibly metastatic brain tumors. The present review covers the biological and radiobiological considerations on which BNCT is based, boron-containing low- and high-molecular weight delivery agents, neutron sources, clinical studies, and future areas of research. Two boron compounds currently are being used clinically, sodium borocaptate and boronophenylalanine, and a number of new delivery agents are under investigation, including boronated porphyrins, nucleosides, amino acids, polyamines, monoclonal and bispecific antibodies, liposomes, and epidermal growth factor. These are discussed, as is optimization of their delivery. Nuclear reactors currently are the only source of neutrons for BNCT, and the fission reaction within the core produces a mixture of lower energy thermal and epithermal neutrons, fast or high-energy neutrons, and gamma-rays. Although thermal neutron beams have been used clinically in Japan to treat patients with brain tumors and cutaneous melanomas, epithermal neutron beams now are being used in the United States and Europe because of their superior tissue-penetrating properties. Currently, there are clinical trials in progress in the United States, Europe, and Japan using a combination of debulking surgery and then BNCT to treat patients with glioblastomas. The American and European studies are Phase I trials using boronophenylalanine and sodium borocaptate, respectively

  1. Determination of Thermal Neutron Capture Cross-Sections at Budapest PGAA Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Revay, Zsolt; Belgya, Tamas; Firestone, Richard B.

    2007-10-26

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) is a powerful nuclear analytical technique to determine the elemental and isotopic composition of materials. The PGAA facility at Budapest, Hungary is one of the leading laboratories of the world, determining spectroscopic data for chemical analysis to be used in other laboratories. These partial gamma-ray production cross-sections and k{sub 0} values, being proportional to the analytical sensitivities of the chemical elements, can be transformed into thermal neutron capture cross-sections, i.e. the probabilities of the (n,{gamma}) reactions, which are of broader interest in different fields of nuclear physics. Some preliminary results on thermal neutron capture cross-sections are presented.

  2. Validating (d,pγ) as a surrogate for neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Pain, S. D.; Adekola, A. S.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Fotiadis, Nikolaos; McCleskey, M.; Burcher, S.; Shand, C. M; Austin, R. A. E.; Baugher, T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Devlin, Matthew James; Escher, J. E.; Hardy, S.; Hatarik, R.; Howard, M. E.; Hughes, R. O.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Lister, C. J.; Manning, B.; O'Donnell, John M.; Peters, W. A.; Ross, T. J.; Scielzo, N. D.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.

    2015-02-13

    The r-process is responsible for creating roughly half of the elements heavier than iron. It has recently become understood that the rates at which neutron capture reactions proceed at late times in the r-process may dramatically affect the final abundance pattern. However, direct measurements of neutron capture reaction rates on exotic nuclei are exceptionally difficult, necessitating the development of indirect approaches such as the surrogate technique. The (d,pγ) reaction at low energies was identified as a promising surrogate for the (n,γ) reaction, as both reactions share many characteristics. We report on a program to validate (d,pγ) as a surrogate for (n,γ) using 95Mo as a target. The experimental campaign includes direct measurements of the γ-ray intensities from the decay of excited states populated in the 95Mo(n,γ) and 95Mo(d,pγ) reactions.

  3. Validating (d,p gamma) as a Surrogate for Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Cizewski, J.A.; Pain, S.D.; Adekola, A.S.; Burke, J.T.; Casperson, R.J.; Fotiades, N.; McCleskey, M.; Burcher, S.; Shand, C.M.; Austin, R.A.E.; Baugher, T.; Carpenter, M.P.; Devlin, M.; Escher, J.E.; Hardy, S.; Hatarik, R.; Howard, M.E.; Hughes, R.O.; Jones, K.L.; Kozub, R.L.; Lister, C.J.; Manning, B.; O’Donnell, J.M.; Peters, W.A.; Ross, T.J.; Scielzo, N.D.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The r-process is responsible for creating roughly half of the elements heavier than iron. It has recently become understood that the rates at which neutron capture reactions proceed at late times in the r-process may dramatically affect the final abundance pattern. However, direct measurements of neutron capture reaction rates on exotic nuclei are exceptionally difficult, necessitating the development of indirect approaches such as the surrogate technique. The (d,pγ) reaction at low energies was identified as a promising surrogate for the (n,γ) reaction, as both reactions share many characteristics. We report on a program to validate (d,pγ) as a surrogate for (n,γ) using 95Mo as a target. The experimental campaign includes direct measurements of the γ-ray intensities from the decay of excited states populated in the 95Mo(n,γ) and 95Mo(d,pγ) reactions.

  4. Boron analysis and boron imaging in biological materials for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT).

    PubMed

    Wittig, Andrea; Michel, Jean; Moss, Raymond L; Stecher-Rasmussen, Finn; Arlinghaus, Heinrich F; Bendel, Peter; Mauri, Pier Luigi; Altieri, Saverio; Hilger, Ralf; Salvadori, Piero A; Menichetti, Luca; Zamenhof, Robert; Sauerwein, Wolfgang A G

    2008-10-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is based on the ability of the stable isotope 10B to capture neutrons, which leads to a nuclear reaction producing an alpha- and a 7Li-particle, both having a high biological effectiveness and a very short range in tissue, being limited to approximately one cell diameter. This opens the possibility for a highly selective cancer therapy. BNCT strongly depends on the selective uptake of 10B in tumor cells and on its distribution inside the cells. The chemical properties of boron and the need to discriminate different isotopes make the investigation of the concentration and distribution of 10B a challenging task. The most advanced techniques to measure and image boron are described, both invasive and non-invasive. The most promising approach for further investigation will be the complementary use of the different techniques to obtain the information that is mandatory for the future of this innovative treatment modality.

  5. Using 171,173Yb(d,p) to benchmark a surrogate reaction for neutron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Hatarik, R; Bersntein, L; Burke, J; Cizewski, J; Gibelin, J; Lesher, S; O'Malley, P; Phair, L; Swan, T

    2008-08-08

    Neutron capture cross sections on unstable nuclei are important for many applications in nuclear structure and astrophysics. Measuring these cross sections directly is a major challenge and often impossible. An indirect approach for measuring these cross sections is the surrogate reaction method, which makes it possible to relate the desired cross section to a cross section of an alternate reaction that proceeds through the same compound nucleus. To benchmark the validity of using the (d,p{gamma}) reaction as a surrogate for (n,{gamma}), the {sup 171,173}Yb(d,p{gamma}) reactions were measured with the goal to reproduce the known [1] neutron capture cross section ratios of these nuclei.

  6. Validating (d,p gamma) as a Surrogate for Neutron Capture

    DOE PAGES

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Cizewski, J.A.; Pain, S.D.; ...

    2015-05-28

    The r-process is responsible for creating roughly half of the elements heavier than iron. It has recently become understood that the rates at which neutron capture reactions proceed at late times in the r-process may dramatically affect the final abundance pattern. However, direct measurements of neutron capture reaction rates on exotic nuclei are exceptionally difficult, necessitating the development of indirect approaches such as the surrogate technique. The (d,pγ) reaction at low energies was identified as a promising surrogate for the (n,γ) reaction, as both reactions share many characteristics. We report on a program to validate (d,pγ) as a surrogate formore » (n,γ) using 95Mo as a target. The experimental campaign includes direct measurements of the γ-ray intensities from the decay of excited states populated in the 95Mo(n,γ) and 95Mo(d,pγ) reactions.« less

  7. Validating (d,p gamma) as a Surrogate for Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Pain, S.; Adekola, A. S.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R.J.; Fotiades, N.; McCleskey, M.; Burcher, S.; Shand, C. M.; Baugher, T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Devlin, M.; Escher, J. E.; Hardy, S.; Howard, M.; Hughes, R.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Lister, C. J.; Manning, B.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Peters, W. A.; Ross, T.J.; Scielzo, N.D.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.

    2015-01-01

    The r-process is responsible for creating roughly half of the elements heavier than iron. It has recently become understood that the rates at which neutron capture reactions proceed at late times in the rprocess may dramatically affect the final abundance pattern. However, direct measurements of neutron capture reaction rates on exotic nuclei are exceptionally difficult, necessitating the development of indirect approaches such as the surrogate technique. The (d,py) reaction at low energies was identified as a promising surrogate for the (n,y) reaction, as both reactions share many characteristics. We report on a program to validate (d,py) as a surrogate for (n,y) using 95Mo as a target. The experimental campaign includes direct measurements of the y-ray intensities from the decay of excited states populated in the 95Mo(n,y) and 95Mo(d,py) reactions.

  8. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Optical Extension for Neutron Capture Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melendez, Matthew; O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Donor, John; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Stassun, Keivan G.; APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. However, neutron capture elements are very limited in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we are conducting a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. As part of this effort, we present Ba II, La II, Ce II and Eu II results for a few open clusters without previous abundance measurements using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph.This work is supported by an NSF AAG grant AST-1311835.

  9. Neutron Capture Elements in the Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Hearty, Fred R.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Sdss /Apogee-1, III

    2015-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. The high-resolution (R=22,500), near-infrared (H-band) APOGEE-1 survey allows for cluster membership probability determination and analysis of light and iron-peak elements. Neutron capture elements, however, prove to be elusive in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we conducted a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. We present results based on prominent resonance lines for Eu, La, Ba, and Ce in the ~5400-6750 AA range using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph.

  10. Numerical characterization of a tomographic system for online dose measurements in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Minsky, D. M.; Valda, A. A.; Somacal, H.; Burlon, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.

    2007-02-12

    A tomographic system for online dose measurements in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) based on the measurement of a specific 478 keV {gamma}-ray emitted after the neutron capture in boron is being developed. In the present work we study by means of Monte Carlo numerical simulations the effects of the finite spatial resolution and the limited number of counts, i. e. the statistical noise, on the reconstructed image contrast of numerical phantoms. These phantoms, of simple geometry, mimic the tumor (specific) and the normal tissue (non specific) boron concentrations. The simulated projection data were reconstructed using the expectation-maximization maximum-likelihood algorithm. These studies will help in the improvement of BNCT dosimetry.

  11. Exposure ages and neutron capture record in lunar samples from Fra Mauro.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lugmair, G. W.; Marti, K.

    1972-01-01

    Cosmic-ray exposure ages of Apollo 14 rocks and rock fragments obtained by the Kr81-Kr83 method range from 27 to 700 m.y. Rock 14321, collected near the Cone crater rim, is one of the many approximately 27 m.y. old ejecta which were reported at the Third Lunar Science Conference. All the other rocks have considerably higher exposure ages. Isotopic anomalies from neutron capture in gadolinium, bromine, and barium are used to obtain information on the lunar neutron spectrum at various depths below the lunar surface. The flux ratio of resonance and slow (less than 0.3 eV) neutrons is found to be nearly constant in the topmost approximately 100 g/sq cm.

  12. Dose homogeneity in boron neutron capture therapy using an epithermal neutron beam.

    PubMed

    Konijnenberg, M W; Dewit, L G; Mijnheer, B J; Raaijmakers, C P; Watkins, P R

    1995-06-01

    Simulation models based on the neutron and photon Monte Carlo code MCNP were used to study the therapeutic possibilities of the HB11 epithermal neutron beam at the High Flux Reactor in Petten. Irradiations were simulated in two types of phantoms filled with water or tissue-equivalent material for benchmark treatment planning calculations. In a cuboid phantom the influence of different field sizes on the thermal-neutron-induced dose distribution was investigated. Various shapes of collimators were studied to test their efficacy in optimizing the thermal-neutron distribution over a planning target volume and healthy tissues. Using circular collimators of 8, 12 and 15 cm diameter it was shown that with the 15-cm field a relatively larger volume within 85% of the maximum neutron-induced dose was obtained than with the 8- or 12-cm-diameter field. However, even for this large field the maximum diameter of this volume was 7.5 cm. In an ellipsoid head phantom the neutron-induced dose was calculated assuming the skull to contain 10 ppm 10B, the brain 5 ppm 10B and the tumor 30 ppm 10B. It was found that with a single 15-cm-diameter circular beam a very inhomogenous dose distribution in a typical target volume was obtained. Applying two equally weighted opposing 15-cm-diameter fields, however, a dose homogeneity within +/- 10% in this planning target volume was obtained. The dose in the surrounding healthy brain tissue is 30% at maximum of the dose in the center of the target volume. Contrary to the situation for the 8-cm field, combining four fields of 15 cm diameter gave no large improvement of the dose homogeneity over the target volume or a lower maximum dose in the healthy brain. Dose-volume histograms were evaluated for the planning target volume as well as for the healthy brain to compare different irradiation techniques, yielding a graphical confirmation of the above conclusions. Therapy with BNCT on brain tumors must be performed either with an 8-cm four

  13. NCTPlan application for neutron capture therapy dosimetric planning at MEPhI nuclear research reactor.

    PubMed

    Elyutina, A S; Kiger, W S; Portnov, A A

    2011-12-01

    The results of modeling of two therapeutic beams HEC-1 and HEC-4 at the NRNU "MEPhI" research nuclear reactor exploitable for preclinical treatments are reported. The exact models of the beams are constructed as an input to the NCTPlan code used for planning Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) procedure. The computations are purposed to improve the accuracy of prediction of a dose absorbed in tissue with the account of all components of radiation.

  14. Analytical sensitivities and energies of thermal-neutron-capture gamma rays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffey, D.; El-Kady, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1970-01-01

    A table of the analytical sensitivities of the principal lines in the thermal-neutron-capture gamma ray spectrum has been compiled for most of the elements. In addition a second table of the full-energy, single-escape, and double-escape peaks has been compiled according to energy for all significant lines above 3 MeV. Lines that contrast well with adjacent lines are noted as prominent. The tables are useful for spectral interpretation and calibration. ?? 1970.

  15. Analytical sensitivities and energies of thermal neutron capture gamma rays II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moore, H.D.; Leep, D.B.; El-Kady, A.; Duffey, D.

    1971-01-01

    A table of the analytical sensitivities of the principal lines in the thermal neutron capture gamma-ray spectrum from 0 to 3 MeV has been compiled for most of the elements. A tabulation of the full-energy, single-escape, and double-escape peaks has also been made according to energy. The tables are useful for spectral interpretation and calibration. ?? 1971.

  16. Boron neutron capture therapy for oral precancer: proof of principle in an experimental animal model

    SciTech Connect

    A. Monti Hughes; ECC Pozzi; S. Thorp; M. A. Garabalino; R. O. Farias; S. J. Gonzalez; E. M. Heber; M. E. Itoiz; R. F. Aromando; A. J. Molinari; M. Miller; D. W. Nigg; P. Curotto; V. A. Trivillin; A. E. Schwint

    2013-11-01

    Field-cancerized tissue can give rise to second primary tumours, causing therapeutic failure. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on biological targeting and would serve to treat undetectable foci of malignant transformation. The aim of this study was to optimize BNCT for the integral treatment for oral cancer, with particular emphasis on the inhibitory effect on tumour development originating in precancerous conditions, and radiotoxicity of different BNCT protocols in a hamster cheek pouch oral precancer model.

  17. Gamma-ray cascade transitions from resonant neutron capture in Cd-111 and Cd-113

    SciTech Connect

    Rusev, Gencho Y.

    2012-08-27

    A neutron-capture experiment on {sup nat}Cd has been carried out at DANCE. Multiple-fold coincidence {gamma}-ray spectra have been collected from J=0, 1 resonances in {sup 111}Cd and {sup 113}Cd. The cascades ending at the ground state can be described by the SLO model while the cascades ending at the 2+ states are better reproduced by the mixed SLO+KMF model.

  18. Investigation of 186Re via radiative thermal-neutron capture on 185Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matters, D. A.; Lerch, A. G.; Hurst, A. M.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Carroll, J. J.; Detwiler, B.; Révay, Zs.; McClory, J. W.; McHale, S. R.; Firestone, R. B.; Sleaford, B. W.; Krtička, M.; Belgya, T.

    2016-05-01

    Partial γ -ray production cross sections and the total radiative thermal-neutron capture cross section for the 185Re(n ,γ ) 186Re reaction were measured using the Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis facility at the Budapest Research Reactor with an enriched 185Re target. The 186Re cross sections were standardized using well-known 35Cl(n ,γ )36Cl cross sections from irradiation of a stoichiometric natReCl3 target. The resulting cross sections for transitions feeding the 186Re ground state from low-lying levels below a cutoff energy of Ec=746 keV were combined with a modeled probability of ground-state feeding from levels above Ec to arrive at a total cross section of σ0=111 (6 ) b for radiative thermal-neutron capture on 185Re. A comparison of modeled discrete-level populations with measured transition intensities led to proposed revisions for seven tentative spin-parity assignments in the adopted level scheme for 186Re. Additionally, 102 primary γ rays were measured, including 50 previously unknown. A neutron-separation energy of Sn=6179.59 (5 ) keV was determined from a global least-squares fit of the measured γ -ray energies to the known 186Re decay scheme. The total capture cross section and separation energy results are comparable to earlier measurements of these values.

  19. Strong neutrino cooling by cycles of electron capture and decay in neutron star crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, Hendrik; Gupta, Sanjib; Moeller, Peter; Beard, Mary; Brown, Edward; Deibel, A. T.; Gasques, Leandro; Hix, William Raphael; Keek, Laurens; Lau, Rita; Steiner, Andrew M; Wiescher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The temperature in the crust of an accreting neutron star, which comprises its outermost kilometre, is set by heating from nuclear reactions at large densities, neutrino cooling and heat transport from the interior. The heated crust has been thought to affect observable phenomena at shallower depths, such as thermonuclear bursts in the accreted envelope. Here we report that cycles of electron capture and its inverse, decay, involving neutron-rich nuclei at a typical depth of about 150 metres, cool the outer neutron star crust by emitting neutrinos while also thermally decoupling the surface layers from the deeper crust. This Urca mechanism has been studied in the context of white dwarfs13 and type Ia supernovae, but hitherto was not considered in neutron stars, because previous models1, 2 computed the crust reactions using a zero-temperature approximation and assumed that only a single nuclear species was present at any given depth. The thermal decoupling means that X-ray bursts and other surface phenomena are largely independent of the strength of deep crustal heating. The unexpectedly short recurrence times, of the order of years, observed for very energetic thermonuclear superbursts are therefore not an indicator of a hot crust, but may point instead to an unknown local heating mechanism near the neutron star surface.

  20. A capture-gated neutron calorimeter using plastic scintillators and 3He drift tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhehui; Morris, Christopher L; Spaulding, Randy J; Bacon, Jeffrey D; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Chung, Kiwhan; Clark, Deborah J; Green, Jesse A; Greene, Steven J; Hogan, Gary E; Jason, Andrew; Lisowski, Paul W; Makela, Mark F; Mariam, Fessaha G; Miyadera, Haruo; Murray, Matthew M; Saunders, Alexander; Wysocki, Frederick J; Gray, Frederick E

    2010-01-01

    A segmented neutron calorimeter using nine 4-inch x 4-inch x 48-inch plastic scintillators and sixteen 2-inch-diameter 48-inch-long 200-mbar-{sup 3}He drift tubes is described. The correlated scintillator and neutron-capture events provide a means for n/{gamma} discrimination, critical to the neutron calorimetry when the {gamma} background is substantial and the {gamma} signals are comparable in amplitude to the neutron signals. A single-cell prototype was constructed and tested. It can distinguish between a {sup 17}N source and a {sup 252}Cf source when the {gamma} and the thermal neutron background are sufficiently small. The design and construction of the nine-cell segmented detector assembly follow the same principle. By recording the signals from individual scintillators, additional {gamma}-subtraction schemes, such as through the time-of-flight between two scintillators, may also be used. The variations of the light outputs from different parts of a scintillator bar are less than 10%.

  1. Inhibition of human pancreatic cancer growth in nude mice by boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Yanagië, H; Tomita, T; Kobayashi, H; Fujii, Y; Nonaka, Y; Saegusa, Y; Hasumi, K; Eriguchi, M; Kobayashi, T; Ono, K

    1997-01-01

    Immunoliposomes were prepared by conjugating anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody with liposomes containing [10B]compound. These immunoliposomes were shown to bind selectively to human pancreatic carcinoma cells (AsPC-1) bearing CEA on their surface. The cytotoxic effects of locally injected [10B]compound, multilamellar liposomes containing [10B]compound or [10B]immunoliposomes (anti-CEA) on human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts in nude mice were evaluated with thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation of mice injected with [10B]solution, 10B-containing liposomes or [10B]immunoliposomes, AsPC-1 tumour growth was suppressed relative to controls. Injection of [10B]immunoliposomes caused the greatest tumour suppression with thermal neutron irradiation in vivo. Histopathologically, hyalinization and necrosis were found in 10B-treated tumours, while tumour tissue injected with saline or saline-containing immunoliposomes showed neither destruction nor necrosis. These results suggest that intratumoral injection of boronated immunoliposomes can increase the retention of 10B atoms by tumour cells, causing tumour growth suppression in vivo upon thermal neutron irradiation. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with intratumoral injection of immunoliposomes is able to destroy malignant cells in the marginal portion between normal tissues and cancer tissues from the side of 4He generation.

  2. Controllability of depth dose distribution for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    The updating construction of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor has been performed from November 1995 to March 1996 mainly for the improvement in neutron capture therapy. On the performance, the neutron irradiation modes with the variable energy spectra from almost pure thermal to epi-thermal neutrons became available by the control of the heavy-water thickness in the spectrum shifter and by the open-and-close of the cadmium and boral thermal neutron filters. The depth distributions of thermal, epi-thermal and fast neutron fluxes were measured by activation method using gold and indium, and the depth distributions of gamma-ray absorbed dose rate were measured using thermo-luminescent dosimeter of beryllium oxide for the several irradiation modes. From these measured data, the controllability of the depth dose distribution using the spectrum shifter and the thermal neutron filters was confirmed.

  3. Astrophysical reaction rates for {sup 58,60}Ni(n,{gamma}) from new neutron capture cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K. H.; Derrien, H.; Leal, L. C.; Arbanas, G.; Wiarda, D.; Koehler, P. E.; Harvey, J. A.

    2010-11-15

    New neutron capture cross sections of {sup 58,60}Ni were measured in the energy range from 100 eV to 600 keV using the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. The combination of these new neutron capture data with previous transmission data allowed a resonance analysis up to 900 keV using R-matrix theory. The theoretically determined direct capture cross sections were included in the analyses. From these resonance parameters and the direct capture contribution, new (n,{gamma}) astrophysical reaction rates were determined over the entire energy range needed by the latest stellar models describing the so-called weak s process.

  4. The Evolution of Neutron-Capture Elements in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overbeek, Jamie C.

    Neutron-capture elements (those with Z>30) are formed in two ways: slow neutron-capture (the s-process) and rapid neutron-capture (the r-process). The s-process is thought to mainly occur in low and intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars; the r-process site has not been conclusively identified but probably involves core collapse supernovae or neutron star mergers. A conflict has recently arisen between s-process models and observations, as [Ba/Fe] ratios appear to increase dramatically with decreasing age in open clusters to a degree not predicted by standard s-process models. Other s-process elements do not show the degree of enhancement in young clusters that Ba does. Various solutions have been proposed, including an intermediate process which may disproportionally create Ba, and an increased neutron source in low-mass (M<1.5M) AGB stars. We have assembled and analyzed a sample of 75 stars in 24 open clusters to measure abundances of three light s-process elements (Sr, Y, Zr), three heavy s-process elements (Ba, La, Ce), three r-process elements (Eu, Dy, and Gd), and three elements with significant contributions from both processes (`mixed' elements Mo, Pr, and Nd). Examining [s-process/Fe] trends with age confirms that Ba is unique in its behavior, as it has a large trend with age of -0.05 dex/Gyr but the other s-process elements have more modest trends with cluster age of -0.01 to -0.02 dex/Gyr. All of the s-process elements except Ba fit models based on an enhanced neutron source in low-mass AGB stars; we also do not see in our data the heavy s-process element trends with metallicity predicted by standard models. Problems we encountered with measuring Ba features combined with the uncertainty in predictions of i-process models require caution in interpreting the i-process as a solution to the Ba discrepancy. We do not find strong trends in s-process elements with Galactocentric radius, although there is some evidence of a break in the s

  5. Optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for the Treatment of Undifferentiated Thyroid Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra; Thomasz, Lisa M.Sc.; Longhino, Juan; Perona, Marina; Calzetta, Osvaldo; Blaumann, Herman; Rebagliati, Raul Jimenez; Cabrini, Romulo; Kahl, Steven; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Pisarev, Mario Alberto

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze the possible increase in efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC) by using p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) plus 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX (BOPP) and BPA plus nicotinamide (NA) as a radiosensitizer of the BNCT reaction. Methods and Materials: Nude mice were transplanted with a human UTC cell line (ARO), and after 15 days they were treated as follows: (1) control, (2) NCT (neutrons alone), (3) NCT plus NA (100 mg/kg body weight [bw]/day for 3 days), (4) BPA (350 mg/kg bw) + neutrons, (5) BPA + NA + neutrons, and (6) BPA + BOPP (60 mg/kg bw) + neutrons. The flux of the mixed (thermal + epithermal) neutron beam was 2.8 x 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}/sec for 83.4 min. Results: Neutrons alone or with NA caused some tumor growth delay, whereas in the BPA, BPA + NA, and BPA + BOPP groups a 100% halt of tumor growth was observed in all mice at 26 days after irradiation. When the initial tumor volume was 50 mm{sup 3} or less, complete remission was found with BPA + NA (2 of 2 mice), BPA (1 of 4), and BPA + BOPP (7 of 7). After 90 days of complete regression, recurrence of the tumor was observed in BPA + NA (2 of 2) and BPA + BOPP (1 of 7). The determination of apoptosis in tumor samples by measurements of caspase-3 activity showed an increase in the BNCT (BPA + NA) group at 24 h (p < 0.05 vs. controls) and after the first week after irradiation in the three BNCT groups. Terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling analysis confirmed these results. Conclusions: Although NA combined with BPA showed an increase of apoptosis at early times, only the group irradiated after the combined administration of BPA and BOPP showed a significantly improved therapeutic response.

  6. Neodymium neutron transmission and capture measurements and development of a new transmission detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Devin P.

    Neodymium is a 235U fission product and is important in reactor neutronic calculations. The aim of this thesis is to improve upon the existing neutron cross section data of neodymium. Neutron capture and transmission measurements were performed by the time-of-flight technique at the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute LINAC using metallic neodymium samples. The capture measurements were made at the 25-m flight station with a 16-segment Nal multiplicity detector, and the transmission measurements were performed at 15-m and 25-m flight stations, respectively, with 6Li glass scintillation detectors. After the data were collected and reduced, resonance parameters were determined by simultaneously fitting the transmission and capture data with the multilevel R-matrix Bayesian code SAMMY. The resonance parameters for all naturally occurring neodymium isotopes were deduced within the energy range of 1.0 eV to 500 eV. The resulting resonance parameters were used to calculate the capture resonance integral with this energy region and were compared to calculations obtained when using the resonance parameters from ENDF-B/VI. The RPI parameters gave a resonance integral value of 32 +/- 1 barns that is approximately 7% lower than that obtained with the ENDF-B/VI parameters. The current measurements significantly reduce the statistical uncertainties on the resonance parameters when compared with previously published parameters. This thesis also explains the resolution function in detail and discusses its importance when fitting experimental data to extract resonance parameters. More accurate resolution function parameters were determined for epithermal transmission and capture measurements by fitting well known resonances in Uranium-238. Improved transmission bare-bounce target in-beam photomultiplier tube (PMT) resolution function parameters were found and compared to those used previously at the RPI LINAC and a marked improvement in the quality of the fits is shown. In addition

  7. Krypton and xenon in Apollo 14 samples - Fission and neutron capture effects in gas-rich samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozd, R.; Hohenberg, C.; Morgan, C.

    1975-01-01

    Gas-rich Apollo 14 breccias and trench soil are examined for fission xenon from the decay of the extinct isotopes Pu-244 and I-129, and some samples have been found to have an excess fission component which apparently was incorporated after decay elsewhere and was not produced by in situ decay. Two samples have excess Xe-129 resulting from the decay of I-129. The excess is correlated at low temperatures with excess Xe-128 resulting from neutron capture on I-127. This neutron capture effect is accompanied by related low-temperature excesses of Kr-80 and Kr-82 from neutron capture on the bromine isotopes. Surface correlated concentrations of iodine and bromine are calculated from the neutron capture excesses.

  8. An overview of DANCE: a 4II BaF[2] detector for neutron capture measurements at LANSCE.

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture experiments (DANCE) is a 162-element, 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} array designed to make neutron capture cross-section measurements on rare or radioactive targets with masses as little as 1 mg. Accurate capture cross sections are needed in many research areas, including stellar nucleosynthesis, advanced nuclear fuel cycles, waste transmutation, and other applied programs. These cross sections are difficult to calculate accurately and must be measured. Up to now, except for a few long-lived nuclides there are essentially no differential capture measurements on radioactive nuclei. The DANCE array is located at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE, which is a continuous-spectrum neutron source with useable energies from below thermal to about 100 keV. Data acquisition is done with 320 fast waveform digitizers. The design and initial performance results, including background minimization, will be discussed.

  9. Contribution of neutron-capture reactions in energy release in the fuel core of BN-600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahdanovich, R. B.; Romanenko, V. I.; Tikhomirov, G. V.

    2017-01-01

    The use of modern computing powers and calculation methods allows to get closer to reality results of modelling, as well as to explore areas inaccessible to the experiment. Until now, the calculation of the energy released from the capture of neutrons in the reactor core has been given little attention. The method for calculation of the effective energy release components in a nuclear reactor allows to specify the values used by engineering programs for capture energy release in fast reactors. The paper presents improved method and the results of calculation of three models of the reactor BN-600. It is shown that the contribution of capture energy release in effective energy release for fresh fuel is equal to 4%, which is more than for VVER reactors. During the calculation we created a simple calculation model of the fast reactor, considering its features.

  10. Anomalous Neutron Capture and Plastic Deformation of cu and pd Cathodes during Electrolysis in a Weak Thermalized Neutron Field:. Evidence of Nuclei-Lattice Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, A. G.; Miley, G. H.; Lipson, A. G.

    2006-02-01

    Anomalous neutron capture and plastic deformation in the hardened Cu and Pd cathodes has been established under combined action of electrolysis and a weak thermalized neutron field (WTNF) with a flux in the range of 180-400 n/s cm2. Experiments with these cathodes showed ~7.0% decrease in the 2224 keV n-D gamma peak accompanying thermalized neutron capture inside the PE cavity during electrolysis vs. experiments with annealed Cu and Pd as well as with the background runs (i.e., no electrolysis). The anomalous neutron capture and plastic deformation of Cu and Pd cathodes under combined action of electrolysis and WTNF may be explained energetically by assuming a selective radiationless thermalized neutron capture at high-internal strain concentration sites in the hardened cathodes. The results of these experiments provide straightforward (avoids the Coulomb barrier penetration issue) evidence that nuclei-lattice energy exchange can result in an increase in neutron capture probability and radiationless de-excitation of the resulting compound nuclei.

  11. DNA damage induced by boron neutron capture therapy is partially repaired by DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Hirota, Yuki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kinashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ohnishi, Takeo; Ono, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a particle radiation therapy that involves the use of a thermal or epithermal neutron beam in combination with a boron ((10)B)-containing compound that specifically accumulates in tumor. (10)B captures neutrons and the resultant fission reaction produces an alpha ((4)He) particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus ((7)Li). These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and therefore have marked biological effects. High-LET radiation is a potent inducer of DNA damage, specifically of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of DNA ligase IV, a key player in the non-homologous end-joining repair pathway, in the repair of BNCT-induced DSBs. We analyzed the cellular sensitivity of the mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines Lig4-/- p53-/- and Lig4+/+ p53-/- to irradiation using a thermal neutron beam in the presence or absence of (10)B-para-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line had a higher sensitivity than the Lig4+/+ p53-/-cell line to irradiation with the beam alone or the beam in combination with BPA. In BNCT (with BPA), both cell lines exhibited a reduction of the 50 % survival dose (D 50) by a factor of 1.4 compared with gamma-ray and neutron mixed beam (without BPA). Although it was found that (10)B uptake was higher in the Lig4+/+ p53-/- than in the Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line, the latter showed higher sensitivity than the former, even when compared at an equivalent (10)B concentration. These results indicate that BNCT-induced DNA damage is partially repaired using DNA ligase IV.

  12. Absolute measurement of the 242Pu neutron-capture cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Buckner, M. Q.; Wu, C. Y.; Henderson, R. A.; Bucher, B.; Chyzh, A.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2016-04-21

    Here, the absolute neutron-capture cross section of 242Pu was measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center using the Detector for Advanced Neutron-Capture Experiments array along with a compact parallel-plate avalanche counter for fission-fragment detection. The first direct measurement of the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section was made over the incident neutron energy range from thermal to ≈ 6 keV, and the absolute scale of the (n,γ) cross section was set according to the known 239Pu(n,f) resonance at En,R = 7.83 eV. This was accomplished by adding a small quantity of 239Pu to the 242Pu sample. The relative scale of the cross section, with a range of four orders of magnitude, was determined for incident neutron energies from thermal to ≈ 40 keV. Our data, in general, are in agreement with previous measurements and those reported in ENDF/B-VII.1; the 242Pu(n,γ) cross section at the En,R = 2.68 eV resonance is within 2.4% of the evaluated value. However, discrepancies exist at higher energies; our data are ≈30% lower than the evaluated data at En ≈ 1 keV and are approximately 2σ away from the previous measurement at En ≈ 20 keV.

  13. Do electron-capture supernovae make neutron stars?. First multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the oxygen deflagration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Röpke, F. K.; Pakmor, R.; Seitenzahl, I. R.; Ohlmann, S. T.; Edelmann, P. V. F.

    2016-09-01

    Context. In the classical picture, electron-capture supernovae and the accretion-induced collapse of oxygen-neon white dwarfs undergo an oxygen deflagration phase before gravitational collapse produces a neutron star. These types of core collapse events are postulated to explain several astronomical phenomena. In this work, the oxygen deflagration phase is simulated for the first time using multidimensional hydrodynamics. Aims: By simulating the oxygen deflagration with multidimensional hydrodynamics and a level-set-based flame approach, new insights can be gained into the explosive deaths of 8-10 M⊙ stars and oxygen-neon white dwarfs that accrete material from a binary companion star. The main aim is to determine whether these events are thermonuclear or core-collapse supernova explosions, and hence whether neutron stars are formed by such phenomena. Methods: The oxygen deflagration is simulated in oxygen-neon cores with three different central ignition densities. The intermediate density case is perhaps the most realistic, being based on recent nuclear physics calculations and 1D stellar models. The 3D hydrodynamic simulations presented in this work begin from a centrally confined flame structure using a level-set-based flame approach and are performed in 2563 and 5123 numerical resolutions. Results: In the simulations with intermediate and low ignition density, the cores do not appear to collapse into neutron stars. Instead, almost a solar mass of material becomes unbound from the cores, leaving bound remnants. These simulations represent the case in which semiconvective mixing during the electron-capture phase preceding the deflagration is inefficient. The masses of the bound remnants double when Coulomb corrections are included in the equation of state, however they still do not exceed the effective Chandrasekhar mass and, hence, would not collapse into neutron stars. The simulations with the highest ignition density (log 10ρc = 10.3), representing the case

  14. Monte Carlo calculations of thermal neutron capture in gadolinium: a comparison of GEANT4 and MCNP with measurements.

    PubMed

    Enger, Shirin A; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Rezaei, Arash; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-02-01

    GEANT4 is a Monte Carlo code originally implemented for high-energy physics applications and is well known for particle transport at high energies. The capacity of GEANT4 to simulate neutron transport in the thermal energy region is not equally well known. The aim of this article is to compare MCNP, a code commonly used in low energy neutron transport calculations and GEANT4 with experimental results and select the suitable code for gadolinium neutron capture applications. To account for the thermal neutron scattering from chemically bound atoms [S(alpha,beta)] in biological materials a comparison of thermal neutron fluence in tissue-like poly(methylmethacrylate) phantom is made with MCNP4B, GEANT4 6.0 patch1, and measurements from the neutron capture therapy (NCT) facility at the Studsvik, Sweden. The fluence measurements agreed with MCNP calculated results considering S(alpha,beta). The location of the thermal neutron peak calculated with MCNP without S(alpha,beta) and GEANT4 is shifted by about 0.5 cm towards a shallower depth and is 25%-30% lower in amplitude. Dose distribution from the gadolinium neutron capture reaction is then simulated by MCNP and compared with measured data. The simulations made by MCNP agree well with experimental results. As long as thermal neutron scattering from chemically bound atoms are not included in GEANT4 it is not suitable for NCT applications.

  15. Technical aspects of boron neutron capture therapy at the BNL Medical Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.; Rorer, D.C.; Patti, F.J.; Liu, H.B.; Reciniello, R.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-07-01

    The Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, BMRR, is a 3 MW heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for biomedical studies. Early BNL work in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) used a beam of thermal neutrons for experimental treatment of brain tumors. Research elsewhere and at BNL indicated that higher energy neutrons would be required to treat deep seated brain tumors. Epithermal neutrons would be thermalized as they penetrated the brain and peak thermal neutron flux densities would occur at the depth of brain tumors. One of the two BMRR thermal port shutters was modified in 1988 to include plates of aluminum and aluminum oxide to provide an epithermal port. Lithium carbonate in polyethylene was added in 1991 around the bismuth port to reduce the neutron flux density coming from outside the port. To enhance the epithermal neutron flux density, the two vertical thimbles A-3 (core edge) and E-3 (in core) were replaced with fuel elements. There are now four fuel elements of 190 grams each and 28 fuel elements of 140 grams each for a total of 4.68 kg of {sup 235}U in the core. The authors have proposed replacing the epithermal shutter with a fission converter plate shutter. It is estimated that the new shutter would increase the epithermal neutron flux density by a factor of seven and the epithermal/fast neutron ratio by a factor of two. The modifications made to the BMRR in the past few years permit BNCT for brain tumors without the need to reflect scalp and bone flaps. Radiation workers are monitored via a TLD badge and a self-reading dosimeter during each experiment. An early concern was raised about whether workers would be subject to a significant dose rate from working with patients who have been irradiated. The gamma ray doses for the representative key personnel involved in the care of the first 12 patients receiving BNCT are listed. These workers did not receive unusually high exposures.

  16. Boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors: past history, current status, and future potential.

    PubMed

    Barth, R F; Soloway, A H; Brugger, R M

    1996-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction that occurs when boron-10 is irradiated with low-energy thermal neutrons to yield alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. High-grade astrocytomas, glioblastoma multiforme, and metastatic brain tumors constitute a major group of neoplasms for which there is no effective treatment. There is growing interest in using BNCT in combination with surgery to treat patients with primary, and possibly metastatic brain tumors. For BNCT to be successful, a large number of 10B atoms must be localized on or preferably within neoplastic cells, and a sufficient number of thermal neutrons must reach and be absorbed by the 10B atoms to sustain a lethal 10B(n, alpha)7 Li reaction. Two major questions will be addressed in this review. First, how can a large number of 10B atoms be delivered selectively to cancer cells? Second, how can a high fluence of neutrons be delivered to the tumor? Two boron compounds currently are being used clinically, sodium borocaptate (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA), and a number of new delivery agents are under investigation, including boronated porphyrins, nucleosides, amino acids, polyamines, monoclonal and bispecific antibodies, liposomes, and epidermal growth factor. These will be discussed, and potential problems associated with their use as boron delivery agents will be considered. Nuclear reactors, currently, are the only source of neutrons for BNCT, and the fission process within the core produces a mixture of lower-energy thermal and epithermal neutrons, fast or high (> 10,000 eV) energy neutrons, and gamma rays. Although thermal neutron beams have been used clinically in Japan to treat patients with brain tumors and cutaneous melanomas, epithermal neutron beams should be more useful because of their superior tissue-penetrating properties. Beam sources and characteristics will be discussed in the context of current and future BNCT trials. Finally, the past and present

  17. Neutron-capture Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36, and Sm-150 in large chondrites: Evidence for high fluences of thermalized neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bansal, B. M.; Garrison, D. H.; Wiesmann, H.; Herzog, G. F.; Albrecht, A. A.; Vogt, S.; Klein, J.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured significant concentrations of Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36 from decay of Cl-36, and Sm-150 produced from the capture of thermalized neutrons in the large Chico L6 chondrite. Activities of Cl-36 and Ca-41, corrected for a high-energy spallogenic component and a terrestrial age of approximately 50 ka, give average neutron-capture production rates of 208 atoms/min/g-Cl and 1525 atoms/min/kg-Ca, which correspond to thermal neutron (n) fluxes of 6.2 n/sq cm/s and 4.3 n/sq cm/s, respectively. If sustained for the approximately 65 Ma single-stage, cosmic ray exposure age of Chico, these values correspond to thermal neutron fluences of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp 16) and 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm for Cl-36 and Ca-41, respectively. Stepwise temperature extraction of Ar in Chico impact melt shows Ar-36/Ar-38 ratios as large as approximately 9. The correlation of high Ar-36/Ar-38 with high Cl/Ca phases in neutron-irradiated Chico indicates that the excess Ar-36 above that expected from spallation is due to decay of neutron-produced Cl-36. Excess Ar-36 in Chico requires a thermal neutron fluence of 0.9-1.7 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Decreases in Sm-149/Sm-152 due to neutron-capture by Sm-149 correlate with increases in Sm-150/Sm-152 for three samples of Chico, and one of the Torino H-chondrite. The 0.08% decrease in Sm-149 shown by Chico corresponds to a neutron fluence of 1.23 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. This fluence derived from Sm considers capture of epithermal neutrons and effects of chemical composition on the neutron energy distribution. Excess Ar-36 identified in the Arapahoe, Bruderheim, and Torino chondrites and the Shallowater aubrite suggest exposure to neutron fluences of approximately 0.2-0.2 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Depletion of Sm-149 in Torino and the LEW86010 angrite suggest neutron fluences of 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm and 0.25 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm, respectively. Neutron fluences of approximately 10(exp 16) n/sq cm in Chico are almost as large as those previously

  18. Simultaneous measurement of neutron-induced capture and fission reactions at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, C.; Berthoumieux, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Mendoza, E.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Billowes, J.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chiaveri, E.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Dillmann, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Fernández-Ordóñez, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ganesan, S.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Jenkins, D.; Jericha, E.; Kadi, Y.; Käppeler, F.; Karadimos, D.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Lebbos, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Losito, R.; Lozano, M.; Manousos, A.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Meaze, M.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Paradela, C.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Plag, R.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sarmento, R.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vermeullen, M.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weiß, C.; Wright, T.

    2012-03-01

    The measurement of the capture cross-section of fissile elements, of utmost importance for the design of innovative nuclear reactors and the management of nuclear waste, faces particular difficulties related to the γ -ray background generated in the competing fission reactions. At the CERN neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF we have combined the Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC) capture detector with a set of three 235U loaded MicroMegas (MGAS) fission detectors for measuring simultaneously two reactions: capture and fission. The results presented here include the determination of the three detection efficiencies involved in the process: ensuremath \\varepsilon_{TAC}(n,f) , ensuremath \\varepsilon_{TAC}(n,γ) and ensuremath \\varepsilon_{MGAS}(n,f) . In the test measurement we have succeeded in measuring simultaneously with a high total efficiency the 235U capture and fission cross-sections, disentangling accurately the two types of reactions. The work presented here proves that accurate capture cross-section measurements of fissile isotopes are feasible at n_TOF.

  19. Neutron capture cross section of unstable 63Ni: implications for stellar nucleosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lederer, C; Massimi, C; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Kivel, N; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Korschinek, G; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondelaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Pignatari, M; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wright, T J; Zugec, P

    2013-01-11

    The 63Ni(n,γ) cross section has been measured for the first time at the neutron time-of-flight facility n_TOF at CERN from thermal neutron energies up to 200 keV. In total, capture kernels of 12 (new) resonances were determined. Maxwellian averaged cross sections were calculated for thermal energies from   kT=5-100  keV with uncertainties around 20%. Stellar model calculations for a 25M⊙ star show that the new data have a significant effect on the s-process production of 63Cu, 64Ni, and 64Zn in massive stars, allowing stronger constraints on the Cu yields from explosive nucleosynthesis in the subsequent supernova.

  20. Boron analysis for neutron capture therapy using particle-induced gamma-ray emission.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Kei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Okamoto, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Matsumura, Akira; Yamada, Naoto; Kitamura, Akane; Koka, Masashi; Satoh, Takahiro

    2015-12-01

    The neutron source of BNCT is currently changing from reactor to accelerator, but peripheral facilities such as a dose-planning system and blood boron analysis have still not been established. To evaluate the potential application of particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) for boron measurement in clinical boron neutron capture therapy, boronophenylalanine dissolved within a cell culture medium was measured using PIGE. PIGE detected 18 μgB/mL f-BPA in the culture medium, and all measurements of any given sample were taken within 20 min. Two hours of f-BPA exposure was required to create a boron distribution image. However, even though boron remained in the cells, the boron on the cell membrane could not be distinguished from the boron in the cytoplasm.

  1. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Dose Calculation using Geometrical Factors Spherical Interface for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Zasneda, Sabriani; Widita, Rena

    2010-06-22

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a cancer therapy by utilizing thermal neutron to produce alpha particles and lithium nuclei. The superiority of BNCT is that the radiation effects could be limited only for the tumor cells. BNCT radiation dose depends on the distribution of boron in the tumor. Absorbed dose to the cells from the reaction 10B (n, {alpha}) 7Li was calculated near interface medium containing boron and boron-free region. The method considers the contribution of the alpha particle and recoiled lithium particle to the absorbed dose and the variation of Linear Energy Transfer (LET) charged particles energy. Geometrical factor data of boron distribution for the spherical surface is used to calculate the energy absorbed in the tumor cells, brain and scalp for case Glioblastoma Multiforme. The result shows that the optimal dose in tumor is obtained for boron concentrations of 22.1 mg {sup 10}B/g blood.

  2. [Development of high boron content liposomes and their promising antitumor effect for neutron capture therapy].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

      High accumulation and selective delivery of boron into tumor tissue are the most important requirements to achieve the efficient cell-killing effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) that relies on the nuclear reaction of two essentially nontoxic species, boron-10 ((10)B) and thermal neutrons in boron-loaded tissues. Recent development of boron cluster lipids and their liposomal boron delivery system (BDS) are summarized in this article. Boron compounds that have no affinity to tumor can potentially be delivered to tumor tissues by liposomes, therefore, liposomal BDS would be one of the most attractive approaches for efficient BNCT of various cancers. There are two approaches for BDS: encapsulation of boron compounds into liposomes and incorporation of boron-conjugated lipids into the liposomal bilayer. The combination of both approaches has a potential for reduction of the total dose of liposomes without reducing the efficacy of BNCT.

  3. Boron neutron capture therapy for malignant melanoma: first clinical case report in China

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Zhong; Song, Zewen; Zhou, Yongmao; Liu, Tong; Zhang, Zizhu; Zhao, Yanzhong; Chen, Yang; Jin, Congjun; Chen, Xiang; Lu, Jianyun; Han, Rui; Li, Pengzhou; Sun, Xulong; Wang, Guohui; Shi, Guangqing; Zhu, Shaihong

    2016-01-01

    A phase I/II clinical trial for treating malignant melanoma by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was designed to evaluate whether the world’s first in-hospital neutron irradiator (IHNI) was qualified for BNCT. In this clinical trial planning to enroll 30 patients, the first case was treated on August 19, 2014. We present the protocol of this clinical trial, the treating procedure, and the clinical outcome of this first case. Only grade 2 acute radiation injury was observed during the first four weeks after BNCT and the injury healed after treatment. No late radiation injury was found during the 24-month follow-up. Based on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) scan, pathological analysis and gross examination, the patient showed a complete response to BNCT, indicating that BNCT is a potent therapy against malignant melanoma and IHNI has the potential to enable the delivery of BNCT in hospitals. PMID:28174492

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of boron compounds for neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Soloway, A.H.; Barth, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy offers the potentiality for treating brain tumors currently resistant to treatment. The success of this form of therapy is directly dependent upon the delivery of sufficient numbers of thermal-neutrons to tumor cells which possess high concentrations of B-10. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methodology to synthesize boron-containing compounds with the potential for becoming incorporated into rapidly-dividing malignant brain tumor cells and excluded from normal components of the brain and surrounding tissues, to develope biological methods for assessing the potential of the compound by use of cell culture or intratumoral injection, to develop analytical methodology for measuring boron in cells and tissue using direct current plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (DCP-AES) and alpha track autoradiography, to develop biochemical and HPLC procedures for evaluating compound uptake and tissue half-life, and to develop procedures required to assess both in vitro and vivo efficacy of BNCT with selected compounds.

  5. Scissors Mode of 162 Dy Studied from Resonance Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Baramsai, B.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kroll, J.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O’Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Valenta, S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2015-05-28

    Multi-step cascade γ-ray spectra from the neutron capture at isolated resonances of 161Dy nucleus were measured at the LANSCE/DANCE time-of-flight facility in Los Alamos National Laboratory. The objectives of this experiment were to confirm and possibly extend the spin assignment of s-wave neutron resonances and get new information on photon strength functions with emphasis on the role of the M1 scissors mode vibration. The preliminary results show that the scissors mode plays a significant role in all transitions between accessible states of the studied nucleus. The photon strength functions describing well our data are compared to results from 3He-induced reactions, (n,γ) experiments on Gd isotopes, and (γ,γ’) reactions.

  6. Neutron Capture Surrogate Reaction on 75As in Inverse Kinematics Using (d,p(gamma))

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, W A; Cizewski, J A; Hatarik, R; O?Malley, P D; Jones, K L; Schmitt, K; Moazen, B H; Chae, K Y; Pittman, S T; Kozub, R L; Vieira, D; Jandel, M; Wilhelmy, J B; Matei, C; Escher, J; Bardayan, D W; Pain, S D; Smith, M S

    2009-11-09

    The {sup 75}As(d,p{gamma}) reaction in inverse kinematics as a surrogate for neutron capture was performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using a deuterated plastic target. The intensity of the 165 keV {gamma}-ray from {sup 76}As in coincidence with ejected protons, from exciting {sup 76}As above the neutron separation energy populating a compound state, was measured. A tight geometry of four segmented germanium clover {gamma}-ray detectors together with eight ORRUBA-type silicon-strip charged-particle detectors was used to optimize geometric acceptance. The preliminary analysis of the {sup 75}As experiment, and the efficacy and future plans of the (d,p{gamma}) surrogate campaign in inverse kinematics, are discussed.

  7. Boron neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme using the p- boronophenylalanine-fructose complex and epithermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D.; Joel, D.D.; Liu, H.B.; Slatkin, D.N.; Wielopolski, L.; Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M.

    1994-12-31

    The amino acid analogue p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) is under investigation as a neutron capture agent for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme. A series of patients undergoing surgical removal of tumor received BPA orally as the free amino acid. Favorable tumor/blood boron concentration ratios were obtained but the absolute amount of boron in the tumor would have been insufficient for BNCT. BPA can be solubilized at neutral pH by complexation with fructose (BPA-F). Studies with rats suggest that intraperitoneal injection of BPA-F complex produces a much higher tumor boron concentration to rat intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma that were possible with oral BPA. Higher boron concentrations have allowed higher tumor radiation doses to be delivered while maintaining the dose to the normal brain vascular endothelium below the threshold of tolerance. The experience to date of the administration of BPA-F to one patient is provided in this report.

  8. Neutron capture cross section measurements for 238U in the resonance region at GELINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. I.; Paradela, C.; Sirakov, I.; Becker, B.; Capote, R.; Gunsing, F.; Kim, G. N.; Kopecky, S.; Lampoudis, C.; Lee, Y.-O.; Massarczyk, R.; Moens, A.; Moxon, M.; Pronyaev, V. G.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Wynants, R.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements were performed at the time-of-flight facility GELINA to determine the 238U(n, γ) cross section in the resonance region. Experiments were carried out at a 12.5 and 60m measurement station. The total energy detection principle in combination with the pulse height weighting technique was applied using C6D6 liquid scintillators as prompt γ-ray detectors. The energy dependence of the neutron flux was measured with ionisation chambers based on the 10B(n, α) reaction. The data were normalised to the isolated and saturated 238U resonance at 6.67 eV. Special procedures were applied to reduce bias effects due to the weighting function, normalization, dead time and background corrections, and corrections related to the sample properties. The total uncertainty due to the weighting function, normalization, neutron flux and sample characteristics is about 1.5%. Resonance parameters were derived from a simultaneous resonance shape analysis of the GELINA capture data and transmission data obtained previously at a 42m and 150m station of ORELA. The parameters of resonances below 500 eV are in good agreement with those resulting from an evaluation that was adopted in the main data libraries. Between 500 eV and 1200 eV a systematic difference in the neutron width is observed. Average capture cross section data were derived from the experimental capture yield in the energy region between 3.5 keV and 90 keV. The results are in good agreement with an evaluated cross section resulting from a least squares fit to experimental data available in the literature prior to this work. The average cross section data derived in this work were parameterised in terms of average resonance parameters and included in a least squares analysis together with other experimental data reported in the literature.

  9. Boron containing magnetic nanoparticles for neutron capture therapy--an innovative approach for specifically targeting tumors.

    PubMed

    Tietze, Rainer; Unterweger, Harald; Dürr, Stephan; Lyer, Stefan; Canella, Lea; Kudejova, Petra; Wagner, Franz M; Petry, Winfried; Taccardi, Nicola; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    The selective delivery of (10)B into the tumor tissue remains to be further improved for successful and reliable Boron Neutron Capture Therapy applications. Magnetic Drug Targeting using intraarterially administered superparamagnetic nanoparticles and external magnetic fields already exhibited convincing results in terms of highly efficient and selective drug deposition. Using the same technique for the targeted (10)B delivery is a promising new approach. Here, systematic irradiation experiments of phantom cubes containing different concentrations of boron and nanoparticles as well as varying three-dimensional arrangements have been performed.

  10. Neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements in the actinide region

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, R.W.; Lougheed, R.W.; Barreau, G.; Boerner, H.; Davidson, W.F.; Schreckenbach, K.; Warner, D.D.; von Egidy, T.; White, D.H.

    1981-09-01

    From recent neutron capture gamma-ray measurements, experimental data for states involving quasiparticle-vibrational admixtures in /sup 227/Ra, /sup 231/Th, /sup 233/Th, /sup 235/U, /sup 237/U, and /sup 239/U have been compared with theoretical calculations by Soloviev's group. This analysis shows the experimental level structure is more complex than that calculated. In the levels of /sup 250/Bk, four Gallagher-Moszkowski pairs are observed. The moment of inertia for each band with antiparallel alignment of odd-nucleon momenta is systematically larger than for its parallel-aligned mate.

  11. Tomographic image of prompt gamma ray from boron neutron capture therapy: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suk Suh, Tae; Jo Hong, Key

    2014-02-24

    Purpose of paper is to confirm the feasibility of acquisition of three dimensional single photon emission computed tomography image from boron neutron capture therapy using Monte Carlo simulation. Prompt gamma ray (478 keV) was used to reconstruct image with ordered subsets expectation maximization method. From analysis of receiver operating characteristic curve, area under curve values of three boron regions were 0.738, 0.623, and 0.817. The differences between length of centers of two boron regions and distance of maximum count points were 0.3 cm, 1.6 cm, and 1.4 cm.

  12. Drug delivery system design and development for boron neutron capture therapy on cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sherlock Huang, Lin-Chiang; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Jiun-Yu; Huang, Su-Chin; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsu, Ming-Hua

    2014-06-01

    We have already synthesized a boron-containing polymeric micellar drug delivery system for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The synthesized diblock copolymer, boron-terminated copolymers (Bpin-PLA-PEOz), consisted of biodegradable poly(D,l-lactide) (PLA) block and water-soluble polyelectrolyte poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEOz) block, and a cap of pinacol boronate ester (Bpin). In this study, we have demonstrated that synthesized Bpin-PLA-PEOz micelle has great potential to be boron drug delivery system with preliminary evaluation of biocompatibility and boron content.

  13. Dose estimation for internal organs during boron neutron capture therapy for body-trunk tumors.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Y; Tanaka, H; Suzuki, M; Masunaga, S; Kinashi, Y; Kondo, N; Ono, K; Maruhashi, A

    2014-06-01

    Radiation doses during boron neutron capture therapy for body-trunk tumors were estimated for various internal organs, using data from patients treated at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. Dose-volume histograms were constructed for tissues of the lung, liver, kidney, pancreas, and bowel. For pleural mesothelioma, the target total dose to the normal lung tissues on the diseased side is 5Gy-Eq in average for the whole lung. It was confirmed that the dose to the liver should be carefully considered in cases of right lung disease.

  14. The formulation of polyhedral boranes for the boron neutron capture therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Gianpiero; Nesnas, John J; Barbu, Eugen; Fatouros, Dimitris; Tsibouklis, John

    2012-02-01

    The early promise of boron neutron capture therapy as a method for the treatment of cancer has been inhibited by the inherent toxicity associated with therapeutically useful doses of ¹⁰B-containing pharmacophores, the need for target-tissue specificity and the challenges imposed by biological barriers. Although developments in the synthetic chemistry of polyhedral boranes have addressed issues of toxicity to a considerable extent, the optimisation of the transport and the delivery of boronated agents to the site of action--the subject of this review--is a challenge that is addressed by the development of innovative formulation strategies.

  15. Boron neutron capture therapy as new treatment for clear cell sarcoma: trial on different animal model.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Tooru; Fujimoto, Takuya; Sudo, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Epstein, Alan L; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki

    2014-06-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare malignant tumor with a poor prognosis. In our previous study, the tumor disappeared under boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on subcutaneously-transplanted CCS-bearing animals. In the present study, the tumor disappeared under this therapy on model mice intramuscularly implanted with three different human CCS cells. BNCT led to the suppression of tumor-growth in each of the different model mice, suggesting its potentiality as an alternative to, or integrative option for, the treatment of CCS.

  16. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Singh, Paviter; Kumar, Manjeet; Thakur, Anup; Kumar, Akshay

    2015-05-01

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H3BO3). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

  17. Potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Andoh, Tooru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Hirose, Tkanori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Kawamoto, Teruya; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Satomi; Atagi, Shinji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are relatively rare neoplasms with poor prognosis. At present there is no effective treatment for MPNST other than surgical resection. Nonetheless, the anti-tumor effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was recently demonstrated in two patients with MPNST. Subsequently, tumor-bearing nude mice subcutaneously transplanted with a human MPNST cell line were injected with p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA) and subjected to BNCT. Pathological studies then revealed that the MPNST cells were selectively destroyed by BNCT.

  18. Model-Independent Calculation of Radiative Neutron Capture on Lithium-7

    SciTech Connect

    Rupak, Gautam; Higa, Renato

    2011-06-03

    The radiative neutron capture on lithium-7 is calculated model independently using a low-energy halo effective field theory. The cross section is expressed in terms of scattering parameters directly related to the S-matrix elements. It depends on the poorly known p-wave effective range parameter r{sub 1}. This constitutes the largest uncertainty in traditional model calculations. It is explicitly demonstrated by comparing with potential model calculations. A single parameter fit describes the low-energy data extremely well and yields r{sub 1{approx_equal}}-1.47 fm{sup -1}.

  19. Neutron Capture Rates near A=130 which Effect a Global Change to the r-Process Abundance Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Surman, Rebecca; Beun, Joshua; Mclaughlin, Gail C; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the impact of neutron capture rates near the A=130 peak on the r-process abundance pattern. We show that these capture rates can alter the abundances of individual nuclear species, not only in the region of A=130 peak but also throughout the abundance pattern. We discuss in general the nonequilibrium processes that produce these abundance changes and determine which capture rates have the most significant impact.

  20. Thermal neutron capture cross section of gadolinium by pile-oscillation measurements in MINERVE

    SciTech Connect

    Leconte, P.; Di-Salvo, J.; Antony, M.; Pepino, A.; Hentati, A.

    2012-07-01

    Natural gadolinium is used as a burnable poison in most LWR to account for the excess of reactivity of fresh fuels. For an accurate prediction of the cycle length, its nuclear data and especially its neutron capture cross section needs to be known with a high precision. Recent microscopic measurements at Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. (RPI) suggest a 11% smaller value for the thermal capture cross section of {sup 157}Gd, compared with most of evaluated nuclear data libraries. To solve this inconsistency, we have analyzed several pile-oscillation experiments, performed in the MINERVE reactor. They consist in the measurement of the reactivity variation involved by the introduction in the reactor of small-samples, containing different mass amounts of natural gadolinium. The analysis of these experiments is done through the exact perturbation theory, using the PIMS calculation tool, in order to link the reactivity effect to the thermal capture cross section. The measurement of reactivity effects is used to deduce the 2200 m.s-1 capture cross section of {sup nat}Gd which is (49360 {+-} 790) b. This result is in good agreement with the JEFF3.1.1 value (48630 b), within 1.6% uncertainty at 1{sigma}, but is strongly inconsistent with the microscopic measurements at RPI which give (44200 {+-} 500) b. (authors)

  1. Measurement and resonance analysis of the 237Np neutron capture cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, C.; Cano-Ott, D.; Mendoza, E.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Becvár, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillmann, I.; Dolfini, R.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Goncalves, I.; González-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, S.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Ketlerov, V.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lampoudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lossito, R.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marques, L.; Marrone, S.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; O'Brien, S.; Oshima, M.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vicente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron capture cross section of 237Np was measured between 0.7 and 500 eV at the CERN n_TOF facility using the 4π BaF2 Total Absorption Calorimeter. The experimental capture yield was extracted minimizing all the systematic uncertainties and was analyzed together with the most reliable transmission data available using the sammy code. The result is a complete set of individual as well as average resonance parameters [D0=0.56(2) eV, <Γγ>=40.9(18) meV, 104S0=0.98(6), R'=9.8(6) fm]. The capture cross section obtained in this work is in overall agreement with the evaluations and the data of Weston and Todd [Nucl. Sci. Eng. 79, 184 (1981)], thus showing sizable differences with respect to previous data from Scherbakov [J. Nucl. Sci. Technol. 42, 135 (2005)] and large discrepancies with data Kobayashi [J. Nucl. Sci. Technol.JNSTAX0022-313110.3327/jnst.39.111 39, 111 (2002)]. The results indicate that a new evaluation combining the present capture data with reliable transmission data would allow reaching an accuracy better than 4%, in line with the uncertainty requirements of the nuclear data community for the design and operation of current and future nuclear devices.

  2. A coupled deterministic/stochastic method for computing neutron capture therapy dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Thomas Richard

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is an experimental method of treating brain tumors and other cancers by: (1) injecting or infusing the patient with a tumor-seeking, neutron target-labeled drug; and (2) irradiating the patient in an intense epithermal neutron fluence. The nuclear reaction between the neutrons and the target nuclei (e.g. sp{10}B(n,alpha)sp7Lirbrack releases energy in the form of high-LET (i.e. energy deposited within the range of a cell diameter) reaction particles which selectively kill the tumor cell. The efficacy of NCT is partly dependent on the delivery of maximum thermal neutron fluence to the tumor and the minimization of radiation dose to healthy tissue. Since the filtered neutron source (e.g. research reactor) usually provides a broad energy spectrum of highly-penetrating neutron and gamma-photon radiation, detailed transport calculations are necessary in order to plan treatments that use optimal treatment facility configurations and patient positioning. Current computational methods for NCT use either discrete ordinates calculation or, more often, Monte Carlo simulation to predict neutron fluences in the vicinity of the tumor. These methods do not, however, accurately calculate the transport of radiation throughout the entire facility or the deposition of dose in all the various parts of the body due to shortcomings of using either method alone. A computational method, specifically designed for NCT problems, has been adapted from the MASH methodology and couples a forward discrete ordinates (Ssb{n}) calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo run to predict the dose at any point within the patient. The transport from the source through the filter/collimator is performed with a forward DORT run, and this is then coupled to adjoint MORSE results at a selected coupling parallelepiped which surrounds human phantom. Another routine was written to allow the user to generate the MORSE models at various angles and positions within the treatment room. The

  3. FUSE Observations of Neutron-Capture Elements in Wolf-Rayet Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, H.

    We propose to obtain FUSE observations of planetary nebula central stars of the WC Wolf-Rayet ([WC]) class, in order to search for the products of neutron-capture processes in these stars and provide constraints on their evolutionary status. Although the origin of the [WC]'s is controversial, their H-deficient, C-rich surface compositions indicate that they have experienced a high degree of mixing and/or mass loss. Thus one might expect the nebulae they produce to show enhanced concentrations of He-burning and other nuclear products, such as nuclei produced by slow neutron capture during the AGB phase. We have already detected an absorption line from one such element, Germanium (Sterling, Dinerstein, & Bowers 2002), while conducting a search for H2 absorption from nebular molecular material FUSE GI programs A085 and B069). Since the strongest Ge enhancements were found in PNe with [WC] central stars, we propose to enlarge the sample of such objects observed by FUSE. THIS TEMPORARY AND PARTIAL SCRIPT COVERS ONE TARGET, HE 2-99, AND REQUESTS AN EXPOSURE TIME OF 15 KSEC. PHASE 2 INFORMATION FOR THE REMAINDER OF THE PROGRAM'S TOTAL TIME ALLOCATION OF 60 KSEC WILL BE SUBMITTED AT A LATER TIME.

  4. Hemorrhage in mouse tumors induced by dodecaborate cluster lipids intended for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Schaffran, Tanja; Jiang, Nan; Bergmann, Markus; Küstermann, Ekkehard; Süss, Regine; Schubert, Rolf; Wagner, Franz M; Awad, Doaa; Gabel, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    The potential of boron-containing lipids with three different structures, which were intended for use in boron neutron capture therapy, was investigated. All three types of boron lipids contained the anionic dodecaborate cluster as the headgroup. Their effects on two different tumor models in mice following intravenous injection were tested; for this, liposomes with boron lipid, distearoyl phosphatidylcholine, and cholesterol as helper lipids, and containing a polyethylene glycol lipid for steric protection, were administered intravenously into tumor-bearing mice (C3H mice for SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma and BALB/c mice for CT26/WT colon carcinoma). With the exception of one lipid (B-THF-14), the lipids were well tolerated, and no other animal was lost due to systemic toxicity. The lipid which led to death was not found to be much more toxic in cell culture than the other boron lipids. All of the lipids that were well tolerated showed hemorrhage in both tumor models within a few hours after administration. The hemorrhage could be seen by in vivo magnetic resonance and histology, and was found to occur within a few hours. The degree of hemorrhage depended on the amount of boron administered and on the tumor model. The observed unwanted effect of the lipids precludes their use in boron neutron capture therapy.

  5. Detector-Response Correction of Two-Dimensional γ -Ray Spectra from Neutron Capture

    DOE PAGES

    Rusev, G.; Jandel, M.; Arnold, C. W.; ...

    2015-05-28

    The neutron-capture reaction produces a large variety of γ-ray cascades with different γ-ray multiplicities. A measured spectral distribution of these cascades for each γ-ray multiplicity is of importance to applications and studies of γ-ray statistical properties. The DANCE array, a 4π ball of 160 BaF2 detectors, is an ideal tool for measurement of neutron-capture γ-rays. The high granularity of DANCE enables measurements of high-multiplicity γ-ray cascades. The measured two-dimensional spectra (γ-ray energy, γ-ray multiplicity) have to be corrected for the DANCE detector response in order to compare them with predictions of the statistical model or use them in applications. Themore » detector-response correction problem becomes more difficult for a 4π detection system than for a single detector. A trial and error approach and an iterative decomposition of γ-ray multiplets, have been successfully applied to the detector-response correction. Applications of the decomposition methods are discussed for two-dimensional γ-ray spectra measured at DANCE from γ-ray sources and from the 10B(n, γ) and 113Cd(n, γ) reactions.« less

  6. Neutron Capture Elements in the Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Hearty, Fred R.

    2016-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. The high-resolution (R=22,500), near-infrared (H-band) APOGEE-1 survey allows for cluster membership probability determination and analysis of light and iron-peak elements. Neutron capture elements, however, prove to be elusive in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we conducted a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. We present results for ten open clusters using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph. We see abundance trends for Ba II, La II and Eu II that are consistent with Galactic abundance patterns for these elements. Ce II appears to be slightly enhanced in all program stars with a median value of ~0.1 dex and a spread of 0.5 dex for the entire sample.

  7. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Galactic Neutron Capture Abundance Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Melendez, Matthew; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    The evolution of elements, as a function or age, throughout the Milky Way disk provides a key constraint for galaxy evolution models. In an effort to provide these constraints, we have conducted an investigation into the r- and s- process elemental abundances for a large sample of open clusters as part of an optical follow-up to the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. Stars were identified as cluster members by the Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey, which culls member candidates by radial velocity, metallicity, and proper motion from the observed APOGEE sample. To obtain data for neutron capture elements in these clusters, we conducted a long-term observing campaign covering three years (2013-2016) using the McDonald Observatory Otto Struve 2.1-m telescope and Sandiford Cass Echelle Spectrograph (R ~ 60,000). We present Galactic neutron-capture abundance gradients using 30+ clusters, within 6 kpc of the Sun, covering a range of ages from ~80 Myr to ~10 Gyr .

  8. Stellar neutron capture cross sections of Nd, Pm, and Sm isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Toukan, K.A. ); Debus, K.; Kaeppeler, F. ); Reffo, G. )

    1995-03-01

    The neutron capture cross sections of [sup 146,148,150]Nd have been determined relative to that of gold by means of the activation method. The samples were irradiated in a quasistellar neutron spectrum for [ital kT]=25 keV using the [sup 7]Li([ital p],[ital n])[sup 7]Be reaction near threshold. Variation of the experimental conditions in different activations and the use of different samples allowed for the reliable determination of corrections and the evaluation of systematic uncertainties. The resulting stellar cross sections can be given with uncertainties around 6%, which represents a considerable improvement compared to previous measurements. These data are complemented by a new set of calculated cross sections for the unstable isotopes [sup 147]Nd, [sup 147,148,149]Pm, and [sup 151]Sm, which act as branching points in the [ital s]-process path. Based on these results, the [ital s]-process flow in the Nd-Pm-Sm region is discussed with respect to the neutron density during stellar helium burning and to isotopic anomalies in meteorites. The updated [ital s]-abundances are also used for a discussion of [ital r]- and [ital p]-process residuals.

  9. Tetrakis(p-carboranylthio-tetrafluorophenyl)chlorin (TPFC): application for photodynamic therapy and boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Hiramatsu, Ryo; Kawabata, Shinji; Tanaka, Hiroki; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Hao, Erhong; Vicente, M Graça H

    2015-03-01

    Carboranyl-containing chlorins have emerged as promising dual sensitizers for use in both photodynamic therapy (PDT) and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), by virtue of their known tumor affinity, low cytotoxicity in dark conditions, and their strong absorptions in the red region of the optical spectrum. Tetrakis(p-carboranylthio-tetrafluorophenyl)chlorin (TPFC) is a new synthetic carboranyl-containing chlorin of high boron content (24% by weight). To evaluate TPFC's applicability as sensitizer for both PDT and BNCT, we performed an in vitro and in vivo study using F98 rat glioma cells and F98 rat glioma-bearing brain tumor models. For the in vivo BNCT study, we used boronophenylalanine (BPA), which is currently used in clinical BNCT studies, via intravenous administration (i.v.) and/or used TPFC via convection-enhanced delivery (CED), a method for local drug infusion directly into the brain. In the in vitro PDT study, the cell surviving fraction following laser irradiation (9 J/cm(2) ) was 0.035 whereas in the in vitro BNCT study, the cell surviving fraction following neutron irradiation (thermal neutron = 1.73 × 10(12) n/cm(2) ) was 0.04. In the in vivo BNCT study, the median survival time following concomitant administration of BPA (i.v.) and TPFC (CED) was 42 days (95% confidence interval; 37-43 days).

  10. Tetrakis(p-Carboranylthio-Tetrafluorophenyl)Chlorin (TPFC): Application for Photodynamic Therapy and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    PubMed Central

    HIRAMATSU, RYO; KAWABATA, SHINJI; TANAKA, HIROKI; SAKURAI, YOSHINORI; SUZUKI, MINORU; ONO, KOJI; MIYATAKE, SHIN-ICHI; KUROIWA, TOSHIHIKO; HAO, ERHONG; VICENTE, M. GRAÇA H.

    2015-01-01

    Carboranyl-containing chlorins have emerged as promising dual sensitizers for use in both photodynamic therapy (PDT) and boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), by virtue of their known tumor affinity, low cytotoxicity in dark conditions, and their strong absorptions in the red region of the optical spectrum. Tetrakis(p-carboranylthio-tetrafluorophenyl)chlorin (TPFC) is a new synthetic carboranyl-containing chlorin of high boron content (24% by weight). To evaluate TPFC’s applicability as sensitizer for both PDT and BNCT, we performed an in vitro and in vivo study using F98 rat glioma cells and F98 rat glioma-bearing brain tumor models. For the in vivo BNCT study, we used boronophenylalanine (BPA), which is currently used in clinical BNCT studies, via intravenous administration (i.v.) and/or used TPFC via convection-enhanced delivery (CED), a method for local drug infusion directly into the brain. In the in vitro PDT study, the cell surviving fraction following laser irradiation (9 J/cm2) was 0.035 whereas in the in vitro BNCT study, the cell surviving fraction following neutron irradiation (thermal neutron = 1.73 × 1012 n/cm2) was 0.04. In the in vivo BNCT study, the median survival time following concomitant administration of BPA (i.v.) and TPFC (CED) was 42 days (95% confidence interval; 37–43 days). PMID:25546823

  11. Neutron capture production rates of cosmogenic 60Co, 59Ni and 36Cl in stony meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spergel, M. S.; Reedy, R. C.; Lazareth, O. W.; Levy, P. W.

    1986-01-01

    Results for neutron flux calculations in stony meteoroids (of various radii and compositions) and production rates for Cl-36, Ni-59, and Co-60 are reported. The Ni-59/Co-60 ratio is nearly constant with depth in most meteorites: this effect is consistent with the neutron flux and capture cross section properties. The shape of the neutron flux energy spectrum, varies little with depth in a meteorite. The size of the parent meteorite can be determined from one of its fragments, using the Ni-59/Co-60 ratios, if the parent meteorite was less than 75 g/cm(2) in radius. If the parent meteorite was larger, a lower limit on the size of the parent meteorite can be determined from a fragment. In C3 chondrites this is not possible. In stony meteorites with R less than 50 g/cm(2) the calculated Co-60 production rates (mass less than 4 kg), are below 1 atom/min g-Co. The highest Co-60 production rates occur in stony meteorites with radius about 250 g/cm(2) (1.4 m across). In meteorites with radii greater than 400 g/cm(2), the maximum Co-60 production rate occurs at a depth of about 175 g/cm(2) in L-chondrite, 125 g/cm(2) in C3 chrondrite, and 190 g/cm(2) in aubrites.

  12. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver metastasis: therapeutic efficacy in an experimental model

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg

    2012-08-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was proposed for untreatable colorectal liver metastases. The present study evaluates tumor control and potential radiotoxicity of BNCT in an experimental model of liver metastasis. BDIX rats were inoculated with syngeneic colon cancer cells DHD/K12/TRb. Tumor-bearing animals were divided into three groups: BPA–BNCT, boronophenylalanine (BPA) ? neutron irradiation; Beam only, neutron irradiation; Sham, matched manipulation. The total absorbed dose administered with BPA–BNCT was 13 ± 3 Gy in tumor and 9 ± 2 Gy in healthy liver. Three weeks posttreatment, the tumor surface area post-treatment/pre-treatment ratio was 0.46 ± 0.20 for BPA–BNCT, 2.7 ± 1.8 for Beam only and 4.5 ± 3.1 for Sham. The pre-treatment tumor nodule mass of 48 ± 19 mgfell significantly to 19 ± 16 mg for BPA–BNCT, but rose significantly to 140 ± 106 mg for Beam only and to 346 ± 302 mg for Sham. For both end points, the differences between the BPA–BNCT group and each of the other groups were statistically significant (ANOVA). No clinical, macroscopic or histological normal liver radiotoxicity was observed. It is concluded that BPA– BNCT induced a significant remission of experimental colorectal tumor nodules in liver with no contributory liver toxicity.

  13. Measured microdosimetric spectra and therapeutic potential of boron neutron capture enhancement of 252Cf brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, J; Kota, C; Maughan, R L

    2005-09-01

    Californium-252 is a neutron-emitting radioisotope used as a brachytherapy source for radioresistant tumors. Presented here are microdosimetric spectra measured as a function of simulated site diameter and distance from applicator tube 252Cf sources. These spectra were measured using miniature tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs). An investigation of the clinical potential of boron neutron capture (BNC) enhancement of 252Cf brachytherapy is also provided. The absorbed dose from the BNC reaction was measured using a boron-loaded miniature TEPC. Measured neutron, photon and BNC absorbed dose components are provided as a function of distance from the source. In general, the absorbed dose results show good agreement with results from other measurement techniques. A concomitant boost to 252Cf brachytherapy may be provided through the use of the BNC reaction. The potential magnitude of this BNC enhancement increases with increasing distance from the source and is capable of providing a therapeutic gain greater than 30% at a distance of 5 cm from the source, assuming currently achievable boron concentrations.

  14. Neutron-Capture Nucleosynthesis and the Chemical Evolution of Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shingles, Luke J.

    2015-09-01

    Elements heavier than iron are almost entirely produced in stars through neutron captures and radioactive decays. Of these heavy elements, roughly half are produced by the slow neutron-capture process (s-process), which takes place under extended exposure to low neutron densities. Most of the s-process production occurs in stars with initial masses between roughly 0.8 and 8 solar masses (Msun), which evolve through the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) phase. This thesis explores several topics related to AGB stars and the s-process, with a focus on comparing theoretical models to observations in the literature on planetary nebulae, post-AGB stars, and globular cluster stars. A recurring theme is the uncertainty of carbon-13-pocket formation, which is crucial for building accurate models of s-process nucleosynthesis. We first investigated whether neutron-capture reactions in AGB stars are the cause of the low sulphur abundances in planetary nebulae and post-AGB stars relative to the interstellar medium. Accounting for uncertainties in the size of the partial mixing zone that forms carbon-13 pockets and the rates of neutron-capture and neutron-producing reactions, our models failed to reproduce the observed levels of sulphur destruction. From this, we concluded that AGB nucleosynthesis is not the cause of the sulphur anomaly. We also discovered a new method to constrain the extent of the partial mixing zone using neon abundances in planetary nebulae. We next aimed to discover the stellar sites of the s-process enrichment in globular clusters that have inter- and intra-cluster variation, with the examples of M4 (relative to M5) and M22, respectively. Using a new chemical evolution code developed by the candidate, we tested models with stellar yields from rotating massive stars and AGB stars. We compared our model predictions for the production of s-process elements with abundances from s-poor and s-rich populations. We found that rotating massive stars alone do not

  15. An irradiation facility for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy application based on a radio frequency driven D-T neutron source and a new beam shaping assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, Nicola; Esposito, Juan; Leung, Ka Ngo; Custodero, Salvatore

    2002-10-01

    A line of the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) research program aimed at the treatment of brain tumors, carried on at the Nuclear Departments of Pisa and Genova Universities (DIMNP and DITEC), is being focused on a new, 3H(d,n)4He (D-T), accelerator-based neutron source concept, developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Simple and compact accelerator designs, using mixed D+ T+ ion beam with relatively low energy, ˜100 keV, have been developed which, in turn, can generate high neutron yields. New approaches have thus been started to design an epithermal neutron irradiation facility able to selectively slow the 14.1 MeV D-T neutrons down to the epithermal (1 eV-10 KeV) energy range. New neutron spectrum shifter and filtering materials, as well as different facility layout approaches have been tested. Possible beam shaping assembly models have also been designed. The research demonstrates that a D-T neutron source could be successfully implemented to provide a ˜1×109 n/cm2 s epithermal neutron flux, in spite of its hard spectrum, although a generator device, able to yield ˜1014 n/s is, at present, not yet available. The latest Monte Carlo simulation of an accelerator-based facility, which relies on a single or multiple rf driven DT fusion neutron generator, is presented.

  16. Optimum design and criticality safety of a beam-shaping assembly with an accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier for boron neutron capture therapies.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, F

    2015-12-01

    The beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapies with a compact accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier was designed so that an epithermal neutron flux of 1.9×10(9) cm(-2) s(-1) at the treatment position was generated by 5 MeV protons in a beam current of 2 mA. Changes in the atomic density of (135)Xe in the nuclear fuel due to the operation of the beam-shaping assembly were estimated. The criticality safety of the beam-shaping assembly in terms of Xe poisoning is discussed.

  17. Treatment of malignant melanoma by selective thermal neutron capture therapy using melanoma-seeking compound

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, Y.; Ichihashi, M.; Tsuji, M.; Hatta, S.; Ueda, M.; Honda, C.; Suzuki, T.

    1989-05-01

    As pigment cells undergo melanoma genesis, accentuated melanogenesis concurrently occurs in principle. Subsequent to the understanding of intrinsic factors controlling both processes, we found our selective melanoma neutron capture therapy (NCT) using 10B-dopa (melanin substrate) analogue, 10B1-p-boronophenylalanine (10B1-BPA), followed by 10B(n, alpha)7Li reaction, induced by essentially harmless thermal neutrons, which releases energy of 2.33 MeV to 14 mu, the diameter of melanoma cells. In vitro/in vivo radiobiological analysis revealed the highly enhanced melanoma killing effect of 10B1-BPA. Chemical and prompt gamma ray spectrometry assays of 10B accumulated within melanoma cells after 10B1-BPA administration in vitro and in vivo show high affinity, e.g., 10B melanoma/blood ratio of 11.5. After successfully eradicating melanoma transplanted into hamsters with NCT, we advanced to preclinical studies using spontaneously occurring melanoma in Duroc pig skin. We cured three melanoma cases, 4.6 to 12 cm in diameter, by single neutron capture treatment. Complete disappearance of melanoma was obtained without substantial side effects. Acute and subacute toxicity as well as pharmacodynamics of 10B1-BPA have been studied in relation to therapeutic dosage requirements. Clinical radiation dosimetry using human phantom has been carried out. Further preclinical studies using human melanoma transplanted into nude mouse have been a useful model for obtaining optimal results for each melanoma type. We recently treated the first human melanoma patient with our NCT, using essentially the method for Duroc pig melanoma, and obtained similar regression time course leading to cure.

  18. Exploring Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Farías, Rubén O; Bortolussi, Silva; Menéndez, Pablo R; González, Sara J

    2014-12-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapy that combines biological targeting and high LET radiation. It consists in the enrichment of tumour with (10)B and in the successive irradiation of the target with low energy neutrons producing charged particles that mainly cause non-repairable damages to the cells. The feasibility to treat Non Small Cells Lung Cancer (NSCLC) with BNCT was explored. This paper proposes a new approach to determine treatment plans, introducing the possibility to choose the irradiation start and duration to maximize the tumour dose. A Tumour Control Probability (TCP) suited for lung BNCT as well as other high dose radiotherapy schemes was also introduced. Treatment plans were evaluated in localized and disseminated lung tumours. Semi-ideal and real energy spectra beams were employed to assess the best energy range and the performance of non-tailored neutron sources for lung tumour treatments. The optimal neutron energy is within [500 eV-3 keV], lower than the 10 keV suggested for the treatment of deep-seated tumours in the brain. TCPs higher than 0.6 and up to 0.95 are obtained for all cases. Conclusions drawn from [Suzuki et al., Int Canc Conf J 1 (4) (2012) 235-238] supporting the feasibility of BNCT for shallow lung tumours are confirmed, however discussions favouring the treatment of deeper lesions and disseminated disease are also opened. Since BNCT gives the possibility to deliver a safe and potentially effective treatment for NSCLC, it can be considered a suitable alternative for patients with few or no treatment options.

  19. Boron neutron capture therapy for glioblastoma multiforme: clinical studies in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Capala, Jacek; Stenstam, Britta H; Sköld, Kurt; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Giusti, Valerio; Persson, Charlotta; Wallin, Eva; Brun, Arne; Franzen, Lars; Carlsson, Jörgen; Salford, Leif; Ceberg, Crister; Persson, Bertil; Pellettieri, Luigi; Henriksson, Roger

    2003-01-01

    A boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility has been constructed at Studsvik, Sweden. It includes two filter/moderator configurations. One of the resulting neutron beams has been optimized for clinical irradiations with a filter/moderator system that allows easy variation of the neutron spectrum from the thermal to the epithermal energy range. The other beam has been designed to produce a large uniform field of thermal neutrons for radiobiological research. Scientific operations of the Studsvik BNCT project are overseen by the Scientific Advisory Board comprised of representatives of major universities in Sweden. Furthermore, special task groups for clinical and preclinical studies have been formed to facilitate collaboration with academia. The clinical Phase II trials for glioblastoma are sponsored by the Swedish National Neuro-Oncology Group and, presently, involve a protocol for BNCT treatment of glioblastoma patients who have not received any therapy other than surgery. In this protocol, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), administered as a 6-h intravenous infusion, is used as the boron delivery agent. As of January 2002, 17 patients were treated. The 6-h infusion of 900 mg BPA/kg body weight was shown to be safe and resulted in the average blood-boron concentration of 24 microg/g (range: 15-32 microg/g) at the time of irradiation (approximately 2-3 h post-infusion). Peak and average weighted radiation doses to the brain were in the ranges of 8.0-15.5 Gy(W) and 3.3-6.1 Gy(W), respectively. So far, no severe BNCT-related acute toxicities have been observed. Due to the short follow-up time, it is too early to evaluate the efficacy of these studies.

  20. Noble gas excimer scintillation following neutron capture in boron thin films

    SciTech Connect

    McComb, Jacob C.; Al-Sheikhly, Mohamad; Coplan, Michael A.; Thompson, Alan K.; Vest, Robert E.; Clark, Charles W.

    2014-04-14

    Far-ultraviolet scintillation signals have been measured in heavy noble gases (argon, krypton, xenon) following boron-neutron capture ({sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li) in {sup 10}B thin films. The observed scintillation yields are comparable to the yields from some liquid and solid neutron scintillators. At noble gas pressures of 107 kPa, the number of photons produced per neutron absorbed following irradiation of a 1200 nm thick {sup 10}B film was 14 000 for xenon, 11 000 for krypton, and 6000 for argon. The absolute scintillation yields from the experimental configuration were calculated using data from (1) experimental irradiations, (2) thin-film characterizations, (3) photomultiplier tube calibrations, and (4) photon collection modeling. Both the boron films and the photomultiplier tube were characterized at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Monte Carlo modeling of the reaction cell provided estimates of the photon collection efficiency and the transport behavior of {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products escaping the thin films. Scintillation yields increased with gas pressure due to increased ionization and excitation densities of the gases from the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products, increased frequency of three-body, excimer-forming collisions, and reduced photon emission volumes (i.e., larger solid angle) at higher pressures. Yields decreased for thicker {sup 10}B thin films due to higher average energy loss of the {sup 10}B(n,α){sup 7}Li reaction products escaping the films. The relative standard uncertainties in the measurements were determined to lie between 14% and 16%. The observed scintillation signal demonstrates that noble gas excimer scintillation is promising for use in practical neutron detectors.

  1. Relative biological effects of neutron mixed-beam irradiation for boron neutron capture therapy on cell survival and DNA double-strand breaks in cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Kakuji; Kinashi, Yuko; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Kitajima, Erika; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Ono, Koji; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the biological effects of neutron mixed-beam irradiation used for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is important in order to improve the efficacy of the therapy and to reduce side effects. In the present study, cell viability and DNA double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) were examined in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) and their radiosensitive mutant cells (xrs5, Ku80-deficient), following neutron mixed-beam irradiation for BNCT. Cell viability was significantly impaired in the neutron irradiation groups compared to the reference gamma-ray irradiation group. The relative biological effectiveness for 10% cell survival was 3.3 and 1.2 for CHO-K1 and xrs5 cells, respectively. There were a similar number of 53BP1 foci, indicators of DNA-DSBs, in the neutron mixed-beam and the gamma-ray groups. In addition, the size of the foci did not differ between groups. However, neutron mixed-beam irradiation resulted in foci with different spatial distributions. The foci were more proximal to each other in the neutron mixed-beam groups than the gamma-ray irradiation groups. These findings suggest that neutron beams may induce another type of DNA damage, such as clustered DNA-DSBs, as has been indicated for other high-LET irradiation. PMID:22966174

  2. Determination of radiative neutron capture cross sections for unstable nuclei by the {gamma}-ray strength function method

    SciTech Connect

    Utsunomiya, H.; Goriely, S.

    2012-11-12

    An indirect method referred to as the {gamma}-ray strength function method has been devised to determine radiative neutron capture cross sections for unstable nuclei along the valley of {beta}-stability. This method is based on the {gamma}-ray strength function which interconnects radiative neutron capture and photoneutron emission within the statistical model. The method was applied to several unstable nuclei such as {sup 93,95}Zr, {sup 107}Pd, and 121,123Sn. This method offers a versatile application extended to unstable nuclei far from the stability when combined with Coulomb dissociation experiments at RIKEN-RIBF and GSI.

  3. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234 , 236 , 238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Krticka, M.; Kawano, T.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Chyzh, A.

    2015-10-01

    Calculations of the neutron-capture cross section at low neutron energies (10 eV through 100's of keV) are very sensitive to the nuclear level density and radiative strength function. These quantities are often poorly known, especially for radioactive targets, and actual measurements of the capture cross section are usually required. An additional constraint on the calculation of the capture cross section is provided by measurements of the cascade gamma spectrum following neutron capture. Recent measurements of 234 , 236 , 238U(n, γ) emission spectra made using the DANCE 4 π BaF2 array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will be presented. Calculations of gamma-ray spectra made using the DICEBOX code and of the capture cross section made using the CoH3 code will also be presented. These techniques may be also useful for calculations of more unstable nuclides. This work was performed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396) and Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734).

  4. Monte Carlo based treatment planning systems for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in Petten, The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nievaart, V. A.; Daquino, G. G.; Moss, R. L.

    2007-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiotherapy for the treatment of tumour lesions. Since the cancer cells in the treatment volume are targeted with 10B, a higher dose is given to these cancer cells due to the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction, in comparison with the surrounding healthy cells. In Petten (The Netherlands), at the High Flux Reactor, a specially tailored neutron beam has been designed and installed. Over 30 patients have been treated with BNCT in 2 clinical protocols: a phase I study for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and a phase II study on the treatment of malignant melanoma. Furthermore, activities concerning the extra-corporal treatment of metastasis in the liver (from colorectal cancer) are in progress. The irradiation beam at the HFR contains both neutrons and gammas that, together with the complex geometries of both patient and beam set-up, demands for very detailed treatment planning calculations. A well designed Treatment Planning System (TPS) should obey the following general scheme: (1) a pre-processing phase (CT and/or MRI scans to create the geometric solid model, cross-section files for neutrons and/or gammas); (2) calculations (3D radiation transport, estimation of neutron and gamma fluences, macroscopic and microscopic dose); (3) post-processing phase (displaying of the results, iso-doses and -fluences). Treatment planning in BNCT is performed making use of Monte Carlo codes incorporated in a framework, which includes also the pre- and post-processing phases. In particular, the glioblastoma multiforme protocol used BNCT_rtpe, while the melanoma metastases protocol uses NCTPlan. In addition, an ad hoc Positron Emission Tomography (PET) based treatment planning system (BDTPS) has been implemented in order to integrate the real macroscopic boron distribution obtained from PET scanning. BDTPS is patented and uses MCNP as the calculation engine. The precision obtained by the Monte Carlo based TPSs exploited at Petten

  5. Boron neutron capture therapy and radiation synovectomy research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.; Nwanguma, C.I.; Wazer, D.E.; Saris, S.; Madoc-Jones, H. ); Sledge, C.B.; Shortkroff, S. )

    1992-04-01

    In this paper, current research in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and radiation synovectomy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor is reviewed. In the last few years, major emphasis has been placed on the development of BNCT primarily for treatment of brain tumors. This has required a concerted effort in epithermal beam design and construction as well as the development of analytical capabilities for {sup 10}B analysis and patient treatment planning. Prompt gamma analysis and high-resolution track-etch autoradiography have been developed to meet the needs, respectively, for accurate bulk analysis and for quantitative imaging of {sup 10}B in tissue at subcellular resolutions. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning codes have been developed to ensure optimized and individualized patient treatments. In addition, the development of radiation synovectomy as an alternative therapy to surgical intervention is joints that are affected by rheumatoid arthritis is described.

  6. Radiative-neutron-capture gamma-ray analysis by a linear combination technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, A.B.; Bhargava, R.C.; Senftle, F.E.; Brinkerhoff, J.M.

    1972-01-01

    The linear combination technique, when applied to a gamma-ray spectrum, gives a single number indicative of the extent to which the spectral lines of a sought element are present in a complex spectrum. Spectra are taken of the sought element and of various other substances whose spectra interfere with that of the sought element. A weighting function is then computed for application to spectra of unknown materials. The technique was used to determine calcium by radiative-neutron-capture gamma-ray analysis in the presence of interfering elements, notably titanium, and the results were compared with those for two popular methods of peak area integration. Although linearity of response was similar for the methods, the linear combination technique was much better at rejecting interferences. For analyses involving mixtures of unknown composition the technique consequently offers improved sensitivity. ?? 1972.

  7. Heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory approach to thermal neutron capture on {sup 3}He

    SciTech Connect

    Lazauskas, Rimantas; Park, Tae-Sun

    2011-03-15

    The cross section for radiative thermal neutron capture on {sup 3}He ({sup 3}He+n{yields}{sup 4}He+{gamma}; known as the hen reaction) is calculated based on heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory. The relevant M1 operators are derived up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N{sup 3}LO). The initial and final nuclear wave functions are obtained from the rigorous Faddeev-Yakubovski equations for five sets of realistic nuclear interactions. Up to N{sup 3}LO, the M1 operators contain two low-energy constants, which appear as the coefficients of nonderivative two-nucleon contact terms. After determining these two constants using the experimental values of the magnetic moments of the triton and {sup 3}He, we carry out a parameter-free calculation of the hen cross section. The results are in good agreement with the data.

  8. Rational design of gold nanoparticles functionalized with carboranes for application in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ciani, Laura; Bortolussi, Silva; Postuma, Ian; Cansolino, Laura; Ferrari, Cinzia; Panza, Luigi; Altieri, Saverio; Ristori, Sandra

    2013-12-31

    In this paper we propose a bottom-up approach to obtain new boron carriers built with ortho-carborane functionalized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for applications in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The interaction between carboranes and the gold surface was assured by one or two SH-groups directly linked to the boron atoms of the B10C2 cage. This allowed obtaining stable, nontoxic systems, though optimal biological performance was hampered by low solubility in aqueous media. To improve cell uptake, the hydrophilic character of carborane functionalized GNPs was enhanced by further coverage with an appropriately tailored diblock copolymer (PEO-b-PCL). This polymer also contained pendant carboranes to provide anchoring to the pre-functionalized GNPs. In vitro tests, carried out on osteosarcoma cells, showed that the final vectors possessed excellent biocompatibility joint to the capacity of concentrating boron atoms in the target, which is encouraging evidenced to pursue applications in vivo.

  9. Carborane-conjugated 2-quinolinecarboxamide ligands of the translocator protein for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Cappelli, Andrea; Valenti, Salvatore; Mancini, Alessandra; Giuliani, Germano; Anzini, Maurizio; Altieri, Saverio; Bortolussi, Silva; Ferrari, Cinzia; Clerici, Anna Maria; Zonta, Cecilia; Carraro, Fabio; Filippi, Irene; Giorgi, Gianluca; Donati, Alessandro; Ristori, Sandra; Vomero, Salvatore; Concas, Alessandra; Biggio, Giovanni

    2010-12-15

    Potential boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agents have been designed on the basis of the evidence about translocator protein (TSPO) overexpression on the outer mitochondrial membrane of tumor cells. The structure of the first TSPO ligand bearing a carborane cage (compound 2d) has been modified in order to find a suitable candidate for in vivo studies. The designed compounds were synthesized and evaluated for their potential interaction with TSPO and tumor cells. In vitro biological evaluation showed in the case of fluoromethyl derivative 4b a nanomolar TSPO affinity very similar to that of 2d, a significantly lower cytotoxicity, and a slightly superior performance as boron carrier toward breast cancer cells. Moreover, compound 4b could be used as a ¹⁹F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent as well as labeled with ¹¹C or ¹⁸F to obtain positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers in order to apply the "see and treat" strategy in BNCT.

  10. Cell cycle dependence of boron uptake from two boron compounds used for clinical neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, F; Matsumura, A; Shibata, Y; Yamamoto, T; Nakauchi, H; Okumura, M; Nose, T

    2002-12-10

    In neutron capture therapy, it is important that the boron is selectively uptaken by tumor cells. In the present study, we used flow cytometry to sort the cells in the G0/G1 phase and those in the G2/M phase, and the boron concentration in each fraction was measured with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. The results revealed that sodium borocaptate and boronophenylalanine (BPA), were associated with higher rates of boron uptake in the G2/M than in the G0/G1 phase. However, the difference was more prominent in the case of BPA. The G2/M:G0/G1 ratio decreased as a function of exposure time in BPA containing culture medium, thereby indicating the cell cycle dependency of BPA uptake. Such heterogeneity of boron uptake by tumor cells should be considered for microdosimetry.

  11. The measurement of the solar neutrino flux with the sudbury neutrino observatory's neutron capture detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, B.

    2008-06-01

    Phase III of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment began after the installation of the Neutral-Current Detector (NCD) array in the D2O-filled acrylic vessel. This unique phase provides a measurement of the Neutral-Current (NC) flux that can be statistically and systematically separated from the Elastic-Scattering (ES) and Charged-Current (CC) fluxes by simply counting the number of solar-induced dissociated neutrons captured in the NCD array. The measurement with NCDs will provide increased precision on the CC and NC fluxes, and thus on the solar neutrino mixing parameters. This poster presents the status of the analysis of the SNO phase III solar neutrino fluxes.

  12. Neutron-capture nucleosynthesis in HdC stars: the case of HE 1015-2050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Aruna; Karinkuzhi, Drisya

    Hydrogen-deficient carbon (HdC) stars and R Coronae Borealis (RCB) type stars form a rare class of carbon-rich supergiants. A fraction of these stars in our Galaxy are known to exhibit strong features of light neutron-capture elements such as Sr, Y and Zr usually attributed to the weak component of the s-process. These stars are believed to be in a very short-lived evolutionary phase; hence, their ejecta could have significantly contributed to chemical enrichment in the Galaxy. From medium-resolution spectral analyses of faint high latitude carbon (FHLC) stars of Hamburg/ESO survey Goswami et al. (2010) have added a new member HE 1015-2050, to this rare class. This object is found to exhibit anomalously strong features of Sr in its spectrum. Possible scenarios that might have led to the formation of this object are discussed in the light of existing scenarios of HdC star formation.

  13. Stellar electron capture rates on neutron-rich nuclei and their impact on stellar core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raduta, Ad. R.; Gulminelli, F.; Oertel, M.

    2017-02-01

    During the late stages of gravitational core-collapse of massive stars, extreme isospin asymmetries are reached within the core. Due to the lack of microscopic calculations of electron-capture (EC) rates for all relevant nuclei, in general simple analytic parametrizations are employed. We study here several extensions of these parametrizations, allowing for a temperature, electron density, and isospin dependence as well as for odd-even effects. The latter extra degrees of freedom considerably improve the agreement with large-scale microscopic rate calculations. We find, in particular, that the isospin dependence leads to a significant reduction of the global EC rates during core collapse with respect to fiducial results, where rates optimized on calculations of stable f p -shell nuclei are used. Our results indicate that systematic microscopic calculations and experimental measurements in the N ≈50 neutron-rich region are desirable for realistic simulations of the core collapse.

  14. Single step synthesis of nanostructured boron nitride for boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Singh, Paviter; Kumar, Akshay; Kumar, Manjeet; Thakur, Anup

    2015-05-15

    Nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN) has been successfully synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction of Boric Acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}). This method is a relatively low temperature synthesis route and it can be used for large scale production of nanostructured BN. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and differential thermal analyzer (DTA). XRD analysis confirmed the formation of single phase nanostructured Boron Nitride. SEM analysis showed that the particles are spherical in shape. DTA analysis showed that the phase is stable upto 900 °C and the material can be used for high temperature applications as well boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT)

  15. Boron neutron capture therapy of ocular melanoma and intracranial glioma using p-boronophenylalanine

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Greenberg, D.; Micca, P.L.; Joel, D.D.; Saraf, S. ); Packer, S. . Div. of Ophthalmology)

    1990-01-01

    During conventional radiotherapy, the dose that can be delivered to the tumor is limited by the tolerance of the surrounding normal tissue within the treatment volume. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) represents a promising modality for selective tumor irradiation. The key to effective BNCT is selective localization of {sup 10}B in the tumor. We have shown that the synthetic amino acid p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) will selectively deliver boron to melanomas and other tumors such as gliosarcomas and mammary carcinomas. Systemically delivered BPA may have general utility as a boron delivery agent for BNCT. In this paper, BNCT with BPA is used in treatment of experimentally induced gliosarcoma in rats and nonpigmented melanoma in rabbits. The tissue distribution of boron is described, as is response to the BNCT. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in the Treatment of Locally Recurred Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kankaanranta, Leena; Seppaelae, Tiina; Koivunoro, Hanna; Saarilahti, Kauko; Atula, Timo; Collan, Juhani; Salli, Eero; Kortesniemi, Mika; Uusi-Simola, Jouni; Maekitie, Antti; Seppaenen, Marko; Minn, Heikki; Kotiluoto, Petri; Auterinen, Iiro; Savolainen, Sauli; Kouri, Mauri; Joensuu, Heikki

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: Head and neck carcinomas that recur locally after conventional irradiation pose a difficult therapeutic problem. We evaluated safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of such cancers. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with inoperable, recurred, locally advanced (rT3, rT4, or rN2) head and neck cancer were treated with BNCT in a prospective, single-center Phase I-II study. Prior treatments consisted of surgery and conventionally fractionated photon irradiation to a cumulative dose of 56-74 Gy administered with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Tumor responses were assessed using the RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) criteria and adverse effects using the National Cancer Institute common toxicity grading v3.0. Intravenously administered boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F, 400 mg/kg) was used as the boron carrier. Each patient was scheduled to be treated twice with BNCT. Results: Ten patients received BNCT twice; 2 were treated once. Ten (83%) patients responded to BNCT, and 2 (17%) had tumor growth stabilization for 5.5 and 7.6 months. The median duration of response was 12.1 months; six responses were ongoing at the time of analysis or death (range, 4.9-19.2 months). Four (33%) patients were alive without recurrence with a median follow-up of 14.0 months (range, 12.8-19.2 months). The most common acute adverse effects were mucositis, fatigue, and local pain; 2 patients had a severe (Grade 3) late adverse effect (xerostomia, 1; dysphagia, 1). Conclusions: Boron neutron capture therapy is effective and safe in the treatment of inoperable, locally advanced head and neck carcinomas that recur at previously irradiated sites.

  17. Subaru/HDS study of CH stars: elemental abundances for stellar neutron-capture process studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Aruna; Aoki, Wako; Karinkuzhi, Drisya

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive abundance analysis providing rare insight into the chemical history of lead stars is still lacking. We present results from high-resolution (R ˜ 50 000) spectral analyses of three CH stars, HD 26, HD 198269 and HD 224959, and, a carbon star with a dusty envelope, HD 100764. Previous studies on these objects are limited by both resolution and wavelength regions and the results differ significantly from each other. We have undertaken to reanalyse the chemical composition of these objects based on high-resolution Subaru spectra covering the wavelength regions 4020-6775 Å. Considering local thermodynamic equilibrium and using model atmospheres, we have derived the stellar parameters, the effective temperatures Teff, surface gravities log g, and metallicities [Fe/H] for these objects. The derived parameters for HD 26, HD 100764, HD 198269 and HD 224959 are (5000, 1.6, -1.13), (4750, 2.0 -0.86), (4500, 1.5, -2.06) and (5050, 2.1, -2.44), respectively. The stars are found to exhibit large enhancements of heavy elements relative to iron in conformity to previous studies. Large enhancement of Pb with respect to iron is also confirmed. Updates on the elemental abundances for several s-process elements (Y, Zr, La, Ce, Nd, Sm and Pb) along with the first-time estimates of abundances for a number of other heavy elements (Sr, Ba, Pr, Eu, Er and W) are reported. Our analysis suggests that neutron-capture elements in HD 26 primarily originate in the s-process while the major contributions to the abundances of neutron-capture elements in the more metal-poor objects HD 224959 and HD 198269 are from the r-process, possibly from materials that are pre-enriched with products of the r-process.

  18. Boron uptake measurements in a rat model for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of lung tumours.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Bakeine, J G; Ballarini, F; Bruschi, P; Gadan, M A; Protti, N; Stella, S; Clerici, A; Ferrari, C; Cansolino, L; Zonta, C; Zonta, A; Nano, R; Altieri, S

    2011-02-01

    Lung carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the Western countries. Despite the introduction over the last few years of new therapeutic agents, survival from lung cancer has shown no discernible improvement in the last 20 years. For these reasons any efforts to find and validate new effective therapeutic procedures for lung cancer are very timely. The selective boron uptake in the tumour with respect to healthy tissues makes Boron Neutron Capture Therapy a potentially advantageous option in the treatment of tumours that affect whole vital organs, and that are surgically inoperable. To study the possibility of applying BNCT to the treatment of diffuse pulmonary tumours, an animal model for boron uptake measurements in lung metastases was developed. Both healthy and tumour-bearing rats were infused with Boronophenylalanine (BPA) and sacrificed at different time intervals after drug administration. The lungs were extracted, and prepared for boron analysis by neutron autoradiography and α-spectroscopy. The boron concentrations in tumour and normal lung were plotted as a function of the time elapsed after BPA administration. The concentration in tumour is almost constant within the error bars for all the time intervals of the experiment (1-8 h), while the curve in normal lung decreases after 4 h from BPA infusion. At 4 h, the ratio of boron concentration in tumour to boron concentration in healthy lung is higher than 3, and it stays above this level up to 8 h. Also the images of boron distribution in the samples, obtained by neutron autoradiography, show a selective absorption in the metastases.

  19. Biodistribution of sodium borocaptate (BSH) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in an oral cancer model.

    PubMed

    Garabalino, Marcela A; Heber, Elisa M; Monti Hughes, Andrea; González, Sara J; Molinari, Ana J; Pozzi, Emiliano C C; Nievas, Susana; Itoiz, Maria E; Aromando, Romina F; Nigg, David W; Bauer, William; Trivillin, Verónica A; Schwint, Amanda E

    2013-08-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on selective accumulation of ¹⁰B carriers in tumor followed by neutron irradiation. We previously proved the therapeutic success of BNCT mediated by the boron compounds boronophenylalanine and sodium decahydrodecaborate (GB-10) in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model. Based on the clinical relevance of the boron carrier sodium borocaptate (BSH) and the knowledge that the most effective way to optimize BNCT is to improve tumor boron targeting, the specific aim of this study was to perform biodistribution studies of BSH in the hamster cheek pouch oral cancer model and evaluate the feasibility of BNCT mediated by BSH at nuclear reactor RA-3. The general aim of these studies is to contribute to the knowledge of BNCT radiobiology and optimize BNCT for head and neck cancer. Sodium borocaptate (50 mg ¹⁰B/kg) was administered to tumor-bearing hamsters. Groups of 3-5 animals were killed humanely at nine time-points, 3-12 h post-administration. Samples of blood, tumor, precancerous pouch tissue, normal pouch tissue and other clinically relevant normal tissues were processed for boron measurement by optic emission spectroscopy. Tumor boron concentration peaked to therapeutically useful boron concentration values of 24-35 ppm. The boron concentration ratio tumor/normal pouch tissue ranged from 1.1 to 1.8. Pharmacokinetic curves showed that the optimum interval between BSH administration and neutron irradiation was 7-11 h. It is concluded that BNCT mediated by BSH at nuclear reactor RA-3 would be feasible.

  20. An international dosimetry exchange for boron neutron capture therapy. Part I: Absorbed dose measurements.

    PubMed

    Binns, P J; Riley, K J; Harling, O K; Kiger, W S; Munck af Rosenschöld, P M; Giusti, V; Capala, J; Sköld, K; Auterinen, I; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Uusi-Simola, J; Marek, M; Viererbl, L; Spurny, F

    2005-12-01

    An international collaboration was organized to undertake a dosimetry exchange to enable the future combination of clinical data from different centers conducting neutron capture therapy trials. As a first step (Part I) the dosimetry group from the Americas, represented by MIT, visited the clinical centers at Studsvik (Sweden), VTT Espoo (Finland), and the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) at Rez (Czech Republic). A combined VTT/NRI group reciprocated with a visit to MIT. Each participant performed a series of dosimetry measurements under equivalent irradiation conditions using methods appropriate to their clinical protocols. This entailed in-air measurements and dose versus depth measurements in a large water phantom. Thermal neutron flux as well as fast neutron and photon absorbed dose rates were measured. Satisfactory agreement in determining absorbed dose within the experimental uncertainties was obtained between the different groups although the measurement uncertainties are large, ranging between 3% and 30% depending upon the dose component and the depth of measurement. To improve the precision in the specification of absorbed dose amongst the participants, the individually measured dose components were normalized to the results from a single method. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) that is typical of concentrations realized clinically with the boron delivery compound boronophenylalanine-fructose, systematic discrepancies in the specification of the total biologically weighted dose of up to 10% were apparent between the different groups. The results from these measurements will be used in future to normalize treatment plan calculations between the different clinical dosimetry protocols as Part II of this study.

  1. Dynamic infrared imaging for biological and medical applications in Boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; González, Sara J.; Dagrosa, Alejandra; Schwint, Amanda E.; Carpano, Marina; Trivillin, Verónica A.; Boggio, Esteban F.; Bertotti, José; Marín, Julio; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Molinari, Ana J.; Albero, Miguel

    2011-05-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality, currently focused on the treatment of cancer, which involves a tumor selective 10B compound and a specially tuned neutron beam to produce a lethal nuclear reaction. BNCT kills target cells with microscopic selectivity while sparing normal tissues from potentially lethal doses of radiation. In the context of the Argentine clinical and research BNCT projects at the National Atomic Energy Commission and in a strong collaboration with INVAP SE, we successfully implemented Dynamic Infrared Imaging (DIRI) in the clinical setting for the observation of cutaneous melanoma patients and included DIRI as a non invasive methodology in several research protocols involving small animals. We were able to characterize melanoma lesions in terms of temperature and temperature rate-of-recovery after applying a mild cold thermal stress, distinguishing melanoma from other skin pigmented lesions. We observed a spatial and temporal correlation between skin acute reactions after irradiation, the temperature pattern and the dose distribution. We studied temperature distribution as a function of tumor growth in mouse xenografts, observing a significant correlation between tumor temperature and drug uptake; we investigated temperature evolution in the limbs of Wistar rats for a protocol of induced rheumatoid arthritis (RA), DIRI being especially sensitive to RA induction even before the development of clinical signs and studied surface characteristics of tumors, precancerous and normal tissues in a model of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch.

  2. Verification of the computational dosimetry system in JAERI (JCDS) for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Matsumura, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakagawa, Y.; Nakai, K.; Kageji, T.

    2004-08-01

    Clinical trials for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) by using the medical irradiation facility installed in Japan Research Reactor No. 4 (JRR-4) at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) have been performed since 1999. To carry out the BNCT procedure based on proper treatment planning and its precise implementation, the JAERI computational dosimetry system (JCDS) which is applicable to dose planning has been developed in JAERI. The aim of this study was to verify the performance of JCDS. The experimental data with a cylindrical water phantom were compared with the calculation results using JCDS. Data of measurements obtained from IOBNCT cases at JRR-4 were also compared with retrospective evaluation data with JCDS. In comparison with phantom experiments, the calculations and the measurements for thermal neutron flux and gamma-ray dose were in a good agreement, except at the surface of the phantom. Against the measurements of clinical cases, the discrepancy of JCDS's calculations was approximately 10%. These basic and clinical verifications demonstrated that JCDS has enough performance for the BNCT dosimetry. Further investigations are recommended for precise dose distribution and faster calculation environment.

  3. Characteristics of a heavy water photoneutron source in boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danial, Salehi; Dariush, Sardari; M. Salehi, Jozani

    2013-07-01

    Bremsstrahlung photon beams produced by medical linear accelerators are currently the most commonly used method of radiation therapy for cancerous tumors. Photons with energies greater than 8-10 MeV potentially generate neutrons through photonuclear interactions in the accelerator's treatment head, patient's body, and treatment room ambient. Electrons impinging on a heavy target generate a cascade shower of bremsstrahlung photons, the energy spectrum of which shows an end point equal to the electron beam energy. By varying the target thickness, an optimum thickness exists for which, at the given electron energy, maximum photon flux is achievable. If a source of high-energy photons i.e. bremsstrahlung, is conveniently directed to a suitable D2O target, a novel approach for production of an acceptable flux of filterable photoneturons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) application is possible. This study consists of two parts. 1. Comparison and assessment of deuterium photonuclear cross section data. 2. Evaluation of the heavy water photonuclear source.

  4. Induced radioactivity in the blood of cancer patients following Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Keiko; Kinashi, Yuko; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Yashima, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Kouta; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Ono, Koji; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2013-07-01

    Since 1990, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been used for over 400 cancer patients at the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI). After BNCT, the patients are radioactive and their (24)Na and (38)Cl levels can be detected via a Na-I scintillation counter. This activity is predominantly due to (24)Na, which has a half-life of 14.96 h and thus remains in the body for extended time periods. Radioactive (24)Na is mainly generated from (23)Na in the target tissue that is exposed to the neutron beam in BNCT. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the radioactivity of blood (24)Na following BNCT and the absorbed gamma ray dose in the irradiated field. To assess blood (24)Na, 1 ml of peripheral blood was collected from 30 patients immediately after the exposure, and the radioactivity of blood (24)Na was determined using a germanium counter. The activity of (24)Na in the blood correlated with the absorbed gamma ray doses in the irradiated field. For the same absorbed gamma ray dose in the irradiated field, the activity of blood (24)Na was higher in patients with neck or lung tumors than in patients with brain or skin tumors. The reasons for these findings are not readily apparent, but the difference in the blood volume and the ratio of bone to soft tissue in the irradiated field, as well as the dose that leaked through the clinical collimator, may be responsible.

  5. Boron neutron capture therapy of a murine mammary carcinoma using a lipophilic carboranyltetraphenylporphyrin.

    PubMed

    Miura, M; Morris, G M; Micca, P L; Lombardo, D T; Youngs, K M; Kalef-Ezra, J A; Hoch, D A; Slatkin, D N; Ma, R; Coderre, J A

    2001-04-01

    The first control of a malignant tumor in vivo by porphyrin- mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is described. In mice bearing implanted EMT-6 mammary carcinomas, boron uptake using a single injection of either p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) or mercaptoundecahydrododecaborane (BSH) was compared with either a single injection or multiple injections of the carboranylporphyrin CuTCPH. The BSH and BPA doses used were comparable to the highest doses of these compounds previously administered in a single injection to rodents. For BNCT, boron concentrations averaged 85 microg (10)B/g in the tumor and 4 microg (10)B/g in blood 2 days after the last of six injections (over 32 h) that delivered a total of 190 microg CuTCPH/g body weight. During a single 15, 20, 25 or 30 MW-min exposure to the thermalized neutron beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, a tumor received average absorbed doses of approximately 39, 52, 66 or 79 Gy, respectively. A long-term (>200 days) tumor control rate of 71% was achieved at a dose of 66 Gy with minimal damage to the leg. Equivalent long-term tumor control by a single exposure to 42 Gy X rays was achieved, but with greater damage to the irradiated leg.

  6. Verification of the computational dosimetry system in JAERI (JCDS) for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, H; Yamamoto, K; Matsumura, A; Yamamoto, T; Nakagawa, Y; Nakai, K; Kageji, T

    2004-08-07

    Clinical trials for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) by using the medical irradiation facility installed in Japan Research Reactor No. 4 (JRR-4) at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) have been performed since 1999. To carry out the BNCT procedure based on proper treatment planning and its precise implementation, the JAERI computational dosimetry system (JCDS) which is applicable to dose planning has been developed in JAERI. The aim of this study was to verify the performance of JCDS. The experimental data with a cylindrical water phantom were compared with the calculation results using JCDS. Data of measurements obtained from IOBNCT cases at JRR-4 were also compared with retrospective evaluation data with JCDS. In comparison with phantom experiments, the calculations and the measurements for thermal neutron flux and gamma-ray dose were in a good agreement, except at the surface of the phantom. Against the measurements of clinical cases, the discrepancy of JCDS's calculations was approximately 10%. These basic and clinical verifications demonstrated that JCDS has enough performance for the BNCT dosimetry. Further investigations are recommended for precise dose distribution and faster calculation environment.

  7. Brain tumour and infiltrations dosimetry of boron neutron capture therapy combined with 252Cf brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Sâmia F; Campos, Tarcísio P R

    2012-04-01

    This article presents a dosimetric investigation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy for brain tumour control. The study was conducted through computational simulation in MCNP5 code, using a precise and discrete voxel model of a human head, in which a hypothetical brain tumour was incorporated. A boron concentration ratio of 1:5 for healthy-tissue: tumour was considered. Absorbed and biologically weighted dose rates and neutron fluency in the voxel model were evaluated. The absorbed dose rate results were exported to SISCODES software, which generates the isodose surfaces on the brain. Analyses were performed to clarify the relevance of boron concentrations in occult infiltrations far from the target tumour, with boron concentration ratios of 1:1 up to 1:50 for healthy-tissue:infiltrations and healthy-tissue:tumour. The average biologically weighted dose rates at tumour area exceed up to 40 times the surrounding healthy tissue dose rates. In addition, the biologically weighted dose rates from boron have the main contribution at the infiltrations, especially far from primary tumour. In conclusion, BNCT combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy is an alternative technique for brain tumour treatment because it intensifies dose deposition at the tumour and at infiltrations, sparing healthy brain tissue.

  8. Electron-capture delayed fission properties of neutron-deficient einsteinium nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Shaughnessy, Dawn A.

    2000-01-01

    Electron-capture delayed fission (ECDF) properties of neutron-deficient einsteinium isotopes were investigated using a combination of chemical separations and on-line radiation detection methods. 242Es was produced via the 233U(14N,5n)242Es reaction at a beam energy of 87 MeV (on target) in the lab system, and was found to decay with a half-life of 11 ± 3 seconds. The ECDF of 242Es showed a highly asymmetric mass distribution with an average pre-neutron emission total kinetic energy (TKE) of 183 ± 18 MeV. The probability of delayed fission (PDF) was measured to be 0.006 ± 0.002. In conjunction with this experiment, the excitation functions of the 233U(14N,xn)247-xEs and 233U(15N,xn)248-xEs reactions were measured for 243Es, 244Es and 245Es at projectile energies between 80 MeV and 100 MeV.

  9. Induced radioactivity in the blood of cancer patients following Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Keiko; Kinashi, Yuko; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Yashima, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Kouta; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Ono, Koji; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2013-01-01

    Since 1990, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been used for over 400 cancer patients at the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI). After BNCT, the patients are radioactive and their 24Na and 38Cl levels can be detected via a Na-I scintillation counter. This activity is predominantly due to 24Na, which has a half-life of 14.96 h and thus remains in the body for extended time periods. Radioactive 24Na is mainly generated from 23Na in the target tissue that is exposed to the neutron beam in BNCT. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the radioactivity of blood 24Na following BNCT and the absorbed gamma ray dose in the irradiated field. To assess blood 24Na, 1 ml of peripheral blood was collected from 30 patients immediately after the exposure, and the radioactivity of blood 24Na was determined using a germanium counter. The activity of 24Na in the blood correlated with the absorbed gamma ray doses in the irradiated field. For the same absorbed gamma ray dose in the irradiated field, the activity of blood 24Na was higher in patients with neck or lung tumors than in patients with brain or skin tumors. The reasons for these findings are not readily apparent, but the difference in the blood volume and the ratio of bone to soft tissue in the irradiated field, as well as the dose that leaked through the clinical collimator, may be responsible. PMID:23392825

  10. Studies on depth-dose-distribution controls by deuteration and void formation in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Yoshinori

    2004-08-07

    Physical studies on (i) replacement of heavy water for body water (deuteration), and (ii) formation of a void in human body (void formation) were performed as control techniques for dose distribution in a human head under neutron capture therapy. Simulation calculations were performed for a human-head-size cylindrical phantom using a two-dimensional transport calculation code for mono-energetic incidences of higher-energy epi-thermal neutrons (1.2-10 keV), lower-energy epi-thermal neutrons (3.1-23 eV) and thermal neutrons (1 meV to 0.5 eV). The deuteration was confirmed to be effective both in thermal neutron incidence and in epi-thermal neutron incidence from the viewpoints of improvement of the thermal neutron flux distribution and elimination of the secondary gamma rays. For the void formation, a void was assumed to be 4 cm in diameter and 3 cm in depth at the surface part in this study. It was confirmed that the treatable depth was improved almost 2 cm for any incident neutron energy in the case of the 10 cm irradiation field diameter. It was made clear that the improvement effect was larger in isotropic incidence than in parallel incidence, in the case that an irradiation field size was delimited fitting into a void diameter.

  11. Benchmark Experiments of Thermal Neutron and Capture Gamma-Ray Distributions in Concrete Using {sup 252}Cf

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Yoshihiro; Sugita, Takeshi; Hirose, Hideyuki; Suzaki, Takenori

    2005-10-15

    The distributions of thermal neutrons and capture gamma rays in ordinary concrete were investigated by using {sup 252}Cf. Two subjects are considered. One is the benchmark experiments for the thermal neutron and the capture gamma-ray distributions in ordinary concrete. The thermal neutron and the capture gamma-ray distributions were measured by using gold-foil activation detectors and thermoluminescence detectors. These were compared with the simulations by using the discrete ordinates code ANISN with two different group structure types of cross-section library of a new Japanese version, JENDL-3.3, showing reasonable agreement with both fine and rough structure groups of thermal neutron energy. The other is a comparison of the simulations with two different cross-section libraries, JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VI, for the deep penetration of neutrons in the concrete, showing close agreement in 0- to 100-cm-thick concrete. However, the differences in flux grow with an increase in concrete thickness, reaching up to approximately eight times near 4-m thickness.

  12. Preparation of a one-curie 171Tm target for the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Taylor, Wayne A.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Vieira, David J.

    2008-05-15

    Roughly one curie of 171Tm (t1/2=1.92a) has been produced and purified for the purpose of making a nuclear target for the first measurements of its neutron capture cross section. Target preparation consisted of three key steps: (1) material production; (2) separation and purification; and (3) electrodeposition onto a suitable backing material. Approximately 1.5 mg of the target material (at the time of separation) was produced by irradiating roughly 250 mg of its stable enriched 170Er lanthanide neighbor with neutrons at the ILL reactor in France. This production method resulted in a “difficult-to-separate” 1:167 mixture of near-neighboring lanthanides, Tm and Er. Separation and purification was accomplished using high-performance liquid chromatorgraphy (HPLC), with a proprietary cation exchange column (Dionex, CS-3) and alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid (a-HIB) eluent. This technique yielded a final product of ~95% purity with respect to Tm. A portion (20 ug) of the Tm was electrodeposited on thin Be foil and delivered to the Los Alamos Neutron Science CEnter (LANSCE) for preliminary analysis of its neutron capture cross section using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). This paper discusses the major hurdles associated with the separation and purification step including, scale-up issues related to the use of HPLC for material separation and purification of the target material from a-HIB and 4-(2-pyridylazo)resorcinol (PAR) colorant.

  13. Measuring Neutron-Proton Radiative Capture Cross-section at Low Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, To Chin; Kovash, Michael; Matthews, June; Yang, Hongwei; Yang, Yunjie

    2015-10-01

    The experiment aims to fill in a gap in our data for the cross-section of neutron-proton radiative capture (p(n,d γ)) at energies below 500 keV. Current measurements in this energy range are scarce and inconsistent with theoretical predictions and with each other. A well-determined cross-section of the capture reaction in the low energy range is useful in nuclear physics due to its fundamental nature. The measurement is also of interest in cosmology. Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), the process by which light elements are formed in early universe, is very sensitive to the p(n,d γ) cross-section in the low energy range. The measurement enables us to put tighter constraints on the theoretical predictions of BBN. We have conducted preliminary measurements in the van de Graaff accelerator facility at the University of Kentucky. Our array of detectors consists of three plastic scintillators to serve as proton targets and deuteron detectors, and five BGO scintillators to detect γ-rays. The combination results in an over-determination of reaction kinematics that discriminates against scattering processes and other backgrounds. We have obtained some early results which show promise for the precise measurement of the p(n,d γ) cross-section.

  14. Measurement of the radiative neutron capture cross section of Pb206 and its astrophysical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo-Pardo, C.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Álvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Bisterzo, S.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillman, I.; Dolfini, R.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrant, L.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Gramegna, F.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Isaev, M.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Ketlerov, V.; Koehler, P.; Konovalov, V.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Lamboudis, C.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; Oshima, M.; O'Brien, S.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rosetti, M.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2007-10-01

    The (n,γ) cross section of Pb206 has been measured at the CERN n_TOF facility with high resolution in the energy range from 1 eV to 620 keV by using two optimized C6D6 detectors. In the investigated energy interval about 130 resonances could be observed, from which 61 had enough statistics to be reliably analyzed via the R-matrix analysis code SAMMY. Experimental uncertainties were minimized, in particular with respect to (i) angular distribution effects of the prompt capture γ-rays, and to (ii) the TOF-dependent background due to sample-scattered neutrons. Other background components were addressed by background measurements with an enriched Pb208 sample. The effect of the lower energy cutoff in the pulse height spectra of the C6D6 detectors was carefully corrected via Monte Carlo simulations. Compared to previous Pb206 values, the Maxwellian averaged capture cross sections derived from these data are about 20% and 9% lower at thermal energies of 5 keV and 30 keV, respectively. These new results have a direct impact on the s-process abundance of Pb206, which represents an important test for the interpretation of the cosmic clock based on the decay of U238.

  15. Clinical potential of boron neutron capture therapy for locally recurrent inoperable previously irradiated head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Diana; Quah, Daniel S C; Leech, Michelle; Marignol, Laure

    2015-12-01

    This review compares the safety and efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in the treatment of previously irradiated, inoperable locoregional recurrent HNC patients and compares BNCT against the standard treatment of platinum-based chemotherapy. Our analysis of published clinical trials highlights efficacy of BNCT associated with mild side effects. However, the use of BNCT should be explored in stratified randomised trials.

  16. Neutron-Capture Elements in Low Metallicity Stars within the Inner Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumper, Kenneth A.; Burris, Debra L.

    2017-01-01

    The inner galactic halo is home to some of the oldest and low metallicity stars known. These stars are local enough to observe heavy element synthesis in the oldest stars in our galaxy. The purpose of this research is to analyze the distributions of neutron capture elements in low metallicity stars to help us understand the nature of first stars, which are responsible for the chemical enrichment of our galaxy, and consequently get man closer to an answer to some of the most fundamental questions about the universe.. The researchers will analyze and measure the stellar abundances of metal poor stars using MOOG’s spectral synthesis. Heavy element formation is connected to stellar evolution, thus by observing the chronometric ages of the distributions of Thorium/Europium, one can determine the age of the oldest stars. Analyzing the distribution of Uranium and Thorium as chronometers can set a lower limit on the age of the Universe. The chemical composition in our oldest observable stars resemble that of the earliest stars. This demonstrates that these stars were not synthesized internally but a result of previous deaths of stars generations before. This in turn provides useful information about the first star’s formation, evolution and nucleosynthesis of stars, and the arrangement of the structure of the early Universe. The most r-process rich halo stars abundances are consistent with a scaled solar system r-process abundance distribution. Also, there is symmetry in the rare earth elements in the stars within the Galactic halo. However the lighter n-capture abundances don’t conform to the solar pattern. This suggests the possibility of multiple synthesis mechanisms for the n capture elements. The combinations could include the main r-process, V-P process (core collapsed super- novae), charged particle reactions with Beta delayed fission, and the weak r-process. The weak r-process is sometimes called the incomplete r-process does not have enough neutrons to

  17. The 234U Neutron Capture Cross Section Measurement at the n_TOF Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lampoudis, C.; Koehler, Paul Edward; Collaboration, n_TOF

    2008-01-01

    The neutron capture cross-section of {sup 234}U has been measured for energies from thermal up to the keV region in the neutron time-of-flight facility n{_}TOF, based on a spallation source located at CERN. A 4n BaF{sub 2} array composed of 40 crystals, placed at a distance of 184.9 m from the neutron source, was employed as a total absorption calorimeter (TAC) for detection of the prompt {gamma}-ray cascade from capture events in the sample. This text describes the experimental setup, all necessary steps followed during the data analysis procedure. Results are presented in the form of R-matrix resonance parameters from fits with the SAMMY code and compared to the evaluated data of ENDF in the relevant energy region, indicating the good performance of the n{_}TOF facility and the TAC.

  18. Radiation dose measurements and Monte Carlo calculations for neutron and photon reactions in a human head phantom for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Don-Soo

    Dose measurements and radiation transport calculations were investigated for the interactions within the human brain of fast neutrons, slow neutrons, thermal neutrons, and photons associated with accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy (ABNCT). To estimate the overall dose to the human brain, it is necessary to distinguish the doses from the different radiation sources. Using organic scintillators, human head phantom and detector assemblies were designed, constructed, and tested to determine the most appropriate dose estimation system to discriminate dose due to the different radiation sources that will ultimately be incorporated into a human head phantom to be used for dose measurements in ABNCT. Monoenergetic and continuous energy neutrons were generated via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction in a metallic lithium target near the reaction threshold using the 5.5 MV Van de Graaff accelerator at the University of Massachusetts Lowell. A human head phantom was built to measure and to distinguish the doses which result from proton recoils induced by fast neutrons, alpha particles and recoil lithium nuclei from the 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction, and photons generated in the 7Li accelerator target as well as those generated inside the head phantom through various nuclear reactions at the same time during neutron irradiation procedures. The phantom consists of two main parts to estimate dose to tumor and dose to healthy tissue as well: a 3.22 cm3 boron loaded plastic scintillator which simulates a boron containing tumor inside the brain and a 2664 cm3 cylindrical liquid scintillator which represents the surrounding healthy tissue in the head. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX(TM) was used for the simulation of radiation transport due to neutrons and photons and extended to investigate the effects of neutrons and other radiation on the brain at various depths.

  19. A new analytical formula for neutron capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes in radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ghiasi, Hosein; Mesbahi, Asghar

    2012-01-01

    Background Photoneutrons are produced in radiation therapy with high energy photons. Also, capture gamma rays are the byproduct of neutrons interactions with wall material of radiotherapy rooms. Aim In the current study an analytical formula was proposed for capture gamma dose calculations in double bend mazes in radiation therapy rooms. Materials and methods A total of 40 different layouts with double-bend mazes and a 18 MeV photon beam of Varian 2100 Clinac were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo (MC) code. Neutron capture gamma ray dose equivalent was calculated by the MC method along the maze and at the maze entrance door of all the simulated rooms. Then, all MC resulted data were fitted to an empirical formula for capture gamma dose calculations. Wu–McGinley analytical formula for capture gamma dose equivalent at the maze entrance door in single-bend mazes was also used for comparison purposes. Results For capture gamma dose equivalents at the maze entrance door, the difference of 2–11% was seen between MC and the derived equation, while the difference of 36–87% was found between MC and the Wu–McGinley methods. Conclusion Our results showed that the derived formula results were consistent with the MC results for all of 40 different geometries. However, as a new formula, further evaluations are required to validate its use in practical situations. Finally, its application is recommend for capture gamma dose calculations in double-bend mazes to improve shielding calculations. PMID:24377027

  20. New insights on Ba overabundance in open clusters. Evidence for the intermediate neutron-capture process at play?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishenina, T.; Pignatari, M.; Carraro, G.; Kovtyukh, V.; Monaco, L.; Korotin, S.; Shereta, E.; Yegorova, I.; Herwig, F.

    2015-02-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies were devoted to measure the abundances of neutron-capture elements heavier than iron in stars belonging to Galactic Open Clusters (OCs). OCs span a sizeable range in metallicity (-0.6 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ +0.4), and they show abundances of light elements similar to disc stars of the same age. A different pattern is observed for heavy elements. A large scatter is observed for Ba, with most OCs showing [Ba/Fe] and [Ba/La] overabundant with respect to the Sun. The origin of this overabundance is not clearly understood. With the goal of providing new observational insights, we determined radial velocities, atmospheric parameters and chemical composition of 27 giant stars members of five OCs: Cr 110, Cr 261, NGC 2477, NGC 2506 and NGC 5822. We used high-resolution spectra obtained with the UVES spectrograph at European Southern Observatory Paranal. We perform a detailed spectroscopic analysis of these stars to measure the abundance of up to 22 elements per star. We study the dependence of element abundance on metallicity and age with unprecedented detail, complementing our analysis with data culled from the literature. We confirm the trend of Ba overabundance in OCs, and show its large dispersion for clusters younger than ˜4 Gyr. Finally, the implications of our results for stellar nucleosynthesis are discussed. We show in this work that the Ba enrichment compared to other neutron-capture elements in OCs cannot be explained by the contributions from the slow neutron-capture process and the rapid neutron-capture process. Instead, we argue that this anomalous signature can be explained by assuming an additional contribution by the intermediate neutron-capture process.

  1. SU-E-T-21: A D-D Based Neutron Generator System for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, M; Liu, Y; Nie, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator for application in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain cancer Methods: MCNP simulations were performed using a head phantom and a monoenergetic neutron source, which resembles the point source in a DD generator that emits 2.45-MeV neutrons. Source energies ranging from 5eV to 2.45MeV were simulated to determine the optimal treatment energy. The phantom consisted of soft tissue, brain tissue, skull, skin layer, and a brain tumor of 5 cm in diameter. Tumor depth was varied from 5–10 cm. Boron-10 concentrations of 10 ppm, 15 ppm, and 30 ppm were used in the soft/brain tissues, skin, and tumor, respectively. The neutron flux required to deliver 60 Gy to the tumor as well as the normal tissue doses were determined. Results: Beam energies between 5eV and 10keV obtained doses with the highest dose ratios (3.3–25.9) between the tumor and the brain at various depths. The dose ratio with 2.45-MeV neutrons ranged from 0.8–6.6. To achieve the desired tumor dose in 40 minutes, the required neutron flux for a DD generator was between 8.8E10 and 5.2E11 n/s and the resulting brain dose was between 2.3 and 18 Gy, depending on the tumor depth. The skin and soft tissue doses were within acceptable tolerances. The boron-neutron interaction accounted for 54–58% of the total dose. Conclusion: This study shows that the DD neutron generator can be a feasible neutron source for BNCT. The required neutron flux for treatment is achievable with the current DD neutron technology. With a well-designed beam shaping assembly and treatment geometry, the neutron flux can be further improved and a 60-Gy prescription can be accurately delivered to the target while maintaining tolerable normal tissue doses. Further experimental studies will be developed and conducted to validate the simulation results.

  2. Design, construction, and characterization of a facility for neutron capture gamma ray analysis of sulfur in coal using californium-252

    SciTech Connect

    Layfield, J.R.

    1980-03-01

    A study of neutron capture gamma ray analysis of sulfur in coal using californium-252 as a neutron source is reported. Both internal and external target geometries are investigated. The facility designed for and used in this study is described. The external target geometry is found to be inappropriate because of the low thermal neutron flux at the sample location, which must be outside the biological shielding. The internal target geometry is found to have a sufficient thermal neutron flux, but an excessive gamma ray background. A water filled plastic facility, rather than the paraffin filled steel one used in this study, is suggested as a means of increasing flexibility and decreasing the beackground in the internal target geometry.

  3. Astrophysical reaction rates for Ni-58,Ni-60(n,gamma) from new neutron capture cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, Klaus H; Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea; Koehler, Paul; Harvey, John A

    2010-01-01

    New neutron capture cross section of 58,60Ni were measured in the energy range from 100 eV to 600 keV using the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The combination of these new neutron capture data with previous transmission data allowed a resonance analysis up to 900 keV using R-matrix theory. The theoretically determined direct capture (DC) cross sections were included in the analyses. From these resonance parameters and the DC contribution, new (n,y) astrophysical reaction rates were determined over the entire energy range needed by the lastest stellar models describing the so-called weak s process. PACS numbers: 25.40.Lw, 26.20Kn, 27.40.+z, 27.50.+e, 97.10.Cv

  4. Independent measurement of the neutrino mixing angle θ13 via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Beriguete, W.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Butorov, I.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chasman, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Draeger, E.; Du, X. F.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Ely, S. R.; Fu, J. Y.; Ge, L. Q.; Gill, R.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, X. H.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, G. H.; Hans, S.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Hinrichs, P.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, L. M.; Hu, L. J.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Hussain, G.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, H. J.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lai, W. C.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, A.; Leung, J. K. C.; Lewis, C. A.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, P. Y.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y. C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, S. S.; Liu, Y. B.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Luk, K. B.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; McDonald, K. T.; McFarlane, M. C.; McKeown, R. D.; Meng, Y.; Mitchell, I.; Monari Kebwaro, J.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Nemchenok, I.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevski, A.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, B.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Shao, B. B.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tam, Y. H.; Tang, X.; Themann, H.; Tsang, K. V.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Tull, C. E.; Tung, Y. C.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, L. Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Webber, D. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wei, Y. D.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, Q.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xia, X.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yan, J.; Yang, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Yeh, M.; Yeh, Y. S.; Young, B. L.; Yu, G. Y.; Yu, J. Y.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zang, S. L.; Zeng, B.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, F. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, Y. C.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    A new measurement of the θ13 mixing angle has been obtained at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment via the detection of inverse beta decays tagged by neutron capture on hydrogen. The antineutrino events for hydrogen capture are distinct from those for gadolinium capture with largely different systematic uncertainties, allowing a determination independent of the gadolinium-capture result and an improvement on the precision of the θ13 measurement. With a 217-day antineutrino data set obtained with six antineutrino detectors and from six 2.9 GWth reactors, the rate deficit observed at the far hall is interpreted as sin22θ13=0.083±0.018 in the three-flavor oscillation model. When combined with the gadolinium-capture result from Daya Bay, we obtain sin22θ13=0.089±0.008 as the final result for the six-antineutrino-detector configuration of the Daya Bay experiment.

  5. Database of prompt gamma rays from slow neutron capture forelemental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, R.B.; Choi, H.D.; Lindstrom, R.M.; Molnar, G.L.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Paviotti-Corcuera, R.; Revay, Zs; Trkov, A.; Zhou,C.M.; Zerkin, V.

    2004-12-31

    The increasing importance of Prompt Gamma-ray ActivationAnalysis (PGAA) in a broad range of applications is evident, and has beenemphasized at many meetings related to this topic (e.g., TechnicalConsultants' Meeting, Use of neutron beams for low- andmedium-fluxresearch reactors: radiography and materialscharacterizations, IAEA Vienna, 4-7 May 1993, IAEA-TECDOC-837, 1993).Furthermore, an Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) for the Coordination of theNuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators Network has stated that thereis a need for a complete and consistent library of cold- and thermalneutron capture gammaray and cross-section data (AGM held at Budapest,14-18 October 1996, INDC(NDS)-363); this AGM also recommended theorganization of an IAEA CRP on the subject. The International NuclearData Committee (INDC) is the primary advisory body to the IAEA NuclearData Section on their nuclear data programmes. At a biennial meeting in1997, the INDC strongly recommended that the Nuclear Data Section supportnew measurements andupdate the database on Neutron-induced PromptGamma-ray Activation Analysis (21st INDC meeting, INDC/P(97)-20). As aconsequence of the various recommendations, a CRP on "Development of aDatabase for Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGAA)" wasinitiated in 1999. Prior to this project, several consultants had definedthe scope, objectives and tasks, as approved subsequently by the IAEA.Each CRP participant assumed responsibility for the execution of specifictasks. The results of their and other research work were discussed andapproved by the participants in research co-ordination meetings (seeSummary reports: INDC(NDS)-411, 2000; INDC(NDS)-424, 2001; andINDC(NDS)-443, 200). PGAA is a non-destructive radioanalytical method,capable of rapid or simultaneous "in-situ" multi-element analyses acrossthe entire Periodic Table, from hydrogen to uranium. However, inaccurateand incomplete data were a significant hindrance in the qualitative andquantitative

  6. The Anti-Proliferative Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Yuki; Takai, Tomoaki; Ibuki, Naokazu; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kawabata, Shinji; Kiyama, Satoshi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiation treatment for tumors that preferentially accumulate drugs carrying the stable boron isotope, 10B. BNCT has been evaluated clinically as an alternative to conventional radiation therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and more recently, recurrent advanced head and neck cancer. Here we investigated the effect of BNCT on prostate cancer (PCa) using an in vivo mouse xenograft model that we have developed. Materials and Methods Mice bearing the xenotransplanted androgen-independent human PCa cell line, PC3, were divided into four groups: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: Boronophenylalanine (BPA); Group 3: neutron; Group 4: BPA-mediated BNCT. We compared xenograft growth among these groups, and the body weight and any motility disturbance were recorded. Immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the proliferation marker, Ki-67, and TUNEL staining were performed 9 weeks after treatment. Results The in vivo studies demonstrated that BPA-mediated BNCT significantly delayed tumor growth in comparison with the other groups, without any severe adverse events. There was a significant difference in the rate of freedom from gait abnormalities between the BPA-mediated BNCT group and the other groups. The IHC studies revealed that BNCT treatment significantly reduced the number of Ki-67-positive cells in comparison with the controls (mean±SD 6.9±1.5 vs 12.7±4.0, p<0.05), while there was no difference in the number of apoptotic cells, suggesting that BPA-mediated BNCT reduced PCa progression without affecting apoptosis at 9 weeks post-treatment. Conclusions This study has provided the first preclinical proof-of-principle data to indicate that BPA-mediated BNCT reduces the in vivo growth of PCa. Although further studies will be necessary, BNCT might be a novel potential treatment for PCa. PMID:26325195

  7. Macroscopic geometric heterogeneity effects in radiation dose distribution analysis for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Moran, J M; Nigg, D W; Wheeler, F J; Bauer, W F

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This paper describes such a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for the tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for this model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous-tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10%-20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  8. A benchmark analysis of radiation flux distribution for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of canine brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly-heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This work describes a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador Retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador Retriever head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for the model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that the peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10-20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  9. Convection enhanced delivery of carboranylporphyrins for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Shinji; Yang, Weilian; Barth, Rolf F; Wu, Gong; Huo, Tianyao; Binns, Peter J; Riley, Kent J; Ongayi, Owendi; Gottumukkala, Vijay; Vicente, M Graça H

    2011-06-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive 10B is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to produce α-particles (10B[n,α] Li). Carboranylporphyrins are a class of substituted porphyrins containing multiple carborane clusters. Three of these compounds, designated H2TBP, H2TCP, and H2DCP, have been evaluated in the present study. The goals were two-fold. First, to determine their biodistribution following intracerebral (i.c.) administration by short term (30 min) convection enhanced delivery (CED) or sustained delivery over 24 h by Alzet™ osmotic pumps to F98 glioma bearing rats. Second, to determine the efficacy of H2TCP and H2TBP as boron delivery agents for BNCT in F98 glioma bearing rats. Tumor boron concentrations immediately after i.c. pump delivery were high and they remained so at 24 h. The corresponding normal brain concentrations were low and the blood and liver concentrations were undetectable. Based on these data, therapy studies were initiated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) with H2TCP and H2TBP 24 h after CED or pump delivery. Mean survival times (MST) ± standard deviations of animals that had received H2TCP or H2TBP, followed by BNCT, were of 35 ± 4 and 44 ± 10 days, compared to 23 ± 3 and 27 ± 3 days, respectively, for untreated and irradiated controls. However, since the tumor boron concentrations of the carboranylporphyrins were 3-5× higher than intravenous (i.v.) boronophenylalanine (BPA), we had expected that the MSTs would have been greater. Histopathologic examination of brains of BNCT treated rats revealed that there were large numbers of porphyrin-laden macrophages, as well as extracellular accumulations of porphyrins, indicating that the seemingly high tumor boron concentrations did not represent the true tumor cellular uptake. Nevertheless, our data are the first to show that carboranyl porphyrins can be

  10. Biological efficacy of boronated low-density lipoprotein for boron neutron capture therapy as measured in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Laster, B H; Kahl, S B; Popenoe, E A; Pate, D W; Fairchild, R G

    1991-09-01

    Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) are known to be internalized by the cell through receptor-mediated mechanisms. There is evidence that LDLs may be taken up avidly by tumor cells to provide cholesterol for the synthesis of cell membranes. Thus, the possibility exists that LDLs may provide an ideal vehicle for the transport of boron to tumor cells for boron neutron capture therapy. A boronated analogue of LDL has recently been synthesized for possible application in boron neutron capture therapy. The analogue was tested in cell culture for uptake and biological efficacy in the thermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. It was found that boron concentrations 10 times higher than that required in tumors for boron neutron capture therapy were easily obtained and that the amount of uptake was consistent with a receptor-mediated binding mechanism. The measured intracellular concentration of approximately 240 micrograms 10B/g cells is significantly higher than that obtained with any other boron compound previously evaluated for possible clinical application.

  11. Influence of Neutron Sources and 10B Concentration on Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Shallow and Deeper Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiyan; Tang, Xiaobin; Shu, Diyun; Liu, Yuanhao; Geng, Changran; Gong, Chunhui; Hang, Shuang; Chen, Da

    2017-03-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapy that combines biological targeting and high Linear Energy Transfer (LET). It is considered a potential therapeutic approach for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It could avoid the inaccurate treatment caused by the lung motion during radiotherapy, because the dose deposition mainly depends on the boron localization and neutron source. Thus, B concentration and neutron sources are both principal factors of BNCT, and they play significant roles in the curative effect of BNCT for different cases. The purpose was to explore the feasibility of BNCT treatment for NSCLC with either of two neutron sources (the epithermal reactor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology named "MIT source" and the accelerator neutron source designed in Argentina named "MEC source") and various boron concentrations. Shallow and deeper lung tumors were defined in the Chinese hybrid radiation phantom, and the Monte Carlo method was used to calculate the dose to tumors and healthy organs. The MEC source was more appropriate to treat the shallow tumor (depth of 6 cm) with a shorter treatment time. However, the MIT source was more suitable for deep lung tumor (depth of 9 cm) treatment, as the MEC source is more likely to exceed the skin dose limit. Thus, a neutron source consisting of more fast neutrons is not necessarily suitable for deep treatment of lung tumors. Theoretical distribution of B in tumors and organs at risk (especially skin) was obtained to meet the treatable requirement of BNCT, which may provide the references to identify the feasibility of BNCT for the treatment of lung cancer using these two neutron sources in future clinical applications.

  12. A conceptual design of a beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapy based on deuterium-tritium neutron generators.

    PubMed

    Martín, Guido; Abrahantes, Arian

    2004-05-01

    A conceptual design of a beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapy using deuterium-tritium accelerator based neutrons source is developed. Calculations based on a simple geometry model for the radiation transport are initially performed to estimate the assembly materials and their linear dimensions. Afterward, the assembly geometry is produced, optimized and verified. In order to perform these calculations the general-purpose MCNP code is used. Irradiation time and therapeutic gain are utilized as beam assessment parameters. Metallic uranium and manganese are successfully tested for fast-to-epithermal neutron moderation. In the present beam-shaping assembly proposal, the therapeutic gain is improved by 23% and the accelerator current required for a fixed irradiation period is reduced by six times compared to previous proposals based on the same D-T reaction.

  13. Fission, total and neutron capture cross section measurements at ORELA for {sup 233}U, {sup 27}Al and natural chlorine

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K.H.; Spencer, R.R.; Leal, L.C.; Larson, D.C.; Santos, G. Dos; Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.

    1998-08-01

    The authors have made use of the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA) to measure the fission cross section of {sup 233}U in the neutron energy range of 0.36 eV to {approximately} 700 keV. This paper reports integral data and average cross sections. In addition they measured the total neutron cross section of {sup 27}Al and natural chlorine, as well as the capture cross section of Al over an energy range from 100 eV up to about 400 keV.

  14. Prediction of In-Phantom Dose Distribution Using In-Air Neutron Beam Characteristics for Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, Jerome M.; Chen, Allen S.; Vujic, Jasmina L.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2000-08-15

    A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study was carried out to determine the optimal neutron energy range for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using radiation synovectomy. The goal of the treatment is the ablation of diseased synovial membranes in joints such as knees and fingers. This study focuses on human knee joints. Two figures of merit are used to measure the neutron beam quality, the ratio of the synovium-absorbed dose to the skin-absorbed dose, and the ratio of the synovium-absorbed dose to the bone-absorbed dose. It was found that (a) thermal neutron beams are optimal for treatment and that (b) similar absorbed dose rates and therapeutic ratios are obtained with monodirectional and isotropic neutron beams. Computation of the dose distribution in a human knee requires the simulation of particle transport from the neutron source to the knee phantom through the moderator. A method was developed to predict the dose distribution in a knee phantom from any neutron and photon beam spectra incident on the knee. This method was revealed to be reasonably accurate and enabled one to reduce the particle transport simulation time by a factor of 10 by modeling the moderator only.

  15. Nanostructured Boron Nitride With High Water Dispersibility For Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Paviter; Singh, Kulwinder; Kumar, Baban; Vij, Ankush; Kumar, Manjeet; Bala, Rajni; Meena, Ramovatar; Singh, Ajay; Thakur, Anup; Kumar, Akshay

    2016-10-01

    Highly water dispersible boron based compounds are innovative and advanced materials which can be used in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for cancer treatment (BNCT). Present study deals with the synthesis of highly water dispersible nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN). Unique and relatively low temperature synthesis route is the soul of present study. The morphological examinations (Scanning/transmission electron microscopy) of synthesized nanostructures showed that they are in transient phase from two dimensional hexagonal sheets to nanotubes. It is also supported by dual energy band gap of these materials calculated from UV- visible spectrum of the material. The theoretically calculated band gap also supports the same (calculated by virtual nano lab Software). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the synthesized material has deformed structure which is further supported by Raman spectroscopy. The structural aspect of high water disperse ability of BN is also studied. The ultra-high disperse ability which is a result of structural deformation make these nanostructures very useful in BNCT. Cytotoxicity studies on various cell lines (Hela(cervical cancer), human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7)) show that the synthesized nanostructures can be used for BNCT.

  16. Development of JCDS, a computational dosimetry system at JAEA for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Matsumura, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakagawa, Y.

    2007-06-01

    Clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are being carried out using several research reactors throughout the world. In Japan, many medical groups perform clinical trials of BNCT using Japan Research Reactor No.4 (JRR-4) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). JAEA has developed a treatment planning system, JCDS, in order to evaluate radiation dose given to a patient in the BNCT. JCDS employs a voxel calculation method to compute the radiation dose given to a patient. An initial version of JCDS created a voxel model, dividing a space into 1 × 1 × 1 cm3voxel cells. JCDS was improved to create a detailed voxel model consisting of minute voxel cells such as 2 × 2 × 2 mm3voxel cells. Verification of accuracy of calculations with the detailed voxel mode demonstrated that the detailed voxel model enables JCDS to evaluate more accurately the radiation doses to a patient undergoing BNCT. Furthermore, the calculation code of JCDS is being incorporated into the PHITS system as a Monte-Carlo transport code. By employing the PHITS system in the dose evaluation, total doses given to a patient by combined modality therapy such as BNCT and X-ray therapy can be estimated accurately. Here, an outline and the performances of the latest version of JCDS are presented, and a future system integrated with JCDS is introduced.

  17. GPU-based prompt gamma ray imaging from boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suk Suh, Tae; Jo Hong, Key; Sil Lee, Keum

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to perform the fast reconstruction of a prompt gamma ray image using a graphics processing unit (GPU) computation from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) simulations. Methods: To evaluate the accuracy of the reconstructed image, a phantom including four boron uptake regions (BURs) was used in the simulation. After the Monte Carlo simulation of the BNCT, the modified ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm using the GPU computation was used to reconstruct the images with fewer projections. The computation times for image reconstruction were compared between the GPU and the central processing unit (CPU). Also, the accuracy of the reconstructed image was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The image reconstruction time using the GPU was 196 times faster than the conventional reconstruction time using the CPU. For the four BURs, the area under curve values from the ROC curve were 0.6726 (A-region), 0.6890 (B-region), 0.7384 (C-region), and 0.8009 (D-region). Conclusions: The tomographic image using the prompt gamma ray event from the BNCT simulation was acquired using the GPU computation in order to perform a fast reconstruction during treatment. The authors verified the feasibility of the prompt gamma ray image reconstruction using the GPU computation for BNCT simulations.

  18. Gadolinium dosimetry, a problematic issue in the neutron capture therapy. Comparison between experiments and computational simulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufalino, D.; Cerullo, N.; Colli, V.; Gambarini, G.; Rosi, G.

    2006-05-01

    In GdNCT the interested isotope is 157Gd that captures neutrons with (n, ) reaction and also emits internal conversion and Auger electrons. These electrons have an important effect on DNA strands, mainly due to the property of gadolinium to link to DNA. The emitted gamma rays partially interacts with tumours but mainly diffuse in the body damaging healthy tissues. Therefore in the study of Gd therapeutical effect both dosimetric and microdosimetric analyses must be performed. At Pisa University, in the last years some works were performed by NCT group. At the present these researches are continued on these topics carrying out also a PhD thesis. In this frame some simulations, using MC code, were performed in order to evaluate the dose distribution due to Gd reactions. It is however necessary to calibrate the calculations on experimental results, though they are scarce in GdNCT. Some experiments with 157Gd were performed by Milan group using gel dosimetry [1, 2, 3]. Therefore some computational comparisons were done. In these article the results of this comparisons are shown and discussed.

  19. Early history of development of boron neutron capture therapy of tumors.

    PubMed

    Sweet, W H

    1997-05-01

    The stable isotope 10B has a peculiarly marked avidity to capture slow neutrons whereupon it disintegrates into a lithium and a helium atom. These give up the 2.4 MeV of disintegration energy which they share within 5 and 9 microns of the 10B atom respectively. This means that the cell closest to the 10B atom bears the brunt of its atomic explosion. The objective of the tumor therapist is to find a carrier molecule for the boron atom which will concentrate in the tumor. Although a number of investigators saw the peculiar advantage of this selective tactic to achieve destruction of a species of unwanted cells, no success in animal studies was achieved until 1950. Sweet and colleagues found that the capillary blood-brain barrier keeps many substances out of the normal brain but that the gliomas had much less of such a barrier. He, Brownell, Soloway and Hatanaka in Boston together with Farr. Godwin, Robertson, Stickley. Konikowski and others at the Brookhaven. National Laboratory worked partially in collaboration and partly independently. We irradiated at 3 nuclear reactors several series of glioma patients with no long-term remission, much less a cure being achieved. Hatanaka on his return to Japan kept BNCT alive by treating a total of 140 patients with various brain tumors. Beginning in 1972, Mishima and colleagues have achieved useful concentrations of 10B-borono-phenylalanine, an analogue of the melanin precursor tyrosine, for BNCT of melanomas.

  20. Boron neutron capture therapy outcomes for advanced or recurrent head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Minoru; Kato, Ituro; Aihara, Teruhito; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Niimi, Miyuki; Kimura, Yoshihiro; Ariyoshi, Yasunori; Haginomori, Shin-Ichi; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kinashi, Yuko; Masunaga, Shin-Ichiro; Fukushima, Masanori; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We retrospectively review outcomes of applying boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to unresectable advanced or recurrent head and neck cancers. Patients who were treated with BNCT for either local recurrent or newly diagnosed unresectable head or neck cancers between December 2001 and September 2007 were included. Clinicopathological characteristics and clinical outcomes were retrieved from hospital records. Either a combination of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine (BPA) or BPA alone were used as boron compounds. In all the treatment cases, the dose constraint was set to deliver a dose <10-12 Gy-eq to the skin or oral mucosa. There was a patient cohort of 62, with a median follow-up of 18.7 months (range, 0.7-40.8). A total of 87 BNCT procedures were performed. The overall response rate was 58% within 6 months after BNCT. The median survival time was 10.1 months from the time of BNCT. The 1- and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 43.1% and 24.2%, respectively. The major acute Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were hyperamylasemia (38.6%), fatigue (6.5%), mucositis/stomatitis (9.7%) and pain (9.7%), all of which were manageable. Three patients died of treatment-related toxicity. Three patients experienced carotid artery hemorrhage, two of whom had coexistent infection of the carotid artery. This study confirmed the feasibility of our dose-estimation method and that controlled trials are warranted.

  1. Inborn errors in metabolism and 4-boronophenylalanine-fructose-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Juha; Ruokonen, Inkeri; Lapatto, Risto; Kallio, Merja

    2003-11-01

    Infusions of boronophenylalanine-fructose complex (BPA-F), at doses up to 900 mg/kg of BPA and 860 mg/kg of fructose, have been used to deliver boron to cancer tissue for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In patients with phenylketonuria (PKU), phenylalanine accumulates, which is harmful in the long run. PKU has been an exclusion criterion for BPA-F-mediated BNCT. Fructose is harmful to individuals with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) in amounts currently used in BNCT. The harmful effects are mediated through induction of hypoglycemia and acidosis, which may lead to irreversible organ damage or even death. Consequently, HFI should be added as an exclusion criterion for BNCT if fructose-containing solutions are used in boron carriers. Non-HFI subjects may also develop symptoms, such as gastrointestinal pain, if the fructose infusion rate is high. We therefore recommend monitoring of glucose levels and correcting possible hypoglycemia promptly. Except for some populations with extremely low PKU prevalence, HFI and PKU prevalences are similar, approximately 1 or 2 per 20,000.

  2. Nanostructured Boron Nitride With High Water Dispersibility For Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Paviter; Singh, Kulwinder; Kumar, Baban; Vij, Ankush; Kumar, Manjeet; Bala, Rajni; Meena, Ramovatar; Singh, Ajay; Thakur, Anup; Kumar, Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Highly water dispersible boron based compounds are innovative and advanced materials which can be used in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for cancer treatment (BNCT). Present study deals with the synthesis of highly water dispersible nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN). Unique and relatively low temperature synthesis route is the soul of present study. The morphological examinations (Scanning/transmission electron microscopy) of synthesized nanostructures showed that they are in transient phase from two dimensional hexagonal sheets to nanotubes. It is also supported by dual energy band gap of these materials calculated from UV- visible spectrum of the material. The theoretically calculated band gap also supports the same (calculated by virtual nano lab Software). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the synthesized material has deformed structure which is further supported by Raman spectroscopy. The structural aspect of high water disperse ability of BN is also studied. The ultra-high disperse ability which is a result of structural deformation make these nanostructures very useful in BNCT. Cytotoxicity studies on various cell lines (Hela(cervical cancer), human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7)) show that the synthesized nanostructures can be used for BNCT. PMID:27759052

  3. ARE THERE ANY STARS LACKING NEUTRON-CAPTURE ELEMENTS? EVIDENCE FROM STRONTIUM AND BARIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.

    2013-01-01

    The cosmic dispersion in the abundances of the heavy elements strontium and barium in halo stars is well known. Strontium and barium are detected in most cool, metal-poor giants, but are these elements always detectable? To identify stars that could be considered probable candidates for lacking these elements, I examine the stellar abundance data available in the literature for 1148 field stars and 226 stars in dwarf galaxies, 776 of which have metallicities lower than [Fe/H] <-2.0. Strontium or barium have been detected in all field, globular cluster, and dwarf galaxy environments studied. All upper limits are consistent with the lowest detected ratios of [Sr/H] and [Ba/H]. The frequent appearance of these elements raises the intriguing prospect that at least one kind of neutron-capture reaction operates as often as the nucleosynthesis mechanisms that produce lighter elements, such as magnesium, calcium, or iron, although the yields of heavy elements may be more variable.

  4. Potential of using boric acid as a boron drug for boron neutron capture therapy for osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C F; Lin, S Y; Peir, J J; Liao, J W; Lin, Y C; Chou, F I

    2011-12-01

    Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor commonly found in human and animals. The ability of boric acid (BA) to accumulate in osteosarcoma due to the mechanism of the bone formation of cancer cells would make boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) an alternative therapy for osteosarcoma. This study evaluated the feasibility of using BA as the boron drug for BNCT of bone cancer. The cytotoxicity of BA to L929 cells exceeded that of UMR-106 cells. With 25 μg (10)B/mL medium of BA treatment, the boron concentration in UMR-106 cells was higher than that in L929 cells. The biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of BA in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were studied by administrating 25 mg (10)B/kg body weight to SD rats. Blood boron level decreased rapidly within one hour after BA injection. Boron concentration in the long bone was 4-6 time higher than that of blood. Results of this study suggest that BA may be a potential drug for BNCT for osteosarcoma.

  5. Sc and neutron-capture abundances in Galactic low- and high-α field halo stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishlock, C. K.; Yong, D.; Karakas, A. I.; Alves-Brito, A.; Meléndez, J.; Nissen, P. E.; Kobayashi, C.; Casey, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    We determine relative abundance ratios for the neutron-capture elements Zr, La, Ce, Nd, and Eu for a sample of 27 Galactic dwarf stars with -1.5 < [Fe/H] <-0.8. We also measure the iron-peak element Sc. These stars separate into three populations (low- and high-α halo and thick-disc stars) based on the [α/Fe] abundance ratio and their kinematics as discovered by Nissen & Schuster. We find differences between the low- and high-α groups in the abundance ratios of [Sc/Fe], [Zr/Fe], [La/Zr], [Y/Eu], and [Ba/Eu] when including Y and Ba from Nissen & Schuster. For all ratios except [La/Zr], the low-α stars have a lower abundance compared to the high-α stars. The low-α stars display the same abundance patterns of high [Ba/Y] and low [Y/Eu] as observed in present-day dwarf spheroidal galaxies, although with smaller abundance differences, when compared to the high-α stars. These distinct chemical patterns have been attributed to differences in the star formation rate between the two populations and the contribution of low-metallicity, low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to the low-α population. By comparing the low-α population with AGB stellar models, we place constraints on the mass range of the AGB stars.

  6. Lithium Nitride Synthesized by in situ Lithium Deposition and Ion Implantation for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishitama, Shintaro; Baba, Yuji; Fujii, Ryo; Nakamura, Masaru; Imahori, Yoshio

    Li3N synthesis on Li deposition layer was conducted without H2O and O2 by in situ lithium deposition in high vacuum chamber of 10-6 Pa and ion implantation techniques and the thermo-chemical stability of the Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) under laser heating and air exposure was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Following conclusions were derived; (1) Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target with very low oxide and carbon contamination was synthesized by in situ lithium vacuum deposition and N2+ ion implantation without H2O and O2 additions, (2) The starting temperature of evaporation of Li3N/Li/Cu tri-layered target increased by 120K compared to that of the Li/Cu target and (3) Remarkable oxidation and carbon contamination were observed on the surface of Li3N/Li/Cu after air exposure and these contaminated compositions was not removed by Ar+ heavy sputtering.

  7. Nanostructured Boron Nitride With High Water Dispersibility For Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bikramjeet; Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Paviter; Singh, Kulwinder; Kumar, Baban; Vij, Ankush; Kumar, Manjeet; Bala, Rajni; Meena, Ramovatar; Singh, Ajay; Thakur, Anup; Kumar, Akshay

    2016-10-19

    Highly water dispersible boron based compounds are innovative and advanced materials which can be used in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for cancer treatment (BNCT). Present study deals with the synthesis of highly water dispersible nanostructured Boron Nitride (BN). Unique and relatively low temperature synthesis route is the soul of present study. The morphological examinations (Scanning/transmission electron microscopy) of synthesized nanostructures showed that they are in transient phase from two dimensional hexagonal sheets to nanotubes. It is also supported by dual energy band gap of these materials calculated from UV- visible spectrum of the material. The theoretically calculated band gap also supports the same (calculated by virtual nano lab Software). X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis shows that the synthesized material has deformed structure which is further supported by Raman spectroscopy. The structural aspect of high water disperse ability of BN is also studied. The ultra-high disperse ability which is a result of structural deformation make these nanostructures very useful in BNCT. Cytotoxicity studies on various cell lines (Hela(cervical cancer), human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7)) show that the synthesized nanostructures can be used for BNCT.

  8. Spectromicroscopy of boron for the optimization of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, B.; Redondo, J.; Baudat, P.-A.; Lorusso, G. F.; Andres, R.; Van Meir, E. G.; Brunet, J.-F.; Hamou, M.-F.; Suda, T.; Mercanti, Delio; Ciotti, M. Teresa; Droubay, T. C.; Tonner, B. P.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, M.; DeStasio, Gelsomina

    1998-10-01

    We used synchrotron spectromicroscopy to study the microscopic distribution of boron in rat brain tumour and healthy tissue in the field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The success of this experimental cancer therapy depends on the preferential uptake of ? in tumour cells after injection of a boron compound (in our case ?, or BSH). With the Mephisto (microscope à emission de photoélectrons par illumination synchrotronique de type onduleur) spectromicroscope, high-magnification imaging and chemical analysis was performed on brain tissue sections from a rat carrying an implanted brain tumour and the results were compared with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) detection of boron in bulk tissue. Boron was found to have been taken up more favourably by regions of tumour rather than healthy tissue, but the resulting boron distribution in the tumour was inhomogeneous. The results demonstrate that Mephisto can perform microchemical analysis of tissue sections, detect and localize the presence of boron with submicron spatial resolution. The application of this technique to boron in brain tissue can therefore be used to evaluate the current efforts to optimize BNC therapy.

  9. The Am-243 Neutron Capture Measurement at the n_TOF Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, E.; Cano-Ott, D.; Guerrero, C.; Álvarez-Velarde, F.; García-Ríos, A.; González-Romero, E.; Martínez, T.; Villamarin, D.; Kadi, Y.; Colonna, N.; Marrone, S.; Meaze, M. H.; Tagliente, G.; Terlizzi, R.; Abbondanno, U.; Belloni, F.; Fujii, K.; Milazzo, P. M.; Moreau, C.; Andriamonje, S.; Calviani, M.; Vlachoudis, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Andrzejewski, J.; Marganiec, J.; Assimakopoulos, P.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Patronis, N.; Audouin, L.; David, S.; Ferrant, L.; Isaev, S.; Stephan, C.; Tassan-Got, L.; Badurek, G.; Jericha, E.; Leeb, H.; Oberhummer, H.; Pigni, M. T.; Poch, A.; Baumann, P.; Kerveno, M.; Lukic, S.; Rudolf, G.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Calvino, F.; Capote, R.; Frais-Koelbl, H.; Griesmayer, E.; Mengoni, A.; Lozano, M.; Quesada, J. M.; Carrillo de Albornoz, A.; Tavora, L.; Marques, L.; Salgado, J.; Vaz, P.; Cennini, P.; Dahlfors, M.; Ferrari, A.; Gramegna, F.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Mastinu, P.; Praena, J.; Sarchiapone, L.; Wendler, H.; Chepel, V.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Goncalves, I.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Neves, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Dridi, W.; Gunsing, F.; Aerts, G.; Pancin, J.; Perrot, L.; Plukis, A.; Cortes, G.; Pretel, C.; Couture, A. J.; Cox, J.; O'Brien, S.; Wiescher, M.; Dillman, I.; Heil, M.; Käppeler, F.; Mosconi, M.; Plag, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wisshak, K.; Dolfini, R.; Rubbia, C.; Domingo Pardo, C.; Tain, J. L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Lampoudis, C.; Savvidis, I.; Furman, W.; Konovalov, V.; Goverdovski, A.; Ketlerov, V.; Duran, I.; Paradela, C.; Álvarez, H.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Reifarth, R.; Igashira, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Massimi, C.; Vannini, G.; Oshima, M.; Papadopoulos, C.; Vlastou, R.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Plompen, A.; Rullhusen, P.; Rauscher, T.; Rosetti, M.; Ventura, A.

    2013-03-01

    The 243Am neutron capture cross section has been measured at the n_TOF facility1 in the 0.7 eV-2 keV energy range. The n_TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter2 (TAC) composed by 40 BaF2 crystals has been used in the measurement for detecting the electromagnetic cascades produced in the 243Am(n, γ) reactions. All current evaluations in the resolved resonance region are based essentially in fission measurements and in only one transmission measurement.3 The analysis of the measurement has been finished recently, and it is ready for its distribution to the EXFOR nuclear database. In addition, the data obtained with the TAC provide valuable information on the level density in the compound nucleus 244Am and on its electromagnetic de-excitation scheme. In particular, the 243Am data will be combined with data from previous measurements of 241Am, 240Pu, 237Np and 233,234,236U and with future measurements of 235,238U for a systematic investigation of the photon strength functions in actinides.

  10. Radiative neutron capture on a proton at big-bang nucleosynthesis energies

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, S.; Cyburt, R. H.; Hong, S. W.; Hyun, C. H.

    2006-08-15

    The total cross section for radiative neutron capture on a proton, np{yields}d{gamma}, is evaluated at big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) energies. The electromagnetic transition amplitudes are calculated up to next-to-leading-order within the framework of pionless effective field theory with dibaryon fields. We also calculate the d{gamma}{yields}np cross section and the photon analyzing power for the d{gamma}(vector sign){yields}np process from the amplitudes. The values of low-energy constants that appear in the amplitudes are estimated by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis using the relevant low-energy experimental data. Our result agrees well with those of other theoretical calculations except for the np{yields}d{gamma} cross section at some energies estimated by an R-matrix analysis. We also study the uncertainties in our estimation of the np{yields}d{gamma} cross section at relevant BBN energies and find that the estimated cross section is reliable to within {approx}1% error.

  11. [A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors]. Technical progress report 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Zamenhof, R.G.

    1988-12-31

    This report describes progress made in refining of neutron-induced alpha tract autoradiography, in designing epithermal neutron bean at MITR-II and in planning treatment dosimetry using Monte Carlo techniques.

  12. CHARGED-PARTICLE AND NEUTRON-CAPTURE PROCESSES IN THE HIGH-ENTROPY WIND OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Farouqi, K.; Truran, J. W.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K. E-mail: truran@nova.uchicago.ed E-mail: k-l.Kratz@mpic.d E-mail: F-K.Thielemann@unibas.c

    2010-04-01

    The astrophysical site of the r-process is still uncertain, and a full exploration of the systematics of this process in terms of its dependence on nuclear properties from stability to the neutron drip-line within realistic stellar environments has still to be undertaken. Sufficiently high neutron-to-seed ratios can only be obtained either in very neutron-rich low-entropy environments or moderately neutron-rich high-entropy environments, related to neutron star mergers (or jets of neutron star matter) and the high-entropy wind of core-collapse supernova explosions. As chemical evolution models seem to disfavor neutron star mergers, we focus here on high-entropy environments characterized by entropy S, electron abundance Y{sub e} , and expansion velocity V{sub exp}. We investigate the termination point of charged-particle reactions, and we define a maximum entropy S{sub final} for a given V{sub exp} and Y{sub e} , beyond which the seed production of heavy elements fails due to the very small matter density. We then investigate whether an r-process subsequent to the charged-particle freeze-out can in principle be understood on the basis of the classical approach, which assumes a chemical equilibrium between neutron captures and photodisintegrations, possibly followed by a beta-flow equilibrium. In particular, we illustrate how long such a chemical equilibrium approximation holds, how the freeze-out from such conditions affects the abundance pattern, and which role the late capture of neutrons originating from beta-delayed neutron emission can play. Furthermore, we analyze the impact of nuclear properties from different theoretical mass models on the final abundances after these late freeze-out phases and beta-decays back to stability. As only a superposition of astrophysical conditions can provide a good fit to the solar r-abundances, the question remains how such superpositions are attained, resulting in the apparently robust r-process pattern observed in low

  13. Neutron Capture Reaction on 112Cd to Study of the s-process Origin of 115Sn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Takehito; Toh, Yosuke; Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Atsushi; Nakamura, Shoji; Harada, Hideo; Iwamoto, Nobuyuki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Chiba, Satoshi

    The astrophysical origin of 115Sn has remained still an open question. An isomer with a half-life of 14.1 y in 113Cd is a branching point from which a nucleosynthesis flow reaches to a rare isotope 115Sn. The s-process abundance of 115Sn depends on the ratio of the 112Cd(n, γ)113Cdm reaction cross section to the 112Cd(n, γ)113Cdgs reaction cross section. However, the isomer production ratio following the neutron capture reaction has not been measured in an energy region higher than the thermal energy. We have measured γ-ray intensity ratios following neutron capture reactions on 112Cd using the HPGe detectors in conjunction with a time-of-flight method at ANNRI in J-PARC.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of GCR neutron capture production of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites and lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KolláR, D.; Michel, R.; Masarik, J.

    2006-03-01

    A purely physical model based on a Monte Carlo simulation of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particle interaction with meteoroids is used to investigate neutron interactions down to thermal energies. Experimental and/or evaluated excitation functions are used to calculate neutron capture production rates as a function of the size of the meteoroid and the depth below its surface. Presented are the depth profiles of cosmogenic radionuclides 36Cl, 41Ca, 60Co, 59Ni, and 129I for meteoroid radii from 10 cm up to 500 cm and a 2π irradiation. Effects of bulk chemical composition on n-capture processes are studied and discussed for various chondritic and lunar compositions. The mean GCR particle flux over the last 300 ka was determined from the comparison of simulations with measured 41Ca activities in the Apollo 15 drill core. The determined value significantly differs from that obtained using equivalent models of spallation residue production.

  15. A rat model for the treatment of melanoma metastatic to the brain by means of neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Matalka, K.Z.; Bailey, M.Q.; Barth, R.F.; Staubus, A.E.; Adams, D.M.; Soloway, A.H.; James, S.M.; Goodman, J.H. ); Coderre, J.A.; Fairchild, R.G. ); Rofstad, E.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Melanoma metastatic to the brain is a serious clinical problem for which there currently is no satisfactory treatment. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been shown by Mishima et al. to be clinically effective in the treatment of cutaneous melanoma using {sup 10}B-enriched boronophenylalaine (BPA) as the capture agent. In the present pilot study we have observed a significant prolongation in survival time of nude rats bearing intracerebral implants of the human melanoma cell line MRA 27 following administration of BPA and neutron irradiation. These findings suggest therapeutic efficacy, but unequivocal proof depends upon confirmation in a more definitive experiment using large numbers of animals with both solitary and multiple implants of melanoma. If our preliminary results are confirmed, then this will lay the groundwork for a clinical study of BNCT for the treatment of melanoma metastatic to the brain. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Isomeric ratio measurements for the radiative neutron capture 176Lu(n ,γ ) at the LANL DANCE facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis-Petit, D.; Roig, O.; Méot, V.; Morillon, B.; Romain, P.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; Vieira, D. J.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    The isomeric ratios for the neutron capture reaction 176Lu(n ,γ ) to the Jπ=5 /2- , 761.7 keV, T1 /2=32.8 ns and the Jπ=15 /2+ , 1356.9 keV, T1 /2=11.1 ns levels of 177Lu have been measured for the first time. The experiment was carried out with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Measured isomeric ratios are compared with talys calculations using different models for photon strength functions, level densities, and optical potentials. In order to reproduce the experimental γ -ray spectra, a low-energy resonance must be added in the photon strength function used in our Hauser-Feshbach calculations.

  17. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Valda, Alejandro A.; Girola, Santiago; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the {sup 7}Li(p, n){sup 7}Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  18. Advances in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at kyoto university - From reactor-based BNCT to accelerator-based BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Takata, Takushi; Fujimoto, Nozomi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kondo, Natsuko; Narabayashi, Masaru; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira

    2015-07-01

    At the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), a clinical study of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using a neutron irradiation facility installed at the research nuclear reactor has been regularly performed since February 1990. As of November 2014, 510 clinical irradiations were carried out using the reactor-based system. The world's first accelerator-based neutron irradiation system for BNCT clinical irradiation was completed at this institute in early 2009, and the clinical trial using this system was started in 2012. A shift of BCNT from special particle therapy to a general one is now in progress. To promote and support this shift, improvements to the irradiation system, as well as its preparation, and improvements in the physical engineering and the medical physics processes, such as dosimetry systems and quality assurance programs, must be considered. The recent advances in BNCT at KURRI are reported here with a focus on physical engineering and medical physics topics.

  19. A Small-Animal Irradiation Facility for Neutron Capture Therapy Research at the RA-3 Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Emiliano Pozzi; David W. Nigg; Marcelo Miller; Silvia I. Thorp; Amanda E. Schwint; Elisa M. Heber; Veronica A. Trivillin; Leandro Zarza; Guillermo Estryk

    2007-11-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA) has constructed a thermal neutron source for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) applications at the RA-3 research reactor facility located in Buenos Aires. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CNEA have jointly conducted some initial neutronic characterization measurements for one particular configuration of this source. The RA-3 reactor (Figure 1) is an open pool type reactor, with 20% enriched uranium plate-type fuel and light water coolant. A graphite thermal column is situated on one side of the reactor as shown. A tunnel penetrating the graphite structure enables the insertion of samples while the reactor is in normal operation. Samples up to 14 cm height and 15 cm width are accommodated.

  20. Synthesis of Sugar-Boronic Acid Derivatives: A Class of Potential Agents for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Imperio, Daniela; Del Grosso, Erika; Fallarini, Silvia; Lombardi, Grazia; Panza, Luigi

    2017-04-07

    To date, sugar analogues that contain boronic acids as substitutes for hydroxyl groups are a class of compounds nearly unknown in the literature. The challenging synthesis of two sugar-boronic acid analogues is described, and data are retrieved on their solution behavior, stability, and toxicity. As these compounds were expected to mimic the behavior of carbohydrates, they were tested in regards to their future development as potential boron neutron capture therapy agents.

  1. Clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy [in humans] [at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center][at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Christine

    2001-05-29

    Assessment of research records of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy was conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center using the Code of Federal Regulations, FDA Regulations and Good Clinical Practice Guidelines. Clinical data were collected from subjects' research charts, and differences in conduct of studies at both centers were examined. Records maintained at Brookhaven National Laboratory were not in compliance with regulatory standards. Beth Israel's records followed federal regulations. Deficiencies discovered at both sites are discussed in the reports.

  2. Neutron Capture Cross Sections of the s-Process Branching Points 147Pm, 171Tm, and 204Tl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Carlos; Domingo-Pardo, Cesar; Lerendegui-Marco, Jorge; Casanovas, Adria; Cortes-Giraldo, Miguel A.; Dressler, Rugard; Halfon, Shlomi; Heinitz, Stephan; Kivel, Niko; Köster, Ulli; Paul, Michael; Quesada-Molina, Jose Manuel; Schumann, Dorothea; Tarifeño-Saldivia, Ariel; Tessler, Moshe; Weissman, Leo

    The neutron capture cross section of several key unstable isotopes acting as branching points in the s-process are crucial for stellar nucleosynthesis studies, but they are very challenging to measure due to the difficult production of sufficient sample material, the high activity of the resulting samples, and the actual (n, γ) measurement, for which high neutron fluxes and effective background rejection capabilities are required. As part of a new program to measure some of these important branching points, radioactive targets of 147Pm, 171Tm, and 204Tl have been produced by irradiation of stable isotopes (146Nd, 170Er, and 203Tl) at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) high flux reactor. After breeding in the reactor and a certain cooling period, the resulting mixed 204Tl/203Tl sample was used directly while 147Pm and 171Tm were radiochemically separated in non-carrier-added quality at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), then prepared as targets. A set of theses samples has been used for time-of-flight measurements at the CERN n_TOF facility using the 19 and 185 m beam lines, during 2014 and 2015. The capture cascades were detected with a set of four C6D6 scintillators, allowing to observe the associated neutron capture resonances. The results presented in this work are the first ever determination of the resonance capture cross sections of 147Pm, 171Tm, and 204Tl. Activation experiments on the same 147Pm and 171Tm targets with a high-intensity quasi-Maxwellian flux of neutrons have been performed using the SARAF accelerator and the Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT) in order to extract the corresponding Maxwellian Average Cross Section (MACS). The experimental setups are here described together with the first, preliminary results of the n_TOF measurement.

  3. A Bystander Effect Observed in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy: A Study of the Induction of Mutations in the HPRT Locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kinashi, Yuko . E-mail: kinashi@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Nagata, Kenji; Suzuki, Minoru; Takahashi, Sentaro; Ono, Koji

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate bystander mutagenic effects induced by {alpha}-particles during boron neutron capture therapy, we mixed cells that were electroporated with borocaptate sodium (BSH), which led to the accumulation of {sup 10}B inside the cells, and cells that did not contain the boron compound. The BSH-containing cells were irradiated with {alpha}-particles produced by the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li reaction, whereas cells without boron were affected only by the {sup 1}H(n,{gamma}){sup 2}H and {sup 14}N(n,{rho}){sup 14}C reactions. Methods and Materials: The lethality and mutagenicity measured by the frequency of mutations induced in the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase locus were examined in Chinese hamster ovary cells irradiated with neutrons (Kyoto University Research Reactor: 5 MW). Neutron irradiation of 1:1 mixtures of cells with and without BSH resulted in a survival fraction of 0.1, and the cells that did not contain BSH made up 99.4% of the resulting cell population. The molecular structures of the mutations were determined using multiplex polymerase chain reactions. Results: Because of the bystander effect, the frequency of mutations increased in the cells located nearby the BSH-containing cells compared with control cells. Molecular structural analysis indicated that most of the mutations induced by the bystander effect were point mutations and that the frequencies of total and partial deletions induced by the bystander effect were less than those induced by the original neutron irradiation. Conclusion: These results suggested that in boron neutron capture therapy, the mutations caused by the bystander effect and those caused by the original neutron irradiation are induced by different mechanisms.

  4. Preliminary evaluation of neutron capture cross sections for /sup 144/Sm, /sup 145/Sm and /sup 145/Pm

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.

    1986-02-13

    We have made preliminary neutron-capture cross-section calculations of the Hauser-Feshbach type for the isotopes /sup 144/Sm, /sup 145/Sm, and /sup 145/Pm to investigate the production of radioactive /sup 145/Pm by neutron capture on the stable isotope /sup 144/Sm. The calculations were made for incident neutron energies from 2.5 MeV to about 1/sup -4/ or 10/sup -5/ MeV, wherever the first unbound resonance was estimated to occur in each case. At that energy, the calculated value was reduced by a somewhat arbitrary factor, and the excitation function extended down to thermal energy using a (E/sub n/)/sup -1/2/ energy dependence. Since very large uncertainties are associated with the position and magnitude of the first unbound resonance and the subsequent extrapolation back to thermal energy, the cross sections in this low-energy region should not be considered more accurate than +- a factor of 10. For incident neutron energies above each step, the calculations represent an average through the separated and overlapping resonance regions and may be accurate to better than +- a factor of 2. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Tumor growth suppression by gadolinium-neutron capture therapy using gadolinium-entrapped liposome as gadolinium delivery agent.

    PubMed

    Dewi, Novriana; Yanagie, Hironobu; Zhu, Haito; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Shinohara, Atsuko; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Sekino, Masaki; Sakurai, Yuriko; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Iyomoto, Naoko; Nagasaki, Takeshi; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Nakajima, Jun; Ono, Minoru; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is a promising non-invasive cancer therapy approach and some recent NCT research has focused on using compounds containing gadolinium as an alternative to currently used boron-10 considering several advantages that gadolinium offers compared to those of boron. In this study, we evaluated gadolinium-entrapped liposome compound as neutron capture therapy agent by in vivo experiment on colon-26 tumor-bearing mice. Gadolinium compound were injected intravenously via tail vein and allowed to accumulate into tumor site. Tumor samples were taken for quantitative analysis by ICP-MS at 2, 12, and 24 h after gadolinium compound injection. Highest gadolinium concentration was observed at about 2 h after gadolinium compound injection with an average of 40.3 μg/g of wet tumor tissue. We performed neutron irradiation at JRR-4 reactor facility of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute in Tokaimura with average neutron fluence of 2×10¹² n/cm². The experimental results showed that the tumor growth suppression of gadolinium-injected irradiated group was revealed until about four times higher compared to the control group, and no significant weight loss were observed after treatment suggesting low systemic toxicity of this compound. The gadolinium-entrapped liposome will become one of the candidates for Gd delivery system on NCT.

  6. Development of high boron content liposomes and their promising antitumor effect for neutron capture therapy of cancers.

    PubMed

    Koganei, Hayato; Ueno, Manabu; Tachikawa, Shoji; Tasaki, Lisa; Ban, Hyun Seung; Suzuki, Minoru; Shiraishi, Kouichi; Kawano, Kumi; Yokoyama, Masayuki; Maitani, Yoshie; Ono, Koji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-16

    Mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH)-encapsulating 10% distearoyl boron lipid (DSBL) liposomes were developed as a boron delivery vehicle for neutron capture therapy. The current approach is unique because the liposome shell itself possesses cytocidal potential in addition to its encapsulated agents. BSH-encapsulating 10% DSBL liposomes have high boron content (B/P ratio: 2.6) that enables us to prepare liposome solution with 5000 ppm boron concentration. BSH-encapsulating 10% DSBL liposomes displayed excellent boron delivery efficacy to tumor: boron concentrations reached 174, 93, and 32 ppm at doses of 50, 30, and 15 mg B/kg, respectively. Magnescope was also encapsulated in the 10% DSBL liposomes and the real-time biodistribution of the Magnescope-encapsulating DSBL liposomes was measured in a living body using MRI. Significant antitumor effect was observed in mice injected with BSH-encapsulating 10% DSBL liposomes even at the dose of 15 mg B/kg; the tumor completely disappeared three weeks after thermal neutron irradiation ((1.5-1.8) × 10(12) neutrons/cm(2)). The current results enabled us to reduce the total dose of liposomes to less than one-fifth compared with that of the BSH-encapsulating liposomes without reducing the efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT).

  7. Cosmic-ray exposure histories of Martian meteorites studied from neutron capture reactions of Sm and Gd isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidaka, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Shigekazu; Nishiizumi, Kunihiko

    2009-11-01

    The isotopic compositions of Sm and Gd in twelve Martian meteorites, ALH 77005, ALH 84001, DaG 735, Dhofar 019, EET 79001, Lafayette, Los Angeles, Nakhla, SaU 005, Y 000593, Y 000749 and Zagami, were determined to quantify the neutron capture records of individual meteorite specimens. Seven of these twelve samples, ALH 84001, Y 000749, DaG 735, Dhofar 019, EET 79001, SaU 005 and Zagami, showed significant isotopic shifts of 150Sm/ 149Sm and/or 158Gd/ 157Gd corresponding to neutron fluences of (0.7-3.4) × 10 15 n cm - 2 . Among these seven meteorites, the neutron fluences of ALH 84001, Y 000749, and Dhofar 019 apparently correlated with their cosmic-ray exposure ages, indicating that most of the irradiation took place while the meteoroids were small bodies in space after the ejection from Mars. However, our results suggest an accumulation of their inherited irradiation occurred on Mars. On the other hand, the exposure histories of the other four meteorites (basaltic shergottites), DaG 735, EET 79001, SaU 005, and Zagami, cannot be explained as single- or multistage irradiations in space, or as a single irradiation on the Martian surface. The mixing between basaltic lava with a significantly irradiated Martian regolith is a reasonable interpretation of the excess neutron capture records observed in these four basaltic shergottites.

  8. Borocaptate sodium: a potential boron delivery compound for boron neutron capture therapy evaluated in dogs with spontaneous intracranial tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, S L; Gavin, P R; DeHaan, C E; Leathers, C W; Bauer, W F; Miller, D L; Dorn, R V

    1992-01-01

    Borocaptate sodium (Na2B12H11SH) is a boron-carrying compound under consideration for use in boron neutron capture therapy. The biodistribution of boron from borocaptate sodium administration will partly determine boron neutron capture therapy efficacy and normal tissue radiation tolerance. The biodistribution of boron was determined in 30 dogs with spontaneous intracranial tumors at 2, 6, or 12 hr after intravenous borocaptate sodium infusion. Blood and tissue boron concentrations were measured using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Mean tumor boron concentration (mean +/- standard error) was 35.9 +/- 4.6 (n = 15), 22.5 +/- 6.0 (n = 9), and 7.0 +/- 1.1 micrograms of boron per g (n = 6) at 2, 6, and 12 hr, respectively, after borocaptate sodium infusion. Peritumor boron concentrations were elevated above that of normal brain in half of the dogs. Normal brain boron concentration (mean +/- standard error) was 4.0 +/- 0.5, 2.0 +/- 0.4, and 2.0 +/- 0.3 micrograms of boron per g at 2, 6, and 12 hr after infusion, respectively. Some cranial and systemic tissues, and blood, had high boron concentration relative to tumor tissue. Geometric dose sparing should partly offset these relatively high normal tissue and blood concentrations. Borocaptate sodium biodistribution is favorable because tumor boron concentrations of recommended magnitude for boron neutron capture therapy were obtained and there was a high tumor-to-normal brain boron concentration ratio. PMID:1465427

  9. Neutron capture of /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te, /sup 124/Te, /sup 125/Te, and /sup 126/Te

    SciTech Connect

    Macklin, R.L.; Winters, R.R.

    1989-07-01

    Isotopically enriched samples of the tellurium isotopes from mass 122 to mass 126 were used to measure neutron capture in the energy range 2.6 keV to 600 keV at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator pulsed neutron source. Starting at 2.6 keV, over 200 Breit-Wigner resonances for each isotope were used to describe the capture data. Least-squares adjustment gave parameters and their uncertainties for a total of 1659 resonances. Capture cross sections averaged over Maxwellian neutron distributions with temperatures ranging from kT = 5 keV to kT = 100 keV were derived for comparison with stellar nucleosynthesis calculations. For the three isotopes shielded from the astrophysical r-process, /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te and /sup 124/Te at kT = 30 keV the respective values were (280 /plus minus/ 10) mb, (819 /plus minus/ 30) mb and (154 /plus minus/ 6) mb. The corresponding products of cross section and solar system abundance are nearly equal in close agreement with s-process nucleosynthesis calculations. 26 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. A nude rat model for neutron capture therapy of human intracerebral melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, R.F.; Matalka, K.Z.; Bailey, M.Q.; Staubus, A.E.; Soloway, A.H.; Moeschberger, M.L. ); Coderre, J.A. ); Rofstad, E.K. )

    1994-03-30

    The present study was carried out to determine the efficacy of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for intracerebral melanoma using nude rats, the human melanoma cell line MRA 27, and boronophenylalanine as the capture agent. MRA 27 cells (2 [times] 10[sup 5]) were implanted intracerebrally, and 30 days later, 120 mg of [sup 10]B-L-BPA were injected intraperitoneally into nude rats. Thirty days following implantation, tumor bearing rats were irradiated at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor. Six hours following administration of BPA, tumor, blood, and normal brain boron-10 levels were 23.7, 9.4, and 8.4 [mu]g/g respectively. Median survival time of untreated rats was 44 days compared to 76 days and 93 days for those receiving physical doses of 2.73 Gy and 3.64 Gy, respectively. Rats that have received both [sup 10]B-BPA and physical doses of 1.82, 2.73, or 3.64 Gy had median survival times of 170, 182, and 262 days, respectively. Forty percent of rats that had received the highest tumor dose (10.1 Gy) survived for > 300 days and in a replicate experiment 21% of the rats were longterm survivors (>220 days). Animals that received 12 Gy in a single dose or 18 Gy fractionated (2 Gy [times] 9) of gamma photons from a [sup 137]Cs source had median survival times of 86 and 79 days, respectively, compared to 47 days for untreated animals. Histopathologic examination of the brains of longterm surviving rats, euthanized at 8 or 16 months following BNCT, showed no residual tumor, but dense accumulations of melanin laden macrophages and minimal gliosis were observed. Significant prolongations in median survival time were noted in nude rats with intracerebral human melanoma that had received BNCT, thereby suggesting therapeutic efficacy. Large animal studies should be carried out to further assess BNCT of intracerebral melanoma before any human trials are contemplated. 49 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. First application of dynamic infrared imaging in boron neutron capture therapy for cutaneous malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Santa Cruz, G. A.; Gonzalez, S. J.; Bertotti, J.; Marin, J.

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to assess the potential of dynamic infrared imaging (DIRI) as a functional, noninvasive technique for evaluating the skin acute toxicity and tumor control within the framework of the Argentine boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) program for cutaneous malignant melanoma. Methods: Two patients enrolled in the Argentine phase I/II BNCT clinical trial for cutaneous malignant melanoma were studied with DIRI. An uncooled infrared camera, providing a video output signal, was employed to register the temperature evolution of the normal skin and tumor regions in patients subjected to a mild local cooling (cold stimulus). In order to study the spatial correlation between dose and acute skin reactions, three-dimensional representations of the superficial dose delivered to skin were constructed and cameralike projections of the dose distribution were coregistered with visible and infrared images. Results: The main erythematous reaction was observed clinically between the second and fifth week post-BNCT. Concurrently, with its clinical onset, a reactive increase above the basal skin temperature was observed with DIRI in the third week post-BNCT within regions that received therapeutic doses. Melanoma nodules appeared as highly localized hyperthermic regions. 2 min after stimulus, these regions reached a temperature plateau and increased in size. Temperature differences with respect to normal skin up to 10 deg. C were observed in the larger nodules. Conclusions: Preliminary results suggest that DIRI, enhanced by the application of cold stimuli, may provide useful functional information associated with the metabolism and vasculature of tumors and inflammatory processes related to radiation-induced changes in the skin as well. These capabilities are aimed at complementing the clinical observations and standard imaging techniques, such as CT and Doppler ultrasound.

  12. Boron neutron capture therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme: an assessment of clinical potential.

    PubMed

    Sköld, K; Gorlia, T; Pellettieri, L; Giusti, V; H-Stenstam, B; Hopewell, J W

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), with a 6-h infusion of the boron carrier l-boronophenylalanine as a fructose preparation (BPA-f), as first-line radiotherapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Patient survival data from a Phase II study using BNCT were compared with retrospective data from the two arms of a Phase III study using conventional radiotherapy (RT) in the reference arm and using RT plus concomitant and adjuvant medication with temozolomide (TMZ) in the experimental arm, and were also compared with small subgroups of these patients for whom the methylation status of the MGMT (O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) DNA repair gene was known. Differences in the baseline characteristics, salvage therapy after recurrence and levels of severe adverse events were also considered. The results indicate that BNCT offers a treatment that is at least as effective as conventional RT alone. For patients with an unmethylated MGMT DNA repair gene, a possible clinical advantage of BNCT over RT/TMZ was suggested. BNCT is a single-day treatment, which is of convenience to patients, with mild side effects, which would offer an initial 6 weeks of good-quality life during the time when patients would otherwise be undergoing daily treatments with RT and TMZ. It is suggested that the use of BNCT with a 6-h infusion of BPA-f should be explored in a stratified randomised Phase II trial in which patients with the unmethylated MGMT DNA repair gene are offered BNCT in the experimental arm and RT plus TMZ in the reference arm.

  13. Capturing the electromagnetic counterparts of binary neutron star mergers through low-latency gravitational wave triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Q.; Howell, E. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Gao, H.; Zhang, B.; Tingay, S. J.; Boër, M.; Wen, L.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the prospects for joint low-latency gravitational wave (GW) detection and prompt electromagnetic (EM) follow-up observations of coalescing binary neutron stars (BNSs). For BNS mergers associated with short duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs), we for the first time evaluate the feasibility of rapid EM follow-ups to capture the prompt emission, early engine activity, or reveal any potential by-products such as magnetars or fast radio bursts. To achieve our goal, we first simulate a population of coalescing BNSs using realistic distributions of source parameters and estimate the detectability and localization efficiency at different times before merger. We then use a selection of facilities with GW follow-up agreements in place, from low-frequency radio to high-energy γ-ray to assess the prospects of prompt follow-up. We quantify our assessment using observational SGRB flux data extrapolated to be within the horizon distances of the advanced GW interferometric detectors LIGO and Virgo and to the prompt phase immediately following the binary merger. Our results illustrate that while challenging, breakthrough multimessenger science is possible with EM follow-up facilities with fast responses and wide fields-of-view. We demonstrate that the opportunity to catch the prompt stage (<5 s) of SGRBs can be enhanced by speeding up the detection pipelines of both GW observatories and EM follow-up facilities. We further show that the addition of an Australian instrument to the optimal detector network could possibly improve the angular resolution by a factor of 2 and thereby contribute significantly to GW-EM multimessenger astronomy.

  14. Measurement of θ 13 in Double Chooz using neutron captures on hydrogen with novel background rejection techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Abe, Y.; Appel, S.; Abrahão, T.; ...

    2016-01-27

    We observed a measurement of the Double Chooz collaboration and the neutrino mixing angle θ13 using reactormore » $$\\bar{v}$$e via the inverse beta decay reaction in which the neutron is captured on hydrogen. Our measurement is based on 462.72 live days data, approximately twice as much data as in the previous such analysis, collected with a detector positioned at an average distance of 1050 m from two reactor cores. Several novel techniques have been developed to achieve significant reductions of the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties. Accidental coincidences, the dominant background in this analysis, are suppressed by more than an order of magnitude with respect to our previous publication by a multi-variate analysis. Furthermore, these improvements demonstrate the capability of precise measurement of reactor $$\\bar{v}$$e without gadolinium loading. Spectral distortions from the $$\\bar{v}$$e reactor flux predictions previously reported with the neutron capture on gadolinium events are confirmed in the independent data sample presented here. A value of sin2 2θ13= 0.0950.039+0.038 (stat+syst) is obtained from a fit to the observed event rate as a function of the reactor power, a method insensitive to the energy spectrum shape. A simultaneous fit of the hydrogen capture events and of the gadolinium capture events yields a measurement of sin2 2θ13 = 0.088 ± 0.033(stat+syst).« less

  15. RADIATIVE NEUTRON CAPTURE ON 9Be, 14C, 14N, 15N AND 16O AT THERMAL AND ASTROPHYSICAL ENERGIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovichenko, Sergey; Dzhazairov-Kakhramanov, Albert; Afanasyeva, Nadezhda

    2013-10-01

    The total cross-sections of the radiative neutron capture processes on 9Be, 14C, 14N, 15N and 16O are described in the framework of the modified potential cluster model with the classification of orbital states according to Young tableaux. The continued interest in the study of these reactions is due, on the one hand, to the important role played by this process in the analysis of many fundamental properties of nuclei and nuclear reactions, and, on the other hand, to the wide use of the capture cross-section data in the various applications of nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics, and, also, to the importance of the analysis of primordial nucleosynthesis in the Universe. This article is devoted to the description of results for the processes of the radiative neutron capture on certain light atomic nuclei at thermal and astrophysical energies. The considered capture reactions are not part of stellar thermonuclear cycles, but involve in the reaction chains of inhomogeneous Big Bang models.

  16. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4π array of BaF2 crystals installed at LANSCE, Lujan Center. Neutron capture measurements on ^157Gd and ^89Y nuclei were conducted using this facility.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyzh, A.; Mitchell, G.; Vieira, D.; Bredeweg, T.; Ullmann, J.; Jandel, M.; Couture, A.; Keksis, A.; Rundberg, R.; Wilhelmy, J.; O'Donnell, J.; Baramsai, B.; Haight, R.; Wouters, J.; Krticka, M.; Parker, W.; Becker, J.; Agvaanlusan, U.

    2009-10-01

    DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4π array of BaF2 crystals installed at LANSCE, Lujan Center. Neutron capture measurements on ^157Gd and ^89Y nuclei were conducted using this facility. The absolute cross sections of the ^89Y(n,γ) reaction was measured for the first time ever in the neutron energy range of 10 eV -- 10 keV and improvements were made in the 10 -- 300 keV range. The error bars were significantly reduced and number of cross section points was increased since the past ^89Y(n,γ) experiments. The ^157Gd(n,γ) cross section was determined at En = 20 eV -- 300 keV by normalizing the experimental DANCE data to a well known resonance taken from the ENDF/B-VII library. Computer simulations of the ^157Gd(n,γ) cascades and DANCE pulse height function were made using DICEBOX and GEANT4 codes and simulated Esum and Eγ spectra are compared to the experimental DANCE data. Values of spin and photon strength function (PSF) of the ^157Gd(n,γ) resonances are provided in the range of En = 2 -- 300 eV using spin dependence upon a γ-ray multiplicity.

  17. Treatment of isografted 9L rat brain tumors with beta-5-o-carboranyl-2'-deoxyuridine neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Schinazi, R F; Hurwitz, S J; Liberman, I; Juodawlkis, A S; Tharnish, P; Shi, J; Liotta, D C; Coderre, J A; Olson, J

    2000-02-01

    beta-5-o-Carboranyl-2'-deoxyuridine (D-CDU) is a nontoxic pyrimidine nucleoside analogue designed for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors. In vitro studies indicated that D-CDU accumulates to levels 92- and 117-fold higher than the extracellular concentration in rat 9L and human U-251 glioma cells, respectively, and persists for several hours at levels 5-fold higher than the extracellular concentration. Furthermore, D-CDU was not toxic to rats injected i.p. with up to 150 mg/kg. On the basis of these studies, D-CDU was evaluated as a neutron capture therapy agent using rats bearing stereotactically implanted intracranial 9L tumors at single i.p. doses of 30 mg/kg and 150 mg/kg of D-CDU (20% 10B enriched), given 2 h before irradiation with thermal neutrons. Boron concentrations in tumors 2 h after dosing were 2.3 +/- 1.6 and 7.4 +/- 1.3 micrograms boron/g tissue (mean +/- SD), corresponding to tumor/brain ratios of 11.5 +/- 3.6 and 6.8 +/- 2.0 micrograms boron/g tissue for the low and high doses, respectively. All untreated animals died within 28 days, whereas half survived at days 32, 55, and 38 for groups receiving neutrons only, 30 mg/kg D-CDU, and 150 mg/kg D-CDU, respectively. Odds ratios of all treatment groups differed significantly from the untreated group (P < 0.002; logrank test). The median survival time for the 30 mg/kg-treated group but not for the 150 mg/kg-treated group was significantly longer than for rats treated with neutrons only (P = 0.036), which may correlate with the decreased tumor selectivity for D-CDU observed at the higher dose. Additional pharmacodynamic studies are warranted to determine optimal dosing strategies for D-CDU.

  18. Development of beryllium-based neutron target system with three-layer structure for accelerator-based neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumada, Hiroaki; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshioka, Masakazu; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugano, Tomei; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Sakae, Takeji; Matsumura, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The iBNCT project team with University of Tsukuba is developing an accelerator-based neutron source. Regarding neutron target material, our project has applied beryllium. To deal with large heat load and blistering of the target system, we developed a three-layer structure for the target system that includes a blistering mitigation material between the beryllium used as the neutron generator and the copper heat sink. The three materials were bonded through diffusion bonding using a hot isostatic pressing method. Based on several verifications, our project chose palladium as the intermediate layer. A prototype of the neutron target system was produced. We will verify that sufficient neutrons for BNCT treatment are generated by the device in the near future.

  19. Boron-Containing Compounds for Liposome-Mediated Tumor Localization and Application to Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, M. Frederick

    2005-04-07

    Medical application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) has been significantly hindered by the slow development of boron drug-targeting methodologies for the selective delivery of high boron concentration sto malignant cells. We have successfully sought to fill this need by creating liposomes suitable as in vivo boron delivery vehicles for BNCT. Delivery of therapeutic quantities of boron to tumors in murine models has been achieved with small unilamellar boron-rich liposomes. Subsequently, attempts have been made to improve delivery efficiency of liposomes encapsulating boron-containing water-soluble species into their hollow core by incorporating lipophilic boron compounds as addenda to the liposome bilayer, incorporating boron compounds as structural components of the bilayer (which however, poses the risk of sacrificing some stability), and combinations thereof. Regardless of the method, approximately 90% of the total liposome mass remains therapeutically inactive and comprised of the vehicle's construction materials, while less than 5% is boron for neutron targeting. Following this laboratory's intensive study, the observed tumor specificity of certain liposomes has been attributed to their diminutive size of these liposomes (30-150 nm), which enables these small vesicles to pass through the porous, immature vasculature of rapidly growing tumor tissue. We surmised that any amphiphilic nanoparticle of suitable size could possess some tumor selectivity. Consequently, the discovery of a very boron-rich nanoparticle delivery agent with biodistribution performance similar to unilamellar liposomes became one of our goals. Closomers, a new class of polyhedral borane derivatives, attracted us as an alternative BNCT drug-delivery system. We specifically envisioned dodeca (nido-carboranyl)-substituted closomers as possibly having a great potential role in BNCT drug delivery. They could function as extraordinarily boron-rich BNCT drugs since they are amphiphilic

  20. Dosimetry and stability studies of the boron neutron capture therapy agent F-BPA-Fr using PET and MRI