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Sample records for neutron flux optimization

  1. Analysis of neutron flux distribution for the validation of computational methods for the optimization of research reactor utilization.

    PubMed

    Snoj, L; Trkov, A; Jaćimović, R; Rogan, P; Zerovnik, G; Ravnik, M

    2011-01-01

    In order to verify and validate the computational methods for neutron flux calculation in TRIGA research reactor calculations, a series of experiments has been performed. The neutron activation method was used to verify the calculated neutron flux distribution in the TRIGA reactor. Aluminium (99.9 wt%)-Gold (0.1 wt%) foils (disks of 5mm diameter and 0.2mm thick) were irradiated in 33 locations; 6 in the core and 27 in the carrousel facility in the reflector. The experimental results were compared to the calculations performed with Monte Carlo code MCNP using detailed geometrical model of the reactor. The calculated and experimental normalized reaction rates in the core are in very good agreement for both isotopes indicating that the material and geometrical properties of the reactor core are modelled well. In conclusion one can state that our computational model describes very well the neutron flux and reaction rate distribution in the reactor core. In the reflector however, the accuracy of the epithermal and thermal neutron flux distribution and attenuation is lower, mainly due to lack of information about the material properties of the graphite reflector surrounding the core, but the differences between measurements and calculations are within 10%. Since our computational model properly describes the reactor core it can be used for calculations of reactor core parameters and for optimization of research reactor utilization.

  2. NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.T.

    1964-04-21

    A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

  3. Neutron fluxes in radiotherapy rooms.

    PubMed

    Agosteo, S; Foglio Para, A; Maggioni, B

    1993-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the neutron flux, originated in an electron accelerator therapy room when energies above the threshold of (y,n) and (e,e'n) reactions are employed, is physically due to a direct flux, coming from the accelerator head, and to a flux diffused from the walls. In this work, the flux is described to a high degree of approximation by a set of functions whose spatial behavior is univocally determined by the angular distributions of the neutrons emitted from the shield of the accelerator head and diffused from the walls. The analytical results are verified with an extended series of Monte Carlo simulations obtained with the MCNP code.

  4. Apparatus for measuring a flux of neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Stringer, James L.

    1977-01-01

    A flux of neutrons is measured by disposing a detector in the flux and applying electronic correlation techniques to discriminate between the electrical signals generated by the neutron detector and the unwanted interfering electrical signals generated by the incidence of a neutron flux upon the cables connecting the detector to the electronic measuring equipment at a remote location.

  5. Cosmic Ray Neutron Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayananda, Mathes

    2009-11-01

    Cosmic rays are high-energetic particles originating from outer space that bombard the upper atmosphere of the Earth. Almost 90% of cosmic ray particles consist of protons, electrons and heavy ions. When these particles hit the Earth's atmosphere, cascade of secondary particles are formed. The most abundant particles reach to the surface of the Earth are muons, electrons and neutrons. In recent years many research groups are looking into potential applications of the effects of cosmic ray radiation at the surface of the Earth [1, 2]. At Georgia State University we are working on a long-term measurement of cosmic ray flux distribution. This study includes the simultaneous measurement of cosmic ray muons, neutrons and gamma particles at the Earth surface in downtown Atlanta. The initial effort is focusing on the correlation studies of the cosmic ray particle flux distribution and the atmospheric weather conditions. In this presentation, I will talk about the development of a cosmic ray detector using liquid scintillator and the preliminary results. [4pt] [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, ``Radiographic imaging with cosmic-ray muons'', Nature, Vol.422, p.277, Mar.2003[0pt] [2] Svensmark Henrik, Physical Review 81, 3, (1998)

  6. Spacecraft-produced neutron fluxes on Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quist, T. C.; Furst, M.; Burnett, D. S.; Baum, J. H.; Peacock, C. L., Jr.; Perry, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of neutron fluxes in different energy ranges are reported for the Skylab spacecraft. Detectors composed of uranium, thorium, and bismuth foils with mica as a fission track recorder, as well as boron foils with cellulose acetate as an alpha-particle recorder, were deployed at different positions in the Orbital Workshop. It was found that the Skylab neutron flux was dominated by high energy (greater than 1 MeV) contributions and that there was no significant time variation in the fluxes. Firm upper limits of 7-15 neutrons/sq cm-sec, depending on the detector location in the spacecraft, were established for fluxes above 1 MeV. Below 1 MeV, the neutron fluxes were about an order of magnitude lower. The neutrons are interpreted as originating from the interactions of leakage protons from the radiation belt with the spacecraft.

  7. Gravitational effects on planetary neutron flux spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Drake, D. M.; O'dell, R. D.; Brinkley, F. W.; Anderson, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the planetary neutron flux spectra for planet Mars, and the lifetime of the neutron, were investigated using a modified one-dimensional diffusion accelerated neutral-particle transport code, coupled with a multigroup cross-section library tailored specifically for Mars. The results showed the presence of a qualitatively new feature in planetary neutron leakage spectra in the form of a component of returning neutrons with kinetic energies less than the gravitational binding energy (0.132 eV for Mars). The net effect is an enhancement in flux at the lowest energies that is largest at and above the outermost layer of planetary matter.

  8. Neutron flux assessment of a neutron irradiation facility based on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Sztejnberg Gonçalves-Carralves, M L; Miller, M E

    2015-12-01

    Neutron generators based on inertial electrostatic confinement fusion were considered for the design of a neutron irradiation facility for explanted organ Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) that could be installed in a health care center as well as in research areas. The chosen facility configuration is "irradiation chamber", a ~20×20×40 cm(3) cavity near or in the center of the facility geometry where samples to be irradiated can be placed. Neutron flux calculations were performed to study different manners for improving scattering processes and, consequently, optimize neutron flux in the irradiation position. Flux distributions were assessed through numerical simulations of several models implemented in MCNP5 particle transport code. Simulation results provided a wide spectrum of combinations of net fluxes and energy spectrum distributions. Among them one can find a group that can provide thermal neutron fluxes per unit of production rate in a range from 4.1·10(-4) cm(-2) to 1.6·10(-3) cm(-2) with epithermal-to-thermal ratios between 0.3% and 13% and fast-to-thermal ratios between 0.01% to 8%. Neutron generators could be built to provide more than 10(10) n s(-1) and, consequently, with an arrangement of several generators appropriate enough neutron fluxes could be obtained that would be useful for several BNCT-related irradiations and, eventually, for clinical practice.

  9. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, Edward H.; vanderWoerd, Mark; Damon, Michael; Judge, Russell, A.; Myles, Dean; Meilleur, F.

    2006-01-01

    Neutron diffraction is uniquely sensitive to hydrogen positions and protonation state. In that context structural information from neutron data is complementary to that provided through X-ray diffraction. However, there are practical obstacles to overcome in fully exploiting the potential of neutron diffraction, Le. low flux and weak scattering. Several approaches are available to overcome these obstacles and we have investigated the simplest: increasing the diffracting volume of the crystals. Volume is a quantifiable metric that is well suited for experiment design and optimization techniques. By using response surface methods we have optimized xylose isomerase crystal volume, enabling neutron diffraction while we determined the crystallization parameters with the minimum of experiments. Our results suggest a systematic means of enabling neutron diffraction studies for a larger number of samples that require information on hydrogen position and/or protonation state.

  10. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mihalczo, John T.; Simpson, Marc L.; McElhaney, Stephanie A.

    1994-01-01

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination.

  11. STRATIFIED COMPOSITION EFFECTS ON PLANETARY NEUTRON FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    O. GASNAULT; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    All the bodies of the solar system that are directly irradiated by the galactic cosmic rays, emit enough neutrons to allow a measurement from space. These leakage neutron fluxes are indexes of the surface composition, depending on the energy of the neutrons [1]. Recent work propose geochemical interpretations of these fluxes: the thermal energy range is sensitive to iron, titanium, rare earth elements and thorium [2, 3], the epithermal energy range is sensitive to hydrogen, samarium and gadolinium [2] and the fast energy range is representative of the average soil atomic mass [4]. Nevertheless these studies make the hypothesis of a composition uniform within the footprint of the spectrometer and independent of depth. We show in this abstract that a stratified composition could change significantly the flux intensity and complicate the interpretation of the measurements. The neutron leakage flux is a competition between production effects (sensitive at high energy) and diffusion-capture effects (mostly sensitive at low energy). On one hand, it happens to be that the elements which produce the higher number of neutrons in typical lunar compositions are iron and titanium, which have also large cross section of absorption with the neutrons. On the other hand, the maximum of neutron intensity does not occur at the surface but at about 180 g cm{sup {minus}2} in depth. Therefore, if we have an iron- and/or titanium-rich soil (important production of neutrons) with a top layer having less iron and/or titanium (i.e. more transparent to the neutrons), we can expect an enhancement of the flux compared to a uniform composition.

  12. Stratified composition effects on planetary neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasnault, O.

    2001-01-01

    All the bodies of the solar system that are directly irradiated by the galactic cosmic rays, emit enough neutrons to allow a measurement from space. These leakage neutron fluxes are indexes of the surface composition, depending on the energy of the neutrons (1). Recent work propose geochemical interpretations of these fluxes: the thermal energy range is sensitive to iron, titanium, rare earth elements and thorium (2, 3), the epithermal energy range is sensitive to hydrogen, samarium and gadolinium (2) and the fast energy range is representative of the average soil atomic mass (4). Nevertheless these studies make the hypothesis of a composition uniform within the footprint of the spectrometer and independent of depth. We show in this abstract that a stratified composition could change significantly the flux intensity and complicate the interpretation of the measurements. The neutron leakage flux is a competition between production effects (sensitive at high energy) and diffusion-capture effects (mostly sensitive at low energy). On one hand, it happens to be that the elements which produce the higher number of neutrons in typical lunar compositions are iron and titanium, which have also large cross section of absorption with the neutrons. On the other hand, the maximum of neutron intensity does not occur at the surface but at about 180 g cm(sup (minus)2) in depth. Therefore, if we have an iron- and/or titanium-rich soil (important production of neutrons) with a top layer having less iron and/or titanium (i.e. more transparent to the neutrons), we can expect an enhancement of the flux compared to a uniform composition.

  13. Optimization of neutron imaging plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haga, Y. K.; Neriishi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Niimura, N.

    2002-07-01

    Considering the elementary processes of neutron detection occurring in the neutron imaging plate (NIP) has optimized the performance of NIP. For these processes, the color center creation efficiencies ( ɛcc values) have been experimentally determined with NIPs which have different mole fraction of photostimulated (PSL) material ( φPSL values) and different thickness ( t). The effectiveness of the optimization procedure has been demonstrated by the measurement of the neutron diffraction intensities from a hen egg-white lysozyme protein crystal.

  14. Characterization of neutron yield and x-ray spectra of a High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnamani, Nnaemeka; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG) is a DD plasma-based source, with a self-loading target intended for fundamental science and engineering applications, including 40 Ar/39 Ar geochronology, neutron cross section measurements, and radiation hardness testing of electronics. Our first estimate of the neutron yield, based on the population of the 4.486 hour 115 In isomer gave a neutron yield of the order 108 n/sec; optimization is ongoing to achieve the design target of 1011 n/sec. Preliminary x-ray spectra showed prominent energy peaks which are likely due to atomic line-emission from back-streaming electrons accelerated up to 100 keV impinging on various components of the HFNG chamber. Our x-ray and neutron diagnostics will aid us as we continue to evolve the design to suppress back-streaming electrons, necessary to achieve higher plasma beam currents, and thus higher neutron flux. This talk will focus on the characterization of the neutron yield and x-ray spectra during our tests. A collimation system is being installed near one of the chamber ports for improved observation of the x-ray spectra. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and the UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  15. Strong flux of low-energy neutrons produced by thunderstorms.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, A V; Antonova, V P; Chubenko, A P; Karashtin, A N; Mitko, G G; Ptitsyn, M O; Ryabov, V A; Shepetov, A L; Shlyugaev, Yu V; Vildanova, L I; Zybin, K P

    2012-03-23

    We report here for the first time about the registration of an extraordinary high flux of low-energy neutrons generated during thunderstorms. The measured neutron count rate enhancements are directly connected with thunderstorm discharges. The low-energy neutron flux value obtained in our work is a challenge for the photonuclear channel of neutron generation in thunderstorm: the estimated value of the needed high-energy γ-ray flux is about 3 orders of magnitude higher than that one observed.

  16. Radial Flux Distribution of Low-Energy Neutrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higinbotham, J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to illustrate the basic principle involved in the process of moderation of fast neutrons by water, and the monitoring of the low-energy neutron flux using indium as a probe. (GA)

  17. Validation of neutron flux redistribution factors in JSI TRIGA reactor due to control rod movements.

    PubMed

    Kaiba, Tanja; Žerovnik, Gašper; Jazbec, Anže; Štancar, Žiga; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-10-01

    For efficient utilization of research reactors, such as TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, it is important to know neutron flux distribution in the reactor as accurately as possible. The focus of this study is on the neutron flux redistributions due to control rod movements. For analyzing neutron flux redistributions, Monte Carlo calculations of fission rate distributions with the JSI TRIGA reactor model at different control rod configurations have been performed. Sensitivity of the detector response due to control rod movement have been studied. Optimal radial and axial positions of the detector have been determined. Measurements of the axial neutron flux distribution using the CEA manufactured fission chambers have been performed. The experiments at different control rod positions were conducted and compared with the MCNP calculations for a fixed detector axial position. In the future, simultaneous on-line measurements with multiple fission chambers will be performed inside the reactor core for a more accurate on-line power monitoring system.

  18. Validation of the MCNP computational model for neutron flux distribution with the neutron activation analysis measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiyapun, K.; Chimtin, M.; Munsorn, S.; Somchit, S.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate the method for validating the predication of the calculation methods for neutron flux distribution in the irradiation tubes of TRIGA research reactor (TRR-1/M1) using the MCNP computer code model. The reaction rate using in the experiment includes 27Al(n, α)24Na and 197Au(n, γ)198Au reactions. Aluminium (99.9 wt%) and gold (0.1 wt%) foils and the gold foils covered with cadmium were irradiated in 9 locations in the core referred to as CT, C8, C12, F3, F12, F22, F29, G5, and G33. The experimental results were compared to the calculations performed using MCNP which consisted of the detailed geometrical model of the reactor core. The results from the experimental and calculated normalized reaction rates in the reactor core are in good agreement for both reactions showing that the material and geometrical properties of the reactor core are modelled very well. The results indicated that the difference between the experimental measurements and the calculation of the reactor core using the MCNP geometrical model was below 10%. In conclusion the MCNP computational model which was used to calculate the neutron flux and reaction rate distribution in the reactor core can be used for others reactor core parameters including neutron spectra calculation, dose rate calculation, power peaking factors calculation and optimization of research reactor utilization in the future with the confidence in the accuracy and reliability of the calculation.

  19. Global Maps of Lunar Neutron Fluxes from the LEND Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Sanin, A.; Malakhov, A.; Boynton, W. V.; Chin, G.; Droege, G.; Evans, L. G.; Garvin, J.; Golovin, D. V.; Harshman, K.; McClanahan, T. P.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Mazarico, E.; Milikh, G.; Neumann, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Smith, D. E.; Starr, R.; Zuber, M. T.

    2012-01-01

    The latest neutron spectrometer measurements with the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) are presented. It covers more than 1 year of mapping phase starting on 15 September 2009. In our analyses we have created global maps showing regional variations in the flux of thermal (energy range < 0.015 eV) and fast neutrons (>0.5 MeV), and compared these fluxes to variances in soil elemental composition, and with previous results obtained by the Lunar Prospector Neutron Spectrometer (LPNS). We also processed data from LEND collimated detectors and derived a value for the collimated signal of epithermal neutrons based on the comparative analysis with the LEND omnidirectional detectors. Finally, we have compared our final (after the data reduction) global epithermal neutron map with LPNS data.

  20. Superheavy Elements Production in High Intensive Neutron Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Lyashuk, V. I.; Panov, I. V.

    2013-06-01

    The possibility of superheavy elements production in high intensive neutron fluxes is being studied. A model of the transuranium isotopes production under conditions of pulse nucleosynthesis in a neutron flux with densities of up to ~1025 neutron/cm2 is considered. The pulse process allows us to divide it in time into two stages: the process of multiple neutron captures (with t < 10-6 s) and the subsequent β-decay of neutron-rich nuclei. The modeling of the transuranium yields takes into account the adiabatic character of the process, the probability of delayed fission, and the emission of delayed neutrons. A target with a binary composition of 238U and 239Pu, 248Cm, and 251Cf isotopes is used to predict the yields of heavy and superheavy isotopes.

  1. Development of high flux thermal neutron generator for neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko H.; Chen, Allan X.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K.; Jones, Glenn; Pantell, Richard H.

    2015-05-01

    The new model DD110MB neutron generator from Adelphi Technology produces thermal (<0.5 eV) neutron flux that is normally achieved in a nuclear reactor or larger accelerator based systems. Thermal neutron fluxes of 3-5 · 107 n/cm2/s are measured. This flux is achieved using four ion beams arranged concentrically around a target chamber containing a compact moderator with a central sample cylinder. Fast neutron yield of ∼2 · 1010 n/s is created at the titanium surface of the target chamber. The thickness and material of the moderator is selected to maximize the thermal neutron flux at the center. The 2.5 MeV neutrons are quickly thermalized to energies below 0.5 eV and concentrated at the sample cylinder. The maximum flux of thermal neutrons at the target is achieved when approximately half of the neutrons at the sample area are thermalized. In this paper we present simulation results used to characterize performance of the neutron generator. The neutron flux can be used for neutron activation analysis (NAA) prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for determining the concentrations of elements in many materials. Another envisioned use of the generator is production of radioactive isotopes. DD110MB is small enough for modest-sized laboratories and universities. Compared to nuclear reactors the DD110MB produces comparable thermal flux but provides reduced administrative and safety requirements and it can be run in pulsed mode, which is beneficial in many neutron activation techniques.

  2. Neutron flux profile monitor for use in a fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.; Valentine, Kenneth H.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron flux monitor is provided which consists of a plurality of fission counters arranged as spaced-apart point detectors along a delay line. As a fission event occurs in any one of the counters, two delayed current pulses are generated at the output of the delay line. The time separation of the pulses identifies the counter in which the particular fission event occured. Neutron flux profiles of reactor cores can be more accurately measured as a result.

  3. Determination of spallation neutron flux through spectral adjustment techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mosby, Michelle A.; Engle, Jonathan Ward; Jackman, Kevin Richard; Nortier, Francois Meiring; Birnbaum, Eva R.

    2016-05-30

    The Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF) creates medical isotopes using a proton beam impinged on a target stack. Spallation neutrons are created in the interaction of the beam with target. The use of these spallation neutrons to produce additional radionuclides has been proposed in this paper. However, the energy distribution and magnitude of the flux is not well understood. Finally, a modified SAND-II spectral adjustment routine has been used with radioactivation foils to determine the differential neutron fluence for these spallation neutrons during a standard IPF production run.

  4. Determination of spallation neutron flux through spectral adjustment techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, M. A.; Engle, J. W.; Jackman, K. R.; Nortier, F. M.; Birnbaum, E. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF) creates medical isotopes using a proton beam impinged on a target stack. Spallation neutrons are created in the interaction of the beam with target. The use of these spallation neutrons to produce additional radionuclides has been proposed. However, the energy distribution and magnitude of the flux is not well understood. A modified SAND-II spectral adjustment routine has been used with radioactivation foils to determine the differential neutron fluence for these spallation neutrons during a standard IPF production run.

  5. Neutron flux reduction programs for reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Kim, B.C.

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to implement various fast neutron flux reduction programs on the belt-line region of the reactor pressure vessel to reduce the increasing rate of reference temperature for pressurized thermal shock (RT PTS) for Korea Nuclear Unit 1. A pressurized thermal shock (PTS) event is an event or transient in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) causing severe overcooling (thermal shock) concurrent with or followed by significant pressure in the reactor vessel. A PTS concern arises if one of these transients acts in the belt-line region of a reactor vessel where a reduced fracture resistance exists because of neutron irradiation. Generally, the RT PTS value is continuously increasing according to the fast neutron irradiation during the reactor operation, and it can reach the screening criterion prior to the expiration of the operating license. To reduce the increasing rate of RT PTS, various neutron flux reduction programs can be implemented, which are focused on license renewal. In this paper, neutron flux reduction programs, such as low leakage loading pattern strategy, loading of neutron absorber rods, and dummy fuel assembly loading are considered for Korea Nuclear Unit 1, of which the RT PTS value of the leading material (circumferential weld) is going to reach the screening criterion in the near future. To evaluate the effects of the neutron flux reduction programs, plant and cycle specific forward neutron transport calculations for the various neutron flux reduction programs were carried out. For the analysis, all transport calculations were carried out by using the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinate code and BUGLE-96 cross-section library. (authors)

  6. Optimization of Shielded Scintillator for Neutron Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belancourt, Patrick; Morrison, John; Akli, Kramer; Freeman, Richard; High Energy Density Physics Team

    2011-10-01

    The High Energy Density Physics group is interested in the basic science of creating a neutron and gamma ray source. The neutrons and gamma rays are produced by accelerating ions via a laser into a target and creating fusion neutrons and gamma rays. A scintillator and photomultiplier tube will be used to detect these neutrons. Neutrons and photons produce ionizing radiation in the scintillator which then activates metastable states. These metastable states have both short and long decay rates. The initial photon count is orders of magnitude higher than the neutron count and poses problems for accurately detecting the neutrons due to the long decay state that is activated by the photons. The effects of adding lead shielding on the temporal response and signal level of the neutron detector will be studied in an effort to minimize the photon count without significant reduction to the temporal resolution of the detector. MCNP5 will be used to find the temporal response and energy deposition into the scintillator by adding lead shielding. Results from the simulations will be shown. Optimization of our scintillator neutron detection system is needed to resolve the neutron energies and neutron count of a novel neutron and gamma ray source.

  7. High-Energy Neutron Spectra and Flux Measurements Below Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-03-01

    High-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous and often poorly measured background. Below ground, these neutrons could potentially interfere with antineutrino based reactor monitoring experiments as well as other rare-event neutral particle detectors. We have designed and constructed a transportable fast neutron detection system for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The spectrometer uses a multiplicity technique in order to have a higher effective area than traditional transportable high-energy neutron spectrometers. Transportability ensures a common detector-related systematic bias for future measurements. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. A high-energy neutron may interact in the lead producing many secondary neutrons. The detector records the correlated secondary neutron multiplicity. Over many events, the response can be used to infer the incident neutron energy spectrum and flux. As a validation of the detector response, surface measurements have been performed; results confirm agreement with previous experiments. Below ground measurements have been performed at 3 depths (380, 600, and 1450 m.w.e.); results from these measurements will be presented.

  8. Distribution of thermal neutron flux around a PET cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Yoshimune; Ishigure, Nobuhito; Mochizuki, Shingo; Ito, Kengo; Hatano, Kentaro; Abe, Junichiro; Miyahara, Hiroshi; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Hajime

    2011-05-01

    The number of positron emission tomography (PET) examinations has greatly increased world-wide. Since positron emission nuclides for the PET examinations have short half-lives, they are mainly produced using on-site cyclotrons. During the production of the nuclides, significant quantities of neutrons are generated from the cyclotrons. Neutrons have potential to activate the materials around the cyclotrons and cause exposure to the staff. To investigate quantities and distribution of the thermal neutrons, thermal neutron fluxes were measured around a PET cyclotron in a laboratory associating with a hospital. The cyclotron accelerates protons up to 18 MeV, and the mean particle current is 20 μA. The neutron fluxes were measured during both 18F production and C production. Gold foils and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badges were used to measure the neutron fluxes. The neutron fluxes in the target box averaged 9.3 × 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) and 1.7 × 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) during 18F and 11C production, respectively. Those in the cyclotron room averaged 4.1 × 10(5) cm(-2) s(-1) and 1.2 × 10(5) cm(-2) s(-1), respectively. Those outside the concrete wall shielding were estimated as being equal to or less than ∼3 cm s, which corresponded to 0.1 μSv h(-1) in effective dose. The neutron fluxes outside the concrete shielding were confirmed to be quite low compared to the legal limit.

  9. Optimal fluxes and Reynolds stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Javier

    2016-12-01

    It is remarked that fluxes in conservation laws, such as the Reynolds stresses in the momentum equation of turbulent shear flows, or the spectral energy flux in isotropic turbulence, are only defined up to an arbitrary solenoidal field. While this is not usually significant for long-time averages, it becomes important when fluxes are modelled locally in large-eddy simulations, or in the analysis of intermittency and cascades. As an example, a numerical procedure is introduced to compute fluxes in scalar conservation equations in such a way that their total integrated magnitude is minimised. The result is an irrotational vector field that derives from a potential, thus minimising sterile flux `circuits'. The algorithm is generalised to tensor fluxes and applied to the transfer of momentum in a turbulent channel. The resulting instantaneous Reynolds stresses are compared with their traditional expressions, and found to be substantially different.

  10. Electronic Reliability and the Environmental Thermal Neutron Flux

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    several Californium sources of varying strengths. The room is ten by ten by three meters. It is below ground with concrete walls. In a high flux...desirable for calibrating the system. Californium -252 is a self-fissioning fast neutron source, which can be moderated to produce thermal neutrons...NIST has several Californium sources with strengths as high as 200 mrem/h at one meter. The Cf sources are stored below the floor for the safety

  11. Neutronics Modeling of the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Primm, Trent; Freels, James D; Maldonado, G Ivan

    2011-01-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a versatile 85 MWth research reactor with cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, isotope production, and neutron activation analysis capabilities. HFIR staff members are currently in the process of updating the thermal hydraulic and reactor transient modeling methodologies. COMSOL Multiphysics has been adopted for the thermal hydraulic analyses and has proven to be a powerful finite-element-based simulation tool for solving multiple physics-based systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. Modeling reactor transients is a challenging task because of the coupling of neutronics, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. This paper presents a preliminary COMSOL-based neutronics study performed by creating a two-dimensional, two-group, diffusion neutronics model of HFIR to study the spatially-dependent, beginning-of-cycle fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The 238-group ENDF/B-VII neutron cross section library and NEWT, a two-dimensional, discrete-ordinates neutron transport code within the SCALE 6 code package, were used to calculate the two-group neutron cross sections required to solve the diffusion equations. The two-group diffusion equations were implemented in the COMSOL coefficient form PDE application mode and were solved via eigenvalue analysis using a direct (PARDISO) linear system solver. A COMSOL-provided adaptive mesh refinement algorithm was used to increase the number of elements in areas of largest numerical error to increase the accuracy of the solution. The flux distributions calculated by means of COMSOL/SCALE compare well with those calculated with benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP and KENO models, a necessary first step along the path to implementing two- and three-dimensional models of HFIR in COMSOL for the purpose of studying the spatial dependence of transient-induced behavior in the reactor core.

  12. A calorimeter for neutron flux measurement. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chupp, T.E.

    1993-04-01

    A calorimeter for absolute neutron flux measurement has been built and tested. The calorimeter measures the heat produced in a 10{degrees}K thick LiPb target when neutrons are captured via the {sup 6}Li(n,{sup 3}H){sup 4}He reaction. The sensitivity achieved was 1.3x10{sup 6} n/s for a 1 hour measurement. Separate flux measurements with the calorimeter and a {sup 238}U fission chamber are in agreement and show that systematic errors are less than 3%. An improved calorimeter has been built which is sensitive to 10{sup 5} n/s for a 1 hour measurement.

  13. Hierarchical optimization for neutron scattering problems

    DOE PAGES

    Bao, Feng; Archibald, Rick; Bansal, Dipanshu; ...

    2016-03-14

    In this study, we present a scalable optimization method for neutron scattering problems that determines confidence regions of simulation parameters in lattice dynamics models used to fit neutron scattering data for crystalline solids. The method uses physics-based hierarchical dimension reduction in both the computational simulation domain and the parameter space. We demonstrate for silicon that after a few iterations the method converges to parameters values (interatomic force-constants) computed with density functional theory simulations.

  14. Hierarchical optimization for neutron scattering problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Feng; Archibald, Rick; Bansal, Dipanshu; Delaire, Olivier

    2016-06-15

    We present a scalable optimization method for neutron scattering problems that determines confidence regions of simulation parameters in lattice dynamics models used to fit neutron scattering data for crystalline solids. The method uses physics-based hierarchical dimension reduction in both the computational simulation domain and the parameter space. We demonstrate for silicon that after a few iterations the method converges to parameters values (interatomic force-constants) computed with density functional theory simulations.

  15. Target Design Optimization of KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Zhaopeng; Gohar, Yousry; Merzari, Elia; Kraus, Adam; Sofu, Tanju

    2015-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States developed and designed a neutron source facility for Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine. The facility was constructed at Kharkov, Ukraine and its commissioning process has been started. The facility has an electron accelerator driving a subcritical assembly. The electron beam power is 100 kW using 100 MeV electrons. The subcritical assembly has WWR-M2 fuel assemblies with U-235 enrichment of 19.7 wt%. The facility will be utilized to perform basic and applied nuclear research, to produce medical isotopes, and to train young nuclear specialists. Solid target design with stacked disks is selected and each target disk is cooled by water from both side. Tungsten or natural uranium is the target material. This paper presents the target design optimization to maximize the neutron yield and the neutron flux level of the facility while satisfying the thermal-hydraulic design criteria. Monte Carlo computer code MCNPX is utilized for the neutron yield analyses with ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data libraries, as a function of target thickness using a simplified target model without cladding or coolant channels. It’s found that the neutron yield saturates at target thickness 60 ~ 70 mm for both tungsten and uranium materials. For the final target design with cladding and coolant channels, the total uranium thickness is 56.5 mm, and the total tungsten thickness is only 33.0 mm. The tungsten material has a large absorption cross section for thermal neutrons. If the tungsten thickness is increased, the neutron yield gain is offset by the neutron absorption reaction. The paper presents the design optimization analyses for both target materials.

  16. Improved monitoring system of neutron flux during boron-neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harasawa, S.; Nakamoto, A.; Hayakawa, Y.; Egawa, J.

    1981-10-01

    Continuous and simultaneous monitoring of neutron flux in the course of a boron-neutron capture operation on a brain tumor has been achieved using a new monitoring system. A silicon surface barrier diode mounted with /sup 6/LiF instead of the previously reported borax is used to sense neutrons. The pulse heights of /sup 3/H and ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 6/Li(n, ..cap alpha..)/sup 2/H reaction are sufficiently high and well separated from noises due to ..gamma.. rays. The effect of pulse-height reduction due to the radiation damage of the diode thus becomes smaller, permitting continuous monitoring. The relative error of the monitoring is within 2% over 5 hr for a neutron-flux density of 2 x 10/sup 9/ n/cm/sup 2/ sec.

  17. Criticality experiments to provide benchmark data on neutron flux traps

    SciTech Connect

    Bierman, S.R.

    1988-06-01

    The experimental measurements covered by this report were designed to provide benchmark type data on water moderated LWR type fuel arrays containing neutron flux traps. The experiments were performed at the US Department of Energy Hanford Critical Mass Laboratory, operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The experimental assemblies consisted of 2 /times/ 2 arrays of 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel rods, uniformly arranged in water on a 1.891 cm square center-to-center spacing. Neutron flux traps were created between the fuel units using metal plates containing varying amounts of boron. Measurements were made to determine the effect that boron loading and distance between the fuel and flux trap had on the amount of fuel required for criticality. Also, measurements were made, using the pulse neutron source technique, to determine the effect of boron loading on the effective neutron multiplications constant. On two assemblies, reaction rate measurements were made using solid state track recorders to determine absolute fission rates in /sup 235/U and /sup 238/U. 14 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Operation TEAPOT. Project 2.2. Neutron Flux Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    fissionable materials used were K plutonium-239, neptunium - 237 , and uranium-238. Approximate thresholds, cross sections, and sample weights were: Approximate...Shots 9 and 10 and on weapons of essentially new design, -~ Detectors employing gold, sulfur, plutonium, neptunium , and uranium-238 were employed...calibrated in terms of the integrated flux interacting with the sample. Neptunium has a neutron fission threshold in the region of 700 key. Samples are

  19. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R.

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  20. "Influence Method" applied to measure a moderated neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rios, I. J.; Mayer, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The "Influence Method" is conceived for the absolute determination of a nuclear particle flux in the absence of known detector efficiency. This method exploits the influence of the presence of one detector, in the count rate of another detector when they are placed one behind the other and define statistical estimators for the absolute number of incident particles and for the efficiency. The method and its detailed mathematical description were recently published (Rios and Mayer, 2015 [1]). In this article we apply it to the measurement of the moderated neutron flux produced by an 241AmBe neutron source surrounded by a light water sphere, employing a pair of 3He detectors. For this purpose, the method is extended for its application where particles arriving at the detector obey a Poisson distribution and also, for the case when efficiency is not constant over the energy spectrum of interest. Experimental distributions and derived parameters are compared with theoretical predictions of the method and implications concerning the potential application to the absolute calibration of neutron sources are considered.

  1. Measuring fast-neutron flux by track-etch technique

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The method covers the measurement of neutron flux by the use of fissionable materials. Fission fragments emitted by the fissionable materials during neutron bombardment penetrate a suitable recording medium, such as plastic, glass, or mica, that is in contact with the fissionable material. Appropriate etching techniques render the path of the fragment in the recording medium visible under an optical microscope. Since measurement of the decay of radioisotopes is not involved in this method, irradiation times are limited only by the maximum number of fission fragment tracks that can be clearly distinguished without pile up: approximately 2 x 10/sup 5//cm/sup 2/. The method includes a discussion of apparatus, reagents and materials, procedure, calculations, precision, and accuracy. (JMT)

  2. Optimization of the lead probe neutron detector.

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Lee; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Franklin, James Kenneth; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Nelson, Alan J.

    2004-03-01

    The lead probe neutron detector was originally designed by Spencer and Jacobs in 1965. The detector is based on lead activation due to the following neutron scattering reactions: {sup 207}Pb(n, n'){sup 207m}Pb and {sup 208}Pb(n, 2n){sup 207m}Pb. Delayed gammas from the metastable state of {sup 207m}Pb are counted using a plastic scintillator. The half-life of {sup 207m}Pb is 0.8 seconds. In the work reported here, MCNP was used to optimize the efficiency of the lead probe by suitably modifying the original geometry. A prototype detector was then built and tested. A 'layer cake' design was investigated in which thin (< 5 mm) layers of lead were sandwiched between thicker ({approx} 1 - 2 cm) layers of scintillator. An optimized 'layer cake' design had Figures of Merit (derived from the code) which were a factor of 3 greater than the original lead probe for DD neutrons, and a factor of 4 greater for DT neutrons, while containing 30% less lead. A smaller scale, 'proof of principle' prototype was built by Bechtel/Nevada to verify the code results. Its response to DD neutrons was measured using the DD dense plasma focus at Texas A&M and it conformed to the predicted performance. A voltage and discriminator sweep was performed to determine optimum sensitivity settings. It was determined that a calibration operating point could be obtained using a {sup 133}Ba 'bolt' as is the case with the original lead probe.

  3. An investigation of the neutron flux in bone-fluorine phantoms comparing accelerator based in vivo neutron activation analysis and FLUKA simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; McNeill, F. E.; Chettle, D. R.; Matysiak, W.; Bhatia, C.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have tested the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for its ability to assist in the development of a better system for the in vivo measurement of fluorine. We used it to create a neutron flux map of the inside of the in vivo neutron activation analysis irradiation cavity at the McMaster Accelerator Laboratory. The cavity is used in a system that has been developed for assessment of fluorine levels in the human hand. This study was undertaken to (i) assess the FLUKA code, (ii) find the optimal hand position inside the cavity and assess the effects on precision of a hand being in a non-optimal position and (iii) to determine the best location for our γ-ray detection system within the accelerator beam hall. Simulation estimates were performed using FLUKA. Experimental measurements of the neutron flux were performed using Mn wires. The activation of the wires was measured inside (1) an empty bottle, (2) a bottle containing water, (3) a bottle covered with cadmium and (4) a dry powder-based fluorine phantom. FLUKA was used to simulate the irradiation cavity, and used to estimate the neutron flux in different positions both inside, and external to, the cavity. The experimental results were found to be consistent with the Monte Carlo simulated neutron flux. Both experiment and simulation showed that there is an optimal position in the cavity, but that the effect on the thermal flux of a hand being in a non-optimal position is less than 20%, which will result in a less than 10% effect on the measurement precision. FLUKA appears to be a code that can be useful for modeling of this type of experimental system.

  4. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    SciTech Connect

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-20

    The availability of whole-cell level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30,000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy-tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations have relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reaction are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central-carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  5. Optimal flux patterns in cellular metabolic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind

    2007-06-01

    The availability of whole-cell-level metabolic networks of high quality has made it possible to develop a predictive understanding of bacterial metabolism. Using the optimization framework of flux balance analysis, I investigate the metabolic response and activity patterns to variations in the availability of nutrient and chemical factors such as oxygen and ammonia by simulating 30 000 random cellular environments. The distribution of reaction fluxes is heavy tailed for the bacteria H. pylori and E. coli, and the eukaryote S. cerevisiae. While the majority of flux balance investigations has relied on implementations of the simplex method, it is necessary to use interior-point optimization algorithms to adequately characterize the full range of activity patterns on metabolic networks. The interior-point activity pattern is bimodal for E. coli and S. cerevisiae, suggesting that most metabolic reactions are either in frequent use or are rarely active. The trimodal activity pattern of H. pylori indicates that a group of its metabolic reactions (20%) are active in approximately half of the simulated environments. Constructing the high-flux backbone of the network for every environment, there is a clear trend that the more frequently a reaction is active, the more likely it is a part of the backbone. Finally, I briefly discuss the predicted activity patterns of the central carbon metabolic pathways for the sample of random environments.

  6. A study on the optimum fast neutron flux for boron neutron capture therapy of deep-seated tumors.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2015-02-01

    High-energy neutrons, named fast neutrons which have a number of undesirable biological effects on tissue, are a challenging problem in beam designing for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, BNCT. In spite of this fact, there is not a widely accepted criterion to guide the beam designer to determine the appropriate contribution of fast neutrons in the spectrum. Although a number of researchers have proposed a target value for the ratio of fast neutron flux to epithermal neutron flux, it can be shown that this criterion may not provide the optimum treatment condition. This simulation study deals with the determination of the optimum contribution of fast neutron flux in the beam for BNCT of deep-seated tumors. Since the dose due to these high-energy neutrons damages shallow tissues, delivered dose to skin is considered as a measure for determining the acceptability of the designed beam. To serve this purpose, various beam shaping assemblies that result in different contribution of fast neutron flux are designed. The performances of the neutron beams corresponding to such configurations are assessed in a simulated head phantom. It is shown that the previously used criterion, which suggests a limit value for the contribution of fast neutrons in beam, does not necessarily provide the optimum condition. Accordingly, it is important to specify other complementary limits considering the energy of fast neutrons. By analyzing various neutron spectra, two limits on fast neutron flux are proposed and their validity is investigated. The results show that considering these limits together with the widely accepted IAEA criteria makes it possible to have a more realistic assessment of sufficiency of the designed beam. Satisfying these criteria not only leads to reduction of delivered dose to skin, but also increases the advantage depth in tissue and delivered dose to tumor during the treatment time. The Monte Carlo Code, MCNP-X, is used to perform these simulations.

  7. Feasibility study of Self Powered Neutron Detectors in Fast Reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Jammes, Christian; Filliatre, Philippe; Verma, Vasudha; Hellesen, Carl; Jacobsson Svard, Staffan

    2015-07-01

    Neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the design of a Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor system. Diverse possibilities of detector systems installation have to be investigated with respect to practicality and feasibility according to the detection parameters. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of using self powered neutron detectors as in-core detectors in fast reactors for detecting local change in neutron flux distribution. We show that the gamma contribution from fission products decay in the fuel and activation of structural materials is very small compared to the fission gammas. Thus, it is possible for the in-core SPND signal to follow changes in local neutron flux as they are proportional to each other. This implies that the signal from an in-core SPND can provide dynamic information on the neutron flux perturbations occurring inside the reactor core. (authors)

  8. The study of the thermal neutron flux in the deep underground laboratory DULB-4900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseenko, V. V.; Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Dzhappuev, D. D.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kudzhaev, A. U.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the study of thermal neutron flux using monitors based on mixture of ZnS(Ag) and LiF enriched with a lithium-6 isotope at the deep underground laboratory DULB-4900 at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory. An annual modulation of thermal neutron flux in DULB-4900 is observed. Experimental evidences were obtained of correlation between the long-term thermal neutron flux variations and the absolute humidity of the air in laboratory. The amplitude of the modulation exceed 5% of total neutron flux.

  9. Neutron flux characterization of californium-252 Neutron Research Facility at the University of Texas - Pan American by nuclear analytical technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Kareem; Sanchez, Patrick; Hannan, Mohammad

    2014-03-01

    In the field of nuclear science, neutron flux is an intrinsic property of nuclear reaction facilities that is the basis for experimental irradiation calculations and analysis. In the Rio Grande Valley (Texas), the UTPA Neutron Research Facility (NRF) is currently the only neutron facility available for experimental research purposes. The facility is comprised of a 20-microgram californium-252 neutron source surrounded by a shielding cascade containing different irradiation cavities. Thermal and fast neutron flux values for the UTPA NRF have yet to be fully investigated and may be of particular interest to biomedical studies in low neutron dose applications. Though a variety of techniques exist for the characterization of neutron flux, neutron activation analysis (NAA) of metal and nonmetal foils is a commonly utilized experimental method because of its detection sensitivity and availability. The aim of our current investigation is to employ foil activation in the determination of neutron flux values for the UTPA NSRF for further research purposes. Neutron spectrum unfolding of the acquired experimental data via specialized software and subsequent comparison for consistency with computational models lends confidence to the results.

  10. A scintillating fission detector for neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Burgett, Eric A; May, Iain; Muenchausen, Ross E; Taw, Felicia; Tovesson, Fredrik K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron flux monitors are commonly used for a variety of nuclear physics applications. A scintillating neutron detector, consisting of a liquid scintillator loaded with fissionable material, has been developed, characterized, and tested in the beam line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, and shows a significant improvement in neutron sensitivity compared with a conventional fission chamber. Recent research on nanocomposite-based scintillators for gamma-ray detection indicates that this approach can be extended to load nanoparticles of fissionable material into a scintillating matrix, with up to three orders of magnitude higher loading than typical fission chambers. This will result in a rugged, cost-efficient detector with high efficiency, a short signal rise time, and the ability to be used in low neutron-flux environments. Initial efforts to utilize the luminescence of uranyl oxide to eliminate the need for wavelength-shifting dyes were unsuccessful. Excitation of uranyl compounds has been reported at wavelengths ranging from 266 nm to 532 nm. However, neither the 300 nm emission of toluene, nor the 350 nm emission of PPO, nor the 410 nm emission of POPOP resulted in significant excitation of and emission by uranyl oxide. As indicated by UV/visible spectroscopy, light emitted at these wavelengths was absorbed by the colored solution. {sup 235}U remains the most attractive candidate for a fissionable scintillator, due to its high fission cross-section and lack of a threshold fission energy, but all solutions containing molecular uranium compounds will be colored, most more highly than the U{sup 6+} compounds used here. Research is therefore continuing toward the fabrication of uranium nanoparticles, in which, due to Rayleigh scattering, the coloration should be less pronounced. The characterization of the thorium-loaded liquid scintillator and the fabrication of the 100 mL detectors for use at LANSCE demonstrated the feasibility of loading fissionable

  11. Neutron Distribution in the Nuclear Fuel Cell using Collision Probability Method with Quadratic Flux Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafii, M. A.; Fitriyani, D.; Tongkukut, S. H. J.; Abdullah, A. G.

    2017-03-01

    To solve the integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method usually requires flat flux (FF) approach. In this research, it has been carried out in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh with quadratic flux approach. This means that the neutron flux at any region of the nuclear fuel cell is forced to follow the pattern of a quadratic function. The mechanism may be referred to as the process of non-flat flux (NFF) approach. The parameters that calculated in this study are the k-eff and the distribution of neutron flux. The result shows that all parameters are in accordance with the result of SRAC.

  12. Comparison of HEU and LEU Fuel Neutron Spectrum for ATR Fuel Element and ATR Flux-Trap Positions

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2008-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the high total core power and high neutron flux, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. An optimized low-enriched uranium (LEU) (U-10Mo) core conversion case, which can meet the project requirements, has been selected. However, LEU contains a significant quantity of high density U-238 (80.3 wt.%), which will harden the neutron spectrum in the core region. Based on the reference ATR HEU and the optimized LEU full core plate-by-plate (PBP) models, the present work investigates and compares the neutron spectra differences in the fuel element (FE), Northeast flux trap (NEFT), Southeast flux trap (SEFT), and East flux trap (EFT) positions. A detailed PBP MCNP ATR core model was developed and validated for fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. The current ATR core with HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0wt.% was used as the reference model. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm (20 mil). In this work, an optimized LEU (U-10Mo) core conversion case with a nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm (13 mil) and the U-235 enrichment of 19.7 wt.% was used to calculate the impact of the neutron spectrum in FE and FT positions. MCNP-calculated results show that the neutron spectrum in the LEU FE is slightly harder than in the HEU FE, as expected. However, when neutrons transport through water coolant and beryllium (Be), the neutrons are thermalized to an equilibrium neutron spectrum as a function of water volume fraction in the investigated FT positions. As a result, the neutron spectrum differences of the HEU and LEU in the NEFT, SEFT, and EFT are negligible. To demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the

  13. The Minor Actinide Transmutation-Incineration Potential Studies in High Intensity Neutron Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Letourneau, A.; Chabod, S.; Foucher, Y.; Marie, F.; Ridikas, D.; Veyssiere, Ch.; Blandin, Ch.

    2005-05-24

    In the framework of nuclear waste transmutation studies, the Mini-INCA project has been initiated at CEA/DSM with objectives to determine optimal conditions for transmutation and incineration of Minor Actinides (MA) in high intensity neutron fluxes. Our experimental tools based on alpha- and gamma-spectroscopy of irradiated samples and the development of fission micro-chambers could gather both microscopic information on nuclear reactions (total and partial cross sections for neutron capture and/or fission reactions) and macroscopic information on transmutation and incineration potentials. Cross sections of selected actinides (241Am, 242Am, 242Pu, 237Np, 238Np) have already been measured at ILL, showing some discrepancies when compared to evaluated data libraries but in overall good agreement with recent experimental data.

  14. Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global

  15. Determination of neutron flux distribution in an Am-Be irradiator using the MCNP.

    PubMed

    Shtejer-Diaz, K; Zamboni, C B; Zahn, G S; Zevallos-Chávez, J Y

    2003-10-01

    A neutron irradiator has been assembled at IPEN facilities to perform qualitative-quantitative analysis of many materials using thermal and fast neutrons outside the nuclear reactor premises. To establish the prototype specifications, the neutron flux distribution and the absorbed dose rates were calculated using the MCNP computer code. These theoretical predictions then allow one to discuss the optimum irradiator design and its performance.

  16. Determination of fast neutron flux distribution in irradiation sites of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor.

    PubMed

    Yavar, A R; Sarmani, S B; Wood, A K; Fadzil, S M; Radir, M H; Khoo, K S

    2011-05-01

    Determination of thermal to fast neutron flux ratio (f(fast)) and fast neutron flux (ϕ(fast)) is required for fast neutron reactions, fast neutron activation analysis, and for correcting interference reactions. The f(fast) and subsequently ϕ(fast) were determined using the absolute method. The f(fast) ranged from 48 to 155, and the ϕ(fast) was found in the range 1.03×10(10)-4.89×10(10) n cm(-2) s(-1). These values indicate an acceptable conformity and applicable for installation of the fast neutron facility at the MNA research reactor.

  17. Measurements of the thermal neutron flux for an accelerator-based photoneutron source.

    PubMed

    Taheri, Ali; Pazirandeh, Ali

    2016-12-01

    To have access to an appropriate neutron source is one of the most demanding requirements for neutron studies. This is important specially in laboratory and clinical applications, which need more compact and accessible sources. The most known neutron sources are fission reactors and natural isotopes, but there is an increasing interest for using accelerator based neutron sources because of their advantages. In this paper, we shall present a photo-neutron source prototype which is designed and fabricated to be used for different neutron researches including in-laboratory neutron activation analysis and neutron imaging, and also preliminary studies in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Series of experimental tests were conducted to examine the intensity and quality of the neutron field produced by this source. Monte-Carlo simulations were also utilized to provide more detailed evaluation of the neutron spectrum, and determine the accuracy of the experiments. The experiments demonstrated a thermal neutron flux in the order of 10(7) (n/cm(2).s), while simulations affirmed this flux and showed a neutron spectrum with a sharp peak at thermal energy region. According to the results, about 60 % of produced neutrons are in the range of thermal to epithermal neutrons.

  18. Neutron flux and power in RTP core-15

    SciTech Connect

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie Zin, Muhammad Rawi Md; Usang, Mark Dennis; Bayar, Abi Muttaqin Jalal; Hamzah, Na’im Syauqi Bin

    2016-01-22

    PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor achieved initial criticality on June 28, 1982. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes. This paper describes the reactor parameters calculation for the PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP); focusing on the application of the developed reactor 3D model for criticality calculation, analysis of power and neutron flux distribution of TRIGA core. The 3D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA reactor. The model represents in detailed all important components of the core with literally no physical approximation. The consistency and accuracy of the developed RTP MCNP model was established by comparing calculations to the available experimental results and TRIGLAV code calculation.

  19. Neutron flux and power in RTP core-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie; Zin, Muhammad Rawi Md; Usang, Mark Dennis; Bayar, Abi Muttaqin Jalal; Hamzah, Na'im Syauqi Bin

    2016-01-01

    PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor achieved initial criticality on June 28, 1982. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes. This paper describes the reactor parameters calculation for the PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP); focusing on the application of the developed reactor 3D model for criticality calculation, analysis of power and neutron flux distribution of TRIGA core. The 3D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA reactor. The model represents in detailed all important components of the core with literally no physical approximation. The consistency and accuracy of the developed RTP MCNP model was established by comparing calculations to the available experimental results and TRIGLAV code calculation.

  20. Wide Range Neutron Flux Measuring Channel for Aerospace Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibils, R. M.; Busto, A.; Gonella, J. L.; Martinez, R.; Chielens, A. J.; Otero, J. M.; Nuñez, M.; Tropea, S. E.

    2008-01-01

    The use of classical techniques for neutron flux measurements in nuclear reactors involves the switching between several detection chains as the power grows up to 10 decades. In space applications where mass and size constraints are of key significance, such volume of hardware represents a clear disadvantage. Instead of requiring different instruments for each reactor operating range (start-up, ramping-up, and nominal power), a single instrument chain should be desirable. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) system, combining a classic pulse Counting Channel with a Campbell's theorem based Fluctuation Channel can be implemented for the monitoring and control of a space nuclear reactor. Such an instrument will allow for a reduction in the complexity of space-based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. In this presentation we will discuss the criteria and tradeoffs involved in the development of such a system. We will focus particularly on the characteristics of the System On Chip (SOC) and the DSP board used to implement this instrument.

  1. Wide Range Neutron Flux Measuring Channel for Aerospace Application

    SciTech Connect

    Cibils, R. M.; Busto, A.; Gonella, J. L.; Martinez, R.; Chielens, A. J.; Otero, J. M.; Nunez, M.; Tropea, S. E.

    2008-01-21

    The use of classical techniques for neutron flux measurements in nuclear reactors involves the switching between several detection chains as the power grows up to 10 decades. In space applications where mass and size constraints are of key significance, such volume of hardware represents a clear disadvantage. Instead of requiring different instruments for each reactor operating range (start-up, ramping-up, and nominal power), a single instrument chain should be desirable. A Wide Range Neutron Detector (WRND) system, combining a classic pulse Counting Channel with a Campbell's theorem based Fluctuation Channel can be implemented for the monitoring and control of a space nuclear reactor. Such an instrument will allow for a reduction in the complexity of space-based nuclear instrumentation and control systems. In this presentation we will discuss the criteria and tradeoffs involved in the development of such a system. We will focus particularly on the characteristics of the System On Chip (SOC) and the DSP board used to implement this instrument.

  2. Neutron flux spectra and radiation damage parameters for the Russian Bor-60 and SM-2 reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Karasiov, A.V.; Greenwood, L.R.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to compare neutron irradiation conditions in Russian reactors and similar US facilities. Neutron fluence and spectral information and calculated radiation damage parameters are presented for the BOR-60 (Fast Experimental Reactor - 60 MW) and SM-2 reactors in Russia. Their neutron exposure characteristics are comparable with those of the Experimental Breeder Reactor (ERB-II), the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the United States.

  3. Flux and Spectrum of Neutrons Generated from 25 Mv Medical X-Ray Therapy Machine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    neutron absorption cross section at t. By using this relation in equation (1) the integration is possible over...0 n td f dat) n (it, rpLthprmQJ where 000 is defined as the microscopic neutron absorption cross - section at 2200 m/s, the most probable speed of a... neutron - absorption cross - section of the target as a function of energy O(E) is neutron flux per unit of energy as a function of energy. 1,d is

  4. Measuring planetary neutron albedo fluxes by remote gamma-ray sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, E. L.; Metzger, A. E.

    In order to measure the planetary neutron albedo fluxes, a neutron-absorbing shield which emits gamma rays of characteristic energy and serves as a neutron detector, is added to a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS). The gamma rays representing the neutron flux are observed against interference consisting of cosmic gamma rays, planetary continuum and line emission, and gamma rays arising from the interaction of cosmic rays with the GRS and the spacecraft. The uncertainty and minimum detection limits in neutron albedo fluxes are calculated for two missions, a lunar orbiter and a comet nucleus rendezvous. A GRS on a lunar orbiter at 100 km altitude detects a thermal neutron albedo flux as low as 0.002/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.6/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.001/sq cm/s, for a 100 h observation period. For the comet nucleus, again in a 100 h observing period, a thermal neutron albedo flux is detected at a level of 0.006/sq cm/s and an expected flux of about 0.4/sq cm/s is measured with an uncertainty of 0.004/sq cm/s. The expanded geological capabilities made possible by this technique include improvements in H sensitivity, spatial resolution, and measurement depth; and an improved model of induced gamma-ray emission.

  5. TORT/MCNP coupling method for the calculation of neutron flux around a core of BWR.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Masahiko

    2005-01-01

    For the analysis of BWR neutronics performance, accurate data are required for neutron flux distribution over the In-Reactor Pressure Vessel equipments taking into account the detailed geometrical arrangement. The TORT code can calculate neutron flux around a core of BWR in a three-dimensional geometry model, but has difficulties in fine geometrical modelling and lacks huge computer resource. On the other hand, the MCNP code enables the calculation of the neutron flux with a detailed geometry model, but requires very long sampling time to give enough number of particles. Therefore, a TORT/MCNP coupling method has been developed to eliminate the two problems mentioned above in each code. In this method, the TORT code calculates angular flux distribution on the core surface and the MCNP code calculates neutron spectrum at the points of interest using the flux distribution. The coupling method will be used as the DOT-DOMINO-MORSE code system. This TORT/MCNP coupling method was applied to calculate the neutron flux at points where induced radioactivity data were measured for 54Mn and 60Co and the radioactivity calculations based on the neutron flux obtained from the above method were compared with the measured data.

  6. Calculations of neutron flux spectra induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic cosmic rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Chandler, K. C.; Barish, J.

    1972-01-01

    Calculations have been carried out to determine the neutron flux induced in the earth's atmosphere by galactic protons and alpha particles at solar minimum for a geomagnetic latitude of 42 N. Neutron flux spectra were calculated using Monte Carlo and discrete ordinates methods, and various comparisons with experimental data are presented. The magnitude and shape of the calculated neutron-leakage spectrum at the particular latitude considered support the theory that the cosmic-ray-albedo-neutron-decay mechanism is the source of the protons and electrons trapped in the Van Allen belts.

  7. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  8. Constraining neutron guide optimizations with phase-space considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelsen, Mads; Lefmann, Kim

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a method named the Minimalist Principle that serves to reduce the parameter space for neutron guide optimization when the required beam divergence is limited. The reduced parameter space will restrict the optimization to guides with a minimal neutron intake that are still theoretically able to deliver the maximal possible performance. The geometrical constraints are derived using phase-space propagation from moderator to guide and from guide to sample, while assuming that the optimized guides will achieve perfect transport of the limited neutron intake. Guide systems optimized using these constraints are shown to provide performance close to guides optimized without any constraints, however the divergence received at the sample is limited to the desired interval, even when the neutron transport is not limited by the supermirrors used in the guide. As the constraints strongly limit the parameter space for the optimizer, two control parameters are introduced that can be used to adjust the selected subspace, effectively balancing between maximizing neutron transport and avoiding background from unnecessary neutrons. One parameter is needed to describe the expected focusing abilities of the guide to be optimized, going from perfectly focusing to no correlation between position and velocity. The second parameter controls neutron intake into the guide, so that one can select exactly how aggressively the background should be limited. We show examples of guides optimized using these constraints which demonstrates the higher signal to noise than conventional optimizations. Furthermore the parameter controlling neutron intake is explored which shows that the simulated optimal neutron intake is close to the analytically predicted, when assuming that the guide is dominated by multiple scattering events.

  9. Fission converter and metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor study of thermal neutron flux distribution in an epithermal neutron therapy beam.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G I; Rosenfeld, A B; Allen, B J; Coderre, J A; Liu, H B

    1999-09-01

    The depth distribution of the thermal neutron flux is a major factor in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in determining the efficiency of cell sterilization. In this paper the fission detector method is developed and applied to measure the in-phantom thermal neutron flux depth distribution. Advantages of the fission detector include small size, direct measurement of thermal neutron flux in a mixed radiation field of BNCT beam, self-calibration, and the possibility of on-line measurement. The measurements were performed at epithermal a BNCT facility. The experimental results were compared with the thermal neutron flux calculated by the Monte Carlo method and found to be in good agreement.

  10. Measurement of angular distribution of neutron flux for the 6MeV race-track microtron based pulsed neutron source.

    PubMed

    Patil, B J; Chavan, S T; Pethe, S N; Krishnan, R; Dhole, S D

    2010-09-01

    The 6MeV race track microtron based pulsed neutron source has been designed specifically for the elemental analysis of short lived activation products, where the low neutron flux requirement is desirable. Electrons impinges on a e-gamma target to generate bremsstrahlung radiations, which further produces neutrons by photonuclear reaction in gamma-n target. The optimisation of these targets along with their spectra were estimated using FLUKA code. The measurement of neutron flux was carried out by activation of vanadium at different scattering angles. Angular distribution of neutron flux indicates that the flux decreases with increase in the angle and are in good agreement with the FLUKA simulation.

  11. Optimization of a solid state polarizing bender for cold neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, V. R.; Washington, A. L.; Stonaha, P.; Ashkar, R.; Kaiser, H.; Krist, T.; Pynn, Roger

    2014-12-01

    We have designed a solid state bender to polarize cold neutrons for the Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME) instrument at the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University. The design attempts to achieve high neutron polarization across a wide range of neutron wavelengths and divergence angles by optimizing the supermirror coating materials. The transmission and polarizing efficiency of the bender were modeled using the VITESS software, then measured at both continuous-wave and pulsed neutron sources. While the measured peak neutron transmission and polarization agree reasonably well with simulations, neither quantity has been successfully modeled for long wavelength neutrons. These results imply an insufficient understanding of the magnetic microstructure of the supermirror coatings used.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations for optimization of neutron shielding concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Tomasz; Tefelski, Dariusz B.; Polański, Aleksander; Skubalski, Janusz

    2012-06-01

    Concrete is one of the main materials used for gamma and neutron shielding. While in case of gamma rays an increase in density is usually efficient enough, protection against neutrons is more complex. The aim of this paper is to show the possibility of using the Monte Carlo codes for evaluation and optimization of concrete mix to reach better neutron shielding. Two codes (MCNPX and SPOT — written by authors) were used to simulate neutron transport through a wall made of different concretes. It is showed that concrete of higher compressive strength attenuates neutrons more effectively. The advantage of heavyweight concrete (with barite aggregate), usually used for gamma shielding, over the ordinary concrete was not so clear. Neutron shielding depends on many factors e.g. neutron energy, barrier thickness and atomic composition. All this makes a proper design of concrete as a very important issue for nuclear power plant safety assurance.

  13. Modification of the University of Washington Neutron Radiotherapy Facility for optimization of neutron capture enhanced fast-neutron therapy.

    PubMed

    Nigg, D W; Wemple, C A; Risler, R; Hartwell, J K; Harker, Y D; Laramore, G E

    2000-02-01

    A modified neutron production target assembly has been developed to provide improved performance of the proton-cyclotron-based neutron radiotherapy facility at the University of Washington for applications involving neutron capture enhanced fast-neutron therapy. The new target produces a neutron beam that yields essentially the same fast-neutron physical depth-dose distribution as is produced by the current UW clinical system, but that also has an increased fraction of BNCT enhancement relative to the total therapeutic dose. The modified target is composed of a 5-millimeter layer of beryllium, followed by a 2.5-millimeter layer of tungsten, with a water-cooled copper backing. Measurements of the free-field neutron spectrum of the beam produced by the new target were performed using activation foils with a direct spectral unfolding technique. Water phantom measurements were performed using a tissue-equivalent ion chamber to characterize the fast-neutron depth-dose curve and sodium activation in soda-lime glass beads to characterize the thermal-neutron flux (and thus the expected neutron capture dose enhancement) as a function of depth. The results of the various measurements were quite consistent with expectations based on the design calculations for the modified target. The spectrum of the neutron beam produced by the new target features an enhanced low-energy flux component relative to the spectrum of the beam produced by the standard UW target. However, it has essentially the same high-energy neutron flux, with a reduced flux component in the mid-range of the energy spectrum. As a result, the measured physical depth-dose curve in a large water phantom has the same shape compared to the case of the standard UW clinical beam, but approximately twice the level of BNCT enhancement per unit background neutron dose at depths of clinical interest. In-vivo clinical testing of BNCT-enhanced fast-neutron therapy for canine lung tumors using the new beam was recently

  14. Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability method with quadratic flux approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shafii, Mohammad Ali Meidianti, Rahma Wildian, Fitriyani, Dian; Tongkukut, Seni H. J.; Arkundato, Artoto

    2014-09-30

    Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method with quadratic flux approach has been carried out. In general, the solution of the neutron transport using the CP method is performed with the flat flux approach. In this research, the CP method is implemented in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh being conducted into non flat flux approach. It means that the neutron flux at any point in the nuclear fuel cell are considered different each other followed the distribution pattern of quadratic flux. The result is presented here in the form of quadratic flux that is better understanding of the real condition in the cell calculation and as a starting point to be applied in computational calculation.

  15. Systematic investigation of background sources in neutron flux measurements with a proton-recoil silicon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, P.; Mathieu, L.; Acosta, L.; Aïche, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Jurado, B.; Tsekhanovich, I.

    2017-01-01

    Proton-recoil detectors (PRDs), based on the well known standard H(n,p) elastic scattering cross section, are the preferred instruments to perform precise quasi-absolute neutron flux measurements above 1 MeV. The limitations of using a single silicon detector as PRD at a continuous neutron beam facility are investigated, with the aim of extending such measurements to neutron energies below 1 MeV. This requires a systematic investigation of the background sources affecting the neutron flux measurement. Experiments have been carried out at the AIFIRA facility to identify these sources. A study on the role of the silicon detector thickness on the background is presented and an energy limit on the use of a single silicon detector to achieve a neutron flux precision better than 1% is given.

  16. The Experimental Determination of Thermal Neutron Flux in the Radiochemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Patrick M.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment for determining the thermal neutron flux of the light-water nuclear reactor at the University of California, Irvine. The difficulty of the activity can be varied to match the student's level of proficiency. (SL)

  17. Low-energy neutron flux measurement using a resonance absorption filter surrounding a lithium glass scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghal-Eh, N.; Koohi-Fayegh, R.; Hamidi, S.

    2007-06-01

    The resonance absorption filter technique has been used to determine the thermal/epithermal neutron flux. The main idea in this technique is to use an element with a high and essentially singular resonance in the neutron absorption cross section as a filter surrounding a miniature-type lithium glass scintillator. The count with and without the filter surrounding the detector gives the number of resonance-energy neutrons. Some preliminary results and a comparison with the MCNP code are shown.

  18. Neutron-flux profile monitor for use in a fission reactor

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, M.K.; Valentine, K.H.

    1981-09-15

    A neutron flux monitor is provided which consists of a plurality of fission counters arranged as spaced-apart point detectors along a delay line. As a fission event occurs in any one of the counters, two delayed current pulses are generated at the output of the delay line. The time separation of the pulses identifies the counter in which the particular fission event occurred. Neutron flux profiles of reactor cores can be more accurately measured as a result.

  19. Measurement of high-energy neutron flux above ground utilizing a spallation based multiplicity technique

    DOE PAGES

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; ...

    2016-11-14

    Cosmogenic high-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous, difficult to shield, poorly measured background. Above ground the high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux has been measured, with significantly varying results. Below ground, high-energy neutron fluxes are largely unmeasured. Here we present a reconstruction algorithm to unfold the incident neutron energy-dependent flux measured using the Multiplicity and Recoil Spectrometer (MARS), simulated test cases to verify the algorithm, and provide a new measurement of the above ground high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux with a detailed systematic uncertainty analysis. Uncertainty estimates are provided based upon the measurement statistics, the incident angular distribution, the surrounding environment of the Montemore » Carlo model, and the MARS triggering efficiency. Quantified systematic uncertainty is dominated by the assumed incident neutron angular distribution and surrounding environment of the Monte Carlo model. The energy-dependent neutron flux between 90 MeV and 400 MeV is reported. Between 90 MeV and 250 MeV the MARS results are comparable to previous Bonner sphere measurements. Over the total energy regime measured, the MARS result are located within the span of previous measurements. Lastly, these results demonstrate the feasibility of future below ground measurements with MARS.« less

  20. Measurement of high-energy neutron flux above ground utilizing a spallation based multiplicity technique

    SciTech Connect

    Roecker, Caleb; Bernstein, Adam; Marleau, Peter; Vetter, Kai

    2016-11-14

    Cosmogenic high-energy neutrons are a ubiquitous, difficult to shield, poorly measured background. Above ground the high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux has been measured, with significantly varying results. Below ground, high-energy neutron fluxes are largely unmeasured. Here we present a reconstruction algorithm to unfold the incident neutron energy-dependent flux measured using the Multiplicity and Recoil Spectrometer (MARS), simulated test cases to verify the algorithm, and provide a new measurement of the above ground high-energy neutron energy-dependent flux with a detailed systematic uncertainty analysis. Uncertainty estimates are provided based upon the measurement statistics, the incident angular distribution, the surrounding environment of the Monte Carlo model, and the MARS triggering efficiency. Quantified systematic uncertainty is dominated by the assumed incident neutron angular distribution and surrounding environment of the Monte Carlo model. The energy-dependent neutron flux between 90 MeV and 400 MeV is reported. Between 90 MeV and 250 MeV the MARS results are comparable to previous Bonner sphere measurements. Over the total energy regime measured, the MARS result are located within the span of previous measurements. Lastly, these results demonstrate the feasibility of future below ground measurements with MARS.

  1. Progress on the realization of a new GEM based neutron diagnostic concept for high flux neutron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Croci, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Gorini, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M.; Grosso, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Cavenago, M.

    2014-08-21

    Fusion reactors will need high flux neutron detectors to diagnose the deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium. A candidate detection technique is the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). New GEM based detectors are being developed for application to a neutral deuterium beam test facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission due to interaction of the deuterium beam with the deuterons implanted in the beam dump surface. This is done by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses nGEM detectors, i.e. GEM detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. After the realization and test of several small area prototypes, a full size prototype has been realized and tested with laboratory sources. Test on neutron beams are foreseen for the next months.

  2. Combined analysis of neutron and photon flux measurements for the Jules Horowitz reactor core mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Bignan, G.; Chauvin, J. P.; Gonnier, C.; Guimbal, P.; Malo, J. Y.; Carette, M.; Janulyte, A.; Merroun, O.; Brun, J.; Zerega, Y.; Andre, J.

    2011-07-01

    We study the combined analysis of nuclear measurements to improve the knowledge of the irradiation conditions in the experimental locations of the future Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR). The goal of the present work is to measure more accurately neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating in the reactor. In a Material Testing Reactor (MTR), nuclear heating is a crucial parameter to design the experimental devices to be irradiated in harsh nuclear conditions. This parameter drives the temperature of the devices and of the samples. The numerical codes can predict this parameter but in-situ measurements are necessary to reach the expected accuracy. For this reason, one objective of the IN-CORE program [1] is to study the combined measurements of neutron and photon flux and their cross advanced interpretation. It should be reminded that both neutron and photon sensors are not totally selective as their signals are due to neutron and photon interactions. We intend to measure the neutron flux by three different kinds of sensors (Uranium Fission chamber, Plutonium Fission chamber and Self Powered Neutron Detector), the photon flux by two different sensors (Ionization chamber and Self Powered Gamma Detector) and the nuclear heating by two different ones (Differential calorimeter and Gamma Thermometer). For the same parameter, we expect that the use of different kinds of sensors will allow a better estimation of the aimed parameter by mixing different spectrum responses and different neutron and gamma contributions. An experimental test called CARMEN-1 is scheduled in OSIRIS reactor (CEA Saclay - France) at the end of 2011, with the goal to map irradiation locations in the reactor reflector to get a first validation of the analysis model. This article focuses on the sensor selection for CARMEN-1 experiment and to the way to link neutron and photon flux measurements in view to reduce their uncertainties but also to better assess the neutron and photon contributions to nuclear

  3. Measurement of the solar diurnal anisotropy of the cosmic-ray albedo neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifedili, S. O.

    1982-03-01

    The solar diurnal anisotropy of the cosmic-ray albedo neutron flux has been measured by a neutron detector on board the OGO-6 satellite. On the average the diurnal amplitudes and phases of the cosmic ray albedo neutron flux (less than or equal to 10 MeV) were respectively 0.18 + or - 0.02% and 15 + or - 1 hr LT, though there were substantial fluctuations of a few days' duration which did not depend on the solar sector structure polarity and a 27-day periodicity in the diurnal amplitudes which was associated with the sun's rotation.

  4. Fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse shape discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, A. A.; Zubarev, P. V.; Ivanenko, S. V.; Khilchenko, A. D.; Kotelnikov, A. I.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Puryga, E. A.; Shvyrev, V. G.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of subthermonuclear plasma confinement and heating in magnetic fusion devices such as GOL-3 and GDT at the Budker Institute (Novosibirsk, Russia) requires sophisticated equipment for neutron-, gamma- diagnostics and upgrading data acquisition systems with online data processing. Measurement of fast neutron flux with stilbene scintillation detectors raised the problem of discrimination of the neutrons (n) from background cosmic particles (muons) and neutron-induced gamma rays (γ). This paper describes a fast neutron flux analyzer with real-time digital pulse-shape discrimination (DPSD) algorithm FPGA-implemented for the GOL-3 and GDT devices. This analyzer was tested and calibrated with the help of 137Cs and 252Cf radiation sources. The Figures of Merit (FOM) calculated for different energy cuts are presented.

  5. Optimizing Crystal Volume for Neutron Diffraction Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snell, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    For structural studies with neutron diffraction more intense neutron sources, improved sensitivity detector and larger volume crystals are all means by which the science is being advanced to enable studies on a wider range of samples. We have chosen a simplistic approach using a well understood crystallization method, with minimal amounts of sample and using design of experiment techniques to maximize the crystal volume all for minimum effort. Examples of the application are given.

  6. Measurements of neutron fluxes with energies from thermal to several MeV in near-Earth space: SINP results.

    PubMed

    Shavrin, P I; Kuzhevskij, B M; Kuznetsov, S N; Nechaev, O Yu; Panasyuk, M I; Ryumin, S P; Yushkov, B Yu; Bratolyubova-Tsulukidze, L S; Lyagushin, V I; Germantsev, Yu L

    2002-10-01

    Neutron measurement results obtained at SINP MSU since 1970 are presented. These measurements were made using techniques based on neutron moderation and subsequent detection in a Li6I(Eu) crystal or a He3 coronal counter. The measurements were mainly carried out in orbits with inclination of 52 degrees and altitudes of 200-450 km. The spatial and angular distributions of the measured neutron fluxes were studied. The albedo neutron flux was estimated according to the count rate difference for opposite detector orientations towards Earth and away from it. This flux is comparable to the local neutron flux outside the Brazil anomaly region, where local neutrons dominate. Neutron fluxes, generated by solar protons, were detected during a solar flare on June 6, 1991 for the first time. Their spectrum was estimated as a power law with alpha>2.

  7. Mapping carbon flux uncertainty and selecting optimal locations for future flux towers in the Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gu, Y.; Howard, D.M.; Wylie, B.K.; Zhang, L.

    2012-01-01

    Flux tower networks (e. g., AmeriFlux, Agriflux) provide continuous observations of ecosystem exchanges of carbon (e. g., net ecosystem exchange), water vapor (e. g., evapotranspiration), and energy between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The long-term time series of flux tower data are essential for studying and understanding terrestrial carbon cycles, ecosystem services, and climate changes. Currently, there are 13 flux towers located within the Great Plains (GP). The towers are sparsely distributed and do not adequately represent the varieties of vegetation cover types, climate conditions, and geophysical and biophysical conditions in the GP. This study assessed how well the available flux towers represent the environmental conditions or "ecological envelopes" across the GP and identified optimal locations for future flux towers in the GP. Regression-based remote sensing and weather-driven net ecosystem production (NEP) models derived from different extrapolation ranges (10 and 50%) were used to identify areas where ecological conditions were poorly represented by the flux tower sites and years previously used for mapping grassland fluxes. The optimal lands suitable for future flux towers within the GP were mapped. Results from this study provide information to optimize the usefulness of future flux towers in the GP and serve as a proxy for the uncertainty of the NEP map.

  8. Measurement of neutron flux and beam divergence at the cold neutron guide system of the new Munich research reactor FRM-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitelhack, K.; Schanzer, C.; Kastenmüller, A.; Röhrmoser, A.; Daniel, C.; Franke, J.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Kudryashov, V.; Maier, D.; Päthe, D.; Petry, W.; Schöffel, T.; Schreckenbach, K.; Urban, A.; Wildgruber, U.

    2006-05-01

    A sophisticated neutron guide system has been installed at the new Munich neutron source FRM-II to transport neutrons from the D 2 cold neutron source to several instruments, which are situated in a separate neutron guide hall. The guide system takes advantage of supermirror coatings and includes a worldwide unique "twisted" guide for a desired phase space transformation of the neutron beam. During the initial reactor commissioning in summer 2004, the integral and differential neutron flux as well as the distribution of beam divergence at the exit of two representative and the twisted neutron guide were measured using time-of-flight spectroscopy and gold-foil activation. The experimental results can be compared to extensive simulation calculations based on MCNP and McStas. The investigated guides fulfill the expectations of providing high neutron fluxes and reveal good quality with respect to the reflective coatings and the installation precision.

  9. The Effects of Flux Spectrum Perturbation on Transmutation of Actinides: Optimizing the Production of Transcurium Isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hogle, Susan L; Maldonado, G Ivan; Alexander, Charles W

    2012-01-01

    This research presented herein involves the optimization of transcurium production in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Due to the dependence of isotope cross sections on incoming neutron energy, the efficiency with which an isotope is transmuted is highly dependent upon the flux spectrum. There are certain energy bands in which the rate of fission of transcurium production feedstock materials is minimized, relative to the rate of non-fission absorptions. It is proposed that by perturbing the flux spectrum, it is possible to increase the amount of key isotopes, such as 249Bk and 252Cf, that are produced during a transmutation cycle, relative to the consumption of feedstock material. This optimization process is carried out by developing an iterative objective framework involving problem definition, flux spectrum and cross section analysis, simulated transmutation, and analysis of final yields and transmutation parameters. It is shown that it is possible to perturb the local flux spectrum in the transcurium target by perturbing the composition of the target. It is further shown that these perturbations are able to alter the target yields in a non-negligible way. Future work is necessary to develop the optimization framework, and identify the necessary algorithms to update the problem definition based upon progress towards the optimization goals.

  10. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  11. Optimization of a uranyl nitrate passive neutron counter

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Eric Benton; Bracken, David; West, James; Freeman, Corey; Newell, Matthew R; Bourret, Steven C; Rothrock, Richard B; Ladd - Lively, Jennifer L; Schuh, Denise

    2010-01-01

    Safeguarding natural uranium as it enters the fuel cycle has become a priority for the safeguards community in recent years. Uranyl nitrate is a material of interest in this endeavor because it is normally a step in the process from converting uranium ores to more concentrated forms like UO{sub 2} and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. This paper will detail the improvements and design optimizations made for a uranyl nitrate neutron detector. The original design of the detector was based on standard neutron counter designs and featured 2 rings of He-3 tubes fully moderated and shielded from background. Several areas for enhancement were identified after months of testing in three different locations. An operating uranyl nitrate facility was included as one of the test locations. Three significant upgrades to the counter addressed in the redesign were: real time background detection, counter reliability improvements, and optimization of the detector design for the detection of neutrons emitted by the uranyl nitrate flowing through the monitored process pipe. The optimized detector design includes significant electronics upgrades, the ability to detect neutrons (background and signal) with 36 degree spatial resolution around the process pipe for signal and 45 degree spatial resolution for background, inner and outer rings of He-3 tubes for real time background corrections, and notably more reliable cabling. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) modeling was used to optimize the signal (neutrons from uranyl nitrate in the monitored process pipe) to noise (background neutrons from all sources) ratio of the inner ring of He-3 tubes. Additionally, MCNP modeling maximized noise to signal on the outer ring of He-3 tubes. Details of the detector optimization as well as all the additional detector enhancements will be discussed. The neutron counter will be field tested on the Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  12. Progress on performance assessment of ITER enhanced heat flux first wall technology after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, T.; Bao, L.; Barabash, V.; Chappuis, Ph; Eaton, R.; Escourbiac, F.; Giqcuel, S.; Merola, M.; Mitteau, R.; Raffray, R.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Pintsuk, G.; Wirtz, M.; Boomstra, D.; Magielsen, A.; Chen, J.; Wang, P.; Gervash, A.; Safronov, V.

    2016-02-01

    ITER first wall (FW) panels are irradiated by energetic neutrons during the nuclear phase. Thus, an irradiation and high heat flux testing programme is undertaken by the ITER organization in order to evaluate the effects of neutron irradiation on the performance of enhanced heat flux (EHF) FW components. The test campaign includes neutron irradiation (up to 0.6-0.8 dpa at 200 °C-250 °C) of mock-ups that are representative of the final EHF FW panel design, followed by thermal fatigue tests (up to 4.7 MW m-2). Mock-ups were manufactured by the same manufacturing process as proposed for the series production. After a pre-irradiation thermal screening, eight mock-ups will be selected for the irradiation campaigns. This paper reports the preparatory work of HHF tests and neutron irradiation, assessment results as well as a brief description of mock-up manufacturing and inspection routes.

  13. SNM Detection with an Optimized Water Cherenkov Neutron Detector

    DOE PAGES

    Dazeley, S.; Sweany, M.; Bernstein, A.

    2012-07-23

    Special Nuclear Material (SNM) can either spontaneously fission or be induced to do so: either case results in neutron emission. For this reason, neutron detection performs a crucial role in the functionality of Radiation Portal Monitoring (RPM) devices. Since neutrons are highly penetrating and difficult to shield, they could potentially be detected escaping even a well-shielded cargo container. If the shielding were sophisticated, detecting escaping neutrons would require a highly efficient detector with close to full solid angle coverage. In 2008, we reported the successful detection of neutrons with a 250 liter (l) gadolinium doped water Cherenkov prototype—a technology thatmore » could potentially be employed cost effectively with full solid angle coverage. More recently we have built and tested both 1-kl and 3.5-kl versions, demonstrating that very large, cost effective, non-flammable and environmentally benign neutron detectors can be operated efficiently without being overwhelmed by background. In our paper, we present a new design for a modular system of water-based neutron detectors that could be deployed as a real RPM. The modules contain a number of optimizations that have not previously been combined within a single system. We present simulations of the new system, based on the performance of our previous detectors. These simulations indicate that an optimized system such as is presented here could achieve SNM sensitivity competitive with a large 3He-based system. Moreover, the realization of large, cost effective neutron detectors could, for the first time, enable the detection of multiple neutrons per fission from within a large object such as a cargo container. Such a signal would provide a robust indication of the presence of fissioning material, reducing the frequency of false alarms while increasing sensitivity.« less

  14. Heavy and Superheavy Elements Production in High Intensive Neutron Fluxes of Explosive Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutostansky, Yu. S.; Lyashuk, V. I.; Panov, I. V.

    2015-06-01

    Mathematical model of heavy and superheavy nuclei production in intensive pulsed neutron fluxes of explosive process is developed. The pulse character of the process allows dividing it in time into two stages: very short rapid process of multiple neutron captures with higher temperature and very intensive neutron fluxes, and relatively slower process with lesser temperature and neutron fluxes. The model was also extended for calculation of the transuranium yields in nuclear explosions takes into account the adiabatic character of the process, the probabilities of delayed fission, and the emission of delayed neutrons. Also the binary starting target isotopes compositions were included. Calculations of heavy transuranium and transfermium nuclei production were made for "Mike", "Par" and "Barbel" experiments, performed in USA. It is shown that the production of transfermium neutron-rich nuclei and superheavy elements with A ~ 295 is only possible when using binary mixture of starting isotopes with the significant addition of heavy components, such as long-lived isotopes of curium, or californium.

  15. Neutron flux mapping inside a cubic and a head PMMA phantom using indirect neutron radiography.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pi-En; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Huang, Chun-Kai; Liu, Hong-Ming; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2009-07-01

    This study aims to measure the two-dimensional (2D) neutron spatial distribution inside a cubic and a head PMMA phantom for the purpose of further comparison with the treatment planning. The measurements were made by using the indirect neutron radiography (INR), which utilized a thin copper foil and the imaging plate. The developed image provides satisfactory spatial resolution and very low statistical error (< 1%). As to the time cost, the whole procedure normally takes less than 3 h. The result shows that the indirect neutron radiography can be a quick and reliable method to provide a 2D neutron spatial distribution inside a phantom.

  16. Digital Real-Time Multiple Channel Multiple Mode Neutron Flux Estimation on FPGA-based Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thevenin, Mathieu; Barbot, Loïc; Corre, Gwénolé; Woo, Romuald; Destouches, Christophe; Normand, Stéphane

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a complete custom full-digital instrumentation device that was designed for real-time neutron flux estimation, especially for nuclear reactor in-core measurement using subminiature Fission Chambers (FCs). Entire fully functional small-footprint design (about 1714 LUTs) is implemented on FPGA. It enables real-time acquisition and analysis of multiple channels neutron's flux both in counting mode and Campbelling mode. Experimental results obtained from this brand new device are consistent with simulation results and show good agreement within good uncertainty. This device paves the way for new applications perspectives in real-time nuclear reactor monitoring.

  17. Comparison of three-dimensional neutron flux calculations for Maine Yankee

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, W.T.; Crotzer, L.A.; Waters, L.S.; Parsons, D.K.; Alcouffe, R.E.; Spinney, K.B.; Cacciapouti, R.J.

    1996-10-01

    Calculations have been performed on the Maine Yankee Power Plant to obtain three-dimensional neutron fluxes using the spatial synthesis with the two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DORT, the three-dimensional discrete ordinates code THREEDANT and the three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP. Neutron fluxes are compared for energies above 0.1 MeV and 1.0 MeV as well as dpa. Results were obtained at the Yankee dosimetry locations and special test regions within the pressure vessel, in the reactor cavity, and in a shield tank detector well.

  18. Neutron flux measurement using activated radioactive isotopes at the Baksan underground scintillation telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochkarov, M. M.; Alikhanov, I. A.; Boliev, M. M.; Dzaparova, I. M.; Novoseltseva, R. V.; Novoseltsev, Yu. F.; Petkov, V. B.; Volchenko, V. I.; Volchenko, G. V.; Yanin, A. F.

    2016-11-01

    Preliminary results of a neutron background measurement at the Baksan underground scintillation telescope (BUST) are presented. The external planes of the BUST are fully covered with standard scintillation detectors shielding the internal planes and suppressing thus background events due to cosmogenic and local radioactivity. The shielded internal planes were used as target for the neutron flux registration. The experimental method is based on the delayed coincidences between signals from any of the BUST counters. It is assumed that the first signal is due to inelastic interaction of a neutron with the organic scintillator, while the second signal comes from the decay of an unstable radioactive isotope formed when the fast neutron interacts with the 12C nuclei. Using the Monte-Carlo method (GEANT4) we also simulated propagation of neutrons through a layer of scintillator. The experimentally found muon induced neutron flux is j =1.3 -0.3 +0.7 ×10-10cm-2s-1 for neutron energies E ≥ 22MeV, which is in a qualitative agreement with similar measurements of other underground laboratories as well as with predictions of the GEANT4.

  19. Bayesian Statistical Analysis Applied to NAA Data for Neutron Flux Spectrum Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, D.; Previtali, E.; Sisti, M.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we present a statistical method, based on Bayesian statistics, to evaluate the neutron flux spectrum from the activation data of different isotopes. The experimental data were acquired during a neutron activation analysis (NAA) experiment [A. Borio di Tigliole et al., Absolute flux measurement by NAA at the Pavia University TRIGA Mark II reactor facilities, ENC 2012 - Transactions Research Reactors, ISBN 978-92-95064-14-0, 22 (2012)] performed at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of Pavia University (Italy). In order to evaluate the neutron flux spectrum, subdivided in energy groups, we must solve a system of linear equations containing the grouped cross sections and the activation rate data. We solve this problem with Bayesian statistical analysis, including the uncertainties of the coefficients and the a priori information about the neutron flux. A program for the analysis of Bayesian hierarchical models, based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations, is used to define the problem statistical model and solve it. The energy group fluxes and their uncertainties are then determined with great accuracy and the correlations between the groups are analyzed. Finally, the dependence of the results on the prior distribution choice and on the group cross section data is investigated to confirm the reliability of the analysis.

  20. Simulations towards optimization of a neutron/anti-neutron oscillation experiment at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Matthew; Kamyshkov, Yuri; Castellanos, Luis; Klinkby, Esben; US NNbar Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The observation of Neutron/Anti-neutron oscillation would prove the existence of Baryon Number Violation (BNV), and thus an explanation for the dominance of matter over anti-matter in the universe. The latest experiments have shown the oscillation time to be greater than 8.6 x 107 seconds, whereas current theoretical predictions suggest times on the order of 108 to 109 seconds. A neutron oscillation experiment proposed at the European Spallation Source (ESS) would provide sensitivity of more than 1000 times previous experiments performed, thus providing a result well-suited to confirm or deny current theory. A conceptual design of the proposed experiment will be presented, as well as the optimization of key experiment components using Monte-Carlo simulation methods, including the McStas neutron ray-trace simulation package. This work is supported by the Organized Research Units Program funded by The University of Tennessee, Knoxville Office of Research and Engagement.

  1. Optimizing Dense Plasma Focus Neutron Yields with Fast Gas Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Matthew; Kueny, Christopher; Stein, Elizabeth; Link, Anthony; Schmidt, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    We report a study using the particle-in-cell code LSP to perform fully kinetic simulations modeling dense plasma focus (DPF) devices with high density gas jets on axis. The high density jet models fast gas puffs which allow for more mass on axis while maintaining the optimal pressure for the DPF. As the density of the jet compared to the background fill increases we find the neutron yield increases, as does the variability in the neutron yield. Introducing perturbations in the jet density allow for consistent seeding of the m =0 instability leading to more consistent ion acceleration and higher neutron yields with less variability. Jets with higher on axis density are found to have the greatest yield. The optimal jet configuration is explored. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Optimization-based design of a heat flux concentrator

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Ignacio; Fachinotti, Víctor D.; Ciarbonetti, Ángel A.

    2017-01-01

    To gain control over the diffusive heat flux in a given domain, one needs to engineer a thermal metamaterial with a specific distribution of the generally anisotropic thermal conductivity throughout the domain. Until now, the appropriate conductivity distribution was usually determined using transformation thermodynamics. By this way, only a few particular cases of heat flux control in simple domains having simple boundary conditions were studied. Thermal metamaterials based on optimization algorithm provides superior properties compared to those using the previous methods. As a more general approach, we propose to define the heat control problem as an optimization problem where we minimize the error in guiding the heat flux in a given way, taking as design variables the parameters that define the variable microstructure of the metamaterial. In the present study we numerically demonstrate the ability to manipulate heat flux by designing a device to concentrate the thermal energy to its center without disturbing the temperature profile outside it. PMID:28084451

  3. Optimization-based design of a heat flux concentrator.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Ignacio; Fachinotti, Víctor D; Ciarbonetti, Ángel A

    2017-01-13

    To gain control over the diffusive heat flux in a given domain, one needs to engineer a thermal metamaterial with a specific distribution of the generally anisotropic thermal conductivity throughout the domain. Until now, the appropriate conductivity distribution was usually determined using transformation thermodynamics. By this way, only a few particular cases of heat flux control in simple domains having simple boundary conditions were studied. Thermal metamaterials based on optimization algorithm provides superior properties compared to those using the previous methods. As a more general approach, we propose to define the heat control problem as an optimization problem where we minimize the error in guiding the heat flux in a given way, taking as design variables the parameters that define the variable microstructure of the metamaterial. In the present study we numerically demonstrate the ability to manipulate heat flux by designing a device to concentrate the thermal energy to its center without disturbing the temperature profile outside it.

  4. Optimization-based design of a heat flux concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Ignacio; Fachinotti, Víctor D.; Ciarbonetti, Ángel A.

    2017-01-01

    To gain control over the diffusive heat flux in a given domain, one needs to engineer a thermal metamaterial with a specific distribution of the generally anisotropic thermal conductivity throughout the domain. Until now, the appropriate conductivity distribution was usually determined using transformation thermodynamics. By this way, only a few particular cases of heat flux control in simple domains having simple boundary conditions were studied. Thermal metamaterials based on optimization algorithm provides superior properties compared to those using the previous methods. As a more general approach, we propose to define the heat control problem as an optimization problem where we minimize the error in guiding the heat flux in a given way, taking as design variables the parameters that define the variable microstructure of the metamaterial. In the present study we numerically demonstrate the ability to manipulate heat flux by designing a device to concentrate the thermal energy to its center without disturbing the temperature profile outside it.

  5. MONDO: A neutron tracker for particle therapy secondary emission fluxes measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marafini, M.; Patera, V.; Pinci, D.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Spiriti, E.

    2016-07-01

    Cancer treatment is performed, in Particle Therapy, using accelerated charged particles whose high irradiation precision and conformity allows the tumor destruction while sparing the surrounding healthy tissues. Dose release monitoring devices using photons and charged particles produced by the beam interaction with the patient body have already been proposed, but no attempt based on the detection of the abundant secondary radiation neutron component has been made yet. The reduced attenuation length of neutrons yields a secondary particle sample that is larger in number when compared to photons and charged particles. Furthermore, neutrons allow for a backtracking of the emission point that is not affected by multiple scattering. Since neutrons can release a significant dose far away from the tumor region, a precise measurement of their flux, production energy and angle distributions is eagerly needed in order to improve the Treatment Planning Systems (TPS) software, so to predict not only the normal tissue toxicity in the target region but also the risk of late complications in the whole body. All the aforementioned issues underline the importance for an experimental effort devoted to the precise characterization of the neutron production gaining experimental access both to the emission point and production energy. The technical challenges posed by a neutron detector aiming for a high detection efficiency and good backtracking precision will be addressed within the MONDO (MOnitor for Neutron Dose in hadrOntherapy) project. The MONDO's main goal is to develop a tracking detector targeting fast and ultrafast secondary neutrons. The tracker is composed by a scintillating fiber matrix (4 × 4 × 8cm3). The full reconstruction of protons, produced in elastic interactions, will be used to measure energy and direction of the impinging neutron. The neutron tracker will measure the neutron production yields, as a function of production angle and energy, using different

  6. Neutron flux from a 14-MeV neutron generator with tungsten filter for research in NDA methods for nuclear safeguards and security

    SciTech Connect

    Rennhofer, H.; Pedersen, B.; Crochemore, J.-M.

    2009-12-02

    The Joint Research Centre has taken into operation a new experimental device designed for research in the fields of nuclear safeguards and security applications. The research projects currently undertaken include detection of shielded contraband materials, detection of fissile materials, and mass determination of small fissile materials in shielded containers. The device, called the Pulsed Neutron Interrogation Test Assembly (PUNITA), incorporates a pulsed 14-MeV (D-T) neutron generator and a large graphite mantle surrounding the sample cavity. By pulsing the neutron generator with a frequency in the range of 10 to 150 Hz, a sample may be interrogated first by fast neutrons and a few hundred micro-seconds later by a pure thermal neutron flux. The permanent detection systems incorporated in PUNITA include {sup 3}He neutrons detectors, HPGe gamma detectors, and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors.We have studied the effects of placing a tungsten liner around the neutron generator target. The 14-MeV neutrons induce (n, 2n) and (n, 3n) reactions. In addition the mean neutron energy emitted from generator/tungsten assembly is reduced to about 1 MeV. Both of these effects increase the thermal neutron flux in the sample cavity. The paper describes the observed advantages of the tungsten liner with respect to increase in thermal flux, and better shielding capabilities of the nearby gamma and neutron detectors.

  7. Neutron lifetime measurement with pulsed beam at J-PARC:Incident Beam Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Risa; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hirota, Katsuya; Sugino, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Satoru; Katayama, Ryo; Yamada, Takahito; Higashi, Nao; Yokoyama, Harumichi; Sumino, Hirochika; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Otono, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Genki; Sumi, Naoyuki; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Kitahara, Ryunosuke; Oide, Hideyuki; Shima, Tatsushi; Ino, Takashi; Mishima, Kenji; Taketani, Kaoru; Seki, Yoshichika; NOP Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron lifetime is one of the important parameters in the estimation of the abundance of the light elements in the early universe through the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). The accuracy of 0.1% is desired in the neutron lifetime to quantitatively discuss the BBN in combination with the observation of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave. We have started a lifetime measurement with pulsed neutrons at J-PARC/BL05. To measure the lifetime, we detect the decay electrons from the bunched neutrons and the incident neutron flux in the TPC at the same time. By diluting a small amount of 3He gas into the TPC, the incident flux is estimated by counting protons via 3He(n,p)3H reactions. The accuracy of the selection of 3He(n,p)3H events and the influence of the contamination of nitrogen gas are the major systematic errors. In this paper, the estimation of the systematic error in the incident flux is reported.

  8. Optimizing the Ranchero Coaxial Flux Compression Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Tasker, D.G.; Goforth, J.H.; Fowler, C.M.; Lopez, E.A.; Oona, H.; King, J.C.; Herrera, D.H.; Torres, D.T.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Martinez, E.C.; Stokes, J.L.; Tabaka, L.J.; Garcia, O.F.; Atchison, W.L.; Faehl, R.J.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Keinigs, R.K.; Miller, P.J.

    1998-10-18

    Ranchero is an explosively driven magnetic flux-compression generator that has been developed, over the last four years, as a versatile power source for high energy density physics experiments. It is coaxial, and comprises a 15 cm-diameter armature and a 30-cm stator, each aluminum. The length may be varied to suit the demands of each experiment; thus far, lengths of 0.43 m and 1.4 m have been used. The stator is filled and driven by a high performance cast explosive, and the ultimate performance of the device is limited by the smoothness of the armature expansion. The armature explosive is initiated on axis by PETN hemispheres, spaced at intervals of about 18 mm and 24.5 mm; each is simultaneously detonated by a slapper detonator system. Calculations of armature expansion predicted ripples less than 0.2 mm, and this was confirmed in early experiments. Yet, ripples approaching tens of millimeters were observed in some more recent experiments. The authors discuss the possible origins of the se large ripples, and the methods the authors have used to correct them.

  9. Computer program calculates gamma ray source strengths of materials exposed to neutron fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiser, P. C.; Ricks, L. O.

    1968-01-01

    Computer program contains an input library of nuclear data for 44 elements and their isotopes to determine the induced radioactivity for gamma emitters. Minimum input requires the irradiation history of the element, a four-energy-group neutron flux, specification of an alloy composition by elements, and selection of the output.

  10. Discussion about modeling the effects of neutron flux exposure for nuclear reactor core analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vondy, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    Methods used to calculate the effects of exposure to a neutron flux are described. The modeling of the nuclear-reactor core history presents an analysis challenge. The nuclide chain equations must be solved, and some of the methods in use for this are described. Techniques for treating reactor-core histories are discussed and evaluated.

  11. Minimum activation martensitic alloys for surface disposal after exposure to neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Steel alloys for long-term exposure to neutron flux have a martensitic microstructure and contain chromium, carbon, tungsten, vanadium and preferably titanium. Activation of the steel is held to within acceptable limits for eventual surface disposal by stringently controlling the impurity levels of Ni, Mo, Cu, N, Co, Nb, Al and Mn.

  12. Acceleration of deuterons from laser plasma in direct pulsed electron fluxes for generation of neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikanov, A. E.; Vovchenko, E. D.; Kozlovskii, K. I.; Shatokhin, V. L.

    2016-12-01

    We report the results of experiments in which laser plasma deuterons are accelerated toward beryllium and deuterated polyethylene targets in a drift tube by means of a direct pulsed flux of electrons accelerated to maximum energy of 250 keV. Neutrons produced as a result of the interaction of deuterons with the targets are detected. The yield of neutrons in some of the experimental series reaches 106 n/pulse. Using a pulsed magnetic field synchronized with the generation of laser plasma is proposed for increasing the neutron yield as a result of electron flux compression. This magnetic field in the drift region of electrons is created by a spiral coil of conical shape.

  13. A neutron pinhole camera for PF-24 source: Conceptual design and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielecki, J.; Wójcik-Gargula, A.; Wiacek, U.; Scholz, M.; Igielski, A.; Drozdowicz, K.; Woźnicka, U.

    2015-07-01

    A fast-neutron pinhole camera based on small-area (5mm × 5 mm) BCF-12 scintillation detectors with nanosecond time resolution has been designed. The pinhole camera is dedicated to the investigation of the spatial and temporal distributions of DD neutrons from the Plasma Focus (PF-24) source. The geometrical parameters of the camera have been optimized in terms of maximum neutron flux at the imaging plane by means of MCNP calculations. The detection system consists of four closely packed scintillation detectors coupled via long optical fibres to Hamamatsu H3164-10 photomultiplier tubes. The pinhole consists of specially designed 420 mm long copper collimator with an effective aperture of 1.7 mm mounted inside a cylindrical polyethylene tube. The performance of the presented detection system in the mixed (hard X-ray and neutron) radiation field of the PF-24 plasma focus device has been tested. The results of the tests showed that the small-area BCF-12 scintillation detectors can be successfully applied as the detection system of the neutron pinhole camera for the PF-24 device.

  14. Complex optimization for big computational and experimental neutron datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Feng; Archibald, Richard; Niedziela, Jennifer; Bansal, Dipanshu; Delaire, Olivier

    2016-12-01

    We present a framework to use high performance computing to determine accurate solutions to the inverse optimization problem of big experimental data against computational models. We demonstrate how image processing, mathematical regularization, and hierarchical modeling can be used to solve complex optimization problems on big data. We also demonstrate how both model and data information can be used to further increase solution accuracy of optimization by providing confidence regions for the processing and regularization algorithms. We use the framework in conjunction with the software package SIMPHONIES to analyze results from neutron scattering experiments on silicon single crystals, and refine first principles calculations to better describe the experimental data.

  15. Computer simulation tests of optimized neutron powder diffractometer configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cussen, L. D.; Lieutenant, K.

    2016-06-01

    Recent work has developed a new mathematical approach to optimally choose beam elements for constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers. This article compares Monte Carlo computer simulations of existing instruments with simulations of instruments using configurations chosen using the new approach. The simulations show that large performance improvements over current best practice are possible. The tests here are limited to instruments optimized for samples with a cubic structure which differs from the optimization for triclinic structure samples. A novel primary spectrometer design is discussed and simulation tests show that it performs as expected and allows a single instrument to operate flexibly over a wide range of measurement resolution.

  16. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Study on spatial resolution of micromegas as a neutron detector under condition of high neutron flux and γ ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Ji-Jin; Hu, Bi-Tao

    2009-02-01

    In this paper Micromegas has been designed to detect neutrons. The simulation of the spatial resolution of Micromegas as neutron detector is carried out by GEANT4 toolkit. The neutron track reconstruction method based on the time coincidence technology is employed in the present work. The influence of the flux of incident 14 MeV neutron and high gamma background on the spatial resolution is carefully studied. Our results show that the spatial resolution of the detector is sensitive to the neutron flux, but insensitive to the intensity of γ background if the neutron track reconstruction method proposed by our group is used. The γ insensitivity makes it possible for us to use the Micromegas detector under condition which has high γ-rays background.

  17. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, Charles D.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  18. Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Bowman, C.D.

    1992-11-03

    Apparatus for nuclear transmutation and power production using an intense accelerator-generated thermal neutron flux. High thermal neutron fluxes generated from the action of a high power proton accelerator on a spallation target allows the efficient burn-up of higher actinide nuclear waste by a two-step process. Additionally, rapid burn-up of fission product waste for nuclides having small thermal neutron cross sections, and the practicality of small material inventories while achieving significant throughput derive from employment of such high fluxes. Several nuclear technology problems are addressed including 1. nuclear energy production without a waste stream requiring storage on a geological timescale, 2. the burn-up of defense and commercial nuclear waste, and 3. the production of defense nuclear material. The apparatus includes an accelerator, a target for neutron production surrounded by a blanket region for transmutation, a turbine for electric power production, and a chemical processing facility. In all applications, the accelerator power may be generated internally from fission and the waste produced thereby is transmuted internally so that waste management might not be required beyond the human lifespan.

  19. Neutron Imager and Flux Monitor Based on Micro Channel Plates (MCP) in Electrostatic Mirror Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Variale, V.

    In this paper, a new high transparency device based on MCP for the monitoring the flux and spatial profile of a neutron beam will be described. The assembly consists of a carbon foil with a 6Li deposit, placed in the beam, and a MCP equipped with a phosphor screen readout viewed by a CCD camera, placed outside the beam. Secondary emitted electrons (SEE) produced in the carbon foil by the alpha-particles and tritons from the 6Li+n reaction, are deflected to the MCP detector by means of an electrostatic mirror, suitably designed to preserve the spatial resolution. The conductive layer on the phosphor can be used for neutron counting, and to obtain time-of-flight information. A peculiar feature of this device is that the use of an electrostatic mirror minimizes the perturbation of the neutron beam, i.e. absorption and scattering. It can be used at existing time-of-flight (TOF) facilities, in particular at the n_TOF facility at CERN, for monitoring the flux and special profile of the neutron beam in the thermal and epithermal region. In this work, the device principle and design will be presented, together with the main features in terms of resolution and neutron detection efficiency.

  20. One directional polarized neutron reflectometry with optimized reference layer method

    SciTech Connect

    Masoudi, S. Farhad; Jahromi, Saeed S.

    2012-09-01

    In the past decade, several neutron reflectometry methods for determining the modulus and phase of the complex reflection coefficient of an unknown multilayer thin film have been worked out among which the method of variation of surroundings and reference layers are of highest interest. These methods were later modified for measurement of the polarization of the reflected beam instead of the measurement of the intensities. In their new architecture, these methods not only suffered from the necessity of change of experimental setup but also another difficulty was added to their experimental implementations. This deficiency was related to the limitations of the technology of the neutron reflectometers that could only measure the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam. As the instruments are limited, the theory has to be optimized so that the experiment could be performed. In a recent work, we developed the method of variation of surroundings for one directional polarization analysis. In this new work, the method of reference layer with polarization analysis has been optimized to determine the phase and modulus of the unknown film with measurement of the polarization of the reflected neutrons in the same direction as the polarization of the incident beam.

  1. Measurement of Neutron and Muon Fluxes 100~m Underground with the SciBath Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, Lance

    2014-01-01

    The SciBath detector is an 80 liter liquid scintillator detector read out by a three dimensional grid of 768 wavelength-shifting fibers. Initially conceived as a fine-grained charged particle detector for neutrino studies that could image charged particle tracks in all directions, it is also sensitive to fast neutrons (15-200 MeV). In fall of 2011 the apparatus performed a three month run to measure cosmic-induced muons and neutrons 100~meters underground in the FNAL MINOS near-detector area. Data from this run has been analyzed and resulted in measurements of the cosmic muon flux as \

  2. Determination of the cosmic-ray-induced neutron flux and ambient dose equivalent at flight altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazianotto, M. T.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Federico, C. A.; Gonçalez, O. L.; Quesada, J. M.; Carlson, B. V.

    2015-07-01

    There is interest in modeling the atmosphere in the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly in order to obtain information about the cosmic-ray induced neutron spectrum and angular distribution as functions of altitude. In this work we use the Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and Geant4 to determine the cosmic-ray-induced neutron flux in the atmosphere produced by the cosmic ray protons incident on the top of the atmosphere and to estimate the ambient dose equivalent rate as function of altitude. The results present a reasonable conformity to other codes (QARM and EXPACS) based on other parameterizations.

  3. Neutron Star Mass-Radius Constraints Using Evolutionary Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, A. L.; Fiege, J. D.; Leahy, D. A.; Morsink, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The equation of state of cold supra-nuclear-density matter, such as in neutron stars, is an open question in astrophysics. A promising method for constraining the neutron star equation of state is modeling pulse profiles of thermonuclear X-ray burst oscillations from hot spots on accreting neutron stars. The pulse profiles, constructed using spherical and oblate neutron star models, are comparable to what would be observed by a next-generation X-ray timing instrument like ASTROSAT, NICER, or a mission similar to LOFT. In this paper, we showcase the use of an evolutionary optimization algorithm to fit pulse profiles to determine the best-fit masses and radii. By fitting synthetic data, we assess how well the optimization algorithm can recover the input parameters. Multiple Poisson realizations of the synthetic pulse profiles, constructed with 1.6 million counts and no background, were fitted with the Ferret algorithm to analyze both statistical and degeneracy-related uncertainty and to explore how the goodness of fit depends on the input parameters. For the regions of parameter space sampled by our tests, the best-determined parameter is the projected velocity of the spot along the observer’s line of sight, with an accuracy of ≤3% compared to the true value and with ≤5% statistical uncertainty. The next best determined are the mass and radius; for a neutron star with a spin frequency of 600 Hz, the best-fit mass and radius are accurate to ≤5%, with respective uncertainties of ≤7% and ≤10%. The accuracy and precision depend on the observer inclination and spot colatitude, with values of ˜1% achievable in mass and radius if both the inclination and colatitude are ≳60°.

  4. The measurement of the solar neutrino flux with the sudbury neutrino observatory's neutron capture detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, B.

    2008-06-01

    Phase III of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment began after the installation of the Neutral-Current Detector (NCD) array in the D2O-filled acrylic vessel. This unique phase provides a measurement of the Neutral-Current (NC) flux that can be statistically and systematically separated from the Elastic-Scattering (ES) and Charged-Current (CC) fluxes by simply counting the number of solar-induced dissociated neutrons captured in the NCD array. The measurement with NCDs will provide increased precision on the CC and NC fluxes, and thus on the solar neutrino mixing parameters. This poster presents the status of the analysis of the SNO phase III solar neutrino fluxes.

  5. Glass-fiber-based neutron detectors for high- and low-flux environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, Mary; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Craig, Richard A.; Geelhood, Bruce D.; Knopf, Michael A.; Miley, Harry S.; Perkins, Richard W.; Reeder, Paul L.; Sunberg, Debra S.; Warner, Ray A.; Wogman, Ned A.

    1995-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has fabricated cerium-activated lithium silicate scintillating fibers via a hot-downdraw process. These fibers typically have a operational transmission length (e(superscript -1) length) of greater than 2 meters. This permits the fabrication of devices which were not possible to consider. Scintillating fibers permit conformable devices, large-area devices, and extremely small devices; in addition, as the thermal-neutron sensitive elements in a fast neutron detection system, scintillating fibers can be dispersed within moderator, improving neutron economy, over that possible with commercially available (superscript 3)He or BF(subscript 3) proportional counters. These fibers can be used for national-security applications, in medical applications, in the nuclear-power industry, and for personnel protection at experimental facilities. Data are presented for devices based on single fibers and devices made up of ribbons containing many fibers under high-and low-flux conditions.

  6. Integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents integral measurements of neutron and gamma-ray leakage fluxes from a critical mockup of the Hiroshima bomb Little Boy at Los Alamos National Laobratory with detector systems developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Bonner ball detectors were used to map the neutron fluxes in the horizontal midplane at various distances from the mockup and for selected polar angles, keeping the source-detector separation constant. Gamma-ray energy deposition measurements were made with thermoluminescent detectors at several locations on the iron shell of the source mockup. The measurements were performed as part of a larger progam to provide benchmark data for testing the methods used to calculate the radiation released from the Little Boy bomb over Hiroshima. 3 references, 10 figures.

  7. Neutron Spectral Brightness of Cold Guide 4 at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, B. L.; Robertson, J. L.; Iverson, E. B.; Selby, D. L.

    2010-11-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor resumed operation in June of 2007 with a supercritical hydrogen cold source in horizontal beam tube 4. Cold guide 4 is a guide system designed to deliver neutrons from this source with a reasonable flux at wavelengths greater than 4 Å to several instruments, and includes a 15-m, 96-section, 4-channel bender. A time-of-flight spectrum with calibrated detector was recorded at port C of cold guide 4, and compared to McStas simulations, to generate a brightness spectrum.

  8. Neutron tomography experiments for the study of trapped flux distributions in high- T c superconducting ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, V. T.; Gordeev, G. P.; Toperverg, B. P.; Rekveldt, T.; Roest, W.; Cser, L.; Rosta, L.; Torok, Gy.

    1995-02-01

    We describe a new version of Neutron Spin Echo, for the study of magnetic flux in high- Tc superconductors, which is based on the evolution of the echo group in the specimen which is installed in the third precession region. The polarization of the transmitted beam reflects the spin rotation in the internal field which can be found by Fourier transforming the data. It is required for example, in research on the flux self-organization in the critical state. Experiments on Y sbnd Ba sbnd Cu sbnd O ceramics are discussed.

  9. Mare and Highlands Studies of Correlated Observations of the Moon's Diurnally Modulating Epithermal Neutron Flux using LRO's LEND, Diviner and LOLA instruments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClanahan, T. P.

    2015-12-01

    Several independent observational studies have identified a modulating diurnal signal in the Moon's neutron leakage flux. Those studies show that the diurnally varying neutron flux signal is of global extent, that the phase of the flux modulations are similar, that the flux minima occur at dawn and that the maxima occur at dusk. Two plausible hypotheses suggest differing explanations for the flux modulation. 1) Diurnally variant surface hydration or 2) Regolith temperature variation, which may modulate the neutron leakage flux with temperature. Studies of the high-latitudes found that for the north and south polar regions >75°, the amplitude of the neutron flux modulation was significantly greater for poleward-facing slopes (PFS) as compared to equator-facing slopes (EFS). If regolith temperature alone is driving the neutron flux modulation, then EFS should exhibit the greater diurnal amplitude, opposite the observation. More recently, studies of the neutron leakage flux in the mid-latitudes indicated that the greater amplitude of the neutron flux modulation on EFS was greater than PFS and is consistent with an interpretation that regolith temperature is modulating the neutron flux towards the northern Mare. However, between +/-(65° to 72°) latitude the ratio of the EFS to PFS neutron flux amplitudes inverts, with the PFS maintaining the greater amplitude as compared to the EFS. In this study the lunar mid to upper latitudes +/-(45° to 90°) will be studied in an effort to discriminate the source of the neutron flux modluation. Neutron, temperature and topography observations by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's (LRO) Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND), Diviner Radiometer, and Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimiter (LOLA) will be used to investigate the properties of the neutron leakage flux. Correlated studies of these three datasets in Mare and highlands regions will be used to determine the neutron flux characteristics of their respective EFS and PFS.

  10. High-Flux Neutron Generator Facility for Geochronology and Nuclear Physics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, Cory; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A facility based on a next-generation, high-flux D-D neutron generator (HFNG) is being commissioned at UC Berkeley. The generator is designed to produce monoenergetic 2.45 MeV neutrons at outputs exceeding 1011 n/s. The HFNG is designed around two RF-driven multi-cusp ion sources that straddle a titanium-coated copper target. D + ions, accelerated up to 150 keV from the ion sources, self-load the target and drive neutron generation through the d(d,n)3 He fusion reaction. A well-integrated cooling system is capable of handling beam power reaching 120 kW impinging on the target. The unique design of the HFNG target permits experimental samples to be placed inside the target volume, allowing the samples to receive the highest neutron flux (1011 cm-2 s-1) possible from the generator. In addition, external beams of neutrons will be available simultaneously, ranging from thermal to 2.45 MeV. Achieving the highest neutron yields required carefully designed schemes to mitigate back-streaming of high energy electrons liberated from the cathode target by deuteron bombardment. The proposed science program is focused on pioneering advances in the 40 Ar/39 Ar dating technique for geochronology, new nuclear data measurements, basic nuclear science, and education. An end goal is to become a user facility for researchers. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  11. Neutron flux characterisation of the Pavia TRIGA Mark II research reactor for radiobiological and microdosimetric applications.

    PubMed

    Alloni, D; Prata, M; Salvini, A; Ottolenghi, A

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays the Pavia TRIGA reactor is available for national and international collaboration in various research fields. The TRIGA Mark II nuclear research reactor of the Pavia University offers different in- and out-core neutron irradiation channels, each characterised by different neutron spectra. In the last two years a campaign of measurements and simulations has been performed in order to guarantee a better characterisation of these different fluxes and to meet the demands of irradiations that require precise information on these spectra in particular for radiobiological and microdosimetric studies. Experimental data on neutron fluxes have been collected analysing and measuring the gamma activity induced in thin target foils of different materials irradiated in different TRIGA experimental channels. The data on the induced gamma activities have been processed with the SAND II deconvolution code and finally compared with the spectra obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison between simulated and measured spectra showed a good agreement allowing a more precise characterisation of the neutron spectra and a validation of the adopted method.

  12. The measurement of thermal neutron flux depression for determining the concentration of boron in blood.

    PubMed

    Brooke, S L; Green, S; Charles, M W; Beddoe, A H

    2001-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a form of targeted radiotherapy that relies on the uptake of the capture element boron by the volume to be treated. The treatment procedure requires the measurement of boron in the patient's blood. The investigation of a simple and inexpensive method for determining the concentration of the capture element 10B in blood is described here. This method, neutron flux depression measurement, involves the determination of the flux depression of thermal neutrons as they pass through a boron-containing sample. It is shown via Monte Carlo calculations and experimental verification that, for a maximum count rate of 1 x 10(4) counts/s measured by the detector, a 10 ppm 10B sample of volume 20 ml can be measured with a statistical precision of 10% in 32 +/- 2 min. For a source activity of less than 1.11 x 10(11) Bq and a maximum count rate of less than 1 x 10(4) counts/s, a 10 ppm 10B sample of volume 20 ml can be measured with a statistical precision of 10% in 58 +/- 3 min. It has also been shown that this technique can be applied to the measurement of the concentration of any element with a high thermal neutron cross section such as 157Gd.

  13. Optimization of measurements of the Earth's radiation belt particle fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, M. I.; Podzolko, M. V.; Kovtyukh, A. S.; Brilkov, I. A.; Vlasova, N. A.; Kalegaev, V. V.; Osedlo, V. I.; Tulupov, V. I.; Yashin, I. V.

    2017-03-01

    The Earth's radiation belts discovered at the end of the 1950s have great scientific and practical interest. Their main characteristics in magnetically quiet periods are well known. However, the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts during magnetic storms and substorms, particularly the dynamics of relativistic electrons of the outer belt, when Earth's radiation belt particle fluxes undergo significant time variations, is studied insufficiently. At present, principally new experiments have been performed and planned with the intention to better study the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts and to operationally control the space-energy distributions of the Earth's radiation belt particle fluxes. In this paper, for spacecraft designed to measure the fluxes of electrons and protons of the Earth's radiation belts at altitudes of 0.5-10000 km, the optimal versions for detector orientation and orbital parameters have been considered and selected.

  14. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Rebecca; Kszos, Lynn A

    2011-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews

  15. High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Paul, M.; Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I.

    2013-04-19

    A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

  16. The HB-2D Polarized Neutron Development Beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Lowell; Hamilton, WA; Zhao, JK; Robertson, JL

    2016-09-01

    The Polarized Neutron Development beamline, recently commissioned at the HB-2D position on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides a tool for development and testing of polarizers, polarized neutron devices, and prototyping of polarized neutron techniques. With available monochromators including pyrolytic graphite and polarizing enriched Fe-57 (Si), the instrument has operated at 4.25 and 2.6 Å wavelengths, using crystal, supermirror, or He-3 polarizers and analyzers in various configurations. The Neutron Optics and Development Team has used the beamline for testing of He-3 polarizers for use at other HFIR and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) instruments, as well as a variety of flipper devices. Recently, we have acquired new supermirror polarizers which have improved the instrument performance. The team and collaborators also have continuing demonstration experiments of spin-echo focusing techniques, and plans to conduct polarized diffraction measurements. The beamline is also used to support a growing use of polarization techniques at present and future instruments at SNS and HFIR.

  17. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geslot, B.; Vermeeren, L.; Filliatre, P.; Lopez, A. Legrand; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Bréaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.

    2011-03-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 × 1020 n/cm2. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  18. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Geslot, B.; Filliatre, P.; Barbot, L.; Jammes, C.; Breaud, S.; Oriol, L.; Villard, J.-F.; Lopez, A. Legrand

    2011-03-15

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  19. New measurement system for on line in core high-energy neutron flux monitoring in materials testing reactor conditions.

    PubMed

    Geslot, B; Vermeeren, L; Filliatre, P; Lopez, A Legrand; Barbot, L; Jammes, C; Bréaud, S; Oriol, L; Villard, J-F

    2011-03-01

    Flux monitoring is of great interest for experimental studies in material testing reactors. Nowadays, only the thermal neutron flux can be monitored on line, e.g., using fission chambers or self-powered neutron detectors. In the framework of the Joint Instrumentation Laboratory between SCK-CEN and CEA, we have developed a fast neutron detector system (FNDS) capable of measuring on line the local high-energy neutron flux in fission reactor core and reflector locations. FNDS is based on fission chambers measurements in Campbelling mode. The system consists of two detectors, one detector being mainly sensitive to fast neutrons and the other one to thermal neutrons. On line data processing uses the CEA depletion code DARWIN in order to disentangle fast and thermal neutrons components, taking into account the isotopic evolution of the fissile deposit. The first results of FNDS experimental test in the BR2 reactor are presented in this paper. Several fission chambers have been irradiated up to a fluence of about 7 × 10(20) n∕cm(2). A good agreement (less than 10% discrepancy) was observed between FNDS fast flux estimation and reference flux measurement.

  20. The properties of gamma-radiation and high-energy neutron fluxes in "MIR" station orbit.

    PubMed

    Bogomolov, A V; Bogomolov, V V; Denisov, Yu I; Logachev, Yu I; Svertilov, S I; Kudryavtsev, M I; Lyagushin, V I; Ershova, T V

    2002-10-01

    The study of radiation background components in the near-Earth space is very important for different branches of space research, in particular for space dosimetry and for the planning of gamma-astronomy experiments. Detailed information on the neutral components (gamma-quanta, neutrons) of background radiation was obtained during the Grif-1 experiment onboard Mir orbital station (OS). The measurements of fluxes of 0.05-50 MeV gamma-quanta and >30 MeV neutrons with a large area instrument (approximately 250 cm2 for gamma-quanta, approximately 30 cm2 for neutrons) as well as corresponding charged particle measurements (0.4-1.5 MeV electrons, 1-200 MeV protons) were made during this experiment. The background components induced by the station's own radiation as well as the albedo gamma-rays from the Earth's atmosphere were revealed as the result of data analysis for about 600 h of observation. A mathematical model describing the latitude and energy dependences of atmospheric albedo gamma-rays as well as of those of gamma-quanta produced in the material of the station due to cosmic ray interactions was developed. An analytical approximation of the spectrum of induced gamma-rays from radioactive isotopes stored in the station and instrument's materials is presented. The dynamics of gamma-quantum background fluxes during the geomagnetic disturbances of January 10-11, 1997 are discussed. An analytical representation of the latitude dependence of the integral flux of neutrons with >30 MeV is given.

  1. A benchmark analysis of radiation flux distribution for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of canine brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly-heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This work describes a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador Retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador Retriever head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for the model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that the peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10-20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  2. Optimal shape of a cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefmann, K.; Filges, U.; Treue, F.; Kirkensgård, J. J. K.; Plesner, B.; Hansen, K. S.; Klenø, K. H.

    2011-04-01

    We have performed a McStas optimization of the primary spectrometer for a generic 40 m long, cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer with a doubly focusing monochromator. The optimal design contains an elliptically focusing guide, a virtual source point before a low-grade PG monochromator, and non-equidistant focusing at the monochromator. The flux at 5 meV shows a gain factor 12 over the “classical” design with a straight 12×3cm2, m=2 guide and a vertically focusing PG monochromator. In addition, the energy resolution was found to be improved. This unexpectedly large design improvement agrees with the Liouville theorem and can be understood as the product of many smaller gain factors, combined with a more optimal utilization of the beam divergence within the guide. Our results may be relevant for a possible upgrade of a number of cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometers—and for a possible triple-axis spectrometer at the European Spallation Source.

  3. Optimal conditions for identifying 80Br and 128I in health food Angelica keiskei using rapid epithermal neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Yi

    2003-04-01

    This study presents an optimal rapid epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) technique, using a 1mm Cd filter in reactor neutron flux, to analyze 80Br and 128I in the roots, stems, and leaves of health food Angelica keiskei (AK). Various sample weights of lichen (IAEA-336) for each portion of AK, under various periods of irradiation and counting, were used to optimize the elemental analysis. Selecting the analytical conditions depends on the minimum detectable concentration (MDC), required sensitivities and the quantitative accuracy of Br and I elements. These findings imply that the MDCs of Br and I, measured under 10min activation and 5min counting followed by 10min decaying, using 350mg of lichen are ideal for elemental analysis. Moreover, each portions of AK were analyzed under optimal conditions. The elemental concentrations of Br, Cl, I, Mg, Mn and Na and their implications are discussed.

  4. Mock-up experiment at Birmingham University for BNCT project of Osaka University--Neutron flux measurement with gold foil.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, S; Sakai, M; Yoshihashi, S; Manabe, M; Zushi, N; Murata, I; Hoashi, E; Kato, I; Kuri, S; Oshiro, S; Nagasaki, M; Horiike, H

    2015-12-01

    Mock-up experiment for development of accelerator based neutron source for Osaka University BNCT project was carried out at Birmingham University, UK. In this paper, spatial distribution of neutron flux intensity was evaluated by foil activation method. Validity of the design code system was confirmed by comparing measured gold foil activities with calculations. As a result, it was found that the epi-thermal neutron beam was well collimated by our neutron moderator assembly. Also, the design accuracy was evaluated to have less than 20% error.

  5. Development and application of CVD diamond detectors to 14 MeV neutron flux monitoring.

    PubMed

    Angelone, M; Pillon, M; Marinelli, M; Milani, E; Paoletti, A; Tucciarone, A; Pucella, G; Verona-Rinati, G

    2004-01-01

    CVD diamond is an interesting material for radiation detection, its atomic number (Z = 6) is close to that of soft tissues (Z = 7.1) and it can also work in harsh environments. Since many years CVD diamond films have been grown at the Faculty of Engineering, Rome 'Tor Vergata' University, and in 1998 a collaboration with ENEA Fusion Division was established to develop fast neutron monitors to be used in fusion tokamak environment. In this paper the first test of a 120 microm thick polycrystalline CVD diamond detector used for monitoring 14.7 MeV neutrons emission produced with the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG) is reported. The detector operates in air and in pulse mode. The time irradiation profiles recorded with the CVD diamond detector were compared with those recorded by the standard monitors available at FNG (SSD, fission chamber, NE-213). Good stability and capability to operate in neutron flux up to 1.5 x 10(8) n cm(-2) s(-1) was observed. The radiation hardness property was also investigated using a 460 microm thick film and these results are also reported.

  6. Estimation method of planetary fast neutron flux by a Ge gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareyama, M.; Fujibayashi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Karouji, Y.; Nagaoka, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Reedy, R. C.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; d'Uston, C.; Kim, K. J.; Hasebe, N.

    2016-08-01

    An intensity map of lunar fast neutrons (LFNs) and their temporal variation has been estimated by fitting "sawtooth" peaks in the energy spectra of lunar gamma rays observed by the Kaguya (SELENE) Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) consisting of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a BGO scintillator. While an ordinary peak in the spectrum is produced by only gamma ray lines, the sawtooth peak is produced by gamma ray lines and recoil nuclei in the detector by Ge(n ,n‧ γ) reaction. We develop a model for the shape of the sawtooth peak and apply it to fit sawtooth peaks together with ordinary peaks in actual observed spectra on the Moon. The temporal variation of LFNs is synchronous with that of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), and the global distribution of fast neutrons on the lunar surface agrees well with the past observation reported by the Neutron Spectrometer aboard Lunar Prospector. Based on these results, a new method is established to estimate the flux of fast neutrons by fitting sawtooth peaks on the gamma ray spectrum observed by the HPGe detector.

  7. Neutron focusing system for the Texas Cold Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehring, Bernard W.; Kim, Jong-Youl; Ünlü, Kenan

    1994-12-01

    A "converging neutron guide" focusing system located at the end of the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) "curved neutron guide" would increase the neutron flux for neutron capture experiments. Our design for a converging guide is based on using several rectangular truncated cone sections. Each rectangular truncated cone consists of four 20-cm long Si plates coated with NiC-Ti supermirrors. Dimensions of each section were determined by a three-dimensional Monte Carlo optimization calculation. The two slant angles of the truncated cones were varied to optimize the neutron flux at the focal area of the focusing system. Different multielement converging guides were designed and their performance analyzed. From the performance results and financial considerations, we selected a four-section 80-cm long converging guide focusing system for construction and use with the TCNS. The focused cold neutron beam will be used for neutron capture experiment, e.g., prompt gamma activation analysis and neutron depth profiling.

  8. A Numerical Method for Obtaining Monoenergetic Neutron Flux Distributions and Transmissions in Multiple-Region Slabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Harold

    1959-01-01

    This method is investigated for semi-infinite multiple-slab configurations of arbitrary width, composition, and source distribution. Isotropic scattering in the laboratory system is assumed. Isotropic scattering implies that the fraction of neutrons scattered in the i(sup th) volume element or subregion that will make their next collision in the j(sup th) volume element or subregion is the same for all collisions. These so-called "transfer probabilities" between subregions are calculated and used to obtain successive-collision densities from which the flux and transmission probabilities directly follow. For a thick slab with little or no absorption, a successive-collisions technique proves impractical because an unreasonably large number of collisions must be followed in order to obtain the flux. Here the appropriate integral equation is converted into a set of linear simultaneous algebraic equations that are solved for the average total flux in each subregion. When ordinary diffusion theory applies with satisfactory precision in a portion of the multiple-slab configuration, the problem is solved by ordinary diffusion theory, but the flux is plotted only in the region of validity. The angular distribution of neutrons entering the remaining portion is determined from the known diffusion flux and the remaining region is solved by higher order theory. Several procedures for applying the numerical method are presented and discussed. To illustrate the calculational procedure, a symmetrical slab ia vacuum is worked by the numerical, Monte Carlo, and P(sub 3) spherical harmonics methods. In addition, an unsymmetrical double-slab problem is solved by the numerical and Monte Carlo methods. The numerical approach proved faster and more accurate in these examples. Adaptation of the method to anisotropic scattering in slabs is indicated, although no example is included in this paper.

  9. Influence of neutron flux, frequency and temperature to electrical impedance of nano silica particles

    SciTech Connect

    Huseynov, Elchin E-mail: hus.elchin@gmail.com; Garibov, Adil; Mehdiyeva, Ravan; Andreja, Eršte; Rustamov, Anar

    2014-11-15

    We studied electric impedance of SiO{sub 2} nanomaterial at its initial state and after being exposed to continuous neutron irradiation for up to 20 hours. In doing so we employed a flux of neutrons of 2x10{sup 13} n⋅cm{sup −2}s{sup −1} while the frequency and temperature ranges amounted to 0,09 – 2.3 MHz and 100 – 400 K correspondingly. Analysis in terms of the Cole-Cole expression revealed that with increasing irradiation period the polarization and relaxation times decrease as a result of combination of nanoparticles. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the electric conductivity of samples, on the other hand, increases with the increasing irradiation period. At low temperatures formations of clusters at three distinct states with different energies were resolved.

  10. New neutron small-angle diffraction instrument at the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, D.K.; Schoenborn, B.P.

    1982-01-01

    The new instrument utilizes cold neutrons emerging from a series of straight neutron guides. A multilayered monochromator is used in combination with a short collimator to obtain a monochromatized beam with a wavelength between 4 and 10 A and a wavelength spread of about 10%. The flux at 5 A exceeds 10/sup 6/ ns/sup -1/ cm/sup -2/ in a typical beam of 6-mm diameter at the sample. The spectrometer itself incorporates provisions for computer-controlled positioning of samples and a two-dimensional detector. At a sample-detector distance between 50 and 200 cm the detector can be centered at scattering angles of up to 45/sup 0/. The beam-defining components, the monochromator, the collimator, and various slits, are easily accessible and exchangeable for alternative devices. These features make the instrument modular and give it flexibility approaching that of standard x-ray equipment.

  11. Optimization of Thermal Neutron Converter in SiC Sensors for Spectral Radiation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Krolikowski, Igor; Cetnar, Jerzy; Issa, Fatima; Ferrone, Raffaello; Ottaviani, Laurent; Szalkai, Dora; Klix, Axel; Vermeeren, Ludo; Lyoussi, Abdalla; Saenger, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Optimization of the neutron converter in SiC sensors is presented. The sensors are used for spectral radiation measurements of thermal and fast neutrons and optionally gamma ray at elevated temperature in harsh radiation environment. The neutron converter, which is based on 10B, allows to detect thermal neutrons by means of neutron capture reaction. Two construction of the sensors were used to measure radiation in experiments. Sensor responses collected in experiments have been reproduced by the computer tool created by authors, it allows to validate the tool. The tool creates the response matrix function describing the characteristic of the sensors and it was used for detailed analyses of the sensor responses. Obtained results help to optimize the neutron converter in order to increase thermal neutron detection. Several enhanced construction of the sensors, which includes the neutron converter based on {sup 10}B or {sup 6}Li, were proposed. (authors)

  12. Silicon detectors for the neutron flux and beam profile measurements of the n_TOF facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musumarra, Agatino; Cosentino, Luigi; Barbagallo, Massimo; Colonna, Nicola; Damone, Lucia; Pappalardo, Alfio; Piscopo, Massimo; Finocchiaro, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The demand of new and high precision cross section data for neutron-induced reactions is continuously growing, driven by the requirements from several fields of fundamental physics, as well as from nuclear technology, medicine, etc. Several neutron facilities are operational worldwide, and new ones are being built. In the coming years, neutron beam intensities never reached up to now will be available, thus opening new scientific and technological frontiers. Among existing facilities, n_TOF at CERN provides a high intensity pulsed neutron beam in a wide energy range (thermal to GeV) and with an extremely competitive energy resolution that also allows spectroscopy studies. In order to ensure high quality measurements, the neutron beams must be fully characterized as a function of the neutron energy, in particular by measuring the neutron flux and the beam transverse profile with high accuracy. In 2014 a new experimental area (EAR2), with a much higher neutron flux, has been completed and commissioned at n_TOF. In order to characterize the neutron beam in the newly built experimental area at n_TOF, two suitable diagnostics devices have been built by the INFN-LNS group. Both are based on silicon detectors coupled with 6Li converter foils, in particular Single Pad for the flux measurement and Position Sensitive (strips and others) for the beam profile. The devices have been completely characterized with radioactive sources and with the n_TOF neutron beam, fulfilling all the specifications and hence becoming immediately operational. The performances of these devices and their high versatility, in terms of neutron beam intensity, make them suitable to be used in both n_TOF experimental areas. A description of the devices and the main results obtained so far will be presented.

  13. VERITAS: a high-flux neutron reflectometer with vertical sample geometry for a long pulse spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattauch, S.; Ioffe, A.; Lott, D.; Menelle, A.; Ott, F.; Medic, Z.

    2016-04-01

    An instrument concept of a reflectometer with a vertical sample geometry fitted to the long pulse structure of a spallation source, called “VERITAS” at the ESS, is presented. It focuses on designing a reflectometer with high intensity at the lowest possible background following the users' demand to investigate thin layers or interfacial areas in the sub-nanometer length scale. The high intensity approach of the vertical reflectometer fits very well to the long pulse structure of the ESS. Its main goal is to deliver as much usable intensity as possible at the sample position and be able to access a reflectivity range of 8 orders of magnitude and more. The concept assures that the reflectivity measurements can be performed in its best way to maximize the flux delivered to the sample. The reflectometer is optimized for studies of (magnetic) layers having thicknesses down to 5Å and a surface area of 1x1cm2. With reflectivity measurements the depth-resolved, laterally averaged chemical and magnetic profile can be investigated. By using polarised neutrons, additional vector information on the in-plane magnetic correlations (off-specular scattering at the pm length scale, GISANS at the nm length scale) can be studied. The full polarisation analysis could be used for soft matter samples to correct for incoherent scattering which is presently limiting neutron reflectivity studies to a reflectivity range on the order of 10-6.

  14. Design Optimization for a Maglev System Employing Flux Eliminating Coils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davey, Kent R.

    1996-01-01

    Flux eliminating coils have received no little attention over the past thirty years as an alternative for realizing lift in a MAGLEV system. When the magnets on board the vehicle are displaced from the equilibrium or null flux point of these coils, they induce current in those coils which act to restore the coil to its null flux or centerline position. The question being addressed in this paper is that of how to choose the best coil for a given system. What appears at first glance to be an innocent question is in fact one that is actually quite involved, encompassing both the global economics and physics of the system. The real key in analyzing that question is to derive an optimization index or functional which represents the cost of the system subject to constraints, the primary constraint being that the vehicle lift itself at a certain threshold speed. Outlined in this paper is one scenario for realizing a total system design which uses sequential quadratic programming techniques.

  15. In-situ monitoring the realkalisation process by neutron diffraction: Electroosmotic flux and portlandite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Castellote, Marta . E-mail: martaca@ietcc.csic.es; Llorente, Irene; Andrade, Carmen; Turrillas, Xavier; Alonso, Cruz; Campo, Javier

    2006-05-15

    Even though the electroosmotic flux through hardened cementitious materials during laboratory realkalisation trials had been previously noticed, it has never been in-situ monitored, analysing at the same time the establishment of the electroosmotic flux and the microstructure changes in the surroundings of the rebar. In this paper, two series of cement pastes, cast with CEM I and CEM I substituted in a 35% by fly ash, previously carbonated at 100% CO{sub 2}, were submitted to realkalisation treatments followed on line by simultaneous acquisition of neutron diffraction data. As a result, it has been possible to confirm the electroosmosis as the driving force of carbonates towards the rebar and to determine the range of pH in the anolyte in which most of the relevant electroosmotic phenomena takes place. On the other hand, the behaviour of the main crystalline phases involved in the process has been monitored during the treatment, with the precipitation of portlandite as main result.

  16. Method for measuring dose-equivalent in a neutron flux with an unknown energy spectra and means for carrying out that method

    DOEpatents

    Distenfeld, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    A method for measuring the dose-equivalent for exposure to an unknown and/or time varing neutron flux which comprises simultaneously exposing a plurality of neutron detecting elements of different types to a neutron flux and combining the measured responses of the various detecting elements by means of a function, whose value is an approximate measure of the dose-equivalent, which is substantially independent of the energy spectra of the flux. Also, a personnel neutron dosimeter, which is useful in carrying out the above method, comprising a plurality of various neutron detecting elements in a single housing suitable for personnel to wear while working in a radiation area.

  17. The Vertical Distribution of Buried Volatiles at the Moon revealed by Thermal and Epithermal Neutron Fluxes from LEND Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Su, J. J.; Murray, J.; Livengood, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the quantity and vertical distribution of volatile species on and below the surface of planetary bodies is vital to understand the primordial chemical inventory and subsequent evolution of planets. Volatiles may provide resources to support future human exploration. This is particularly true for the Moon, which is well observed by many methods from ground-based, lunar orbit, and in situ, and is an accessible destination or way station for human exploration. We present Geant4 models of relative fluxes of Fast, Epithermal, and Thermal neutron emission generated in a planetary regolith by galactic cosmic rays to reveal the first 1-2 meters vertical structure of embedded hydrogen or water. Varying ratios of Thermal versus Epithermal, low-energy-Epithermal versus high-energy-Epithermal, and Thermal versus Fast neutron emissions are diagnostics of the depth in which hydrogen/water layers are buried within the top 1-2 meters of the regolith. In addition, we apply model calculations to Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND) thermal and epithermal data, acquired on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), in specific regions of the Moon to retrieve the vertical distribution of buried ice from the remote sensing information. GEANT4 is a set of particle physics transport simulation codes that exploits object-oriented software methods to deliver a comprehensive and flexible toolkit that is modular and extensible, based on a free open-source development model. GEANT4 has become a standard tool to simulate applications as diverse as particle telescope and detector response, space radiation shielding and optimization, total ionizing dose in spacecraft components, and biological effects of radiation.

  18. Partial inhibition and bilevel optimization in flux balance analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Within Flux Balance Analysis, the investigation of complex subtasks, such as finding the optimal perturbation of the network or finding an optimal combination of drugs, often requires to set up a bilevel optimization problem. In order to keep the linearity and convexity of these nested optimization problems, an ON/OFF description of the effect of the perturbation (i.e. Boolean variable) is normally used. This restriction may not be realistic when one wants, for instance, to describe the partial inhibition of a reaction induced by a drug. Results In this paper we present a formulation of the bilevel optimization which overcomes the oversimplified ON/OFF modeling while preserving the linear nature of the problem. A case study is considered: the search of the best multi-drug treatment which modulates an objective reaction and has the minimal perturbation on the whole network. The drug inhibition is described and modulated through a convex combination of a fixed number of Boolean variables. The results obtained from the application of the algorithm to the core metabolism of E.coli highlight the possibility of finding a broader spectrum of drug combinations compared to a simple ON/OFF modeling. Conclusions The method we have presented is capable of treating partial inhibition inside a bilevel optimization, without loosing the linearity property, and with reasonable computational performances also on large metabolic networks. The more fine-graded representation of the perturbation allows to enlarge the repertoire of synergistic combination of drugs for tasks such as selective perturbation of cellular metabolism. This may encourage the use of the approach also for other cases in which a more realistic modeling is required. PMID:24286232

  19. Monte Carlo simulations for high-rate fast neutron flux measurements made at the RAON neutron science facility by using MICROMEGAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi; Kim, Jae Cheon; Kim, Gi Dong; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2015-10-01

    RAON is a Korean heavy-ion accelerator complex that is planned to be built by 2021. Deuterons (53 MeV) and protons (88 MeV) accelerated by using a low-energy driver linac (SCL1) are delivered to the neutron production target in the Neutron Science Facility (NSF) to produce high-energy neutrons in the interval from 1 to 88 MeV with high fluxes of the order of 1012 n/cm2-sec. The repetition rate of the neutron beam ranges from 1 kHz to 1 MHz, and the maximum beam current is ~12 μA at 1 MHz. The beam width is 1 ~ 2 ns. The high-energy and high-rate fast neutrons are used to estimate accurate neutron-induced cross sections for various nuclides at the NSF. A MICROMEGAS (MICRO Mesh Gaseous Structure), which is a gaseous detector initially developed for tracking in high-rate, high-energy physics experiments, is tentatively being considered as a neutron beam monitor. It can be used to measure both the energy distribution and the flux of the neutron beam. In this study, a MICROMEGAS detector for installation at the NSF was designed and investigated. 6Li, 10B, 235U and 238U targets are being considered as neutron/charged particle converters. For the low-energy region, 6Li(n,α)t and 10B(n,α)7Li are used in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. 235U(n,f) and 238U(n,f) reactions are used for high-energy region up to 90 MeV. All calculations are performed by using the GEANT4 toolkit.

  20. A continuously self regenerating high-flux neutron-generator facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A. M.; Becker, T. A.; Bernstein, L. A.; van Bibber, K.; Bleuel, D. L.; Chen, A. X.; Daub, B. H.; Goldblum, B. L.; Firestone, R. B.; Leung, K.-N.; Renne, P. R.; Waltz, C.

    2013-10-01

    A facility based on a next-generation, high-flux D-D neutron generator (HFNG) is being constructed at UC Berkeley. The current generator, designed around two RF-driven multicusp deuterium ion sources, is capable of producing a neutron output of >1011 n/s. A specially designed titanium-coated copper target located between the ion sources accelerates D+ ions up to 150 keV, generating 2.45 MeV neutrons through the d(d,3He)n fusion reaction. Deuterium in the target is self loaded and regenerating through ion implantation, enabling stable and continuous long-term operation. The proposed science program is focused on pioneering advances in the 40Ar/39Ar dating technique for geochronology, new nuclear data measurements, basic nuclear science research including statistical model studies of radiative-strength functions and level densities, and education. An overview of the facility and its unique capabilities as well as first measurements from the HFNG commissioning will be presented. Work supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, and U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x ray fluxes with CCD cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, G. J.; Smith, G. W.; Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M. C.

    The capability to measure bursts of neutron fluences and gamma/x-ray fluxes directly with charge coupled device (CCD) cameras while being able to distinguish between the video signals produced by these two types of radiation, even when they occur simultaneously, has been demonstrated. Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCD's) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (4-12 MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate approx. = .05 V/rad responsivity with greater than or = 1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or 'peaks' binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 105 to 107 n/cc range indicate smearing over approx. 1 to 10 percent of the CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels.

  2. Neutron and Gamma Fluxes and dpa Rates for HFIR Vessel Beltline Region (Present and Upgrade Designs)

    SciTech Connect

    Blakeman, E.D.

    2001-01-11

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is currently undergoing an upgrading program, a part of which is to increase the diameters of two of the four radiation beam tubes (HB-2 and HB-4). This change will cause increased neutron and gamma radiation dose rates at and near locations where the tubes penetrate the vessel wall. Consequently, the rate of radiation damage to the reactor vessel wall at those locations will also increase. This report summarizes calculations of the neutron and gamma flux (particles/cm{sup 2}/s) and the dpa rate (displacements/atom/s) in iron at critical locations in the vessel wall. The calculated dpa rate values have been recently incorporated into statistical damage evaluation codes used in the assessment of radiation induced embrittlement. Calculations were performed using models based on the discrete ordinates methodology and utilizing ORNL two-dimensional and three-dimensional discrete ordinates codes. Models for present and proposed beam tube designs are shown and their results are compared. Results show that for HB-2, the dpa rate in the vessel wall where the tube penetrates the vessel will be increased by {approximately}10 by the proposed enlargement. For HB-4, a smaller increase of {approximately}2.6 is calculated.

  3. Optimizing the Construction of the A1 Collaboration Neutron Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinn, Edward; A1 Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We report on the design and construction of a frame designed to optimize both the time efficiency and construction quality of the large scintillator elements These elements will be assembled to form a neutron detector for use by the A1 Collaboration at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Mainz, Germany. The design had to provide adequate support for the 20 kg scintillator bars while gluing light guides and photomultiplier tubes to both sides of the bars using optical cement. The optical cement requires approximately 24 hours to dry and 100 bars have to be glued with this apparatus. To address each of these issues, several different prototypes were designed and reviewed. The selected apparatus minimized size to meet space constraints, with reduced material cost and provided the most time-efficient way to build the neutron detector. Once the schematic design was selected, we produced technical drawings in AutoDesk Inventor. Assembled the structure and completed gluing of the first batch of scintillators, in order to verify the performance. This apparatus was successful at producing high quality scintillators which were evaluated using cosmic rays. National Science Foundation Grant No. IIA-1358175.

  4. Optimization of Neutron Spectrum in Northwest Beam Tube of Tehran Research Reactor for BNCT, by MCNP Code

    SciTech Connect

    Zamani, M.; Kasesaz, Y.; Khalafi, H.; Shayesteh, M.

    2015-07-01

    In order to gain the neutron spectrum with proper components specification for BNCT, it is necessary to design a Beam Shape Assembling (BSA), include of moderator, collimator, reflector, gamma filter and thermal neutrons filter, in front of the initial radiation beam from the source. According to the result of MCNP4C simulation, the Northwest beam tube has the most optimized neuron flux between three north beam tubes of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR). So, it has been chosen for this purpose. Simulation of the BSA has been done in four above mentioned phases. In each stage, ten best configurations of materials with different length and width were selected as the candidates for the next stage. The last BSA configuration includes of: 78 centimeters of air as an empty space, 40 centimeters of Iron plus 52 centimeters of heavy-water as moderator, 30 centimeters of water or 90 centimeters of Aluminum-Oxide as a reflector, 1 millimeters of lithium (Li) as thermal neutrons filter and finally 3 millimeters of Bismuth (Bi) as a filter of gamma radiation. The result of Calculations shows that if we use this BSA configuration for TRR Northwest beam tube, then the best neutron flux and spectrum will be achieved for BNCT. (authors)

  5. Analysis of a link of embrittlement mechanisms and neutron flux effect as applied to reactor pressure vessel materials of WWER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, B. Z.; Yurchenko, E. V.; Morozov, A. M.; Pirogova, N. E.; Brumovsky, M.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of neutron flux on embrittlement of WWER RPV materials is analyzed for cases when different radiation defects prevail. Data bases on the ductile-brittle transition temperature shifts obtained in the surveillance specimens programs and the research programs are used. The material embrittlement mechanisms for which the flux effect is practically absent and for which the flux effect is remarkable are determined. For case when the phosphorus segregation mechanism dominates the theoretical justification of the absence of the flux effect is performed on the basis of the theory of radiation-enhanced diffusion.

  6. Upper limits to the quiet-time solar neutron flux from 10 to 100 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, S.; Simnett, G. M.; White, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    The UCR large area solid-angle double scatter neutron telescope was flown to search for solar neutrons on 3 balloon flights on September 26, 1971, May 14, 1972 and September 19, 1972. The first two flights were launched from Palestine, Texas and the third from Cape Girardeau, Missouri. The float altitude on each flight was at about 5 g/sq cm residual atmosphere. Neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV were measured. No solar flares occurred during the flights. Upper limits to the quiet time solar neutron fluxes at the 95% confidence level are .00028, .00046, .00096 and .00090 neutrons/sq cm-sec in the energy intervals of 10-30, 30-50, 50-100 and 10-100 MeV, respectively.

  7. Optimization study for an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy at the University of Virginia Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Jr., Thomas Dean

    1995-05-01

    The non-surgical brain cancer treatment modality, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), requires the use of an epithermal neutron beam. This purpose of this thesis was to design an epithermal neutron beam at the University of Virginia Research Reactor (UVAR) suitable for BNCT applications. A suitable epithermal neutron beam for BNCT must have minimal fast neutron and gamma radiation contamination, and yet retain an appreciable intensity. The low power of the UVAR core makes reaching a balance between beam quality and intensity a very challenging design endeavor. The MCNP monte carlo neutron transport code was used to develop an equivalent core radiation source, and to perform the subsequent neutron transport calculations necessary for beam model analysis and development. The code accuracy was validated by benchmarking output against experimental criticality measurements. An epithermal beam was designed for the UVAR, with performance characteristics comparable to beams at facilities with cores of higher power. The epithermal neutron intensity of this beam is 2.2 x 108 n/cm2 • s. The fast neutron and gamma radiation KERMA factors are 10 x 10-11cGy•cm2/nepi and 20 x 10-11 cGy•cm2/nepi , respectively, and the current-to-flux ratio is 0.85. This thesis has shown that the UVAR has the capability to provide BNCT treatments, however the performance characteristics of the final beam of this study were limited by the low core power.

  8. Theory of Ground Ice on Mars and Implications to the Neutron Leakage Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellon, M. T.; Feldman, W. C.; Prettyman, T. H.

    2003-12-01

    Near-surface ground ice (subsurface ice in the upper several meters of the surface) is an important component of the global cycles of water and the behavior of the martian climate. It represents a substantial reservoir of water that can dynamically exchange with the atmosphere on timescales comparable to that of oscillations in the planet's orbit. As the martian obliquity increases or decreases, the global atmospheric humidity also increases or deceases. In response to this and changes in the regolith temperatures, ground ice can undergo cycles of sublimation and condensation, such that the upper meter or two of the martian regolith can become alternately ice-saturated and desiccated. The rate of sublimation and condensation is fast enough to respond to orbital changes, but slow enough that the distribution of ice in one year may not reflect the climate conditions of that year, but instead reflect an average over the previous thousand or so years. Therefore, the present day distribution of ground ice reflects some measure of the longer-term martian climate. In this work we present new calculations of the geographic and depth distribution of ground ice on Mars and draw comparisons with the inferred distribution of ice from Mars Odyssey Neutron Spectrometer observations of the neutron leakage flux. We find that ground ice is stable at relatively shallow depths on Mars, at an ice table such that ice-cemented soil occurs beneath a dry-soil layer, similar to the configuration of ground ice found in the Antarctic Dry Valleys. Predicted ice-table depths vary, but values average around a few centimeters. We also find that the measured geographic distribution of leakage neutrons in the martian southern hemisphere is extremely consistent with a presence of ground ice at a depth in diffusive equilibrium with atmospheric water vapor. The amount of water vapor that best corresponds to the measured neutron flux is near 20 precipitable micrometers, somewhat more water vapor than

  9. A semi-experimental nodal synthesis method for the on-line reconstruction of three-dimensional neutron flux-shapes and reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Jacqmin, R.P.

    1991-12-10

    The safety and optimal performance of large, commercial, light-water reactors require the knowledge at all time of the neutron-flux distribution in the core. In principle, this information can be obtained by solving the time-dependent neutron diffusion equations. However, this approach is complicated and very expensive. Sufficiently accurate, real-time calculations (time scale of approximately one second) are not yet possible on desktop computers, even with fast-running, nodal kinetics codes. A semi-experimental, nodal synthesis method which avoids the solution of the time-dependent, neutron diffusion equations is described. The essential idea of this method is to approximate instantaneous nodal group-fluxes by a linear combination of K, precomputed, three-dimensional, static expansion-functions. The time-dependent coefficients of the combination are found from the requirement that the reconstructed flux-distribution agree in a least-squares sense with the readings of J ({ge}K) fixed, prompt-responding neutron-detectors. Possible numerical difficulties with the least-squares solution of the ill-conditioned, J-by-K system of equations are brought under complete control by the use of a singular-value-decomposition technique. This procedure amounts to the rearrangement of the original, linear combination of K expansion functions into an equivalent more convenient, linear combination of R ({le}K) orthogonalized modes'' of decreasing magnitude. Exceedingly small modes are zeroed to eliminate any risk of roundoff-error amplification, and to assure consistency with the limited accuracy of the data. Additional modes are zeroed when it is desirable to limit the sensitivity of the results to measurement noise.

  10. A semi-experimental nodal synthesis method for the on-line reconstruction of three-dimensional neutron flux-shapes and reactivity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacqmin, R.P.

    1991-12-10

    The safety and optimal performance of large, commercial, light-water reactors require the knowledge at all time of the neutron-flux distribution in the core. In principle, this information can be obtained by solving the time-dependent neutron diffusion equations. However, this approach is complicated and very expensive. Sufficiently accurate, real-time calculations (time scale of approximately one second) are not yet possible on desktop computers, even with fast-running, nodal kinetics codes. A semi-experimental, nodal synthesis method which avoids the solution of the time-dependent, neutron diffusion equations is described. The essential idea of this method is to approximate instantaneous nodal group-fluxes by a linear combination of K, precomputed, three-dimensional, static expansion-functions. The time-dependent coefficients of the combination are found from the requirement that the reconstructed flux-distribution agree in a least-squares sense with the readings of J ({ge}K) fixed, prompt-responding neutron-detectors. Possible numerical difficulties with the least-squares solution of the ill-conditioned, J-by-K system of equations are brought under complete control by the use of a singular-value-decomposition technique. This procedure amounts to the rearrangement of the original, linear combination of K expansion functions into an equivalent more convenient, linear combination of R ({le}K) orthogonalized ``modes`` of decreasing magnitude. Exceedingly small modes are zeroed to eliminate any risk of roundoff-error amplification, and to assure consistency with the limited accuracy of the data. Additional modes are zeroed when it is desirable to limit the sensitivity of the results to measurement noise.

  11. Determination of the thermal neutron flux in a fast neutron beam by use of a boron-coated ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Lüdemann, L; Matzen, T; Matzke, M; Schmidt, R; Scobel, W

    1995-11-01

    The thermal neutron distribution in slow and fast neutron beams is usually determined using the foil activation method. In this work a small magnesium walled ionization chamber, in which the inner surface of the wall has been coated with 10B to increase the sensitivity for thermal neutrons, is used to estimate the thermal neutron component of the beam. After calibration and determination of the directional response in a thermal neutron beam a comparison with foil activation at different depths in water was performed to investigate the reliability of the ionization measurements. The chamber was used in a computer controlled water phantom to measure the depth and lateral distribution of the thermal neutron dose. With this arrangement two-dimensional scans of the thermal neutrons could be performed quickly and with high accuracy.

  12. Progress in the development of the neutron flux monitoring system of the French GEN-IV SFR: simulations and experimental validations [ANIMMA--2015-IO-98

    SciTech Connect

    Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; De Izarra, G.; Elter, Zs.; Pazsit, I.; Verma, V.; Hellesen, C.; Jacobsson, S.; Hamrita, H.; Bakkali, M.; Chapoutier, N.; Scholer, A-C.; Verrier, D.; Cantonnet, B.; Nappe, J-C.; Molinie, P.; Dessante, P.; Hanna, R.; Kirkpatrick, M.; Odic, E.; Jadot, F.

    2015-07-01

    The neutron flux monitoring system of the French GEN-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor will rely on high temperature fission chambers installed in the reactor vessel and capable of operating over a wide-range neutron flux. The definition of such a system is presented and the technological solutions are justified with the use of simulation and experimental results. (authors)

  13. Operation Sun Beam shots Little Feller I and II, Johnie boy, and Small Boy. Project Officer's report. Project 2. 3. Neutron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Rigotti, D.L.; McNeilly, J.H.; Brady, R.E.; Tarbox, J.L.

    1985-09-01

    The objectives of this project were (1) to measure free-field neutron flux and spectrum as required in support of other projects; (2) to document the neutron flux versus ground range; and (3) to determine the effect of various blast containers and shields on detector activation.

  14. Detailed studies of Minor Actinide transmutation-incineration in high-intensity neutron fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Bringer, O.; Blandin, C.; Oriol, L.

    2006-07-01

    The Mini-INCA project is dedicated to the measurement of incineration-transmutation chains and potentials of minor actinides in high-intensity thermal neutron fluxes. In this context, new types of detectors and methods of analysis have been developed. The {sup 241}Am and {sup 232}Th transmutation-incineration chains have been studied and several capture and fission cross sections measured very precisely, showing some discrepancies with existing data or evaluated data. An impact study was made on different based-like GEN-IV reactors. It underlines the necessity to proceed to precise measurements for a large number of minor-actinides that contribute to these future incineration scenarios. (authors)

  15. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR).

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, S. C.

    1998-01-14

    A neutronic feasibility study was performed to determine the uranium densities that would be required to convert the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from HEU (93%) to LEU (<20%)fuel. The LEU core that was studied is the same as the current HEU core, except for potential changes in the design of the fuel plates. The study concludes that conversion of HFIR from HEU to LEU fuel would require an advanced fuel with a uranium density of 6-7 gU/cm{sup 3} in the inner fuel element and 9-10 gU/cm{sup 3} in the outer fuel element to match the cycle length of the HEU core. LEU fuel with uranium density up to 4.8 gU/cm{sup 3} is currently qualified for research reactor use. Modifications in fuel grading and burnable poison distribution are needed to produce an acceptable power distribution.

  16. A U.S. high-flux neutron facility for fusion materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Rei, Donald J

    2010-01-01

    Materials for a fusion reactor first wall and blanket structure must be able to reliably function in an extreme environment that includes 10-15 MW-year/m{sup 2} neutron and heat fluences. The various materials and structural challenges are as difficult and important as achieving a burning plasma. Overcoming radiation damage degradation is the rate-controlling step in fusion materials development. Recent advances with oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels show promise in meeting reactor requirements, while multi-timescale atomistic simulations of defect-grain boundary interactions in model copper systems reveal surprising self-annealing phenomenon. While these results are promising, simultaneous evaluation of radiation effects displacement damage ({le} 200 dpa) and in-situ He generation ({le} 2000 appm) at prototypical reactor temperatures and chemical environments is still required. There is currently no experimental facility in the U.S. that can meet these requirements for macroscopic samples. The E.U. and U.S. fusion communities have recently concluded that a fusion-relevant, high-flux neutron source for accelerated characterization of the effects of radiation damage to materials is a top priority for the next decade. Data from this source will be needed to validate designs for the multi-$B next-generation fusion facilities such as the CTF, ETF, and DEMO, that are envisioned to follow ITER and NIF.

  17. Determining the Magnitude of Neutron and Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) Fluxes at the Moon using the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector during the Historic Space-Age Era of High GCR Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, G.; Sagdeev, R.; Boynton, W. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Milikh, G. M.; Su, J. J.; Livengood, T. A.; McClanahan, T. P.; Evans, L.; Starr, R. D.; litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) was launched June 18, 2009 during an historic space-age era of minimum solar activity [1]. The lack of solar sunspot activity signaled a complex set of heliospheric phenomena [2,3,4] that also gave rise to a period of unprecedentedly high Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) flux [5]. These events coincided with the primary mission of the Lunar Exploration Neutron Detector (LEND, [6]), onboard LRO in a nominal 50-km circular orbit of the Moon [7]. Methods to calculate the emergent neutron albedo population using Monte Carlo techniques [8] rely on an estimate of the GCR flux and spectra calibrated at differing periods of solar activity [9,10,11]. Estimating the actual GCR flux at the Moon during the LEND's initial period of operation requires a correction using a model-dependent heliospheric transport modulation parameter [12] to adjust the GCR flux appropriate to this unique solar cycle. These corrections have inherent uncertainties depending on model details [13]. Precisely determining the absolute neutron and GCR fluxes is especially important in understanding the emergent lunar neutrons measured by LEND and subsequently in estimating the hydrogen/water content in the lunar regolith [6]. LEND is constructed with a set of neutron detectors to meet differing purposes [6]. Specifically there are two sets of detector systems that measure the flux of epithermal neutrons: a) the uncollimated Sensor for Epi-Thermal Neutrons (SETN) and b) the Collimated Sensor for Epi-Thermal Neutrons (CSETN). LEND SETN and CSETN observations form a complementary set of simultaneous measurements that determine the absolute scale of emergent lunar neutron flux in an unambiguous fashion and without the need for correcting to differing solar-cycle conditions. LEND measurements are combined with a detailed understanding of the sources of instrumental back-ground, and the performance of CSETN and SETN. This comparison allows us to calculate a constant scale factor

  18. Neutron proton crystallography station (PCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Zoe; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Johnson, Hannah; Mustyakimov, Marat

    2009-01-01

    The PCS (Protein Crystallography Station) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a unique facility in the USA that is designed and optimized for detecting and collecting neutron diffraction data from macromolecular crystals. PCS utilizes the 20 Hz spallation neutron source at LANSCE to enable time-of-flight measurements using 0.6-7.0 {angstrom} neutrons. This increases the neutron flux on the sample by using a wavelength range that is optimal for studying macromolecular crystal structures. The diagram below show a schematic of PCS and photos of the detector and instrument cave.

  19. Axial Neutron Flux Evaluation in a Tokamak System: a Possible Transmutation Blanket Position for a Fusion-Fission Transmutation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasquez, Carlos E.; de P. Barros, Graiciany; Pereira, Claubia; Fortini Veloso, Maria A.; Costa, Antonella L.

    2012-08-01

    A sub-critical advanced reactor based on Tokamak technology with a D-T fusion neutron source is an innovative type of nuclear system. Due to the large number of neutrons produced by fusion reactions, such a system could be useful in the transmutation process of transuranic elements (Pu and minor actinides (MAs)). However, to enhance the MA transmutation efficiency, it is necessary to have a large neutron wall loading (high neutron fluence) with a broad energy spectrum in the fast neutron energy region. Therefore, it is necessary to know and define the neutron fluence along the radial axis and its characteristics. In this work, the neutron flux and the interaction frequency along the radial axis are evaluated for various materials used to build the first wall. W alloy, beryllium, and the combination of both were studied, and the regions more suitable to transmutation were determined. The results demonstrated that the best zone in which to place a transmutation blanket is limited by the heat sink and the shield block. Material arrangements of W alloy/W alloy and W alloy/beryllium would be able to meet the requirements of the high fluence and hard spectrum that are needed for transuranic transmutation. The system was simulated using the MCNP code, data from the ITER Final Design Report, 2001, and the Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library/MC-2.1 nuclear data library.

  20. Fluxes of fast and epithermal neutrons from Lunar Prospector: evidence for water ice at the lunar poles.

    PubMed

    Feldman, W C; Maurice, S; Binder, A B; Barraclough, B L; Elphic, R C; Lawrence, D J

    1998-09-04

    Maps of epithermal- and fast-neutron fluxes measured by Lunar Prospector were used to search for deposits enriched in hydrogen at both lunar poles. Depressions in epithermal fluxes were observed close to permanently shaded areas at both poles. The peak depression at the North Pole is 4.6 percent below the average epithermal flux intensity at lower latitudes, and that at the South Pole is 3.0 percent below the low-latitude average. No measurable depression in fast neutrons is seen at either pole. These data are consistent with deposits of hydrogen in the form of water ice that are covered by as much as 40 centimeters of desiccated regolith within permanently shaded craters near both poles.

  1. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Kelton, K. F.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Goldman, A. I.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Egami, T.

    2016-01-15

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr{sub 64}Ni{sub 36} measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg)

  2. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Mauro, N A; Vogt, A J; Derendorf, K S; Johnson, M L; Rustan, G E; Quirinale, D G; Kreyssig, A; Lokshin, K A; Neuefeind, J C; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A I; Egami, T; Kelton, K F

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg).

  3. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    DOE PAGES

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elasticmore » and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).« less

  4. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. But, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. Furthermore, to demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample ( 100 mg).

  5. Monitoring of the time and spatial distribution of neutron-flux spectral density outside the Russian segment of the International Space Station based on data from the BTN-Neutron space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. L.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Nuzhdin, I. O.; Vostrukhin, A. V.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Tretyakov, V. I.; Fedosov, F. S.

    2017-03-01

    Results of measurements of neutron-flux spectral density in the vicinity of the International Space Station (ISS) based on BTN-Neutron space experimental data acquired in 2007-2014 have been presented in this paper. It has been shown that, during the flight of the ISS over different regions of the Earth's surface, neutron flux in the energy range of 0.4 eV-15 MeV varies from 0.1 n/sm2/s in equatorial regions to 50 n/sm2/s in the South Atlantic anomaly region. The measurements were used to estimate the contribution of the neutron component to the overall exposure dose rate. The total contribution of fast neutrons is about 0.1-0.4 μ Zv/h above the equator area and more than 50 μ Zv/h above the South Atlantic anomaly region. A data analysis of BTN-Neutron data also showed that the time profile of neutron flux has long-periodic variations. It was found that, under the influence of Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), modulation during 24th solar cycle neutron flux changed almost twofold (above high latitude regions). Maximum values of neutron flux were observed in January 2010 and minimum values were observed in January 2014.

  6. Optimized performance for neutron interrogation to detect SNM

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D R; Asztalos, S J; Biltoft, P J; Church, J A; Descalle, M; Hall, J M; Luu, T C; Manatt, D R; Mauger, G J; Norman, E B; Petersen, D C; Pruet, J A; Prussin, S G

    2007-02-14

    A program of simulations and validating experiments was utilized to evaluate a concept for neutron interrogation of commercial cargo containers that would reliably detect special nuclear material (SNM). The goals were to develop an interrogation system capable of detecting a 5 kg solid sphere of high-enriched uranium (HEU) even when deeply embedded in commercial cargo. Performance goals included a minimum detection probability, P{sub d} {ge} 95%, a maximum occurrence of false positive indications, P{sub fA} {le} 0.001, and maximum scan duration of t {le} 1 min. The conditions necessary to meet these goals were demonstrated in experimental measurements even when the SNM is deeply buried in any commercial cargo, and are projected to be met successfully in the most challenging cases of steel or hydrocarbons at areal density {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. Optimal performance was obtained with a collimated ({Delta}{Theta} = {+-} 15{sup o}) neutron beam at energy E{sub n} = 7 MeV produced by the D(d,n) reaction with the deuteron energy E{sub d} = 4 MeV. Two fission product signatures are utilized to uniquely identify SNM, including delayed neutrons detected in a large array of polyethylene moderated 3He proportional counters and high energy {beta}-delayed fission product {gamma}-radiation detected in a large array of 61 x 61 x 25 cm{sup 3} plastic scintillators. The latter detectors are nearly blind to normal terrestrial background radiation by setting an energy threshold on the detection at E{sub min} {ge} 3 MeV. Detection goals were attained with a low beam current (I{sub d} = 15-65 {micro}A) source up to {rho}L = 75 g/cm{sup 2} utilizing long irradiations, T = 30 sec, and long counting times, t = 30-100 sec. Projecting to a higher beam current, I{sub d} {ge} 600 {micro}A and larger detector array the detection and false alarm goals would be attained even with intervening cargo overburden as large as {rho}L {le} 150 g/cm{sup 2}. The latter cargo thickness corresponds to

  7. Decay of the pulsed thermal neutron flux in two-zone hydrogenous systems Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP standard data libraries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiącek, Urszula; Krynicka, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed neutron experiments in two-zone spherical and cylindrical geometry has been simulated using the MCNP code. The systems are built of hydrogenous materials. The inner zone is filled with aqueous solutions of absorbers (H3BO3 or KCl). It is surrounded by the outer zone built of Plexiglas. The system is irradiated with the pulsed thermal neutron flux and the thermal neutron decay in time is observed. Standard data libraries of the thermal neutron scattering cross-sections of hydrogen in hydrogenous substances have been used to simulate the neutron transport. The time decay constant of the fundamental mode of the thermal neutron flux determined in each simulation has been compared with the corresponding result of the real pulsed neutron experiment.

  8. Optimal gate-width setting for passive neutrons multiplicity counting

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A

    2010-01-01

    When setting up a passive neutron coincidence counter it is natural to ask what coincidence gate settings should be used to optimize the counting precision. If the gate width is too short then signal is lost and the precision is compromised because in a given period only a few coincidence events will be observed. On the other hand if the gate is too large the signal will be maximized but it will also be compromised by the high level of random pile-up or Accidental coincidence events which must be subtracted. In the case of shift register electronics connected to an assay chamber with an exponential dieaway profile operating in the regime where the Accidentals rate dominates the Reals coincidence rate but where dead-time is not a concern, simple arguments allow one to show that the relative precision on the net Reals rate is minimized when the coincidence gate is set to about 1.2 times the lie dieaway time of the system. In this work we show that making the same assumptions it is easy to show that the relative precision on the Triples rates is also at a minimum when the relative precision of the Doubles (or Reals) is at a minimum. Although the analysis is straightforward to our knowledge such a discussion has not been documented in the literature before. Actual measurement systems do not always behave in the ideal we choose to model them. Fortunately however the variation in the relative precision as a function of gate width is rather flat for traditional safeguards counters and so the performance is somewhat forgiving of the exact choice. The derivation further serves to delineate the important parameters which determine the relative counting precision of the Doubles and Triples rates under the regime considered. To illustrate the similarities and differences we consider the relative standard deviation that might be anticipated for a passive correlation count of an axial section of a spent nuclear fuel assembly under practically achievable conditions.

  9. Observation of Periodic and Transient Cosmic Ray Flux Variations by the Daejeon Neutron Monitor and the Seoul muon Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Suyeon; Kang, Jeongsoo

    2013-09-01

    Recently, two instruments of cosmic ray are operating in South Korea. One is Seoul muon detector after October 1999 and the other is Daejeon neutron monitor (Kang et al. 2012) after October 2011. The former consists of four small plastic scintillators and the latter is the standard 18 NM 64 type. In this report, we introduce the characteristics of both instruments. We also analyze the flux variations of cosmic ray such as diurnal variation and Forbush decrease. As the result, the muon flux shows the typical seasonal and diurnal variations. The neutron flux also shows the diurnal variation. The phase which shows the maximum flux in the diurnal variation is around 13-14 local time. We found a Forbush decrease on 7 March 2012 by both instruments. It is also identified by Nagoya multi-direction muon telescope and Oulu neutron monitor. The observation of cosmic ray at Jangbogo station as well as in Korean peninsula can support the important information on space weather in local area. It can also enhance the status of Korea in the international community of cosmic ray experiments.

  10. High thermal neutron flux effects on structural and macroscopic properties of alkali-borosilicate glasses used as neutron guide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffy, R.; Peuget, S.; Schweins, R.; Beaucour, J.; Bermejo, F. J.

    2016-05-01

    The behaviour of four alkali-borosilicate glasses under homogeneous thermal neutron irradiation has been studied. These materials are used for the manufacturing of neutron guides which are installed in most facilities as devices to transport neutrons from intense sources such as nuclear reactors or spallation sources up to scientific instruments. Several experimental techniques such as Raman, NMR, SANS and STEM have been employed in order to understand the rather different macroscopic behaviour under irradiation of materials that belong to a same glass family. The results have shown that the remarkable glass shrinking observed for neutron doses below 0.5 ·1018 n/cm2 critically depends upon the presence of domains where silicate and borate network do not mix.

  11. Design and optimization of a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator and dose evaluation using a simulated head phantom.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2012-12-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to design a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator. The optimization of this configuration has been realized in different steps. This proposed system consists of metallic uranium as neutron multiplier, TiF(3) and Al(2)O(3) as moderators, Pb as reflector, Ni as shield and Li-Poly as collimator to guide neutrons toward the patient position. The in-air parameters recommended by IAEA were assessed for this proposed configuration without using any filters which enables us to have a high epithermal neutron flux at the beam port. Also a simulated Snyder head phantom was used to evaluate dose profiles due to the irradiation of designed beam. The dose evaluation results and depth-dose curves show that the neutron beam designed in this work is effective for deep-seated brain tumor treatments even with D-T neutron generator with a neutron yield of 2.4×10(12) n/s. The Monte Carlo Code MCNP-4C is used in order to perform these calculations.

  12. Precision neutron flux measurements and applications using the Alpha Gamma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eamon; Alpha Gamma; BL2 Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Alpha Gamma device is a totally-absorbing 10 B neutron detector designed to measure the absolute detection efficiency of a thin-film lithium neutron monitor on a monoenergetic neutron beam. The detector has been shown to measure neutron fluence with an absolute accuracy of 0.06%. This capability has been used to perform the first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n , t) 4He cross section at sub-thermal energy, improve the neutron fluence determination in a past beam neutron lifetime measurement by a factor of five, and is being used to calibrate the neutron monitors for use in the upcoming beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2 (NIST Beam Lifetime 2). The principle of the measurement method will presented and the applications will be discussed. We would like to acknowledge support of this research through the NSF-PHY-1068712 grant as well as the NIST Precision Measurement Grant program.

  13. Precision neutron flux measurements and applications using the Alpha Gamma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Eamon

    2016-03-01

    The Alpha Gamma device is a totally-absorbing 10 B neutron detector designed to measure the absolute detection efficiency of a thin-film lithium neutron monitor on a monoenergetic neutron beam. The detector has been shown to measure neutron fluence with an absolute accuracy of 0.06%. This capability has been used to perform the first direct, absolute measurement of the 6Li(n,t) 4He cross section at sub-thermal energy, improve the neutron fluence determination in a past beam neutron lifetime measurement by a factor of five, and is being used to calibrate the neutron monitors for use in the upcoming beam neutron lifetime measurement BL2 (NIST Beam Lifetime 2). The principle of the measurement method will presented and the applications will be discussed. We would like to acknowledge support of this research through the NSF-PHY-1068712 Grant as well as the NIST Precision Measurement Grant program.

  14. Altitude survey of the galactic cosmic ray flux with a Mini Neutron Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, A.; Borgazzi, A.; Caballero-Lopez, R.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of a survey of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux measured at different altitudes, from the sea level, up to ∼4600 m a.s.l. This altitude survey was carried out with a "Mini" Neutron Monitor (MNM), and performed inside a small area of the central part of Mexico (centered around the 19° N and 97° W position) where the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity is ∼7.8 GV. In particular, the latitudinal variation of the survey was less than 1°. making negligible the associated changes in the geomagnetic cutoff rigidity (∼0.4 GV). This is the first time that an altitude survey has been performed using a MNM. This survey allowed us to compute the barometric coefficient β = 0.00732 ± 0.00054mbar-1 and β = 0.00729 ± 0.00055mbar-1 when we correct our data by the differences in the cutoff rigidity. This coefficient may be used to calibrate and correct the data of other cosmic ray detectors. We show that from the sea level up to ∼4600 m the barometric coefficient is constant and does not depend on the altitude as found in previous surveys. For comparison, we also present the counting rates measured by the NM64 located at Mexico City, as well as other observations carried out to determine the stability of the MNM.

  15. Evaluation of neutron flux parameters in irradiation sites of research reactor using the Westcott-formalism for the k0 neutron activation analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasban, H.; Hamid, Ashraf

    2015-12-01

    Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis using k0 (k0-INAA) method has been used to determine a number of elements in sediment samples collected from El-Manzala Lake in Egypt. k0-INAA according to Westcott's formalism has been implemented using the complete irradiation kit of the fast pneumatic rabbit and some selected manually loaded irradiation sites for short and long irradiation at Egypt Second Research Reactor (ETRR-2). Zr-Au and Co sets as neutron flux monitors are used to determine the neutron flux parameters (f and α) in each irradiation sites. Two reference materials IAEA Soil-7 samples have been inserted and implemented for data validation and an internal monostandard multi monitor used (k0 based IM-NAA). It was given a good agreement between the experimental analyzed values and that obtained of the certified values. The major and trace elements in the sediment samples have been evaluated with the use of Co as an internal and Au as an external monostandard comparators. The concentrations of the elements (Cr, Mn and Zn) in the sediment samples of the present work are discussed regarding to those obtained from other sites.

  16. Characterization of neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites of a 37 GBq 241Am-Be isotopic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, Haluk; Budak, Mustafa Guray; Karadag, Mustafa; Yüksel, Alptuğ Özer

    2014-11-01

    For the applicability of instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique, an irradiation unit with a 37 GBq 241Am-Be neutron source was installed at Institute of Nuclear Sciences of Ankara University. Design and configuration properties of the irradiation unit are described. It has two different sample irradiation positions, one is called site #1 having a pneumatic sample transfer system and the other is site #2 having a location for manual use. In order to characterize neutron flux spectra in the irradiation sites, the measurement results were obtained for thermal (Фth) and epithermal neutron fluxes (Фepi), thermal to epithermal flux ratio (f) and epithermal spectrum shaping factors (α) by employing cadmium ratios of gold (Au) and molybdenum (Mo) monitors. The activities produced in these foils were measured by using a p-type, 44.8% relative efficiency HPGe well detector. For the measured γ-rays, self-absorption and true coincidence summing effects were taken into account. Additionally, thermal neutron self-shielding and resonance neutron self-shielding effects were taken into account in the measured results. For characterization of site #1, the required parameters were found to be Фth = (2.11 ± 0.05) × 103 n cm-2 s-1, Фepi = (3.32 ± 0.17) × 101 n cm-2 s-1, f = 63.6 ± 1.5, α = 0.045 ± 0.009, respectively. Similarly, those parameters were measured in site #2 as Фth = (1.49 ± 0.04) × 103 n cm-2 s-1, Фepi = (2.93 ± 0.15) × 101 n cm-2 s-1, f = 50.9 ± 1.3 and α = 0.038 ± 0.008. The results for f-values indicate that good thermalization of fast neutrons on the order of 98% was achieved in both sample irradiation sites. This is because an optimum combination of water and paraffin moderator is used in the present configuration. In addition, the shielding requirements are met by using natural boron oxide powder (5.5 cm) and boron loaded paraffin layers against neutrons, and a 15 cm thick lead bricks against gamma-rays from source and its

  17. Assessing FPAR Source and Parameter Optimization Scheme in Application of a Diagnostic Carbon Flux Model

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D P; Ritts, W D; Wharton, S; Thomas, C; Monson, R; Black, T A

    2009-02-26

    The combination of satellite remote sensing and carbon cycle models provides an opportunity for regional to global scale monitoring of terrestrial gross primary production, ecosystem respiration, and net ecosystem production. FPAR (the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by the plant canopy) is a critical input to diagnostic models, however little is known about the relative effectiveness of FPAR products from different satellite sensors nor about the sensitivity of flux estimates to different parameterization approaches. In this study, we used multiyear observations of carbon flux at four eddy covariance flux tower sites within the conifer biome to evaluate these factors. FPAR products from the MODIS and SeaWiFS sensors, and the effects of single site vs. cross-site parameter optimization were tested with the CFLUX model. The SeaWiFs FPAR product showed greater dynamic range across sites and resulted in slightly reduced flux estimation errors relative to the MODIS product when using cross-site optimization. With site-specific parameter optimization, the flux model was effective in capturing seasonal and interannual variation in the carbon fluxes at these sites. The cross-site prediction errors were lower when using parameters from a cross-site optimization compared to parameter sets from optimization at single sites. These results support the practice of multisite optimization within a biome for parameterization of diagnostic carbon flux models.

  18. Estimation of low energy neutron flux (En <= 15 MeV) in India-based Neutrino Observatory cavern using Monte Carlo techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokania, N.; Singh, V.; Mathimalar, S.; Garai, A.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Bhushan, K. G.

    2015-12-01

    The neutron flux at low energy (En <= 15 MeV) resulting from the radioactivity of the rock in the underground cavern of the India-based Neutrino Observatory is estimated using Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The neutron production rate due to the spontaneous fission of 235, 238U, 232Th and (α, n) interactions in the rock is determined employing the actual rock composition. It is shown that the total flux is equivalent to a finite size cylindrical rock (D=L=140 cm) element. The energy integrated neutron flux thus obtained at the center of the underground tunnel is 2.76 (0.47) × 10-6 n cm-2 s-1. The estimated neutron flux is of the same order (~10-6 n cm-2 s-1) as measured in other underground laboratories.

  19. Hybrid optimization for 13C metabolic flux analysis using systems parametrized by compactification

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tae Hoon; Frick, Oliver; Heinzle, Elmar

    2008-01-01

    Background The importance and power of isotope-based metabolic flux analysis and its contribution to understanding the metabolic network is increasingly recognized. Its application is, however, still limited partly due to computational inefficiency. 13C metabolic flux analysis aims to compute in vivo metabolic fluxes in terms of metabolite balancing extended by carbon isotopomer balances and involves a nonlinear least-squares problem. To solve the problem more efficiently, improved numerical optimization techniques are necessary. Results For flux computation, we developed a gradient-based hybrid optimization algorithm. Here, independent flux variables were compactified into [0, 1)-ranged variables using a single transformation rule. The compactified parameters could be discriminated between non-identifiable and identifiable variables after model linearization. The developed hybrid algorithm was applied to the central metabolism of Bacillus subtilis with only succinate and glutamate as carbon sources. This creates difficulties caused by symmetry of succinate leading to limited introduction of 13C labeling information into the system. The algorithm was found to be superior to its parent algorithms and to global optimization methods both in accuracy and speed. The hybrid optimization with tolerance adjustment quickly converged to the minimum with close to zero deviation and exactly re-estimated flux variables. In the metabolic network studied, some fluxes were found to be either non-identifiable or nonlinearly correlated. The non-identifiable fluxes could correctly be predicted a priori using the model identification method applied, whereas the nonlinear flux correlation was revealed only by identification runs using different starting values a posteriori. Conclusion This fast, robust and accurate optimization method is useful for high-throughput metabolic flux analysis, a posteriori identification of possible parameter correlations, and also for Monte Carlo

  20. Optimizing a neutron-beam focusing device for the direct geometry time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the FRM II reactor source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, N. G.; Simeoni, G. G.; Lefmann, K.

    2016-04-01

    A dedicated beam-focusing device has been designed for the direct geometry thermal-cold neutron time-of-flight spectrometer TOFTOF at the neutron facility FRM II (Garching, Germany). The prototype, based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept, benefits from the adaptive-optics technology (adjustable supermirror curvature) and the compact size (only 0.5 m long). We have simulated the neutron transport across the entire guide system. We present a detailed computer characterization of the existing device, along with the study of the factors mostly influencing the future improvement. We have optimized the simulated prototype as a function of the neutron wavelength, accounting also for all relevant features of a real instrument like the non-reflecting side edges. The results confirm the "chromatic" displacement of the focal point (flux density maximum) at fixed supermirror curvature, and the ability of a variable curvature to keep the focal point at the sample position. Our simulations are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions and the experimentally measured beam profile. With respect to the possibility of a further upgrade, we find that supermirror coatings with m-values higher than 3.5 would have only marginal influence on the optimal behaviour, whereas comparable spectrometers could take advantage of longer focusing segments, with particular impact for the thermal region of the neutron spectrum.

  1. Optimizing laboratory-based radon flux measurements for sediments.

    PubMed

    Chanyotha, Supitcha; Kranrod, Chutima; Kritsananuwat, Rawiwan; Lane-Smith, Derek; Burnett, William C

    2016-07-01

    Radon flux via diffusion from sediments and other materials may be determined in the laboratory by circulating air through the sample and a radon detector in a closed loop. However, this approach is complicated by the necessity of having to determine the total air volume in the system and accounting for any small air leaks that can arise if using extended measurement periods. We designed a simple open-loop configuration that includes a measured mass of wet sediment and water inside a gas-tight reaction flask connected to a drying system and a radon-in-air analyzer. Ambient air flows through two charcoal columns before entering the reaction vessel to eliminate incoming radon. After traveling through the reaction flask, the air passes the drier and the radon analyzer and is then vented. After some time, the radon activity will reach a steady state depending upon the airflow rate. With this approach, the radon flux via diffusion is simply the product of the steady-state radon activity (Bq/m(3)) multiplied by the airflow rate (mL/min). We demonstrated that this setup could produce good results for materials that produce relatively high radon fluxes. We also show that a modified closed system approach, including radon removal of the incoming air by charcoal filtration in a bypass, can produce very good results including samples with very low emission rates.

  2. Detection of 235U in hydrogenous cargo with Differential Die-Away Analysis and optimized neutron detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kelly A.; Gozani, Tsahi

    2007-08-01

    Differential Die-Away Analysis (DDAA) is a sensitive technique for detecting the presence of fissile materials such as 235U and 239Pu. In DDAA, a neutron generator produces repetitive pulses of neutrons that are directed into a cargo being inspected. As each pulse passes through the cargo, the neutrons are thermalized and absorbed. The thermalization process is very rapid and the population of the source and epithermal neutrons decays away within microseconds. The population of thermal neutrons, however, decays much slower with the diffusion decay time of the inspected medium (thermal neutron "die away" time), on the order of hundreds of microseconds. If Special Nuclear Material (SNM) is present, the thermalized neutrons from the source will cause fissions that produce a new source of neutrons. These fast fission neutrons decay with a time very similar to that of the thermal neutron die-away of the surrounding cargo. The sensitivity of DDAA for a given source of neutrons critically depends on optimizing the fast/epithermal neutron detection system. Optimization involves both time response and detection efficiency. Optimized detectors were able to detect fissile material throughout pallets of cargo.

  3. Optimization of Neutron Activation of Carbon at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padalino, S.; Polsin, D.; Russ, M.; Sangster, T.; LLE Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    To determine the rhoR of ignition scale targets at the NIF, a carbon activation diagnostic is being developed to measure tertiary neutron yield. It has been shown theoretically that the ratio of the tertiary yield to the primary yield is directly related to rhoR and is nearly independent of hot-spot electron temperature. Due to carbon's 20.3 MeV reaction threshold, it is insensitive to 14.7 MeV primary neutrons which are measured by other means and allows for an unambiguous determination of the tertiary to primary ratio. The energy distribution of the 20 to 30 MeV DT neutrons folded with the (n,2n) cross section in this energy region determines the degree in which carbon will be activated. However, the published 12C(n,2n) cross sections in this energy range are bifurcated. To set upper and lower limits on the sensitivity of the activation diagnostic, a finite element calculation was used to determine the limits of the method's usefulness at differing primary yields and solid angles for the NIF chamber. It was further used to verify MCNPX activation calculations. This work was funded in part by the USDOE through LLE.

  4. Optimizing Neutron Thermal Scattering Effects in very High Temperature Reactors. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2014-07-08

    This project aims to develop a holistic understanding of the phenomenon of neutron thermalization in the VHTR. Neutron thermalization is dependent on the type and structure of the moderating material. The fact that the moderator (and reflector) in the VHTR is a solid material will introduce new and interesting considerations that do not apply in other (e.g. light water) reactors. The moderator structure is expected to undergo radiation induced changes as the irradiation (or burnup) history progresses. In this case, the induced changes in structure will have a direct impact on many properties including the neutronic behavior. This can be easily anticipated if one recognizes the dependence of neutron thermalization on the scattering law of the moderator. For the pebble bed reactor, it is anticipated that the moderating behavior can be tailored, e.g. using moderators that consist of composite materials, which could allow improved optimization of the moderator-to-fuel ratio.

  5. Capacitively coupled RF voltage probe having optimized flux linkage

    DOEpatents

    Moore, James A.; Sparks, Dennis O.

    1999-02-02

    An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

  6. Intense fusion neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuteev, B. V.; Goncharov, P. R.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Khripunov, V. I.

    2010-04-01

    The review describes physical principles underlying efficient production of free neutrons, up-to-date possibilities and prospects of creating fission and fusion neutron sources with intensities of 1015-1021 neutrons/s, and schemes of production and application of neutrons in fusion-fission hybrid systems. The physical processes and parameters of high-temperature plasmas are considered at which optimal conditions for producing the largest number of fusion neutrons in systems with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement are achieved. The proposed plasma methods for neutron production are compared with other methods based on fusion reactions in nonplasma media, fission reactions, spallation, and muon catalysis. At present, intense neutron fluxes are mainly used in nanotechnology, biotechnology, material science, and military and fundamental research. In the near future (10-20 years), it will be possible to apply high-power neutron sources in fusion-fission hybrid systems for producing hydrogen, electric power, and technological heat, as well as for manufacturing synthetic nuclear fuel and closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Neutron sources with intensities approaching 1020 neutrons/s may radically change the structure of power industry and considerably influence the fundamental and applied science and innovation technologies. Along with utilizing the energy produced in fusion reactions, the achievement of such high neutron intensities may stimulate wide application of subcritical fast nuclear reactors controlled by neutron sources. Superpower neutron sources will allow one to solve many problems of neutron diagnostics, monitor nano-and biological objects, and carry out radiation testing and modification of volumetric properties of materials at the industrial level. Such sources will considerably (up to 100 times) improve the accuracy of neutron physics experiments and will provide a better understanding of the structure of matter, including that of the neutron itself.

  7. Flux and Instrumentation Upgrade for the Epithermal Neutron Beam Facility at Washington State University

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; J.R. Venhuizen; C.E. Wemple; G. E. Tripard; S. Sharp; K. Fox

    2004-11-01

    An epithermal neutron beam facility for preclinical neutron capture therapy research has been constructed at the Washington State University TRIGA research reactor installation. Subsequent to a recent upgrade, this new facility offers a high-purity epithermal beam with intensity on the order of 1.2×109 n/cm2 s. Key features include a fluoride-based design for the neutron filtering and moderating components as well as a novel collimator design that allows ease of assembly and disassembly of the beamline components.

  8. Flux pinning and flux creep in neutron irradiated (Y,Gd)Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, J.O. Superconductivity Research Lab., Tokyo ); Sickafus, K.E.; Peterson, D.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Powder samples of Y{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} were irradiated with mixed spectrum ({approximately}50% E<0.5eV, 50% E>0.5eV) neutrons with most interactions expected to occur at the Gd site. As a function of fluence the samples showed increased ({approximately}X3-X8) magnetically measured critical current densities J{sub c} at low fluences, falling off at the highest values. An analysis of magnetic relaxation data, which allows for a nonlinear pinning potential U vs J relationship, revealed substantial increases in U at constant J, indicating that the irradiation introduced more effective pinning centers than those originally present. 13 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Solar flux forecasting using mutual information with an optimal delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashrafi, S.; Conway, D.; Rokni, M.; Sperling, R.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    Solar flux F(sub 10.7) directly affects the atmospheric density, thereby changing the lifetime and prediction of satellite orbits. For this reason, accurate forecasting of F(sub 10.7) is crucial for orbit determination of spacecraft. Our attempts to model and forecast F(sub 10.7) uncovered highly entangled dynamics. We concluded that the general lack of predictability in solar activity arises from its nonlinear nature. Nonlinear dynamics allow us to predict F(sub 10.7) more accurately than is possible using stochastic methods for time scales shorter than a characteristic horizon, and with about the same accuracy as using stochastic techniques when the forecasted data exceed this horizon. The forecast horizon is a function of two dynamical invariants: the attractor dimension and the Lyapunov exponent. In recent years, estimation of the attractor dimension reconstructed from a time series has become an important tool in data analysis. In calculating the invariants of the system, the first necessary step is the reconstruction of the attractor for the system from the time-delayed values of the time series. The choice of the time delay is critical for this reconstruction. For an infinite amount of noise-free data, the time delay can, in principle, be chosen almost arbitrarily. However, the quality of the phase portraits produced using the time-delay technique is determined by the value chosen for the delay time. Fraser and Swinney have shown that a good choice for this time delay is the one suggested by Shaw, which uses the first local minimum of the mutual information rather than the autocorrelation function to determine the time delay. This paper presents a refinement of this criterion and applies the refined technique to solar flux data to produce a forecast of the solar activity.

  10. BEAM-LOSS DRIVEN DESIGN OPTIMIZATION FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) RING.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; CAMERON,P.; DANBY,G.; GARDNER,C.J.; JACKSON,J.; LEE,Y.Y.; LUDEWIG,H.; MALITSKY,N.; RAPARIA,D.; TSOUPAS,N.; WENG,W.T.; ZHANG,S.Y.

    1999-03-29

    This paper summarizes three-stage design optimization for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ring: linear machine design (lattice, aperture, injection, magnet field errors and misalignment), beam core manipulation (painting, space charge, instabilities, RF requirements), and beam halo consideration (collimation, envelope variation, e-p issues etc.).

  11. Optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for the Treatment of Undifferentiated Thyroid Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra; Thomasz, Lisa M.Sc.; Longhino, Juan; Perona, Marina; Calzetta, Osvaldo; Blaumann, Herman; Rebagliati, Raul Jimenez; Cabrini, Romulo; Kahl, Steven; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Pisarev, Mario Alberto

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze the possible increase in efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma (UTC) by using p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) plus 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX (BOPP) and BPA plus nicotinamide (NA) as a radiosensitizer of the BNCT reaction. Methods and Materials: Nude mice were transplanted with a human UTC cell line (ARO), and after 15 days they were treated as follows: (1) control, (2) NCT (neutrons alone), (3) NCT plus NA (100 mg/kg body weight [bw]/day for 3 days), (4) BPA (350 mg/kg bw) + neutrons, (5) BPA + NA + neutrons, and (6) BPA + BOPP (60 mg/kg bw) + neutrons. The flux of the mixed (thermal + epithermal) neutron beam was 2.8 x 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}/sec for 83.4 min. Results: Neutrons alone or with NA caused some tumor growth delay, whereas in the BPA, BPA + NA, and BPA + BOPP groups a 100% halt of tumor growth was observed in all mice at 26 days after irradiation. When the initial tumor volume was 50 mm{sup 3} or less, complete remission was found with BPA + NA (2 of 2 mice), BPA (1 of 4), and BPA + BOPP (7 of 7). After 90 days of complete regression, recurrence of the tumor was observed in BPA + NA (2 of 2) and BPA + BOPP (1 of 7). The determination of apoptosis in tumor samples by measurements of caspase-3 activity showed an increase in the BNCT (BPA + NA) group at 24 h (p < 0.05 vs. controls) and after the first week after irradiation in the three BNCT groups. Terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling analysis confirmed these results. Conclusions: Although NA combined with BPA showed an increase of apoptosis at early times, only the group irradiated after the combined administration of BPA and BOPP showed a significantly improved therapeutic response.

  12. {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) Neutrons Scintillator Detector Configuration for Optimal Readout

    SciTech Connect

    Osovizky, A.; Yehuda-Zada, Y.; Ghelman, M.; Tsai, P.; Thompson, A.K.; Pritchard, K.; Ziegler, J.B.; Ibberson, R.M.; Majkrzak, C.F.; Maliszewskyj, N.C.

    2015-07-01

    A Chromatic Analysis Neutron Diffractometer Or Reflectometer (CANDOR) is under development at the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). The CANDOR neutron sensor will rely on scintillator material for detecting the neutrons scattered by the sample under test. It consists of {sup 6}LiF:ZnS(Ag) scintillator material into which wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers have been embedded. Solid state photo-sensors (silicon photomultipliers) coupled to the WLS fibers are used to detect the light produced by the neutron capture event ({sup 6}Li (n,α) {sup 3}H reaction) and ionization of the ZnS(Ag). This detector configuration has the potential to accomplish the CANDOR performance requirements for efficiency of 90% for 5 A (3.35 meV) neutrons with high gamma rejection (10{sup 7}) along with compact design, affordable cost and materials availability. However this novel design includes challenges for precise neutron detection. The recognizing of the neutron signature versus the noise event produce by gamma event cannot be easy overcome by pulse height discrimination obstacle as can be achieved with {sup 3}He gas tube. Furthermore the selection of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) as the light sensor maintains the obstacle of dark noise that does not exist when a photomultiplier tube is coupled to the scintillator. A proper selection of SiPM should focus on increasing the output signal and reducing the dark noise in order to optimize the detection sensitivity and to provide a clean signal pulse shape discrimination. The main parameters for evaluation are: - Quantum Efficiency (QE) - matching the SiPM peak QE with the peak transmission wavelength emission of the WLS. - Recovery time - a short recovery time is preferred to minimize the pulse width beyond the intrinsic decay time of the scintillator crystal (improves the gamma rejection based output pulse shape (time)). - Diode dimensions -The dark noise is proportional to the diode active area while the signal is provided by the

  13. Ground-based observations of thunderstorm-correlated fluxes of high-energy electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Chilingarian, A.; Daryan, A.; Arakelyan, K.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Mailyan, B.; Melkumyan, L.; Hovsepyan, G.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.; Vanyan, L.

    2010-08-15

    The Aragats Space Environmental Center facilities continuously measure fluxes of neutral and charged secondary cosmic ray incidents on the Earth's surface. Since 2003 in the 1-minute time series we have detected more than 100 enhancements in the electron, gamma ray, and neutron fluxes correlated with thunderstorm activities. During the periods of the count rate enhancements, lasting tens of minutes, millions of additional particles were detected. Based on the largest particle event of September 19, 2009, we show that our measurements support the existence of long-lasting particle multiplication and acceleration mechanisms in the thunderstorm atmosphere. For the first time we present the energy spectra of electrons and gamma rays from the particle avalanches produced in the thunderstorm atmosphere, reaching the Earth's surface.

  14. Neutronics Conversion Analyses of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL) High Flux Reactor (RHF)

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, A.; Dionne, B.; Calzavara, Y.

    2014-09-30

    The following report describes the neutronics results obtained with the MCNP model of the RHF U7Mo LEU reference design that has been established in 2010 during the feasibility analysis. This work constitutes a complete and detailed neutronics analysis of that LEU design using models that have been significantly improved since 2010 and the release of the feasibility report. When possible, the credibility of the neutronics model is tested by comparing the HEU model results with experimental data or other codes calculations results. The results obtained with the LEU model are systematically compared to the HEU model. The changes applied to the neutronics model lead to better comparisons with experimental data or improved the calculation efficiency but do not challenge the conclusion of the feasibility analysis. If the U7Mo fuel is commercially available, not cost prohibitive, a back-end solution is established and if it is possible to manufacture the proposed element, neutronics analyses show that the performance of the reactor would not be challenged by the conversion to LEU fuel.

  15. Report of the ANS Project Feasibility Workshop for a High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Peretz, F.J.; Booth, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and its subsequent updates provided definitive design, cost, and schedule estimates for the entire ANS Project. A recent update to this estimate of the total project cost for this facility was $2.9 billion, as specified in the FY 1996 Congressional data sheet, reflecting a line-item start in FY 1995. In December 1994, ANS management decided to prepare a significantly lower-cost option for a research facility based on ANS which could be considered during FY 1997 budget deliberations if DOE or Congressional planners wished. A cost reduction for ANS of about $1 billion was desired for this new option. It was decided that such a cost reduction could be achieved only by a significant reduction in the ANS research scope and by maximum, cost-effective use of existing High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and ORNL facilities to minimize the need for new buildings. However, two central missions of the ANS -- neutron scattering research and isotope production-were to be retained. The title selected for this new option was High Flux Isotope Reactor-Center for Neutron Research (HFIR-CNR) because of the project`s maximum use of existing HFIR facilities and retention of selected, central ANS missions. Assuming this shared-facility requirement would necessitate construction work near HFIR, it was specified that HFIR-CNR construction should not disrupt normal operation of HFIR. Additional objectives of the study were that it be highly credible and that any material that might be needed for US Department of Energy (DOE) and Congressional deliberations be produced quickly using minimum project resources. This requirement made it necessary to rely heavily on the ANS design, cost, and schedule baselines. A workshop methodology was selected because assessment of each cost and/or scope-reduction idea required nearly continuous communication among project personnel to ensure that all ramifications of propsed changes.

  16. Measurement of the High Energy Neutron Flux on the Surface of the Natural Uranium Target Assembly QUINTA Irradiated by Deuterons of 4 and 8 GeV Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Baldin, A. A.; Chilap, V.; Furman, W.; Katovsky, K.; Khushvaktov, J.; Kumar, V.; Pronskikh, V.; Mar'in, I.; Solnyshkin, A.; Suchopar, M.; Tsupko-Sitnikov, V.; Tyutyunnikov, S.; Vrzalova, J.; Wagner, V.; Zavorka, L.

    Experiments with the natural uranium target assembly "QUINTA" exposed to 4 and 8 GeV deuteron beams of the Nuclotron accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna) are analyzed. The reaction rates of 27Al(n,y1)24Na, 27Al(n,y2)22Na and 27Al(n,y3)7Be reactions with effective threshold energies of 5, 27, and 119 MeV were measured at both 4 GeV and 8 GeV deuteron beam energies. The average neutron fluxes between the effective threshold energies and the effective ends of the neutron spectra (which are 800 or 1000 MeV for 4 or 8 GeV deuterons) were determined. The evidence for the intensity shift of the neutron spectra to higher neutron energies with the increase of the deuteron energy from 4 GeV to 8 GeV was found from the ratios of the average neutron fluxes. The reaction rates and the average neutron fluxes were calculated with the MCNPX 2.7 code.

  17. Effective conditions for the neutron flux density at axial boundaries of the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristarkhova, E. A.; Malofeev, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Analytical expressions for elements of the triangular matrix of effective conditions at the boundary of the core with a multiregion reflector are derived in the few-group diffusion approximation. The developed technique is verified using the example of fuel assemblies of a light-water reactor with an intermediate neutron spectrum.

  18. Characterization of neutron flux spectra in irradiation sites of MNSR reactor using the Westcott-formalism for the k0 neutron activation analysis method.

    PubMed

    Akaho, E H K; Nyarko, B J B

    2002-08-01

    For the general applicability of the k0-NAA method to deal with "non-l/v" (n,gamma) reaction nuclides, the modified spectral index r(alpha) square root (Tn/T0) and g(Tn) factor for monitoring neutron temperature Tn for the inner and outer irradiation sites of the Ghana MNSR reactor (GHARR-1) were measured using the Cd-ratio method. Using the measured Cd ratio for lutetium and the modified spectral index, the reduced resonance integral of lutetium s0,Lu was also calculated. The computed result of 1.64 was in good agreement with the reported value of 1.67. Based on the assumption that the definitions of reaction rates in the Westcott-formalism and in Nisle's unified formulation are equal, a theoretical verification of the accuracy of the measured modified spectral indices for our data and those reported in the literature for other research reactors was carried out. Employing 197Au, 96Zr and 94Zr as "1/v" monitors, the theoretical values which depend on the choice of the monitor, followed the trend for measured values of the sub- to epi-cadmium flux ratio f for nine irradiation sites of four different research reactors. The computed and experimental modified spectral indices for the different flux ratios associated with irradiation sites within the range 18.8-152 fitted well to a simple exponential relationship. Calculated and measured data are in good agreement when appropriate correction factors are used.

  19. An optimized neutron-beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Burlon, A A; Kreiner, A J; Valda, A A; Minsky, D M

    2004-11-01

    Different materials and proton beam energies have been studied in order to search for an optimized neutron production target and beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT. The solution proposed in this work consists of successive stacks of Al, polytetrafluoroethylene, commercially known as Teflon, and LiF as moderator and neutron absorber, and Pb as reflector. This assembly is easy to build and its cost is relatively low. An exhaustive Monte Carlo simulation study has been performed evaluating the doses delivered to a Snyder model head phantom by a neutron production Li-metal target based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction for proton bombarding energies of 1.92, 2.0, 2.3 and 2.5 MeV. Three moderator thicknesses have been studied and the figures of merit show the advantage of irradiating with near-resonance-energy protons (2.3 MeV) because of the relatively high neutron yield at this energy, which at the same time keeps the fast neutron healthy tissue dose limited and leads to the lowest treatment times. A moderator of 34 cm length has shown the best performance among the studied cases.

  20. Estimating ground-level neutron-flux enhancements in the extreme cosmic-ray events of the next 100, 1000 and 10 000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Estimates are proposed of the enhancement in neutron flux which may be experienced at ground level in cosmic-ray events of extreme magnitude over the next century, millennium and ten millennia. The estimates are based on a points-over-threshold analysis of hourly neutron counts measured over the last decades by nine neutron-monitor stations located in Europe, North America and Antarctica. The present results are in good agreement with recent studies of extreme solar events based on the direct observation of flares and the abundance of cosmogenic nuclides in terrestrial and lunar archives.

  1. Impact of Siberian observations on the optimization of surface CO2 flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinwoong; Kim, Hyun Mee; Cho, Chun-Ho; Boo, Kyung-On; Jacobson, Andrew R.; Sasakawa, Motoki; Machida, Toshinobu; Arshinov, Mikhail; Fedoseev, Nikolay

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of additional CO2 observations in the Siberia region on the Asian and global surface CO2 flux analyses, two experiments using different observation data sets were performed for 2000-2009. One experiment was conducted using a data set that includes additional observations of Siberian tower measurements (Japan-Russia Siberian Tall Tower Inland Observation Network: JR-STATION), and the other experiment was conducted using a data set without the above additional observations. The results show that the global balance of the sources and sinks of surface CO2 fluxes was maintained for both experiments with and without the additional observations. While the magnitude of the optimized surface CO2 flux uptake and flux uncertainty in Siberia decreased from -1.17 ± 0.93 to -0.77 ± 0.70 Pg C yr-1, the magnitude of the optimized surface CO2 flux uptake in the other regions (e.g., Europe) of the Northern Hemisphere (NH) land increased for the experiment with the additional observations, which affect the longitudinal distribution of the total NH sinks. This change was mostly caused by changes in the magnitudes of surface CO2 flux in June and July. The observation impact measured by uncertainty reduction and self-sensitivity tests shows that additional observations provide useful information on the estimated surface CO2 flux. The average uncertainty reduction of the conifer forest of Eurasian boreal (EB) is 29.1 % and the average self-sensitivities at the JR-STATION sites are approximately 60 % larger than those at the towers in North America. It is expected that the Siberian observations play an important role in estimating surface CO2 flux in the NH land (e.g., Siberia and Europe) in the future.

  2. Tuning advanced gravitational-wave detectors to optimally measure neutron-star merger waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Leo

    2010-02-01

    Next-generation gravitational wave detectors have the potential to bring us astrophysical information in yet unexplored regimes. One of the possibilities is learning about neutron stars' equations of state from the gravitational wave burst of a binary coalescence. Since these events are ``bursty'', one does not have the luxury of time-averaging to improve S/N; one can only hope to do better by ``tuning'' a detector network to have the noise performance which will be most informative about the physics. We present a Bayesian method for optimizing a detector network given a prior distribution of physical parameters which affect the gravitational wave signal. Each detection adds information about the parameter distribution, updating the posterior and the optimal detector configuration. We demonstrate the algorithm with toy signal and detector response models and predict whether tuning Advanced LIGO (via the signal recycling cavity) will be fruitful in accelerating our understanding of neutron stars through their mergers. )

  3. Measuring neutron fluences and gamma/x ray fluxes with CCD cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, G. J.; Smith, G. W.; Zagarino, P.; Thomas, M. C.

    Volume and area measurements of transient radiation-induced pixel charge in English Electric Valve (EEV) Frame Transfer (FT) charge coupled devices (CCDs) from irradiation with pulsed neutrons (14 MeV) and Bremsstrahlung photons (16-MeV endpoint) are utilized to calibrate the devices as radiometric imaging sensors capable of distinguishing between the two types of ionizing radiation. Measurements indicate approximately 0.5 V/rad responsivity with greater than or equal to 1 rad required for saturation from photon irradiation. Neutron-generated localized charge centers or 'peaks' binned by area and amplitude as functions of fluence in the 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 7) n/sq cm range indicate smearing over approximately 1 to 10 percent of CCD array with charge per pixel ranging between noise and saturation levels.

  4. Population-based metaheuristic optimization in neutron optics and shielding design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, D. D.; Björgvinsdóttir, H.; Zendler, C.; Bentley, P. M.

    2016-11-01

    Population-based metaheuristic algorithms are powerful tools in the design of neutron scattering instruments and the use of these types of algorithms for this purpose is becoming more and more commonplace. Today there exists a wide range of algorithms to choose from when designing an instrument and it is not always initially clear which may provide the best performance. Furthermore, due to the nature of these types of algorithms, the final solution found for a specific design scenario cannot always be guaranteed to be the global optimum. Therefore, to explore the potential benefits and differences between the varieties of these algorithms available, when applied to such design scenarios, we have carried out a detailed study of some commonly used algorithms. For this purpose, we have developed a new general optimization software package which combines a number of common metaheuristic algorithms within a single user interface and is designed specifically with neutronic calculations in mind. The algorithms included in the software are implementations of Particle-Swarm Optimization (PSO), Differential Evolution (DE), Artificial Bee Colony (ABC), and a Genetic Algorithm (GA). The software has been used to optimize the design of several problems in neutron optics and shielding, coupled with Monte-Carlo simulations, in order to evaluate the performance of the various algorithms. Generally, the performance of the algorithms depended on the specific scenarios, however it was found that DE provided the best average solutions in all scenarios investigated in this work.

  5. On dynamically generating relevant elementary flux modes in a metabolic network using optimization.

    PubMed

    Oddsdóttir, Hildur Æsa; Hagrot, Erika; Chotteau, Véronique; Forsgren, Anders

    2015-10-01

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) are pathways through a metabolic reaction network that connect external substrates to products. Using EFMs, a metabolic network can be transformed into its macroscopic counterpart, in which the internal metabolites have been eliminated and only external metabolites remain. In EFMs-based metabolic flux analysis (MFA) experimentally determined external fluxes are used to estimate the flux of each EFM. It is in general prohibitive to enumerate all EFMs for complex networks, since the number of EFMs increases rapidly with network complexity. In this work we present an optimization-based method that dynamically generates a subset of EFMs and solves the EFMs-based MFA problem simultaneously. The obtained subset contains EFMs that contribute to the optimal solution of the EFMs-based MFA problem. The usefulness of our method was examined in a case-study using data from a Chinese hamster ovary cell culture and two networks of varied complexity. It was demonstrated that the EFMs-based MFA problem could be solved at a low computational cost, even for the more complex network. Additionally, only a fraction of the total number of EFMs was needed to compute the optimal solution.

  6. Flux extrapolation models used in the DOT IV discrete ordinates neutron transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, E.T.; Rhoades, W.A.; Engle, W.W. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    The DOT IV code solves the Boltzmann transport equation in two dimensions using the method of discrete ordinates. Special techniques have been incorporated in this code to mitigate the effects of flux extrapolation error in space meshes of practical size. This report presents the flux extrapolation models as they appear in DOT IV. A sample problem is also presented to illustrate the effects of the various models on the resultant flux. Convergence of the various models to a single result as the mesh is refined is also examined. A detailed comparison with the widely used TWOTRAN II code is reported. The features which cause DOT and TWOTRAN to differ in the converged results are completely observed and explained.

  7. A flux-conservative formalism for convective and dissipative multi-fluid systems, with application to Newtonian superfluid neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, N.; Comer, G. L.

    2006-09-01

    We develop a flux-conservative formalism for a Newtonian multi-fluid system, including dissipation and entrainment (i.e. allowing the momentum of one fluid to be a linear combination of the velocities of all fluids). Maximum use is made of mass, energy and linear and angular momentum conservation to specify the equations of motion. Also used extensively are insights gleaned from a convective variational action principle, the key being the distinction between each velocity and its canonically conjugate momentum (which is modified because of entrainment). Dissipation is incorporated to second order in the 'thermodynamic forces' via the approach pioneered by Onsager, which makes it transparent how to guarantee the law of increase of entropy. An immediate goal of the investigation is to understand better the number, and form, of independent dissipation terms required for a consistent set of equations of motion in the multi-fluid context. A significant, but seemingly innocuous detail is that one must be careful to isolate 'forces' that can be written as total gradients, otherwise errors can be made in relating the net internal force to the net externally applied force. Our long-range aim is to provide a formalism that can be used to model dynamical multi-fluid systems both perturbatively and via fully nonlinear 3D numerical evolutions. To elucidate the formalism we consider the standard model for a heat-conducting, superfluid neutron star, which is believed to be dominated by superfluid neutrons, superconducting protons and a highly degenerate, ultra-relativistic gas of normal fluid electrons. We determine that in this case there are, in principle, 19 dissipation coefficients in the final set of equations. A final reduction of the system is made by neglecting heat conduction. This leads to an extension of the standard two-fluid model for neutron star cores, which has been used in a number of previous applications, and illustrates how mutual friction is represented in

  8. Supplementary neutron-flux calculations for the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Maudlin, P.J.; Maerker, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation using the MORSE code was performed to validate a procedure previously adopted in the ORNL discrete ordinate analysis of measurements made in the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility. The results of these flux calculations agree, within statistical undertainties of about 5%, with those obtained from a discrete ordinate analysis employing the same procedure. This study therefore concludes that the procedure for combining several one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations into a three-dimensional flux is sufficiently accurate that it does not account for the existing discrepancies observed between calculations and measurements in this facility.

  9. OBJECT KINETIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF RADIATION DAMAGE IN TUNGSTEN SUBJECTED TO NEUTRON FLUX WITH PKA SPECTRUM CORRESPONDING TO THE HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Nandipati, Giridhar; Setyawan, Wahyu; Heinisch, Howard L.; Roche, Kenneth J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2015-12-31

    The objective of this work is to study the damage accumulation in pure tungsten (W) subjected to neutron bombardment with a primary knock-on atom (PKA) spectrum corresponding to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), using the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) method.

  10. Optimization of a Light Collection System for use in the Neutron Lifetime Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, C.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Mumm, P.; Thompson, A.; Huffman, P.

    2007-10-01

    The Ultracold Neutron (UCN) Lifetime Project is an ongoing experiment with the objective of improving the average measurement of the neutron beta-decay lifetime. A more accurate measurement may increase our understanding of the electroweak interaction and improve astrophysical/cosmological theories on Big Bang nucleosynthesis. The current apparatus uses 0.89 nm cold neutrons to produce UCN through inelastic collisions with superfluid 4He in the superthermal process. The lifetime of the UCN is measured by detection of scintillation light from superfluid 4He created by electrons produced in neutron decay. Competing criteria of high detection efficiency outside of the apparatus and minimum heating of the experimental cell has led to the design of an acrylic light collection system. Initial designs were based on previous generations of the apparatus. ANSYS was used to optimize the cooling system for the light guide by checking simulated end conditions based on width of contact area, number of contact points, and location on the guide itself. SolidWorks and AutoCAD were used for design. The current system is in the production process.

  11. Neutron dosimetry

    DOEpatents

    Quinby, Thomas C.

    1976-07-27

    A method of measuring neutron radiation within a nuclear reactor is provided. A sintered oxide wire is disposed within the reactor and exposed to neutron radiation. The induced radioactivity is measured to provide an indication of the neutron energy and flux within the reactor.

  12. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preszler, A. M.; Moon, S.; White, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Additional calibrations of the University of California double-scatter neutron detector and additional analysis corrections lead to slightly changed neutron fluxes. The theoretical angular distributions of Merker (1975) are in general agreement with the reported experimental fluxes but do not give the peaks for vertical upward and downward moving neutrons. The theoretical neutron escape current is in agreement with the experimental values from 10 to 100 MeV. The experimental fluxes obtained agree with those of Kanbach et al. (1974) in the overlap region from 70 to 100 MeV.

  13. Determination of neutron flux distribution by using ANISN, a one-dimensional discrete S sub n ordinates transport code with anisotropic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghorai, S. K.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to use a one-dimensional discrete coordinates transport code called ANISN in order to determine the energy-angle-spatial distribution of neutrons in a 6-feet cube rock box which houses a D-T neutron generator at its center. The project was two-fold. The first phase of the project involved adaptation of the ANISN code written for an IBM 360/75/91 computer to the UNIVAC system at JSC. The second phase of the project was to use the code with proper geometry, source function and rock material composition in order to determine the neutron flux distribution around the rock box when a 14.1 MeV neutron generator placed at its center is activated.

  14. Fluxnet and Satellite data to optimize carbon and water fluxes simulated by ORCHIDEE biosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santaren, D.; Peylin, P.; Kuppel, S.; Bacour, C.; Granier, A.; Rayner, P. J.; Ciais, P.

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem models are used to predict the response of energy water and carbon balances of Earth's ecosystems to environmental changes. However, the estimated fluxes remain subject to large uncertainties, partly because of unknown or poorly calibrated parameters. Assimilation of in situ data should help constraining these parameter to improve simulations of the carbon balance and climate predictions. Using a state of the art mechanistic vegetation model ORCHIDEE, involved in the next AR5-IPCC report, we investigated the benefit of Fluxnet data (net CO2 flux (NEE) and latent heat flux (LE)) as well as remotely sensed fAPAR (fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation) to improve the model. ORCHIDEE computes the energy, carbon and water balances on a half-hourly basis, depending on the meteorological forcing and the biome composition of the ecosystem. The phenology of the model is also fully prognostic allowing the derivation of leaf area index time course. A four dimensional variational data (4D-var) assimilation system has been developed, using the tangent linear model, to assimilate synergistically different observations (daily means) and optimize critical parameters of the model (on the order of 20). The study makes uses of available data from few sites in Europe and investigates three major points. We first analyze the ability of the model to capture the fluxes during particular extreme climate conditions (i.e. summer 2003 in Europe) using parameters optimized during “normal weather” conditions at a beach forest in France (Hesse site). The model-data fit for NEE and LE is analyzed in terms of annual mean, seasonal cycles and synoptic variations. We then performed an optimization using multiple sites of the same Plant Functional Type (PFT) at the same time. This optimization allows assessing the potential of the model to simulate with a mean set of parameters the carbon and water fluxes of several sites under different climate regimes

  15. From Neutron Star Observables to the Equation of State. I. An Optimal Parametrization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raithel, Carolyn A.; Özel, Feryal; Psaltis, Dimitrios

    2016-11-01

    The increasing number and precision of measurements of neutron star masses, radii, and, in the near future, moments of inertia offer the possibility of precisely determining the neutron star equation of state (EOS). One way to facilitate the mapping of observables to the EOS is through a parametrization of the latter. We present here a generic method for optimizing the parametrization of any physically allowed EOS. We use mock EOS that incorporate physically diverse and extreme behavior to test how well our parametrization reproduces the global properties of the stars, by minimizing the errors in the observables of mass, radius, and the moment of inertia. We find that using piecewise polytropes and sampling the EOS with five fiducial densities between ˜1-8 times the nuclear saturation density results in optimal errors for the smallest number of parameters. Specifically, it recreates the radii of the assumed EOS to within less than 0.5 km for the extreme mock EOS and to within less than 0.12 km for 95% of a sample of 42 proposed, physically motivated EOS. Such a parametrization is also able to reproduce the maximum mass to within 0.04 {M}⊙ and the moment of inertia of a 1.338 {M}⊙ neutron star to within less than 10% for 95% of the proposed sample of EOS.

  16. Systematic Uncertainties in the Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron-star Masses and Radii from Thermonuclear X-Ray Bursts. III. Absolute Flux Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güver, Tolga; Özel, Feryal; Marshall, Herman; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guainazzi, Matteo; Díaz-Trigo, Maria

    2016-09-01

    Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826-238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE/PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE/PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the differences between the measured fluxes during bursts. We find that the RXTE/PCA and the Chandra gratings measurements agree with each other within their formal uncertainties, increasing our confidence in these flux measurements. In contrast, XMM-Newton EPIC-pn measures 14.0 ± 0.3% less flux than the RXTE/PCA. This is consistent with the previously reported discrepancy with the flux measurements of EPIC-pn, compared with EPIC MOS1, MOS2, and ACIS-S detectors. We also show that any intrinsic time-dependent systematic uncertainty that may exist in the calibration of the satellites has already been implicity taken into account in the neutron star radius measurements.

  17. Neutron source

    DOEpatents

    Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

    1975-10-21

    A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

  18. The role of flexibility and optimality in the prediction of intracellular fluxes of microbial central carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tarlak, Fatih; Sadıkoğlu, Hasan; Çakır, Tunahan

    2014-07-29

    Prediction of intracellular metabolic fluxes based on optimal biomass assumption is a well-known computational approach. While there has been a significant emphasis on the optimality, cellular flexibility, the co-occurrence of suboptimal flux distributions in a microbial population, has hardly been considered in the related computational methods. We have implemented a flexibility-incorporated optimization framework to calculate intracellular fluxes based on a few extracellular measurement constraints. Taking into account slightly suboptimal flux distributions together with a dual-optimality framework (maximization of the growth rate followed by the minimization of the total enzyme amount) we were able to show the positive effect of incorporating flexibility and minimal enzyme consumption on the better prediction of intracellular fluxes of central carbon metabolism of two microorganisms: E. coli and S. cerevisiae.

  19. Limits from the soft X-ray background on the temperature of old neutron stars and on the flux of superheavy magnetic monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, E. W.; Turner, M. S.

    1984-11-01

    Using recent observations of the diffuse, soft X-ray background, we obtain upper limits of 49 eV to the average surface temperature and 1032 ergs s-1 to the total photon luminosity of old (˜ 1010 yr) neutron stars in the Galaxy. If neutron stars are kept hot through monopole-induced nucleon decay, this limit corresponds to a monopole flux limit of FM(σ0 β) < 3r x 10-23 cm-2 sr-1 s-1, where the cross section for catalyzed nucleon decay times the monopole-nucleon relative velocity is σ v = 10-28(σ0 βc) cm2 (β = v/c), and r=LTOT/Lγ is the ratio of the total luminosity to the photon luminosity of a neutron star whose surface temperature T ≍ 50 eV. For conventional neutron star equations of state r ≍ 1, while for the more exotic ones r can be O(103-104). Although our temperature limit places a very stringent limit on the monopole flux, it does not significantly constrain other mechanisms for heating old neutron stars.

  20. Neutronic optimization in high conversion Th-{sup 233}U fuel assembly with simulated annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Kotlyar, D.; Shwageraus, E.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on fuel design optimization of a PWR operating in a self sustainable Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle. Monte Carlo simulated annealing method was used in order to identify the fuel assembly configuration with the most attractive breeding performance. In previous studies, it was shown that breeding may be achieved by employing heterogeneous Seed-Blanket fuel geometry. The arrangement of seed and blanket pins within the assemblies may be determined by varying the designed parameters based on basic reactor physics phenomena which affect breeding. However, the amount of free parameters may still prove to be prohibitively large in order to systematically explore the design space for optimal solution. Therefore, the Monte Carlo annealing algorithm for neutronic optimization is applied in order to identify the most favorable design. The objective of simulated annealing optimization is to find a set of design parameters, which maximizes some given performance function (such as relative period of net breeding) under specified constraints (such as fuel cycle length). The first objective of the study was to demonstrate that the simulated annealing optimization algorithm will lead to the same fuel pins arrangement as was obtained in the previous studies which used only basic physics phenomena as guidance for optimization. In the second part of this work, the simulated annealing method was used to optimize fuel pins arrangement in much larger fuel assembly, where the basic physics intuition does not yield clearly optimal configuration. The simulated annealing method was found to be very efficient in selecting the optimal design in both cases. In the future, this method will be used for optimization of fuel assembly design with larger number of free parameters in order to determine the most favorable trade-off between the breeding performance and core average power density. (authors)

  1. Arrangement Analysis of Leaves Optimized on Photon Flux Density or Photosynthetic Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Shin'ya; Tanno, Itaru

    By clarifying a plant evolutive process, useful information may be obtained on engineering. Consequently, an analysis algorithm that investigates the optimal arrangement of plant leaves was developed. In the developed algorithm, the Monte Carlo method is introduced and sunlight is simulated. Moreover, the arrangement optimization of leaves is analyzed using a Genetic Algorithm (GA). The number of light quanta (photon flux density) that reaches leaves, or the average photosynthetic rate of the same was set as the objective function, and leaf models of a dogwood and a ginkgo tree were analyzed. The number of leaf models was set between two to four, and the position of the leaf was expressed in terms of the angle of direction, elevation angle, rotation angle, and the representative length of the branch of a leaf. The chromosome model introduced into GA consists of information concerning the position of the leaf. Based on the analysis results, the characteristics of the leaf of an actual plant could be simulated by ensuring the algorithm had multiple constrained conditions. The optimal arrangement of leaves differs in maximization of the photon flux density, and that of the average value of a photosynthetic rate. Furthermore, the leaf form affecting the optimal arrangement of leave and also having a significant influence also on a photosynthetic rate was shown.

  2. Differential Bees Flux Balance Analysis with OptKnock for In Silico Microbial Strains Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Choon, Yee Wen; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Deris, Safaai; Illias, Rosli Md.; Chong, Chuii Khim; Chai, Lian En; Omatu, Sigeru; Corchado, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Microbial strains optimization for the overproduction of desired phenotype has been a popular topic in recent years. The strains can be optimized through several techniques in the field of genetic engineering. Gene knockout is a genetic engineering technique that can engineer the metabolism of microbial cells with the objective to obtain desirable phenotypes. However, the complexities of the metabolic networks have made the process to identify the effects of genetic modification on the desirable phenotypes challenging. Furthermore, a vast number of reactions in cellular metabolism often lead to the combinatorial problem in obtaining optimal gene deletion strategy. Basically, the size of a genome-scale metabolic model is usually large. As the size of the problem increases, the computation time increases exponentially. In this paper, we propose Differential Bees Flux Balance Analysis (DBFBA) with OptKnock to identify optimal gene knockout strategies for maximizing the production yield of desired phenotypes while sustaining the growth rate. This proposed method functions by improving the performance of a hybrid of Bees Algorithm and Flux Balance Analysis (BAFBA) by hybridizing Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm into neighborhood searching strategy of BAFBA. In addition, DBFBA is integrated with OptKnock to validate the results for improving the reliability the work. Through several experiments conducted on Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Clostridium thermocellum as the model organisms, DBFBA has shown a better performance in terms of computational time, stability, growth rate, and production yield of desired phenotypes compared to the methods used in previous works. PMID:25047076

  3. HERITAGE: the concept of a giant flux neutron reflectometer for the exploration of 3-d structure of free-liquid and solid interfaces in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattauch, S.; Ioffe, A.; Lott, D.; Bottyán, L.; Daillant, J.; Markó, M.; Menelle, A.; Sajti, S.; Veres, T.

    2017-01-01

    The instrumental concept of HERITAGE - a reflectometer with a horizontal sample geometry - well fitted to the long pulse structure of a neutron source is presented. It is constitutes a new class of reflectometers achieving the unprecedentedly high flux for classical specular reflectometry combined with off-specular reflectometry and grazing incidence small-angle scattering (GISANS), thus resulting in a complete 3-d exploration of lateral and in depth structures in thin films. This is achieved by specially designed neutron guides. In the horizontal direction (perpendicular to the scattering plane) the guide's elliptic shape focusses the neutrons onto the sample. In the vertical direction a multichannel geometry provides a smooth divergence distribution at the sample position while accepting the entire beam from a compact high-brilliance flat moderator. The modular collimation setup of HERITAGE provides extremely high flexibility in respect to sample geometries and environments, including the possibility to study virtually all types of solid and liquid interfaces, statically or kinetically. The use of multiple beam illumination allows for reflectivity and GISANS measurements at liquid interfaces both from above and below without a need to move the sample. This concept assures the delivery of the maximum possible and usable flux to the sample in both reflectivity and GISANS measurement regimes. The presented design outperforms the flux of all present-day and already for the ESS planned reflectometers and GISANS setups in flux and in measuring time for standard samples.

  4. Polar-Drive Designs for Optimizing Neutron Yields on the National Ignition Faciltiy

    SciTech Connect

    Cok, A.M.; Craxton, R.S.; McKenty, P.W.

    2008-09-10

    Polar-drive designs are proposed for producing symmetric implosions of thin-shell, DT gas-filled targets leading to high fusion-neutron yields for neutron-diagnostic development. The designs can be implemented as soon as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell and W. J. Hogan, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41, B39 (1999)] is operational as they use indirect-drive phase plates. Two-dimensional simulations using the hydrodynamics code SAGE [R. S. Craxton and R. L. McCrory, J. Appl. Phys. 56, 108 (1984)] have shown that good low-mode uniformity can be obtained by choosing combinations of pointing and defocusing of the beams, including pointing offsets of individual beams within some of the NIF laser-beam quads. The optimizations have been carried out for total laser energies ranging from 350 kJ to 1.5 MJ, enabling the optimum pointing and defocusing parameters to be determined through interpolation for any given laser energy in this range. Neutron yields in the range of 10^15–10^16 are expected.

  5. Polar-drive designs for optimizing neutron yields on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Cok, A. M.; Craxton, R. S.; McKenty, P. W.

    2008-08-15

    Polar-drive designs are proposed for producing symmetric implosions of thin-shell, DT gas-filled targets leading to high fusion-neutron yields for neutron-diagnostic development. The designs can be implemented as soon as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell and W. J. Hogan, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41, B39 (1999)] is operational as they use indirect-drive phase plates. Two-dimensional simulations using the hydrodynamics code SAGE [R. S. Craxton and R. L. McCrory, J. Appl. Phys. 56, 108 (1984)] have shown that good low-mode uniformity can be obtained by choosing combinations of pointing and defocusing of the beams, including pointing offsets of individual beams within some of the NIF laser-beam quads. The optimizations have been carried out for total laser energies ranging from 350 kJ to 1.5 MJ, enabling the optimum pointing and defocusing parameters to be determined through interpolation for any given laser energy in this range. Neutron yields in the range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 16} are expected.

  6. Monte Carlo simulations of the pulsed thermal neutron flux in two-zone systems with Plexiglas - Using the MCNP code with a modified hydrogen-data library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krynicka, Ewa; Wiącek, Urszula; Drozdowicz, Krzysztof; Gabańska, Barbara; Tracz, Grzegorz

    2006-09-01

    A comparison of real and Monte Carlo simulated pulsed neutron experiments in two-zone cylindrical systems is presented. Such geometry is met when a neutron moderator surrounds a sample of the investigated material. In this study, a Plexiglas shell (hydrogenous medium) surrounds the inner zone filled with a non-hydrogenous medium: copper oxide or chrome oxide. The time decay constant of the thermal neutron flux is determined as the result of the experiment. The primary simulations have been made using the MCNP code with the attached standard thermal neutron scattering library for hydrogen in polyethylene (poly.01t). A modification of this library is proposed to obtain the data dedicated more precisely for scattering of neutrons on hydrogen in Plexiglas in the thermal energy region. Results of the simulations for two-zone cylindrical systems, using the MCNP code with the modified hydrogen-data library, show a considerably better agreement with the experimental results. The average relative deviations have decreased from about 2% (always positive) to less than 0.5% fluctuating around zero. Adequacy of the applied modification is also confirmed in simulations of the pulsed neutron experiments on homogeneous cylinders of Plexiglas.

  7. Optimization of the steady neutron source technique for absorption cross section measurement by using an 124Sb-Be neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Gardner, Robin P.

    2004-01-01

    An improved experimental approach has been developed to determine thermal neutron absorption cross sections. It uses an 124Sb-Be neutron source which has an average neutron energy of only about 12 keV. It can be moderated in either a water tank or a paraffin filled box and can be used for aqueous or powder samples. This new design is first optimized by MCNP simulation and then benchmarked and calibrated with experiments to verify the simulations and realize the predicted improved measurement sensitivity and reproducibility. The 124Sb-Be source device is from 1.35 to 1.71 times more sensitive than the previous method based on the use of a 252Cf source.

  8. Ensemble calibration and sensitivity study of a surface CO2 flux scheme using an optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lulin; Pan, Zaitao

    2008-05-01

    Carbon exchange between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystem is a key component affecting climate changes. Because the in situ measurements are not dense enough to resolve CO2 exchange spatial variation on various scales, the variation has been mainly simulated by numerical ecosystem models. These models contain large uncertainties in estimating CO2 exchange owing to incorporating a number of empirical parameters on different scales. This study applied a global optimization algorithm and ensemble approach to a surface CO2 flux scheme to (1) identify sensitive photosynthetic and respirational parameters, and (2) optimize the sensitive parameters in the modeling sense and improve the model skills. The photosynthetic and respirational parameters of corn (C4 species) and soybean (C3 species) in NCAR land surface model (LSM) are calibrated against observations from AmeriFlux site at Bondville, IL during 1999 and 2000 growing seasons. Results showed that the most sensitive parameters are maximum carboxylation rate at 25°C and its temperature sensitivity parameter (Vcmax25 and avc), quantum efficiency at 25°C (Qe25), temperature sensitivity parameter for maintenance respiration (arm), and temperature sensitivity parameter for microbial respiration (amr). After adopting calibrated parameter values, simulated seasonal averaged CO2 fluxes were improved for both the C4 and the C3 crops (relative bias reduced from 0.09 to -0.02 for the C4 case and from 0.28 to -0.01 for the C3 case). An updated scheme incorporating new parameters and a revised flux-integration treatment is also proposed.

  9. Concept for Inclusion of Analytical and Computational Capability in Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) for Measurement of Neutron Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, Marshall Clint; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.

    2004-01-01

    Researchers are working on many fronts to make possible high-speed, automated classification and quantification of constituent materials in numerous environments. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has implemented a system for rocket engine flowfields/plumes. The Optical Plume Anomaly Detector (OPAD) system was designed to utilize emission and absorption spectroscopy for monitoring molecular and atomic particulates in gas plasma. An accompanying suite of tools and analytical package designed to utilize information collected by OPAD is known as the Engine Diagnostic Filtering System (EDiFiS). The current combination of these systems identifies atomic and molecular species and quantifies mass loss rates in H2/O2 rocket plumes. Capabilities for real-time processing are being advanced on several fronts, including an effort to hardware encode components of the EDiFiS for health monitoring and management. This paper addresses the OPAD with its tool suites, and discusses what is considered a natural progression: a concept for taking OPAD to the next logical level of high energy physics, incorporating fermion and boson particle analyses in measurement of neutron flux.

  10. Optimization of multi-channel neutron focusing guides for extreme sample environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Julio, D. D.; Lelièvre-Berna, E.; Courtois, P.; Andersen, K. H.; Bentley, P. M.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, we present and discuss simulation results for the design of multichannel neutron focusing guides for extreme sample environments. A single focusing guide consists of any number of supermirror-coated curved outer channels surrounding a central channel. Furthermore, a guide is separated into two sections in order to allow for extension into a sample environment. The performance of a guide is evaluated through a Monte-Carlo ray tracing simulation which is further coupled to an optimization algorithm in order to find the best possible guide for a given situation. A number of population-based algorithms have been investigated for this purpose. These include particle-swarm optimization, artificial bee colony, and differential evolution. The performance of each algorithm and preliminary results of the design of a multi-channel neutron focusing guide using these methods are described. We found that a three-channel focusing guide offered the best performance, with a gain factor of 2.4 compared to no focusing guide, for the design scenario investigated in this work.

  11. An Optimal Estimation Method to Obtain Surface Layer Turbulent Fluxes from Profile Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D.

    2015-12-01

    In the absence of direct turbulence measurements, the turbulence characteristics of the atmospheric surface layer are often derived from measurements of the surface layer mean properties based on Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST). This approach requires two levels of the ensemble mean wind, temperature, and water vapor, from which the fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, and water vapor can be obtained. When only one measurement level is available, the roughness heights and the assumed properties of the corresponding variables at the respective roughness heights are used. In practice, the temporal mean with large number of samples are used in place of the ensemble mean. However, in many situations the samples of data are taken from multiple levels. It is thus desirable to derive the boundary layer flux properties using all measurements. In this study, we used an optimal estimation approach to derive surface layer properties based on all available measurements. This approach assumes that the samples are taken from a population whose ensemble mean profile follows the MOST. An optimized estimate is obtained when the results yield a minimum cost function defined as a weighted summation of all error variance at each sample altitude. The weights are based one sample data variance and the altitude of the measurements. This method was applied to measurements in the marine atmospheric surface layer from a small boat using radiosonde on a tethered balloon where temperature and relative humidity profiles in the lowest 50 m were made repeatedly in about 30 minutes. We will present the resultant fluxes and the derived MOST mean profiles using different sets of measurements. The advantage of this method over the 'traditional' methods will be illustrated. Some limitations of this optimization method will also be discussed. Its application to quantify the effects of marine surface layer environment on radar and communication signal propagation will be shown as well.

  12. Design and simulations of the neutron dump for the back-streaming white neutron beam at CSNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L. Y.; Jing, H. T.; Tang, J. Y.; Wang, X. Q.

    2016-10-01

    For nuclear data measurements with a white neutron source, to control the background at the detector is a key issue. The neutron dump which locates at the end of the white neutron beam line at CSNS has a very important impact to the neutron and gamma backgrounds in the endstation. A sophisticated neutron dump was designed to reduce the backgrounds to the level of about 10-8 relative to the neutron flux. In this paper, the method to suppress both neutron and gamma backgrounds near a white-spectrum neutron dump is introduced. The optimized geometry structure and materials of the dump are described, and the neutron and gamma space distributions have been calculated by using the FLUKA code for different operation settings which are defined by beam spots of Φ30 mm, Φ60 mm and 90 mm×90 mm, respectively.

  13. High-temperature long-lasting stability assessment of a single-crystal diamond detector under high-flux neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilotti, R.; Angelone, M.; Marinelli, M.; Milani, E.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Verona, C.; Prestopino, G.; Montereali, R. M.; Vincenti, M. A.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Scherillo, A.; Pietropaolo, A.

    2016-11-01

    An innovative diamond detector layout is presented that is designed to operate at high temperature under intense neutron and gamma fluxes. It is made of a 500 μm “electronic grade” diamond film with 100 nm thick Ag metal contacts deposited onto each surface of the film by means of thermal evaporation. A 2 μ \\text{m} thick layer of 6LiF has been deposited on top of one of the two Ag contacts to make the detector sensitive to thermal neutrons. The device was tested at the ISIS spallation neutron source (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK) using the INES beam line. The detector was continuously irradiated for 100 hours in vacuum (p = 10-5 \\text{mbar}) , exposed to a neutron flux of about 106 n cm-2 s-1 at a temperature T =150 ^\\circ \\text{C} . The aim of this experiment was to study the time dependence of the diamond detector performance while operating at high temperature under irradiation, providing a first experimental proof of reliable continuous operation for 100 hours at high temperature in a harsh environment.

  14. Two-dimensional DORT discrete ordinates X-Y geometry neutron flux calculations for the Halden Heavy Boiling Water Reactor core configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.O.

    1990-07-01

    Results are reported for two-dimensional discrete ordinates, X-Y geometry calculations performed for seven Halden Heavy Boiling Water Reactor core configurations. The calculations were performed in support of an effort to reassess the neutron fluence received by the reactor vessel. Nickel foil measurement data indicated considerable underprediction of fluences by the previously used multigroup removal- diffusion method. Therefore, calculations by a more accurate method were deemed appropriate. For each core configuration, data are presented for (1) integral fluxes in the core and near the vessel wall, (2) neutron spectra at selected locations, (3) isoflux contours superimposed on the geometry models, (4) plots of the geometry models, and (5) input for the calculations. The initial calculations were performed with several mesh sizes. Comparisons of the results from these calculations indicated that the uncertainty in the calculated fluxes should be less than 10%. However, three-dimensional effects (such as axial asymmetry in the fuel loading) could contribute to much greater uncertainty in the calculated neutron fluxes. 7 refs., 22 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Application of the Monte Carlo methods and variational procedure for optimizing time-of-flight neutron diffractometer characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrushchinsky, A. A.; Kuten, S. A.; Viarenich, K. A.; Speransky, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    Based on variational calculus, a procedure for the optimal approximation of detector surface of the time-of-flight neutron diffractometer has been suggested. The exact solution for a point sample and zero thickness detector has been obtained. Using the shape of the detector surface, an optimized Monte Carlo simulation has been performed for the parameters of the spectrometer depending on the sample size and detector thickness, its azimuthal and Bragg's angular dimensions, and taking into account the neutron absorption in the sample and detector.

  16. Optimal results on TV bounds for scalar conservation laws with discontinuous flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Shyam Sundar

    2015-02-01

    This paper is concerned with the total variation of the solution of scalar conservation law with discontinuous flux in one space dimension. One of the main unsettled questions concerning conservation law with discontinuous flux was the boundedness of the total variation of the solution near interface. In [1], it has been shown by a counter-example at T = 1, that the total variation of the solution blows up near interface, but in that example the solution become of bounded variation after time T > 1. So the natural question is what happens to the BV-ness of the solution for large time. Here we give a complete picture of the bounded variation of the solution for all time. For a uniform convex flux with only L∞ data, we obtain a natural smoothing effect in BV for all time t >T0. Also we give a counter-example (even for a BV data) to show that the assumptions which have been made are optimal.

  17. Protein crystallography with spallation neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Langan, P.; Schoenborn, Benno P.

    2003-01-01

    proteins and oriented molecular complexes. With spallation neutrons and their time dependent wavelength structure, one can select data with an optimal wavelength bandwidth and cover the whole Laue spectrum as time (wavelength) resolved diffraction data. This optimizes data quality with best peak to background ratios and provides spatial and energy resolution to eliminate peak overlaps. Such a Protein Crystallography Station (PCS) has been built and tested at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. A partially coupled moderator is used to increase flux and data are collected by a Cylindrical He3 detector covering 120' with 200mm height. The PCS is described along with examples of data collected from a number of proteins.

  18. Characterizing the optimal flux space of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions through modified latin-hypercube sampling.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Neha; Tøndel, Kristin; Bhatnagar, Rakesh; dos Santos, Vítor A P Martins; Puchałka, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Genome-Scale Metabolic Reconstructions (GSMRs), along with optimization-based methods, predominantly Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) and its derivatives, are widely applied for assessing and predicting the behavior of metabolic networks upon perturbation, thereby enabling identification of potential novel drug targets and biotechnologically relevant pathways. The abundance of alternate flux profiles has led to the evolution of methods to explore the complete solution space aiming to increase the accuracy of predictions. Herein we present a novel, generic algorithm to characterize the entire flux space of GSMR upon application of FBA, leading to the optimal value of the objective (the optimal flux space). Our method employs Modified Latin-Hypercube Sampling (LHS) to effectively border the optimal space, followed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to identify and explain the major sources of variability within it. The approach was validated with the elementary mode analysis of a smaller network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and applied to the GSMR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (iMO1086). It is shown to surpass the commonly used Monte Carlo Sampling (MCS) in providing a more uniform coverage for a much larger network in less number of samples. Results show that although many fluxes are identified as variable upon fixing the objective value, majority of the variability can be reduced to several main patterns arising from a few alternative pathways. In iMO1086, initial variability of 211 reactions could almost entirely be explained by 7 alternative pathway groups. These findings imply that the possibilities to reroute greater portions of flux may be limited within metabolic networks of bacteria. Furthermore, the optimal flux space is subject to change with environmental conditions. Our method may be a useful device to validate the predictions made by FBA-based tools, by describing the optimal flux space associated with these predictions, thus to improve them.

  19. Experimental determination of gamma-ray discrimination in pillar-structured thermal neutron detectors under high gamma-ray flux

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Qinghui; Conway, Adam M.; Voss, Lars F.; Radev, Radoslav P.; Nikolić, Rebecca J.; Dar, Mushtaq A.; Cheung, Chin L.

    2015-08-04

    Silicon pillar structures filled with a neutron converter material (10B) are designed to have high thermal neutron detection efficiency with specific dimensions of 50 μm pillar height, 2 μm pillar diameter and 2 μm spacing between adjacent pillars. In this paper, we have demonstrated such a detector has a high neutron-to-gamma discrimination of 106 with a high thermal neutron detection efficiency of 39% when exposed to a high gamma-ray field of 109 photons/cm2s.

  20. Optimal design of a novel hybrid MR brake for motorcycles considering axial and radial magnetic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Choi, S. B.

    2012-05-01

    This work presents an optimal solution of a new type of motorcycle brake featuring different smart magnetorheological (MR) fluids. In this study, typical types of commercial MR fluid are considered there for the design of a motorcycle MR brake; MRF-122-2ED (low yield stress), MRF-132-DG (medium yield stress) and MRF-140-CG (high yield stress). As a first step, a new configuration featuring a T-shaped drum MR brake is introduced and a hybrid concept of magnetic circuit (using both axial and radial magnetic flux) to generate braking force is analyzed based on the finite element method. An optimal design of the MR brake considering the required braking torque, the temperature due to friction of the MR fluid, the mass of the brake system and all significant geometric dimensions is then performed. For the optimization, the finite element analysis (FEA) is used to achieve principal geometric dimensions of the MR brake. In addition, the size, mass and power consumption of three different MR motorcycle brakes are quantitatively analyzed and compared.

  1. Reduction of the secondary neutron dose in passively scattered proton radiotherapy, using an optimized pre-collimator/collimator

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, David J; Elliston, Carl D; Hall, Eric J; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Proton radiotherapy represents a potential major advance in cancer therapy. Most current proton beams are spread out to cover the tumor using passive scattering and collimation, resulting in an extra whole-body high-energy neutron dose, primarily from proton interactions with the final collimator. There is considerable uncertainty as to the carcinogenic potential of low doses of high-energy neutrons, and thus we investigate whether this neutron dose can be significantly reduced without major modifications to passively scattered proton beam lines. Our goal is to optimize the design features of a patient-specific collimator or pre-collimator/collimator assembly. There are a number of often contradictory design features, in terms of geometry and material, involved in an optimal design. For example, plastic or hybrid plastic/metal collimators have a number of advantages. We quantify these design issues, and investigate the practical balances that can be achieved to significantly reduce the neutron dose without major alterations to the beamline design or function. Given that the majority of proton therapy treatments, at least for the next few years, will use passive scattering techniques, reducing the associated neutron-related risks by simple modifications of the collimator assembly design is a desirable goal. PMID:19779218

  2. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P [Idaho Falls, ID; Longhurst, Glen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Porter, Douglas L [Idaho Falls, ID; Parry, James R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  3. Neutrons Flux Distributions of the Pu-Be Source and its Simulation by the MCNP-4B Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihi, F.; Mehdizadeh, S.; Hadad, K.

    Neutron Fluence rate of a low intense Pu-Be source is measured by Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) of 197Au foils. Also, the neutron fluence rate distribution versus energy is calculated using the MCNP-4B code based on ENDF/B-V library. Theoretical simulation as well as our experimental performance are a new experience for Iranians to make reliability with the code for further researches. In our theoretical investigation, an isotropic Pu-Be source with cylindrical volume distribution is simulated and relative neutron fluence rate versus energy is calculated using MCNP-4B code. Variation of the fast and also thermal neutrons fluence rate, which are measured by NAA method and MCNP code, are compared.

  4. Effect of optimal estimation of flux difference information on the lattice traffic flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu-hong; Li, Chun-gui; Tang, Xin-lai; Tian, Chuan

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a new lattice model is proposed by considering the optimal estimation of flux difference information. The effect of this new consideration upon the stability of traffic flow is examined through linear stability analysis. Furthermore, a modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation near the critical point is constructed and solved by means of nonlinear analysis method, and thus the propagation behavior of traffic jam can be described by the kink-antikink soliton solution of the mKdV equation. Numerical simulation is carried out under periodical condition with results in good agreement with theoretical analysis, therefore, it is verified that the new consideration can enhance the stability of traffic systems and suppress the emergence of traffic jams effectively.

  5. Integral Equation Space-Energy Flux Synthesis for Spherical Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    flux distribution eigenfunction An eigenvalue associated with in(r) n(E) neutron number density in units...technique for obtaining the spatial and energy neutron flux distributions in multiplying systems. In IES, the integral form of the neutron transport... FLUX SYNTHESIS FOR SPHERICAL SYSTEMS I. Introduction The calculations of neutron flux distributions and neutron growth rate (a) for multiplying

  6. Neutron scattering in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, R.B.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering techniques have been part of the Australian scientific research community for the past three decades. The High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR) is a multi-use facility of modest performance that provides the only neutron source in the country suitable for neutron scattering. The limitations of HIFAR have been recognized and recently a Government initiated inquiry sought to evaluate the future needs of a neutron source. In essence, the inquiry suggested that a delay of several years would enable a number of key issues to be resolved, and therefore a more appropriate decision made. In the meantime, use of the present source is being optimized, and where necessary research is being undertaken at major overseas neutron facilities either on a formal or informal basis. Australia has, at present, a formal agreement with the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) for access to the spallation source ISIS. Various aspects of neutron scattering have been implemented on HIFAR, including investigations of the structure of biological relevant molecules. One aspect of these investigations will be presented. Preliminary results from a study of the interaction of the immunosuppressant drug, cyclosporin-A, with reconstituted membranes suggest that the hydrophobic drug interdigitated with lipid chains.

  7. The diffusion of cesium in the graphitic matrix A3-3 under irradiation by a fast neutron flux of 2 × 10 17 m -2 s -1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensel, W.; Hoinkis, E.

    1995-09-01

    The 137Cs core release rate of High Temperature Reactors (HTR) is effected by the interactions of cesium with the graphitic material used as a matrix for the coated fuel particles. The migration of 137Cs in the graphitic matrix A3-3 at a fast neutron flux of 2 × 10 17 m -2 s -1 was studied in short-term experiments using the thin-film technique. The penetration profiles did not satisfy Fick's second law. The diffusion/trapping/re-emission model was applied to determine the diffusion coefficient D and the trapping coefficient μ for four profiles produced at 1088 and 1166 K. D, μ and the reemission coefficient b at 1293 K were determined for two profiles. Compared to laboratory conditions no effect of the fast neutron irradiation on the 137Cs migration in matrix A3-3 was observed.

  8. In-situ determination of macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross-section of borehole model materials using the integrated flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menn, Scott A.; Hall, Hugh E.

    1995-02-01

    The integrated thermal neutron flux method of determining the macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross-section of samples consisting of approx. 400 kg of unconsolidated geologic material, saturated with fresh water, to be used in borehole models is reported. One advantage of this method is that bulk cross-section determinations are made relative to a single standard, with fresh (distilled) water being used as the standard in this work. The values of matrix Σ determined for unconsolidated sand, limestone, and dolomite for the particular samples measured fall within the range of previously reported measurements of similar type samples. The method was checked using 50,000 ppm NaCl for which a value of 39.1 ± 0.5 c.u. was determined.

  9. Optimizations in angular dispersive neutron powder diffraction using divergent beam geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchsteiner, Alexandra; Stüßer, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    Angular dispersive neutron powder diffractometers are usually built using beam divergencies defined by Soller type collimators. To account for the needs of resolution for crystal structure refinement a good in-pile collimation α1, a high take-off angle above 90∘ at the monochromator and a good collimation α3 in front of the detector bank are chosen whereas the value of α2 for the collimation between monochromator and sample is less crucial. During the last years new strategies were developed at our institute using wide divergent beam geometries defined by fan collimators or slit-type diaphragms which correlate ray direction and wavelength within the beam. Here we present the performance of a newly developed fan collimator, which enables one to adjust the opening of the collimator channels on both sides independently. This fan collimator is positioned in front of the monochromator at the instrument E6 at the Helmholtz Centre Berlin (formerly Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin). It will be shown that control of the beam divergency allows optimization of the resolution in a large angular diffraction range. Hence the resolution and intensity can be adapted to the needs of powder diffraction. Monte Carlo simulations using McStas are used to check and prove the optimal setting of the instrument. We obtain a very good agreement between experimental and simulated data and demonstrate the superior outcome of the new instrument configuration with respect to Soller type instruments.

  10. Simulation of a suite of generic long-pulse neutron instruments to optimize the time structure of the European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lefmann, Kim; Kleno, Kaspar H.; Holm, Sonja L.; Sales, Morten; Birk, Jonas Okkels; Hansen, Britt R.; Knudsen, Erik; Willendrup, Peter K.; Lieutenant, Klaus; Moos, Lars von; Andersen, Ken H.

    2013-05-15

    We here describe the result of simulations of 15 generic neutron instruments for the long-pulsed European Spallation Source. All instruments have been simulated for 20 different settings of the source time structure, corresponding to pulse lengths between 1 ms and 2 ms; and repetition frequencies between 10 Hz and 25 Hz. The relative change in performance with time structure is given for each instrument, and an unweighted average is calculated. The performance of the instrument suite is proportional to (a) the peak flux and (b) the duty cycle to a power of approximately 0.3. This information is an important input to determining the best accelerator parameters. In addition, we find that in our simple guide systems, most neutrons reaching the sample originate from the central 3-5 cm of the moderator. This result can be used as an input in later optimization of the moderator design. We discuss the relevance and validity of defining a single figure-of-merit for a full facility and compare with evaluations of the individual instrument classes.

  11. Neutron-Induced Failures in Semiconductor Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wender, Stephen Arthur

    2016-04-06

    This slide presentation explores single event effect, environmental neutron flux, system response, the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) neutron testing facility, examples of SEE measurements, and recent interest in thermal neutrons.

  12. Progress in the development of the neutron flux monitoring system of the French GEN-IV SFR: simulations and experimental validations [ANIMMA--2015-IO-392

    SciTech Connect

    Jammes, C.; Filliatre, P.; Izarra, G. de; Elter, Zs.; Verma, V.; Hamrita, H.; Bakkali, M.; Chapoutier, N.; Scholer, A.C.; Verrier, D.; Hellesen, C.; Jacobsson, S.; Pazsit, I.; Cantonnet, B.; Nappe, J.C.; Molinie, P.; Dessante, P.; Hanna, R.; Kirkpatrick, M.; Odic, E.

    2015-07-01

    France has a long experience of about 50 years in designing, building and operating sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) such as RAPSODIE, PHENIX and SUPER PHENIX. Fast reactors feature the double capability of reducing nuclear waste and saving nuclear energy resources by burning actinides. Since this reactor type is one of those selected by the Generation IV International Forum, the French government asked, in the year 2006, CEA, namely the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, to lead the development of an innovative GEN-IV nuclear- fission power demonstrator. The major objective is to improve the safety and availability of an SFR. The neutron flux monitoring (NFM) system of any reactor must, in any situation, permit both reactivity control and power level monitoring from startup to full power. It also has to monitor possible changes in neutron flux distribution within the core region in order to prevent any local melting accident. The neutron detectors will have to be installed inside the reactor vessel because locations outside the vessel will suffer from severe disadvantages; radially the neutron shield that is also contained in the reactor vessel will cause unacceptable losses in neutron flux; below the core the presence of a core-catcher prevents from inserting neutron guides; and above the core the distance is too large to obtain decent neutron signals outside the vessel. Another important point is to limit the number of detectors placed in the vessel in order to alleviate their installation into the vessel. In this paper, we show that the architecture of the NFM system will rely on high-temperature fission chambers (HTFC) featuring wide-range flux monitoring capability. The definition of such a system is presented and the justifications of technological options are brought with the use of simulation and experimental results. Firstly, neutron-transport calculations allow us to propose two in-vessel regions, namely the above-core and under

  13. Optimal tracers for parallel labeling experiments and (13)C metabolic flux analysis: A new precision and synergy scoring system.

    PubMed

    Crown, Scott B; Long, Christopher P; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2016-11-01

    (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) is a widely used approach in metabolic engineering for quantifying intracellular metabolic fluxes. The precision of fluxes determined by (13)C-MFA depends largely on the choice of isotopic tracers and the specific set of labeling measurements. A recent advance in the field is the use of parallel labeling experiments for improved flux precision and accuracy. However, as of today, no systemic methods exist for identifying optimal tracers for parallel labeling experiments. In this contribution, we have addressed this problem by introducing a new scoring system and evaluating thousands of different isotopic tracer schemes. Based on this extensive analysis we have identified optimal tracers for (13)C-MFA. The best single tracers were doubly (13)C-labeled glucose tracers, including [1,6-(13)C]glucose, [5,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose, which consistently produced the highest flux precision independent of the metabolic flux map (here, 100 random flux maps were evaluated). Moreover, we demonstrate that pure glucose tracers perform better overall than mixtures of glucose tracers. For parallel labeling experiments the optimal isotopic tracers were [1,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose. Combined analysis of [1,6-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]glucose labeling data improved the flux precision score by nearly 20-fold compared to widely use tracer mixture 80% [1-(13)C]glucose +20% [U-(13)C]glucose.

  14. Novel Materials and Devices for Solid-State Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Pfeifer, Kent B.

    2015-11-01

    There is a need in many fields, such as nuclear medicine, non-proliferation, energy exploration, national security, homeland security, nuclear energy, etc, for miniature, thermal neutron detectors. Until recently, thermal neutron detection has required physically large devices to provide sufficient neutron interaction and transduction signal. Miniaturization would allow broader use in the fields just mentioned and open up other applications potentially. Recent research shows promise in creating smaller neutron detectors through the combination of high-neutron-cross-section converter materials and solid-state devices. Yet, till recently it is difficult to measure low neutron fluxes by solidstate means given the need for optimized converter materials (purity, chemical composition and thickness) and a lack of designs capable of efficient transduction of the neutron conversion products (x-rays, electrons, gamma rays). Gadolinium-based semiconductor heterojunctions have detected electrons produced by Gd-neutron reactions but only at high neutron fluxes. One of the main limitations to this type of approach is the use of thin converter layers and the inability to utilize all the conversion products. In this LDRD we have optimized the converter material thickness and chemical composition to improve capture of conversion electrons and have detected thermal neutrons with high fidelity at low flux. We are also examining different semiconductor materials and converter materials to attempt to capture a greater percentage of the conversion electrons, both low and higher energy varieties. We have studied detector size and bias scaling, and cross-sensitivity to xrays and shown that we can detect low fluxes of thermal neutrons in less than 30 minutes with high selectivity by our approach. We are currently studying improvements in performance with direct placement of the Gd converter on the detector. The advancement of sensitive, miniature neutron detectors will have benefits in

  15. FLEXINVERT: an atmospheric Bayesian inversion framework for determining surface fluxes of trace species using an optimized grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. L.; Stohl, A.

    2014-06-01

    We present a new modular Bayesian inversion framework, called FLEXINVERT, for estimating the surface fluxes of atmospheric trace species. FLEXINVERT can be applied to determine the spatio-temporal flux distribution of any species for which the atmospheric loss (if any) can be described as a linear process and can be used on continental to regional and even local scales with little or no modification. The relationship between changes in atmospheric mixing ratios and fluxes (the so-called source-receptor relationship) is described by a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) run in a backwards in time mode. In this study, we use FLEXPART but any LPDM could be used. The framework determines the fluxes on a nested grid of variable resolution, which is optimized based on the source-receptor relationships for the given observation network. Background mixing ratios are determined by coupling FLEXPART to the output of a global Eulerian model (or alternatively, from the observations themselves) and are also optionally optimized in the inversion. Spatial and temporal error correlations in the fluxes are taken into account using a simple model of exponential decay with space and time and, additionally, the aggregation error from the variable grid is accounted for. To demonstrate the use of FLEXINVERT, we present one case study in which methane fluxes are estimated in Europe in 2011 and compare the results to those of an independent inversion ensemble.

  16. FLEXINVERT: an atmospheric Bayesian inversion framework for determining surface fluxes of trace species using an optimized grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. L.; Stohl, A.

    2014-09-01

    We present a new modular Bayesian inversion framework, called FLEXINVERT, for estimating the surface fluxes of atmospheric trace species. FLEXINVERT can be applied to determine the spatio-temporal flux distribution of any species for which the atmospheric loss (if any) can be described as a linear process and can be used on continental to regional and even local scales with little or no modification. The relationship between changes in atmospheric mixing ratios and fluxes (the so-called source-receptor relationship) is described by a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model (LPDM) run in a backwards-in-time mode. In this study, we use FLEXPART but any LPDM could be used. The framework determines the fluxes on a nested grid of variable resolution, which is optimized based on the source-receptor relationships for the given observation network. Background mixing ratios are determined by coupling FLEXPART to the output of a global Eulerian model (or alternatively, from the observations themselves) and are also optionally optimized in the inversion. Spatial and temporal error correlations in the fluxes are taken into account using a simple model of exponential decay with space and time and, additionally, the aggregation error from the variable grid is accounted for. To demonstrate the use of FLEXINVERT, we present one case study in which methane fluxes are estimated in Europe in 2011 and compare the results to those of an independent inversion ensemble.

  17. Neutron activation analysis at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Smith, E.H.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Marsh, D.L.; Zhao, L.

    1997-12-01

    The Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science has been established to provide {sup 252}Cf-based neutron irradiation services and research capabilities including neutron activation analysis (NAA). A major advantage of the CUF is its accessibility and controlled experimental conditions compared with those of a reactor environment The CUF maintains the world`s largest inventory of compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources. Neutron source intensities of {le} 10{sup 11} neutrons/s are available for irradiations within a contamination-free hot cell, capable of providing thermal and fast neutron fluxes exceeding 10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} at the sample. Total flux of {ge}10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} is feasible for large-volume irradiation rabbits within the {sup 252}Cf storage pool. Neutron and gamma transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP to estimate irradiation fluxes available for sample activation within the hot cell and storage pool and to design and optimize a prompt gamma NAA (PGNAA) configuration for large sample volumes. Confirmatory NAA irradiations have been performed within the pool. Gamma spectroscopy capabilities including PGNAA are being established within the CUF for sample analysis.

  18. Spectromicroscopy of boron for the optimization of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, B.; Redondo, J.; Baudat, P.-A.; Lorusso, G. F.; Andres, R.; Van Meir, E. G.; Brunet, J.-F.; Hamou, M.-F.; Suda, T.; Mercanti, Delio; Ciotti, M. Teresa; Droubay, T. C.; Tonner, B. P.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, M.; DeStasio, Gelsomina

    1998-10-01

    We used synchrotron spectromicroscopy to study the microscopic distribution of boron in rat brain tumour and healthy tissue in the field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The success of this experimental cancer therapy depends on the preferential uptake of ? in tumour cells after injection of a boron compound (in our case ?, or BSH). With the Mephisto (microscope à emission de photoélectrons par illumination synchrotronique de type onduleur) spectromicroscope, high-magnification imaging and chemical analysis was performed on brain tissue sections from a rat carrying an implanted brain tumour and the results were compared with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) detection of boron in bulk tissue. Boron was found to have been taken up more favourably by regions of tumour rather than healthy tissue, but the resulting boron distribution in the tumour was inhomogeneous. The results demonstrate that Mephisto can perform microchemical analysis of tissue sections, detect and localize the presence of boron with submicron spatial resolution. The application of this technique to boron in brain tissue can therefore be used to evaluate the current efforts to optimize BNC therapy.

  19. Determination of neutron flux density distribution in the core with LEU fuel IRT-4M at the training reactor VR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Huml, O.

    2008-07-15

    The objective of this work was to determine the neutron flux density distribution in various places of the training reactor VR-1 Sparrow. This experiment was performed on the new core design C1, composed of the new low-enriched uranium fuel cells IRT-4M (19.7 %). This fuel replaced the old high-enriched uranium fuel IRT-3M (36 %) within the framework of the RERTR Program in September 2005. The measurement used the neutron activation analysis method with gold wires. The principle of this method consists in neutron capture in a nucleus of the material forming the activation detector. This capture can change the nucleus in a radioisotope, whose activity can be measured. The absorption cross-section values were evaluated by MCNP computer code. The gold wires were irradiated in seven different positions in the core C1. All irradiations were performed at reactor power level 1E8 (1 kW{sub therm}). The activity of segments of irradiated wires was measured by special automatic device called 'Drat' (Wire in English). (author)

  20. Neutronic design of the APT Target/Blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Pitcher, E.J.; Russell, G.J.; Kidman, R.B.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1997-12-01

    The primary function of the Accelerator Production of Tritium Target/Blanket assembly is the safe and efficient production of tritium. The T/B accepts a 1.7-GeV, 100-mA proton beam and produces neutrons via the spallation process. These neutrons then react with {sup 3}He to produce tritium. Neutronic optimization of the T/B is achieved by efficiently using the proton beam to produce neutrons and then, once produced, assuring that they are captured mostly by {sup 3}He. This optimization must occur within the constraints imposed by engineering considerations such as heat flux limits, structural integrity, fabricability, and safe and reliable operation. The target/blanket achieves these goals with a neutron production rate that is 75% of that achievable with an ideal target, and a neutronic efficiency of 84%, leading to an overall tritium production rate that is 63% of the theoretical maximum.

  1. Neutronics Simulations of 237Np Targets to Support Safety-Basis and 238Pu Production Assessment Efforts at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Ellis, Ronald James

    2015-01-01

    Fueled by two highly enriched uranium-bearing fuel elements surrounded by a large concentric ring of beryllium reflector, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) provides one of the highest neutron fluxes in the world and is used to produce unique isotopes like plutonium-238. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration use radioisotope thermoelectric generators powered by 238Pu for deep-space missions. As part of the US Department of Energy s task to reestablish the domestic production of 238Pu, a technology demonstration sub-project has been initiated to establish a new 238Pu supply chain. HFIR safety-basis neutronics calculations are being performed to ensure the target irradiations have no adverse impacts on reactor performance and to calculate data required as input to follow-on thermal-structural, thermal-hydraulic and radionuclide/dose analyses. Plutonium-238 production assessments are being performed to estimate the amount of 238Pu that can be produced in HFIR s permanent beryllium reflector. It is estimated that a total of 0.96 1.12 kg 238Pu (~1.28 1.49 kg PuO2 at 85% 238Pu/Pu purity) could be produced per year in HFIR s permanent beryllium reflector irradiation facilities if they are all utilized.

  2. Optimization and comprehensive characterization of metal hydride based hydrogen storage systems using in-situ Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Börries, S.; Metz, O.; Pranzas, P. K.; Bellosta von Colbe, J. M.; Bücherl, T.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Schreyer, A.

    2016-10-01

    For the storage of hydrogen, complex metal hydrides are considered as highly promising with respect to capacity, reversibility and safety. The optimization of corresponding storage tanks demands a precise and time-resolved investigation of the hydrogen distribution in scaled-up metal hydride beds. In this study it is shown that in situ fission Neutron Radiography provides unique insights into the spatial distribution of hydrogen even for scaled-up compacts and therewith enables a direct study of hydrogen storage tanks. A technique is introduced for the precise quantification of both time-resolved data and a priori material distribution, allowing inter alia for an optimization of compacts manufacturing process. For the first time, several macroscopic fields are combined which elucidates the great potential of Neutron Imaging for investigations of metal hydrides by going further than solely 'imaging' the system: A combination of in-situ Neutron Radiography, IR-Thermography and thermodynamic quantities can reveal the interdependency of different driving forces for a scaled-up sodium alanate pellet by means of a multi-correlation analysis. A decisive and time-resolved, complex influence of material packing density is derived. The results of this study enable a variety of new investigation possibilities that provide essential information on the optimization of future hydrogen storage tanks.

  3. Optimization methods, flux conserving methods for steady state Navier-Stokes equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeyeye, John; Attia, Nauib

    1995-01-01

    Navier-Stokes equation as discretized by new flux conserving method proposed by Chang and Scott results in the system: vector F(vector x) = 0, where F is a vector valued function. The Optimization method we use is based on Quasi-Newton methods: given a nonlinear function vector F(vector x) = 0, we solve, Delta(vector x) = -BF(vector x), where Delta(vector x) is the correction term and B is the inverse Jacobian of F(x). Then, iteratively, vector(x(sub (i+1))) = vector(x (sub i)) + alpha.Delta(vector x(sub i)), where alpha is a line search correction term determined by a line search routine. We use the BFCG's update the Jacobian matrix B(sub k) at each iteration. It is well known that B(sub k) approaches B(*) at the solution X(*). This algorithm has several advantages over the Newton-Raphson method. For example, we do not need to calculate the Jacobian matrix at each iteration which is computationally very expensive.

  4. Elimination of flux loss by optimizing the groove angle in modified Fresnel lens to increase illuminance uniformity, color uniformity and flux efficiency in LED illumination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byungwook; Choi, Minseok; Kim, Hokwan; Lim, Jiseok; Kang, Shinill

    2009-09-28

    A Fresnel lens is an optical component that can be used to create systems more compact, cost-effective, and lightweight than those using conventional continuous surface optics. However, Fresnel lenses can usually cause a loss of flux efficiency and non-uniform distribution of illuminance due to secondary refraction by surface discontinuities, especially along the groove facet. We therefore proposed to modify a groove angle in the Fresnel lens and analyzed interrelation between the groove angle and multiple optical performances, such as flux efficiency and the uniformity of illuminance and color. The groove angle was optimized to maximize the uniformity and efficiency in the target viewing angle considering various weights of merit functions. Specifically, in our study, when the uniformity of illuminance had a little more weight than the flux efficiency (ratio of 0.6:0.4), final optimum groove angles of 24.7 degrees , 29.4 degrees , and 31.3 degrees were obtained at target viewing angles of 20 degrees , 30 degrees , and 40 degrees , respectively. We also fabricated a modified Fresnel lens with a groove angle of 29.4 degrees using UV-imprinting. The real optical performance of the fabricated Fresnel lens was then compared to that of a spherical lens.

  5. Ground water and snow sensor based on directional detection of cosmogenic neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Robert Lee; Marleau, Peter; Griffin, Patrick J.

    2011-06-01

    A fast neutron detector is being developed to measure the cosmic ray neutron flux in order to measure soil moisture. Soil that is saturated with water has an enhanced ability to moderate fast neutrons, removing them from the backscatter spectrum. The detector is a two-element, liquid scintillator detector. The choice of liquid scintillator allows rejection of gamma background contamination from the desired neutron signal. This enhances the ability to reconstruct the energy and direction of a coincident neutron event. The ability to image on an event-by-event basis allows the detector to selectively scan the neutron flux as a function of distance from the detector. Calibrations, simulations, and optimization have been completed to understand the detector response to neutron sources at variable distances and directions. This has been applied to laboratory background measurements in preparation for outdoor field tests.

  6. Ultradiscrete optimal velocity model: a cellular-automaton model for traffic flow and linear instability of high-flux traffic.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Masahiro; Isojima, Shin; Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Tokihiro, Tetsuji

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, we propose the ultradiscrete optimal velocity model, a cellular-automaton model for traffic flow, by applying the ultradiscrete method for the optimal velocity model. The optimal velocity model, defined by a differential equation, is one of the most important models; in particular, it successfully reproduces the instability of high-flux traffic. It is often pointed out that there is a close relation between the optimal velocity model and the modified Korteweg-de Vries (mkdV) equation, a soliton equation. Meanwhile, the ultradiscrete method enables one to reduce soliton equations to cellular automata which inherit the solitonic nature, such as an infinite number of conservation laws, and soliton solutions. We find that the theory of soliton equations is available for generic differential equations and the simulation results reveal that the model obtained reproduces both absolutely unstable and convectively unstable flows as well as the optimal velocity model.

  7. Evaluation of a digital data acquisition system and optimization of n-{gamma} discrimination for a compact neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Zimbal, A.; Reginatto, M.; Tittelmeier, K.

    2011-01-15

    A compact NE213 liquid scintillation neutron spectrometer with a new digital data acquisition (DAQ) system is now in operation at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). With the DAQ system, developed by ENEA Frascati, neutron spectrometry with high count rates in the order of 5x10{sup 5} s{sup -1} is possible, roughly an order of magnitude higher than with an analog acquisition system. To validate the DAQ system, a new data analysis code was developed and tests were done using measurements with 14-MeV neutrons made at the PTB accelerator. Additional analysis was carried out to optimize the two-gate method used for neutron and gamma (n-{gamma}) discrimination. The best results were obtained with gates of 35 ns and 80 ns. This indicates that the fast and medium decay time components of the NE213 light emission are the ones that are relevant for n-{gamma} discrimination with the digital acquisition system. This differs from what is normally implemented in the analog pulse shape discrimination modules, namely, the fast and long decay emissions of the scintillating light.

  8. Evaluation of a digital data acquisition system and optimization of n-γ discrimination for a compact neutron spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Giacomelli, L; Zimbal, A; Reginatto, M; Tittelmeier, K

    2011-01-01

    A compact NE213 liquid scintillation neutron spectrometer with a new digital data acquisition (DAQ) system is now in operation at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). With the DAQ system, developed by ENEA Frascati, neutron spectrometry with high count rates in the order of 5×10(5) s(-1) is possible, roughly an order of magnitude higher than with an analog acquisition system. To validate the DAQ system, a new data analysis code was developed and tests were done using measurements with 14-MeV neutrons made at the PTB accelerator. Additional analysis was carried out to optimize the two-gate method used for neutron and gamma (n-γ) discrimination. The best results were obtained with gates of 35 ns and 80 ns. This indicates that the fast and medium decay time components of the NE213 light emission are the ones that are relevant for n-γ discrimination with the digital acquisition system. This differs from what is normally implemented in the analog pulse shape discrimination modules, namely, the fast and long decay emissions of the scintillating light.

  9. Optimization of source-sample-detector geometries for bulk hydrogen analysis using epithermal neutrons.

    PubMed

    Csikai, J; Dóczi, R

    2009-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of epithermal neutrons in qualification of hydrocarbons via their H contents and C/H atomic ratios have been investigated systematically. Sensitivity of this method and the dimensions of the interrogated regions were determined for various types of hydrogenous samples. Results clearly demonstrate the advantages of direct neutron detection, e.g. by BF(3) counters as compared to the foil activation method in addition to using the hardness of the spectral shape of Pu-Be neutrons to that from a (252)Cf source.

  10. Estimating local atmosphere-surface fluxes using eddy covariance and numerical Ogive optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievers, J.; Papakyriakou, T.; Larsen, S.; Jammet, M. M.; Rysgaard, S.; Sejr, M. K.; Sørensen, L. L.

    2014-08-01

    Regardless of study type, site topography, homogeneity and large-scale meteorological flows, estimating ecosystem-scale surface-fluxes using the micrometeorological eddy covariance method inevitably leads to questions concerning inclusion or exclusion of advective flux contributions, in providing representative results. For process-oriented studies in which fluxes are linked to local physical parameters and up-scaled through numerical modeling efforts, advection represents a site-specific component which interferes with our ability to isolate local biochemical processes of interest, as represented by turbulent fluxes. Yet, outside of discarding data reflecting excessive advective interference, no method currently exists to disentangle these contributions on flux estimates. Here, we present a novel comprehensive numerical scheme to identify and separate out advective contributions to exchanges in the surface layer. Comparison between the presented method and conventional methodology on observations of sensible heat, latent heat and CO2-fluxes from a number of sites suggests the presence of absolute flux thresholds at |QSENS|=30 Wm-2, |QLAT|=16 Wm-2 and |FCO2|=2.0 μmol m-2 s-1 marking clear shifts in the influence of advection. Above the thresholds, the relative difference of flux estimates δ remained fixed at δ =5-25% suggesting arguably negligible advection influence. Below the thresholds, however, relative difference rises to δSENS=⟨ 51%|88%|225%⟩, δLAT=⟨14%|28%|99%⟩ and δCO2=⟨ 41%|83%|521%⟩, where bracketed values are the 13.6th percentile, 50th percentile (the median) and the 86.4th percentile respectively, suggesting non-negligible relative influence of advection on low flux estimates. The thresholds thus serve as lower limits to local-scale flux resolvability by conventional methodology. The presented method is shown to allow for flux estimation during severe signal disruption and to yield fewer estimates for an enclosed gas analyzer during

  11. Fast-SNP: a fast matrix pre-processing algorithm for efficient loopless flux optimization of metabolic models

    PubMed Central

    Saa, Pedro A.; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Computation of steady-state flux solutions in large metabolic models is routinely performed using flux balance analysis based on a simple LP (Linear Programming) formulation. A minimal requirement for thermodynamic feasibility of the flux solution is the absence of internal loops, which are enforced using ‘loopless constraints’. The resulting loopless flux problem is a substantially harder MILP (Mixed Integer Linear Programming) problem, which is computationally expensive for large metabolic models. Results: We developed a pre-processing algorithm that significantly reduces the size of the original loopless problem into an easier and equivalent MILP problem. The pre-processing step employs a fast matrix sparsification algorithm—Fast- sparse null-space pursuit (SNP)—inspired by recent results on SNP. By finding a reduced feasible ‘loop-law’ matrix subject to known directionalities, Fast-SNP considerably improves the computational efficiency in several metabolic models running different loopless optimization problems. Furthermore, analysis of the topology encoded in the reduced loop matrix enabled identification of key directional constraints for the potential permanent elimination of infeasible loops in the underlying model. Overall, Fast-SNP is an effective and simple algorithm for efficient formulation of loop-law constraints, making loopless flux optimization feasible and numerically tractable at large scale. Availability and Implementation: Source code for MATLAB including examples is freely available for download at http://www.aibn.uq.edu.au/cssb-resources under Software. Optimization uses Gurobi, CPLEX or GLPK (the latter is included with the algorithm). Contact: lars.nielsen@uq.edu.au Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27559155

  12. Validation of absolute axial neutron flux distribution calculations with MCNP with 197Au(n,γ)198Au reaction rate distribution measurements at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Vladimir; Štancar, Žiga; Snoj, Luka; Trkov, Andrej

    2014-02-01

    The calculation of axial neutron flux distributions with the MCNP code at the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor has been validated with experimental measurements of the (197)Au(n,γ)(198)Au reaction rate. The calculated absolute reaction rate values, scaled according to the reactor power and corrected for the flux redistribution effect, are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effect of different cross-section libraries on the calculations has been investigated and shown to be minor.

  13. Second generation fusion neutron time-of-flight spectrometer at optimized rate for fully digital data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. E-mail: jnke1@icloud.com Fan, T.; Yuan, X.; Xie, X.; Chen, Z.; Källne, J.; Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.

    2014-04-15

    The progress on high-rate event recording of data is taken as starting point to revisit the design of fusion neutron spectrometers based on the TOF (time-of-flight) technique. The study performed was aimed at how such instruments for optimized rate (TOFOR) can be further developed to enhance the plasma diagnostic capabilities based on measurement of the 2.5 MeV dd neutron emission from D plasmas, especially the weak spectral components that depend on discrimination of extraneous events. This paper describes a design (TOFOR II) adapted for use with digital wave form recording of all detector pulses providing information on both amplitude (pulse height) and timing. The results of simulations are presented and the performance enhancement is assessed in comparison to the present.

  14. Complementarities between Biomass and FluxNet data to optimize ORCHIDEE ecosystem model at European forest and grassland sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thum, T.; Peylin, P.; Granier, A.; Ibrom, A.; Linden, L.; Loustau, D.; Bacour, C.; Ciais, P.

    2010-12-01

    Assimilation of data from several measurements provides knowledge of the model's performance and uncertainties. In this work we investigate the complementary of Biomass data to net CO2 flux (NEE) and latent heat flux (LE) in optimising parameters of the biogeochemical model ORCHIDEE. Our optimisation method is a gradient based iterative method. We optimized the model at the French forest sites, European beech forest of Hesse (48 .67°N, 7.06°E) and maritime pine forest of Le Bray (44.72°N, 0.77°W). First we adapted the model to represent the past clearcut on these two sites in order to obtain a realistic age of the forest. The model-data improvement in terms of aboveground biomass will be discussed. We then used FluxNet and Biomass data, separately and altogether, in the optimization process to assess the potential and the complementarities of these two data stream. For biomass data optimization we added parameters linked to allocation to the optimization scheme. The results show a decrease in the uncertainty of the parameters after optimization and reveal some structural deficiencies in the model. In a second step, data from ecosystem manipulation experiment site Brandbjerg (55.88°N, 11.97°E), a Danish grassland site, were used for model optimisation. The different ecosystem experiments at this site include rain exclusion, warming, and increased CO2 concentration, and only biomass data were available and used in the optimization for the different treatments. We investigate the ability of the model to represent the biomass differences between manipulative experiments with a given set of parameters and highlight model deficiencies.

  15. IsoDesign: a software for optimizing the design of 13C-metabolic flux analysis experiments.

    PubMed

    Millard, Pierre; Sokol, Serguei; Letisse, Fabien; Portais, Jean-Charles

    2014-01-01

    The growing demand for (13) C-metabolic flux analysis ((13) C-MFA) in the field of metabolic engineering and systems biology is driving the need to rationalize expensive and time-consuming (13) C-labeling experiments. Experimental design is a key step in improving both the number of fluxes that can be calculated from a set of isotopic data and the precision of flux values. We present IsoDesign, a software that enables these parameters to be maximized by optimizing the isotopic composition of the label input. It can be applied to (13) C-MFA investigations using a broad panel of analytical tools (MS, MS/MS, (1) H NMR, (13) C NMR, etc.) individually or in combination. It includes a visualization module to intuitively select the optimal label input depending on the biological question to be addressed. Applications of IsoDesign are described, with an example of the entire (13) C-MFA workflow from the experimental design to the flux map including important practical considerations. IsoDesign makes the experimental design of (13) C-MFA experiments more accessible to a wider biological community. IsoDesign is distributed under an open source license at http://metasys.insa-toulouse.fr/software/isodes/

  16. Explosives (and other threats) detection using pulsed neutron interrogation and optimized detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strellis, Dan A.; Elsalim, Mashal; Gozani, Tsahi

    2011-06-01

    We have previously reported results from a human-portable system using neutron interrogation to detect contraband and explosives. We summarized our methodology for distinguishing threat materials such as narcotics, C4, and mustard gas in the myriad of backgrounds present in the maritime environment. We are expanding our mission for the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) to detect Special Nuclear Material (SNM) through the detection of multiple fission signatures without compromising the conventional threat detection performance. This paper covers our initial investigations into using neutrons from compact pulsed neutron generators via the d(D,n)3He or d(T,n)α reactions with energies of ~2.5 and 14 MeV, respectively, for explosives (and other threats) detection along with a variety of gamma-ray detectors. Fast neutrons and thermal neutrons (after successive collisions) can stimulate the emission of various threat detection signatures. For explosives detection, element-specific gamma-ray signatures via the (n,n'γ) inelastic scattering reaction and the (n,'γ) thermal capture reaction are detected. For SNM, delayed gamma-rays following fission can be measured with the same detector. Our initial trade-off investigations of several gamma-ray detectors types (NaI, CsI, LaBr3, HPGe) for measuring gamma-ray signatures in a pulsed neutron environment for potential application in a human-portable active interrogation system are covered in this paper.

  17. Local Neutron Flux Distribution Measurements by Wire-Dosimetry in the AMMON Experimental Program in the EOLE Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruel, A.; Di Salvo, J.; Roche, A.; Girard, J.-M.; Philibert, H.; Bonora, J.; Ledoux, J.-F.; Morel, C.; Lecluze, A.; Foucras, A.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Colombier, A.-C.

    2016-02-01

    Dosimetry measurements were carried out during the AMMON experimental program, in the EOLE facility. Al-0.1 wt% Au wires were positioned along curved fuel plates of JHR-type assemblies to investigate the azimuthal and axial gold capture rate profiles, directly linked to the thermal and epithermal flux. After irradiation, wires were cut into small segments (a few mm), and the gold capture rate of each part was measured by gamma spectrometry on the MADERE platform. This paper presents results in the "hafnium" configuration, and more specifically the azimuthal flux profile characterization. The final uncertainty on each measured wire lies below 1% (at 2 standard deviations). Experimental profiles are in a good agreement against Monte Carlo calculations, and the 4% capture rate increase at the plate edge is well observed. The flux dissymmetry due to assembly position in the core is also measured, and shows a 10% discrepancy between the two edges of the plate.

  18. Evaluation of an iron-filtered epithermal neutron beam for neutron-capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Musolino, S V; McGinley, P H; Greenwood, R C; Kliauga, P; Fairchild, R G

    1991-01-01

    An epithermal neutron filter using iron, aluminum, and sulfur was evaluated to determine if the therapeutic performance could be improved with respect to aluminum-sulfur-based filters. An empirically optimized filter was developed that delivered a 93% pure beam of 24-keV epithermal neutrons. It was expected that a thick filter using iron with a density thickness greater than 200 g/cm2 would eliminate the excess gamma contamination found in Al-S filters. This research showed that prompt gamma production from neutron interactions in iron was the dominant dose component. Dosimetric parameters of the beam were determined from the measurement of absorbed dose in air, thermal neutron flux in a head phantom, neutron and gamma spectroscopy, and microdosimetry.

  19. Current and future capabilities of the neutron reflectometer MIRROR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, W. A.; Smith, G. S.; Taylor, G. B.; Larkins, B. M.; Porcar, L.

    2006-11-01

    The peripatetic ORNL HFIR Center for Neutron Scattering reflectometer instrument MIRROR has recently been re-installed in an interim beam line position in the reactor beam room. In 2006 an upgraded version of the instrument will move to a high intensity guide hall position fed by the new HFIR cold source. In this short note, we present some aspects of current instrument operation-particularly with respect to data reduction from the instrument's linear reflection plane detector-with examples of ongoing research and analysis, and a brief outline of the expected capabilities of the fully upgraded guide hall instrument.

  20. Instruments to study fast neutrons fluxes in the upper atmosphere with the use of high-altitude balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyudin, A. F.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Galkin, V. I.; Golovanov, I. A.; Krasnov, A.; Markelova, A. K.; Markelov, I.; Morgunova, Yu.; Osedlo, V. I.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Rozhkov, G.; Svertilov, S. I.

    2015-11-01

    The successful circumpolar flight of the X-ray polarimeter PoGOLite in the northern hemisphere during the summer campaign of 2013 inspired us, the team consisting mostly of students and senior researchers, to develop a Modular Monitor of the Cosmic Neutral Emission (MMCNE) prototype that can be flown on the high-altitude balloons to study two components of neutral emission, namely spectra of neutrons and of gamma-rays in the upper layers of Earth atmosphere. Instrument modular concept, and some of the simulated detection characteristics for the selected layout will be presented in this paper.

  1. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  2. Organic metal neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.

    1987-01-01

    A device for detecting neutrons comprises a layer of conductive polymer sandwiched between electrodes, which may be covered on each face with a neutron transmissive insulating material layer. Conventional electrodes are used for a non-imaging integrating total neutron fluence-measuring embodiment, while wire grids are used in an imaging version of the device. The change in conductivity of the polymer after exposure to a neutron flux is determined in either case to provide the desired data. Alternatively, the exposed conductive polymer layer may be treated with a chemical reagent which selectively binds to the sites altered by neutrons to produce an image of the flux detected.

  3. Optimization of permeate flux produced by solar energy driven membrane distillation process using central composite design approach.

    PubMed

    Bouguecha, Salah T; Boubakri, Ali; Aly, Samir E; Al-Beirutty, Mohammad H; Hamdi, Mohamed M

    2016-01-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) is considered as a relatively high-energy requirement. To overcome this drawback, it is recommended to couple the MD process with solar energy as the renewable energy source in order to provide heat energy required to optimize its performance to produce permeate flux. In the present work, an original solar energy driven direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) pilot plant was built and tested under actual weather conditions at Jeddah, KSA, in order to model and optimize permeate flux. The dependency of permeate flux on various operating parameters such as feed temperature (46.6-63.4°C), permeate temperature (6.6-23.4°C), feed flow rate (199-451L/h) and permeate flow rate (199-451L/h) was studied by response surface methodology based on central composite design approach. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) confirmed that all independent variables had significant influence on the model (where P-value <0.05). The high coefficient of determination (R(2) = 0.9644 and R(adj)(2) = 0.9261) obtained by ANOVA demonstrated good correlation between experimental and predicted values of the response. The optimized conditions, determined using desirability function, were T(f) = 63.4°C, Tp = 6.6°C, Q(f) = 451L/h and Q(p) = 451L/h. Under these conditions, the maximum permeate flux of 6.122 kg/m(2).h was achieved, which was close to the predicted value of 6.398 kg/m(2).h.

  4. Optimization of multiply acquired magnetic flux density B(z) using ICNE-Multiecho train in MREIT.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyun Soo; Kwon, Oh In

    2010-05-07

    The aim of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is to visualize the electrical properties, conductivity or current density of an object by injection of current. Recently, the prolonged data acquisition time when using the injected current nonlinear encoding (ICNE) method has been advantageous for measurement of magnetic flux density data, Bz, for MREIT in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, the ICNE method results in undesirable side artifacts, such as blurring, chemical shift and phase artifacts, due to the long data acquisition under an inhomogeneous static field. In this paper, we apply the ICNE method to a gradient and spin echo (GRASE) multi-echo train pulse sequence in order to provide the multiple k-space lines during a single RF pulse period. We analyze the SNR of the measured multiple B(z) data using the proposed ICNE-Multiecho MR pulse sequence. By determining a weighting factor for B(z) data in each of the echoes, an optimized inversion formula for the magnetic flux density data is proposed for the ICNE-Multiecho MR sequence. Using the ICNE-Multiecho method, the quality of the measured magnetic flux density is considerably increased by the injection of a long current through the echo train length and by optimization of the voxel-by-voxel noise level of the B(z) value. Agarose-gel phantom experiments have demonstrated fewer artifacts and a better SNR using the ICNE-Multiecho method. Experimenting with the brain of an anesthetized dog, we collected valuable echoes by taking into account the noise level of each of the echoes and determined B(z) data by determining optimized weighting factors for the multiply acquired magnetic flux density data.

  5. Optimized concept design of the target station of Chinese spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Q. W.; Yin, W.; Yu, B. L.

    2005-08-01

    CSNS (Chinese spallation neutron source) target station, with proton beam power of 100 kW, consists of Tungsten rectangular target surrounded by a beryllium/steel reflector, three wing-moderators and the shield having 18 beam tubes. The leakage neutron intensity from the target (with reflector) and heat deposition on the target, reflector and shield were calculated using Monte Carlo code NMTC/JAM respectively. It is reported that the target having rectangular section will produce more leakage neutron intensity than a square one for the same proton power. The temperature and thermal stress distribution in the target disks were calculated by the finite element method. The performances of moderators were calculated using MCNP-4A code.

  6. Optimized {gamma}-Multiplicity Based Spin Assignments of s-Wave Neutron Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Becvar, F.; Koehler, Paul Edward; Krticka, Milan; Mitchell, G. E.; Ullmann, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    The multiplicity of -ray emission following neutron capture at isolated resonances carries valuable information on the resonance spin. Several methods utilizing this information have been developed. The latest method was recently introduced for analyzing the data from time-of-flight measurements with 4 -calorimetric detection systems. The present paper describes a generalization of this method. The goal is the separation of the -emission yields belonging to the two neutron capturing state spins of isolated (or even unresolved) s-wave neutron resonances on targets with non-zero spin. The formalism for performing this separation is described and then tested on artificially generated data. This new method was applied to the -multiplicity data obtained for the 147Sm(n, )148Sm reaction using the DANCE detector system at the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The analyzing power of the upgraded method is supported by combined dicebox and geant4 simulations of the fluctuation properties of the multiplicity distributions.

  7. On the Evolution of the Inner Disk Radius with Flux in the Neutron Star Low-mass X-Ray Binary Serpens X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chia-Ying; Morgan, Robert A.; Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.

    2016-11-01

    We analyze the latest Suzaku observation of the bright neutron star (NS) low-mass X-ray binary Serpens X-1 taken in 2013 October and 2014 April. The observation was taken using the burst mode and only suffered mild pile-up effects. A broad iron line is clearly detected in the X-ray spectrum. We test different models and find that the iron line is asymmetric and best interpreted by relativistic reflection. The relativistically broadened iron line is generally believed to originate from the innermost regions of the accretion disk, where strong gravity causes a series of special and general relativistic effects. The iron line profile indicates an inner radius of ˜8 R G, which gives an upper limit on the size of the NS. The asymmetric iron line has been observed in a number of previous observations, which gives several inner radius measurements at different flux states. We find that the inner radius of Serpens X-1 does not evolve significantly over the range of L/L Edd ˜ 0.4-0.6, and the lack of flux dependence of the inner radius implies that the accretion disk may be truncated outside of the innermost stable circular orbit by the boundary layer, rather than the stellar magnetic field.

  8. Procedure of calculation of the spatial distribution of temperatures and heat fluxes in the steam generator of a nuclear power installation with an RBEC fast-neutron reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, A. A.; Sedov, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    A method for combined 3D/1D-modeling of thermohydraulics of a once-through steam generator (SG) based on the joint analysis of three-dimensional thermo- and hydrodynamics of a single-phase heating coolant in the intertube space and one-dimensional thermohydraulics of steam-generating channels (tubes) with the use of well-known friction and heat-transfer correlations under various boiling conditions is discussed. This method allows one to determine the spatial distribution of temperatures and heat fluxes of heat-exchange surfaces of SGs with a single-phase heating coolant in the intertube space and with steam generation within tubes. The method was applied in the analytical investigation of typical operation of a once-through SG of a nuclear power installation with an RBEC fast-neutron heavy-metal reactor that is being designed by Kurchatov Institute in collaboration with OKB GIDROPRESS and Leipunsky Institute of Physics and Power Engineering. Flow pattern and temperature fields were obtained for the heavy-metal heating coolant in the intertube space. Nonuniformities of heating of the steam-water coolant in different heat-exchange tubes and nonuniformities in the distribution of heat fluxes at SG heat-exchange surfaces were revealed.

  9. Optimizing moderation of He-3 neutron detectors for shielded fission sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, Lawrence B.; Czirr, J. Bart

    2012-07-10

    Abstract: The response of 3-He neutron detectors is highly dependent on the amount of moderator incorporated into the detector system. If there is too little moderation, neutrons will not react with the 3-He. If there is too much moderation, neutrons will not reach the 3-He. In applications for portal or border monitors where 3He detectors are used to interdict illicit Importation of plutonium, the fission source is always shielded to some extent. Since the energy distribution of neutrons emitted from the source depends on the amount and type of shielding present, the optimum placement of moderating material around 3-He tubes is a function of shielding. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo techniques to model the response of 3-He tubes placed in polyethylene boxes for moderation. To model the shielded fission neutron source, we use a 252-Cf source placed in the center of spheres of water of varying radius. Detector efficiency as a function of box geometry and shielding are explored. We find that increasing the amount of moderator behind and to the sides of the detector generally improves the detector response, but that benefits are limited if the thickness of the polyethylene moderator is greater than about 5-7 cm. The thickness of the moderator in front of the 3He tubes, however, is very important. For bare sources, about 5-6 cm of moderator is optimum, but as the shielding increases, the optimum thickness of this moderator decreases to 0-1 cm. A two-tube box with a moderator thickness of 5 cm in front of the first tube and a thickness of 1 cm in front of the second tube is proposed to improve the detector's sensitivity to lower-energy neutrons.

  10. Optimizing moderation of He-3 neutron detectors for shielded fission sources

    DOE PAGES

    Rees, Lawrence B.; Czirr, J. Bart

    2012-07-10

    Abstract: The response of 3-He neutron detectors is highly dependent on the amount of moderator incorporated into the detector system. If there is too little moderation, neutrons will not react with the 3-He. If there is too much moderation, neutrons will not reach the 3-He. In applications for portal or border monitors where 3He detectors are used to interdict illicit Importation of plutonium, the fission source is always shielded to some extent. Since the energy distribution of neutrons emitted from the source depends on the amount and type of shielding present, the optimum placement of moderating material around 3-He tubesmore » is a function of shielding. In this paper, we use Monte Carlo techniques to model the response of 3-He tubes placed in polyethylene boxes for moderation. To model the shielded fission neutron source, we use a 252-Cf source placed in the center of spheres of water of varying radius. Detector efficiency as a function of box geometry and shielding are explored. We find that increasing the amount of moderator behind and to the sides of the detector generally improves the detector response, but that benefits are limited if the thickness of the polyethylene moderator is greater than about 5-7 cm. The thickness of the moderator in front of the 3He tubes, however, is very important. For bare sources, about 5-6 cm of moderator is optimum, but as the shielding increases, the optimum thickness of this moderator decreases to 0-1 cm. A two-tube box with a moderator thickness of 5 cm in front of the first tube and a thickness of 1 cm in front of the second tube is proposed to improve the detector's sensitivity to lower-energy neutrons.« less

  11. Study of flux pinning mechanism under hydrostatic pressure in optimally doped (Ba,K)Fe2As2 single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Shabbir, Babar; Wang, Xiaolin; Ma, Y.; Dou, S. X.; Yan, S. S.; Mei, L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Strong pinning depends on the pinning force strength and number density of effective defects. Using the hydrostatic pressure method, we demonstrate here that hydrostatic pressure of 1.2 GPa can significantly enhance flux pinning or the critical current density (Jc) of optimally doped Ba0.6K0.4Fe2As2 crystals by a factor of up to 5 in both low and high fields, which is generally rare with other Jc enhancement techniques. At 4.1 K, high pressure can significantly enhance Jc from 5 × 105 A/cm2 to nearly 106 A/cm2 at 2 T, and from 2 × 105 A/cm2 to nearly 5.5 × 105 A/cm2 at 12 T. Our systematic analysis of the flux pinning mechanism indicates that both the pinning centre number density and the pinning force are greatly increased by the pressure and enhance the pinning. This study also shows that superconducting performance in terms of flux pinning or Jc for optimally doped superconducting materials can be further improved by using pressure. PMID:26983500

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  13. Conceptual design and optimization of a plastic scintillator array for 2D tomography using a compact D-D fast neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Adams, Robert; Zboray, Robert; Cortesi, Marco; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2014-04-01

    A conceptual design optimization of a fast neutron tomography system was performed. The system is based on a compact deuterium-deuterium fast neutron generator and an arc-shaped array of individual neutron detectors. The array functions as a position sensitive one-dimensional detector allowing tomographic reconstruction of a two-dimensional cross section of an object up to 10 cm across. Each individual detector is to be optically isolated and consists of a plastic scintillator and a Silicon Photomultiplier for measuring light produced by recoil protons. A deterministic geometry-based model and a series of Monte Carlo simulations were used to optimize the design geometry parameters affecting the reconstructed image resolution. From this, it is expected that with an array of 100 detectors a reconstructed image resolution of ~1.5mm can be obtained. Other simulations were performed in order to optimize the scintillator depth (length along the neutron path) such that the best ratio of direct to scattered neutron counts is achieved. This resulted in a depth of 6-8 cm and an expected detection efficiency of 33-37%. Based on current operational capabilities of a prototype neutron generator being developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, planned implementation of this detector array design should allow reconstructed tomograms to be obtained with exposure times on the order of a few hours.

  14. The neutronic design and performance of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavelle, Christopher M.

    Neutron scattering research is performed primarily at large-scale facilities. However, history has shown that smaller scale neutron scattering facilities can play a useful role in education and innovation while performing valuable materials research. This dissertation details the design and experimental validation of the LENS TMR as an example for a small scale accelerator driven neutron source. LENS achieves competitive long wavelength neutron intensities by employing a novel long pulse mode of operation, where the neutron production target is irradiated on a time scale comparable to the emission time of neutrons from the system. Monte Carlo methods have been employed to develop a design for optimal production of long wavelength neutrons from the 9Be(p,n) reaction at proton energies ranging from 7 to 13 MeV proton energy. The neutron spectrum was experimentally measured using time of flight, where it is found that the impact of the long pulse mode on energy resolution can be eliminated at sub-eV neutron energies if the emission time distribution of neutron from the system is known. The emission time distribution from the TMR system is measured using a time focussed crystal analyzer. Emission time of the fundamental cold neutron mode is found to be consistent with Monte Carlo results. The measured thermal neutron spectrum from the water reflector is found to be in agreement with Monte Carlo predictions if the scattering kernels employed are well established. It was found that the scattering kernels currently employed for cryogenic methane are inadequate for accurate prediction of the cold neutron intensity from the system. The TMR and neutronic modeling have been well characterized and the source design is flexible, such that it is possible for LENS to serve as an effective test bed for future work in neutronic development. Suggestions for improvements to the design that would allow increased neutron flux into the instruments are provided.

  15. Advancing Materials Science using Neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Carpenter, John

    2016-07-12

    Jack Carpenter, pioneer of accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron sources, talks about neutron science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and a need for a second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). ORNL is the Department of Energy's largest multiprogram science and energy laboratory, and is home to two scientific user facilities serving the neutron science research community: the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and SNS. HFIR and SNS provide researchers with unmatched capabilities for understanding the structure and properties of materials, macromolecular and biological systems, and the fundamental physics of the neutron. Neutrons provide a window through which to view materials at a microscopic level that allow researchers to develop better materials and better products. Neutrons enable us to understand materials we use in everyday life. Carpenter explains the need for another station to produce long wavelength neutrons, or cold neutrons, to answer questions that are addressed only with cold neutrons. The second target station is optimized for that purpose. Modern technology depends more and more upon intimate atomic knowledge of materials, and neutrons are an ideal probe.

  16. Optimization of the Army’s Fast Neutron Moderator for Radiography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-26

    Development, and Engineering Center (ARDEC). From the early 1970s through the 1980s, neutron imaging was done using Californium -252 (Cf-252), and showed...Measurement c centi-, 1E-2 Cf-252 Californium isotope 252 COTS Commercials off the shelf D-D Deuterium – Deuterium DoD Department of

  17. Optimization of ecosystem model parameters with different temporal variabilities using tower flux data and an ensemble Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, L.; Chen, J. M.; Liu, J.; Mo, G.; Zhen, T.; Chen, B.; Wang, R.; Arain, M.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem models have been widely used to simulate carbon, water and energy fluxes and climate-ecosystem interactions. In these models, some vegetation and soil parameters are determined based on limited studies from literatures without consideration of their seasonal variations. Data assimilation (DA) provides an effective way to optimize these parameters at different time scales . In this study, an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is developed and applied to optimize two key parameters of an ecosystem model, namely the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS): (1) the maximum photosynthetic carboxylation rate (Vcmax) at 25 °C, and (2) the soil water stress factor (fw) for stomatal conductance formulation. These parameters are optimized through assimilating observations of gross primary productivity (GPP) and latent heat (LE) fluxes measured in a 74 year-old pine forest, which is part of the Turkey Point Flux Station's age-sequence sites. Vcmax is related to leaf nitrogen concentration and varies slowly over the season and from year to year. In contrast, fw varies rapidly in response to soil moisture dynamics in the root-zone. Earlier studies suggested that DA of vegetation parameters at daily time steps leads to Vcmax values that are unrealistic. To overcome the problem, we developed a three-step scheme to optimize Vcmax and fw. First, the EnKF is applied daily to obtain precursor estimates of Vcmax and fw. Then Vcmax is optimized at different time scales assuming fw is unchanged from first step. The best temporal period or window size is then determined by analyzing the magnitude of the minimized cost-function, and the coefficient of determination (R2) and Root-mean-square deviation (RMSE) of GPP and LE between simulation and observation. Finally, the daily fw value is optimized for rain free days corresponding to the Vcmax curve from the best window size. The optimized fw is then used to model its relationship with soil moisture. We found that

  18. Proceedings of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/Brookhaven National Laboratory workshop on neutron scattering instrumentation at high-flux reactors

    SciTech Connect

    McBee, M.R.; Axe, J.D.; Hayter, J.B.

    1990-07-01

    For the first three decades following World War II, the US, which pioneered the field of neutron scattering research, enjoyed uncontested leadership in the field. By the mid-1970's, other countries, most notably through the West European consortium at Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France, had begun funding neutron scattering on a scale unmatched in this country. By the early 1980's, observers charged with defining US scientific priorities began to stress the need for upgrading and expansion of US research reactor facilities. The conceptual design of the ANS facility is now well under way, and line-item funding for more advanced design is being sought for FY 1992. This should lead to a construction request in FY 1994 and start-up in FY 1999, assuming an optimal funding profile. While it may be too early to finalize designs for instruments whose construction is nearly a decade removed, it is imperative that we begin to develop the necessary concepts to ensure state-of-the-art instrumentation for the ANS. It is in this context that this Instrumentation Workshop was planned. The workshop touched upon many ideas that must be considered for the ANS, and as anticipated, several of the discussions and findings were relevant to the planning of the HFBR Upgrade. In addition, this report recognizes numerous opportunities for further breakthroughs on neutron instrumentation in areas such as improved detection schemes (including better tailored scintillation materials and image plates, and increased speed in both detection and data handling), in-beam monitors, transmission white beam polarizers, multilayers and supermirrors, and more. Each individual report has been cataloged separately.

  19. Neutronic effects on tungsten-186 double neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Marc Alan

    Rhenium-188, a daughter product of tungsten-188, is an isotope of great interest in therapeutic nuclear medicine, being used in dozens of laboratory and clinical investigations worldwide. Applications include various cancer therapy strategies, treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, prevention of restenosis following coronary artery angioplasty, and palliation of bone pain associated with cancer metastases. With its half-life of 17 hours, 2.12 MeV (maximum) beta-particle emission, chemical similarity to technetium-99m (the most widely used diagnostic radioisotope), and its availability in a convenient tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator system, rhenium-188 is a superb candidate for a broad range of applications. Production of 188W is typically via double neutron capture by 186W in a high flux nuclear reactor, predominantly the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. Experience at HFIR has shown that production yields (measured in Ci of 188W produced per g of 186W target) decrease considerably as target size increases. While the phenomenon of neutron resonance self-shielding would be expected to produce such an effect, temperature effects on neutron flux distribution and neutron capture rates may also be involved. Experimental investigations of these phenomena have not been previously performed. The work presented in this thesis evaluates the factors that contribute to the decrease in 188W yield from both theoretical and experimental standpoints. Neutron self-shielding and temperature effects were characterized to develop a strategy for target design that would optimize production yield, an important factor in minimizing health care costs. It was determined that decrease in yield due to neutron self-shielding can be attributed to depletion of epithermal neutrons at resonant energies, most significantly within the initial 0.4 mm depth of the target. The results from these studies further show that 188W yield in the interior of the

  20. Neutron diffractometers for structural biology at spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenborn, B.P.; Pitcher, E.

    1994-12-31

    Spallation neutron sources are ideal for diffraction studies of proteins and oriented molecular complexes. With spoliation neutrons and their time dependent wavelength structure, it is easy to electronically select data with an optimal wavelength bandwidth and cover the whole Laue spectrum as time (wavelength) resolved snapshots. This optimized data quality with best peak-to-background ratios and provides adequate spatial and energy resolution to eliminate peak overlaps. The application of this concept will use choppers to select the desired Laue wavelength spectrum and employ focusing optics and large cylindrical {sup 3}He detectors to optimize data collection rates. Such a diffractometer will cover a Laue wavelength range from 1 to 5{Angstrom} with a flight path length of 10m and an energy resolution of 0.25{Angstrom}. Moderator concepts for maximal flux distribution within this energy range will be discussed using calculated flux profiles. Since the energy resolution required for such timed data collection in this super Laue techniques is not very high, the use of a linac only (LAMPF) spoliation target is an exciting possibility with an order of magnitude increase in flux.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of moderator and reflector in coal analyzer based on a D-T neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Shan, Qing; Chu, Shengnan; Jia, Wenbao

    2015-11-01

    Coal is one of the most popular fuels in the world. The use of coal not only produces carbon dioxide, but also contributes to the environmental pollution by heavy metals. In prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA)-based coal analyzer, the characteristic gamma rays of C and O are mainly induced by fast neutrons, whereas thermal neutrons can be used to induce the characteristic gamma rays of H, Si, and heavy metals. Therefore, appropriate thermal and fast neutrons are beneficial in improving the measurement accuracy of heavy metals, and ensure that the measurement accuracy of main elements meets the requirements of the industry. Once the required yield of the deuterium-tritium (d-T) neutron generator is determined, appropriate thermal and fast neutrons can be obtained by optimizing the neutron source term. In this article, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) Transport Code and Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) database are used to optimize the neutron source term in PGNAA-based coal analyzer, including the material and shape of the moderator and neutron reflector. The optimized targets include two points: (1) the ratio of the thermal to fast neutron is 1:1 and (2) the total neutron flux from the optimized neutron source in the sample increases at least 100% when compared with the initial one. The simulation results show that, the total neutron flux in the sample increases 102%, 102%, 85%, 72%, and 62% with Pb, Bi, Nb, W, and Be reflectors, respectively. Maximum optimization of the targets is achieved when the moderator is a 3-cm-thick lead layer coupled with a 3-cm-thick high-density polyethylene (HDPE) layer, and the neutron reflector is a 27-cm-thick hemispherical lead layer.

  2. First in-core simultaneous measurements of nuclear heating and thermal neutron flux obtained with the innovative mobile calorimeter CALMOS inside the OSIRIS reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lepeltier, Valerie; Bubendorff, Jacques; Carcreff, Hubert; Salmon, Laurent

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear heating inside a MTR reactor has to be known in order to design and to run irradiation experiments which have to fulfill target temperature constraints. This measurement is usually carried out by calorimetry. The innovative calorimetric system, CALMOS, has been studied and built in 2011 for the 70 MWth OSIRIS reactor operated by CEA. Thanks to a new type of calorimetric probe, associated to a specific displacement system, it provides measurements along the fissile height and above the core. This development required preliminary modelling and irradiation of mock-ups of the calorimetric probe in the ex-core area, where nuclear heating rate does not exceed 2 W.g{sup -1}. The calorimeter working modes, the different measurement procedures allowed with such a new probe, the main modeling and experimental results and expected advantages of this new technique have been already presented. However, these first in-core measurements were not performed beyond 6 W.g{sup -1}, due to an inside temperature limitation imposed by a safety authority requirement. In this paper, we present the first in-core simultaneous measurements of nuclear heating and conventional thermal neutron flux obtained by the CALMOS device at the 70 MW nominal reactor power. For the first time, this experimental system was operated in nominal in-core conditions, with nominal neutron flux up to 2.7 10{sup 14} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} and nuclear heating up to 12 W.g{sup -1}. A comprehensive measurement campaign carried out from 2013 to 2015 inside all accessible irradiation locations of the core, allowed to qualify definitively this new device, not only in terms of measurement ability but also in terms of reliability. After a brief reminder of the calorimetric cell configuration and displacement system specificities, first nuclear heating distributions at nominal power are presented and discussed. In order to reinforce the heating evaluation, a systematic comparison is made between results obtained by

  3. Concept for Inclusion of Analytical and Computational Capability in Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) for Measurement of Neutron Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, M. Clinton; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.

    2004-01-01

    Researchers are working on many konts to make possible high speed, automated classification and quantification of constituent materials in numerous environments. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has implemented a system for rocket engine flow fields/plumes; the Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) system was designed to utilize emission and absorption spectroscopy for monitoring molecular and atomic particulates in gas plasma. An accompanying suite of tools and analytical package designed to utilize information collected by OPAD is known as the Engine Diagnostic Filtering System (EDIFIS). The current combination of these systems identifies atomic and molecular species and quantifies mass loss rates in H2/O2 rocket plumes. Additionally, efforts are being advanced to hardware encode components of the EDIFIS in order to address real-time operational requirements for health monitoring and management. This paper addresses the OPAD with its tool suite, and discusses what is considered a natural progression: a concept for migrating OPAD towards detection of high energy particles, including neutrons and gamma rays. The integration of these tools and capabilities will provide NASA with a systematic approach to monitor space vehicle internal and external environment.

  4. A Concept for the Inclusion of Analytical and Computational Capability in Existing Systems for Measurement of Neutron Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, Clinton; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.

    2005-01-01

    For approximately two decades, efforts have been sponsored by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to make possible high-speed, automated classification and quantification of constituent materials in various harsh environments. MSFC, along with the Air Force/Arnold Engineering Development Center, has led the work, developing and implementing systems that employ principles of emission and absorption spectroscopy to monitor molecular and atomic particulates in gas plasma of rocket engine flow fields. One such system identifies species and quantifies mass loss rates in H2/O2 rocket plumes. Other gases have been examined and the physics of their detection under numerous conditions were made a part of the knowledge base for the MSFC/USAF team. Additionally, efforts are being advanced to hardware encode components of the data analysis tools in order to address real-time operational requirements for health monitoring and management. NASA has a significant investment in these systems, warranting a spiral approach that meshes current tools and experience with technological advancements. This paper addresses current systems - the Optical Plume Anomaly Detector (OPAD) and the Engine Diagnostic Filtering System (EDIFIS) - and discusses what is considered a natural progression: a concept for migrating them towards detection of high energy particles, including neutrons and gamma rays. The proposal outlines system development to date, basic concepts for future advancements, and recommendations for accomplishing them.

  5. MCNP optimization of filtered neutron beams for calibration of the SIMPLE detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C.; Giuliani, F.; Girard, T. A.; Marques, J. G.; Salgado, J.; Collar, J. I.; Morlat, T.; Limagne, D.; Waysand, G.

    2004-01-01

    We report an MCNP study of filtered monochromatic neutron beams of energies 25, 54 and 149 keV for response studies of a superheated droplet detector for the SIMPLE experiment. The results identify the importance of the detector temperature stabilizing water bath and the aqueous gel of the detector on the beam quality, in general agreement with recent measurements made on the thermal port of the Portuguese research reactor.

  6. Modeling and Simulation Optimization and Feasibility Studies for the Neutron Detection without Helium-3 Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, James H.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.

    2013-01-01

    This report details the results of the modeling and simulation work accomplished for the ‘Neutron Detection without Helium-3’ project during the 2011 and 2012 fiscal years. The primary focus of the project is to investigate commercially available technologies that might be used in safeguards applications in the relatively near term. Other technologies that are being developed may be more applicable in the future, but are outside the scope of this study.

  7. Optimization of Magneto-Rheological Damper for Maximizing Magnetic Flux Density in the Fluid Flow Gap Through FEA and GA Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Hemanth; Kumar, Hemantha; Gangadharan, Kalluvalappil

    2016-06-01

    A magneto rheological (MR) fluid damper offers cost effective solution for semiactive vibration control in an automobile suspension. The performance of MR damper is significantly depends on the electromagnetic circuit incorporated into it. The force developed by MR fluid damper is highly influenced by the magnetic flux density induced in the fluid flow gap. In the present work, optimization of electromagnetic circuit of an MR damper is discussed in order to maximize the magnetic flux density. The optimization procedure was proposed by genetic algorithm and design of experiments techniques. The result shows that the fluid flow gap size less than 1.12 mm cause significant increase of magnetic flux density.

  8. Predicting the critical heat flux in concentric-tube open thermosiphon: a method based on support vector machine optimized by chaotic particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jiejin

    2012-08-01

    This study presents a method based on support vector machine (SVM) optimized by chaotic particle swarm optimization algorithm (CPSO) for the prediction of the critical heat flux (CHF) in concentric-tube open thermosiphon. In this process, the parameters C, ɛ and δ2 of SVM have been determined by the CPSO. As for a comparision, the traditional back propagation neural network (BPNN), radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), general regression neural network (GRNN) are also used to predict the CHF for the same experimental results under a variety of operating conditions. The MER and RMSE of SVM-CPSO model are about 45% of the BPNN model, about 60% of the RBFNN model, and about 80% of GRNN model. The simulation results demonstrate that the SVM-CPSO method can get better accuracy.

  9. Optimization of a mirror-based neutron source using differential evolution algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurov, D. V.; Prikhodko, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    This study is dedicated to the assessment of capabilities of gas-dynamic trap (GDT) and gas-dynamic multiple-mirror trap (GDMT) as potential neutron sources for subcritical hybrids. In mathematical terms the problem of the study has been formulated as determining the global maximum of fusion gain (Q pl), the latter represented as a function of trap parameters. A differential evolution method has been applied to perform the search. Considered in all calculations has been a configuration of the neutron source with 20 m long distance between the mirrors and 100 MW heating power. It is important to mention that the numerical study has also taken into account a number of constraints on plasma characteristics so as to provide physical credibility of searched-for trap configurations. According to the results obtained the traps considered have demonstrated fusion gain up to 0.2, depending on the constraints applied. This enables them to be used either as neutron sources within subcritical reactors for minor actinides incineration or as material-testing facilities.

  10. A New Approach in Optimizing the Induction Heating Process Using Flux Concentrators: Application to 4340 Steel Spur Gear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barka, Noureddine; Chebak, Ahmed; El Ouafi, Abderrazak; Jahazi, Mohammad; Menou, Abdellah

    2014-09-01

    The beneficial effects of using flux concentrators during induction heat treatment process of spur gears made of 4340 high strength steel is demonstrated using 3D finite element model. The model is developed by coupling electromagnetic field and heat transfer equations and simulated by using Comsol software. Based on an adequate formulation and taking into account material properties and process parameters, the model allows calculating temperature distribution in the gear tooth. A new approach is proposed to reduce the electromagnetic edge effect in the gear teeth which allows achieving optimum hardness profile after induction heat treatment. In the proposed method, the principal gear is positioned in sandwich between two other gears having the same geometry that act as flux concentrators. The gap between the gear and the flux concentrators was optimized by studying temperature variation between the tip and root regions of gear teeth. Using the proposed model, it was possible identifying processing conditions that allow for quasi-uniform final temperature profile in the medium and high frequency conditions during induction hardening of spur gears.

  11. Neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Methods of neutron detection and measurement are discussed. Topics include sources of neutrons, neutrons in medicine, interactions of neutrons with matter, neutron shielding, neutron measurement units, measurement methods, and neutron spectroscopy. (ACR)

  12. Design of the cold neutron triple-axis spectrometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, P.; Zhang, Hongxia; Bao, W.; Schneidewind, A.; Link, P.; Grünwald, A. T. D.; Georgii, R.; Hao, L. J.; Liu, Y. T.

    2016-06-01

    The design of the first cold neutron triple-axis spectrometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor is presented. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations using neutron ray-tracing program McStas, the parameters of major neutron optics in this instrument are optimized. The neutron flux at sample position is estimated to be 5.6 ×107 n/cm2/s at neutron incident energy Ei=5 meV when the reactor operates normally at the designed 60 MW power. The performances of several neutron supermirror polarizing devices are compared and their critical parameters are optimized for this spectrometer. The polarization analysis will be realized with a flexible switch from the unpolarized experimental mode.

  13. Solid state neutron detector array

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, J.G.; Ruddy, F.H.; Brandt, C.D.; Dulloo, A.R.; Lott, R.G.; Sirianni, E.; Wilson, R.O.

    1999-08-17

    A neutron detector array is capable of measuring a wide range of neutron fluxes. The array includes multiple semiconductor neutron detectors. Each detector has a semiconductor active region that is resistant to radiation damage. In one embodiment, the array preferably has a relatively small size, making it possible to place the array in confined locations. The ability of the array to detect a wide range of neutron fluxes is highly advantageous for many applications such as detecting neutron flux during start up, ramp up and full power of nuclear reactors. 7 figs.

  14. Expected total counts for the Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry measurements of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Rossa, Riccardo; Borella, Alessandro; Van der Meer, Klaas; Labeau, Pierre-Etienne; Pauly, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    The Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a passive neutron technique that aims at a direct quantification of {sup 239}Pu in spent fuel assemblies by measuring the attenuation of the neutron flux in the energy region close to the 0.3 eV resonance of {sup 239}Pu. The {sup 239}Pu mass is estimated by calculating the SINRD signature, that is the ratio between the neutron counts in the fast energy region and around the 0.3 eV resonance region. The SINRD measurement approach in this study consisted in introducing a small neutron detector in the central guide tube of a PWR 17x17 fuel assembly. In order to measure the neutron flux in the energy regions defined in the SINRD signature, different detector types were used. The response of a bare {sup 238}U fission chamber is considered for the determination of the fast neutron flux, while other thermal-epithermal detectors wrapped in neutron absorbers are envisaged to measure the neutron flux around the resonance region. This paper provides an estimation of the total neutron counts that can be achieved with the detector types proposed for the SINRD measurement. In the first section a set of detectors are evaluated in terms of total neutron counts and sensitivity to the {sup 239}Pu content, in order to identify the optimal measurement configuration for each detector type. Then a study is performed to increase the total neutron counts by increasing the detector size. The study shows that the highest total neutron counts are achieved by using either {sup 3}He or {sup 10}B proportional counters because of the high neutron efficiency of these detectors. However, the calculations indicate that the biggest contribution to the measurement uncertainty is due to the measurement of the fast neutron flux. Finally, similar sensitivity to the {sup 239}Pu content is obtained by using the different detector types for the measurement of the neutron flux close to the resonance region. Therefore, the total neutron counts

  15. Development of a new deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator for prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Bergaoui, K; Reguigui, N; Gary, C K; Brown, C; Cremer, J T; Vainionpaa, J H; Piestrup, M A

    2014-12-01

    A new deuterium-deuterium (D-D) neutron generator has been developed by Adelphi Technology for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), neutron activation analysis (NAA), and fast neutron radiography. The generator makes an excellent fast, intermediate, and thermal neutron source for laboratories and industrial applications that require the safe production of neutrons, a small footprint, low cost, and small regulatory burden. The generator has three major components: a Radio Frequency Induction Ion Source, a Secondary Electron Shroud, and a Diode Accelerator Structure and Target. Monoenergetic neutrons (2.5MeV) are produced with a yield of 10(10)n/s using 25-50mA of deuterium ion beam current and 125kV of acceleration voltage. The present study characterizes the performance of the neutron generator with respect to neutron yield, neutron production efficiency, and the ionic current as a function of the acceleration voltage at various RF powers. In addition the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) simulation code was used to optimize the setup with respect to thermal flux and radiation protection.

  16. Optimizing ZnS/6LiF scintillators for wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Crow, Lowell; Funk, Loren L; Hannan, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Riedel, Richard A; Wang, Cai-Lin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we compare the performance of grooved and flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators in a wavelength shifting-fiber (WLSF) detector. Flat ZnS/6LiF scintillators with the thickness L=0.2-0.8 mm were characterized using photon counting and pulse-height analysis and compared to a grooved scintillator of approximately 0.8 mm thick. While a grooved scintillator considerably increases the apparent thickness of the scintillator to neutrons for a given coating thickness, we find that the flat scintillators perform better than the grooved scintillators in terms of both light yield and neutron detection efficiency. The flat 0.8-mm-thick scintillator has the highest light output, and it is 52% higher compared with a grooved scintillator of same thickness. The lower light output of the grooved scintillator as compared to the flat scintillator is consistent with the greater scintillator-WLSF separation and the much larger average emission angle of the grooved scintillator. We also find that the average light cone width, or photon travel-length as measured using time-of-flight powder diffraction of diamond and vanadium, decreases with increasing L in the range of L=0.6-0.8 mm. This result contrasts with the traditional Swank diffusion model for micro-composite scintillators, and could be explained by a decrease in photon diffusion-coefficient or an increase in micro-particle content in the flat scintillator matrix for the thicker scintillators.

  17. The ITER Radial Neutron Camera Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Marocco, D.; Belli, F.; Esposito, B.; Petrizzi, L.; Riva, M.; Bonheure, G.; Kaschuck, Y.

    2008-03-12

    A multichannel neutron detection system (Radial Neutron Camera, RNC) will be installed on the ITER equatorial port plug 1 for total neutron source strength, neutron emissivity/ion temperature profiles and n{sub t}/n{sub d} ratio measurements [1]. The system is composed by two fan shaped collimating structures: an ex-vessel structure, looking at the plasma core, containing tree sets of 12 collimators (each set lying on a different toroidal plane), and an in-vessel structure, containing 9 collimators, for plasma edge coverage. The RNC detecting system will work in a harsh environment (neutron fiux up to 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} s, magnetic field >0.5 T or in-vessel detectors), should provide both counting and spectrometric information and should be flexible enough to cover the high neutron flux dynamic range expected during the different ITER operation phases. ENEA has been involved in several activities related to RNC design and optimization [2,3]. In the present paper the up-to-date design and the neutron emissivity reconstruction capabilities of the RNC will be described. Different options for detectors suitable for spectrometry and counting (e.g. scintillators and diamonds) focusing on the implications in terms of overall RNC performance will be discussed. The increase of the RNC capabilities offered by the use of new digital data acquisition systems will be also addressed.

  18. Computational and experimental platform for understanding and optimizing water flux and salt rejection in nanoporous membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, Susan B.

    2010-09-01

    Affordable clean water is both a global and a national security issue as lack of it can cause death, disease, and international tension. Furthermore, efficient water filtration reduces the demand for energy, another national issue. The best current solution to clean water lies in reverse osmosis (RO) membranes that remove salts from water with applied pressure, but widely used polymeric membrane technology is energy intensive and produces water depleted in useful electrolytes. Furthermore incremental improvements, based on engineering solutions rather than new materials, have yielded only modest gains in performance over the last 25 years. We have pursued a creative and innovative new approach to membrane design and development for cheap desalination membranes by approaching the problem at the molecular level of pore design. Our inspiration comes from natural biological channels, which permit faster water transport than current reverse osmosis membranes and selectively pass healthy ions. Aiming for an order-of-magnitude improvement over mature polymer technology carries significant inherent risks. The success of our fundamental research effort lies in our exploiting, extending, and integrating recent advances by our team in theory, modeling, nano-fabrication and platform development. A combined theoretical and experimental platform has been developed to understand the interplay between water flux and ion rejection in precisely-defined nano-channels. Our innovative functionalization of solid state nanoporous membranes with organic protein-mimetic polymers achieves 3-fold improvement in water flux over commercial RO membranes and has yielded a pending patent and industrial interest. Our success has generated useful contributions to energy storage, nanoscience, and membrane technology research and development important for national health and prosperity.

  19. Optimization of the beam shaping assembly in the D-D neutron generators-based BNCT using the response matrix method.

    PubMed

    Kasesaz, Y; Khalafi, H; Rahmani, F

    2013-12-01

    Optimization of the Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) has been performed using the MCNP4C Monte Carlo code to shape the 2.45 MeV neutrons that are produced in the D-D neutron generator. Optimal design of the BSA has been chosen by considering in-air figures of merit (FOM) which consists of 70 cm Fluental as a moderator, 30 cm Pb as a reflector, 2mm (6)Li as a thermal neutron filter and 2mm Pb as a gamma filter. The neutron beam can be evaluated by in-phantom parameters, from which therapeutic gain can be derived. Direct evaluation of both set of FOMs (in-air and in-phantom) is very time consuming. In this paper a Response Matrix (RM) method has been suggested to reduce the computing time. This method is based on considering the neutron spectrum at the beam exit and calculating contribution of various dose components in phantom to calculate the Response Matrix. Results show good agreement between direct calculation and the RM method.

  20. A study on optical aberrations in parabolic neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Hongli; Liu, Yuntao; Zu, Yong; He, Linfeng; Wei, Guohai; Sun, Kai; Han, Songbai; Chen, Dongfeng

    2015-06-01

    It is widely believed that a neutron beam can be focused to a small spot using a parabolic guide, which will significantly improve the flux. However, researchers have also noted challenges for the neutron inhomogeneous phase space distribution in parabolic focusing guide systems. In this paper, the sources of most prominent optical aberrations, such as an inhomogeneous phase space distribution and irregular divergence distribution, are discussed, and an optimization solution is also proposed. We indicate that optimizing the parabolic guide geometrical configuration removes almost all of the aberrations and yields a considerable intensity gain factor.

  1. Increased reliability of mean travel time predictions of river-groundwater exchange fluxes using optimal design techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wöhling, Thomas; Gosses, Moritz; Osenbrück, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we follow up on previous work at the Steinlach test site (Osenbrück et al, 2013) near Tübingen, Germany, to investigate hyporheic exchange fluxes in a shallow riparian aquifer. A steady-state MODFLOW model has been developed for the site and calibrated using an existing network of 14 observation wells. Due to a relatively steep hydraulic gradient (0.012 m/m) between the upstream and downstream flow stages of the river bend, water infiltrates from the river into the shallow aquifer along the upstream section of the river and is forced to re-enter the river at the downstream end. The passage through the aquifer potentially allows for mitigation and transformation of river water-bound pollutants. One important factor to estimate attenuation potentials are travel (and exposure) times through (parts of) the aquifer. In our approach we used forward particle tracking (MODPATH) and a flux-weighting scheme to estimate travel time distributions for the river-groundwater exchange fluxes in the study domain. Travel times vary significantly within the domain, however, estimates of mean travel times derived from deconvolution of EC and δ18O-H2O data at selected wells exhibit a consistent pattern with modelled travel times. The flux-weighted mean travel time of all river water that passed the riparian aquifer was calculated to 26.1 days. The uncertainty of the flux-weighted mean travel time was calculated using the prediction error variance approach by Moore and Doherty (2005) which resulted in a post-calibration uncertainty of ±93.5 d (1σ), i.e. about 350% of the actual prediction. We further analysed the worth of potential new observations to reduce the large uncertainty of this model prediction. In our optimization framework, we extend the method by Moore and Doherty (2005) to simultaneously optimize multiple observations using a modified Genetic Algorithm (GA) that can also sample from past states for higher efficiency. The observations considered are

  2. Flux Optimization in Human Specific Map-Kinase Pathways: A Systems Biology Approach to Study Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Sombeet

    2010-10-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAP kinases) transduces signals that are involved in a multitude of cellular pathways and functions in response to variety of ligands and cell stimuli. Aberrant or inappropriate functions of MAPKs have now been identified in diseases ranging from Cancer to Alzheimer disease to Leshmaniasis however the pathway is still growing and little is known about the dynamics of the pathway. Here we model the MAPK metabolic pathways and thus find the key metabolites or reactions involved on perturbing which the transcription factors are affected. The approach, which we used for modeling of this pathway, is Flux Balance Analysis (FBA). Further we established the growth factors EGF, PDGF were also responsible for the determination of downstream species concentrations. Tuning the parameters gave the optimum kinetics of the growth factor for which the downstream events were at the minimum. Also the Ras and Braf steady state concentrations were significantly affected when the Growth factor kinetics were tuned. This type of study can shed light on controlling various diseases and also may be helpful for identifying important drug targets.

  3. An optimal design of coreless direct-drive axial flux permanent magnet generator for wind turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, D.; Ahmad, A.

    2013-06-01

    Different types of generators are currently being used in wind power technology. The commonly used are induction generator (IG), doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG), electrically excited synchronous generator (EESG) and permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG). However, the use of PMSG is rapidly increasing because of advantages such as higher power density, better controllability and higher reliability. This paper presents an innovative design of a low-speed modular, direct-drive axial flux permanent magnet (AFPM) generator with coreless stator and rotor for a wind turbine power generation system that is developed using mathematical and analytical methods. This innovative design is implemented in MATLAB / Simulink environment using dynamic modelling techniques. The main focus of this research is to improve efficiency of the wind power generation system by investigating electromagnetic and structural features of AFPM generator during its operation in wind turbine. The design is validated by comparing its performance with standard models of existing wind power generators. The comparison results demonstrate that the proposed model for the wind power generator exhibits number of advantages such as improved efficiency with variable speed operation, higher energy yield, lighter weight and better wind power utilization.

  4. GEM-based detectors for thermal and fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, G.; Claps, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Foggetta, L.; Muraro, A.; Valente, P.

    2015-06-01

    Lately the problem of 3He replacement for neutron detection stimulated an intense activity research on alternative technologies based on alternative neutron converters. This paper presents briefly the results obtained with new GEM detectors optimized for fast and thermal neutrons. For thermal neutrons, we realized a side-on GEM detector based on a series of boron-coated alumina sheets placed perpendicularly to the incident neutron beam direction. This prototype has been tested at n@BTF photo-production neutron facilty in order to test its effectiveness under a very high flux gamma background. For fast neutrons, we developed new GEM detectors (called nGEM) for the CNESM diagnostic system of the SPIDER NBI prototype for ITER (RFX-Consortium, Italy) and as beam monitor for fast neutrons lines at spallation sources. The nGEM is a Triple GEM gaseous detector equipped with a polyethylene layer used to convert fast neutrons into recoil protons through the elastic scattering process. This paper describes the results obtained by testing a medium size (30 × 25 cm2 active area) nGEM detector at the ISIS spallation source on the VESUVIO beam line.

  5. Deployment of a three-dimensional array of Micro-Pocket Fission Detector triads (MPFD3) for real-time, in-core neutron flux measurements in the Kansas State University TRIGA Mark-II Nuclear Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmes, Martin Francis

    A Micro-Pocket Fission Detector (MPFD) is a miniaturized type of fission chamber developed for use inside a nuclear reactor. Their unique design allows them to be located between or even inside fuel pins while being built from materials which give them an operational lifetime comparable to or exceeding the life of the fuel. While other types of neutron detectors have been made for use inside a nuclear reactor, the MPFD is the first neutron detector which can survive sustained use inside a nuclear reactor while providing a real-time measurement of the neutron flux. This dissertation covers the deployment of MPFDs as a large three-dimensional array inside the Kansas State University TRIGA Mark-II Nuclear Reactor for real-time neutron flux measurements. This entails advancements in the design, construction, and packaging of the Micro-Pocket Fission Detector Triads with incorporated Thermocouple, or MPFD3-T. Specialized electronics and software also had to be designed and built in order to make a functional system capable of collecting real-time data from up to 60 MPFD3-Ts, or 180 individual MPFDs and 60 thermocouples. Design of the electronics required the development of detailed simulations and analysis for determining the theoretical response of the detectors and determination of their size. The results of this research shows that MPFDs can operate for extended times inside a nuclear reactor and can be utilized toward the use as distributed neutron detector arrays for advanced reactor control systems and power mapping. These functions are critical for continued gains in efficiency of nuclear power reactors while also improving safety through relatively inexpensive redundancy.

  6. Expanded Glucose Import Capability Affords Staphylococcus aureus Optimized Glycolytic Flux during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vitko, Nicholas P.; Grosser, Melinda R.; Khatri, Dal; Lance, Thurlow R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acquisition of numerous virulence determinants affords Staphylococcus aureus greater pathogenicity than other skin-colonizing staphylococci in humans. Additionally, the metabolic adaptation of S. aureus to nonrespiratory conditions encountered during infection (e.g., hypoxia, nitric oxide, iron chelation) has been implicated as contributing to S. aureus virulence. Specifically, S. aureus has been shown to ferment glycolytic substrates in nonrespiratory environments encountered within the host. Here, we show that S. aureus has acquired unique carbohydrate transporters that facilitate the maximal uptake of host sugars and serve to support nonrespiratory growth in inflamed tissue. The carbohydrate substrates of 11 S. aureus transporters were identified, and at least four of their genes encode S. aureus glucose transporters (glcA, glcB, glcC, and glcU). Moreover, two transporter genes (glcA and glcC) are unique to S. aureus and contribute disproportionately to the nonrespiratory growth of S. aureus on glucose. Targeted inactivation of sugar transporters reduced glucose uptake and attenuated S. aureus in a murine model of skin and soft tissue infections. These data expand the evidence for metabolic adaptation of S. aureus to invasive infection and demonstrate the specific requirement for the fermentation of glucose over all other available carbohydrates. Ultimately, acquisition of foreign genes allows S. aureus to adopt a metabolic strategy resembling that of infiltrating host immune cells: high glycolytic flux coupled to lactate excretion. PMID:27329749

  7. Collaborative Project: Building improved optimized parameter estimation algorithms to improve methane and nitrogen fluxes in a climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Mahowald, Natalie

    2016-11-29

    Soils in natural and managed ecosystems and wetlands are well known sources of methane, nitrous oxides, and reactive nitrogen gases, but the magnitudes of gas flux to the atmosphere are still poorly constrained. Thus, the reasons for the large increases in atmospheric concentrations of methane and nitrous oxide since the preindustrial time period are not well understood. The low atmospheric concentrations of methane and nitrous oxide, despite being more potent greenhouse gases than carbon dioxide, complicate empirical studies to provide explanations. In addition to climate concerns, the emissions of reactive nitrogen gases from soils are important to the changing nitrogen balance in the earth system, subject to human management, and may change substantially in the future. Thus improved modeling of the emission fluxes of these species from the land surface is important. Currently, there are emission modules for methane and some nitrogen species in the Community Earth System Model’s Community Land Model (CLM-ME/N); however, there are large uncertainties and problems in the simulations, resulting in coarse estimates. In this proposal, we seek to improve these emission modules by combining state-of-the-art process modules for emissions, available data, and new optimization methods. In earth science problems, we often have substantial data and knowledge of processes in disparate systems, and thus we need to combine data and a general process level understanding into a model for projections of future climate that are as accurate as possible. The best methodologies for optimization of parameters in earth system models are still being developed. In this proposal we will develop and apply surrogate algorithms that a) were especially developed for computationally expensive simulations like CLM-ME/N models; b) were (in the earlier surrogate optimization Stochastic RBF) demonstrated to perform very well on computationally expensive complex partial differential equations in

  8. The advanced neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, S.; Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new user experimental facility planned to be operational at Oak Ridge in the late 1990's. The centerpiece of the ANS will be a steady-state research reactor of unprecedented thermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub th} {approx} 8 {times} 10{sup 19} m{sup {minus}2} {center dot}s{sup {minus}1}) accompanied by extensive and comprehensive equipment and facilities for neutron-based research.

  9. The Advanced Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hayter, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new user experimental facility planned to be operational at Oak Ridge in the late 1990's. The centerpiece of the ANS will be a steady-state research reactor of unprecedented thermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub th} {approx} 9{center dot}10{sup 19} m{sup -2}{center dot}s{sup -1}) accompanied by extensive and comprehensive equipment and facilities for neutron-based research. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  10. FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.

    1959-01-20

    A method is presented for preparing a more efficient neutron source comprising inserting in a container a quantity of Po-210, inserting B powder coated with either Ag, Pt, or Ni. The container is sealed and then slowly heated to about 450 C to volatilize the Po and effect combination of the coated powder with the Po. The neutron flux emitted by the unit is moritored and the heating step is terminated when the flux reaches a maximum or selected level.

  11. Parabolic versus elliptic focusing - Optimization of the focusing design of a cold triple-axis neutron spectrometer by Monte-Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarek, A. C.; Böni, P.; Braden, M.

    2011-08-01

    We present Monte-Carlo simulations for the focusing design of a novel cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer to be installed at the end position of the cold guide NL-1 of the research reactor FRM-II in Munich, Germany. Our simulations are of general relevance for the design of triple-axis spectrometers at end positions of neutron guides. Using the McStas program code we performed ray trajectories to compare parabolic and elliptic focusing concepts. In addition the design of the monochromator was optimized concerning crystal size and mosaic spread. The parabolic focusing concept is superior to the elliptic alternative in view of the neutron intensity distribution as a function of energy and divergence. In particular, the elliptical configuration leads to an inhomogeneous divergence distribution.

  12. Metabolic flux analysis model for optimizing xylose conversion into ethanol by the natural C5-fermenting yeast Candida shehatae.

    PubMed

    Bideaux, Carine; Montheard, Julie; Cameleyre, Xavier; Molina-Jouve, Carole; Alfenore, Sandrine

    2016-02-01

    A metabolic flux analysis (MFA) model was developed to optimize the xylose conversion into ethanol using Candida shehatae strain. This metabolic model was compartmented and constructed with xylose as carbon substrate integrating the enzymatic duality of the first step of xylose degradation via an algebraic coefficient. The model included the pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis, synthesis of major metabolites like ethanol, acetic acid and glycerol, the tricarboxylic acid cycle as well as the respiratory chain, the cofactor balance, and the maintenance. The biomass composition and thus production were integrated considering the major biochemical synthesis reactions from monomers to each constitutive macromolecule (i.e., proteins, lipids, polysaccharides, nucleic acids). The construction of the model resulted into a 122-linear equation system to be resolved. A first experiment allowed was to verify the accuracy of the model by comparing calculated and experimental data. The metabolic model was utilized to determine the theoretical yield taking into account oxido-reductive balance and to optimize ethanol production. The maximal theoretical yield was calculated at 0.62 Cmolethanol/Cmolxylose for an oxygen requirement of 0.33 moloxygen/molxylose linked to the cofactors of the xylose reductase. Cultivations in chemostat mode allowed the fine tuning of both xylose and oxygen uptakes and showed that lower was the oxygen/xylose ratio, higher was the ethanol production yield. The best experimental ethanol production yield (0.51 Cmolethanol/Cmolxylose) was obtained for an oxygen supply of 0.47 moloxygen/molxylose.

  13. Ground albedo neutrons produced by cosmic radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, M.

    1983-05-01

    Day-to-day variations of cosmic-ray-produced neutron fluxes near the earth's ground surface are measured by using three sets of paraffin-moderated BF3 counters, which are installed in different locations, 3 m above ground, ground level, and 20 cm under ground. Neutron flux decreases observed by these counters when snowcover exists show that there are upward-moving neutrons, that is, ground albedo neutron near the ground surface. The amount of albedo neutrons is estimated to be about 40 percent of total neutron flux in the energy range 1-10 to the 6th eV.

  14. Spectral unfolding of fast neutron energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, Michelle; Jackman, Kevin; Engle, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of the energy distribution of a neutron flux is difficult in experiments with constrained geometry where techniques such as time of flight cannot be used to resolve the distribution. The measurement of neutron fluxes in reactors, which often present similar challenges, has been accomplished using radioactivation foils as an indirect probe. Spectral unfolding codes use statistical methods to adjust MCNP predictions of neutron energy distributions using quantified radioactive residuals produced in these foils. We have applied a modification of this established neutron flux characterization technique to experimentally characterize the neutron flux in the critical assemblies at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and the spallation neutron flux at the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Results of the unfolding procedure are presented and compared with a priori MCNP predictions, and the implications for measurements using the neutron fluxes at these facilities are discussed.

  15. On the optimization of the isotopic neutron source method for measuring the thermal neutron absorption cross section: advantages and disadvantages of BF3 and 3He counters.

    PubMed

    Bolewski, A; Ciechanowski, M; Dydejczyk, A; Kreft, A

    2008-04-01

    The effect of the detector characteristics on the performance of an isotopic neutron source device for measuring thermal neutron absorption cross section (Sigma) has been examined by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Three specific experimental arrangements, alternately with BF(3) counters and (3)He counters of the same sizes, have been modelled using the MCNP-4C code. Results of Monte Carlo calculations show that devices with BF(3) counters are more sensitive to Sigma, but high-pressure (3)He counters offer faster assays.

  16. Neutron counter based on beryllium activation

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowska, B.; Prokopowicz, R.; Kaczmarczyk, J.; Paducha, M.; Scholz, M.; Igielski, A.; Karpinski, L.; Pytel, K.

    2014-08-21

    The fusion reaction occurring in DD plasma is followed by emission of 2.45 MeV neutrons, which carry out information about fusion reaction rate and plasma parameters and properties as well. Neutron activation of beryllium has been chosen for detection of DD fusion neutrons. The cross-section for reaction {sup 9}Be(n, α){sup 6}He has a useful threshold near 1 MeV, which means that undesirable multiple-scattered neutrons do not undergo that reaction and therefore are not recorded. The product of the reaction, {sup 6}He, decays with half-life T{sub 1/2} = 0.807 s emitting β{sup −} particles which are easy to detect. Large area gas sealed proportional detector has been chosen as a counter of β–particles leaving activated beryllium plate. The plate with optimized dimensions adjoins the proportional counter entrance window. Such set-up is also equipped with appropriate electronic components and forms beryllium neutron activation counter. The neutron flux density on beryllium plate can be determined from the number of counts. The proper calibration procedure needs to be performed, therefore, to establish such relation. The measurements with the use of known β–source have been done. In order to determine the detector response function such experiment have been modeled by means of MCNP5–the Monte Carlo transport code. It allowed proper application of the results of transport calculations of β{sup −} particles emitted from radioactive {sup 6}He and reaching proportional detector active volume. In order to test the counter system and measuring procedure a number of experiments have been performed on PF devices. The experimental conditions have been simulated by means of MCNP5. The correctness of simulation outcome have been proved by measurements with known radioactive neutron source. The results of the DD fusion neutron measurements have been compared with other neutron diagnostics.

  17. Investigating a cyclotron HM-30 based neutron source for BNCT of deep-seated tumors by using shifting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suharyana; Riyatun; Octaviana, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    We have successfully proposed a simulation of a neutron beam-shaping assembly using MCNPX Code. This simulation study deals with designing a compact, optimized, and geometrically simple beam shaping assembly for a neutron source based on a proton cyclotron for BNCT purpose. Shifting method was applied in order to lower the fast neutron energy to the epithermal energy range by choosing appropriate materials. Based on a set of MCNPX simulations, it has been found that the best materials for beam shaping assembly are 3 cm Ni layered with 7 cm Pb as the reflector and 13 cm AlF3 the moderator. Our proposed beam shaping assembly configuration satisfies 2 of 5 of the IAEA criteria, namely the epithermal neutron flux 1.25 × 109 n.cm-2 s-1 and the gamma dose over the epithermal neutron flux is 0.18×10 -13 Gy.cm 2 n -1. However, the ratio of the fast neutron dose rate over neutron epithermal flux is still too high. We recommended that the shifting method must be accompanied by the filter method to reduce the fast neutron flux.

  18. APPARATUS FOR CONTROLLING NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Dietrich, J.R.; Harrer, J.M.

    1958-09-16

    A device is described for rapidly cortrolling the reactivity of an active portion of a reactor. The inveniion consists of coaxially disposed members each having circumferenital sections of material having dlfferent neutron absorbing characteristics and means fur moving the members rotatably and translatably relative to each other within the active portion to vary the neutron flux therein. The angular and translational movements of any member change the neutron flux shadowing effect of that member upon the other member.

  19. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.-P.; Holden, N. E.; Reciniello, R. N.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation facility, a series of innovative designs and major modifications made to enhance the beam intensity and to ease the experimental sampling at BMRR were performed; including (1) in-core fuel addition to increase source strength and balance flux of neutrons towards two ports, (2) out of core moderator remodeling, done by replacing thicker D2O tanks at graphite-shutter interfacial areas, to expedite neutron thermalization, (3) beam shutter upgrade to reduce strayed neutrons and gamma dose, (4) beam collimator redesign to optimize the beam flux versus dose for animal treatment, (5) beam port shielding installation around the shutter opening area (lithium-6 enriched polyester-resin in boxes, attached with polyethylene plates) to reduce prompt gamma and fast neutron doses, (6) sample holder repositioning to optimize angle versus distance for a single organ or whole body irradiation, and (7) holder wall buildup with neutron reflector materials to increase dose and dose rate from scattered thermal neutrons. During the facility upgrade, reactor dosimetry was conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD for gamma dose estimate, using ion chambers to confirm fast neutron and gamma dose rate, and by the activation of gold-foils with and without cadmium-covers, for fast and thermal neutron flux determination. Based on the combined effect from the size and depth of tumor cells and the location and geometry of dosimeters, the measured flux from cadmium-difference method was 4-7% lower than

  20. Dosimetry in Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility at BMRR

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J. P.; Holden, N. E.; Reciniello, R. N.

    2014-05-23

    Radiation dosimetry for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) has been performed since 1959 at Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the three-megawatt light-water cooled Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). In the early 1990s when more effective drug carriers were developed for NCT, in which the eye melanoma and brain tumors in rats were irradiated in situ, extensive clinical trials of small animals began using a focused thermal neutron beam. To improve the dosimetry at irradiation facility, a series of innovative designs and major modifications made to enhance the beam intensity and to ease the experimental sampling at BMRR were performed; including (1) in-core fuel addition to increase source strength and balance flux of neutrons towards two ports, (2) out of core moderator remodeling, done by replacing thicker D2O tanks at graphite-shutter interfacial areas, to expedite neutron thermalization, (3) beam shutter upgrade to reduce strayed neutrons and gamma dose, (4) beam collimator redesign to optimize the beam flux versus dose for animal treatment, (5) beam port shielding installation around the shutter opening area (lithium-6 enriched polyester-resin in boxes, attached with polyethylene plates) to reduce prompt gamma and fast neutron doses, (6) sample holder repositioning to optimize angle versus distance for a single organ or whole body irradiation, and (7) holder wall buildup with neutron reflector materials to increase dose and dose rate from scattered thermal neutrons. During the facility upgrade, reactor dosimetry was conducted using thermoluminescent dosimeters TLD for gamma dose estimate, using ion chambers to confirm fast neutron and gamma dose rate, and by the activation of gold-foils with and without cadmium-covers, for fast and thermal neutron flux determination. Based on the combined effect from the size and depth of tumor cells and the location and geometry of dosimeters, the measured flux from cadmium-difference method was 4 - 7

  1. The 14 MeV Neutron Irradiation Facility in MARIA Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopowicz, R.; Pytel, K.; Dorosz, M.; Zawadka, A.; Lechniak, J.; Lipka, M.; Marcinkowska, Z.; Wierzchnicka, M.; Malkiewicz, A.; Wilczek, I.; Krok, T.; Migdal, M.; Koziel, A.

    2015-07-01

    The MARIA reactor with thermal neutron flux density up to 3x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and a number of vertical channels is well suited to material testing by thermal neutron treatment. Beside of that some fast neutron irradiation facilities are operated in MARIA reactor as well. One of them is thermal to 14 MeV neutron converter launched in 2014. It is especially devoted to fusion devices material testing irradiation. The ITER and DEMO research thermonuclear facilities are to be run using the deuterium - tritium fusion reaction. Fast neutrons (of energy approximately 14 MeV) resulting from the reaction are essential to carry away the released thermonuclear energy and to breed tritium. However, constructional materials of which thermonuclear reactors are to be built must be specially selected to survive intense fluxes of fast neutrons. Strong sources of 14 MeV neutrons are needed if research on resistance of candidate materials to such fluxes is to be carried out effectively. Nuclear reactor-based converter capable to convert thermal neutrons into 14 MeV fast neutrons may be used to that purpose. The converter based on two stage nuclear reaction on lithium-6 and deuterium compounds leading to 14 MeV neutron production. The reaction chain is begun by thermal neutron capture by lithium-6 nucleus resulted in triton release. The neutron and triton transport calculations have been therefore carried-out to estimate the thermal to 14 MeV neutron conversion efficiency and optimize converter construction. The usable irradiation space of ca. 60 cm{sup 3} has been obtained. The released energy have been calculated. Heat transport has been asses to ensure proper device cooling. A set of thermocouples has been installed in converter to monitor its temperature distribution on-line. Influence of converter on reactor operation has been studied. Safety analyses of steady states and transients have been done. Performed calculations and analyses allow designing the converter and

  2. Feasibility of sealed D-T neutron generator as neutron source for liver BNCT and its beam shaping assembly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Li, Gang; Liu, Linmao

    2014-04-01

    This paper involves the feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver tumor with four sealed neutron generators as neutron source. Two generators are placed on each side of the liver. The high energy of these emitted neutrons should be reduced by designing a beam shaping assembly (BSA) to make them useable for BNCT. However, the neutron flux decreases as neutrons pass through different materials of BSA. Therefore, it is essential to find ways to increase the neutron flux. In this paper, the feasibility of using low enrichment uranium as a neutron multiplier is investigated to increase the number of neutrons emitted from D-T neutron generators. The neutron spectrum related to our system has a proper epithermal flux, and the fast and thermal neutron fluxes comply with the IAEA recommended values.

  3. Studies by neutron diffraction and {mu}SR of flux lattice orientation, pinning, melting and decomposition in high-T{sub c} superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Forgan, E.M.; Cubitt, R.; Wylie, M.T.

    1994-09-01

    We review the results of recent microscopic measurements of flux line structures and their breakdown in the high-Tc superconductors BSCCO and YBCO. These results show clear effects of flux of lattice melting, dimensional crossover and pinning. The huge differences in behaviour of the flux lattice in these two materials can be understood theoretically.

  4. Measurement of thermal neutron fluence distribution with use of 23Na radioactivation around a medical compact cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Kasahara, Tetsuharu; Iimori, Takashi; Masuda, Yoshitada; Kimura, Ken-ichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Isobe, Tomonori; Sakae, Takeji

    2009-07-01

    A medical compact cyclotron produces about 10(15) neutrons per day along with 100 GBq of (18)F. Therefore, it is important to establish radiation safety guidelines on residual radioactivity for routine operation, maintenance work, and decommissioning. Thus, we developed a simple method for measuring the thermal neutrons in a cyclotron room. In order to verify the feasibility of our proposed method, we measured the thermal neutron distribution around a cyclotron by using the activation of (23)Na in salt. We installed 78 salt dosimeters in the cyclotron room with a 50 cm mesh. The photopeak of (24)Na was measured, and the neutron flux distribution was estimated. Monitoring the neutron flux distribution in a cyclotron room appears to be useful for not only obtaining an accurate estimate of the distribution of induced radioactivity, but also optimizing the shield design for radiation safety in preparation for the decommissioning process.

  5. Measuring and monitoring KIPT Neutron Source Facility Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Yan; Gohar, Yousry; Zhong, Zhaopeng

    2015-08-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on developing and constructing a neutron source facility at Kharkov, Ukraine. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven subcritical system. The accelerator has a 100 kW electron beam using 100 MeV electrons. The subcritical assembly has keff less than 0.98. To ensure the safe operation of this neutron source facility, the reactivity of the subcritical core has to be accurately determined and continuously monitored. A technique which combines the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method is purposed to determine the reactivity of the KIPT subcritical assembly at various conditions. In particular, the area-ratio method can determine the absolute reactivity of the subcritical assembly in units of dollars by performing pulsed-neutron experiments. It provides reference reactivities for the flux-to-current ratio method to track and monitor the reactivity deviations from the reference state while the facility is at other operation modes. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to simulate both methods using the numerical model of the KIPT subcritical assembly. It is found that the reactivities obtained from both the area-ratio method and the flux-to-current ratio method are spatially dependent on the neutron detector locations and types. Numerical simulations also suggest optimal neutron detector locations to minimize the spatial effects in the flux-to-current ratio method. The spatial correction factors are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for both measuring methods at the selected neutron detector locations. Monte Carlo simulations are also performed to verify the accuracy of the flux-to-current ratio method in monitoring the reactivity swing during a fuel burnup cycle.

  6. In-Pile Experiment of a New Hafnium Aluminide Composite Material to Enable Fast Neutron Testing in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Donna Post Guillen; Douglas L. Porter; James R. Parry; Heng Ban

    2010-06-01

    A new hafnium aluminide composite material is being developed as a key component in a Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL) system designed to provide fast neutron flux test capability in the Advanced Test Reactor. An absorber block comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) particles (~23% by volume) dispersed in an aluminum matrix can absorb thermal neutrons and transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels. However, the thermophysical properties, such as thermal conductivity, of this material and the effect of irradiation are not known. This paper describes the design of an in-pile experiment to obtain such data to enable design and optimization of the BFFL neutron filter.

  7. Development of the prototype pneumatic transfer system for ITER neutron activation systema)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, M. S.; Seon, C. R.; Pak, S.; Lee, H. G.; Bertalot, L.

    2012-10-01

    The neutron activation system (NAS) measures neutron fluence at the first wall and the total neutron flux from the ITER plasma, providing evaluation of the fusion power for all operational phases. The pneumatic transfer system (PTS) is one of the key components of the NAS for the proper operation of the system, playing a role of transferring encapsulated samples between the capsule loading machine, irradiation stations, counting stations, and disposal bin. For the validation and the optimization of the design, a prototype of the PTS was developed and capsule transfer tests were performed with the developed system.

  8. Facing Challenges for Monte Carlo Analysis of Full PWR Cores : Towards Optimal Detail Level for Coupled Neutronics and Proper Diffusion Data for Nodal Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuttin, A.; Capellan, N.; David, S.; Doligez, X.; El Mhari, C.; Méplan, O.

    2014-06-01

    Safety analysis of innovative reactor designs requires three dimensional modeling to ensure a sufficiently realistic description, starting from steady state. Actual Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport codes are suitable candidates to simulate large complex geometries, with eventual innovative fuel. But if local values such as power densities over small regions are needed, reliable results get more difficult to obtain within an acceptable computation time. In this scope, NEA has proposed a performance test of full PWR core calculations based on Monte Carlo neutron transport, which we have used to define an optimal detail level for convergence of steady state coupled neutronics. Coupling between MCNP for neutronics and the subchannel code COBRA for thermal-hydraulics has been performed using the C++ tool MURE, developed for about ten years at LPSC and IPNO. In parallel with this study and within the same MURE framework, a simplified code of nodal kinetics based on two-group and few-point diffusion equations has been developed and validated on a typical CANDU LOCA. Methods for the computation of necessary diffusion data have been defined and applied to NU (Nat. U) and Th fuel CANDU after assembly evolutions by MURE. Simplicity of CANDU LOCA model has made possible a comparison of these two fuel behaviours during such a transient.

  9. Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Vickie; Chen, Meili; Cobb, John; Kohl, Jim; Miller, Steve; Speirs, David; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan

    2010-11-01

    The unique contributions of the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway (NSTG) are the connection of national user facility instrument data sources to the integrated cyberinfrastructure of the National Science FoundationTeraGrid and the development of a neutron science gateway that allows neutron scientists to use TeraGrid resources to analyze their data, including comparison of experiment with simulation. The NSTG is working in close collaboration with the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge as their principal facility partner. The SNS is a next-generation neutron source. It has completed construction at a cost of 1.4 billion and is ramping up operations. The SNS will provide an order of magnitude greater flux than any previous facility in the world and will be available to all of the nation's scientists, independent of funding source, on a peer-reviewed merit basis. With this new capability, the neutron science community is facing orders of magnitude larger data sets and is at a critical point for data analysis and simulation. There is a recognized need for new ways to manage and analyze data to optimize both beam time and scientific output. The TeraGrid is providing new capabilities in the gateway for simulations using McStas and a fitting service on distributed TeraGrid resources to improved turnaround. NSTG staff are also exploring replicating experimental data in archival storage. As part of the SNS partnership, the NSTG provides access to gateway support, cyberinfrastructure outreach, community development, and user support for the neutron science community. This community includes not only SNS staff and users but extends to all the major worldwide neutron scattering centers.

  10. Fundamental neutron physics at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.

    1995-10-01

    Modern neutron sources and science share a common origin in mid-20th-century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for studying condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and justified) as tools for neutron scattering and materials science research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities performed at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high-flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high-power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for continuing this research.

  11. Italian neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prata, M.; Alloni, D.; De Felice, P.; Palomba, M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Pillon, M.; Quintieri, L.; Santagata, A.; Valente, P.

    2014-11-01

    Many research activities, instrumental analysis, studies of radiation damage, etc., require neutron sources. The main neutron sources present in Italy are described in three different sections: nuclear research reactors, accelerator driven, and metrology stations. The nuclear research reactors of LENA (University of Pavia) and ENEA Casaccia are described in terms of irradiation facilities available, neutron flux for each of them and the main activities carried out by each research centre. In the second section, the Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG), the Frascati Beam-Test Facility (BTF) and their main features are reported. In the last section there is a detailed description of the institutional role and the main activities carried out in the field of neutron metrology by the National Institute for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (INMRI) with a brief description of neutron sources of which the institute is endowed.

  12. HYSPEC : A CRYSTAL TIME OF FLIGHT HYBRID SPECTROMETER FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; ZALIZNYAK,I.A.

    2002-12-30

    design for a focused-beam, hybrid time-of-flight instrument with a crystal monochromator for the SNS called HYSPEC (an acronym for hybrid spectrometer). The proposed instrument has a potential to collect data more than an order of magnitude faster than existing steady-source spectrometers over a wide range of energy transfer ({h_bar}{omega}) and momentum transfer (Q) space, and will transform the way that data in elastic and inelastic single-crystal spectroscopy are collected. HYSPEC is optimized to provide the highest neutron flux on sample in the thermal and epithermal neutron energy ranges at a good-to-moderate energy resolution. By providing a flux on sample several times higher than other inelastic instruments currently planned for the SNS, the proposed instrument will indeed allow unique ground-breaking measurements, and will ultimately make polarized beam studies at a pulsed spallation source a realistic possibility.

  13. Determination of optimal imaging parameters for the reconstruction of a nuclear fuel assembly using limited angle neutron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abir, M. I.; Islam, F. F.; Craft, A.; Williams, W. J.; Wachs, D. M.; Chichester, D. L.; Meyer, M. K.; Lee, H. K.

    2016-01-01

    The core components of nuclear reactors (e.g., fuel assemblies, spacer grids, control rods) encounter harsh environments due to high temperature, physical stress, and a tremendous level of radiation. The integrity of these elements is crucial for safe operation of nuclear power plants; post-irradiation examination (PIE) can reveal information about the integrity of these components. Neutron computed tomography (CT) is one important PIE measurement tool for nondestructively evaluating the structural integrity of these items. CT typically requires many projections to be acquired from different view angles, after which a mathematical algorithm is used for image reconstruction. However, when working with heavily irradiated materials and irradiated nuclear fuel, obtaining many projections is laborious and expensive. Image reconstruction from a smaller number of projections has been explored to achieve faster and more cost-efficient PIE. Classical reconstruction methods (e.g., filtered backprojection), unfortunately, do not typically offer stable reconstructions from a highly asymmetric, few-projection data set and often create severe streaking artifacts. We propose an iterative reconstruction technique to reconstruct curved, plate-type nuclear fuel assemblies using limited-angle CT. The performance of the proposed method is assessed using simulated data and validated through real projections. We also discuss the systematic strategy for establishing the conditions of reconstructions and finding the optimal imaging parameters for reconstructions of the fuel assemblies from few projections using limited-angle CT. Results show that a fuel assembly can be reconstructed using limited-angle CT if 36 or more projections are taken from a particular direction with 1° angular increment.

  14. Bayesian optimization of modeled CO2 fluxes in Oregon using a dense tower network, aircraft campaigns, and the community land model 4.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A.; Conley, S. A.; Goeckede, M.; Andrews, A. E.; Masarie, K. A.; Sweeney, C.

    2015-12-01

    Modeled estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) calculated with CLM4.5 at 4 km horizontal resolution were optimized using a classical Bayesian inversion approach with atmospheric mixing ratio observations from a dense tower network in Oregon. We optimized NEE in monthly batches for the years 2012 through 2014, and determined the associated reduction in flux uncertainties broken up by sub-domains. The WRF-STILT transport model was deployed to link modelled fluxes of CO2 to the concentrations from 5 high precision and accuracy CO2 observation towers equipped with CRDS analyzers. To find the best compromise between aggregation errors and the degrees of freedom in the system, we developed an approach for the spatial structuring of our domain that was informed by an unsupervised clustering approach based on flux values of the prior state vector and information about the land surface, soil, and vegetation distribution that was used in the model. To assess the uncertainty of the transport modeling component within our inverse optimization framework we used the data of 7 airborne measurement campaigns over the Oregon domain during the study period providing detailed information about the errors in the model boundary-layer height and wind field of the transport model. The optimized model was then used to estimate future CO2 budgets for Oregon, including potential effects of LULC changes from conventional agriculture towards energy crops.

  15. An Optimized Air-Core Coil Sensor with a Magnetic Flux Compensation Structure Suitable to the Helicopter TEM System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Liu, Fei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Kaiguang; Wang, Yanzhang

    2016-01-01

    The air-core coil sensor (ACS) is widely used as a transducer to measure the variation in magnetic fields of a helicopter transient electromagnetic (TEM) system. A high periodic emitting current induces the magnetic field signal of the underground medium. However, such current also generates a high primary field signal that can affect the received signal of the ACS and even damage the receiver. To increase the dynamic range of the received signal and to protect the receiver when emitting current rises/falls, the combination of ACS with magnetic flux compensation structure (bucking coil) is necessary. Moreover, the optimized ACS, which is composed of an air-core coil and a differential pre-amplifier circuit, must be investigated to meet the requirements of the helicopter TEM system suited to rapid surveying for shallow buried metal mine in rough topography. Accordingly, two ACSs are fabricated in this study, and their performance is verified and compared inside a magnetic shielding room. Using the designed ACSs, field experiments are conducted in Baoqing County. The field experimental data show that the primary field response can be compensated when the bucking coil is placed at an appropriate point in the range of allowed shift distance beyond the center of the transmitting coil and that the damage to the receiver induced by the over-statured signal can be solved. In conclusion, a more suitable ACS is adopted and is shown to have better performance, with a mass of 2.5 kg, resultant effective area of 11.6 m2 (i.e., diameter of 0.496 m), 3 dB bandwidth of 66 kHz, signal-to-noise ratio of 4 (i.e., varying magnetic field strength of 0.2 nT/s), and normalized equivalent input noise of 3.62 nV/m2. PMID:27077862

  16. An Optimized Air-Core Coil Sensor with a Magnetic Flux Compensation Structure Suitable to the Helicopter TEM System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Liu, Fei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Kaiguang; Wang, Yanzhang

    2016-04-12

    The air-core coil sensor (ACS) is widely used as a transducer to measure the variation in magnetic fields of a helicopter transient electromagnetic (TEM) system. A high periodic emitting current induces the magnetic field signal of the underground medium. However, such current also generates a high primary field signal that can affect the received signal of the ACS and even damage the receiver. To increase the dynamic range of the received signal and to protect the receiver when emitting current rises/falls, the combination of ACS with magnetic flux compensation structure (bucking coil) is necessary. Moreover, the optimized ACS, which is composed of an air-core coil and a differential pre-amplifier circuit, must be investigated to meet the requirements of the helicopter TEM system suited to rapid surveying for shallow buried metal mine in rough topography. Accordingly, two ACSs are fabricated in this study, and their performance is verified and compared inside a magnetic shielding room. Using the designed ACSs, field experiments are conducted in Baoqing County. The field experimental data show that the primary field response can be compensated when the bucking coil is placed at an appropriate point in the range of allowed shift distance beyond the center of the transmitting coil and that the damage to the receiver induced by the over-statured signal can be solved. In conclusion, a more suitable ACS is adopted and is shown to have better performance, with a mass of 2.5 kg, resultant effective area of 11.6 m² (i.e., diameter of 0.496 m), 3 dB bandwidth of 66 kHz, signal-to-noise ratio of 4 (i.e., varying magnetic field strength of 0.2 nT/s), and normalized equivalent input noise of 3.62 nV/m².

  17. Neutron Transport Characteristics of a Nuclear Reactor Based Dynamic Neutron Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Khaial, Anas M.; Harvel, Glenn D.; Chang, Jen-Shih

    2006-07-01

    An advanced dynamic neutron imaging system has been constructed in the McMaster Nuclear Reactor (MNR) for nondestructive testing and multi-phase flow studies in energy and environmental applications. A high quality neutron beam is required with a thermal neutron flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 6} n/cm{sup 2}-s and a collimation ratio of 120 at image plane to promote high-speed neutron imaging up to 2000 frames per second. Neutron source strength and neutron transport have been experimentally and numerically investigated. Neutron source strength at the beam tube entrance was evaluated experimentally by measuring the thermal and fast neutron fluxes, and simple analytical neutron transport calculations were performed based upon these measured neutron fluxes to predict facility components in accordance with high-speed dynamic neutron imaging and operation safety requirements. Monte-Carlo simulations (using MCNP-4B code) with multiple neutron energy groups have also been used to validate neutron beam parameters and to ensure shielding capabilities of facility shutter and cave walls. Neutron flux distributions at the image plane and the neutron beam characteristics were experimentally measured by irradiating a two-dimensional array of Copper foils and using a real-time neutron radiography system. The neutron image characteristics -- such as neutron flux, image size, beam quality -- measured experimentally and predicted numerically for beam tube, beam shutter and radiography cave are compared and discussed in detail in this paper. The experimental results show that thermal neutron flux at image plane is nearly uniform over an imaging area of 20.0-cm diameter and its magnitude ranges from 8.0 x 10{sup 6} - 1.0 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}-sec while the neutron-to-gamma ratio is 6.0 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}-{mu}Sv. (authors)

  18. Some general reflections on {open_quotes}long pulse{close_quotes} neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, G.S.

    1995-12-31

    A long pulse spallation neutron source (LPSS) having about 20 times more time average thermal flux than its short pulse counterpart (SPSS) at the same proton beam power and featuring a pronounced time structure not available on CW sources (CWNS) of equal time average flux can in principle host instruments typical for both classes of facilities. While the need for additional choppers introduces some restrictions on inverted time of flight techniques typical for SPSS and high incident neutron energies are not easier to use on LPSS than on CWNS, taking advantage of the pulsed nature of the neutron flux can enhance significantly the performance of direct time of flight instruments and of crystal spectrometers or diffractometers. In the paper some of the options are reviewed in a general manner and criteria are discussed which can be used to optimize the performance enhancement.

  19. Ecosystem model optimization using in situ flux observations: benefit of Monte Carlo versus variational schemes and analyses of the year-to-year model performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santaren, D.; Peylin, P.; Bacour, C.; Ciais, P.; Longdoz, B.

    2014-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem models can provide major insights into the responses of Earth's ecosystems to environmental changes and rising levels of atmospheric CO2. To achieve this goal, biosphere models need mechanistic formulations of the processes that drive the ecosystem functioning from diurnal to decadal timescales. However, the subsequent complexity of model equations is associated with unknown or poorly calibrated parameters that limit the accuracy of long-term simulations of carbon or water fluxes and their interannual variations. In this study, we develop a data assimilation framework to constrain the parameters of a mechanistic land surface model (ORCHIDEE) with eddy-covariance observations of CO2 and latent heat fluxes made during the years 2001-2004 at the temperate beech forest site of Hesse, in eastern France. As a first technical issue, we show that for a complex process-based model such as ORCHIDEE with many (28) parameters to be retrieved, a Monte Carlo approach (genetic algorithm, GA) provides more reliable optimal parameter values than a gradient-based minimization algorithm (variational scheme). The GA allows the global minimum to be found more efficiently, whilst the variational scheme often provides values relative to local minima. The ORCHIDEE model is then optimized for each year, and for the whole 2001-2004 period. We first find that a reduced (<10) set of parameters can be tightly constrained by the eddy-covariance observations, with a typical error reduction of 90%. We then show that including contrasted weather regimes (dry in 2003 and wet in 2002) is necessary to optimize a few specific parameters (like the temperature dependence of the photosynthetic activity). Furthermore, we find that parameters inverted from 4 years of flux measurements are successful at enhancing the model fit to the data on several timescales (from monthly to interannual), resulting in a typical modeling efficiency of 92% over the 2001-2004 period (Nash

  20. Study on the influence of the B4C layer thickness on the neutron flux and energy distribution shape in multi-electrode ionisation chamber.

    PubMed

    Tymińska, K; Maciak, M; Ośko, J; Tulik, P; Zielczyński, M; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A model of a multi-electrode ionisation chamber, with polypropylene electrodes coated with a thin layer of B4C was created within Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNPX) and Fluktuierende Kaskade (FLUKA) codes. The influence of the layer thickness on neutron absorption in B4C and on the neutron spectra in the consecutive intra-electrode gas volumes has been studied using the MCNPX and FLUKA codes. The results will be used for designing the new type of the ionisation chamber.

  1. The design of a high-efficiency neutron counter for waste drums to provide optimized sensitivity for plutonium assay

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, H.O.; Beddingfield, D.H.; Pickrell, M.M.

    1997-11-01

    An advanced passive neutron counter has been designed to improve the accuracy and sensitivity for the nondestructive assay of plutonium in scrap and waste containers. The High-Efficiency Neutron Counter (HENC) was developed under a Cooperative Research Development Agreement between the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Canberra Industries. The primary goal of the development was to produce a passive assay system for 200-L drums that has detectability limits and multiplicity counting features that are superior to previous systems. A detectability limit figure of merit (FOM) was defined that included the detector efficiency, the neutron die-away time, and the detector`s active volume and density that determine the cosmic-ray background. Monte Carlo neutron calculations were performed to determine the parameters to provide an optimum FOM. The system includes the {sup 252}Cf {open_quotes}add-a-source{close_quotes} feature to improve the accuracy as well as statistical filters to reduce the cosmic-ray spallation neutron background. The final decision gave an efficiency of 32% for plutonium with a detector {sup 3}He tube volume that is significantly smaller than for previous high-efficiency systems for 200-L drums. Because of the high efficiency of the HENC, we have incorporated neutron multiplicity counting for matrix corrections for those cases where the plutonium is localized in nonuniform hydrogenous materials. The paper describes the design and performance testing of the advanced system. 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Preparation and optimization of ceramic neutron image plates based on BaFBr : Eu2+ and GdF3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, R.; Zimmermann, J.; Schlapp, M.; Hesse, S.; von Seggern, H.

    2005-09-01

    Commercially available neutron image plates (NIPs) consist of a mixture of a powdered x-ray storage phosphor and a neutron converter, both embedded in an organic binder supported on a polymer sheet. The initiation of the storage mechanism in the phosphor is caused by conversion electrons generated in the neutron converter due to neutron absorption and activation and its subsequent decay. The organic binder phase just provides mechanical stability to the NIP but reduces its efficiency through two effects: first by the absorption of low energy electrons and second by introducing an inactive volume fraction to the layer. Avoiding the organic fraction, for example by preparing a ceramic NIP without binder, could increase the efficiency and spatial resolution without a loss in mechanical stability. In the following, two processes for preparation of ceramic NIPs are reported, both delivering ceramic NIPs consisting solely of GdF3, as the neutron converter and BaFBr : Eu2+, as the storage phosphor. The correlation between the sintering parameters and volume fraction of the neutron converter is investigated with respect to high efficiency and high spatial resolution. The generally observed antidromic behaviour between these two quantities was observed in this study also.

  3. Determination of (n,γ) Cross Sections of 241Am by Cold Neutron Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genreith, C.; Rossbach, M.; Révay, Zs.; Kudejova, P.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate cross section data of actinides are crucial for criticality calculations of GEN IV reactors and transmutation but also for analytical purposes such as nuclear waste characterization, decommissioning of nuclear installations and safeguard applications. Tabulated data are inconsistent and sometimes associated with large uncertainties. Neutron activation with external cold neutron beams from high flux reactors offers a chance for determination of accurate capture cross sections scalable to the whole 1/√{E}-region even for isotopes with low-lying resonances like 241Am. Preparation of 241Am samples for irradiation at the PGAA station of the FRM II in Garching has been optimized together with PTB in Braunschweig. Two samples were irradiated together with gold flux monitors to extract the thermal neutron capture cross section after appropriate corrections for attenuation of neutrons and photons in the sample. For one sample, the thermal ground state neutron capture cross section was measured as 663.0 ± 28.8 b. The thermal neutron capture cross section was calculated to 725.4 ± 34.4 b. For the other sample, a ground state neutron capture cross section of 649.9 ± 28.2 b was measured and a thermal neutron capture cross section of 711.1 ± 33.9 b was derived.

  4. Accelerator-based epithermal neutron sources for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Blue, Thomas E; Yanch, Jacquelyn C

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of low-energy light ion accelerator-based neutron sources (ABNSs) for the treatment of brain tumors through an intact scalp and skull using boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A major advantage of an ABNS for BNCT over reactor-based neutron sources is the potential for siting within a hospital. Consequently, light-ion accelerators that are injectors to larger machines in high-energy physics facilities are not considered. An ABNS for BNCT is composed of: (1) the accelerator hardware for producing a high current charged particle beam, (2) an appropriate neutron-producing target and target heat removal system (HRS), and (3) a moderator/reflector assembly to render the flux energy spectrum of neutrons produced in the target suitable for patient irradiation. As a consequence of the efforts of researchers throughout the world, progress has been made on the design, manufacture, and testing of these three major components. Although an ABNS facility has not yet been built that has optimally assembled these three components, the feasibility of clinically useful ABNSs has been clearly established. Both electrostatic and radio frequency linear accelerators of reasonable cost (approximately 1.5 M dollars) appear to be capable of producing charged particle beams, with combinations of accelerated particle energy (a few MeV) and beam currents (approximately 10 mA) that are suitable for a hospital-based ABNS for BNCT. The specific accelerator performance requirements depend upon the charged particle reaction by which neutrons are produced in the target and the clinical requirements for neutron field quality and intensity. The accelerator performance requirements are more demanding for beryllium than for lithium as a target. However, beryllium targets are more easily cooled. The accelerator performance requirements are also more demanding for greater neutron field quality and intensity. Target HRSs that are based on submerged-jet impingement and

  5. Neutron spectroscopy with scintillation detectors using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica

    The purpose of this research was to study neutron spectroscopy using the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. This scintillator material provided a novel means of detection for fast neutrons, without the disadvantages of traditional liquid scintillation materials. EJ-299-33A provided a more durable option to these materials, making it less likely to be damaged during handling. Unlike liquid scintillators, this plastic scintillator was manufactured from a non-toxic material, making it safer to use, as well as easier to design detectors. The material was also manufactured with inherent pulse shape discrimination abilities, making it suitable for use in neutron detection. The neutron spectral unfolding technique was developed in two stages. Initial detector response function modeling was carried out through the use of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The response functions were developed for a monoenergetic neutron flux. Wavelets were then applied to smooth the response function. The spectral unfolding technique was applied through polynomial fitting and optimization techniques in MATLAB. Verification of the unfolding technique was carried out through the use of experimentally determined response functions. These were measured on the neutron source based on the Van de Graff accelerator at the University of Kentucky. This machine provided a range of monoenergetic neutron beams between 0.1 MeV and 24 MeV, making it possible to measure the set of response functions of the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detector to neutrons of specific energies. The response of a plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) source was measured using the source available at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The neutron spectrum reconstruction was carried out using the experimentally measured response functions. Experimental data was collected in the list mode of the waveform digitizer. Post processing of this data focused on the pulse shape discrimination analysis of the recorded response functions to remove the

  6. Optimum design of a moderator system based on dose calculation for an accelerator driven Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, R; Hiraga, F; Kiyanagi, Y

    2014-06-01

    An accelerator based BNCT has been desired because of its therapeutic convenience. However, optimal design of a neutron moderator system is still one of the issues. Therefore, detailed studies on materials consisting of the moderator system are necessary to obtain the optimal condition. In this study, the epithermal neutron flux and the RBE dose have been calculated as the indicators to look for optimal materials for the filter and the moderator. As a result, it was found that a combination of MgF2 moderator with Fe filter gave best performance, and the moderator system gave a dose ratio greater than 3 and an epithermal neutron flux over 1.0×10(9)cm(-2)s(-1).

  7. The design of a multisource americium-beryllium (Am-Be) neutron irradiation facility using MCNP for the neutronic performance calculation.

    PubMed

    Sogbadji, R B M; Abrefah, R G; Nyarko, B J B; Akaho, E H K; Odoi, H C; Attakorah-Birinkorang, S

    2014-08-01

    The americium-beryllium neutron irradiation facility at the National Nuclear Research Institute (NNRI), Ghana, was re-designed with four 20 Ci sources using Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code to investigate the maximum amount of flux that is produced by the combined sources. The results were compared with a single source Am-Be irradiation facility. The main objective was to enable us to harness the maximum amount of flux for the optimization of neutron activation analysis and to enable smaller sample sized samples to be irradiated. Using MCNP for the design construction and neutronic performance calculation, it was realized that the single-source Am-Be design produced a thermal neutron flux of (1.8±0.0007)×10(6) n/cm(2)s and the four-source Am-Be design produced a thermal neutron flux of (5.4±0.0007)×10(6) n/cm(2)s which is a factor of 3.5 fold increase compared to the single-source Am-Be design. The criticality effective, k(eff), of the single-source and the four-source Am-Be designs were found to be 0.00115±0.0008 and 0.00143±0.0008, respectively.

  8. Focusing adaptive-optics for neutron spectroscopy at extreme conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Simeoni, G. G.; Valicu, R. G.; Borchert, G.; Böni, P.; Rasmussen, N. G.; Yang, F.; Kordel, T.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Kargl, F.; Meyer, A.

    2015-12-14

    Neutron Spectroscopy employing extreme-conditions sample environments is nowadays a crucial tool for the understanding of fundamental scientific questions as well as for the investigation of materials and chemical-physical properties. For all these kinds of studies, an increased neutron flux over a small sample area is needed. The prototype of a focusing neutron guide component, developed and produced completely at the neutron source FRM II in Garching (Germany), has been installed at the time-of-flight (TOF) disc-chopper neutron spectrometer TOFTOF and came into routine-operation. The design is based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept for finite-size divergent sources. It represents a unique device combining the supermirror technology with Adaptive Optics, suitable for broad-bandwidth thermal-cold TOF neutron spectroscopy (here optimized for 1.4–10 Å). It is able to squeeze the beam cross section down to a square centimeter, with a more than doubled signal-to-background ratio, increased efficiency at high scattering angles, and improved symmetry of the elastic resolution function. We present a comparison between the simulated and measured beam cross sections, as well as the performance of the instrument within real experiments. This work intends to show the unprecedented opportunities achievable at already existing instruments, along with useful guidelines for the design and construction of next-generation neutron spectrometers.

  9. Focusing adaptive-optics for neutron spectroscopy at extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeoni, G. G.; Valicu, R. G.; Borchert, G.; Böni, P.; Rasmussen, N. G.; Yang, F.; Kordel, T.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Kargl, F.; Meyer, A.

    2015-12-01

    Neutron Spectroscopy employing extreme-conditions sample environments is nowadays a crucial tool for the understanding of fundamental scientific questions as well as for the investigation of materials and chemical-physical properties. For all these kinds of studies, an increased neutron flux over a small sample area is needed. The prototype of a focusing neutron guide component, developed and produced completely at the neutron source FRM II in Garching (Germany), has been installed at the time-of-flight (TOF) disc-chopper neutron spectrometer TOFTOF and came into routine-operation. The design is based on the compressed Archimedes' mirror concept for finite-size divergent sources. It represents a unique device combining the supermirror technology with Adaptive Optics, suitable for broad-bandwidth thermal-cold TOF neutron spectroscopy (here optimized for 1.4-10 Å). It is able to squeeze the beam cross section down to a square centimeter, with a more than doubled signal-to-background ratio, increased efficiency at high scattering angles, and improved symmetry of the elastic resolution function. We present a comparison between the simulated and measured beam cross sections, as well as the performance of the instrument within real experiments. This work intends to show the unprecedented opportunities achievable at already existing instruments, along with useful guidelines for the design and construction of next-generation neutron spectrometers.

  10. An Investigation of the Effects of Body Design on Measurement Accuracy and Optimal Deployment Duration of a Passive Surface Water Flux Meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padowski, J. C.; Jawitz, J. W.; Klammler, H.; Hatfield, K.; Annable, M. D.

    2007-05-01

    Water quality monitoring is essential for evaluating and complying with Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL). Conventional methods for gathering water and solute flux data from surface waters involves collecting, compiling and analyzing discrete point measurements to obtain cumulative flux data. The Passive Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM) is designed to measure water and solute fluxes by automatically integrating instantaneous data in situ; therefore replacing the need for individual sample collections and data processing. A small cartridge within the device contains two types of porous media which simultaneously sorb solutes and release a resident tracer so that solute and water flux may be quantified. The PSFM utilizes the natural pressure gradient created by water flowing around the device. This gradient is used to induce flow through a small cartridge containing sorptive porous media pre-equilibrated with a resident tracer. In general, higher velocities correlate to larger pressure gradients across the cartridge and therefore reduce the amount of time a device can be deployed. However, the magnitude of the pressure gradient depends not only on the velocity of the water but the body design of the device. Body design can be modified to adjust the range of pressure gradients produced. Devices that are more blunt (cylindrical) in nature create higher gradients than more streamlined devices. Therefore, optimal shape and water velocity play an important role in the length of time a PSFM can be deployed and the accuracy of the measurements. Two designs, a blunt (cylindrical) and a streamlined (Joukowsky profile) device, were tested in this study. Laboratory experiments were performed in a large tilting flume to determine maximum deployment times for both devices across velocities ranging from 25-65 cm/s. Optimal deployment time was determined from the amount of resident tracers remaining within the cartridge and accuracy was determined by comparing measurement performance

  11. Ecosystem model optimization using in-situ flux observations: benefit of monte-carlo vs. variational schemes and analyses of the year-to-year model performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santaren, D.; Peylin, P.; Bacour, C.; Ciais, P.; Longdoz, B.

    2013-11-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem models can provide major insights into the responses of Earth's ecosystems to environmental changes and rising levels of atmospheric CO2. To achieve this goal, biosphere models need mechanistic formulations of the processes that drive the ecosystem functioning from diurnal to decadal time-scales. However, the subsequent complexity of model equations is associated with unknown or poorly calibrated parameters that limit the accuracy of long-term simulations of carbon or water fluxes and their inter-annual variations. In this study, we develop a data assimilation framework to constrain the parameters of a mechanistic land surface model (ORCHIDEE) with eddy-covariance observations of CO2 and latent heat fluxes made during the years 2001-2004 on the temperate beech forest site of Hesse, in eastern France. As a first technical issue, we show that for a complex process-based model such as ORCHIDEE with many (28) parameters to be retrieved, a Monte Carlo approach (genetic algorithm, GA) provides more reliable optimal parameter values than a gradient-based minimization algorithm (variational scheme). The GA allows finding the global minimum more efficiently whilst the variational scheme often provides values relative to local minima. The ORCHIDEE model is then optimized for each year, and for the whole 2001-2004 period. We first find that a reduced (<10) set of parameters can be tightly constrained by the eddy-covariance observations with a typical error reduction of 90%. We then show that including contrasted weather regimes (dry in 2003 and wet in 2002) is necessary to optimize few specific parameters (like the temperature dependence of the photosynthetic activity). Furthermore, we find that parameters inverted from four years of flux measurements are successful at enhancing the model fit to the data at several time-scales (from monthly to interannual) resulting to a typical modeling efficiency of 92% over the 2001-2004 period (Nash

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CORE INSTRUMENT

    DOEpatents

    Mims, L.S.

    1961-08-22

    A multi-purpose instrument for measuring neutron flux, coolant flow rate, and coolant temperature in a nuclear reactor is described. The device consists essentially of a hollow thimble containing a heat conducting element protruding from the inner wall, the element containing on its innermost end an amount of fissionsble materinl to function as a heat source when subjected to neutron flux irradiation. Thermocouple type temperature sensing means are placed on the heat conducting element adjacent the fissionable material and at a point spaced therefrom, and at a point on the thimble which is in contact with the coolant fluid. The temperature differentials measured between the thermocouples are determinative of the neutron flux, coolant flow, and temperature being measured. The device may be utilized as a probe or may be incorporated in a reactor core. (AE C)

  13. SU-E-T-21: A D-D Based Neutron Generator System for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, M; Liu, Y; Nie, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a deuterium-deuterium (DD) neutron generator for application in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain cancer Methods: MCNP simulations were performed using a head phantom and a monoenergetic neutron source, which resembles the point source in a DD generator that emits 2.45-MeV neutrons. Source energies ranging from 5eV to 2.45MeV were simulated to determine the optimal treatment energy. The phantom consisted of soft tissue, brain tissue, skull, skin layer, and a brain tumor of 5 cm in diameter. Tumor depth was varied from 5–10 cm. Boron-10 concentrations of 10 ppm, 15 ppm, and 30 ppm were used in the soft/brain tissues, skin, and tumor, respectively. The neutron flux required to deliver 60 Gy to the tumor as well as the normal tissue doses were determined. Results: Beam energies between 5eV and 10keV obtained doses with the highest dose ratios (3.3–25.9) between the tumor and the brain at various depths. The dose ratio with 2.45-MeV neutrons ranged from 0.8–6.6. To achieve the desired tumor dose in 40 minutes, the required neutron flux for a DD generator was between 8.8E10 and 5.2E11 n/s and the resulting brain dose was between 2.3 and 18 Gy, depending on the tumor depth. The skin and soft tissue doses were within acceptable tolerances. The boron-neutron interaction accounted for 54–58% of the total dose. Conclusion: This study shows that the DD neutron generator can be a feasible neutron source for BNCT. The required neutron flux for treatment is achievable with the current DD neutron technology. With a well-designed beam shaping assembly and treatment geometry, the neutron flux can be further improved and a 60-Gy prescription can be accurately delivered to the target while maintaining tolerable normal tissue doses. Further experimental studies will be developed and conducted to validate the simulation results.

  14. Metabolic flux ratio analysis and multi-objective optimization revealed a globally conserved and coordinated metabolic response of E. coli to paraquat-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tie; Rui, Bin; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Ximing; Yi, Yin; Wen, Han; Zheng, Haoran; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2013-01-27

    The ability of a microorganism to adapt to changes in the environment, such as in nutrient or oxygen availability, is essential for its competitive fitness and survival. The cellular objective and the strategy of the metabolic response to an extreme environment are therefore of tremendous interest and, thus, have been increasingly explored. However, the cellular objective of the complex regulatory structure of the metabolic changes has not yet been fully elucidated and more details regarding the quantitative behaviour of the metabolic flux redistribution are required to understand the systems-wide biological significance of this response. In this study, the intracellular metabolic flux ratios involved in the central carbon metabolism were determined by fractional (13)C-labeling and metabolic flux ratio analysis (MetaFoR) of the wild-type E. coli strain JM101 at an oxidative environment in a chemostat. We observed a significant increase in the flux through phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malic enzyme (MEZ) and serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT). We applied an ε-constraint based multi-objective optimization to investigate the trade-off relationships between the biomass yield and the generation of reductive power using the in silico iJR904 genome-scale model of E. coli K-12. The theoretical metabolic redistribution supports that the trans-hydrogenase pathway should not play a direct role in the defence mounted by E. coli against oxidative stress. The agreement between the measured ratio and the theoretical redistribution established the significance of NADPH synthesis as the goal of the metabolic reprogramming that occurs in response to oxidative stress. Our work presents a framework that combines metabolic flux ratio analysis and multi-objective optimization to investigate the metabolic trade-offs that occur under varied environmental conditions. Our results led to the proposal that the metabolic response of E

  15. Spatial versus Day-To-Day Within-Lake Variability in Tropical Floodplain Lake CH4 Emissions – Developing Optimized Approaches to Representative Flux Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Roberta B.; Machado-Silva, Fausto; Marotta, Humberto; Enrich-Prast, Alex; Bastviken, David

    2015-01-01

    Inland waters (lakes, rivers and reservoirs) are now understood to contribute large amounts of methane (CH4) to the atmosphere. However, fluxes are poorly constrained and there is a need for improved knowledge on spatiotemporal variability and on ways of optimizing sampling efforts to yield representative emission estimates for different types of aquatic ecosystems. Low-latitude floodplain lakes and wetlands are among the most high-emitting environments, and here we provide a detailed investigation of spatial and day-to-day variability in a shallow floodplain lake in the Pantanal in Brazil over a five-day period. CH4 flux was dominated by frequent and ubiquitous ebullition. A strong but predictable spatial variability (decreasing flux with increasing distance to the shore or to littoral vegetation) was found, and this pattern can be addressed by sampling along transects from the shore to the center. Although no distinct day-to-day variability were found, a significant increase in flux was identified from measurement day 1 to measurement day 5, which was likely attributable to a simultaneous increase in temperature. Our study demonstrates that representative emission assessments requires consideration of spatial variability, but also that spatial variability patterns are predictable for lakes of this type and may therefore be addressed through limited sampling efforts if designed properly (e.g., fewer chambers may be used if organized along transects). Such optimized assessments of spatial variability are beneficial by allowing more of the available sampling resources to focus on assessing temporal variability, thereby improving overall flux assessments. PMID:25860229

  16. Method and apparatus for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material in an object

    DOEpatents

    Crane, Thomas W.

    1986-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material within an object. Neutrons having an energy higher than thermal neutrons are generated and thermalized. The thermal neutrons are detected and counted. The object is placed between the neutron generator and the neutron detector. The reduction in the neutron flux corresponds to the amount of thermal neutron absorbing material in the object. The object is advanced past the neutron generator and neutron detector to obtain neutron flux data for each segment of the object. The object may comprise a space reactor heat pipe and the thermal neutron absorbing material may comprise lithium.

  17. Method and apparatus for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material in an object

    DOEpatents

    Crane, T.W.

    1983-12-21

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus and method for determining the content and distribution of a thermal neutron absorbing material within an object. Neutrons having an energy higher than thermal neutrons are generated and thermalized. The thermal neutrons are detected and counted. The object is placed between the neutron generator and the neutron detector. The reduction in the neutron flux corresponds to the amount of thermal neutron absorbing material in the object. The object is advanced past the neutron generator and neutron detector to obtain neutron flux data for each segment of the object. The object may comprise a space reactor heat pipe and the thermal neutron absorbing material may comprise lithium.

  18. Intense steady state neutron source. The CNR reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Difilippo, F.C.; Moon, R.M.; Gambill, W.R.; Moon, R.M.; Primm, R.T. III; West, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The Center for Neutron Research (CNR) has been proposed in response to the needs - neutron flux, spectrum, and experimental facilities - that have been identified through workshops, studies, and discussions by the neutron-scattering, isotope, and materials irradiation research communities. The CNR is a major new experimental facility consisting of a reactor-based steady state neutron source of unprecedented flux, together with extensive facilities and instruments for neutron scattering, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other areas of research.

  19. Neutron measurements of the OGO-VI Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    The neutron measurements with the OGO-6 spacecraft are reported. Topics discussed include: the design and calibration of a neutron monitor for measuring the cosmic ray neutron leakages from the earth's atmosphere, determination of latitude dependence of cosmic ray leakage flux, determination of the angular distribution of neutron leakage flux as deduced by measurements of the altitude dependence, and verification of the solar modulation of the cosmic ray source for the neutron leakage.

  20. Detection of 14 MeV neutrons in high temperature environment up to 500 deg. C using 4H-SiC based diode detector

    SciTech Connect

    Szalkai, D.; Klix, A.; Ferone, R.; Issa, F.; Ottaviani, L.; Vervisch, V.; Gehre, D.; Lyoussi, A.

    2015-07-01

    In reactor technology and industrial applications detection of fast and thermal neutrons plays a crucial role in getting relevant information about the reactor environment and neutron yield. The inevitable elevated temperatures make neutron yield measurements problematic. Out of the currently available semiconductors 4H-SiC seems to be the most suitable neutron detector material under extreme conditions due to its high heat and radiation resistance, large band-gap and lower cost of production than in case of competing diamond detectors. In the framework of the European I-Smart project, optimal {sup 4}H-SiC diode geometries were developed for high temperature neutron detection and have been tested with 14 MeV fast neutrons supplied by a deuterium-tritium neutron generator with an average neutron flux of 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} n/(s*cm{sup 2}) at Neutron Laboratory of the Technical University of Dresden in Germany from room temperatures up to several hundred degrees Celsius. Based on the results of the diode measurements, detector geometries appear to play a crucial role for high temperature measurements up to 500 deg. C. Experimental set-ups using SiC detectors were constructed to simulate operation in the harsh environmental conditions found in the tritium breeding blanket of the ITER fusion reactor, which is planned to be the location of neutron flux characterization measurements in the near future. (authors)

  1. FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES

    DOEpatents

    Birden, J.H.

    1959-04-21

    A method is presented for preparing a neutron source from polonium-210 and substances, such as beryllium and boron, characterized by emission of neutrons upon exposure to alpha particles from the polonium. According to the invention, a source is prepared by placing powdered beryllium and a platinum foil electroplated with polonium-2;.0 in a beryllium container. The container is sealed and then heated by induction to a temperature of 450 to 1100 deg C to volatilize the polonium off the foil into the powder. The heating step is terminated upon detection of a maximum in the neutron flux level.

  2. Fast Neutron Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections in THORIUM-232.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarcia, Christopher Albert

    Fast neutron inelastic scattering cross sections for levels between 700-1550-keV excitation energy in the actinide nucleus, ('232)Th, have been measured using the (n,n') time-of-flight technique. Two series of measurements were undertaken using neutrons with a typical energy spread of 8-10 keV, generated by the ('7)Li(p,n)('7)Be reaction. These measurments for 125(DEGREES)-differential scattering cross sections were performed over the incident neutron energy regions of (i) 0.950-1.550 MeV, in 50-keV intervals with the time-of-flight spectrometer optimized to detect 0.200 -0.400-MeV scattered neutrons and (ii) 1.200-2.000 MeV, in 100-keV intervals with the time-of-flight spectrometer optimized to detect 0.400-0.800-MeV scattered neutrons. Over these scattered energy regions, an overall energy resolution of less than 15 keV was maintained. The relative neutron fluence was determined for each individual measurement, by positioning the main detector at 0(DEGREES) to view the primary neutron flux. Relative normalization was achieved by measuring the direct neutron flux from the lithium target with a fixed overhead monitor detector in both measurements. Main detector response was determined by comparison with a ('235)U fission chamber of known efficiency. Techniques for unfolding the complicated spectra obtained from these (n,n') studies were developed, employing user interactive computer codes to (i) generate simulated scattered neutron group response functions, (ii) subtract background effects from the measured spectra, (iii) approximate the background subtracted spectra in a weighted least-squares fashion by a superposition of response functions and (iv) make corrections for neutron absorption, finite scatterer size effects and multiple neutron scattering. Support codes consisting of graphics interaction packages, data file manipulation and transfer utility routines were created to assist in the spectral analysis procedure. Excitation function and angular distribution

  3. Application of ecosystem model and Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for parameter optimization and ecosystem productivity prediction at seven forest flux sites across North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, C.; Zhou, X.

    2015-12-01

    To reduce simulation uncertainties due to inaccurate model parameters, the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method was applied in this study to improve the estimations of four key parameters used in the process-based ecosystem model of TRIPLEX-FLUX. These four key parameters include a maximum photosynthetic carboxylation rate of 25°C (Vcmax), an electron transport (Jmax) light-saturated rate within the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle of leaves, a coefficient of stomatal conductance (m), and a reference respiration rate of 10ºC (R10). Seven forest flux tower sites located across North America were used to investigate and facilitate understanding of the daily variation in model parameters for three deciduous forests, three evergreen temperate forests, and one evergreen boreal forest. Eddy covariance CO2 exchange measurements were assimilated to optimize the parameters in the year 2006. After parameter optimization and adjustment took place, net ecosystem production prediction significantly improved (by approximately 25%) compared to the CO2 flux measurements taken at the seven forest ecosystem sites.

  4. On the design of a cold neutron irradiator (CNI) for quantitative materials characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atwood, Alexander Grover

    1997-11-01

    A design study of a cold neutron irradiator (CNI) for materials characterization using prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is presented. Using 252Cf neutron sources in a block of moderator, a portion of which is maintained at a cryogenic temperature, the CNI employs cold neutrons instead of thermal neutrons to enhance the neutron capture reaction rate in a sample. Capture gamma rays are detected in an HPGe photon detector. Optimization of the CNI with respect to elemental sensitivity (counts per mg) is the primary goal of this design study. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport, by means of the MCNP code and the ENDF/B cross-section libraries, is used to model the CNI. A combination of solid methane at 22 K, room-temperature polyethylene, and room-temperature beryllium has been chosen for the neutron delivery subsystem of the CNI. Using four 250-microgram 252Cf neutron sources, with a total neutron emission rate of 2.3× 109 neutrons/s, a thermal-equivalent neutron flux of 1.7× 107 neutrons/cm2-s in an internally located cylindrical sample space of diameter 6.5 cm and height 6.0 cm is predicted by MCNP calculations. A cylindrical port with an integral annular collimator composed of bismuth, lead, polyethylene, and lithium carbonate, is located between the sample and the detector. Calculations have been performed of gamma-ray and neutron transport in the port and integral collimator with the objective of optimizing the statistical precision with which one can measure elemental masses in the sample while also limiting the fast neutron flux incident upon the HPGe detector to a reasonable level. The statistical precision with which one can measure elemental masses can be enhanced by a factor of between 2.3 and 5.3 (depending on the origin of the background gamma rays) compared with a neutron irradiator identical to the CNI except for the replacement of the cryogenic solid methane by room-temperature polyethylene. The projected performance of

  5. Modelling central metabolic fluxes by constraint-based optimization reveals metabolic reprogramming of developing Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit.

    PubMed

    Colombié, Sophie; Nazaret, Christine; Bénard, Camille; Biais, Benoît; Mengin, Virginie; Solé, Marion; Fouillen, Laëtitia; Dieuaide-Noubhani, Martine; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Gibon, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Modelling of metabolic networks is a powerful tool to analyse the behaviour of developing plant organs, including fruits. Guided by our current understanding of heterotrophic metabolism of plant cells, a medium-scale stoichiometric model, including the balance of co-factors and energy, was constructed in order to describe metabolic shifts that occur through the nine sequential stages of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit development. The measured concentrations of the main biomass components and the accumulated metabolites in the pericarp, determined at each stage, were fitted in order to calculate, by derivation, the corresponding external fluxes. They were used as constraints to solve the model by minimizing the internal fluxes. The distribution of the calculated fluxes of central metabolism were then analysed and compared with known metabolic behaviours. For instance, the partition of the main metabolic pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, etc.) was relevant throughout fruit development. We also predicted a valid import of carbon and nitrogen by the fruit, as well as a consistent CO2 release. Interestingly, the energetic balance indicates that excess ATP is dissipated just before the onset of ripening, supporting the concept of the climacteric crisis. Finally, the apparent contradiction between calculated fluxes with low values compared with measured enzyme capacities suggest a complex reprogramming of the metabolic machinery during fruit development. With a powerful set of experimental data and an accurate definition of the metabolic system, this work provides important insight into the metabolic and physiological requirements of the developing tomato fruits.

  6. Modelling central metabolic fluxes by constraint-based optimization reveals metabolic reprogramming of developing Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit

    PubMed Central

    Colombié, Sophie; Nazaret, Christine; Bénard, Camille; Biais, Benoît; Mengin, Virginie; Solé, Marion; Fouillen, Laëtitia; Dieuaide-Noubhani, Martine; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Beauvoit, Bertrand; Gibon, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Modelling of metabolic networks is a powerful tool to analyse the behaviour of developing plant organs, including fruits. Guided by our current understanding of heterotrophic metabolism of plant cells, a medium-scale stoichiometric model, including the balance of co–factors and energy, was constructed in order to describe metabolic shifts that occur through the nine sequential stages of Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) fruit development. The measured concentrations of the main biomass components and the accumulated metabolites in the pericarp, determined at each stage, were fitted in order to calculate, by derivation, the corresponding external fluxes. They were used as constraints to solve the model by minimizing the internal fluxes. The distribution of the calculated fluxes of central metabolism were then analysed and compared with known metabolic behaviours. For instance, the partition of the main metabolic pathways (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, etc.) was relevant throughout fruit development. We also predicted a valid import of carbon and nitrogen by the fruit, as well as a consistent CO2 release. Interestingly, the energetic balance indicates that excess ATP is dissipated just before the onset of ripening, supporting the concept of the climacteric crisis. Finally, the apparent contradiction between calculated fluxes with low values compared with measured enzyme capacities suggest a complex reprogramming of the metabolic machinery during fruit development. With a powerful set of experimental data and an accurate definition of the metabolic system, this work provides important insight into the metabolic and physiological requirements of the developing tomato fruits. PMID:25279440

  7. Experimental findings on self-recovery and improvement of representative parameters of some semiconductor devices as irradiated in fast neutron flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, W.; Sterlinski, Sl.; Nazarov, V. M.; Bober, Z.

    Semiconductor devices (Si-Li detectors, diodes, transistors and integrated circuits) were irradiated at a nuclear reactor up to 2.8 x 10(exp14)n x cm(sup -2)(E sub n greater than 0.5 MeV) anda 14 MeV neutron generator up to 10(exp 13) n x cm(sup -2). While testing radiation damage it was seen that some Si-Li detectors and integrated circuits showed the effects of self-recovery and improvement of electrical characteristics.

  8. Nested Focusing Optics for Compact Neutron Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the University of Alabama Huntsville (UAH) have developed novel neutron grazing incidence optics for use with small-scale portable neutron generators. The technology was developed to enable the use of commercially available neutron generators for applications requiring high flux densities, including high performance imaging and analysis. Nested grazing incidence mirror optics, with high collection efficiency, are used to produce divergent, parallel, or convergent neutron beams. Ray tracing simulations of the system (with source-object separation of 10m for 5 meV neutrons) show nearly an order of magnitude neutron flux increase on a 1-mm diameter object. The technology is a result of joint development efforts between NASA and MIT researchers seeking to maximize neutron flux from diffuse sources for imaging and testing applications.

  9. Predictive Potential of Flux Balance Analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using as Optimization Function Combinations of Cell Compartmental Objectives

    PubMed Central

    García Sánchez, Carlos Eduardo; Vargas García, César Augusto; Torres Sáez, Rodrigo Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Background The main objective of flux balance analysis (FBA) is to obtain quantitative predictions of metabolic fluxes of an organism, and it is necessary to use an appropriate objective function to guarantee a good estimation of those fluxes. Methodology In this study, the predictive performance of FBA was evaluated, using objective functions arising from the linear combination of different cellular objectives. This approach is most suitable for eukaryotic cells, owing to their multiplicity of cellular compartments. For this reason, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as model organism, and its metabolic network was represented using the genome-scale metabolic model iMM904. As the objective was to evaluate the predictive performance from the FBA using the kind of objective function previously described, substrate uptake and oxygen consumption were the only input data used for the FBA. Experimental information about microbial growth and exchange of metabolites with the environment was used to assess the quality of the predictions. Conclusions The quality of the predictions obtained with the FBA depends greatly on the knowledge of the oxygen uptake rate. For the most of studied classifications, the best predictions were obtained with “maximization of growth”, and with some combinations that include this objective. However, in the case of exponential growth with unknown oxygen exchange flux, the objective function “maximization of growth, plus minimization of NADH production in cytosol, plus minimization of NAD(P)H consumption in mitochondrion” gave much more accurate estimations of fluxes than the obtained with any other objective function explored in this study. PMID:22912775

  10. Neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations for HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron dosimetry measurements have been conducted for various positions of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in order to measure the neutron flux and energy spectra. Neutron dosimetry results and radiation damage calculations are presented for positions V10, V14, and V15.

  11. Optimizing LED lighting for space plant growth unit: Joint effects of photon flux density, red to white ratios and intermittent light pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avercheva, O. V.; Berkovich, Yu. A.; Konovalova, I. O.; Radchenko, S. G.; Lapach, S. N.; Bassarskaya, E. M.; Kochetova, G. V.; Zhigalova, T. V.; Yakovleva, O. S.; Tarakanov, I. G.

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work were to choose a quantitative optimality criterion for estimating the quality of plant LED lighting regimes inside space greenhouses and to construct regression models of crop productivity and the optimality criterion depending on the level of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), the proportion of the red component in the light spectrum and the duration of the duty cycle (Chinese cabbage Brassica сhinensis L. as an example). The properties of the obtained models were described in the context of predicting crop dry weight and the optimality criterion behavior when varying plant lighting parameters. Results of the fractional 3-factor experiment demonstrated the share of the PPFD level participation in the crop dry weight accumulation was 84.4% at almost any combination of other lighting parameters, but when PPFD value increased up to 500 μmol m-2 s-1 the pulse light and supplemental light from red LEDs could additionally increase crop productivity. Analysis of the optimality criterion response to variation of lighting parameters showed that the maximum coordinates were the following: PPFD = 500 μmol m-2 s-1, about 70%-proportion of the red component of the light spectrum (PPFDLEDred/PPFDLEDwhite = 1.5) and the duty cycle with a period of 501 μs. Thus, LED crop lighting with these parameters was optimal for achieving high crop productivity and for efficient use of energy in the given range of lighting parameter values.

  12. Optimizing LED lighting for space plant growth unit: Joint effects of photon flux density, red to white ratios and intermittent light pulses.

    PubMed

    Avercheva, O V; Berkovich, Yu A; Konovalova, I O; Radchenko, S G; Lapach, S N; Bassarskaya, E M; Kochetova, G V; Zhigalova, T V; Yakovleva, O S; Tarakanov, I G

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work were to choose a quantitative optimality criterion for estimating the quality of plant LED lighting regimes inside space greenhouses and to construct regression models of crop productivity and the optimality criterion depending on the level of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), the proportion of the red component in the light spectrum and the duration of the duty cycle (Chinese cabbage Brassica сhinensis L. as an example). The properties of the obtained models were described in the context of predicting crop dry weight and the optimality criterion behavior when varying plant lighting parameters. Results of the fractional 3-factor experiment demonstrated the share of the PPFD level participation in the crop dry weight accumulation was 84.4% at almost any combination of other lighting parameters, but when PPFD value increased up to 500µmol m(-2)s(-1) the pulse light and supplemental light from red LEDs could additionally increase crop productivity. Analysis of the optimality criterion response to variation of lighting parameters showed that the maximum coordinates were the following: PPFD = 500µmol m(-2)s(-1), about 70%-proportion of the red component of the light spectrum (PPFDLEDred/PPFDLEDwhite = 1.5) and the duty cycle with a period of 501µs. Thus, LED crop lighting with these parameters was optimal for achieving high crop productivity and for efficient use of energy in the given range of lighting parameter values.

  13. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT): implications of neutron beam and boron compound characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, F J; Nigg, D W; Capala, J; Watkins, P R; Vroegindeweij, C; Auterinen, I; Seppälä, T; Bleuel, D

    1999-07-01

    The potential efficacy of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant glioma is a significant function of epithermal-neutron beam biophysical characteristics as well as boron compound biodistribution characteristics. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to evaluate the relative significance of these factors on theoretical tumor control using a standard model. The existing, well-characterized epithermal-neutron sources at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), the Petten High Flux Reactor (HFR), and the Finnish Research Reactor (FiR-1) were compared. Results for a realistic accelerator design by the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) are also compared. Also the characteristics of the compound p-Boronophenylaline Fructose (BPA-F) and a hypothetical next-generation compound were used in a comparison of the BMRR and a hypothetical improved reactor. All components of dose induced by an external epithermal-neutron beam fall off quite rapidly with depth in tissue. Delivery of dose to greater depths is limited by the healthy-tissue tolerance and a reduction in the hydrogen-recoil and incident gamma dose allow for longer irradiation and greater dose at a depth. Dose at depth can also be increased with a beam that has higher neutron energy (without too high a recoil dose) and a more forward peaked angular distribution. Of the existing facilities, the FiR-1 beam has the better quality (lower hydrogen-recoil and incident gamma dose) and a penetrating neutron spectrum and was found to deliver a higher value of Tumor Control Probability (TCP) than other existing beams at shallow depth. The greater forwardness and penetration of the HFR the FiR-1 at greater depths. The hypothetical reactor and accelerator beams outperform at both shallow and greater depths. In all cases, the hypothetical compound provides a significant improvement in efficacy but it is shown that the full benefit of improved compound is not realized until the neutron beam is fully

  14. Optimization of Performance of Arc Welding Using Fluxes in Welded Ship Structures from HY-100 and HY-130 KPSI.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    the basic coating has raised the question of 1I 15 Zr+0 2 = ZrO2 -83+02=2/3 820 3 .0 k ro oSTi02 ==i oo AT +O+2TSO2 2Mn +022MnO 0 4 /5Cb+0i-2/5CbA0 0...IM002 139200 127.94 -1088 MnO 95400 70.94 -1344 Cr2 03 267750 151.99 -1761 Na2V 111700 61.98 -2899 ZrO2 255020 123.22 -2069 CaQ 153500 56.08 -2737...gram mole (11). 1 17. 30- 20- 0 Addition of 0 0 I/ 5% Cr~203 a 0.75% 0 MoO3 in Flux A F0 05 5 / Flux A / (COO-SiC 2 Type) 0 / 1101 i 0.1 1.0 Silicon

  15. Coded source neutron imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Philip R; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J

    2011-01-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100 m) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100um and 10um aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  16. Coded source neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Philip; Santos-Villalobos, Hector; Tobin, Ken

    2011-03-01

    Coded aperture techniques have been applied to neutron radiography to address limitations in neutron flux and resolution of neutron detectors in a system labeled coded source imaging (CSI). By coding the neutron source, a magnified imaging system is designed with small spot size aperture holes (10 and 100μm) for improved resolution beyond the detector limits and with many holes in the aperture (50% open) to account for flux losses due to the small pinhole size. An introduction to neutron radiography and coded aperture imaging is presented. A system design is developed for a CSI system with a development of equations for limitations on the system based on the coded image requirements and the neutron source characteristics of size and divergence. Simulation has been applied to the design using McStas to provide qualitative measures of performance with simulations of pinhole array objects followed by a quantitative measure through simulation of a tilted edge and calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF) from the line spread function. MTF results for both 100μm and 10μm aperture hole diameters show resolutions matching the hole diameters.

  17. Neutron Detection Using Gadolinium-Based Diodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    prevent thermal neutron escape and limit neutron 51 intrusion [26]. The neutron source for the AFIT Pile is a five Curie plutonium -beryllium...University of Nebraska, Lincoln, the diodes were exposed to thermal neutron fluxes of approximately 103 n/cm2·s in the AFIT Standard Graphite Pile...and 109 n/cm2·s in the thermal column of the Ohio State University Research Reactor. Pulse height spectra collected during irradiations at various

  18. Comparison of NSTX FIDA, Charge Exchange, and Neutron Fluxes with Calculated Signals Based on CQL3D-FOW Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu. V.; Kinsey, J. E.; Liu, D.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Taylor, G.; Bonoli, P. T.

    2014-10-01

    Ion distribution function calculations with CQL3D have been substantially advanced through implementation of guiding-center-orbit-based Fokker-Planck Coefficients. The resulting finite-orbit-width (FOW) calculations are carried out with a fast CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW option, and in a slower but neoclassically complete (except no Er yet) CQL3D-FOW option. Good comparison between time-dependent Fast Ion Diagnostic FIDA, NPA, and neutron signals resulting from neutral beaminjection(NBI) and high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power injected into the NSTX spherical tokamak have been simulated with the CQL3D-Hybrid-FOW, using only the FOW effects on QL diffusion, and particle losses, direct and CX. Comparisons are also made with recent CQL3D-FOW results, as well as between the original FIDA calculation code and a recent fortran version. Supported by USDOE Grants SC0006614, ER54744, and ER44649.

  19. Solar Neutrons and the Earth's Radiation Belts.

    PubMed

    Lingenfelter, R E; Flamm, E J

    1964-04-17

    The intensity and spectrum of solar neutrons in the vicinity of the earth are calculated on the assumption that the low-energy protons recently detected in balloon and satellite flights are products of solar neutron decay. The solar-neutron flux thus obtained exceeds the global average cosmic-ray neutron leakage above 10 Mev, indicating that it may be an important source of both the inner and outer radiation belts. Neutron measurements in the atmosphere are reviewed and several features of the data are found to be consistent with the estimated solar neutron spectrum.

  20. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  1. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2009-12-29

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  2. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  3. Neutron Transport Simulations for NIST Neutron Lifetime Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangchen; BL2 Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Neutrons in stable nuclei can exist forever; a free neutron lasts for about 15 minutes on average before it beta decays to a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino. Precision measurements of the neutron lifetime test the validity of weak interaction theory and provide input into the theory of the evolution of light elements in the early universe. There are two predominant ways of measuring the neutron lifetime: the bottle method and the beam method. The bottle method measures decays of ultracold neutrons that are stored in a bottle. The beam method measures decay protons in a beam of cold neutrons of known flux. An improved beam experiment is being prepared at the National Institute of Science and Technology (Gaithersburg, MD) with the goal of reducing statistical and systematic uncertainties to the level of 1 s. The purpose of my studies was to develop computer simulations of neutron transport to determine the beam collimation and study the neutron distribution's effect on systematic effects for the experiment, such as the solid angle of the neutron flux monitor. The motivation for the experiment and the results of this work will be presented. This work was supported, in part, by a Grant to Gettysburg College from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program.

  4. Neutrons against cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovbnya, A. N.; Kuplennikov, E. L.; Kandybey, S. S.; Krasiljnikov, V. V.

    2014-09-01

    The review is devoted to the analysis and generalization of the research carried out during recent years in industrially advanced countries on the use of fast, epithermal, and thermal neutrons for therapy of malignant tumors. Basic facilities for neutron production used for cancer treatment are presented. Optimal parameters of therapeutic beams are described. Techniques using neutrons of different energy regions are discussed. Results and medical treatment efficiency are given. Comparison of the current state of neutron therapy of tumors and alternative treatments with beams of protons and carbon ions has been conducted. Main attention is given to the possibility of the practical use of accumulated experience of application of neutron beams for cancer therapy.

  5. Optimizing Power Density and Efficiency of a Double-Halbach Array Permanent-Magnet Ironless Axial-Flux Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating hybrid electric and turboelectric propulsion concepts for future aircraft to reduce fuel burn, emissions, and noise. Systems studies show that the weight and efficiency of the electric system components need to be improved for this concept to be feasible. This effort aims to identify design parameters that affect power density and efficiency for a double-Halbach array permanent-magnet ironless axial flux motor configuration. These parameters include both geometrical and higher-order parameters, including pole count, rotor speed, current density, and geometries of the magnets, windings, and air gap.

  6. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Crever, F.E.

    1962-05-01

    BS>A slow-acting shim rod for control of major variations in reactor neutron flux and a fast-acting control rod to correct minor flux variations are employed to provide a sensitive, accurate control system. The fast-acting rod is responsive to an error signal which is produced by changes in the neutron flux from a predetermined optimum level. When the fast rod is thus actuated in a given direction, means is provided to actuate the slow-moving rod in that direction to return the fast rod to a position near the midpoint of its control range. (AEC)

  7. Portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source provides increased experimental accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohr, W. C.; Stewart, D. C.; Wahlgren, M. A.

    1968-01-01

    Small portable, high intensity isotopic neutron source combines twelve curium-americium beryllium sources. This high intensity of neutrons, with a flux which slowly decreases at a known rate, provides for increased experimental accuracy.

  8. Neutron dosimetry in boron neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Miola, U.J.; Ettinger, K.V.

    1981-01-01

    The recent development of various borated compounds and the utilization of one of these (Na/sub 2/B/sub 12/H/sub 11/SH) to treat brain tumors in clinical studies in Japan has renewed interest in neutron capture therapy. In these procedures thermal neutrons interact with /sup 10/B in boron containing cells through the /sup 10/B(n,..cap alpha..)/sup 7/Li reaction producing charged particles with a maximum range of approx. 10..mu..m in tissue. Borated analogs of chlorpromazine, porphyrin, thiouracil and deoxyuridine promise improved tumor uptake and blood clearance. The therapy beam from the Medical Research Reactor in Brookhaven contains neutrons from a modified and filtered fission spectrum and dosimetric consequences of the use of the above mentioned compounds in conjunction with thermal and epithermal fluxes are discussed in the paper. One of the important problems of radiation dosimetry in capture therapy is determination of the flux profile and, hence, the dose profile in the brain. This has been achieved by constructing a brain phantom made of TE plastic. The lyoluminescence technique provides a convenient way of monitoring the neutron flux distributions; the detectors for this purpose utilize /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B compounds. Such compounds have been synthesized specially for the purpose of dosimetry of thermal and epithermal beams. In addition, standard lyoluminescent phosphors, like glutamine, could be used to determine the collisional component of the dose as well as the contribution of the /sup 14/N(n,p)/sup 14/C reaction. Measurements of thermal flux were compared with calculations and with measurements done with activation foils.

  9. Prospects for fusion neutron NPLs

    SciTech Connect

    Petra, M.; Miley, G.H.; Batyrbekov, E.; Jassby, D.L.; McArthur, D.

    1996-05-01

    To date, nuclear pumped lasers (NPLs) have been driven by neutrons from pulsed research fission reactors. However, future applications using either a Magnetic Confinement Fusion (MCF) neutron source or an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) source appear attractive. One unique combination proposed earlier would use a neutron feedback NPL driver in an ICF power plant. 14-MeV D-T neutrons (and 2.5-MeV D-D neutrons) provide a unique opportunity for a neutron recoil pumped NPL. Alternatively, these neutrons can be thermalized to provide thermal-neutron induced reactions for pumping. Initial experience with a fusion-pumped NPL can possibly be obtained using the D-T burn experiments in progress/planning at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak devices or at the planned National Ignition Facility (NIF) high-gain ICF target experimental facility. With neutron fluxes presently available, peak thermalized fluxes at a test laser in the shield region could exceed 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}/sec. Several low-threshold NPLs might be utilized in such an experiment, including the He-Ne-H{sub 2} NPL and the Ar-Xe NPL. Experimental set-ups for both the tokamak and the NIF will be described. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Fast neutron activation analysis by means of low voltage neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhat, M. E.

    A description of D-T neutron generator (NG) is presented. This machine can be used for fast neutron activation analysis applied to determine some selected elements, especially light elements, in different materials. Procedure of neutron flux determination and efficiency calculation is described. Examples of testing some Egyptian natural cosmetics are given.

  11. SELF-REACTIVATING NEUTRON SOURCE FOR A NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Newson, H.W.

    1959-02-01

    Reactors of the type employing beryllium in a reflector region around the active portion and to a neutron source for use therewith are discussed. The neutron source is comprised or a quantity of antimony permanently incorporated in, and as an integral part of, the reactor in or near the beryllium reflector region. During operation of the reactor the natural occurring antimony isotope of atomic weight 123 absorbs neutrons and is thereby transformed to the antimony isotope of atomic weight 124, which is radioactive and emits gamma rays. The gamma rays react with the beryllium to produce neutrons. The beryllium and antimony thus cooperate to produce a built in neutron source which is automatically reactivated by the operation of the reactor itself and which is of sufficient strength to maintain the slow neutron flux at a sufficiently high level to be reliably measured during periods when the reactor is shut down.

  12. Larmor labeling of neutron spin using superconducting Wollaston prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fankang

    Neutron spin Larmor labeling using magnetic Wollaston prisms (WP) provides a way to overcome some of the limitations arising from the nature of neutron beams: low flux and divergence. Using superconducting films and tapes, a series of strong, well-defined shaped magnetic fields can be produced due to both the zero-resistance and Meissner effect in superconductors. Using finite element simulations, the criterion to build a superconducting magnetic Wollaston prism with high encoding efficiency and low Larmor phase aberrations are presented. To achieve a high magnetic field and simplify the maintenance, we optimize the design using careful thermal analysis. The measured neutron spin flipping efficiency is measured to be independent of both the neutron wavelength and energizing current, which is a significant improvement over other devices with similar functions. A highly linear variation of the Larmor phase is measured across the device, which ensures a highly uniform encoding of scattering angles into the neutron spin Larmor phase. Using two WPs, the correlation function for a colloidal silica sample was measured by spin echo modulated small angle neutron scattering (SEMSANS) and agrees well with other techniques. Using Monte Carlo code (McStas), we further investigated the SEMSANS setup and showed the requirements to improve its performance. We have proposed a new technique to implement neutron spin echo on a triple axis neutron spectrometer to achieve high resolution measurements of the lifetime of dispersive phonon excitations. The spin echo is tuned by appropriate choice of magnetic fields instead of physically tilting the coils used in traditional methods. This new approach allows a higher energy resolution and a larger effective tilting angle and hence larger group velocity to be measured.

  13. Influence of oxygen deficiency and of neutron-induced defects on flux pinning in melt textured bulk YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, A.; Czurda, C.; Weber, H. W.; Baran, M.; Reissner, M.; Steiner, W.; Zhang, P. X.; Zhou, L.

    1996-02-01

    Critical current densities ( Jc), irreversibility lines (IL) and the time dependence of magnetic moments in melt-textured YBa 2Cu 3O 7- x with different oxygen contents (92.4 K < Tc < 27.4 K) were investigated. The samples show an increasing tendency towards two-dimensional pinning with decreasing oxygen content. The values of Jc and the effective activation energy decrease systematically and all the ILs shift to lower magnetic fields and temperatures with decreasing oxygen content. The ILs show a crossover from a power law dependence Hirr = β(1 - Tirr/ Tc) α with α ∼ {3}/{2} to a more rapid temperature dependence at higher fields. The field Hcr, at which the crossover occurs, is lower for samples with higher oxygen deficiency. After neutron irradiation Jc increases in all cases except for the material with Tc = 27.4 K, and the temperature dependence of Jc becomes flatter than in the unirradiated state. After irradiation the ILs change differently depending on oxygen content, i.e. they shift markedly to higher fields and temperature at intermediate oxygen content, change only slightly or shift to lower fields and temperatures at high and low oxygen contents. For all the samples the crossover field Hcr increases after irradiation.

  14. Boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of cerebral gliomas. I. Theoretical evaluation of the efficacy of various neutron beams.

    PubMed

    Zamenhof, R G; Murray, B W; Brownell, G L; Wellum, G R; Tolpin, E I

    1975-01-01

    The technique of boron neutron capture therapy in the treatment of cerebral gliomas depends upon the selective loading of the tumor with a 10B-enriched compound and subsequent irradiation of the brain with low-energy neutrons. The charged particles produced in the 10B (n,alpha) 7Li reaction have ranges in tissue of less than 10 mum so that the dose distribution closely follows the 10B distribution even to the cellular level. The effectiveness of this therapy procedure is dependent not only on the 10B compound but on the spectral characteristics of the neutron source as well. Hence, an optimization of these characteristics will increase the chances of therapeutic success. Transport calculations using a neutral particle transport code have been made to determine the dose-depth distributions within a simple head phantom for five different incident neutron beams. Comparison of these beams to determine their relative therapeutic efficacy was made by the use of a maximum useable depth criterion. In particular, with presently available compounds, the MIT reactor (MITR) therapy beam (a) is not inferior to a pure thermal neutron beam, (b) would be marginally improved if its gamma-ray contamination were eliminated, (c) is superior to a partially 10B-filtered MITR beam, and (d) produces a maximum useable depth which is strongly dependent upon the tumor-to-blood ratio of 10B concentrations and weakly dependent upon the absolute 10B concentration in tumor. A pure epithermal neutron beam with a mean energy of 37 eV is shown to have close to the optimal characteristics for boron neutron capture therapy. Futhermore, these optimal characteristics can be approximated by a judiciously D2O moderated and 10B-filtered 252Cf neutron source. This tailored 252Cf source would have at least a 1.5 cm greater maximum useable depth than the MITR therapy beam for realistic 10B concentrations. However, at least one gram of 252Cf would be needed to make this a practical therapy source. If the

  15. Parameter sensitivity analysis and optimization for a satellite-based evapotranspiration model across multiple sites using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and flux data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Ma, Jinzhu; Zhu, Gaofeng; Ma, Ting; Han, Tuo; Feng, Li Li

    2017-01-01

    Global and regional estimates of daily evapotranspiration are essential to our understanding of the hydrologic cycle and climate change. In this study, we selected the radiation-based Priestly-Taylor Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL) model and assessed it at a daily time scale by using 44 flux towers. These towers distributed in a wide range of ecological systems: croplands, deciduous broadleaf forest, evergreen broadleaf forest, evergreen needleleaf forest, grasslands, mixed forests, savannas, and shrublands. A regional land surface evapotranspiration model with a relatively simple structure, the PT-JPL model largely uses ecophysiologically-based formulation and parameters to relate potential evapotranspiration to actual evapotranspiration. The results using the original model indicate that the model always overestimates evapotranspiration in arid regions. This likely results from the misrepresentation of water limitation and energy partition in the model. By analyzing physiological processes and determining the sensitive parameters, we identified a series of parameter sets that can increase model performance. The model with optimized parameters showed better performance (R2 = 0.2-0.87; Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) = 0.1-0.87) at each site than the original model (R2 = 0.19-0.87; NSE = -12.14-0.85). The results of the optimization indicated that the parameter β (water control of soil evaporation) was much lower in arid regions than in relatively humid regions. Furthermore, the optimized value of parameter m1 (plant control of canopy transpiration) was mostly between 1 to 1.3, slightly lower than the original value. Also, the optimized parameter Topt correlated well to the actual environmental temperature at each site. We suggest that using optimized parameters with the PT-JPL model could provide an efficient way to improve the model performance.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of neutron-scattering instruments using McStas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, K.; Lefmann, K.

    2000-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have become an essential tool for improving the performance of neutron-scattering instruments, since the level of sophistication in the design of instruments is defeating purely analytical methods. The program McStas, being developed at Risø National Laboratory, includes an extension language that makes it easy to adapt it to the particular requirements of individual instruments, and thus provides a powerful and flexible tool for constructing such simulations. McStas has been successfully applied in such areas as neutron guide design, flux optimization, non-Gaussian resolution functions of triple-axis spectrometers, and time-focusing in time-of-flight instruments.

  17. Portable Neutron Sensors for Emergency Response Operations

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2012-06-24

    This article presents the experimental work performed in the area of neutron detector development at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews Operations (RSL-AO) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in the last four years. During the 1950s neutron detectors were developed mostly to characterize nuclear reactors where the neutron flux is high. Due to the indirect nature of neutron detection via interaction with other particles, neutron counting and neutron energy measurements have never been as precise as gamma-ray counting measurements and gamma-ray spectroscopy. This indirect nature is intrinsic to all neutron measurement endeavors (except perhaps for neutron spin-related experiments, viz. neutron spin-echo measurements where one obtains μeV energy resolution). In emergency response situations generally the count rates are low, and neutrons may be scattered around in inhomogeneous intervening materials. It is also true that neutron sensors are most efficient for the lowest energy neutrons, so it is not as easy to detect and count energetic neutrons. Most of the emergency response neutron detectors are offshoots of nuclear device diagnostics tools and special nuclear materials characterization equipment, because that is what is available commercially. These instruments mostly are laboratory equipment, and not field-deployable gear suited for mobile teams. Our goal is to design and prototype field-deployable, ruggedized, lightweight, efficient neutron detectors.

  18. Lunar neutron stratigraphy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russ, G. P., III; Burnett, D. S.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the isotopic composition of gadolinium and samarium in four soil and seven drill stem samples returned by the Apollo 15 mission. The results show the possibility to date sedimentary processes on the lunar surface for time scales of around 100 million years because of the particular dependence of neutron capture reactions on depth. The neutron flux has a distinct peak as a function of depth. This peak appears to lie below the level of shallow cratering for time scales of less than one billion years and consequently forms a readily identified marker layer of both depth and time.

  19. Neutron sources based on medical Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, M.; Durisi, E.; Monti, V.; Visca, L.; Zanini, A.; Giannini, G.

    2016-11-01

    The paper proposes the study of a novel photo-neutron source based on a medical high-energy electron Linac. Previous studies by the authors already demonstrated the possibility to obtain with this technique a thermal neutron flux of the order of 107 cm-2 s-1 . This paper shows possible Linac's setup and a new photo-converter design to reach a thermal neutron flux around 6×107 cm-2 s-1 , keeping a reasonable high quality of the beam with respect to fast neutron and gamma contaminations.

  20. Calculation of thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for aqueous bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasrabadi, M. N.; Jalali, M.; Mohammadi, A.

    2007-10-01

    In this work thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing materials is studied using bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) with the MCNP code. The code was used to perform three dimensional simulations of a neutron source, neutron detector and sample of various material compositions. The MCNP model was validated against experimental measurements of the neutron flux performed using a BF 3 detector. Simulations were performed to predict thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing solutes. In practice, the MCNP calculations are combined with experimental measurements of the relative thermal neutron flux over the sample's surface, with respect to a reference water sample, to derive the thermal neutron self-shielding within the sample. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the average thermal neutron flux within the sample volume is required.

  1. The time-of-flight spectrometer with cold neutrons at the FRM-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirkel, A.; Roth, S.; Schneider, W.; Neuhaus, J.; Petry, W.

    2000-03-01

    We are presenting a design study of the new cold-time-of-flight spectrometer to be built at the FRM-II. Monte Carlo techniques were used to optimize the flux at the sample position and to calculate the elastic energy resolution. A doubly focusing neutron guide is used to enhance the intensity on the sample. Magnetic bearings and carbon fiber composite disks will give access to very high chopper speeds, thereby considerably increasing the overall performance of the instrument.

  2. Thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for large sample instrumental neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzika, F.; Stamatelatos, I. E.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal neutron self-shielding within large samples was studied using the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. The code enabled a three-dimensional modeling of the actual source and geometry configuration including reactor core, graphite pile and sample. Neutron flux self-shielding correction factors derived for a set of materials of interest for large sample neutron activation analysis are presented and evaluated. Simulations were experimentally verified by measurements performed using activation foils. The results of this study can be applied in order to determine neutron self-shielding factors of unknown samples from the thermal neutron fluxes measured at the surface of the sample.

  3. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-03-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 10(5) n/cm(2)/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources.

  4. Application of an ultraminiature thermal neutron monitor for irradiation field study of accelerator-based neutron capture therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masayori; Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satrou; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Phantom experiments to evaluate thermal neutron flux distribution were performed using the Scintillator with Optical Fiber (SOF) detector, which was developed as a thermal neutron monitor during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) irradiation. Compared with the gold wire activation method and Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) calculations, it was confirmed that the SOF detector is capable of measuring thermal neutron flux as low as 105 n/cm2/s with sufficient accuracy. The SOF detector will be useful for phantom experiments with BNCT neutron fields from low-current accelerator-based neutron sources. PMID:25589504

  5. Ultracold neutron detectors based on 10B converters used in the qBounce experiments☆

    PubMed Central

    Jenke, Tobias; Cronenberg, Gunther; Filter, Hanno; Geltenbort, Peter; Klein, Martin; Lauer, Thorsten; Mitsch, Kevin; Saul, Heiko; Seiler, Dominik; Stadler, David; Thalhammer, Martin; Abele, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Gravity experiments with very slow, so-called ultracold neutrons connect quantum mechanics with tests of Newton's inverse square law at short distances. These experiments face a low count rate and hence need highly optimized detector concepts. In the frame of this paper, we present low-background ultracold neutron counters and track detectors with micron resolution based on a 10B converter. We discuss the optimization of 10B converter layers, detector design and concepts for read-out electronics focusing on high-efficiency and low-background. We describe modifications of the counters that allow one to detect ultracold neutrons selectively on their spin-orientation. This is required for searches of hypothetical forces with spin–mass couplings. The mentioned experiments utilize a beam-monitoring concept which accounts for variations in the neutron flux that are typical for nuclear research facilities. The converter can also be used for detectors, which feature high efficiencies paired with high spatial resolution of 1–2μm. They allow one to resolve the quantum mechanical wave function of an ultracold neutron bound in the gravity potential above a neutron mirror. PMID:25843998

  6. Ultracold neutron detectors based on (10)B converters used in the qBounce experiments.

    PubMed

    Jenke, Tobias; Cronenberg, Gunther; Filter, Hanno; Geltenbort, Peter; Klein, Martin; Lauer, Thorsten; Mitsch, Kevin; Saul, Heiko; Seiler, Dominik; Stadler, David; Thalhammer, Martin; Abele, Hartmut

    2013-12-21

    Gravity experiments with very slow, so-called ultracold neutrons connect quantum mechanics with tests of Newton's inverse square law at short distances. These experiments face a low count rate and hence need highly optimized detector concepts. In the frame of this paper, we present low-background ultracold neutron counters and track detectors with micron resolution based on a (10)B converter. We discuss the optimization of (10)B converter layers, detector design and concepts for read-out electronics focusing on high-efficiency and low-background. We describe modifications of the counters that allow one to detect ultracold neutrons selectively on their spin-orientation. This is required for searches of hypothetical forces with spin-mass couplings. The mentioned experiments utilize a beam-monitoring concept which accounts for variations in the neutron flux that are typical for nuclear research facilities. The converter can also be used for detectors, which feature high efficiencies paired with high spatial resolution of [Formula: see text]. They allow one to resolve the quantum mechanical wave function of an ultracold neutron bound in the gravity potential above a neutron mirror.

  7. Optimization of metabolic capacity and flux through environmental cues to maximize hydrogen production by the cyanobacterium "Arthrospira (Spirulina) maxima".

    PubMed

    Ananyev, Gennady; Carrieri, Damian; Dismukes, G Charles

    2008-10-01

    Environmental and nutritional conditions that optimize the yield of hydrogen (H(2)) from water using a two-step photosynthesis/fermentation (P/F) process are reported for the hypercarbonate-requiring cyanobacterium "Arthrospira maxima." Our observations lead to four main conclusions broadly applicable to fermentative H(2) production by bacteria: (i) anaerobic H(2) production in the dark from whole cells catalyzed by a bidirectional [NiFe] hydrogenase is demonstrated to occur in two temporal phases involving two distinct metabolic processes that are linked to prior light-dependent production of NADPH (photosynthetic) and dark/anaerobic production of NADH (fermentative), respectively; (ii) H(2) evolution from these reductants represents a major pathway for energy production (ATP) during fermentation by regenerating NAD(+) essential for glycolysis of glycogen and catabolism of other substrates; (iii) nitrate removal during fermentative H(2) evolution is shown to produce an immediate and large stimulation of H(2), as nitrate is a competing substrate for consumption of NAD(P)H, which is distinct from its slower effect of stimulating glycogen accumulation; (iv) environmental and nutritional conditions that increase anaerobic ATP production, prior glycogen accumulation (in the light), and the intracellular reduction potential (NADH/NAD(+) ratio) are shown to be the key variables for elevating H(2) evolution. Optimization of these conditions and culture age increases the H(2) yield from a single P/F cycle using concentrated cells to 36 ml of H(2)/g (dry weight) and a maximum 18% H(2) in the headspace. H(2) yield was found to be limited by the hydrogenase-mediated H(2) uptake reaction.

  8. Perspectives for online analysis of raw material by pulsed neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Pierre; Le Tourneur, P.; Poumarede, B.

    1997-02-01

    On-line analysis by pulsed neutron irradiation is an example of an advanced technology application of nuclear techniques, concerning real problems in the cement, mineral and coal industries. The most significant of these nuclear techniques is their capability of continuous measurement without contact and without sampling, which can lead to improved control of processes and resultant large financial savings. Compared to Californium neutron sources, the use of electrical pulsed neutron generators allows to obtain a higher signal/noise ratio for a more sensitive measurement, and allows to overcome a number of safety problems concerning transportation, installation and maintenance. An experiment related to a possible new on-line raw material analyzer is described, using a pulsed neutron generator. The key factors contributing to an accurate measurement are related to a suitable generator, to a high count rate gamma ray spectroscopy electronics, and to computational tools. Calculation and results for the optimization of the neutron irradiation time diagram are reported. One of the operational characteristics of such an equipment is related to neutron flux available: it is possible to adjust it to the requested accuracy, i.e. for a high accuracy during a few hours/day and for a lower accuracy the rest of the time. This feature allows to operate the neutron tube during a longer time, and then to reduce the cost of analysis.

  9. A system of materials composition and geometry arrangement for fast neutron beam thermalization: An MCNP study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlář, Radim; Alexa, Petr; Pištora, Jaromír

    2013-03-01

    Compact deuterium-tritium neutron generators emit fast neutrons (14.2 MeV) that have to be thermalized for neutron activation analysis experiments. To maximize thermal neutron flux and minimize epithermal and fast neutron fluxes across the output surface of the neutron generator facility, Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP5; Los Alamos National Laboratory) for different moderator types and widths and collimator and reflector designs have been performed. A thin lead layer close to the neutron generator as neutron multiplier followed by polyethylene moderator and surrounded by a massive lead and nickel collimator and reflector was obtained as the optimum setup.

  10. Performance of an elliptically tapered neutron guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlbauer, Sebastian; Stadlbauer, Martin; Böni, Peter; Schanzer, Christan; Stahn, Jochen; Filges, Uwe

    2006-11-01

    Supermirror coated neutron guides are used at all modern neutron sources for transporting neutrons over large distances. In order to reduce the transmission losses due to multiple internal reflection of neutrons, ballistic neutron guides with linear tapering have been proposed and realized. However, these systems suffer from an inhomogeneous illumination of the sample. Moreover, the flux decreases significantly with increasing distance from the exit of the neutron guide. We propose using elliptically tapered guides that provide a more homogeneous phase space at the sample position as well as a focusing at the sample. Moreover, the design of the guide system is simplified because ellipses are simply defined by their long and short axes. In order to prove the concept we have manufactured a doubly focusing guide and investigated its properties with neutrons. The experiments show that the predicted gains using the program package McStas are realized. We discuss several applications of elliptic guides in various fields of neutron physics.

  11. Biological neutron scattering: Now and the future

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.

    1996-06-01

    Neutrons have an important role to play in structural biology. Neutron crystallography, small-angle neutron scattering and inelastic neutron scattering techniques can all contribute unique information on biomolecular structures. In particular, solution scattering techniques can give critical information on the conformations an dispositions of the components of complex assemblies under a wide variety of relevant conditions. The power of these methods are demonstrated for examples by protein/DNA complexes, and Ca{sup 2+}- binding proteins complexed with their regulatory targets. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of a new structural approach suing neutron resonance scattering. The impact of biological neutron scattering to date has been constrained principally by the available fluxes at neutron sources and the true potential of these approaches will only be realized with the development of new more powerful neutron sources.

  12. Neutron Imaging of Archaeological Bronzes

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzewski, Krysta; Herringer, Susan; Bilheux, Hassina Z; Walker, Lakeisha MH; Sheldon, Brian; Voisin, Sophie; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe; Finocchiaro, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the initial results of 2-D and 3-D neutron imaging of bronze artifacts using the CG-1D prototype beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Neutron imaging is a non-destructive technique capable of producing unprecedented three-dimensional information on archaeomaterials, including qualitative, quantitative, and visual data on impurities, composition change, voids, and c

  13. Neutron beam imaging at neutron spectrometers at Dhruva

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Shraddha S.; Rao, Mala N.

    2012-06-05

    A low efficiency, 2-Dimensional Position Sensitive Neutron Detector based on delay line position encoding is developed. It is designed to handle beam flux of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}/s and for monitoring intensity profiles of neutron beams. The present detector can be mounted in transmission mode, as the hardware allows maximum neutron transmission in sensitive region. Position resolution of 1.2 mm in X and Y directions, is obtained. Online monitoring of beam images and intensity profile of various neutron scattering spectrometers at Dhruva are presented. It shows better dynamic range of intensity over commercial neutron camera and is also time effective over the traditionally used photographic method.

  14. Atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korff, S. A.; Mendell, R. B.; Merker, M.; Light, E. S.; Verschell, H. J.; Sandie, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Contributions to fast neutron measurements in the atmosphere are outlined. The results of a calculation to determine the production, distribution and final disappearance of atmospheric neutrons over the entire spectrum are presented. An attempt is made to answer questions that relate to processes such as neutron escape from the atmosphere and C-14 production. In addition, since variations of secondary neutrons can be related to variations in the primary radiation, comment on the modulation of both radiation components is made.

  15. The possibility existence of volatile compounds in the area of NSR S5 spot of local suppression of epithermal neutron flux in the South Pole region of the Moon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feoktistova, Ekaterina

    2016-07-01

    6 statistically significant areas in which it was recorded a lower value of the flow of epithermal neutrons was found in the polar regions of the moon according to LEND: 5 areas are located in the south polar region (the area NSR S1 - 5 [1]) and one (area NSR N1[1]) to the north. One of these areas - the area NSR S5 - is located in the landing sector Luna - Globe mission [2], the launch of which is planned by Russian Space Agency in 2018. In this paper, we investigated the temperature regime, illumination conditions and the possibility of the existence of deposits of volatile compounds in this area. To study we selected a number of substances was detected in the LCROSS impact site in the crater Cabeus, particularly compounds such as H2O, CO2, SO2, CH3OH, NH3, C2H4, H2S, CH4 · 5.75H2O and CO · 5.75H2O [3]. We divided the area of NSR S5 spot into a grid with a number of elements. Step in longitude grid was 0.15 degrees, a step in latitude 0.05 degrees. The total number of the elements of the area of the crater is 36000. The height, slope and orientation of each element were calculated based on a LOLA DEM [4] using an algorithm described in [5]. Our results show that the compounds of deposits such as H2O, CO2, SO2, CH3OH, NH3, C2H4, H2S, CH4 · 5.75H2O and CO · 5.75H2O may exist in NSR S5. Thus, the local suppression the epithermal neutron flux in this region may be due to the presence of hydrogen-containing compounds deposits. [1] Mitrofanov et al. (2012) JGR 117, E003956 [2] Ivanov et al. (2014) Solar System Res. 48, 391 - 402 [3] Colaprete et al. (2010) Science 330, 463-468 [4] http://wwwpds.wustl.edu/ [5] Zevenbergen, L.W., Thorne (1987) Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 12(1), 47-56.

  16. A fundamental study on hyper-thermal neutrons for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Y; Kobayashi, T; Kanda, K

    1994-12-01

    The utilization of hyper-thermal neutrons, which have an energy spectrum with a Maxwellian distribution at a higher temperature than room temperature (300 K), was studied in order to improve the thermal neutron flux distribution at depth in a living body for neutron capture therapy. Simulation calculations were carried out using a Monte Carlo code 'MCNP-V3' in order to investigate the characteristics of hyper-thermal neutrons, i.e. (i) depth dependence of the neutron energy spectrum, and (ii) depth distribution of the reaction rate in a water phantom for materials with 1/v neutron absorption. It is confirmed that hyper-thermal neutron irradiation can improve the thermal neutron flux distribution in the deeper areas in a living body compared with thermal neutron irradiation. When hyper-thermal neutrons with a 3000 K Maxwellian distribution are incident on a body, the reaction rates of 1/v materials such as 14N, 10B etc are about twice that observed for incident thermal neutrons at 300 K, at a depth of 5 cm. The limit of the treatable depth for tumours having 30 ppm 10B is expected to be about 1.5 cm greater by utilizing hyper-thermal neutrons at 3000 K compared with the incidence of thermal neutrons at 300 K.

  17. The accelerator neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatov, D.; Koshkarev, A.; Kuznetsov, A.; Makarov, A.; Ostreinov, Yu; Shchudlo, I.; Sorokin, I.; Sycheva, T.; Taskaev, S.; Zaidi, L.

    2016-11-01

    The accelerator based epithermal neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is proposed, created and used in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. In 2014, with the support of the Russian Science Foundation created the BNCT laboratory for the purpose to the end of 2016 get the neutron flux, suitable for BNCT. For getting 3 mA 2.3 MeV proton beam, was created a new type accelerator - tandem accelerator with vacuum isolation. On this moment, we have a stationary proton beam with 2.3 MeV and current 1.75 mA. Generation of neutrons is carried out by dropping proton beam on to lithium target as a result of threshold reaction 7Li(p,n)7Be. Established facility is a unique scientific installation. It provides a generating of neutron flux, including a monochromatic energy neutrons, gamma radiation, alpha-particles and positrons, and may be used by other research groups for carrying out scientific researches. The article describes an accelerator neutron source, presents and discusses the result of experiments and declares future plans.

  18. Neutron guide

    DOEpatents

    Greene, Geoffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A neutron guide in which lengths of cylindrical glass tubing have rectangular glass plates properly dimensioned to allow insertion into the cylindrical glass tubing so that a sealed geometrically precise polygonal cross-section is formed in the cylindrical glass tubing. The neutron guide provides easier alignment between adjacent sections than do the neutron guides of the prior art.

  19. Variable control of neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.; Micklich, Bradley J.

    1986-01-01

    An arrangement is provided for controlling neutron albedo in toroidal fusion devices having inboard and outboard vacuum vessel walls for containment of the neutrons of a fusion plasma. Neutron albedo material is disposed immediately adjacent the inboard wall, and is movable, preferably in vertical directions, so as to be brought into and out of neutron modifying communication with the fusion neutrons. Neutron albedo material preferably comprises a liquid form, but may also take pebble, stringer and curtain-like forms. A neutron flux valve, rotatable about a vertical axis is also disclosed.

  20. Measurement of neutron scattering lengths using neutron interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi, Chandra B.

    This thesis describes the details on building a new Neutron Interferometry and Optics Facility (NIOFa), the measurement of the incoherent neutron scattering length bi of 3He, and the measurement of the coherent neutron scattering length bc of 4He at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). A new monochromatic beamline and facility has been installed at the NCNR devoted to neutron interferometry in the research areas of spin control, spin manipulation, quantum mechanics, quantum information science, spintronics, and material science. This facility is possible in part because of advances in decoherence free subspace interferometer designs that have demonstrated consistent contrast in the presence of vibrational noise; a major environmental constraint that has prevented neutron interferometry from being applied at other neutron facilities. This new facility, NIOFa, is located in the guide hall of the NCNR upstream of the existing Neutron Interferometry and Optics Facility (NIOF) and has several advantages over the NIOF including higher incident flux, better neutron polarization, and increased accessibility. The measurement of the incoherent neutron scattering length bi of 3He was done using a (220) single silicon crystal skew symmetric interferometer. This experiment requires both a polarized beam and a polarized target. We report bi = -2.35 +/- 0.014 (stat.) +/- 0.014 (syst.). This experiment is a revision of the previous experiment which was done in 2008, and partially explains the non-zero phase shift seen in 2008 experiment even if target cell was completely unpolarized. The measurement of the coherent neutron scattering length b c of the 4He was done using a (111) single silicon crystal interferometer. The neutron interferometry and optics facility at NIST had been used previously to determine the coherent scattering lengths for n- 1H, n-2H, and n-3He to less than 1% relative uncertainty. We report bc of the 4He

  1. Optimization of Beam-Shaping Assemblies for BNCS Using the High-Energy Neutron Sources D-D and D-T

    SciTech Connect

    Verbeke, Jerome M.; Chen, Allen S.; Vujic, Jasmina L.; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2001-06-15

    Boron neutron capture synovectomy is a novel approach for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The goal of the treatment is the ablation of diseased synovial membranes in articulating joints. The treatment of knee joints is the focus of this work. A method was developed, as discussed previously, to predict the dose distribution in a knee joint from any neutron and photon beam spectra incident on the knee. This method is validated and used to design moderators for the deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron sources. Treatment times >2 h were obtained with the D-D reaction. They could potentially be reduced if the {sup 10}B concentration in the synovium was increased. For D-T neutrons, high therapeutic ratios and treatment times <5 min were obtained for neutron yields of 10{sup 14} s{sup -1}. This treatment time makes the D-T reaction attractive for boron neutron capture synovectomy.

  2. Measurements of electron-induced neutrons as a tool for determination of electron temperature of fast electrons in the task of optimization laser-produced plasma ions acceleration.

    PubMed

    Sakaki, H; Nishiuchi, M; Maeda, S; Sagisaka, A; Pirozhkov, A S; Pikuz, T; Faenov, A; Ogura, K; Fukami, T; Matsukawa, K; Kanasaki, M; Fukuda, Y; Yogo, A; Esirkepov, T; Kiriyama, H; Shimomura, T; Nakai, Y; Tanoue, M; Torimoto, K; Okamoto, M; Sato, T; Niita, K; Tamura, J; Nishio, K; Sako, H; Yamauchi, T; Watanabe, Y; Bulanov, S; Kondo, K

    2014-02-01

    High intensity laser-plasma interaction has attracted considerable interest for a number of years. The laser-plasma interaction is accompanied by generation of various charged particle beams, such as high-energy proton and ions with high charge to mass ratio (Q/M; same as multi-charged ions). Results of simultaneous novel measurements of electron-induced photonuclear neutrons (photoneutron), which are a diagnostic of the laser-plasma interaction, are proposed to use for optimization of the laser-plasma ion generation. The proposed method is demonstrated by the laser irradiation with the intensity of 1 × 10(21) W/cm(2) on the metal foil target. The photoneutrons are measured by using NE213 liquid scintillation detectors. Heavy-ion signal is registered with the CR-39 track detector simultaneously. The measured signals of the electron-induced photoneutrons are well reproduced by using the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System. The results obtained provide useful approach for analyzing the various laser based ion beams.

  3. On a novel rate theory for transport in narrow ion channels and its application to the study of flux optimization via geometric effects.

    PubMed

    Abad, E; Reingruber, J; Sansom, M S P

    2009-02-28

    We present a novel rate theory based on the notions of splitting probability and mean first passage time to describe single-ion conduction in narrow, effectively one-dimensional membrane channels. In contrast to traditional approaches such as transition state theory or Kramers theory, transitions between different conduction states in our model are governed by rates which depend on the full geometry of the potential of mean force (PMF) resulting from the superposition of an equilibrium free energy profile and a transmembrane potential induced by a nonequilibrium constraint. If a detailed theoretical PMF is available (e.g., from atomistic molecular dynamics simulations), it can be used to compute characteristic conductance curves in the framework of our model, thereby bridging the gap between the atomistic and the mesoscopic level of description. Explicit analytic solutions for the rates, the ion flux, and the associated electric current can be obtained by approximating the actual PMF by a piecewise linear potential. As illustrative examples, we consider both a theoretical and an experimental application of the model. The theoretical example is based on a hypothetical channel with a fully symmetric sawtooth equilibrium PMF. For this system, we explore how changes in the spatial extent of the binding sites affect the rate of transport when a linear voltage ramp is applied. Already for the case of a single binding site, we find that there is an optimum size of the site which maximizes the current through the channel provided that the applied voltage exceeds a threshold value given by the binding energy of the site. The above optimization effect is shown to arise from the complex interplay between the channel structure and the applied electric field, expressed by a nonlinear dependence of the rates with respect to the linear size of the binding site. In studying the properties of current-voltage curves, we find a double crossover between sublinear and superlinear

  4. Information from leading neutrons at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoze, V. A.; Martin, A. D.; Ryskin, M. G.

    2006-12-01

    In principle, leading neutrons produced in photoproduction and deep-inelastic scattering at HERA have the potential to determine the pion structure function, the neutron absorptive cross section and the form of the pion flux. To explore this potential we compare theoretical predictions for the xL and pt spectra of leading neutrons and the Q2 dependence of the cross section with the existing ZEUS data.

  5. Neutron Characterization for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Thomas; Bilheux, Hassina; An, Ke; Payzant, Andrew; DeHoff, Ryan; Duty, Chad; Peter, William; Blue, Craig; Brice, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leveraging decades of experience in neutron characterization of advanced materials together with resources such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) shown in Fig. 1 to solve challenging problems in additive manufacturing (AM). Additive manufacturing, or three-dimensional (3-D) printing, is a rapidly maturing technology wherein components are built by selectively adding feedstock material at locations specified by a computer model. The majority of these technologies use thermally driven phase change mechanisms to convert the feedstock into functioning material. As the molten material cools and solidifies, the component is subjected to significant thermal gradients, generating significant internal stresses throughout the part (Fig. 2). As layers are added, inherent residual stresses cause warping and distortions that lead to geometrical differences between the final part and the original computer generated design. This effect also limits geometries that can be fabricated using AM, such as thin-walled, high-aspect- ratio, and overhanging structures. Distortion may be minimized by intelligent toolpath planning or strategic placement of support structures, but these approaches are not well understood and often "Edisonian" in nature. Residual stresses can also impact component performance during operation. For example, in a thermally cycled environment such as a high-pressure turbine engine, residual stresses can cause components to distort unpredictably. Different thermal treatments on as-fabricated AM components have been used to minimize residual stress, but components still retain a nonhomogeneous stress state and/or demonstrate a relaxation-derived geometric distortion. Industry, federal laboratory, and university collaboration is needed to address these challenges and enable the U.S. to compete in the global market. Work is currently being conducted on AM technologies at the ORNL

  6. Calculated angular distributions of energetic atmospheric neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merker, M.

    1975-01-01

    Calculated angular distributions of atmospheric leakage neutron fluxes from 19 MeV to 1 GeV are presented. Comparisons with the balloon measurements of Preszler et al. and Kanbach et al. are made and show substantial agreement, strengthening the belief in the importance of the CRAND (cosmic-ray albedo-neutron decay) contribution to the high-energy protons in the earth's inner radiation belt. The calculation is presented as a means for investigating features of atmospheric flux distributions.

  7. On the neutrons streaming in straight duct

    PubMed

    Jehouani; Boulkheir; Ichaoui

    2000-10-01

    The main aim of this study is to evaluate the thermal neutron streaming through a straight cylindrical duct by using the Monte Carlo method and evaluating the neutron reflection by the duct wall to the total flux at the exit of the duct. The duct walls are made separately of iron and aluminum. We have considered 10 groups of energy between 10(-5) and 10 eV. For a point source at the mouth of the duct, we have determined the direct and the reflected part of the total thermal neutron flux at the exit of the duct for different lengths and different radii of the duct. For a punctual source, we have found that the major contribution to the total flux of neutrons at the exit is due to the neutron reflection by walls, and the reflection contribution decreases when the neutron energy decreases. For a constant length of the duct, the reflected part decreases when the duct radius increases, while for the disk shaped source, we have found the opposite phenomenon. The transmitted neutron flux distribution at the exit of the duct is determined for a disk shaped source for different neutron energies and different distances from the exit center.

  8. A highly optimized code for calculating atomic data at neutron star magnetic field strengths using a doubly self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimeczek, C.; Engel, D.; Wunner, G.

    2014-05-01

    Our previously published code for calculating energies and bound-bound transitions of medium- Z elements at neutron star magnetic field strengths [D. Engel, M. Klews, G. Wunner, Comp. Phys. Comm. 180, 3-2-311 (2009)] was based on the adiabatic approximation. It assumes a complete decoupling of the (fast) gyration of the electrons under the action of the magnetic field and the (slow) bound motion along the field under the action of the Coulomb forces. For the single-particle orbitals this implied that each is a product of a Landau state and an (unknown) longitudinal wave function whose B-spline coefficients were determined self-consistently by solving the Hartree-Fock equations for the many-electron problem on a finite-element grid. In the present code we go beyond the adiabatic approximation, by allowing the transverse part of each orbital to be a superposition of Landau states, while assuming that the longitudinal part can be approximated by the same wave function in each Landau level. Inserting this ansatz into the energy variational principle leads to a system of coupled equations in which the B-spline coefficients depend on the weights of the individual Landau states, and vice versa, and which therefore has to be solved in a doubly self-consistent manner. The extended ansatz takes into account the back-reaction of the Coulomb motion of the electrons along the field direction on their motion in the plane perpendicular to the field, an effect which cannot be captured by the adiabatic approximation. The new code allows for the inclusion of up to 8 Landau levels. This reduces the relative error of energy values as compared to the adiabatic approximation results by typically a factor of three (1/3 of the original error) and yields accurate results also in regions of lower neutron star magnetic field strengths where the adiabatic approximation fails. Further improvements in the code are a more sophisticated choice of the initial wave functions, which takes into

  9. Optimism

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Charles S.; Scheier, Michael F.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.

    2010-01-01

    Optimism is an individual difference variable that reflects the extent to which people hold generalized favorable expectancies for their future. Higher levels of optimism have been related prospectively to better subjective well-being in times of adversity or difficulty (i.e., controlling for previous well-being). Consistent with such findings, optimism has been linked to higher levels of engagement coping and lower levels of avoidance, or disengagement, coping. There is evidence that optimism is associated with taking proactive steps to protect one's health, whereas pessimism is associated with health-damaging behaviors. Consistent with such findings, optimism is also related to indicators of better physical health. The energetic, task-focused approach that optimists take to goals also relates to benefits in the socioeconomic world. Some evidence suggests that optimism relates to more persistence in educational efforts and to higher later income. Optimists also appear to fare better than pessimists in relationships. Although there are instances in which optimism fails to convey an advantage, and instances in which it may convey a disadvantage, those instances are relatively rare. In sum, the behavioral patterns of optimists appear to provide models of living for others to learn from. PMID:20170998

  10. Redesign of the Target-Moderator-Reflector-Shield Assembly for Optimization of the Neutron Flux in the 0.001 – 1 MeV at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Nowicki, Suzanne Florence; Mocko, Michal; Wender, Stephen Arthur; Ferres, Laurent

    2016-08-10

    These are the slides for a presentation at the 2016 Postdoc Summer Seminar Series at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The conclusions of the research presented are the following: we can provide a significant gain in intensity in the upper tier; lower and upper tier are coupled: translating the target in the FOV of the upper tier decreases the intensity in the lower tier; it is possible to balance the production between the upper and lower tier if we keep some of the material between the tiers.

  11. Design and characterisation of a pulsed neutron interrogation facility.

    PubMed

    Favalli, A; Pedersen, B

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Research Centre recently obtained a license to operate a new experimental device intended for research in the field of nuclear safeguards. The research projects currently being planned for the new device includes mass determination of fissile materials in matrices and detection of contraband non-nuclear materials. The device incorporates a commercial pulsed neutron generator and a large graphite mantle surrounding the sample cavity. In this configuration, a relatively high thermal neutron flux with a long lifetime is achieved inside the sample cavity. By pulsing the neutron generator, a sample may be interrogated by a pure thermal neutron flux during repeated time periods. The paper reports on the design of the new device and the pulsed fast and thermal neutron source. The thermal neutron flux caused by the neutron generator and the graphite structure has been characterised by foil activation, fission chamber and (3)He proportional counter measurements.

  12. Synthesis of neutron-rich transuranic nuclei in fissile spallation targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishustin, Igor; Malyshkin, Yury; Pshenichnov, Igor; Greiner, Walter

    2015-04-01

    A possibility of synthesizing neutron-rich superheavy elements in spallation targets of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) is considered. A dedicated software called Nuclide Composition Dynamics (NuCoD) was developed to model the evolution of isotope composition in the targets during a long-time irradiation by intense proton and deuteron beams. Simulation results show that transuranic elements up to 249Bk can be produced in multiple neutron capture reactions in macroscopic quantities. However, the neutron flux achievable in a spallation target is still insufficient to overcome the so-called fermium gap. Further optimization of the target design, in particular, by including moderating material and covering it by a reflector could turn ADS into an alternative source of transuranic elements in addition to nuclear fission reactors.

  13. Facility for fast neutron irradiation tests of electronics at the ISIS spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Salsano, A.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Gerardin, S.; Frost, C. D.; Ansell, S.; Platt, S. P.

    2008-03-17

    The VESUVIO beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source was set up for neutron irradiation tests in the neutron energy range above 10 MeV. The neutron flux and energy spectrum were shown, in benchmark activation measurements, to provide a neutron spectrum similar to the ambient one at sea level, but with an enhancement in intensity of a factor of 10{sup 7}. Such conditions are suitable for accelerated testing of electronic components, as was demonstrated here by measurements of soft error rates in recent technology field programable gate arrays.

  14. Neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Stephan, Andrew C.; Jardret; Vincent D.

    2011-04-05

    A neutron detector has a volume of neutron moderating material and a plurality of individual neutron sensing elements dispersed at selected locations throughout the moderator, and particularly arranged so that some of the detecting elements are closer to the surface of the moderator assembly and others are more deeply embedded. The arrangement captures some thermalized neutrons that might otherwise be scattered away from a single, centrally located detector element. Different geometrical arrangements may be used while preserving its fundamental characteristics. Different types of neutron sensing elements may be used, which may operate on any of a number of physical principles to perform the function of sensing a neutron, either by a capture or a scattering reaction, and converting that reaction to a detectable signal. High detection efficiency, an ability to acquire spectral information, and directional sensitivity may be obtained.

  15. Overview of Spallation Neutron Source Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, G. J.; Pitcher, E. J.; Muhrer, G.; Mezei, F.; Ferguson, P. D.

    In December 1971 , the world's most advanced steady-state research reactor, the High Flux Reactor at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble, France, reached full power operation. The reactor has recently undergone an extensive renovation, is equipped with hot and cold sources, and has a complement of word class instruments. As such, the ILL reactor is the worldwide center for neutron research at a reactor installation. With present technology, the constraints of heat removal and fuel cost place a limit on the available flux of a steadystate research reactor at levels not much higher than that of the ILL reactor. There has been extensive progress worldwide to realize new high-flux neutron facilities using the technology of spallation. When coupled with the spallation process in appropriate target materials, highpower accelerators can be used to produce large numbers of neutrons, thus providing an alternate method to the use of nuclear reactors for this purpose. Spallation technology has recently become increasingly focussed on pulsed spallation neutron sources. Pulsed spallation neutron sources avoid the limitations of high time-average heat removal by producing neutrons for only a small fraction of the time. Also, the amount of energy deposited per useful neutron produced from spallation is less than that from fission. During the pulse, the available neutron flux from a pulsed spallation source can be much more intense than that obtainable in a steady-state reactor. Furthermore, pulsed neutron sources have certain unique features, which open up qualitatively new areas of science, which are not accessible to steady-state reactors. We discuss here the spallation process and spallation neutron sources. We compare the qualitative differences between fission and spallation and provide absolute neutron intensities for cold neutron production from a liquid H2, moderator at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) short-pulse pulsed spallation

  16. Layered shielding design for an active neutron interrogation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, Zachary D.; Kearfott, Kimberlee J.

    2016-08-01

    The use of source and detector shields in active neutron interrogation can improve detector signal. In simulations, a shielded detector with a source rotated π/3 rad relative to the opening decreased neutron flux roughly three orders of magnitude. Several realistic source and detector shield configurations were simulated. A layered design reduced neutron and secondary photon flux in the detector by approximately one order of magnitude for a deuterium-tritium source. The shield arrangement can be adapted for a portable, modular design.

  17. Theoretical neutron damage calculations in industrial robotic manipulators used for non-destructive imaging applications

    DOE PAGES

    Hashem, Joseph; Schneider, Erich; Pryor, Mitch; ...

    2017-01-01

    Our paper describes how to use MCNP to evaluate the rate of material damage in a robot incurred by exposure to a neutron flux. The example used in this work is that of a robotic manipulator installed in a high intensity, fast, and collimated neutron radiography beam port at the University of Texas at Austin's TRIGA Mark II research reactor. Our effort includes taking robotic technologies and using them to automate non-destructive imaging tasks in nuclear facilities where the robotic manipulator acts as the motion control system for neutron imaging tasks. Simulated radiation tests are used to analyze the radiationmore » damage to the robot. Once the neutron damage is calculated using MCNP, several possible shielding materials are analyzed to determine the most effective way of minimizing the neutron damage. Furthermore, neutron damage predictions provide users the means to simulate geometrical and material changes, thus saving time, money, and energy in determining the optimal setup for a robotic system installed in a radiation environment.« less

  18. Theoretical neutron damage calculations in industrial robotic manipulators used for non-destructive imaging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hashem, Joseph; Schneider, Erich; Pryor, Mitch; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    Our paper describes how to use MCNP to evaluate the rate of material damage in a robot incurred by exposure to a neutron flux. The example used in this work is that of a robotic manipulator installed in a high intensity, fast, and collimated neutron radiography beam port at the University of Texas at Austin's TRIGA Mark II research reactor. Our effort includes taking robotic technologies and using them to automate non-destructive imaging tasks in nuclear facilities where the robotic manipulator acts as the motion control system for neutron imaging tasks. Simulated radiation tests are used to analyze the radiation damage to the robot. Once the neutron damage is calculated using MCNP, several possible shielding materials are analyzed to determine the most effective way of minimizing the neutron damage. Furthermore, neutron damage predictions provide users the means to simulate geometrical and material changes, thus saving time, money, and energy in determining the optimal setup for a robotic system installed in a radiation environment.

  19. Measurements of the neutron yields from 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (thick target) with incident energies from 1.885 to 2.0 MeV.

    PubMed

    Yu, W; Yue, G; Han, X; Chen, J; Tian, B

    1998-07-01

    Accelerator-based neutron source have been considered to be practical for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Based on experience with a parameters of the Brookhaven National Laboratory BMRR reactor neutron source, which has been used in treatment experiments, the future accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT should have the properties of low energy distribution (< 100 keV) and high flux (about 10(9) neutrons per second per square centimeter) in the patient zone. Using protons to bombard thick 7Li targets, generating neutrons via the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction, is one of the optimal choices for this kind of neutron source. Neutron yield data versus incident energy are necessary in order to select the proper incident energy and for estimating how high the incident proton current should be. The required proton beam current intensity is one of the key parameters for an accelerator useful for BNCT. In the present work, neutron yields of the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction with a thick lithium target and incident energies of 1.885 and 1.9 MeV were measured at 0 degree with respect to the incident beam direction. The results are (3.08 +/- 0.17) x 10(12) and (5.71 +/- 0.32) x 10(12) neutrons/C sr, respectively. Neutron yield angular distribution measurements at 2 MeV incident energy were also performed. The proton beams were generated by the Peking University 4.5 MV electrostatic accelerator. The emitted neutrons from these reactions have the advantages of low energy distribution and forward angular distribution, which are requirements for a BNCT neutron source. The data obtained in this work can be used as a reference to study the accelerator-based neutron sources for BNCT.

  20. Determination of europium content in Li2SiO3(Eu) by neutron activation analysis using Am-Be neutron source.

    PubMed

    Naik, Yeshwant; Tapase, Anant Shamrao; Mhatre, Amol; Datrik, Chandrashekhar; Tawade, Nilesh; Kumar, Umesh; Naik, Haladhara

    2016-12-01

    Circulardiscs of Li2SiO3 doped with europium were prepared and a new activation procedure for the neutron dose estimation in a breeder blanket of fusion reactor is described. The amount of europium in the disc was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA) using an isotopic neutron source. The average neutron absorption cross section for the reaction was calculated using neutron distribution of the Am-Be source and available neutron absorption cross section data for the (151)Eu(n,γ)(152m)Eu reaction, which was used for estimation of europium in the pallet. The cross section of the elements varies with neutron energy, and the flux of the neutrons in each energy range seen by the nuclei under investigation also varies. Neutron distribution spectrum of the Am-Be source was worked out prior to NAA and the effective fractional flux for the nuclear reaction considered for the flux estimation was also determined.

  1. Differential neutron energy spectra measured on spacecraft low Earth orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.; Dudkin, E.V.; Potapov, Yu.V.; Akopova, A.B.; Melkumyan, L.V. |

    1995-03-01

    Two methods for measuring neutrons in the range from thermal energies to dozens of MeV were used. In the first method, alpha-particles emitted from the (sup 6) Li(n,x)T reaction are detected with the help of plastic nuclear track detectors, yielding results on thermal and resonance neutrons. Also, fission foils are used to detect fast neutrons. In the second method, fast neutrons are recorded by nuclear photographic emulsions (NPE). The results of measurements on board various satellites are presented. The neutron flux density does not appear to correlate clearly with orbital parameters. Up to 50% of neutrons are due to albedo neutrons from the atmosphere while the fluxes inside the satellites are 15-20% higher than those on the outside. Estimates show that the neutron contribution to the total equivalent radiation dose reaches 20-30%.

  2. Differential neutron energy spectra measured on spacecraft low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.; Dudkin, E. V.; Potapov, Yu. V.; Akopova, A. B.; Melkumyan, L. V.

    1995-01-01

    Two methods for measuring neutrons in the range from thermal energies to dozens of MeV were used. In the first method, alpha-particles emitted from the (sup 6) Li(n.x)T reaction are detected with the help of plastic nuclear track detectors, yielding results on thermal and resonance neutrons. Also, fission foils are used to detect fast neutrons. In the second method, fast neutrons are recorded by nuclear photographic emulsions (NPE). The results of measurements on board various satellites are presented. The neutron flux density does not appear to correlate clearly with orbital parameters. Up to 50% of neutrons are due to albedo neutrons from the atmosphere while the fluxes inside the satellites are 15-20% higher than those on the outside. Estimates show that the neutron contribution to the total equivalent radiation dose reaches 20-30%.

  3. Three-dimensional neutronics optimization of helium-cooled blanket for multi-functional experimental fusion-fission hybrid reactor (FDS-MFX)

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Yuan, B.; Jin, M.; Wang, M.; Long, P.; Hu, L.

    2012-07-01

    Three-dimensional neutronics optimization calculations were performed to analyse the parameters of Tritium Breeding Ratio (TBR) and maximum average Power Density (PDmax) in a helium-cooled multi-functional experimental fusion-fission hybrid reactor named FDS (Fusion-Driven hybrid System)-MFX (Multi-Functional experimental) blanket. Three-stage tests will be carried out successively, in which the tritium breeding blanket, uranium-fueled blanket and spent-fuel-fueled blanket will be utilized respectively. In this contribution, the most significant and main goal of the FDS-MFX blanket is to achieve the PDmax of about 100 MW/m3 with self-sustaining tritium (TBR {>=} 1.05) based on the second-stage test with uranium-fueled blanket to check and validate the demonstrator reactor blanket relevant technologies based on the viable fusion and fission technologies. Four different enriched uranium materials were taken into account to evaluate PDmax in subcritical blanket: (i) natural uranium, (ii) 3.2% enriched uranium, (iii) 19.75% enriched uranium, and (iv) 64.4% enriched uranium carbide. These calculations and analyses were performed using a home-developed code VisualBUS and Hybrid Evaluated Nuclear Data Library (HENDL). The results showed that the performance of the blanket loaded with 64.4% enriched uranium was the most attractive and it could be promising to effectively obtain tritium self-sufficiency (TBR-1.05) and a high maximum average power density ({approx}100 MW/m{sup 3}) when the blanket was loaded with the mass of {sup 235}U about 1 ton. (authors)

  4. Dose homogeneity in boron neutron capture therapy using an epithermal neutron beam.

    PubMed

    Konijnenberg, M W; Dewit, L G; Mijnheer, B J; Raaijmakers, C P; Watkins, P R

    1995-06-01

    Simulation models based on the neutron and photon Monte Carlo code MCNP were used to study the therapeutic possibilities of the HB11 epithermal neutron beam at the High Flux Reactor in Petten. Irradiations were simulated in two types of phantoms filled with water or tissue-equivalent material for benchmark treatment planning calculations. In a cuboid phantom the influence of different field sizes on the thermal-neutron-induced dose distribution was investigated. Various shapes of collimators were studied to test their efficacy in optimizing the thermal-neutron distribution over a planning target volume and healthy tissues. Using circular collimators of 8, 12 and 15 cm diameter it was shown that with the 15-cm field a relatively larger volume within 85% of the maximum neutron-induced dose was obtained than with the 8- or 12-cm-diameter field. However, even for this large field the maximum diameter of this volume was 7.5 cm. In an ellipsoid head phantom the neutron-induced dose was calculated assuming the skull to contain 10 ppm 10B, the brain 5 ppm 10B and the tumor 30 ppm 10B. It was found that with a single 15-cm-diameter circular beam a very inhomogenous dose distribution in a typical target volume was obtained. Applying two equally weighted opposing 15-cm-diameter fields, however, a dose homogeneity within +/- 10% in this planning target volume was obtained. The dose in the surrounding healthy brain tissue is 30% at maximum of the dose in the center of the target volume. Contrary to the situation for the 8-cm field, combining four fields of 15 cm diameter gave no large improvement of the dose homogeneity over the target volume or a lower maximum dose in the healthy brain. Dose-volume histograms were evaluated for the planning target volume as well as for the healthy brain to compare different irradiation techniques, yielding a graphical confirmation of the above conclusions. Therapy with BNCT on brain tumors must be performed either with an 8-cm four

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of explosive detection system based on a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Bergaoui, K; Reguigui, N; Gary, C K; Brown, C; Cremer, J T; Vainionpaa, J H; Piestrup, M A

    2014-12-01

    An explosive detection system based on a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) neutron generator has been simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP5). Nuclear-based explosive detection methods can detect explosives by identifying their elemental components, especially nitrogen. Thermal neutron capture reactions have been used for detecting prompt gamma emission (10.82MeV) following radiative neutron capture by (14)N nuclei. The explosive detection system was built based on a fully high-voltage-shielded, axial D-D neutron generator with a radio frequency (RF) driven ion source and nominal yield of about 10(10) fast neutrons per second (E=2.5MeV). Polyethylene and paraffin were used as moderators with borated polyethylene and lead as neutron and gamma ray shielding, respectively. The shape and the thickness of the moderators and shields are optimized to produce the highest thermal neutron flux at the position of the explosive and the minimum total dose at the outer surfaces of the explosive detection system walls. In addition, simulation of the response functions of NaI, BGO, and LaBr3-based γ-ray detectors to different explosives is described.

  6. Novel neutron focusing mirrors for compact neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaykovich, B.; Gubarev, M. V.; Zavlin, V. E.; Katz, R.; Resta, G.; Liu, D.; Robertson, L.; Crow, L.; Ramsey, B. D.; Moncton, D. E.

    We demonstrated neutron beam focusing and neutron imaging using axisymmetric optics, based on pairs of confocal ellipsoid and hyperboloid mirrors. Such systems, known as Wolter mirrors, are commonly used in x-ray telescopes. A system containing four nested Ni mirror pairs was implemented and tested by focusing a polychromatic neutron beam at the MIT Reactor and conducting an imaging experiment at HFIR. The major advantage of the Wolter mirrors is the possibility of nesting for large angular collection. Using nesting, the relatively short optics can be made comparable to focusing guides in flux collection capabilities. We discuss how such optics can be used as polychromatic lenses to improve the performance of small-angle-scattering, imaging, and other instruments at compact neutron sources.

  7. Pulsed thermal neutron source at the fast neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Tracz, Grzegorz; Drozdowicz, Krzysztof; Gabańska, Barbara; Krynicka, Ewa

    2009-06-01

    A small pulsed thermal neutron source has been designed based on results of the MCNP simulations of the thermalization of 14 MeV neutrons in a cluster-moderator which consists of small moderating cells decoupled by an absorber. Optimum dimensions of the single cell and of the whole cluster have been selected, considering the thermal neutron intensity and the short decay time of the thermal neutron flux. The source has been built and the test experiments have been performed. To ensure the response is not due to the choice of target for the experiments, calculations have been done to demonstrate the response is valid regardless of the thermalization properties of the target.

  8. Monte Carlo Calculations for Neutron and Gamma Radiation Fields on a Fast Neutron Irradiation Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, A.; Ramalho, A.; Gonçalves, I. C.; Fernandes, A.; Barradas, N.; Marques, J. G.; Prata, J.; Chaussy, Ch.

    We used the Monte Carlo program MCNP to calculate the neutron and gamma fluxes on a fast neutron irradiation facility being installed on the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI). The purpose of this facility is to provide a fast neutron beam for irradiation of electronic circuits. The gamma dose should be minimized. This is achieved by placing a lead shield preceded by a thin layer of boral. A fast neutron flux of the order of 109 n/cm2s is expected at the exit of the tube, while the gamma radiation is kept below 20 Gy/h. We will present results of the neutron and gamma doses for several locations along the tube and different thickness of the lead shield. We found that the neutron beam is very collimated at the end of the tube with a dominant component on the fast region.

  9. Diagnostic of fusion neutrons on JET tokamak using diamond detector

    SciTech Connect

    Nemtsev, G.; Amosov, V.; Marchenko, N.; Meshchaninov, S.; Rodionov, R.; Popovichev, S.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Conbributors

    2014-08-21

    In 2011-2012, an experimental campaign with a significant yield of fusion neutrons was carried out on the JET tokamak. During this campaign the facility was equipped with two diamond detectors based on natural and artificial CVD diamond. These detectors were designed and manufactured in State Research Center of Russian Federation TRINITI. The detectors measure the flux of fast neutrons with energies above 0.2 MeV. They have been installed in the torus hall and the distance from the center of plasma was about 3 m. For some of the JET pulses in this experiment, the neutron flux density corresponded to the operational conditions in collimator channels of ITER Vertical Neutron Camera. The main objective of diamond monitors was the measurement of total fast neutron flux at the detector location and the estimation of the JET total neutron yield. The detectors operate as threshold counters. Additionally a spectrometric measurement channel has been configured that allowed us to distinguish various energy components of the neutron spectrum. In this paper we describe the neutron signal measuring and calibration procedure of the diamond detector. Fluxes of DD and DT neutrons at the detector location were measured. It is shown that the signals of total neutron yield measured by the diamond detector correlate with signals measured by the main JET neutron diagnostic based on fission chambers with high accuracy. This experiment can be considered as a successful test of diamond detectors in ITER-like conditions.

  10. Solar neutron decay proton observations in cycle 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evenson, Paul; Kroeger, Richard; Meyer, Peter; Reames, Donald

    1990-01-01

    Measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of the protons resulting from the decay of solar flare neutrons gives unique information on the spectrum of neutrons from 5 to 200 MeV. Neutrons from three flares have been observed in this manner during solar cycle 21. The use of the decay protons to determine neutron energy spectra is reviewed, and new and definitive energy spectra are presented for the two large flares on June 3, 1982 and April 25, 1984.

  11. TRANSP modelling of total and local neutron emission on MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimek, I.; Cecconello, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Keeling, D.; Meakins, A.; Jones, O.; Akers, R.; Lupelli, I.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Ericsson, G.; the MAST Team

    2015-02-01

    The results of TRANSP simulations of neutron count rate profiles measured by a collimated neutron flux monitor-neutron camera (NC)—for different plasma scenarios on MAST are reported. In addition, the effect of various plasma parameters on neutron emission is studied by means of TRANSP simulation. The fast ion redistribution and losses due to fishbone modes, which belong to a wider category of energetic particle modes, are observed by the NC and modelled in TRANSP.

  12. Neutron and proton activation measurements from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Radioactivity induced by high-energy protons and secondary neutrons (from nuclear interactions) in various samples returned from different locations in Skylab was measured directly by gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of decay gamma rays from the samples. Incident fluxes were derived from the activation measurements, using known nuclear cross-section. Neutron and proton flux values were found to range from 0.2 to 5 particles/sq cm-sec, depending on the energy range and location in Skylab. The thermal neutron flux was less than 0.07 neutrons/sq cm-sec. The results are useful for data analysis and planning of future high-energy astronomy experiments.

  13. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Junghee

    2015-08-01

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas.

  14. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Junghee

    2015-08-01

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas.

  15. Cherenkov neutron detector for fusion reaction and runaway electron diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, MunSeong Kim, Junghee

    2015-08-15

    A Cherenkov-type neutron detector was newly developed and neutron measurement experiments were performed at Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research. It was shown that the Cherenkov neutron detector can monitor the time-resolved neutron flux from deuterium-fueled fusion plasmas. Owing to the high temporal resolution of the detector, fast behaviors of runaway electrons, such as the neutron spikes, could be observed clearly. It is expected that the Cherenkov neutron detector could be utilized to provide useful information on runaway electrons as well as fusion reaction rate in fusion plasmas.

  16. Neutron stars. [quantum mechanical processes associated with magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.

    1978-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical processes associated with the presence of high magnetic fields and the effect of such fields on the evolution of neutron stars are reviewed. A technical description of the interior of a neutron star is presented. The neutron star-pulsar relation is reviewed and consideration is given to supernovae explosions, flux conservation in neutron stars, gauge-invariant derivation of the equation of state for a strongly magnetized gas, neutron beta-decay, and the stability condition for a neutron star.

  17. Burst Oscillations: Watching Neutron Stars Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2010-01-01

    It is now almost 15 years since the first detection of rotationally modulated emission from X-ray bursting neutron stars, "burst oscillations," This phenomenon enables us to see neutron stars spin, as the X-ray burst flux asymmetrically lights up the surface. It has enabled a new way to probe the neutron star spin frequency distribution, as well as to elucidate the multidimensional nature of nuclear burning on neutron stars. I will review our current observational understanding of the phenomenon, with an eye toward highlighting some of the interesting remaining puzzles, of which there is no shortage.

  18. Fundamental neutron physics beamline at the spallation neutron source at ORNL

    DOE PAGES

    Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Allen, R. R.; ...

    2014-11-04

    In this paper, we describe the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FnPB) facility located at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The FnPB was designed for the conduct of experiments that investigate scientific issues in nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology using a pulsed slow neutron beam. Finally, we present a detailed description of the design philosophy, beamline components, and measured fluxes of the polychromatic and monochromatic beams.

  19. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.